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Sample records for colon carcinoma caco-2

  1. Adhesion of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli to the human colon carcinoma cell line Caco-2 in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Darfeuille-Michaud, A; Aubel, D; Chauviere, G; Rich, C; Bourges, M; Servin, A; Joly, B

    1990-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains possessing colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I), CFA/II, CFA/III, and antigen 2230 were tested for their ability to adhere to the following cell lines: HeLa, HEp-2, HRT 18, Hutu 80, MDBK, MDCK, Vero, and Caco-2. ETEC strains adhered only to the Caco-2 cell line. Irrespective of the known adhesive factors, the ETEC strains that adhered to the brush border of human enterocytes also adhered to the Caco-2 cell line. The negative variants, which were cured of the plasmid encoding the adhesive factor, did not adhere. Adhesion of ETEC strains no longer occurred when the Caco-2 cells were pretreated with the homologous colonization factor antigen or when the bacterial cells were pretreated with homologous antibodies raised against the adhesive factors. This indicates that this adhesion is specific and that a different receptor exists for each type of adhesion factor. Electron micrographs of cross sections of the monolayer showed that the adhesion of ETEC strains to the brush border microvilli does not induce any lesion. Therefore, the Caco-2 cell line behaves in the same way as human enterocytes do. Images PMID:2180823

  2. Identification of transport pathways for citric acid cycle intermediates in the human colon carcinoma cell line, Caco-2.

    PubMed

    Weerachayaphorn, Jittima; Pajor, Ana M

    2008-04-01

    Citric acid cycle intermediates are absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract through carrier-mediated mechanisms, although the transport pathways have not been clearly identified. This study examines the transport of citric acid cycle intermediates in the Caco-2 human colon carcinoma cell line, often used as a model of small intestine. Inulin was used as an extracellular volume marker instead of mannitol since the apparent volume measured with mannitol changed with time. The results show that Caco-2 cells contain at least three distinct transporters, including the Na+-dependent di- and tricarboxylate transporters, NaDC1 and NaCT, and one or more sodium-independent pathways, possibly involving organic anion transporters. Succinate transport is mediated mostly by Na+-dependent pathways, predominantly by NaDC1, but with some contribution by NaCT. RT-PCR and functional characteristics verified the expression of these transporters in Caco-2 cells. In contrast, citrate transport in Caco-2 cells occurs by a combination of Na+-independent pathways, possibly mediated by an organic anion transporter, and Na+-dependent mechanisms. The non-metabolizable dicarboxylate, methylsuccinate, is also transported by a combination of Na+-dependent and -independent pathways. In conclusion, we find that multiple pathways are involved in the transport of di- and tricarboxylates by Caco-2 cells. Since many of these pathways are not found in human intestine, this model may be best suited for studying Na+-dependent transport of succinate by NaDC1.

  3. Coffee reduces KRAS expression in Caco-2 human colon carcinoma cells via regulation of miRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Takuya; Funakoshi-Tago, Megumi; Tamura, Hiroomi

    2017-01-01

    Previous epidemiological studies have demonstrated that moderate coffee consumption is associated with a lower risk of certain types of cancer, particularly colon cancer. To elucidate the molecular basis for this protective action, the effect of coffee on Caco-2 human colon carcinoma cells was investigated. Low concentrations of coffee (<5%) inhibited proliferation of Caco-2 cells without affecting cell viability. Coffee also reduced KRAS proto-oncogene, GTPase (KRAS) gene expression in a dose-dependent manner; however, caffeine, caffeic acid and chlorogenic acid, three major constituents of coffee, did not exhibit this effect. Increasing the duration of coffee bean roasting increased the reduction in KRAS expression, suggesting that the active constituents responsible for this effect emerged during the roasting process. MicroRNA (miR) analysis revealed that coffee induced the expression of miR-30c and miR-96, both of which target the KRAS gene. The results of the present study suggested that daily coffee consumption may reduce KRAS activity, thereby preventing the malignant growth of colon carcinoma cells. PMID:28693281

  4. A new in vitro model of Entamoeba histolytica adhesion, using the human colon carcinoma cell line Caco-2: scanning electron microscopic study.

    PubMed Central

    Rigothier, M C; Coconnier, M H; Servin, A L; Gayral, P

    1991-01-01

    The human colon carcinoma cell line Caco-2, which is widely used to study the adhesion and cytotoxicity of enterobacteria, was used to investigate the adhesion of the trophozoites of Entamoeba histolytica. We observed a high percentage of adhesion of amoebae to Caco-2 cells. Scanning electron microscopy showed that amoebial membrane structures were involved in adhesion and the cytolytic action. These differentiated cells should prove to be a useful model system for investigation of the pathogenic action of amoebae. Images PMID:1937772

  5. Prune extract (Prunus domestica L.) suppresses the proliferation and induces the apoptosis of human colon carcinoma Caco-2.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Takashi; Ikami, Takao; Xu, Jin-Wen; Ikeda, Katsumi

    2006-10-01

    Prunes are the dried fruits of certain cultivars of Prunus domestica L., and are recognized as a health food. The separated ethanol fraction from concentrated prune juice by DIAION HP-20 (PE) was investigated for cytotoxic effects on two different cancer cell lines in vitro. PE dose-dependently reduced the viable cell number of Caco-2, KATO III, but does not reduce the viable cell number of human normal colon fibroblast cells (CCD-18Co) used as a normal cell model. PE treatment for 24 h led to apoptotic changes in Caco-2 such as cell shrinkage and blebbed surfaces due to the convolutions of nuclear and plasma membranes and chromatin condensation, but this was not observed in CCD-18Co. PE induced nucleosomal DNA fragmentation typical of apoptosis in Caco-2 after 24 h of treatment. These results show that PE induced apoptosis in Caco-2. Furthermore, by Caco-2 treatment with H2O2 chelator catalase and Ca2+-chelator BAPTA/AM, the PE-induced cytotoxic pathway was completely blocked, and the viable cell number of Caco-2 was not affected.

  6. Differentiation-associated modulation of heparan sulfate structure and function in CaCo-2 colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Salmivirta, M; Safaiyan, F; Prydz, K; Andresen, M S; Aryan, M; Kolset, S O

    1998-10-01

    Heparan sulfate species expressed by different cell and tissue types differ in their structural and functional properties. Limited information is available on differences in regulation of heparan sulfate biosynthesis within a single tissue or cell population under different conditions. We have approached this question by studying the effect of cell differentiation on the biosynthesis and function of heparan sulfate in human colon carcinoma cells (CaCo-2). These cells undergo spontaneous differentiation in culture when grown on semipermeable supports; the differentiated cells show phenotypic similarity to small intestine enterocytes. Metabolically labeled heparan sulfate was isolated from the apical and basolateral media from cultures of differentiated and undifferentiated cells. Compositional analysis of disaccharides, derived from the contiguous N-sulfated regions of heparan sulfate, indicated a greater proportion of 2-O-sulfated iduronic acid units and a smaller amount of 6-O-sulfated glucosamine units in differentiated than in undifferentiated cells. By contrast, the overall degree of sulfation, the chain length and the size distribution of the N-acetylated regions were similar regardless the differentiation status of the cells. The structural changes were found to affect the binding of heparan sulfate to the long isoform of platelet-derived growth factor A chain but not to fibroblast growth factor 2. These findings show that heparan sulfate structures change during cell differentiation and that heparan sulfate-growth factor interactions may be affected by such changes.

  7. Differential induction of apoptosis in human colonic carcinoma cells (Caco-2) by Atopobium, and commensal, probiotic and enteropathogenic bacteria: mediation by the mitochondrial pathway.

    PubMed

    Altonsy, Mohammed O; Andrews, Simon C; Tuohy, Kieran M

    2010-02-28

    The induction of apoptosis in mammalian cells by bacteria is well reported. This process may assist infection by pathogens whereas for non-pathogens apoptosis induction within carcinoma cells protects against colon cancer. Here, apoptosis induction by a major new gut bacterium, Atopobium minutum, was compared with induction by commensal (Escherichia coli K-12 strains), probiotic (Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Bifidobacterium latis) and pathogenic (E. coli: EPEC and VTEC) gut bacteria within the colon cancer cell line, Caco-2. The results show a major apoptotic effect for the pathogens, mild effects for the probiotic strains and A. minutum, but no effect for commensal E. coli. The mild apoptotic effects observed are consistent with the beneficial roles of probotics in protection against colon cancer and suggest, for the first time, that A. minutum possesses similar advantageous, anti-cancerous activity. Although bacterial infection increased Caco-2 membrane FAS levels, caspase-8 was not activated indicating that apoptosis is FAS independent. Instead, in all cases, apoptosis was induced through the mitochondrial pathway as indicated by BAX translocation, cytochrome c release, and caspase-9 and -3 cleavage. This suggests that an intracellular stimulus initiates the observed apoptosis responses.

  8. The Intestinal Transport of Bovine Milk Exosomes Is Mediated by Endocytosis in Human Colon Carcinoma Caco-2 Cells and Rat Small Intestinal IEC-6 Cells.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Tovah; Baier, Scott R; Zempleni, Janos

    2015-10-01

    MicroRNAs play essential roles in gene regulation. A substantial fraction of microRNAs in tissues and body fluids is encapsulated in exosomes, thereby conferring protection against degradation and a pathway for intestinal transport. MicroRNAs in cow milk are bioavailable in humans. This research assessed the transport mechanism of bovine milk exosomes, and therefore microRNAs, in human and rodent intestinal cells. The intestinal transport of bovine milk exosomes and microRNAs was assessed using fluorophore-labeled bovine milk exosomes in human colon carcinoma Caco-2 cells and rat small intestinal IEC-6 cells. Transport kinetics and mechanisms were characterized using dose-response studies, inhibitors of vesicle transport, carbohydrate competitors, proteolysis of surface proteins on cells and exosomes, and transepithelial transport in transwell plates. Exosome transport exhibited saturation kinetics at 37°C [Michaelis constant (Km) = 55.5 ± 48.6 μg exosomal protein/200 μL of media; maximal transport rate = 0.083 ± 0.057 ng of exosomal protein · 81,750 cells(-1) · h(-1)] and decreased by 64% when transport was measured at 4°C, consistent with carrier-mediated transport in Caco-2 cells. Exosome uptake decreased by 61-85% under the following conditions compared with controls in Caco-2 cells: removal of exosome and cell surface proteins by proteinase K, inhibition of endocytosis and vesicle trafficking by synthetic inhibitors, and inhibition of glycoprotein binding by carbohydrate competitors. When milk exosomes, at a concentration of 5 times the Km, were added to the upper chamber in transwell plates, Caco-2 cells accumulated miR-29b and miR-200c in the lower chamber, and reverse transport was minor. Transport characteristics were similar in IEC-6 cells and Caco-2 cells, except that substrate affinity and transporter capacity were lower and higher, respectively. The uptake of bovine milk exosomes is mediated by endocytosis and depends on cell and exosome

  9. Induction of cell death in Caco-2 human colon carcinoma cells by ellagic acid rich fractions from muscadine grapes (Vitis rotundifolia).

    PubMed

    Mertens-Talcott, Susanne U; Lee, Joon-Hee; Percival, Susan S; Talcott, Stephen T

    2006-07-26

    Possible anticancer mechanisms exerted by polyphenolic compounds contained in fruits and vegetables include antioxidant activity, the inhibition of proliferation, and the induction of apoptosis in cancer cells. This study examined the effects of four isolated polyphenolic extracts from red muscadine grapes (Vitis rotundifolia) on vital cell parameters and the induction of apoptosis in Caco-2 colon carcinoma cells. The magnitude of effects in cell culture was then correlated to polyphenolic composition and antioxidant capacity. Whereas anticancer effects of individual polyphenolic compounds have been demonstrated multiple times, information relating to anticancer effects of polyphenolic extracts is not available in abundance. All four extracts induced apoptosis, decreased cell number, and caused alterations in cell cycle kinetics in a concentration-dependent manner. The efficacy of the polyphenolics on vital cell parameters correlated well to the presence of ellagic acid glycosides and flavonoids and also to the antioxidant capacity. This study demonstrated the anticancer properties of ellagic acid rich extracts from red muscadine juice.

  10. Inhibitory effects of green tea and grape juice on the phenol sulfotransferase activity of mouse intestines and human colon carcinoma cell line, Caco-2.

    PubMed

    Tamura, H; Matsui, M

    2000-06-01

    Tea and fruit juices are beverages consumed daily all over the world. The present study reports the inhibitory effects of these beverages on the activity of mammalian intestinal phenol sulfotransferases (P-STs). Green tea strongly inhibited the E. coli-expressed mouse intestinal P-ST activity in vitro. (-)-Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) was found to be the most potent inhibitor among the catechins tested (IC50=0.93 microM). (-)EGCG also inhibited the P-ST activity of the human colon carcinoma cell line, Caco-2. Kinetic analysis showed that the inhibition was competitive. Among fruit juices examined (apple, grape, grapefruit and orange), grape juice exhibited the most potent inhibitory action on the P-ST activity of mouse intestines and human colon carcinoma cells. The inhibitory activity of grape juice was located mainly in the skin and seeds. Flavonols, such as quercetin and kaempferol, inhibited the P-ST activity at low concentrations. These observations suggest the possible inhibition of P-ST activity in human intestines by green tea or grape juice.

  11. Antioxidant effectiveness of phenolic apple juice extracts and their gut fermentation products in the human colon carcinoma cell line caco-2.

    PubMed

    Bellion, Phillip; Hofmann, Thomas; Pool-Zobel, Beatrice L; Will, Frank; Dietrich, Helmut; Knaup, Bastian; Richling, Elke; Baum, Matthias; Eisenbrand, Gerhard; Janzowski, Christine

    2008-08-13

    Apples represent a major dietary source of antioxidative polyphenols. Their metabolic conversion by the gut microflora might generate products that protect the intestine against oxidative damage. We studied the antioxidant effectiveness of supernatants of fermented apple juice extracts (F-AEs, 6 and 24 h fermentation) and of selected phenolic degradation products, identified by HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS. Cell free antioxidant capacity of unfermented apple juice extracts (AEs) was decreased after fermentation by 30-50%. In the human colon carcinoma cell line Caco-2, F-AEs (containing <0.5% of original AE-phenolics) decreased the reactive oxygen species (ROS) level more efficiently than the F-blank (fermented without AE) but were less effective than the respective AEs. Similarly, antioxidant effectiveness of individual degradation products was lower compared to respective AE constituents. Glutathione level was slightly increased and oxidative DNA damage slightly decreased by fermented AE03, rich in quercetin glycosides. In conclusion, F-AEs/degradation products exhibit antioxidant activity in colon cells but to a lesser extent than the respective unfermented AEs/constituents.

  12. Cooperation between the bacterial-derived short-chain fatty acid butyrate and interleukin-22 detected in human Caco2 colon epithelial/carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Malte; Meissner, Carlotta; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Mühl, Heiko

    2017-03-01

    By generating biologically active factors luminal microbiota shape the intestinal micro-milieu thereby regulating pathological processes such as inflammation and carcinogenesis. Preclinical data suggest that bacterial-derived butyrate and the signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-3 activating cytokine interleukin (IL)-22 display concordant protective properties at the inflamed colonic epithelium. Herein, biochemical cooperation between the short-chain fatty acid butyrate and IL-22 was investigated by focusing on human Caco2 colon epithelial/carcinoma cells. We report that physiological levels of butyrate enhance IL-22 signaling thereby enforcing expression of the prototypic STAT3-downstrean target genes α1-antichymotrypsin and suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS)-3. A dual mode of butyrate action on the IL-22/STAT3 axis was identified. Butyrate acted by upregulating IL-22R1, the decisive chain of the heterodimeric IL-22 receptor, and, independent from that, has the potential to directly amplify STAT3-mediated gene activation as detected by chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis of STAT3 binding to the SOCS3 promoter. Since trichostatin A acted similarly, inhibition of histone deacetylases is likely at the root of these butyrate biological properties. The mutual benefit gained from interactions between the host and commensal intestinal bacteria-derived factors is an expanding field of research beginning to affect clinical practice. Data presented herein propose a supportive and fine-tuning role for butyrate in IL-22 signaling that might be therapeutically exploited by local butyrate administration or by increasing its bacterial production in the context of a fiber-rich diet. © 2016 BioFactors, 43(2):283-292, 2017. © 2016 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  13. Palmitoylethanolamide Exerts Antiproliferative Effect and Downregulates VEGF Signaling in Caco-2 Human Colon Carcinoma Cell Line Through a Selective PPAR-α-Dependent Inhibition of Akt/mTOR Pathway.

    PubMed

    Sarnelli, Giovanni; Gigli, Stefano; Capoccia, Elena; Iuvone, Teresa; Cirillo, Carla; Seguella, Luisa; Nobile, Nicola; D'Alessandro, Alessandra; Pesce, Marcella; Steardo, Luca; Cuomo, Rosario; Esposito, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) is a nutraceutical compound that has been demonstrated to improve intestinal inflammation. We aimed at evaluating its antiproliferative and antiangiogenic effects in human colon adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cell line. Caco-2 cells were treated with increasing concentrations of PEA (0.001, 0.01 and 0.1 μM) in the presence of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-a (PPAR-α) or PPAR-γ antagonists. Cell proliferation was evaluated by performing a MTT assay. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) release was estimated by ELISA, while the expression of VEGF receptor and the activation of the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway were evaluated by western blot analysis. PEA caused a significant and concentration-dependent decrease of Caco-2 cell proliferation at 48 h. PEA administration significantly reduced in a concentration-dependent manner VEGF secretion and VEGF receptor expression. Inhibition of Akt phosphorylation and a downstream decrease of phospho-mTOR and of p-p70S6K were observed as compared with untreated cells. PPAR-α, but not PPAR-γ antagonist, reverted all effects of PEA. PEA is able to decrease cell proliferation and angiogenesis. The antiangiogenic effect of PEA depends on the specific inhibition of the AkT/mTOR axis, through the activation of PPAR-α pathway. If supported by in vivo models, our data pave the way to PEA co-administration to the current chemotherapeutic regimens for colon carcinoma. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Rosa canina Extracts Have Antiproliferative and Antioxidant Effects on Caco-2 Human Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, Sandra; Gascón, Sonia; Luquin, Asunción; Laguna, Mariano; Ancin-Azpilicueta, Carmen; Rodríguez-Yoldi, María Jesús

    2016-01-01

    The in vitro antiproliferative and antioxidant effects of different fractions of Rosa canina hips on human colon cancer cell lines (Caco-2) was studied. The compounds tested were total extract (fraction 1), vitamin C (fraction 2), neutral polyphenols (fraction 3) and acidic polyphenols (fraction 4). All the extracts showed high cytotoxicity after 72 h, both low and high concentrations. The flow cytometric analysis revealed that all the fractions produce disturbances in the cell cycle resulting in a concomitant cell death by an apoptotic pathway. Changes in the redox status of Caco-2 cells in response to Rosa canina hips were determined. Cells were exposed to hydrogen peroxide in presence of plant fractions and the production of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) was significantly decreased. Therefore, our data demonstrate that rosehip extracts are a powerful antioxidant that produces an antiproliferative effect in Caco-2 cells. Therefore, these results predict a promising future for Rosa canina as a therapeutic agent. Thus, this natural plant could be an effective component of functional foods addressed towards colorectal carcinoma. PMID:27467555

  15. Application of HPLC for determination of phytic acid in the colonic epithelial Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Weglarz, Ludmiła; Parfiniewicz, Beata; Bat, Beata; Orchel, Arkadiusz; Dzierzewicz, Zofia; Wilczok, Tadeusz

    2004-12-01

    Phytic acid (myo-inositol hexaphosphate, IP6) is currently receiving a considerable interest because of its anticancer (preventive and therapeutic) potential against colon tumors and the need for methods of its determination. The aim of this study was to analyze the uptake of IP6 by human colon adenocarcinoma cells (Caco-2 cell line) and to evaluate the method of its intracellular quantification with the use of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) technique. Chromatographic analysis revealed a rapid uptake of IP6 by cells. The intracellular accumulation of IP6 was saturable at 0.5 h and it did not change with the prolongation of incubation up to 72 h.

  16. In Situ Perfusion Model in Rat Colon for Drug Absorption Studies: Comparison with Small Intestine and Caco-2 Cell Model.

    PubMed

    Lozoya-Agullo, Isabel; González-Álvarez, Isabel; González-Álvarez, Marta; Merino-Sanjuán, Matilde; Bermejo, Marival

    2015-09-01

    Our aim is to develop and to validate the in situ closed loop perfusion method in rat colon and to compare with small intestine and Caco-2 cell models. Correlations with human oral fraction absorbed (Fa) and human colon fraction absorbed (Fa_colon) were developed to check the applicability of the rat colon model for controlled release (CR) drug screening. Sixteen model drugs were selected and their permeabilities assessed in rat small intestine and colon, and in Caco-2 monolayers. Correlations between colon/intestine/Caco-2 permeabilities versus human Fa and human Fa_colon have been explored to check model predictability and to apply a BCS approach in order to propose a cut off value for CR screening. Rat intestine perfusion with Doluisio's method and single-pass technique provided a similar range of permeabilities demonstrating the possibility of combining data from different laboratories. Rat colon permeability was well correlated with Caco-2 cell-4 days model reflecting a higher paracellular permeability. Rat colon permeabilities were also higher than human colon ones. In spite of the magnitude differences, a good sigmoidal relationship has been shown between rat colon permeabilities and human colon fractions absorbed, indicating that rat colon perfusion can be used for compound classification and screening of CR candidates. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  17. Polyelectrolyte complex containing silver nanoparticles with antitumor property on Caco-2 colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Martins, Alessandro F; Follmann, Heveline D M; Monteiro, Johny P; Bonafé, Elton G; Nocchi, Samara; Silva, Cleiser T P; Nakamura, Celso V; Girotto, Emerson M; Rubira, Adley F; Muniz, Edvani C

    2015-08-01

    Polyelectrolyte complex (beads) based on N,N,N-trimethyl chitosan/alginate was successful obtained and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were loaded within beads. In vitro cytotoxicity assays using beads/silver nanoparticles (beads/AgNPs) provided results, indicating that this material significantly inhibited the growth of colon cancer cells (Caco-2). In vitro release studies showed that the beads stabilized AgNPs and repressed Ag(0) oxidation under gastric conditions (pH 2.0). On the other hand, at physiological condition (pH 7.4) the beads/AgNPs released 3.3 μg of Ag(+) per each beads milligram. These studies showed that the concentration of Ag(+) released (3.3 μg) was cytotoxic for the Caco-2 cells and was not cytotoxic on healthy VERO cells. This result opens new perspectives for the manufacture of biomaterials based on beads/AgNPs with anti-tumor properties. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of pectin derivative with antitumor property against Caco-2 colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Elizângela A M S; Facchi, Suelen P; Martins, Alessandro F; Nocchi, Samara; Schuquel, Ivânia T A; Nakamura, Celso V; Rubira, Adley F; Muniz, Edvani C

    2015-01-22

    New pectin derivative (Pec-MA) was obtained in specific reaction conditions. The presence of maleoyl groups in Pec-MA structure was confirmed by (1)H NMR and FTIR spectroscopy. The substitution degree of Pec-MA (DS=24%) was determined by (1)H NMR. The properties of Pec-MA were investigated through WAXS, TGA/DTG, SEM and zeta potential techniques. The Pec-MA presented amorphous characteristics and higher-thermal stability compared to raw pectin (Pec). In addition, considerable morphological differences between Pec-MA and Pec were observed by SEM. The cytotoxic effect on the Caco-2 cells showed that the Pec-MA significantly inhibited the growth of colon cancer cells whereas the Pec-MA does not show any cytotoxic effect on the VERO healthy cells. This result opens new perspectives for the manufacture of biomaterials based on Pec with anti-tumor properties.

  19. Hypertonic stress induces VEGF production in human colon cancer cell line Caco-2: inhibitory role of autocrine PGE₂.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Luciana B; Piva, Bruno; Diaz, Bruno L

    2011-01-01

    Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) is a major regulator of angiogenesis. VEGF expression is up regulated in response to micro-environmental cues related to poor blood supply such as hypoxia. However, regulation of VEGF expression in cancer cells is not limited to the stress response due to increased volume of the tumor mass. Lipid mediators in particular arachidonic acid-derived prostaglandin (PG)E₂ are regulators of VEGF expression and angiogenesis in colon cancer. In addition, increased osmolarity that is generated during colonic water absorption and feces consolidation seems to activate colon cancer cells and promote PGE₂ generation. Such physiological stimulation may provide signaling for cancer promotion. Here we investigated the effect of exposure to a hypertonic medium, to emulate colonic environment, on VEGF production by colon cancer cells. The role of concomitant PGE₂ generation and MAPK activation was addressed by specific pharmacological inhibition. Human colon cancer cell line Caco-2 exposed to a hypertonic environment responded with marked VEGF and PGE₂ production. VEGF production was inhibited by selective inhibitors of ERK 1/2 and p38 MAPK pathways. To address the regulatory role of PGE₂ on VEGF production, Caco-2 cells were treated with cPLA₂ (ATK) and COX-2 (NS-398) inhibitors, that completely block PGE₂ generation. The Caco-2 cells were also treated with a non selective PGE₂ receptor antagonist. Each treatment significantly increased the hypertonic stress-induced VEGF production. Moreover, addition of PGE₂ or selective EP₂ receptor agonist to activated Caco-2 cells inhibited VEGF production. The autocrine inhibitory role for PGE₂ appears to be selective to hypertonic environment since VEGF production induced by exposure to CoCl₂ was decreased by inhibition of concomitant PGE₂ generation. Our results indicated that hypertonicity stimulates VEGF production in colon cancer cell lines. Also PGE₂ plays an inhibitory

  20. Noni (Morinda citrifolia L.) Fruit Extracts Improve Colon Microflora and Exert Anti-Inflammatory Activities in Caco-2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hsin-Lun; Liu, Cheng-Tzu; Chou, Ming-Chih; Ko, Chien-Hui; Wang, Chin-Kun

    2015-06-01

    Intestinal microflora and inflammation are associated with the risk of inflammatory bowel diseases. Noni (Morinda citrifolia L.) has various bioactivities, but its effect on colon health remains unknown. This study focused on the effects of fermented noni fruit extracts on colon microflora and inflammation of colon epithelial cells. The anti-inflammatory activities of ethanol and ethyl acetate extracts on Caco-2 cells were evaluated including interleukin-8 (IL-8) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). The growth of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species was promoted by ethanol extract. Ethyl acetate extract decreased intracellular reactive oxygen species and significantly suppressed COX-2, IL-8, and prostaglandin E2 production and neutrophil chemotaxis by suppressing the translocation of the p65 subunit. Quercetin was the main contributor to the anti-inflammatory activity. The fermented noni fruit promoted probiotic growths and downregulated the intracellular oxidation and inflammation in Caco-2 cells. These results suggest that fermented noni fruit might protect against inflammatory diseases of the colon.

  1. Parallels between Global Transcriptional Programs of Polarizing Caco-2 Intestinal Epithelial Cells In Vitro and Gene Expression Programs in Normal Colon and Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sääf, Annika M.; Halbleib, Jennifer M.; Chen, Xin; Yuen, Siu Tsan; Leung, Suet Yi

    2007-01-01

    Posttranslational mechanisms are implicated in the development of epithelial cell polarity, but little is known about the patterns of gene expression and transcriptional regulation during this process. We characterized temporal patterns of gene expression during cell–cell adhesion-initiated polarization of cultured human Caco-2 cells, which develop structural and functional polarity resembling enterocytes in vivo. A distinctive switch in gene expression patterns occurred upon formation of cell–cell contacts. Comparison to gene expression patterns in normal human colon and colon tumors revealed that the pattern in proliferating, nonpolarized Caco-2 cells paralleled patterns seen in human colon cancer in vivo, including expression of genes involved in cell proliferation. The pattern switched in polarized Caco-2 cells to one more closely resembling that in normal colon tissue, indicating that regulation of transcription underlying Caco-2 cell polarization is similar to that during enterocyte differentiation in vivo. Surprisingly, the temporal program of gene expression in polarizing Caco-2 cells involved changes in signaling pathways (e.g., Wnt, Hh, BMP, FGF) in patterns similar to those during migration and differentiation of intestinal epithelial cells in vivo, despite the absence of morphogen gradients and interactions with stromal cells characteristic of enterocyte differentiation in situ. The full data set is available at http://microarray-pubs.stanford.edu/CACO2. PMID:17699589

  2. Sinomenine Sensitizes Multidrug-Resistant Colon Cancer Cells (Caco-2) to Doxorubicin by Downregulation of MDR-1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhen; Duan, Zhi-Jun; Chang, Jiu-Yang; Zhang, Zhi-feng; Chu, Rui; Li, Yu-Ling; Dai, Ke-Hang; Mo, Guang-quan; Chang, Qing-Yong

    2014-01-01

    Chemoresistance in multidrug-resistant (MDR) cells over expressing P-glycoprotein (P-gp) encoded by the MDR1 gene, is a major obstacle to successful chemotherapy for colorectal cancer. Previous studies have indicated that sinomenine can enhance the absorption of various P-gp substrates. In the present study, we investigated the effect of sinomenine on the chemoresistance in colon cancer cells and explored the underlying mechanism. We developed multidrug-resistant Caco-2 (MDR-Caco-2) cells by exposure of Caco-2 cells to increasing concentrations of doxorubicin. We identified overexpression of COX-2 and MDR-1 genes as well as activation of the NF-κB signal pathway in MDR-Caco-2 cells. Importantly, we found that sinomenine enhances the sensitivity of MDR-Caco-2 cells towards doxorubicin by downregulating MDR-1 and COX-2 expression through inhibition of the NF-κB signaling pathway. These findings provide a new potential strategy for the reversal of P-gp-mediated anticancer drug resistance. PMID:24901713

  3. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles activate IL8-related inflammatory pathways in human colonic epithelial Caco-2 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, Kristin; Cossais, François; Neve, Horst; Klempt, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Nanosized titanium dioxide (TiO2) particles are widely used as food additive or coating material in products of the food and pharmaceutical industry. Studies on various cell lines have shown that TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) induced the inflammatory response and cytotoxicity. However, the influences of TiO2 NPs' exposure on inflammatory pathways in intestinal epithelial cells and their differentiation have not been investigated so far. This study demonstrates that TiO2 NPs with particle sizes ranging between 5 and 10 nm do not affect enterocyte differentiation but cause an activation of inflammatory pathways in the human colon adenocarcinoma cell line Caco-2. 5 and 10 nm NPs' exposures transiently induce the expression of ICAM1, CCL20, COX2 and IL8, as determined by quantitative PCR, whereas larger particles (490 nm) do not. Further, using nuclear factor (NF)-κB reporter gene assays, we show that NP-induced IL8 mRNA expression occurs, in part, through activation of NF-κB and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways.

  4. Selenium is critical for cancer-signaling gene expression but not cell proliferation in human colon Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Huawei; Botnen, James H

    2007-01-01

    Selenium (Se) is a potential anticarcinogenic nutrient, and the essential role of Se in cell growth is well recognized but certain cancer cells appear to have acquired a survival advantage under conditions of Se-deficiency. To understand the molecular basis of Se-anticancer effects at nutritional doses (nmol/L) for cultured cells, we generated Se-deficient colon Caco-2 cells by gradually reducing serum in media because serum contains a trace amount of Se. The glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity of Se-deficient Caco-2 cells was 10.8 mU/mg protein compared to 133.6 approximately 146.3 mU/mg protein in Caco-2 cells supplemented with 500 nmol/L selenite, SeMSC or SeMet (three tested Se-chemical forms) after 7-d culture in serum free media. Interestingly, there were no detectable differences in cell growth, cell cycle progression between Se-deficient cells and cells supplemented with 500 nmol/L Se. To examine differential cancer signaling-gene expression between Se-deficient and Se-supplemented cells, we employed a cancer signal pathway-specific array assay coupled with the real time PCR analysis. Our data demonstrate that although Caco-2 cells are resistant to Se deprivation, Se may exert its anticancer property through increasing the expression of humoral defense gene (A2M) and tumor suppressor-related genes (IGFBP3, HHIP) while decreasing pro-inflammatory gene (CXC L9, HSPB2) expression.

  5. Usefulness of Caco-2/HT29-MTX and Caco-2/HT29-MTX/Raji B Coculture Models To Predict Intestinal and Colonic Permeability Compared to Caco-2 Monoculture.

    PubMed

    Lozoya-Agullo, Isabel; Araújo, Francisca; González-Álvarez, Isabel; Merino-Sanjuán, Matilde; González-Álvarez, Marta; Bermejo, Marival; Sarmento, Bruno

    2017-04-03

    The Caco-2 cellular monolayer is a widely accepted in vitro model to predict human permeability but suffering from several and critical limitations. Therefore, some alternative cell cultures to mimic the human intestinal epithelium, as closely as possible, have been developed to achieve more physiological conditions, as the Caco-2/HT29-MTX coculture and the triple Caco-2/HT29-MTX/Raji B models. In this work the permeability of 12 model drugs of different Biopharmaceutical Classification System (BCS) characteristics, in the coculture and triple coculture models was assessed. Additionally, the utility of both models to classify compounds according to the BCS criteria was scrutinized. The obtained results suggested that the coculture of Caco-2/HT29-MTX and the triple coculture of Caco-2/HT29-MTX/Raji B were useful models to predict intestinal permeability and to classify the drugs in high or low permeability according to BCS. Moreover, to study thoroughly the transport mechanism of a specific drug, using a more complex model than Caco-2 monocultures is more suitable because coculture and triple coculture are more physiological models, so the results obtained with them will be closer to those obtained in the human intestine.

  6. Ellagitannins from Rubus idaeus L. Exert Geno- and Cytotoxic Effects against Human Colon Adenocarcinoma Cell Line Caco-2.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Adriana; Sójka, Michał; Klewicka, Elżbieta; Lipińska, Lidia; Klewicki, Robert; Kołodziejczyk, Krzysztof

    2017-03-28

    Ellagitannins possess several biological activities, including anticancer properties. The goal of the present study was to investigate the cyto- and genotoxic activities of a red raspberry ellagitannin preparation (REP) in the concentration range of 2.5-160 μg/mL, as well as that of the main individual raspberry ellagitannins, sanguiin H-6 (SH-6, 12.8-256 μM) and lambertianin C (LC, 9.3-378 μM), against human colon adenocarcinoma cell line Caco-2. The ellagitannin concentrations used in the study correspond to those found in foodstuffs containing raspberry fruit. REP, SH-6, and LC exhibited strong concentration-dependent genotoxic properties, inducing DNA damage ranging from 7.3 ± 1.3 to 56.8 ± 4.3%, causing double-strand breaks and oxidation of DNA bases. At IC50 (124 μg/mL) the REP affected the nuclear morphology and induced the apoptosis of Caco-2 cells. Because the REP has been found to possess chemopreventive activity, it can be used as a natural food additive to enhance the health benefits of foodstuffs.

  7. Comparative cytotoxicity of nanosilver in human liver HepG2 and colon Caco2 cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Saura C; Zheng, Jiwen; Graham, Lesley; Chen, Lynn; Ihrie, John; Yourick, Jeffrey J; Sprando, Robert L

    2014-11-01

    The use of silver nanoparticles in food, food contact materials, dietary supplements and cosmetics has increased significantly owing to their antibacterial and antifungal properties. As a consequence, the need for validated rapid screening methods to assess their toxicity is necessary to ensure consumer safety. This study evaluated two widely used in vitro cell culture models, human liver HepG2 cells and human colon Caco2 cells, as tools for assessing the potential cytotoxicity of food- and cosmetic-related nanoparticles. The two cell culture models were utilized to compare the potential cytotoxicity of 20-nm silver. The average size of the silver nanoparticle determined by our transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis was 20.4 nm. The dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis showed no large agglomeration of the silver nanoparticles. The concentration of the 20-nm silver solution determined by our inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis was 0.962 mg ml(-1) . Our ICP-MS and TEM analysis demonstrated the uptake of 20-nm silver by both HepG2 and Caco2 cells. Cytotoxicity, determined by the Alamar Blue reduction assay, was evaluated in the nanosilver concentration range of 0.1 to 20 µg ml(-1) . Significant concentration-dependent cytotoxicity of the nanosilver in HepG2 cells was observed in the concentration range of 1 to 20 µg ml(-1) and at a higher concentration range of 10 to 20 µg ml(-1) in Caco2 cells compared with the vehicle control. A concentration-dependent decrease in dsDNA content was observed in both cell types exposed to nanosilver but not controls, suggesting an increase in DNA damage. The DNA damage was observed in the concentration range of 1 to 20 µg ml(-1) . Nanosilver-exposed HepG2 and Caco2 cells showed no cellular oxidative stress, determined by the dichlorofluorescein assay, compared with the vehicle control in the concentration range used in this study. A concentration-dependent decrease in

  8. Oleic Acid Uptake Reveals the Rescued Enterocyte Phenotype of Colon Cancer Caco-2 by HT29-MTX Cells in Co-Culture Mode.

    PubMed

    Berger, Emmanuelle; Nassra, Merian; Atgié, Claude; Plaisancié, Pascale; Géloën, Alain

    2017-07-20

    Gastrointestinal epithelium is the unique route for nutrients and for many pharmaceuticals to enter the body. The present study aimed to analyze precisely whether co-culture of two colon cancer cell lines, mucus-producing cells HT29-MTX and enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells, ameliorate differentiation into an in vitro intestinal barrier model and the signaling pathways involved. Differentiated Caco-2 cells gene datasets were compared first to intestinal or cancer phenotypes and second to signaling pathway gene datasets. Experimental validations were performed in real-time experiments, immunochemistry, and gene expression analyses on Caco-2 versus co-cultures of Caco-2 and HT29-MTX (10%) cells. Partial maintenance of cancer-cell phenotype in differentiated Caco-2 cells was confirmed and fatty acids merged as potential regulators of cancer signaling pathways. HT29-MTX cells induced morphological changes in Caco-2 cells, slightly increased their proliferation rate and profoundly modified gene transcription of phenotype markers, fatty acid receptors, intracellular transporters, and lipid droplet components as well as functional responses to oleic acid. In vitro, enterocyte phenotype was rescued partially by co-culture of cancer cells with goblet cells and completed through oleic acid interaction with signaling pathways dysregulated in cancer cells.

  9. Dietary flavanols exert different effects on antioxidant defenses and apoptosis/proliferation in Caco-2 and SW480 colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Sonia; Rodríguez-Ramiro, Ildefonso; Martín, María Angeles; Goya, Luis; Bravo, Laura

    2011-12-01

    Flavanols intake has been associated with reduced risk of cancer. In this study, the anticarcinogenic effects of the flavanols epicatechin (EC), epicatechin-gallate (ECG) and procyanidin B2 (PB2) on Caco-2 and SW480 colon cancer cells were investigated. Catechins showed different cytotoxicity depending on the cell line. ECG displayed strong growth inhibitory effects against SW480 cells, but was ineffective on Caco-2 cells. In contrast, PB2 did not affect Caco-2 cells, whereas promoted cell growth in SW480 cells and EC had no obvious effects on any cell line. Exposure of SW480 cells to ECG led to apoptosis as determined by caspase-3 activity, imbalance among Bcl-2 anti- and pro-apoptotic protein levels, ERK activation and AKT inhibition, whereas PB2 treatment enhanced phospho-AKT and phospho-ERK levels. Incubation of Caco-2 cells with ECG increased glutathione levels without affecting the expression of pro- and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins, AKT or ERK. The results suggest that the different cytotoxicity of flavanols is caused by their different activity and the degree of differentiation of the colon cancer cell line. Thus, ECG induced apoptosis in SW480 cells and contributed to the cytotoxic effect, whereas ECG enhanced the antioxidant potential in Caco-2 cells. PB2 activated cell proliferation and survival/proliferation pathways in SW480 cells.

  10. The von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor-suppressor gene is down-regulated by selenium deficiency in Caco-2 cells and rat colon mucosa

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To test the hypothesis that selenium affects DNA methylation and hence gene regulation we employed a methylation array (Panomics) in the human colonic epithelial Caco-2 cell model. The array profiles DNA methylation from promoter regions of 82 human genes. After conditioning cells to repeatedly redu...

  11. Selenium is critical for the regulation of tumor suppressor and pro-inflammatory gene expresssion in human colon Caco-2 cells

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The essential role of Se in growth of most mammalian cells is well recognized but certain cancer cells appear to have acquired a survival advantage under conditions of Se-deficiency. We generated Se-deficient colon Caco-2 cells by gradually reducing serum in the media because serum contains a trace ...

  12. Induction of spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase (SSAT) by aspirin in Caco-2 colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Babbar, Naveen; Gerner, Eugene W; Casero, Robert A

    2006-02-15

    Epidemiological, experimental and clinical results suggest that aspirin and other NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) inhibit the development of colon cancer. It has been shown that the NSAID sulindac induces apoptosis and suppresses carcinogenesis, in part, by a mechanism leading to the transcriptional activation of the gene encoding SSAT (spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase), a rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine catabolism. In the present study, we show that a variety of NSAIDs, including aspirin, sulindac, ibuprofen and indomethacin, can induce SSAT gene expression in Caco-2 cells. Aspirin, at physiological concentrations, can induce SSAT mRNA via transcriptional initiation mechanisms. This induction leads to increased SSAT protein levels and enzyme activity. Promoter deletion analysis of the 5' SSAT promoter-flanking region led to the identification of two NF-kappaB (nuclear factor kappaB) response elements. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assays showed binding of NF-kappaB complexes at these sequences after aspirin treatment. Aspirin treatment led to the activation of NF-kappaB signalling and increased binding at these NF-kappaB sites in the SSAT promoter, hence providing a potential mechanism for the induction of SSAT by aspirin in these cells. Aspirin-induced SSAT ultimately leads to a decrease in cellular polyamine content, which has been associated with decreased carcinogenesis. These results suggest that activation of SSAT by aspirin and different NSAIDs may be a common property of NSAIDs that plays an important role in their chemopreventive actions in colorectal cancer.

  13. Maslinic Acid, a Natural Triterpene, Induces a Death Receptor-Mediated Apoptotic Mechanism in Caco-2 p53-Deficient Colon Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Zurita, Fernando J.; Rufino-Palomares, Eva E.; García-Salguero, Leticia; Peragón, Juan; Medina, Pedro P.; Parra, Andrés; Cascante, Marta; Lupiáñez, José A.

    2016-01-01

    Maslinic acid (MA) is a natural triterpene present in high concentrations in the waxy skin of olives. We have previously reported that MA induces apoptotic cell death via the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in HT29 colon cancer cells. Here, we show that MA induces apoptosis in Caco-2 colon cancer cells via the extrinsic apoptotic pathway in a dose-dependent manner. MA triggered a series of effects associated with apoptosis, including the cleavage of caspases -8 and -3, and increased the levels of t-Bid within a few hours of its addition to the culture medium. MA had no effect on the expression of the Bax protein, release of cytochrome-c or on the mitochondrial membrane potential. This suggests that MA triggered the extrinsic apoptotic pathway in this cell type, as opposed to the intrinsic pathway found in the HT29 colon-cancer cell line. Our results suggest that the apoptotic mechanism induced in Caco-2 may be different from that found in HT29 colon-cancer cells, and that in Caco-2 cells MA seems to work independently of p53. Natural antitumoral agents capable of activating both the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways could be of great use in treating colon-cancer of whatever origin. PMID:26751572

  14. Validation of in vitro cell models used in drug metabolism and transport studies; genotyping of cytochrome P450, phase II enzymes and drug transporter polymorphisms in the human hepatoma (HepG2), ovarian carcinoma (IGROV-1) and colon carcinoma (CaCo-2, LS180) cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Brandon, Esther F.A.; Bosch, Tessa M.; Deenen, Maarten J.; Levink, Rianne; Wal, Everdina van der; Meerveld, Joyce B.M. van; Bijl, Monique; Beijnen, Jos H. |; Schellens, Jan H.M. |; Meijerman, Irma . E-mail: I.Meijerman@pharm.uu.nl

    2006-02-15

    Human cell lines are often used for in vitro biotransformation and transport studies of drugs. In vivo, genetic polymorphisms have been identified in drug-metabolizing enzymes and ABC-drug transporters leading to altered enzyme activity, or a change in the inducibility of these enzymes. These genetic polymorphisms could also influence the outcome of studies using human cell lines. Therefore, the aim of our study was to pharmacogenotype four cell lines frequently used in drug metabolism and transport studies, HepG2, IGROV-1, CaCo-2 and LS180, for genetic polymorphisms in biotransformation enzymes and drug transporters. The results indicate that, despite the presence of some genetic polymorphisms, no real effects influencing the activity of metabolizing enzymes or drug transporters in the investigated cell lines are expected. However, this characterization will be an aid in the interpretation of the results of biotransformation and transport studies using these in vitro cell models.

  15. Induction of spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase (SSAT) by aspirin in Caco-2 colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Babbar, Naveen; Gerner, Eugene W.; Casero, Robert A.

    2005-01-01

    Epidemiological, experimental and clinical results suggest that aspirin and other NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) inhibit the development of colon cancer. It has been shown that the NSAID sulindac induces apoptosis and suppresses carcinogenesis, in part, by a mechanism leading to the transcriptional activation of the gene encoding SSAT (spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase), a rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine catabolism. In the present study, we show that a variety of NSAIDs, including aspirin, sulindac, ibuprofen and indomethacin, can induce SSAT gene expression in Caco-2 cells. Aspirin, at physiological concentrations, can induce SSAT mRNA via transcriptional initiation mechanisms. This induction leads to increased SSAT protein levels and enzyme activity. Promoter deletion analysis of the 5′ SSAT promoter-flanking region led to the identification of two NF-κB (nuclear factor κB) response elements. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assays showed binding of NF-κB complexes at these sequences after aspirin treatment. Aspirin treatment led to the activation of NF-κB signalling and increased binding at these NF-κB sites in the SSAT promoter, hence providing a potential mechanism for the induction of SSAT by aspirin in these cells. Aspirininduced SSAT ultimately leads to a decrease in cellular polyamine content, which has been associated with decreased carcinogenesis. These results suggest that activation of SSAT by aspirin and different NSAIDs may be a common property of NSAIDs that plays an important role in their chemopreventive actions in colorectal cancer. PMID:16262603

  16. Syndecan-1 alterations during the tumorigenic progression of human colonic Caco-2 cells induced by human Ha-ras or polyoma middle T oncogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Levy, P.; Munier, A.; Baron-Delage, S.; Di Gioia, Y.; Gespach, C.; Capeau, J.; Cherqui, G.

    1996-01-01

    The products of ras and src proto-oncogenes are frequently activated in a constitutive state in human colorectal cancer. In this study we attempted to establish whether the tumorigenic progression induced by oncogenic activation of p21ras and pp60c-src in human colonic Caco-2 cells is associated with specific alterations of syndecan-1, a membrane-anchored proteoglycan playing a role in cell-matrix interaction and neoplastic growth control. To this end, we used Caco-2 cells made highly tumorigenic by transfection with an activated (Val 12) human Ha-ras gene or with the polyoma middle T (Py-MT) oncogene, a constitutive activator of pp60c-src tyrosine kinase activity. Compared with control vector-transfected Caco-2 cells, both oncogene-transfected cell lines (1) contained smaller amounts of membrane-anchored PGs; (2) exhibited decreased syndecan-1 expression at the protein but not the mRNA level; (3) synthesized 35S-labelled syndecan-1 with decreased specific activity; (4) produced a syndecan-1 ectodomain with a lower molecular mass and reduced GAG chain size and sulphation; and (5) expressed heparanase degradative activity. These results show that the dramatic activation of the tumorigenic potential induced by oncogenic p21ras or Py-MT/pp60c-src in Caco-2 cells is associated with marked alterations of syndecan-1 expression at the translational and post-translational levels. Images Figure 2 PMID:8695359

  17. Comparative genotoxicity of nanosilver in human liver HepG2 and colon Caco2 cells evaluated by a flow cytometric in vitro micronucleus assay.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Saura C; Njoroge, Joyce; Bryce, Steven M; Yourick, Jeffrey J; Sprando, Robert L

    2014-11-01

    Two widely used in vitro cell culture models, human liver HepG2 cells and human colon Caco2 cells, and flow cytometry techniques were evaluated as tools for rapid screening of potential genotoxicity of food-related nanosilver. Comparative genotoxic potential of 20 nm silver was evaluated in HepG2 and Caco2 cell cultures by a flow cytometric-based in vitro micronucleus assay. The nanosilver, characterized by the dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry analysis, showed no agglomeration of the silver nanoparticles. The inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy analysis demonstrated the uptake of 20 nm silver by both cell types. The 20 nm silver exposure of HepG2 cells increased the concentration-dependent micronucleus formation sevenfold at 10 µg ml(-1) concentration in attached cell conditions and 1.3-fold in cell suspension conditions compared to the vehicle controls. However, compared to the vehicle controls, the 20 nm silver exposure of Caco2 cells increased the micronucleus formation 1.2-fold at a concentration of 10 µg ml(-1) both in the attached cell conditions as well as in the cell suspension conditions. Our results of flow cytometric in vitro micronucleus assay appear to suggest that the HepG2 cells are more susceptible to the nanosilver-induced micronucleus formation than the Caco2 cells compared to the vehicle controls. However, our results also suggest that the widely used in vitro models, HepG2 and Caco2 cells and the flow cytometric in vitro micronucleus assay are valuable tools for the rapid screening of genotoxic potential of nanosilver and deserve more careful evaluation.

  18. Comparative genotoxicity of nanosilver in human liver HepG2 and colon Caco2 cells evaluated by fluorescent microscopy of cytochalasin B-blocked micronucleus formation.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Saura C; Roy, Shambhu; Zheng, Jiwen; Yourick, Jeffrey J; Sprando, Robert L

    2014-11-01

    As a consequence of the increased use of silver nanoparticles in food, food contact materials, dietary supplements and cosmetics to prevent fungal and bacterial growth, there is a need for validated rapid screening methods to assess the safety of nanoparticle exposure. This study evaluated two widely used in vitro cell culture models, human liver HepG2 cells and human colon Caco2 cells, as tools for assessing the potential genotoxicity of 20-nm nanosilver. The average silver nanoparticle size as determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was 20.4 nm. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis showed no large agglomeration of the silver nanoparticles. The silver concentration in a 20-nm nanosilver solution determined by the inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis was 0.962 mg ml(-1) . Analysis by ICP-MS and TEM demonstrated the uptake of 20-nm silver by both HepG2 and Caco2 cells. Genotoxicity was determined by the cytochalasin B-blocked micronucleus assay with acridine orange staining and fluorescence microscopy. Concentration- and time-dependent increases in the frequency of binucleated cells with micronuclei induced by the nanosilver was observed in the concentration range of 0.5 to 15 µg ml(-1) in both HepG2 and Caco2 cells compared with the control. Our results indicated that HepG2 cells were more sensitive than Caco2 cells in terms of micronuclei formation induced by nanosilver exposure. In summary, the results of this study indicate that the widely used in vitro models, HepG2 and Caco2 cells in culture, represent potential screening models for prediction of genotoxicity of silver nanoparticles by in vitro micronucleus assay.

  19. Low molecular weight procyanidins from grape seeds enhance the impact of 5-Fluorouracil chemotherapy on Caco-2 human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Ker Y; Howarth, Gordon S; Bindon, Keren A; Kennedy, James A; Bastian, Susan E P

    2014-01-01

    Grape seed procyanidins (PC) are flavan-3-ol oligomers and polymers known for their biological activity in the gut. Grape seed extract (GSE) have been reported to reduce intestinal injury in a rat model of mucositis. We sought to investigate effects of purified PC fractions differing in mean degree of polymerization (mDP) combined with 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) chemotherapy on the viability of colon cancer cells (Caco-2). SixPC fractions (F1-F6) were isolated from Cabernet Sauvignon seeds at two ripeness stages: pre-veraison unripe (immature) and ripe (mature), utilizing step gradient, low-pressure chromatography on a Sephadex LH-20 resin. Fractions were tested on Caco-2 cells, alone and in combination with 5-FU. Eluted fractions were characterized by phloroglucinolysis and gel permeation chromatography. Cell viability was determined by the 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide) (MTT) assay. All isolated fractions significantly reduced Caco-2 cell viability compared to the control (P<0.05), but F2 and F3 (mDP 2-6) were the most active fractions (immature F2 = 32% mDP 2.4, F3 = 35% mDP 5.8 and mature F2 = 13% mDP 3.6 and F3 = 17% mDP 5.9; percentage of viable cells remaining) on Caco-2 cells. When combined with 5-FU, immature fractions F1-F3 enhanced the cell toxicity effects of 5-FU by 27-73% (P<0.05). Mature seed PC fractions (F1-F4) significantly enhanced the toxicity of 5-FU by 60-83% against Caco-2 cells (P<0.05). Moreover, some fractions alone were more potent at decreasing viability in Caco-2 cells (P<0.05; immature fractions = 65-68% and mature fractions = 83-87%) compared to 5-FU alone (37%). PCs of mDP 2-6 (immature F1-F3 and mature F1 and F4)not only enhanced the impact of 5-FU in killing Caco-2 cells, but also surpassed standard 5-FU chemotherapy as an anti-cancer agent.The bioactivity of PC is therefore attributed primarily to lower molecular weight PCs.

  20. Lysophosphatidic acid prevents apoptosis of Caco-2 colon cancer cells via activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase and phosphorylation of Bad.

    PubMed

    Rusovici, Raluca; Ghaleb, Amr; Shim, Hyunsuk; Yang, Vincent W; Yun, C Chris

    2007-08-01

    Lysophosphatidic acids (LPA) exert growth factor-like effects through specific G protein-coupled receptors. The presence of different LPA receptors often determines the specific signaling mechanisms and the physiological consequences of LPA in different environments. Among the four members of the LPA receptor family, LPA(2) has been shown to be overexpressed in colon cancer suggesting that the signaling by LPA(2) may potentiate growth and survival of tumor cells. In this study, we examined the effect of LPA on survival of colon cancer cells using Caco-2 cells as a cell model system. LPA rescued Caco-2 cells from apoptosis elicited by the chemotherapeutic drug, etoposide. This protection was accompanied by abrogation of etoposide-induced stimulation of caspase activity via a mechanism dependent on Erk and PI3K. In contrast, perturbation of cellular signaling mediated by the LPA(2) receptor by knockdown of a scaffold protein NHERF2 abrogated the protective effect of LPA. Etoposide decreased the expression of Bcl-2, which was reversed by LPA. Etoposide decreased the phosphorylation level of the proapoptotic protein Bad in an Erk-dependent manner, without changing Bad expression. We further show that LPA treatment resulted in delayed activation of Erk. These results indicate that LPA protects Caco-2 cells from apoptotic insult by a mechanism involving Erk, Bad, and Bcl-2.

  1. Evaluation of physicochemical properties and intestinal permeability of six dietary polyphenols in human intestinal colon adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Himanshu; Jana, Snehasis

    2016-02-01

    Phenolic compounds are common ingredients in many dietary supplements and functional foods. However, data concerning physicochemical properties and permeability of polyphenols on the intestinal epithelial cells are scarce. The aims of this study were to determine the experimental partition coefficient (Log P), and parallel artificial membrane permeability assay (PAMPA), to characterize the bi-directional transport of six phenolic compounds viz. caffeic acid, chrysin, gallic acid, quercetin, resveratrol and rutin in Caco-2 cells. The experimental Log P values of six polyphenols were correlated (R (2) = 0.92) well with the calculated Log P values. The apparent permeability (P app) range of all polyphenols in PAMPA for the apical (AP) to basolateral (BL) was 1.18 ± 0.05 × 10(-6) to 5.90 ± 0.16 × 10(-6) cm/s. The apparent Caco-2 permeability (P app) range for the AP-BL was 0.96 ± 0.03 × 10(-6) to 3.80 ± 0.45 × 10(-6) cm/s. The efflux ratio of P app (BL → AP) to P app (AP → BL) for all phenolics was <2, suggesting greater permeability in the absorptive direction. Six compounds exhibited strong correlations between Log P and PAMPA/Caco-2 cell monolayer permeation data. Dietary six polyphenols were poorly absorbed through PAMPA and Caco-2 cells, and their transepithelial transports were mainly by passive diffusion.

  2. Cocoa polyphenols prevent inflammation in the colon of azoxymethane-treated rats and in TNF-α-stimulated Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Ramiro, Ildefonso; Ramos, Sonia; López-Oliva, Elvira; Agis-Torres, Angel; Bravo, Laura; Goya, Luis; Martín, Maria Angeles

    2013-07-28

    Numerous lines of evidence support a relationship between intestinal inflammation and cancer. Therefore, much attention has recently been focused on the identification of natural compounds with anti-inflammatory activities as a strategy to suppress the early stages of colorectal cancer. Because cocoa is a rich source of bioactive compounds, the present study investigated its anti-inflammatory properties in a rat model of azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colon carcinogenesis and in TNF-α-stimulated Caco-2 cells. A total of forty male rats were fed with control or cocoa-enriched diets (12 %) during 8 weeks and injected with saline or AOM (20 mg/kg body weight) during the third and fourth week (n 10 rats/group). At the end of the experiment, colon samples were evaluated for markers of inflammation. The anti-inflammatory activity of a cocoa polyphenolic extract (10 μg/ml) was examined in TNF-α-stimulated Caco-2 cells, an in vitro model of experimentally induced intestinal inflammation. The signalling pathways involved, including NF-κB and the mitogen-activated protein kinase family such as c-Jun NH₂-terminal kinases (JNK), extracellular signal-regulated kinases and p38, were also evaluated. The results show that the cocoa-rich diet decreases the nuclear levels of NF-κB and the expression of pro-inflammatory enzymes such as cyclo-oxygenase-2 and inducible NO synthase induced by AOM in the colon. Additionally, the experiments in Caco-2 cells confirm that cocoa polyphenols effectively down-regulate the levels of inflammatory markers induced by TNF-α by inhibiting NF-κB translocation and JNK phosphorylation. We conclude that cocoa polyphenols suppress inflammation-related colon carcinogenesis and could be promising in the dietary prevention of intestinal inflammation and related cancer development.

  3. Flow cytometric evaluation of the contribution of ionic silver to genotoxic potential of nanosilver in human liver HepG2 and colon Caco2 cells.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Saura C; Njoroge, Joyce; Bryce, Steven M; Zheng, Jiwen; Ihrie, John

    2016-04-01

    Exposure to nanosilver found in food- and cosmetics-related consumer products is of public concern because of the lack of information about its safety. In this study, two widely used in vitro cell culture models, human liver HepG2 and colon Caco2 cells, and the flow cytometric micronucleus (FCMN) assay were evaluated as tools for rapid predictive screening of the potential genotoxicity of nanosilver. Recently, we reported the genotoxicity of 20 nm nanosilver using these systems. In the current study presented here, we tested the hypothesis that the nanoparticle size and cell types were critical determinants of its genotoxicity. To test this hypothesis, we used the FCMN assay to evaluate the genotoxic potential of 50 nm nanosilver of the same shape, composition, surface charge and obtained from the same commercial source using the same experimental conditions and in vitro models (HepG2 and Caco2) as previously tested for the 20 nm silver. Results of our study show that up to the concentrations tested in these cultured cell test systems, the smaller (20 nm) nanoparticle is genotoxic to both the cell types by inducing micronucleus (MN). However, the larger (50 nm) nanosilver induces MN only in HepG2 cells, but not in Caco2 cells. Also in this study, we evaluated the contribution of ionic silver to the genotoxic potential of nanosilver using silver acetate as the representative ionic silver. The MN frequencies in HepG2 and Caco2 cells exposed to the ionic silver in the concentration range tested are not statistically significant from the control values except at the top concentrations for both the cell types. Therefore, our results indicate that the ionic silver may not contribute to the MN-forming ability of nanosilver in HepG2 and Caco2 cells. Also our results suggest that the HepG2 and Caco2 cell cultures and the FCMN assay are useful tools for rapid predictive screening of a genotoxic potential of food- and cosmetics-related chemicals including nanosilver.

  4. Up-regulation of tumor suppressor carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 in human colon cancer Caco-2 cells following repetitive exposure to dietary levels of a polyphenol-rich chokeberry juice.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez-Soto, María J; Larrosa, Mar; Garcia-Cantalejo, Jesús M; Espín, Juan C; Tomás-Barberan, Francisco A; García-Conesa, María T

    2007-04-01

    Consumption of berries and red fruits rich in polyphenols may contribute to the reduction of colon cancer through mechanisms not yet understood. In this study, we investigated the response of subconfluent Caco-2 cells (a human colon carcinoma model) to repetitive exposure (2 h a day for a 4-day period) of a subtoxic dose of a chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa) juice containing mixed polyphenols. To mimic physiological conditions, we subjected the chokeberry juice to in vitro gastric and pancreatic digestion. The effects on viability, proliferation and cell cycle were determined, and changes in the expression of genes in response to the chokeberry treatment were screened using Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarrays. Exposure to the chokeberry juice inhibited Caco-2 cell proliferation by causing G(2)/M cell cycle arrest. We detected changes in the expression of a group of genes involved in cell growth and proliferation and cell cycle regulation, as well as those associated to colorectal cancer. A selection of these genes was further confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR. Among these, the tumor suppressor carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1), whose expression is known to be reduced in the majority of early adenomas and carcinomas, was up-regulated by the treatment both at the mRNA and protein levels (as shown by flow cytometry analysis). CEACAM1, with a significant regulatory role on cell proliferation of particular interest at early stages of cancer development, may be a potential target for chemoprevention by food components such as those present in polyphenol-rich fruits.

  5. Correlation between the destruction of tight junction by patulin treatment and increase of phosphorylation of ZO-1 in Caco-2 human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kawauchiya, Tomoko; Takumi, Ryo; Kudo, Yukako; Takamori, Akiko; Sasagawa, Tatuya; Takahashi, Kohei; Kikuchi, Hideaki

    2011-08-28

    Patulin is a mycotoxin and its contamination of food has been reported to cause gastrointestinal inflammation, ulcers, and bleeding. The toxicity of patulin is thought to be due to the destruction of tight junctions (TJs) in gastrointestinal tissues. However, the precise mechanism has not been clarified. Here, we investigated the phosphorylation of TJ components. The transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) of Caco-2 human colon cancer cells decreased gradually during the first 24h of treatment with 50μM patulin. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed that the TJ proteins ZO-1 and claudin-4, but not occludin, had decreased after 24h and decreased from the cell-cell contact regions of TJs after 48h of patulin treatment. Western blotting showed that the level of ZO-1 decreased after 48h of patulin treatment, but the levels of claudin-4 and occludin remained at the initial level until 72h. Phosphorylation of ZO-1 was detected by 24h and increased markedly after 72h of patulin treatment. However, phosphorylation of claudin-4 and occludin was not detected by probing with anti-phosphotyrosine antibody. Immunoprecipitation showed that interaction of ZO-1 with claudin-4 had decreased after 48h and was completely absent after 72h. These results suggest that phosphorylation caused the degradation of ZO-1 protein and the decrease in TER induced by patulin treatment of Caco-2 cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Apoptosis-inducing factor and caspase-dependent apoptotic pathways triggered by different grape seed extracts on human colon cancer cell line Caco-2.

    PubMed

    Dinicola, Simona; Cucina, Alessandra; Pasqualato, Alessia; Proietti, Sara; D'Anselmi, Fabrizio; Pasqua, Gabriella; Santamaria, Anna Rita; Coluccia, Pierpaolo; Laganà, Aldo; Antonacci, Donato; Giuliani, Alessandro; Bizzarri, Mariano

    2010-09-01

    Consumption of grape seed extract (GSE) is widely marketed as a dietary supplement and is considered safe for human health. Nevertheless, the analytical composition of GSE from different grape cultivars, growing in special agronomic constraints, differs greatly in flavan-3-ols content. The major concern with GSE studies is a lack of availability of uniformly standardised preparations, which raises an important question whether different GSE samples have comparable activity and trigger the same mechanisms of action on a given biological system. Therefore, it is tempting to speculate that GSE, obtained from different cultivars, could exert differentiated anticancer effects. The focus of the present study is to determine the selective biological efficacy of GSE obtained from three different sources on the human colon cancer cell line Caco-2. Irrespective of its source, high doses of GSE induced a significant inhibition on Caco-2 cell growth. Moreover, apoptosis was enhanced through both caspase-dependent and caspase-independent mechanisms, leading to an early apoptosis-inducing factor release and, further, to a dramatic increase in caspase 7 and 3 activity. However, a significant difference in apoptotic rates induced by the three grape sources clearly emerged when treating cancer cells with low and intermediate GSE concentrations (25 and 50 microg/ml).

  7. Grape seed extract triggers apoptosis in Caco-2 human colon cancer cells through reactive oxygen species and calcium increase: extracellular signal-regulated kinase involvement.

    PubMed

    Dinicola, Simona; Mariggiò, Maria Addolorata; Morabito, Caterina; Guarnieri, Simone; Cucina, Alessandra; Pasqualato, Alessia; D'Anselmi, Fabrizio; Proietti, Sara; Coluccia, Pierpaolo; Bizzarri, Mariano

    2013-09-14

    Grape seed extract (GSE) from Italia, Palieri and Red Globe cultivars inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis in Caco-2 human colon cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. In order to investigate the mechanism(s) supporting the apoptotic process, we analysed reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, intracellular Ca2+ handling and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation. Upon exposure to GSE, ROS and intracellular Ca2+ levels increased in Caco-2 cells, concomitantly with ERK inactivation. As ERK activity is thought to be essential for promoting survival pathways, inhibition of this kinase is likely to play a relevant role in GSE-mediated anticancer effects. Indeed, pretreatment with N-acetyl cysteine, a ROS scavenger, reversed GSE-induced apoptosis, and promoted ERK phosphorylation. This effect was strengthened by ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid-mediated inhibition of extracellular Ca2+ influx. ROS and Ca2+ influx inhibition, in turn, increased ERK phosphorylation, and hence almost entirely suppressed GSE-mediated apoptosis. These data suggested that GSE triggers a previously unrecognised ERK-based mechanism, involving both ROS production and intracellular Ca2+ increase, eventually leading to apoptosis in cancer cells.

  8. Substrate specificity and some properties of phenol sulfotransferase from human intestinal Caco-2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Baranczyk-Kuzma, A.; Garren, J.A.; Hidalgo, I.J.; Borchardt, R.T. )

    1991-01-01

    The phase 2 metabolic reactions, sulfation and glucuronidation, were studied in a human colon carcinoma cell line (Caco-2), which has been developed as a model of intestinal enterocytes. Phenol sulfotransferase was isolated from Caco-2 cells cultured for 7, 14 and 21 days. The enzyme catalyzed the sulfation of both p-nitrophenol and catecholamines as well as most catecholamine metabolites. The affinity (K{sub m}) of PST for dopamine was much higher than for p-nitrophenol, and the specific activity of PST with both substrates increased with the age of the cells. The thermal stability of Caco-2 PST increased with cell age and was not dependent on the acceptor substrate used. The thermolabile PST from 7-day old cells was more sensitive to NEM than was the thermostable enzyme from 21-day old cells. No UDP-glucuronyltransferase activity was detected in 7-, 14- and 21-day old Caco-2 cells with any of the methods used.

  9. In vivo production of novel vitamin D2 hydroxy-derivatives by human placentas, epidermal keratinocytes, Caco-2 colon cells and the adrenal gland

    PubMed Central

    Slominski, Andrzej T.; Kim, Tae-Kang; Shehabi, Haleem Z.; Tang, Edith; Benson, Heather A. E.; Semak, Igor; Lin, Zongtao; Yates, Charles R.; Wang, Jin; Li, Wei; Tuckey, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the metabolism of vitamin D2 to hydroxyvitamin D2 metabolites ((OH)D2) by human placentas ex-utero, adrenal glands ex-vivo and cultured human epidermal keratinocytes and colonic Caco-2 cells, and identified 20(OH)D2, 17,20(OH)2D2, 1,20(OH)2D2, 25(OH)D2 and 1,25(OH)2D2 as products. Inhibition of product formation by 22R-hydroxycholesterol indicated involvement of CYP11A1 in 20- and 17-hydroxylation of vitamin D2, while use of ketoconazole indicated involvement of CYP27B1 in 1α-hydroxylation of products. Studies with purified human CYP11A1 confirmed the ability of this enzyme to convert vitamin D2 to 20(OH)D2 and 17,20(OH)2D2. In placentas and Caco-2 cells, production of 20(OH)D2 was higher than 25(OH)D2 while in human keratinocytes the production of 20(OH)D2 and 25(OH)D2 were comparable. HaCaT keratinocytes showed high accumulation of 1,20(OH)2D2 relative to 20(OH)D2 indicating substantial CYP27B1 activity. This is the first in vivo evidence for a novel pathway of vitamin D2 metabolism initiated by CYP11A1 and modified by CYP27B1, with the product profile showing tissue- and cell-type specificity. PMID:24382416

  10. In vivo production of novel vitamin D2 hydroxy-derivatives by human placentas, epidermal keratinocytes, Caco-2 colon cells and the adrenal gland.

    PubMed

    Slominski, Andrzej T; Kim, Tae-Kang; Shehabi, Haleem Z; Tang, Edith K Y; Benson, Heather A E; Semak, Igor; Lin, Zongtao; Yates, Charles R; Wang, Jin; Li, Wei; Tuckey, Robert C

    2014-03-05

    We investigated the metabolism of vitamin D2 to hydroxyvitamin D2 metabolites ((OH)D2) by human placentas ex-utero, adrenal glands ex-vivo and cultured human epidermal keratinocytes and colonic Caco-2 cells, and identified 20(OH)D2, 17,20(OH)₂D2, 1,20(OH)₂D2, 25(OH)D2 and 1,25(OH)₂D2 as products. Inhibition of product formation by 22R-hydroxycholesterol indicated involvement of CYP11A1 in 20- and 17-hydroxylation of vitamin D2, while use of ketoconazole indicated involvement of CYP27B1 in 1α-hydroxylation of products. Studies with purified human CYP11A1 confirmed the ability of this enzyme to convert vitamin D2 to 20(OH)D2 and 17,20(OH)₂D2. In placentas and Caco-2 cells, production of 20(OH)D2 was higher than 25(OH)D2 while in human keratinocytes the production of 20(OH)D2 and 25(OH)D2 were comparable. HaCaT keratinocytes showed high accumulation of 1,20(OH)₂D2 relative to 20(OH)D2 indicating substantial CYP27B1 activity. This is the first in vivo evidence for a novel pathway of vitamin D2 metabolism initiated by CYP11A1 and modified by CYP27B1, with the product profile showing tissue- and cell-type specificity.

  11. Cyto- and genotoxicity of a vanadyl(IV) complex with oxodiacetate in human colon adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells: potential use in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Di Virgilio, Ana L; Rivadeneira, Josefina; Muglia, Cecilia I; Reigosa, Miguel A; Butenko, Nataliya; Cavaco, Isabel; Etcheverry, Susana B

    2011-12-01

    The complex of vanadyl(IV) cation with oxodiacetate, VO(oda) caused an inhibitory effect on the proliferation of the human colon adenocarcinoma cell line Caco-2 in the range of 25-100 μM (P < 0.001). This inhibition was partially reversed by scavengers of free radicals. The difference in cell proliferation in the presence and the absence of scavengers was statistically significant in the range of 50-100 μM (P < 0.05). VO(oda) altered lysosomal and mitochondria metabolisms (neutral red and MTT bioassays) in a dose-response manner from 10 μM (P < 0.001). Morphological studies showed important transformations that correlated with the disassembly of actin filaments and a decrease in the number of cells in a dose response manner. Moreover, VO(oda) caused statistically significant genotoxic effects on Caco-2 cells in the low range of concentration (5-25 μM) (Comet assay). Increment in the oxidative stress and a decrease in the GSH level are the main cytotoxic mechanisms of VO(oda). These effects were partially reversed by scavengers of free radicals in the range of 50-100 μM (P < 0.05). Besides, VO(oda) interacted with plasmidic DNA causing single and double strand cleavage, probably through the action of free radical species. Altogether, these results suggest that VO(oda) is a good candidate to be evaluated for alternative therapeutics in cancer treatment.

  12. Use of Tween 40 and Tween 80 to deliver a mixture of phytochemicals to human colonic adenocarcinoma cell (CaCo-2) monolayers.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Sinead M; Woods, Julie A; O'Brien, Nora M

    2004-05-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that dietary intake of carotenoids and tocopherols may influence the risk of certain chronic diseases, such as cancer and CVD. In vitro studies investigating the synergistic effects of mixtures of carotenoids and tocopherols have been hindered due to the difficulty of solubilising these lipophilic compounds. The objective of the present study was to develop a system for delivering tocopherols and carotenoids simultaneously to cells in culture. Differentiated human colonic adenocarcinoma cells (CaCo-2) were incubated with a mixture of these phytochemicals for 24 h. The phytochemical mixture included carotenoids (astaxanthin, canthaxanthin, lutein, lycopene, alpha-carotene, beta-carotene) and tocopherols (alpha-tocopherol and gamma-tocopherol). The emulsifiers polyoxyethylene sorbitan monopalmitate (Tween 40) and polyoxyethylene sorbitan monooleate (Tween 80) were employed as the delivery vehicles, and were compared with tetrahydrofuran (THF). Each vehicle was added at a maximum concentration of 1 ml/l. No toxic effects to the CaCo-2 cells were noted when Tween 40 or Tween 80 were used. Both Tween 40 and Tween 80 resulted in greater solubility of the mixture and delivered substantially more carotenoids and tocopherols to the cells than THF. In particular, lycopene was detected within the cells when Tween 40 and Tween 80 were employed, whereas it was below the limits of detection by HPLC when THF was used as the delivery vehicle. The phytochemicals were retained within the cells for 24 h after supplementation. Tween 40 and Tween 80 have potential as simple, rapid and non-toxic methods for delivering mixtures of carotenoids and tocopherols to cells in culture.

  13. Quercetin Suppresses the Migration and Invasion in Human Colon Cancer Caco-2 Cells Through Regulating Toll-like Receptor 4/Nuclear Factor-kappa B Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Han, Mingyang; Song, Yucheng; Zhang, Xuedong

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The migration and invasion features, which were associated with inflammatory response, acted as vital roles in the development of colon cancer. Quercetin, a bioflavonoid compound, was widely spread in vegetables and fruits. Although quercetin exerts antioxidant and anticancer activities, the molecular signaling pathways in human colon cancer cells remain unclear. Hence, the present study was conducted to investigate the suppression of quercetin on migratory and invasive activity of colon cancer and the underlying mechanism. Materials and Methods: The effect of quercetin on cell viability, migration, and invasion of Caco-2 cells was analyzed by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, wound-healing assay, and transwell chambers assay, respectively. The protein expressions of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) p65, mitochondrial membrane potential-2 (MMP-2), and MMP-9 were detected by Western blot assay. The inflammatory factors, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2), and interleukin-6 (IL-6), in cell supernatant were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: The concentration of quercetin <20 μM was chosen for further experiments. Quercetin (5 μM) could remarkably suppress the migratory and invasive capacity of Caco-2 cells. The expressions of metastasis-related proteins of MMP-2, MMP-9 were decreased, whereas the expression of E-cadherin protein was increased by quercetin in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, the anti-TLR4 (2 μg) antibody or pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC; 1 μM) could affect the inhibition of quercetin on cell migration and invasion, as well as the protein expressions of MMP-2, MMP-9, E-cadherin, TLR4, and NF-κB p65. In addition, quercetin could reduce the inflammation factors production of TNF-α, Cox-2, and IL-6. Conclusion: The findings suggested for the 1st time that quercetin might exert its anticolon cancer activity via

  14. Bitter gourd seed fatty acid rich in 9c,11t,13t-conjugated linolenic acid induces apoptosis and up-regulates the GADD45, p53 and PPARgamma in human colon cancer Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Yumiko; Hosokawa, Masashi; Sahara, Takehiko; Suzuki, Rikako; Ohgiya, Satoru; Kohno, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Takuji; Miyashita, Kazuo

    2005-08-01

    Bitter gourd (Momordica charantia) seed oil (BGO) is a unique oil which contains 9cis, 11trans, 13trans-conjugated linolenic acid (9c,11t,13t-CLN) at a high level of more than 60%. In this study, we investigated the anti-proliferative and apoptosis-inducing effects of free fatty acids prepared from BGO (BGO-FFA) using colon cancer Caco-2 cells. BGO-FFA and purified 9c,11t,13t-CLN remarkably reduced the cell viability of Caco-2. In Caco-2 cells treated with BGO-FFA, DNA fragmentation of apoptosis indicators was observed in a dose-dependent manner. The expression level of apoptosis suppressor Bcl-2 protein was also decreased by BGO-FFA treatment. The GADD45 and p53, which play an important role in apoptosis-inducing pathways, were remarkably up-regulated by BGO-FFA treatment in Caco-2 cells. Up-regulation of PPARgamma mRNA and protein were also observed during apoptosis induced by BGO-FFA. These results suggest that BGO-FFA rich in 9c,11t,13t-CLN may induce apoptosis in Caco-2 cells through up-regulation of GADD45, p53 and PPARgamma.

