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Sample records for colon volvulus experience

  1. Management of colonic volvulus.

    PubMed

    Gingold, Daniel; Murrell, Zuri

    2012-12-01

    Colonic volvulus is a common cause of large bowel obstruction worldwide. It can affect all parts of the colon, but most commonly occurs in the sigmoid and cecal areas. This disease has been described for centuries, and was studied by Hippocrates himself. Currently, colonic volvulus is the third most common cause of large bowel obstruction worldwide, and is responsible for ∼15% of large bowel obstructions in the United States. This article will discuss the history of colonic volvulus, and the predisposing factors that lead to this disease. Moreover, the epidemiology and diagnosis of each type of colonic volvulus, along with the various treatment options will be reviewed. PMID:24294126

  2. Management of the colonic volvulus in 2016.

    PubMed

    Perrot, L; Fohlen, A; Alves, A; Lubrano, J

    2016-06-01

    Colonic volvulus is the third leading cause of colonic obstruction worldwide, occurring at two principal locations: the sigmoid colon and cecum. In Western countries, sigmoid volvulus preferentially affects elderly men whereas cecal volvulus affects younger women. Some risk factors, such as chronic constipation, high-fiber diet, frequent use of laxatives, personal past history of laparotomy and anatomic predispositions, are common to both locations. Clinical symptomatology is non-specific, including a combination of abdominal pain, gaseous distention, and bowel obstruction. Abdominopelvic computerized tomography is currently the gold standard examination, allowing positive diagnosis as well as detection of complications. Specific management depends on the location, patient comorbidities and colonic wall viability, but treatment is an emergency in every case. If clinical or radiological signs of gravity are present, emergency surgery is mandatory, but is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. For sigmoid volvulus without criteria of gravity, the ideal strategy is an endoscopic detorsion procedure followed, within 2 to 5 days, by surgery that includes a sigmoid colectomy with primary anastomosis. Exclusively endoscopic therapy must be reserved for patients who are at excessive risk for surgical intervention. In cecal volvulus, endoscopy has no role and surgery is the rule. PMID:27132752

  3. Volvulus of the Sigmoid Colon Associated With Rectal Cancer: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Hyun; Ahn, Byung-Kwon; Baek, Sung-Uhn

    2015-01-01

    Sigmoid volvulus is one of the three most common causes of acute colonic obstruction. Predisposing factors include chronic constipation, adhesion from a prior abdominal surgery, and megacolon. However, concomitant presentation of volvulus of the sigmoid colon and rectal cancer is extremely rare. We report a case of a 50-year-old woman with coexisting volvulus of the sigmoid colon and rectal cancer. The patient presented with abdominal distension and pain for 2 days. On computed tomography, the whole colon was dilated with gas and feces. A whirl sign with rotation of the inferior mesenteric vessel was identified. The rectum had irregular wall thickening. Colonoscopy showed a circumscribed, ulcerofungating mass approximately 6 cm from the anal verge. The sigmoid colon was obstructed at a point approximately 25 cm from the anal verge. The mucosa was hyperemic and edematous with the pathognomonic spiral pattern. Endoscopic reduction was not successful. On laparotomy, the sigmoid colon was rotated around its mesentery. It was severely distended with edematous, hyperemic serosa. A tumor of the rectum was identified in the mid-rectum. The patient underwent low anterior resection and protective ileostomy. Pathologic findings confirmed adenocarcinoma of the rectum. The postoperative course was complicated by an ileus, which was managed with conservative treatment.

  4. Sigmoid colon morphology in the population groups of Durban, South Africa, with special reference to sigmoid volvulus.

    PubMed

    Madiba, T E; Haffajee, M R

    2011-05-01

    Sigmoid volvulus demonstrates geographical, racial, and gender variation. This autopsy study was undertaken to establish morphological differences of the sigmoid colon and its mesocolon in which the length and other characteristics were assessed. A total of 590 cadavers were examined (403 African, 91 Indian, and 96 White). Length and height of the sigmoid colon and mesocolon were significantly longer in Africans, and mesocolon root was significantly narrower in Africans. Mesocolic ratio for Africans, Indians, and Whites was 1.1 ± 0.8, 1.8 ± 0.7, and 1.9 ± 1.0, respectively. Africans had a significantly high incidence of redundant sigmoid colon with the long-narrow type and suprapelvic position predominating (P = 0.003); the opposite applied to the classic type. There was no difference in sigmoid colon length, mesocolon height, and width between males and females in all population groups. Among Africans, the long-narrow type was more common in males, and the classic and long-broad types were more common in females. Splaying of teniae coli and thickening of the mesentery were more common in Africans. Tethering of the sigmoid colon to the posterior abdominal wall was less common in Africans compared with other population groups. In conclusion, the sigmoid colon was longer, and the sigmoid mesocolon root was narrower in Africans compared with the other population groups, and the sigmoid colon had a suprapelvic disposition among Africans. In Africans, the sigmoid colon was longer in males with a long-narrow shape. These differences may explain geographical and racial differences in sigmoid volvulus.

  5. Detection and comparison of nitric oxide in clinically healthy horses and those with naturally acquired strangulating large colon volvulus

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Abstract The objective of the study was to determine whether nitric oxide (NO) is present in clinically healthy horses (control) under basal conditions, and if it increases secondary to naturally acquired strangulating large colon volvulus (affected). Eleven affected horses and 10 controls were studied. Jugular venous blood, abdominal fluid, and urine were collected. The NO concentrations were standardized to the creatinine concentration in the respective samples. A biopsy specimen collected from the large colon pelvic flexure at surgery was divided into subsections for processing for inducible nitric synthase (iNOS) and nitrotyrosine (NT) immunohistochemical staining and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) diaphorase histochemical staining. There were no significant differences in plasma, abdominal fluid, or urine NO concentrations between affected and control horses. There was a significant decrease in submucosal arteriolar and venular endothelium, submucosal plexus, mucosal leukocyte, mucosal and musclaris vasculature, and myenteric plexus NADPH diaphorase staining in affected versus control horses. There was a significant increase in iNOS staining in mucosal leukocytes and vasculature in affected versus control horses. Other than a greater number of positively stained mucosal leukocytes in affected horses, there were no significant differences between affected and control horses for NT staining. The presence of NADPH diaphorase staining in the endothelium and submucosal neurons suggests endothelial and neuronal NOS are present under basal conditions in the large colon of horses. Increased iNOS and NT staining in mucosal leukocytes of affected horses suggests involvement of the NO pathway in large colon volvulus. The reasons for the lack of a significant difference in plasma, abdominal fluid, and urine NO concentrations between affected and control horses are unknown. PMID:15971674

  6. A Peterson's hernia and subsequent small bowel volvulus: surgical reconstruction utilizing transverse colon as a new Roux-en-Y limb - 1 case.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jae Seong; Shin, Dong Gue

    2013-12-01

    Peterson's hernia is an internal hernia that can occur after Roux-en-Y anastomosis. It often accompanies small bowel volvulus and is prone to strangulation. Reconstruction of intestinal continuity after massive small bowel resection in a patient who undergoes near total gastrectomy and Roux-en-Y anastomosis can be difficult. A 74-year-old man who had undergone a near total gastrectomy and Roux-en-Y gastrojejunostomy for stomach cancer presented with abdominal pain. The preoperative computed tomography showed strangulated small bowel volvulus. During the emergent laparotomy, we found a strangulated Peterson's hernia with small bowel volvulus. After resection of the necrotized intestine, we made a new Roux-en-Y anastomosis connecting the remnant stomach and the jejunum with a transverse colon segment. We were safely able to connect the remnant stomach and the jejunum by making a new Roux-en-Y anastomosis utilizing a transverse colon segment as a new Roux-limb by two stage operation.

  7. Undiagnosed hypothyroidism presenting with sigmoid volvulus

    PubMed Central

    Meytes, Vadim; Schulberg, Steven P.; Morin, Nicholas; Glinik, Galina

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of hypothyroidism presenting with sigmoid volvulus, a phenomenon known as myxedema pseudovolvulus, is exceedingly rare. A male in his late thirties presented to our institution with a chief complaint of abdominal pain. The patient underwent CT scan, which was consistent with massive colonic dilatation with sigmoid volvulus. He was taken to the operating room for exploration and was found to have sigmoid volvulus and underwent a segmental resection. Postoperatively, the patient was newly diagnosed with severe hypothyroidism. PMID:27106615

  8. An interesting rare case of double volvulus.

    PubMed

    Chittal, R; Harris, D; Patel, A; Goodyear, S; Parkianathan, V

    2011-02-23

    A 71-year-old female presented with recurrent sigmoid volvulus. In the current admission, her symptoms were not settling on conservative measures and subsequently went on to have laparotomy. During laparotomy, along with the sigmoid volvulus, there was associated gallbladder torsion. About 500 cases of gallbladder volvulus have been published in literature, however, in our literature search, the authors did not find any similar published case presenting with volvulus involving the gallbladder and the sigmoid colon at the same time. This patient went onto have cholecystectomy and sigmoid colectomy and had a good postoperative recovery and was discharged on the tenth postoperative day. At 6-week postoperative follow-up, she was doing well with no specific concerns.

  9. Single-port laparoscopic surgery for sigmoid volvulus

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Byung Jo; Jeong, Won Jun; Kim, Say-June; Lee, Sang Chul

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To report our experience with single-port laparoscopic surgery (SPLS) for sigmoid volvulus (SV). METHODS: Between October 2009 and April 2013, 10 patients underwent SPLS for SV. SPLS was performed transumbilically or through a predetermined stoma site. Conventional straight and rigid-type laparoscopic instruments were used. After intracorporeal, segmental resection of the affected sigmoid colon, the specimen was extracted through the single-incision site. Patient demographics and perioperative data were analyzed. RESULTS: SPLS for SV was successful in all 10 patients (4, resection and primary anastomosis; 6, Hartmann’s procedure). The median operative time and postoperative hospitalization period were 168 (range, 85-315) min and 6.5 (range, 4-29) d, respectively. No intraoperative complications were noted; there were 2 postoperative complications, including 1 anastomotic leak. CONCLUSION: SPLS was a safe and feasible therapeutic approach for SV, when performed by a surgeon experienced in conventional laparoscopic surgery. PMID:25741145

  10. Sigmoid volvulus: is it a possible complication after stapled transanal rectal resection (STARR)?

    PubMed Central

    RESTA, G.; SCAGLIARINI, L.; BANDI, M.; VEDANA, L.; MARZETTI, A.; FERROCCI, G.; SANTINI, M.; ANANIA, G.; CAVALLESCO, G.; BACCARINI, M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary We report a case of sigmoid volvulus post-stapled transanal rectal resection (STARR) for obstructed defecation. The patient, a 68-year-old woman with chronic constipation and dolichosigma, two days post-STARR presented severe abdominal pain. CT revealed sigmoid ischemia. The patient underwent resection of the sigmoid colon with end colostomy (Hartmann’s procedure). Can STARR procedure produce a serious complication as sigmoid volvulus in patient with dolichosigma and obstructed defecation syndrome? PMID:24091179

  11. Sigmoid volvulus: is it a possible complication after stapled transanal rectal resection (STARR)?

    PubMed

    Resta, G; Scagliarini, L; Bandi, M; Vedana, L; Marzetti, A; Ferrocci, G; Santini, M; Anania, G; Cavallesco, G; Baccarini, M

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of sigmoid volvulus post-stapled transanal rectal resection (STARR) for obstructed defecation. The patient, a 68-yearold woman with chronic constipation and dolichosigma, two days post-STARR presented severe abdominal pain. CT revealed sigmoid ischemia. The patient underwent resection of the sigmoid colon with end colostomy (Hartmann's procedure). Can STARR procedure produce a serious complication as sigmoid volvulus in patient with dolichosigma and obstructed defecation syndrome?

  12. [Volvulus in pregnancy: a case report].

    PubMed

    Aguayo-Macías, Eduardo; Rodríguez-Valle, Antonio Joel; Gonzalez-Habib, Roberto; Reyes-Sepúlveda, Hernán

    2012-03-01

    There are several etiologies of abdominal pain during pregnancy, including an extremely rare: the intestinal volvulus. Have been reported about 78 cases in the literature of intestinal volvulus complicating pregnancy, we reported this case occurred in our hospital and to assess the difficult diagnosis of intestinal volvulus in pregnancy.

  13. [Malrotation with or without volvulus].

    PubMed

    Heidsma, Charlotte M; Hulsker, Caroline C C; van der Zee, David; Kramer, William H

    2015-01-01

    Malrotation occurs when there is a failure in the intestinal rotation leading to abnormal fixation to the abdominal wall and a mesentery with a short root. Volvulus is a life-threatening complication of malrotation. It can lead to irreversible intestinal necrosis and requires immediate attention. Early recognition of malrotation and surgical correction could prevent the onset of volvulus. We describe 3 cases of children with a malrotation. Case A involves a 2-year-old boy who suffered from repeated episodes of vomiting. Case B, a 1-month-old female, was taken to the general practitioner after acute onset of crying and flexing of the legs. Case C, a 5-year-old-boy with no medical history, had started vomiting hourly. In presenting these 3 cases, we highlight the dangers of untreated malrotation and make recommendations on how to manage a patient suspected of having this congenital abnormality.

  14. Intestinal malrotation and midgut volvulus.

    PubMed

    Hamidi, Hidayatullah; Obaidy, Yalda; Maroof, Sahar

    2016-09-01

    A four-day-old boy presented with persistent bilious vomiting, bloody stained stool, and mild abdominal distension. Transabdominal ultrasound demonstrated a round soft-tissue mass-like structure in the right upper quadrant. With color Doppler ultrasound, the whirlpool sign was observed. Abdominal radiograph showed nonspecific findings. Upper gastrointestinal series revealed upper gastrointestinal tract obstruction at the level of distal duodenum. The diagnosis of intestinal malrotation with midgut volvulus was established and the treated surgically. Intestinal malrotation is congenital abnormal positioning of the bowel loops within the peritoneal cavity resulting in abnormal shortening of mesenteric root that is predisposed to midgut volvulus. Neonates and infants with persistent bilious vomiting should undergo diagnostic workup and preferably ultrasound as the first step. With classic sonographic appearance of whirlpool sign, even further imaging investigations is often not needed, and the surgeon should be alerted to plan surgery. PMID:27594965

  15. A case of cecal volvulus mimicking Ogilvie Syndrome in a hospitalized patient with a pelvis fracture

    PubMed Central

    Tampakis, Athanasios; Droeser, Raoul A.; Tampaki, Ekaterini Christina; von Holzen, Urs; Delko, Tarik

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cecal volvulus and ogilvie syndrome are two entities which may display similar clinical presentation but require different treatment approaches. Presentation of case An 84-year old male patient admitted for conservative treatment of a pelvis fracture, complained of abdominal cramps and flatulence on the third hospitalization day. Abdominal radiographs arose suspicion of cecal volvulus. The diagnosis was ruled out on the CT scan but however was later confirmed by an exploratory laparotomy. Discussion The management of cecal volvulus requires prompt (emergency) surgical intervention while Ogilvie syndrome can be principally managed with conservative treatment. Our patient's profile was typical for both entities. The absence of air throughout all colonic segments including the rectosigmoid on plain abdominal radiographs seems to be the most important sign in the exclusion of the Ogilvie syndrome diagnosis. Conclusion Cecal volvulus and Ogilvie syndrome display overlapping clinical features at their time of presentation and need to be carefully distinguished. By uncertainty, an exploratory laparotomy should always be performed, in view of the reported high mortality rate of cecal volvulus if surgery is delayed. PMID:27054035

  16. Cecal volvulus following laparoscopic nephrectomy and renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Eng, Mary; Ravindra, Kadiyala

    2009-01-01

    Cecal volvulus is a rare cause of bowel obstruction that carries a high mortality. Recent surgery is known to be a risk factor for the development of cecal volvulus. We present a case of cecal volvulus following laparoscopic nephrectomy and renal transplantation.

  17. Sigmoid volvulus in an adolescent girl: staged management with emergency colonoscopic reduction and decompression followed by elective sigmoid colectomy.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ramnik V; Njere, Ike; Campbell, Alison; Daniel, Rejoo; Azaz, Amer; Fleet, Mahmud

    2014-08-20

    A case of acute sigmoid volvulus in a 14-year-old adolescent girl presenting with acute low large bowel obstruction with a background of chronic constipation has been presented. Abdominal radiograph and CT scan helped in diagnosis. She underwent emergency colonoscopic detorsion and decompression uneventfully. Lower gastrointestinal contrast study showed very redundant sigmoid colonic loop without any transition zone and she subsequently underwent elective sigmoid colectomy with good outcome. The sigmoid volvulus should be considered in the differential diagnosis of paediatric acute abdomen presenting with marked abdominal distention, absolute constipation and pain but without vomiting. Plain abdominal radiograph and the CT scan are helpful to confirm the diagnosis. Early colonoscopic detorsion and decompression allows direct visualisation of the vascular compromise, assessment of band width of the volvulus and can reduce complications and mortality. Associated Hirschsprung's disease should be suspected if clinical and radiological features are suggestive in which case a rectal biopsy before definitive surgery should be considered.

  18. Colonization by aerobic bacteria in karst: laboratory and in situ experiments.

    PubMed

    Personné, J C; Poty, F; Mahler, B J; Drogue, C

    2004-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to investigate the potential for bacterial colonization of different substrates in karst aquifers and the nature of the colonizing bacteria. Laboratory batch experiments were performed using limestone and PVC as substrates, a natural bacterial isolate and a known laboratory strain (Escherichia coli [E. coli]) as inocula, and karst ground water and a synthetic formula as growth media. In parallel, fragments of limestone and granite were submerged in boreholes penetrating two karst aquifers for more than one year; the boreholes are periodically contaminated by enteric bacteria from waste water. Once a month, rock samples were removed and the colonizing bacteria quantified and identified. The batch experiments demonstrated that the natural isolate and E. coli both readily colonized limestone surfaces using karst ground water as the growth medium. In contrast, bacterial colonization of both the limestone and granite substrates, when submerged in the karst, was less intense. More than 300 bacterial strains were isolated over the period sampled, but no temporal pattern in colonization was seen as far as strain, and colonization by E. coli was notably absent, although strains of Salmonella and Citrobacter were each observed once. Samples suspended in boreholes penetrating highly fractured zones were less densely colonized than those in the borehole penetrating a less fractured zone. The results suggest that contamination of karst aquifers by enteric bacteria is unlikely to be persistent. We hypothesize that this may be a result of the high flow velocities found in karst conduits, and of predation of colonizing bacteria by autochthonous zooplankton.

  19. Colonization by aerobic bacteria in karst: Laboratory and in situ experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Personne, J.-C.; Poty, F.; Mahler, B.J.; Drogue, C.

    2004-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to investigate the potential for bacterial colonization of different substrates in karst aquifers and the nature of the colonizing bacteria. Laboratory batch experiments were performed using limestone and PVC as substrates, a natural bacterial isolate and a known laboratory strain (Escherichia coli [E. coli]) as inocula, and karst ground water and a synthetic formula as growth media. In parallel, fragments of limestone and granite were submerged in boreholes penetrating two karst aquifers for more than one year; the boreholes are periodically contaminated by enteric bacteria from waste water. Once a month, rock samples were removed and the colonizing bacteria quantified and identified. The batch experiments demonstrated that the natural isolate and E. coli both readily colonized limestone surfaces using karst ground water as the growth medium. In contrast, bacterial colonization of both the limestone and granite substrates, when submerged in the karst, was less intense. More than 300 bacterial strains were isolated over the period sampled, but no temporal pattern in colonization was seen as far as strain, and colonization by E. coli was notably absent, although strains of Salmonella and Citrobacter were each observed once. Samples suspended in boreholes penetrating highly fractured zones were less densely colonized than those in the borehole penetrating a less fractured zone. The results suggest that contamination of karst aquifers by enteric bacteria is unlikely to be persistent. We hypothesize that this may be a result of the high flow velocities found in karst conduits, and of predation of colonizing bacteria by autochthonous zooplankton.

  20. Colon perforation during percutaneous renal surgery: a 10-year experience in a single endourology centre.

    PubMed

    Kachrilas, Stefanos; Stefanos, Kachrilas; Papatsoris, Athanasios; Athanasios, Papatsoris; Bach, Christian; Christian, Bach; Kontos, Stylianos; Stylianos, Kontos; Faruquz, Zaman; Zaman, Faruquz; Goyal, Anuj; Anuj, Goyal; Masood, Junaid; Junaid, Masood; Buchholz, Noor; Noor, Buchholz

    2012-06-01

    The use of percutaneous renal surgery has been recently revolutionised with novel endourological instruments and techniques. However, the incidence, prevention and management of severe complications such as colon perforation still lack consensus. By presenting our 10-year experience, we would like to highlight the diagnosis and management of the rare complication of colon perforation.

  1. Cicatrical cecal volvulus following laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Morris, Michael W; Barker, Andrea K; Harrison, James M; Anderson, Andrew J; Vanderlan, Wesley B

    2013-01-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is the procedure of choice for the treatment of symptomatic biliary disease. There is currently no agreement on the management of spilled gallstones, which commonly occurs during laparoscopic cholecystectomy and may produce significant morbidity. We present a case of spilled gallstones causing cicatrical cecal volvulus and also provide a review of pertinent literature. PMID:23925032

  2. Imaging, Endoscopic and Genetic Assessment of Marfan Syndrome Presenting with Sigmoid Volvulus: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Hurairah, Abu; Shaikh, Faiq

    2016-01-01

    The Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a pleiotropic, autosomal dominant disorder of connective tissue with highly variable clinical manifestations. It primarily involves the skeletal, cardiovascular, and ocular systems; however, gastrointestinal complications are rare. Herein, we describe the case of a 31-year-old male who initially presented with acute abdominal pain for one day. His imaging features revealed a dilated sigmoid colon, consistent with sigmoid volvulus that was immediately decompressed. Surgical resection was recommended to treat the sigmoid volvulus. Preceding the treatment, the patient underwent an extensive workup, including an echocardiography that revealed aortic root dilatation. His clinical history, physical exam, and echocardiographic findings raised the suspicion for MFS. Subsequently, the diagnosis of MFS was confirmed on genetic testing. This is a case that highlights the multidisciplinary (clinical, radiological, endoscopic, molecular/genetic) approach to diagnose a patient with MFS who presented with symptomatic sigmoid volvulus. As this presentation may be a harbinger of more severe manifestations of MFS, it is important to identify it as such in order to accomodate for timely management. PMID:27382527

  3. Misidentification of Onchocerca volvulus as guinea worm.

    PubMed

    Eberhard, M L; Melemoko, G; Zee, A K; Weisskopf, M G; Ruiz-Tiben, E

    2001-12-01

    Over the past 10 years, the status of human infection with guinea worm (Dracunculus medinensis) in the Central African Republic (CAR) has been difficult to ascertain. It is unclear if indigenous cases are occurring and whether cases are migrating into the CAR from surrounding countries. A team of investigators visited the CAR in July-August 2000, to attempt to ascertain the presence of indigenous transmission. No cases of true guinea-worm infection (i.e. dracunculiasis) were detected, but three cases of human infection with Onchocerca volvulus, each of which had been misidentified as dracunculiasis, were detected. The unusual presentation of skin blisters and extraction of an intact female O. volvulus are described. As a result of this investigation, and the confusion of onchocerciasis being misidentified as dracunculiasis, the presence of endemic transmission of guinea worm in the CAR remains in question.

  4. Vegetarian diets and colon cancer: the German experience.

    PubMed

    Frentzel-Beyme, R; Chang-Claude, J

    1994-05-01

    The study assessed mortality and morbidity risks as related to nutritional status of moderate and strict vegetarians in Germany. The total cohort of 1904 self-identified persons was followed up for 11 y. Compared with national mortality rates for Federal Republic of Germany, the observed deaths for all causes were below expectation by a factor of 0.44 for men and 0.53 for women. The mortality for colon cancer was reduced [standardized mortality ration (SMR 44.1 for men and 77.9 for women]. No deaths were observed from rectal cancer. A vegetarian lifestyle of long duration (> or = 20 y) was associated with decreased overall and cancer mortality. Other determinants of decreased cause-specific mortality were physical activity, body weight, and strictness of adherence to the life-style. The relationship between a vegetarian and fiber-rich diet and a decreased risk for colon cancer has been reported in many studies. In this study, the influence of other factors such as health-conscious behavior and a healthy lifestyle seem to indicate partly stronger effects than nutrition itself. This may explain the generally better health of moderate vegetarians.

  5. Emergency repair of Morgagni hernia with partial gastric volvulus: our approach.

    PubMed

    Razi, Kasra; Light, Duncan; Horgan, Liam

    2016-01-01

    Morgagni hernias are a rare form of congenital diaphragmatic hernias, thus there is paucity in literature about the diagnosis and management of the condition. We report an 83-year-old woman who presented with vomiting and a metabolic acidosis with a previous computed tomography diagnosis of Bochdalek's hernia. Diagnostic laparoscopy revealed a Morgagni hernia containing transverse colon, greater curvature of the stomach and a partial gastric volvulus. The hernia was reduced with the sac untouched, and the defect was closed with a composite mesh using tac fixation. The operation was done successfully in 45 minutes with no complications. PMID:27605660

  6. [Caecal volvulus after heart surgery with artificial circulation].

    PubMed

    Korostelev, A N; Kuznetsov, A M; Chzhao, A V

    2016-01-01

    Presented herein is a description of a rare complication, i.e. caecal volvulus, after heart surgery. This case report illustrates difficulty of diagnosis of abdominal organs complications after artificial circulation and necessity of active surgical policy. PMID:27336350

  7. Onchocerca volvulus Molting Inhibitors Identified through Scaffold Hopping.

    PubMed

    Gooyit, Major; Harris, Tyler L; Tricoche, Nancy; Javor, Sacha; Lustigman, Sara; Janda, Kim D

    2015-05-01

    The anthelmintic closantel has shown promise in abrogating the L3 molting of Onchocerca volvulus, the causative agent of the infectious disease onchocerciasis. In our search for alternative scaffolds, we utilized a fragment replacement/modification approach to generate novel chemotypes with improved chitinase inhibitory properties. Further evaluation of the compounds unveiled the potential of urea-tropolones as potent inhibitors of O. volvulus L3 molting. PMID:27622649

  8. Endoscopic management of sigmoid volvulus in children

    PubMed Central

    Parolini, Filippo; Orizio, Paolo; Bulotta, Anna Lavinia; Garcia Magne, Miguel; Boroni, Giovanni; Cengia, Gianpaolo; Torri, Fabio; Alberti, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    Sigmoid volvulus (SV) is extremely uncommon in children and is usually associated with a long-standing history of constipation or pseudo-obstruction. An early diagnosis and management are crucial in order to prevent the appearance of hemorrhagic infarction of the twisted loop, avoiding further complications such as necrosis, perforation and sepsis. In patients with no evidence of peritonitis or ischemic bowel, treatment starts with resuscitation and detorsion of the SV, accomplished by means of sigmoidoscopy and concomitant rectal tube placement. The bowel is then prepared and surgery is undertaken electively during the same hospitalization. We report a detailed review of the literature focusing on technical details, risks and benefits of endoscopic management of SV in childhood. PMID:27358669

  9. Outcome of Jejuno-Ileal Atresia Associated with Intraoperative Finding of Volvulus of Small Bowel

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Shalini; Sarin, Yogesh Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To compare the outcome of patients with jeuno-ileal atresia (JIA) associated with the intraoperative finding of volvulus of small bowel (group A) with that of JIA without volvulus (group B). Materials and Methods: It is a retrospective observational study conducted at one of the two units of Pediatric Surgery, in a tertiary care public hospital of India, from January 2001 to December 2010. Hospital records were retrieved and analyzed. During this time period, 65 patients with JIA were operated of which 40 (61.5%) had ileal atresia (IA) and 25 (38.5%) had jejunal atresia (JA). Eleven (16.9%) patients had associated intraoperative finding of volvulus of small bowel (Group A) and were studied and compared with group B- not associated with intraoperative findings of volvulus of small bowel (n=54). The demography, clinical features, operative findings, associated anomalies, anastomotic leakage, and outcome were compared. Results: Group A comprising of 6 boys and 5 girls, had 8 IA and 3 JA; one case each of Type 3b and Type 4 JIA was seen. Associated anomalies included meconium ileus (n=2), Down’s syndrome (n=1) and malrotation (n=1). Anastomotic leak rate was 75% for IA and 66.7% for JA. The mortality was 91% in Group A, 100% for IA and 67% for JA. Group B comprising of 37 boys and 17 girls, had 32 IA and 22 JA; 2 cases of Type 4 and 1 case of Type 3b JIA was seen. Associated anomalies were malrotation (n=2), meconium ileus (n=1), exomphalos (n=1), gastroschisis (n=1) and ileal duplication cyst (n=1). The anastomotic leak rate for JA was 8/21 (38.1%) and IA was 3/28 (10.7%); persistent obstruction was seen in 3/21(14.3%) JA and 1/28 (3.6%) IA patients. In group B, overall mortality rate was 8/22 (36.4%) for JA and 9/32 (28%) for IA. The morbidity and mortality was significantly higher in group A when compared to group B. Conclusions: JIA associated with volvulus (without malrotation) is a sinister entity with a dismal outcome in our experience. PMID:26023396

  10. [Megacolon and sigmoid volvulus: incidence and physiopathology].

    PubMed

    Saravia Burgos, Jaime; Acosta Canedo, Abel

    2015-01-01

    The etiology of Megacolon is multiple. One of these causes and the most frequent is Chagas disease. Its complication: sigmoid volvulus was de main diagnosis in the admitted patients at the Bolivian and Japanese Gastroenterological Institute of Cochabamba Bolivia. It usually affects people of a low economic income. In this Gastroenterological Hospital a transversal and prospective study has been done, in order to know the real incidence and the physiopathology of this disease. In a six year period, from 2000 to 2006, 8.954 patients were admitted to the Hospital: of these, 814 (9.09%), where diagnosticated as lower intestinal obstruction. In 608 (74.7%) the final diagnosis was sigmoid torsion. Radiological diagnosis was made in 84% of the patients and endoscopic decompression was successful in 88.7%. As reported in the medical literature, the main cause of megacolon in this part of the world is Chagas disease. In our investigation 22% (98 patients), were serology positive to Chagas disease, and another 21.44% (95 patients) were serology negative. They were coca leaf chewers. One of coca leaf compounds is cocaine which blocks the adrenaline and noradrenaline degradation by mean of monoamine oxidase inactivation. These two hormones stay a long term of time in the target organ: the large bowel. By this mean chronic and persistent vessel constriction develops intestinal wall atrophy and lower resistance to the intraintestinal pressure.

  11. Total management of short gut secondary to midgut volvulus without prolonged total parenteral alimentation.

    PubMed

    Tepas, J J; MacLean, W C; Kolbach, S; Shermeta, D W

    1978-12-01

    Absorption studies in rats have shown that intestinal adaptation after catastrophic injury can be stimulated by early enteral feeding. Using this concept, we have devised a technique of early initiation and advancement of oral feedings that begins with Cho-Free and Polycose and gradually adds sucrose and MCT in increasing proportions. The increasing complexity and caloric density of this diet provide sufficient nutrition to allow weaning from total parenteral alimentation within 2--3 wk. Our preliminary experience in babies with midgut volvulus, necrotizing enterocolitis, and gastroschisis has been successful and uncomplicated. These patients have demonstrated consistent weight gain and have been spared the complications associated with prolonged parenteral alimentation.

  12. The mitogenome of Onchocerca volvulus from the Brazilian Amazonia focus.

    PubMed

    Crainey, James L; Silva, Túllio R R da; Encinas, Fernando; Marín, Michel A; Vicente, Ana Carolina P; Luz, Sérgio L B

    2016-01-01

    We report here the first complete mitochondria genome of Onchocerca volvulus from a focus outside of Africa. An O. volvulus mitogenome from the Brazilian Amazonia focus was obtained using a combination of high-throughput and Sanger sequencing technologies. Comparisons made between this mitochondrial genome and publicly available mitochondrial sequences identified 46 variant nucleotide positions and suggested that our Brazilian mitogenome is more closely related to Cameroon-origin mitochondria than West African-origin mitochondria. As well as providing insights into the origins of Latin American onchocerciasis, the Brazilian Amazonia focus mitogenome may also have value as an epidemiological resource. PMID:26814648

  13. Volvulus of ileum: a rare cause of small bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Islam, Shariful; Hosein, Devin; Dan, Dilip; Naraynsingh, Vijay

    2016-01-01

    Small bowel volvulus is a rare but life-threatening surgical emergency. Owing to its rarity, it is seldom entertained as a differential for small bowel obstruction. The aetiology may be either primary or secondary, with secondary being more common in the Western world. Prompt diagnosis and urgent surgical treatment is required if bowel necrosis is to be prevented, which is associated with increased mortality. We present a case of primary ileal volvulus with a gangrenous segment and a brief overview of the current literature. PMID:27646320

  14. Absolute constipation caused by sigmoid volvulus in a young man

    PubMed Central

    Nuevo, Sergio Pozo; Macías Robles, María Dolores; Sevillano, Ramón Delgado; Pérez-Gallarza, Susana Serrano

    2013-01-01

    We describe a challenging case of sigmoid volvulus where a previously unrecognised anatomical condition, rather than the patient's age, was the main predisposing factor. A man in his thirties presented to the emergency department with a 3-day history of constipation and acute abdominal pain. Initial assessment and studies were inconclusive, but a CT scan revealed torsion of the large bowelSigmoid volvulus is a frequent cause of bowel obstruction that can be missed if appropriate imaging is not available. Clinical presentation and blood analysis can be similar to the findings in acute abdomen caused by other more common causes. PMID:23744852

  15. The mitogenome of Onchocerca volvulus from the Brazilian Amazonia focus

    PubMed Central

    Crainey, James L; da Silva, Túllio RR; Encinas, Fernando; Marín, Michel A; Vicente, Ana Carolina P; Luz, Sérgio LB

    2016-01-01

    We report here the first complete mitochondria genome of Onchocerca volvulus from a focus outside of Africa. An O. volvulus mitogenome from the Brazilian Amazonia focus was obtained using a combination of high-throughput and Sanger sequencing technologies. Comparisons made between this mitochondrial genome and publicly available mitochondrial sequences identified 46 variant nucleotide positions and suggested that our Brazilian mitogenome is more closely related to Cameroon-origin mitochondria than West African-origin mitochondria. As well as providing insights into the origins of Latin American onchocerciasis, the Brazilian Amazonia focus mitogenome may also have value as an epidemiological resource. PMID:26814648

  16. The mitogenome of Onchocerca volvulus from the Brazilian Amazonia focus.

    PubMed

    Crainey, James L; Silva, Túllio R R da; Encinas, Fernando; Marín, Michel A; Vicente, Ana Carolina P; Luz, Sérgio L B

    2016-01-01

    We report here the first complete mitochondria genome of Onchocerca volvulus from a focus outside of Africa. An O. volvulus mitogenome from the Brazilian Amazonia focus was obtained using a combination of high-throughput and Sanger sequencing technologies. Comparisons made between this mitochondrial genome and publicly available mitochondrial sequences identified 46 variant nucleotide positions and suggested that our Brazilian mitogenome is more closely related to Cameroon-origin mitochondria than West African-origin mitochondria. As well as providing insights into the origins of Latin American onchocerciasis, the Brazilian Amazonia focus mitogenome may also have value as an epidemiological resource.

  17. Volvulus of ileum: a rare cause of small bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Islam, Shariful; Hosein, Devin; Dan, Dilip; Naraynsingh, Vijay

    2016-09-19

    Small bowel volvulus is a rare but life-threatening surgical emergency. Owing to its rarity, it is seldom entertained as a differential for small bowel obstruction. The aetiology may be either primary or secondary, with secondary being more common in the Western world. Prompt diagnosis and urgent surgical treatment is required if bowel necrosis is to be prevented, which is associated with increased mortality. We present a case of primary ileal volvulus with a gangrenous segment and a brief overview of the current literature.

  18. Strangulation du colon sigmoïdien par un testicule ectopique géant

    PubMed Central

    Sanogo, Zimogo; Koita, Adama; Camara, Moussa; Soumaré, Lamine; Kamaté, Bakarou; Doumbia, Dieneba; Ouattara, Zanafon; Tembely, Ali; Yena, Sadio; Coulibaly, Youssouf; Sangaré, Djibril

    2012-01-01

    Les causes de volvulus du colon sigmoïde sont variées et parmi elles la strangulation est des plus fréquentes dans notre contexte d’exercice. Les lésions vues tard permettent très rarement un traitement sans résection. La survenue d’un volvulus du colon sigmoïde autour d’un pédicule de testicule géant ectopique est une première que nous rapportons dans cette étude de cas. PMID:22593796

  19. [Primary small bowel volvulus in a young adult].

    PubMed

    Pastor, J; Adámek, S; Polanecký, O

    2014-06-01

    The authors present a rare case of a young male patient with primary small bowel volvulus. They show the main points to be considered in clinical diagnosis of this kind of acute abdomen and the importance of CT scan in such cases.

  20. Sigmoid volvulus in pregnancy: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Serafeimidis, Costas; Waqainabete, Ifereimi; Creaton, Anne; Vakamacawai, Esala; Kumar, Ronal

    2016-08-01

    Sigmoid volvulus in pregnancy is a very rare condition. Despite this, clinicians should have a high index of suspicion of this condition if they encounter a pregnant woman with symptoms suggestive of bowel obstruction. Incorrect diagnosis may be catastrophic, resulting in major complications, including fetal and maternal death. PMID:27525078

  1. Gastric volvulus and associated gastro-oesophageal reflux.

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, M; Burge, D M; Griffiths, D M

    1995-01-01

    Between 1984 and 1994, 10 neurologically normal children between 2 and 24 months were diagnosed as having gastric volvulus with associated gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR). The common features at presentation were episodic colicky abdominal pain, non-bilious vomiting, upper abdominal distension, haematemesis, and failure to thrive. Anterior gastropexy and conservative management of GOR was curative. Images Figure 2 PMID:8554369

  2. T cell responses in coinfection with Onchocerca volvulus and the human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Sentongo, E; Rubaale, T; Büttner, D W; Brattig, N W

    1998-09-01

    Onchocerca volvulus and the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are two immunocompromising infectious agents of major public health concern in Uganda. To examine the effect of coinfection with O. volvulus and HIV on cellular immune responses, lymphocyte proliferative responses and cytokine production of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from persons infected with O. volvulus with and without HIV type 1 infection were compared. Proliferation of PBMC to PHA and tuberculin (PPD) in coinfection was less (P = 0.08, P < 0.01) than in O. volvulus infection. O. volvulus extract stimulated lymphocyte proliferation in microfilaria-negative and HIV-negative O. volvulus infection while only an inconspicuous response was observed in microfilaria-negative coinfection. After stimulation of PBMC with PPD, the production of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-5-demonstrated in O. volvulus infection-were reduced in coinfection with HIV (P < 0.01). While both groups failed to produce IFN-gamma in response to O. volvulus extract, only O. volvulus infected persons generated pronounced IL-5 and low IL-4 levels (0.01 > P = 0.02). The cellular immune responses in coinfection suggested an HIV-related lack of specific reactivity to O. volvulus antigen and impairment of IL-4 and IL-5 production in addition to the lack of IFN-gamma response on antigenic stimulation. PMID:9767610

  3. [Primary volvulus of the small intestine: vascular-like acute abdomen].

    PubMed

    Damiani, S; Ruscazio, M; Ciulla, A; Miceli, G; Tomasello, G

    1998-01-01

    The Authors discuss etiology, clinical picture, diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities of intestinal volvulus, an uncommon disease in Europe, thinking of a case of primitive small intestine volvulus, recently observed, and considering the literature. The Authors have come to the conclusion that in all the cases of intestinal occlusion, in emergency hospitalization, it is important to suspect the intestinal volvulus and to operate on the patient urgently to avoid the raise of postoperative mortality in all the cases complicated with intestinal gangrene.

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Diagnosis of Volvulus through Mesenteric Defect in Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Leopold, Scott; Al-Qaraghouli, Mohammed; Hussain, Naveed; Finck, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Antenatal midgut volvulus is a rare surgical emergency in which bowel is severely compromised. Rarely the etiology is a mesenteric defect. Early diagnosis is essential and lifesaving in the immediate newborn period. Typically upper gastrointestinal or ultrasound imaging can be suggestive of the diagnosis of volvulus in the neonate. Sometimes, however, the diagnosis may be elusive. Herein, we report on the use of neonatal magnetic resonance imaging to diagnose a midgut volvulus that occurred through a congenital mesenteric defect. PMID:27551577

  5. Dual protonophore-chitinase inhibitors dramatically affect O. volvulus molting.

    PubMed

    Gooyit, Major; Tricoche, Nancy; Lustigman, Sara; Janda, Kim D

    2014-07-10

    The L3-stage-specific chitinase OvCHT1 has been implicated in the development of Onchocerca volvulus, the causative agent of onchocerciasis. Closantel, a known anthelmintic drug, was previously discovered as a potent and specific OvCHT1 inhibitor. As closantel is also a known protonophore, we performed a simple scaffold modulation to map out the structural features that are relevant for its individual or dual biochemical roles. Furthermore, we present that either OvCHT1 inhibition or protonophoric activity was capable of affecting O. volvulus L3 molting and that the presence of both activities in a single molecule yielded more potent inhibition of the nematode's developmental process. PMID:24918716

  6. Gastric Dilatation and Volvulus in a Red Panda (Ailurus fulgens)

    PubMed Central

    Neilsen, Colleen; Mans, Christoph; Colopy, Sara A.

    2014-01-01

    A 12-year-old male red panda (Ailurus fulgens) was evaluated for acute onset inappetance, staggering, collapse, and tachypnea. Gastric dilatation and volvulus (GDV) was diagnosed by radiography, abdominal ultrasonography, and exploratory celiotomy. Torsion of the stomach was corrected and an incisional gastropexy performed to prevent recurrence. No organs were devitalized, no other abnormalities detected, and the red panda recovered fully within 72 hours. PMID:24467661

  7. The association of adult Onchocerca volvulus with lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, C D; Huntington, M K; Wanji, S; Lovato, R V; Eversole, R R; Geary, T G

    2010-02-01

    Immunocytochemical examination of onchocercal nodule tissues containing adult Onchocerca volvulus using immuno-markers for blood and lymphatic vessels (vWF, D2-40, podoplanin, Prox-1, and Lyve1) shows a distinct pattern of distribution of these vessels within nodules. Blood vessels were commonly seen associated with organized lymphoid cellular aggregates in the both the outer and inner areas of the nodules. In contrast, the majority of the lymphatic vessel positivity was seen in the central zone in close apposition to the adult parasites, and the remainder usually associated with microfilariae in the outer areas of the nodule. These findings suggest an intimate relationship between adult O. volvulus and lymphatic vessels, including the likely proliferation of lymphatic endothelial cells (lymphangectasia) akin to that seen with other filariae. These findings indicate that adult O. volvulus may migrate via the lymphatic system, and that clinical manifestations of this disease that involve tissue edema may be the result of the location of these worms in the lymphatic system.

  8. Self-expanding metal stenting for obstructing left colon cancer: A district hospital experience.

    PubMed

    Harilingam, Mohan Raj; Khushal, Amjad; Aikoye, Abdulmalik

    2016-07-01

    Stenting of malignant colonic obstructions using self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) is commonly used for palliation and can be used as an interim procedure prior to definitive surgery. We retrospectively reviewed prospectively collected data from all consecutive colonic stenting procedures undertaken between September 2007 and December 2014 at a district general hospital. Technical and clinical success rates, mortality, colonic perforation, and other complications were documented and analyzed. Sixty-four colonic stenting procedures were undertaken. Fifty-three (83 %) were for palliation and eleven (17 %) were performed as a bridge to definitive surgery. Technical (98.4 %) and clinical (89.9 %) success rates were excellent. The single documented failure was secondary to complete luminal obstruction. Three stent occlusions (4.6 %), one colonic perforation (1.5 %), and one migration were encountered. There were no procedure-related deaths. Colonic stenting for obstructing left-sided colon cancer is a safe and effective procedure, even in the district general hospital setting. The use of SEMS as a bridge to elective surgery balances surgical and oncological considerations and, therefore, is most appropriate for high surgical risk patients in this setting. PMID:27448435

  9. Epibenthic colonization of concrete and steel pilings in a cold-temperate embayment: a field experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Mathias H.; Berggren, Matz; Wilhelmsson, Dan; Öhman, Marcus C.

    2009-09-01

    With large-scale development of offshore wind farms, vertical structures are becoming more common in open water areas. To examine how vertical structures of different materials may be colonized by epibenthic organisms, an experiment was carried out using steel and concrete pilings constructed to resemble those commonly used in wind farm constructions as well as in bridges, jetties and oil platforms. The early recruitment and succession of the epibenthic communities were sampled once a month for the first 5 months and then again after 1 year. Further, the fish assemblages associated with the pillars were sampled and compared to natural areas. The main epibenthic species groups, in terms of coverage, differed between the two materials at five out of six sampling occasions. Dominant organisms on steel pillars were the barnacle Balanus improvisus, the calcareous tubeworm Pomatoceros triqueter and the tunicate Ciona intestinalis. On the concrete pillars, the hydroid Laomedea sp. and the tunicates Corella parallelogramma and Ascidiella spp. dominated. However, there was no different in coverage at different heights on the pillars or in biomass and species abundance at different directions (north-east or south-west) 5 months after submergence. Fish showed overall higher abundances and species numbers on the pillars (but no difference between steel and concrete) compared to the surrounding soft bottom habitats but not compared to natural vertical rock walls. Two species were attracted to the pillars, indicating a reef effect; Gobiusculus flavescens and Ctenolabrus rupestris. The bottom-dwelling gobies, Pomatoschistus spp., did not show such preferences.

  10. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia with recurrent gastric volvulus and pulmonary sequestration: A “chance” combination

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Kashish; Khanna, Vikram; Dhua, Anjan Kumar; Bhatnagar, Veereshwar

    2016-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a known cause of secondary gastric volvulus. It is also known that bronchopulmonary sequestration (BPS) may be associated with CDH. An extremely rare case of BPS associated with gastric volvulus in a girl with left sided CDH is being reported. PMID:26862295

  11. A rare case of acute on chronic gastric volvulus with Borchardt's triad.

    PubMed

    Senior, Andrew; Hari, Churunal

    2014-01-01

    Gastric volvulus is a rare condition with two forms of presentation, either acute or chronic. Since its discovery, there have been no cases of acute on chronic volvulus discussed in the literature. Its vague presentation makes diagnosis and subsequent management difficult. The diagnosis of acute gastric volvulus is made on clinical grounds via Borchardt's triad; however, barium swallow and oesophagogastroduodenoscopy have been shown to play a role. We describe a case of a 95-year-old Caucasian woman who presented with worsening dysphagia, epigastric pain, retching without vomiting and hiccups of 5 months. Initially diagnosed as a hiatus hernia, the patient subsequently died following an acute on chronic gastric volvulus. This rare, life-threatening diagnosis provides an opportunity to discuss characteristics of gastric volvulus and the difficulties in management. PMID:25413999

  12. Sigmoid Volvulus Complicating Pregnancy Managed by Resection and Primary Anastomosis: Case report with literature review.