  15. The Importance of the Stem Cell Marker Prominin-1/CD133 in the Uptake of Transferrin and in Iron Metabolism in Human Colon Cancer Caco-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Benoit, Jean-Pierre; Garcion, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    As the pentaspan stem cell marker CD133 was shown to bind cholesterol and to localize in plasma membrane protrusions, we investigated a possible function for CD133 in endocytosis. Using the CD133 siRNA knockdown strategy and non-differentiated human colon cancer Caco-2 cells that constitutively over-expressed CD133, we provide for the first time direct evidence for a role of CD133 in the intracellular accumulation of fluorescently labeled extracellular compounds. Assessed using AC133 monoclonal antibody, CD133 knockdown was shown to improve Alexa488-transferrin (Tf) uptake in Caco-2 cells but had no impact on FITC-dextran or FITC-cholera-toxin. Absence of effect of the CD133 knockdown on Tf recycling established a role for CD133 in inhibiting Tf endocytosis rather than in stimulating Tf exocytosis. Use of previously identified inhibitors of known endocytic pathways and the positive impact of CD133 knockdown on cellular uptake of clathrin-endocytosed synthetic lipid nanocapsules supported that CD133 impact on endocytosis was primarily ascribed to the clathrin pathway. Also, cholesterol extraction with methyl-β-cyclodextrine up regulated Tf uptake at greater intensity in the CD133high situation than in the CD133low situation, thus suggesting a role for cholesterol in the inhibitory effect of CD133 on endocytosis. Interestingly, cell treatment with the AC133 antibody down regulated Tf uptake, thus demonstrating that direct extracellular binding to CD133 could affect endocytosis. Moreover, flow cytometry and confocal microscopy established that down regulation of CD133 improved the accessibility to the TfR from the extracellular space, providing a mechanism by which CD133 inhibited Tf uptake. As Tf is involved in supplying iron to the cell, effects of iron supplementation and deprivation on CD133/AC133 expression were investigated. Both demonstrated a dose-dependent down regulation here discussed to the light of transcriptional and post-transciptional effects. Taken

  16. Degradation of the transcription factors NF-κB, STAT3, and STAT5 is involved in Entamoeba histolytica-induced cell death in Caco-2 colonic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyeong Ah; Min, Arim; Lee, Young Ah; Shin, Myeong Heon

    2014-10-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is a tissue-invasive protozoan parasite causing dysentery in humans. During infection of colonic tissues, amoebic trophozoites are able to kill host cells via apoptosis or necrosis, both of which trigger IL-8-mediated acute inflammatory responses. However, the signaling pathways involved in host cell death induced by E. histolytica have not yet been fully defined. In this study, we examined whether calpain plays a role in the cleavage of pro-survival transcription factors during cell death of colonic epithelial cells, induced by live E. histolytica trophozoites. Incubation with amoebic trophozoites induced activation of m-calpain in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Moreover, incubation with amoebae resulted in marked degradation of STAT proteins (STAT3 and STAT5) and NF-κB (p65) in Caco-2 cells. However, IκB, an inhibitor of NF-κB, was not cleaved in Caco-2 cells following adherence of E. histolytica. Entamoeba-induced cleavage of STAT proteins and NF-κB was partially inhibited by pretreatment of cells with a cell-permeable calpain inhibitor, calpeptin. In contrast, E. histolytica did not induce cleavage of caspase-3 in Caco-2 cells. Furthermore, pretreatment of Caco-2 cells with a calpain inhibitor, calpeptin (but not the pan-caspase inhibitor, z-VAD-fmk) or m-calpain siRNA partially reduced Entamoeba-induced DNA fragmentation in Caco-2 cells. These results suggest that calpain plays an important role in E. histolytica-induced degradation of NF-κB and STATs in colonic epithelial cells, which ultimately accelerates cell death.

  17. Degradation of the Transcription Factors NF-κB, STAT3, and STAT5 Is Involved in Entamoeba histolytica-Induced Cell Death in Caco-2 Colonic Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyeong Ah; Min, Arim; Lee, Young Ah

    2014-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is a tissue-invasive protozoan parasite causing dysentery in humans. During infection of colonic tissues, amoebic trophozoites are able to kill host cells via apoptosis or necrosis, both of which trigger IL-8-mediated acute inflammatory responses. However, the signaling pathways involved in host cell death induced by E. histolytica have not yet been fully defined. In this study, we examined whether calpain plays a role in the cleavage of pro-survival transcription factors during cell death of colonic epithelial cells, induced by live E. histolytica trophozoites. Incubation with amoebic trophozoites induced activation of m-calpain in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Moreover, incubation with amoebae resulted in marked degradation of STAT proteins (STAT3 and STAT5) and NF-κB (p65) in Caco-2 cells. However, IκB, an inhibitor of NF-κB, was not cleaved in Caco-2 cells following adherence of E. histolytica. Entamoeba-induced cleavage of STAT proteins and NF-κB was partially inhibited by pretreatment of cells with a cell-permeable calpain inhibitor, calpeptin. In contrast, E. histolytica did not induce cleavage of caspase-3 in Caco-2 cells. Furthermore, pretreatment of Caco-2 cells with a calpain inhibitor, calpeptin (but not the pan-caspase inhibitor, z-VAD-fmk) or m-calpain siRNA partially reduced Entamoeba-induced DNA fragmentation in Caco-2 cells. These results suggest that calpain plays an important role in E. histolytica-induced degradation of NF-κB and STATs in colonic epithelial cells, which ultimately accelerates cell death. PMID:25352693

  18. [Lactobacilli and colon carcinoma--A review].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shumei; Zhang, Lanwei; Shan, Yujuan

    2015-06-04

    Epidemiological studies showed that incidence of colon carcinoma is increased in the world. There are many difficulties to inhibit colon carcinoma because the causes of inducing colon carcinoma were various and interactive each other. Previous evidence supported the balance of the colonic microflora was critical in inhibiting colon carcinoma and the protection by colonic microflora could be improved by ingesting lactobacilli. Therefore, the biological functions and anticancer effects of lactobacilli attract attention of researchers. In this review we discussed the causes of colon carcinoma; the anticancer mechanisms of lactobacilli on the basis of our own studies. Eventually, we summarized the effects of anticancer of different components and metabolic products extracted from lactobacilli.

  19. Evaluation of the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of extracts of mussels originating from Moroccan Atlantic coast, in human colonic epithelial cells Caco-2.

    PubMed

    Nasser, Boubker; Moustaid, Khadija; Moukha, Serge; Mobio, Théophile A; Essamadi, Abdelkhalid; Creppy, Edmond E

    2008-08-01

    Industrial processing of phosphates generates chemical wastes which are, without any treatment, discharged directly into the Atlantic Ocean at Jorf Lasfar (JL), located 120 km south of Casablanca (Morocco) were shellfish are also collected by people without any control. Marine bivalves concentrate these pollutants by filtration and serve as vectors in human's exposure. The objective of this study was to test and compare in vitro on human intestinal cells (Caco-2) the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) extracts (either hydrophilic or lipophilic) collected at two coastal sites; JL (neighboring a phosphate processing plat-form) and Oualidia (OL) (a vegetable growing area) located 160 km south of Casablanca (i.e. 40 km south of JL). Using Caco-2 cells, the following end-points have been evaluated, cytotoxicity as measured by MTS test, inhibition of cellular macromolecules syntheses (DNA and protein) and genotoxicity evaluated by DNA fragmentation in agarose gel electrophoresis. The results indicated, that hydrophilic and lipophilic OL mussels extracts are cytotoxic and inhibit cellular macromolecules syntheses. Moreover these extracts damage the DNA in Caco-2 cells. The lipophilic JL mussels extract is cytotoxic, inhibits cellular macromolecules syntheses, and damages the DNA in Caco-2 cells whereas the hydrophilic extract of JL mussels fails to inhibit protein synthesis and does not damage the DNA. This extract rather enhances protein synthesis, suggesting possible metallothioneins induction by metal ions. Altogether these in vitro data indicate that mussels collected from OL could be more harmful than those from JL even though the later is closer to the pollution site than OL. Nevertheless consumption of mussels from all these areas may present a risk for humans. Epidemiological studies will be needed for global risk assessment in humans living in these areas especially those consuming see food regularly.

  20. Effect of Maillard reaction on biochemical properties of peanut 7S globulin (Ara h 1) and its interaction with a human colon cancer cell line (Caco-2).

    PubMed

    Teodorowicz, Małgorzata; Fiedorowicz, Ewa; Kostyra, Henryk; Wichers, Harry; Kostyra, Elżbieta

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of Maillard reaction (MR, glycation) on biochemical and biological properties of the major peanut allergen Ara h 1. Three different time/temperature conditions of treatment were applied (37, 60, and 145 °C). The extent of MR was assessed by SDS-PAGE, loss of free amino groups, fluorescence intensity, content of bound sugar and fructosamine. The Caco-2 model system was applied to study effects of hydrolysed and non-hydrolysed Ara h 1 on proliferation and interleukin-8 (IL-8) secretion from Caco-2 cells. We demonstrated significant differences in the biochemical properties of Ara h 1 glycated at different time/temperature conditions. Glycation of Ara h 1 at 37 °C was shown to cause least biochemical changes, not limiting pepsin hydrolysis. Loss of free amino groups, increase of fluorescence and brown colour of Ara h 1 glycated at 60 and 145 °C indicated advanced and final stages of MR. Non-treated Ara h 1 inhibited Caco-2 cell proliferation and stimulated IL-8 secretion. This effect was less pronounced for glycated Ara h 1. Incubation of Caco-2 cells with non-hydrolysed Ara h 1, glycated at the temperature of 37 and 60 °C, did not stimulate IL-8 secretion. Each applied time/temperature-treatment combination caused different biochemical changes of Ara h 1, underlining diversity of formed MRPs. MR, independently of temperature/time conditions, reduced the pro-inflammatory properties of native Ara h 1, reflected in stimulation of IL-8 secretion from intestinal epithelial cells.

  1. [Effects of K-ras gene mutation on colon cancer cell line Caco-2 metastasis by regulating E-cadherin/beta-catenin/p120 protein complex formation and RhoA protein activity].

    PubMed

    Li, Jing-nan; Li, Xiao; Qian, Jia-ming; Lu, Xin-qing; Yang, Hong

    2010-02-01

    To explore the effects of K-ras gene mutation on colon cancer cell line Caco-2 metastasis by regulating E-cadherin/beta-catenin/p120 protein complex formation and RhoA protein activity. K-ras wild-type colon cancer cell line Caco-2 was transiently transfected by phr-GFP vector (control group), transfected by mutant K-ras gene phr-K-ras (Val12) vector (transfection group), transfected by mutant K-ras gene phr-K-ras (Val12) vector and treated by specific MAPK pathway inhibitor PD98059 (MAPK inhibition group), or transfected by mutant K-ras gene phr-K-ras (Val12) vector and treated by specific PI-3K pathway inhibitor LY294002 (PI-3K inhibition group), respectively. Cell migration was tested by Transwell experiment. E-cadherin and beta-catenin protein expression and intracellular location were detected by cell immunofluorescence method. Intracellular p120 protein expression was detected by Western blot. beta-catenin protein level which combined with E-cadherin was detected by immunoprecipitation. RhoA activity was analyzed by Pull-down assay. The Caco-2 cell migration rate was (19.8 +/- 5.6) % in transfection group, which was significantly higher than that in control group [(14.0 +/- 4.2) %] (P = 0.001) and in MAPK inhibition group [(15.8 +/- 1.2) %] (P = 0.044), but was not significantly different from that in PI-3K inhibition group [(17.5 +/- 2.8) %] (P = 0.095). Immunofluorescence method showed that the E-cadherin and beta-catenin stain located in the cell membrane decreased in transfection group. Western blot showed that the total intracellular p120 protein decreased in transfection group and PI-3K inhibition group. Immunoprecipitation data showed that beta-catenin protein level combined with E-cadherin decreased in transfection group and PI-3K group. Pull-down test showed that RhoA protein activity was up-regulated in transfection group. K-ras gene mutation stimulates the migration of colon cancer cell Caco-2, which may be achieved by decreasing the E

  2. Hydrophobicity of Antifungal β-Peptides Is Associated with Their Cytotoxic Effect on In Vitro Human Colon Caco-2 and Liver HepG2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mora-Navarro, Camilo; Méndez-Vega, Janet; Caraballo-León, Jean; Lee, Myung-ryul; Palecek, Sean; Torres-Lugo, Madeline; Ortiz-Bermúdez, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    The widespread distribution of fungal infections, with their high morbidity and mortality rate, is a global public health problem. The increase in the population of immunocompromised patients combined with the selectivity of currents treatments and the emergence of drug-resistant fungal strains are among the most imperative reasons to develop novel antifungal formulations. Antimicrobial β-peptides are peptidomimetics of natural antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), which have been proposed as developmental platforms to enhance the AMPs selectivity and biostability. Their tunability allows the design of sequences with remarkable activity against a wide spectrum of microorganisms such as the human pathogenic Candida spp., both in planktonic and biofilm morphology. However, the β-peptide’s effect on surrounding host cells remains greatly understudied. Assessments have mainly relied on the extent of hemolysis that a candidate peptide is able to cause. This work investigated the in vitro cytotoxicity of various β-peptides in the Caco-2 and HepG2 mammalian cell lines. Results indicated that the cytotoxic effect of the β-peptides was influenced by cell type and was also correlated to structural features of the peptide such as hydrophobicity. We found that the selectivity of the most hydrophobic β-peptide was 2–3 times higher than that of the least hydrophobic one, for both cell types according to the selectivity index parameter (IC50/MIC). The IC50 of Caco-2 and HepG2 increased with hydrophobicity, which indicates the importance of testing putative therapeutics on different cell types. We report evidence of peptide-cell membrane interactions in Caco-2 and HepG2 using a widely studied β-peptide against C. albicans. PMID:26992117

  3. The human vasoactive intestinal peptide/pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide receptor 1 (VPAC1) promoter: characterization and role in receptor expression during enterocytic differentiation of the colon cancer cell line Caco-2Cl.20.

    PubMed Central

    Couvineau, A; Maoret, J J; Rouyer-Fessard, C; Carrero, I; Laburthe, M

    2000-01-01

    The basic organization of the human vasoactive intestinal peptide/pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide receptor (VPAC) 1 promoter was investigated after cloning the 5'-flanking region (1.4 kb) of the VPAC1 gene from a human genomic library. Subsequent functional analysis of various deletions of the 5'-flanking sequence, subcloned upstream of a luciferase reporter gene, was carried out in HT-29 cells. The minimal promoter region identified encompasses the -205/+76 sequence and contains a crucial CCAAT box (-182/-178) and a GC-rich sequence. Moreover a region (-1348/-933) containing a silencer element was identified. We previously showed that the expression of the VPAC1 receptor binding site is strictly dependent upon the enterocytic differentiation of human colon cancer Caco-2 cells [Laburthe, Rousset, Rouyer-Fessard, Couvineau, Chantret, Chevalier and Zweibaum (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262, 10180-10184]. In the present study we show that VPAC1 mRNA increases dramatically when Caco-2Cl.20 cells differentiate, as measured by RNase protection assays and reverse transcriptase-PCR. A single transcript species of 3 kb is detected in differentiated cells by Northern-blot analysis. Accumulation of VPAC1 receptor mRNA is due to a 5-fold increase of transcription rate (run-on assay) without a change in mRNA half-life (9 h). Stable transfections of various constructs in Caco-2Cl.20 cells and subsequent analysis of reporter gene expression, during the enterocytic differentiation process over 25 days of culture, further indicated that the -254/+76 5'-flanking sequence is endowed with the regulatory element(s) necessary for transcriptional regulation of VPAC1 during differentiation. Altogether, these observations provide the first characterization of the basic organization of the human VPAC1 gene promoter and unravel the crucial role of a short promoter sequence in the strict transcriptional control of VPAC1 expression during differentiation of human colon cancer Caco-2

  4. Anthocyanins and Phenolic Acids of Hybrid and Native Blue Maize (Zea mays L.) Extracts and Their Antiproliferative Activity in Mammary (MCF7), Liver (HepG2), Colon (Caco2 and HT29) and Prostate (PC3) Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Urias-Lugo, D A; Heredia, J B; Muy-Rangel, M D; Valdez-Torres, J B; Serna-Saldívar, S O; Gutiérrez-Uribe, J A

    2015-06-01

    Blue maize is an excellent source of bioactive components such as phenolic acids and anthocyanins but when it is processed for human consumption, these compounds decrease considerably. Therefore, blue maize could be directed to produce nutraceutical extracts. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relation between anthocyanins composition of acidified and non-acidified extracts from native and hybrid blue maize genotypes and their antiproliferative effect in mammary (MCF7), liver (HepG2), colon (Caco2 and HT29) and prostate (PC3) cancer cells. The most abundant phenolic acid was ferulic acid. Nine anthocyanins were quantified in the extracts, being Cy3-Glu the most abundant. Acylated forms were also obtained in high abundance depending of the extraction method. An extract concentration range of 4.31 to 7.23 mg/mL inhibited by 50% the growth of untransformed cells NIH3T3. Antiproliferative effect on PC3, Caco2, HepG2 and MCF7 cancer cells of acidified extracts from hybrid blue maize was larger than the observed using non-acidified extracts. Among the nine compounds that were quantified in the extracts tested, CyMalGlu I showed the strongest correlation with the reduction of cell viability in Caco2 (-0.876), HepG2 (-0.813), MCF7 (-0.765) and PC3 (-0.894). No significant correlation or differences in antiproliferative effect on HT29 was found among the extracts. The method of extraction of maize anthocyanins must be selected to obtain a high yield of CyMalGlu I more than only Cy3-Glu since acylation affects the inhibition of cancer cell growth.

  5. Role of SAP7-10 and Morphological Regulators (EFG1, CPH1) in Candida albicans' Hypha Formation and Adhesion to Colorectal Carcinoma Caco-2.

    PubMed

    Staniszewska, Monika; Bondaryk, Małgorzata; Zukowski, Kamil; Chudy, Michał

    2015-01-01

    Secreted aspartic proteases (Saps) are considered as key virulence factors of Candida albicans. Hopefully our outlook will widen the knowledge of SAP7's role in C. albicans pathogenesis. The goal of our study was to investigate SAP7 expression during C. albicans adhesion to intestinal human cells. Another objective was to study the role of SAP8-10 and transcriptional regulators: EFG1 and CPH1, using the mutants: Δsap, Δefg1, Δcph1 during growth on Caco-2 monolayer. SAP7 expression was analyzed using real time RT-PCR; relative quantification was normalized against ACT1 in cells after growth on Caco-2. Adherence assay of C. albicans to Caco-2 was performed in a 24-well-plate. The results proved that SAP7 can play a role during the initial adaptation of C. albicans to intestinal tract and decreases over time. Up-regulation of SAP7 occured in the absence of SAP8 and SAP10 (genetic alternations dependence). SAP7 can be regulated by the morphogensis' regulators during C. albicans growth on epithelium. Adhesion of the mutants was indistinguishable from SC5314. The lack of neither SAP8-10 nor EFG1/CPH1 influences the adhesive behaviour of C. albicans. Deletion of SAP8-10 resulted in no filamentation defects. The results help better understand the role of SAP7 during adhesion and morphogenesis in C. albicans.

  6. Bifidobacteria Prevent Tunicamycin-Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Subsequent Barrier Disruption in Human Intestinal Epithelial Caco-2 Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Takuya; Oishi, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is caused by accumulation of unfolded and misfolded proteins in the ER, thereby compromising its vital cellular functions in protein production and secretion. Genome wide association studies in humans as well as experimental animal models linked ER stress in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) with intestinal disorders including inflammatory bowel diseases. However, the mechanisms linking the outcomes of ER stress in IECs to intestinal disease have not been clarified. In this study, we investigated the impact of ER stress on intestinal epithelial barrier function using human colon carcinoma-derived Caco-2 monolayers. Tunicamycin-induced ER stress decreased the trans-epithelial electrical resistance of Caco-2 monolayers, concomitant with loss of cellular plasma membrane integrity. Epithelial barrier disruption in Caco-2 cells after ER stress was not caused by caspase- or RIPK1-dependent cell death but was accompanied by lysosomal rupture and up-regulation of the ER stress markers Grp78, sXBP1 and Chop. Interestingly, several bifidobacteria species inhibited tunicamycin-induced ER stress and thereby diminished barrier disruption in Caco-2 monolayers. Together, these results showed that ER stress compromises the epithelial barrier function of Caco-2 monolayers and demonstrate beneficial impacts of bifidobacteria on ER stress in IECs. Our results identify epithelial barrier loss as a potential link between ER stress and intestinal disease development, and suggest that bifidobacteria could exert beneficial effects on this phenomenon. PMID:27611782

  7. Differential transcytosis and toxicity of the hNGAL receptor ligands cadmium-metallothionein and cadmium-phytochelatin in colon-like Caco-2 cells: implications for in vivo cadmium toxicity.

    PubMed

    Langelueddecke, Christian; Lee, Wing-Kee; Thévenod, Frank

    2014-04-21

    The environmental toxicant cadmium (Cd) enters the food chain. A substantial proportion of Cd in nutrients of plant origin is present as Cd-metallothionein (CdMT) and Cd-phytochelatin (CdPC) complexes, which may be absorbed and transcytosed intact by colonic enterocytes following bacterial fermentation and contribute to systemic Cd toxicity, e.g. in liver and kidneys. We have recently demonstrated that the receptor for human neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (hNGAL) is expressed in human colon and colon-like Caco-2 BBE cells where it mediates transcytosis of MT and PC. Here we show in colon-like Caco-2 BBE cells that hNGAL receptor (hNGAL-R) dependent toxicity is significantly higher with CdMT than with CdPC3 (2.5-50μM Cd(2+) complexed to MT or PC3 for ≤24h), using MTT assay. Fluorescence-labelled A546-MT, but not A488-PC3 (both 700nM), co-localizes with the lysosomal marker cathepsin-B, as determined by confocal microscopy. In transwell experiments with confluent monolayers, transcytosis efficiency (i.e. the ratio of basal delivery to apical decrease) of A546-MT is decreased compared to A488-PC3 (both 700nM). The tubulin polymerization disruptor nocodazole (16.7μM) almost abolished CdMT and CdPC3 toxicity, reduced apical uptake of both A546-MT and A488-PC3, but increased transcytosis efficiency of A546-MT compared to that of A488-PC3 by preventing trafficking of A546-MT to lysosomes. Hence, following hNGAL-R dependent endocytosis of CdMT/CdPC3 in colonic epithelia, a nocodazole-sensitive trafficking pathway may preferentially target CdMT, but not CdPC3, to lysosomes, causing increased colonic epithelial toxicity but reduced systemic toxicity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of co-treatment with sulforaphane and autophagy modulators on uridine 5′-diphospho-glucuronosyltransferase 1A isoforms and cytochrome P450 3A4 expression in Caco-2 human colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    WANG, MIN; ZHU, JING-YU; CHEN, SHUO; QING, YING; WU, DONG; LIN, YING-MIN; LUO, JI-ZHUANG; HAN, WEI; LI, YAN-QING

    2014-01-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN), which is highly enriched in cruciferous vegetables, has been investigated for its cancer chemopreventive properties and ability to induce autophagy. Uridine 5′-diphospho (UDP)-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT)1A induction is one of the mechanisms that is responsible for the cancer chemopreventive activity of SFN. The current study demonstrates that rapamycin may enhance the chemopreventive effects of SFN on Caco-2 cells; this may be partially attributed to nuclear translocation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)- and human pregnane X receptor (hPXR)-mediated UGT1A1, UGT1A8 and UGT1A10 induction. These results indicate that targeting autophagy modulation may be a promising strategy for increasing the chemopreventive effects of SFN in cases of colon cancer. PMID:25364403

  9. Anti-inflammatory effects of resveratrol occur via inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-induced NF-κB activation in Caco-2 and SW480 human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Panaro, Maria Antonietta; Carofiglio, Vito; Acquafredda, Angela; Cavallo, Pasqua; Cianciulli, Antonia

    2012-11-14

    Resveratrol, a polyphenol abundantly found in grapes and red wine, exhibits beneficial health effects due to its anti-inflammatory properties. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of resveratrol on inflammatory responses induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment of human intestinal Caco-2 and SW480 cell lines. In the LPS-treated intestinal cells, resveratrol dose-dependently inhibited the expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) mRNA as well as protein expression, resulting in a decreased production of NO. In addition, Toll-like receptor-4 expression was significantly diminished in LPS-stimulated cells after resveratrol pre-treatment. To investigate the mechanisms by which resveratrol reduces NO production and iNOS expression, we examined the activation of inhibitor of κB (IκB) in LPS-stimulated intestinal cells. Results demonstrated that resveratrol inhibited the phosphorylation, as well as the degradation, of the IκB complex. Overall, these results show that resveratrol is able to reduce LPS-induced inflammatory responses by intestinal cells, interfering with the activation of NF-κB-dependent molecular mechanisms.

  10. Berry Phenolic Compounds Increase Expression of Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor-1α (HNF-1α) in Caco-2 and Normal Colon Cells Due to High Affinities with Transcription and Dimerization Domains of HNF-1α.

    PubMed

    Real Hernandez, Luis M; Fan, Junfeng; Johnson, Michelle H; Gonzalez de Mejia, Elvira

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor-1α (HNF-1α) is found in the kidneys, spleen, thymus, testis, skin, and throughout the digestive organs. It has been found to promote the transcription of various proteins involved in the management of type II diabetes, including dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV). Phenolic compounds from berries and citrus fruits are known to inhibit DPP-IV, but have not been tested for their interactions with wild-type HNF-1α. By studying the interactions of compounds from berries and citrus fruits have with HNF-1α, pre-transcriptional mechanisms that inhibit the expression of proteins such as DPP-IV may be elucidated. In this study, the interactions of berry phenolic compounds and citrus flavonoids with the dimerization and transcriptional domains of HNF-1α were characterized using the molecular docking program AutoDock Vina. The anthocyanin delphinidin-3-O-arabinoside had the highest binding affinity for the dimerization domain as a homodimer (-7.2 kcal/mol) and transcription domain (-8.3 kcal/mol) of HNF-1α. Anthocyanins and anthocyanidins had relatively higher affinities than resveratrol and citrus flavonoids for both, the transcription domain and the dimerization domain as a homodimer. The flavonoid flavone had the highest affinity for a single unit of the dimerization domain (-6.5 kcal/mol). Nuclear expression of HNF-1α was measured in Caco-2 and human normal colon cells treated with blueberry and blackberry anthocyanin extracts. All extracts tested increased significantly (P < 0.05) the nuclear expression of HNF-1α in Caco-2 cells by 85.2 to 260% compared to a control. The extracts tested increased significantly (P < 0.02) the nuclear expression of HNF-1α in normal colon cells by 48.6 to 243%. It was confirmed that delphinidin-3-O-glucoside increased by 3-fold nuclear HNF-1α expression in Caco-2 cells (P < 0.05). Anthocyanins significantly increased nuclear HNF-1α expression, suggesting that these compounds might regulate the genes HNF-1

  11. Gene expression profiling in Caco-2 human colon cells exposed to TCDD, benzo[a]pyrene, and natural Ah receptor agonists from cruciferous vegetables and citrus fruits.

    PubMed

    de Waard, W J; Aarts, J M M J G; Peijnenburg, A A C M; Baykus, H; Talsma, E; Punt, A; de Kok, T M C M; van Schooten, F J; Hoogenboom, L A P

    2008-03-01

    Cruciferous vegetables and citrus fruits are reported to possess health-beneficial properties, but also have been shown to contain natural aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists (NAhRAs). Binding to the AhR is widely assumed to activate the main pathway by which dioxins, like 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) exert their toxicity. To establish whether or not activation of the AhR pathway by NAhRAs and dioxin-like substances results in similar cellular responses, gene expression profiles induced in Caco-2 cells were studied using microarray analysis. Cells were exposed to indolo[3,2-b]carbazole (ICZ), an acid reaction product from cruciferous vegetables, and to extracts of citrus pulp and grapefruit juice. Gene expression profiles induced by these NAhRAs were compared to those of the xenobiotic AhR agonists TCDD and benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P). Over 20 genes were found more than 1.5 times up- or down-regulated by TCDD, and the expression of most of these genes was modulated in the same direction and to a similar extent by B[a]P and the NAhRAs. Results were confirmed by RT-PCR, and many of these genes may be involved in dioxin-related toxic effects. In conclusion, this in vitro study showed similar effects induced by NAhRAs, TCDD and B[a]P at the transcriptome level in a human intestinal cell line.

  12. Effect of Pseudomonas graminis strain CPA-7 on the ability of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica to colonize Caco-2 cells after pre-incubation on fresh-cut pear.

    PubMed

    Collazo, Cyrelys; Abadías, Maribel; Colás-Medà, Pilar; Iglesias, María Belén; Granado-Serrano, Ana Belén; Serrano, José; Viñas, Inmaculada

    2017-09-12

    To further gain insight into the mechanism by which the biopreservative bacterium Pseudomonas graminis CPA-7 develops its antimicrobial activity, we have examined the effect that the prior interaction stablished by this bacterium and two foodborne pathogens on fresh-cut pear, has on their capacity to colonize human epithelial cells (Caco-2 cell line) which is crucial for establishing infection. CPA-7 inhibited the growth of L. monocytogenes and S. enterica subsp. enterica ser. Enteritidis by 5.5 and 3.1 log10, respectively, after 7d of interaction at 10°C. Furthermore, CPA-7 attenuated the adherence of S. enterica to Caco-2 cells by 0.8 log10 regardless of the pre-adaptation on the fruit. Conversely, the adhesiveness of L. monocytogenes was not influenced by the interaction with the antagonist but it was reduced by 0.5 log10 after incubation on the food matrix. Pathogen-antagonist-food matrix interaction was associated to a significant reduction of the relative invasiveness of both pathogens, by 1.3 log10 in the case of L. monocytogenes and to an undetectable level (below 5CFU/g fruit) for S. enterica. CPA-7 can adhere to and internalize into intestinal epithelium which enables it for competition. Its adherence positively correlates to the multiplicity of infection (MOI) with respect to Caco-2 cells, increasing by 0.6 log10 in an MOI range of 0.1:1 to 100:1. For the same levels of inoculum, internalized cells could only be detected after 7d of pre-adaptation in the fruit (pH4.5-5.0). However, the combination of gastrointestinal digestion and habituation on the fruit resulted in a significant reduction of CPA-7 populations (by 2 log10 more after 7d of incubation than on inoculation day) as well as in the decrease of its adhesiveness (by 0.8 log10) and invasiveness (to undetectable levels). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Contribution of ionic silver to genotoxic potential of nanosilver in human liver HepG2 and colon Caco2 cells evaluated by the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Saura C; Roy, Shambhu; Zheng, Jiwen; Ihrie, John

    2016-04-01

    Extensive human exposure to food- and cosmetics-related consumer products containing nanosilver is of public concern because of the lack of information about their safety. Genotoxicity is an important endpoint for the safety and health hazard assessment of regulated products including nanomaterials. The in vitro cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay is a very useful test for predictive genotoxicity testing. Recently, we have reported the genotoxicity of 20 nm nanosilver in human liver HepG2 and colon Caco2 cells evaluated using the CBMN assay. The objective of our present study was three-fold: (i) to evaluate if HepG2 and Caco2 cells are valuable in vitro models for rapid genotoxicity screening of nanosilver; (ii) to test the hypothesis that the nanoparticle size and cell types are critical determinants of its genotoxicity; and (iii) to determine if ionic silver contributes to the nanosilver genotoxicity. With these objectives in mind, we evaluated the genotoxic potential of 50 nm nanosilver of the same shape, composition, surface charge, obtained from the same commercial source, under the same experimental conditions and the same genotoxic CBMN endpoint used for the previously tested 20 nm silver. The ionic silver (silver acetate) was also evaluated under the same conditions. Results of our study show that up to the concentrations tested in these cell types, the smaller (20 nm) nanosilver induces micronucleus formation in both the cell types but the larger (50 nm) nanosilver and the ionic silver provide a much weaker response compared with controls under the same conditions. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  14. Anthocyanin Absorption and Metabolism by Human Intestinal Caco-2 Cells--A Review.

    PubMed

    Kamiloglu, Senem; Capanoglu, Esra; Grootaert, Charlotte; Van Camp, John

    2015-09-08

    Anthocyanins from different plant sources have been shown to possess health beneficial effects against a number of chronic diseases. To obtain any influence in a specific tissue or organ, these bioactive compounds must be bioavailable, i.e., effectively absorbed from the gut into the circulation and transferred to the appropriate location within the body while still maintaining their bioactivity. One of the key factors affecting the bioavailability of anthocyanins is their transport through the gut epithelium. The Caco-2 cell line, a human intestinal epithelial cell model derived from a colon carcinoma, has been proven to be a good alternative to animal studies for predicting intestinal absorption of anthocyanins. Studies investigating anthocyanin absorption by Caco-2 cells report very low absorption of these compounds. However, the bioavailability of anthocyanins may be underestimated since the metabolites formed in the course of digestion could be responsible for the health benefits associated with anthocyanins. In this review, we critically discuss recent findings reported on the anthocyanin absorption and metabolism by human intestinal Caco-2 cells.

  15. Anthocyanin Absorption and Metabolism by Human Intestinal Caco-2 Cells—A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kamiloglu, Senem; Capanoglu, Esra; Grootaert, Charlotte; Van Camp, John

    2015-01-01

    Anthocyanins from different plant sources have been shown to possess health beneficial effects against a number of chronic diseases. To obtain any influence in a specific tissue or organ, these bioactive compounds must be bioavailable, i.e., effectively absorbed from the gut into the circulation and transferred to the appropriate location within the body while still maintaining their bioactivity. One of the key factors affecting the bioavailability of anthocyanins is their transport through the gut epithelium. The Caco-2 cell line, a human intestinal epithelial cell model derived from a colon carcinoma, has been proven to be a good alternative to animal studies for predicting intestinal absorption of anthocyanins. Studies investigating anthocyanin absorption by Caco-2 cells report very low absorption of these compounds. However, the bioavailability of anthocyanins may be underestimated since the metabolites formed in the course of digestion could be responsible for the health benefits associated with anthocyanins. In this review, we critically discuss recent findings reported on the anthocyanin absorption and metabolism by human intestinal Caco-2 cells. PMID:26370977

  16. Salicylic acid induces apoptosis in colon carcinoma cells grown in-vitro: Influence of oxygen and salicylic acid concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Zitta, Karina; Meybohm, Patrick; Bein, Berthold; Huang, Ying; Heinrich, Christin; Scholz, Jens; Steinfath, Markus; Albrecht, Martin

    2012-04-15

    In solid tumors the hypoxic environment can promote tumor progression and resistance to therapy. Recently, acetylsalicylic acid a major component of analgesic drugs and its metabolite salicylic acid (SA) have been shown to reduce the risk of colon cancer, but the mechanisms of action remain still unclear. Here we elucidate the effects of physiologically relevant concentrations of SA on colon carcinoma cells (CaCo-2) grown under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Western blotting, caspase-3/7 apoptosis assays, MTS cell-proliferation assays, LDH cytotoxicity assays and hydrogen peroxide measurements were performed to investigate the effects of 1 and 10 {mu}M SA on CaCo-2 cells grown under normoxic conditions and cells exposed to hypoxia. Under normoxic conditions, SA did not influence cell proliferation or LDH release of CaCo-2 cells. However, caspase-3/7 activity was significantly increased. Under hypoxia, cell proliferation was reduced and LDH release and caspase-3/7 activities were increased. None of these parameters was altered by the addition of SA under hypoxic conditions. Hypoxia increased hydrogen peroxide concentrations 300-fold and SA significantly augmented the release of hydrogen peroxide under normoxic, but not under hypoxic conditions. Phosphorylation of the pro-survival kinases akt and erk1/2 was not changed by SA under hypoxic conditions, whereas under normoxia SA reduced phosphorylation of erk1/2 after 2 hours. We conclude that in colon carcinoma cells effects of SA on apoptosis and cellular signaling are dependent on the availability of oxygen. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effects of salicylic acid on colon carcinoma cells grown under normoxic and hypoxic conditions Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Salicylic acid increases caspase-3/7 activity and hydrogen peroxide release under normoxia Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Salicylic acid decreases pro-survival erk-1/2 phosphorylation under normoxia Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Salicylic acid does

  17. Carbohydrate Markers in Colon Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz; Jankowska, Anna; Zwierz, Krzysztof

    2008-01-01

    Spontaneously mutated multiple oncogenes and/or tumor suppressor genes in colon epithelial cell and its progeny, may cause proliferation out of control and create benign colon neoplasm (colon polyp). If additional mutations involve genes responsible for cell adhesion and movement, aberrant epithelial cells may become malignant (colon cancer) and invade surrounding and remote tissues, creating secondary tumors called metastases. Incidence of colorectal cancer dramatically increases at 50–65 year of age. In Europe in 2006 colorectal cancer consisted 12.9% of all cancers and caused 207 400 deaths. To laboratory detection and monitoring of colon cancer are used tumor markers. Tumor markers are substances produced by the body in response to cancer, or by cancer tissue itself. Glycoconjugate markers for colon cancer include aberrant: mucins covering the surface of the colon epithelial cells, cadherins, selectins and Ig –like adhesion molecules mediating cell-cell adhesion, integrins and integral membrane proteoglycans responsible for adhesion of colon epithelial cells to extracellular matrix, glycoconjugate components of ECM, as well as lysosomal membrane glycoproteins and exoglycosidases. Detection of colon cancer at early non malignant stage is crucial in its prevention and eradication. As colon cancer is the effect of accumulation many somatic mutations in oncogens, supressors, mismatch repair genes and many genes responsible for posttranslational modifications of proteins, multidirectional approach should be applied for its detection. A glycobiological approach to diagnosis and treatment of colorectal cancer should be directed to detection changes in glycosylation accompanying every step of colon cancer progression, and correlation between changes in glycosylation and tumor progression. PMID:19126967

  18. Carbohydrate markers in colon carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz; Jankowska, Anna; Zwierz, Krzysztof

    2008-01-01

    Spontaneously mutated multiple oncogenes and/or tumor suppressor genes in colon epithelial cell and its progeny, may cause proliferation out of control and create benign colon neoplasm (colon polyp). If additional mutations involve genes responsible for cell adhesion and movement, aberrant epithelial cells may become malignant (colon cancer) and invade surrounding and remote tissues, creating secondary tumors called metastases. Incidence of colorectal cancer dramatically increases at 50-65 year of age. In Europe in 2006 colorectal cancer consisted 12.9% of all cancers and caused 207,400 deaths. To laboratory detection and monitoring of colon cancer are used tumor markers. Tumor markers are substances produced by the body in response to cancer, or by cancer tissue itself. Glycoconjugate markers for colon cancer include aberrant: mucins covering the surface of the colon epithelial cells, cadherins, selectins and Ig-like adhesion molecules mediating cell-cell adhesion, integrins and integral membrane proteoglycans responsible for adhesion of colon epithelial cells to extracellular matrix, glycoconjugate components of ECM, as well as lysosomal membrane glycoproteins and exoglycosidases. Detection of colon cancer at early non malignant stage is crucial in its prevention and eradication. As colon cancer is the effect of accumulation many somatic mutations in oncogens, supressors, mismatch repair genes and many genes responsible for posttranslational modifications of proteins, multidirectional approach should be applied for its detection. A glycobiological approach to diagnosis and treatment of colorectal cancer should be directed to detection changes in glycosylation accompanying every step of colon cancer progression, and correlation between changes in glycosylation and tumor progression.

  19. Anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activity of whole extract and isolated indicaxanthin from Opuntia ficus-indica associated with re-activation of the onco-suppressor p16{sup INK4a} gene in human colorectal carcinoma (Caco-2) cells

    SciTech Connect

    Naselli, Flores; Tesoriere, Luisa; Caradonna, Fabio; Bellavia, Daniele; Attanzio, Alessandro; Gentile, Carla; Livrea, Maria A.

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Cactus pear fruit extract and indicaxanthin cause apoptosis of colon cancer cells. • Indicaxanthin does not cause ROS formation, but affects epigenoma in Caco-2 cells. • Indicaxanthin reverses methylation of oncosuppressor p16{sup INK4a} gene in Caco-2 cells. • Indicaxanthin reactivates retinoblastoma in Caco-2 cells. • Bioavailable indicaxanthin may have chemopreventive activity in colon cancer. - Abstract: Phytochemicals may exert chemo-preventive effects on cells of the gastro-intestinal tract by modulating epigenome-regulated gene expression. The effect of the aqueous extract from the edible fruit of Opuntia ficus-indica (OFI extract), and of its betalain pigment indicaxanthin (Ind), on proliferation of human colon cancer Caco-2 cells has been investigated. Whole extract and Ind caused a dose-dependent apoptosis of proliferating cells at nutritionally relevant amounts, with IC{sub 50} 400 ± 25 mg fresh pulp equivalents/mL, and 115 ± 15 μM (n = 9), respectively, without toxicity for post-confluent differentiated cells. Ind accounted for ∼80% of the effect of the whole extract. Ind did not cause oxidative stress in proliferating Caco-2 cells. Epigenomic activity of Ind was evident as de-methylation of the tumor suppressor p16{sup INK4a} gene promoter, reactivation of the silenced mRNA expression and accumulation of p16{sup INK4a}, a major controller of cell cycle. As a consequence, decrease of hyper-phosphorylated, in favor of the hypo-phosphorylated retinoblastoma was observed, with unaltered level of the cycline-dependent kinase CDK4. Cell cycle showed arrest in the G2/M-phase. Dietary cactus pear fruit and Ind may have chemo-preventive potential in intestinal cells.

  20. Plaque assay for human coronavirus NL63 using human colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Petra; Drosten, Christian; Müller, Marcel A

    2008-11-12

    Coronaviruses cause a broad range of diseases in animals and humans. Human coronavirus (hCoV) NL63 is associated with up to 10% of common colds. Viral plaque assays enable the characterization of virus infectivity and allow for purifying virus stock solutions. They are essential for drug screening. Hitherto used cell cultures for hCoV-NL63 show low levels of virus replication and weak and diffuse cytopathogenic effects. It has not yet been possible to establish practicable plaque assays for this important human pathogen. 12 different cell cultures were tested for susceptibility to hCoV-NL63 infection. Human colon carcinoma cells (CaCo-2) replicated virus more than 100 fold more efficiently than commonly used African green monkey kidney cells (LLC-MK2). CaCo-2 cells showed cytopathogenic effects 4 days post infection. Avicel, agarose and carboxymethyl-cellulose overlays proved suitable for plaque assays. Best results were achieved with Avicel, which produced large and clear plaques from the 4th day of infection. The utility of plaque assays with agrose overlay was demonstrated for purifying virus, thereby increasing viral infectivity by 1 log 10 PFU/mL. CaCo-2 cells support hCoV-NL63 better than LLC-MK2 cells and enable cytopathogenic plaque assays. Avicel overlay is favourable for plaque quantification, and agarose overlay is preferred for plaque purification. HCoV-NL63 virus stock of increased infectivity will be beneficial in antiviral screening, animal modelling of disease, and other experimental tasks.

  1. Rapid eradication of colon carcinoma by Clostridium perfringens Enterotoxin suicidal gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Pahle, Jessica; Menzel, Lutz; Niesler, Nicole; Kobelt, Dennis; Aumann, Jutta; Rivera, Maria; Walther, Wolfgang

    2017-02-13

    Bacterial toxins have evolved to an effective therapeutic option for cancer therapy. The Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE) is a pore-forming toxin with selective cytotoxicity. The transmembrane tight junction proteins claudin-3 and -4 are known high affinity CPE receptors. Their expression is highly upregulated in human cancers, including breast, ovarian and colon carcinoma. CPE binding to claudins triggers membrane pore complex formation, which leads to rapid cell death. Previous studies demonstrated the anti-tumoral effect of treatment with recombinant CPE-protein. Our approach aimed at evaluation of a selective and targeted cancer gene therapy of claudin-3- and/or claudin-4- expressing colon carcinoma in vitro and in vivo by using translation optimized CPE expressing vector. In this study the recombinant CPE and a translation optimized CPE expressing vector (optCPE) was used for targeted gene therapy of claudin-3 and/or -4 overexpressing colon cancer cell lines. All experiments were performed in the human SW480, SW620, HCT116, CaCo-2 and HT-29 colon cancer and the isogenic Sk-Mel5 and Sk-Mel5 Cldn-3-YFP melanoma cell lines. Claudin expression analysis was done at protein and mRNA level, which was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. The CPE induced cytotoxicity was analyzed by the MTT cytotoxicity assay. In addition patient derived colon carcinoma xenografts (PDX) were characterized and used for the intratumoral in vivo gene transfer of the optCPE expressing vector in PDX bearing nude mice. Claudin-3 and -4 overexpressing colon carcinoma lines showed high sensitivity towards both recCPE application and optCPE gene transfer. The positive correlation between CPE cytotoxicity and level of claudin expression was demonstrated. Transfection of optCPE led to targeted, rapid cytotoxic effects such as membrane disruption and necrosis in claudin overexpressing cells. The intratumoral optCPE in vivo gene transfer led to tumor growth inhibition in colon carcinoma PDX

  2. Colon carcinoma metastatic to the thyroid gland

    SciTech Connect

    Lester, J.W. Jr.; Carter, M.P.; Berens, S.V.; Long, R.F.; Caplan, G.E.

    1986-09-01

    Metastatic carcinoma to the thyroid gland rarely is encountered in clinical practice; however, autopsy series have shown that it is not a rare occurrence. A case of adenocarcinoma of the colon with metastases to the thyroid is reported. A review of the literature reveals that melanoma, breast, renal, and lung carcinomas are the most frequent tumors to metastasize to the thyroid. Metastatic disease must be considered in the differential diagnosis of cold nodules on radionuclide thyroid scans, particularly in patients with a known primary.

  3. Iron availability of a fortified processed wheat cereal: a comparison of fourteen iron forms using an in vitro digestion/human colonic adenocarcinoma (CaCo-2) cell model.

    PubMed

    Wortley, Gary; Leusner, Steven; Good, Carolyn; Gugger, Eric; Glahn, Raymond

    2005-01-01

    In this three-phase study we first compared the availability of fourteen Fe forms in a wheat-based ready-to-eat breakfast cereal using an in vitro digestion/human colonic adenocarcinoma (CaCo-2) cell model. We then investigated the effect of milk and/or coffee on those fortified cereals found in phase 1 to show promising increases in Fe availability. The Fe forms assessed in phase 1 were reduced (control), carbonyl, electrolytic, FePO(4), FeSO(4), FeCO(3), Na(2)FeEDTA, Ferrochel (Albion Laboratories, Clearfield, UT, USA; ferrous bis-glycinate), encapsulated ferrous fumarate, FeSO(4), ferrous lactate and Biofer (LipoTech, Britwell Salome, Oxfordshire; FeSO(4)), SQM (Sea-Questra-Min Iron; Quali Tech, Chaska, MN, USA; polysaccharide-complexed FeSO(4)) and Sun Active (Taiyo Kagaku, Yokkaichi, Japan). All these forms increased Fe uptake compared with the unfortified cereal. Relative to the control, the following increases in Fe availability were observed: electrolytic, 52 %; ferrous fumarate, 30-35 %; Sun Active, 78 %; Ferrochel, 125 %; Na(2)FeEDTA, 291 %. Recent human studies have shown similar data with regard to Ferrochel, FeSO4 and Na(2)FeEDTA, with the latter being more bioavailable. Our phase-2 studies indicated that the addition of milk to FeSO(4)-fortified cereal increased Fe availability, but this availability was markedly decreased by the addition of coffee to the digest. Conversely, a loss in availability from Na(2)FeEDTA was observed with the addition of milk; however, the addition of coffee did not markedly affect Fe availability from this form. In phase-3 studies we observed increased Fe availability upon the addition of milk to cereals containing Ferrochel, FeSO(4), Sun Active, a mixture of reduced Fe and Na(2)FeEDTA or reduced Fe. For these forms we did not assess the behaviour after the addition of coffee. In conclusion, when considering possible fortificants for optimizing Fe bioavailability within a foodstuff, it is of paramount importance to consider

  4. Carcinoma of the colon: margins of resection.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, Ahud

    2008-12-15

    Resection of colonic carcinoma with curative intent must encompass: (1) margins of bowel wall that are wider than the extent of microscopic intramural tumor spread beyond the macroscopic edge of the tumor; (2) lymphatic tissue draining the tumor and possibly containing cancer cells; (3) structures adhering to the tumor and possibly infiltrated by tumor cells. The minimal extent of resection that satisfies these requirements and possible benefits of extending the resection are reviewed.

  5. A novel quinone-based derivative (DTNQ-Pro) induces apoptotic death via modulation of heat shock protein expression in Caco-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Monterrey, Isabel; Campiglia, Pietro; Bertamino, Alessia; Aquino, Claudio; Sala, Marina; Grieco, Paolo; Dicitore, Alessandra; Vanacore, Daniela; Porta, Amalia; Maresca, Bruno; Novellino, Ettore; Stiuso, Paola

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: The resistance of human colon adenocarcinoma cells to antineoplastic agents may be related to the high endogenous expression of stress proteins, including the family of heat shock proteins (HSPs). Recently, a quinone-based pentacyclic derivative, DTNQ-Pro, showed high cytotoxic activity in human colon carcinoma cell lines. The aim of the present study was to determine the precise cellular mechanisms of this cytotoxic action of DTNQ-Pro. Experimental approach: Using human colorectal carcinoma-derived Caco-2 cells as a model, we studied the effects of DTNQ-Pro on cellular viability and oxidative stress; HSP70 and HSP27 accumulation; and cell cycle, differentiation and apoptosis. Key results: Incubation of Caco-2 cells with DTNQ-Pro reduced cell growth and increased the levels of reactive oxygen species in mitochondria. After 48 h of treatment, cells surviving showed an increased expression of Mn-superoxide dismutase (SOD), nitric oxide production and membrane lipid peroxidation. Treatment with DTNQ-Pro decreased HSP70 expression, and redistributed HSP27 and vimentin within the cell. DTNQ-Pro down-regulated the expression of A and B cyclins with arrest of the cell cycle in S phase and increased cellular differentiation. A second treatment of Caco-2 cells with DTNQ-Pro induced cellular death by activation of the apoptotic pathway. Conclusions and implications: DTNQ-Pro causes Caco-2 cell death by induction of apoptosis via inhibition of HSP70 accumulation and the intracellular redistribution of HSP27. These findings suggest the potential use of DTNQ-Pro in combination chemotherapy for colon cancer. PMID:20590589

  6. [Influence of clinical and pathomorphological parameters on prognosis in colon carcinoma and rectal carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Xu, Fang-ying; Di, Mei-juan; Dong, Jian-kang; Wang, Feng-juan; Jin, Yi-sen; Zhu, Yi-min; Lai, Mao-de

    2006-05-01

    To investigate the effects of clinical and pathomorphological parameters on the prognosis of colon carcinoma and rectal carcinoma. Univariate and multivariate COX proportional hazard models were used to study the effects of the clinical and pathomorphological factors on the prognosis in 101 cases of colon carcinoma, 219 of rectal carcinoma and 137 of rectal carcinoma under curative resections. By using univariate analysis, we identified that lymph node metastasis and distant metastasis were the common prognostic factors for both colon carcinoma and rectal carcinoma. Smoking, deep infiltration, chemotherapy and serum albumin concentration were the uncertain prognostic factors for colon carcinoma. Signet-ring cell carcinoma, larger tumor size (>6 cm), deep infiltration, lack of radical surgery, and advanced TNM stage were the exclusive adverse prognostic factors for rectal carcinoma. Further studies showed that the adverse prognostic factors for the rectal carcinoma under curative resection included deep infiltration, lymph node metastasis, vessel invasion, less of peritumoral lymphocyte infiltration, lack of Crohn's like reactivity, high level of tumor budding, advanced TNM stage and positive urine glucose. By using multivariate analysis based on a COX proportional hazard model, it was identified that smoking, lymph node metastasis and serum albumin concentration were independent prognostic factors for colon carcinoma; advanced TNM stage, distant metastasis and palliative surgery for rectal carcinoma; and vessel invasion, lymph node metastasis and urine glucose for rectal carcinoma under curative resections. The various clinical and pathomorphological parameters show different prognostic value for colon carcinoma, rectal carcinoma and rectal carcinoma under curative resections.

  7. [Thyroid metastasis due to right colonic carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Rauber, E; Pancrazio, F; Spivach, A; Stanta, G

    1998-12-01

    Clinical evident metastases to the thyroid gland are rarely found antemortem. A case of a 62 year-old man with a history of right colonic carcinoma, who presented a mass in the right lobe of his thyroid gland one year after the removal of a metachronous metastasis in his right lung, is presented. The tumour of the thyroid was found to be metastatic adenocarcinoma from his previous colonic cancer. The clinical finding of metastases to the thyroid gland is rare, particularly from a colorectal primary neoplasm. However, the possibility of a tumour of the thyroid gland representing a secondary malignancy is to be considered in any patient with a prior history of cancer.

  8. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs attenuate proliferation of colonic carcinoma cells by blocking epidermal growth factor-induced Ca++ mobilization.

    PubMed

    Kokoska, E R; Smith, G S; Miller, T A

    2000-01-01

    Numerous studies suggest that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) inhibit colorectal carcinogenesis. We have previously reported that NSAIDs, in human colonic carcinoma cells (Caco-2), attenuate epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced cellular proliferation through a process independent of their inhibitory effects on prostaglandin synthesis. Furthermore, separate studies have also suggested that NSAIDs inhibit EGF-induced store-operated Ca++ influx. Thus we developed the hypothesis that NSAIDs may limit the activity of EGF by altering intracellular Ca++ ([Ca++]i) mobilization. Serum-deprived Caco-2 cells were employed for all experimentation. [Ca++]i was measured with Fluo-3 and extracellular Ca++ influx was monitored by quenching Fluo-3 fluorescence with Mn++. Proliferation was quantitated with two assays: cellular nucleic acid and total protein content. Caco-2 cells exposed to EGF demonstrated an initial increase in [Ca++]i which was blocked by neomycin, an inhibitor of IPsubscript 3 generation, and the phospholipase C inhibitor U73122 but not U73343 (inactive control). This was followed by sustained extracellular Ca++ influx, which was attenuated with calcium-free buffer (-Ca++), the store- operated Ca++ channel blocker lanthanum, indomethacin, ibuprofen, and aspirin. In subsequent studies, cells were treated with either serum-free media or EGF +/- the aforementioned inhibitors, and again serum starved. Cells exposed to EGF +/- the inactive phospholipase C inhibitor U73343 demonstrated a significant increase in nucleic acid and protein. However, proliferation induced by EGF was not observed when [Ca++]i elevation was prevented by blocking either internal Ca++ store release via phospholipase C/IPsubscript 3 or sustained Ca++ influx through store-operated Ca++ channels. Sustained [Ca++]i elevation, as induced by EGF, appears to be required for mitogenesis. These data support our premise that one mechanism whereby NSAIDs may attenuate colonic neoplasia is

  9. Caco-2 cells, biopharmaceutics classification system (BCS) and biowaiver.

    PubMed

    Smetanová, Libuse; Stĕtinová, Vĕra; Svoboda, Zbynek; Kvetina, Jaroslav

    2011-01-01

    Almost all orally administered drugs are absorbed across the intestinal mucosa. The Caco-2 monolayers are used as an in vitro model to predict drug absorption in humans and to explore mechanism of drug absorption. The Caco-2 cells are derived from a human colon adenocarcinoma and spontaneously differentiate to form confluent monolayer of polarized cells structurally and functionally resembling the small intestinal epithelium. For studying drug permeability, Caco-2 cells are seeded onto the Transwell inserts with semipermeable membrane and grown to late confluence (21 days). After determination of cell viability, the integrity of monolayer is checked by phenol red permeability and by 14C-mannitol permeability. The transport from apical to basolateral (AP-BL) and basolateral to apical (BL-AP) is studied by adding the diluted drug on the apical or basolateral side and withdrawing the samples from the opposite compartment, respectively, for HPLC analysis or liquid scintillation spectrometry. Ca2+ -free transport medium is used to determine paracellular component of the drug transport. On the basis of permeability and solubility, drugs can be categorized into four classes of Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS). For certain drugs, the BCS-based biowaiver approach can be used which enables to reduce in vivo bioequivalence studies.

  10. [A Case of Adenosquamous Carcinoma of the Ascending Colon].

    PubMed

    Hijikawa, Takeshi; Yoshida, Ryo; Yamada, Masanori; Nakatani, Kazuyoshi; Tokuhara, Katsuji; Kitade, Hiroaki; Shikata, Nobuaki; Yoshioka, Kazuhiko; Kon, Masanori

    2015-10-01

    We report a case of adenosquamous carcinoma of the colon. A 70-year-old woman underwent a colonoscopic examination because of a positive fecal occult blood test. Colonoscopy demonstrated a type 2 tumor of the ascending colon, and a biopsy specimen showed poorly-moderately differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma. We performed a right hemicolectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy. The histopathology of the tumor demonstrated adenosquamous adenocarcinoma. Primary adenosquamous carcinoma of the colon is relatively rare and has a poor prognosis. Therefore, adenosquamous carcinoma of the colon may require strict follow-up.

  11. Chronic anisakiasis of the ascending colon associated with carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mineta, Sho; Shimanuki, Kimiyoshi; Sugiura, Atsushi; Tsuchiya, Yoshikazu; Kaneko, Masahiro; Sugiyama, Yoshihiko; Akimaru, Koho; Tajiri, Takashi

    2006-06-01

    Chronic anisakiasis of the colon is rare and difficult to diagnose. We report a case of chronic anisakiasis associated with advanced colonic carcinoma. A 69-year-old man was admitted for abdominal pain, diarrhea, and urticaria. Right hemicolectomy was performed because of an obstruction of the ascending colon and a palpable tumor of the right lower abdomen. The lesion was thought to be located in the deeper layers of the ascending colon. Preoperative examinations failed to detect the coexistence of anisakiasis and carcinoma of the colon. The anisakis was identified morphologically in the intestinal wall of the resected specimen and by an elevated titer of an IgE antibody specific to the parasite. Seventy-five cases of colonic and rectal anisakiasis, including the present case, have been reported in Japan. This is the only reported case of anisakiasis to appear in association with colonic carcinoma.

  12. SRC is dephosphorylated at tyrosine 530 in human colon carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shudong; Bjorge, Jeffrey D; Fujita, Donald J

    2011-09-01

    Src is a protein tyrosine kinase that plays important roles in cancer development, and Src kinase activity has been found to be elevated in several types of cancers. However, the cause of the elevation of Src kinase activity in the majority of human colon carcinomas is still largely unknown. We aim at finding the cause of elevated Src kinase activity in human colon carcinomas. We employed normal colon epithelial FHC cells and examined Src activation in human colon carcinoma specimens from 8 patients. Protein expression levels were determined by Western blotting, and the activity of Src kinase by kinase assay. Actin levels were different between tumor and normal tissues, demonstrating the complexities and inhomogeneities of the tissue samples. Src kinase activities were increased in the majority of the colon carcinomas as compared with normal colon epithelial cells (range 13-29). Src protein levels were reduced in the colon carcinomas. Src Y530 phosphorylation levels were reduced to a higher extent than protein levels in the carcinomas. The results suggest that Src specific activities were highly increased in human colon carcinomas; phosphorylation at Src Y530 was reduced, contributing to the highly elevated Src specific activity and Src kinase activity.

  13. Expression and function of FERMT genes in colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kiriyama, Kenji; Hirohashi, Yoshihiko; Torigoe, Toshihiko; Kubo, Terufumi; Tamura, Yasuaki; Kanaseki, Takayuki; Takahashi, Akari; Nakazawa, Emiri; Saka, Eri; Ragnarsson, Charlotte; Nakatsugawa, Munehide; Inoda, Satoko; Asanuma, Hiroko; Takasu, Hideo; Hasegawa, Tadashi; Yasoshima, Takahiro; Hirata, Koichi; Sato, Noriyuki

    2013-01-01

    Invasion into the matrix is one of hallmarks of malignant diseases and is the first step for tumor metastasis. Thus, analysis of the molecular mechanisms of invasion is essential to overcome tumor cell invasion. In the present study, we screened for colon carcinoma-specific genes using a cDNA microarray database of colon carcinoma tissues and normal colon tissues, and we found that fermitin family member-1 (FERMT1) is overexpressed in colon carcinoma cells. FRRMT1, FERMT2 and FERMT3 expression was investigated in colon carcinoma cells. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis revealed that only FERMT1 had cancer cell-specific expression. Protein expression of FERMT1 was confirmed by western blotting and immunohistochemical staining. To address the molecular functions of FERMT genes in colon carcinoma cells, we established FERMT1-, FERMT2- and FERMT3-overexpressing colon carcinoma cells. FERMT1-overexpressing cells exhibited greater invasive ability than did FERMT2- and FERMT3-overexpressing cells. On the other hand, FERMT1-, FERMT2- and FERMT3-overexpressing cells exhibited enhancement of cell growth. Taken together, the results of this study indicate that FERMT1 is expressed specifically in colon carcinoma cells, and has roles in matrix invasion and cell growth. These findings indicate that FERMT1 is a potential molecular target for cancer therapy.

  14. Analysis of the Anti-Cancer Effects of Cincau Extract (Premna oblongifolia Merr) and Other Types of Non-Digestible Fibre Using Faecal Fermentation Supernatants and Caco-2 Cells as a Model of the Human Colon.

    PubMed

    Nurdin, Samsu U; Le Leu, Richard K; Young, Graeme P; Stangoulis, James C R; Christophersen, Claus T; Abbott, Catherine A

    2017-04-03

    Green cincau (Premna oblongifolia Merr) is an Indonesian food plant with a high dietary fibre content. Research has shown that dietary fibre mixtures may be more beneficial for colorectal cancer prevention than a single dietary fibre type. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of green cincau extract on short chain fatty acid (SCFA) production in anaerobic batch cultures inoculated with human faecal slurries and to compare these to results obtained using different dietary fibre types (pectin, inulin, and cellulose), singly and in combination. Furthermore, fermentation supernatants (FSs) were evaluated in Caco-2 cells for their effect on cell viability, differentiation, and apoptosis. Cincau increased total SCFA concentration by increasing acetate and propionate, but not butyrate concentration. FSs from all dietary fibre sources, including cincau, reduced Caco-2 cell viability. However, the effects of all FSs on cell viability, cell differentiation, and apoptosis were not simply explainable by their butyrate content. In conclusion, products of fermentation of cincau extracts induced cell death, but further work is required to understand the mechanism of action. This study demonstrates for the first time that this Indonesian traditional source of dietary fibre may be protective against colorectal cancer.

  15. Analysis of the Anti-Cancer Effects of Cincau Extract (Premna oblongifolia Merr) and Other Types of Non-Digestible Fibre Using Faecal Fermentation Supernatants and Caco-2 Cells as a Model of the Human Colon

    PubMed Central

    Nurdin, Samsu U.; Le Leu, Richard K.; Young, Graeme P.; Stangoulis, James C. R.; Christophersen, Claus T.; Abbott, Catherine A.

    2017-01-01

    Green cincau (Premna oblongifolia Merr) is an Indonesian food plant with a high dietary fibre content. Research has shown that dietary fibre mixtures may be more beneficial for colorectal cancer prevention than a single dietary fibre type. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of green cincau extract on short chain fatty acid (SCFA) production in anaerobic batch cultures inoculated with human faecal slurries and to compare these to results obtained using different dietary fibre types (pectin, inulin, and cellulose), singly and in combination. Furthermore, fermentation supernatants (FSs) were evaluated in Caco-2 cells for their effect on cell viability, differentiation, and apoptosis. Cincau increased total SCFA concentration by increasing acetate and propionate, but not butyrate concentration. FSs from all dietary fibre sources, including cincau, reduced Caco-2 cell viability. However, the effects of all FSs on cell viability, cell differentiation, and apoptosis were not simply explainable by their butyrate content. In conclusion, products of fermentation of cincau extracts induced cell death, but further work is required to understand the mechanism of action. This study demonstrates for the first time that this Indonesian traditional source of dietary fibre may be protective against colorectal cancer. PMID:28368356

  16. Metabolism of haem in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Uc, Aliye; McDonagh, Antony F; Stokes, John B

    2010-02-01

    The haem oxygenase-1-biliverdin reductase system degrades haem and generates biliverdin and bilirubin, both of which possess antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Biliverdin and bilirubin are protective in intestinal injury models, but little is known about their generation and fate in the intestine. In the present work, an in vitro intestinal epithelial cell model, Caco-2 cells, were exposed to haem from either the apical or the basolateral side, and bile pigment generation and transport were measured spectrophotometrically and with high-pressure liquid chromatography. The Caco-2 cells generated bilirubin and bilirubin glucuronides upon exposure to haem. Bilirubin appeared predominantly in the apical medium regardless of the side to which haem was applied. In contrast to an earlier report, significant bidirectional haem transport was not observed. We conclude that Caco-2 cells metabolize haem and export its metabolic product, bilirubin, principally to the lumen, where it may exert antioxidant and anti-inflammatory functions.

  17. Comparative clinicopathological characteristics of colon and rectal T1 carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ichimasa, Katsuro; Kudo, Shin-Ei; Miyachi, Hideyuki; Kouyama, Yuta; Hayashi, Takemasa; Wakamura, Kunihiko; Hisayuki, Tomokazu; Kudo, Toyoki; Misawa, Masashi; Mori, Yuichi; Matsudaira, Shingo; Hidaka, Eiji; Hamatani, Shigeharu; Ishida, Fumio

    2017-01-01

    Lymph node metastasis significantly influences the management of patients with colorectal carcinoma. It has been observed that the biology of colorectal carcinoma differs by location. The aim of the current study was to retrospectively compare the clinicopathological characteristics of patients with colon and rectal T1 carcinomas, particularly their rates of lymph node metastasis. Of the 19,864 patients who underwent endoscopic or surgical resection of colorectal neoplasms at Showa University Northern Yokohama Hospital, 557 had T1 surgically resected carcinomas, including 457 patients with colon T1 carcinomas and 100 patients with rectal T1 carcinomas. Analysed clinicopathological features included patient age, gender, tumor size, morphology, tumor budding, invasion depth, vascular invasion, histological grade, lymphatic invasion and lymph node metastasis. Rectal T1 carcinomas were significantly larger than colon T1 carcinomas (mean ± standard deviation: 23.7±13.1 mm vs. 19.9±11.0 mm, P<0.01) and were accompanied by significantly higher rates of vascular invasion (48.0% vs. 30.2%, P<0.01). Significant differences were not observed among any other clinicopathological factors. In conclusion, tumor location itself was not a risk factor for lymph node metastasis in colorectal T1 carcinomas, even though on average, rectal T1 carcinomas were larger and accompanied by a significantly higher rate of vascular invasion than colon T1 carcinomas. PMID:28356962

  18. Cytotoxicity of fucosterol containing fraction of marine algae against breast and colon carcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Khanavi, Mahnaz; Gheidarloo, Razieh; Sadati, Nargess; Ardekani, Mohammad Reza Shams; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad Bagher; Tavajohi, Shohreh; Ostad, Seyed Nasser

    2012-01-01

    Marine algae produce different secondary metabolites with a wide range of biological activities. Many studies have been achieved on the screening of biological effects of marine organisms and a lot of active compounds were isolated and characterized. In an attempt to find cytotoxic compound of hexane fraction, isolation, identification, and cytotoxicity of active compound of this fraction were performed. In this study, total methanolic (70%) extract and partition fractions of hexane, chloroform (CHCl(3)), ethyl acetate (EtOAc), and MeOH-H(2)O of Sargassum angustifolium, Chondria dasyphylla, and Ulva flexuosa, collected from coastlines of the Persian Gulf in south of Iran, were studied against colon carcinoma (HT-29), colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2), breast ductal carcinoma (T47D), and Swiss mouse embryo fibroblast (NIH 3T3) cell lines by MTT assay. IC(50) (median growth inhibitory concentration) values were calculated by Sigmaplot (10) software. Hexane fraction of Chondria dasyphylla (IC(50) 82.26 ± 4.09 μg/ml) and MeOH-H(2)O fraction of Ulva flexuosa (IC(50) 116.92 ± 8.58 μg/ml) showed cytotoxic activity against proliferation of T47D cells. Hexane fraction of Sargassum angustifolium was also observed for cytotoxicity against T47D and HT-29 cell lines (IC(50) 166.42 ± 26.7 and 190.24 ± 52.8 μg/ml), respectively. An investigation of a component from the hexane fraction of Sargassum angustifolium yielded a steroidal metabolite, fucosterol, with cytotoxicity in T47D and HT29 (IC(50) 27.94 ± 9.3 and 70.41 ± 7.5 μg/ml). These results indicated that fucosterol, the most abundant phytosterol in brown algae, is responsible for cytotoxic effect of this extract against breast and colon carcinoma cell lines.

  19. Specific Antigen in Serum of Patients with Colon Carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koprowski, Hilary; Herlyn, Meenhard; Steplewski, Zenon; Sears, Henry F.

    1981-04-01

    The binding of monoclonal antibody specific for colon carcinoma was inhibited by serum from patients with adenocarcinoma of the colon but not by serum from patients with other bowel diseases or from healthy volunteers. Of other malignancies studied, serum from two patients with gastric carcinoma and two patients with pancreatic carcinoma also inhibited the specific binding of monoclonal antibody. The levels of carcinoembryonic antigen in these serum samples were not correlated with their levels of binding inhibition. Such monoclonal antibodies may prove useful for the detection of colorectal carcinoma.

  20. Plant-synthesized E. coli CFA/I fimbrial protein protects Caco-2 cells from bacterial attachment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Yong; Yu, Jie; Henderson, David; Langridge, William H R

    2004-11-25

    A DNA fragment encoding the cholera toxin A2 subunit (CTA2) linked to the enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) colony forming fimbrial antigen CFA/I was inserted into a plant expression vector containing the cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) fused to the rotavirus enterotoxin 22 amino acid epitope NSP422. Anti-CFA/I antibodies recognized a single band of approximately 72-kDa in transformed potato tuber tissue consistent with CFA/I-CTA2 and CTB-NSP4 fusion protein assembly into a cholera holotoxin-like structure. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (GM1 ELISA) indicated that the CFA/I-CTA2 fusion protein bound specific GM1 ganglioside membrane receptors and made up approximately 0.002% of the total soluble tuber protein. Oral immunization of BALB/c mice with transformed tuber tissues generated anti-CFA/I serum and intestinal IgG and IgA secretory antibodies. Attachment of ETEC H10407 to enterocyte-like Caco-2 human colon carcinoma cells incubated with antiserum from immunized mice was reduced by 15% in comparison with Caco-2 cells incubated with serum from unimmunized mice. Immunogold staining of bacterial preparations revealed deposition of gold particles on E. coli H10407 fimbria incubated with immune serum but not on fimbria treated with sera from unimmunized mice demonstrating the specificity of antibodies in the immune serum for binding to CFA/I protein containing fimbria. The protection against toxic E. coli binding to Caco-2 cells generated by antisera from mice immunized with plant-synthesized CFA/I antigen demonstrates the feasibility of plant-based multi-component vaccine protection against enterotoxigenic E. coli, rotavirus and cholera, three enteric diseases that together exert the highest levels of child morbidity and mortality in economically emerging countries.

  1. Cytokine responses of human intestinal epithelial-like Caco-2 cells to the nonpathogenic bacterium Bacillus subtilis (natto).

    PubMed

    Hosoi, Tomohiro; Hirose, Rieko; Saegusa, Shizue; Ametani, Akio; Kiuchi, Kan; Kaminogawa, Shuichi

    2003-05-15

    Intestinal epithelial cells produce cytokines in response to pathogenic bacteria. However, cellular responses of these cells to nonpathogenic strains, such as Bacillus subtilis, are yet to be determined. In this study, we investigate whether epithelial-like human colon carcinoma Caco-2 cells produce cytokines in response to B. subtilis or B. subtilis (natto). The latter strain is utilized for manufacturing the fermented soy food "natto". Live cells of nonpathogenic B. subtilis JCM 1465(T), B. subtilis (natto) and E. coli JCM 1649(T), as well as pathogenic S. enteritidis JCM 1652 and P. aeruginosa JCM 5516 strains, induced secretion of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and/or IL-8, but not IL-7, IL-15 or tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). Transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) of Caco-2 cell monolayers cultured with E. coli, S. enteritidis or P. aeruginosa decreased more rapidly than that of cells cultured with B. subtilis or B. subtilis (natto). The amounts of cytokine induced by B. subtilis (natto) cells were strain-dependent. Moreover, B. subtilis (natto) cells subjected to hydrochloric acid treatment, but not autoclaving, induced a higher secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 than intact cells. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including AG126 and genistein, suppressed cytokine secretion. Our results suggest that the nonpathogenic B. subtilis (natto) bacterium induces cytokine responses in intestinal epithelial cells via activation of an intracellular signaling pathway, such as that of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB).

  2. Human bocavirus 1 infection of CACO-2 cell line cultures.

    PubMed

    Ghietto, Lucía María; Toigo D'Angelo, Ana Paola; Viale, Franco Agustin; Adamo, María Pilar

    2017-10-01

    Human bocavirus 1 (HBoV1) is a parvovirus associated with pneumonia in infants. It has been detected in different tissues, including colorectal tumors. In this study, we investigated whether Caco-2 cell line, derived from human colon cancer, can be utilized as a model for HBoV1 replication. We demonstrate HBoV1 replication in Caco-2 cultures supplemented with DEAE-dextran after inoculation with respiratory material from infected patients presenting with acute respiratory infection. A viral cycle of rapid development is displayed. However, in spite of HBoV1 DNA 4-fold increment in the supernatants and monolayers by day 1, evidencing that the system allows the virus genome replication after the entry occurred, infectious progeny particles were not produced. These results are consistent with an infection that is limited to a single growth cycle, which can be associated to mutations in the NS1 and VP1/VP2 regions of HBoV1 genome. Further research will contribute to fully elucidate these observations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The effect of menadione on glutathione S-transferase A1 (GSTA1): c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) complex dissociation in human colonic adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Adnan, Humaira; Antenos, Monica; Kirby, Gordon M

    2012-10-02

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) act as modulators of mitogen-activated protein kinase signal transduction pathways via a mechanism involving protein-protein interactions. We have demonstrated that GSTA1 forms complexes with JNK and modifies JNK activation during cellular stress, but the factors that influence complex association and dissociation are unknown. We hypothesized that menadione causes dissociation of GSTA1-JNK complexes, activates JNK, and the consequences of menadione exposure depend on GSTA1 expression. We demonstrate that menadione causes GSTA1-JNK dissociation and JNK activation in preconfluent Caco-2 cells, whereas postconfluent cells are resistant to this effect. Moreover, preconfluent cells are more sensitive than postconfluent cells to menadione-induced cytotoxicity. Activation of JNK is transient since removal of menadione causes GSTA1 to re-associate with JNK reducing cytotoxicity. Over-expression and knockdown of GSTA1 did not alter JNK activation by menadione or sensitivity to menadione-induced cytotoxicity. These results indicate that GSTA1-JNK complex integrity does not affect the ability of menadione to activate JNK. N-acetyl cysteine prevents GSH depletion and blocks menadione-induced complex dissociation, JNK activation and inhibits menadione-induced cytotoxicity. JNK activation and inhibits menadione-induced cytotoxicity. The data suggest that the mechanism of menadione-induced JNK activation involves the production of reactive oxygen species, likely superoxide anion, and intracellular GSH levels play an important role in preventing GSTA1-JNK complex dissociation, subsequent JNK activation and induction of cytotoxicity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activity of whole extract and isolated indicaxanthin from Opuntia ficus-indica associated with re-activation of the onco-suppressor p16(INK4a) gene in human colorectal carcinoma (Caco-2) cells.

    PubMed

    Naselli, Flores; Tesoriere, Luisa; Caradonna, Fabio; Bellavia, Daniele; Attanzio, Alessandro; Gentile, Carla; Livrea, Maria A

    2014-07-18

    Phytochemicals may exert chemo-preventive effects on cells of the gastro-intestinal tract by modulating epigenome-regulated gene expression. The effect of the aqueous extract from the edible fruit of Opuntia ficus-indica (OFI extract), and of its betalain pigment indicaxanthin (Ind), on proliferation of human colon cancer Caco-2 cells has been investigated. Whole extract and Ind caused a dose-dependent apoptosis of proliferating cells at nutritionally relevant amounts, with IC50 400±25 mg fresh pulp equivalents/mL, and 115±15 μM (n=9), respectively, without toxicity for post-confluent differentiated cells. Ind accounted for ∼80% of the effect of the whole extract. Ind did not cause oxidative stress in proliferating Caco-2 cells. Epigenomic activity of Ind was evident as de-methylation of the tumor suppressor p16(INK4a) gene promoter, reactivation of the silenced mRNA expression and accumulation of p16(INK4a), a major controller of cell cycle. As a consequence, decrease of hyper-phosphorylated, in favor of the hypo-phosphorylated retinoblastoma was observed, with unaltered level of the cycline-dependent kinase CDK4. Cell cycle showed arrest in the G2/M-phase. Dietary cactus pear fruit and Ind may have chemo-preventive potential in intestinal cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Different responses of Fe transporters in Caco2/HT29-MTX cocultures than in independent Caco-2 cell cultures

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The human intestinal epithelium is composed of several cell types; mainly enterocytes and globet (mucin-secreting) cells. This study compares the cellular response for Fe transporters in Caco-2, HT29-MTX, and Caco-2/HT29-MTX coculture models for Fe bioavailability studies. Under culture, Caco-2 cell...