    PubMed

    Machado, Norman O; Machado, Lovina S M

    2009-04-01

    Sigmoid volvulus is an extremely rare cause of intestinal obstruction in pregnancy. The rarity of the condition and the fact that pregnancy itself clouds the clinical picture invariably leads to a delay in diagnosis with an increased risk of gangrene of the gut. The majority of these patients would then require resection and colostomy. However, an early diagnosis and intervention as in our patient, which would require a high index of clinical suspicion, could significantly improve the outcome of the foetus and the mother. A case of sigmoid volvulus in pregnancy is reported which was managed by resection and primary anastomosis. A review of literature revealed no previous reports of sigmoid volvulus in pregnancy managed by primary anastomosis following resection of the sigmoid volvulus. The literature is also reviewed regarding predisposing factors, management options and the outcome of sigmoid volvulus complicating pregnancy.

  13. Laparoscopic repair of hiatal hernia with mesenterioaxial volvulus of the stomach.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Kazuki; Sakurai, Yoichi; Isogaki, Jun; Komori, Yoshiyuki; Uyama, Ichiro

    2011-04-21

    Although mesenterioaxial gastric volvulus is an uncommon entity characterized by rotation at the transverse axis of the stomach, laparoscopic repair procedures have still been controversial. We reported a case of mesenterioaxial intrathoracic gastric volvulus, which was successfully treated with laparoscopic repair of the diaphragmatic hiatal defect using a polytetrafluoroethylene mesh associated with Toupet fundoplication. A 70-year-old Japanese woman was admitted to our hospital because of sudden onset of upper abdominal pain. An upper gastrointestinal series revealed an incarcerated intrathoracic mesenterioaxial volvulus of the distal portion of the stomach and the duodenum. The complete laparoscopic approach was used to repair the volvulus. The laparoscopic procedures involved the repair of the hiatal hernia using polytetrafluoroethylene mesh and Toupet fundoplication. This case highlights the feasibility and effectiveness of the laparoscopic procedure, and laparoscopic repair of the hiatal defect using a polytetrafluoroethylene mesh associated with Toupet fundoplication may be useful for preventing postoperative recurrence of hiatal hernia, volvulus, and gastroesophageal reflux.

  14. [Colonization and destruction of concrete by mitosporic fungi in model experiment].

    PubMed

    Fomina, M O; Olishevs'ka, S V; Kadoshnikov, V M; Zlobenko, B P; Pidhors'kyĭ, V S

    2005-01-01

    When investigating the action of microscopic fungi of genera Aspergillus, Alternaria, Cladosporium and Paecilomyces on concrete specimens in the model system, it was shown that the fungi can colonize successfully the concrete surface during 1 year and cause its destructive changes. However the fungi did not colonize those sections of concrete surface which were filled with granite. The fungi leached chemical elements of concrete into nutrition medium, accumulated them in their biomass and caused their transformation into newly-formed crystals of calcium oxalates on the surface of concrete.

  15. [Vancomycin-resistant enterococcus colonization in neonatal intensive care unit: prevention and eradication experience].

    PubMed

    Benzer, Derya; Yavuzcan Öztürk, Dilek; Gürsoy, Tuğba; Ocalmaz, Mutlu Seyda; Karatekin, Güner; Ovalı, Hüsnü Fahri

    2012-10-01

    Vancomycin resistant enterococci (VRE) are important etiologic agents of nosocomial infections and colonization for hospitalized patients. Isolation rate of VRE is higher especially in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), due to the immune insufficiency of neonates, frequent use of antibiotics and prolonged duration of hospitalization. The aims of this report were to present the rapid dissemination of VRE colonization in our NICU, to determine the factors related to colonization and to share the precautions taken to prevent the dissemination. Upon the isolation of VRE from the urine culture of a premature infant followed up in the NICU, rectal swab specimens were obtained from this index patient, other patients staying at the NICU, the related health-care personnel and also environmental sampling was performed. Although strict contact precautions were implemented for the VRE positive patient, VRE were isolated from the rectal swabs of other patients and the number of VRE positive cases increased to 11 on the 18th day. No VRE were detected in the environmental samples. By strict adherence and compliance to isolation precautions, physical separation of VRE positive newborns and healthcare workers and education of the personnel, VRE colonization was eradicated on the 55th day. During the period between the first detection of VRE colonization and the management of eradication (August 10th-October 4th 2009), 133 patients were followed up in the NICU and 52 (40%) of those patients were colonized by VRE. Patients were divided into two groups according to the presence or absence of VRE colonization. These patients' anthropometric and clinical findings were evaluated retrospectively. Gestational age and birth weights of VRE positive and negative patients were 30.9 ± 3.8 weeks and 1441 ± 543 g; 34.5 ± 4 weeks and 2396 ± 917 g, respectively (p< 0.05). VRE colonization was detected on the postnatal 16th day (days between 2-144). VRE became negative in 10 (19.2%) of the

  16. [Critical review of 222 cases of neoplastic pathology of the colon. Our experience using a computer].

    PubMed

    Parrella, R E; Astore, S; Brizi, M G; Natale, L; Pagano, A; Posi, G

    1987-11-01

    From August 1983 to December 1985, 2352 radiological examinations of the colon were performed in the Radiology Department of Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore of Rome. From this group a sample of 222 patients was analyzed. They included 111 patients with colonic polyps and 111 with cancer. These cases were carefully examined, in terms of age, frequency of this pathology according to sex, symptom-illness rate, and the radiological data were compared with the endoscopic and histological findings. The data were processed using a computerized program. A critical correlation of the data obtained revealed that: 1) The surest symptom of colon carcinoma is blood in faeces with or without changes in defaecation frequency. Nor should isolated bowel disorders be ignored ("irritated" colon due to organic injuries). 2) The diagnostic accuracy of double contrast enema is very close to that of endoscopy, provided that intestinal cleaning is adequate (this in fact is an important aspect of the examination). 3) The mean age of patients in this group is high and cancer is more common than polyps. This seems to be due to the back of a complete diagnostic sequence, in which radiology has a specific and important role.

  17. Immune recognition of Onchocerca volvulus proteins in the human host and animal models of onchocerciasis.

    PubMed

    Manchang, T K; Ajonina-Ekoti, I; Ndjonka, D; Eisenbarth, A; Achukwi, M D; Renz, A; Brattig, N W; Liebau, E; Breloer, M

    2015-05-01

    Onchocerca volvulus is a tissue-dwelling, vector-borne nematode parasite of humans and is the causative agent of onchocerciasis or river blindness. Natural infections of BALB/c mice with Litomosoides sigmodontis and of cattle with Onchocerca ochengi were used as models to study the immune responses to O. volvulus-derived recombinant proteins (OvALT-2, OvNLT-1, Ov103 and Ov7). The humoral immune response of O. volvulus-infected humans against OvALT-2, OvNLT-1 and Ov7 revealed pronounced immunoglobulin G (IgG) titres which were, however, significantly lower than against the lysate of O. volvulus adult female worms. Sera derived from patients displaying the hyperreactive form of onchocerciasis showed a uniform trend of higher IgG reactivity both to the single proteins and the O. volvulus lysate. Sera derived from L. sigmodontis-infected mice and from calves exposed to O. ochengi transmission in a hyperendemic area also contained IgM and IgG1 specific for O. volvulus-derived recombinant proteins. These results strongly suggest that L. sigmodontis-specific and O. ochengi-specific immunoglobulins elicited during natural infection of mice and cattle cross-reacted with O. volvulus-derived recombinant antigens. Monitoring O. ochengi-infected calves over a 26-month period, provided a comprehensive kinetic of the humoral response to infection that was strictly correlated with parasite load and occurrence of microfilariae. PMID:24721822

  18. Spontaneous Acute Mesenteroaxial Gastric Volvulus Diagnosed by Computed Tomography Scan in a Young Man

    PubMed Central

    Jabbour, Gaby; Afifi, Ibrahim; Ellabib, Mohamed; El-Menyar, Ayman; Al-Thani, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 23 Final Diagnosis: Acute spontaneous gastric volvulus Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Laparotomy Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare disease Background: Acute gastric volvulus is a surgical emergency that requires early recognition and treatment. Acute idiopathic mesenteroaxial gastric volvulus is a rare sub-type and there are few cases reported in children and there are even fewer reports in adults. Case Report: We report a rare case of a 23-year-old man who presented with a 1-day history of vomiting, epigastric pain, distention, and constipation. The diagnosis for mesenteroaxial type gastric volvulus was confirmed by abdominal radiography and computed tomography. The patient was successfully treated by laparotomy with resection of the ischemic stomach wall and anastomosis. Acute spontaneous mesenteroaxial gastric volvulus is rare in adults and early diagnosis is challenging due to non-specific symptoms. A missed or delayed diagnosis may result in serious complications due to gastric obstruction. Conclusions: A patient presenting with severe epigastric pain and clinical evidence of gastric outlet obstruction should be considered as a surgical emergency to rule out gastric volvulus. High index of suspicion, early diagnosis and prompt surgical management are important for favorable outcome in patients with acute spontaneous gastric volvulus. PMID:27112797

  19. Early experience of the compression anastomosis ring (CARTM 27) in left-sided colon resection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Yeon; Woo, Jin-Hee; Choi, Hong-Jo; Park, Ki-Jae; Roh, Young-Hoon; Kim, Ki-Han; Lee, Hak-Yoon

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate clinical validity of the compression anastomosis ring (CAR™ 27) anastomosis in left-sided colonic resection. METHODS: A non-randomized prospective data collection was performed for patients undergoing an elective left-sided colon resection, followed by an anastomosis using the CAR™ 27 between November 2009 and January 2011. Eligibility criteria of the use of the CAR™ 27 were anastomoses between the colon and at or above the intraperitoneal rectum. The primary short-term clinical endpoint, rate of anastomotic leakage, and other clinical outcomes, including intra- and postoperative complications, length of operation time and hospital stay, and the ring elimination time were evaluated. RESULTS: A total of 79 patients (male, 43; median age, 64 years) underwent an elective left-sided colon resection, followed by an anastomosis using the CAR™ 27. Colectomy was performed laparoscopically in 70 patients, in whom two patients converted to open procedure (2.9%). There was no surgical mortality. As an intraoperative complication, total disruption of the anastomosis occurred by premature enforced tension on the proximal segment of the anastomosis in one patient. The ring was removed and another new CAR™ 27 anastomosis was constructed. One patient with sigmoid colon cancer showed postoperative anastomotic leakage after 6 d postoperatively and temporary diverting ileostomy was performed. Exact date of expulsion of the ring could not be recorded because most patients were not aware that the ring had been expelled. No patients manifested clinical symptoms of anastomotic stricture. CONCLUSION: Short-term evaluation of the CAR™ 27 anastomosis in elective left colectomy suggested it to be a safe and efficacious alternative to the standard hand-sewn or stapling technique. PMID:22147979

  20. Angiogenic activity of an Onchocerca volvulus Ancylostoma secreted protein homologue.

    PubMed

    Higazi, Tarig B; Pearlman, Eric; Whikehart, David R; Unnasch, Thomas R

    2003-06-01

    Angiogenesis is an important step in the development of ocular onchocercaisis. In previous studies, it has been demonstrated that Onchocerca volvulus homologues of the Ancylostoma secreted protein family have pronounced angiogenic activity. The overall goal of the current study was to determine if this angiogenic effect is exerted through a direct or indirect mechanism. These studies focused on one member of this family, OvASP-2, as this protein is expressed in microfilaria, the stage of the parasite that causes ocular onchocercaisis. Clones encoding truncated and full length open reading frames were expressed as fusion proteins with Escherichia coli maltose binding protein (MBP), and angiogenic activity was compared in vitro and in vivo with MBP alone. Truncated constructs expressing only the first 105 amino acids of OvASP-2 were as active as the full length protein in inducing new blood vessel formation. The full length fusion protein did not stimulate proliferation or production of vascular endothelial growth factor in vascular endothelial cells in vitro, indicating that OvASP-2 does not directly stimulate angiogenesis. Sequence analysis demonstrated that the gene encoding OvASP-2 contained five introns. Sequence comparisons of the genomic loci from West African blinding and non-blinding strains of O. volvulus revealed that some polymorphism existed among the various isolates tested. However, none of these polymorphisms could be used to differentiate the parasite strains, suggesting that qualitative variation in OvASP-2 could not explain the difference in ocular pathogenic potential of the two parasite strains.

  1. Cryopreservation of infective larvae of Onchocerca volvulus (Filarioidea: Onchocercidae).

    PubMed

    Trpis, M; Scoles, G A; Struble, R H

    1993-10-01

    Infective larvae (L3) of Onchocerca volvulus were procured in Liberia, West Africa, in the natural black fly vector, Simulium yahense. A cryobiological technique was developed to preserve L3 of O. volvulus that were fully viable after thawing. Larvae were treated before cooling with 4 cryoprotective compounds. Three compounds, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), glycerol, and ethylene glycol, were prepared with distilled water. The fourth compound was DMSO prepared in different concentrations with 0.25 M sucrose. The treatment with DMSO + 0.25 M sucrose cryoprotectant resulted in the highest survival of infective larvae. Five cooling rates between 0.5 C/min and 20.0 C/min were applied. The highest survival of L3 was with the cooling rate of 1.0 C/min. Two-step cooling of L3 was applied. In the first step, L3's were frozen to 5 levels from -10.0 C to -20.0 C, -30.0 C, -40.0 C, -60 C, and -80.0 C, and in the second step, larvae were transferred into liquid nitrogen at -196 C for rapid cooling and storage. The survival was the highest when larvae were cooled to approximately -40 C prior to transfer into liquid nitrogen. Slow, gradual, and rapid thawing procedures were applied. The survival was the highest in rapid warming.

  2. [Treatment of colonic cancer with laser (Nd-YAG). Our initial experience].

    PubMed

    Meroño, E; Martín de Argila, C; Martín-Scapa, A; García Plaza, A

    1992-11-01

    Laser-therapy represents an acceptable alternative in the palliative treatment of colon cancer. We have treated 25 patients with this pathology, 10 with obstructive tumor, which impeded the insertion of the endoscope, and 15 non-obstructive tumors. Higher technical difficulties on the former, together with a worse clinical situation, due to the fact that the tumor was more invasive, produce a more discrete result and with a higher risk of complications (one patient had a perforation and other an obstructive stenosis after two months of treatment) in comparison with the group of patients with non-obstructive tumors. However the treatment improved their quality of life with the recovery of their intestinal function. Among patients with non-obstructive tumors of the colonic light, prolonged survival (mean 6.8 months) was reached by 73.3% of patients belonging to this group; disappearing after treatment even the endoscopic view of the tumor in 33.3% of the patients.

  3. Impact of in Vivo Ischemic Time on RNA Quality--Experiences from a Colon Cancer Biobank.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Jesper; Kirkeby, Lene T; Eiholm, Susanne; Jess, Per; Troelsen, Jesper T; Gögenür, Ismail; Olsen, Jorgen

    2015-08-01

    Considerable effort has been made to improve differentiated diagnostics as well as personalized treatment for colorectal cancer patients. High-quality fresh frozen tissue is often required to investigate relevant molecular signatures in these patients. In RNA expression studies, the "RNA integrity number" is widely accepted as a reliable marker of RNA quality. Here, we investigate the feasibility of obtaining high-quality tissue from a colon cancer biobank and the impact of in vivo ischemic time and various technical and clinicopathological factors on RNA quality. Biopsies were obtained immediately following the tumor removal. The time from clamping the main arterial supply to resection and removal of the tumor was used to estimate the in vivo ischemic time. We did not observe a significant difference in RNA quality between normal tissue and tumor tissue. We observed a significant correlation between in vivo ischemic time and RNA quality in normal tissue (r = -0.24, p<0.001) but not in tumor tissue. Male gender and laparoscopic procedure were also significantly associated with lower RNA quality in normal tissue only. In tumor tissue, poor differentiation was associated with low RNA quality. In conclusion, in vivo ischemic time, surgical procedure, and gender have minor but significant effects on the quality of RNA from normal colon tissue but not tumor tissue. Poorly differentiated tumors are associated with lower RNA quality. Although its impact is low, it can still be considered to note in vivo ischemic time in colon cancer specimen procurement.

  4. Molecular cloning of an Onchocerca volvulus extracellular Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed Central

    James, E R; McLean, D C; Perler, F

    1994-01-01

    Onchocerca volvulus, a human parasitic nematode, is the third leading cause of preventable blindness worldwide. This study describes the molecular cloning of a novel superoxide dismutase (SOD) from the parasite. This putative O. volvulus extracellular SOD (OvEcSOD) is 628 nucleotides (nt) long, including a 22-nt 5' spliced leader (SL1) and a portion encoding an N-terminal hydrophobic 42-amino-acid signal peptide. The remainder of the cDNA shares 71% identity with an O. volvulus cytosolic SOD sequence and is 3 nt longer. All residues involved in metal ion binding, active site formation, folding, and dimer formation in SODs are conserved. Data indicate the OvEcSOD and O. volvulus cytosolic SOD are separate gene products and that the OvEcSOD appears to possess the characteristics of a membrane-bound or secreted enzyme which may be involved in the parasite defense against phagocyte-generated reactive oxygen species. Images PMID:8300230

  5. Malrotation and Midgut Volvulus associated with Asymptomatic Duplication Cyst of Jejunum.

    PubMed

    Rahul, Sandip Kumar; Upadhyaya, Vijai Datta; Kumar, Basant

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal duplications can affect any part of the alimentary tract and are notorious for their variable presentation. Their association with malrotation and midgut volvulus is rare. We describe an 8-year old boy presented with episodes of abdominal pain. Radiological workup showed whirlpool sign and abnormal relationship of mesenteric vessels. At operation, malrotation with chronic volvulus was found. Incidentally, a jejunal communicating duplication cyst was also noted. PMID:27672583

  6. Malrotation and Midgut Volvulus associated with Asymptomatic Duplication Cyst of Jejunum

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyaya, Vijai Datta; Kumar, Basant

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal duplications can affect any part of the alimentary tract and are notorious for their variable presentation. Their association with malrotation and midgut volvulus is rare. We describe an 8-year old boy presented with episodes of abdominal pain. Radiological workup showed whirlpool sign and abnormal relationship of mesenteric vessels. At operation, malrotation with chronic volvulus was found. Incidentally, a jejunal communicating duplication cyst was also noted. PMID:27672583

  7. Effects of landscape transformation on bird colonization and extinction patterns in a large-scale, long-term natural experiment.

    PubMed

    Mortelliti, Alessio; Lindenmayer, David B

    2015-10-01

    Conversion of agricultural land to forest plantations is a major driver of global change. Studies on the impact of forest plantations on biodiversity in plantations and in the surrounding native vegetation have been inconclusive. Consequently, it is not known how to best manage the extensive areas of the planet currently covered by plantations. We used a novel, long-term (16 years) and large-scale (30,000 ha) landscape transformation natural experiment (the Nanangroe experiment, Australia) to test the effects of land conversion on population dynamics of 64 bird species associated with woodland and forest. A unique aspect of our study is that we focused on the effects of plantations on birds in habitat patches within plantations. Our study design included 56 treatment sites (Eucalyptus patches where the surrounding matrix was converted from grazed land to pine plantations), 55 control sites (Eucalyptus patches surrounded by grazed land), and 20 matrix sites (sites within the pine plantations and grazed land). Bird populations were studied through point counts, and colonization and extinction patterns were inferred through multiple season occupancy models. Large-scale pine plantation establishment affected the colonization or extinction patterns of 89% of studied species and thus led to a comprehensive turnover in bird communities inhabiting Eucalyptus patches embedded within the maturing plantations. Smaller bodied species appeared to respond positively to plantations (i.e., colonization increased and extirpation of these species decreased in patches surrounded by plantations) because they were able to use the newly created surrounding matrix. We found that the effects of forest plantations affected the majority of the bird community, and we believe these effects could lead to the artificial selection of one group of species at the expense of another.

  8. Effects of landscape transformation on bird colonization and extinction patterns in a large-scale, long-term natural experiment.

    PubMed

    Mortelliti, Alessio; Lindenmayer, David B

    2015-10-01

    Conversion of agricultural land to forest plantations is a major driver of global change. Studies on the impact of forest plantations on biodiversity in plantations and in the surrounding native vegetation have been inconclusive. Consequently, it is not known how to best manage the extensive areas of the planet currently covered by plantations. We used a novel, long-term (16 years) and large-scale (30,000 ha) landscape transformation natural experiment (the Nanangroe experiment, Australia) to test the effects of land conversion on population dynamics of 64 bird species associated with woodland and forest. A unique aspect of our study is that we focused on the effects of plantations on birds in habitat patches within plantations. Our study design included 56 treatment sites (Eucalyptus patches where the surrounding matrix was converted from grazed land to pine plantations), 55 control sites (Eucalyptus patches surrounded by grazed land), and 20 matrix sites (sites within the pine plantations and grazed land). Bird populations were studied through point counts, and colonization and extinction patterns were inferred through multiple season occupancy models. Large-scale pine plantation establishment affected the colonization or extinction patterns of 89% of studied species and thus led to a comprehensive turnover in bird communities inhabiting Eucalyptus patches embedded within the maturing plantations. Smaller bodied species appeared to respond positively to plantations (i.e., colonization increased and extirpation of these species decreased in patches surrounded by plantations) because they were able to use the newly created surrounding matrix. We found that the effects of forest plantations affected the majority of the bird community, and we believe these effects could lead to the artificial selection of one group of species at the expense of another. PMID:25926353

  9. Gastric dilitation-volvulus in a Red Panda (Ailurus fulgens).

    PubMed

    Schlanser, Justin R; Agnew, Dalen; Paperd, Deborah W; Harrison, Tara M

    2014-06-01

    A 10-year-old male red panda presented acutely with symptoms of shock due to acute abdominal distress and respiratory compromise. Abdominal ultrasound confirmed a severely distended stomach for which passage of an orogastric tube for relief was unsuccessful. Intra-operatively, the stomach was found to be distended and torsed around its long axis supporting the diagnosis of Gastric dilitation-volvulus (GDV). The animal arrested and died intra-operatively and was submitted for necropsy with lesions supportive of the diagnosis of GDV. No risk factors for GDV were found to correlate between the panda and those described in domestic dogs. This case suggests that red pandas can be susceptible to this condition in captive settings.

  10. Gastric dilitation-volvulus in a Red Panda (Ailurus fulgens).

    PubMed

    Schlanser, Justin R; Agnew, Dalen; Paperd, Deborah W; Harrison, Tara M

    2014-06-01

    A 10-year-old male red panda presented acutely with symptoms of shock due to acute abdominal distress and respiratory compromise. Abdominal ultrasound confirmed a severely distended stomach for which passage of an orogastric tube for relief was unsuccessful. Intra-operatively, the stomach was found to be distended and torsed around its long axis supporting the diagnosis of Gastric dilitation-volvulus (GDV). The animal arrested and died intra-operatively and was submitted for necropsy with lesions supportive of the diagnosis of GDV. No risk factors for GDV were found to correlate between the panda and those described in domestic dogs. This case suggests that red pandas can be susceptible to this condition in captive settings. PMID:24521795

  11. Bochdalek Hernia With Gastric Volvulus in an Adult

    PubMed Central

    Atef, Mejri; Emna, Trigui

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Bochdalek hernias in adulthood are rare. Symptomatic Bochdalek hernias in adults are rarer, but may lead to fatal complications. Patients with acute gastric volvulus on diaphragmatic hernia are a diagnostic and therapeutic emergency. Here, we report a case of a 56-year-old woman diagnosed with epigastric pain, cough, vomiting since 2 weeks and shortness of breath. Complicated Bochdalek hernia was an incidental finding, diagnosed by chest radiograph, computed tomography (CT), and barium swallow study. Stomach was within the thorax in the left side due to left diaphragmatic hernia of a nontraumatic cause. The patient was prepared for the laparoscopic surgical repair, to close the defect. The patient recovered with accepted general condition and was discharged 9 days later. Diagnoses of Bochdalek hernias in adulthood are challenging. However, although rare, this possibility should be kept in mind to avoid fatal complications. PMID:26705205

  12. Gastric Dilitation-Volvulus in a Red Panda (Ailurus fulgens)

    PubMed Central

    SCHLANSER, Justin R.; AGNEW, Dalen; PAPERD, Deborah W.; HARRISON, Tara M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT A 10-year-old male red panda presented acutely with symptoms of shock due to acute abdominal distress and respiratory compromise. Abdominal ultrasound confirmed a severely distended stomach for which passage of an orogastric tube for relief was unsuccessful. Intra-operatively, the stomach was found to be distended and torsed around its long axis supporting the diagnosis of Gastric dilitation-volvulus (GDV). The animal arrested and died intra-operatively and was submitted for necropsy with lesions supportive of the diagnosis of GDV. No risk factors for GDV were found to correlate between the panda and those described in domestic dogs. This case suggests that red pandas can be susceptible to this condition in captive settings. PMID:24521795

  13. A mesenteric hernia complicated with a triple necrotic volvulus.

    PubMed

    Tassinari, Davide; Santoro, Stefano; Bernardi, Filippo; Lima, Mario

    2012-09-24

    A 6-year-old girl was admitted to the paediatric emergency department with colicky abdominal pain. She had a significant medical history, with four previous admissions due to recurrent abdominal pain in the past year. On examination the abdomen was soft, there was no rebound tenderness and Rovsing's sign was negative. Her blood tests revealed a raised white cells count, although her C reactive protein was within the normal range. Abdominal x-ray revealed small bowel obstruction. During her assessment the patient rapidly deteriorated and seemed to go into shock. Her clinical state in addition to the radiological findings meant that she was taken to theatre for surgical exploration. This showed a triple volvulus with necrotic bowel loops that had herniated through a mesenteric defect. The necrotic bowel was subsequently resected.

  14. Colon cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Colorectal cancer; Cancer - colon; Rectal cancer; Cancer - rectum; Adenocarcinoma - colon; Colon - adenocarcinoma ... In the United States, colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of deaths due to cancer. Early diagnosis can often lead to a complete cure. Almost ...

  15. Microbial borehole observatories deployed within the oceanic crust: Design considerations and initial results from long-term colonization experiments (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orcutt, B. N.; Bach, W.; Becker, K.; Fisher, A. T.; Hulme, S.; Toner, B. M.; Wheat, C. G.; Edwards, K. J.; Iodp Expedition 327 Shipboard Party

    2010-12-01

    Borehole observatories developed for long-term sampling and monitoring in the subseafloor of the deep ocean must satisfy design and operation requirements that are similar to systems deployed on land. Many of these systems are used to achieve simultaneous hydrologic, geochemical and microbiological goals, requiring innovative design, installation, and operation. There are major logistical challenges for subseafloor observatories, the foremost being having to remotely access sites kilometers underwater using multiple oceanographic platforms (drill ship, surface ship, submersible, remotely-operated vehicle) and reliance on autonomous devices that are serviced only after several years. Contamination of the analytical environment is probable during installation operations, requiring vigilance during analysis for interpretation. Subseafloor observatories also require self-contained and robust instrumentation that can withstand long-term exposure to seawater at high pressures, elevated temperatures, a variety of redox conditions, and little to no access to external power. Although subseafloor borehole observatories have been in development for hydrologic monitoring for two decades, the inclusion of experimentation to examine the deep biosphere in the marine subsurface has only recently been developed. Results from some of the first microbial colonization experiments in young basaltic rocks on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge demonstrate in situ microbial-mineral interactions that can be identified using complementary geochemical and microbiological techniques. Mineral surfaces were first colonized by iron oxidizing bacteria, and as fluid composition changed, the microbial community became dominated by Firmicutes bacteria, some of which are phylogenetically similar to microbial communities observed in the terrestrial deep biosphere.

  16. Chemokines and cytokines in patients with an occult Onchocerca volvulus infection.

    PubMed

    Lechner, Christian J; Gantin, Richard G; Seeger, Tanja; Sarnecka, Alicja; Portillo, Jennifer; Schulz-Key, Hartwig; Karabou, Potochoziou K; Helling-Giese, Gertrud; Heuschkel, Christoph; Banla, Meba; Soboslay, Peter T

    2012-05-01

    Repeated ivermectin treatment will clear microfilaria (Mf) of Onchocerca volvulus from skin and eyes of onchocerciasis patients while adult filaria remains alive and reproductive, and such occult O. volvulus infection may persist for years. To investigate the effect of residual adult filaria on the immune response profile, chemokines and cytokines were quantified 1) in onchocerciasis patients who developed an occult O. volvulus infection (Mf-negative) due to repeated ivermectin treatments, 2) patients who became Mf-negative without ivermectin treatments due to missing re-infection, and 3) endemic and non-endemic O. volvulus Mf-negative controls. With occult O. volvulus infection, serum levels of pro-inflammatory chemokines MCP-1/CCL2, MIP-1α/CCL3, MIP-1β/CCL4, MPIF-1/CCL23 and CXCL8/IL-8 enhanced and approached higher concentrations as determined in infection-free controls, whilst regulatory and Th2-type cytokines and chemokines MCP-4/CCL13, MIP-1δ/CCL15, TARC/CCL17 and IL-13 lessened. Levels of Eotaxin-2/CCL24, MCP-3/CCL7 and BCA-1/CXCL13 remained unchanged. At 3 days post-initial ivermectin treatment, MCP-1/CCL2, MCP-4/CCL13, MPIF-1/CCL23 and Eotaxin-2/CCL24 were strongly enhanced, suggesting that monocytes and eosinophil granulocytes have mediated Mf clearance. In summary, with occult and expiring O. volvulus infections the serum levels of inflammatory chemokines enhanced over time while regulatory and Th2-type-promoting cytokines and chemokines lessened; these changes may reflect a decreasing effector cell activation against Mf of O. volvulus, and in parallel, an enhancing inflammatory immune responsiveness. PMID:22202179

  17. Interruption of Onchocerca volvulus transmission in Northern Venezuela

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Onchocerciasis is caused by Onchocerca volvulus and transmitted by Simulium species (black flies). In the Americas, the infection has been previously described in 13 discrete regional foci distributed among six countries (Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Guatemala, Mexico and Venezuela) where more than 370,000 people are currently considered at risk. Since 2001, disease control in Venezuela has relied on the mass drug administration to the at-risk communities. This report provides empirical evidence of interruption of Onchocerca volvulus transmission by Simulium metallicum in 510 endemic communities from two Northern foci of Venezuela, after 10–12 years of 6-monthly Mectizan® (ivermectin) treatment to all the eligible residents. Methods In-depth entomologic and epidemiologic surveys were serially conducted from 2001–2012 in selected (sentinel and extra-sentinel) communities from the North-central (NC) and North-east (NE) onchocerciasis foci of Venezuela in order to monitor the impact of ivermectin treatment. Results From 2007–2009, entomological indicators in both foci confirmed that 0 out of 112,637 S. metallicum females examined by PCR contained L3 infection in insect heads. The upper bound of the 95% confidence intervals of the infective rate of the vector reached values below 1% by 2009 (NC) and 2012 (NE). Additionally, after 14 (NC) and 22 (NE) rounds of treatment, the seasonal transmission potential (±UL CIs) of S. metallicum was under the critical threshold of 20 L3 per person per season. Serological analysis in school children < 15 years-old demonstrated that 0 out of 6,590 individuals were harboring antibodies to Ov-16. Finally, epidemiological surveys made during 2010 (NC) and 2012 (NE) showed no evidence of microfilariae in the skin and eyes of the population. Conclusions These results meet the WHO criteria for absence of parasite transmission and disease morbidity in these endemic areas which represent 91% of the population previously at

  18. Colon volvulus displaced into the chest - right-sided posttraumatic hernia or congenital malformation?

    PubMed

    Toliczenko-Bernatowicz, Dorota; Dębek, Wojciech; Matuszczak, Ewa

    2016-06-01

    We present the case of a 13.5-year-old girl who was admitted to the Pediatric Surgery Department from the Pediatric Department of a district hospital, where she stayed because of stomachache and vomiting. Interview revealed blunt injury of the epigastrium a week ago. Chest X-ray revealed a loss of the right diaphragmatic outline, irregular radiolucency on the right side of the chest, collapsed right lung and mediastinal displacement to the left. The patient was operated on, and the surgery revealed herniation of the intestines and half of the stomach into the defect of the right dome of the diaphragm. The patient made an uneventful postoperative recovery. A small innate defect of the diaphragm can remain asymptomatic and undiagnosed as long as there is no herniation of the abdominal organs into the chest. PMID:27516794

  19. Colon volvulus displaced into the chest – right-sided posttraumatic hernia or congenital malformation?

    PubMed Central

    Dębek, Wojciech; Matuszczak, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 13.5-year-old girl who was admitted to the Pediatric Surgery Department from the Pediatric Department of a district hospital, where she stayed because of stomachache and vomiting. Interview revealed blunt injury of the epigastrium a week ago. Chest X-ray revealed a loss of the right diaphragmatic outline, irregular radiolucency on the right side of the chest, collapsed right lung and mediastinal displacement to the left. The patient was operated on, and the surgery revealed herniation of the intestines and half of the stomach into the defect of the right dome of the diaphragm. The patient made an uneventful postoperative recovery. A small innate defect of the diaphragm can remain asymptomatic and undiagnosed as long as there is no herniation of the abdominal organs into the chest. PMID:27516794

  20. [Experience of organization of flushing and disinfection of centralized system of hot water supply in town Verkhnyaya Pyshma after its colonization by Legionella].

    PubMed

    Onishchenko, G G; Nikonov, B I; Gurvich, V B; Akramov, R L; Vlasov, I A; Belov, E A; Shatilo, S V; Mustafina, N V; Kaletnik, V P

    2008-01-01

    Causes of outbreak incidence of pneumonia due to Legionella infection in population of Verkhnyaya Pyshma as well as factors promoting colonization of town's hot water supply system by Legionella were discussed. Experience of organization of flushing and disinfection of hot water supply system was described, effectiveness of different methods of disinfection was evaluated.

  1. Primary intrathoracic gastric volvulus in the neonatal period: a differential diagnosis of esophageal atresia

    PubMed Central

    El Azzouzi, Driss

    2014-01-01

    Intrathoracic gastric volvulus in the neonatal period is a rare surgical emergency. Delays in diagnosis and treatment are life-threatening due to progressive deterioration of the gastric walls. Presentation in this period can be confused with the possibility of esophageal atresia or esophageal web. The upper gastrointestinal tract contrast study is diagnostic in this disease. The authors report a case of acute intrathoracic gastric volvulus diagnosis by radiologic-contrast-study in 1-day-old girl that was confirmed at surgery. The physiopathology, classification and different presentations of this entity are briefly reviewed. PMID:25309661

  2. Experts reviews of the multidisciplinary consensus conference colon and rectal cancer 2012: science, opinions and experiences from the experts of surgery.

    PubMed

    van de Velde, C J H; Boelens, P G; Tanis, P J; Espin, E; Mroczkowski, P; Naredi, P; Pahlman, L; Ortiz, H; Rutten, H J; Breugom, A J; Smith, J J; Wibe, A; Wiggers, T; Valentini, V

    2014-04-01

    The first multidisciplinary consensus conference on colon and rectal cancer was held in December 2012, achieving a majority of consensus for diagnostic and treatment decisions using the Delphi Method. This article will give a critical appraisal of the topics discussed during the meeting and in the consensus document by well-known leaders in surgery that were involved in this multidisciplinary consensus process. Scientific evidence, experience and opinions are collected to support multidisciplinary teams (MDT) with arguments for medical decision-making in diagnosis, staging and treatment strategies for patients with colon or rectal cancer. Surgery is the cornerstone of curative treatment for colon and rectal cancer. Standardizing treatment is an effective instrument to improve outcome of multidisciplinary cancer care for patients with colon and rectal cancer. In this article, a review of the following focuses; Perioperative care, age and colorectal surgery, obstructive colorectal cancer, stenting, surgical anatomical considerations, total mesorectal excision (TME) surgery and training, surgical considerations for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) and local recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC), surgery in stage IV colorectal cancer, definitions of quality of surgery, transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM), laparoscopic colon and rectal surgery, preoperative radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy, and how about functional outcome after surgery?

  3. Onchocerca gutturosa and O. volvulus: studies on the viability and drug responses of cryopreserved adult worms in vitro.

    PubMed

    Townson, S; Shay, K E; Dobinson, A R; Connelly, C; Comley, J C; Zea-Flores, G

    1989-01-01

    The viability and drug responses of cryopreserved adult Onchocerca have been examined in vitro. Male worms were cryopreserved in liquid nitrogen (-196 degrees C) using ethanediol as a cryoprotectant in a 2-step incubation procedure. After thawing, 85-90% of O. gutturosa males were normally motile. These motile worms were evaluated for viability using 4 measurements (long-term motility/survival in culture; [U-14C]adenine uptake and leakage; glucose utilization; MTT-formazan colorimetry) and were no different from unfrozen controls. Subsequent experiments demonstrated that the motility responses of cryopreserved worms exposed to the antifilarial drugs ivermectin, CGP 6140 and levamisole were virtually identical to unfrozen controls. Some success was also obtained with this technique in cryopreserving O. volvulus males, with 2 thawed specimens surviving in culture for 93 and 106 d respectively. Following collagenase isolation, female worms were cryopreserved in medium +10% serum without protectant at -79 degrees C. A batch of 8 female O. gutturosa were all motile when thawed 14 d later, with a mean survival time (based on 5 specimens) of 71 d (range 60-90). However, a batch of worms transferred from -79 degrees C to -196 degrees C were badly damaged when thawed. Female O. volvulus were cryopreserved at -79 degrees C in Guatemala and sent by air freight on solid CO2 to the UK. Most specimens were active when thawed. Survival of motile specimens ranged from 7 to 272 d in culture. It is concluded that these techniques are of practical value for the storage and transportation of adult Onchocerca.

  4. Colonic Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... where your body makes and stores stool. Many disorders affect the colon's ability to work properly. Some ... abdominal cramping and other symptoms Treatment for colonic diseases varies greatly depending on the disease and its ...

  5. Elimination of Onchocerca volvulus Transmission in the Huehuetenango Focus of Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Ortiz, Nancy; Gonzalez, Rodrigo J; Lindblade, Kim A; Richards, Frank O; Sauerbrey, Mauricio; Zea-Flores, Guillermo; Dominguez, Alfredo; Oliva, Orlando; Catú, Eduardo; Rizzo, Nidia

    2012-01-01

    In Latin America, onchocerciasis is targeted for elimination by 2012 through twice-yearly mass treatment of the eligible population with ivermectin. In Guatemala, two of the four historical endemic foci have demonstrated elimination of transmission, following World Health Organization guidelines. Using established guidelines ophthalmological, serological, and entomological evaluations were conducted in 2007-8 to determine the transmission status of onchocerciasis in the Huehuetenango focus. The prevalence of Onchocerca volvulus microfilariae in the anterior segment of the eye in 365 residents was 0% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0-0.8%), the prevalence of infection of O. volvulus in Simulium ochraceum among 8252 flies collected between November 2007 and April 2008 was 0% (95% CI 0-0.02%), and the prevalence of antibodies to a recombinant O. volvulus antigen in 3118 school age children was 0% (95% CI 0-0.1%). These results showed transmission interruption; thus, in 2009 mass treatment was halted and posttreatment surveillance began. To verify for potential recrudescence an entomological evaluation (from December 2010 to April 2011) was conducted during the 2nd and 3rd year of posttreatment surveillance. A total of 4587 S. ochraceum were collected, and the prevalence of infection of O. volvulus was 0% (95% CI 0-0.04%). Transmission of onchocerciasis in the Huehuetenango focus has been eliminated. PMID:22970346

  6. Elimination of Onchocerca volvulus Transmission in the Huehuetenango Focus of Guatemala

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Ortiz, Nancy; Gonzalez, Rodrigo J.; Lindblade, Kim A.; Richards, Frank O.; Sauerbrey, Mauricio; Zea-Flores, Guillermo; Dominguez, Alfredo; Oliva, Orlando; Catú, Eduardo; Rizzo, Nidia

    2012-01-01

    In Latin America, onchocerciasis is targeted for elimination by 2012 through twice-yearly mass treatment of the eligible population with ivermectin. In Guatemala, two of the four historical endemic foci have demonstrated elimination of transmission, following World Health Organization guidelines. Using established guidelines ophthalmological, serological, and entomological evaluations were conducted in 2007-8 to determine the transmission status of onchocerciasis in the Huehuetenango focus. The prevalence of Onchocerca volvulus microfilariae in the anterior segment of the eye in 365 residents was 0% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0–0.8%), the prevalence of infection of O. volvulus in Simulium ochraceum among 8252 flies collected between November 2007 and April 2008 was 0% (95% CI 0–0.02%), and the prevalence of antibodies to a recombinant O. volvulus antigen in 3118 school age children was 0% (95% CI 0–0.1%). These results showed transmission interruption; thus, in 2009 mass treatment was halted and posttreatment surveillance began. To verify for potential recrudescence an entomological evaluation (from December 2010 to April 2011) was conducted during the 2nd and 3rd year of posttreatment surveillance. A total of 4587 S. ochraceum were collected, and the prevalence of infection of O. volvulus was 0% (95% CI 0–0.04%). Transmission of onchocerciasis in the Huehuetenango focus has been eliminated. PMID:22970346

  7. Acute gastric volvulus: a deadly but commonly forgotten complication of hiatal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Olivieri, Brandon; Vincentelli, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Gastric volvulus is a rare condition resulting from rotation of the stomach beyond 180 degrees. It is a difficult condition to diagnose, mostly because it is rarely considered. Furthermore, the imaging findings are often subtle resulting in many cases being diagnosed at the time of surgery or, as in our case, at autopsy. We present the case of a 76-year-old man with an extensive medical history, including coronary artery disease with multiple bypass grafts, who became diaphoretic and nauseated while eating. His presumptive diagnosis at arrival to the hospital was an acute coronary event; however, his initial cardiac work-up was negative. A computed tomography scan revealed a type III hiatal hernia. The following day, after consistent complaints of nausea and episodes of nonbloody emesis, he suddenly became hypotensive, tachycardic and had an episode of coffee-ground emesis. Subsequently, the patient's condition suddenly deteriorated and resuscitation attempts were unsuccessful. The autopsy revealed a partially sliding hiatal hernia, which was consistent with the radiologic impression. Additionally, a gastric volvulus was present with extensive, focally transmural necrosis involving the body/fundus. Gastric volvulus is a rare entity with variable, nonspecific clinical presentations, which requires a high level of suspicion for radiologic diagnosis. Acute cases have a high mortality rate and require emergency surgery. This case highlights the value of autopsy in the diagnosis of unsuspected cases of gastric volvulus when death occurs prior to surgical intervention. PMID:27284537

  8. Reverse intestinal rotation: a rare case of volvulus around a vitelline duct remnant

    PubMed Central

    Dreyer, Stephan; Kaczynski, Jakub; Hrobar, Petr; Collins, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    We present a rare case of reverse intestinal rotation with volvulus around a Meckel's diverticulum attached to a vitelline duct remnant. The diagnosis was established by CT. The patient was treated with exploratory laparotomy and small bowel resection. The patient made a full recovery and was discharged home on the seventh postoperative day. PMID:25246458

  9. Volvulus of an ileal conduit with retroperitoneal urinoma in a child: first reported case.

    PubMed

    Harold, D L; Kass, E J

    1978-02-01

    Ileal loop urinary diversion requires long-term followup. A case of an ileal conduit volvulus with a retroperitoneal urinoma 14 years after the initial procedure is reported. A brief discussion of long and short-term complications of ileal loops is presented.

  10. Wandering Spleen and Organoaxial Gastric Volvulus after Morgagni Hernia Repair: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Gulia, Caterina; Miele, Vittorio; Trinci, Margherita; Briganti, Vito

    2016-01-01

    Wandering spleen and gastric volvulus are two rare entities that have been described in association with congenital diaphragmatic hernia. The diagnosis is difficult and any delay can result in ischemia and necrosis of both organs. We present a case of a 13-year-old girl, previously operated on for anterior diaphragmatic hernia and intrathoracic gastric volvulus, that presented to our service for a subdiaphragmatic gastric volvulus recurrence associated with a wandering spleen. In this report we reviewed the literature, analyzing the clinical presentation, diagnostic assessment, and treatment options of both conditions, in particular in the case associated with diaphragmatic hernia. PMID:27703832

  11. Longitudinal Rates of Colon Cancer Screening Use in Winnipeg, Canada: The Experience of a Universal Health-Care System with an Organized Colon Screening Program

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Kathleen M; Demers, Alain A; Nugent, Zoann; Biswanger, Natalie; Singh, Harminder

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We examined trends in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening (fecal occult blood test (FOBT), colonoscopy, and flexible sigmoidoscopy (FS)) and differences in CRC screening by income in a population with an organized CRC screening program and universal health-care coverage. METHODS: Individuals who had an FOBT, colonoscopy, or FS were identified from the provincial Physician Claims database and the population-based colon cancer screening registry. Trends in age-standardized rates were determined. Logistic regression was performed to explore the association between CRC screening and income quintiles by year. RESULTS: Up-to-date CRC screening (FOBT, colonoscopy, or FS) increased over time for men and women, all age groups, and all income quintiles. Up-to-date CRC screening was very high among 65- to 69- and 70- to 74-year-olds (70% and 73%, respectively). There was a shift toward the use of an FOBT for CRC screening for individuals in the lower income quintiles. The disparity in colonoscopy/FS coverage by income quintile was greater in 2012 than in 1995. Overall, there was no reduction in disparities by income in up-to-date CRC screening nor did the rate of increase in up-to-date CRC screening or FOBT use change after the introduction of the organized provincial CRC screening program. CONCLUSIONS: CRC screening is increasing over time for both men and women and all age groups. However, a disparity in up-to-date CRC screening by income persisted even with an organized CRC screening program in a universal health-care setting. PMID:26169513

  12. [Colonic balantidiasis].