  6. Quantification of pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor in colonic carcinoma and normal adjacent colonic mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Bohe, H; Bohe, M; Jönsson, P; Lindström, C; Ohlsson, K

    1992-01-01

    AIMS: To measure the content of immunoreactive human pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor (irPSTI) in colonic carcinoma and adjacent normal colonic mucosa. METHODS: From a stable hybridoma cell line producing monoclonal antibodies specific for human PSTI, a specific enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for human PSTI was developed. In a precipitation assay system these antibodies bound human PSTI in a dose-dependent manner. The specimens were obtained from resectional surgery. RESULTS: The content of irPSTI was 19.9 micrograms/g protein (0.55 micrograms/g tissue wet weight) in colonic carcinoma. In adjacent normal colonic mucosa 43.6 micrograms/g protein (1.12 micrograms/g tissue wet weight) was shown. CONCLUSIONS: The enzymatic degradation of surrounding tissue necessary for tumour cell invasion could be facilitated by this relative deficit of the inhibitor in infiltrative carcinoma. PMID:1479031

  7. Cholecystocolic fistula caused by gallbladder carcinoma: preoperatively misdiagnosed as hepatic colon carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ha, Gi Won; Lee, Min Ro; Kim, Jong Hun

    2015-04-21

    Cholecystocolic fistula secondary to gallbladder carcinoma is extremely rare and has been reported in very few studies. Most cholecystocolic fistulae are late complications of gallstone disease, but can also develop following carcinoma of the gallbladder when the necrotic tumor penetrates into the adjacent colon. Although no currently available imaging technique has shown great accuracy in recognizing cholecystocolic fistula, abdominopelvic computed tomography may show fistulous communication and anatomical details. Herein we report an unusual case of cholecystocolic fistula caused by gallbladder carcinoma, which was preoperatively misdiagnosed as hepatic flexure colon carcinoma.

  8. Measuring oxygen levels in Caco-2 cultures

    PubMed Central

    Zeitouni, Nathalie E; Fandrey, Joachim; Naim, Hassan Y; von Köckritz-Blickwede, Maren

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Measuring oxygen levels in three different systems of Caco-2 cell culture. Methods Caco-2 cells were cultured in three different systems, using conventional polystyrene 24-well plates, special 24-well gas permeable plates, or on membrane inserts in conventional plates. Optical sensor spots were used to measure dissolved O2 levels in these cultured cells over the course of 6 days under normoxia (143 mmHg) and for 6 hours under hypoxia (7 mmHg). Western blot analysis was used to determine the protein levels of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) in the different cultures. Results All culture systems displayed lower O2 levels over time than expected when cultured under normoxia conditions. On average, O2 levels reached as low as 25 mmHg in 24-well plates but remained at 97 and 117 mmHg in gas permeable plates and membrane inserts, respectively. Under hypoxia, 1 mL cell cultures equilibrated to 7 mmHg O2 within the first 60 minutes and dropped to 0.39 and 0.61 mmHg O2 in 24-well and gas permeable plates, respectively, after the 6-hour incubation period. Cultures in membrane inserts did not equilibrate to 7 mmHg by the end of the 6-hour incubation period, where the lowest O2 measurements reached 23.12 mmHg. Western blots of HIF-1α protein level in the whole cell lysates of the different Caco-2 cultures revealed distinct stabilization of HIF-1α after hypoxic incubation for 1, 2, and 4 hours in 24-well plates as well as gas permeable plates. For membrane inserts, notable HIF-1α was seen after 4 hours of hypoxic incubation. Conclusion Cellular oxygen depletion was achieved in different hypoxic Caco-2 culture systems. However, different oxygen levels comparing different culture systems indicate that O2 level should be carefully considered in oxygen-dependent experiments. PMID:27774482

  9. Reduced expression of TANGO in colon and hepatocellular carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Arndt, Stephanie; Bosserhoff, Anja K

    2007-10-01

    The TANGO gene was originally identified as a new family member of the MIA gene family. The gene codes for a 14-kDa protein of so far unknown function. Recently, we identified TANGO as a tumor suppressor in malignant melanoma. In this study we evaluated TANGO transcription in different colon and hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines and tissue samples, to analyze whether loss of TANGO expression is a more general process in tumor development. TANGO was down-regulated or lost in all hepatocellular and colon cell lines compared to primary human hepatocytes or normal colon epithelial cells, respectively, and in most of the tumor samples compared to non-tumorous tissue. These results were confirmed in situ by immunohistochemistry on paraffin-embedded sections of colon and hepatocellular tumors. Functional assays with exogenous TANGO treatment of colon and hepatoma cell lines revealed reduced motility and invasion capacity. Our studies present for the first time the down-regulation of TANGO in colon and hepatocellular carcinoma and provide the first indications for a tumor suppressor role of the TANGO gene in human colon and hepatocellular carcinoma. Thus, functional relevant loss of TANGO expression may contribute to general tumor development and progression, and may provide a new target for therapeutic strategies.

  10. Transepithelial transport of ambroxol hydrochloride across human intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Stetinová, Vera; Smetanová, Libuse; Kholová, Dagmar; Svoboda, Zbynek; Kvetina, Jaroslav

    2009-09-01

    This study aimed i) to characterize the transepithelial transport of the mucolytic agent ambroxol hydrochloride across the intestinal barrier, ii) to classify the ambroxol according to Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) and iii) to predict ambroxol absorption in humans. Transport of ambroxol (100, 300 and 1000 micromol/l) was studied in a human colon carcinoma cell line Caco-2 in apical to basolateral and basolateral to apical direction, under iso-pH 7.4 and pH-gradient (6 vs. 7.4) conditions. The relative contribution of the paracellular route was estimated using Ca2+-free transport medium. Ambroxol samples from receiver compartments were analysed by HPLC with UV detection (242 nm). Results showed that ambroxol transport is linear with time, pH-dependent and direction-independent, displays non-saturable (first-order) kinetics. Thus, the transport seems to be transcellular mediated by passive diffusion. Estimated high solubility and high permeability (P(app) = 45 x 10(-6) cm/s) of ambroxol rank it among well absorbed compounds and class I of BCS. It can be expected that the oral dose fraction of ambroxol absorbed in human intestine is high.

  11. Protective effect of polyphenols from Glycyrrhiza glabra against oxidative stress in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Stefania; Morana, Alessandra; Salvatore, Anna; Zappia, Vincenzo; Galletti, Patrizia

    2009-12-01

    In the present article, we have investigated the antioxidant properties of methanolic liquorice polyphenol extracts (LPE(s)). Polyphenol extraction was performed with 60% and 100% methanol. Analysis of LPE(s) by thin-layer chromatography revealed that a higher amount of polyphenols was recovered by extraction with 60% methanol. Antioxidant activity measurement of the reducing power, scavenging effect on 2,2'-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl free radical, and hydrogen peroxide scavenging capability have been taken as the parameters for assessment of antioxidant potential of LPE(s). Results have been compared with both natural and synthetic antioxidants. All experimental data have indicated that LPE(s) possess strong antioxidant power proportional to their o-diphenolic and total polyphenolic content, independently from the assay used. Therefore, the LPE(s) antioxidant property was examined against the cytotoxic effects of reactive oxygen species in human colon carcinoma cells. Pretreatment of Caco-2 cells with liquorice polyphenolic extracts provided a remarkable protection against oxidative damage induced by H(2)O(2). The highest oxidative stress protection (72% of cell vitality) was measured in cells pretreated with 0.54 mM polyphenols. This effect seems to be associated to the antioxidant activity of liquorice polyphenolic compounds. Our data suggest that polyphenols from Glycyrrhiza glabra could exert a beneficial action in the prevention of intestinal pathologies related to production of reactive oxygen species.

  12. Cold-storage affects antioxidant properties of apples in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Tarozzi, Andrea; Marchesi, Alessandra; Cantelli-Forti, Giorgio; Hrelia, Patrizia

    2004-05-01

    Data on the composition of phenolic antioxidant compounds present in food plants and assessment of their activity are essential for epidemiological explanation of the health benefits of fruit and vegetables. Various factors such as cultivation methods, industrial processing, and storage may affect the final concentrations of phytochemicals in food plants and their eventual bioactivity. This study investigated the influence of commercial cold-storage periods on the antioxidant properties of apples grown either by organic or integrated systems. In both cases, total phenolics and total antioxidant activity decreased only in the first 3 mo and only in apples with skin (P < 0.05), suggesting that cold storage rapidly impoverishes these properties in skin but not in pulp. Assessment of antioxidant bioactivity in vitro, measured in terms of intracellular antioxidant, cytoprotective, and antiproliferative activity in human colon carcinoma (Caco-2) cells (differentiated to normal intestinal epithelia for intracellular antioxidant and cytoprotective effects), showed strong, time-related decreases over 6 mo of cold storage for all 3 parameters (P < 0.01), irrespective of the cultivation system. These findings with integrated and organic apples further support the concept that organic systems of cultivation do not generally provide real health benefits. Moreover, the data from the present study clearly show that factors such as cold storage may affect the antioxidant properties of apples. Epidemiological studies on the cancer-preventive benefits of fruits and vegetables should take into account the cold-storage bias for apples, and possibly for other products.

  13. Synchronous occurrence of neuroendocrine colon carcinoma and hairy cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Salemis, Nikolaos S; Pinialidis, Dionisios; Tsiambas, Evangelos; Gakis, Christos; Nakos, Georgios; Sambaziotis, Dimitrios; Christofyllakis, Charalambos

    2011-09-01

    BACKGROUND-PURPOSE: The risk of secondary malignancy development in patients with hairy cell leukemia has been evaluated in several studies with varying results. The aim of this study is to describe a case of synchronous occurrence of neuroendocrine colon carcinoma and hairy cell leukemia. A 69-year-old man presented with rectal bleeding. Colonoscopy revealed a rectal tumor, whereas biopsy specimens revealed a poorly differentiated carcinoma. During the preoperative evaluation, pancytopenia was detected. At laparotomy, a mass was detected 16 cm from the anal verge and an anterior resection of the rectum was performed. Detailed histological and immunohistochemical analyses revealed a poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma of the rectum. Postoperative evaluation of pancytopenia revealed hairy cell leukemia. The patient was initially treated with chemotherapy for hairy cell leukemia followed by chemotherapy for neuroendocrine colon carcinoma. Survival was 44 months. To our knowledge, synchronous occurrence of neuroendocrine colon carcinoma and hairy cell leukemia has not been previously reported in the literature. Given the rare incidence of both entities in the general population, it is highly unlikely that they occurred together by chance. Further research is needed to determine what would be the optimal management options of patients with simultaneous hairy cell leukemia and a neuroendocrine colon cancer.

  14. Significance of Bcl-xL in human colon carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, You-Li; Pang, Li-Qun; Wu, Ying; Wang, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Chong-Qiang; Fan, Yu

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the clinical significance of Bcl-xL gene in the pathogenesis of human colon carcinoma. METHODS: Fifty-six pair tissue samples from patients with colon cancer were collected, and protein level of the Bcl-xL gene was measured by immunohistochemistry method. The correlation of Bcl-xL expression with clinical index was evaluated. After human colon cancer cell line HT29 was transfected with Bcl-xL small interfering RNA (siRNA), the anchorage-independent growth of cancer cells was detected by colony formation in soft agar and invasion ability of cancer cells was determined by a transwell model. RESULTS: The Bcl-xL expression was higher in cancerous tissue samples than in normal tissue samples (38.78 ±11.36 vs 0.89 ± 0.35, P < 0.001), and was associated with the pathological grade, lymphnode metastasis and Duke’s stage of colorectal carcinoma. Transfection with Bcl-xL siRNA inhibited the colony formation and invasion ability of human colon cancer cell line HT29 in vitro. CONCLUSION: Bcl-xL gene plays an important role in carcinogenesis of human colorectal carcinoma and is associated with malignant biological behaviors of human colorectal carcinoma. PMID:18494061

  15. Hollow fiber culture accelerates differentiation of Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xudong; Zhang, Guoliang; Shen, Chong; Yin, Jian; Meng, Qin

    2013-08-01

    Caco-2 cells usually require 21 days of culture for developing sufficient differentiation in traditional two-dimensional Transwell culture, deviating far away from the quick differentiation of enterocytes in vivo. The recently proposed three-dimensional cultures of Caco-2 cells, though imitating the villi/crypt-like microstructure of intestinal epithelium, showed no effect on accelerating the differentiation of Caco-2 cells. In this study, a novel culture of Caco-2 cells on hollow fiber bioreactor was applied to morphologically mimic the human small intestine lumen for accelerating the expression of intestine functions. The porous hollow fibers of polyethersulfone (PES), a suitable membrane material for Caco-2 cell culture, successfully promoted cells to form confluent monolayer on the inner surface. The differentiated functions of Caco-2 cells, represented by alkaline phosphatase, γ-glutamyltransferase, and P-glycoprotein activity, were greatly higher in a 10-day hollow fiber culture than in a 21-day Transwell culture. Moreover, the Caco-2 cells on PES hollow fibers expressed higher F-actin and zonula occludens-1 protein than those on Transwell culture, indicative of an increased mechanical stress in Caco-2 cells on PES hollow fibers. The accelerated differentiation of Caco-2 cells on PES hollow fibers was unassociated with membrane chemical composition and surface roughness, but could be stimulated by hollow fiber configuration, since PES flat membranes with either rough or smooth surface failed to enhance the differentiation of Caco-2. Therefore, the accelerated expression of Caco-2 cell function on hollow fiber culture might show great values in simulation of the tissue microenvironment in vivo and guide the construction of intestinal tissue engineering apparatus.

  16. Papillary thyroid carcinoma and familial adenomatous polyposis of the colon.

    PubMed

    Donnellan, Kimberly A; Bigler, Steven A; Wein, Richard O

    2009-01-01

    Case report and limited review of the literature on the topic of papillary thyroid carcinoma and familial adenomatous polyposis and its genetic associations. A patient with multiple prior surgeries for colonic polyps, abdominal perineal resection for colorectal cancer, and wedge resection for metastatic adenocarcinoma (consistent with rectal primary) presented with a thyroid mass. Fine-needle aspiration demonstrated papillary thyroid carcinoma. The patient underwent total thyroidectomy. Pathologic examination revealed the cribriform-morular variant of papillary carcinoma that has been reported in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis. Cribriform-morular variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma is an uncommon diagnosis known to be associated with familial adenomatous polyposis. Although the incidence is rare, this diagnosis should raise the clinician's suspicions to recommend both colorectal screening and genetic counseling for family members.

  17. Clinical significance of urothelial carcinoma associated 1 in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Tao, Kun; Yang, Jing; Hu, Yuemei; Sun, Yaohua; Tan, Zhenyu; Duan, Jinglin; Zhang, Feng; Yan, Hongli; Deng, Anmei

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the expression levels of urothelial carcinoma associated 1 (UCA1) in cancer tissues and plasma of colon cancer patients, and evaluate its clinical significance. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to determine the expression levels of UCA1 in 80 pairs of colon cancer and adjacent normal tissues, plasma samples from 20 healthy controls, 20 colon cancer patients before and after tumor removal. The relationships between UCA1 expression and clinical features and overall survival were analyzed. Compared with adjacent normal tissues, UCA1 was significantly upregulated in colon cancer tissues, especially in cases with LNM and advanced TNM stages (P < 0.05). High UCA1 expression was associated with LMN, higher pT category, and advanced TNM stages (P < 0.05). Patients with high UCA1 expression had worse survival time than those with low UCA1 expression (adjusted HR = 2.002, 95% CI 1.007-3.981, P = 0.048). Furthermore, plasma levels of UCA1 in colon cancer patients were significantly higher than those of controls (P = 0.016). There was significant difference in plasma level of UCA1 between samples taken before and after surgery (P = 0.048). In conclusion, tissue expression of UCA1 is related to prognosis in colon cancer. Plasma UCA1 may serve as a potential biomarker for early diagnosis and disease monitoring of colon cancer patients.

  18. The Caco-2 cell monolayer: usefulness and limitations.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huadong; Chow, Edwin Cy; Liu, Shanjun; Du, Yimin; Pang, K Sandy

    2008-04-01

    The Caco-2 monolayer has been used extensively for the high-throughput screening of drug permeability and identification of substrates, inhibitors, and inducers of intestinal transporters, especially P-glycoprotein (P-gp). Traditionally, the Caco-2 monolayer is viewed as a single barrier rather than a polarized cell monolayer consisting of metabolic enzymes that are sandwiched between two membrane barriers with distinctly different transporters. This review addressed the usefulness and limitations of the Caco-2 cell monolayer in drug discovery and mechanistic studies. This mini-review covered applications of the Caco-2 monolayer, clarified misconceptions, and critically addressed issues on data interpretation. The catenary model extends the usefulness of Caco-2 monolayer and provides proper mechanistic insight and data interpretation.

  19. Primary signet ring cell carcinoma of the colon and rectum.

    PubMed

    Arifi, Samia; Elmesbahi, Omar; Amarti Riffi, Afaf

    2015-10-01

    Colorectal primary signet ring cell carcinoma (SRCC) is a rare entity accounting for nearly 1% of all colorectal carcinomas. It is an independent prognostic factor associated with less favorable outcome. This aggressiveness is mainly due to the intrinsic biology of these tumors. Here is an overview of the literature related to clinicopathological features, molecular biology, and management of SRCC of the colon and the rectum. Copyright © 2015 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Carcinoma transverse colon masquerading as carcinoma gall bladder.

    PubMed

    Munghate, Anand; Kumar, Ashwani; Singh, Harnam; Singh, Gurpreet; Singh, Bimaljot; Chauhan, Mahak

    2014-04-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancer worldwide .Its incidence is reported to be increasing in developing countries. It commonly presents with weight loss, anaemia, lump abdomen, change of bowel habit, obstruction or fresh rectal bleeding. Beside these common modes of presentations, there are some rare manifestations which masqueraded as different disease like obstructive jaundice, empyema gall bladder or cholecystitis. A 60-year-old male presented to hospital with right sided pain abdomen. On abdominal examination mild tenderness was present in right hypochondrium. Intra operatively gall bladder was separated from the adjoining gut, peritoneum and liver bed and was removed. On further exploration, there was a large mass in the vicinity of the gall bladder related to transverse colon. Extended right hemicolectomy was done. Histopathological examination of gut mass revealed adenocarcinoma of transverse colon with free margins and gall bladder showed cholecystitis with no evidence of malignancy. We present an interesting case of colon cancer colon that caused diagnostic confusion by mimicking as cholecystitis. Colorectal cancer constitutes a major public health issue globally. Therefore, public awareness, screening of high-risk populations, early diagnosis and effective treatment and follow-up will help to reduce its occurance and further complications.

  1. Late metastatic colon cancer masquerading as primary jejunal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Meshikhes, A-WN; Joudeh, AA

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis to the small bowel from a previously resected colorectal cancer is rare and may erroneously be diagnosed as a primary small bowel carcinoma. It usually occurs several years after the primary resection. We present the case of a 67-year-old man who had undergone left hemicolectomy for colon cancer 3 years earlier and returned with subacute small bowel obstruction. This was initially thought, based on preoperative radiological findings and normal colonoscopic examination, to be due a primary jejunal cancer. Even at surgery, the lesion convincingly appeared as an obstructing primary small bowel carcinoma. However, the histology of the resected small bowel revealed metastatic colon cancer. This rare and an unusual metastatic occurrence some years after the primary resection is described and reviewed. PMID:26890851

  2. A colonic tissue architecture assay applied to human colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ilantzis, C; Stanners, C P

    1997-01-01

    A two-component tissue architecture assay system has been devised that tests the ability of human colon carcinoma cells to conform to the specific three-dimensional cell-cell and cell-substratum interactions characteristic of normal colonic tissues. Dissociated fetal rat colonic cells (FRCC) were allowed to reaggregate in suspension with or without the addition of different proportions (0.1%, 1%, and 10% of the total cells) of the human colon carcinoma cell lines, SW-1222 and LS-174T. Cellular aggregates obtained after 36 hours, incubation exhibited cell sorting by the formation of recognizable epithelial colonic crypt-like structures with glandular lumens in a mesenchyme-like background. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-positive SW-1222 cells in 10% mixed aggregates were organized into numerous well-formed glandular structures with a polarized apical distribution of CEA. LS-174T cells, on the other hand, were self-sorted but structurally disorganized with a continuous cell surface CEA distribution. Pure FRCC and mixed aggregates were implanted under the kidney capsules of Swiss nu/nu (nude) or CD-1 nu/nu mice and allowed to grow for a period of 7-10 days. Whereas the normal FRCC readily formed colonic tissue, the SW-1222 cells exhibited a capacity for differentiation into colonic crypts which became progressively less normal and more tumor-like as the proportion of carcinoma cells in the aggregates was increased. The LS-174T cells demonstrated poor differentiation at all concentrations. Cell surface levels of CEA and the CEA family member nonspecific crossreacting antigen (NCA), both overexpressed in colon cancer, were higher in LS-174T than in SW-1222 cells, whereas family member biliary glycoprotein (BGP), downregulated in colon carcinoma was higher in the SW-1222 cells. These results thus support the suggestion that deregulated expression of CEA family members can be involved in the ability of colonocytes to differentiate and conform to normal tissue architecture

  3. [A case of mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma of the transverse colon].

    PubMed

    Kusakabe, Jiro; Miki, Akira; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Uryuhara, Kenji; Hashida, Hiroki; Mizumoto, Masaki; Kaihara, Satoshi; Hosotani, Ryo; Yamashita, Daisuke

    2014-11-01

    A 7 1-year-old man presented to our hospital with constipation and abdominal pain. Computed tomography of the abdomen and colonoscopy revealed advanced cancer of the transverse colon. The biopsy specimen indicated a highly differentiated adenocarcinoma. The patient underwent extended right hemicolectomy with regional lymph node dissection. Pathological examination showed a neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC) with concurrent adenocarcinoma of the transverse colon and regional lymph node metastases of the NEC and adenocarcinoma. The histopathological examination confirmed a diagnosis of mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC) in accordance with the 2010 WHO Classification of Tumors of the Digestive System. Liver and lung metastases were identified 8 months after the surgery. We administered chemotherapy including 5-fluorouracil, Leucovorin, and oxaliplatin (mFOLFOX) plus bevacizumab, with limited therapeutic effect, as the disease progressed despite treatment. The patient chose best supportive care 13 months after the surgery. Several studies have reported that most patients with adenoendocrine cell carcinoma, including MANEC, experience relapse within 1 year after surgery, and few patients remain disease-free for long periods after surgery. The optimal strategy for the management of MANEC is variable owing to its rarity; only 2 cases of MANEC in the colon, including the present case, have been reported in Japan. It is thus important to gather more evidence on this disease and its management.

  4. Recurrent histoplasmosis in AIDS mimicking a colonic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Aisenberg, G; Marcos, L A; Ogbaa, I

    2009-06-01

    The prevalence rate of lower gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with AIDS is around 2.6%. A 42-year-old woman with AIDS (CD(4) count 9/microL) and recently treated for disseminated histoplasmosis presented to the emergency room with melena, severe anaemia and fever. A colonoscopy showed an umbilicated colonic nodule mimicking a carcinoma of the colon. The biopsy showed intracytoplasmic microorganisms compatible with Histoplasma capsulatum. She had poor compliance to the itraconazole when discharge on previous admission. Despite the fact that colonic histoplasmosis is uncommon, the mortality rate is around 8% and clinicians should be aware of the clinical presentation of histoplasmosis when recur, especially in patients not taking the itraconazole for long-term treatment.

  5. [A case of adenosquamous carcinoma of the ascending colon].

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Tetsutaka; Nishimura, Yoji; Yatsuoka, Toshimasa; Yokoyama, Yasuyuki; Shimada, Ryu; Ishikawa, Hideki; Fukuda, Takashi; Amikura, Katsumi; Kawashima, Yoshiyuki; Sakamoto, Hirohiko; Tanaka, Yoichi; Nishimura, Yu

    2014-11-01

    A 6 8-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with lower abdominal pain. Lower gastrointestinal endoscopy showed type 2 advanced cancer in the ascending colon. Histopathological examination after endoscopical biopsy revealed both moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma and well-differentiated squamous carcinoma. Subsequently, right hemicolectomy was performed. The tumor was 55 × 40 mm in size and was diagnosed as an adenosquamous carcinoma A, type 2, pSS, pN0, sH0, sP0, sM0, fStageII. Adenosquamous carcinoma is extremely rare, represents about 0.1% of all colorectal cancer, and usually has a poor prognosis. Thirty-one months after surgery, the patient is still in good health and displays no signs of recurrence.

  6. Betalains increase vitexin-2-O-xyloside cytotoxicity in CaCo-2 cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Farabegoli, F; Scarpa, E S; Frati, A; Serafini, G; Papi, A; Spisni, E; Antonini, E; Benedetti, S; Ninfali, P

    2017-03-01

    Vitexin-2-O-xyloside (XVX) from Beta vulgaris var. cicla L. (BVc) seeds, betaxanthin (R1) and betacyanin (R2) fractions from Beta vulgaris var. rubra L. (BVr) roots were combined and tested for cytotoxicity in CaCo-2 colon cancer cells. XVX was the most cytotoxic molecule, but the combination of XVX with R1 and R2 significantly prolonged its cytotoxicity. Cytotoxicity was mediated by the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, as shown by an increase in Bcl2-like protein 4, cleaved Poly ADP-Ribosyl Polymerase 1 and cleaved Caspase 3 levels with a parallel decrease in anti-apoptotic protein B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 2 levels. R1 and R2, used alone or in combination, reduced oxidative stress triggered by H2O2 in CaCo-2 cells. Betalains dampened cyclooxygenase-2 and interleukin-8 mRNA expression after lipopolysaccharide induction in CaCo-2, showing an anti-inflammatory action. Our results support the use of a cocktail of R1, R2 and XVX as a chemopreventive tool against colon cancer.

  7. Physiological intestinal oxygen modulates the Caco-2 cell model and increases sensitivity to the phytocannabinoid cannabidiol.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, Tara; Armstrong, Jane A; Criddle, David N; Wright, Karen L

    2014-01-01

    The Caco-2 cell model is widely used as a model of colon cancer and small intestinal epithelium but, like most cell models, is cultured in atmospheric oxygen conditions (∼21%). This does not reflect the physiological oxygen range found in the colon. In this study, we investigated the effect of adapting the Caco-2 cell line to routine culturing in a physiological oxygen (5%) environment. Under these conditions, cells maintain a number of key characteristics of the Caco-2 model, such as increased formation of tight junctions and alkaline phosphatase expression over the differentiation period and maintenance of barrier function. However, these cells exhibit differential oxidative metabolism, proliferate less and become larger during differentiation. In addition, these cells were more sensitive to cannabidiol-induced antiproliferative actions through changes in cellular energetics: from a drop of oxygen consumption rate and loss of mitochondrial membrane integrity in cells treated under atmospheric conditions to an increase in reactive oxygen species in intact mitochondria in cells treated under low-oxygen conditions. Inclusion of an additional physiological parameter, sodium butyrate, into the medium revealed a cannabidiol-induced proliferative response at low doses. These effects could impact on its development as an anticancer therapeutic, but overall, the data supports the principle that culturing cells in microenvironments that more closely mimic the in vivo conditions is important for drug screening and mechanism of action studies.

  8. Pleomorphic Carcinoma of the Colon: Morphological and Immunohistochemical Findings

    PubMed Central

    Branca, Giovanni; Barresi, Valeria; Ieni, Antonio; Irato, Eleonora; Caruso, Rosario Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Pleomorphic carcinoma is an aggressive neoplasm defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as a poorly differentiated (squamous cell carcinoma or adenocarcinoma) or undifferentiated carcinoma in which at least 10% spindle and/or giant cells are identified, or as a carcinoma constituted purely of spindle and giant cells. Although this entity has initially been shown in the lung, it has been described also in extrapulmonary locations, with only one report for a colonic site. A 65-year-old woman developed a caecal tumour. Gross examination revealed an endophytic/ulcerative mass 7 cm in length. Microscopically, the tumour was a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma with a pleomorphic component that occupied more than 10% of the specimen. The tumour shared these histopathological findings with pulmonary giant cell carcinoma but differed in other clinicopathological features such as a pushing growth pattern, stage pT3N1, and an uneventful outcome 24 months after operation. The pleomorphic component showed morphological and immunohistochemical features compatible with mitotic catastrophe, a non-apoptotic cell death occurring in cycling cells after aberrant mitosis. These features included multinucleation, micronucleation, atypical mitoses, foci of geographic necrosis, as well as immunohistochemical overexpression of p53 and Ki-67. The interpretation of the pleomorphic component as morphological expression of mitotic catastrophe may be useful in comprehending the pathogenesis of this rare neoplasm, and it may have practical implications as a potential cancer therapeutic target. PMID:27462191

  9. KAI1 gene expression in colonic carcinoma and its clinical significances

    PubMed Central

    Wu, De-Hua; Liu, Li; Chen, Long-Hua; Ding, Yan-Qing

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate KAI1 gene expression in the progression of human colonic carcinoma and its clinical significances. METHODS: KAI1 expression was detected by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry in the 4 established cell lines of colorectal carcinoma with different metastatic potentials, and in 80 specimens of colonic carcinoma, 21 colonic carcinoma specimens with lymphatic metastasis and 20 controls of normal colonic mucosa. RESULTS: The expressions of KAI1 in HT29 and SW480 cell lines were higher than those in LoVo and SW620. The expression of KAI1 gene was significantly higher in colorectal carcinoma compared with normal colonic mucosa and lymphatic metastasis (χ2 = 46.838, P < 0.01). The expression of KAI1 gene had no relationship with histological grade. The KAI1 expressions in Dukes A and B carcinoma were higher at both mRNA and protein levels compared to Dukes C carcinoma (χ2 = 16.061, P < 0.05). The expression of KAI1 in colonic carcinoma specimens with lymphatic metastasis was almost lost. The results of in situ hybridization were in concordance with immunohistochemistry. CONCLUSION: KAI1 is highly related to the metastasis of colonic carcinoma and may be a useful indicator of metastasis in colonic carcinoma. PMID:15259074

  10. 3D-fibroblast tissues constructed by a cell-coat technology enhance tight-junction formation of human colon epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Matsusaki, Michiya; Hikimoto, Daichi; Nishiguchi, Akihiro; Kadowaki, Koji; Ohura, Kayoko; Imai, Teruko; Akashi, Mitsuru

    2015-02-13

    Caco-2, human colon carcinoma cell line, has been widely used as a model system for intestinal epithelial permeability because Caco-2 cells express tight-junctions, microvilli, and a number of enzymes and transporters characteristic of enterocytes. However, the functional differentiation and polarization of Caco-2 cells to express sufficient tight-junctions (a barrier) usually takes over 21 days in culture. This may be due to the cell culture environment, for example inflammation induced by plastic petri dishes. Three-dimensional (3D) sufficient cell microenvironments similar to in vivo natural conditions (proteins and cells), will promote rapid differentiation and higher functional expression of tight junctions. Herein we report for the first time an enhancement in tight-junction formation by 3D-cultures of Caco-2 cells on monolayered (1L) and eight layered (8L) normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF). Trans epithelial electric resistance (TEER) of Caco-2 cells was enhanced in the 3D-cultures, especially 8L-NHDF tissues, depending on culture times and only 10 days was enough to reach the same TEER value of Caco-2 monolayers after a 21 day incubation. Relative mRNA expression of tight-junction proteins of Caco-2 cells on 3D-cultures showed higher values than those in monolayer structures. Transporter gene expression patterns of Caco-2 cells on 3D-constructs were almost the same as those of Caco-2 monolayers, suggesting that there was no effect of 3D-cultures on transporter protein expression. The expression correlation between carboxylesterase 1 and 2 in 3D-cultures represented similar trends with human small intestines. The results of this study clearly represent a valuable application of 3D-Caco-2 tissues for pharmaceutical applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Medullary carcinoma of the colon: can the undifferentiated be differentiated?

    PubMed

    Fiehn, Anne-Marie Kanstrup; Grauslund, Morten; Glenthøj, Anders; Melchior, Linea Cecilie; Vainer, Ben; Willemoe, Gro Linno

    2015-01-01

    Medullary carcinoma of the colon is a rare variant of colorectal cancer claimed to have a more favorable prognosis than conventional adenocarcinomas. The histopathologic appearance may be difficult to distinguish from poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. The study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic interobserver agreement and to characterize the immunohistochemical and molecular differences between these two subgroups. Fifteen cases initially classified as medullary carcinoma and 30 cases of poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas were included. Two pathologists reviewed the slides independently without knowledge of the original diagnosis and subgrouped the tumors into the two entities. Agreement was reached in 31 of 45 cases (69 %) with kappa = 0.32. An extensive immunohistochemical panel was performed, and KRAS, NRAS, and BRAF mutational status was assessed. Of the 31 cases with diagnostic agreement, the expression of only MLH-1 along with corresponding expression of PMS-2 differed significantly (p = 0.04). A high rate of BRAF mutations was detected in both subgroups without significant differences. Expression of MLH-1 was superior in dividing the tumors into two separate entities with significant differences in CK20 (p = 0.005) expression and in the rate of BRAF mutations (p = 0.0035). In conclusion, medullary carcinomas of the colon are difficult to discriminate from poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma even with the help of immunohistochemical and molecular analyses. This raises the question whether these morphological subtypes should be maintained or whether an alternative classification of poorly differentiated colorectal adenocarcinomas based on MLH-1 status rather than morphology should be suggested.

  12. Cytotoxicity and Apoptotic Effects of Polyphenols from Sugar Beet Molasses on Colon Carcinoma Cells in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mingshun; Zhao, Zhengang; Yu, Shujuan

    2016-01-01

    Three polyphenols were isolated and purified from sugar beet molasses by ultrasonic-aid extraction and various chromatographic techniques, and their structures were elucidated by spectral analysis. Cytotoxicity and the molecular mechanism were measured by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay, flow cytometry, caspase-3 activity assay and Western blot assay. The results showed that gallic acid, cyanidin-3-O-glucoside chloride and epicatechin have cytotoxicity to the human colon, hepatocellular and breast cancer cells. Cyanidin-3-O-glucoside chloride showed its cytotoxicity against various tumor cell lines, particularly against colon cancer Caco-2 cells with half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of 23.21 ± 0.14 μg/mL in vitro. Cyanidin-3-O-glucoside chloride may be a potential candidate for the treatment of colon cancer. In the mechanism study, cyanidin-3-O-glucoside chloride increased the ratio of cell cycle at G0/G1 phase and reduced cyclin D1 expression on Caco-2 cells. Cyanidin-3-O-glucoside chloride decreased mutant p21 expression, and increased the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 and the activation of caspase-3 to induce apoptosis. PMID:27347927

  13. Sigmoid colon carcinoma with focal neuroendocrine differentiation associated with ulcerative colitis: A case report.

    PubMed

    Rifu, Kazuma; Koinuma, Koji; Horie, Hisanaga; Morimoto, Mitsuaki; Kono, Yoshihiko; Tahara, Makiko; Sakuma, Yasunaru; Hosoya, Yoshinori; Kitayama, Joji; Lefor, Alan Kawarai; Sata, Naohiro; Suzuki, Tsukasa; Fukushima, Noriyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors of the colon and rectum are relatively rare compared to sporadic colorectal carcinoma. There are few reports of neuroendocrine tumors of the colon and rectum in patients with ulcerative colitis. A patient with sigmoid colon carcinoma with focal neuroendocrine features is presented. A 32-year-old man, who had been followed for ulcerative colitis for 14 years, was found to have carcinoma of the sigmoid colon on routine annual colonoscopy, and he underwent laparoscopic total colectomy. Pathologic examination showed sigmoid colon adenocarcinoma with focal neuroendocrine features. Most colorectal carcinomas associated with inflammatory bowel disease are histologically similar to the sporadic type, and tumors with neuroendocrine features are very unusual. Very rare case of sigmoid colon carcinoma with neuroendocrine features arising in a patient with UC was described. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Primary colonic signet ring cell carcinoma in a young patient

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Raghunath; Kumar, Neha; Krishna, Sunil; Shenoy, Rajgopal

    2014-01-01

    A 28-year-old woman presented with colicky abdominal pain for 3 months. Pain was associated with episodes of vomiting, abdominal distension and constipation. She also had loss of weight for this duration. General physical examination was unremarkable and the abdomen was soft, with no palpable organomegaly. A CT of the abdomen showed small bowel and ascending colon dilation with multiple air fluid levels. There was also a short segment of circumferential bowel wall thickening and luminal narrowing in the hepatic flexure with sudden transition of bowel diameter. She underwent a right hemicolectomy after necessary preoperative investigations. Histopathology revealed signet ring cell carcinoma (SRCC). This case highlights the importance of detecting such a lesion in a young, otherwise fit woman. The challenge lies in early diagnosis and awareness of general practitioners about this aggressive form of colonic tumours. PMID:24654235

  15. Sphere formation assay is not an effective method for cancer stem cell derivation and characterization from the Caco-2 colorectal cell line.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui; Zhang, Haihong; Hu, Yue; Xia, Qiu; Liu, Chenlu; Li, Yingnan; Yu, Bin; Gu, Tiejun; Zhang, Xizhen; Yu, Xianghui; Kong, Wei

    2014-03-01

    Although the existence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) has been demonstrated in colorectal cancer, further investigation is hindered by controversies over their surface markers. The sphere formation assay is widely used as in vitro method for derivation and characterization of CSCs based on the intrinsic self-renewal property of these cells. Isolated cancer cells that form tumorspheres are generally recognized as CSCs with self-renewal and tumorigenic capacities. In this study, colon spheres grown from Caco-2 cells in the sphere formation assay were separated from other differentiated cells and characterized. Compared with Caco-2 cells, the derived colon spheres lost several CSC properties. The colon spheres contained decreased levels of specific colorectal CSC surface markers as well as low levels of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters typically overexpressed in CSCs, resulting in the near loss of their chemoresistance ability. Furthermore, cells that developed as colon spheres with strong self-renewal ability in vitro lost their tumorigenic capacity in vivo compared with Caco-2 cells, which could establish tumors in non-obese diabetic/severe-combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID) mice. The results indicated that the Caco-2 cell derived colon spheres did not consist of colorectal CSCs. Thus, the well-accepted sphere formation assay may not be an effective method for CSC isolation and characterization from the Caco-2 colorectal cancer cell line.

  16. Biphasic effect of falcarinol on caco-2 cell proliferation, DNA damage, and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Young, Jette F; Duthie, Susan J; Milne, Lesley; Christensen, Lars P; Duthie, Garry G; Bestwick, Charles S

    2007-02-07

    The polyacetylene falcarinol, isolated from carrots, has been shown to be protective against chemically induced colon cancer development in rats, but the mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study CaCo-2 cells were exposed to falcarinol (0.5-100 microM) and the effects on proliferation, DNA damage, and apoptosis investigated. Low-dose falcarinol exposure (0.5-10 microM) decreased expression of the apoptosis indicator caspase-3 concomitantly with decreased basal DNA strand breakage. Cell proliferation was increased (1-10 microM), whereas cellular attachment was unaffected by <10 microM falcarinol. At concentrations above 20 microM falcarinol, proliferation of CaCo-2 cells decreased and the number of cells expressing active caspase-3 increased simultaneously with increased cell detachment. Furthermore, DNA single-strand breakage was significantly increased at concentrations above 10 microM falcarinol. Thus, the effects of falcarinol on CaCo-2 cells appear to be biphasic, inducing pro-proliferative and apoptotic characteristics at low and high concentrations of falcarinol, respectively.

  17. Carcinoma of the colon in children: a report of six new cases and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Andersson, A; Bergdahl, L

    1976-12-01

    Of six children with carcinoma of the colon, none had ulcerative colitis or a family history of carcinoma of the colon or colonic polyposis. In 75 cases traced in the literature, a common early symptom of carcinoma of the colon in children is acute, crampy abdominal pain. At laparotomy for suspected appendictis, the possibility of the acute pain being due to carcinoma of the colon should be borne in mind. Otherwise the symptoms of carcinoma of the colon in children do not differ substantially from those in adults. The prognosis is unfavorable; in only 2.5% of the cases on record did the children survive 5 yr after the operation.

  18. Endoscopic mucosal resection of early stage colon neuroendocrine carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yamasaki, Yasushi; Uedo, Noriya; Ishihara, Ryu; Tomita, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Early stage colorectal neuroendocrine carcinoma is rare. A small colon tumour was found in a 56-year-old man during diagnostic colonoscopy performed after a positive faecal occult blood test, and he was referred for treatment. A slightly reddish superficial elevated lesion with a shallow depression 10 mm in size was found in the transverse colon. Magnifying narrow-band imaging revealed disrupted irregular microvessels and the absence of a surface pattern in the depressed area. En bloc endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) of the tumour was undertaken. The tumour was positive for chromogranin A and synaptophysin, and had a mitotic rate of >20/10 high-power fields and a Ki-67 proliferative index of >50%; it was diagnosed as a neuroendocrine carcinoma. The tumour minimally invaded the submucosa (300 μm) without lymphovascular involvement. The patient was followed up carefully, and at 1 year after EMR, no recurrence was found using colonoscopy and CT scans. PMID:25737221

  19. Metachronous squamous-cell carcinoma of the colon and treatment of rectal squamous carcinoma with chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Brammer, R D; Taniere, P; Radley, S

    2009-02-01

    Rectal squamous-cell carcinoma is a rare tumour with an incidence of less than 1 per 1000 cases. We report such a case treated with chemoradiotherapy. The patient developed a metastasis in the spleen and a further squamous tumour in the right colon, both of which were successfully resected. No histological evidence of recurrent rectal tumour has been found. Two years following presentation, the patient remains disease-free although symptomatic from a radiotherapy-induced stricture of the rectum.

  20. APOBEC3G expression is correlated with poor prognosis in colon carcinoma patients with hepatic metastasis.

    PubMed

    Lan, Huanrong; Jin, Ketao; Gan, Meifu; Wen, Shouxiang; Bi, Tienan; Zhou, Shenkang; Zhu, Naibiao; Teng, Lisong; Yu, Wenjie

    2014-01-01

    Increased expression of apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like 3G (APOBEC3G) in human primary colorectal tumors and hepatic metastasis has been detected. However, the clinical relevance of APOBEC3G in colon carcinoma hepatic metastasis remains uncertain. The aim of this study was to assess the prognostic value of APOBEC3G in colon carcinoma patients with hepatic metastasis after hepatic resection. APOBEC3G expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in paraffin-embedded primary colon carcinoma and paired hepatic metastasis tissues from 136 patients with liver metastasis from colon carcinoma that underwent hepatic resection. The relation between APOBEC3G expression and clinicopathologic factors and long-term prognosis in these 136 patients was retrospectively examined. The prognostic significance of negative or positive APOBEC3G expression in colon carcinoma hepatic metastasis was assessed using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and log-rank tests. Positive expression of APOBEC3G was correlated with liver metastasis of colon cancer. Univariate analysis indicated significantly worse overall survival (OS) for patients with a positive APOBEC3G expression in colon carcinoma hepatic metastasis than for patients with a negative APOBEC3G expression. Multivariate analysis showed positive-APOBEC3G in colon carcinoma hepatic metastasis to be an independent prognostic factor for OS after hepatic resection (P = 0.000). Positive expression of APOBEC3G was statistically significantly associated with poor prognosis of colon carcinoma patients with hepatic metastasis. APOBEC3G could be a novel predictor for poor prognosis of colon carcinoma patients with hepatic metastasis after hepatic resection.

  1. Evaluation of alkylmaltosides as intestinal permeation enhancers: comparison between rat intestinal mucosal sheets and Caco-2 monolayers.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Signe Beck; Nolan, Gavin; Maher, Sam; Rahbek, Ulrik Lytt; Guldbrandt, Mette; Brayden, David J

    2012-11-20

    Alkylmaltosides are a class of non-ionic surfactant currently in clinical trials to improve nasal permeation of peptide drugs, however few studies have detailed their potential effects on intestinal permeation enhancement. Tetradecyl maltoside (TDM, C(14)), was examined in Caco-2 monolayers and in isolated rat jejunal and colonic mucosae mounted in Ussing chambers. Dodecyl maltoside (DDM, C(12)) was examined in mucosae. Parameters measured included critical micelle concentration (CMC), transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER), and apparent permeability coefficients (P(app)) of paracellular and transcellular flux markers. TDM and DDM decreased TEER and increased the P(app) of [(14)C]-mannitol and FD-4 across Caco-2 monolayers and colonic mucosae in the concentration range of 0.01-0.1% w/v, concentrations much higher than the CMC. Remarkably, neither agent had any effect on the TEER or fluxes of jejunal mucosae. Histopathology, cell death assays (MTT and LDH) and sub-lethal high content cytotoxicity analyses (HCA) were carried out with TDM. Exposure of colonic mucosae to high concentrations of TDM had no major effects on gross histology and ion transport function was retained. In Caco-2, HCA data at sub-lethal concentrations of TDM was consistent with the action of a mild non-ionic surfactant. In conclusion, alkylmaltosides are effective non-toxic permeation enhancers in isolated colonic tissue and their inclusion in oral peptide formulations directed to that intestinal region warrants further study. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Detection of Enterobius vermicularis eggs in the submucosa of the transverse colon of a man presenting with colon carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sai-Cheong; Hwang, Kao-Pin; Tsai, Wen-Sy; Lin, Chin-Yew; Lee, Ning

    2002-11-01

    We report a case of a chronic infiltrate of the intestinal wall of the transverse colon by the eggs of Enterobius vermicularis in a man who had immigrated to Taiwan from mainland China 50 years ago. During surgery for suspected transverse colon carcinoma, histologic examination of the tumor mass revealed eggs of E. vermicularis embedded in granulation tissue in the submucosa of the transverse colon. Results of a stool examination were negative for eggs but strongly positive for occult blood. The mass in the transverse colon was completely removed during surgery. At the present time, the patient remains asymptomatic.

  3. Metastasis of colon cancer to medullary thyroid carcinoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yeo, So-Jung; Kim, Kyu-Jin; Kim, Bo-Yeon; Jung, Chan-Hee; Lee, Seung-Won; Kwak, Jeong-Ja; Kim, Chul-Hee; Kang, Sung-Koo; Mok, Ji-Oh

    2014-10-01

    Metastasis to the primary thyroid carcinoma is extremely rare. We report here a case of colonic adenocarcinoma metastasis to medullary thyroid carcinoma in a 53-yr old man with a history of colon cancer. He showed a nodular lesion, suggesting malignancy in the thyroid gland, in a follow-up examination after colon cancer surgery. Fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) of the thyroid gland showed tumor cell clusters, which was suspected to be medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). The patient underwent a total thyroidectomy. Using several specific immunohistochemical stains, the patient was diagnosed with colonic adenocarcinoma metastasis to MTC. To the best of our knowledge, the present patient is the first case of colonic adenocarcinoma metastasizing to MTC. Although tumor-tumor metastasis to primary thyroid carcinoma is very rare, we still should consider metastasis to the thyroid gland, when a patient with a history of other malignancy presents with a new thyroid finding.

  4. Proteomic analysis of colon and rectal carcinoma using standard and customized databases.

    PubMed

    Slebos, Robbert J C; Wang, Xia; Wang, Xiaojing; Wang, Xaojing; Zhang, Bing; Tabb, David L; Liebler, Daniel C

    2015-01-01

    Understanding proteomic differences underlying the different phenotypic classes of colon and rectal carcinoma is important and may eventually lead to a better assessment of clinical behavior of these cancers. We here present a comprehensive description of the proteomic data obtained from 90 colon and rectal carcinomas previously subjected to genomic analysis by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Here, the primary instrument files and derived secondary data files are compiled and presented in forms that will allow further analyses of the biology of colon and rectal carcinoma. We also discuss new challenges in processing these large proteomic datasets for relevant proteins and protein variants.

  5. Intestinal transport of sophocarpine across the Caco-2 cell monolayer model and quantification by LC/MS.

    PubMed

    Sun, Sen; Zhang, Hai; Sun, Fengfeng; Zhao, Liang; Zhong, Yanqiang; Chai, Yifeng; Zhang, Guoqing

    2014-06-01

    Sophocarpine is a biologically active component obtained from the foxtail-like sophora herb and seed that is often orally administered for the treatment of cancer and chronic bronchial asthma. The aim of this study was to develop a rapid and specific LC/MS method for the determination of sophocarpine and to explore its transcellular transport mechanism across the Caco-2 (the human colon adenocarcia cell lines) monolayer cell transwell model. Caco-2 cells were seeded on permeable polycarbonate membranes and incubated for 21 days. Before the experiment, the trans-epithelial electric resistance, integrity and alkaline phosphatase activity of the Caco-2 monolayers were verified and used in subsequent experiments. In the Caco-2 model constructed, many influencing factors were investigated, including time, concentration, pH and different protein inhibitors. The results suggested that sophocarpine was transported mainly by passive diffusion. The flux of sophocarpine was time- and concentration-dependent, and the pH also had an effect on its transportation. The PappBA was higher than PappAB , indicating that a polarized transport might exist for sophocarpine. MK-571 and reserpine, inhibitors of the multidrug resistance associated protein 2 and the breast cancer resistance protein, decreased the efflux of sophocarpine, while verapamil had no effect on its transport. These results revealed that sophocarpine is absorbed mainly by passive diffusion, and that a carrier-mediated mechanism is also involved in the transport of sophocarpine.

  6. Human rotavirus strain Wa downregulates NHE1 and NHE6 expressions in rotavirus-infected Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Honglang; Song, Lijun; Li, Guixian; Chen, Wenfeng; Zhao, Shumin; Zhou, Ruoxia; Shi, Xiaoying; Peng, Zhenying; Zhao, Wenchang

    2017-03-13

    Rotavirus (RV) is the most common cause of severe gastroenteritis and fatal dehydration in human infants and neonates of different species. However, the pathogenesis of rotavirus-induced diarrhea is poorly understood. Secretory diarrhea caused by rotavirus may lead to a combination of excessive secretion of fluid and electrolytes into the intestinal lumen. Fluid absorption in the small intestine is driven by Na(+)-coupled transport mechanisms at the luminal membrane, including Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE). Here, we performed qRT-PCR to detect the transcription of NHEs. Western blotting was employed for protein detection. Furthermore, immunocytochemistry was used to validate the NHE's protein expression. Finally, intracellular Ca(2+) concentration was detected by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The results demonstrated that the NHE6 mRNA and protein expressed in the human colon adenocarcinoma cell line (Caco-2). Furthermore, RV-Wa induced decreased expression of the NHE1 and NHE6 in Caco-2 cell in a time-dependent manner. In addition, intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in RV-Wa-infected Caco-2 cells was higher than that in the mock-infected cells. Furthermore, RV-Wa also can downregulate the expression of calmodulin (CaM) and calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII) in Caco-2 cells. These findings provides important insights into the mechanisms of rotavirus-induced diarrhea. Further studies on the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms that downregulate NHEs in RV-induced diarrhea are required.

  7. Small cell carcinoma of the colon arising in a carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Saif, M Wasif

    2013-04-01

    Small cell carcinomas of the gastrointestinal tract are rare and clinically aggressive tumors. A case is presented of a 70 year-old woman who presented with small bowel obstruction and was found to have a cecal mass. She underwent right hemicolectomy, and histopathology showed a small cell carcinoma arising in the background of a carcinoid tumor. Although small cell carcinomas of the colon have frequently been found in association with colonic adenomas, this appears to be the first report of a low-grade carcinoid tumor in combination with a small cell carcinoma.

  8. Effects of Japanese mistletoe lectin on cytokine gene expression in human colonic carcinoma cells and in the mouse intestine.

    PubMed

    Monira, Pervin; Koyama, Yu; Fukutomi, Ryuuta; Yasui, Kensuke; Isemura, Mamoru; Yokogoshi, Hidehiko

    2009-10-01

    Mistletoe lectins have various biological activities including anti-cancer and immunomodulatory effects. We previously isolated a lectin (ML-J) from Japanese mistletoe. In the present study, we examined the effects of ML-J on cytokine gene expression in human colon adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells and in the mouse intestine. The results of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction indicated that ML-J caused an upregulation of the gene expression of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-8, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and IL-6 in Caco-2 cells and TNF-alpha and IL-6 in the duodenum. This study provides the first example to show that a perorally administered plant lectin affects gene expression in the duodenum.

  9. Differentiating the undifferentiated: immunohistochemical profile of medullary carcinoma of the colon with an emphasis on intestinal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Winn, Brody; Tavares, Rosemarie; Fanion, Jacqueline; Noble, Lelia; Gao, John; Sabo, Edmond; Resnick, Murray B

    2009-03-01

    Undifferentiated or medullary carcinoma is characterized by its distinct histologic appearance and relatively better prognosis compared to poorly differentiated colonic carcinoma. These 2 entities may be difficult to differentiate by light microscopy alone. Only limited immunohistochemical studies investigating medullary carcinoma have been reported. These studies suggest a loss of intestinal differentiation, exemplified by a high percentage of CDX2 negativity. Our aim was to further characterize the immunohistochemical profile of medullary carcinoma, with particular emphasis on intestinal markers. Paraffin blocks from 16 cases of medullary carcinoma and 33 cases of poorly differentiated colonic carcinoma were retrieved, and tissue microarrays were constructed and stained with an immunohistochemical panel including CDX2, CK7, CK20, p53, intestinal trefoil factor 3, chromogranin, synaptophysin, MLH-1, MUC-1, MUC-2, and calretinin. A significantly higher proportion of medullary carcinomas, as opposed to poorly differentiated colonic carcinomas, showed loss of staining for MLH-1 and for the intestinal transcription factor CDX2, in accordance with previous studies. MLH-1 staining was present in only 21% of medullary carcinoma cases compared with 60% of the poorly differentiated colonic carcinoma cases (P = .02), whereas CDX2 was positive in 19% of medullary carcinomas and 55% of poorly differentiated colonic carcinomas (P = .03). Interestingly, calretinin staining was strongly positive in 73% of medullary carcinomas compared to only 12% of poorly differentiated colonic carcinomas (P < .0001). Evidence of intestinal differentiation by MUC-1, MUC-2, and TFF-3 staining was seen in 67%, 60%, and 53% of the medullary carcinomas, respectively. These 3 markers were frequently positive in many of the CDX2-negative medullary carcinoma cases. Medullary carcinoma of the colon retains a significant degree of intestinal differentiation as evidenced by its high percentage of

  10. [Signet ring cell carcinoma of sigmoid colon in an adolescent patient. Report of a case].

    PubMed

    Casavilca Zambrano, S; Cisneros Gallegos, E; Lem Arce, F; Magallanes Maldonado, M

    2001-01-01

    We report the case of a female patient, sixteen years old who was diagnosed of signet ring cell carcinoma of sigmoid colon. We discuss the clinical presentation outstanding the early presentation of this unusual cancer.

  11. Study on the clinical significance of Argonaute2 expression in colonic carcinoma by tissue microarray.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying-Xin; Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Bao-Feng; Yang, Chang-Qing; Gao, Heng-Jun

    2013-01-01

    To study the expression levels and clinical significance of Argonaute2 (EIF2C2) on colonic carcinomas and normal tissues. Colon tissue samples from 90 cases of colonic carcinomas and 90 normal subjects were accumulated and made into a tissue microarray containing 360 dots. Expression of Argonaute2 (EIF2C2) was detected by immunohistochemical staining of the tissue microarray. There was significant difference in the expression levels of Argonaute2 (EIF2C2) between colonic carcinomas and normal tissues (P<0.01). However, the expression of Argonaute2 (EIF2C2) was not related to sex, age, position, differentiation, lymphatic metastasis and clinical stage of the tumor (P>0.05). Abnormal expression of Argonaute2 (EIF2C2) may be correlated with colon tumorigenesis.

  12. Quantum dots incorporated magnetic nanoparticles for imaging colon carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Engineered multifunctional nanoparticles (NPs) have made a tremendous impact on the biomedical sciences, with advances in imaging, sensing and bioseparation. In particular, the combination of optical and magnetic responses through a single particle system allows us to serve as novel multimodal molecular imaging contrast agents in clinical settings. Despite of essential medical imaging modalities and of significant clinical application, only few nanocomposites have been developed with dual imaging contrast. A new method for preparing quantum dots (QDs) incorporated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) based on layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly techniques have developed and used for cancer cells imaging. Methods Here, citrate - capped negatively charged Fe3O4 NPs were prepared and coated with positively - charged hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB). Then, thiol - capped negatively charged CdTe QDs were electrostatically bound with CTAB. Morphological, optical and magnetic properties of the fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles (FMNPs) were characterized. Prepared FMNPs were additionally conjugated with hCC49 antibodies fragment antigen binding (Fab) having binding affinity to sialylated sugar chain of TAG-72 region of LS174T cancer cells, which was prepared silkworm expression system, and then were used for imaging colon carcinoma cells. Results The prepared nanocomposites were magnetically responsive and fluorescent, simultaneously that are useful for efficient cellular imaging, optical sensing and magnetic separation. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) revealed that the particle size is around 50 nm in diameter with inner magnetic core and outer CdTe QDs core-shell structure. Cytotoxicity test of prepared FMNPs indicates high viability in Vero cells. NPs conjugated with anti cancer antibodies were successfully labeled on colon carcinoma cells (LS174) in vitro and showed significant specificity to target cells

  13. Cytotoxicity of monodispersed chitosan nanoparticles against the Caco-2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Loh, Jing Wen; Saunders, Martin; Lim, Lee-Yong

    2012-08-01

    Published toxicology data on chitosan nanoparticles (NP) often lack direct correlation to the in situ size and surface characteristics of the nanoparticles, and the repeated NP assaults as experienced in chronic use. The aim of this paper was to breach these gaps. Chitosan nanoparticles synthesized by spinning disc processing were characterised for size and zeta potential in HBSS and EMEM at pHs 6.0 and 7.4. Cytotoxicity against the Caco-2 cells was evaluated by measuring the changes in intracellular mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity, TEER and sodium fluorescein transport data and cell morphology. Cellular uptake of NP was observed under the confocal microscope. Contrary to established norms, the collective data suggest that the in vitro cytotoxicity of NP against the Caco-2 cells was less influenced by positive surface charges than by the particle size. Particle size was in turn determined by the pH of the medium in which the NP was dispersed, with the mean size ranging from 25 to 333 nm. At exposure concentration of 0.1%, NP of 25 ± 7 nm (zeta potential 5.3 ± 2.8 mV) was internalised by the Caco-2 cells, and the particles were observed to inflict extensive damage to the intracellular organelles. Concurrently, the transport of materials along the paracellular pathway was significantly facilitated. The Caco-2 cells were, however, capable of recovering from such assaults 5 days following NP removal, although a repeat NP exposure was observed to produce similar effects to the 1st exposure, with the cells exhibiting comparable resiliency to the 2nd assault. -- Highlights: ► Chitosan nanoparticles reduced mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity. ► Cellular uptake of chitosan nanoparticles was observed. ► Chitosan nanoparticles inflicted extensive damage to the cell morphology. ► The transport of materials along the paracellular pathway was facilitated.

  14. Chemical composition and effect on intestinal Caco-2 cell viability and lipid profile of fixed oil from Cynomorium coccineum L.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Antonella; Rescigno, Antonio; Piras, Alessandra; Atzeri, Angela; Scano, Paola; Porcedda, Silvia; Zucca, Paolo; Assunta Dessì, M

    2012-10-01

    Cynomorium coccineum L. is a non-photosynthetic plant, spread over Mediterranean countries, amply used in traditional medicine. We investigated the composition and effect on intestinal Caco-2 cell viability and lipid profile of fixed oil obtained from dried stems of the plant. Oil isolation has been performed by supercritical fractioned extraction with CO2. 13C NMR spectroscopy has been used to study the molecular composition of oil lipids; fatty acid composition was identified using GC and HPLC techniques. The fixed oil was composed mainly by triacylglycerols and derivates. The main fatty acids were 18:1 n-9 (38%), 18:2 n-6 (20%), 16:0 (15%), and 18:3 n-3 (10.8%). The oil showed a significant in vitro inhibitory effect on the growth of colon cancer undifferentiated Caco-2 cells. Moreover, cell viability, lipid composition, and lipid peroxidation were measured in intestinal epithelial cells (differentiated Caco-2 cells) after 24 h incubation with fixed oil. The oil did not show a toxic effect on colon epithelial cell viability but induced a significant change in fatty acid composition, with a significant accumulation of the essential fatty acids 18:3 n-3 and 18:2 n-6. The results showed remarkable biological activity of Maltese mushroom oil, and qualify it as a potential resource for food/pharmaceutical applications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) on human intestinal Caco-2 cells at non cytotoxic concentrations.

    PubMed

    Bradai, Mohamed; Han, Junkyu; Omri, Abdelfatteh El; Funamizu, Naoyuki; Sayadi, Sami; Isoda, Hiroko

    2016-08-01

    Linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) is a cytotoxic synthetic anionic surfactant widely present in the environment due to its large-scale production and intensive use in the detergency field. In this study, we investigated the effect of LAS (CAS No. 25155-30-0) at non cytotoxic concentrations on human intestinal Caco-2 cells using different in vitro bioassays. As results, LAS increased Caco-2 cell proliferation at concentrations ranging from 1 to 15 ppm, more significantly for shorter exposure time (24 h), confirmed using flow cytometry and trypan blue exclusion methods. Moreover, proteomics analysis revealed that this effect was associated with an over-expression of elongation factor 2 and dipeptidyl peptidase 3, and a down-regulation of 14-3-3 protein theta, confirmed at mRNA level using real-time PCR. These findings suggest that LAS at non cytotoxic concentrations, similar to those observed at wastewater treatment plants outlets, increases the growth rate of colon cancer cells, raising thereby its tumor promotion effect potential.

  16. Gastrointestinal Hormone Cholecystokinin Increases P-Glycoprotein Membrane Localization and Transport Activity in Caco-2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Yano, Kentaro; Shimizu, Saori; Tomono, Takumi; Ogihara, Takuo

    2017-09-01

    It was reported that stimulation of taste receptor type 2 member 38 by a bitter substance, phenylthiocarbamide (PTC), increased P-glycoprotein (P-gp) mRNA level and transport activity via release of the gastrointestinal hormone cholecystokinin-8 (CCK-8) at 9 h. Therefore, we hypothesized that CCK-8 and PTC might also regulate P-gp activity more rapidly via a different mechanism. As a result, we found that the pretreatment of human colon adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells with 10-mM PTC significantly decreased the intracellular accumulation of P-gp substrate rhodamine 123 (Rho123) compared with the control after 90-min incubation. Moreover, CCK-8 treatments significantly reduced the accumulation of Rho123 within 30 min, compared with the control. On the other hand, when Caco-2 cells were pretreated with PTC, the efflux ratio of Rho123 was significantly increased compared with control. The efflux ratio of Rho123 in CCK-8 treatment cells was also significantly increased compared with control. Furthermore, CCK-8 increased the phosphorylation of the scaffold proteins ezrin, radixin, and moesin, which regulate translocation of P-gp to the plasma membrane. Therefore, our results indicate that PTC induced release of CCK-8, which in turn induced the phosphorylation of ezrin, radixin, and moesin proteins, leading to upregulation of P-gp transport activity via increased membrane localization of P-gp. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. FRZB up-regulation is correlated with hepatic metastasis and poor prognosis in colon carcinoma patients with hepatic metastasis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yanping; Zhang, Fang; Lan, Huanrong; Chen, Ke; Zhang, Qi; Xie, Guoming; Teng, Lisong; Jin, Ketao

    2015-01-01

    Frizzled-related protein (FRZB) was up-regulated in hepatic metastasis samples compared with primary colon cancer samples in our previous work. However, the clinical relevance of FRZB in colon cancer hepatic metastasis remains uncertain. The aim of this study was to assess the prognostic value of FRZB in patients with colon carcinoma hepatic metastasis after hepatic resection. FRZB expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) primary colon carcinoma and paired hepatic metastasis tissues from 136 patients with liver metastasis from colon carcinoma that underwent hepatic resection. The relation between FRZB expression and clinicopathologic factors and long-term prognosis in these 136 patients was retrospectively examined. The prognostic significance of negative or positive FRZB expression in colon carcinoma hepatic metastasis was assessed using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and log-rank tests. Positive expression of FRZB was correlated with liver metastasis of colon cancer. Univariate analysis indicated significantly worse overall survival (OS) for patients with a positive FRZB expression in colon carcinoma hepatic metastasis than for patients with a negative FRZB expression. Multivariate analysis showed positive-FRZB in colon carcinoma hepatic metastasis to be an independent prognostic factor for OS after hepatic resection (P = 0.001). Positive expression of FRZB was statistically significantly associated with poor prognosis of patients with colon carcinoma hepatic metastasis. FRZB could be a novel predictor for poor prognosis of patients with colon carcinoma hepatic metastasis after hepatic resection.

  18. Cronkhite-Canada syndrome associated with carcinoma of the sigmoid colon: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Nakatsubo, N; Wakasa, R; Kiyosaki, K; Matsui, K; Konishi, F

    1997-01-01

    Cronkhite-Canada syndrome is generally accepted as being a benign disorder. We herein present a 66-year-old-male patient with Cronkhite-Canada syndrome who had a carcinoma of the sigmoid colon along with multiple colonic polyps, which included juvenile-type polyps, adenomas, and hyperplastic polyps. In the world literature, there have been 34 cases of Cronkhite-Canada syndrome associated with colorectal carcinoma among the 280 reported cases of this syndrome. This report thus adds to the growing evidence that Cronkhite-Canada syndrome may be a premalignant condition for colorectal carcinoma. A periodic examination of the colon is therefore advised in order to detect any development of colorectal carcinoma at an early stage.

  19. 5-aminosalicylic acid in combination with nimesulide inhibits proliferation of colon carcinoma cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Hai-Ming; Mei, Qiao; Xu, Jian-Ming; Ma, Wei-Juan

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) in combination with nimesulide on the proliferation of HT-29 colon carcinoma cells and its potential mechanisms. METHODS: Inhibitory effects of drugs (5-ASA, nimesulide and their combination) on HT-29 colon carcinoma cells were investigated by thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Cellular apoptosis and proliferation were detected by TUNEL assay and immunocytochemical staining, respectively. RESULTS: Pretreatment with 5-ASA or nimesulide at the concentration of 10-1000 μmol/L inhibited proliferation of HT-29 colon carcinoma cells in a dose-dependent manner in vitro (t = 5.122, P < 0.05; t = 3.086, P < 0.05, respectively). The inhibition rate of HT-29 colon carcinoma cell proliferation was also increased when pretreated with 5-ASA (100 μmol/L) or nimesulide (100 μmol/L) for 12-96 h, which showed an obvious time-effect relationship (t = 6.149, P < 0.05; t = 4.159, P < 0.05, respectively). At the concentration of 10-500 μmol/L, the apoptotic rate of HT-29 colon carcinoma cells significantly increased (t = 18.156, P < 0.001; t = 19.983, P < 0.001, respectively), while expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was remarkably decreased (t = 6.828, P < 0.05; t = 14.024, P < 0.05, respectively). 5-ASA in combination with nimesulide suppressed the proliferation of HT-29 colon carcinoma cells more than either of these agents in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner (t = 5.448, P < 0.05; t = 4.428, P < 0.05, respectively). CONCLUSION: 5-ASA and nimesulide may inhibit the proliferation of HT-29 colon carcinoma cells and coadministration of these agents may have additional chemopreventive potential. PMID:17569127

  20. Adipokine regulation of colon cancer: adiponectin attenuates interleukin-6-induced colon carcinoma cell proliferation via STAT-3.

    PubMed

    Fenton, Jenifer I; Birmingham, Janette M

    2010-07-01

    Obesity results in increased circulating levels of specific adipokines, which are associated with colon cancer risk. The disease state is associated with increased leptin, insulin, IGF-1, and IL-6. Conversely, adiponectin levels are decreased in obese individuals. Previously, we demonstrated adipokine-enhanced cell proliferation in preneoplastic, but not normal, colon epithelial cells, demonstrating a differential effect of adipokines on colon cancer progression in vitro. Using a model of late stage carcinoma cancer cell, namely murine MC-38 colon carcinoma cells, we compared the effect of obesity-associated adipokines (leptin, insulin, IGF-1, and IL-6) on MC-38 cell proliferation and determined whether adiponectin (full length or globular) could modulate adipokine-induced cell proliferation. We show that insulin and IL-6, but not leptin and IGF-1, induce proliferation in MC-38 cells. Adiponectin treatment of MC-38 cells did not inhibit insulin-induced cell proliferation but did inhibit IL-6-induced cell proliferation by decreasing STAT-3 phosphorylation and activation. Nitric oxide (NO) production was increased in MC-38 cells treated with IL-6; co-treatment with adiponectin blocked IL-6-induced iNOS and subsequent NO production. These data are compared to previously reported findings from our laboratory using the YAMC (model normal colon epithelial cells) and IMCE (model preneoplastic) cells. The cell lines are utilized to construct a model summarizing the hormonal consequences of obesity and the impact on the differential regulation of colon epithelial cells along the continuum to carcinoma. These data, taken together, highlight mechanisms involved in obesity-associated cancers and may lead to potential-targeted therapies.

  1. Heterogeneity between primary colon carcinoma and paired lymphatic and hepatic metastases.

    PubMed

    Lan, Huanrong; Jin, Ketao; Xie, Bojian; Han, Na; Cui, Binbin; Cao, Feilin; Teng, Lisong

    2012-11-01

    Heterogeneity is one of the recognized characteristics of human tumors, and occurs on multiple levels in a wide range of tumors. A number of studies have focused on the heterogeneity found in primary tumors and related metastases with the consideration that the evaluation of metastatic rather than primary sites could be of clinical relevance. Numerous studies have demonstrated particularly high rates of heterogeneity between primary colorectal tumors and their paired lymphatic and hepatic metastases. It has also been proposed that the heterogeneity between primary colon carcinomas and their paired lymphatic and hepatic metastases may result in different responses to anticancer therapies. The heterogeneity in primary colon carcinoma and corresponding metastases by genome‑wide gene expression analysis has not been extensively studied. In the present study, we investigated the differentially expressed genes between a primary colon carcinoma specimen (obtained from a 40-year-old female colon carcinoma patient with lymphatic and hepatic metastases) and its paired lymphatic and hepatic metastases by genome-wide gene expression analysis using GeneChip HGU133Plus2.0 expression arrays. Our results demonstrate that genome-wide gene expression varies between primary colon carcinoma and its paired lymphatic and hepatic metastases.

  2. Survivin promotes the invasion of human colon carcinoma cells by regulating the expression of MMP‑7.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fei; Zhang, Yuqin; Yang, Feng; Wang, Peng; Wang, Wenjun; Su, Yan; Luo, Weiren

    2014-03-01

    Increased expression levels of survivin are crucial for invasion activity in several types of human cancer, including colon carcinoma. However, the molecular mechanisms whereby survivin regulates cancer invasion have not been completely elucidated. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to investigate the role of matrix metalloprotease‑7 (MMP‑7) in cell invasion that is induced by survivin by using in vitro assays, including western blot, immunofluorescence and qPCR analyses. The results demonstrated that the ectopic expression of survivin significantly promoted the invasive activity of colon carcinoma cells (SW620 and HCT‑116) and resulted in increased levels of MMP‑7 activation. By contrast, the small interfering RNA (siRNA)‑based knockdown of survivin markedly reduced cell migration and led to a dose‑dependent decrease in MMP‑7 expression levels. Compared with the controls, knockdown of MMP‑7 by siRNA in colon carcinoma cells led to reduced invasion ability, whereas no obvious changes were observed when MMP‑7 expression was silenced in survivin‑overexpressing colon carcinoma cells. These findings demonstrate that MMP‑7 is crucial for survivin‑mediated invasiveness, suggesting that the survivin‑mediated MMP‑7 signaling pathway is a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of colon carcinoma.

  3. Differential expression in normal-adenoma-carcinoma sequence suggests complex molecular carcinogenesis in colon.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seungkoo; Bang, Seunghyun; Song, Kyuyoung; Lee, Inchul

    2006-10-01

    The majority of colon cancers develop from pre-existing adenomas. We analyzed the expression profiles in the sequence of normal colon crypts, adenomas and early-stage carcinomas using microdissected cells from tubular adenomas with foci of malignant transformation. Differentially expressed genes were detected between normal-adenoma and adenoma-carcinoma, and were grouped according to the patterns of expression changes in the sequence. Down-regulated genes in the sequence included PLA2G2A, TSPAN1, PDCD4, FCGBP, AATK, EPLIN, FABP1, AGR2, MTUS1, TSC1, galectin 4 and MT1F. PLA2G2A has been shown to suppress colon tumorigenesis in mice, but the pathobiological role in humans has been controversial. Our data showed continuous down-regulation of PLA2G2A in the sequence supporting an implication in human colon cancer. Tumor suppressor and/ or proapoptotic activities have also been reported in other genes. Up-regulated genes included ribosomal proteins, IER3 and TPR. TGF-beta2 and matrix metalloproteinase 23B were up-regulated in carcinoma but not in adenoma, supporting the pathobiological roles in malignant transformation. Differentially expressed genes partly coincided with those in the adenoma-carcinoma sequence of the stomach, which was published previously, suggesting a partial overlap between the adenoma-carcinoma sequences of the colon and stomach.

  4. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α suppresses the aggravation of colon carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hou Shan; Wang, Juan; Zhang, Xiao Ping; Wang, Liang Zhe; Wang, Yi; Li, Xin Xing; Jin, Kai Zhou; Hu, Zhi Qian; Wang, Wei Jun

    2016-05-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4-α (HNF4α), a nuclear receptor, is expressed at lower levels in colon carcinoma tissues than in adjacent normal tissues. However, the relation between HNF4α and colon cancer progression and the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we investigated the role of HNF4α in the progression of colon carcinoma. We showed that HNF4α mRNA and protein were downregulated in colon carcinoma specimens. HNF4α expression was related to pT classification (P < 0.001), lymph node metastasis (P = 0.002), distant metastasis (P < 0.001) and clinical stage (P < 0.001) in colon carcinoma patients. Patients with low or negative HNF4α expression had worse 3-year progression-free survival (PFS, P = 0.006) and overall survival (OS, P = 0.005) than patients with high HNF4α expression. Low HNF4α expression was an independent prognostic factor for 3-year PFS (hazard ratio 2.94; 95% confidence interval 1.047-8.250; P = 0.041). Ectopic expression of HNF4α inhibited colon carcinoma cell (HT29, LoVo, and SW480) proliferation, migration, and invasion, induced G2/M phase arrest and promoted apoptosis. Ectopic expression of HNF4α upregulated E-cadherin and downregulated vimentin in vitro, and suppressed SW480 xenograft tumor growth and liver metastasis in vivo. Furthermore, HNF4α overexpression downregulated the expression of snail, slug and twist. HNF4α inhibited EMT through its effect on the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, and HNF4α downregulation may be mediated by promoter methylation in cancer tissues. Our results suggest that downregulation of HNF4α plays a critical role in the aggravation of colon carcinoma possibly by promoting EMT via the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and by affecting apoptosis and cell cycle progression.

  5. Medullary carcinoma of the colon: a case series and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Julia; Kantekure, Kanchan; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2014-01-01

    Most colon cancers are adenocarcinoma of the colon, which present with a typical histological type. However, a relatively newly-recognized subtype, called medullary carcinoma of the colon, has been characterized. This type is generally divided into subtypes of poorly-differentiated and undifferentiated medullary carcinoma. Only a handful of studies have been conducted thus far, mostly focusing on immunohistochemical and clinical characteristics of the disease. Herein we present two cases seen at our hospital within one academic year. The first is the case of a 79-year-old African-American woman, who presented with generalized weakness and gait unsteadiness ultimately diagnosed with a Stage IIIB medullary carcinoma of the proximal colon at the time of surgery, but later found to have metastases to a single paraesophageal lymph node. The second is a case of a 79-year-old Caucasian woman, who presented with several weeks of malaise, nausea, and diarrhea leading to diagnosis of a stage IIB medullary colon carcinoma now receiving chemotherapy. Although these tumors tend to be right-sided and therefore present at an advanced stage, distant metastasis is rare at presentation and is primarily to the liver or regional lymph nodes. Only one study has been performed regarding short-term outcomes, which failed to reach statistical significance, but trended towards better prognosis compared to poorly-differentiated and undifferentiated colonic adenocarcinomas.

  6. Olive oil hydroxytyrosol reduces toxicity evoked by acrylamide in human Caco-2 cells by preventing oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Ramiro, Ildefonso; Martín, María Ángeles; Ramos, Sonia; Bravo, Laura; Goya, Luis

    2011-10-09

    Humans are exposed to dietary acrylamide (AA) during their lifetime, it is therefore necessary to investigate the mechanisms associated with AA-induced toxic effects. Accumulating evidence indicates that oxidative stress contributes to AA cytotoxicity, thus, dietary antioxidants might have a protective role in colonic cells against AA toxicity. We have recently reported that hydroxytyrosol (HTy), a natural antioxidant abundant in olive oil, is able to enhance the cellular antioxidant defence capacity, thereby protecting cells from oxidative stress. In this study, we evaluate the protective role of HTy on alterations of the redox balance induced by AA in Caco-2 intestinal cells. AA cytotoxicity was counteracted by HTy by powerfully reducing ROS generation, recovering the excited enzyme antioxidant defences and decreasing phospho-Jun kinase concentration and caspase-3 activity induced by AA. Therefore, AA-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis are closely related to oxidative stress in Caco-2 cells and the olive oil natural dietary antioxidant HTy was able to contain AA toxicity by improving the redox status of Caco-2 cells and by partly restraining the apoptotic pathway activated by AA.