    PubMed

    González de Canales Simón, P; del Olmo Martínez, L; Cortejoso Hernández, A; Arranz Santos, T

    2000-03-01

    Balantidium coli is a Protozoa that is not usually pathogenic in man, although epidemics have been described in tropical areas. It mainly affects the colon and clinical presentation varies from asymptomatic forms to severe dysenteric syndromes. We present a case of endoscopically diagnosed colonic balantidiasis and review the most important characteristics of this parasite-induced disease. PMID:10804691

  13. Low Enteric Colonization with Multidrug-Resistant Pathogens in Soldiers Returning from Deployments- Experience from the Years 2007–2015

    PubMed Central

    Frickmann, Hagen; Wiemer, Dorothea; Frey, Claudia; Hagen, Ralf Matthias; Hinz, Rebecca; Podbielski, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    This assessment describes the enteric colonization of German soldiers 8–12 weeks after returning from mostly but not exclusively subtropical or tropical deployment sites with third-generation cephalosporin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Between 2007 and 2015, 828 stool samples from returning soldiers were enriched in nonselective broth and incubated on selective agars for Enterobacteriaceae expressing extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL), VRE and MRSA. Identification and resistance testing of suspicious colonies was performed using MALDI-TOF-MS, VITEK-II and agar diffusion gradient testing (bioMérieux, Marcy-l’Étoile, France). Isolates with suspicion of ESBL were characterized by ESBL/ampC disc-(ABCD)-testing and molecular approaches (PCR, Sanger sequencing). Among the returnees, E. coli with resistance against third-generation cephalosporins (37 ESBL, 1 ESBL + ampC, 1 uncertain mechanism) were found in 39 instances (4.7%). Associated quinolone resistance was found in 46.2% of these isolates. Beta-lactamases of the blaCTX-M group 1 predominated among the ESBL mechanisms, followed by the blaCTX-M group 9, and blaSHV. VRE of vanA-type was isolated from one returnee (0.12%). MRSA was not isolated at all. There was no clear trend regarding the distribution of resistant isolates during the assessment period. Compared with colonization with resistant bacteria described in civilians returning from the tropics, the colonization in returned soldiers is surprisingly low and stable. This finding, together with high colonization rates found in previous screenings on deployment, suggests a loss of colonization during the 8- to 12-week period between returning from the deployments and assessment. PMID:27598775

  14. Low Enteric Colonization with Multidrug-Resistant Pathogens in Soldiers Returning from Deployments- Experience from the Years 2007-2015.

    PubMed

    Frickmann, Hagen; Wiemer, Dorothea; Frey, Claudia; Hagen, Ralf Matthias; Hinz, Rebecca; Podbielski, Andreas; Köller, Thomas; Warnke, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    This assessment describes the enteric colonization of German soldiers 8-12 weeks after returning from mostly but not exclusively subtropical or tropical deployment sites with third-generation cephalosporin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Between 2007 and 2015, 828 stool samples from returning soldiers were enriched in nonselective broth and incubated on selective agars for Enterobacteriaceae expressing extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL), VRE and MRSA. Identification and resistance testing of suspicious colonies was performed using MALDI-TOF-MS, VITEK-II and agar diffusion gradient testing (bioMérieux, Marcy-l'Étoile, France). Isolates with suspicion of ESBL were characterized by ESBL/ampC disc-(ABCD)-testing and molecular approaches (PCR, Sanger sequencing). Among the returnees, E. coli with resistance against third-generation cephalosporins (37 ESBL, 1 ESBL + ampC, 1 uncertain mechanism) were found in 39 instances (4.7%). Associated quinolone resistance was found in 46.2% of these isolates. Beta-lactamases of the blaCTX-M group 1 predominated among the ESBL mechanisms, followed by the blaCTX-M group 9, and blaSHV. VRE of vanA-type was isolated from one returnee (0.12%). MRSA was not isolated at all. There was no clear trend regarding the distribution of resistant isolates during the assessment period. Compared with colonization with resistant bacteria described in civilians returning from the tropics, the colonization in returned soldiers is surprisingly low and stable. This finding, together with high colonization rates found in previous screenings on deployment, suggests a loss of colonization during the 8- to 12-week period between returning from the deployments and assessment. PMID:27598775

  15. Exploiting the Polypharmacology of ß-Carbolines to Disrupt O. volvulus Molting.

    PubMed

    Gooyit, Major; Tricoche, Nancy; Javor, Sacha; Lustigman, Sara; Janda, Kim D

    2015-03-12

    Onchocerciasis is an infection caused by the filarial worm Onchocerca volvulus, which can eventually result in blindness. The lack of an effective macrofilaricide and the possible development of ivermectin-resistant strains of O. volvulus necessitate the need for alternative treatment strategies. We have shown that targeting the L3-stage-specific chitinase OvCHT1 impairs the shedding of the filarial cuticle. In our continued efforts to discover OvCHT1 inhibitors, we identified the β-carboline alkaloid scaffolding as a chitinase inhibitor that is capable of penetrating the worm cuticle. Herein, we disclose the rich polypharmacology of the β-carboline class of compounds as an approach to abrogate the molting of the parasite and thus the initiation of infection in the human host. PMID:25815157

  16. Gastric dilatation and volvulus in a brachycephalic dog with hiatal hernia.

    PubMed

    Aslanian, M E; Sharp, C R; Garneau, M S

    2014-10-01

    A brachycephalic dog was presented with an acute onset of retching and abdominal discomfort. The dog had a chronic history of stertor and exercise intolerance suggestive of brachycephalic airway obstructive syndrome. Radiographs were consistent with a Type II hiatal hernia. The dog was referred and within hours of admission became acutely painful and developed tympanic abdominal distension. A right lateral abdominal radiograph confirmed gastric dilatation and volvulus with herniation of the pylorus through the hiatus. An emergency exploratory coeliotomy was performed, during which the stomach was derotated, and an incisional gastropexy, herniorrhaphy and splenectomy were performed. A staphylectomy was performed immediately following the exploratory coeliotomy. The dog recovered uneventfully. Gastric dilatation and volvulus is a potentially life-threatening complication that can occur in dogs with Type II hiatal hernia and should be considered a surgical emergency.

  17. Small bowel volvulus as a complication of von Recklinghausen’s disease: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Thomas Artur; Kröpil, Feride; Schoppe, Martin Olaf; Kröpil, Patric; Knoefel, Wolfram Trudo; Krieg, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 25-year-old male with Neurofibromatosis type I (NF-1), who presented at the time of admission with clinical findings of an acute abdomen caused by a mechanical obstruction. Computerized tomography showed a volvulus of the terminal ileum with mesenteric swirling as the cause of the patient’s symptoms. Consecutive exploratory laparotomy confirmed the diagnosis and 70 cm of the small intestine was resected due to an affection of the mesentery by multiple neurofibromas. The gastrointestinal tract is affected in approximately 10% of patients with NF-1, however the mesentery is almost always spared. Here we describe the unique case of a patient with a volvulus caused by mesenteric manifestation of von Recklinghausen’s disease, emphasizing the role of surgery in a team of multidisciplinary specialists to treat this multiorganic disease. PMID:24976735

  18. Le volvulus gastrique idiopathique aigu: à propos d'une nouvelle observation

    PubMed Central

    Abdelilah, Mouhsine; Jihad, Anzaoui; Rachid, Bouchentouf

    2013-01-01

    Le volvulus gastrique est une rotation anormale de l'estomac autour de son axe. La forme aiguë constitue une urgence chirurgicale. Le diagnostic est souvent retardé en raison d'une symptomatologie fréquemment non spécifique. Des signes respiratoires tels la dyspnée et le hoquet peuvent révéler cette pathologie. Les auteurs rapportent une nouvelle observation de volvulus gastrique aigu chez un adolescent de 17 ans, diagnostiqué par la tomodensitométrie, et confirmé par une intervention chirurgicale. Le traitement est chirurgical et consiste à détordre et fixer l'estomac pour prévenir la récidive. PMID:23503200

  19. [Predisposing factors, clinical picture and mortality in volvulus of the small intestine].

    PubMed

    Díaz Plasencia, J; Huaynalaya, E; Rodríguez, F; Rebaza, H

    1992-01-01

    This retrospective study evaluated predisposing factors, clinical picture and the methods of treatment related to morbidity and mortality of 19 small bowel volvulus (SBV) who underwent operation at Belen Hospital (Trujillo-Peru) during the last 26 years (1966-1992). The SBV was 1.6% of all cases of intestinal obstruction in this period and 10.8% of all intestinal volvulus. The median age was of 43 +/- 20.5 years (range, 6 to 78 years) and the majority of them were between 41 and 60 years. Sixteen cases (84.2%) were men from Indian and Spanish extraction and most of them were farmers and came from the Sierra of the Department of La Libertad. Two cases (10.5%) had non-related antecedents previous surgery. In six patients (31.6%) the volvulus was less than seven day's duration and in thirty (68.4%) it was more eight day's duration with previous attacks of obstruction (median: 19.3 days, range: 17 hours to 94 days). Pain, vomiting and distention were present in almost all of these cases. The most frequent abdominal finding was distention. The location of the volvulus was: ileum, 12 cases (63.2%), root of mesentery, 4 cases (21%) and jejunum, 3 cases (15.8%). Gangrenous bowel was present in six patients (31.5) and gangrenous intestine with perforation in two cases (10.5%) who underwent resection of the involved segment with primary anastomosis. In this group one patient (5.2%) died of sepsis and the wound infection rate was of 37.5%. There was no statistically significant correlation with the duration of illness and the presence of gangrenous loops or the mortality rate (p > 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. A simple isothermal DNA amplification method to screen black flies for Onchocerca volvulus infection.

    PubMed

    Alhassan, Andy; Makepeace, Benjamin L; LaCourse, Elwyn James; Osei-Atweneboana, Mike Y; Carlow, Clotilde K S

    2014-01-01

    Onchocerciasis is a debilitating neglected tropical disease caused by infection with the filarial parasite Onchocerca volvulus. Adult worms live in subcutaneous tissues and produce large numbers of microfilariae that migrate to the skin and eyes. The disease is spread by black flies of the genus Simulium following ingestion of microfilariae that develop into infective stage larvae in the insect. Currently, transmission is monitored by capture and dissection of black flies and microscopic examination of parasites, or using the polymerase chain reaction to determine the presence of parasite DNA in pools of black flies. In this study we identified a new DNA biomarker, encoding O. volvulus glutathione S-transferase 1a (OvGST1a), to detect O. volvulus infection in vector black flies. We developed an OvGST1a-based loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay where amplification of specific target DNA is detectable using turbidity or by a hydroxy naphthol blue color change. The results indicated that the assay is sensitive and rapid, capable of detecting DNA equivalent to less than one microfilaria within 60 minutes. The test is highly specific for the human parasite, as no cross-reaction was detected using DNA from the closely related and sympatric cattle parasite Onchocerca ochengi. The test has the potential to be developed further as a field tool for use in the surveillance of transmission before and after implementation of mass drug administration programs for onchocerciasis. PMID:25299656

  1. A simple isothermal DNA amplification method to screen black flies for Onchocerca volvulus infection.

    PubMed

    Alhassan, Andy; Makepeace, Benjamin L; LaCourse, Elwyn James; Osei-Atweneboana, Mike Y; Carlow, Clotilde K S

    2014-01-01

    Onchocerciasis is a debilitating neglected tropical disease caused by infection with the filarial parasite Onchocerca volvulus. Adult worms live in subcutaneous tissues and produce large numbers of microfilariae that migrate to the skin and eyes. The disease is spread by black flies of the genus Simulium following ingestion of microfilariae that develop into infective stage larvae in the insect. Currently, transmission is monitored by capture and dissection of black flies and microscopic examination of parasites, or using the polymerase chain reaction to determine the presence of parasite DNA in pools of black flies. In this study we identified a new DNA biomarker, encoding O. volvulus glutathione S-transferase 1a (OvGST1a), to detect O. volvulus infection in vector black flies. We developed an OvGST1a-based loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay where amplification of specific target DNA is detectable using turbidity or by a hydroxy naphthol blue color change. The results indicated that the assay is sensitive and rapid, capable of detecting DNA equivalent to less than one microfilaria within 60 minutes. The test is highly specific for the human parasite, as no cross-reaction was detected using DNA from the closely related and sympatric cattle parasite Onchocerca ochengi. The test has the potential to be developed further as a field tool for use in the surveillance of transmission before and after implementation of mass drug administration programs for onchocerciasis.

  2. A Simple Isothermal DNA Amplification Method to Screen Black Flies for Onchocerca volvulus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Alhassan, Andy; Makepeace, Benjamin L.; LaCourse, Elwyn James; Osei-Atweneboana, Mike Y.; Carlow, Clotilde K. S.

    2014-01-01

    Onchocerciasis is a debilitating neglected tropical disease caused by infection with the filarial parasite Onchocerca volvulus. Adult worms live in subcutaneous tissues and produce large numbers of microfilariae that migrate to the skin and eyes. The disease is spread by black flies of the genus Simulium following ingestion of microfilariae that develop into infective stage larvae in the insect. Currently, transmission is monitored by capture and dissection of black flies and microscopic examination of parasites, or using the polymerase chain reaction to determine the presence of parasite DNA in pools of black flies. In this study we identified a new DNA biomarker, encoding O. volvulus glutathione S-transferase 1a (OvGST1a), to detect O. volvulus infection in vector black flies. We developed an OvGST1a-based loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay where amplification of specific target DNA is detectable using turbidity or by a hydroxy naphthol blue color change. The results indicated that the assay is sensitive and rapid, capable of detecting DNA equivalent to less than one microfilaria within 60 minutes. The test is highly specific for the human parasite, as no cross-reaction was detected using DNA from the closely related and sympatric cattle parasite Onchocerca ochengi. The test has the potential to be developed further as a field tool for use in the surveillance of transmission before and after implementation of mass drug administration programs for onchocerciasis. PMID:25299656

  3. Metastatic Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Massagué, Joan; Obenauf, Anna C.

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is the main cause of death from cancer. To colonize distant organs, circulating cancer cells must overcome many obstacles through mechanisms that we are starting to understand. Infiltrating distant tissue, evading immune defences, adapting to supportive niches, surviving as latent tumour-initiating seeds, and eventually breaking out to replace the host tissue, are key steps for metastatic colonization. These obstacles make metastasis a highly inefficient process, but once metastases are established current treatments frequently fail to provide durable responses. A better understanding of the mechanistic determinants of metastatic colonization is needed to better prevent and treat metastatic cancer. PMID:26791720

  4. A calibrated agent-based computer model of stochastic cell dynamics in normal human colon crypts useful for in silico experiments

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Normal colon crypts consist of stem cells, proliferating cells, and differentiated cells. Abnormal rates of proliferation and differentiation can initiate colon cancer. We have measured the variation in the number of each of these cell types in multiple crypts in normal human biopsy specimens. This has provided the opportunity to produce a calibrated computational model that simulates cell dynamics in normal human crypts, and by changing model parameter values, to simulate the initiation and treatment of colon cancer. Results An agent-based model of stochastic cell dynamics in human colon crypts was developed in the multi-platform open-source application NetLogo. It was assumed that each cell’s probability of proliferation and probability of death is determined by its position in two gradients along the crypt axis, a divide gradient and in a die gradient. A cell’s type is not intrinsic, but rather is determined by its position in the divide gradient. Cell types are dynamic, plastic, and inter-convertible. Parameter values were determined for the shape of each of the gradients, and for a cell’s response to the gradients. This was done by parameter sweeps that indicated the values that reproduced the measured number and variation of each cell type, and produced quasi-stationary stochastic dynamics. The behavior of the model was verified by its ability to reproduce the experimentally observed monocolonal conversion by neutral drift, the formation of adenomas resulting from mutations either at the top or bottom of the crypt, and by the robust ability of crypts to recover from perturbation by cytotoxic agents. One use of the virtual crypt model was demonstrated by evaluating different cancer chemotherapy and radiation scheduling protocols. Conclusions A virtual crypt has been developed that simulates the quasi-stationary stochastic cell dynamics of normal human colon crypts. It is unique in that it has been calibrated with measurements of human biopsy

  5. [Experience of the Pharmacotherapy against Appendix and Sigmoid Colon Signet Ring Cell Carcinoma with the Peritoneal Dissemination].

    PubMed

    Harada, Shingo; Tsuchida, Kazuhito; Shibuya, Taisuke; Doi, Yuki; Kikuchi, Akitomo; Mori, Koichi; Yabushita, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Takuo; Murakami, Hitoshi; Hasegawa, Seiji; Fukushima, Tadao; Ike, Hideyuki; Nakayama, Takashi

    2015-10-01

    We report 2 cases of signet ring cell carcinoma of the appendix and colon. Case 1: A 61-year-old man was admitted for lower abdominal pain. Colonoscopy revealed an elevated lesion in the orifice of the appendix. Signet ring cell carcinoma was diagnosed on biopsy. The surgical findings showed multiple peritoneal dissemination nodules, while the primary tumor was unresectable owing to extensive invasion into the retroperitoneum. The histopathological findings were signet ring cell carcinoma, T4b (retroperitoneum), NX, P3, Stage Ⅳ. Although the patient received 14 courses of treatment with S-1 as postoperative chemotherapy, he died of his illness at 32 postoperative months. Case 2: A 76-year-old man was admitted for abdominal pain. Perforation of the lower gastrointestinal tract was diagnosed on abdominal CT, and an emergency operation was performed. The surgical findings demonstrated a large number of peritoneal dissemination nodules, cecal invasion of a sigmoid tumor, and perforation of the ascending colon. The primary tumor was thought to be unresectable, and the perforated segment was resected. The histopathological findings were signet ring cell carcinoma, T4b (cecum), NX, P3, Stage Ⅳ. Although 11 courses of treatment using FOLFIRI+Bev were administered as postoperative chemotherapy, the patient died of his illness at 26 postoperative months.

  6. Onchocerca volvulus-neurotransmitter tyramine is a biomarker for river blindness.

    PubMed

    Globisch, Daniel; Moreno, Amira Y; Hixon, Mark S; Nunes, Ashlee A K; Denery, Judith R; Specht, Sabine; Hoerauf, Achim; Janda, Kim D

    2013-03-12

    Onchocerciasis, also known as "river blindness", is a neglected tropical disease infecting millions of people mainly in Africa and the Middle East but also in South America and Central America. Disease infectivity initiates from the filarial parasitic nematode Onchocerca volvulus, which is transmitted by the blackfly vector Simulium sp. carrying infectious third-stage larvae. Ivermectin has controlled transmission of microfilariae, with an African Program elimination target date of 2025. However, there is currently no point-of-care diagnostic that can distinguish the burden of infection--including active and/or past infection--and enable the elimination program to be effectively monitored. Here, we describe how liquid chromatography-MS-based urine metabolome analysis can be exploited for the identification of a unique biomarker, N-acetyltyramine-O,β-glucuronide (NATOG), a neurotransmitter-derived secretion metabolite from O. volvulus. The regulation of this tyramine neurotransmitter was found to be linked to patient disease infection, including the controversial antibiotic doxycycline treatment that has been shown to both sterilize and kill adult female worms. Further clues to its regulation have been elucidated through biosynthetic pathway determination within the nematode and its human host. Our results demonstrate that NATOG tracks O. volvulus metabolism in both worms and humans, and thus can be considered a host-specific biomarker for onchocerciasis progression. Liquid chromatography-MS-based urine metabolome analysis discovery of NATOG not only has broad implications for a noninvasive host-specific onchocerciasis diagnostic but provides a basis for the metabolome mining of other neglected tropical diseases for the discovery of distinct biomarkers and monitoring of disease progression. PMID:23440222

  7. Use of percutaneous endoscopic colostomy (PEC) to treat sigmoid volvulus: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Lucinda; Moran, Alex; Beaton, Ceri

    2016-01-01

    Background and aim: Percutaneous endoscopic colostomy provides an alternative management option for patients with recurrent sigmoid volvulus who are considered too high risk to undergo surgery. We reviewed the literature to assess whether the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence guidelines published in 2006 supporting the use of percutaneous endoscopic colostomy are still valid. Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted using PubMed, Web of Science, and Embase. The exploded search terms “Percutaneous Endoscopic Colostomy” and “Sigmoid Volvulus” were used. Librarian support was used to ensure the maximum number of relevant articles were returned. Identified abstracts were then analyzed and included if they met the inclusion criteria. Results: Five observational studies and 5 case reports were identified that met the inclusion criteria. They provided data on 56 patients with recurrent sigmoid volvulus treated with percutaneous endoscopic colostomy placement. Sixteen of the 56 patients were treated with a single percutaneous endoscopic colostomy (PEC) tube while 38 patients were treated with 2 PEC tubes. For 2 patients the details of the procedure were unknown. Five patients developed major complications following the procedure: 1 patient developed peritonitis after 4 days, due to fecal contamination secondary to tube migration and 2 patients with cognitive impairment pulled their PEC tubes out. Two other patients died following PEC insertion. Nine patients developed minor complications following the procedure. The most commonly reported minor complication was infection at the PEC site. Four of 56 patients developed a recurrent sigmoid volvulus with a PEC tube in situ. Conclusion: Although in these case series there is a 21 % risk of morbidity and 5 % risk of mortality from the use of a PEC, this is favorable compared to the mortality risk of 6.6 % to 44 % reported with operative intervention. This review of contemporary

  8. Colon Capsule Endoscopy: Review and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Modayil, Rani; Stavropoulos, Stavros

    2016-01-01

    Colon capsule endoscopy utilizing PillCam COLON 2 capsule allows for visualization potentially of the entire colon and is currently approved for patients who cannot withstand the rigors of traditional optical colonoscopy (OC) and associated sedation as well as those that had an OC that was incomplete for technical reasons other than a poor preparation. We will then describe the prior experience and current status of colon capsule endoscopy. PMID:27698664

  9. Space colonization.

    PubMed

    2002-12-01

    NASA interest in colonization encompasses space tourism; space exploration; space bases in orbit, at L1, on the Moon, or on Mars; in-situ resource utilization; and planetary terraforming. Activities progressed during 2002 in areas such as Mars colonies, hoppers, and biomass; space elevators and construction; and in-situ consumables.

  10. Space colonization.

    PubMed

    2002-12-01

    NASA interest in colonization encompasses space tourism; space exploration; space bases in orbit, at L1, on the Moon, or on Mars; in-situ resource utilization; and planetary terraforming. Activities progressed during 2002 in areas such as Mars colonies, hoppers, and biomass; space elevators and construction; and in-situ consumables. PMID:12506926

  11. DNA vaccine encoding the moonlighting protein Onchocerca volvulus glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (Ov-GAPDH) leads to partial protection in a mouse model of human filariasis.

    PubMed

    Steisslinger, Vera; Korten, Simone; Brattig, Norbert W; Erttmann, Klaus D

    2015-10-26

    River blindness, caused by the filarial parasite Onchocerca volvulus, is a major socio-economic and public health problem in Sub-Saharan Africa. In January 2015, The Onchocerciasis Vaccine for Africa (TOVA) Initiative has been launched with the aim of providing new tools to complement mass drug administration (MDA) of ivermectin, thereby promoting elimination of onchocerciasis in Africa. In this context we here present Onchocerca volvulus glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (Ov-GAPDH) as a possible DNA vaccine candidate. We report that in a laboratory model for filariasis, immunization with Ov-GAPDH led to a significant reduction of adult worm load and microfilaraemia in BALB/c mice after challenge infection with the filarial parasite Litomosoides sigmodontis. Mice were either vaccinated with Ov-GAPDH.DNA plasmid (Ov-pGAPDH.DNA) alone or in combination with recombinantly expressed Ov-GAPDH protein (Ov-rGAPDH). During the following challenge infection of immunized and control mice with L. sigmodontis, those formulations which included the DNA plasmid, led to a significant reduction of adult worm loads (up to 57% median reduction) and microfilaraemia (up to 94% reduction) in immunized animals. In a further experiment, immunization with a mixture of four overlapping, synthetic Ov-GAPDH peptides (Ov-GAPDHpept), with alum as adjuvant, did not significantly reduce worm loads. Our results indicate that DNA vaccination with Ov-GAPDH has protective potential against filarial challenge infection in the mouse model. This suggests a transfer of the approach into the cattle Onchocerca ochengi model, where it is possible to investigate the effects of this vaccination in the context of a natural host-parasite relationship. PMID:26320419

  12. DNA vaccine encoding the moonlighting protein Onchocerca volvulus glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (Ov-GAPDH) leads to partial protection in a mouse model of human filariasis.