  7. Study of the Biotransformation of Tongmai Formula by Human Intestinal Flora and Its Intestinal Permeability across the Caco-2 Cell Monolayer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuai; Xu, Wei; Wang, Fu-Rong; Yang, Xiu-Wei

    2015-10-15

    Tongmai formula (TMF) is a well-known Chinese medicinal preparation that contains isoflavones as its major bioactive constituents. As traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) are usually used by oral administration, their fate inside the intestinal lumen, including their biotransformation by human intestinal flora (HIF) and intestinal absorption deserves study. In this work TMF extract was incubated with human intestinal bacteria under anaerobic conditions and the changes in the twelve main constituents of TMF were then investigated. Their intestinal permeabilities, i.e., the transport capability across the intestinal brush border were investigated with a human colon carcinoma cell line (Caco-2) cell monolayer model to predict the absorption mechanism. Meanwhile, rapid HPLC-DAD methods were established for the assay. According to the biotransformation curves of the twelve constituents and the permeability coefficients, the intestinal absorption capacity of the typical compounds was elevated from the levels of 10(-7) cm/s to 10(-5) cm/s from those of the original compounds in TMF. Among them the main isoflavone glycosides puerarin (4), mirificin (6) and daidzin (7) were transformed into the same aglycone, daidzein (10). Therefore it was predicted that the aglycone compounds might be the real active ingredients in TMF. The models used can represent a novel path for the TCM studies.

  8. The effect of probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 lipopolysaccharide on the 5-aminosalicylic acid transepithelial transport across Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Stětinová, Věra; Smetanová, Libuše; Kholová, Dagmar; Květina, Jaroslav; Svoboda, Zbyněk; Zídek, Zdeněk; Tlaskalová-Hogenová, Helena

    2013-09-01

    The object of this study was to investigate the effect of probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 (EcN) (i) EcN lipopolysaccharide (EcN LPS) and (ii) bacteria-free supernatant of EcN suspension (EcN supernatant) on in vitro transepithelial transport of mesalazine (5-aminosalicylic acid, 5-ASA), the most commonly prescribed anti-inflammatory drug in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Effect of co-administered EcN LPS (100 µg/ml) or EcN supernatant (50 µg/ml) on the 5-ASA transport (300 µmol/l) was studied using the Caco-2 monolayer (a human colon carcinoma cell line) as a model of human intestinal absorption. Permeability characteristics for absorptive and secretory transport of parent drug and its intracellularly-formed metabolite were determined. The quantification of 5-ASA and its main metabolite N-acetyl-5-amino-salicylic acid (N-Ac-5-ASA) was performed by high performance liquid chromatography. Obtained results suggest that neither EcN LPS nor EcN supernatant had effect on the total 5-ASA transport (secretory flux greater than absorptive flux) and on the transport of intracellularly formed N-Ac-5-ASA (preferentially transported in the secretory direction). The percent cumulative transport of the total 5-ASA alone or in combination with EcN LPS or EcN supernatant did not exceed 1%.

  9. Diagnosis of colonic amebiasis and coexisting signet-ring cell carcinoma in intestinal biopsy.

    PubMed

    Grosse, Alexandra

    2016-09-28

    Amebiasis is uncommon in developed countries. Several case reports in the literature emphasize that both the presenting symptoms and the radiological findings of colonic amebiasis closely resemble more common conditions, such as idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease and gastro-intestinal malignancy. We describe a unique case of colonic amebiasis (amebomas) coexisting with signet-ring cell carcinoma of the ileocecal valve, the cecum and the appendix. Endoscopically, the ulcerated tumor was indistinguishable from the ulcerations and pseudotumors (amebomas) detected in the ascending colon. Histological examination of biopsy specimens revealed the pathognomonic features of protozoa with ingested erythrocytes in combination with signet-ring cell infiltration. The author concludes that amebiasis may not only mimic carcinoma but, rarely, may coexist with carcinoma in the same patient. Clinicians and pathologists should be aware of this possibility in order not to delay diagnosis and treatment of malignant disease.

  10. [Effect of tBHQ and sulforaphane on Nrf2-ARE signaling pathway of Caco2 cells].

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-yuan; Qu, Li-yan; Quan, Kang; Jiang, Yan-ling; Tang, Xiu-wen

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the effect of tBHQ and sulforaphane on the protein expression in Nrf2-ARE signaling pathway of Caco2 cells. Human colorectal carcinoma Caco2 cells were treated with 20 micromol/L tBHQ and 5 micromol/L sulforaphane (SFN) respectively. Real time PCR, Western blotting and immunoflourescence staining (IF) were performed to measure the target gene expression. Nrf2, AKR1C1 and NQO1 protein expressions were increased time-dependently in Caco2 cells after treatment with tBHQ and SFN. Time-course experiments showed that tBHQ and SFN increased the accumulation of Nrf2, and concomitantly increased the protein levels of AKR1C1 and NQO1. Real-time PCR and Western blotting showed that tBHQ and SFN significantly increased the expression of Nrf2 at 8h after the treatment, and AKR1C1 and NQO1 at 16 h. Confocal microscopy technique showed that Nrf2 accumulated in the nucleus at 6-8 h after treatment with tBHQ. After 1 h treatment with tBHQ the nuclear Nrf2 maintained at elevated level for at least 4 h with tBHQ withdrawn. tBHQ and SFN induced nuclear accumulation of Nrf2 and activated Nrf2-dependent regulation of ARE-mediated gene expression in Caco2 cells. In addition, the results provide experimental evidence for choosing the dose and frequency of the inducer in cancer chemoprevention study and in developing inhibitors of Nrf2-ARE signaling pathway.

  11. Early-stage primary signet ring cell carcinoma of the colon.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Hyun; Park, Seun Ja; Park, Moo In; Moon, Won; Kim, Sung Eun

    2013-06-28

    Primary signet ring cell carcinoma of the colorectum detected at an early stage is very rare; most cases are detected at an advanced stage. Therefore, its prognosis is poorer than that of ordinary colorectal cancer. A 56-year-old Korean man was seen at this hospital for management of signet ring cell carcinoma of the colon. Colonoscopic examination revealed a IIa-like, ill-defined and flatly elevated 9-mm residual tumor in the cecum. Endoscopic mucosal resection was preformed. Pathological examination of the resected specimen revealed signet ring cell carcinoma that had invaded the lamina propria without venous or perineural invasion. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) and positron CT showed no evidence of primary lesions or distant metastasis. An additional laparoscopic right-hemicolectomy was performed; no residual tumor or lymph node metastasis was found. We report a case of primary signet ring cell carcinoma of the colon detected at an early stage and provide a review of the literature.

  12. Salmonella enterica Serovar Kentucky Flagella Are Required for Broiler Skin Adhesion and Caco-2 Cell Invasion.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Sanaz; Howe, Kevin; Lawrence, Mark L; Brooks, John P; Bailey, R Hartford; Karsi, Attila

    2017-01-15

    Nontyphoidal Salmonella strains are the main source of pathogenic bacterial contamination in the poultry industry. Recently, Salmonella enterica serovar Kentucky has been recognized as the most prominent serovar on carcasses in poultry-processing plants. Previous studies showed that flagella are one of the main factors that contribute to bacterial attachment to broiler skin. However, the precise role of flagella and the mechanism of attachment are unknown. There are two different flagellar subunits (fliC and fljB) expressed alternatively in Salmonella enterica serovars using phase variation. Here, by making deletions in genes encoding flagellar structural subunits (flgK, fliC, and fljB), and flagellar motor (motA), we were able to differentiate the role of flagella and their rotary motion in the colonization of broiler skin and cellular attachment. Utilizing a broiler skin assay, we demonstrated that the presence of FliC is necessary for attachment to broiler skin. Expression of the alternative flagellar subunit FljB enables Salmonella motility, but this subunit is unable to mediate tight attachment. Deletion of the flgK gene prevents proper flagellar assembly, making Salmonella significantly less adherent to broiler skin than the wild type. S Kentucky with deletions in all three structural genes, fliC, fljB, and flgK, as well as a flagellar motor mutant (motA), exhibited less adhesion and invasion of Caco-2 cells, while an fljB mutant was as adherent and invasive as the wild-type strain. In this work, we answered clearly the role of flagella in S Kentucky attachment to the chicken skin and Caco-2 cells. We demonstrated that the presence of FliC is necessary for attachment to broiler skin. Expression of the alternative flagellar subunit FljB enables Salmonella motility, but this subunit is unable to mediate strong attachment. Deletion of the flgK gene prevents proper flagellar assembly, making Salmonella significantly less adherent to broiler skin than the wild

  13. Salmonella enterica Serovar Kentucky Flagella Are Required for Broiler Skin Adhesion and Caco-2 Cell Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Salehi, Sanaz; Howe, Kevin; Lawrence, Mark L.; Brooks, John P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nontyphoidal Salmonella strains are the main source of pathogenic bacterial contamination in the poultry industry. Recently, Salmonella enterica serovar Kentucky has been recognized as the most prominent serovar on carcasses in poultry-processing plants. Previous studies showed that flagella are one of the main factors that contribute to bacterial attachment to broiler skin. However, the precise role of flagella and the mechanism of attachment are unknown. There are two different flagellar subunits (fliC and fljB) expressed alternatively in Salmonella enterica serovars using phase variation. Here, by making deletions in genes encoding flagellar structural subunits (flgK, fliC, and fljB), and flagellar motor (motA), we were able to differentiate the role of flagella and their rotary motion in the colonization of broiler skin and cellular attachment. Utilizing a broiler skin assay, we demonstrated that the presence of FliC is necessary for attachment to broiler skin. Expression of the alternative flagellar subunit FljB enables Salmonella motility, but this subunit is unable to mediate tight attachment. Deletion of the flgK gene prevents proper flagellar assembly, making Salmonella significantly less adherent to broiler skin than the wild type. S. Kentucky with deletions in all three structural genes, fliC, fljB, and flgK, as well as a flagellar motor mutant (motA), exhibited less adhesion and invasion of Caco-2 cells, while an fljB mutant was as adherent and invasive as the wild-type strain. IMPORTANCE In this work, we answered clearly the role of flagella in S. Kentucky attachment to the chicken skin and Caco-2 cells. We demonstrated that the presence of FliC is necessary for attachment to broiler skin. Expression of the alternative flagellar subunit FljB enables Salmonella motility, but this subunit is unable to mediate strong attachment. Deletion of the flgK gene prevents proper flagellar assembly, making Salmonella significantly less adherent to broiler

  14. Disturbed Colonic Motility Contributes to Anorectal Symptoms and Dysfunction After Radiotherapy for Carcinoma of the Prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Yeoh, Eric K.; Bartholomeusz, Dylan L.; Holloway, Richard H.; Fraser, Robert J.; Botten, Rochelle; Di Matteo, Addolorata; Moore, James W.; Schoeman, Mark N.

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of colonic motility in the pathogenesis of anorectal symptoms and dysfunction after radiotherapy (RT) for carcinoma of the prostate. Patients and Methods: Thirty-eight patients, median age 71 (range, 50-81) years with localized prostate carcinoma randomized to one of two radiation dose schedules underwent colonic transit scintigraphy and assessment of anorectal symptoms (questionnaire), anorectal function (manometry), and anal sphincteric morphology (endoanal ultrasound) before and at 1 month and 1 year after RT. Results: Whole and distal colonic transit increased 1 month after RT, with faster distal colonic transit only persisting at 1 year. Frequency and urgency of defecation, fecal incontinence, and rectal bleeding increased 1 month after RT and persisted at 1 year. Basal anal pressures remained unchanged, but progressive reductions occurred in anal squeeze pressures and responses to increased intra-abdominal pressure. Rectal compliance decreased progressively in the patients, although no changes in anorectal sensory function ensued. Radiotherapy had no effect on the morphology of the internal and external anal sphincters. Distal colonic retention was weakly related to rectal compliance at 1 month, but both faster colonic transit and reduced rectal compliance were more frequent with increased fecal urgency. At 1 year, a weak inverse relationship existed between colonic half-clearance time and frequency of defecation, although both faster whole-colonic transit and reduced rectal compliance occurred more often with increased stool frequency. Conclusion: Colonic dysmotility contributes to anorectal dysfunction after RT for carcinoma of the prostate. This has implications for improving the management of anorectal radiation sequelae.

  15. Thyroid hormone regulation of the Na+/glucose cotransporter SGLT1 in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Matosin-Matekalo, M; Mesonero, J E; Delezay, O; Poiree, J C; Ilundain, A A; Brot-Laroche, E

    1998-01-01

    The expression of the Na+/glucose cotransporter (SGLT1) in response to thyroid hormone [3,5,3'-tri-iodo-l-thyronine (T3)] was investigated in the enterocytic model cell line Caco-2/TC7. In differentiated cells, T3 treatment induces an average 10-fold increase in glucose consumption as well as a T3 dose-dependent increase in SGLT1 mRNA abundance. Only cells grown on glucose-containing media, but not on the non-metabolizable glucose analogue alpha-methylglucose (AMG), could respond to T3-treatment. The Vmax parameter of AMG transport was enhanced 6-fold by T3 treatment, whereas the protein abundance of SGLT1 was unchanged. The role of Na+ recycling in the T3-related activation of SGLT1 activity was suggested by both the large increase in Na+/K+ATPase protein abundance and the inhibition, down to control levels, of AMG uptake in ouabain-treated cells. Further investigations aimed at identifying the presence of a second cotransporter that could be expressed erroneously in the colon cancer cell line were unsuccessful: T3-treatment did not modify the sugar-specificity profile of AMG transport and did not induce the expression of SGLT2 as assessed by reverse transcription-PCR. Our results show that T3 can stimulate the SGLT1 cotransport activity in Caco-2 cells. Both transcriptional and translational levels of regulation are involved. Finally, glucose metabolism is required for SGLT1 expression, a result that contrasts with the in vivo situation and may be related to the fetal phenotype of the cells. PMID:9729472

  16. Transport of hop aroma compounds across Caco-2 monolayers.

    PubMed

    Heinlein, A; Metzger, M; Walles, H; Buettner, A

    2014-11-01

    Although being reported and used as a sedative remedy for several years, the bioactive principle of hop preparations is still not decisively clarified. Understanding absorption and transformation processes of potential physiologically active constituents is essential to evaluate the likeliness of biological effects on humans. Therefore, single hop aroma compounds as well as digestive transformation products thereof have been investigated in view of their human intestinal absorption, applying Caco-2 transport experiments as well as investigations on potential biotransformation processes. Selective and sensitive identification and quantification were thereby achieved by application of two-dimensional high resolution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in conjunction with stable isotope dilution analysis, leading to the determination of apparent permeability values by different mathematical approaches considering sink and non-sink conditions. Overall, calculated permeability values ranged from 2.6 × 10(-6) to 1.8 × 10(-4) cm s(-1) with all mathematical approaches, indicating high absorption potential and almost complete bioavailability for all tested compounds with hydroxyl-functionalities. Considering this high permeability together with the high lipophilicity of these substances, a passive transcellular uptake route can be speculated. Investigated sesquiterpenes and β-myrcene showed flat absorption profiles while the investigated esters showed decreasing profiles. In view of the lipophilic and volatile nature of the investigated substances, special attention was paid to recovery and mass balance determination. Furthermore, in the course of the transport experiments of 1-octen-3-ol and 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol, additional biotransformation products were observed, namely 3-octanone and 3-methyl-2-butenal, respectively. The absence of these additional substances in control experiments strongly indicates an intestinal first-pass metabolism of the

  17. Transepithelial transport of flavanone in intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Shoko; Konishi, Yutaka

    2008-03-28

    Our recent study [S. Kobayashi, S. Tanabe, M. Sugiyama, Y. Konishi, Transepithelial transport of hesperetin and hesperidin in intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers, Biochim. Biophys. Acta, 1778 (2008) 33-41] shows that the mechanism of absorption of hesperetin involves both proton-coupled active transport and transcellular passive diffusion. Here, as well as analyzing the cell permeability of hesperetin, we also study the transport of other flavanones, naringenin and eriodictyol, using Caco-2 cell monolayers. Similar to hesperetin mentioned, naringenin and eriodictyol showed proton-coupled polarized transport in apical-to-basolateral direction in non-saturable manner, constant permeation in the apical-to-basolateral direction (J{sub ap{yields}}{sub bl}) irrespective of the transepithelial electrical resistance (TER), and preferable distribution into the basolateral side after apical loading in the presence of a proton gradient. Furthermore, the proton-coupled J{sub ap{yields}}{sub bl} of hesperetin, naringenin and eriodictyol, were inhibited by substrates of the monocarboxylic acid transporter (MCT), such as benzoic acid, but not by ferulic acid. In contrast, both benzoic and ferulic acids have no stimulatory effect on J{sub ap{yields}}{sub bl} of each flavanone by trans-stimulation analysis. These results indicates that proton-driven active transport is commonly participated in the absorption of flavanone in general, and that its transport is presumed to be unique other than MCT-mediated transport for absorption of phenolic acids (PAs), sodium-dependent MCT (SMCT) nor anion exchanger-mediated transport.

  18. Transport of decursin and decursinol angelate across Caco-2 and MDR-MDCK cell monolayers: in vitro models for intestinal and blood-brain barrier permeability.

    PubMed

    Madgula, Vamsi L; Avula, Bharathi; Reddy V L, Niranjan; Khan, Ikhlas A; Khan, Shabana I

    2007-04-01

    Decursin (DE) and decursinol angelate (DA) were isolated from the roots of Angelica gigas (Apiaceae) and purified by HPLC. DE and DA have been reported to exhibit significant neuropharmacological activities, but their intestinal transport and permeability in terms of CNS penetration across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) are unknown. This study was undertaken to evaluate the IN VITRO intestinal and BBB transport of DE and DA using Caco-2 and MDR-MDCK cell monolayer models, respectively. The bidirectional transport of DE and DA across Caco-2 and MDR-MDCK monolayers was examined for 2 hours. Integrity of the monolayer was determined by TEER value and by monitoring the transport of Lucifer yellow (Ly) across the monolayers. Quantitation of DE and DA was performed by HPLC. DE and DA exhibited bidirectional transport with a Papp value in the range of 9.0-12.0x10(-6) cm/sec and 7.2-11.7x10(-6) cm/sec in Caco-2 and MDR-MDCK monolayers, respectively. The TEER values were in the range of 410-440 and 1170-1230 ohm cm2 for Caco-2 and MDR-MDCK monolayers, respectively. Ly measurement, the fluorescent marker of passive paracellular diffusion, resulted in Papp values of 2.5-5.0x10(-6) in Caco-2 and 6.0-8.0x10(-6) cm/sec in MDR-MDCK monolayers, confirming that the monolayer integrity was intact at the end of the experiment. Caco-2:human colonic adenocarcinoma DA:decursinol angelate DE:decursin Ly:Lucifer yellow MDCK:Madin-Darby canine kidney MDR:multidrug resistant Papp:apparent permeability TEER:transepithelial electrical resistance.

  19. The destruction complex of beta-catenin in colorectal carcinoma and colonic adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Bourroul, Guilherme Muniz; Fragoso, Hélio José; Gomes, José Walter Feitosa; Bourroul, Vivian Sati Oba; Oshima, Celina Tizuko Fujiyama; Gomes, Thiago Simão; Saba, Gabriela Tognini; Palma, Rogério Tadeu; Waisberg, Jaques

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To evaluate the destruction complex of beta-catenin by the expression of the proteins beta-catetenin, adenomatous polyposis coli, GSK3β, axin and ubiquitin in colorectal carcinoma and colonic adenoma. Methods Tissue samples from 64 patients with colorectal carcinoma and 53 patients with colonic adenoma were analyzed. Tissue microarray blocks and slides were prepared and subjected to immunohistochemistry with polyclonal antibodies in carcinoma, adjacent non-neoplastic mucosa, and adenoma tissues. The immunoreactivity was evaluated by the percentage of positive stained cells and by the intensity assessed through of the stained grade of proteins in the cytoplasm and nucleus of cells. In the statistical analysis, the Spearman correlation coefficient, Student’s t, χ2, Mann-Whitney, and McNemar tests, and univariate logistic regression analysis were used. Results In colorectal carcinoma, the expressions of beta-catenin and adenomatous polyposis coli proteins were significantly higher than in colonic adenomas (p<0.001 and p<0.0001, respectively). The immunoreactivity of GSK3β, axin 1 and ubiquitin proteins was significantly higher (p=0.03, p=0.039 and p=0.03, respectively) in colorectal carcinoma than in the colonic adenoma and adjacent non-neoplastic mucosa. The immunohistochemistry staining of these proteins did not show significant differences with the clinical and pathological characteristics of colorectal cancer and colonic adenoma. Conclusions These results suggest that, in adenomas, the lower expression of the beta-catenin, axin 1 and GSK3β proteins indicated that the destruction complex of beta-catenin was maintained, while in colorectal carcinoma, the increased expression of beta-catenin, GSK3β, axin 1, and ubiquitin proteins indicated that the destruction complex of beta-catenin was disrupted. PMID:27462886

  20. Scintigraphic demonstration of acute gastrointestinal bleeding caused by gallbladder carcinoma eroding the colon

    SciTech Connect

    Czerniak, A.; Zwas, S.T.; Rabau, M.Y.; Avigad, I.; Borag, B.; Wolfstein, I.

    1985-08-01

    Massive lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding caused by gallbladder carcinoma eroding into the colonic wall was demonstrated accurately by Tc-99m RBCs. In addition, retrograde bleeding into the gallbladder was also identified while arteriography did not show contrast extravasation. This case supports the use of Tc-99m RBCs over Tc-99m sulfur colloid for more accurate localization of lower GI bleeding.

  1. Visualization of metastases from colon carcinoma using an iodine 131-radiolabeled monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Leyden, M.J.; Thompson, C.H.; Lichtenstein, M.; Andrews, J.T.; Sullivan, J.R.; Zalcberg, J.R.; McKenzie, I.F.

    1986-03-15

    A murine monoclonal antibody that reacts with human colonic cancer (250-30.6) was labeled with radioactive iodine (131I) and the antibody was injected intravenously into 15 patients with known metastases originating from carcinoma of the colon (10 cases), malignant melanoma (1), breast (1), pancreas (1), hepatocellular carcinoma (1), and adenocarcinoma of unknown origin (1). Of the patients with metastatic colon carcinoma, there were 19 known deposits as judged by the techniques of clinical examination, x-rays, and scans obtained using sulpha-colloid. Of these 19 deposits, 17 (90%) were found using the 131I-labeled monoclonal antibody. In one case, the primary tumor, previously undiagnosed, was found. In only 1 of the 10 patients was tumor not found and this was due to the subsequent finding that the undifferentiated tumor did not react with antibody. Of the five patients who did not have carcinoma of the colon, three had negative scans, but two were positive. Thus, the technique of immunoscintography can readily detect both primary and metastatic tumors.

  2. Frequency and spectrum of c-Ki-ras mutations in human sporadic colon carcinoma, carcinomas arising in ulcerative colitis, and pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Burmer, G.C.; Rabinovitch, P.S.; Loeb, L.A. )

    1991-06-01

    Sporadic colon carcinomas, carcinomas arising in chronic ulcerative colitis, and pancreatic adenocarcinomas have been analyzed for the presence of c-Ki-ras mutations by a combination of histological enrichment, cell sorting, polymerase chain reaction, and direct sequencing. Although 60% (37/61) of sporadic colon carcinomas contained mutations in codon 12, only 1 of 17 specimens of dysplasia or carcinoma from ulcerative colitis patients contained c-Ki-ras mutations, despite a high frequency of aneuploid tumors. In contrast, a higher percentage (16/20 = 80%) of pancreatic adenocarcinomas contained mutations in c-Ki-ras 2, despite a lower frequency of DNA aneuploidy in these neoplasms. Moreover, the spectrum of mutations differed between sporadic colon carcinoma, where the predominant mutation was a G to A transition, and pancreatic carcinomas, which predominantly contained G to C or T transversions. These results suggest that the etiology of ras mutations is different in these three human neoplasms.

  3. The effect of five artificial sweeteners on Caco-2, HT-29 and HEK-293 cells.

    PubMed

    van Eyk, Armorel Diane

    2015-01-01

    Artificial sweeteners (AS) have been associated with tumor development (including colon cancer) in both animals and humans although evidence has been conflicting. Additional research was thus conducted by studying the effects of 5 AS on the morphology, cell proliferation and DNA in cells by utilizing Caco-2, HT-29 (colon) and HEK-293 (kidney) cell lines. Cells were exposed to sodium cyclamate, sodium saccharin, sucralose and acesulfame-K (0-50 mM) and aspartame (0-35 mM) over 24, 48 and 72 hours. Morphological changes were presented photographically and % cell viability was determined by using the MTT cell viability assay. Possible DNA damage (comet assay) induced by the AS (0.1, 1 and 10 mM, treated for 24, 48 and 72 hours) was studied. The appearance of "comets" was scored from no damage to severe damage (0-4). Cells became flatter and less well defined at higher AS concentrations (>10 mM). At concentrations >10 mM, decreased cell viability was noted with both increasing concentration and increasing incubation time for all cell lines tested. In general, HEK-293 cells seemed to be less affected then the colon cancer cells. Sucralose and sodium saccharin seemed to elicit the greatest degree of DNA fragmentation of all the sweeteners tested in all the cell lines used. Morphological cell alterations, cell viability and DNA fragmentation seemed to be more in the colon cancer cells. Further studies have to be performed to clarify mechanisms involved causing these alterations in mammalian cells.

  4. A case of descending colon carcinoma metastasized to left spermatic cord, testis, and epididymis

    PubMed Central

    Augustin, Herbert; Popper, Helmut; Pummer, Karl

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of descending colon carcinoma metastasized to the left spermatic cord, testis, and epididymis. A 77-year old male patient underwent a left hemicolectomy for a descending colon cancer. He was referred to our department because of swelling and pain of the left scrotum two years and six months after surgery. High left orchiectomy was performed. Histological examination revealed a metastasis of the colon carcinoma within the spermatic cord and epididymis approaching the testicle. Reports on metastatic cancer of the testis are scarce, because this metastatic cancer is extremely rare. In general, testicular pain is rare in the elderly. We suggest that any elder presenting with testicular pain deserves a complete clinical and diagnostic evaluation. PMID:24578939

  5. Accumulation characteristics of human colon carcinomas after monoclonal antibody ex vivo perfusion.

    PubMed Central

    Löhde, E.; Schwarzendahl, P.; Schlicker, H.; Abri, O.; Kalthoff, H.; Matzku, S.; Epenetos, A. A.; Kraas, E.

    1990-01-01

    Human colon carcinomas were operatively resected and the tumour-bearing segments interposed into an oxygenised ex vivo perfusion system. Pressure, flow, temperature, pH and metabolic parameters were controlled. Over a period of 45 min the 131I-labelled monoclonal antibody AUA1 was administered and its distribution in the tumour tissue analysed scintigraphically. The accumulated activity was determined in different tissues. The results showed that the AUA1 uptake increased with the degree of histological tumour differentiation. The main tumour:non-tumour ratio reached 0.8 in poorly, 4.1 in moderately and 5.9 in highly differentiated adenocarcinomas. Introducing the oxygenised erythrocyte-enriched perfusion media significantly increased the viability of the colon tissue. The ex vivo perfusion system will help to analyse factors determining monoclonal antibody accumulation in human colon carcinomas. Images Figure 3 PMID:2383474

  6. Factors derived from Escherichia coli Nissle 1917, grown in different growth media, enhance cell death in a model of 5-fluorouracil-induced Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cell damage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hanru; Bastian, Susan E P; Lawrence, Andrew; Howarth, Gordon S

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated supernatants (SNs) from Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) grown in commonly used growth media for their capacity to affect the viability of Caco-2 colon cancer cells in the presence and absence of 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) chemotherapy. EcN was grown in Luria-Bertani (LB), tryptone soya (TSB), Man Rogosa Sharpe (MRS), and M17 broth supplemented with 10% (v/v) lactose solution (M17). Human Caco-2 colon cancer cells were treated with DMEM (control), growth media alone (LB, TSB, MRS, and M17) or EcN SNs derived from these 4 media, in the presence and absence of 5-FU. Cell viability, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and cell monolayer permeability were determined. EcN SN in LB medium reduced Caco-2 cell viability significantly, to 51% at 48 h. The combination of this EcN SN and 5-FU further reduced cell viability to 37% at 48 h, compared to 5-FU control. MRS broth and EcN SN in MRS, together with 5-FU, generated significantly lower levels of ROS compared to 5-FU control. However, all 5-FU treatments significantly disrupted the Caco-2 cell barrier compared to control; with no significant differences observed among any of the 5-FU treatments. EcN SNs (LB+) was most effective at decreasing the viability of Caco-2 cells. This could indicate a potential role for this EcN SN in chemoprevention for colon cancer.

  7. Runt-related transcription factor 2 in human colon carcinoma: a potent prognostic factor associated with estrogen receptor.

    PubMed

    Sase, Tomohiko; Suzuki, Takashi; Miura, Koh; Shiiba, Kenichi; Sato, Ikuro; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Takagi, Kiyoshi; Onodera, Yoshiaki; Miki, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Mika; Ishida, Kazuyuki; Ohnuma, Shinobu; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Sato, Ryuichiro; Karasawa, Hideaki; Shibata, Chikashi; Unno, Michiaki; Sasaki, Iwao; Sasano, Hironobu

    2012-11-15

    Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) belongs to the RUNX family of heterodimeric transcription factors, and is mainly associated with osteogenesis. Previous in vitro studies demonstrated that RUNX2 increased the cell proliferation of mouse and rat colon carcinoma cells but the status of RUNX2 has remained unknown in human colon carcinoma. Therefore, we examined clinical significance and biological functions of RUNX2 in colon carcinoma. RUNX2 immunoreactivity was examined in 157 colon carcinoma tissues using immunohistochemistry. RUNX2 immunoreactivity was evaluated as percentage of positive carcinoma cells [i.e., labeling index (LI)]. We used SW480 and DLD-1 human colon carcinoma cells, expressing estrogen receptor-β (ER) in subsequent in vitro studies. RUNX2 immunoreactivity was detected in colon carcinoma cells, and the median value of RUNX2 LI was 67%. RUNX2 LI was significantly associated with Dukes' stage, liver metastasis and ERβ status. In addition, RUNX2 LI was significantly associated with adverse clinical outcome of the colon carcinoma patients, and turned out an independent prognostic factor following multivariate analysis. Results of in vitro studies demonstrated that both SW480 and DLD-1 cells transfected with small interfering RNA against RUNX2 significantly decreased their cell proliferation, migration and invasive properties. In addition, RUNX2 mRNA level was significantly decreased by ER antagonist in these two cells. These findings all suggest that RUNX2 is a potent prognostic factor in human colon carcinoma patients through the promotion of cell proliferation and invasion properties, and is at least partly upregulated by estrogen signals through ERβ of carcinoma cells.

  8. Alanylglutamine dipeptide and growth hormone maintain PepT1-mediated transport in oxidatively stressed Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Alteheld, B; Evans, M E; Gu, L H; Ganapathy, V; Leibach, F H; Jones, D P; Ziegler, T R

    2005-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by gut mucosal cells during conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may impair mucosal repair and nutrient transport/absorptive function. Absorption of di- and tripeptides in the small intestine and colon is mediated by the H(+)-dependent transporter PepT1, but effects of oxidative stress on di- and tripeptide transport are unknown. We assessed whether exposure to hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) influences dipeptide transport in human colonic epithelial (Caco-2) cells. Uptake of [(14)C]glycylsarcosine (Gly-Sar) was used to evaluate PepT1-mediated dipeptide transport. Exposure to 1-5 mmol/L H(2)O(2) for 24 h caused a dose-dependent decrease in Gly-Sar transport, which was associated with decreased PepT1 transport velocity (V(max)). Treatment with alanylglutamine (Ala-Gln) or growth hormone (GH) did not alter Caco-2 Gly-Sar transport in the absence of H(2)O(2). However, both Ala-Gln and GH prevented the decrease in dipeptide transport observed with 1 mmol/L H(2)O(2) treatment. Ala-Gln, but not GH, maintained cellular glutathione and prevented the decrease in PepT1 protein expression. Thus, these agents should be further investigated as potential therapies to improve absorption of small peptides in disorders associated with oxidative injury to the gut mucosa.

  9. [A case of ascending colon carcinoma metastasized to an inguinal hernia sac].

    PubMed

    Miyake, Yasuhiro; Kato, Takeshi; Katayama, Kinzo; Doi, Takashi; Oshima, Kazuteru; Handa, Rio; Hoshi, Minako; Makari, Yoichi; Oshima, Satoshi; Iijima, Shohei; Kurokawa, Eiji; Kikkawa, Nobuteru

    2007-11-01

    While inguinal hernia is one of the most common diseases, metastatic cancer of an inguinal hernia sac is rare. We report a case of ascending colon cancer metastasized to an inguinal hernia sac. A 60-year-old man, who was undergone a right hemicolectomy for an ascending colon cancer, was pointed out a palpable inguinal mass at one year and eight months after the operation. He was diagnosed as inguinal hernia, and herniorrhaphy was performed. In the operation, a tumor of the inguinal hernia sac, which invaded to spermatic cord, could be found and was removed with right testis. Bassini's method was performed after the resection of the inguinal tumor. Histological examination revealed that the tumor was metastasis of colon carcinoma. Examination of the entire body showed no other metastasis. As for the advanced colon cancer, we need to mention the possibility of metastatic saccular tumor.

  10. Transepithelial transport of biperiden hydrochloride in Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Abalos, Ivana S; Rodríguez, Yanina I; Lozano, Verónica; Cereseto, Marina; Mussini, Maria V; Spinetto, Marta E; Chiale, Carlos; Pesce, Guido

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this research has been to determine the biperiden hydrochloride permeability in Caco-2 model, in order to classify it based on the Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS). The World Health Organization (WHO) as well as many other authors have provisionally assigned the drug as BCS class I (high solubility-high permeability) or III (high solubility-low permeability), based on different methods. We determined biperiden BCS class by comparing its permeability to 5 pre-defined compounds: atenolol and ranitidine hydrochloride (low permeability group) and metoprolol tartrate, sodium naproxen and theophylline (high permeability group). Since biperiden permeability was higher than those obtained for high permeability drugs, we classified it as a BCS class I compound. On the other hand, as no differences were obtained for permeability values when apical to basolateral and basolateral to apical fluxes were studied, this drug cannot act as a substrate of efflux transporters. As a consequence of our results, we suggest that the widely used antiparkinsonian drug, biperiden, should be candidate for a waiver of in vivo bioequivalence studies.

  11. [Marked therapeutic effects of hybrid liposomes on the hepatic metastasis of colon carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Funamoto, Kota; Ichihara, Hideaki; Matsushita, Taku; Matsumoto, Yoko; Ueoka, Ryuichi

    2009-04-01

    Hybrid liposomes (HLs) composed of vesicular and micellar surfactants have inhibitory effects on the growth of tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. Successful clinical chemotherapy with drug-free HLs to patient with lymphoma has been reported after approval by the Committe of Bioethics. However, the therapeutic effects of HLs on the metastasis of colon carcinoma cells have not yet been elucidated. In this study, the therapeutic effects of HLs composed of L-alpha-dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and polyoxyethylene (23) dodecyl ether [C(12)(EO)(23)] on the metastasis of colon carcinoma (Colon26) cells were examined in vivo. Marked high therapeutic effects were obtained in the hepatic metastasis mice model after the treatment with HLs. Furthermore, optical microscopic analysis indicated that HLs could induce the apoptosis of colon carcinoma cells in vivo. No toxicity was observed in the hepatic metastasis mice model after intravenously injecting HLs. Therapeutic effects along with the induction of apoptosis by HLs without any drugs on hepatic metastasis were revealed on the basis of optical microscopic analysis for the first time in vivo.

  12. Genetic analysis of multiple synchronous lesions of the colon adenoma–carcinoma sequence

    PubMed Central

    Sedivy, R; Wolf, B; Kalipciyan, M; Steger, G G; Karner-Hanusch, J; Mader, R M

    2000-01-01

    The colorectal adenoma–carcinoma sequence represents a well-known paradigm for the sequential development of cancer driven by the accumulation of genomic defects. Although the colorectal adenoma–carcinoma sequence is well investigated, studies about tumours of different dignity co-existent in the same patient are seldom. In order to address the distribution of genetic alterations in different lesions of the same patient, we coincidently investigated carcinomas, adenomas and aberrant crypt foci in patients with sporadic colon cancer. By utilizing polymerase chain reaction, single-strand conformation polymorphism, heteroduplex-analysis, restriction fragment length polymorphism, protein truncation test and sequencing techniques we looked for mutations and microsatellite instability of APC, H- ras, K- ras, p53, DCC and the DNA repair genes hMLH1/hMSH2. In accordance with the suggested adenoma–carcinoma sequence of the colon, four patients reflected the progressive accumulation of genetic defects in synchronously appearing tumours during carcinogenesis. However, two patients with non-hereditary malignomas presented different genetic instabilities in different but synchronously appearing tumours suggesting non-clonal growth under almost identical conditions of the environment. Thus, sporadically manifesting multiple lesions of the colon were not necessarily driven by similar genetic mechanisms. Premalignant lesions may transform into malignant tumours starting from different types of genetic instability, which indicates independent and simultaneous tumorigenesis within the same organ. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10755401

  13. H3K9 Trimethylation Silences Fas Expression To Confer Colon Carcinoma Immune Escape and 5-Fluorouracil Chemoresistance.

    PubMed

    Paschall, Amy V; Yang, Dafeng; Lu, Chunwan; Choi, Jeong-Hyeon; Li, Xia; Liu, Feiyan; Figueroa, Mario; Oberlies, Nicholas H; Pearce, Cedric; Bollag, Wendy B; Nayak-Kapoor, Asha; Liu, Kebin

    2015-08-15

    The Fas-FasL effector mechanism plays a key role in cancer immune surveillance by host T cells, but metastatic human colon carcinoma often uses silencing Fas expression as a mechanism of immune evasion. The molecular mechanism under FAS transcriptional silencing in human colon carcinoma is unknown. We performed genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing analysis and identified that the FAS promoter is enriched with H3K9me3 in metastatic human colon carcinoma cells. The H3K9me3 level in the FAS promoter region is significantly higher in metastatic than in primary cancer cells, and it is inversely correlated with Fas expression level. We discovered that verticillin A is a selective inhibitor of histone methyltransferases SUV39H1, SUV39H2, and G9a/GLP that exhibit redundant functions in H3K9 trimethylation and FAS transcriptional silencing. Genome-wide gene expression analysis identified FAS as one of the verticillin A target genes. Verticillin A treatment decreased H3K9me3 levels in the FAS promoter and restored Fas expression. Furthermore, verticillin A exhibited greater efficacy than decitabine and vorinostat in overcoming colon carcinoma resistance to FasL-induced apoptosis. Verticillin A also increased DR5 expression and overcame colon carcinoma resistance to DR5 agonist drozitumab-induced apoptosis. Interestingly, verticillin A overcame metastatic colon carcinoma resistance to 5-fluorouracil in vitro and in vivo. Using an orthotopic colon cancer mouse model, we demonstrated that tumor-infiltrating cytotoxic T lymphocytes are FasL(+) and that FasL-mediated cancer immune surveillance is essential for colon carcinoma growth control in vivo. Our findings determine that H3K9me3 of the FAS promoter is a dominant mechanism underlying FAS silencing and resultant colon carcinoma immune evasion and progression.

  14. Tumor-associated macrophages favor C26 murine colon carcinoma cell proliferation in an oxidative stress-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Luput, Lavinia; Licarete, Emilia; Sesarman, Alina; Laura, Patras; Alupei, Marius Costel; Banciu, Manuela

    2017-02-17

    The role of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) in the development of colon carcinoma is still controversial. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the TAM‑driven processes that may affect colon cancer cell proliferation. To achieve this purpose, murine macrophages were co-cultured with C26 murine colon carcinoma cells at a cell density ratio that approximates physiological conditions for colon carcinoma development in vivo. In this respect, the effects of TAM-mediated angiogenesis, inflammation and oxidative stress on the proliferative capacity of C26 murine colon carcinoma cells were studied. To gain insight into the TAM-driven oxidative stress, NADPH oxidase, the main pro-oxidant enzyme in macrophages, was inhibited. Our data revealed that the stimulatory effects of TAMs on C26 cell proliferation may be related mainly to their pro-oxidant actions exerted by NADPH oxidase activity, which maintains the redox status and the angiogenic capacity of the tumor microenvironment. Additionally, the anti-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic effects of TAMs on tumor cells were found to create a favorable microenvironment for C26 colon carcinoma development and progression. In conclusion, our data confirmed the protumor role of TAMs in the development of colon carcinoma in an oxidative stress-dependent manner that potentiates the angiogenic capacity of the tumor microenvironment. These data may offer valuable information for future tumor-targeted therapies based on TAM 're-education' strategies.

  15. Activated macrophages containing tumor marker in colon carcinoma: immunohistochemical proof of a concept.

    PubMed

    Faber, T J E; Japink, D; Leers, M P G; Sosef, M N; von Meyenfeldt, M F; Nap, M

    2012-04-01

    The presence of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-containing activated macrophages has been demonstrated in peripheral blood from patients with colorectal carcinoma. Macrophages migrate from the circulation into the tissue, phagocytose debris, and return to the bloodstream. Hence it seems likely that activated macrophages containing tumor debris, i.e., tumor marker, are present in the stroma of colorectal carcinoma. After phagocytosis, they could follow a hematogenic or lymphogenic route to the peripheral blood. The aim of this study is to assess the presence of tumor marker-containing activated macrophages in the stroma of colon carcinoma and in regional lymph nodes. From 10 cases of colon carcinoma, samples of tumor tissue and metastasis-free lymph nodes were cut in serial sections and stained for CD68 to identify macrophages and for CEA, cytokeratin, or M30 presence. Slides were digitalised and visually inspected using two monitors, comparing the CD68 stain to the tumor marker stain to evaluate the presence of tumor marker-positive macrophages. Macrophages containing tumor marker could be identified in tumor stroma and in metastasis-free regional lymph nodes. The distribution varied for the different markers, CEA-positive macrophages being most abundant. The presence of macrophages containing tumor marker in the tumor stroma and lymph nodes from patients with colon carcinoma could be confirmed in this series using serial immunohistochemistry. This finding supports the concept of activated macrophages, after phagocytosing cell debris, being transported or migrating through the lymphatic system. These results support the potential of tumor marker-containing macrophages to serve as a marker for diagnosis and follow-up of colon cancer patients.

  16. Evaluation of antioxidant activity and antiproliferative effect of fruit juices enriched with Pycnogenol® in colon carcinoma cells. The effect of in vitro gastrointestinal digestion.

    PubMed

    Frontela-Saseta, Carmen; López-Nicolás, Rubén; González-Bermúdez, Carlos A; Peso-Echarri, Patricia; Ros-Berruezo, Gaspar; Martínez-Graciá, Carmen; Canali, Raffaella; Virgili, Fabio

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of in vitro gastrointestinal digestion on the antioxidant and antiproliferative effect of fruit juices enriched with Pycnogenol® (0.5 g/L) on a colon carcinoma cell line (Caco-2). The total phenolic concentration (TPC), antioxidant activity and inhibition cell growth were studied in fresh and digested pineapple juice and red fruits juice (both enriched with pine bark extract and not). After in vitro digestion the level of detectable phenolic compounds (expressed as gallic acid equivalent) was higher in both pineapple and red fruits juices enriched with Pycnogenol® than in non-enriched commercial juices (155.6 mg/100 mL vs 94.6 mg/100 mL and 478.5 mg/100 mL vs 406.9 mg/100 mL, respectively). Increased antioxidant activity (measured by 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) and oxygen radical absorbance capacity assay (ORAC) methods) was observed in digested enriched juices with respect to the same samples before digestion. Pycnogenol® enrichment led to a high antiproliferative effect between 24 and 72 h of incubation with undigested pineapple juice compared with the non-enriched juice. It can be concluded that enrichment of fruit juices with Pycnogenol® provides a source of phenolic compounds with high stability to in vitro gastrointestinal conditions; however, the antioxidant properties of fruit juices were affected to a different extent.

  17. Identification of stromal differentially expressed proteins in the colon carcinoma by quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Mu, Yibing; Chen, Yongheng; Zhang, Guiying; Zhan, Xianquan; Li, Yuanyuan; Liu, Ting; Li, Guoqing; Li, Maoyu; Xiao, Zhefeng; Gong, Xiaoxiang; Chen, Zhuchu

    2013-06-01

    Tumor microenvironment plays very important roles in the carcinogenesis. A variety of stromal cells in the microenvironment have been modified to support the unique needs of the malignant state. This study was to discover stromal differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) that were involved in colon carcinoma carcinogenesis. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) was captured and isolated the stromal cells from colon adenocarcinoma (CAC) and non-neoplastic colon mucosa (NNCM) tissues, respectively. Seventy DEPs were identified between the pooled LCM-enriched CAC and NNCM stroma samples by iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics. Gene Ontology (GO) relationship analysis revealed that DEPs were hierarchically grouped into 10 clusters, and were involved in multiple biological functions that were altered during carcinogenesis, including extracellular matrix organization, cytoskeleton, transport, metabolism, inflammatory response, protein polymerization, and cell motility. Pathway network analysis revealed 6 networks and 56 network eligible proteins with Ingenuity pathway analysis. Four significant networks functioned in digestive system development and its function, inflammatory disease, and developmental disorder. Eight DEPs (DCN, FN1, PKM2, HSP90B1, S100A9, MYH9, TUBB, and YWHAZ) were validated by Western blotting, and four DEPs (DCN, FN1, PKM2, and HSP90B1) were validated by immunohistochemical analysis. It is the first report of stromal DEPs between CAC and NNCM tissues. It will be helpful to recognize the roles of stromas in the colon carcinoma microenvironment, and improve the understanding of carcinogenesis in colon carcinoma. The present data suggest that DCN, FN1, PKM2, HSP90B1, S100A9, MYH9, TUBB, and YWHAZ might be the potential targets for colon cancer prevention and therapy.

  18. Identification and functional analysis of ligands for natural killer cell activating receptors in colon carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhang; Su, Tao; He, Liang; Wang, Hongtao; Ji, Gang; Liu, Xiaonan; Zhang, Yun; Dong, Guanglong

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play important roles in the immune defense against tumor cells. The function of NK cells is determined by a balance between activating and inhibitory signals. DNAX accessory molecule-1 (DNAM-1) and NK group 2 member D (NKG2D) are major NK cell activating receptors, which transduce activating signals after binding their ligands CD155, CD112 and major histocompatibility complex class I-related chains A and B (MICA/B). However, the expression and functions of these ligands in colon carcinoma are still elusive. Here, we show the higher expression of CD155, CD112 and MICA/B in colon carcinoma tissues, although no correlations between the ligands expression and patient clinicopathological parameters were found. The subsequent cytotoxicity assay indicated that NK cells effectively kill colon carcinoma cells. Functional blocking of these ligands and/or receptors with antibodies led to significant inhibition of NK cell cytotoxicity. Importantly, expression of DNAM-1 and NKG2D was reduced in NK cells of colon cancer patients, and this reduction could directly suppress the activation of NK cells. Moreover, colon cancer patients have higher serum concentrations of sCD155 and sMICA/B (soluble ligands, secreted or shed from cells) than those in healthy donors (sCD155, 127.82 ± 44.12 vs. 63.67 ± 22.30 ng/ml; sMICA, 331.51 ± 65.23 vs. 246.74 ± 20.76 pg/ml; and sMICB, 349.42 ± 81.69 vs. 52.61 ± 17.56 pg/ml). The up-regulation of these soluble ligands may down-regulate DNAM-1 and NKG2D on NK cells, ultimately leading to the inhibition of NK cytotoxicity. Colon cancer might be a promising target for NK cell-based adoptive immunotherapy.

  19. Feasibility of electronic nose technology for discriminating between head and neck, bladder, and colon carcinomas.

    PubMed

    van de Goor, R M G E; Leunis, N; van Hooren, M R A; Francisca, E; Masclee, A; Kremer, B; Kross, K W

    2017-02-01

    Electronic nose (e-nose) technology has the potential to detect cancer at an early stage and can differentiate between cancer origins. Our objective was to compare patients who had head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) with patients who had colon or bladder cancer to determine the distinctive diagnostic characteristics of the e-nose. Feasibility study An e-nose device was used to collect samples of exhaled breath from patients who had HNSCC and those who had bladder or colon cancer, after which the samples were analyzed and compared. One hundred patients with HNSCC, 40 patients with bladder cancer, and 28 patients with colon cancer exhaled through an e-nose for 5 min. An artificial neural network was used for the analysis, and double cross-validation to validate the model. In differentiating HNSCC from colon cancer, a diagnostic accuracy of 81 % was found. When comparing HNSCC with bladder cancer, the diagnostic accuracy was 84 %. A diagnostic accuracy of 84 % was found between bladder cancer and colon cancer. The e-nose technique using double cross-validation is able to discriminate between HNSCC and colon cancer and between HNSCC and bladder cancer. Furthermore, the e-nose technique can distinguish colon cancer from bladder cancer.

  20. Label-free detection of tumor markers in a colon carcinoma tumor progression model by confocal Raman microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalfi-Happ, Claudia; Rück, Angelika; Udart, Martin; Hauser, Carmen; Dürr, Christine; Kriebel, Martin

    2013-06-01

    Living colon carcinoma cells were investigated by confocal Raman microspectroscopy. An in vitro model of tumor progression was established. Evaluation of data sets by cluster analysis reveals that lipid bodies might be a valuable diagnostic parameter for early carcinogenesis.

  1. Labile complexes facilitate cadmium uptake by Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Verheyen, L; Degryse, F; Niewold, T; Smolders, E

    2012-06-01

    The Free Ion Activity Model (FIAM) predicts that metal uptake in biota is related to the free ion activity in the external solution and that metal complexes do not contribute. However, studies with plants have shown that labile metal complexes enhance metal bioavailability when the uptake is rate-limited by transport of the free ion in solution to the uptake site. Here, the role of labile complexes of Cd on metal bioavailability was assessed using Caco-2 cells, the cell model for intestinal absorption. At low Cd(2+) concentration (1 nM), the CdCl(n)(2-n) complexes contributed to the uptake almost to the same extent as the free ion. At large Cd(2+) concentration (10 μM), the contribution of the complexes was much smaller. At constant Cd(2+) concentration, Cd intake in the cells from solutions containing synthetic ligands such as EDTA increased as the dissociation rate of the cadmium complexes increased, and correlated well with the Cd diffusion flux in solution measured with the Diffusive Gradient in Thin Films technique (DGT). The Cd intake fluxes in the cells were well predicted assuming that the specific uptake is limited by diffusion of the free Cd(2+) ion to the cell surface. Our results underline that speciation of Cd has a major effect on its uptake by intestinal cells, but the availability is not simply related to the free ion concentration. Labile complexes of Cd enhance metal bioavailability in these cells, likely by alleviating diffusive limitations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Doxorubicin decreases paraquat accumulation and toxicity in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Silva, Renata; Carmo, Helena; Vilas-Boas, Vânia; de Pinho, Paula Guedes; Dinis-Oliveira, Ricardo Jorge; Carvalho, Félix; Silva, Isabel; Correia-de-Sá, Paulo; Bastos, Maria de Lourdes; Remião, Fernando

    2013-02-13

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is an efflux pump belonging to the ATP-binding cassette transporter superfamily expressed in several organs. Considering its potential protective effects, the induction of de novo synthesis of P-gp could be used therapeutically in the treatment of intoxications by its substrates. The herbicide paraquat (PQ) is a P-gp substrate responsible for thousands of fatal intoxications worldwide that still lacks an effective antidote. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the effectiveness of such an antidote by testing whether doxorubicin (DOX), a known P-gp inducer, could efficiently protect Caco-2 cells against PQ cytotoxicity, 6 h after the incubation with the herbicide, reflecting a real-life intoxication scenario. Cytotoxicity was evaluated by the MTT assay and PQ intracellular concentrations were measured by gas chromatography-ion trap-mass spectrometry (GC-IT-MS). Also, the DOX modulatory effect on choline uptake transport system was assessed by measuring the uptake of [³H]-choline. The results show that DOX exerts protective effects against PQ cytotoxicity, preventing the intracellular accumulation of the herbicide. These protective effects were not completely prevented by the incubation with the UIC2 antibody, a specific P-gp inhibitor, suggesting the involvement of alternative protection mechanisms. In fact, DOX also efficiently inhibited the choline transport system that influences PQ cellular uptake. In conclusion, in this cellular model, DOX effectively protects against PQ toxicity by inducing P-gp and through the interaction with the choline transporter, suggesting that compounds presenting this double feature of promoting the efflux and limiting the uptake of PQ could be used as effective antidotes to treat intoxications.

  3. Na+-independent phosphate transport in Caco2BBE cells

    PubMed Central

    Candeal, Eduardo; Caldas, Yupanqui A.; Guillén, Natalia; Levi, Moshe

    2014-01-01

    Pi transport in epithelia has both Na+-dependent and Na+-independent components, but so far only Na+-dependent transporters have been characterized in detail and molecularly identified. Consequently, in the present study, we initiated the characterization and analysis of intestinal Na+-independent Pi transport using an in vitro model, Caco2BBE cells. Only Na+-independent Pi uptake was observed in these cells, and Pi uptake was dramatically increased when cells were incubated in high-Pi DMEM (4 mM) from 1 day to several days. No response to low-Pi medium was observed. The increased Pi transport was mainly caused by Vmax changes, and it was prevented by actinomycin D and cycloheximide. Pi transport in cells grown in 1 mM Pi (basal DMEM) decreased at pH > 7.5, and it was inhibited with proton ionophores. Pi transport in cells incubated with 4 mM Pi increased with alkaline pH, suggesting a preference for divalent phosphate. Pi uptake in cells in 1 mM Pi was completely inhibited only by Pi and partially inhibited by phosphonoformate, oxalate, DIDS, SITS, SO42−, HCO3−, and arsenate. This inhibition pattern suggests that more than one Pi transporter is active in cells maintained with 1 mM Pi. Phosphate transport from cells maintained at 4 mM Pi was only partially inhibited by phosphonoformate, oxalate, and arsenate. Attempts to identify the responsible transporters showed that multifunctional anion exchangers of the Slc26 family as well as members of Slc17, Slc20, and Slc37 and the Pi exporter xenotropic and polytropic retrovirus receptor 1 are not involved. PMID:25298422

  4. Na+-independent phosphate transport in Caco2BBE cells.

    PubMed

    Candeal, Eduardo; Caldas, Yupanqui A; Guillén, Natalia; Levi, Moshe; Sorribas, Víctor

    2014-12-15

    Pi transport in epithelia has both Na(+)-dependent and Na(+)-independent components, but so far only Na(+)-dependent transporters have been characterized in detail and molecularly identified. Consequently, in the present study, we initiated the characterization and analysis of intestinal Na(+)-independent Pi transport using an in vitro model, Caco2BBE cells. Only Na(+)-independent Pi uptake was observed in these cells, and Pi uptake was dramatically increased when cells were incubated in high-Pi DMEM (4 mM) from 1 day to several days. No response to low-Pi medium was observed. The increased Pi transport was mainly caused by Vmax changes, and it was prevented by actinomycin D and cycloheximide. Pi transport in cells grown in 1 mM Pi (basal DMEM) decreased at pH > 7.5, and it was inhibited with proton ionophores. Pi transport in cells incubated with 4 mM Pi increased with alkaline pH, suggesting a preference for divalent phosphate. Pi uptake in cells in 1 mM Pi was completely inhibited only by Pi and partially inhibited by phosphonoformate, oxalate, DIDS, SITS, SO4 (2-), HCO3 (-), and arsenate. This inhibition pattern suggests that more than one Pi transporter is active in cells maintained with 1 mM Pi. Phosphate transport from cells maintained at 4 mM Pi was only partially inhibited by phosphonoformate, oxalate, and arsenate. Attempts to identify the responsible transporters showed that multifunctional anion exchangers of the Slc26 family as well as members of Slc17, Slc20, and Slc37 and the Pi exporter xenotropic and polytropic retrovirus receptor 1 are not involved. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Knockdown of Immature Colon Carcinoma Transcript 1 Inhibits Proliferation and Promotes Apoptosis of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiling; He, Jiantao; Zhang, Shenghui; Yang, Qingbo; Wang, Bo; Liu, Zhiyu; Wu, Xintian

    2016-07-13

    Non-small cell lung cancer, as the most frequent type lung cancer, has lower survival rate of 5 years, despite improvements in surgery and chemotherapy. Previous studies showed immature colon carcinoma transcript 1 is closely related to tumorigenesis of human cancer cells. In the present study, we found immature colon carcinoma transcript 1 was overexpressed in lung cancer tissues using Oncomine database mining, and the biological effect of immature colon carcinoma transcript 1 was investigated in non-small cell lung cancer cell lines 95D and A549. Lentivirus-mediated RNA interference was used to knock down immature colon carcinoma transcript 1 expression in 95D and A549 cells in vitro, and the knockdown efficiency was determined using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot assay. Knockdown of immature colon carcinoma transcript 1 significantly suppressed non-small cell lung cancer cell proliferation and colony formation ability confirmed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and colony formation assay. Flow cytometry was applied to measure cell cycle arrest, and the result showed the cell cycle arrested in G2/M phase in 95D cells and arrested in G0/G1 phase in A549 cells. Furthermore, we measured the levels of cell cycle-associated proteins by Western blot analysis and found immature colon carcinoma transcript 1-mediated cell proliferation inhibition appeared due to downregulation of cell cycle activator cyclin D1 and upregulation of cell cycle inhibitor p21. In addition, immature colon carcinoma transcript 1 silencing significantly induced non-small cell lung cancer cell apoptosis by annexin V/7-amino-actinomycin D double-staining assay. All our data suggest that immature colon carcinoma transcript 1 may play an important role for non-small cell lung cancer cell proliferation and could be a potential molecular target for diagnosing and treating human non-small cell lung cancer.

  6. Contributions of NanI sialidase to Caco-2 cell adherence by Clostridium perfringens type A and C strains causing human intestinal disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Jihong; McClane, Bruce A

    2014-11-01

    Previous studies showed that Clostridium perfringens type D animal disease strain CN3718 uses NanI sialidase for adhering to enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells. The current study analyzed whether NanI is similarly important when type A and C human intestinal disease strains attach to Caco-2 cells. A PCR survey determined that the nanI gene was absent from typical type A food poisoning (FP) strains carrying a chromosomal enterotoxin (CPE) gene or the genetically related type C Darmbrand (Db) strains. However, the nanI gene was present in type A strains from healthy humans, type A strains causing CPE-associated antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD) or sporadic diarrhea (SD), and type C Pig-Bel strains. Consistent with NanI sialidase being the major C. perfringens sialidase when produced, FP and Db strains had little supernatant sialidase activity compared to other type A or C human intestinal strains. All type A and C human intestinal strains bound to Caco-2 cells, but NanI-producing strains had higher attachment levels. When produced, NanI can contribute to host cell attachment of human intestinal disease strains, since a nanI null mutant constructed in type A SD strain F4969 had lower Caco-2 cell adhesion than wild-type F4969 or a complemented strain. Further supporting a role for NanI in host cell attachment, sialidase inhibitors reduced F4969 adhesion to Caco-2 cells. Collectively, these results suggest that NanI may contribute to the intestinal attachment and colonization needed for the chronic diarrhea of CPE-associated AAD and SD, but this sialidase appears to be dispensable for the acute pathogenesis of type A FP or type C enteritis necroticans. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Contributions of NanI Sialidase to Caco-2 Cell Adherence by Clostridium perfringens Type A and C Strains Causing Human Intestinal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jihong

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies showed that Clostridium perfringens type D animal disease strain CN3718 uses NanI sialidase for adhering to enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells. The current study analyzed whether NanI is similarly important when type A and C human intestinal disease strains attach to Caco-2 cells. A PCR survey determined that the nanI gene was absent from typical type A food poisoning (FP) strains carrying a chromosomal enterotoxin (CPE) gene or the genetically related type C Darmbrand (Db) strains. However, the nanI gene was present in type A strains from healthy humans, type A strains causing CPE-associated antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD) or sporadic diarrhea (SD), and type C Pig-Bel strains. Consistent with NanI sialidase being the major C. perfringens sialidase when produced, FP and Db strains had little supernatant sialidase activity compared to other type A or C human intestinal strains. All type A and C human intestinal strains bound to Caco-2 cells, but NanI-producing strains had higher attachment levels. When produced, NanI can contribute to host cell attachment of human intestinal disease strains, since a nanI null mutant constructed in type A SD strain F4969 had lower Caco-2 cell adhesion than wild-type F4969 or a complemented strain. Further supporting a role for NanI in host cell attachment, sialidase inhibitors reduced F4969 adhesion to Caco-2 cells. Collectively, these results suggest that NanI may contribute to the intestinal attachment and colonization needed for the chronic diarrhea of CPE-associated AAD and SD, but this sialidase appears to be dispensable for the acute pathogenesis of type A FP or type C enteritis necroticans. PMID:25135687

  8. Massive gas gangrene secondary to occult colon carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Andrew S; Crawford, Matthew D; Gupta, Rajan T

    2016-06-01

    Gas gangrene is a rare but often fatal soft-tissue infection. Because it is uncommon and the classic symptom of crepitus does not appear until the infection is advanced, prompt diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion. We present a case report of a middle-aged man who presented with acute onset lower-extremity pain that was initially thought to be due to deep vein thrombosis. After undergoing workup for pulmonary embolism, he was found to have massive gas gangrene of the lower extremity secondary to an occult colon adenocarcinoma and died within hours of presentation from multisystem organ failure.

  9. Impaired skin barrier function in mice with colon carcinoma induced by azoxymethane and dextran sodium sulfate.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Satoshi; Hiramoto, Keiichi; Koyama, Mayu; Ooi, Kazuya

    2015-01-01

    We have previously reported that impaired skin barrier function was induced by small intestinal injury in mice. Therefore, we postulated that other intestinal diseases might also influence skin barrier function. In this study, we evaluated the skin barrier function of hairless mice with colon carcinoma that was induced by azoxymethane (AOM) and dextran sodium sulfate (DSS). In mice treated with these drugs, we observed elevated transepidermal water loss and reduced skin hydration levels, compared to those in the control mice. In addition, plasma nitrogen di/trioxide (NO2(-)/NO3(-)) levels were significantly elevated, and expression of type I collagen was significantly reduced in the treated mice, compared to those in control. These results suggest that impaired skin barrier function occurs in mice when colon carcinoma is present.

  10. Radiography of the distal colon and rectum after irradiation of carcinoma of the cervix

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, J.E.

    1981-04-01

    High dose therapeutic irradiation for carcinoma of the cervix, usually delivered using a combination of external and intracavitary sources, may damage the rectum, sigmoid, distal small bowel, vagina, and urinary bladder. A pretreatment barium enema is valuable for baseline comparison should symptoms developing after treatment necessitate radiographic evaluation of the colon and rectum. Included in this review are a summary of radiation therapy techniques for carcinoma of the cervix, the radiation tolerance of normal pelvic structures, and the histopathology of changes in the bowel following irradiation. The spectrum of radiographic manifestations of radiation effect on the rectum and sigmoid is presented and contrasted with changes secondary to recurrent of persistent tumor. Gradations of symmetrical volume loss characterize radiation change, whereas mass effect, asymmetrical narrowing of the colon lumen, or fixation are more typical of tumor recurrence.

  11. [Impact of saikosaponin on absorption and transport of paeoniflorin in Caco-2 cell model].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Wang, Jinyan; Xin, Ran; Tan, Xiaobin

    2012-06-01

    To study the impact of saikosaponin on absorption and transport of paeoniflorin in Caco-2 cell model. The concentration of paeoniflorin in cell culture medium was measured by UPLC and the apparent permeability coefficients (P(app)) was calculated to study differences in bi-direction transport of paeoniflorin solutions of different concentrations and its compatibility with saikosaponin a, and saikosaponin d in Caco-2 cell model. Meanwhile, the electric resistance of Caco-2 cell was determined before and after the experiment. The amount of paeoniflorin increased linearly with the transport of Caco-2 cell monolayer in 4 h, with a lower absorptive permeability, which was (0.98 +/- 0.10) x 10(-6), (0.92 +/- 0.09) x 10(-6), (0.89 +/- 0.04) x 10(-6) cm x s(-1) at the concentration of 20, 50, 100 micromol x L(-1), respectively. After compatibility with saikosaponin a and saikosaponin d, the absorptive permeability of paeoniflorin increased by 2.37 times and 2.54 times, respectively, while the electric resistance of Caco-2 cell was decreased significantly after the experiment. Saikosaponin a, d can enhance the absorption of paeoniflorin in Caco-2 cell monolayer, which may be related to saikosaponin's ability to open up intercellular tight junctions among Caco-2 cells.

  12. Role of alpha 5 beta 1 integrin in determining malignant properties of colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Gong, J; Wang, D; Sun, L; Zborowska, E; Willson, J K; Brattain, M G

    1997-01-01

    We characterized the expression of alpha 5 beta 1 integrin in two distinct phenotypes of colon carcinoma cell lines. Highly invasive colon cell lines (designated Group I cell lines) expressed higher levels of integrin alpha 5 beta 1 mRNA and protein than did poorly invasive colon cell lines (designated Group III cell lines). The relatively high expression of integrin alpha 5 beta 1 in Group I cell lines resulted in strong enhancement of cell adhesion to fibronectin (FN) tissue culture plates, whereas Group III cell lines showed little or no enhancement of cell adhesion by coating. There was no significant difference between Group I and Group III cell lines with respect to cell adhesion to laminin and collagen IV. Cell adhesion to FN in Group I cells was mainly mediated by integrin alpha 5 beta 1 because a monoclonal anti-alpha 5 subunit antibody could block cell adhesion to FN, whereas anti-alpha 2 and anti-alpha 3 antibodies had no effect on cell adhesion to FN. The divergence of alpha 5 beta 1 expression in these two distinct colon carcinoma phenotypes suggested that high expression of alpha 5 beta 1 might contribute to malignant progression in this model system. To test this hypothesis, GEO cells, a Group III cell line that did not express alpha 5 integrin, were transfected with the alpha 5 subunit. Stable transfection of alpha 5 sense cDNA into a typical GEO-limiting dilution clone led to the expression of alpha 5 subunit mRNA and cell surface alpha 5 beta 1 protein. The alpha 5 sense transfectants showed enhanced attachment to FN-coated plates and were more tumorigenic when the cells were injected into athymic nude mice. These results indicate that inappropriately high alpha 5 beta 1 integrin expression contributes to malignant progression in colon carcinoma.

  13. Successful radioimmunotherapy of established syngeneic rat colon carcinoma with 211At-mAb

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Most carcinomas are prone to metastasize despite successful treatment of the primary tumor. One way to address this clinical challenge may be targeted therapy with α-emitting radionuclides such as astatine-211 (211At). Radioimmunotherapy utilizing α-particle emitting radionuclides is considered especially suitable for the treatment of small cell clusters and single cells, although lesions of different sizes may also be present in the patient. The aim of this study was primarily to evaluate the toxicity and secondarily in vivo efficacy of a 211At-labeled monoclonal antibody (mAb) directed against colon carcinoma with tumor diameters of approximately 10 mm. Methods Eighteen rats with subperitoneal syngeneic colon carcinoma were allocated to three groups of six animals together with three healthy rats in each group. The groups were injected intravenously with either 150 μg of unlabeled mAbs (controls) or 2.5 or 5 MBq 211At-mAbs directed towards the Lewis Y antigen expressed on the cell membrane of several carcinomas. Tumor volume, body weight, and blood cell counts were monitored for 100 days after treatment. Results Local tumors were non-palpable in five out of six rats after treatment with both activities of 211At-mAbs, compared to one out of six in the control group. At the study end, half of the animals in each group given 211At-BR96 and one animal in the control group were free from disease. Radioimmunotherapy resulted in dose-dependent, transient weight loss and myelotoxicity. Survival was significantly better in the groups receiving targeted alpha therapy than in those receiving unlabeled mAbs. Conclusions This study demonstrates the possibility of treating small, solid colon carcinoma tumors with α-emitting radionuclides such as 211At bound to mAbs, with tolerable toxicity. PMID:23557183

  14. Combination Gene Therapy for Liver Metastasis of Colon Carcinoma in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shu-Hsai; Chen, X. H. Li; Wang, Yibin; Kosai, Ken-Ichiro; Finegold, Milton J.; Rich, Susan S.

    1995-03-01

    The efficacy of combination therapy with a "suicide gene" and a cytokine gene to treat metastatic colon carcinoma in the liver was investigated. Tumor in the liver was generated by intrahepatic injection of a colon carcinoma cell line (MCA-26) in syngeneic BALB/c mice. Recombinant adenoviral vectors containing various control and therapeutic genes were injected directly into the solid tumors, followed by treatment with ganciclovir. While the tumors continued to grow in all animals treated with a control vector or a mouse interleukin 2 vector, those treated with a herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase vector, with or without the coadministration of the mouse interleukin 2 vector, exhibited dramatic necrosis and regression. However, only animals treated with both vectors developed an effective systemic antitumoral immunity against challenges of tumorigenic doses of parental tumor cells inoculated at distant sites. The antitumoral immunity was associated with the presence of MCA-26 tumor-specific cytolytic CD8^+ T lymphocytes. The results suggest that combination suicide and cytokine gene therapy in vivo can be a powerful approach for treatment of metastatic colon carcinoma in the liver.

  15. A Link between FXYD3 (Mat-8)-mediated Na,K-ATPase Regulation and Differentiation of Caco-2 Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bibert, Stéphanie; Aebischer, David; Desgranges, Florian; Roy, Sophie; Schaer, Danièle; Kharoubi-Hess, Solange; Horisberger, Jean-Daniel

    2009-01-01

    FXYD3 (Mat-8) proteins are regulators of Na,K-ATPase. In normal tissue, FXYD3 is mainly expressed in stomach and colon, but it is also overexpressed in cancer cells, suggesting a role in tumorogenesis. We show that FXYD3 silencing has no effect on cell proliferation but promotes cell apoptosis and prevents cell differentiation of human colon adenocarcinoma cells (Caco-2), which is reflected by a reduction in alkaline phosphatase and villin expression, a change in several other differentiation markers, and a decrease in transepithelial resistance. Inhibition of cell differentiation in FXYD3-deficient cells is accompanied by an increase in the apparent Na+ and K+ affinities of Na,K-ATPase, reflecting the absence of Na,K-pump regulation by FXYD3. In addition, we observe a decrease in the maximal Na,K-ATPase activity due to a decrease in its turnover number, which correlates with a change in Na,K-ATPase isozyme expression that is characteristic of cancer cells. Overall, our results suggest an important role of FXYD3 in cell differentiation of Caco-2 cells. One possibility is that FXYD3 silencing prevents proper regulation of Na,K-ATPase, which leads to perturbation of cellular Na+ and K+ homeostasis and changes in the expression of Na,K-ATPase isozymes, whose functional properties are incompatible with Caco-2 cell differentiation. PMID:19109419

  16. Genetic instability associated with adenoma to carcinoma progression in hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, R F; Marshall, D J; Kailas, S; Schlack, S; Harms, B; Love, R

    1995-07-01

    Genetic instability related to defective DNA mismatch repair genes may be involved in the pathogenesis of carcinoma in hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer (HNPCC). However, nonneoplastic tissues from patients inheriting defects in human MSH2 or human MLH1 do not show significant genetic instability. The aim of this study was to determine whether acquisition of genetic instability at the adenoma stage promotes malignant transformation by studying adenoma-carcinoma progression in HNPCC. Dinucleotide repeat loci were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction from microdissected adenoma and/or carcinoma stages from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded HNPCC tumors. Although genetic instability was observed at some loci in almost all cases, the proportion of microsatellite loci altered was significantly less (P < 0.01) in completely benign adenomas (24%) than in benign areas of adenomas with malignancy (54%). Molecular fingerprints indicated intratumor heterogeneity, with evolution of related subclones of neoplastic cells. However, in all cases of tumor progression, at least one subclone from the adenoma stage was closely related to the carcinoma. Some genetic instability develops at the benign adenoma stage in most HNPCC tumors. Adenomas with a greater rate of genetic instability are more likely to progress to carcinoma. Topographic genotyping data provides evidence supporting the hypothesis of adenoma-carcinoma progression in HNPCC.

  17. Polydatin, a natural precursor of resveratrol, induces cell cycle arrest and differentiation of human colorectal Caco-2 cell

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Human colon adenocarcinoma cells are resistant to chemotherapeutic agents, such as anthracyclines, that induce death by increasing the reactive oxygen species. A number of studies have been focused on chemo-preventive use of resveratrol as antioxidant against cardiovascular diseases, aging and cancer. While resveratrol cytotoxic action was due to its pro-oxidant properties. In this study, we investigate whether the Resveratrol (trans-3,5,49-trihydroxystilbene) and its natural precursor Polydatin (resveratrol-3-O-b-mono- D-glucoside, the glycoside form of resveratrol) combination, might have a cooperative antitumor effect on either growing or differentiated human adenocarcinoma colon cancer cells. Methods The polydatin and resveratrol pharmacological interaction was evaluated in vitro on growing and differentiated Caco-2 cell lines by median drug effect analysis calculating a combination index with CalcuSyn software. We have selected a synergistic combination and we have evaluated its effect on the biological and molecular mechanisms of cell death. Results Simultaneous exposure to polydatin and resveratrol produced synergistic antiproliferative effects compared with single compound treatment. We demonstrated that polydatin alone or in combination with resveratrol at 3:1 molar ratio synergistically modulated oxidative stress, cell cycle, differentiation and apoptosis. Worthy of note treatment with polydatin induced a nuclear localization and decreased expression of heat shock protein 27, and vimentin redistributed within the cell. Conclusions From morphological, and biochemical outcome we obtained evidences that polydatin induced a transition from a proliferative morphology to cell-specific differentiated structures and caused human CaCo-2 cell death by induction of apoptosis. Our data suggest the potential use of polydatin in combination chemotherapy for human colon cancer. PMID:24138806

  18. Staphylococcus aureus induces IL-8 expression through its lipoproteins in the human intestinal epithelial cell, Caco-2.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seok-Seong; Noh, Su Young; Park, Ok-Jin; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2015-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus can cause the intestinal inflammatory diseases. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism of S. aureus infection in the intestine. In the present study, we investigated whether S. aureus could stimulate human intestinal epithelial cells triggering inflammation. When the human intestinal epithelial cell-line, Caco-2, and the primary colon cells were stimulated with ethanol-inactivated S. aureus, IL-8 expression was induced in a dose-dependent manner. The inactivated S. aureus preferentially stimulated Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 rather than TLR4. Lipoproteins, lipoteichoic acid (LTA), and peptidoglycan (PGN) are considered as potential TLR2 ligands of S. aureus. Interestingly, S aureus lipoproteins and Pam2CSK4 mimicking Gram-positive bacterial lipoproteins, but not LTA and PGN of S. aureus, significantly induced IL-8 expression in Caco-2 cells. Furthermore, lipoprotein-deficient S. aureus mutant strain failed to induce IL-8 production. Collectively, these results suggest that S. aureus stimulates the human intestinal epithelial cells to induce the chemokine IL-8 production through its lipoproteins, potentially contributing the development of intestinal inflammation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Transverse colon perforation due to carcinoma rectum: an unusual presentation against Laplace's law.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Manash Ranjan; Kumar, Anil; Jaiswal, Sunil; C, Basavaraja

    2013-08-16

    We present a case of distal large bowel obstruction, in the setting of a competent ileocaecal valve, the caecum is the most common site of perforation (for Laplace's law). We describe a case of obstruction at the rectum due to constricting carcinomatous growth, presenting with perforation of transverse colon (against Laplace's law). A 60-year-old women presented to the emergency department with acute abdominal pain. The pain was preceded by 3 days of intestinal obstruction. Clinically there was guarding and rigidity. Straight X-ray of the abdomen revealed free gas under diaphragm. Surgical exploration revealed transverse colon perforation with carcinoma of rectum. Loop transverse colostomy was performed as the patient was very sick. The patient improved slowly in the intensive care unit. To conclude, even though the caecum is the most common site for perforation in case of distal obstruction, perforation of transverse colon can occur otherwise as a unique presentation.

  20. Syndecan-1 deficiency promotes tumor growth in a murine model of colitis-induced colon carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Binder Gallimidi, Adi; Nussbaum, Gabriel; Hermano, Esther; Weizman, Barak; Meirovitz, Amichay; Vlodavsky, Israel; Götte, Martin; Elkin, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Syndecan-1 (Sdc1) is an important member of the cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan family, highly expressed by epithelial cells in adult organisms. Sdc1 is involved in the regulation of cell migration, cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, growth-factor, chemokine and integrin activity, and implicated in inflammatory responses and tumorigenesis. Gastrointestinal tract represents an important anatomic site where loss of Sdc1 expression was reported both in inflammation and malignancy. However, the biological significance of Sdc1 in chronic colitis-associated tumorigenesis has not been elucidated. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to test the effects of Sdc1 loss on colorectal tumor development in inflammation-driven colon tumorigenesis. Utilizing a mouse model of colitis-related colon carcinoma induced by the carcinogen azoxymethane (AOM), followed by the inflammatory agent dextran sodium sulfate (DSS), we found that Sdc1 deficiency results in increased susceptibility to colitis-associated tumorigenesis. Importantly, colitis-associated tumors developed in Sdc1-defficient mice were characterized by increased local production of IL-6, activation of STAT3, as well as induction of several STAT3 target genes that act as important effectors of colonic tumorigenesis. Altogether, our results highlight a previously unknown effect of Sdc1 loss in progression of inflammation-associated cancer and suggest that decreased levels of Sdc1 may serve as an indicator of colon carcinoma progression in the setting of chronic inflammation. PMID:28350804

  1. Antitumor effect of D-erythrose in an abdominal metastatic model of colon carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    LIU, LI-LI; YI, TAO; ZHAO, XIA

    2015-01-01

    Traditional chemotherapy drugs against colorectal cancer possess little or no specificity, leading to severe intolerable side-effects. Therefore, it is necessary to develop additional specific therapeutic strategies. It has been suggested that D-erythrose may specifically inhibit the growth of tumor cells. However, the in vivo antitumor effect of D-erythrose against colorectal cancer remains unknown. Thus, the present study investigated the antitumor effect of D-erythrose in an abdominal metastatic model of colon carcinoma. Intraperitoneal (IP) colon carcinoma-bearing BALB/c mice received an IP injection of D-erythrose or normal saline (NS) daily for 15 days. The mice were weighed every three days. The tumor weights and the volume of ascites were evaluated following the treatment. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay was used to assess apoptosis in tumor tissues. The results revealed that D-erythrose significantly reduced the weight of the intraperitoneal tumor by 69.1%, markedly inhibited the development of ascites and increased tumor cell apoptosis, without any observed toxic effects. These observations suggest that D-erythrose possesses antitumor activity against colon cancer. The present study may provide a potentially effective and specific approach for colon cancer treatment. PMID:25621049

  2. [Primary squamous cell carcinoma of the ascending colon: report of a case and Korean literature review].

    PubMed

    Cho, Dong Keun; Kim, Sang Hun; Cho, Sung Bum; Lee, Wan Sik; Joo, Young Eun

    2014-08-01

    Primary squamous cell carcinoma of the colon is an extremely rare malignancy. A 48-year-old male visited our hospital for screening colonoscopy. Colonoscopic examination showed a 1 cm sized sessile polyp in the ascending colon. The patient underwent endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) without any complication. The pathologic findings were compatible with squamous differentiation of tumor cells in inflammatory colonic mucosa. The tumor was confined to the mucosa and the margins of the excised tissue were found to be free of the tumor. There were no other primary sites and no distant metastases in the extensive evaluation using a whole body CT scan and PET-CT. Additional surgical resection was not done. Follow-up colonoscopy performed eight month later showed a whitish scar without evidence of local recurrence and follow-up PET-CT demonstrated no evidence of recurrence. Herein, we report a case of primary squamous cell carcinoma of the ascending colon presenting as a sessile polyp which was removed by EMR.

  3. Ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone syndrome caused by neuroendocrine carcinoma of the colon.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Kazuyo; Nakashima, Takatoshi; Sasaki, Kazunari; Hayashi, Kenichi; Hanafusa, Masao; Yoshida, Shiei; Myojo, Satoshi; Yoshida, Shun-Ichi; Sawai, Shigeaki; Sano, Nobuya

    A 48-year-old woman with a history of autoimmune hemolytic anemia and taking long-term corticosteroid therapy presented with a 3-month history of general fatigue, abdominal distension, and pigmentation. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen showed a tumor in the sigmoid colon and multiple metastatic nodules in the liver. A colonoscopy revealed an obstructing mass with the presence of an irregular ulcer in the sigmoid colon. Following biopsy and histopathological analysis, the patient was diagnosed with neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC) of the colon. She received her first cycle of chemotherapy, with carboplatin and etoposide. During hospitalization, her pigmentation and hypertension worsened and hypokalemia was observed, all of which suggsted Cushing's syndrome. Her plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol levels were high, and an ectopic ACTH-producing tumor was suspected. After a second chemotherapy cycle, she developed neutropenic fever and subsequently died. At autopsy, two histological types were found in the tumor: small cell carcinoma and large cell NEC. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed ACTH in the large cell NEC. This is the first reported case of an ectopic ACTH syndrome caused by NEC of the colon.

  4. Major Protein of Carcinoembryonic Antigen Gene Family - CD66c, A Novel Marker in Colon Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nataraj, Suma M; Prema, Chaitra Linganna; Vimalambike, Manjunath Gubbanna; Shivalingaiah, Sheeladevi Chandakavadi; Sundaram, Shivakumar; Kumar, Anjali Pradeep; Math, Ananda Kuruvatti

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In view of rising trend of the incidence of colorectal carcinoma in the Indian population due to adoption of western lifestyles and behaviours, we investigated the expression of the new emerging stem cell biomarker, CD66c in colorectal carcinoma of Indian origin. Aim To study the expression of CD66c in human colorectal carcinoma and to correlate level of marker expression with tumour staging. Materials and Methods This hospital based prospective study was conducted on 26 colorectal carcinoma patients in the age group of 20 years to 70 years. Surgically resected tumour specimens along with adjacent normal tissue were collected taking necessary precautions, paraffin embedded sections were prepared and used for histological and immunohistochemical analysis of CD66c. Statistical analysis Descriptive statistical measures like mean, standard deviation, percentage was applied. Other inferential statistical tests like Chi-square, Fisher’s-exact test and one-way ANOVA was applied to find out the association of CD66c with different stages. The difference were interpreted as statistically significant when p <0.05. Results CD66c showed differential expression with membrane positivity in normal colorectal epithelial cells and cytoplasmic expression in tumour cells. There was significant correlation between CD66c expression and tumour site (p=0.02) with colon carcinoma showing positive expression compared to the rectal carcinoma. There was no significant correlation between CD66c staining and tumour stage (p=0.947). No significant relationship was observed between CD66c expression and other clinicopathologic variables studied such as sex (p=0.552), age (p=0.713) and tumour grade (p=0.263). Conclusion CD66c can be specifically used for colon carcinoma and may be a novel marker in colon carcinoma stem cell isolation. The quantification of CD66c can be further verified by flow cytometry and RT-PCR. Further studies can be carried out using CD66c alone or in

  5. Early-stage primary signet ring cell carcinoma of the colon

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Hyun; Park, Seun Ja; Park, Moo In; Moon, Won; Kim, Sung Eun

    2013-01-01

    Primary signet ring cell carcinoma of the colorectum detected at an early stage is very rare; most cases are detected at an advanced stage. Therefore, its prognosis is poorer than that of ordinary colorectal cancer. A 56-year-old Korean man was seen at this hospital for management of signet ring cell carcinoma of the colon. Colonoscopic examination revealed a IIa-like, ill-defined and flatly elevated 9-mm residual tumor in the cecum. Endoscopic mucosal resection was preformed. Pathological examination of the resected specimen revealed signet ring cell carcinoma that had invaded the lamina propria without venous or perineural invasion. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) and positron CT showed no evidence of primary lesions or distant metastasis. An additional laparoscopic right-hemicolectomy was performed; no residual tumor or lymph node metastasis was found. We report a case of primary signet ring cell carcinoma of the colon detected at an early stage and provide a review of the literature. PMID:23840131

  6. Opposite variation tendencies of serum CA724 levels in patients with colon and rectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhanmeng; Chen, Zhe; Chen, Chunlin; Yang, Ziyi; Xuan, Weibo; Hou, Yahui; Zuo, Yunfei; Ren, Shuangyi

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate tumor biomarker carbohydrate antigen 724 (CA724) in the serum of patients with carcinomas of the colon and rectum at various clinical stages. Serum was collected from 51 patients with colon carcinoma (CC) and 49 patients with rectal carcinoma (RC). CA724 levels were then measured in the different groups according to site, TNM classification, gender, age and metastastic status of the patients. The statistical significance of the differences between the groups was calculated by non-parametric statistics (Mann-Whitney and Kruskall-Wallis tests). We observed a close association between the serum CA724 levels and tumor migration in colorectal carcinoma (CRC) and opposite variation tendencies of CA724 in the evolution of CC and RC. In conclusion, we identified a close association between the serum levels of CA724 and tumor migration in CRC. The opposite variation tendencies of CA724 in the different evolution groups of CC and RC may reflect the differences between these two types of cancer. The evaluation of serum CA724 may be of monitoring and and predictive value and may also assist in the development of treatment strategies for CRC patients.

  7. Hepcidin Attenuates Zinc Efflux in Caco-2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Hennigar, Stephen R; McClung, James P

    2016-11-01

    Hepcidin mediates the hypoferremia of inflammation by inhibiting iron transfer into circulation; however, a regulator for the hypozincemia observed in individuals with acute and chronic inflammatory and infectious diseases is not known. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of hepcidin on zinc transport in intestinal epithelial cells. Differentiated human intestinal Caco-2 cells were untreated or treated with 1 μM hepcidin for 3-24 h. Zinc transport was assessed in cells seeded on Transwell inserts. Media from the apical and basolateral chambers were collected, and zinc concentrations were determined using (67)Zn. Labile zinc pools were imaged and quantified in cells loaded with FluoZin-3-AM and expression of metallothionein and the zinc transporters zrt-/irt-like protein (ZIP)4 (SLC39A4), ZIP5 (SLC39A5), ZIP14 (SLC39A14), and zinc transporter 1 (ZnT1) (SLC30A1) was determined. Cells were transfected with SLC40A1- or SLC30A1-specific small interfering RNA to knock down ferroportin and ZnT1 protein, respectively. Cell surface proteins were isolated by cell surface biotinylation and lysosomal and proteasomal degradation was inhibited by treating cells with chloroquine or MG132, respectively. Hepcidin attenuated zinc transport, as cells treated with hepcidin exported 26% less (67)Zn (P < 0.05) into the basolateral chamber and retained 27% more cellular (67)Zn (P < 0.05) than did control cells. Labile zinc decreased, and the mRNA abundance of metallothionein increased by ∼50% in hepcidin-treated cells compared with control cells (P < 0.05). Hepcidin reduced ZnT1 protein by 75% (P < 0.05) compared with control cells. Hepcidin-mediated reductions in zinc export remained in ferroportin knockdown cells compared with untreated controls (P < 0.05), whereas knockdown of ZnT1 inhibited this effect (P ≥ 0.05). Hepcidin significantly reduced biotinylated cell surface ZnT1 compared with control cells (P < 0.05); chloroquine inhibited hepcidin

  8. HDAC inhibitors induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition in colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ji, Meiying; Lee, Eun Jeoung; Kim, Ki Bae; Kim, Yangmi; Sung, Rohyun; Lee, Sang-Jeon; Kim, Don Soo; Park, Seon Mee

    2015-05-01

    The effects of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors on epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) differ in various types of cancers. We investigated the EMT phenotype in four colon cancer cell lines when challenged with HDAC inhibitors trichostatin A (TSA) and valproic acid (VPA) with or without transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) treatment. Four colon cancer cell lines with different phenotypes in regards to tumorigenicity, microsatellite stability and DNA mutation were used. EMT phenotypes were assessed by the expression of E-cadherin and vimentin using western blot analysis, immunofluorescence, quantitative real-time RT-PCR following treatment with TSA (100 or 200 nM) or VPA (0.5 mM) with or without TGF-β1 (5 ng/ml) for 24 h. Biological EMT phenotypes were also evaluated by cell morphology, migration and invasion assays. TSA or VPA induced mesenchymal features in the colon carcinoma cells by a decrease in E-cadherin and an increase in vimentin expression at the mRNA and protein levels. Confocal microscopy revealed membranous attenuation or nuclear translocation of E-cadherin and enhanced expression of vimentin. These responses occurred after 6 h and increased until 24 h. Colon cancer cells changed from a round or rectangular shape to a spindle shape with increased migration and invasion ability following TSA or VPA treatment. The susceptibility to EMT changes induced by TSA or VPA was comparable in microsatellite stable (SW480 and HT29) and microsatellite unstable cells (DLD1 and HCT116). TSA or VPA induced a mesenchymal phenotype in the colon carcinoma cells and these effects were augmented in the presence of TGF-β1. HDAC inhibitors require careful caution before their application as new anticancer drugs for colon cancers.

  9. The Influence of Spirulina platensis Filtrates on Caco-2 Proliferative Activity and Expression of Apoptosis-Related microRNAs and mRNA.

    PubMed

    Śmieszek, Agnieszka; Giezek, Ewa; Chrapiec, Martyna; Murat, Martyna; Mucha, Aleksandra; Michalak, Izabela; Marycz, Krzysztof

    2017-03-07

    Spirulina platensis (SP) is a blue-green microalga that has recently raised attention not only as a nutritional component, but also as a source of bioactivities that have therapeutic effects and may find application in medicine, including cancer treatment. In the present study we determined the cytotoxic effect of S. platensis filtrates (SPF) on human colon cancer cell line Caco-2. Three concentrations of SPF were tested-1.25%, 2.5%, and 5% (v/v). We have found that the highest concentration of SPF exerts the strongest anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effect on Caco-2 cultures. The SPF negatively affected the morphology of Caco-2 causing colony shrinking and significant inhibition of metabolic and proliferative activity of cells. The wound-healing assay showed that the SPF impaired migratory capabilities of Caco-2. This observation was consistent with lowered mRNA levels for metalloproteinases. Furthermore, SPF decreased the transcript level of pro-survival genes (cyclin D1, surviving, and c-Myc) and reduced the autocrine secretion of Wnt-10b. The cytotoxic effect of SPF involved the modulation of the Bax and Bcl-2 ratio and a decrease of mitochondrial activity, and was related with increased levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO). Moreover, the SPF also caused an increased number of cells in the apoptotic sub-G0 phase and up-regulated expression of mir-145, simultaneously decreasing expression of mir-17 and 146. Obtained results indicate that SPF can be considered as an agent with anti-cancer properties that may be used for colon cancer prevention and treatment.

  10. The Influence of Spirulina platensis Filtrates on Caco-2 Proliferative Activity and Expression of Apoptosis-Related microRNAs and mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Śmieszek, Agnieszka; Giezek, Ewa; Chrapiec, Martyna; Murat, Martyna; Mucha, Aleksandra; Michalak, Izabela; Marycz, Krzysztof

    2017-01-01

    Spirulina platensis (SP) is a blue-green microalga that has recently raised attention not only as a nutritional component, but also as a source of bioactivities that have therapeutic effects and may find application in medicine, including cancer treatment. In the present study we determined the cytotoxic effect of S. platensis filtrates (SPF) on human colon cancer cell line Caco-2. Three concentrations of SPF were tested—1.25%, 2.5%, and 5% (v/v). We have found that the highest concentration of SPF exerts the strongest anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effect on Caco-2 cultures. The SPF negatively affected the morphology of Caco-2 causing colony shrinking and significant inhibition of metabolic and proliferative activity of cells. The wound-healing assay showed that the SPF impaired migratory capabilities of Caco-2. This observation was consistent with lowered mRNA levels for metalloproteinases. Furthermore, SPF decreased the transcript level of pro-survival genes (cyclin D1, surviving, and c-Myc) and reduced the autocrine secretion of Wnt-10b. The cytotoxic effect of SPF involved the modulation of the Bax and Bcl-2 ratio and a decrease of mitochondrial activity, and was related with increased levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO). Moreover, the SPF also caused an increased number of cells in the apoptotic sub-G0 phase and up-regulated expression of mir-145, simultaneously decreasing expression of mir-17 and 146. Obtained results indicate that SPF can be considered as an agent with anti-cancer properties that may be used for colon cancer prevention and treatment. PMID:28272349

  11. HLA-A, -B, -C expression in colon carcinoma mimics that of the normal colonic mucosa and is prognostically relevant.

    PubMed

    Benevolo, Maria; Mottolese, Marcella; Piperno, Giulia; Sperduti, Isabella; Cione, Antonio; Sibilio, Leonardo; Martayan, Aline; Donnorso, Raffaele Perrone; Cosimelli, Maurizio; Giacomini, Patrizio

    2007-01-01

    Whether human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A, -B, -C expression has any predictive value on the prognosis of human malignancies remains controversial. Herein, monoclonal antibodies with preferential reactivity for HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-C (HCA2, HC10, and L31) were used to stain an archival collection of 291 formalin-fixed/paraffin-embedded tissues, comprising neoplastic lesions from stages II and III colon carcinoma patients (n=165), and the uninvolved, morphologically normal mucosae from a subset (n=126) of these patients. Marked staining variability was detected not only in the tumors as in previous studies, but also in the normal paired mucosae. HLA-A, -B, -C expression was similar in approximately two thirds of the available 126 normal/neoplastic pairs, confirming in vivo our previous observation that most tumor cells mimic the HLA phenotypes of their normal counterparts. Both up and down-regulation occurred in the remaining third of the pairs, but did not coincide with high and low expression, respectively, conventionally evaluated on the tumor lesion only. Remarkably, a "paired" evaluation, but not high or low expression in the tumor, was predictive of the clinical outcome. Deviations from the expression in the normal paired mucosa (both increases and decreases) of HCA2-reactive class I molecules (possibly HLA-A), and down-regulation of L31-reactive class I molecules (possibly HLA-C), particularly in tumors from stage II patients, correlated with poor 5-year overall and disease-free survival, hazard risk ranging from 2 to 6, approximately. Thus, a paired immunohistochemical comparison reveals a novel immune evasion strategy that may impact on the prognosis of colon carcinoma.

  12. The effect of hyperosmosis on paracellular permeability in Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Inokuchi, Hitoshi; Takei, Takuto; Aikawa, Katsuyoshi; Shimizu, Makoto

    2009-02-01

    The intestinal epithelium is a significant barrier to oral absorption of hydrophilic compounds, and their passage through the intercellular space is restricted by the tight junctions. In this study we found that hyperosmosis is a significant factor altering paracellular transport in Caco-2 cell monolayers. Osmotic regulators, such as sodium chloride, mannitol, and raffinose, decreased transepithelial electrical resistance and enhanced lucifer yellow permeability. The effect of these osmotic regulators on Caco-2 cell monolayers was not likely to be caused by gross cytotoxicity. Although certain amino acids and oligosaccharides have been reported to have specific tight junction-modulating activity, we found that the increased paracellular permeability of Caco-2 monolayers induced by these compounds was at least partly due to the increased osmotic pressure of the test solutions. These findings provide a new potential precaution in the evaluation of paracellular permeability-modulating substances using the Caco-2 cell monolayer system.

  13. A simple coculture system shows mutualism between anaerobic faecalibacteria and epithelial Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Sadaghian Sadabad, Mehdi; von Martels, Julius Z H; Khan, Muhammed Tanweer; Blokzijl, Tjasso; Paglia, Giuseppe; Dijkstra, Gerard; Harmsen, Hermie J M; Faber, Klaas Nico

    2015-12-15

    Most gut bacteria are obligate anaerobes and are important for human health. However, little mechanistic insight is available on the health benefits of specific anaerobic gut bacteria. A main obstacle in generating such knowledge is the lack of simple and robust coculturing methods for anaerobic bacteria and oxygen-requiring human cells. Here, we describe the development of a coculture system for intestinal Caco-2 cells and an anaerobic symbiont, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, making use of 50 mL culture tubes. F. prausnitzii was grown in 40 mL YCFAG-agar with glass-adhered Caco-2 cells placed on top in 10 mL DMEM medium. Grown for 18-36 h in a humidified incubator at 37 °C and 5% CO2, coverslip-attached Caco-2 cells promoted growth and metabolism of F. prausnitzii, while F. prausnitzii suppressed inflammation and oxidative stress in Caco-2 cells. F. prausnitzii did not compromise Caco-2 cell viability. Exogenously added porcine mucin also promoted growth of F. prausnitzii, suggesting that it may be part of the mechanism of Caco-2-stimulated growth of F. prausnitzii. This 'Human oxygen-Bacteria anaerobic' (HoxBan) coculturing system uniquely establishes host-microbe mutualism of a beneficial anaerobic gut microbe in vitro and principally allows the analysis of host-microbe interactions of pure and mixed cultures of bacteria and human cells.

  14. Early signet ring cell carcinoma arising from colonic adenoma: the molecular profiling supports the adenoma-carcinoma sequence.

    PubMed

    Bellan, Alberto; Cappellesso, Rocco; Lo Mele, Marcello; Peraro, Laura; Balsamo, Laura; Lanza, Cristiano; Fassan, Matteo; Rugge, Massimo

    2016-04-01

    Among colorectal cancers, the prevalence of signet ring cell carcinoma (SRCC) is lower than 1%; to date, only 6 cases of early SRCCs arising in colonic adenoma have been reported. In spite of the well-established understanding of the phenotypic and genetic changes occurring in conventional colonic carcinogenesis, the molecular landscape of colon SRCC is still far to be elucidated. We describe the histologic and immunohistochemical phenotype and the molecular profile of a case of intramucosal SRCC developed within a 4.5-cm large sigmoid adenoma. The DNA sequencing of the 2 microdissected neoplastic components (adenomatous and SRCC) showed the same G12V KRAS mutation. Interestingly, although the adenomatous epithelium showed unequivocal p53 overexpression, no signet ring cancer cells featured p53 nuclear immunostain. This molecular pattern supports the unique histogenesis of the 2 coexisting neoplastic oncotypes, also suggesting that the signet ring cell component is derived from the molecular de-differentiation (p53 loss) of the preexisting adenomatous lesion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Morphological Differentiation of Colon Carcinoma Cell Lines in Rotating Wall Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jessup, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of this project were to determine whether (1) microgravity permits unique, three-dimensional cultures of neoplastic human colon tissues and (2) this culture interaction produces novel intestinal growth and differentiation factors. The initial phase of this project tested the efficacy of simulated microgravity for the cultivation and differentiation of human colon carcinoma in rotating wall vessels (RWV's) on microcarrier beads. The RWV's simulate microgravity by randomizing the gravity vector in an aqueous medium under a low shear stress environment in unit gravity. This simulation achieves approximately a one-fifth g environment that allows cells to 'float' and form three-dimensional relationships with less shear stress than in other stirred aqueous medium bioreactors. In the second phase of this project we assessed the ability of human colon carcinoma lines to adhere to various substrates because adhesion is the first event that must occur to create three-dimensional masses. Finally, we tested growth factor production in the last phase of this project.

  16. Multiple promoter elements govern expression of the human ornithine decarboxylase gene in colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Moshier, J A; Osborne, D L; Skunca, M; Dosescu, J; Gilbert, J D; Fitzgerald, M C; Polidori, G; Wagner, R L; Friezner Degen, S J; Luk, G D

    1992-01-01

    Overexpression of the ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) gene may be important to the development and maintenance of colonic neoplasms, as well as tumors in general. In this study, we examined the promoter elements governing constitutive expression of the human ODC gene in HCT 116 human colon carcinoma cells and, for comparison, K562 human erythro-leukemia cells. It was determined by functional analysis that the promoter elements responsible reside within the 378 bp immediately upstream from the transcription start site. Within this sequence, there are at least three regions that modulate the efficiency of the ODC promoter cooperatively. Both DNA bandshift and footprint assays demonstrated all three regions to be rich in sites that bind to nuclear proteins isolated from HCT 116 and K562 cells; the protein binding pattern of non-transformed, diploid fibroblasts was found to be much less complex. Several of the protein binding sequences have little or no homology to common regulatory elements. We suggest that the constitutive activity of the ODC gene in HCT 116 colon carcinoma cells, and perhaps transformed cells in general, involves a complex interaction of multiple regulatory sequences and their associated nuclear proteins. Finally, the saturation of the promoter in these transformed cell lines suggests that high levels of protein binding in the ODC promoter may contribute to elevated constitutive expression of this gene. Images PMID:1598217

  17. A rare case of medullary carcinoma of the colon presenting as intussusception in an adult with rectal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Jain, Shilpa; Jain, Ankur; Onizuka, Neil; Boukhar, Sarag A

    2014-11-01

    Medullary carcinoma is a recently recognized rare subtype of colorectal cancer resembling both poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine tumors. Medullary carcinoma most commonly presents in the proximal colon and can be differentiated from other right-sided malignant lesions by histology and immunochemical markers. We present here a rare case of an adult patient with rectal bleeding who was found to have an intussusception due to underlying medullary carcinoma of the splenic flexure. A 72-year-old woman presented to our GI clinic with rectal bleeding. Colonoscopy revealed a necrotic mass of the sigmoid colon, later determined by CT to be a colo-colonic intussusception at the level of the splenic flexure. Patient underwent diagnostic laparoscopy with findings of a large splenic flexure mass, which was resected and found to be medullary carcinoma of the colon. The tumor was poorly differentiated and exhibited microsatellite instability but was discovered at an early stage and thus did not require any adjuvant chemotherapy. Unlike most previously reported cases of medullary carcinoma, our patient presented with a left sided tumor. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a medullary colon cancer presenting with intussusception.

  18. Increased mRNA expression of a laminin-binding protein in human colon carcinoma: Complete sequence of a full-length cDNA encoding the protein

    SciTech Connect

    Yow, Hsiukang; Wong, Jau Min; Chen, Hai Shiene; Lee, C.; Steele, G.D. Jr.; Chen, Lanbo

    1988-09-01

    Reliable markers to distinguish human colon carcinoma from normal colonic epithelium are needed particularly for poorly differentiated tumors where no useful marker is currently available. To search for markers the authors constructed cDNA libraries from human colon carcinoma cell lines and screened for clones that hybridize to a greater degree with mRNAs of colon carcinomas than with their normal counterparts. Here they report one such cDNA clone that hybridizes with a 1.2-kilobase (kb) mRNA, the level of which is /approx/9-fold greater in colon carcinoma than in adjacent normal colonic epithelium. Blot hybridization of total RNA from a variety of human colon carcinoma cell lines shows that the level of this 1.2-kb mRNA in poorly differentiated colon carcinomas is as high as or higher than that in well-differentiated carcinomas. Molecular cloning and complete sequencing of cDNA corresponding to the full-length open reading frame of this 1.2-kb mRNA unexpectedly show it to contain all the partial cDNA sequence encoding 135 amino acid residues previously reported for a human laminin receptor. The deduced amino acid sequence suggests that this putative laminin-binding protein from human colon carcinomas consists of 295 amino acid residues with interesting features. There is an unusual C-terminal 70-amino acid segment, which is trypsin-resistant and highly negatively charged.

  19. Functional Role and Therapeutic Potential of the Pim-1 Kinase in Colon Carcinoma12

    PubMed Central

    Weirauch, Ulrike; Beckmann, Nadine; Thomas, Maren; Grünweller, Arnold; Huber, Kilian; Bracher, Franz; Hartmann, Roland K; Aigner, Achim

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The provirus integration site for Moloney murine leukemia virus 1 (Pim-1) kinase is overexpressed in various tumors and has been linked to poor prognosis. Its role as proto-oncogene is based on several Pim-1 target proteins involved in pivotal cellular processes. Here, we explore the functional relevance of Pim-1 in colon carcinoma. Experimental Design RNAi-based knockdown approaches, as well as a specific small molecule inhibitor, were used to inhibit Pim-1 in colon carcinoma cells. The effects were analyzed regarding proliferation, apoptosis, sensitization toward cytostatic treatment, and overall antitumor effect in vitro and in mouse tumor models in vivo. Results We demonstrate antiproliferative, proapoptotic, and overall antitumor effects of Pim-1 inhibition. The sensitization to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) treatment upon Pim-1 knockdown offers new possibilities for combinatorial treatment approaches. Importantly, this also antagonizes a 5-FU-triggered Pim-1 up-regulation, which is mediated by decreased levels of miR-15b, a microRNA we newly identify to regulate Pim-1. The analysis of the molecular effects of Pim-1 inhibition reveals a complex regulatory network, with therapeutic Pim-1 repression leading to major changes in oncogenic signal transduction with regard to p21Cip1/WAF1, STAT3, c-jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK), c-Myc, and survivin and in the levels of apoptosis-related proteins Puma, Bax, and Bcl-xL. Conclusions We demonstrate that Pim-1 plays a pivotal role in several tumor-relevant signaling pathways and establish the functional relevance of Pim-1 in colon carcinoma. Our results also substantiate the RNAi-mediated Pim-1 knockdown based on polymeric polyethylenimine/small interfering RNA nanoparticles as a promising therapeutic approach. PMID:23814490

  20. Antitumor activity of PEGylated nanoliposomes containing crocin in mice bearing C26 colon carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Rastgoo, Marziyeh; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein; Alavizadeh, Hoda; Abbasi, Azam; Ayati, Zahra; Jaafari, Mahmoud R

    2013-04-01

    Crocin is a pharmacologically active component of Crocus sativus. It is an unusual water-soluble carotenoid responsible for the red color of saffron. In various studies, the anticancer effect of saffron and its constituents has been established. Polyethylene glycolated nanoliposomes with a size range up to 200 nm are suitable for encapsulation of cytotoxic drugs and can target tumors passively through the enhanced permeation and retention effect. The aim of this study was to develop a nanoliposomal formulation containing crocin with a higher therapeutic index for the treatment of cancer. Four formulations of polyethylene glycolated nanoliposomes containing 25 mg/ml crocin were prepared with hydrogenated soy phosphatidylcholine, cholesterol, and methoxy-polyethylene glycol (MW 2000)-distearoylphosphatidylcholine at different molar ratios by a solvent evaporation method plus extrusion. Then the liposomes were characterized for their size, zeta potential, crocin encapsulation, release properties, and in vitro cytotoxicity against C26 colon carcinoma cells. Based on in vitro results, the best formulation was selected for an in vivo study, and its antitumor activity was evaluated in BALB/c mice bearing C26 colon carcinoma. The IC50 of crocin itself against C26 colon carcinoma was 0.73 mM. The characterization of the best formulation was as follow: Z-average size: 127.6 ± 1.5 nm; polydispersity index: 0.087 ± 0.018; zeta potential: - 21.7 mV ± 6.7; % encapsulation: 84.62 ± 0.59; % release after 168 hours in RPMI 1640 containing 30 % FBS: 16.26 ± 0.01 %. Liposomal crocin at doses of 50 and 100 mg/kg significantly decreased tumor size and increased survival rate compared with PBS and crocin in buffer (100 mg/kg) groups. The results of this study indicated that liposomal encapsulation of crocin could increase its antitumorigenic activity. Thus, to obtain an optimal dose for use in humans, the formulation merits further investigation.

  1. Chemical Characterization of Enteromorpha prolifera Extract Obtained by Enzyme-Assisted Extraction and Its Influence on the Metabolic Activity of Caco-2

    PubMed Central

    Michalak, Izabela; Dmytryk, Agnieszka; Śmieszek, Agnieszka; Marycz, Krzysztof

    2017-01-01

    The green seaweed Enteromorpha prolifera was used as a feedstock for the production of enzymatic hydrolysate using cellulase. The selection of the conditions for enzymatic hydrolysis of the biomass was carried out for different enzyme doses and incubation periods. The obtained extract was examined in terms of its multielemental composition, content of polyphenols and antibacterial properties (tested against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus). Additionally, its influence on the metabolic activity of human colon epithelial cells (Caco-2) was analyzed. The tested concentrations of extract using an in vitro model were 62.5, 125, 250, 500, 1000 and 2000 µg/mL. The hydrolysis yield in the most suitable experimental conditions (8-h process and 50 and 100 µL of cellulase) was 36%. Micro- and macroelements were poorly extracted from the algal biomass. Total phenolic content was 55 mg of gallic acid equivalent per 100 g of dry mass of extract. The cytotoxic effect of extracts, related to the inhibition of the metabolic activity of Caco-2, was noted only after 24 h. In turn, cultures of Caco-2 propagated with extracts for 72 h were characterized by significantly elevated metabolism (the concentration of extracts ranged from 62.5 to 1000 µg/mL, p < 0.05). Obtained results indicated the high biological activity of the prepared extracts; however, the observed effects did not occur in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:28241482

  2. Inhibitory effects of a soluble dietary fiber from Amorphophallus konjac on cytotoxicity and DNA damage induced by fecal water in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Shu-Lan; Lin, Meng-Sjen; Chen, Hsiao-Ling

    2007-10-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the effects of konjac glucomannan (KGM), a water-soluble dietary fiber from Amorphophallu konjac C. Koch, on the cytotoxicity and DNA damage of fecal water-treated Caco-2 cells, a human colon adenocarcinoma cell line, and to compare these effects with those of inulin, oligofructose (FO), cellulose and no fiber diet. In addition, the possible mechanisms by which dietary fibers modulated the toxicity of feces were investigated. Seven-week-old BALB/c mice were randomly allocated to consume an AIN-93 diet that contained no dietary fiber (FF) or 5 % (w/w) KGM, inulin, FO, or cellulose for 3 weeks. Fresh feces were collected during days 18 - 21. Our results indicated that the survival rate (%) of fecal water-treated Caco-2 cells was similarly enhanced by each dietary fiber as compared with that of FF group, respectively. The inhibition of fecal water-induced DNA damage of Caco-2 cells was in the descending order of inulin> FO> cellulose, KGM group. Cellulose significantly exerted a bulk effect, while KGM, inulin and FO significantly increased the ratio of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria in feces, respectively, as well as the ferrous ion-chelating ability of fecal water, respectively. Therefore, this study suggests that KGM, inulin and FO may reduce the toxicity of fecal water mainly by increasing the fecal probiotics and ferrous ion-chelating activities while cellulose may act mainly by increasing the fecal bulk. FF: fiber free FO: oligofructose KGM: konjac glucomannan.

  3. Expression Profiles of miRNA Subsets Distinguish Human Colorectal Carcinoma and Normal Colonic Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Pellatt, Daniel F; Stevens, John R; Wolff, Roger K; Mullany, Lila E; Herrick, Jennifer S; Samowitz, Wade; Slattery, Martha L

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-protein-coding RNA molecules that are commonly dysregulated in colorectal tumors. The objective of this study was to identify smaller subsets of highly predictive miRNAs. METHODS: Data come from population-based studies of colorectal cancer conducted in Utah and the Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program. Tissue samples were available for 1,953 individuals, of which 1,894 had carcinoma tissue and 1,599 had normal mucosa available for statistical analysis. Agilent Human miRNA Microarray V.19.0 was used to generate miRNA expression profiles; validation of expression levels was carried out using quantitative PCR. We used random forest analysis and verified findings with logistic modeling in separate data sets. Important microRNAs are identified and bioinformatics tools are used to identify target genes and related biological pathways. RESULTS: We identified 16 miRNAs for colon and 17 miRNAs for rectal carcinoma that appear to differentiate between carcinoma and normal mucosa; of these, 12 were important for both colon and rectal cancer, hsa-miR-663b, hsa-miR-4539, hsa-miR-17-5p, hsa-miR-20a-5p, hsa-miR-21-5p, hsa-miR-4506, hsa-miR-92a-3p, hsa-miR-93-5p, hsa-miR-145-5p, hsa-miR-3651, hsa-miR-378a-3p, and hsa-miR-378i. Estimated misclassification rates were low at 4.83% and 2.5% among colon and rectal observations, respectively. Among independent observations, logistic modeling reinforced the importance of these miRNAs, finding the primary principal components of their variation statistically significant (P<0.001 among both colon and rectal observations) and again producing low misclassification rates. Repeating our analysis without those miRNAs initially identified as important identified other important miRNAs; however, misclassification rates increased and distinctions between remaining miRNAs in terms of classification importance were reduced. CONCLUSIONS: Our data support the hypothesis that while many miRNAs are

  4. Evaluation of the mutagenicity and genotoxic potential of carvacrol and thymol using the Ames Salmonella test and alkaline, Endo III- and FPG-modified comet assays with the human cell line Caco-2.

    PubMed

    LLana-Ruiz-Cabello, Maria; Maisanaba, Sara; Puerto, Maria; Prieto, Ana I; Pichardo, Silvia; Jos, Ángeles; Cameán, Ana M

    2014-10-01

    Currently, direct antimicrobial and antioxidant additives derived from essential oils are used in food packaging and are perceived by consumers as low-health-risk compounds. In this study, we investigated the potential mutagenicity and genotoxicity of carvacrol and thymol, major compounds in several essential oils, using the Ames Salmonella test and the alkaline, Endo III- and formamidopyrimidine glycosylase (FPG)-modified comet assays, respectively. Thymol did not show any mutagenic activity at any concentration assayed (0-250 μM), whereas carvacrol exhibited mutagenic potential, displaying greater activity in presence of the metabolic fraction (29-460 μM). The genotoxic effects were evaluated in the human colon carcinoma cell line Caco-2, and the standard comet assay revealed that neither carvacrol (0-460 μM) nor thymol (0-250 μM) had any affects at 24 and 48 h. The FPG-modified comet assay showed that the highest concentration of carvacrol (460 μM) caused DNA damage, indicating damage to the purine bases. These results should be used to identify the appropriate concentrations of carvacrol and thymol as additives in food packaging. Moreover, further studies are necessary to explore the safety and/or the toxicity mechanisms of these compounds. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Trans fatty acids affect cellular viability of human intestinal Caco-2 cells and activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors.

    PubMed

    Kloetzel, Marianne; Ehlers, Anke; Niemann, Birgit; Buhrke, Thorsten; Lampen, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    Trans fatty acids (TFA) are hypothesized to have an impact not only on coronary heart diseases but also on the development of colon cancer. To analyze if TFA exhibit cellular and molecular effects which could be involved in colon tumor progression, cells of the human colorectal adenocarcinoma-derived cell line Caco-2 were treated with various TFA isomers differing in the number and position of trans double bonds. The TFA tested in this study did not increase cellular proliferation but displayed growth-inhibitory effects at concentrations higher than 500 μM. In case of the TFA isomer C18:3 t9, t11, t13, an IC50 value of 23 μM was estimated for cytotoxicity indicating a high cytotoxic potential of this compound. In addition to the cytotoxicity studies, the TFA isomers were tested for their ability to activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) by taking advantage of a PPAR-dependent reporter gene assay. In contrast to PPARγ that was not activated by the TFA isomers tested in this study, the substances were shown to moderately activate PPARα, and strong activation was observed for PPARδ. The putative impact of TFA on colon cancer development with respect to PPARδ activation is being discussed.

  6. Biofortification of rice with zinc: assessment of the relative bioavailability of zinc in a Caco-2 cell model and suckling rat pups.

    PubMed

    Jou, Ming-Yu; Du, Xiaogu; Hotz, Christine; Lönnerdal, Bo

    2012-04-11

    Staple foods, such as rice, can now be enriched in micronutrients through conventional breeding (i.e., biofortification) to enhance dietary intake of vulnerable populations. The objectives of this study were (1) to establish a rapid, high capacity Caco-2 cell model to determine the relative bioavailability of zinc (Zn) from samples of staple food breeding lines for potential use as a guideline for selection/breeding and (2) to determine the relative bioavailability of Zn from conventional rice varieties and one Zn-biofortified type. Polished or undermilled, parboiled rice samples were digested in vitro with pepsin and pH adjustment, and by pancreatic enzymes. Zn uptake from digested samples was measured in Caco-2 cells in culture. A previously validated rat pup model was also used to assess Zn absorption in vivo, using gastric intubation and (65)Zn labeling. Pups were killed after 6 h, and radioactivity in tissues and in small intestine perfusate and cecum-colon contents was used to measure Zn bioavailability. A biofortified rice variety contained substantially more Zn than conventional varieties, with no change in phytate content. Absorbed Zn (μg/g rice) was significantly higher from the new variety in both the in vitro Caco-2 cell model (2.1-fold) and the rat pup model (2.0-fold). Results from the two models were highly correlated, particularly for the polished samples. Biofortification of rice with Zn results in significantly increased Zn uptake in both models. Since results from the Caco-2 cell model correlated well with those from rat pups, this cell model is likely to predict results in human populations and can be used for screening purposes.

  7. Supercritical CO₂ extraction of oil, fatty acids and flavonolignans from milk thistle seeds: Evaluation of their antioxidant and cytotoxic activities in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Ben Rahal, Naila; Barba, Francisco J; Barth, Danielle; Chevalot, Isabelle

    2015-09-01

    The optimal conditions of supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) (160-220 bars, 40-80 °C) technology combined with co-solvent (ethanol), to recover oil, flavonolignans (silychristin, silydianin and silybinin) and fatty acids from milk thistle seeds, to be used as food additives and/or nutraceuticals, were studied. Moreover, the antioxidant and cytotoxic activities of the SC-CO2 oil seeds extracts were evaluated in Caco-2 carcinoma cells. Pressure and temperature had a significant effect on oil and flavonolignans recovery, although there was not observed a clear trend. SC-CO2 with co-solvent extraction at 220 bars, 40 °C was the optimum treatment to recover oil (30.8%) and flavonolignans from milk thistle seeds. Moreover, linoleic (47.64-66.70%), and oleic (19.68-24.83%) acids were the predominant fatty acids in the oil extracts recovered from milk thistle under SC-CO2. In addition, SC-CO2 extract showed a high antioxidant activity determined by DPPH and ABTS tests. Cytotoxic activities of silychristin, silydianin and silybinin and the obtained SC-CO2 extract (220 bars, 40 °C) were evaluated against Caco-2 cells. The SC-CO2 extract inhibited the proliferation of Caco-2 cells in a dose-responsive manner and induced the highest percentage of mortality of Caco-2 cells (from 43 to 71% for concentrations from 10 up to 100 μg/ml of SC-CO2 oil seeds).

  8. Design of 3D printed insert for hanging culture of Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chong; Meng, Qin; Zhang, Guoliang

    2014-12-17

    A Caco-2 cell culture on Transwell, an alternative testing to animal or human testing used in evaluating drug intestinal permeability, incorrectly estimated the absorption of actively transported drugs due to the low expression of membrane transporters. Similarly, three-dimensional (3D) cultures of Caco-2 cells, which have been recommended to be more physiological relevant, were not superior to the Transwell culture in either accuracy or convenience in drug permeability testing. Using rapid 3D printing prototyping techniques, this study proposed a hanging culture of Caco-2 cells that performed with high accuracy in predicting drug permeability in humans. As found, hanging cultured Caco-2 cells formed a confluent monolayer and maintained high cell viability on the 3D printed insert. Compared with the normal culture on Transwell, the Caco-2 cells on the 3D printed insert presented ∼30-100% higher brush border enzyme activity and ∼2-7 folds higher activity of P-glycoprotein/multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 during 21 days of incubation. For the eight membrane transporter substrates, the predictive curve of the 3D printing culture exhibited better linearity (R(2) = 0.92) to the human oral adsorption than that of the Transwell culture (R(2) = 0.84), indicating better prediction by the 3D printing culture. In this regard, the 3D printed insert for hanging culture could be potentially developed as a convenient and low-cost tool for testing drug oral absorption.

  9. Adherence of Clostridium difficile spores to Caco-2 cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Paredes-Sabja, Daniel; Sarker, Mahfuzur R

    2012-09-01

    Clostridium difficile is the causative agent of the majority of antibiotic associated diarrhoea cases. C. difficile spores are recognized as the persistent and infectious morphotype as well as the vehicle of transmission of CDI. However, there is a lack of knowledge on how C. difficile spores interact with the host's epithelial surfaces. In this context, we have characterized the ability of C. difficile spores to adhere to human Caco-2 cells. Despite the similarities in spore-surface hydrophobicity between spores of C. difficile and Clostridium perfringens (another enteric pathogen that also sporulates in the gut), spores of C. difficile adhere better to Caco-2 cells. Adherence to Caco-2 cells was significantly reduced when C. difficile spores were treated with trypsin. Sonication of C. difficile spores altered the ultrastructure of the outermost exosporium-like structure, releasing two protein species of ~40 kDa and significantly reduced spore hydrophobicity and adherence to Caco-2 cells. Using a trifunctional cross-linker, we were able to co-immunoprecipitate four protein species from the surface of Caco-2 cells. In conclusion, this study provides evidence that C. difficile spores adhere to human intestinal enterocyte-like cells through spore- and enterocytic-surface-specific ligand(s) and/or receptor(s).

  10. Transport of Antihypertensive Peptide RVPSL, Ovotransferrin 328-332, in Human Intestinal Caco-2 Cell Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Ding, Long; Wang, Liying; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Jingbo

    2015-09-23

    The objective of this study was to investigate the transepithelial transport of RVPSL (Arg-Val-Pro-Ser-Leu), an egg-white-derived peptide with angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory and antihypertensive activity, in human intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers. Results revealed that RVPSL could be passively transported across Caco-2 cell monolayers. However, during the process of transport, 36.31% ± 1.22% of the initial RVPSL added to the apical side was degraded, but this degradation decreased to 23.49% ± 0.68% when the Caco-2 cell monolayers were preincubated with diprotin A (P < 0.001), suggesting that RVPSL had a low resistance to various brush border membrane peptidases. When transport from the apical side to the basolateral side was investigated, the apparent permeability coefficient (Papp) was (6.97 ± 1.11) × 10(-6) cm/s. The transport route of RVPSL appears to be the paracellular pathway via tight junctions, as only cytochalasin D, a disruptor of tight junctions (TJs), significantly increased the transport rate (P < 0.001). In addition, the relationship between the structure of RVPSL and transport across Caco-2 cell monolayers was studied by mutation of RVPSL. It was found that N-terminal Pro residues were more beneficial for transport of pentapeptides across Caco-2 cell monolayers than Arg and Val. Furthermore, RVPSL could be more easily transported as smaller peptides, especially in the form of dipeptides and tripeptides.

  11. Implication of an Outer Surface Lipoprotein in Adhesion of Bifidobacterium bifidum to Caco-2 Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Guglielmetti, Simone; Tamagnini, Isabella; Mora, Diego; Minuzzo, Mario; Scarafoni, Alessio; Arioli, Stefania; Hellman, Jukka; Karp, Matti; Parini, Carlo

    2008-01-01

    We found that the human intestinal isolate Bifidobacterium bifidum MIMBb75 strongly adhered to Caco-2 cells. Proteinase K and lithium chloride treatments showed that proteins play a key role in MIMBb75 adhesion to Caco-2 cells. By studying the cell wall-associated proteins, we identified a surface protein, which we labeled BopA. We purified the protein chromatographically and found that it functioned as an adhesion promoter on Caco-2 cells. In silico analysis of the gene coding for this protein and globomycin experiments showed that BopA is a cysteine-anchored lipoprotein expressed as a precursor polypeptide. A database search indicated that BopA appears to function biologically as an oligopeptide/tripeptide-solute-binding protein in the ABC transport system. We discovered a protein corresponding to BopA and its gene in eight other highly adherent B. bifidum strains. Finally, we found that B. bifidum MIMBb75 and BopA affected the production of interleukin-8 in Caco-2 epithelial cells. BopA is the first protein described to date to be directly involved in the adhesion of bifidobacteria to Caco-2 cells and to show immunomodulatory activity. PMID:18539800

  12. Implication of an outer surface lipoprotein in adhesion of Bifidobacterium bifidum to Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Guglielmetti, Simone; Tamagnini, Isabella; Mora, Diego; Minuzzo, Mario; Scarafoni, Alessio; Arioli, Stefania; Hellman, Jukka; Karp, Matti; Parini, Carlo

    2008-08-01

    We found that the human intestinal isolate Bifidobacterium bifidum MIMBb75 strongly adhered to Caco-2 cells. Proteinase K and lithium chloride treatments showed that proteins play a key role in MIMBb75 adhesion to Caco-2 cells. By studying the cell wall-associated proteins, we identified a surface protein, which we labeled BopA. We purified the protein chromatographically and found that it functioned as an adhesion promoter on Caco-2 cells. In silico analysis of the gene coding for this protein and globomycin experiments showed that BopA is a cysteine-anchored lipoprotein expressed as a precursor polypeptide. A database search indicated that BopA appears to function biologically as an oligopeptide/tripeptide-solute-binding protein in the ABC transport system. We discovered a protein corresponding to BopA and its gene in eight other highly adherent B. bifidum strains. Finally, we found that B. bifidum MIMBb75 and BopA affected the production of interleukin-8 in Caco-2 epithelial cells. BopA is the first protein described to date to be directly involved in the adhesion of bifidobacteria to Caco-2 cells and to show immunomodulatory activity.

  13. Autocrine action of amphiregulin in a colon carcinoma cell line and immunocytochemical localization of amphiregulin in human colon

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Amphiregulin (AR) is a newly discovered glycosylated, 84-amino acid residue polypeptide growth regulator which has sequence homology to the EGF family of proteins. To obtain immunological reagents to study the biological role of AR, two synthetic peptides containing sequences corresponding to distinct regions of AR were used to generate polyclonal antibodies in rabbits. One preparation of antipeptide antibodies directed against residues 26-44 of AR (AR-Ab2) was most effective in the detection of native AR, whereas another preparation of antibodies against residues 8-26 (AR-Ab1) was found to be most efficacious in the detection of AR in formalin-fixed and paraffin- embedded tissues. The growth of a colon carcinoma cell line, Geo, which proliferates autonomously under serum-free conditions, was stimulated by the exogenous addition of AR or EGF. Half-maximal stimulation of this growth was observed at 40 and 200 pM of EGF and AR, respectively. A mAb to the extracellular domain of the EGF receptor blocked the stimulation of cell proliferation induced by the exogenous addition of AR, suggesting that this stimulation was mediated via the EGF receptor. Geo cells were found to constitutively express significant levels of the AR mRNA transcript as determined by analysis of the polymerase chain reaction-amplified cDNA product and AR protein was detected immunocytochemically using the AR-Ab1 antibodies in these cells. AR was immunoprecipitated specifically using the AR-Ab2 antibodies from the conditioned medium of Geo cells, which had been metabolically labeled with [35S]cysteine. The secreted AR migrated as a broad band (18.5-22.5 kD) with a median molecular weight of approximately 20.7 kD in SDS- PAGE. Immunospecific removal of AR from serum-free medium conditioned by the Geo cells and readdition of the AR-depleted medium to Geo cells resulted in an approximately 40% inhibition of cell growth relative to controls. Furthermore, the growth of the Geo cells was also inhibited

  14. The Prognostic Impact of Protein Expression of E-Cadherin-Catenin Complexes Differs between Rectal and Colon Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Aamodt, Rolf; Bondi, Johan; Andersen, Solveig Norheim; Bakka, Arne; Bukholm, Geir; Bukholm, Ida R K

    2010-01-01

    The E-cadherin-catenin complex provides cell-cell adhesion. In order for a carcinoma to metastasize, cancer cells must let go of their hold of neighboring cells in the primary tumor. The presence of components of the E-cadherin-catenin complex in 246 rectal adenocarcinomas was examined by immunohistochemistry and compared to their presence in 219 colon carcinomas. The expression data were correlated to clinical information from the patients' records. There were statistically significant differences in protein expression between the rectal and the colon carcinomas regarding membranous beta-catenin, gamma-catenin, p120-catenin, and E-cadherin, as well as nuclear beta-catenin. In the rectal carcinomas, there was a significant inverse association between the expression of p120-catenin in cell membranes of the primary tumors and the occurrence of local recurrence, while membranous protein expression of beta-catenin was inversely related to distant metastases.

  15. The destruction complex of beta-catenin in colorectal carcinoma and colonic adenoma.

    PubMed

    Bourroul, Guilherme Muniz; Fragoso, Hélio José; Gomes, José Walter Feitosa; Bourroul, Vivian Sati Oba; Oshima, Celina Tizuko Fujiyama; Gomes, Thiago Simão; Saba, Gabriela Tognini; Palma, Rogério Tadeu; Waisberg, Jaques

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the destruction complex of beta-catenin by the expression of the proteins beta-catetenin, adenomatous polyposis coli, GSK3β, axin and ubiquitin in colorectal carcinoma and colonic adenoma. Tissue samples from 64 patients with colorectal carcinoma and 53 patients with colonic adenoma were analyzed. Tissue microarray blocks and slides were prepared and subjected to immunohistochemistry with polyclonal antibodies in carcinoma, adjacent non-neoplastic mucosa, and adenoma tissues. The immunoreactivity was evaluated by the percentage of positive stained cells and by the intensity assessed through of the stained grade of proteins in the cytoplasm and nucleus of cells. In the statistical analysis, the Spearman correlation coefficient, Student's t, χ2, Mann-Whitney, and McNemar tests, and univariate logistic regression analysis were used. In colorectal carcinoma, the expressions of beta-catenin and adenomatous polyposis coli proteins were significantly higher than in colonic adenomas (p<0.001 and p<0.0001, respectively). The immunoreactivity of GSK3β, axin 1 and ubiquitin proteins was significantly higher (p=0.03, p=0.039 and p=0.03, respectively) in colorectal carcinoma than in the colonic adenoma and adjacent non-neoplastic mucosa. The immunohistochemistry staining of these proteins did not show significant differences with the clinical and pathological characteristics of colorectal cancer and colonic adenoma. These results suggest that, in adenomas, the lower expression of the beta-catenin, axin 1 and GSK3β proteins indicated that the destruction complex of beta-catenin was maintained, while in colorectal carcinoma, the increased expression of beta-catenin, GSK3β, axin 1, and ubiquitin proteins indicated that the destruction complex of beta-catenin was disrupted. Avaliar o complexo de destruição da betacatenina no carcinoma colorretal e no adenoma do colo pela expressão das proteínas betacatenina, adenomatous polyposis coli, GSK3β, axina e

  16. PARP-1 expression is increased in colon adenoma and carcinoma and correlates with OGG1.

    PubMed

    Dziaman, Tomasz; Ludwiczak, Hubert; Ciesla, Jaroslaw M; Banaszkiewicz, Zbigniew; Winczura, Alicja; Chmielarczyk, Mateusz; Wisniewska, Ewa; Marszalek, Andrzej; Tudek, Barbara; Olinski, Ryszard

    2014-01-01

    The ethiology of colon cancer is largely dependent on inflammation driven oxidative stress. The analysis of 8-oxodeoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo) level in leukocyte DNA of healthy controls (138 individuals), patients with benign adenomas (AD, 137 individuals) and with malignant carcinomas (CRC, 169 individuals) revealed a significant increase in the level of 8-oxodGuo in leukocyte DNA of AD and CRC patients in comparison to controls. The counteracting mechanism is base excision repair, in which OGG1 and PARP-1 play a key role. We investigated the level of PARP-1 and OGG1 mRNA and protein in diseased and marginal, normal tissues taken from AD and CRC patients and in leukocytes taken from the patients as well as from healthy subjects. In colon tumors the PARP-1 mRNA level was higher than in unaffected colon tissue and in polyp tissues. A high positive correlation was found between PARP-1 and OGG1 mRNA levels in all investigated tissues. This suggests reciprocal influence of PARP-1 and OGG1 on their expression and stability, and may contribute to progression of colon cancer. PARP-1 and OGG1 proteins level was several fold higher in polyps and CRC in comparison to normal colon tissues. Individuals bearing the Cys326Cys genotype of OGG1 were characterized by higher PARP-1 protein level in diseased tissues than the Ser326Cys and Ser326Ser genotypes. Aforementioned result may suggest that the diseased cells with polymorphic OGG1 recruit more PARP protein, which is necessary to remove 8-oxodGuo. Thus, patients with decreased activity of OGG1/polymorphism of the OGG1 gene and higher 8-oxodGuo level may be more susceptible to treatment with PARP-1 inhibitors.

  17. Exposure to ZnO nanoparticles induces oxidative stress and cytotoxicity in human colon carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    De Berardis, Barbara; Civitelli, Gabriele; Condello, Maria; Lista, Pasquale; Pozzi, Roberta; Arancia, Giuseppe; Meschini, Stefania

    2010-08-01

    Engineered nanoparticles offer great promise in many industrial and biomedical applications, however little information is available about gastrointestinal toxicity. The purpose of this study was to assess the cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, apoptosis and proinflammatory mediator release induced by ZnO nanoparticles on human colon carcinoma LoVo cells. The biological activity of these particles was related to their physico-chemical characteristics. The physico-chemical characteristics were evaluated by analytical electron microscopy. The cytotoxicity was determined by growth curves and water-soluble tetrazolium assay. The reactive oxygen species production, cellular glutathione content, changes of mitochondrial membrane potential and apoptosis cell death were quantified by flow cytometry. The inflammatory cytokines were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay. Treatment with ZnO (5 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} corresponding to 11.5 {mu}g/ml) for 24 h induced on LoVo cells a significant decrease of cell viability, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/OH{center_dot} increase, O2{sup -{center_dot}} and GSH decrease, depolarization of inner mitochondrial membranes, apoptosis and IL-8 release. Higher doses induced about 98% of cytotoxicity already after 24 h of treatment. The experimental data show that oxidative stress may be a key route in inducing the cytotoxicity of ZnO nanoparticles in colon carcinoma cells. Moreover, the study of the relationship between toxicological effects and physico-chemical characteristics of particles suggests that surface area does not play a primary role in the cytotoxicity.

  18. Optimizing long-circulating liposomes for delivery of simvastatin to C26 colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Porfire, Alina; Tomuta, Ioan; Muntean, Dana; Luca, Lavinia; Licarete, Emilia; Alupei, Marius Costel; Achim, Marcela; Vlase, Laurian; Banciu, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    Simvastatin (SIM) is a lipophilic statin that has potential benefits for prevention and treatment of several types of malignancies. However, its low water solubility and the toxicity associated with administration of high doses recommend it for encapsulation in carriers able to deliver the therapeutic dose in the tumor. In this work, liposomes with long-circulating properties were proposed as delivery systems for SIM. The objective of this study was to optimize the formulation of SIM-loaded long-circulating liposomes (LCL-SIM) by using D-optimal experimental design. The influence of phospholipids concentration, phospholipids to cholesterol molar ratio and SIM concentration was studied on SIM liposomal concentration, encapsulation efficiency and liposomal size. The optimized formulation had liposomal SIM concentration 6238 µg/ml, EE % of 83.4% and vesicle size of 190.5 nm. Additionally we evaluated the in vitro cytotoxicity of the optimized liposomal SIM (LCL-SIM-OPT) on C26 murine colon carcinoma cells cultivated in monoculture as well as in co-culture with murine peritoneal macrophages at a cell density ratio that provides an approximation of physiological conditions of colon carcinoma development in vivo. Our preliminary studies suggested that LCL-SIM-OPT exerted cytotoxicity on C26 cells probably via enhancement of oxidative stress in co-culture environment.

  19. Transforming growth factor-alpha precursors in human colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Asbert, M; Montaner, B; Pérez-Tomás, R

    2001-06-01

    Among the proteins of the epidermal growth factor family, transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha) may be an especially reliable indicator of metastasis or prognosis in human colorectal carcinomas. Moreover, anomalous forms of TGF-alpha have been detected in several tissues of cancer origin, suggesting a role of these forms in the development of the disease. This study was designed to identify the presence of TGF-alpha precursors in different colon cancer cell lines by mean of immunocytochemistry and western blotting techniques. Pro-TGF-alpha was detected in all cell lines tested. Staining for pro-TGF-alpha was observed in cytoplasm. Monoclonal antibody to TGF-alpha detected two bands of 20 and 21 kDa. Polyclonal antibody to pro-TGF-alpha revealed five bands ranging from 15 to 24 kDa. All these proteins were also detected in nonmalignant cells expressing a transfected rat pro-TGF-alpha gene. In conclusions, transformation in these human colon carcinoma cells is not due to the presence of anomalous forms of TGF-alpha precursors.

  20. Non-thermal Plasma Causes p53-Dependent Apoptosis in Human Colon Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tuhvatulin, A.I.; Sysolyatina, E.V.; Scheblyakov, D.V.; Logunov, D.Yu.; Vasiliev, M.M.; Yurova, M.A.; Danilova, M.A.; Petrov, O.F.; Naroditsky, B.S.; Morfill, G.E.; Grigoriev, A.I.; Fortov, V.E.; Gintsburg, A.L.; Ermolaeva, S.A.

    2012-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma (NTP) consists of a huge amount of biologically active particles, whereas its temperature is close to ambient. This combination allows one to use NTP as a perspective tool for solving different biomedical tasks, including antitumor therapy. The treatment of tumor cells with NTP caused dose-dependent effects, such as growth arrest and apoptosis. However, while the outcome of NTP treatment has been established, the molecular mechanisms of the interaction between NTP and eukaryotic cells have not been thoroughly studied thus far. In this work, the mechanisms and the type of death of human colon carcinoma HCT 116 cells upon application of non-thermal argon plasma were studied. The effect of NTP on the major stress-activated protein p53 was investigated. The results demonstrate that the viability of HCT116 cells upon plasma treatment is dependent on the functional p53 protein. NTP treatment caused an increase in the intracellular concentration of p53 and the induction of the p53-controlled regulon. The p53-dependent accumulation of active proapoptotic caspase-3 was shown in NTP-treated cells. The study was the first to demonstrate that treatment of human colon carcinoma cells with NTP results in p53-dependent apoptosis. The results obtained contribute to our understanding of the applicability of NTP in antitumor therapy. PMID:23150806

  1. Aggressive large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the sigmoid colon in a patient with ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Stoner, Patrick; Ghaffaripour, Taban; Cohen, David

    2017-08-07

    Colonic inflammation seen in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) predisposes to the development of colorectal adenocarcinoma. In contrast, colorectal neuroendocrine carcinomas (NECs) have rarely been reported in the setting of IBD, and no definitive relationship between these tumours and IBD has been established. Dysplasia from chronic inflammation leading to neuroendocrine cell differentiation may be responsible for NEC development, though this finding has not been seen consistently. We present a case of large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the sigmoid colon in a 65-year-old woman with long-standing ulcerative colitis. Although she underwent regular endoscopic follow-ups and was receiving the tumour necrosis factor alpha inhibitor infliximab, her tumour was large and aggressive, with metastases to the liver discovered at time of diagnosis. This case highlights the aggressive nature and poor prognosis of NECs and stresses the need to identify patients at high risk of developing NECs and develop improved surveillance guidelines for detecting them. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  2. Genetically Modified Caco-2 Cells With Improved Cytochrome P450 Metabolic Capacity.

    PubMed

    Küblbeck, Jenni; Hakkarainen, Jenni J; Petsalo, Aleksanteri; Vellonen, Kati-Sisko; Tolonen, Ari; Reponen, Petri; Forsberg, Markus M; Honkakoski, Paavo

    2016-02-01

    The human intestinal Caco-2 cell line has been extensively used as a model of small intestinal absorption but it lacks expression and function of cytochrome P450 enzymes, particularly CYP3A4 and CYP2C9, which are normally expressed in the intestinal epithelium. In order to increase the expression and activity of CYP isozymes in these cells, we created 2 novel Caco-2 sublines expressing chimeric constitutive androstane or pregnane X receptors and characterized these cells for their metabolic and absorption properties. In spite of elevated mRNA expression of transporters and differentiation markers, the permeation properties of the modified cell lines did not significantly differ from those of the wild-type cells. In contrast, the metabolic activity was increased beyond the currently used models. Specifically, CYP3A4 activity was increased up to 20-fold as compared to vitamin D treated wild-type Caco-2 cells.

  3. [Study on absorption mechanism of puerarin and its nanoparticles across Caco-2 cell model].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xi-Jing; Jia, Qiang; Wang, Cheng-Yuan; Wang, Nai-Li

    2009-08-01

    To study the absorption mechanism of puerarin and its nanoparticles across Caco-2 cell model. The Caco-2 monolayer model was used to explore the effect of time and drug concentration on the absorption of puerarin and its nanoparticeles. The drug concentration was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography and the Papp was caculated. The puerarin-PLGA-NP could significantly improve the absorption of puerarin. Puerarin was not only absorbed simply through passive diffusion, but also had relations with high dispersion of nanoparticles, increase of affinity and interaction with intestinal mucous membrane. The main mechanism of puerarin and its nanoparticles across Caco-2 monolayer model is passive transference. Puerarin-NP could increase the absorption of the drug in intestinal epithlial.

  4. ROCK activity affects IL-1-induced signaling possibly through MKK4 and p38 MAPK in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sayantan; McGee, Dennis W

    2016-09-01

    Elevated levels of interleukin-1 (IL-1) accompany inflammatory bowel disease. IL-1-stimulated intestinal epithelial cells can secrete potent chemokines like CXCL8 to exacerbate inflammation. Previously, we found that inhibiting the Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) could inhibit IL-1- or TNF-α-induced CXCL8 secretion by the Caco-2 colonic epithelial cell line. This ROCK inhibition did not affect IκBα phosphorylation and degradation, but suppressed the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Therefore, ROCK must play an important role in epithelial cell CXCL8 responses through an effect on the JNK signaling pathway. Here, we extend these studies by showing that inhibiting ROCK suppressed the IL-1-induced phosphorylation of MKK4, a known activator of JNK, but not MKK7. Yet, ROCK inhibition had no significant effect on the IL-1-induced phosphorylation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2. Inhibiting ROCK also suppressed the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK after IL-1 stimulation, but this inhibition had no significant effect on the stability of CXCL8 messenger RNA (mRNA) after IL-1 stimulation. These results suggest that ROCK may be important in IL-1-induced signaling through MKK4 to JNK and the activation of p38 MAPK. Finally, inhibiting ROCK in IL-1 and TNF-α co-stimulated Caco-2 cells also resulted in a significant suppression of CXCL8 secretion and mRNA levels suggesting that inhibiting ROCK may be a mechanism to inhibit the overall response of epithelial cells to both cytokines. These studies indicate a novel signaling event, which could provide a target for suppressing intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) chemokine responses involved in mucosal inflammation.

  5. Human milk oligosaccharides influence maturation of human intestinal Caco-2Bbe and HT-29 cell lines.

    PubMed

    Holscher, Hannah D; Davis, Steven R; Tappenden, Kelly A

    2014-05-01

    Stimulation of gastrointestinal tract maturation is 1 of the many benefits of human milk. Human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) are abundant in human milk and are reported to promote enterocyte differentiation in vitro. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of 3 predominant HMOs on multiple aspects of enterocyte maturation in vitro. Ranging from crypt-like to differentiated enterocytes, we used the well-characterized intestinal cell lines HT-29 and Caco-2Bbe to model early and late stages of differentiation, respectively. With this model of the crypt-villus axis made up of preconfluent HT-29, preconfluent Caco-2Bbe, and postconfluent Caco-2Bbe cultures, we characterized the impact of lacto-N-neotetraose (LNnT), 2'-fucosyllactose (2'FL), and 6'-sialyllactose on epithelial cell kinetics and function. All 3 HMOs dose-dependently inhibited cell proliferation in undifferentiated HT-29 and Caco-2Bbe cultures (P < 0.05). In contrast to previous reports, only treatment with 2'FL at concentrations similar to human milk increased alkaline phosphatase activity by 31% (P = 0.044) in HT-29 cultures and increased sucrase activity by 54% (P = 0.005) in well-differentiated Caco-2Bbe cultures. LNnT at concentrations similar to that reported for human milk increased transepithelial resistance by 21% (P = 0.002) in well-differentiated Caco-2Bbe cells. In summary, all 3 HMOs reduced cell proliferation in an epithelial cell model of the crypt-villus axis. However, effects on differentiation, digestive function, and epithelial barrier function differed between the HMOs tested. These results suggest differential roles for specific HMOs in maturation of the gastrointestinal tract.

  6. Orthotopic xenografts of human melanoma and colonic and ovarian carcinoma in sheep to evaluate radioimmunotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    Turner, J. H.; Rose, A. H.; Glancy, R. J.; Penhale, W. J.

    1998-01-01

    Extrapolation to humans from experimental radioimmunotherapy in nude mouse xenograft models is confounded by large relative tumour size and small volume of distribution in mice allowing tumour uptake of radiolabelled antibodies unattainable in patients. Our large animal model of human tumours in cyclosporin-immunosuppressed sheep demonstrated tumour uptake of targeted radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies comparable with uptakes reported in clinical trials. Sheep immunosuppression with daily intravenous cyclosporin augmented by oral ketoconazole maintained trough blood levels of cyclosporin within the range 1000-1500 ng ml(-1). Human tumour cells were transplanted orthotopically by inoculation of 10(7) cells: SKMEL melanoma subcutaneously; LS174T and HT29 colon carcinoma into bowel, peritoneum and liver; and JAM ovarian carcinoma into ovary and peritoneum. Tumour xenografts grew at all sites within 3 weeks of inoculation, preserving characteristic morphology without evidence of necrosis or host rejection. Lymphatic metastasis was demonstrated in regional nodes draining xenografts of melanoma and ovarian carcinoma. Colonic LS1 74T xenografts produced mucin and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). The anti-CEA IgG1 monoclonal antibody A5B7 was radiolabelled with iodine-131 and administered intravenously to sheep. Peak uptake at 5 days in orthotopic human tumour transplants in gut was 0.027% DI g(-1) (percentage of injected dose per gram) and 0.034% DI g(-1) in hepatic metastases with tumour to blood ratios of 2-2.5. Non-specific tumour uptake in melanoma was 0.003% DI g(-1). Uptake of radiolabelled monoclonal antibody in human tumours in our large animal model is comparable with that observed in patients and may be more realistic than nude mice xenografts for prediction of clinical efficacy of radioimmunotherapy. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9716032

  7. Pathogenesis of Human Enterovirulent Bacteria: Lessons from Cultured, Fully Differentiated Human Colon Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Liévin-Le Moal, Vanessa

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Hosts are protected from attack by potentially harmful enteric microorganisms, viruses, and parasites by the polarized fully differentiated epithelial cells that make up the epithelium, providing a physical and functional barrier. Enterovirulent bacteria interact with the epithelial polarized cells lining the intestinal barrier, and some invade the cells. A better understanding of the cross talk between enterovirulent bacteria and the polarized intestinal cells has resulted in the identification of essential enterovirulent bacterial structures and virulence gene products playing pivotal roles in pathogenesis. Cultured animal cell lines and cultured human nonintestinal, undifferentiated epithelial cells have been extensively used for understanding the mechanisms by which some human enterovirulent bacteria induce intestinal disorders. Human colon carcinoma cell lines which are able to express in culture the functional and structural characteristics of mature enterocytes and goblet cells have been established, mimicking structurally and functionally an intestinal epithelial barrier. Moreover, Caco-2-derived M-like cells have been established, mimicking the bacterial capture property of M cells of Peyer's patches. This review intends to analyze the cellular and molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis of human enterovirulent bacteria observed in infected cultured human colon carcinoma enterocyte-like HT-29 subpopulations, enterocyte-like Caco-2 and clone cells, the colonic T84 cell line, HT-29 mucus-secreting cell subpopulations, and Caco-2-derived M-like cells, including cell association, cell entry, intracellular lifestyle, structural lesions at the brush border, functional lesions in enterocytes and goblet cells, functional and structural lesions at the junctional domain, and host cellular defense responses. PMID:24006470

  8. [A Case of Invasive Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Carcinoma, Penetrating the Stomach, Colon, and Jejunum].

    PubMed

    Goto, Tadahiro; Toyama, Hirochika; Asari, Sadaki; Terai, Sachio; Kinoshita, Hisoka; Matsumoto, Taku; Kuramitsu, Kaori; Tanaka, Motofumi; Takebe, Atsushi; Kido, Masahiro; Matsumoto, Ippei; Ajiki, Tetsuo; Fukumoto, Takumi; Ku, Yonson

    2015-11-01

    A 69-year-old woman was admitted to a nearby clinic complaining of abdominal pain. Abdominal CT showed a 10 cm diameter huge cystic lesion in the body and tail of the pancreas. The patient was referred to our institution for treatment. Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) revealed a cystic mass with a solid lesion. Endoscopic retrograde pancreatography(ERP) demonstrated mucous at the opening of the papilla of Vater and dilatation of the pancreatic duct with a solid nodule. Contrast radiography revealed a fistula from the tumor to the jejunum. A biopsy specimen from the lesion showed adenocarcinoma. Intraoperative findings showed a tumor occupying the pancreas body and tail with suspected invasion to the stomach, jejunum, and transverse colon. We performed distal pancreatectomy with partial resection of stomach, jejunum, and colon. Pathological findings showed an invasive type of IPMC, with invasion to the subserosal layer of the stomach and colon and the mucous layer of the jejunum. While IPMC is recognized as a slow growing malignancy, some cases of invasive carcinoma with fistulation into adjacent organs have been reported. To our knowledge, a case of IPMC penetrating to 3 adjacent organs is rare.

  9. Carcinoma of unknown primary with a colon-cancer profile-changing paradigm and emerging definitions.

    PubMed

    Varadhachary, Gauri R; Raber, Martin N; Matamoros, Aurelio; Abbruzzese, James L

    2008-06-01

    Carcinoma of unknown primary (CUP), which accounts for about 3-5% of all new cancers, is a challenging heterogeneous entity with an unmet research need. Traditionally, CUP has been managed with broad-spectrum chemotherapy, but with the increasing availability of sophisticated diagnostic techniques and the emergence of new treatments that have been shown to be effective in specific cancers the one-treatment-fits-all approach to CUP might eventually no longer be valid. CUP in association with a colon-cancer profile (CCP-CUP) is an example of an emerging, specific CUP subset that seems to benefit from a tailored approach. CCP-CUP is identified by CK20 and CDX2-positive and CK7-negative immunohistochemistry and a clinical course consistent with that of patients known to have metastatic colon cancer. Our findings suggest that patients with CCP-CUP derive substantial benefit from the use of specific treatments developed for colon cancer and larger clinical trials are warranted to more definitely test this finding. In the era of molecular profiling, we expect that additional work with CCP-CUP and other CUP subsets will provide attractive tailored treatment alternatives, with efficacies that exceed the current one-treatment-fits-all approach.

  10. Inhibitory effects of docosahexaenoic acid on colon carcinoma 26 metastasis to the lung.

    PubMed Central

    Iigo, M.; Nakagawa, T.; Ishikawa, C.; Iwahori, Y.; Asamoto, M.; Yazawa, K.; Araki, E.; Tsuda, H.

    1997-01-01

    Unsaturated fatty acids, including n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) such as docosahexaenoic acid (C22:6, DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (C20:5, EPA), and a series of n-6 PUFAs were investigated for their anti-tumour and antimetastatic effects in a subcutaneous (s.c.) implanted highly metastatic colon carcinoma 26 (Co 26Lu) model. EPA and DHA exerted significant inhibitory effects on tumour growth at the implantation site and significantly decreased the numbers of lung metastatic nodules. Oleic acid also significantly inhibited lung metastatic nodules. Treatment with arachidonic acid showed a tendency for reduction in colonization. However, treatment with high doses of fatty acids, especially linoleic acid, increased the numbers of lung metastatic nodules. DHA and EPA only inhibited lung colonizations when administered together with the tumour cells, suggesting that their incorporation is necessary for an influence to be exerted. Chromatography confirmed that contents of fatty acids in both tumour tissues and plasma were indeed affected by the treatments. Tumour cells pretreated with fatty acids in vivo, in particular DHA, also showed a low potential for lung colony formation when transferred to new hosts. Thus, DHA treatment exerted marked antimetastatic activity associated with pronounced change in the fatty acid component of tumour cells. The results indicate that uptake of DHA into tumour cells results in altered tumour cell membrane characteristics and a decreased ability to metastasize. PMID:9043019

  11. A Model of Cadmium Uptake and Transport in Caco-2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Gerasimenko, T N; Senyavina, N V; Anisimov, N U; Tonevitskaya, S A

    2016-05-01

    We created a physiologically substantiated kinetic model of cadmium transport and toxicity in intestinal cell model (Caco-2 cells). Transcriptome profiling of Caco-2 cells revealed high content of transporter DMT1 and ZIP14 and intensive expression of some calcium channels of the CACN family. The mathematical model describing three types of transporters, as well as intracellular cadmium binding with metallothionein and excretion through the basolateral membrane allowed us to construct cadmium uptake and transport curves that approximated the previously obtained experimental data. Using the proposed model, we determined toxic intracellular cadmium concentration leading to cell death and impairing the integrity of cell monolayer and described cadmium transport in this case.

  12. Synchronous metastatic squamous cell carcinoma to the colon and cervical lymph nodes from a carcinoma of unknown primary site: A case report.

    PubMed

    Ito, Homare; Miyakura, Yasuyuki; Tsukui, Hidenori; Naoi, Daishi; Tahara, Makiko; Morimoto, Mitsuaki; Koinuma, Koji; Horie, Hisanaga; Lefor, Alan Kawarai; Sata, Naohiro

    2016-05-12

    Metastatic squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) from an unknown primary site to the colon has not been reported previously. A 75-year-old woman presented with a mass in the left submandibular region. Biopsy revealed a Class V lesion, but the histologic type was undetermined. Surgical resection of the left submandibular gland with cervical lymph node dissection was performed. However, SCC was seen in the lymph nodes only, with no tumor in the submandibular gland. Three months after surgery, computed tomography revealed that the preoperatively diagnosed lesion in the transverse colon had grown considerably. A laparoscopic right hemicolectomy was performed. Histological examination showed features of SCC, similar to the findings in the cervical lymph nodes. We report a rare case of synchronous metastatic SCC to the colon and cervical lymph nodes from a carcinoma of unknown primary site. Published by Oxford University Press and JSCR Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016.

  13. Immature enteric ganglion cells were observed in a 13-year-old colon signet ring cell carcinoma patient

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huili; Huang, Kun; Wang, Hui; Wang, Lin; Yang, Ming; Wang, Lixia; Lin, Rong; Liu, Hongli; Gao, Jinbo; Shuai, Xiaoming; Liu, Xinghua; Tao, Kaixiong; Wang, Guobin; Wang, Zheng

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: All the enteric ganglion cells are fully mature by 2 to 5 years of age in human. No one had reported the presentation of immature enteric ganglion cells in elder ones. Colorectal carcinoma is also rare in the adolescent population. The coincidence of these 2 rare events in a 13-year-old boy has never been reported elsewhere, which may suggest some linkage between them. Patient Concern: A 13-year-old boy presented with progressive abdominal pain and melena for 3 months. Computed tomography (CT) scan and endoscopic ultrasonography showed significant abnormality in the transverse colon characteristic of marked mural thickening. The biopsy results indicated signet ring cell carcinoma. Diagnoses: A 13-year-old male patient with advanced colon signet ring cell carcinoma. In addition, immature but not mature ganglion cells could be observed in almost all of the slices of the resected nontumorous area of the specimen. Interventions: The transverse colon tumor was resected and the subsequent histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of primary colon signet ring cell carcinoma. Then the patient received adjuvant chemotherapy and biological target therapies subsequently. Outcomes: After 6 cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy and biological target therapies, metastasis was however detected within a year. Lessons: In this case, a 13-year-old male patient with advanced colon signet ring cell carcinoma were presented. Unexpectedly, immature ganglion cells could be observed in almost all of the slices of the resected nontumorous area of the specimen. It is critical to raise medical awareness and improve the diagnosis and treatment of the signet ring cell carcinoma. This malignancy and the immature ganglion cells may be associated, possibly caused by some unidentified genetic defects. Genome sequencing, histopathological examination, and long-term follow-up of young patients with related diseases, would help further reveal the potential relationship

  14. Use of Microarray Datasets to generate Caco-2-dedicated Networks and to identify Reporter Genes of Specific Pathway Activity.