    PubMed

    Steisslinger, Vera; Korten, Simone; Brattig, Norbert W; Erttmann, Klaus D

    2015-10-26

    River blindness, caused by the filarial parasite Onchocerca volvulus, is a major socio-economic and public health problem in Sub-Saharan Africa. In January 2015, The Onchocerciasis Vaccine for Africa (TOVA) Initiative has been launched with the aim of providing new tools to complement mass drug administration (MDA) of ivermectin, thereby promoting elimination of onchocerciasis in Africa. In this context we here present Onchocerca volvulus glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (Ov-GAPDH) as a possible DNA vaccine candidate. We report that in a laboratory model for filariasis, immunization with Ov-GAPDH led to a significant reduction of adult worm load and microfilaraemia in BALB/c mice after challenge infection with the filarial parasite Litomosoides sigmodontis. Mice were either vaccinated with Ov-GAPDH.DNA plasmid (Ov-pGAPDH.DNA) alone or in combination with recombinantly expressed Ov-GAPDH protein (Ov-rGAPDH). During the following challenge infection of immunized and control mice with L. sigmodontis, those formulations which included the DNA plasmid, led to a significant reduction of adult worm loads (up to 57% median reduction) and microfilaraemia (up to 94% reduction) in immunized animals. In a further experiment, immunization with a mixture of four overlapping, synthetic Ov-GAPDH peptides (Ov-GAPDHpept), with alum as adjuvant, did not significantly reduce worm loads. Our results indicate that DNA vaccination with Ov-GAPDH has protective potential against filarial challenge infection in the mouse model. This suggests a transfer of the approach into the cattle Onchocerca ochengi model, where it is possible to investigate the effects of this vaccination in the context of a natural host-parasite relationship.

  13. Ivermectin effect on microfilariae of Onchocerca volvulus after a single oral dose in humans.

    PubMed

    Soboslay, P T; Newland, H S; White, A T; Erttmann, K D; Albiez, E J; Taylor, H R; Williams, P N; Greene, B M

    1987-03-01

    Ivermectin is a broad spectrum anti-helminthic agent which is currently being tested for use in human onchocerciasis. Its activity is believed to result from its effect on GABA-mediated neurotransmission. We examined the effects of ivermectin on motility of microfilariae of O. volvulus following administration to humans. When ivermectin was given in dosages of 100, 150 and 200 mcg/kg on day 1 there was a clear reduction in motility of microfilariae obtained on day 3 when compared to microfilariae from the placebo group. The mean motility scores in microfilariae from ivermectin recipients were 3.1, 2.3, and 2.2 at 0, 12, and 24 hours of incubation compared to 3.3, 2.9, and 2.5, respectively, in microfilariae from placebo recipients (p less than 0.003, p less than 0.005, and p less than 0.012, respectively). Examination of the effect according to dose suggested a dose-response relationship. Microfilariae in the anterior chamber of the eye 2 days after a single oral dose of ivermectin showed abnormal and reduced winding and coiling. Microfilariae in 50% of ivermectin recipients showed abnormal motility compared to no such effects in subjects examined concurrently who received oral DEC, DEC lotion or placebo. These observations indicate that ivermectin has an effect on motility of microfilariae of O. volvulus following administration to humans.

  14. Volvulus du grêle sur paquet d’ascaris: à propos d’un cas

    PubMed Central

    Diouf, Cheikh; Kane, Ahmed; Ndoye, Ndeye Aby; Ndour, Oumar; Faye-Fall, Aimé Lakh; Fall, Mbaye; Alumeti, Désiré Munyali; Ngom, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Nous rapportons un cas exceptionnel de volvulus nécrosé de l'intestin grêle dû à des ascaris adultes chez un enfant de 7 ans. A l'admission, l'enfant présentait le tableau d'occlusion intestinale qui évoluait depuis deux jours avec altération de l'état général. La radiographie de l'abdomen sans préparation retrouvait des niveaux hydroaériques de type grêlique et un aspect tigré évoquant le diagnostic d'une occlusion intestinale haute sur masse abdominale. Après la réanimation, le traitement chirurgical consistait en une laparotomie qui avait retrouvé un volvulus nécrosé de l'iléon terminale contenant des ascaris adultes. Une résection du grêle sur environ un mètre emportant le segment nécrosé suivie d'une iléostomie était réalisée. L'évolution a été favorable, l'anastomose iléo-colique fut réalisée quatre semaines plus tard. Au recul de deux ans l'enfant est indemne de tout symptôme. PMID:27795803

  15. Gallbladder Volvulus in a Patient with Type I Choledochal Cyst: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Younan, George; Schumm, Max

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Gallbladder volvulus is a rare, potentially fatal condition unless diagnosed and treated early. Choledochal cysts are rare congenital malformations of the biliary tree predisposing to different pathologies and posing the risk of degradation into cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder cancer. Dealing with both diseases at once has not been published yet in the literature. Presentation of Case. We report a case of gallbladder volvulus in an elderly female who happened to have a concomitant type I choledochal cyst. Treatment was achieved with a cholecystectomy and observation and follow-up of the choledochal cyst. Discussion. Prompt diagnosis and surgical management of gallbladder volvulus is important to avoid the morbidity and mortality of gangrenous cholecystitis and biliary peritonitis in a frail old population of patients. Precise clinical diagnosis, supplemented with specific imaging clues, helps in the diagnosis. Management of choledochal cysts is also surgical; however the timing of surgery is still a matter of debate. Conclusion. We describe in this report the first case of gallbladder volvulus in a patient with a choledochal cyst and propose a management algorithm of a very rare biliary tree pathology combination. PMID:27747125

  16. Transmission and dose–response experiments for social animals: a reappraisal of the colonization biology of Campylobacter jejuni in chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dose-response experiments characterize the relationship between infectious agents and their hosts. They are used to estimate the minimum e'ective infectious dose (ID50), compare between di'erent agents and quantify the e'ect of treatment regimes. The statistical analysis of dose-response data typica...

  17. Immunoglobulin G subclass responses of children during infection with Onchocerca volvulus.

    PubMed Central

    Gbakima, A A; Nutman, T B; Bradley, J E; McReynolds, L A; Winget, M D; Hong, Y; Scott, A L

    1996-01-01

    To characterize the patterns of immunoglobulin G (IgG) subclass and IgE reactivity during the early stages of onchocerciasis, sera were collected from 224 children (age groups, 2 to 5, 6 to 10, and 11 to 15 years) residing in a region of Sierra Leone where Onchocerca volvulus is endemic, and these samples were tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for their reactivity to adult antigens (OvAg) and against four recombinant proteins (OV11, OV27, OV29, and OV16). Over 88% of the samples contained detectable levels of anti-OvAg IgG. In samples from microfilaria (MF)-positive children, IgG4 responses were significantly elevated and constituted on average 39, 35 and 28% of the total IgG responses for the age groups of 2 to 5, 6 to 10, and 11 to 15 years, respectively. For MF-negative individuals, the mean contributions of IgG4 to the total IgG response were 11% (2 to 5 years), 27% (6 to 10 years), and 56% (11 to 15 years). OvAg-specific IgE was detectable in the sera from both MF-negative and MF-positive individuals. To increase the specificity of the response, recombinant antigens OV11, OV27, and OV29 were tested individually or as a cocktail. Nearly 50% of the MF-negative children and 85% of the MF-positive children had detectable levels of IgG against at least one of the recombinant antigens. Only a small portion of the IgG against the recombinant peptides was IgG4. The prevalence of IgG against OV16 in samples from MF-negative children was 51%, and that for MF-positive children was 75%. The general profile of the humoral immune responses mounted by both MF-positive and a large percentage of the MF-negative children during the initial phases of infection with O. volvulus is similar to the profile reported for adults harboring chronic O. volvulus infections. These results suggest that very quickly after infection, the interactions between parasite and host result in an immunological environment that may contribute to the maintenance of a long-term, chronic

  18. Onchocerca volvulus DNA probe classification correlates with epidemiologic patterns of blindness.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, P A; Dadzie, K Y; De Sole, G; Remme, J; Alley, E S; Unnasch, T R

    1992-05-01

    Onchocerciasis, or river blindness, results from infection with Onchocerca volvulus. The parasite is endemic to West Africa, in both rain forest and savanna bioclimes. Several lines of evidence suggest that different strains of the parasite exist in the rain forest and savanna. Furthermore, epidemiologic evidence indicates that ocular onchocerciasis is most severe in savanna regions. This has led to the hypothesis that there is a strain association with ocular pathology. To test this hypothesis, parasites from villages in which severe and mild onchocerciasis were endemic were classified with two strain-specific DNA probes. A strong correlation (P less than .001) was found between disease severity and probe recognition, supporting the hypothesis that pathogenicity is strain related. The results suggest that pFS-1 and pSS-1BT may be used to predict the pathogenic potential of parasite populations throughout much of West Africa.

  19. Occurrence and recurrence of gastric dilatation with or without volvulus after incisional gastropexy

    PubMed Central

    Przywara, John F.; Abel, Steven B.; Peacock, John T.; Shott, Susan

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated recurrence of gastric dilatation without (GD) or with volvulus (GDV) after incisional gastropexy (IG) in dogs that underwent IG for prevention of GDV. Signalment, concurrent surgical procedures, presence of GD or GDV at the time of IG were obtained from medical records of dogs that underwent IG. Owners were contacted to determine whether the dogs experienced GD or GDV after IG, dates of postoperative GD or GDV episodes, survival status, date of death for deceased dogs. Gastric dilatation and GDV recurrence rates were calculated for 40 dogs that had at least 2 y follow-up from the time when IG was performed and for dogs that experienced GD or GDV during the follow-up period. No dogs experienced GDV after IG and 2 dogs (5.0%) experienced GD after IG. The results suggest that GD and GDV rates after IG may be comparable to recurrence rates after other methods of gastropexy. PMID:25320388

  20. Colon cancer - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - colon cancer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on colon cancer : American Cancer Society -- www.cancer.org/cancer/colonandrectumcancer/index Colon Cancer Alliance -- www.ccalliance.org National ...

  1. Interruption of Transmission of Onchocerca volvulus in the Southern Chiapas Focus, México

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Pérez, Mario A.; Domínguez-Vázquez, Alfredo; Unnasch, Thomas R.; Hassan, Hassan K.; Arredondo-Jiménez, Juan I.; Orozco-Algarra, María Eugenia; Rodríguez-Morales, Kristel B.; Rodríguez-Luna, Isabel C.; Prado-Velasco, Francisco Gibert

    2013-01-01

    Background The Southern Chiapas focus of onchocerciasis in Southern Mexico represents one of the major onchocerciasis foci in Latin America. All 559 endemic communities of this focus have undergone semi-annual mass treatment with ivermectin since 1998. In 50 communities of this focus, ivermectin frequency shifted from twice to four times a year in 2003; an additional 113 communities were added to the quarterly treatment regimen in 2009 to achieve a rapid suppression of transmission. Methodology/Principal findings In-depth epidemiologic and entomologic assessments were performed in six sentinel communities (which had undergone 2 rounds of ivermectin treatment per year) and three extra-sentinel communities (which had undergone 4 rounds of ivermectin treatment per year). None of the 67,924 Simulium ochraceum s.l. collected from this focus during the dry season of 2011 were found to contain parasite DNA when tested by polymerase chain reaction-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (PCR-ELISA), resulting in an upper bound of the 95% confidence interval (95%-ULCI) of the infective rate in the vectors of 0.06/2,000 flies examined. Serological assays testing for Onchocerca volvulus exposure conducted on 4,230 children 5 years of age and under (of a total population of 10,280 in this age group) revealed that 2/4,230 individuals were exposed to O. volvulus (0.05%; one sided 95% confidence interval = 0.08%). Conclusions/Significance The in-depth epidemiological and entomological findings from the Southern Chiapas focus meet the criteria for interruption of transmission developed by the international community. PMID:23556018

  2. Role of local conditions of a turbulent boundary layer flow on the colonization and growth of a biofilm: direct numerical simulations and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coundoul, F.; Moulin, F.; Bonometti, T.

    2012-04-01

    . [1]. (which are limited to the inertial sub-layer and the upper roughness sub-layer). The objective of this study was to investigate the role of local conditions of a turbulent boundary layer flow in the development of a river biofilm especially in the phases of colonization and initial growth by using a numerical approach. A direct numerical simulations (DNS) of a turbulent boundary layer flow over a bed of hemispheres was performed using an Immersed Boundary Method. The validity of the scheme was checked by comparison with experimental and numerical results for a flow above a bed of regular cubes. Numerical simulations for a flow above hemispheres are presented and compared with measurements performed during river biofilm growth experiments in a hydraulic flume. The access to local flow conditions in the numerical simulation leads to a better understanding of the morphology of the colonization patches observed in the experiments.

  3. The New Nitinol Conformable Self-Expandable Metal Stents for Malignant Colonic Obstruction: A Pilot Experience as Bridge to Surgery Treatment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) are a nonsurgical option for treatment of malignant colorectal obstruction also as a bridge to surgery approach. The new nitinol conformable stent has improved clinical outcomes in these kinds of patients. We report a pilot experience with nitinol conformable SEMS placement as bridge to surgery treatment in patients with colorectal obstruction. Materials and Methods. Between April and August 2012, we collected data on colonic nitinol conformable SEMS placement in a cohort of consecutive symptomatic patients, with malignant colorectal obstruction, who were treated as a bridge to surgery. Technical success, clinical success, and adverse events were recorded. Results. Ten patients (7 male (70%)), with a mean age of 69.2 ± 10.1, were evaluated. The mean length of the stenosis was 3.6 ± 0.6 cm. Five patients (50%) were treated on an emergency basis. The median time from stent placement to surgery was 16 days (interquartile range 7–21). Technical and clinical success was achieved in all patients with a significant early improvement of symptoms. No adverse events due to the SEMS placement were observed. Conclusion. This pilot study confirmed the important role of nitinol conformable SEMS as a bridge to surgery option in the treatment of symptomatic malignant colorectal obstruction. PMID:24526914

  4. LIFE experiment: isolation of cryptoendolithic organisms from Antarctic colonized sandstone exposed to space and simulated Mars conditions on the international space station.

    PubMed

    Scalzi, Giuliano; Selbmann, Laura; Zucconi, Laura; Rabbow, Elke; Horneck, Gerda; Albertano, Patrizia; Onofri, Silvano

    2012-06-01

    Desiccated Antarctic rocks colonized by cryptoendolithic communities were exposed on the International Space Station (ISS) to space and simulated Mars conditions (LiFE-Lichens and Fungi Experiment). After 1.5 years in space samples were retrieved, rehydrated and spread on different culture media. Colonies of a green alga and a pink-coloured fungus developed on Malt-Agar medium; they were isolated from a sample exposed to simulated Mars conditions beneath a 0.1 % T Suprasil neutral density filter and from a sample exposed to space vacuum without solar radiation exposure, respectively. None of the other flight samples showed any growth after incubation. The two organisms able to grow were identified at genus level by Small SubUnit (SSU) and Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) rDNA sequencing as Stichococcus sp. (green alga) and Acarospora sp. (lichenized fungal genus) respectively. The data in the present study provide experimental information on the possibility of eukaryotic life transfer from one planet to another by means of rocks and of survival in Mars environment.

  5. LIFE Experiment: Isolation of Cryptoendolithic Organisms from Antarctic Colonized Sandstone Exposed to Space and Simulated Mars Conditions on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalzi, Giuliano; Selbmann, Laura; Zucconi, Laura; Rabbow, Elke; Horneck, Gerda; Albertano, Patrizia; Onofri, Silvano

    2012-06-01

    Desiccated Antarctic rocks colonized by cryptoendolithic communities were exposed on the International Space Station (ISS) to space and simulated Mars conditions (LiFE— Lichens and Fungi Experiment). After 1.5 years in space samples were retrieved, rehydrated and spread on different culture media. Colonies of a green alga and a pink-coloured fungus developed on Malt-Agar medium; they were isolated from a sample exposed to simulated Mars conditions beneath a 0.1 % T Suprasil neutral density filter and from a sample exposed to space vacuum without solar radiation exposure, respectively. None of the other flight samples showed any growth after incubation. The two organisms able to grow were identified at genus level by Small SubUnit (SSU) and Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) rDNA sequencing as Stichococcus sp. (green alga) and Acarospora sp. (lichenized fungal genus) respectively. The data in the present study provide experimental information on the possibility of eukaryotic life transfer from one planet to another by means of rocks and of survival in Mars environment.

  6. LIFE experiment: isolation of cryptoendolithic organisms from Antarctic colonized sandstone exposed to space and simulated Mars conditions on the international space station.

    PubMed

    Scalzi, Giuliano; Selbmann, Laura; Zucconi, Laura; Rabbow, Elke; Horneck, Gerda; Albertano, Patrizia; Onofri, Silvano

    2012-06-01

    Desiccated Antarctic rocks colonized by cryptoendolithic communities were exposed on the International Space Station (ISS) to space and simulated Mars conditions (LiFE-Lichens and Fungi Experiment). After 1.5 years in space samples were retrieved, rehydrated and spread on different culture media. Colonies of a green alga and a pink-coloured fungus developed on Malt-Agar medium; they were isolated from a sample exposed to simulated Mars conditions beneath a 0.1 % T Suprasil neutral density filter and from a sample exposed to space vacuum without solar radiation exposure, respectively. None of the other flight samples showed any growth after incubation. The two organisms able to grow were identified at genus level by Small SubUnit (SSU) and Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) rDNA sequencing as Stichococcus sp. (green alga) and Acarospora sp. (lichenized fungal genus) respectively. The data in the present study provide experimental information on the possibility of eukaryotic life transfer from one planet to another by means of rocks and of survival in Mars environment. PMID:22688852

  7. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in β-tubulin selected in Onchocerca volvulus following repeated ivermectin treatment: possible indication of resistance selection.

    PubMed

    Nana-Djeunga, Hugues; Bourguinat, Catherine; Pion, Sébastien D S; Kamgno, Joseph; Gardon, Jacques; Njiokou, Flobert; Boussinesq, Michel; Prichard, Roger K

    2012-09-01

    The control of onchocerciasis or river blindness by mass treatment of the population with ivermectin (IVM) has been a great success until now, so that in certain foci its elimination has become feasible. However, after more than 20 years of repeated IVM mass treatment, the disease still persists in many endemic countries. Sub-optimal responses and genetic changes have been reported in Onchocerca volvulus populations under high IVM pressure but more work is needed to determine whether resistance is developing. The situation needs to be urgently clarified to preserve the achievements of onchocerciasis control programs. In this study, O. volvulus adult worms were collected from the same individuals, before IVM exposure and following three years of annual or three-monthly treatments at 150 μg/kg or 800 μg/kg. Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) occurring in the β-tubulin gene of these parasites were investigated. We found changes in genotype frequencies in O. volvulus β-tubulin gene associated with IVM treatments. The SNP at position 1545 (A/G) showed a significant increase in frequency of the less common nucleotide in the female worms following treatment. After 13 three-monthly treatments, female worm homozygotes with the less common genotype, prior to treatment, increased in frequency. The selected homozygotes, as well as heterozygotes, appeared to be less fertile (without or with very few embryonic stages in their uteri) than the wild-type homozygotes. These results provide additional evidence for genetic selection and strengthen the warning that selection for IVM resistance may be occurring in some O. volvulus populations. PMID:22677339

  8. Analysis of Wuchereria bancrofti infections in a village community in northern Nigeria: increased prevalence in individuals infected with Onchocerca volvulus.

    PubMed

    Engelbrecht, Fred; Oettl, Tobias; Herter, Ursula; Link, Claudia; Philipp, Diana; Edeghere, Henry; Kaliraj, P; Enwezor, Felicia

    2003-03-01

    Infections with Wuchereria bancrofti causing lymphatic filariasis still represent one of the major health problems in the tropics, with 120 million people infected and over 750 million exposed to this filarial parasite. We have studied lymphatic filariasis infections as part of a multi-parasite survey in a village community in the savannah of northern Nigeria. We analysed serum samples from 341 individuals aged 5-70 years, detecting a W. bancrofti circulating antigen using the commercially available ICT Filariasis card test. The prevalence of infections was 10% and clearly age-dependent, increasing from below 2% in children to over 20% in subjects older than 40 years. Measuring IgG4 antibodies against the recombinant W. bancrofti antigen SXP1 showed that 36% of all tested individuals had been at least exposed to the parasite. Antibody levels also increased very significantly with age. A further analysis measuring Onchocerca volvulus-specific IgG4 antibodies showed a very significant association between infections with O. volvulus and those with W. bancrofti. Our data show that infections with W. bancrofti in Nigeria are still a frequently occurring health problem, since they are more prevalent than previously reported, and that individuals with an O. volvulus infection are more often infected with W. bancrofti than expected statistically. PMID:12543143

  9. Small volume resuscitation with hypertonic sodium chloride solution in cattle undergoing surgical correction of abomasal volvulus.

    PubMed

    Sickinger, M; Doll, K; Roloff, N C; Halekoh, U

    2014-09-01

    A randomized clinical trial was conducted to compare the efficacy of rapid intravenous (IV) infusion of a 7.2% hypertonic saline solution with that of continuous application of an isotonic solution in stabilizing the circulation of cows with abomasal volvulus. Cattle treated with hypertonic saline had a significantly greater reduction in volume deficit within the first 10 min of therapy than cows treated with isotonic saline (from 5.9 ± 4.8 to 2.1 ± 4.4 L/100 kg vs. 7.0 ± 4.5 to 4.9 ± 3.8 L/100 kg, respectively). The central venous pressure (CVP) of the cows given the hypertonic saline rose within the first 10 min of therapy from 7.3 ± 3.5 to 10.8 ± 3.4 cm H2O, while the CVP of the cattle treated with isotonic saline did not increase significantly during this time. Sixty minutes after the start of the infusion, the CVP of the isotonic group was still significantly lower than that of the hypertonic group (9.5 ± 2.1 vs. 10.3 ± 3.3 cm H2O, respectively). Within the first 60 min, the base excess decreased from 5.5 ± 6.9 to 4.7 ± 6.2 mmol/L in the hypertonic group whereas it increased from 5.6 ± 5.7 to 6.8 ± 5.4 mmol/L in the isotonic group. These results suggest that for cows with abomasal volvulus, IV therapy with hypertonic saline may improve the haemodynamic and circulatory situation considerably faster and more effectively than continuous infusion with isotonic saline.