    PubMed

    Venkatasubramanian, Prashanna Balaji; Toydemir, Gamze; de Wit, Nicole; Saccenti, Edoardo; Martins Dos Santos, Vitor A P; van Baarlen, Peter; Wells, Jerry M; Suarez-Diez, Maria; Mes, Jurriaan J

    2017-07-28

    Intestinal epithelial cells, like Caco-2, are commonly used to study the interaction between food, other luminal factors and the host, often supported by microarray analysis to study the changes in gene expression as a result of the exposure. However, no compiled dataset for Caco-2 has ever been initiated and Caco-2-dedicated gene expression networks are barely available. Here, 341 Caco-2-specific microarray samples were collected from public databases and from in-house experiments pertaining to Caco-2 cells exposed to pathogens, probiotics and several food compounds. Using these datasets, a gene functional association network specific for Caco-2 was generated containing 8937 nodes 129711 edges. Two in silico methods, a modified version of biclustering and the new Differential Expression Correlation Analysis, were developed to identify Caco-2-specific gene targets within a pathway of interest. These methods were subsequently applied to the AhR and Nrf2 signalling pathways and altered expression of the predicted target genes was validated by qPCR in Caco-2 cells exposed to coffee extracts, known to activate both AhR and Nrf2 pathways. The datasets and in silico method(s) to identify and predict responsive target genes can be used to more efficiently design experiments to study Caco-2/intestinal epithelial-relevant biological processes.

  15. Expression analysis of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) and Her2 in colon carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Drecoll, Enken; Nitsche, Ulrich; Bauer, Karina; Berezowska, Sabina; Slotta-Huspenina, Julia; Rosenberg, Robert; Langer, Rupert

    2014-06-01

    The molecular chaperone heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) plays an important role in several types of tumors also participating in the modulation of the activity of receptor tyrosine kinases activity such as members of the Her family. We evaluated the significance of HSP90 and Her2 expression in colon cancer. HSP90 and Her2 expression was determined by immunohistochemistry and by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on 355 primary resected colon carcinomas. Results were correlated with pathologic features (Union for International Cancer Control (UICC) pTNM category, tumor localisation, tumor differentiation), additional molecular genetic characteristics (BRAF, KRAS mutational status, mismatch repair genes (MMR)), and survival. HSP90 immunoreactivity was observed in various degrees. Fifty-one cases (14 %) were positive for Her2 (score 2+ and 3+) with 16/43 cases with Her2 2+ staining pattern showing amplification of Her2 determined by FISH. There was a significant correlation between high HSP90 expression and Her2 overexpression (p = 0.011). High HSP90 expression was associated with earlier tumor stages (p = 0.019), absence of lymph node (p = 0.006), and absence of distant metastases (p = 0.001). Patients with high tumoral HSP90 levels had a better survival (p = 0.032), but this was not independent from other prognostic relevant pathologic parameters. Her2 expression was not associated with any of the investigated histopathological, molecular, or clinical parameters. High HSP90 levels are reflecting lower malignant potential in colon cancer. Her2 positivity can be observed in a small number of cases. Targeting HSP90 and/or Her2 may be an alternative therapeutic approach in colon cancer in a subset of patients.

  16. Paraneoplastic Dermatomyositis in Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Colonic Perforation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, Naoteru; Emoto, Katsura; Dei, Yoshiaki; Tomiyasu, Kazuhiro; Ishiyama, Ryoko; Horie, Tomofumi; Sakai, Gen; Tahara, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Background Dermatomyositis (DM) is an autoimmune disease characterized by cutaneous Gottron papules, heliotrope rash, and proximal myopathy. It may also present as a paraneoplastic syndrome that can complicate a variety of different cancers, such as lung, cervical, and breast cancer. However, the association with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is extremely rare. Moreover, to our knowledge, there are no previous reports of colonic perforation following steroid pulse treatment for a DM patient. Case Summary A 61-year-old male complained of a skin rash that began in his neck and spread to his face and abdomen. On physical examination, the patient was also found to have symmetrical proximal muscle weakness, abdominal pain, heliotrope rash in the periorbital skin, and poikiloderma on his face and abdomen. Serum level of muscle enzymes was remarkably increased. Muscle examination revealed symmetrical proximal weakness. The diagnosis of DM was made, and steroid treatment was started for symptomatic relief. A search for causative malignancy revealed HCC. Despite steroid therapy for DM, his symptoms did not improve. Additionally, C-reactive protein elevation was seen along with severe abdominal pain on day 14 of admission. Shortly after this, the patient died of septic shock due to suppurative peritonitis after perforation of the ascending colon. Conclusion Here, we present a rare case of DM caused by non-hepatitis-associated advanced HCC with colonic perforation. The cause of colonic perforation is still unclear. This case demonstrates the need to carefully monitor abdominal pain in DM patients as symptoms can be masked by steroid therapy. PMID:27790119

  17. Allicin alleviates inflammation of trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid-induced rats and suppresses P38 and JNK pathways in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Chen; Lun, Weijian; Zhao, Xinmei; Lei, Shan; Guo, Yandong; Ma, Jiayi; Zhi, Fachao

    2015-01-01

    Background. Allicin has anti-inflammatory, antioxidative and proapoptotic properties. Aims. To evaluate the effects and investigate the mechanism of allicin on trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid-induced colitis, specifically with mesalazine or sulfasalazine. Methods. 80 rats were divided equally into 8 groups: control; trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid; allicin prevention; allicin; mesalazine; sulfasalazine; allicin + sulfasalazine, and mesalazine + allicin. Systemic and colonic inflammation parameters were analysed. In addition, protein and culture medium of Caco-2 cells treated with various concentrations of IL-1β or allicin were collected for investigation of IL-8, NF-κB p65 P38, ERK, and JNK. One-way ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis H test were used for parametric and nonparametric tests, respectively. Results. Allicin reduced the body weight loss of trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid-induced rats, histological score, serum TNF-α and IL-1β levels, and colon IL-1β mRNA level and induced serum IL-4 level, particularly in combination with mesalazine. In addition, 1 ng/mL IL-1β stimulated the P38, ERK, and JNK pathways, whereas pretreatment with allicin depressed this phenomenon, except for the ERK pathway. Conclusions. The inflammation induced by trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid is mitigated significantly by allicin treatment, particularly combined with mesalazine. Allicin inhibits the P38 and JNK pathways and the expression of NF-κB which explained the potential anti-inflammatory mechanisms of allicin.

  18. Allicin Alleviates Inflammation of Trinitrobenzenesulfonic Acid-Induced Rats and Suppresses P38 and JNK Pathways in Caco-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chen; Lun, Weijian; Zhao, Xinmei; Lei, Shan; Guo, Yandong; Ma, Jiayi

    2015-01-01

    Background. Allicin has anti-inflammatory, antioxidative and proapoptotic properties. Aims. To evaluate the effects and investigate the mechanism of allicin on trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid-induced colitis, specifically with mesalazine or sulfasalazine. Methods. 80 rats were divided equally into 8 groups: control; trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid; allicin prevention; allicin; mesalazine; sulfasalazine; allicin + sulfasalazine, and mesalazine + allicin. Systemic and colonic inflammation parameters were analysed. In addition, protein and culture medium of Caco-2 cells treated with various concentrations of IL-1β or allicin were collected for investigation of IL-8, NF-κB p65 P38, ERK, and JNK. One-way ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis H test were used for parametric and nonparametric tests, respectively. Results. Allicin reduced the body weight loss of trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid-induced rats, histological score, serum TNF-α and IL-1β levels, and colon IL-1β mRNA level and induced serum IL-4 level, particularly in combination with mesalazine. In addition, 1 ng/mL IL-1β stimulated the P38, ERK, and JNK pathways, whereas pretreatment with allicin depressed this phenomenon, except for the ERK pathway. Conclusions. The inflammation induced by trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid is mitigated significantly by allicin treatment, particularly combined with mesalazine. Allicin inhibits the P38 and JNK pathways and the expression of NF-κB which explained the potential anti-inflammatory mechanisms of allicin. PMID:25729217

  19. Efficient inhibition of C-26 colon carcinoma by VSVMP gene delivered by biodegradable cationic nanogel derived from polyethyleneimine.

    PubMed

    Gou, MaLing; Men, Ke; Zhang, Juan; Li, YuHua; Song, Jia; Luo, Shan; Shi, HuaShan; Wen, YanJun; Guo, Gang; Huang, MeiJuan; Zhao, Xia; Qian, ZhiYong; Wei, YuQuan

    2010-10-26

    Biodegradable cationic nanoparticles have promising application as a gene delivery system. In this article, heparin-polyethyleneimine (HPEI) nanogels were prepared, and these nanogels were developed as a nonviral gene vector. The transfection efficiency of HPEI nanogels was comparable with that of PEI25K, while the cytotoxicity was lower than that of PEI2K and much lower than that of PEI25K in vitro. These HPEI nanogels also had better blood compatibility than PEI25K. After intravenous administration, HPEI nanogels degraded, and the degradation products were excreted through urine. The plasmid expressing vesicular stomatitis virus matrix protein (pVSVMP) could be efficiently transfected into C-26 colon carcinoma cells by HPEI nanogels in vitro, inhibiting the cell proliferation through apoptosis induction. Intraperitoneal injection of pVSVMP/HPEI complexes efficiently inhibited the abdominal metastases of C-26 colon carcinoma through apoptosis induction (mean tumor weight in mice treated with pVSVMP/HPEI complex = 0.93 g and in control mice = 3.28 g, difference = 2.35 g, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.75-2.95 g, P < 0.001) and prolonged the survival of treated mice. Moreover, intravenous application of pVSVMP/HPEI complexes also inhibited the growth of pulmonary metastases of C-26 colon carcinoma through apoptosis induction. The HPEI nanogels delivering pVSVMP have promising application in treating colon carcinoma.

  20. Surface charge-specific interactions between polymer nanoparticles and ABC transporters in Caco-2 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Sourav; van Opstal, Edward J.; Alink, Gerrit M.; Marcelis, Antonius T. M.; Zuilhof, Han; Rietjens, Ivonne M. C. M.

    2013-06-01

    The surface charge-dependent transport of polymeric nanoparticles (PNPs) across Caco-2 monolayers grown on transwell culture systems as an in vitro model for intestinal transport was tested. The transport of well-characterized, monodisperse, and fluorescent tri-block copolymer nanoparticles (TCNPs/size 45 nm) and polystyrene nanoparticles (PSNPs/size 50 nm), with different surface charges (positive and negative), was quantified. The positive PNPs showed a higher intracellular uptake and flux across the Caco-2 monolayers than the negative PNPs. Multidrug resistance/P-glycoprotein (MDR1/P-gp), a specific ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, was found to play a major role in the cellular efflux of positive PNPs, whereas the multidrug resistance protein 1 took part in the efflux of negative PNPs from Caco-2 cells. The positive PNPs also caused an increased cellular uptake and apical to basolateral transport of the carcinogen PhIP across the Caco-2 monolayer. The flavonoid quercetin, which is known to interact with ABC transporters, promoted the intracellular uptake of different PNPs and interfered with the normal distribution patterns of PNPs in the transwell system. These results indicate that PNPs display surface charge-specific interactions with ABC transporters and can even affect the bioavailability of toxic food-borne compounds (like pro-carcinogens).

  1. Effects of Tea Phenolics on Iron Uptake from Different Fortificants by Caco-2 cells

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The in vitro effects of tea phenolics on Fe uptake from different fortificants (FeSO4, FeCl3, FeEDTA) by Caco-2 cells were compared. Cell cultures were exposed to catechin, tannic acid, green or black tea solutions added within Fe-containing solution, or used to pre-treat cell cultures before Fe-exp...

  2. Low molecular weight heparin nanoparticles: mucoadhesion and behaviour in Caco-2 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamprecht, Alf; Koenig, Petra; Ubrich, Nathalie; Maincent, Philippe; Neumann, Dirk

    2006-08-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have shown their efficiency in increasing the oral bioavailability of macromolecular drugs, among them heparin. However, mechanisms of absorption are still unclear. Here, heparin-loaded NPs were prepared from different polymers (Eudragit® RS, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), and their respective mixtures) and analysed for their mucoadhesive properties using a resonant mirror system. Subsequent binding and drug transport studies of the free heparin and heparin-loaded NPs were carried out on Caco-2 cells. Cationic NPs were found to be mucoadhesive, while pure drug and polyester NPs were not. The adsorption of anionic heparin masked the positive surface charge of the particles, thus partially diminishing the adhesiveness to mucin. Increased binding to Caco-2 cells was found for all NP formulation, with RS/PLGA NPs showing maximum binding. However, the transport of heparin was the same for the RS/PLGA NPs and the PLGA NPs and slightly higher than for the free drug. In all cases, no NP transport across the cell layer was observed. When Caco-2 cells were coated with an additional mucin layer, cell binding of RS NPs and RS/PLGA NPs was further increased. Transport across Caco-2 cells demonstrated similar tendencies to results obtained without mucin. In contrast, cationic NPs led to higher heparin transport in the presence of mucin. The mechanism of drug absorption associated with RS NPs was concluded to be independent of typical transcellular NP transport.

  3. In vitro interaction between Bacillus megaterium strains and Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    López, Ana C; Minnaard, Jessica; Pérez, Pablo F; Alippi, Adriana M

    2013-03-01

    To further our understanding of the virulence potential of Bacillus megaterium strains, cell association and invasion assays were conducted in vitro by infecting human enterocytes (Caco-2 cells) with 53 strains of this bacterium isolated from honey. Two series of experiments were performed: (i) necrosis and cell detachment assays with the supernatants of bacterial culture filtrates from 16-h cultures and (ii) adhesion/invasion assays in which cultured enterocytes incubated with bacteria from 3-h cultures were resuspended in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium and chloramphenicol. The detachment of Caco-2 cells was evaluated by staining the cells with crystal violet. Necrosis was assessed by fluorescence microscopy of cells labeled with propidium iodide. Association (adhesion plus invasion) was determined by plate counts and invasion in an aminoglycoside protection assay. The results showed that spent culture supernatants detached and necrotized Caco-2 cells in a strain-dependent manner. Seven out of 53 B. megaterium filtered culture supernatants caused complete cell detachment. Suspensions of these same bacterial strains adhered and invaded enterocytes in 2-h infection experiments. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the interaction between B. megaterium and intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells.

  4. Isolated Glycosaminoglycans from Cooked Haddock Enhance Nonheme Iron Uptake by Caco-2 cells

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study presents new evidence and continues previous research to confirm that glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) exert a positive effect on promoting iron uptake by Caco-2 cells. After being cooked and lyophilized, fish muscle tissue was digested with papain, a cysteine protease that cleaves peptide bonds...

  5. Lack of genoprotective effect of phytosterols and conjugated linoleic acids on Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Daly, Trevor J; Aherne, S Aisling; O'Connor, Tom P; O'Brien, Nora M

    2009-08-01

    Much interest has focused on the cholesterol-lowering effects of phytosterols (plant sterols) but limited data suggests they may also possess anti-carcinogenic activity. Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA), sourced from meat and dairy products of ruminant animals, has also received considerable attention as a potential anti-cancer agent. Therefore, the aims of this project were to (i) examine the effects of phytosterols and CLA on the viability and growth of human intestinal Caco-2 cells and (ii) determine their potential genoprotective (comet assay), COX-2 modulatory (ELISA) and apoptotic (Hoechst staining) activities. Caco-2 cells were supplemented with the phytosterols campesterol, beta-sitosterol, or beta-sitostanol, or a CLA mixture, or individual CLA isomers (c10t12-CLA, t9t11-CLA) for 48 h. The three phytosterols, at the highest levels tested, were found to reduce both the viability and growth of Caco-2 cells while CLA exhibited isomer-specific effects. None of the phytosterols protected against DNA damage. At a concentration of 25 microM, both c10t12-CLA and t9t11-CLA enhanced (P<0.05) oxidant-induced, but not mutagen-induced, DNA damage. Neither the phytosterols nor CLA induced apoptosis or modulated COX-2 production. In conclusion, campesterol, beta-sitosterol, beta-sitostanol, c10t12-CLA, and t9t11-CLA were not toxic to Caco-2 cells, at the lower levels tested, and did not exhibit potential anti-carcinogenic activity.

  6. Application of Caco-2 Cell Line in Herb-Drug Interaction Studies: Current Approaches and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Awortwe, C.; Fasinu, P.S.; Rosenkranz, B.

    2015-01-01

    The Caco-2 model is employed in pre-clinical investigations to predict the likely gastrointestinal permeability of drugs because it expresses cytochrome P450 enzymes, transporters, microvilli and enterocytes of identical characteristics to the human small intestine. The FDA recommends this model as integral component of the Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS). Most dedicated laboratories use the Caco-2 cell line to screen new chemical entities through prediction of its solubility, bioavailability and the possibility of drug-drug or herb-drug interactions in the gut lumen. However, challenges in the inherent characteristics of Caco-2 cell and inter-laboratory protocol variations have resulted to generation of irreproducible data. These limitations affect the extrapolation of data from pre-clinical research to clinical studies involving drug-drug and herb-drug interactions. This review addresses some of these caveats and enumerates the plausible current and future approaches to reduce the anomalies associated with Caco-2 cell line investigations focusing on its application in herb-drug interactions. PMID:24735758

  7. [Expression of PTX3 gene in Caco-2 cells treated with Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM].

    PubMed

    Lv, Xuena; Man, Chaoxin; Han, Linlin; Wang, Mingna; Zhang, Guanghui; Liu, Ying; Yang, Shiqin; Xue, Yuqing; Jiang, Yujun

    2011-04-01

    To study the expression of immunity and inflammatory mediator factor PTX3 in intestinal epithelial cells treated with Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and further to reveal the regulatory mechanism. Caco-2 cells were cocultured with Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM for 0, 2, 4, 8, 12 h and 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4 h respectively, then the total RNA and protein were extracted. The expression of PTX3 gene was analyzed by Real Time RT-PCR. The phosphorylation levels of NF-kappaB was analyzed by Western Blot. Caco-2 cells were pretreated with PDTC for 30 min before cocultured with Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM for 2 h, then the total RNA was extracted and the expression of PTX3 gene was analyzed by Real Time RT-PCR. Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM could induce the expression of PTX3 in Caco-2 cells. The PTX3 expression peaked at 4 h after coculture. Then its expression gradually waned out. Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM could rapidly activate the phosphorylation of NF-kappaB, and the expression of PTX3 was decreased notably after pretreated with PDTC for 30 min. Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM could transiently regulate the immunity and inflammatory mediator factor PTX3 expression through rapidly activating NF-kappaB signaling pathway in Caco-2 cells.

  8. The chemopreventive action of bromelain, from pineapple stem (Ananas comosus L.), on colon carcinogenesis is related to antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects.

    PubMed

    Romano, Barbara; Fasolino, Ines; Pagano, Ester; Capasso, Raffaele; Pace, Simona; De Rosa, Giuseppe; Milic, Natasa; Orlando, Pierangelo; Izzo, Angelo A; Borrelli, Francesca

    2014-03-01

    Colorectal cancer is an important health problem across the world. Here, we investigated the possible antiproliferative/proapoptotic effects of bromelain (from the pineapple stem Ananas comosus L., family Bromeliaceae) in a human colorectal carcinoma cell line and its potential chemopreventive effect in a murine model of colon cancer. Proliferation and apoptosis were evaluated in human colon adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells by the (3) H-thymidine incorporation assay and caspase 3/7 activity measurement, respectively. Extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) and Akt expression were evaluated by Western blot analysis, reactive oxygen species production by a fluorimetric method. In vivo, bromelain was evaluated using the azoxymethane murine model of colon carcinogenesis. Bromelain reduced cell proliferation and promoted apoptosis in Caco-2 cells. The effect of bromelain was associated to downregulation of pERK1/2/total, ERK, and pAkt/Akt expression as well as to reduction of reactive oxygen species production. In vivo, bromelain reduced the development of aberrant crypt foci, polyps, and tumors induced by azoxymethane. Bromelain exerts antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects in colorectal carcinoma cells and chemopreventive actions in colon carcinogenesis in vivo. Bromelain-containing foods and/or bromelain itself may represent good candidates for colorectal cancer chemoprevention. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Comparative evaluation of nano-CuO crossing Caco-2 cell monolayers and cellular uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gao; Lianqin, Zhu; Fenghua, Zhu; Fang, Zheng; Mingming, Song; Kai, Huang

    2015-04-01

    Different concentrations of CuSO4, micro-CuO, and nano-CuO were added to Caco-2 cell monolayers to study the absorption and transport characteristics in this epithelial cell model. Nano-CuO nanoparticles had a diameter of 10-20 nm. Inhibitors of endocytosis were used to explore whether nano-CuO could enter the Caco-2 cell in the form of nanoparticles, and to ascertain the endocytotic pathway that is involved in the transport process. The apparent permeability coefficient ( P app) of CuSO4 and nano-CuO increased with the Cu concentration in the culture medium ( p < 0.05). The micro-CuO of different concentrations had no significant impact on the P app value of Caco-2 cells ( p > 0.05). When the Cu concentration in the culture medium was in the range 31.25-500 μM, the P app value of Caco-2 cells incubated with nano-CuO was significantly higher than that obtained with CuSO4. The latter was also significantly higher than that when cells were incubated with micro-CuO ( p < 0.05). The amount of Cu transport increased with the increase of CuSO4 concentration in the culture medium. After 90 min, the amount of transport began to saturate, and the transport rate of Cu declined with the increase of CuSO4 concentration. For the cells incubated with nano-CuO, the amount of Cu transport increased with the increase of nano-CuO concentration, but did not show an obvious saturation with the extension of transport time. Nano-CuO could enter the Caco-2 cell in the form of nanoparticles, and were found in the cytoplasm, vesicles, lysosomes, and cell nuclei. Several inhibitors of endocytosis effectively prevented the entry of nano-CuO into the Caco-2 cells. It was concluded that nano-CuO particles can enter the Caco-2 cells through several cellular endocytotic pathways.

  10. Unpolished Thai rice prevents ACF formation and dysplastic progression in AOM-induced rats and induces apoptosis through redox alteration in CaCo-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Tammasakchai, Achiraya; Chaiyasut, Chaiyavat; Riengrojpitak, Suda; Suwannalert, Prasit

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is associated with colon carcinogenesis including aberrant crypt foci (ACF) formation and it plays an important role in pathophysiological changes in cancer cells. The aims of this study were to investigate the effects of dietary unpolished Thai rice (UTR) on ACF formation and dysplastic progression in azoxymethane (AOM)-treated rats. Anti-cancer efficacy of UTR regarding apoptotic induction and oxidative redox status in human colon cancer (CaCo-2) cells was also investigated. Rats given 20% and 70% of UTR in the diet showed significantly and dose-dependently decreased total number of ACF. UTR treatment also was strongly associated with the low percentage of dysplastic progression and mucin depletion. In addition, we found that UTR significantly induced cancer cell apoptosis, increased cellular oxidants, and decreased the level of GSH/GSSG ratio in CaCo-2 cells. Our study suggests that UTR supplementation may be a useful strategy for CRC prevention with the inhibition of precancerous progression, with induction of cancer cell apoptosis through redox alteration.

  11. The antiproliferative effect of dietary fiber phenolic compounds ferulic acid and p-coumaric acid on the cell cycle of Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Janicke, Birgit; Hegardt, Cecilia; Krogh, Morten; Onning, Gunilla; Akesson, Björn; Cirenajwis, Helena M; Oredsson, Stina M

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiological and animal studies have shown that dietary fiber is protective against the development of colon cancer. Dietary fiber is a rich source of the hydroxycinnamic acids ferulic acid (FA) and p-coumaric acid (p-CA), which both may contribute to the protective effect. We have investigated the effects of FA and p-CA treatment on global gene expression in Caco-2 colon cancer cells. The Caco-2 cells were treated with 150 μM FA or p-CA for 24 h, and gene expression was analyzed with cDNA microarray technique. A total of 517 genes were significantly affected by FA and 901 by p-CA. As we previously have found that FA or p-CA treatment delayed cell cycle progression, we focused on genes involved in proliferation and cell cycle regulation. The expressions of a number of genes involved in centrosome assembly, such as RABGAP1 and CEP2, were upregulated by FA treatment as well as the gene for the S phase checkpoint protein SMC1L1. p-CA treatment upregulated CDKN1A expression and downregulated CCNA2, CCNB1, MYC, and ODC1. Some proteins corresponding to the affected genes were also studied. Taken together, the changes found can partly explain the effects of FA or p-CA treatment on cell cycle progression, specifically in the S phase by FA and G(2)/M phase by p-CA treatment.

  12. Effects of inositol hexaphosphate on proliferation of HT-29 human colon carcinoma cell line

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Ying; Song, Yang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of inositol hexaphosphate (IP6) on proliferation of HT-29 human colon carcinoma cell line. METHODS: Cells were exposed to various concen-trations (0, 1.8, 3.3, 5.0, 8.0, 13.0 mmol/L) of IP6 for a certain period of time. Its effect on growth of HT-29 cells was measured by MTT assay. The expressions of cell cycle regulators treated with IP6 for 2 d were detected by immunocytochemistry. RESULTS: IP6 inhibited the HT-29 cell growth in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Analysis of cell cycle regulator expression revealed that IP6 reduced the abnormal expression of P53 and PCNA and induced the expression of P21. CONCLUSION: IP6 has potent inhibitory effect on proliferation of HT-29 cells by modulating the expression of special cell cycle regulators. PMID:16830361

  13. Caco-2 cells - expression, regulation and function of drug transporters compared with human jejunal tissue.

    PubMed

    Brück, S; Strohmeier, J; Busch, D; Drozdzik, M; Oswald, S

    2017-03-01

    Induction or inhibition of drug transporting proteins by concomitantly administered drugs can cause serious drug-drug interactions (DDIs). However, in vitro assays currently available are mostly for studying the inhibitory potential of drugs on intestinal transporter proteins, rather than induction. Therefore, this study investigated the suitability of the frequently used intestinal Caco-2 cell line to predict transporter-mediated DDIs as caused by induction via activation of nuclear receptors. TaqMan® low density arrays and LC-MS/MS based targeted proteomics were used to evaluate transporter expression in Caco-2 cells in comparison with jejunal tissue, in culture-time dependence studies and after incubation with different known inducers of drug metabolism and transport. Additionally, studies on ABCB1 function were performed using Transwell® assays with [(3) H]-digoxin and [(3) H]-talinolol as substrates after incubation with the prototypical inducers rifampicin, St John's wort, carbamazepine and efavirenz. The gene and protein expression pattern of drug transporters in Caco-2 cells and jejunal tissue differed considerably. For some transporters culture-time dependent differences in mRNA expression and/or protein abundance could be determined. Finally, none of the studied prototypical inducers showed an effect either on mRNA expression and protein abundance or on the function of ABCB1. Differences in transporter expression in Caco-2 cells compared with jejunal tissue, as well as expression dependence on culture time must be considered in in vitro studies to avoid under- or overestimation of certain transporters. The Caco-2 cell model is not suitable for the evaluation of DDIs caused by transporter induction. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Yogurt inhibits intestinal barrier dysfunction in Caco-2 cells by increasing tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Putt, Kelley K; Pei, Ruisong; White, Heather M; Bolling, Bradley W

    2017-01-25

    Chronic inflammation disrupts intestinal barrier function and may contribute to the pathology of obesity and other diseases. The goal of this study was to determine the mechanism by which yogurt improves intestinal barrier function. Caco-2 cells were differentiated on Transwell inserts and used as a model of intestinal barrier permeability. Transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and flux of 4 kDa fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran (FD) and lucifer yellow (LY) were used as indicators of monolayer integrity and paracellular permeability. Immunofluorescence microscopy and real time quantitative polymerase chain were used to assess the localization and expression of tight junction proteins known to regulate intestinal permeability. Differentiated cells were treated with a vehicle control (C), inflammatory stimulus (I) (interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, interferon-γ, and lipopolysaccharide), or I and 0.03 g mL(-1) yogurt (IY). After 48 h, I reduced Caco-2 TEER by 46%, while IY reduced TEER by only 27% (P < 0.0001). FD and LY flux reflected TEER measurements, with IY having significantly lower permeability than I (P < 0.05). Yogurt also improved localization of occludin and zona occludens protein 1 (ZO-1) at tight junctions of differentiated Caco-2 cells. IY increased Caco-2 claudin-1, ZO-1, and occludin mRNA relative to I (P < 0.05). In a simulated digestion, the barrier-improving bioactivity of yogurt was maintained through the gastric phase, but was reduced to the level of I after intestinal digestion (P < 0.05). Therefore, yogurt improved inflammation-disrupted intestinal barrier function in a Caco-2 model by increasing tight junctions, but the beneficial effect on barrier function was reduced at latter stages of digestion.

  15. Titanium Dioxide Particle Type and Concentration Influence the Inflammatory Response in Caco-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tada-Oikawa, Saeko; Ichihara, Gaku; Fukatsu, Hitomi; Shimanuki, Yuka; Tanaka, Natsuki; Watanabe, Eri; Suzuki, Yuka; Murakami, Masahiko; Izuoka, Kiyora; Chang, Jie; Wu, Wenting; Yamada, Yoshiji; Ichihara, Sahoko

    2016-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles are widely used in cosmetics, sunscreens, biomedicine, and food products. When used as a food additive, TiO2 nanoparticles are used in significant amounts as white food-coloring agents. However, the effects of TiO2 nanoparticles on the gastrointestinal tract remain unclear. The present study was designed to determine the effects of five TiO2 particles of different crystal structures and sizes in human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells and THP-1 monocyte-derived macrophages. Twenty-four-hour exposure to anatase (primary particle size: 50 and 100 nm) and rutile (50 nm) TiO2 particles reduced cellular viability in a dose-dependent manner in THP-1 macrophages, but in not Caco-2 cells. However, 72-h exposure of Caco-2 cells to anatase (50 nm) TiO2 particles reduced cellular viability in a dose-dependent manner. The highest dose (50 µg/mL) of anatase (100 nm), rutile (50 nm), and P25 TiO2 particles also reduced cellular viability in Caco-2 cells. The production of reactive oxygen species tended to increase in both types of cells, irrespective of the type of TiO2 particle. Exposure of THP-1 macrophages to 50 µg/mL of anatase (50 nm) TiO2 particles increased interleukin (IL)-1β expression level, and exposure of Caco-2 cells to 50 µg/mL of anatase (50 nm) TiO2 particles also increased IL-8 expression. The results indicated that anatase TiO2 nanoparticles induced inflammatory responses compared with other TiO2 particles. Further studies are required to determine the in vivo relevance of these findings to avoid the hazards of ingested particles. PMID:27092499

  16. Transport of chlorpromazine in the Caco-2 cell permeability assay: a kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Broeders, Jessica J W; van Eijkeren, Jan C H; Blaauboer, Bas J; Hermens, Joop L M

    2012-07-16

    The intestinal transport of compounds can be measured in vitro with Caco-2 cell monolayers. We took a closer look at the exposure and fate of a chemical in the Caco-2 cell assay, including the effect of protein binding. Transport of chlorpromazine (CPZ) was measured in the absorptive and secretory direction, with and without albumin basolaterally. Samples were taken from medium, cells, and well plastic. For the secretory transport experiments with albumin, the free CPZ concentration at the start of the experiment was measured by negligible depletion-solid phase microextraction (nd-SPME). Recovery of CPZ from the medium was low, especially in the absorptive transport direction. CPZ was found in the cells (≤20%) and bound to the well plastic (≤25%), and 94% of CPZ was bound to albumin. An initial lag phase was observed, which was likely caused by partitioning of CPZ between the donor concentration and the Caco-2 cells; after 20 min, transport of CPZ to the receiver compartment was linear. The low recovery and the test compound found both inside the Caco-2 cells and bound to the well plastic complicate the calculation of the fraction transported and render reliable estimates of permeability constants impossible. For a chemical like chlorpromazine, which is hydrophobic in its neutral form, but in general also for more lipophilic compounds, the Caco-2 cell assay might not be straightforward, and a more detailed study into the fate and exposure of the test compound might be needed to arrive at meaningful data for transport and permeability.

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa serA Gene Is Required for Bacterial Translocation through Caco-2 Cell Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Masashi; Nagata, Syouya; Yamane, Satoshi; Kunikata, Chinami; Kida, Yutaka; Kuwano, Koichi; Suezawa, Chigusa; Okuda, Jun

    2017-01-01

    To specify critical factors responsible for Pseudomonas aeruginosa penetration through the Caco-2 cell epithelial barrier, we analyzed transposon insertion mutants that demonstrated a dramatic reduction in penetration activity relative to P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain. From these strains, mutations could be grouped into five classes, specifically flagellin-associated genes, pili-associated genes, heat-shock protein genes, genes related to the glycolytic pathway, and biosynthesis-related genes. Of these mutants, we here focused on the serA mutant, as the association between this gene and penetration activity is yet unknown. Inactivation of the serA gene caused significant repression of bacterial penetration through Caco-2 cell monolayers with decreased swimming and swarming motilities, bacterial adherence, and fly mortality rate, as well as repression of ExoS secretion; however, twitching motility was not affected. Furthermore, L-serine, which is known to inhibit the D-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase activity of the SerA protein, caused significant reductions in penetration through Caco-2 cell monolayers, swarming and swimming motilities, bacterial adherence to Caco-2 cells, and virulence in flies in the wild-type P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain. Together, these results suggest that serA is associated with bacterial motility and adherence, which are mediated by flagella that play a key role in the penetration of P. aeruginosa through Caco-2 cell monolayers. Oral administration of L-serine to compromised hosts might have the potential to interfere with bacterial translocation and prevent septicemia caused by P. aeruginosa through inhibition of serA function.

  18. Pseudomonas aeruginosa serA Gene Is Required for Bacterial Translocation through Caco-2 Cell Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Masashi; Nagata, Syouya; Yamane, Satoshi; Kunikata, Chinami; Kida, Yutaka; Kuwano, Koichi; Suezawa, Chigusa; Okuda, Jun

    2017-01-01

    To specify critical factors responsible for Pseudomonas aeruginosa penetration through the Caco-2 cell epithelial barrier, we analyzed transposon insertion mutants that demonstrated a dramatic reduction in penetration activity relative to P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain. From these strains, mutations could be grouped into five classes, specifically flagellin-associated genes, pili-associated genes, heat-shock protein genes, genes related to the glycolytic pathway, and biosynthesis-related genes. Of these mutants, we here focused on the serA mutant, as the association between this gene and penetration activity is yet unknown. Inactivation of the serA gene caused significant repression of bacterial penetration through Caco-2 cell monolayers with decreased swimming and swarming motilities, bacterial adherence, and fly mortality rate, as well as repression of ExoS secretion; however, twitching motility was not affected. Furthermore, L-serine, which is known to inhibit the D-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase activity of the SerA protein, caused significant reductions in penetration through Caco-2 cell monolayers, swarming and swimming motilities, bacterial adherence to Caco-2 cells, and virulence in flies in the wild-type P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain. Together, these results suggest that serA is associated with bacterial motility and adherence, which are mediated by flagella that play a key role in the penetration of P. aeruginosa through Caco-2 cell monolayers. Oral administration of L-serine to compromised hosts might have the potential to interfere with bacterial translocation and prevent septicemia caused by P. aeruginosa through inhibition of serA function. PMID:28046014

  19. Effect of simulated intestinal fluid on drug permeability estimation across Caco-2 monolayers.

    PubMed

    Ingels, F; Beck, B; Oth, M; Augustijns, P

    2004-04-15

    Presently, the Caco-2 cell culture model is widely used during drug discovery and development as a predictive tool for the oral absorption of drug candidates. For transport experiments in the Caco-2 system, HBSS-like buffered salt solutions are commonly used, although different shortcomings have been associated with the use of these buffers. In this paper, we investigated the effect of using fasted state simulated intestinal fluid (FaSSIF) as potential biorelevant medium for the drug permeability estimation across Caco-2 monolayers. The transport characteristics of 19 model compounds were determined in the Caco-2 cell culture model in the presence of FaSSIF as compared to classic transport medium. A sigmoidal relation was obtained when the estimated P(app), s of the apical to basolateral transport were plotted versus the reported values of the fraction absorbed in man. Although no effect of FaSSIF as compared to classic transport medium (TM) was observed on the total predictability of the model, an impact was demonstrated (1) on the bi-directional transport of actively transported drugs (including talinolol, digoxin and doxorubicin), (2) on recovery and (3) on the solubility and permeability estimation of poorly water-soluble drugs. The observed differences may be attributed to a P-gp inhibitory effect of sodium taurocholate (NaTC), micellar encapsulation by the NaTC/lecithin mixed micelles and/or an increase of the solubility of lipophilic drugs. As the experimental conditions should mimic the physiological in vivo conditions, the use of FaSSIF as medium during Caco-2 experiments may improve the biorelevance of the model.

  20. Transport Mechanisms of Solid Lipid Nanoparticles across Caco-2 Cell Monolayers and their Related Cytotoxicology.

    PubMed

    Chai, Gui-Hong; Xu, Yingke; Chen, Shao-Qing; Cheng, Bolin; Hu, Fu-Qiang; You, Jian; Du, Yong-Zhong; Yuan, Hong

    2016-03-09

    Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) have been extensively investigated and demonstrated to be a potential nanocarriers for improving oral bioavailability of many drugs. However, the molecular mechanisms related to this discovery are not yet understood. Here, the molecular transport mechanisms of the SLNs crossing simulative intestinal epithelial cell monolayers (Caco-2 cell monolayers) were studied. The cytotoxicology results of the SLNs in Caco-2 cells demonstrated that the nanoparticles had low cytotoxicity, had no effect on the integrity of the cell membrane, did not induce oxidative stress, and could significantly reduce cell membrane fluidity. The endocytosis of the SLNs was time-dependent, and their delivery was energy-dependent. For the first time, the transport of the SLNs was directly verified to be a vesicle-mediated process. The internalization of the SLNs was mediated by macropinocytosis pathway and clathrin- and caveolae (or lipid raft)-related routes. Transferrin-related endosomes, lysosomes, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and Golgi apparatus were confirmed to be the main destinations of the SLNs in Caco-2 cells. As for the transport of the SLNs in Caco-2 cell monolayers, the results demonstrated that the SLNs transported to the basolateral side were intact, and the transport of the nanoparticles did not destroy the structure of tight junctions. The transcytosis of the SLNs across the Caco-2 cell monolayer was demonstrated to be mediated by the same routes as that in the endocytosis study. The ER, Golgi apparatus, and microtubules were confirmed to be important for the transport of the SLNs to both the basolateral and apical membrane sides. This study provides a more thoroughly understand of SLNs transportation crossing intestinal epithelial cell monolayers and could be beneficial for the fabrication of SLNs.

  1. The synergistic effect of ethanol and shock insults on Caco-2 cytokine production and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Amin, Parth B; Diebel, Lawrence N; Liberati, David M

    2008-05-01

    Gut epithelial cells are important in orchestrating immunoinflammatory responses in the gut and may impact systemic immunocompetent cells after shock and trauma. Ethanol (EtOH) intoxication is an important etiological factor in trauma and may increase the likelihood of posttraumatic septic complications. Both EtOH and gut I/R impair intestinal barrier function. However, their combined effects on intestinal epithelial cell function and barrier integrity are unknown. Confluent CaCO2 cell monolayers were grown in a two-chamber culture system and exposed to 0.1% EtOH and/or Escherichia coli C-25 under normoxic (21% O2) or hypoxia (5% O2) followed by reoxygenation (H/R). Apical and basal compartment supernatants were collected, and TNF and IL-6 were quantitated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (picograms per milliliter). CaCO2 cell integrity was indexed by apoptosis and monolayer permeability. TNF-alpha production by CaCO2 cells are greatest when incubated with EtOH and then exposed to H/R group. The apical levels of TNF production are consistently higher than basal levels, although the trend toward increased cytokine production is similar in both compartments. IL-6 production by the CaCO2 cell is also greatest when CaCO2 cells incubated with EtOH undergoes H/R. Lastly, the findings in apoptosis mirror the data of the TNF production in the apical compartment. Ethanol and H/R have a synergistic effect on cytokine production and barrier dysfunction in this model. They may also contribute to increased infectious complications and posttraumatic organ failure.

  2. Titanium Dioxide Particle Type and Concentration Influence the Inflammatory Response in Caco-2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Tada-Oikawa, Saeko; Ichihara, Gaku; Fukatsu, Hitomi; Shimanuki, Yuka; Tanaka, Natsuki; Watanabe, Eri; Suzuki, Yuka; Murakami, Masahiko; Izuoka, Kiyora; Chang, Jie; Wu, Wenting; Yamada, Yoshiji; Ichihara, Sahoko

    2016-04-16

    Titanium dioxide (TiO₂) nanoparticles are widely used in cosmetics, sunscreens, biomedicine, and food products. When used as a food additive, TiO₂ nanoparticles are used in significant amounts as white food-coloring agents. However, the effects of TiO₂ nanoparticles on the gastrointestinal tract remain unclear. The present study was designed to determine the effects of five TiO₂ particles of different crystal structures and sizes in human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells and THP-1 monocyte-derived macrophages. Twenty-four-hour exposure to anatase (primary particle size: 50 and 100 nm) and rutile (50 nm) TiO₂ particles reduced cellular viability in a dose-dependent manner in THP-1 macrophages, but in not Caco-2 cells. However, 72-h exposure of Caco-2 cells to anatase (50 nm) TiO₂ particles reduced cellular viability in a dose-dependent manner. The highest dose (50 µg/mL) of anatase (100 nm), rutile (50 nm), and P25 TiO₂ particles also reduced cellular viability in Caco-2 cells. The production of reactive oxygen species tended to increase in both types of cells, irrespective of the type of TiO₂ particle. Exposure of THP-1 macrophages to 50 µg/mL of anatase (50 nm) TiO₂ particles increased interleukin (IL)-1β expression level, and exposure of Caco-2 cells to 50 µg/mL of anatase (50 nm) TiO₂ particles also increased IL-8 expression. The results indicated that anatase TiO₂ nanoparticles induced inflammatory responses compared with other TiO₂ particles. Further studies are required to determine the in vivo relevance of these findings to avoid the hazards of ingested particles.

  3. Suppressive effect of sinomenine combined with 5-fluorouracil on colon carcinoma cell growth.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ji-Xiang; Yang, Zi-Rong; Wu, Dan-Dan; Song, Jia; Guo, Xu-Feng; Wang, Jing; Dong, Wei-Guo

    2014-01-01

    It is reported that sinomenine (SIN) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) both are effective for colon cancer, but their cooperative suppressive effects and toxicity remain to be clarified in detail. This study aimed to determine suppressive effects and toxicity of sinomenine (SIN) plus 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) on LoVo colon carcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo. CCK-8, Hoechst 33258 staining and an annexin V-FITC/PI apoptosis kit were used to detect suppressive effects. Western blotting was applied to investigate the essential mechanism underlying SIN and 5-FU-induced apoptosis. SIN or 5-FU or both were injected into nude mice, and then suppressive effects and side effects were observed. SIN plus 5-FU apparently inhibited the proliferation of LoVo cells and induced apoptosis. Moreover the united effects were stronger than individually (p<0.05). The results of annexin V-FITC /PI staining and Hoechst 33258 staining showed that the percentage of apoptotic cells induced by SIN and 5-FU combined or alone was significantly higher than the control group (p<0.05). Expression of Bax and Bcl-2 was up-regulated and down-regulated respectively. SIN or 5-FU significantly inhibited effects on the volume of tumour xenografts and their combined suppressive effects were stronger (p<0.05). No obvious side effects were observed. It was apparent that the united effects of SIN and 5-FU on the growth of colorectal carcinoma LoVo cells in vitro and in vivo were superior to those using them individually, and it did not markedly increase the side effects of chemotherapy.

  4. Teng-Long-Bu-Zhong-Tang, a Chinese herbal formula, enhances anticancer effects of 5 - Fluorouracil in CT26 colon carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer remains one of the leading causes of cancer death worldwide. Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) has played a positive role in colorectal cancer treatment. There is a great need to establish effective herbal formula for colorectal cancer treatment. Based on TCM principles and clinical practices, we have established an eight herbs composed formula for colorectal cancer treatment, which is Teng-Long-Bu-Zhong-Tang (TLBZT). We have demonstrated the anticancer effects of TLBZT against colorectal carcinoma in vitro. In present study, we evaluated the anticancer potential of TLBZT, used alone or in combination with low dose of 5-Fluorouracil (5-Fu), in CT26 colon carcinoma in vivo. Methods CT26 colon carcinoma was established in BALB/c mice and treated with TLBZT, 5-Fu, or TLBZT plus 5-Fu. The tumor volumes were observed. Apoptosis was detected by TUNEL assay. Caspases activities were detected by colorimetric assay. Cell senescence was indentified by senescence β-galactosidase staining. Gene expression and angiogenesis was observed by immunohistochemistry or western blot. Results TLBZT significantly inhibited CT26 colon carcinoma growth. TLBZT elicited apoptosis in CT26 colon carcinoma, accompanied by Caspase-3, 8, and 9 activation and PARP cleavage, and downregulation of XIAP and Survivin. TLBZT also induced cell senescence in CT26 colon carcinoma, with concomitant upregulation of p16 and p21 and downregulation of RB phosphorylation. In addition, angiogenesis and VEGF expression in CT26 colon carcinoma was significantly inhibited by TLBZT treatment. Furthermore, TLBZT significantly enhanced anticancer effects of 5-Fu in CT26 colon carcinoma. Conclusions TLBZT exhibited significantly anticancer effect, and enhanced the effects of 5-Fu in CT26 colon carcinoma, which may correlate with induction of apoptosis and cell senescence, and angiogenesis inhibition. The present study provides new insight into TCM approaches for colon cancer treatment

  5. Milk peptides increase iron solubility in water but do not affect DMT-1 expression in Caco-2 cells

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In vitro digestion of milk produces peptide fractions that enhance iron uptake by Caco-2 cells. Our objectives were to investigate whether these fractions a) exert their effect by increasing relative gene expression of DMT-1 in Caco-2 cells b) enhance iron dialyzability when added in meals. Peptid...

  6. Different sucrose-isomaltase response of Caco-2 cells to glucose and maltose suggests dietary maltose sensing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Using the small intestine enterocyte Caco-2 cell model, sucrase-isomaltase (SI, the mucosal alpha-glucosidase complex) expression and modification were examined relative to exposure to different mono- and disaccharide glycemic carbohydrates. Caco-2/TC7 cells were grown on porous supports to post-con...

  7. Purified glycosaminoglycans from cooked haddock may enhance Fe uptake via endocytosis in a Caco-2 cell culture model

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study aims to understand the enhancing effect of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), such as chondroitin/dermatan structures, on Fe uptake to Caco-2 cells. High sulfated GAGs were selectively purified from cooked haddock. An in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell culture model was used to evaluate Fe uptake (ce...

  8. Approaching the cellular processes involved in the positive effect of glycosaminoglycans on Fe uptake to Caco-2 cells

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study constitutes an approach to understand the enhancing effect of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) on Fe uptake to Caco-2 cells. The high-sulfated GAGs fraction was isolated and purified from cooked haddock. An in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell culture model was used to monitor Fe uptake (cell ferritin...

  9. Uptake of quercetin and quercetin 3-glucoside from whole onion and apple peel extracts by Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Jeanelle; Brown, Dan; Liu, Rui Hai

    2004-11-17

    Evidence suggests that regular consumption of fruits and vegetables may reduce the risk of chronic diseases, and phytochemicals from fruits and vegetables may be responsible for this health benefit. However, there is limited knowledge on the bioavailability of specific phytochemicals from whole fruits and vegetables. This study used Caco-2 cells to examine uptake of quercetin aglycon and quercetin 3-glucoside as purified compounds and from whole onion and apple peel extracts. Pure quercetin aglycon was absorbed by the Caco-2 cells in higher concentrations than quercetin 3-glucoside (p < 0.05). Caco-2 cells treated with quercetin 3-glucoside accumulated both quercetin 3-glucoside and quercetin. Caco-2 cells absorbed more onion quercetin aglycon than onion quercetin 3-glucoside (p < 0.05), and the percentage of onion quercetin absorbed was greater than that of pure quercetin, most likely due to enzymatic hydrolysis of quercetin 3-glucoside and other quercetin glucosides found in the onion by the Caco-2 cells. Caco-2 cells absorbed low levels of quercetin 3-glucoside from apple peel extracts, but quercetin aglycon absorption was not detected. Caco-2 cell homogenates demonstrated both lactase and glucosidase activities when incubated with lactose and quercetin 3-glucoside, respectively. This use of the Caco2 cell model appears to be a simple and useful system for studying bioavailability of whole food phytochemicals and may be used to assess differences in bioavailability between foods.

  10. p53 is important for the anti-proliferative effect of ibuprofen in colon carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Janssen, Astrid; Schiffmann, Susanne; Birod, Kerstin; Maier, Thorsten J.; Wobst, Ivonne; Geisslinger, Gerd

    2008-01-25

    S-ibuprofen which inhibits the cyclooxygenase-1/-2 and R-ibuprofen which shows no COX-inhibition at therapeutic concentrations have anti-carcinogenic effects in human colon cancer cells; however, the molecular mechanisms for these effects are still unknown. Using HCT-116 colon carcinoma cell lines, expressing either the wild-type form of p53 (HCT-116 p53{sup wt}) or being p(HCT-116 p53{sup -/-}), we demonstrated that both induction of a cell cycle block and apoptosis after S- and R-ibuprofen treatment is in part dependent on p53. Also in the in vivo nude mice model HCT-116 p53{sup -/-} xenografts were less sensitive for S- and R-ibuprofen treatment than HCT-116 p53{sup wt} cells. Furthermore, results indicate that induction of apoptosis in HCT-116 p53{sup wt} cells after ibuprofen treatment is in part dependent on a signalling pathway including the neutrophin receptor p75{sup NTR}, p53 and Bax.

  11. Predictive gene signatures: molecular markers distinguishing colon adenomatous polyp and carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Drew, Janice E; Farquharson, Andrew J; Mayer, Claus Dieter; Vase, Hollie F; Coates, Philip J; Steele, Robert J; Carey, Francis A

    2014-01-01

    Cancers exhibit abnormal molecular signatures associated with disease initiation and progression. Molecular signatures could improve cancer screening, detection, drug development and selection of appropriate drug therapies for individual patients. Typically only very small amounts of tissue are available from patients for analysis and biopsy samples exhibit broad heterogeneity that cannot be captured using a single marker. This report details application of an in-house custom designed GenomeLab System multiplex gene expression assay, the hCellMarkerPlex, to assess predictive gene signatures of normal, adenomatous polyp and carcinoma colon tissue using archived tissue bank material. The hCellMarkerPlex incorporates twenty-one gene markers: epithelial (EZR, KRT18, NOX1, SLC9A2), proliferation (PCNA, CCND1, MS4A12), differentiation (B4GANLT2, CDX1, CDX2), apoptotic (CASP3, NOX1, NTN1), fibroblast (FSP1, COL1A1), structural (ACTG2, CNN1, DES), gene transcription (HDAC1), stem cell (LGR5), endothelial (VWF) and mucin production (MUC2). Gene signatures distinguished normal, adenomatous polyp and carcinoma. Individual gene targets significantly contributing to molecular tissue types, classifier genes, were further characterised using real-time PCR, in-situ hybridisation and immunohistochemistry revealing aberrant epithelial expression of MS4A12, LGR5 CDX2, NOX1 and SLC9A2 prior to development of carcinoma. Identified gene signatures identify aberrant epithelial expression of genes prior to cancer development using in-house custom designed gene expression multiplex assays. This approach may be used to assist in objective classification of disease initiation, staging, progression and therapeutic responses using biopsy material.

  12. The Potential Therapeutic Agent Mepacrine Protects Caco-2 Cells against Clostridium perfringens Enterotoxin Action.

    PubMed

    Freedman, John C; Hendricks, Matthew R; McClane, Bruce A

    2017-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE) causes the diarrhea associated with a common bacterial food poisoning and many antibiotic-associated diarrhea cases. The severity of some CPE-mediated disease cases warrants the development of potential therapeutics. A previous study showed that the presence of mepacrine inhibited CPE-induced electrophysiology effects in artificial lipid bilayers lacking CPE receptors. However, that study did not assess whether mepacrine inactivates CPE or, instead, inhibits a step in CPE action. Furthermore, CPE action in host cells is complex, involving the toxin binding to receptors, receptor-bound CPE oligomerizing into a prepore on the membrane surface, and β-hairpins in the CPE prepore inserting into the membrane to form a pore that induces cell death. Therefore, the current study evaluated the ability of mepacrine to protect cells from CPE. This drug was found to reduce CPE-induced cytotoxicity in Caco-2 cells. This protection did not involve mepacrine inactivation of CPE, indicating that mepacrine affects one or more steps in CPE action. Western blotting then demonstrated that mepacrine decreases CPE pore levels in Caco-2 cells. This mepacrine-induced reduction in CPE pore levels did not involve CPE binding inhibition but rather an increase in CPE monomer dissociation due to mepacrine interactions with Caco-2 membranes. In addition, mepacrine was also shown to inhibit CPE pores when already present in Caco-2 cells. These in vitro studies, which identified two mepacrine-sensitive steps in CPE-induced cytotoxicity, add support to further testing of the therapeutic potential of mepacrine against CPE-mediated disease. IMPORTANCEClostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE) causes the gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms of a common bacterial food poisoning and several nonfoodborne human GI diseases. A previous study showed that, via an undetermined mechanism, the presence of mepacrine blocks CPE-induced electrophysiologic activity in artificial

  13. Urotensin-II receptor is over-expressed in colon cancer cell lines and in colon carcinoma in humans.

    PubMed

    Federico, Alessandro; Zappavigna, Silvia; Romano, Marco; Grieco, Paolo; Luce, Amalia; Marra, Monica; Gravina, Antonietta Gerarda; Stiuso, Paola; D'Armiento, Francesco Paolo; Vitale, Giovanni; Tuccillo, Concetta; Novellino, Ettore; Loguercio, Carmela; Caraglia, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Urotensin (U)-II receptor (UTR) has been previously reported to be over-expressed in a number of tumours. Whether UTR-related pathway plays a role in colon carcinogenesis is unknown. We evaluated UTR protein and mRNA expression in human epithelial colon cancer cell lines and in normal colon tissue, adenomatous polyps and colon cancer. U-II protein expression was assessed in cancer cell lines. Moreover, we evaluated the effects of U-II(4-11) (an UTR agonist), antagonists and knockdown of UTR protein expression through a specific shRNA, on proliferation, invasion and motility of human colon cancer cells. Cancer cell lines expressed U-II protein and UTR protein and mRNA. By immunohistochemistry, UTR was expressed in 5-30% of epithelial cells in 45 normal controls, in 30-48% in 21 adenomatous polyps and in 65-90% in 48 colon adenocarcinomas. UTR mRNA expression was increased by threefold in adenomatous polyps and eightfold in colon cancer, compared with normal colon. U-II(4-11) induced a 20-40% increase in cell growth while the blockade of the receptor with specific antagonists caused growth inhibition of 20-40%. Moreover, the knock down of UTR with a shRNA or the inhibition of UTR with the antagonist urantide induced an approximately 50% inhibition of both motility and invasion. UTR appears to be involved in the regulation of colon cancer cell invasion and motility. These data suggest that UTR-related pathway may play a role in colon carcinogenesis and that UTR may function as a target for therapeutic intervention in colon cancer. © 2013 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  14. Immunohistochemical and Western blot analysis of two protein tyrosine phosphatase receptors, R and Z1, in colorectal carcinoma, colon adenoma and normal colon tissues.

    PubMed

    Woźniak, Marta; Gamian, Elżbieta; Łaczmańska, Izabela; Sąsiadek, Maria M; Duś-Szachniewicz, Kamila; Ziółkowski, Piotr

    2014-05-01

    Two classes of proteins, namely tyrosine kinases (PTK) and phosphatases (PTP), play an important role in cell proliferation and differentiation, thus leading to an acceleration or inhibition of tumour growth. The role of the above proteins in colorectal carcinoma (CRC) growth is a well-known event. In this study we carried out immunohistochemical and Western blot analysis of colorectal carcinoma, adenoma and normal colon tissue in relation to two protein tyrosine phosphatase receptors, R and Z1. Twenty-five cases of CRC were analyzed and the results were compared with similar data obtained in non-malignant tissues. High expression of both PTP receptors was observed in all examined cases of CRC, adenoma and normal colon tissue in this study. These results are not in line with recently published data, showing that genetic coding for PTPRR and PTPRZ1 were hypermethylated in CRC's. We presume that the protein tyrosine phosphatase overexpression in colorectal carcinoma is not enough to protect from the progression of disease.

  15. [Study on transport mechanism of baicalin in Scutellariae radix extracts and effect of Angelica dahurica extracts on transport of baicalin by Caco-2 cell monolayer model].

    PubMed

    Liang, Xin-Li; Zhu, Meng-Liang; Zhao, Li-Jun; Zhao, Guo-Wei; Liao, Zheng-Gen; Cao, Yun-Chao; Yang, Ming

    2013-07-01

    To study the transport mechanism of baicalin of Scutellariae Radix extracts and the effect of Angelica dahurica extracts on the intestinal absorption of baicalin by using Caco-2 cell monolayer model, in order to analyze the effect mechanism of Angelica dahurica extracts on the intestinal absorption of baicalin. The Caco-2 cell monolayer model was established with human colonic adenocarcinoma cells, and used to study the effect of pH, time, drug concentration and temperature on the transport of baicalin in Scutellariae Radix extracts, the effect of P-gp and MRP protein-dedicated inhibitors on the bidirectional transport of baicalin in Caco-2 cell model, and the effect of angelica root extracts on baicalin absorption and transport. Baicalin was absorbed well at 37 degrees C and under pH 7.4 condition and concentration dependent. Its proteins became inactive at 4 degrees C, with a low transport. The bi-drectional transfer PDR was 0. 54. After P-gp inhibitor verapamil and MRP inhibitor probenecid were added, the value of PappBL-AP of baicalin decreased, but without any difference in PDR. The transport of baicalin was improved by 2.34, 3.31 and 3.13 times, after A. dahurica extract coumarin, volatile oil, and mixture of coumarin and volatile oil. The transport mechanism of baicalin is mainly passive transfer and supplemented with efflux proteins involved. A. dahurica extracts can enhance the absorption of baicalin, which may be related to the passive transfer merchanism of baicalin. A. dahurica extracts' effect in opening the close junction among cells may be related to its expression or function in inhibiting efflux proteins.

  16. Induction of glutathione-S-transferase-pi by short-chain fatty acids in the intestinal cell line Caco-2.

    PubMed

    Stein, J; Schröder, O; Bonk, M; Oremek, G; Lorenz, M; Caspary, W F

    1996-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are a multigene family of detoxification and metabolizing enzymes that have been linked with the susceptibility of tissues to environmental carcinogens. In addition to their role as the main energy source in the colonic mucosa, short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) have been found to act as potent antiproliferative and differentiating agents in various cancer cell lines. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of SCFAs on the induction of GSTpi in the intestine as a possible new anticarcinogenic mechanism of SCFAs. Studies were performed in Caco-2 cells, a cell line resembling functionally normal enterocytes. Cells, cultured in DMEM supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum, were studied from day 0 dpc (days post confluence) until 21 dpc and culture. SCFAs (acetate, propionate, butyrate) were added to give a final concentration of 5 mmol L(-1). At 0, 3, 6, 9, 15, and 21 dpc, protein, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), alkaline phosphatase (AP) and GSTpi were measured. Butyrate supplementation significantly (P < or = 0.01) increased GSTpi levels compared with controls in a concentration-dependent manner. The effect was detectable within 3 dpc with a maximum at 15 dpc. In contrast to butyrate, the other SCFAs tested had no (acetate) or little effect (propionate). In conclusion, the data suggest that the anticancer effect of butyrate in part may be based on the induction of GSTpi activity, resulting in an enhanced detoxification capacity of the gut.

  17. Extraction of antioxidant components from Bidens pilosa flowers and their uptake by human intestinal Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wen-Chin; Peng, Chiung-Chi; Chang, Chi-Huang; Huang, Shiau-Huei; Chyau, Charng-Cherng

    2013-01-25

    Bidens pilosa L. var. radiata (BPR, Asteraceae) is a commonly used folk medicine for treating various disorders such as diabetes, inflammation and hypertension. Recent studies to determine its chemical composition have revealed three di-O-caffeoylquinic acids (DiCQAs) and three polyacetylene glucosides (PGAs) to be among the major bioactive markers. To obtain the major compounds of these two chemical classes, the ethyl acetate fraction (EM) obtained using liquid-liquid partition from the methanol extract resulted in a fraction with the highest total phenolic and total flavonoid contents and antioxidant activities in radical scavenging and ferric reducing power assays. To assess the bioavailability of EM, we examined the in vitro uptake using the Caco-2 human colonic cell line. The apparent permeability coefficient (Papp) for each of the compounds within PGAs measured in both apical (AP) to basolateral (BL) and BL to AP was found to preferentially appear BL to AP direction, indicated that a basolateral to apical efflux system was detected in the study. DiCQAs had a lower efflux ratio than those from PGAs (2.32-3.67 vs. 6.03-78.36). Thus, it strongly implies that most of the DiCQAs are better absorbed than the PGAs.

  18. Sijunzi Decoction attenuates 2, 4, 6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis in rats and ameliorates TNBS-induced claudin-2 damage via NF-κB pathway in Caco2 cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yue; Lin, HanJie; Zhang, JinWei; Wei, JianAn; Sun, Jing; Han, Ling

    2017-01-10

    SijunziDecoction (SJZD) is a traditional Chinese medicine prescription used to treat the diseases of gastrointestinal tract since ancient times. The objective of this study was to investigate the protective effects of SJZD on TNBS-induced colitis in rats and TNBS-damaged Caco2 cells. The rat colitis model was induced by 2, 4, 6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). SJZD (2.8 5.6, 11.2 g/kg) or salazosulfapyridine (SASP) (0.4 g/kg) was administrated orally in rats for 7 days. DAI, pathological scores and the expression of claudin-2 were evaluated. Then we explored the effect and mechanism of SijunziDecoction Serum (SJZDS) onTNBS-damaged Caco2 cells to figure out intestinal barrier protective effect and mechanism of SJZD. SJZD significantly ameliorated the severity of TNBS-induced colitis and downregulated the level of claudin-2 in colonic tissues. SJZDS promoted proliferation and inhibited apoptosis ofTNBS-damaged Caco2 cells. In Caco2 cell monolayers, we provided mechanistic evidence that SJZDS-induced increased TEER and decreased permeability after TNBS damage, which were mediated through claudin-2 and NF-κB pathway, including the upregulation of claudin-2, decreased activity of NF-κB p65, reduced level of NF-κB p65 and MLCK. Our results indicated that SJZD possesses protective effect of intestinal barrier towards TNBS-induced colitis in rats and TNBS-damaged Caco2 cells in vitro. SJZDis a potential protective agent of intestinal barrier that deserves further investigation.

  19. Effect of lactobacilli on E. coli adhesion to Caco-2 cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Horosová, K; Bujnáková, D; Kmet, V

    2006-01-01

    Inhibitory effect of various lactobacilli against pathogenic strains of E. coli in model system Caco2 cells was determined by enumerating the number of adhering E. coli after pre-incubation (exclusion), post-incubation (displacement) or co-incubation (competition) with lactobacilli. Porcine E. coli strain F107 (F18ab, Stx2v) in the competition assay with porcine lactobacillus strain P10 gave bacterial counts 7.25 (log CFU per well); in the exclusion test it was only 7.05 while in displacement test it reached 7.29. The lowest E. coli counts adhering to Caco-2 cells were in exclusion assay (pre-incubation, Lactobacillus inoculated as the first). Pre-treatment of E. coli with our lactobacilli strains reduced the cultivable E. coli numbers.

  20. Isoflavones in food supplements: chemical profile, label accordance and permeability study in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Almeida, I M C; Rodrigues, F; Sarmento, B; Alves, R C; Oliveira, M B P P

    2015-03-01

    Consumers nowadays are playing an active role in their health-care. A special case is the increasing number of women, who are reluctant to use exogenous hormone therapy for the treatment of menopausal symptoms and are looking for complementary therapies. However, food supplements are not clearly regulated in Europe. The EFSA has only recently begun to address the issues of botanical safety and purity regulation, leading to a variability of content, standardization, dosage, and purity of available products. In this study, isoflavones (puerarin, daidzin, genistin, daidzein, glycitein, genistein, formononetin, prunetin, and biochanin A) from food supplements (n = 15) for menopausal symptoms relief are evaluated and compared with the labelled information. Only four supplements complied with the recommendations made by the EC on the tolerable thresholds. The intestinal bioavailability of these compounds was investigated using Caco-2 cells. The apparent permeability coefficients of the selected isoflavonoids across the Caco-2 cells were affected by the isoflavone concentration and product matrix.

  1. Combined impact of pH and organic acids on iron uptake by Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Salovaara, Susan; Sandberg, Ann-Sofie; Andlid, Thomas

    2003-12-17

    Previous studies have shown that organic acids have an impact on both Fe(II) and Fe(III) uptake in Caco-2 cell. However, to what extent this effect is correlated with the anion of organic acids per se, or with the resulting decrease in pH, has not yet been clarified. Therefore, we studied the effect of five organic acids (tartaric, succinic, citric, oxalic, and propionic acid) on the absorption of Fe(II) and Fe(III) in Caco-2 cells and compared this with sample solutions without organic acids but set to equivalent pH by HCl. The results showed that the mechanisms behind the enhancing effect of organic acids differed for the two forms of iron. For ferric iron the organic acids promoted uptake both by chelation and by lowering the pH, whereas for ferrous iron the promoting effect was caused only by the lowered pH.

  2. Sericin reduces serum cholesterol in rats and cholesterol uptake into Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Limpeanchob, Nanteetip; Trisat, Kanittaporn; Duangjai, Acharaporn; Tiyaboonchai, Waree; Pongcharoen, Sutatip; Sutheerawattananonda, Manote

    2010-12-08

    A cholesterol lowering effect of sericin was investigated both in vivo and in vitro. Rats were dosed with cholesterol with and without sericin for 14 days. Non-high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and total serum cholesterols were reduced in rats fed high-cholesterol diet with all three tested doses of sericin (10, 100, and 1000 mg kg(-1) day(-1)). The potential mechanism of actions was determined by measuring the uptake of radiolabeled cholesterol into differentiated Caco-2 cells and cholesterol solubility in mixed lipid micelles. Concentration of sericin as low as 25 and 50 μg/mL inhibited 30% of cholesterol uptake into Caco-2 cells whereas no effect was found at higher concentration. Cholesterol micellar solubility was reduced in the presence of sericin. This study suggests the cholesterol lowering effect of sericin results from its inhibition of cholesterol absorption in intestinal cells and its reduction of cholesterol solubility in lipid micelles.

  3. Mosaic expression of membrane peptidases by confluent cultures of Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Howell, S; Brewis, I A; Hooper, N M; Kenny, A J; Turner, A J

    1993-02-08

    The cell-surface expression of endopeptidase-24.11 (EC 3.4.24.11) on Caco-2 cells cultured to confluency is markedly heterogeneous unlike that of dipeptidylpeptidase IV (EC 3.4.14.5). Here we have investigated the cell-surface expression of three other ectopeptidases: angiotensin converting enzyme (EC 3.4.15.1), aminopeptidase N (EC 3.4.11.2) and aminopeptidase W (EC 3.4.11.16). We show by indirect immunofluorescent staining that these three enzymes are present on the surface of some cells but not on others. However, these enzymes were detected in the majority of detergent-permeabilised Caco-2 cells indicating the presence of intracellular pools of these enzymes. This suggests that there may either be differential regulation of apical transport for these peptidases or that they recycle at different rates.

  4. Transport mechanisms of nicotine across the human intestinal epithelial cell line Caco-2.

    PubMed

    Fukada, Atsuko; Saito, Hideyuki; Inui, Ken-Ichi

    2002-08-01

    Ulcerative colitis is a disease more commonly seen in nonsmokers. Because nicotine was postulated to be a beneficial component of tobacco smoke for ulcerative colitis, various formulations of nicotine have been developed to improve the local bioavailability within the gastrointestinal tissue. In the present study, to characterize the disposition of nicotine in the intestines, we investigated intestinal nicotine transport using Caco-2 cells. Nicotine was predominantly transported across Caco-2 cell monolayers in a unidirectional mode, corresponding to intestinal secretion, by pH-dependent specific transport systems. The specific uptake systems appear to be distinct from organic cation transporters and the transport system for tertiary amines, in terms of its substrate specificity and the pattern of the interaction. These transport systems could play a role in the intestinal accumulation of nicotine from plasma and could also be responsible for the topical delivery of nicotine for ulcerative colitis therapy. These findings could provide useful information for the design of effective nicotine delivery.

  5. miRNAs modified by dietary lipids in Caco-2 cells. A microarray screening

    PubMed Central

    Daimiel, Lidia; Ordovás, Jose Mª.; Dávalos, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    We performed a screening of miRNAs regulated by dietary lipids in a cellular model of enterocytes, Caco-2 cells. Our aim was to describe new lipid-modified miRNAs with an implication in lipid homeostasis and cardiovascular disease [1], [2]. For that purpose, we treated differentiated Caco-2 cells with micelles containing the assayed lipids (cholesterol, conjugated linoleic acid and docosahexaenoic acid) and the screening of miRNAs was carried out by microarray using the μParaflo®Microfluidic Biochip Technology of LC Sciences (Huston, TX, USA). Experimental design, microarray description and raw data have been made available in the GEO database with the reference number of GSE59153. Here we described in detail the experimental design and methods used to obtain the relative expression data. PMID:26484250

  6. Transepithelial transport efficiency of bovine collagen hydrolysates in a human Caco-2 cell line model.

    PubMed

    Feng, Mengmeng; Betti, Mirko

    2017-06-01

    Collagen was extracted from raw bovine hide and hydrolyzed by one of three enzymes - Alcalase, Flavourzyme, or trypsin - or by using a combination of two or three of these enzymes. The Alcalase-containing enzymatic hydrolysis treatments generated a greater proportion of hydrolysates with molecular weight (MW) <2kDa (79.8-82.7%). Flavourzyme-containing hydrolysis treatments exhibited the greatest proportion of free amino acids (686-740nmol/mg). The hydrolysates were then subjected to a simulated gastrointestinal (GI) digestion, and transport studies were conducted using a Caco-2 cell model. Due to the lower MW profile, the hydrolyzed collagen showed greater resistance to GI digestion and greater transport efficiency than the unhydrolyzed collagen control. Hydrolysates from a dual enzyme mixture - the Alcalase/Flavourzyme combination - generated the greatest transport efficiency across Caco-2 cell monolayers (21.4%), two-fold more than that of the collagen control. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Caco-2 cell permeability modelling: a neural network coupled genetic algorithm approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Fenza, Armida; Alagona, Giuliano; Ghio, Caterina; Leonardi, Riccardo; Giolitti, Alessandro; Madami, Andrea

    2007-04-01

    The ability to cross the intestinal cell membrane is a fundamental prerequisite of a drug compound. However, the experimental measurement of such an important property is a costly and highly time consuming step of the drug development process because it is necessary to synthesize the compound first. Therefore, in silico modelling of intestinal absorption, which can be carried out at very early stages of drug design, is an appealing alternative procedure which is based mainly on multivariate statistical analysis such as partial least squares (PLS) and neural networks (NN). Our implementation of neural network models for the prediction of intestinal absorption is based on the correlation of Caco-2 cell apparent permeability ( P app) values, as a measure of intestinal absorption, to the structures of two different data sets of drug candidates. Several molecular descriptors of the compounds were calculated and the optimal subsets were selected using a genetic algorithm; therefore, the method was indicated as Genetic Algorithm-Neural Network (GA-NN). A methodology combining a genetic algorithm search with neural network analysis applied to the modelling of Caco-2 P app has never been presented before, although the two procedures have been already employed separately. Moreover, we provide new Caco-2 cell permeability measurements for more than two hundred compounds. Interestingly, the selected descriptors show to possess physico-chemical connotations which are in excellent accordance with the well known relevant molecular properties involved in the cellular membrane permeation phenomenon: hydrophilicity, hydrogen bonding propensity, hydrophobicity and molecular size. The predictive ability of the models, although rather good for a preliminary study, is somewhat affected by the poor precision of the experimental Caco-2 measurements. Finally, the generalization ability of one model was checked on an external test set not derived from the data sets used to build the models

  8. Accumulation and Oriented Transport of Ampicillin in Caco-2 Cells from Its Pivaloyloxymethylester Prodrug, Pivampicillin

    PubMed Central

    Chanteux, Hugues; Van Bambeke, Françoise; Mingeot-Leclercq, Marie-Paule; Tulkens, Paul M.

    2005-01-01

    Pivampicillin (PIVA), an acyloxymethylester of ampicillin, is thought to enhance the oral bioavailability of ampicillin because of its greater lipophilicity compared to that of ampicillin. The fate of PIVA in intestinal cells and the exact location of its conversion into ampicillin have, however, never been unambiguously established. Polarized Caco-2 cells have been used to examine the handling of PIVA and the release of ampicillin from PIVA by the intestinal epithelium. Experiments were limited to 3 h. Cells incubated with PIVA (apical pole) showed a fast accumulation of ampicillin and transport toward the basolateral medium, whereas PIVA itself was only poorly accumulated and transported. Cells incubated with free ampicillin accumulated and transported only minimal amounts of this drug. Release of ampicillin from cells incubated with PIVA was unaffected by PEPT1 and OCTN2 inhibitors but was sharply decreased after ATP depletion or addition of bis(4-nitrophenyl)-phosphate (BNPP; an esterase inhibitor). PIVA incubated with Caco-2 lysates released free ampicillin, and this release was inhibited by BNPP. Efflux studies showed that the ampicillin that accumulated in cells after incubation with PIVA was preferentially transported out of the cells through the basolateral pole. This efflux was decreased by multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) inhibitors (probenecid, MK-571) and by ATP depletion. A phthalimidomethylester of ampicillin that resists cellular esterases failed to cause any significant release (cell lysate) or transport (polarized Caco-2 cells) of ampicillin. These results show that when PIVA is given to Caco-2 cells from their apical pole, ampicillin is released intracellularly and that ampicillin is thereafter preferentially effluxed into the basolateral medium through an MRP-like transporter. PMID:15793098

  9. Metabolites produced by probiotic Lactobacilli rapidly increase glucose uptake by Caco-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Although probiotic bacteria and their metabolites alter enterocyte gene expression, rapid, non-genomic responses have not been examined. The present study measured accumulation of tracer (2 μM) glucose by Caco-2 cells after exposure for 10 min or less to a chemically defined medium (CDM) with different monosaccharides before and after anaerobic culture of probiotic Lactobacilli. Results Growth of L. acidophilus was supported by CDM with 110 mM glucose, fructose, and mannose, but not with arabinose, ribose, and xylose or the sugar-free CDM. Glucose accumulation was reduced when Caco-2 cells were exposed for 10 min to sterile CDM with glucose (by 92%), mannose (by 90%), fructose (by 55%), and ribose (by 16%), but not with arabinose and xylose. Exposure of Caco-2 cells for 10 min to bacteria-free supernatants prepared after exponential (48 h) and stationary (72 h) growth phases of L. acidophilus cultured in CDM with 110 mM fructose increased glucose accumulation by 83% and 45%, respectively; exposure to a suspension of the bacteria had no effect. The increase in glucose accumulation was diminished by heat-denaturing the supernatant, indicating the response of Caco-2 cells is triggered by as yet unknown heat labile bacterial metabolites, not by a reduction in CDM components that decrease glucose uptake. Supernatants prepared after anaerobic culture of L. gasseri, L. amylovorus, L. gallinarum, and L. johnsonii in the CDM with fructose increased glucose accumulation by 83%, 32%, 27%, and 14%, respectively. Conclusion The rapid, non-genomic upregulation of SGLT1 by bacterial metabolites is a heretofore unrecognized interaction between probiotics and the intestinal epithelium. PMID:20089192

  10. Metabolites produced by probiotic Lactobacilli rapidly increase glucose uptake by Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Rooj, Arun K; Kimura, Yasuhiro; Buddington, Randal K

    2010-01-20

    Although probiotic bacteria and their metabolites alter enterocyte gene expression, rapid, non-genomic responses have not been examined. The present study measured accumulation of tracer (2 microM) glucose by Caco-2 cells after exposure for 10 min or less to a chemically defined medium (CDM) with different monosaccharides before and after anaerobic culture of probiotic Lactobacilli. Growth of L. acidophilus was supported by CDM with 110 mM glucose, fructose, and mannose, but not with arabinose, ribose, and xylose or the sugar-free CDM. Glucose accumulation was reduced when Caco-2 cells were exposed for 10 min to sterile CDM with glucose (by 92%), mannose (by 90%), fructose (by 55%), and ribose (by 16%), but not with arabinose and xylose. Exposure of Caco-2 cells for 10 min to bacteria-free supernatants prepared after exponential (48 h) and stationary (72 h) growth phases of L. acidophilus cultured in CDM with 110 mM fructose increased glucose accumulation by 83% and 45%, respectively; exposure to a suspension of the bacteria had no effect. The increase in glucose accumulation was diminished by heat-denaturing the supernatant, indicating the response of Caco-2 cells is triggered by as yet unknown heat labile bacterial metabolites, not by a reduction in CDM components that decrease glucose uptake. Supernatants prepared after anaerobic culture of L. gasseri, L. amylovorus, L. gallinarum, and L. johnsonii in the CDM with fructose increased glucose accumulation by 83%, 32%, 27%, and 14%, respectively. The rapid, non-genomic upregulation of SGLT1 by bacterial metabolites is a heretofore unrecognized interaction between probiotics and the intestinal epithelium.

  11. S-adenosyl-L-methionine: transcellular transport and uptake by Caco-2 cells and hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    McMillan, J M; Walle, U K; Walle, T

    2005-05-01

    S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAMe) is an endogenous molecule that is known to be protective against hepatotoxic injury. Although oral SAMe appears to be absorbed across the intestinal mucosa, its systemic bioavailability is low. The reason for this is unknown. Using the Caco-2 cell culture model for enterocyte absorption, we determined the mode by which SAMe is transported across this cell monolayer. We also determined the extent it is taken up by both Caco-2 cells and hepatocytes. In Caco-2 cells transport was observed in both apical to basolateral and basolateral to apical directions. The apparent permeability coefficients (Papp) appeared to be concentration independent and were similar in both directions (0.7x10(-6) and 0.6x10(-6) cm s-1, respectively), i.e. identical to that of the paracellular transport marker mannitol (0.9x10(-6) and 0.7x10(-6) cm s-1). This mode of transport was supported by a four-fold increase in the Papp for SAMe transport in Ca++-free buffer. Cellular uptake of SAMe was examined in both Caco-2 cells and cultured rat hepatocytes. Uptake by hepatocytes was not saturable in a concentration range of 0.001-100 microM. Accumulation by both cell types was very low, with a cell:medium ratio at equilibrium of only 0.2-0.5. This low cell accumulation supports the finding of paracellular transport as the only mode of cell membrane transport. Increased hepatocellular protection for SAMe may be accomplished by converting SAMe to a more lipid-soluble prodrug.

  12. Bioavailability of hydroxycinnamic acids from Crepidiastrum denticulatum using simulated digestion and Caco-2 intestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee Ju; Cha, Kwang Hyun; Kim, Chul Young; Nho, Chu Won; Pan, Cheol-Ho

    2014-06-11

    Hydroxycinnamic acids have antioxidant properties and potentially beneficial effects on human health. This study investigated the digestive stability, bioaccessibility, and permeability of hydroxycinnamic acids from Crepidiastrum denticulatum using simulated digestion and Caco-2 intestinal cells. The major compounds of C. denticulatum were determined to be four hydroxycinnamic acids [caftaric acid, chlorogenic acid, chicoric acid, and 3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid (3,5-DCQA)] and one flavonoid (luteolin-7-O-glucuronide) by high-performance liquid chromatography and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Hydroxycinnamic acids from C. denticulatum were rapidly released in the stomach and duodenum phase, maximizing the possibility of absorption in the intestinal Caco-2 cells. The digestive stability and bioaccessibility of hydroxycinnamic acids from C. denticulatum were markedly low after simulated digestion and remained minimal in the soluble fraction of the ileum phase. Unlike the four hydroxycinnamic acids, luteolin-7-O-glucuronide was stable in terms of digestive stability and bioaccessibility during simulated digestion. The cell permeabilities (P(app A to B)/P(app B to A)) of caftaric acid (0.054) and chlorogenic acid (0.055) were higher than those of chicoric acid (0.011) and 3,5-DCQA (0.006) in general. That of luteolin-7-O-glucuronide was not detectable, showing its low absorption in Caco-2 cells. These results indicate that the rapid release of hydroxycinnamic acids in the stomach and duodenum phase may increase the potential for absorption in Caco-2 cells, and that luteolin-7-O-glucuronide, which was stable in terms of digestive stability and bioaccessibility, has relatively low absorption compared with hydroxycinnamic acids.

  13. Characterization of adhesive molecule with affinity to Caco-2 cells in Lactobacillus acidophilus by proteome analysis.

    PubMed

    Ashida, Nobuhisa; Yanagihara, Sae; Shinoda, Tadashi; Yamamoto, Naoyuki

    2011-10-01

    The adhesive activities of eight Lactobacillus acidophilus strains toward intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells were studied to understand the probiotic characteristics of the L. acidophilus L-92 strain. Most of the strains, including L-92, showed high adhesive activity; CP23 showed the lowest adhesive activity. CP23 was selected for comparative analysis of cell wall-associated proteins versus the L-92 strain. Cell wall-associated proteins extracted from L-92 and CP23 were subjected to two-dimensional electrophoresis, and major spots observed in the former were compared to the corresponding spots in the latter. To understand the effects of key components of L-92 on its adhesion to Caco-2 cells, 18 spots with stronger signals in L-92 than those in CP23 were identified by a MALDI-TOF/TOF of Ultraflex analysis. Among the identified proteins of L-92, surface-layer protein A (SlpA) was considered strongly involved in adhesion in the eight L. acidophilus strains. To study the importance of SlpA in the adhesion of L. acidophilus, the amounts of SlpA proteins in LiCl extracts of the eight strains were compared by SDSpolyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. As a result, the adhesive abilities of L. acidophilus strains to Caco-2 cells correlated closely to the amount of SlpA in the cells and the productivity of IL-12, an inflammatory cytokine, in all eight strains. These results strongly suggested that SlpA in L. acidophilus might play a key role in its attachment to Caco-2 cells and in the release of IL-12 from dendritic cells.

  14. Increased serum leptin level in overweight patients with colon carcinoma: A cross-sectional and prospective study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Di; Gao, Lichen; Gong, Kuiyu; Chai, Qin; Wang, Guihua

    2017-01-01

    Leptin is associated with carcinogenesis and progression of various cancers. However, the changes of the serum leptin level in Chinese overweight patients with colon carcinoma and its association with response to treatment in these patients have rarely been investigated. A total of 63 Chinese overweight patients with colon cancer and 40 body mass index-matched control subjects were recruited in the present study. The serum leptin levels of colon cancer patients prior to and 21 days after colectomy, as well as those of healthy controls, were measured and compared. In addition, the focal expression of phosphorylated Akt, mammalian target of rapamycin and 70S6 Kinase (p-Akt, p-mTOR and P-70S6 Kinase) and leptin were determined in the resected specimens and the correlation between serum leptin levels and the focally expressed markers were investigated. The serum leptin levels of colon cancer patients were significantly higher compared with those of the controls (22.67±12.56 vs. 12.68±7.8 ng/ml, respectively; P<0.05). Moreover, the leptin levels decreased after the operation when compared to the preoperative levels (18.67±8.54 vs. 22.67±12.56 ng/ml, respectively; P<0.05). In addition, there was a significant correlation between the serum leptin levels and the focal expression of p-Akt, p-mTOR, P-70S6 Kinase and leptin (P<0.05). In conclusion, the leptin levels were elevated in Chinese overweight patients with colon cance these levels decreased following colectomy, indicating that leptin may be associated with colon carcinogenesis. Thus, serum leptin level may be used for early diagnosis and for monitoring the response to treatment of colon carcinoma in overweight Chinese patients.

  15. Decreased H2B monoubiquitination and overexpression of ubiquitin-specific protease enzyme 22 in malignant colon carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zijing; Zhu, Linlin; Guo, Tianjiao; Wang, Yiping; Yang, Jinlin

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the expression of H2B monoubiquitination enzyme (uH2B) and ubiquitin-specific protease enzyme 22 (USP22) in colon carcinoma and establish a correlation between the expression of these enzymes and clinicopathological parameters. The modification levels of uH2B and USP22 in 20 noncancerous and 129 cancerous colon samples were studied by immunohistochemistry. We used a dual-rated semiquantitative method to classify the expression according to 3 levels and analyzed these results. uH2B was abundant in the normal colon epithelium, but its expression was decreased in colon cancers (P < .001); the uH2B modification level correlated with tumor differentiation (P < .001), lymph node metastasis (P = .017), distant metastasis (P = .036), and tumor stage (P = .039). The USP22 expression in colon carcinoma was higher than that in normal tissues (P = .007) and negatively correlated with the degree of differentiation (P = .006), invasion (P = .025), lymph node metastasis (P = .026), and tumor stage (P = .044). uH2B and USP22 expression negatively correlated (r = -0.401, P < .001). Patients with uH2B-negative and USP22-positive staining were found to have lower survival rates (30.737 ± 2.866 versus 51.667 ± 2.286 months, P < .001). Positive uH2B and negative USP22 expression remained a statistically significant prognostic indicator in a multivariate Cox regression analysis (hazard ratio, 2.557; 95% confidence interval, 1.043-6.269; P = .04). We conclude that uH2B displays differential staining patterns according to progressive stages of colon cancer, indicating that uH2B may play an important inhibitory role in carcinogenesis. Increased USP22 expression in colon cancer correlated with reduced uH2B expression, and this expression pattern may contribute to tumor progression.

  16. Synergistic inhibition of colon carcinoma cell growth by Hedgehog-Gli1 inhibitor arsenic trioxide and phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xinyi; Yu, Kun; Zhang, Lijuan; Li, Yunfeng; Li, Qiang; Yang, Zhibin; Shen, Tao; Duan, Lincan; Xiong, Wei; Wang, Weiya

    2015-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway not only plays important roles in embryogenesis and adult tissue homeostasis, but also in tumorigenesis. Aberrant Hh pathway activation has been reported in a variety of malignant tumors including colon carcinoma. Here, we sought to investigate the regulation of the Hh pathway transcription factor Gli1 by arsenic trioxide and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002 in colon carcinoma cells. We transfected cells with siGli1 and observed a significant reduction of Gli1 expression in HCT116 and HT29 cells, which was confirmed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blots. Knocking down endogenous Gli1 reduced colon carcinoma cell viability through inducing cell apoptosis. Similarly, knocking down Gli2 using short interfering RNA impaired colon carcinoma cell growth in vitro. To elucidate the regulation of Gli1 expression, we found that both Gli inhibitor arsenic trioxide and PI3K inhibitor LY294002 significantly reduced Gli1 protein expression and colon carcinoma cell proliferation. Arsenic trioxide treatment also reduced Gli1 downstream target gene expression, such as Bcl2 and CCND1. More importantly, the inhibition of Hedgehog-Gli1 by arsenic trioxide showed synergistic anticancer effect with the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 in colon carcinoma cells. Our findings suggest that the Hh pathway transcription factor Gli1 is involved in the regulation of colon carcinoma cell viability. Inhibition of Hedgehog-Gli1 expression by arsenic trioxide and PI3K inhibitor synergistically reduces colon cancer cell proliferation, indicating that they could be used as an effective anti-colon cancer combination therapy.

  17. A Caco-2 cell-based quantitative antioxidant activity assay for antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Wan, Hongxia; Liu, Dong; Yu, Xiangying; Sun, Haiyan; Li, Yan

    2015-05-15

    A Caco-2 cell-based antioxidant activity (CAA) assay for quantitative evaluation of antioxidants was developed by optimizing seeding density and culture time of Caco-2 cells, incubation time and concentration of fluorescent probe (2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate, DCFH-DA), incubation way and incubation time of antioxidants (pure phytochemicals) and DCFH-DA with cells, and detection time of fluorescence. Results showed that the CAA assay was of good reproducibility and could be used to evaluate the antioxidant activity of antioxidants at the following conditions: seeding density of 5 × 10(4)/well, cell culture time of 24h, co-incubation of 60 μM DCFH-DA and pure phytochemicals with Caco-2 cells for 20 min and fluorescence recorded for 90 min. Additionally, a significant correlation was observed between CAA values and rat plasma ORAC values following the intake of antioxidants for selected pure phytochemicals (R(2) = 0.815, p < 0.01), demonstrating the good biological relevance of CAA assay.

  18. Effect of chum salmon egg lectin on tight junctions in Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Ryo; Yamamoto, Shintaro; Ogawa, Tomohisa; Naude, Ryno; Muramoto, Koji

    2015-05-05

    The effect of a chum salmon egg lectin (CSL3) on tight junction (TJ) of Caco-2 cell monolayers was investigated. The lectin opened TJ as indicated by the decrease of the transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) value and the increase of the permeation of lucifer yellow, which is transported via the TJ-mediated paracellular pathway. The effects of CSL3 were inhibited by the addition of 10 mM L-rhamnose or D-galactose which were specific sugars for CSL3. The lectin increased the intracellular Ca2+ of Caco-2 cell monolayers, that could be inhibited by the addition of L-rhamnose. The fluorescence immunostaining of β-actin in Caco-2 cell monolayers revealed that the cytoskeleton was changed by the CSL3 treatment, suggesting that CSL3 depolymerized β-actin to cause reversible TJ structural and functional disruption. Although Japanese jack bean lectin and wheat germ lectin showed similar effects in the decrease of the TER values and the increase of the intracellular Ca2+, they could not be inhibited by the same concentrations of simple sugars, such as D-glucose and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine.

  19. In vitro toxicity of different-sized ZnO nanoparticles in Caco-2 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Tianshu; Guan, Rongfa; Chen, Xiaoqiang; Song, Yijuan; Jiang, Han; Zhao, Jin

    2013-11-01

    There has been rapid growth in nanotechnology in both the public and private sectors worldwide, but concern about nanosafety exists. To assess size-dependent cytotoxicity on human cancer cells, we studied the cytotoxic effect of three kinds of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) on human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells. Nanoparticles were first characterized by size, distribution, and intensity. Multiple assays have been adopted to measure the cell activity and oxidative stress. The cytotoxicity of ZnO NPs was time dependent and dose dependent. The 24-h exposure was chosen to confirm the viability and accessibility of the cells and taken as the appropriate time for the following test system. The IC50 value was found at a low concentration. The oxidative stress elicited a significant reduction in glutathione with increase in reactive oxygen species and lactate dehydrogenase. The toxicity resulted in a deletion of cells in the G1 phase and an accumulation of cells in the S and G2/M phases. One type of metallic oxide (ZnO) exerted different cytotoxic effects according to different particle sizes. Data from the previous experiments showed that 26-nm ZnO NPs appeared to have the highest toxicity to Caco-2 cells. The study demonstrated the toxicity of ZnO NPs to Caco-2 cells and the impact of particle size, which could be useful in the medical applications.

  20. Coffee induces breast cancer resistance protein expression in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Isshiki, Marina; Umezawa, Kazuo; Tamura, Hiroomi

    2011-01-01

    Coffee is a beverage that is consumed world-wide on a daily basis and is known to induce a series of metabolic and pharmacological effects, especially in the digestive tract. However, little is known concerning the effects of coffee on transporters in the gastrointestinal tract. To elucidate the effect of coffee on intestinal transporters, we investigated its effect on expression of the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) in a human colorectal cancer cell line, Caco-2. Coffee induced BCRP gene expression in Caco-2 cells in a coffee-dose dependent manner. Coffee treatment of Caco-2 cells also increased the level of BCRP protein, which corresponded to induction of gene expression, and also increased cellular efflux activity, as judged by Hoechst33342 accumulation. None of the major constituents of coffee tested could induce BCRP gene expression. The constituent of coffee that mediated this induction was extractable with ethyl acetate and was produced during the roasting process. Dehydromethylepoxyquinomicin (DHMEQ), an inhibitor of nuclear factor (NF)-κB, inhibited coffee-mediated induction of BCRP gene expression, suggesting involvement of NF-κB in this induction. Our data suggest that daily consumption of coffee might induce BCRP expression in the gastrointestinal tract and may affect the bioavailability of BCRP substrates.

  1. In vitro toxicity of different-sized ZnO nanoparticles in Caco-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    There has been rapid growth in nanotechnology in both the public and private sectors worldwide, but concern about nanosafety exists. To assess size-dependent cytotoxicity on human cancer cells, we studied the cytotoxic effect of three kinds of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) on human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells. Nanoparticles were first characterized by size, distribution, and intensity. Multiple assays have been adopted to measure the cell activity and oxidative stress. The cytotoxicity of ZnO NPs was time dependent and dose dependent. The 24-h exposure was chosen to confirm the viability and accessibility of the cells and taken as the appropriate time for the following test system. The IC50 value was found at a low concentration. The oxidative stress elicited a significant reduction in glutathione with increase in reactive oxygen species and lactate dehydrogenase. The toxicity resulted in a deletion of cells in the G1 phase and an accumulation of cells in the S and G2/M phases. One type of metallic oxide (ZnO) exerted different cytotoxic effects according to different particle sizes. Data from the previous experiments showed that 26-nm ZnO NPs appeared to have the highest toxicity to Caco-2 cells. The study demonstrated the toxicity of ZnO NPs to Caco-2 cells and the impact of particle size, which could be useful in the medical applications. PMID:24261419

  2. Mechanisms of Iron Uptake from Ferric Phosphate Nanoparticles in Human Intestinal Caco-2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Perfecto, Antonio; Elgy, Christine; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Sharp, Paul; Hilty, Florentine; Fairweather-Tait, Susan

    2017-04-04

    Food fortification programs to reduce iron deficiency anemia require bioavailable forms of iron that do not cause adverse organoleptic effects. Rodent studies show that nano-sized ferric phosphate (NP-FePO4) is as bioavailable as ferrous sulfate, but there is controversy over the mechanism of absorption. We undertook in vitro studies to examine this using a Caco-2 cell model and simulated gastrointestinal (GI) digestion. Supernatant iron concentrations increased inversely with pH, and iron uptake into Caco-2 cells was 2-3 fold higher when NP-FePO4 was digested at pH 1 compared to pH 2. The size and distribution of NP-FePO4 particles during GI digestion was examined using transmission electron microscopy. The d50 of the particle distribution was 413 nm. Using disc centrifugal sedimentation, a high degree of agglomeration in NP-FePO4 following simulated GI digestion was observed, with only 20% of the particles ≤1000 nm. In Caco-2 cells, divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) and endocytosis inhibitors demonstrated that NP-FePO4 was mainly absorbed via DMT1. Small particles may be absorbed by clathrin-mediated endocytosis and micropinocytosis. These findings should be considered when assessing the potential of iron nanoparticles for food fortification.

  3. Carrier-mediated uptake of nobiletin, a citrus polymethoxyflavonoid, in human intestinal Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Osamu; Ohta, Chiho; Koga, Nobuyuki; Haraguchi, Koichi; Kato, Yoshihisa; Endo, Tetsuya

    2014-07-01

    The mechanism of intestinal absorption of nobiletin (NBL) was investigated using Caco-2 cells. The uptake of NBL from the apical membranes of Caco-2 cells was rapid and temperature-dependent and the presence of metabolic inhibitors, NaN3 and carbonylcyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone, did not cause a decrease in NBL uptake. The relationship between the initial uptake of NBL and its concentration was saturable, suggesting the involvement of a carrier-mediated process. The Km and uptake clearance (Vmax/Km) values for NBL were 50.6 and 168.1μl/mg protein/min, respectively. This clearance value was about 9-fold greater than that of the non-saturable uptake clearance (Kd: 18.5μl/mg protein/min). The presence of structurally similar compounds, such as quercetin and luteolin, competitively inhibited NBL uptake. These results suggest that uptake of NBL from the apical membranes of Caco-2 cells is mainly mediated by an energy-independent facilitated diffusion process.

  4. Effect of cationized gelatins on the paracellular transport of drugs through caco-2 cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Seki, Toshinobu; Kanbayashi, Hiroshi; Nagao, Tomonobu; Chono, Sumio; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Morimoto, Kazuhiro

    2006-06-01

    Cationized gelatins, candidate absorption enhancers, were prepared by addition of ethylenediamine or spermine to gelatin and the effects of the resulting ethylenediaminated gelatin (EG) and sperminated gelatin (SG) on the paracellular transport of 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein (CF), FITC-dextran-4 (FD4), and insulin through caco-2 cell monolayers were examined. The Renkin function was used for characterization of the paracellular pathway and changes in the pore radius (R) and pore occupancy/length ratio (epsilon/L) calculated from the apparent permeability coefficients (P(app)) of CF and FD4 are discussed. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) increased the R of the caco-2 cell monolayer and the P(app) of all compounds examined was markedly increased by the addition of EDTA. On the other hand, EG and SG did not increase R and their enhancing effects were not as strong as those of EDTA. The increase in epsilon/L could be the enhancing mechanism for the cationized gelatins. The number of pathways for water-soluble drugs, such as CF and FD4, in the caco-2 monolayers could be increased by the addition of the cationized gelatins. The ratios of the permeability coefficients of insulin (observed/calculated based on the Renkin function) suggest that insulin undergoes enzymatic degradation during transport which is not inhibited by enhancers.

  5. Bioavailability of iron from spinach using an in vitro/human Caco-2 cell bioassay model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutzke, Corinne J.; Glahn, Raymond P.; Rutzke, Michael A.; Welch, Ross M.; Langhans, Robert W.; Albright, Louis D.; Combs, Gerald F Jr; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2004-01-01

    Spinach (Spinacia oleracea) cv Whitney was tested for iron bioavailabilty using an in vitro human intestinal cell culture ferritin bioassay technique previously developed. Spinach was cultured in a growth chamber for 33 days, harvested, and freeze-dried. Total iron in the samples was an average of 71 micrograms/g dry weight. Spinach was digested in vitro (pepsin and 0.1 M HCl followed by pancreatin and 0.1 M NaHCO3) with and without the addition of supplemental ascorbic acid. Caco-2 cell cultures were used to determine iron bioavailability from the spinach mixtures. Production of the iron-binding protein ferritin in the Caco-2 cells showed the supplemental ascorbic acid doubled bioavailability of iron from spinach. The data show fresh spinach is a poor source of iron, and emphasize the importance of evaluation of whole meals rather than single food items. The data support the usefulness of the in vitro/Caco-2 cell ferritin bioassay model for prescreening of space flight diets for bioavailable iron.

  6. Homoharringtonine increases intestinal epithelial permeability by modulating specific claudin isoforms in Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Watari, Akihiro; Hashegawa, Maki; Yagi, Kiyohito; Kondoh, Masuo

    2015-01-01

    Homoharringtonine (HHT), a natural alkaloid produced by various Cephalotaxus species, has antileukemic activity in acute and chronic myelogenous leukemia. However, HHT can also induce unanticipated effects in the gastrointestinal tract, such as diarrhea and nausea/vomiting, but the mechanism behind these adverse effects has not been clarified. In the present study, we show that HHT affects the epithelial permeability of intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers. HHT reduced the transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) of Caco-2 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The HHT effect was reversible and no cytotoxicity was observed at the concentrations used. HHT simultaneously increased the paracellular flux of the 4 kDa and 40 kDa FITC-dextrans associated with the TER reduction. Immunoblotting analysis revealed that HHT decreased the protein expression of TJ components such as claudin-3, -5, and -7. However, the transcription levels of these claudins were not repressed by HHT treatment. HHT also disturbed the cellular localization of claudin-1 and -4. These changes coincided with the reduced barrier function. Our findings suggest that HHT enhances the paracellular permeability of Caco-2 cell monolayers by modulating the protein expression and localization of claudin isoforms; these actions might be responsible for the gastrointestinal effects of HHT. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Apple extract induces increased epithelial resistance and claudin 4 expression in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Vreeburg, Robert A M; van Wezel, Esther E; Ocaña-Calahorro, Francisco; Mes, Jurriaan J

    2012-01-30

    The small intestinal epithelium functions both to absorb nutrients, and to provide a barrier between the outside, luminal, world and the human body. One of the passageways across the intestinal epithelium is paracellular diffusion, which is controlled by the properties of tight junction complexes. We used a differentiated Caco-2 monolayer as a model for small intestinal epithelium to study the effect of crude apple extracts on paracellular permeability. Exposure of crude apple homogenate to the differentiated Caco-2 cells increased the paracellular resistance, determined as trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER). This increase was linearly related to the concentration of apple present. The TEER-enhancing effect of apple extract was due to factors mainly present in the cortex, and the induction was not inhibited by protein kinase inhibitors. Apple-induced resistance was accompanied by increased expression of several tight junction related genes, including claudin 4 (CLDN4). Crude apple extract induces a higher paracellular resistance in differentiated Caco-2 cells. Future research will determine whether these results can be extrapolated to human small intestinal epithelia. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Predicting phenolic acid absorption in Caco-2 cells: a theoretical permeability model and mechanistic study.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Tracy L; Poquet, Laure; Dew, Tristan P; Barber, Stuart; Williamson, Gary

    2012-02-01

    There is a considerable need to rationalize the membrane permeability and mechanism of transport for potential nutraceuticals. The aim of this investigation was to develop a theoretical permeability equation, based on a reported descriptive absorption model, enabling calculation of the transcellular component of absorption across Caco-2 monolayers. Published data for Caco-2 permeability of 30 drugs transported by the transcellular route were correlated with the descriptors 1-octanol/water distribution coefficient (log D, pH 7.4) and size, based on molecular mass. Nonlinear regression analysis was used to derive a set of model parameters a', β', and b' with an integrated molecular mass function. The new theoretical transcellular permeability (TTP) model obtained a good fit of the published data (R² = 0.93) and predicted reasonably well (R² = 0.86) the experimental apparent permeability coefficient (P(app)) for nine non-training set compounds reportedly transported by the transcellular route. For the first time, the TTP model was used to predict the absorption characteristics of six phenolic acids, and this original investigation was supported by in vitro Caco-2 cell mechanistic studies, which suggested that deviation of the P(app) value from the predicted transcellular permeability (P(app)(trans)) may be attributed to involvement of active uptake, efflux transporters, or paracellular flux.

  9. Transport in Caco-2 cell monolayers of antidiabetic cucurbitane triterpenoids from Momordica charantia fruits.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shi-Biao; Yue, Grace G L; To, Ming-Ho; Keller, Amy C; Lau, Clara B S; Kennelly, Edward J

    2014-07-01

    Bitter melon, the fruit of Momordica charantia L. (Cucurbitaceae), is a widely-used treatment for diabetes in traditional medicine systems throughout the world. Various compounds have been shown to be responsible for this reputed activity, and, in particular, cucurbitane triterpenoids are thought to play a significant role. The objective of this study was to investigate the gastrointestinal transport of a triterpenoid-enriched n-butanol extract of M. charantia using a two-compartment transwell human intestinal epithelial cell Caco-2 monolayer system, simulating the intestinal barrier. Eleven triterpenoids in this extract were transported from the apical to basolateral direction across Caco-2 cell monolayers, and were identified or tentatively identified by HPLC-TOF-MS. Cucurbitane triterpenoids permeated to the basolateral side with apparent permeability coefficient (P app) values for 3-β-7-β,25-trihydroxycucurbita-5,23(E)-dien-19-al and momordicines I and II at 9.02 × 10(-6), 8.12 × 10(-6), and 1.68 × 10(-6)cm/s, respectively. Also, small amounts of these triterpenoids were absorbed inside the Caco-2 cells. This is the first report of the transport of the reputed antidiabetic cucurbitane triterpenoids in human intestinal epithelial cell monolayers. Our findings, therefore, further support the hypothesis that cucurbitane triterpenoids from bitter melon may explain, at least in part, the antidiabetic activity of this plant in vivo.

  10. Bioavailability of iron from spinach using an in vitro/human Caco-2 cell bioassay model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutzke, Corinne J.; Glahn, Raymond P.; Rutzke, Michael A.; Welch, Ross M.; Langhans, Robert W.; Albright, Louis D.; Combs, Gerald F Jr; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2004-01-01

    Spinach (Spinacia oleracea) cv Whitney was tested for iron bioavailabilty using an in vitro human intestinal cell culture ferritin bioassay technique previously developed. Spinach was cultured in a growth chamber for 33 days, harvested, and freeze-dried. Total iron in the samples was an average of 71 micrograms/g dry weight. Spinach was digested in vitro (pepsin and 0.1 M HCl followed by pancreatin and 0.1 M NaHCO3) with and without the addition of supplemental ascorbic acid. Caco-2 cell cultures were used to determine iron bioavailability from the spinach mixtures. Production of the iron-binding protein ferritin in the Caco-2 cells showed the supplemental ascorbic acid doubled bioavailability of iron from spinach. The data show fresh spinach is a poor source of iron, and emphasize the importance of evaluation of whole meals rather than single food items. The data support the usefulness of the in vitro/Caco-2 cell ferritin bioassay model for prescreening of space flight diets for bioavailable iron.

  11. Sensing Small Changes in Protein Abundance: Stimulation of Caco-2 Cells by Human Whey Proteins.

    PubMed

    Cundiff, Judy K; McConnell, Elizabeth J; Lohe, Kimberly J; Maria, Sarah D; McMahon, Robert J; Zhang, Qiang

    2016-01-04

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic approaches have largely facilitated our systemic understanding of cellular processes and biological functions. Cutoffs in protein expression fold changes (FCs) are often arbitrarily determined in MS-based quantification with no demonstrable determination of small magnitude changes in protein expression. Therefore, many biological insights may remain veiled due to high FC cutoffs. Herein, we employ the intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) line Caco-2 as a model system to demonstrate the dynamicity of tandem-mass-tag (TMT) labeling over a range of 5-40% changes in protein abundance, with the variance controls of ± 5% FC for around 95% of TMT ratios when sampling 9-12 biological replicates. We further applied this procedure to examine the temporal proteome of Caco-2 cells upon exposure to human whey proteins (WP). Pathway assessments predict subtle effects due to WP in moderating xenobiotic metabolism, promoting proliferation and various other cellular functions in differentiating enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells. This demonstration of a sensitive MS approach may open up new perspectives in the system-wide exploration of elusive or transient biological effects by facilitating scrutiny of narrow windows of proteome abundance changes. Furthermore, we anticipate this study will encourage more investigations of WP on infant gastrointestinal tract development.

  12. Apomorphine and its esters: Differences in Caco-2 cell permeability and chylomicron affinity.

    PubMed

    Borkar, Nrupa; Chen, Zhizhong; Saaby, Lasse; Müllertz, Anette; Håkansson, Anders E; Schönbeck, Christian; Yang, Mingshi; Holm, René; Mu, Huiling

    2016-07-25

    Oral delivery of apomorphine via prodrug principle may be a potential treatment for Parkinson's disease. The purpose of this study was to investigate the transport and stability of apomorphine and its esters across Caco-2 cell monolayer and their affinity towards chylomicrons. Apomorphine, monolauroyl apomorphine (MLA) and dilauroyl apomorphine (DLA) were subjected to apical to basolateral (A-B) and basolateral to apical (B-A) transport across Caco-2 cell monolayer. The stability of these compounds was also assessed by incubation at intestinal pH and physiological pH with and without Caco-2 cells. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to understand the stability of the esters on a molecular level. The affinity of the compounds towards plasma derived chylomicrons was assessed. The A-B transport of intact DLA was about 150 times lower than the transport of apomorphine. In contrast, MLA was highly unstable in the aqueous media leading to apomorphine appearance basolaterally. MD simulations possibly explained the differences in hydrolysis susceptibilities of DLA and MLA. The affinity of apomorphine diesters towards plasma derived chylomicrons provided an understanding of their potential lymphatic transport. The intact DLA transport is not favorable; therefore, the conversion of DLA to MLA is an important step for intestinal apomorphine absorption.

  13. Wall-like spin excitations in A-type antiferromagnetic CaCo2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapkota, A.; Ueland, B. G.; Pandey, Abhishek; Johnston, D. C.; Kreyssig, A.; McQueeney, R. J.; Goldman, A. I.; Anand, V. K.; Niedziela, J. L.; Abernathy, D. L.

    The ACo2As2 (A = Ca, Sr, Ba) compounds are structurally and chemically similar to AFe2As2 and possess some interesting similarities and differences in their magnetism. We recently discovered that SrCo2As2 has stripe antiferromagnetic (AFM) spin correlations similar to stripe-ordered AFe2As2. On the other hand, CaCo2As2 orders in an A-type AFM structure with ferromagnetic correlation of the spins in the square-lattice Co-layer and AFM correlations between layers. Despite the A-type order, our recent inelastic neutron scattering measurements show that spin excitations in CaCo2As2 are not associated with either the A-type or stripe-type order. Instead, we observe broad excitations that extend longitudinally (along (1,1,0) in reciprocal space), but remain sharply defined in the transverse direction. These excitations seem to be best characterized as a ``wall'' of scattering and suggest that CaCo2As2 has quasi-one-dimensional spin dynamics very different than in AFe2As2 and SrCo2As2. Work at Ames Laboratory was supported by US DOE, Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, under Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358. Work at ORNL was supported by US DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Scientific User Facilities Division.

  14. [Study on transport characteristics of honokiol in Caco-2 cell model by HPLC].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Bao; Wu, Anguo; Chen, Jiannan; Lai, Xiaping

    2011-05-01

    To study the transport mechanism of honokiol in Caco-2 cell model. The analysis was performed on a Kromasil 100-5 C18 column (4.5 mm x 250 mm, 5 microm) eluted with acetonitrile-water (70: 30) as mobile phase. The detection wavelength was set at 203 nm. Two-way transport of honokiol was studied by using Caco-2 cell model, and the effects of time, drug concentration, inhibitor, pH, temperature on the transport of honokiol was investigated. The drug concentrations were determined by high performance liquid chromatography(HPLC) and used to calculate the apparent permeability coefficient. The standard curve of honokiol was Y = 24 044X - 3 763.6 (r = 0.999 8), and the detection limit was 0.04 micromol x L(-1). In Caco-2 cell model, the transport amounts from the top side to the base side of were more than that from the base side to the top side under the same concentration. The transport amounts increased with time both in AP --> BL and BL --> AP directions. Verapamil could improve the transport amounts of AP --> BL. There were no effects of pH on the transport of AP --> BL. Both in AP --> BL and BL --> AP directions, the transport showed temperature dependence. Honokiol is transported through the intestinal mucosa via a passive diffusion mechanism primarily, coexisting with a carrier-mediated transport, at the same time effected by P-gp.

  15. Avidin chase reduces side effects of radioimmunotherapy in nude mice bearing human colon carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gui-Ping; Wang, Yong-Xian; Huang, Kai; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Chun-Fu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the influence of avidin chase on the side effects of radioimmunotherapy (RIT) in nude mice bearing human colon carcinoma and therapeutic outcome. METHODS: Purified anti-CEA monoclonal antibody (McAb) was biotinylated with NHS-biotin, and then radiolabeled with 188Re by the direct method. 188Re-labeled biotinylated anti-CEA McAb (188Re-CEA McAb-Bt) was intravenously injected followed by intravenous injection of avidin after 24 h. SPECT imaging and biodistribution study were performed at 28-48 h after the injection of 188Re-CEA McAb-Bt. Three groups of nude mice subcutaneously grafted with human colon carcinoma were treated 7 d after the graft. Mice in the avidin chase group received intravenous injection of 188Re-CEA McAb-Bt (11.1 MBq/20 μg) followed by intravenous injection of cold avidin (80 μg) after 24 h. Mice in the control group (treated group without avidin chase) only received the injection of 188Re-CEA McAb-Bt (11.1 MBq/20 μg), another control group (non-treated group) only received 0.1 mL normal saline solution. Toxicity was evaluated on the basis of change of body weight and peripheral WBC counts, and therapy effects were determined by variation in tumor volume. Histological analysis of tumors was also performed. RESULTS: Avidin chase markedly accelerated the clearance of 188Re-CEA McAb-Bt from the blood and normal tissues. The tumor uptakes of 188Re-CEA McAb-Bt at 28 h were 5.90 and 6.42% ID/g, respectively, in chase group and in non-chase group, while the tumor-to-background (T/NT) ratios were 3.19 and 0.56, respectively. The tumor uptake was slightly decreased by avidin chase, but the T/NT ratios were increased. In treated groups the growth rate of body weight and the number of WBC decreased after injection of 188Re-CEA McAb-Bt, and the WBC counts recovered earlier in the group with avidin chase than in the group without avidin chase. Compared to the non-treated group, treated groups with and without avidin chase showed significant

  16. Differential response to EGFR- and VEGF-targeted therapies in patient-derived tumor tissue xenograft models of colon carcinoma and related metastases.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ketao; Lan, Huanrong; Cao, Feilin; Han, Na; Xu, Zhenzhen; Li, Guangliang; He, Kuifeng; Teng, Lisong

    2012-08-01

    Heterogeneity in primary tumors and related metastases may result in failure of antitumor therapies, particularly in targeted therapies for the treatment of cancer. In this study, patient-derived tumor tissue (PDTT) xenograft models of colon carcinoma with lymphatic and hepatic metastases were used to evaluate the response to EGFR- and VEGF-targeted therapies. Our results showed that primary colon carcinoma and its corresponding lymphatic and hepatic metastases have a different response rate to anti-EGFR (cetuximab) and anti-VEGF (bevacizumab) therapies. However, the underlying mechanism of these types of phenomenon is still unclear. To investigate whether such phenomena may result from the heterogeneity in primary colon carcinoma and related metastases, we compared the expression levels of cell signaling pathway proteins using immunohistochemical staining and western blotting, and the gene status of KRAS using pyrosequencing in the same primary colon carcinoma and its corresponding lymphatic and hepatic metastatic tissues which were used for establishing the PDTT xenograft models. Our results showed that the expression levels of EGFR, VEGF, Akt/pAkt, ERK/pERK, MAPK/pMAPK, and mTOR/pmTOR were different in primary colon carcinoma and matched lymphatic and hepatic metastases although the KRAS gene status in all cases was wild-type. Our results indicate that the heterogeneity in primary colon carcinoma and its corresponding lymphatic and hepatic metastases may result in differences in the response to dual-inhibition of EGFR and VEGF.

  17. Aloe-emodin, an anthraquinone, in vitro inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in human colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kai-Yuan; Uen, Yih-Huei

    2010-05-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the anticancer effect of aloe-emodin, an anthraquinone compound present in the leaves of Aloe vera, on two human colon carcinoma cell lines, DLD-1 and WiDr. Colon carcinoma cells were treated with various concentrations of aloe-emodin for different durations. Cell viability was measured by sodium 3'-[1-(phenylamino-carbonyl)-3,4-tetrazolium]-bis(4-methoxy-6-nitro) benzene-sulfonic acid hydrate assay. DNA fragmentation was analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis. Nuclear shrinkage was visualized by Hoechst 33258 staining. Western blotting was used to indicate the release of apoptosis-inducing factor and cytochrome c from mitochondria and the phosphorylation of Bid. Caspase-3 and casein kinase II activities were measured by the respective assays. Cell viability analyses showed that aloe-emodin induced cell death in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Notably, the WiDr cells were more sensitive to aloe-emodin than the DLD-1 cells. Aloe-emodin caused the release of apoptosis-inducing factor and cytochrome c from mitochondria, followed by activation of caspase-3 leading to DNA fragmentation, nuclear shrinkage and apoptosis. In addition, exposure of colon carcinoma cells to aloe-emodin suppressed the casein kinase II activity in a time-dependent manner and was accompanied by a reduced phosphorylation of Bid, a downstream substrate of casein kinase II and a pro-apoptotic molecule. These findings showed that the inhibition of casein kinase II activity, the release of apoptosis-inducing factor and cytochrome c, and the caspase-3 activation are involved in aloe-emodin-mediated apoptosis in colon carcinoma cells.

  18. Aloe-emodin, an anthraquinone, in vitro inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in human colon carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    LIN, KAI-YUAN; UEN, YIH-HUEI

    2010-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the anticancer effect of aloe-emodin, an anthraquinone compound present in the leaves of Aloe vera, on two human colon carcinoma cell lines, DLD-1 and WiDr. Colon carcinoma cells were treated with various concentrations of aloe-emodin for different durations. Cell viability was measured by sodium 3′-[1-(phenylamino-carbonyl)-3,4-tetrazolium]-bis(4-methoxy-6-nitro) benzene-sulfonic acid hydrate assay. DNA fragmentation was analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis. Nuclear shrinkage was visualized by Hoechst 33258 staining. Western blotting was used to indicate the release of apoptosis-inducing factor and cytochrome c from mitochondria and the phosphorylation of Bid. Caspase-3 and casein kinase II activities were measured by the respective assays. Cell viability analyses showed that aloe-emodin induced cell death in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Notably, the WiDr cells were more sensitive to aloe-emodin than the DLD-1 cells. Aloe-emodin caused the release of apoptosis-inducing factor and cytochrome c from mitochondria, followed by activation of caspase-3 leading to DNA fragmentation, nuclear shrinkage and apoptosis. In addition, exposure of colon carcinoma cells to aloe-emodin suppressed the casein kinase II activity in a time-dependent manner and was accompanied by a reduced phosphorylation of Bid, a downstream substrate of casein kinase II and a pro-apoptotic molecule. These findings showed that the inhibition of casein kinase II activity, the release of apoptosis-inducing factor and cytochrome c, and the caspase-3 activation are involved in aloe-emodin-mediated apoptosis in colon carcinoma cells. PMID:22966340

  19. Adherence and Cytokine Induction in Caco-2 Cells by Bacterial Populations from a Three-Stage Continuous-Culture Model of the Large Intestine▿

    PubMed Central

    Bahrami, Bahram; Child, Matthew W.; Macfarlane, Sandra; Macfarlane, George T.

    2011-01-01

    Adherence of bacteria to epithelial cells is an important step in colonization and immune modulation in the large bowel. The aims of this study were to use a three-stage continuous-culture system (CCS) to investigate how environmental factors affect bacterial attachment to Caco-2 cells and modulation of cytokine expression by gut microorganisms, including a probiotic Bifidobacterium longum strain, DD2004. The CCS simulated environmental conditions in the proximal large intestine (vessel 1 [V1]) and distal colon (V2 and V3) at two different system retention times (R) within the range of normal colonic transits (20 and 60 h). The model was inoculated with human fecal material, and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to characterize microbial populations and to assess bacterial attachment to Caco-2 cells. Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) was employed to measure cytokine gene expression following challenge with bacteria from different components of the CCS in the presence and absence of B. longum. At an R of 60 h, bacterial adherence increased from V1 to V3, but this trend was reversed at an R of 20 h. Atopobia were the predominant adherent organisms detected at both system retention times in each culture vessel. Modulation of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and IL-18 gene expression by CCS bacteria was marked at an R of 60 h, while at an R of 20 h, IL-4, IL-10, TGF-β2, IL-1α, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) were significantly affected. The addition of B. longum affected cytokine expression significantly at both retention times. This study demonstrates that environmental determinants regulate the adherence properties of intestinal bacteria and their abilities to regulate cytokine synthesis. PMID:21378047

  20. Transport of sennosides and sennidines from Cassia angustifolia and Cassia senna across Caco-2 monolayers--an in vitro model for intestinal absorption.

    PubMed

    Waltenberger, B; Avula, B; Ganzera, M; Khan, I A; Stuppner, H; Khan, S I

    2008-05-01

    Laxative effects of Senna preparations are mainly mediated by rheinanthrone, a metabolite formed in the intestinal flora from dianthrones. Nevertheless, it was not clear whether dianthrones are bioavailable at all and contribute to the overall effects of this important medicinal plant. Using the Caco-2 human colonic cell line as an in vitro model of the human intestinal mucosal barrier, the bioavailability of dianthrones was studied in apical to basolateral (absorptive) and basolateral to apical (secretive) direction. Permeability coefficients (P(c)) and percent transport were calculated based on quantitations by HPLC. From the data obtained it was concluded that sennosides A and B, as well as their aglycones sennidine A and B are transported through the Caco-2 monolayers in a concentration-dependent manner and their transport was linear with time. The absorption in apical to basolateral direction was poor and P(c) values were comparable to mannitol. The transport was higher in the secretory direction, indicating a significant efflux (e.g. by efflux pumps) of the (poorly) absorbed compounds in the intestinal lumen again. Our findings support the general understanding that the laxative effects of Senna are explainable mainly by metabolites and not by the natively present dianthrones.

  1. Salmosan, a β-Galactomannan-Rich Product, Protects Epithelial Barrier Function in Caco-2 Cells Infected by Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Brufau, M Teresa; Campo-Sabariz, Joan; Bou, Ricard; Carné, Sergi; Brufau, Joaquim; Vilà, Borja; Marqués, Ana M; Guardiola, Francesc; Ferrer, Ruth; Martín-Venegas, Raquel

    2016-08-01

    One promising strategy for reducing human salmonellosis induced by Salmonella Enteritidis is to supplement animal diets with natural feed additives such as mannan oligosaccharides (MOSs). We sought to investigate the potential role of Salmosan (S-βGM), an MOS product extremely rich in β-galactomannan, in preventing epithelial barrier function disruption induced by S. Enteritidis colonization in an in vitro model of intestinal Caco-2 cells in culture. Differentiated Caco-2 cells were incubated for 3 h with S. Enteritidis at a multiplicity of infection of 10 in the absence or presence of 500 μg S-βGM/mL. Paracellular permeability (PP) was assessed by transepithelial electrical resistance (TER), d-mannitol, and fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran (FD-4) flux. Tight junction proteins and cytoskeletal actin were also localized by confocal microscopy. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lipid peroxidation products were evaluated. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy were used to visualize S. Enteritidis adhesion to, and invasion of, the Caco-2 cell cultures. Compared with controls, TER was significantly reduced by 30%, and d-mannitol and FD-4 flux were significantly increased by 374% and 54% in S. Enteritidis-infected cultures, respectively. The presence of S-βGM in infected cultures induced total recoveries of TER and FD-4 flux to values that did not differ from the control and a partial recovery of d-mannitol flux. These effects were confirmed by immunolocalization of actin, zonula occludens protein 1, and occludin. Similar results were obtained for Salmonella Dublin. The protection of S-βGM on PP in infected cultures may be associated with a total recovery of ROS production to values that did not differ from the control. Moreover, S-βGM has the capacity to agglutinate bacteria, leading to a significant reduction of 32% in intracellular S Enteritidis. The results demonstrate that S-βGM contributes to protecting epithelial barrier function in a Caco-2 cell

  2. miRNA expression in human intestinal Caco-2 cells is comparably regulated by cis- and trans-fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Köpke, Solveigh; Buhrke, Thorsten; Lampen, Alfonso

    2015-03-01

    Trans-fatty acids are unsaturated fatty acids with at least one double bond in trans configuration. While their role in the development of coronary heart disease is broadly accepted, a potential impact of these fatty acids on colon carcinogenesis is still under discussion. MiRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that regulate the gene expression at a post-transcriptional level by inhibiting the translation of target mRNAs. We investigated the effect of 16 different C 18 fatty acid isomers on the expression of 84 cancer-related miRNAs in the human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line Caco-2 by using a qRT-PCR array. 66 of these 84 miRNAs were deregulated by at least one fatty acid, however, there was no trans-specific impact on miRNA expression as the corresponding cis isomer of a given fatty acid generally had comparable effects on the miRNA expression profile. The most pronounced effects were observed for hsa-miR-146a-5p, which was upregulated by four of the 16 investigated fatty acids, and hsa-miR-32-5p, which was strongly downregulated by five fatty acids. As hsa-miR-32-5p was described to target genes being involved in the regulation of apoptosis, the effect of α-eleostearic acid on the expression of the apoptosis-associated genes BCL2L11, BCL-2, and BCL-XL was examined. The qPCR results indicate that fatty acid-mediated downregulation of hsa-miR-32-5p is accompanied by a downregulation of BCL-2 and BCL2L11 mRNA whereas BCL-XL was shown to be simultaneously upregulated. In conclusion, our data indicate that several fatty acids are able to regulate miRNA expression of human colon cancer cells. However, no trans-specific regulation was observed.

  3. Gastrin-stimulated Gα13 Activation of Rgnef Protein (ArhGEF28) in DLD-1 Colon Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Masià-Balagué, Miriam; Izquierdo, Ismael; Garrido, Georgina; Cordomí, Arnau; Pérez-Benito, Laura; Miller, Nichol L G; Schlaepfer, David D; Gigoux, Véronique; Aragay, Anna M

    2015-06-12

    The guanine nucleotide exchange factor Rgnef (also known as ArhGEF28 or p190RhoGEF) promotes colon carcinoma cell motility and tumor progression via interaction with focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Mechanisms of Rgnef activation downstream of integrin or G protein-coupled receptors remain undefined. In the absence of a recognized G protein signaling homology domain in Rgnef, no proximal linkage to G proteins was known. Utilizing multiple methods, we have identified Rgnef as a new effector for Gα13 downstream of gastrin and the type 2 cholecystokinin receptor. In DLD-1 colon carcinoma cells depleted of Gα13, gastrin-induced FAK Tyr(P)-397 and paxillin Tyr(P)-31 phosphorylation were reduced. RhoA GTP binding and promoter activity were increased by Rgnef in combination with active Gα13. Rgnef co-immunoprecipitated with activated Gα13Q226L but not Gα12Q229L. The Rgnef C-terminal (CT, 1279-1582) region was sufficient for co-immunoprecipitation, and Rgnef-CT exogenous expression prevented Gα13-stimulated SRE activity. A domain at the C terminus of the protein close to the FAK binding domain is necessary to bind to Gα13. Point mutations of Rgnef-CT residues disrupt association with active Gα13 but not Gαq. These results show that Rgnef functions as an effector of Gα13 signaling and that this linkage may mediate FAK activation in DLD-1 colon carcinoma cells.

  4. Gastrin-stimulated Gα13 Activation of Rgnef Protein (ArhGEF28) in DLD-1 Colon Carcinoma Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Masià-Balagué, Miriam; Izquierdo, Ismael; Garrido, Georgina; Cordomí, Arnau; Pérez-Benito, Laura; Miller, Nichol L. G.; Schlaepfer, David D.; Gigoux, Véronique; Aragay, Anna M.

    2015-01-01

    The guanine nucleotide exchange factor Rgnef (also known as ArhGEF28 or p190RhoGEF) promotes colon carcinoma cell motility and tumor progression via interaction with focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Mechanisms of Rgnef activation downstream of integrin or G protein-coupled receptors remain undefined. In the absence of a recognized G protein signaling homology domain in Rgnef, no proximal linkage to G proteins was known. Utilizing multiple methods, we have identified Rgnef as a new effector for Gα13 downstream of gastrin and the type 2 cholecystokinin receptor. In DLD-1 colon carcinoma cells depleted of Gα13, gastrin-induced FAK Tyr(P)-397 and paxillin Tyr(P)-31 phosphorylation were reduced. RhoA GTP binding and promoter activity were increased by Rgnef in combination with active Gα13. Rgnef co-immunoprecipitated with activated Gα13Q226L but not Gα12Q229L. The Rgnef C-terminal (CT, 1279–1582) region was sufficient for co-immunoprecipitation, and Rgnef-CT exogenous expression prevented Gα13-stimulated SRE activity. A domain at the C terminus of the protein close to the FAK binding domain is necessary to bind to Gα13. Point mutations of Rgnef-CT residues disrupt association with active Gα13 but not Gαq. These results show that Rgnef functions as an effector of Gα13 signaling and that this linkage may mediate FAK activation in DLD-1 colon carcinoma cells. PMID:25922072

  5. Identification of the interplay between SOX9 and S100P in the metastasis and invasion of colon carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhiyong; Deng, Haijun; Fang, Yuan; Zhu, Xianjun; Ye, Geng-Tai; Yan, Li; Liu, Hao; Li, Guoxin

    2015-08-21

    Elevated expression of S100P has been detected in several tumor types and suggested to be responsible for tumor metastasis and invasion, but the upstream regulatory mechanisms promoting S100P overexpression are largely unknown. Here, we report that SOX9 was predicted and verified as a transcription factor of S100P. SOX9 and S100P were both overexpressed in colon cancer. SOX9 bound to and activated the S100P promoter. Knockdown of SOX9 expression down-regulated S100P expression, resulting in reduced invasiveness and metastasis of colon cancer cells by inhibiting the activation of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE)/ERK signaling and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Further, decreased expression of SOX9 dramatically inhibited the tumor growth and peritoneal metastasis in nude mice. More importantly, S100P was found to be critical for SOX9-mediated metastasis and invasion in colon cancer. Knockdown of S100P in SOX9-overexpressing colon cancer cells dramatically suppressed metastasis and invasion both in vitro and in mice. We also detected SOX9 and S100P expression in a tissue microarray with 90 colon cancer cases to provide their clinical relevance. There was a strong correlation between SOX9 and S100P expression in colon carcinomas. In conclusion, our results suggest that SOX9 promotes tumor metastasis and invasion through regulation of S100P expression.

  6. Concurrent determination of topotecan and model permeability markers (atenolol, antipyrine, propranolol and furosemide) by reversed phase liquid chromatography: utility in Caco-2 intestinal absorption studies.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Tripta; Singh, Manoj; Mishra, Gautam; Talegaonkar, Sushama; Khar, Roop K; Jaggi, Manu; Mukherjee, Rama

    2007-11-15

    A simple, sensitive, specific and high-resolution reversed-phase liquid chromatographic method utilizing ultraviolet detection has been developed and validated for simultaneous determination of topotecan and four intestinal permeability markers (atenolol, antipyrine, propranolol and furosemide) as suggested by US-FDA. Chromatography was carried out on C-18 column with mobile phase comprising water (pH 3.0) and acetonitrile gradient pumped at a flow rate of 1 ml min(-1). The validation parameters included specificity, accuracy, precision, sensitivity and stability studies. Topotecan, an anti-cancer drug widely used in metastatic carcinoma, is a P-glycoprotein substrate having oral bioavailability of 30% with large inter-patient variability. The present method was successfully applied for demonstrating P-gp mediated transport of topotecan and its inhibition using verapamil in Caco-2 cell monolayer. The method can be used in identification of novel P-gp inhibitors for topotecan and estimating the contribution of P-gp in affecting oral bioavailability of topotecan. The other applications of method include its use in validation of Caco-2 monolayer assay for getting biowaiver based on Biopharmaceutic Classification System and its extrapolation to in situ and/or in vivo studies.

  7. Oral Colonization, Phenotypic, and Genotypic Profiles of Candida Species in Irradiated, Dentate, Xerostomic Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Leung, W. Keung; Dassanayake, Ranil S.; Yau, Joyce Y. Y.; Jin, Li Jian; Yam, Wing Cheong; Samaranayake, Lakshman P.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate oral yeast colonization and oral yeast strain diversity in irradiated (head and neck), dentate, xerostomic individuals. Subjects were recruited from a nasopharyngeal carcinoma clinic and were segregated into group A (age, <60 years [n = 25; average age ± standard deviation {SD}, 48 ± 6 years; average postirradiation time ± SD, 5 ± 5 years]) and group B (age, ≥60 years [n = 8; average age ± SD, 67 ± 4 years; average postirradiation time ± SD, 2 ± 2 years]) and were compared with age- and sex-matched healthy individuals in group C (age, <60 years [n = 20; average age ± SD, 44 ± 12 years] and group D (age, ≥60 years [n = 10; average age, 70 ± 3 years]). Selective culture of oral rinse samples was carried out to isolate, quantify, and speciate yeast recovery. All test subjects underwent a 3-month comprehensive oral and preventive care regimen plus topical antifungal therapy, if indicated. A total of 12 subjects from group A and 5 subjects from group B were recalled for reassessment of yeast colonization. Sequential (pre- and posttherapy) Candida isolate pairs from patients were phenotypically (all isolate pairs; biotyping and resistotyping profiles) and genotypically (Candida albicans isolate pairs only; electrophoretic karyotyping by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, restriction fragment length polymorphism [RFLP], and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA [RAPD] assays) evaluated. All isolates were Candida species. Irradiated individuals were found to have a significantly increased yeast carriage compared with the controls. The isolation rate of Candida posttherapy remained unchanged. A total of 9 of the 12 subjects in group A and 3 of the 5 subjects in group B harbored the same C. albicans or Candida tropicalis phenotype at recall. Varying degrees of congruence in the molecular profiles were observed when these sequential isolate pairs of C. albicans were analyzed by RFLP and RAPD assays. Variations in the

  8. Adjuvant intraoperative photodynamic therapy (AIOPDT) after photosensitization with mTHPC in a CC531 colon carcinoma model in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Steffi; Prosst, Ruediger L.; Stern, Josef; Rheinwald, Markus; Haase, Thomas; Herfarth, Christian; Gahlen, Johannes

    2001-01-01

    The effectiveness of PDT as an adjuvant alternative therapy method for diverse malignant tumors has been investigated in numerous studies. The therapeutic benefit and extent of side effects is mainly determined by the applied photoactive substance. The second generation photosensitizer (PS) mTHPC is capable of causing selective tumor cell death in colon carcinoma when combined with laser irradiation of a PS specific wavelength. Our study revealed PDT with mTHPC as an efficient adjuvant intraoperative modality after R1/R2 resection of a subcutaneously implanted colon tumor. There was a significant increase of postoperative recurrence-free survival time using PDT compared to a control group in a colon cancer model in nude mice. The accumulation of the PS determined by point spectrometry showed a high tumor-selectivity in the tumor, tumor bed, and overlying skin compared to muscle tissue as reference parameter.

  9. [Experience of the Pharmacotherapy against Appendix and Sigmoid Colon Signet Ring Cell Carcinoma with the Peritoneal Dissemination].

    PubMed

    Harada, Shingo; Tsuchida, Kazuhito; Shibuya, Taisuke; Doi, Yuki; Kikuchi, Akitomo; Mori, Koichi; Yabushita, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Takuo; Murakami, Hitoshi; Hasegawa, Seiji; Fukushima, Tadao; Ike, Hideyuki; Nakayama, Takashi

    2015-10-01

    We report 2 cases of signet ring cell carcinoma of the appendix and colon. Case 1: A 61-year-old man was admitted for lower abdominal pain. Colonoscopy revealed an elevated lesion in the orifice of the appendix. Signet ring cell carcinoma was diagnosed on biopsy. The surgical findings showed multiple peritoneal dissemination nodules, while the primary tumor was unresectable owing to extensive invasion into the retroperitoneum. The histopathological findings were signet ring cell carcinoma, T4b (retroperitoneum), NX, P3, Stage Ⅳ. Although the patient received 14 courses of treatment with S-1 as postoperative chemotherapy, he died of his illness at 32 postoperative months. Case 2: A 76-year-old man was admitted for abdominal pain. Perforation of the lower gastrointestinal tract was diagnosed on abdominal CT, and an emergency operation was performed. The surgical findings demonstrated a large number of peritoneal dissemination nodules, cecal invasion of a sigmoid tumor, and perforation of the ascending colon. The primary tumor was thought to be unresectable, and the perforated segment was resected. The histopathological findings were signet ring cell carcinoma, T4b (cecum), NX, P3, Stage Ⅳ. Although 11 courses of treatment using FOLFIRI+Bev were administered as postoperative chemotherapy, the patient died of his illness at 26 postoperative months.

  10. ZnO nanoparticle tracking from uptake to genotoxic damage in human colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Condello, Maria; De Berardis, Barbara; Ammendolia, Maria Grazia; Barone, Flavia; Condello, Giancarlo; Degan, Paolo; Meschini, Stefania

    2016-09-01

    Zinc Oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles are widely used both in the industry and in biomedical applications for their chemical and physical nanomaterial properties. It is therefore essential to go in depth into the cytotoxicity mechanisms and interactions between nanomaterials and cells. The aim of this work was to evaluate the dissolution of ZnO nanoparticles and their uptake, from a few minutes after treatments up to 24h. ZnO nanoparticles routes of entry into the human colon carcinoma cells (LoVo) were followed at different times by a thorough ultrastructural investigation and semiquantitative analysis. The intracellular release of Zn(2+) ions by Zinquin fluorescent dye, and phosphorylated histone H2AX (γ-H2AX) expression were evaluated. The genotoxic potential of ZnO nanoparticles was also investigated by determining the levels of 8-hydroxyl-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG). The experimental data show that ZnO nanoparticles entered LoVo cells by either passive diffusion or endocytosis or both, depending on the agglomeration state of the nanomaterial. ZnO nanoparticles coming into contact with acid pH of lysosomes altered organelles structure, resulting in the release of Zn(2+) ions. The simultaneous presence of ZnO nanoparticles and Zn(2+) ions in the LoVo cells determined the formation of reactive oxygen species at the mitochondrial and nuclear level, inducing severe DNA damage.

  11. Oak ellagitannins suppress the phosphorylation of the epidermal growth factor receptor in human colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Fridrich, Diana; Glabasnia, Arne; Fritz, Jessica; Esselen, Melanie; Pahlke, Gudrun; Hofmann, Thomas; Marko, Doris

    2008-05-14

    The ellagitannins castalagin and vescalagin, and the C-glycosides grandinin and roburin E as well as ellagic acid were found to potently inhibit the growth of human colon carcinoma cells (HT29) in vitro. In a cell-free system these compounds were identified as potent inhibitors of the protein tyrosine kinase activity of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) with IC 50 values in the low nanomolar range. To address the question of whether the interference with the activity of the isolated EGFR also plays a role within intact cells, effects on the phosphorylation status of the EGFR, as a measure for its activity, were determined in HT29 cells. As exemplified for castalagin and grandinin, both the nonglycosylated and the glycosylated ellagitannins effectively suppressed EGFR phosphorylation, but only at concentrations > or =10 microM, thus, in a concentration range where growth inhibition was observed. These results indicate that the suppression of EGFR-mediated signaling might contribute to the growth inhibitory effects of these compounds present in oak-matured wines and spirits such as whiskey. In contrast, despite substantial growth inhibitory properties, ellagic acid did not significantly affect EGFR phosphorylation in HT29 cells up to 100 microM.

  12. In vitro toxicity of amorphous silica nanoparticles in human colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Gehrke, Helge; Frühmesser, Anne; Pelka, Joanna; Esselen, Melanie; Hecht, Lena L; Blank, Holger; Schuchmann, Heike P; Gerthsen, Dagmar; Marquardt, Clarissa; Diabaté, Silvia; Weiss, Carsten; Marko, Doris

    2013-05-01

    The use of nanostructured silica (SiO2) particles is no longer restricted to biomedical and (bio-) technological fields but rather finding applications in products of the food industry. Thus, our studies on the toxicological relevance of SiO2 nanoparticles focused on cytotoxic effects, the modulation of the cellular redox status and the impact on DNA integrity in human colon carcinoma cells (HT29). The results indicate that these SiO2 nanoparticles stimulate the proliferation of HT29 cells, depending on the incubation time and the particle size. The cytotoxicity of the investigated SiO2 nanoparticles was found to depend on the concentration, size and on the FCS content of the culture medium. Furthermore, SiO2 seem to interfere with glutathione biosynthesis. The results indicate further that effects of SiO2 NPs are not mediated by oxidative stress but by interference with the MAPK/ERK1/2 as well as the Nrf2/ARE signalling pathways. Additionally, investigations regarding DNA integrity revealed no substantial (oxidative) DNA damage.

  13. Physical Activity Counteracts Tumor Cell Growth in Colon Carcinoma C26-Injected Muscles: An Interim Report

    PubMed Central

    Hiroux, Charlotte; Vandoorne, Tijs; Koppo, Katrien; De Smet, Stefan; Hespel, Peter; Berardi, Emanuele

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle tissue is a rare site of tumor metastasis but is the main target of the degenerative processes occurring in cancer-associated cachexia syndrome. Beneficial effects of physical activity in counteracting cancer-related muscle wasting have been described in the last decades. Recently it has been shown that, in tumor xeno-transplanted mouse models, physical activity is able to directly affect tumor growth by modulating inflammatory responses in the tumor mass microenvironment. Here, we investigated the effect of physical activity on tumor cell growth in colon carcinoma C26 cells injected tibialis anterior muscles of BALB/c mice. Histological analyses revealed that 4 days of voluntary wheel running significantly counteracts tumor cell growth in C26-injected muscles compared to the non-injected sedentary controls. Since striated skeletal muscle tissue is the site of voluntary contraction, our results confirm that physical activity can also directly counteract tumor cell growth in a metabolically active tissue that is usually not a target for metastasis. PMID:27478560

  14. ADAM17 silencing in mouse colon carcinoma cells: the effect on tumoricidal cytokines and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Das, Sudipta; Czarnek, Maria; Bzowska, Monika; Mężyk-Kopeć, Renata; Stalińska, Krystyna; Wyroba, Barbara; Sroka, Jolanta; Jucha, Jarosław; Deneka, Dawid; Stokłosa, Paulina; Ogonek, Justyna; Swartz, Melody A; Madeja, Zbigniew; Bereta, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    ADAM17 (a disintegrin and metalloprotease 17) is a major sheddase for numerous growth factors, cytokines, receptors, and cell adhesion molecules and is often overexpressed in malignant cells. It is generally accepted that ADAM17 promotes tumor development via activating growth factors from the EGF family, thus facilitating autocrine stimulation of tumor cell proliferation and migration. Here we show, using MC38CEA murine colon carcinoma model, that ADAM17 also regulates tumor angiogenesis and cytokine profile. When ADAM17 was silenced in MC38CEA cells, in vivo tumor growth and in vitro cell motility were significantly diminished, but no effect was seen on in vitro cell proliferation. ADAM17-silencing was accompanied by decreased in vitro expression of vascular endothelial growth factor-A and matrix metalloprotease-9, which was consistent with the limited angiogenesis and slower growth seen in ADAM17-silenced tumors. Among the growth factors susceptible to shedding by ADAM17, neuregulin-1 was the only candidate to mediate the effects of ADAM17 on MC38CEA motility and tumor angiogenesis. Concentrations of TNF and IFNγ, cytokines that synergistically induced proapoptotic effects on MC38CEA cells, were significantly elevated in the lysates of ADAM17-silenced tumors compared to mock transfected controls, suggesting a possible role for ADAM17 in host immune suppression. These results introduce new, complex roles of ADAM17 in tumor progression, including its impact on the anti-tumor immune response.

  15. Imaging of human colon carcinoma thin sections by FT-IR microspectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasch, Peter; Waesche, Wolfgang; McCarthy, W. J.; Mueller, Gerhard J.; Naumann, Dieter

    1998-04-01

    FTIR microspectroscopic maps of unstained colon carcinoma thin sections were obtained on a conventional IR microscope equipped with an automatic x, y stage, or alternatively by using a MCT focal plane array detector system. IR data were analyzed by different image re-assembling techniques. One main goal of the present study was to test the influence of different spectra data compression approaches on the quality of the FTIR images. The images, re-assembled by Principal component analysis (PCA) on the basis of spectral information available from the fingerprint region exhibited an excellent image contrast confirming standard histo- pathological examinations. The second approach included a systematic search for spectral windows which were supposed to contain the relevant information, necessary for spectra classification and identification. Data from these spectral windows were analyzed by an ANN and output data were utilized for image construction. In contrast to the PCA approach, the image contrast was lower although the main morphological structures were exactly classified. From the spectroscopic point of view, the spectral feature selection method delivered useful information which could be discussed in terms of structural alternations upon carcinogenesis.

  16. Effect of 5-fluorouracil combination therapy on RNA processing in human colonic carcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Greenhalgh, D. A.; Parish, J. H.

    1990-01-01

    We have evaluated the RNA-directed cytotoxicity of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in human colonic carcinoma cells. The mode of action of 5-FU and its effects on human pre-rRNA processing were then examined. From these data, possible reasons why the disruption of pre-rRNA maturation could induce cytotoxic effects are considered. The results imply that inhibition of thymidylate synthase is not the sole primary cytotoxic lesion in this cell line. First, exogenous thymidine (dTHd) enchanced cytotoxicity. Second, addition of dThd to the cells was found to enhance incorporation of 5-FU into total cellular RNA. Third, 5-FU disrupted rRNA processing by a different mechanism from actinomycin D and methotrexate (MTX), suggesting that the inhibition was not just a consequence of cell death. Finally, the addition of dThd was found to enhance the disruption of rRNA processing consistent with an increase in concentration of 5-FU. These data are discussed in the light of literature reports and their potential for optimising 5-FU protocols. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:2328208

  17. The chemopreventive bioflavonoid apigenin modulates signal transduction pathways in keratinocyte and colon carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Van Dross, Rukiyah; Xue, Yue; Knudson, Alexandra; Pelling, Jill C

    2003-11-01

    Apigenin is a nonmutagenic chemopreventive agent found in fruits and green vegetables. In this study, we used two different epithelial cell lines (308 mouse keratinocytes and HCT116 colon carcinoma cells) to determine the effect of apigenin on the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade. Apigenin induced a dose-dependent phosphorylation of both extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) and p38 kinase but had little effect on the phosphorylation of c-jun amino terminal kinase (JNK). We used immunoprecipitation-coupled kinase assays to show that apigenin increased the kinase activity of ERK and p38 but not JNK. Consistent with these results, we found that apigenin induced a 7.4-fold induction in the phosphorylation of Elk, the downstream phosphorylation target of ERK kinase. Similarly, apigenin induced a 3.2-fold induction in the phosphorylation of activating transcription factor-2, the downstream phosphorylation target of p38 kinase. Little change was observed in the phosphorylation of c-jun, the phosphorylation target of JNK. These data suggest that part of the chemopreventive activity of apigenin may be mediated by its ability to modulate the MAPK cascade.

  18. Apigenin induces both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of apoptosis in human colon carcinoma HCT-116 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Zhao, Xin-Huai

    2017-02-01

    Apigenin is one of the plant-originated flavones with anticancer activities. In this study, apigenin was assessed for its in vitro effects on a human colon carcinoma line (HCT‑116 cells) in terms of anti-proliferation, cell cycle progression arrest, apoptosis and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and then outlined its possible apoptotic mechanism for the cells. Apigenin exerted cytotoxic effect on the cells via inhibiting cell growth in a dose-time-dependent manner and causing morphological changes, arrested cell cycle progression at G0/G1 phase, and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential of the treated cells. Apigenin increased respective ROS generation and Ca2+ release and thereby, caused ER stress in the treated cells. Apigenin shows apoptosis induction towards the cells, resulting in enhanced portion of apoptotic cells. A mechanism involved ROS generation and endoplasmic reticulum stress was outlined for the apigenin-mediated apoptosis via both intrinsic mitochondrial and extrinsic pathways, based on the assayed mRNA and protein expression levels in the cells. With this mechanism, apigenin resulted in the HCT-116 cells with enhanced intracellular ROS generation and Ca2+ release together with damaged mitochondrial membrane, and upregulated protein expression of CHOP, DR5, cleaved BID, Bax, cytochrome c, cleaved caspase-3, cleaved caspase-8 and cleaved caspase-9, which triggered apoptosis of the cells.

  19. ADAM17 Silencing in Mouse Colon Carcinoma Cells: The Effect on Tumoricidal Cytokines and Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sudipta; Czarnek, Maria; Bzowska, Monika; Mężyk-Kopeć, Renata; Stalińska, Krystyna; Wyroba, Barbara; Sroka, Jolanta; Jucha, Jarosław; Deneka, Dawid; Stokłosa, Paulina; Ogonek, Justyna; Swartz, Melody A.; Madeja, Zbigniew; Bereta, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    ADAM17 (a disintegrin and metalloprotease 17) is a major sheddase for numerous growth factors, cytokines, receptors, and cell adhesion molecules and is often overexpressed in malignant cells. It is generally accepted that ADAM17 promotes tumor development via activating growth factors from the EGF family, thus facilitating autocrine stimulation of tumor cell proliferation and migration. Here we show, using MC38CEA murine colon carcinoma model, that ADAM17 also regulates tumor angiogenesis and cytokine profile. When ADAM17 was silenced in MC38CEA cells, in vivo tumor growth and in vitro cell motility were significantly diminished, but no effect was seen on in vitro cell proliferation. ADAM17-silencing was accompanied by decreased in vitro expression of vascular endothelial growth factor-A and matrix metalloprotease-9, which was consistent with the limited angiogenesis and slower growth seen in ADAM17-silenced tumors. Among the growth factors susceptible to shedding by ADAM17, neuregulin-1 was the only candidate to mediate the effects of ADAM17 on MC38CEA motility and tumor angiogenesis. Concentrations of TNF and IFNγ, cytokines that synergistically induced proapoptotic effects on MC38CEA cells, were significantly elevated in the lysates of ADAM17-silenced tumors compared to mock transfected controls, suggesting a possible role for ADAM17 in host immune suppression. These results introduce new, complex roles of ADAM17 in tumor progression, including its impact on the anti-tumor immune response. PMID:23251384

  20. Induction of apoptosis of 2,4',6-trihydroxybenzophenone in HT-29 colon carcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Lay, Ma Ma; Karsani, Saiful Anuar; Malek, Sri Nurestri Abd

    2014-01-01

    2,4',6-Trihydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone was isolated from the ethyl acetate fraction of Phaleria macrocarpa (Scheff.) Boerl. fruits. It was found to inhibit cell proliferation in HT-29 human colon carcinoma cell line but caused little damage to WRL-68 normal human liver and MRC-5 normal human fibroblast lung cell lines. The compound was found to sharply affect the viability of HT-29 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. HT-29 cells treated with the compound showed morphological changes under microscopic examination such as cell shrinkage, membrane blebbing, DNA fragmentation, and the occurrence of apoptotic nuclei. The percentage of early apoptotic, late apoptotic, and dead or necrotic cells was determined by flow cytometry using annexin V-FTIC/PI staining. In addition, flow cytometry showed that, when the HT-29 cells were treated with 115 µM of the compound, it resulted in G0/G1 phase arrest in a time-dependent manner. Western blot revealed an upregulation of PUMA, Bak, Bcl-2, and Mcl-1 proteins suggesting that the compound induced apoptosis in HT-29 cells by regulating these proteins.

  1. Fusobacterium nucleatum-Induced Impairment of Autophagic Flux Enhances the Expression of Proinflammatory Cytokines via ROS in Caco-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yin-ping; Zhu, Pan; Fang, Yao; Zhang, Zhu-jun; Mao, Xu-hu; Li, Qian; Zeng, Dong-Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum) plays a critical role in gastrointestinal inflammation. However, the exact mechanism by which F. nucleatum contributes to inflammation is unclear. In the present study, it was revealed that F. nucleatum could induce the production of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-8, IL-1β and TNF-α) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in Caco-2 colorectal) adenocarcinoma cells. Furthermore, ROS scavengers (NAC or Tiron) could decrease the production of proinflammatory cytokines during F. nucleatum infection. In addition, we observed that autophagy is impaired in Caco-2 cells after F. nucleatum infection. The production of proinflammatory cytokines and ROS induced by F. nucleatum was enhanced with either autophagy pharmacologic inhibitors (3-methyladenine, bafilomycin A1) or RNA interference in essential autophagy genes (ATG5 or ATG12) in Caco-2 cells. Taken together, these results indicate that F. nucleatum-induced impairment of autophagic flux enhances the expression of proinflammatory cytokines via ROS in Caco-2 Cells. PMID:27828984

  2. In vitro study of soil arsenic release by human gut microbiota and its intestinal absorption by Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Yin, Naiyi; Cai, Xiaolin; Du, Huili; Zhang, Zhennan; Li, Zejiao; Chen, Xiaochen; Sun, Guoxin; Cui, Yanshan

    2017-02-01

    Arsenic (As) speciation is essential in assessing health risks from As-contaminated soil. Release of soil-bound arsenic, As transformation by human gut microbiota, and the subsequent intestinal absorption of soil As metabolites were evaluated. A colon microbial community in a dynamic human gut model and the intestinal epithelial cell line Caco-2 were cultured. Arsenic speciation analysis and absorption of different As species were undertaken. In this study, soil As release (3.7-581.2 mg kg(-1)) was observed in the colon. Arsenic in the colon digests was transformed more quickly than that in the soil solid phase. X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) analysis showed that 44.2-97.6% of arsenite [As(III)] generated due to arsenate [As(V)] reduction was in the soil solid phase after the colon phase. We observed a high degree of cellular absorption of soil As metabolites, exhibiting that the intestinal absorption of monomethylarsonic acid and As(III) (33.6% and 30.2% resp.) was slightly higher than that of dimethylarsinic acid and As(V) (25.1% and 21.7% resp.). Our findings demonstrate that human gut microbiota can directly release soil-bound arsenic, particularly As-bearing amorphous Fe/Al-oxides. Determining As transformation and intestinal absorption simultaneously will result in an accurate risk assessment of human health with soil As exposures.

  3. Inhibition of growth and induction of differentiation of colon cancer cells by peach and plum phenolic compounds

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The action of extracts from anthocyanin-enriched plums and peaches on growth and differentiation was studied with human colon cancer cells. Growth inhibitory effects were observed in Caco-2, SW1116, HT29 and NCM460 cells. In Caco-2 cells but not in the other cells studied there was evidence for incr...

  4. Use of the human colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cell line for isolating respiratory viruses from nasopharyngeal aspirates.

    PubMed

    Chan, K H; Yan, M K; To, K K W; Lau, S K; Woo, P C; Cheng, V C C; Li, W S; Chan, J F W; Tse, H; Yuen, K Y

    2013-05-01

    The human colorectal adenocarcinoma-derived Caco-2 cell line was evaluated as a means isolating common respiratory viruses from nasopharyngeal aspirates for the diagnosis of respiratory diseases. One hundred eighty-nine direct immunofluorescence positive nasopharyngeal aspirates obtained from patients with various viral respiratory diseases were cultured in the presence of Caco-2 cells or the following conventional cell lines: LLC-MK2, MDCK, HEp-2, and A549. Caco-2 cell cultures effectively propagated the majority (84%) of the viruses present in nasopharyngeal aspirate samples compared with any positive cultures obtained using the panel cells (78%) or individual cell line MDCK (38%), HEp-2 (21%), LLC-MK2 (27%), or A549 (37%) cell lines. The differences against individual cell line were statistically significant (P = < 0.000001). Culture in Caco-2 cells resulted in the isolation of 85% (36/42) of viruses which were not cultivated in conventional cell lines. By contrast, 80% (24/30) of viruses not cultivated in Caco-2 cells were isolated using the conventional panel. The findings indicated that Caco-2 cells were sensitive to a wide range of viruses and can be used to culture a broad range of respiratory viruses.