  10. Lack of Active Onchocerca volvulus Transmission in the Northern Chiapas Focus of Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Pérez, Mario A.; Unnasch, Thomas R.; Domínguez-Vázquez, Alfredo; Morales-Castro, Alba L.; Richards, Frank; Peña-Flores, Graciela P.; Orozco-Algarra, María Eugenia; Prado-Velasco, Gibert

    2010-01-01

    The northern Chiapas onchocerciasis focus has undergone 11 years of ivermectin mass treatment. No evidence of microfilariae in the cornea and/or anterior chamber of the eye or in skin snips was seen in residents examined in 2006 in two sentinel communities (upper limit of the 95% confidence interval [UL 95% CI] = 0.5% and 0.3%, respectively). In children 10 and under, 0 of 305 were found to harbor antibodies to Ov16, a marker of parasite exposure; 0 of 4,400 Simulium ochraceum s.l. collected in 2005 contained parasite DNA, giving an UL 95% CI for the infective rate of 0.9/2,000, and an UL 95% CI of the seasonal transmission potential of 1.2 L3/person. These data, assumed to be representative of the focus as a whole, suggest that there is no ongoing transmission of Onchocerca volvulus in the northern Chiapas focus. Community-wide treatments with ivermectin were halted in 2008, and a post-treatment surveillance phase was initiated. PMID:20595471

  11. Interruption of Onchocerca volvulus transmission in the Abu Hamed focus, Sudan.

    PubMed

    Higazi, Tarig B; Zarroug, Isam M A; Mohamed, Hanan A; Elmubark, Wigdan A; Deran, Tong Chor M; Aziz, Nabil; Katabarwa, Moses; Hassan, Hassan K; Unnasch, Thomas R; Mackenzie, Charles D; Richards, Frank; Hashim, Kamal

    2013-07-01

    Abu Hamed, Sudan, the northernmost location of onchocerciasis in the world, began community-directed treatment with ivermectin (CDTI) in 1998, with annual treatments enhanced to semiannual in 2007. We assessed the status of the parasite transmission in 2011 entomologically, parasitologically, and serologically. O-150 pool screening showed no parasite DNA in 17,537 black flies collected in 2011 (95% confidence interval upper limit [95% CI UL] = 0.023). Skin microfilariae, nodules, and signs of skin disease were absent in 536 individuals in seven local communities. Similarly, no evidence of Onchocerca volvulus Ov16 antibodies was found in 6,756 school children ≤ 10 years (95% CI UL = 0.03%). Because this assessment of the focus meets the 2001 World Health Organization (WHO) criteria for interrupted transmission, treatment was halted in 2012, and a post-treatment surveillance period was initiated in anticipation of declaration of disease elimination in this area. We provide the first evidence in East Africa that long-term CDTI alone can interrupt transmission of onchocerciasis. PMID:23690554

  12. Onchocerca-Simulium interactions and the population and evolutionary biology of Onchocerca volvulus.

    PubMed

    Basáñez, María-Gloria; Churcher, Thomas S; Grillet, María-Eugenia

    2009-01-01

    Parasite-vector interactions shape the population dynamics of vector-borne infections and contribute to observed epidemiological patterns. Also, parasites and their vectors may co-evolve, giving rise to locally adapted combinations or complexes with the potential to stabilise the infection. Here, we focus on Onchocerca-Simulium interactions with particular reference to the transmission dynamics of human onchocerciasis. A wide range of simuliid species may act as vectors of Onchocerca volvulus, each exerting their own influence over the local epidemiology and the feasibility of controlling/eliminating the infection. Firstly, current understanding of the processes involved in parasite acquisition by, and development within, different Simulium species in West Africa and Latin America will be reviewed. A description of how Onchocerca and Simulium exert reciprocal effects on each other's survival at various stages of the parasite's life cycle within the blackfly, and may have adapted to minimise deleterious effects on fitness and maximise transmission will be given. Second, we describe the interactions in terms of resultant (positive and negative) density-dependent processes that regulate parasite abundance, and discuss their incorporation into mathematical models that provide useful qualitative insight regarding transmission breakpoints. Finally, we examine the interactions' influence upon the evolution of anthelmintic resistance, and conclude that local adaptation of Onchocerca-Simulium complexes will influence the feasibility of eliminating the parasite reservoir in different foci.

  13. The Onchocerca volvulus micro- and macrofilarial responses in onchocerciasis patients to increased dosage of diethylcarbamazine.

    PubMed

    Langham, M E; Beltranena, F

    1985-09-01

    The response of 45 severely infected onchocerciasis patients to relatively high doses of diethylcarbamazine citrate (DEC-C) has been determined. The treatment comprised two sequential phases; the first phase comprised the topical applications of a DEC-C lotion and of the anti-inflammatory steroid betamethasone. The second phase comprised the daily oral administration of high doses of DEC-C (30 mg/kg body wt) for seven days. Onchocerca volvulus microfilarial (o.v.mf.) counts in skin snips of the 45 patients decreased by 96 +/- 1.5% after 5 days of treatment with topical DEC-C lotion. Following the administration of oral DEC, the average O.v.mf. counts in the skin snips at days 51, 97, and 143 remained decreased by 85 to 93%. The mean O.v.mf. counts in 10 nodules excised from 5 treated patients at day 77 had decreased by 93% compared to the mean O.v.mf. counts in 11 nodules taken from 5 untreated patients with similar initial O.v.mf. infection. No visual loss resulted from the treatment.

  14. The relationship between gastrointestinal motility and gastric dilatation-volvulus in dogs.

    PubMed

    Gazzola, Krista M; Nelson, Laura L

    2014-09-01

    Gastric dilatation-volvulus (GDV) is a devastating disease that most commonly affects large and giant-breed dogs. Though a number of risk factors have been associated with the development of GDV, the etiology of GDV remains unclear. Abnormal gastric motility patterns and delayed gastric emptying have been previously described in dogs following GDV. Work evaluating the effects of gastropexy procedures and changes to gastric motility after experimental GDV has not found the same changes as those found in dogs with naturally occurring GDV. Although the role of abnormal gastric motility in dogs with GDV will need to be clarified with additional research, such study is likely to be facilitated by improved access to and development of noninvasive measurement techniques for the evaluation of gastric emptying and other motility parameters. In particular, the availability of Food and Drug Administration-approved wireless motility devices for the evaluation of gastrointestinal motility is particularly promising in the study of GDV and other functional gastrointestinal diseases of large and giant-breed dogs.

  15. [The epidemiological significance of neo-natal parasitism with microfilariae of Onchocerca volvulus (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Prost, A; Gorim de Ponsay, E

    1979-12-01

    Between April 1977 and June 1978, 214 babies born of 210 mothers infected with Onchocerciasis, were examined at the maternity of Po Hospital (Upper Volta). In four of them (1.9%) dermal microfilariae of Onchocerca volvulus were found during the first week after birth. In two other cases microfilariae were seen in the tissue of the umbilical cord. All specimens from placentas and amniotic fluid gave negative results. The infected babies were reexamined monthly monthly from 2 to 18 months, depending on the cases. One child remained positive until the 6th month follow-up. The base-line examination of 5.757 children less than 2 years old from different villages in the WHO Onchocerciasis Control Programme in the Volta River Basin Area showed that 1% of children less than one year old and 2% of children of 12 to 23 months old were carriers of dermal microfilariae. These results indicate that in meso- or hyperendemic areas children less than one year old and carriers of microfilariae of Onchocerca volbulus may have been infected in utero. The existence of such cases, in an area of vector control, does not prove a residual vector borne transmission. PMID:575449

  16. Meteorological influence on the occurrence of gastric dilatation-volvulus in military working dogs in Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, George E.; Levine, Michael; Anderson, Johnna D.; Trapp, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Gastric dilatation-volvulus (GDV) is a life-threatening condition in dogs and other species in which the stomach dilates and rotates on itself. The etiology of the disease is multi-factorial, but explicit precipitating causes are unknown. This study sought to determine if there was a significant association between changes in hourly-measured temperature and/or atmospheric pressure and the occurrence of GDV in the population of high-risk working dogs in Texas. The odds of a day being a GDV day, given certain temperature and atmospheric pressure conditions for that day or the day before, was estimated using logistic regression models. There were 57 days in which GDV(s) occurred, representing 2.60% of the days in the 6-year study period. The months of November, December, and January collectively accounted for almost half (47%) of all cases. Disease risk was negatively associated with daily maximum temperature. An increased risk of GDV was weakly associated with the occurrence of large hourly drops in temperature that day and of higher minimum barometric pressure that day and the day before GDV occurrence, but extreme changes were not predictive of the disease.

  17. [The epidemiological significance of neo-natal parasitism with microfilariae of Onchocerca volvulus (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Prost, A; Gorim de Ponsay, E

    1979-12-01

    Between April 1977 and June 1978, 214 babies born of 210 mothers infected with Onchocerciasis, were examined at the maternity of Po Hospital (Upper Volta). In four of them (1.9%) dermal microfilariae of Onchocerca volvulus were found during the first week after birth. In two other cases microfilariae were seen in the tissue of the umbilical cord. All specimens from placentas and amniotic fluid gave negative results. The infected babies were reexamined monthly monthly from 2 to 18 months, depending on the cases. One child remained positive until the 6th month follow-up. The base-line examination of 5.757 children less than 2 years old from different villages in the WHO Onchocerciasis Control Programme in the Volta River Basin Area showed that 1% of children less than one year old and 2% of children of 12 to 23 months old were carriers of dermal microfilariae. These results indicate that in meso- or hyperendemic areas children less than one year old and carriers of microfilariae of Onchocerca volbulus may have been infected in utero. The existence of such cases, in an area of vector control, does not prove a residual vector borne transmission.

  18. Histochemical enzyme-staining patterns of onchocerca volvulus microfilariae and their occurrence in different onchocerciasis areas.

    PubMed

    Omar, M S

    1978-12-01

    Histochemical differentiation of Onchocerca volvulus microfilariae from 164 patients in West African rain-forest (Liberia), Sudan-savanna (Upper Volta), Guatemala and the Yemen has been carried out using a staining method for the demonstration of acid phosphatase. Intrauterine microfilariae showed considerable changes in their enzyme activity during embryonic development which are probably associated with the maturation of the parasite before migration to the tissues. Five distinct types of staining patterns could be distinguished among microfilariae from the skin according to the localization of the enzyme in specific structures of the microfilaria. Two or more types of staining patterns were found in most persons in the different geographic regions. There were significant differences in the overall distribution of the various staining patterns in persons from the different areas. At the present state of our knowledge, little is known about the nature and significance of these differences in the staining patterns of microfilariae. The question of whether they can be ascribed to an ageing process, strain differences or other factors is discussed.

  19. Cross-sectional study of the association of abomasal displacement or volvulus with serum electrolyte and mineral concentrations in dairy cows.

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-Lecaroz, R; Warnick, L D; Guard, C L; Smith, M C; Barry, D A

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate serum mineral and electrolyte concentrations at the time of on-farm diagnosis of left displaced abomasum, right displaced abomasum, or abomasal volvulus in dairy cows. Data were collected from 104 affected cows and 96 control cows matched with cases, based on herd, parity, and stage of lactation. Cows with abomasal displacement or volvulus had significantly lower calcium, phosphorous, magnesium, potassium, and chloride concentrations and increased anion gap at the time of diagnosis compared with control cows from the same herds. The percentages of cases and controls with total serum calcium concentrations below the lower limit of the laboratory reference range (2.08 mmol/L [8.3 mg/dL]) were 70% and 23%, respectively. Based on the large percentage of cases with hypocalcemia, administering calcium salts at the time of treatment of field cases of abomasal displacement or volvulus may be beneficial. PMID:10769767

  20. [Management of traumatic injuries of the colon].

    PubMed

    Wong, J C; Quintero, O; Andrade, R

    1989-01-01

    We have reviewed our experience with penetrating lesions of the colon at the Santo Tomás Hospital. Good results were obtained with immediate suture of the lesions without need for colostomy when favorable conditions permit.

  1. Severe Symptomatic Hypermagnesemia Associated with Over-the-Counter Laxatives in a Patient with Renal Failure and Sigmoid Volvulus

    PubMed Central

    Khairi, Talal; Amer, Syed; Spitalewitz, Samuel; Alasadi, Lutfi

    2014-01-01

    Hypermagnesemia is an uncommon but a potentially serious clinical condition. Over-the-counter magnesium containing products are widely used as antacids or laxatives. Although generally well tolerated in patients with normal renal function, their unsupervised use in the elderly can result in severe symptomatic hypermagnesemia, especially in those patients with concomitant renal failure and bowel disorders. We report a case of severe symptomatic hypermagnesemia associated with over-the-counter laxatives in a 70-year-old male patient with renal failure and sigmoid volvulus, who was successfully treated with hemodialysis. PMID:24563801

  2. A case of fatal sigmoid volvulus visualized on postmortem radiography: The importance of image optimization with multidetector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Usui, Akihito; Kawasumi, Yusuke; Hosokai, Yoshiyuki; Ishizuka, Yuya; Ikeda, Tomoya; Saito, Haruo; Funayama, Masato

    2016-03-01

    This report describes the case of a man who developed fatal sigmoid volvulus that was identified on postmortem radiography before forensic autopsy. Postmortem radiography is useful for visualizing the body prior to autopsy. We discuss postmortem multidetector computed tomography that was tailored for optimum image quality to allow reconstruction of the fatal findings in multiple axes and in three dimensions, helping to pinpoint the anatomical sites of interest. This involves techniques such as manipulation of the scanning beam pitch and overlapping CT section acquisition. These techniques are best performed by personnel with CT technology training. PMID:26980251

  3. Are Organic Falls Bridging Reduced Environments in the Deep Sea? - Results from Colonization Experiments in the Gulf of Cádiz

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Marina R.; Matos, Fábio L.; Génio, Luciana; Hilário, Ana; Moura, Carlos J.; Ravara, Ascensão; Rodrigues, Clara F.

    2013-01-01

    Organic falls create localised patches of organic enrichment and disturbance where enhanced degradation is mediated by diversified microbial assemblages and specialized fauna. The view of organic falls as “stepping stones” for the colonization of deep-sea reducing environments has been often loosely used, but much remains to be proven concerning their capability to bridge dispersal among such environments. Aiming the clarification of this issue, we used an experimental approach to answer the following questions: Are relatively small organic falls in the deep sea capable of sustaining taxonomically and trophically diverse assemblages over demographically relevant temporal scales? Are there important depth- or site-related sources of variability for the composition and structure of these assemblages? Is the proximity of other reducing environments influential for their colonization? We analysed the taxonomical and trophic diversity patterns and partitioning (α- and β-diversity) of the macrofaunal assemblages recruited in small colonization devices with organic and inorganic substrata after 1-2 years of deployment on mud volcanoes of the Gulf of Cádiz. Our results show that small organic falls can sustain highly diverse and trophically coherent assemblages for time periods allowing growth to reproductive maturity, and successive generations of dominant species. The composition and structure of the assemblages showed variability consistent with their biogeographic and bathymetric contexts. However, the proximity of cold seeps had limited influence on the similarity between the assemblages of these two habitats and organic falls sustained a distinctive fauna with dominant substrate-specific taxa. We conclude that it is unlikely that small organic falls may regularly ensure population connectivity among cold seeps and vents. They may be a recurrent source of evolutionary candidates for the colonization of such ecosystems. However, there may be a critical size of

  4. Hinokitiol inhibits cell growth through induction of S-phase arrest and apoptosis in human colon cancer cells and suppresses tumor growth in a mouse xenograft experiment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youn-Sun; Choi, Kyeong-Mi; Kim, Wonkyun; Jeon, Young-Soo; Lee, Yong-Moon; Hong, Jin-Tae; Yun, Yeo-Pyo; Yoo, Hwan-Soo

    2013-12-27

    Hinokitiol (1), a tropolone-related natural compound, induces apoptosis and has anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antitumor activities. In this study, the inhibitory effects of 1 were investigated on human colon cancer cell growth and tumor formation of xenograft mice. HCT-116 and SW-620 cells derived from human colon cancers were found to be similarly susceptible to 1, with IC50 values of 4.5 and 4.4 μM, respectively. Compound 1 induced S-phase arrest in the cell cycle progression and decreased the expression levels of cyclin A, cyclin E, and Cdk2. Conversely, 1 increased the expression of p21, a Cdk inhibitor. Compound 1 decreased Bcl-2 expression and increased the expression of Bax, and cleaved caspase-9 and -3. The effect of 1 on tumor formation when administered orally was evaluated in male BALB/c-nude mice implanted intradermally separately with HCT-116 and SW-620 cells. Tumor volumes and tumor weights in the mice treated with 1 (100 mg/kg) were decreased in both cases. These results suggest that the suppression of tumor formation by compound 1 in human colon cancer may occur through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

  5. Is nodding syndrome an Onchocerca volvulus-induced neuroinflammatory disorder? Uganda's story of research in understanding the disease.

    PubMed

    Idro, Richard; Opar, Bernard; Wamala, Joseph; Abbo, Catherine; Onzivua, Sylvester; Mwaka, Deogratius Amos; Kakooza-Mwesige, Angelina; Mbonye, Anthony; Aceng, Jane R

    2016-04-01

    Nodding syndrome is a devastating neurological disorder, mostly affecting children in eastern Africa. An estimated 10000 children are affected. Uganda, one of the most affected countries, set out to systematically investigate the disease and develop interventions for it. On December 21, 2015, the Ministry of Health held a meeting with community leaders from the affected areas to disseminate the results of the investigations made to date. This article summarizes the presentation and shares the story of studies into this peculiar disease. It also shares the results of preliminary studies on its pathogenesis and puts into perspective an upcoming treatment intervention. Clinical and electrophysiological studies have demonstrated nodding syndrome to be a complex epilepsy disorder. A definitive aetiological agent has not been established, but in agreement with other affected countries, a consistent epidemiological association has been demonstrated with infection by Onchocerca volvulus. Preliminary studies of its pathogenesis suggest that nodding syndrome may be a neuroinflammatory disorder, possibly induced by antibodies to O. volvulus cross-reacting with neuron proteins. Histological examination of post-mortem brains has shown some yet to be characterized polarizable material in the majority of specimens. Studies to confirm these observations and a clinical trial are planned for 2016. PMID:26987477

  6. Transmission of Onchocerca volvulus by Simulium neavei in Mount Elgon focus of Eastern Uganda has been interrupted.

    PubMed

    Katabarwa, Moses; Lakwo, Tom; Habomugisha, Peace; Agunyo, Stella; Byamukama, Edson; Oguttu, David; Ndyomugyenyi, Richard; Tukesiga, Ephraim; Ochieng, Galex Orukan; Abwaimo, Francis; Onapa, Ambrose; Lwamafa, Dennis W K; Walsh, Frank; Unnasch, Thomas R; Richards, Frank O

    2014-06-01

    The study determined that Simulium neavei-transmitted onchocerciasis in Mount Elgon onchocerciasis focus had been interrupted. Annual mass treatment with ivermectin changed to two times per year along with vector elimination in 2007. Then, baseline microfilaria (mf) prevalence data of 1994 in five sentinel communities were compared with follow-up data in 2005 and 2011. Blood spots from 3,051 children obtained in 2009 were analyzed for Onchocerca volvulus immunoglobulin G4 antibodies. Fresh water crab host captures and blackflies collected indicated their infestation with larval stages of S. neavei and presence or absence of the vector, respectively. Mf rates dropped from 62.2% to 0.5%, and 1 (0.03%) of 3,051 children was positive for O. volvulus antibodies. Crab infestation dropped from 41.9% in 2007 to 0%, and S. neavei biting reduced to zero. Both remained zero for the next 3 years, confirming interruption of onchocerciasis transmission, and interventions were halted. PMID:24686740

  7. Bacterial Colonization of Particles: Growth and Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Grossart, Hans-Peter; Kiørboe, Thomas; Tang, Kam; Ploug, Helle

    2003-01-01

    Marine particles in the ocean are exposed to diverse bacterial communities, and colonization and growth of attached bacteria are important processes in the degradation and transformation of the particles. In an earlier study, we showed that the initial colonization of model particles by individual bacterial strains isolated from marine aggregates was a function of attachment and detachment. In the present study, we have investigated how this colonization process was further affected by growth and interspecific interactions among the bacteria. Long-term incubation experiments showed that growth dominated over attachment and detachment after a few hours in controlling the bacterial population density on agar particles. In the absence of grazing mortality, this growth led to an equilibrium population density consistent with the theoretical limit due to oxygen diffusion. Interspecific interaction experiments showed that the presence of some bacterial strains (“residents”) on the agar particles either increased or decreased the colonization rate of other strains (“newcomers”). Comparison between an antibiotic-producing strain and its antibiotic-free mutant showed no inhibitory effect on the newcomers due to antibiotic production. On the contrary, hydrolytic activity of the antibiotic-producing strain appeared to benefit the newcomers and enhance their colonization rate. These results show that growth- and species-specific interactions have to be taken into account to adequately describe bacterial colonization of marine particles. Changes in colonization pattern due to such small-scale processes may have profound effects on the transformation and fluxes of particulate matter in the ocean. PMID:12788756

  8. Bacterial colonization of particles: growth and interactions.

    PubMed

    Grossart, Hans-Peter; Kiørboe, Thomas; Tang, Kam; Ploug, Helle

    2003-06-01

    Marine particles in the ocean are exposed to diverse bacterial communities, and colonization and growth of attached bacteria are important processes in the degradation and transformation of the particles. In an earlier study, we showed that the initial colonization of model particles by individual bacterial strains isolated from marine aggregates was a function of attachment and detachment. In the present study, we have investigated how this colonization process was further affected by growth and interspecific interactions among the bacteria. Long-term incubation experiments showed that growth dominated over attachment and detachment after a few hours in controlling the bacterial population density on agar particles. In the absence of grazing mortality, this growth led to an equilibrium population density consistent with the theoretical limit due to oxygen diffusion. Interspecific interaction experiments showed that the presence of some bacterial strains ("residents") on the agar particles either increased or decreased the colonization rate of other strains ("newcomers"). Comparison between an antibiotic-producing strain and its antibiotic-free mutant showed no inhibitory effect on the newcomers due to antibiotic production. On the contrary, hydrolytic activity of the antibiotic-producing strain appeared to benefit the newcomers and enhance their colonization rate. These results show that growth- and species-specific interactions have to be taken into account to adequately describe bacterial colonization of marine particles. Changes in colonization pattern due to such small-scale processes may have profound effects on the transformation and fluxes of particulate matter in the ocean.

  9. The EndoRotor®: endoscopic mucosal resection system for non-thermal and rapid removal of esophageal, gastric, and colonic lesions: initial experience in live animals

    PubMed Central

    Hollerbach, Stephan; Wellmann, Axel; Meier, Peter; Ryan, Jeffery; Franco, Ramon; Koehler, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: The EndoRotor® is a novel, non-thermal, automated mechanical endoscopic resection system designed to remove benign mucosal neoplastic tissue throughout the gastrointestinal tract. It uses suction pressure to pull in mucosa and rapidly and precisely cut it while automatically transporting the samples to a collection trap for later histologic evaluation. Patients and methods: To study the technical properties and therapeutic potential of this new tool, we performed multiple upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopic mucosal resections in three healthy live pigs. Animals were anesthetized and kept artificially ventilated while two physicians performed multiple qualitative mucosal resections on various sites of the pigs’ esophagus, stomach, duodenum, and colon. Results: Rapid resection of flat and slightly elevated mucosa up to several centimeters in size/diameter was performed. No major bleeding occurred during and after resections. When used properly, no gastrointestinal wall perforations occurred during superficial resections. Perforations in the colon were only observed when the device was deliberately pushed against deeper sub-mucosal layers or when exceptional force was applied to penetrate the gastrointestinal wall. Histologic specimens showed complete mucosal removal at resection sites. The flexible catheter could be moved and directed towards most of the areas of interest in the gastrointestinal tract. Conclusion: The EndoRotor rapidly and easily resects flat and slightly elevated gastrointestinal mucosa with a short learning curve. Future studies in humans should be performed to prove its ability for large-area mucosal resections in benign conditions such as laterally spreading adenomas in the colon, or Barrett’s mucosa in the distal esophagus. PMID:27092332

  10. Ongoing Transmission of Onchocerca volvulus after 25 Years of Annual Ivermectin Mass Treatments in the Vina du Nord River Valley, in North Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Eisenbarth, Albert; Achukwi, Mbunkah Daniel; Renz, Alfons

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent reports of transmission interruption of Onchocerca volvulus, the causing agent of river blindness, in former endemic foci in the Americas, and more recently in West and East Africa, raise the question whether elimination of this debilitating disease is underway after long-term treatment of the population at risk with ivermectin. The situation in Central Africa has not yet been clearly assessed. Methods and findings Entomologic data from two former endemic river basins in North Cameroon were generated over a period of 43 and 48 months to follow-up transmission levels in areas under prolonged ivermectin control. Moreover, epidemiologic parameters of animal-borne Onchocerca spp. transmitted by the same local black fly vectors of the Simulium damnosum complex were recorded and their impact on O. volvulus transmission success evaluated. With mitochondrial DNA markers we unambiguously confirmed the presence of infective O. volvulus larvae in vectors from the Sudan savannah region (mean Annual Transmission Potential 2009–2012: 98, range 47–221), but not from the Adamawa highland region. Transmission rates of O. ochengi, a parasite of Zebu cattle, were high in both foci. Conclusions/significance The high cattle livestock density in conjunction with the high transmission rates of the bovine filaria O. ochengi prevents the transmission of O. volvulus on the Adamawa plateau, whereas transmission in a former hyperendemic focus was markedly reduced, but not completely interrupted after 25 years of ivermectin control. This study may be helpful to gauge the impact of the presence of animal-filariae for O. volvulus transmission in terms of the growing human and livestock populations in sub-Saharan countries. PMID:26926855

  11. Colon cancer screening

    MedlinePlus

    Screening for colon cancer; Colonoscopy - screening; Sigmoidoscopy - screening; Virtual colonoscopy - screening; Fecal immunochemical test; Stool DNA test; sDNA test; Colorectal cancer - screening; Rectal ...