  5. Binding of the hop (Humulus lupulus L.) chalcone xanthohumol to cytosolic proteins in Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yan; Nikolic, Dejan; Zhu, Dongwei; Chadwick, Lucas R; Pauli, Guido F; Farnsworth, Norman R; van Breemen, Richard B

    2007-07-01

    Used in the brewing of beer, hops (Humulus lupulus L.) contain the prenylated chalcone xanthohumol, which is under investigation as a cancer chemoprevention agent and as a precursor for the estrogenic flavanones isoxanthohumol and 8-prenylnaringenin. The uptake, transport and accumulation of xanthohumol were studied using the human intestinal epithelial cell line Caco-2 to help understand the poor bioavailability of this chalcone. Studies were carried out using Caco-2 cell monolayers 18-21 days after seeding. The apparent K(m) and V(max) values of xanthohumol accumulation in Caco-2 cells were determined, and the protein binding of xanthohumol in sub-cellular fractions of Caco-2 cells was investigated. Approximately 70% of xanthohumol added to the apical side of Caco-2 cells accumulated inside the cells, while 93% of the intracellular xanthohumol was localized in the cytosol. Xanthohumol accumulation was temperature dependent and saturable with an apparent K(m )value of 26.5 +/- 4.66 muM and an apparent V(max) of 0.215 +/- 0.018 nmol/mg protein/min. Facilitated transport was not responsible for the uptake of xanthohumol, instead, accumulation inside the Caco-2 cells was apparently the result of specific binding to cytosolic proteins. These data suggest that specific binding of xanthohumol to cytosolic proteins in intestinal epithelial cells contributes to the poor oral bioavailability observed previously in vivo.

  6. A cellular uptake and cytotoxicity properties study of gallic acid-loaded mesoporous silica nanoparticles on Caco-2 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashidi, Ladan; Vasheghani-Farahani, Ebrahim; Soleimani, Masoud; Atashi, Amir; Rostami, Khosrow; Gangi, Fariba; Fallahpour, Masoud; Tahouri, Mohammad Taher

    2014-03-01

    In this study, the effects of intracellular delivery of various concentrations of gallic acid (GA) as a semistable antioxidant, gallic acid-loaded mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs-GA), and cellular uptake of nanoparticles into Caco-2 cells were investigated. MSNs were synthesized and loaded with GA, then characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, N2 adsorption isotherms, X-ray diffraction, and thermal gravimetric analysis. The cytotoxicity of MSNs and MSNs-GA at low and high concentrations were studied by means of 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) test and flow cytometry. MSNs did not show significant toxicity in various concentrations (0-500 μg/ml) on Caco-2 cells. For MSNs-GA, cell viability was reduced as a function of incubation time and different concentrations of nanoparticles. The in vitro GA release from MSNs-GA exhibited the same antitumor properties as free GA on Caco-2 cells. Flow cytometry results confirmed those obtained using MTT assay. TEM and fluorescent microscopy confirmed the internalization of MSNs by Caco-2 cells through nonspecific cellular uptake. MSNs can easily internalize into Caco-2 cells without deleterious effects on cell viability. The cell viability of Caco-2 cells was affected during MSNs-GA uptake. MSNs could be designed as suitable nanocarriers for antioxidants delivery.

  7. Uptake of perfluorooctanoic acid by Caco-2 cells: Involvement of organic anion transporting polypeptides.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Osamu; Fujii, Yukiko; Haraguchi, Koichi; Kato, Yoshihisa; Ohta, Chiho; Koga, Nobuyuki; Endo, Tetsuya

    2017-08-05

    The mechanism underlying the intestinal absorption of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) was investigated using Caco-2 cells. The uptake of PFOA from the apical membrane of Caco-2 cells was fast, and pH, temperature, and concentration dependent, but Na(+) independent. Coincubation with sulfobromophthalein (BSP), glibenclamide, estron-3-sulfate, cyclosporine A or rifamycin SV, which are typical substrates or inhibitors of organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs), significantly decreased the uptake of PFOA. However, coincubation with probenecid or p-aminohippuric acid, typical substrates of organic anion transporters, did not decrease the uptake of PFOA. Furthermore, coincubation with l-lactic acid or benzoic acid, substrates of monocarboxylic acid transporters, did not decrease PFOA uptake. The relationship between the initial uptake of PFOA and its concentration was saturable, suggesting the involvement of a carrier-mediated process. The calculated Km and uptake clearance (Vmax/Km) values for PFOA were 8.3μM and 55.0μL/mg protein/min, respectively. This clearance value was about 3-fold greater than that of the non-saturable uptake clearance (Kd: 18.1μL/mg protein/min). Lineweaver-Burk plots revealed that BSP competitively inhibits the uptake of PFOA, with a Ki value of 23.1μM. These results suggest that the uptake of PFOA from the apical membranes of Caco-2 cells could be, at least in part, mediated by OATPs along with BSP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Selected Phytochemicals and Culinary Plant Extracts Inhibit Fructose Uptake in Caco-2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yurim; Lim, Yeni; Kwon, Oran

    2015-09-18

    This study compared the ability of nine culinary plant extracts containing a wide array of phytochemicals to inhibit fructose uptake and then explored the involvement of intestinal fructose transporters and phytochemicals for selected samples. The chemical signature was characterized by high performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry. Inhibition of [(14)C]-fructose uptake was tested by using human intestinal Caco-2 cells. Then, the relative contribution of the two apical-facing intestinal fructose transporters, GLUT2 and GLUT5, and the signature components for fructose uptake inhibition was confirmed in naive, phloretin-treated and forskolin-treated Caco-2 cells. HPLC/MS analysis of the chemical signature revealed that guava leaf contained quercetin and catechin, and turmeric contained curcumin, bisdemethoxycurcumin and dimethoxycurcumin. Similar inhibition of fructose uptake (by ~50%) was observed with guava leaf and turmeric in Caco-2 cells, but with a higher contribution of GLUT2 for turmeric and that of GLUT5 for guava leaf. The data suggested that, in turmeric, demethoxycurcumin specifically contributed to GLUT2-mediated fructose uptake inhibition, and curcumin did the same to GLUT5-mediated fructose uptake inhibition, but GLUT2 inhibition was more potent. By contrast, in guava leaf, catechin specifically contributed to GLUT5-mediated fructose uptake inhibition, and quercetin affected both GLUT5- and GLUT2-mediated fructose uptake inhibition, resulting in the higher contribution of GLUT5. These results suggest that demethoxycurcumin is an important contributor to GLUT2-mediated fructose uptake inhibition for turmeric extract, and catechin is the same to GLUT5-mediated fructose uptake inhibition for guava leaf extract. Quercetin, curcumin and bisdemethoxycurcumin contributed to both GLUT5- and GLUT2-mediated fructose uptake inhibition, but the contribution to GLUT5 inhibition was higher than the contribution to GLUT2 inhibition.

  9. New sustained release of zidovudine matrix tablets - cytotoxicity toward Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Santos, Jucimary V; Pina, Maria Eugénia T; Marques, M Paula M; de Carvalho, Luís A E Batista

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to adjust the zidovudine (AZT) release from solid tablets to an ideal profile, by developing matrices comprising swellable polymers with nonswellable ones. Directly compressed matrices comprised different ratios of hydroxypropylmethylcellulose K15M and K100M, ethylcellulose, and methacrylic acid (Eudragit(®) RS PO and Eudragit(®) RL PO) were prepared. Technological characterization and evaluation of the in vitro release behavior were carried out. Cell density and viability following drug exposure were evaluated by the SRB method, for the Caco-2 line, while cell morphology was assessed upon Trypan blue staining. A specific formulation containing 5% of each excipient - HPMC K15M, HPMC K100M, Eudragit(®) RS PO, and Eudragit(®) RL PO - was found to yield the best release profile. Application of the Korsmeyer-Peppas model to the dissolution profile evidenced that a non-Fickian (anomalous) transport is involved in the drug release. Regarding the influence of the tablets' composition on the drug's cytotoxic effect toward the Caco-2 cell line, a reduction of cell biomass (0-15%) was verified for the distinct AZT formulations tested, F19 having displayed the highest cytotoxicity, after 24 and 48 h of incubation. Additionally, a high reversibility of the AZT effect was observed. The results showed that the simultaneous application of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic polymers can modulate the drug release process, leading to an improved efficacy and patient compliance. All AZT formulations studied were found to be cytotoxic against Caco-2 cells, F19 being the most effective one.

  10. Cacao polyphenols influence the regulation of apolipoprotein in HepG2 and Caco2 cells.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Akiko; Natsume, Midori; Osakabe, Naomi; Kawahata, Keiko; Koga, Jinichiro

    2011-02-23

    Cocoa powder is rich in polyphenols, such as catechins and procyanidins, and has been shown to inhibit low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation and atherogenesis in a variety of models. Human studies have also shown daily intake of cocoa increases plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and decreases LDL levels. However, the mechanisms responsible for these effects of cocoa on cholesterol metabolism have yet to be fully elucidated. The present study investigated the effects of cacao polyphenols on the production of apolipoproteins A1 and B in human hepatoma HepG2 and intestinal Caco2 cell lines. The cultured HepG2 cells or Caco2 cells were incubated for 24 h in the presence of cacao polyphenols such as (-)-epicatechin, (+)-catechin, procyanidin B2, procyanidin C1, and cinnamtannin A2. The concentration of apolipoproteins in the cell culture media was quantified using an enzyme-linked immunoassay, and the mRNA expression was quantified by RT-PCR. Cacao polyphenols increased apolipoprotein A1 protein levels and mRNA expression, even though apolipoprotein B protein and the mRNA expression were slightly decreased in both HepG2 cells and Caco2 cells. In addition, cacao polyphenols increased sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) and activated LDL receptors in HepG2 cells. These results suggest that cacao polyphenols may increase the production of mature form SREBPs and LDL receptor activity, thereby increasing ApoA1 and decreasing ApoB levels. These results elucidate a novel mechanism by which HDL cholesterol levels become elevated with daily cocoa intake.

  11. Comparative cellular toxicity of hydrophilic and hydrophobic microcystins on Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Vesterkvist, Pia S M; Misiorek, Julia O; Spoof, Lisa E M; Toivola, Diana M; Meriluoto, Jussi A O

    2012-10-25

    Microcystins (MC), cyanobacterial peptide hepatotoxins, comprise more than 100 different variants. They are rather polar molecules but some variants contain hydrophobic amino acid residues in the highly variable parts of the molecule. In MC-LF and MC-LW, the more hydrophobic phenylalanine (F) and tryptophan (W), respectively, have replaced arginine (R) in MC-LR. Depending on the structure, microcystins are expected to have different in vivo toxicity and bioavailability, but only a few studies have considered the toxic properties of the more hydrophobic variants. The present study shows that MC-LF and MC-LW have more pronounced cytotoxic effects on Caco-2 cells as compared to those of MC-LR. Treatment of Caco-2 cells with MC-LW and especially MC-LF showed clear apoptotic features including shrinkage and blebbing, and the cell–cell adhesion was lost. An obvious reduction of cell proliferation and viability, assessed as the activity of mitochondrial dehydrogenases, was observed with MC-LF, followed by MC-LW and MC-LR. Cytotoxicity was quantified by measuring lactate dehydrogenase leakage. The more hydrophobic MC-LW and MC-LF induced markedly enhanced lactate dehydrogenase leakage compared to controls and MC-LR, indicating that the plasma membrane was damaged. All of the three toxins examined inhibited protein phosphatase 1, with MC-LF and MC-LW to a weaker extent compared to MC-LR. The higher toxic potential of the more hydrophobic microcystins could not be explained by the biophysical experiments performed. Taken together, our data show that the more hydrophobic microcystin variants induce higher toxicity in Caco-2 cells.

  12. Chemical and physical modifications to poly(dimethylsiloxane) surfaces affect adhesion of Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Sun, Bing; Ziemer, Katherine S; Barabino, Gilda A; Carrier, Rebecca L

    2010-06-15

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) silicone elastomer is extensively used in soft lithography processes to fabricate microscale or nano scale systems for microfluidic or cell culture applications. Though PDMS is biocompatible, it is not an ideal material for cell culture due to its poor cell adhesion properties. In this study, PDMS surfaces were modified to promote intestinal cell adhesion, in the interest of testing feasibility of using microfabricated PDMS systems for high throughput drug screening. Modification techniques included changing chemical composition of PDMS (i.e., varying curing to mixing agent ratio, and oxidization of PDMS surface by oxygen plasma), surface treatment of PDMS by coating with charged molecules (i.e., poly-D-lysine, L-alpha-phosphatidylcholine, and a layer bylayer coating), and deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins (i.e., laminin, fibronectin, and collagen). The influence of these modifications on PDMS properties, including elastic modulus and surface properties (wettability, chemical composition, topography, and protein adsorption) were characterized. Modification techniques were all found to change PDMS properties and influence the attachment and proliferation of Caco-2 cells over three days of culture to varying degrees. Generally, Caco-2 cells preferred to attach on collagen-coated, fibronectin-coated, and fibronectin-coated oxygen-plasma treated PDMS. The results highlight the importance of considering multiple physical and chemical factors that may be influenced by biomaterial modification and result in altered cell attachment to microfabricated systems, including surface hydrophobicity, chemical composition, stiffness, and topography. This study provides a foundation for further miniaturization, utilizing soft lithography techniques, of Caco-2 cell-based system for high-throughput screening of drug intestinal absorption during lead optimization in drug discovery. The understanding of different surface modifications on

  13. Comparative Cellular Toxicity of Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Microcystins on Caco-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vesterkvist, Pia S. M.; Misiorek, Julia O.; Spoof, Lisa E. M.; Toivola, Diana M.; Meriluoto, Jussi A. O.

    2012-01-01

    Microcystins (MC), cyanobacterial peptide hepatotoxins, comprise more than 100 different variants. They are rather polar molecules but some variants contain hydrophobic amino acid residues in the highly variable parts of the molecule. In MC-LF and MC-LW, the more hydrophobic phenylalanine (F) and tryptophan (W), respectively, have replaced arginine (R) in MC-LR. Depending on the structure, microcystins are expected to have different in vivo toxicity and bioavailability, but only a few studies have considered the toxic properties of the more hydrophobic variants. The present study shows that MC-LF and MC-LW have more pronounced cytotoxic effects on Caco-2 cells as compared to those of MC-LR. Treatment of Caco-2 cells with MC-LW and especially MC-LF showed clear apoptotic features including shrinkage and blebbing, and the cell–cell adhesion was lost. An obvious reduction of cell proliferation and viability, assessed as the activity of mitochondrial dehydrogenases, was observed with MC-LF, followed by MC-LW and MC-LR. Cytotoxicity was quantified by measuring lactate dehydrogenase leakage. The more hydrophobic MC-LW and MC-LF induced markedly enhanced lactate dehydrogenase leakage compared to controls and MC-LR, indicating that the plasma membrane was damaged. All of the three toxins examined inhibited protein phosphatase 1, with MC-LF and MC-LW to a weaker extent compared to MC-LR. The higher toxic potential of the more hydrophobic microcystins could not be explained by the biophysical experiments performed. Taken together, our data show that the more hydrophobic microcystin variants induce higher toxicity in Caco-2 cells. PMID:23202304

  14. Investigation of the cytotoxic effects of titanate nanotubes on Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Fenyvesi, Ferenc; Kónya, Zoltán; Rázga, Zsolt; Vecsernyés, Miklós; Kása, Péter; Pintye-Hódi, Klára; Bácskay, Ildikó

    2014-08-01

    Titanate nanotubes can be used as drug delivery systems, but limited information is available on their interactions with intestinal cells. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of titanate nanotubes on Caco-2 monolayers and found that up to 5 mg/ml concentration, these nanotubes are not cytotoxic and not able to permeate through the intestinal cell layer. Transmission electron microscopic experiments showed that titanate nanotubes are not taken up by cells, only caused a high-density granulation on the surface of the endoplasmic reticulum. According to these results, titanate nanotubes are suitable systems for intestinal drug delivery.

  15. [Transport of PLGA nanoparticles across Caco-2/HT29-MTX co-cultured cells].

    PubMed

    Wen, Zhen; Li, Gang; Lin, Dong-Hai; Wang, Jun-Teng; Qin, Li-Fang; Guo, Gui-Ping

    2013-12-01

    The present study is to establish Caco-2/HT29-MTX co-cultured cells and investigate the transport capability of PLGA nanoparticles with different surface chemical properties across Caco-2/HT29-MTX co-cultured cells. PLGA-NPs, mPEG-PLGA-NPs and chitosan coated PLGA-NPs were prepared by nanoprecipitation method using poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) as carrier material with surface modified by methoxy poly(ethylene glycol) and chitosan. The particle size and zeta potential of nanoparticles were measured by dynamic light scattering. Coumarin 6 was used as a fluorescent marker in the transport of nanoparticles investigated by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The transport of furanodiene (FDE) loaded nanoparticles was quantitively determined by high performance liquid chromatography. Colchicine and nocodazole were used in the transport study to explore the involved endocytosis mechanisms of nanoparticles. Distribution of the tight junction proteins ZO-1 was also analyzed by immunofluorescence staining. The results showed that the nanoparticles dispersed uniformly. The zeta potential of PLGA-NPs was negative, the mPEG-PLGA-NPs was close to neutral and the CS-PLGA-NPs was positive. The entrapment efficiency of FDE in all nanoparticles was higher than 75%. The transport capability of mPEG-PLGA-NPs across Caco-2/HT29-MTX co-cultured cells was higher than that of PLGA-NPs and CS-PLGA-NPs. Colchicine and nocodazole could significantly decrease the transport amount of nanoparticles. mPEG-PLGA-NPs could obviously reduce the distribution of ZO-1 protein than PLGA-NPs and CS-PLGA-NPs. The transport mechanism of PLGA-NPs and mPEG-PLGA-NPs were indicated to be a combination of endocytosis and paracellular way, while CS-PLGA-NPs mainly relied on the endocytosis way. PEG coating could shield the surface charge and enhance the hydrophilicity of PLGA nanoparticles, which leads mPEG-PLGA-NPs to possess higher anti-adhesion activity. As a result, mPEG-PLGA-NPs could penetrate the mucus

  16. Gut microbial diversity in health and disease: experience of healthy Indian subjects, and colon carcinoma and inflammatory bowel disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Bamola, V. Deepak; Ghosh, Arnab; Kapardar, Raj Kishor; Lal, Banwari; Cheema, Simrita; Sarma, Priyangshu; Chaudhry, Rama

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The intestinal microbiota, through complex interactions with the gut mucosa, play a key role in the pathogenesis of colon carcinoma and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The disease condition and dietary habits both influence gut microbial diversity. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the gut microbial profile of healthy subjects and patients with colon carcinoma and IBD. Healthy subjects included ‘Indian vegetarians/lactovegetarians’, who eat plant produce, milk and milk products, and ‘Indian non-vegetarians’, who eat plant produce, milk and milk products, certain meats and fish, and the eggs of certain birds and fish. ‘Indian vegetarians’ are different from ‘vegans’, who do not eat any foods derived wholly or partly from animals, including milk products. Design: Stool samples were collected from healthy Indian vegetarians/lactovegetarians and non-vegetarians, and colon cancer and IBD patients. Clonal libraries of 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) of bacteria were created from each sample. Clones were sequenced from one representative sample of each group. Approximately 500 white colonies were picked at random from each sample and 100 colonies were sequenced after amplified rDNA restriction analysis. Results: The dominant phylum from the healthy vegetarian was Firmicutes (34%), followed by Bacteroidetes (15%). The balance was reversed in the healthy non-vegetarian (Bacteroidetes 84%, Firmicutes 4%; ratio 21:1). The colon cancer and IBD patients had higher percentages of Bacteroidetes (55% in both) than Firmicutes (26% and 12%, respectively) but lower Bacteroidetes:Firmicutes ratios (3.8:1 and 2.4:1, respectively) than the healthy non-vegetarian. Bacterial phyla of Verrucomicrobiota and Actinobacteria were detected in 23% and 5% of IBD and colon patients, respectively. Conclusions: Ribosomal Database Project profiling of gut flora in this study population showed remarkable differences, with unique diversity attributed to

  17. Gut microbial diversity in health and disease: experience of healthy Indian subjects, and colon carcinoma and inflammatory bowel disease patients.

    PubMed

    Bamola, V Deepak; Ghosh, Arnab; Kapardar, Raj Kishor; Lal, Banwari; Cheema, Simrita; Sarma, Priyangshu; Chaudhry, Rama

    2017-01-01

    Background: The intestinal microbiota, through complex interactions with the gut mucosa, play a key role in the pathogenesis of colon carcinoma and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The disease condition and dietary habits both influence gut microbial diversity. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the gut microbial profile of healthy subjects and patients with colon carcinoma and IBD. Healthy subjects included 'Indian vegetarians/lactovegetarians', who eat plant produce, milk and milk products, and 'Indian non-vegetarians', who eat plant produce, milk and milk products, certain meats and fish, and the eggs of certain birds and fish. 'Indian vegetarians' are different from 'vegans', who do not eat any foods derived wholly or partly from animals, including milk products. Design: Stool samples were collected from healthy Indian vegetarians/lactovegetarians and non-vegetarians, and colon cancer and IBD patients. Clonal libraries of 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) of bacteria were created from each sample. Clones were sequenced from one representative sample of each group. Approximately 500 white colonies were picked at random from each sample and 100 colonies were sequenced after amplified rDNA restriction analysis. Results: The dominant phylum from the healthy vegetarian was Firmicutes (34%), followed by Bacteroidetes (15%). The balance was reversed in the healthy non-vegetarian (Bacteroidetes 84%, Firmicutes 4%; ratio 21:1). The colon cancer and IBD patients had higher percentages of Bacteroidetes (55% in both) than Firmicutes (26% and 12%, respectively) but lower Bacteroidetes:Firmicutes ratios (3.8:1 and 2.4:1, respectively) than the healthy non-vegetarian. Bacterial phyla of Verrucomicrobiota and Actinobacteria were detected in 23% and 5% of IBD and colon patients, respectively. Conclusions: Ribosomal Database Project profiling of gut flora in this study population showed remarkable differences, with unique diversity attributed to different diets and disease

  18. Phenolic compounds present in Sardinian wine extracts protect against the production of inflammatory cytokines induced by oxysterols in CaCo-2 human enterocyte-like cells.

    PubMed

    Biasi, Fiorella; Guina, Tina; Maina, Marco; Cabboi, Barbara; Deiana, Monica; Tuberoso, Carlo I; Calfapietra, Simone; Chiarpotto, Elena; Sottero, Barbara; Gamba, Paola; Gargiulo, Simona; Brunetto, Vanessa; Testa, Gabriella; Dessì, Maria A; Poli, Giuseppe; Leonarduzzi, Gabriella

    2013-07-01

    Cholesterol auto-oxidation products, namely oxysterols, are widely present in cholesterol-rich foods. They are thought to potentially interfere with homeostasis of the human digestive tract, playing a role in intestinal mucosal damage. This report concerns the marked up-regulation in differentiated CaCo-2 colonic epithelial cells of two key inflammatory interleukins, IL-6 and IL-8, caused by a mixture of oxysterols representative of a high cholesterol diet. This strong pro-inflammatory effect appeared to be dependent on the net imbalance of red-ox equilibrium with the production of excessive levels of reactive oxygen species through the colonic NADPH-oxidase NOX1 activation. Induction of NOX1 was markedly while not fully inhibited by CaCo-2 cell pre-incubation with phenolic extracts obtained from well-selected wines from typical grape varieties grown in Sardinia. Oxysterol-dependent NOX1 activation, as well as interleukin synthesis, were completely prevented by Cannonau red wine extract that contains an abundant phenolic fraction, in particular phenolic acids and flavonoids. Conversely, cell pre-treatment with Vermentino white wine extract with smaller phenolic fraction showed only a partial NOX1 down-regulation and was ineffective in interleukin synthesis induced by dietary oxysterols. It is thus likely that the effects of Sardinian wine extracts against intestinal inflammation induced by dietary oxysterols are mainly due to their high phenolic content: low doses of phenolics would be responsible only for direct scavenging oxysterol-dependent ROS production. Besides this direct activity, an excess of phenolic compounds detectable in red wine, may exert an additional indirect action by blocking oxysterol-related NOX1 induction, thus totally preventing the pro-oxidant and pro-inflammatory events triggered by dietary oxysterols. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Specific Oncogenic Activity of the Src-Family Tyrosine Kinase c-Yes in Colon Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Paquay de Plater, Ludmilla; Edmonds, Thomas; David, Géraldine; Jan, Michel; de Montrion, Catherine; Cogé, Francis; Léonce, Stéphane; Burbridge, Michael; Bruno, Alain; Boutin, Jean A.; Lockhart, Brian; Roche, Serge; Cruzalegui, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    c-Yes, a member of the Src tyrosine kinase family, is found highly activated in colon carcinoma but its importance relative to c-Src has remained unclear. Here we show that, in HT29 colon carcinoma cells, silencing of c-Yes, but not of c-Src, selectively leads to an increase of cell clustering associated with a localisation of β-catenin at cell membranes and a reduction of expression of β-catenin target genes. c-Yes silencing induced an increase in apoptosis, inhibition of growth in soft-agar and in mouse xenografts, inhibition of cell migration and loss of the capacity to generate liver metastases in mice. Re-introduction of c-Yes, but not c -Src, restores transforming properties of c-Yes depleted cells. Moreover, we found that c-Yes kinase activity is required for its role in β-catenin localisation and growth in soft agar, whereas kinase activity is dispensable for its role in cell migration. We conclude that c-Yes regulates specific oncogenic signalling pathways important for colon cancer progression that is not shared with c-Src. PMID:21390316

  20. Specific oncogenic activity of the Src-family tyrosine kinase c-Yes in colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sancier, Florence; Dumont, Aurélie; Sirvent, Audrey; Paquay de Plater, Ludmilla; Edmonds, Thomas; David, Géraldine; Jan, Michel; de Montrion, Catherine; Cogé, Francis; Léonce, Stéphane; Burbridge, Michael; Bruno, Alain; Boutin, Jean A; Lockhart, Brian; Roche, Serge; Cruzalegui, Francisco

    2011-02-24

    c-Yes, a member of the Src tyrosine kinase family, is found highly activated in colon carcinoma but its importance relative to c-Src has remained unclear. Here we show that, in HT29 colon carcinoma cells, silencing of c-Yes, but not of c-Src, selectively leads to an increase of cell clustering associated with a localisation of β-catenin at cell membranes and a reduction of expression of β-catenin target genes. c-Yes silencing induced an increase in apoptosis, inhibition of growth in soft-agar and in mouse xenografts, inhibition of cell migration and loss of the capacity to generate liver metastases in mice. Re-introduction of c-Yes, but not c -Src, restores transforming properties of c-Yes depleted cells. Moreover, we found that c-Yes kinase activity is required for its role in β-catenin localisation and growth in soft agar, whereas kinase activity is dispensable for its role in cell migration. We conclude that c-Yes regulates specific oncogenic signalling pathways important for colon cancer progression that is not shared with c-Src.

  1. Molecular and immunohistochemical profile of a basaloid (cloacogenic) carcinoma of the sigmoid colon: possible predictive value for clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Gurzu, Simona; Szentirmay, Zoltan; Bara, Tivadar; Bara, Tivadar; Iurcsuk, Olga; Jung, Ioan

    2014-05-01

    A 61-year-old woman was hospitalized with a 5-week history of abdominal discomfort, change in bowel habits, and weight loss. Colonoscopy showed a protruded tumor of the sigmoid colon first diagnosed as undifferentiated carcinoma. Surgical resection of the sigmoid colon was performed. Histological examination of the surgical specimen showed a proliferation of basaloid cells arranged in tumor clusters with central comedonecrosis and peripheral palisading of the nuclei. The tumor invaded the subserosa and presented liver metastasis without lymph node metastases. The tumor cells were marked by keratin AE1/AE3, keratin 5/6, epithelial membrane antigen, bcl-2, vascular endothelial growth factor, CD105, neuron-specific enolase, MLH-1, MSH-2, and p53, and were negative for keratin 7/20, chromogranin, synaptophysin, carcinoembryonic antigen, p63, c-KIT, and maspin. A high p53 nuclear index was also detected. On the basis of these characteristics and molecular examinations, the final diagnosis was microsatellite stable/human papilloma virus-negative/K-ras mutated/BRAF wild-type basaloid carcinoma (BC). Only seven BCs of the colon were reported in the literature, this being the eighth one and the first case that reports new molecular findings about microsatellite instability, K-ras/BRAF mutations, angiogenesis, and maspin expression in BC, with direct involvement in targeted therapy.

  2. Differential effects of EGF and amphiregulin on adhesion molecule expression and migration of colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Solic, N; Davies, D E

    1997-08-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is a potent morphogen affecting cell shape and motility through regulation of adhesive interactions. We have characterized the morphological effects of EGF on GP2d and GP5d colon carcinoma cell lines and have compared the ability of the heparin-binding EGF receptor ligand amphiregulin (AR) to elicit the same effects. EGF induced a marked epithelial-mesenchymal transition in both cell lines. This effect was evident at 7 pM EGF and was associated with a reduction in cellular adherens junctions and diminished cell-cell contact; it was also associated with an increase in expression of alpha2-integrin as well as enhanced adhesion to the substratum and cell spreading. These changes in adhesion molecule expression were accompanied by enhanced migration on collagen. Blockade of cell growth with mitomycin C did not prevent the EGF-induced morphological change, showing that the mitogenic and morphogenic responses of the GP cells were separable. The phosphatidyl inositol (PI) 3-kinase inhibitor wortmannin inhibited basal proliferation but had no effect on the EGF-induced morphological change, further suggesting that the PI 3-kinase pathway was not involved in the morphogenic response of these cells. Amphiregulin stimulated proliferation of both cell lines, but could only elicit a modest morphological change if used at considerably higher doses or if growth was blocked with mitomycin C. In cells treated with 55 nM AR, alpha2-integrin expression was slightly increased; however, unlike the EGF case, adherens junctions remained intact. These differences in the ability of EGF and amphiregulin to affect cellular adhesion and migration may be significant factors influencing normal and tumor cell behavior.

  3. Magnetic Nanoparticles from Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense Increase the Efficacy of Thermotherapy in a Model of Colon Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mannucci, Silvia; Ghin, Leonardo; Conti, Giamaica; Tambalo, Stefano; Lascialfari, Alessandro; Orlando, Tomas; Benati, Donatella; Bernardi, Paolo; Betterle, Nico; Bassi, Roberto; Marzola, Pasquina; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are capable of generate heating power under the influence of alternating magnetic fields (AMF); this behaviour recently opened new scenarios for advanced biomedical applications, mainly as new promising tumor therapies. In this paper we have tested magnetic nanoparticles called magnetosomes (MNs): a class of MNPs naturally produced by magnetotactic bacteria. We extracted MNs from Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense strain MSR-1 and tested the interaction with cellular elements and anti-neoplastic activity both in vitro and in vivo, with the aim of developing new therapeutic approaches for neoplastic diseases. In vitro experiments performed on Human Colon Carcinoma HT-29 cell cultures demonstrated a strong uptake of MNs with no evident signs of cytotoxicity and revealed three phases in the interaction: adherence, transport and accumulation in Golgi vesicles. In vivo studies were performed on subcutaneous tumors in mice; in this model MNs are administered by direct injection in the tumor volume, then a protocol consisting of three exposures to an AMF rated at 187 kHz and 23kA/m is carried out on alternate days, over a week. Tumors were monitored by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to obtain information about MNs distribution and possible tissue modifications induced by hyperthermia. Histological analysis showed fibrous and necrotic areas close to MNs injection sites in mice subjected to a complete thermotherapy protocol. These results, although concerning a specific tumor model, could be useful to further investigate the feasibility and efficacy of protocols based on MFH. Magnetic nanoparticles naturally produced and extracted from bacteria seem to be promising candidates for theranostic applications in cancer therapy. PMID:25289664

  4. Molecular and functional characterization of choline transporter in human colon carcinoma HT-29 cells.

    PubMed

    Kouji, Hironobu; Inazu, Masato; Yamada, Tomoko; Tajima, Hirohisa; Aoki, Tatsuya; Matsumiya, Teruhiko

    2009-03-01

    We examined the molecular and functional characterization of choline uptake in human colon carcinomas using the cell line HT-29. Furthermore, we explored the possible correlation between choline uptake and cell proliferation. Choline uptake was saturable and mediated by a single transport system. Interestingly, removal of Na(+) from the uptake buffer strongly enhanced choline uptake. This increase in component of choline uptake under Na(+)-free conditions was inhibited by a Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 1 (NHE1) inhibitor. Collapse of the plasma-membrane H(+) electrochemical gradient by a protonophore inhibited choline uptake. Choline uptake was inhibited by the choline analogue hemicholinium-3 (HC-3) and various organic cations, and was significantly decreased by acidification of the extracellular medium and by intracellular alkalinization. Real-time PCR revealed that choline transporter-like protein 1 (CTL1), CTL2, CTL4 and NHE1 mRNA are mainly expressed in HT-29 cells. Western blot and immunocytochemical analysis indicated that CTL1 protein was expressed in plasma membrane. The biochemical and pharmacological data indicated that CTL1 is functionally expressed in HT-29 cells and is responsible for choline uptake in these cells. We conclude that choline transporters, especially CTL1, use a directed H(+) gradient as a driving force, and its transport functions in co-operation with NHE1. Finally, cell proliferation was inhibited by HC-3 and tetrahexylammonium chloride (THA), which strongly inhibits choline uptake. Identification of this novel CTL1-mediated choline uptake system provides a potential new target for therapeutic intervention.

  5. Acetaldehyde disrupts tight junctions in Caco-2 cell monolayers by a protein phosphatase 2A-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Dunagan, Mitzi; Chaudhry, Kamaljit; Samak, Geetha; Rao, R K

    2012-12-15

    Acetaldehyde is accumulated at high concentrations in the colonic lumen following ethanol administration. Previous studies demonstrated that acetaldehyde disrupts intestinal epithelial tight junctions and increases paracellular permeability. In the present study, we investigated the role of PP2A in the acetaldehyde-induced disruption of intestinal epithelial tight junctions. Caco-2 cell monolayers were exposed to 200-600 μM acetaldehyde for varying times, and the epithelial barrier function was evaluated by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance and inulin permeability. Acetaldehyde treatment resulted in a time-dependent increase in inulin permeability and redistribution of occludin and ZO-1 from the intercellular junctions. Treatment of cells with fostriecin (a PP2A-selective inhibitor) or knockdown of PP2A by siRNA blocked acetaldehyde-induced increase in inulin permeability and redistribution of occludin and ZO-1. The effects of fostriecin and acetaldehyde were confirmed in mouse intestine ex vivo. Acetaldehyde-induced tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction were also attenuated by a PP2A-specific inhibitory peptide, TPDYFL. Coimmunoprecipitation studies showed that acetaldehyde increased the interaction of PP2A with occludin and induced dephosphorylation of occludin on threonine residues. Fostriecin and TPDYFL significantly reduced acetaldehyde-induced threonine dephosphorylation of occludin. Acetaldehyde failed to change the level of the methylated form of PP2A-C subunit. However, genistein (a tyrosine kinase inhibitor) blocked acetaldehyde-induced association of PP2A with occludin and threonine dephosphorylation of occludin. These results demonstrate that acetaldehyde-induced disruption of tight junctions is mediated by PP2A translocation to tight junctions and dephosphorylation of occludin on threonine residues.

  6. Acetaldehyde disrupts tight junctions in Caco-2 cell monolayers by a protein phosphatase 2A-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Dunagan, Mitzi; Chaudhry, Kamaljit; Samak, Geetha

    2012-01-01

    Acetaldehyde is accumulated at high concentrations in the colonic lumen following ethanol administration. Previous studies demonstrated that acetaldehyde disrupts intestinal epithelial tight junctions and increases paracellular permeability. In the present study, we investigated the role of PP2A in the acetaldehyde-induced disruption of intestinal epithelial tight junctions. Caco-2 cell monolayers were exposed to 200–600 μM acetaldehyde for varying times, and the epithelial barrier function was evaluated by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance and inulin permeability. Acetaldehyde treatment resulted in a time-dependent increase in inulin permeability and redistribution of occludin and ZO-1 from the intercellular junctions. Treatment of cells with fostriecin (a PP2A-selective inhibitor) or knockdown of PP2A by siRNA blocked acetaldehyde-induced increase in inulin permeability and redistribution of occludin and ZO-1. The effects of fostriecin and acetaldehyde were confirmed in mouse intestine ex vivo. Acetaldehyde-induced tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction were also attenuated by a PP2A-specific inhibitory peptide, TPDYFL. Coimmunoprecipitation studies showed that acetaldehyde increased the interaction of PP2A with occludin and induced dephosphorylation of occludin on threonine residues. Fostriecin and TPDYFL significantly reduced acetaldehyde-induced threonine dephosphorylation of occludin. Acetaldehyde failed to change the level of the methylated form of PP2A-C subunit. However, genistein (a tyrosine kinase inhibitor) blocked acetaldehyde-induced association of PP2A with occludin and threonine dephosphorylation of occludin. These results demonstrate that acetaldehyde-induced disruption of tight junctions is mediated by PP2A translocation to tight junctions and dephosphorylation of occludin on threonine residues. PMID:23064762

  7. Lactobacillus paracasei CBA L74 interferes with gliadin peptides entrance in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Sarno, Marco; Lania, Giuliana; Cuomo, Marialaura; Nigro, Federica; Passannanti, Francesca; Budelli, Andrea; Fasano, Francesca; Troncone, Riccardo; Auricchio, Salvatore; Barone, Maria Vittoria; Nigro, Roberto; Nanayakkara, Merlin

    2014-12-01

    Several recent reports describe a role of probiotics as a therapeutic approach for celiac disease (CD). Two undigested A-gliadin peptides, P31-43 and P57-68, are central to CD pathogenesis, inducing an innate and an adaptive immune response, respectively. They enter enterocytes and localize to vesicular compartment to induce their toxic/immunogenics effects. In this article, we tested the effect of probiotic Lactobacillus paracasei (LP) CBA L74 (International Depository Accession Number LMG P-24778), its supernatant and LP-fermented cereals on gliadin peptides, P31-43 and P57-68, entrance in Caco-2 cells. Both LP CBA L74 and its supernatant inhibit P31-43 (intensity of fluorescence; FI: 75%) and P57-68 (FI: 50%) entrance in Caco2 cells, indicating that this biological effect is due to some product included in LP CBA L74 supernatant. This effect was present also after fermentation of cereals. This study describes a novel effect of probiotics in the prevention of undigested gliadin peptides toxic effects.

  8. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) attenuates the inflammatory response in the in vitro intestinal Caco-2 cell model.

    PubMed

    Hollebeeck, Sylvie; Raas, Thomas; Piront, Neil; Schneider, Yves-Jacques; Toussaint, Olivier; Larondelle, Yvan; During, Alexandrine

    2011-10-30

    This study aimed to investigate dose effects of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) (0.05-1%) on the intestinal inflammatory response in confluent- and differentiated-Caco-2 cells stimulated with interleukin (IL)-1β or a pro-inflammatory cocktail for 24 h. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) activity was assayed by incubating inflamed cells with arachidonic acid and then measuring prostaglandin-E(2) (PGE(2)) produced. Soluble mediators (IL-8, IL-6, macrophage chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and COX-2-derived PGE(2)) were quantified by enzyme immunoassays and mRNA expression of 33 proteins by high throughput TaqMan Low Density Array. Data showed that DMSO decreased induced IL-6 and MCP-1 secretions in a dose-dependent manner (P<0.05), but not IL-8; these effects were cell development- and stimulus- independent. Moreover, in IL-1β-stimulated confluent-cells, DMSO dose-dependently reduced COX-2-derived PGE(2) (P<0.05). DMSO at 0.5% decreased significantly mRNA levels of 14 proteins involved in the inflammatory response (including IL-6, IL-1α, IL-1β, and COX-2). Thus, DMSO at low concentrations (0.1-0.5%) exhibits anti-inflammatory properties in the in vitro intestinal Caco-2 cell model. This point is important to be taken into account when assessing anti-inflammatory properties of bioactive compounds requiring DMSO as vehicle, such as phenolic compounds, in order to avoid miss-interpretation of the results.

  9. Lactobacillus plantarum CUL66 can impact cholesterol homeostasis in Caco-2 enterocytes.

    PubMed

    Michael, D R; Moss, J W E; Calvente, D Lama; Garaiova, I; Plummer, S F; Ramji, D P

    2016-06-01

    Hypercholesterolemia drives the development of cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of mortality in western society. Supplementation with probiotics that interfere with cholesterol metabolism may provide a contribution to disease prevention. Lactobacillus plantarum CUL66 (NCIMB 30280) has been assessed in vitro for its ability to impact cholesterol absorption. L. plantarum CUL66 tested positive for bile salt hydrolase activity and the ability to assimilate cholesterol from culture media. RT-qPCR analysis showed that the bacterium significantly decreased the expression of Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 and ATP-binding cassette transporter-1 in polarised Caco-2 cells after 6 h exposure. Conversely, the expression of ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member (ABCG)-5 and ABCG-8, and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase were significantly increased. Using a radiolabelled assay, we also observed significant reductions in the uptake and basolateral efflux of cholesterol by Caco-2 cells exposed to L. plantarum CUL66. This in vitro study identified L. plantarum CUL66 as a cholesterol lowering bacteria by highlighting its ability to beneficially regulate multiple in vitro events associated with intestinal cholesterol metabolism and provides evidence of efficacy for its inclusion in future in vivo studies.

  10. Effects of food lectins on the transport system of human intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Shintaro; Tomiyama, Mai; Nemoto, Ryo; Naganuma, Takako; Ogawa, Tomohisa; Muramoto, Koji

    2013-01-01

    The effects of 16 lectins isolated from foodstuff on the transport system across human intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers were investigated by using four fluorescent markers: lucifer yellow (LY) for the paracellular pathway, fluorescein (FL) for the monocarboxylic acid transporter-mediated pathway, rhodamine 123 for the P-glycoprotein-mediated efflux pathway, and calcein for the multidrug resistance associated protein-related efflux pathway. The transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) values for the monolayers were also measured. WGA from wheat germ, ABA from white mushroom, AOL from Aspergillus oryzae, and CSL3 from chum salmon eggs (each at 100 µg/mL) decreased the TER value by 20-40% which resulted in increased LY transport. These lectins, as well as such other lectins as SBA from soybean, RBA from rice bran, and Con A from jack bean, affected other transport pathways too. These results indicate that the lectins modulated the transepithelial transport system in different ways, probably because of their specific binding characteristics toward Caco-2 cell monolayers.

  11. Zinc inhibits oxidative stress-induced iron signaling and apoptosis in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Kilari, Sreenivasulu; Pullakhandam, Raghu; Nair, K Madhavan

    2010-04-01

    Studies in humans and animals have suggested negative interactions of iron and zinc during their intestinal absorption. Further, zinc seems to prevent iron-induced oxidative damage in rats, which was hypothesized to be through the modulation of the intracellular iron signaling pathway. The aim of this study was, therefore, to understand the effects of zinc on oxidant-induced iron signaling and cell death in human enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells. We demonstrate that zinc decreases glucose/glucose oxidase (H(2)O(2)-generating system)-induced iron uptake and inhibits iron-regulatory protein 1 activation and divalent metal ion transporter 1 expression. There was also a concomitant decrease in oxidant-induced intracellular labile iron and restoration of ferritin and metallothionein expression. Further, zinc enhanced the Bcl-2/Bax ratio and reduced caspase-3 activity, leading to inhibition of apoptosis. Interestingly, bathophenanthroline disulfonic acid, an extracellular iron chelator, emulated the effects of zinc except for the reduced ferritin levels. These results suggest that zinc inhibits apoptosis by reducing oxidant-induced iron signaling in Caco-2 cells.

  12. Bioactive Peptides Isolated from Casein Phosphopeptides Enhance Calcium and Magnesium Uptake in Caco-2 Cell Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yong; Miao, Jianyin; Liu, Guo; Luo, Zhen; Xia, Zumeng; Liu, Fei; Yao, Mingfei; Cao, Xiaoqiong; Sun, Shengwei; Lin, Yanyin; Lan, Yaqi; Xiao, Hang

    2017-03-22

    The ability of casein phosphopeptides (CPPs) to bind and transport minerals has been previously studied. However, the single bioactive peptides responsible for the effects of CPPs have not been identified. This study was to purify calcium-binding peptides from CPPs and to determine their effects on calcium and magnesium uptake by Caco-2 cell monolayers. Five monomer peptides designated P1 to P5 were isolated and the amino acid sequences were determined using LC-MS/MS. Compared with the CPP-free control, all five monomeric peptides exhibited significant enhancing effects on the uptake of calcium and magnesium (P < 0.05). Interestingly, when calcium and magnesium were presented simultaneously with P5, magnesium was taken up with priority over calcium in the Caco-2 cell monolayers. For example, at 180 min, the amount of transferred magnesium and calcium was 78.4 ± 0.95 μg/well and 2.56 ± 0.64 μg/well, respectively, showing a more than 30-fold difference in the amount of transport caused by P5. These results provide novel insight into the mineral transport activity of phosphopeptides obtained from casein.

  13. Myricitrin Inhibits Acrylamide-Mediated Cytotoxicity in Human Caco-2 Cells by Preventing Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Feng, Lina; Shen, Yang; Su, Hongming; Li, Ya; Zhuang, Jingjing; Zhang, Lingxia; Zheng, Xiaodong

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress was thought to be associated with acrylamide cytotoxicity, but the link between oxidative stress and acrylamide cytotoxicity in the gastrointestinal tract, the primary organ in contact with dietary acrylamide, is still unclear. This study was conducted to evaluate the antioxidant activity of natural dietary compound myricitrin and its protective role against acrylamide cytotoxicity. We found that myricitrin can effectively scavenge multiple free radicals (including DPPH free radical, hydroxyl radical, and ABTS free radical) in a concentration-dependent manner. Our results further indicated that the presence of myricitrin (2.5–10 μg/mL) was found to significantly inhibit acrylamide-induced cytotoxicity in human gastrointestinal Caco-2 cells. Moreover, acrylamide-induced cytotoxicity is closely related to oxidative stress in Caco-2 cells. Interestingly, myricitrin was able to suppress acrylamide toxicity by inhibiting ROS generation. Taken together, these results demonstrate that myricitrin had a profound antioxidant effect and can protect against acrylamide-mediated cytotoxicity. PMID:24224177

  14. Potential P-glycoprotein-mediated drug-drug interactions of antimalarial agents in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Oga, Enoche F; Sekine, Shuichi; Shitara, Yoshihisa; Horie, Toshiharu

    2012-07-01

    Antimalarials are widely used in African and Southeast Asian countries, where they are combined with other drugs for the treatment of concurrent ailments. The potential for P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-mediated drug-drug interactions (DDIs) between antimalarials and P-gp substrates was examined using a Caco-2 cell-based model. Selected antimalarials were initially screened for their interaction with P-gp based on the inhibition of rhodamine-123 (Rho-123) transport in Caco-2 cells. Verapamil (100 μM) and quinidine (1 μM) were used as positive inhibition controls. Lumefantrine, amodiaquin, and artesunate all showed blockade of Rho-123 transport. Subsequently, the inhibitory effect of these antimalarials on the bi-directional passage of digoxin (DIG) was examined. All of the drugs decreased basal-to-apical (B-A) P-gp-mediated DIG transport at concentrations of 100 μM and 1 mM. These concentrations may reflect therapeutic doses for amodiaquin and artesunate. Therefore, clinically relevant DDIs may occur between certain antimalarials and P-gp substrates in general.

  15. Optimizing Caco-2 cell monolayers to increase throughput in drug intestinal absorption analysis.

    PubMed

    Markowska, M; Oberle, R; Juzwin, S; Hsu, C P; Gryszkiewicz, M; Streeter, A J

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to evaluate methods for increasing Caco-2 cell throughput for assessing drug intestinal absorption. The use of 6-, 12-, and 24-well membranes and the effect of membrane size on permeability and the integrity of the Caco-2 cell monolayer were assessed. In an effort to optimize the assessment of drug permeability, increased throughput was investigated by testing compounds singly or as mixtures of analytes. The transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) of cell monolayers was measured on 0.33, 1.0, and 4.7 cm2 polycarbonate membranes using EVOM, over a 25-day period. Absorptive transport was determined on all compounds tested using LC-MS/MS assays, or liquid scintillation spectrometry. The effect of multiple compounds in one well compared to single compounds was assessed with atenolol, nadolol, metoprolol, and propranolol for mixtures of four compounds and with RWJ-53308, atenolol, terbutaline, propranolol, naproxen, piroxicam, topiramate, and furosemide for mixtures of eight compounds. The apparent permeability (Papp) values correlated well between single analytes and mixtures of four and eight analytes in each well. Drug permeability decreased slightly with an increase in well size. The TEER value increased with the number of days in culture for each of the 6-, 12-, and 24-well sizes. It was demonstrated that the 24-well format system is ideal for high-throughput assessment. Furthermore, the approach of mixing four or eight analytes in each well to further increase throughput was also demonstrated to be valid.

  16. Inhibition of Cronobacter sakazakii Adhesion to Caco-2 Cells by Commercial Dairy Powders and Raw Buttermilk.

    PubMed

    Ripollés, Daniel; Harouna, Saidou; Parrón, José A; Arenales, Irene; Calvo, Miguel; Pérez, María D; Sánchez, Lourdes

    2017-02-08

    Cronobacter sakazakii is a foodborne pathogen that has been associated with severe infections, mainly in neonates. The binding of this bacterium to host cell surfaces represents the first step in the pathogenesis of disease. An ELISA-based assay has been developed using a polyclonal antiserum against C. sakazakii to determine its adhesion to Caco-2 cells. The antiserum used recognized many of the outer membrane proteins of C. sakazakii. A positive correlation was found between the absorbance values obtained by ELISA and the number of bacteria adhered to cells determined by plate counting. The inhibitory effect on bacterial adhesion to cells observed with some dairy products was concentration-dependent. Commercial buttermilk caused the maximal reduction of the adhesion percentage (33.0 ± 5.07) at the highest concentration assayed (20 mg/mL), followed by butter serum (31.9 ± 5.36), skim milk (30.4 ± 5.07), and raw buttermilk (25.6 ± 3.80). In some cases, significant differences (p < 0.05) were found in the inhibition exerted by the different products evaluated. The results obtained in this study demonstrate that dairy products contain some components with the ability to inhibit the adhesion of C. sakazakii to Caco-2 cells.

  17. Lycopene modulates THP1 and Caco2 cells inflammatory state through transcriptional and nontranscriptional processes.

    PubMed

    Makon-Sébastien, Njock; Francis, Fouchier; Eric, Seree; Henri, Villard Pierre; François, Landrier Jean; Laurent, Pechere; Yves, Barra; Serge, Champion

    2014-01-01

    We revisited the action of a carotenoid, the lycopene, on the expression of proinflammatory genes, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and metalloprotease (MMP9) activity. THP1 and Caco2 cell lines were used as in vitro models for the two main cell types found in intestine tissue, that is, monocytes and epithelial cells. Proinflammatory condition was induced using either phorbol ester acetate (PMA), lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or tumor necrosis factor (TNF). In THP1 cells, short term pretreatment (2 h) with a low concentration (2 μM) of lycopene reinforce proinflammatory gene expression. The extent of the effect of lycopene is dependent on the proinflammtory stimulus (PMA, LPS or TNF) used. Lycopene enhanced MMP9 secretion via a c-AMP-dependent process, and reduced ROS production at higher concentrations than 2 μM. Cell culture media, conditioned by PMA-treated monocytes and then transferred on CaCo-2 epithelial cells, induced a proinflammatory state in these cells. The extent of this inflammatory effect was reduced when cells has been pretreated (12 h) with lycopene. At low concentration (2 μM or less), lycopene appeared to promote an inflammatory state not correlated with ROS modulation. At higher concentration (5 μM-20 μM), an anti-inflammatory effect takes place as a decrease of ROS production was detected. So, both concentration and time have to be considered in order to define the exact issue of the effect of carotenoids present in meals.

  18. Procyanidins can interact with Caco-2 cell membrane lipid rafts: involvement of cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Verstraeten, Sandra V; Jaggers, Grayson K; Fraga, Cesar G; Oteiza, Patricia I

    2013-11-01

    Large procyanidins (more than three subunits) are not absorbed at the gastrointestinal tract but could exert local effects through their interactions with membranes. We previously showed that hexameric procyanidins (Hex), although not entering cells, interact with membranes modulating cell signaling and fate. This paper investigated if Hex, as an example of large procyanidins, can selectively interact with lipid rafts which could in part explain its biological actions. This mechanism was studied in both synthetic membranes (liposomes) and Caco-2 cells. Hex promoted Caco-2 cell membrane rigidification and dehydration, effects that were abolished upon cholesterol depletion with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MCD). Hex prevented lipid raft structure disruption induced by cholesterol depletion/redistribution by MCD or sodium deoxycholate. Supporting the involvement of cholesterol-Hex bonding in Hex interaction with lipid rafts, the absence of cholesterol markedly decreased the capacity of Hex to prevent deoxycholate- and Triton X-100-mediated disruption of lipid raft-like liposomes. Stressing the functional relevance of this interaction, Hex mitigated lipid raft-associated activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) 1/2. Results support the capacity of a large procyanidin (Hex) to interact with membrane lipid rafts mainly through Hex-cholesterol bondings. Procyanidin-lipid raft interactions can in part explain the capacity of large procyanidins to modulate cell physiology.

  19. Cytotoxicity of peptide-coated silver nanoparticles on the human intestinal cell line Caco-2.

    PubMed

    Böhmert, Linda; Niemann, Birgit; Thünemann, Andreas F; Lampen, Alfonso

    2012-07-01

    Silver nanoparticles are used in a wide range of consumer products such as clothing, cosmetics, household goods, articles of daily use and pesticides. Moreover, the use of a nanoscaled silver hydrosol has been requested in the European Union for even nutritional purposes. However, despite the wide applications of silver nanoparticles, there is a lack of information concerning their impact on human health. In order to investigate the effects of silver nanoparticles on human intestinal cells, we used the Caco-2 cell line and peptide-coated silver nanoparticles with defined colloidal, structural and interfacial properties. The particles display core diameter of 20 and 40 nm and were coated with the small peptide L-cysteine L-lysine L-lysine. Cell viability and proliferation were measured using Promegas CellTiter-Blue® Cell Viability assay, DAPI staining and impedance measurements. Apoptosis was determined by Annexin-V/7AAD staining and FACS analysis, membrane damage with Promegas LDH assay and reactive oxygen species by dichlorofluorescein assay. Exposure of proliferating Caco-2 cells to silver nanoparticle induced decreasing adherence capacity and cytotoxicity, whereby the formation of reactive oxygen species could be the mode of action. The effects were dependent on particle size (20, 40 nm), doses (5-100 μg/mL) and time of incubation (4-48 h). Apoptosis or membrane damage was not detected.

  20. Arctigenin from Fructus Arctii (Seed of Burdock) Reinforces Intestinal Barrier Function in Caco-2 Cell Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hee Soon; Jung, Sun Young; Back, Su Yeon; Do, Jeong-Ryong; Shon, Dong-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Fructus Arctii is used as a traditional herbal medicine to treat inflammatory diseases in oriental countries. This study aimed to investigate effect of F. Arctii extract on intestinal barrier function in human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells and to reveal the active component of F. Arctii. We measured transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) value (as an index of barrier function) and ovalbumin (OVA) permeation (as an index of permeability) to observe the changes of intestinal barrier function. The treatment of F. Arctii increased TEER value and decreased OVA influx on Caco-2 cell monolayers. Furthermore, we found that arctigenin as an active component of F. Arctii increased TEER value and reduced permeability of OVA from apical to the basolateral side but not arctiin. In the present study, we revealed that F. Arctii could enhance intestinal barrier function, and its active component was an arctigenin on the functionality. We expect that the arctigenin from F. Arctii could contribute to prevention of inflammatory, allergic, and infectious diseases by reinforcing intestinal barrier function.

  1. Optimization of the Caco-2 permeability assay to screen drug compounds for intestinal absorption and efflux.

    PubMed

    Press, Barry

    2011-01-01

    In vitro permeability assays are a valuable tool for scientists during lead compound optimization. As a majority of discovery projects are focused on the development of orally bioavailable drugs, correlation of in vitro permeability data to in vivo absorption results is critical for understanding the structural-physicochemical relationship (SPR) of drugs exhibiting low levels of absorption. For more than a decade, the Caco-2 screening assay has remained a popular, in vitro system to test compounds for both intestinal permeability and efflux liability. Despite advances in artificial membrane technology and in silico modeling systems, drug compounds still benefit from testing in cell-based epithelial monolayer assays for lead optimization. This chapter provides technical information for performing and optimizing the Caco-2 assay. In addition, techniques are discussed for dealing with some of the most pressing issues surrounding in vitro permeability assays (i.e., low aqueous solubility of test compounds and low postassay recovery). Insights are offered to help researchers avoid common pitfalls in the interpretation of in vitro permeability data, which can often lead to the perception of misleading results for correlation to in vivo data.

  2. Esterification of Quercetin Increases Its Transport Across Human Caco-2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiang-Ning; Zou, Xian-Guo; He, Yi; Chen, Fang; Deng, Ze-Yuan

    2016-07-01

    Plant polyphenols showed useful biochemical characteristics in vitro; however, the assessments of their clinical applications in vivo are restricted by their limited bioavailability due to their strong resistance to 1st-pass effects during absorption. In order to improve the bioavailability of quercetin (QU), the ester derivative of QU (3,3',4',5,7-pentahydroxy flavones, TAQU) was synthesized, followed by examining the oil-water partition coefficient as well as the transport mechanisms of QU and its ester derivative (TAQU) using human Caco-2 cells. The transport characteristics of QU and TAQU transport under different conditions (different concentrations, time, pH, temperature, tight junctions, and potential transporters) were systematically investigated. Results showed that QU had a lower permeability coefficient (2.82 × 10(-6) cm/s) for apical-to-basolateral (AP-BL) transport over 5 to 50 μM, whereas the transport rate for AP to BL flux of TAQU (5.23 × 10(-6) cm/s) was significantly greater than that of QU. Paracellular pathways were not involved during the transport of both QU and TAQU. QU was poorly absorbed by active transport, whereas TAQU was mostly absorbed by passive diffusion. Efflux transporters, P-glycoproteins, multidrug resistance proteins were proven to participate in the transport process of QU, but not in that of TAQU. These results suggested that improving the lipophicity of QU by esterification could increase the transport of QU across Caco-2 cells.

  3. Arctigenin from Fructus Arctii (Seed of Burdock) Reinforces Intestinal Barrier Function in Caco-2 Cell Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hee Soon; Jung, Sun Young; Back, Su Yeon; Do, Jeong-Ryong; Shon, Dong-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Fructus Arctii is used as a traditional herbal medicine to treat inflammatory diseases in oriental countries. This study aimed to investigate effect of F. Arctii extract on intestinal barrier function in human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells and to reveal the active component of F. Arctii. We measured transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) value (as an index of barrier function) and ovalbumin (OVA) permeation (as an index of permeability) to observe the changes of intestinal barrier function. The treatment of F. Arctii increased TEER value and decreased OVA influx on Caco-2 cell monolayers. Furthermore, we found that arctigenin as an active component of F. Arctii increased TEER value and reduced permeability of OVA from apical to the basolateral side but not arctiin. In the present study, we revealed that F. Arctii could enhance intestinal barrier function, and its active component was an arctigenin on the functionality. We expect that the arctigenin from F. Arctii could contribute to prevention of inflammatory, allergic, and infectious diseases by reinforcing intestinal barrier function. PMID:26550018

  4. Effect of dietary protein on heme iron uptake by Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Villarroel, Pía; Flores, Sebastián; Pizarro, Fernando; de Romaña, Daniel López; Arredondo, Miguel

    2011-12-01

    To study heme iron bioavailability and the role of dietary protein (animal and vegetable) on iron uptake using an in vitro model (Caco-2 cell line). Caco-2 cells were seeded in bicameral chambers with different animal (beef, chicken or fish) or vegetable (peas, lentils, and soybeans) proteins or with pure animal (collagen and casein) or vegetable (gliadin, zein, and glutein) protein extracts. The effect of each protein over heme iron absorption was assessed. Intact heme uptake was higher than either heme plus albumin or digested heme plus albumin, but lower than digested heme. White meal exerted the highest inhibitory effect on hemin uptake. Heme iron uptake decreased in the presence of all legume extracts, but was not significantly different among them (one-way ANOVA, NS). Pure animal (collagen and casein) and vegetable (zein and glutelin) proteins increased heme iron uptake, except for gliadin. Animal and vegetable protein in general decreased heme iron uptake. However, purified animal and vegetable protein induce an increase in heme iron uptake.

  5. Quantitative analysis of lab-to-lab variability in Caco-2 permeability assays.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Bong; Zgair, Atheer; Taha, Dhiaa A; Zang, Xiaowei; Kagan, Leonid; Kim, Tae Hwan; Kim, Min Gi; Yun, Hwi-Yeol; Fischer, Peter M; Gershkovich, Pavel

    2017-05-01

    In this study, Caco-2 permeability results from different laboratories were compared. Six different sets of apparent permeability coefficient (Papp) values reported in the literature were compared to experimental Papp obtained in our laboratory. The differences were assessed by determining the root mean square error (RMSE) values between the datasets, which reached levels as high as 0.581 for the training set compounds, i.e. ten compounds with known effective human permeability (Peff). The consequences of these differences in Papp for prediction of oral drug absorption were demonstrated by introducing the Papp into the absorption and pharmacokinetics simulation software application GastroPlus™ for prediction of the fraction absorbed (Fa) in humans using calibrated "user-defined permeability models". The RMSE were calculated to assess the differences between the simulated Fa and experimental values reported in the literature. The RMSE for Fa simulated with the permeability model calibrated using experimental Papp from our laboratory was 0.128. When the calibration was performed using Papp from literature datasets, the RMSE values for Fa were higher in all cases except one. This study shows quantitative lab-to-lab variability of Caco-2 permeability results and the potential consequences this can have in the use of these results for predicting intestinal absorption of drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Intestinal permeability and P-glycoprotein-mediated efflux transport of ticagrelor in Caco-2 monolayer cells.

    PubMed

    Marsousi, Niloufar; Doffey-Lazeyras, Fabienne; Rudaz, Serge; Desmeules, Jules A; Daali, Youssef

    2016-12-01

    Ticagrelor is the unique reversible oral antiplatelet drug commercialized today. During this study, the intestinal permeability of ticagrelor and its potential P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-mediated active transport were assessed. To this end, bidirectional transport of ticagrelor was performed across Caco-2 (human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma) monolayer model in the presence and absence of potent P-gp inhibitor valspodar. Ticagrelor presented an apical-basolateral apparent permeability coefficient (Papp ) of 6.0 × 10(-6) cm/s. On the other hand, mean efflux ratio (ER) of 2.71 was observed for ticagrelor describing a higher efflux permeability compared to the influx component. Valspodar showed a significant inhibitory effect on the efflux of ticagrelor suggesting involvement of P-gp in its oral disposition. Co-incubation of the P-gp inhibitor decreased the efflux Papp of ticagrelor from 1.60 × 10(-5) to 1.13 × 10(-5) cm/s and decreased its ER by 70%. Results suggest a modest active transport of ticagrelor by P-gp across the Caco-2 cell monolayer. The co-administration of ticagrelor with a P-gp inhibitor seems altogether unlikely to have an extended impact on pharmacokinetics of ticagrelor and cause bleeding events in patients. © 2016 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  7. Endocytosis of fluorescent cyclodextrins by intestinal Caco-2 cells and its role in paclitaxel drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Réti-Nagy, Katalin; Malanga, Milo; Fenyvesi, Éva; Szente, Lajos; Vámosi, György; Váradi, Judit; Bácskay, Ildikó; Fehér, Pálma; Ujhelyi, Zoltán; Róka, Eszter; Vecsernyés, Miklós; Balogh, György; Vasvári, Gábor; Fenyvesi, Ferenc

    2015-12-30

    Cyclodextrins are widely used excipients in pharmaceutical formulations. They are mainly utilized as solubilizers and absorption enhancers, but recent results revealed their effects on cell membranes and pharmacological barriers. In addition to the growing knowledge on their interaction with plasma membranes, it was confirmed that cyclodextrins are able to enter cells by endocytosis. The number of the tested cyclodextrins was limited, and the role of this mechanism in drug absorption and delivery is not known. Our aim was to examine the endocytosis of fluorescently labeled hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin, random methyl-β-cyclodextrin and soluble β-cyclodextrin polymer, and the cellular uptake of the fluorescent paclitaxel derivative-random methyl-β-cyclodextrin complex. The studied cyclodextrin derivatives were able to enter Caco-2 intestinal cells and localized in vesicles in the cytoplasm, while their permeability was very limited through Caco-2 monolayers. We demonstrated for the first time that the fluorescent paclitaxel derivative and rhodamine-labeled random methyl-β-cyclodextrin were detected in the same intracellular vesicles after treating cells with their inclusion complex. These results indicate that the endocytosis of cyclodextrin complexes can contribute to drug absorption processes.

  8. Alpha-Melanocyte Stimulating Hormone Protects against Cytokine-Induced Barrier Damage in Caco-2 Intestinal Epithelial Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Váradi, Judit; Harazin, András; Fenyvesi, Ferenc; Réti-Nagy, Katalin; Gogolák, Péter; Vámosi, György; Bácskay, Ildikó; Fehér, Pálma; Ujhelyi, Zoltán; Vasvári, Gábor; Róka, Eszter; Haines, David; Deli, Mária A.; Vecsernyés, Miklós

    2017-01-01

    Alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) is a potent anti-inflammatory peptide with cytoprotective effect in various tissues. The present investigation demonstrates the ability of α-MSH to interact with intestinal epithelial cell monolayers and mitigate inflammatory processes of the epithelial barrier. The protective effect of α-MSH was studied on Caco-2 human intestinal epithelial monolayers, which were disrupted by exposure to tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β. The barrier integrity was assessed by measuring transepithelial electric resistance (TEER) and permeability for marker molecules. Caco-2 monolayers were evaluated by immunohistochemistry for expression of melanocortin-1 receptor and tight junction proteins ZO-1 and claudin-4. The activation of nuclear factor kappa beta (NF-κB) was detected by fluorescence microscopy and inflammatory cytokine expression was assessed by flow cytometric bead array cytokine assay. Exposure of Caco-2 monolayers to proinflammatory cytokines lowered TEER and increased permeability for fluorescein and albumin, which was accompanied by changes in ZO-1 and claudin-4 immunostaining. α-MSH was able to prevent inflammation-associated decrease of TEER in a dose-dependent manner and reduce the increased permeability for paracellular marker fluorescein. Further immunohistochemistry analysis revealed proinflammatory cytokine induced translocation of the NF-κB p65 subunit into Caco-2 cell nuclei, which was inhibited by α-MSH. As a result the IL-6 and IL-8 production of Caco-2 monolayers were also decreased with different patterns by the addition of α-MSH to the culture medium. In conclusion, Caco-2 cells showed a positive immunostaining for melanocortin-1 receptor and α-MSH protected Caco-2 cells against inflammatory barrier dysfunction and inflammatory activation induced by tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β cytokines. PMID:28103316

  9. Coexisting tubular adenoma with a neuroendocrine carcinoma of colon allowing early surgical intervention and implicating a shared stem cell origin

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Mahmoud L; Tiwari, Ashish; Zhao, Qing

    2017-01-01

    High-grade colonic neuroendocrine carcinomas (NECs) are uncommon but extremely aggressive. Their co-existence with tubular adenoma (TA) has rarely been reported. We present a 68-year-old man who was found on routine colonoscopy to have multiple colorectal TAs and an ulcerated lesion in the ascending colon. Microscopically, a poorly-differentiated invasive carcinoma juxtaposed with a TA was identified. Differential diagnosis included a poorly-differentiated adenocarcinoma, medullary carcinoma, high-grade NEC and lymphoma. The immunohistochemical profile showed positive staining for keratins, synaptophysin and chromogranin but negative for LCA, CDX2, CK7, CK20, TTF-1 and PSA, supporting the NEC diagnosis. Upon subsequent laparoscopic right hemicolectomy, the tumor was identified as a 3.0 cm umbilicated and ulcerated mass with an adjacent TA. Both TA and NEC showed positive staining for β-catenin indicating a shared colonic origin. The mitotic counts (77/10 high power fields) and a high proliferation rate (75% by Ki-67) corroborated a high-grade stratification. Mutational analysis indicated a wild-type BRAF and KRAS with mismatch repair proficiency. The AJCC (7th edition) pathologic stage is pT3, pN0, pMx. The patient received adjuvant chemotherapy with cisplatin/etoposides for three cycles and will be followed up for a year to detect recurrence. In conclusion, the co-existence of TA with high grade-NEC in our case allowed early identification and intervention of the otherwise asymptomatic but aggressive tumor. In addition, the finding of a high-grade NEC within a large TA in this case suggests a link between the two lesions and could represent a shared stem cell origin. PMID:28246485

  10. DIFFERENTIATING THE UNDIFFERENTIATED: IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL PROFILE OF MEDULLARY CARCINOMA OF THE COLON WITH AN EMPHASIS ON INTESTINAL DIFFERENTIATION

    PubMed Central

    Winn, Brody; Tavares, Rosemarie; Fanion, Jacqueline; Noble, Lelia; Gao, John; Sabo, Edmond; Resnick, Murray B.

    2009-01-01

    Undifferentiated or medullary carcinoma (MC) is characterized by its distinct histologic appearance and relatively better prognosis compared to poorly differentiated colonic carcinoma (PDC). These two entities may be difficult to differentiate by light microscopy alone. Only limited immunohistochemical studies investigating MC have been reported. These studies suggest a loss of intestinal differentiation, exemplified by a high percentage of CDX2 negativity. Our aim was to further characterize the immunohistochemical profile of MC, with particular emphasis on intestinal markers. Paraffin blocks from 16 cases of MC and 33 cases of PDC were retrieved and tissue microarrays were constructed and stained with an immunohistochemical panel including, CDX2, CK7, CK20, p53, intestinal trefoil factor 3 (TFF3), chromogranin, synaptophysin, MLH-1, MUC-1, MUC-2 and calretinin. A significantly higher proportion of MC, as opposed to PDC showed loss of staining for MLH-1 and for the intestinal transcription factor CDX2, in accordance with previous studies. MLH-1 staining was present in only 21% of MC cases compared with 60% of the PDC cases (p=0.02), whereas CDX2 was positive in 19% of MCs and 55% of PDCs (p=0.03). Interestingly, calretinin staining was strongly positive in 73% of MCs compared to only 12% of PDCs (p<0.0001). Evidence of intestinal differentiation by MUC-1, MUC-2 and TFF-3 staining was seen in 67, 60 and 53% of the MCs respectively. These three markers were frequently positive in many of the CDX2 negative MC cases. Medullary carcinoma of the colon retains a significant degree of intestinal differentiation as evidenced by its high percentage of staining for MUC-1, MUC-2, and TFF-3. Calretinin, MLH-1 and CDX2 may help to differentiate MC from PDC of the colon. PMID:18992917

  11. Effect of ART1 on the proliferation and migration of mouse colon carcinoma CT26 cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jian-Xia; Xiong, Wei; Zeng, Zhen; Tang, Yi; Wang, Ya-Lan; Xiao, Ming; Li, Ming; Li, Qing Shu; Song, Guang-Lin; Kuang, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Arginine-specific mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase 1 (ART1) is an important enzyme that catalyzes arginine-specific mono-ADP-ribosylation. There is evidence that arginine-specific mono-ADP-ribosylation may affect the proliferation of smooth muscle cells via the Rho-dependent signaling pathway. Previous studies have demonstrated that ART1 may have a role in the proliferation, invasion and apoptosis of colon carcinoma in vitro. However, the effect of ART1 on the proliferation and invasion of colon carcinoma in vivo has yet to be elucidated. In the present study, mouse colon carcinoma CT26 cells were infected with a lentivirus to produce ART1 gene silencing or overexpression, and were then subcutaneously transplanted. To observe the effect of ART1 on tumor growth or liver metastasis in vivo, a spleen transplant tumor model of CT26 cells in BALB/c mice was successfully constructed. Expression levels of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), Ras homolog gene family member A (RhoA) and the downstream factors, c-myc, c-fos and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) proteins, were measured in vivo. The results demonstrated that ART1 gene silencing inhibited the growth of the spleen transplanted tumor and its ability to spread to the liver via metastasis. There was also an accompanying increase in expression of FAK, RhoA, c-myc, c-fos and COX-2, whereas CT26 cells with ART1 overexpression demonstrated the opposite effect. These results suggest a potential role for ART1 in the proliferation and invasion of CT26 cells and a possible mechanism in vivo. PMID:28138708

  12. Targeting FGF19 inhibits tumor growth in colon cancer xenograft and FGF19 transgenic hepatocellular carcinoma models.

    PubMed

    Desnoyers, L R; Pai, R; Ferrando, R E; Hötzel, K; Le, T; Ross, J; Carano, R; D'Souza, A; Qing, J; Mohtashemi, I; Ashkenazi, A; French, D M

    2008-01-03

    Although fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) can promote liver carcinogenesis in mice its involvement in human cancer is not well characterized. Here we report that FGF19 and its cognate receptor FGF receptor 4 (FGFR4) are coexpressed in primary human liver, lung and colon tumors and in a subset of human colon cancer cell lines. To test the importance of FGF19 for tumor growth, we developed an anti-FGF19 monoclonal antibody that selectively blocks the interaction of FGF19 with FGFR4. This antibody abolished FGF19-mediated activity in vitro and inhibited growth of colon tumor xenografts in vivo and effectively prevented hepatocellular carcinomas in FGF19 transgenic mice. The efficacy of the antibody in these models was linked to inhibition of FGF19-dependent activation of FGFR4, FRS2, ERK and beta-catenin. These findings suggest that the inactivation of FGF19 could be beneficial for the treatment of colon cancer, liver cancer and other malignancies involving interaction of FGF19 and FGFR4.

  13. Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis tatB and tatC mutants are impaired in Caco-2 cell invasion in vitro and show reduced systemic spread in chickens.

    PubMed

    Mickael, Claudia Silva; Lam, Po-King S; Berberov, Emil M; Allan, Brenda; Potter, Andrew A; Köster, Wolfgang

    2010-08-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis is a leading causative agent of gastroenteritis in humans. This pathogen also colonizes the intestinal tracts of poultry and can spread systemically in chickens. Transfer to humans usually occurs through undercooked or improperly handled poultry meat or eggs. The bacterial twin-arginine transport (Tat) pathway is responsible for the translocation of folded proteins across the cytoplasmic membrane. In order to study the role of the Tat system in the infection and colonization of chickens by Salmonella Enteritidis, we constructed chromosomal deletion mutants of the tatB and tatC genes, which are essential components of the Tat translocon. We observed that the tat mutations affected bacterial cell morphology, motility, and sensitivity to albomycin, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and EDTA. In addition, the mutant strains showed reduced invasion of polarized Caco-2 cells. The wild-type phenotype was restored in all our Salmonella Enteritidis tat mutants by introducing episomal copies of the tatABC genes. When tested in chickens by use of a Salmonella Enteritidis Delta tatB strain, the Tat system inactivation did not substantially affect cecal colonization, but it delayed systemic infection. Taken together, our data demonstrated that the Tat system plays a role in Salmonella Enteritidis pathogenesis.

  14. Urinary epidermal growth factor (hEGF) levels in patients with carcinomas of the breast, colon and rectum.

    PubMed Central

    Sweetenham, J. W.; Davies, D. E.; Warnes, S.; Alexander, P.

    1990-01-01

    A specific two-site ELISA for human epidermal growth factor (hEGF) has been used to measure urinary hEGF/creatinine ratios in 30 normal subjects, 30 hospital in-patients with breast cancer and 30 hospital in-patients with colonic or rectal cancer. There was no significant difference between patients with breast cancer and controls. Although a statistically significant difference between patients with colorectal cancer and controls was observed, the biological significance of this observation is doubtful. No clear effect of the presence of breast or colorectal carcinoma on the urinary excretion of hEGF has been observed. PMID:2206955

  15. Induction of apoptosis in human colon carcinoma COLO 205 cells by the recombinant α subunit of C-phycocyanin.

    PubMed

    Lu, Weihong; Yu, Ping; Li, Jianrong

    2011-03-01

    The α-subunit of C-phycocyanin (CpcA) was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. The recombinant CpcA inhibited the growth of human colon carcinoma COLO 205 cells. Typical apoptotic morphological characteristics, such as chromatin condensation and nuclear fragmentation, were observed in CpcA-treated COLO 205 cells by fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Moreover, the apoptotic process was associated with the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio up-regulation, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, cytochrome c release, and caspase-9 activation. These findings indicate that CpcA induced the death of COLO 205 cells through the intrinsic apoptotic pathway.

  16. Butyrate metabolism upstream and downstream acetyl-CoA synthesis and growth control of human colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Leschelle, X; Delpal, S; Goubern, M; Blottière, H M; Blachier, F

    2000-11-01

    Butyrate is a short chain fatty acid (SCFA) produced by bacterial fermentation of dietary fibers in the colon lumen which severely affects the proliferation of colon cancer cells in in vitro e