  12. A Recombinant Positive Control for Serology Diagnostic Tests Supporting Elimination of Onchocerca volvulus

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Allison; Stevens, Eric J.; Yokobe, Lindsay; Faulx, Dunia; Kalnoky, Michael; Peck, Roger; Valdez, Melissa; Steel, Cathy; Karabou, Potochoziou; Banla, Méba; Soboslay, Peter T.; Adade, Kangi; Tekle, Afework H.; Cama, Vitaliano A.; Fischer, Peter U.; Nutman, Thomas B.; Unnasch, Thomas R.; de los Santos, Tala; Domingo, Gonzalo J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Serological assays for human IgG4 to the Onchocerca volvulus antigen Ov16 have been used to confirm elimination of onchocerciasis in much of the Americas and parts of Africa. A standardized source of positive control antibody (human anti-Ov16 IgG4) will ensure the quality of surveillance data using these tests. Methodology/Principal Findings A recombinant human IgG4 antibody to Ov16 was identified by screening against a synthetic human Fab phage display library and converted into human IgG4. This antibody was developed into different positive control formulations for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and rapid diagnostic test (RDT) platforms. Variation in ELISA results and utility as a positive control of the antibody were assessed from multiple laboratories. Temperature and humidity conditions were collected across seven surveillance activities from 2011–2014 to inform stability requirements for RDTs and positive controls. The feasibility of the dried positive control for RDT was evaluated during onchocerciasis surveillance activity in Togo, in 2014. When the anti-Ov16 IgG4 antibody was used as a standard dilution in horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and alkaline phosphatase (AP) ELISAs, the detection limits were approximately 1ng/mL by HRP ELISA and 10ng/mL by AP ELISA. Positive control dilutions and spiked dried blood spots (DBS) produced similar ELISA results. Used as a simple plate normalization control, the positive control antibody may improve ELISA data comparison in the context of inter-laboratory variation. The aggregate temperature and humidity monitor data informed temperature parameters under which the dried positive control was tested and are applicable inputs for testing of diagnostics tools intended for sub-Saharan Africa. As a packaged positive control for Ov16 RDTs, stability of the antibody was demonstrated for over six months at relevant temperatures in the laboratory and for over 15 weeks under field conditions. Conclusions The

  13. Primary anastomosis in the treatment of acute disease of the unprepared left colon.

    PubMed

    Trillo, C; Paris, M F; Brennan, J T

    1998-09-01

    Between June 1, 1990 and December 31, 1996, 58 consecutive patients with unprepared colons were urgently explored for nontraumatic disease with intent to proceed with primary left-sided colonic anastomosis. Unprotected anastomoses were not attempted in 15 patients. The causes of exclusion included preoperative and intraoperative shock in three patients, and three patients were on long-term high-dose steroids, four had gross fecal contamination of the peritoneal cavity, four had large pelvic abscesses, and one had ischemic colitis. All 43 patients undergoing anastomosis without protective colostomy had stapled anastomoses. Indications included complicated diverticular disease in 32 cases. There were nine cases of obstruction from colorectal carcinoma and one obstruction due to sigmoid volvulus. There was one case of perforation from pseudomembranous enterocolitis. The most common complications were: atelectasis in nine cases, wound infection in two cases, and prolonged ileus in two cases. Pelvic abscess occurred in one case. There was one wound dehiscence. There was one anastomotic dehiscence, and there was no mortality. Operative time averaged 85 minutes and hospital length of stay 9.7 days. Primary anastomosis of the unprepared left colon is safe in most urgent and emergent situations, thus avoiding the significant morbidity and cost of colostomy closure. PMID:9731807

  14. Volvulus grêlique sur hydatidose péritonéale: une cause rare d'occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Bouassria, Abdesslam; Mazine, Khalid; Elbouhaddouti, Hicham; Mouaqit, Ouadii; Ousadden, Abdelmalek; Mazaz, Khalid; Benjelloun, Elbachir; Taleb, Khalid Ait

    2014-01-01

    L'hydatidose péritonéale peut être primitive, hématogène ou hétérotopique, comme elle peut être secondaire et résulte de la fissuration d'un kyste hydatique, le plus souvent hépatique. Cliniquement polymorphe, elle peut se révéler par des douleurs abdominales ou par la palpation d'une masse abdominale. Nous rapportons le cas d'une patiente chez qui l'hydatidose péritonéale était révélée par un accident occlusif: un volvulus grêlique dû à un volumineux kyste hydatique mésentérique. Le traitement de l'hydatidose péritonéale est chirurgical, couplé à un traitement médical à base d'albendazole. PMID:25400846

  15. Multiple risk factors for the gastric dilatation-volvulus syndrome in dogs: a practitioner/owner case-control study.

    PubMed

    Glickman, L T; Glickman, N W; Schellenberg, D B; Simpson, K; Lantz, G C

    1997-01-01

    A study was conducted of 101 dogs (i.e., case dogs) that had acute episodes of gastric dilatation-volvulus (GDV) and 101 dogs (i.e., control dogs) with nonGDV-related problems. The control dogs were matched individually to case dogs by breed or size, and age. Predisposing factors that significantly (p less than 0.10) increased a dog's risk of GDV were male gender, being underweight, eating one meal daily, eating rapidly, and a fearful temperament. Predisposing factors that decreased the risk of GDV significantly were a "happy" temperament and inclusion of table foods in a usual diet consisting primarily of dry dog food. The only factor that appeared to precipitate an acute episode of GDV was stress.

  16. Rapid Point-of-Contact Tool for Mapping and Integrated Surveillance of Wuchereria bancrofti and Onchocerca volvulus Infection.

    PubMed

    Steel, Cathy; Golden, Allison; Stevens, Eric; Yokobe, Lindsay; Domingo, Gonzalo J; de los Santos, Tala; Nutman, Thomas B

    2015-08-01

    Elimination programs for Wuchereria bancrofti and Onchocerca volvulus are in critical need of sensitive, specific, and point-of-contact (POC) tools that can be used for surveillance years beyond cessation of mass drug administration when infection intensities are low. Previously, Wb123 and Ov16 were identified individually as potential filarial antigens for an antibody-based POC test. The present study compares single-antigen Wb123- and Ov16-based POC tests with an integrated configuration to detect antibodies to Wb123 and Ov16 simultaneously. Wb123 and Ov16 isolates were striped onto lateral flow strips containing anti-IgG4. Sera from W. bancrofti-, O. volvulus-, and other helminth-infected or -uninfected individuals were added to the strips with buffer. Strips were read for the appearance of a positive or negative test line for both antigens at 20 min and following drying. Sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values were calculated for the single-antigen and biplex strips. Single and biplex lateral flow strips showed nearly identical results, with >90% sensitivity for Ov16 and >92% sensitivity for Wb123. Overall specificities for the single and biplex tests were 98% and 96% for Ov16 and Wb123, respectively. Biplex tests performed as well as the single-antigen tests regardless of the intensity of patient IgG4 response. The high sensitivity and specificity make these new biplex tests extremely useful for POC long-term surveillance following mass drug administration in Africa that should reduce time and cost in areas where bancroftian filariasis and onchocerciasis are coendemic. PMID:26018537

  17. Genotypic analysis of β-tubulin in Onchocerca volvulus from communities and individuals showing poor parasitological response to ivermectin treatment.

    PubMed

    Osei-Atweneboana, Mike Y; Boakye, Daniel A; Awadzi, Kwablah; Gyapong, John O; Prichard, Roger K

    2012-12-01

    Ivermectin (IVM) has been in operational use for the control of onchocerciasis for two decades and remains the only drug of choice. To investigate the parasitological responses and genetic profile of Onchocerca volvulus, we carried out a 21 month epidemiological study to determine the response of the parasite to IVM in 10 Ghanaian endemic communities. Onchocerca nodules were surgically removed from patients in three IVM response categories (good, intermediate and poor) and one IVM naïve community. DNA from adult worms was analyzed to determine any association between genotype and IVM response phenotypic. Embryogramme analysis showed significantly higher reproductive activity in worms from poor response communities, which had up to 41% of females with live stretched microfilaria (mf) in utero, despite IVM treatment, compared with good response communities, which had no intra-uterine stretched mf. β-tubulin isotype 1 gene has been shown to be linked to IVM selection in O. volvulus and also known to be associated with IVM resistance in veterinary nematodes. We have genotyped the full length genomic DNA sequence of the β-tubulin gene from 127 adult worms obtained from the four community categories. We found SNPs at 24 sites over the entire 3696 bp. Eight of the SNPs occurred at significantly higher (p < 0.05) frequencies in the poor response communities compared with the good response communities and the IVM naïve community. Phenotypic and genotypic analyses show that IVM resistance has been selected and the genotype (1183GG/1188CC/1308TT/1545GG) was strongly associated with the resistance phenotype. Since the region in the β-tubulin gene where these four SNPs occur is within 362 bp, it is feasible to develop a genetic marker for the early detection of IVM resistance. PMID:24533268

  18. Rapid Point-of-Contact Tool for Mapping and Integrated Surveillance of Wuchereria bancrofti and Onchocerca volvulus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Steel, Cathy; Golden, Allison; Stevens, Eric; Yokobe, Lindsay; Domingo, Gonzalo J.; de los Santos, Tala

    2015-01-01

    Elimination programs for Wuchereria bancrofti and Onchocerca volvulus are in critical need of sensitive, specific, and point-of-contact (POC) tools that can be used for surveillance years beyond cessation of mass drug administration when infection intensities are low. Previously, Wb123 and Ov16 were identified individually as potential filarial antigens for an antibody-based POC test. The present study compares single-antigen Wb123- and Ov16-based POC tests with an integrated configuration to detect antibodies to Wb123 and Ov16 simultaneously. Wb123 and Ov16 isolates were striped onto lateral flow strips containing anti-IgG4. Sera from W. bancrofti-, O. volvulus-, and other helminth-infected or -uninfected individuals were added to the strips with buffer. Strips were read for the appearance of a positive or negative test line for both antigens at 20 min and following drying. Sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values were calculated for the single-antigen and biplex strips. Single and biplex lateral flow strips showed nearly identical results, with >90% sensitivity for Ov16 and >92% sensitivity for Wb123. Overall specificities for the single and biplex tests were 98% and 96% for Ov16 and Wb123, respectively. Biplex tests performed as well as the single-antigen tests regardless of the intensity of patient IgG4 response. The high sensitivity and specificity make these new biplex tests extremely useful for POC long-term surveillance following mass drug administration in Africa that should reduce time and cost in areas where bancroftian filariasis and onchocerciasis are coendemic. PMID:26018537

  19. Giant colon diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Chater, C; Saudemont, A; Zerbib, P

    2015-11-01

    Giant colonic diverticulum is defined by a diverticulum whose diameter is greater than 4 cm. This is a rare entity, arising mainly in the sigmoid colon. The diagnosis is based on abdominal computed tomography that shows a gas-filled structure communicating with the adjacent colon, with a smooth, thin diverticular wall that does not enhance after injection of contrast. Surgical treatment is recommended even in asymptomatic diverticula, due to the high prevalence and severity of complications. The gold standard treatment is segmental colectomy. Some authors propose a diverticulectomy when the giant diverticulum is unique.

  20. Transverse colon conduit diversion

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, J.D.; Buchsbaum, H.J.

    1986-05-01

    The versatility and other advantages of the transverse colon conduit for urinary diversion have been described and implemented in 50 patients. Because most patients considered for this procedure will be at high risk because of a history of significant pelvic irradiation, underlying malignancy, poor renal function, fistula, and so forth, the technical details of surgery and patient selection cannot be minimized. The transverse colon segment is indicated for primary supravesical diversion as well as for salvage of problems related to ileal conduits. Adenocarcinoma of the colon is an unlikely long-term complication of this form of diversion because the fecal stream is absent. Now that the transverse colon conduit has been used for more than 10 years, meaningful comparisons with ileal segments should soon be available.

  1. Laparoscopic Colon Resection

    MedlinePlus

    ... inches to complete the procedure. What are the Advantages of Laparoscopic Colon Resection? Results may vary depending ... type of procedure and patient’s overall condition. Common advantages are: Less postoperative pain May shorten hospital stay ...

  2. Volvulus gastrique aigu sur éventration diaphragmatique de l'adulte: à propos d'un cas et revue de la littérature

    PubMed Central

    Guèye, Mohamadou Lamine; Touré, Alpha Oumar; Thiam, Ousmane; Seck, Mamadou; Cissé, Mamadou; Kâ, Ousmane; Dieng, Madieng; Touré, Cheikh Tidiane

    2015-01-01

    Le volvulus gastrique aigu sur éventration diaphragmatique est une affection rare et une urgence diagnostique et thérapeutique. Sa présentation clinique est peu spécifique et la tomodensitométrie abdominale permet de confirmer le diagnostic. Nous rapportons le cas d'un patient de 22 ans qui présentaitun syndrome occlusif et une voussure épigastrique. A la radiographie de l'Abdomen Sans Préparation, on notait 2 niveaux hydro-aériques sous la coupole diaphragmatique gauche qui était surélevée. Une dévolvulation et une gastrectomie atypique ont été réalisées devant un volvulus gastrique aigu avec nécrose du fundus mis en évidence à la laparotomie. Les suites opératoires ont été simples. PMID:26161223

  3. Intestinal colonization resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lawley, Trevor D; Walker, Alan W

    2013-01-01

    Dense, complex microbial communities, collectively termed the microbiota, occupy a diverse array of niches along the length of the mammalian intestinal tract. During health and in the absence of antibiotic exposure the microbiota can effectively inhibit colonization and overgrowth by invading microbes such as pathogens. This phenomenon is called ‘colonization resistance’ and is associated with a stable and diverse microbiota in tandem with a controlled lack of inflammation, and involves specific interactions between the mucosal immune system and the microbiota. Here we overview the microbial ecology of the healthy mammalian intestinal tract and highlight the microbe–microbe and microbe–host interactions that promote colonization resistance. Emerging themes highlight immunological (T helper type 17/regulatory T-cell balance), microbiota (diverse and abundant) and metabolic (short-chain fatty acid) signatures of intestinal health and colonization resistance. Intestinal pathogens use specific virulence factors or exploit antibiotic use to subvert colonization resistance for their own benefit by triggering inflammation to disrupt the harmony of the intestinal ecosystem. A holistic view that incorporates immunological and microbiological facets of the intestinal ecosystem should facilitate the development of immunomodulatory and microbe-modulatory therapies that promote intestinal homeostasis and colonization resistance. PMID:23240815

  4. Epitopes of the Onchocerca volvulus RAL1 antigen, a member of the calreticulin family of proteins, recognized by sera from patients with onchocerciasis.

    PubMed Central

    Rokeach, L A; Zimmerman, P A; Unnasch, T R

    1994-01-01

    RAL1 is an antigen (Ag) encoded by the filarial nematode Onchocerca volvulus, the parasite causing onchocerciasis (river blindness). RAL1 shares 64.4% identity with the autoantigen calreticulin. The striking similarity of the parasite Ag and the human autoantigen has led to the hypothesis that RAL1 may induce a cross-reactive immune response to calreticulin, which in turn may be involved in the pathogenesis of onchocerciasis. To test this hypothesis, we explored the immune response to RAL1 recombinant Ag (RAL1 rAg) and human calreticulin in patients with O. volvulus infection. A total of 86% of the O. volvulus-infected individuals produced antibodies recognizing RAL1 rAg. Antibody reactivity to RAL1 rAg in patient sera was confined primarily to the central and carboxyl-terminal parts of the molecule. No significant correlations were found to associate recognition of RAL1 rAg, or any particular portion thereof, with a particular disease state. Antibodies against RAL1 thus appear to be produced as a general immune reaction to O. volvulus infection and do not necessarily lead to a cross-reacting response with the host protein. In contrast, 33% of the patient sera tested bound recombinant human calreticulin. All of these sera also recognized a polypeptide encompassing the carboxyl-terminal portion of the RAL1 rAg. These results suggest that recognition of an epitope encoded in the carboxyl-terminal portion of RAL1 is at least in part responsible for inducing a cross-reacting immune response to the host protein. Images PMID:7520419

  5. Rapid suppression of Onchocerca volvulus transmission in two communities of the Southern Chiapas focus, Mexico, achieved by quarterly treatments with Mectizan.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Pérez, Mario A; Lutzow-Steiner, Miguel A; Segura-Cabrera, Aldo; Lizarazo-Ortega, Cristian; Domínguez-Vázquez, Alfredo; Sauerbrey, Mauricio; Richards, Frank; Unnasch, Thomas R; Hassan, Hassan K; Hernández-Hernández, Raymundo

    2008-08-01

    The impact of quarterly Mectizan (ivermectin) treatments on transmission, microfiladermia, and ocular lesions was evaluated in two formerly hyperendemic communities (Las Golondrinas and Las Nubes II) located in the main endemic focus for onchocerciasis in Southern Chiapas, Mexico. The data suggest that Onchocerca volvulus transmission has been suppressed after elimination of microfiladermia in these two communities. Increasing the frequency of Mectizan treatment to four times per year appears to have resulted in the rapid suppression of transmission in communities with residual transmission.

  6. Comparative analysis of macrophage migration inhibitory factors (MIFs) from the parasitic nematode Onchocerca volvulus and the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Ajonina-Ekoti, Irene; Kurosinski, Marc Andre; Younis, Abuelhassan Elshazly; Ndjonka, Dieudonne; Tanyi, Manchang Kingsley; Achukwi, Mbunkah; Eisenbarth, Albert; Ajonina, Caroline; Lüersen, Kai; Breloer, Minka; Brattig, Norbert W; Liebau, Eva

    2013-09-01

    The macrophage migration inhibitory factors (MIFs) from the filarial parasite Onchocerca volvulus (OvMIF) were compared to the MIFs from the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (CeMIF) with respect to molecular, biochemical and immunological properties. Except for CeMIF-4, all other MIFs demonstrated tautomerase activity. Surprisingly, OvMIF-1 displayed oxidoreductase activity. The strongest immunostaining for OvMIF-1 was observed in the outer cellular covering of the adult worm body, the syncytial hypodermis; moderate immunostaining was observed in the uterine wall. The generation of a strong humoral immune response towards OvMIF-1 and reduced reactivity to OvMIF-2 was indicated by high IgG levels in patients infected with O. volvulus and cows infected with the closely related Onchocerca ochengi, both MIFs revealing identical amino acid sequences. Using Litomosoides sigmodontis-infected mice, a laboratory model for filarial infection, MIFs derived from the tissue-dwelling O. volvulus, the rodent gut-dwelling Strongyloides ratti and from free-living C. elegans were recognized, suggesting that L. sigmodontis MIF-specific IgM and IgG1 were produced during L. sigmodontis infection of mice and cross-reacted with all MIF proteins tested. Thus, MIF apparently functions as a target of B cell response during nematode infection, but in the natural Onchocerca-specific human and bovine infection, the induced antibodies can discriminate between MIFs derived from parasitic or free-living nematodes. PMID:23820606

  7. Infection rates and parasitic loads of Onchocerca volvulus, and other filariae, in Simulium sanctipauli s.l. and S. yahense in a rain-forest area of Liberia.

    PubMed

    Garms, R

    1987-09-01

    Simulium sanctipauli s.l. and S. yahense are common and widespread in the rain-forest zone of Liberia, but differ with regard to their biting densities and contribution to the transmission of Onchocerca volvulus. Although, in a study area on the St. Pauli River, S. sanctipauli s.l. (presumably S. soubrense in the sense of Post) was the predominant ma-biting species (74.3% of 30,855 females examined), S. yahense was shown to be the important vector. While 1000 biting females of S. yahense carried 96 3rd stage larvae indistinguishable from O. volvulus, only 14 were found per 1000 females of S. sanctipauli s.l. Of the parous females (3135 S. sanctipauli s.l./1621 S. yahense) 23.8/39.9% harboured 1st and/or 2nd stage filarial larvae and 1.9/9.4% 3rd stage larvae of O. volvulus. Animal filariae of unknown origin, indicative of zoophily, were very common in S. sanctipauli s.l. (13.8%) but practically absent from S. yahense (0.5%). In spite of its poorer vectorial performance S. sanctipauli s.l. cannot be neglected as a vector because it may occur in high biting densities and contribute considerably to the transmission, in particular in the vicinity of the St. Paul River. The interplay of two vector species, which develop in different types of water-courses explains the overall high endemicity of onchocerciasis in the study area.

  8. Colonic diverticulitis in adolescents: an index case and associated syndromes.

    PubMed

    Santin, Brian J; Prasad, Vinay; Caniano, Donna A

    2009-10-01

    Diverticular disease of the colon, a common problem among adults, is diagnosed rarely in children. We report an adolescent patient with sigmoid diverticulitis who required operative treatment. Pediatric patients with the complications of diverticula typically have conditions that result in genetic alterations affecting the components of the colonic wall. Our patient had Williams-Beuren syndrome, although Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Marfan syndrome, and cystic fibrosis may also be associated with colonic diverticula in adolescence. Pediatric patients with these disorders who experience abdominal pain should be evaluated for the presence of colonic diverticular complications. PMID:19711089

  9. Vaccines to combat river blindness: expression, selection and formulation of vaccines against infection with Onchocerca volvulus in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Hess, Jessica A; Zhan, Bin; Bonne-Année, Sandra; Deckman, Jessica M; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Hotez, Peter J; Klei, Thomas R; Lustigman, Sara; Abraham, David

    2014-08-01

    Human onchocerciasis is a neglected tropical disease caused by Onchocerca volvulus and an important cause of blindness and chronic disability in the developing world. Although mass drug administration of ivermectin has had a profound effect on control of the disease, additional tools are critically needed including the need for a vaccine against onchocerciasis. The objectives of the present study were to: (i) select antigens with known vaccine pedigrees as components of a vaccine; (ii) produce the selected vaccine antigens under controlled conditions, using two expression systems and in one laboratory and (iii) evaluate their vaccine efficacy using a single immunisation protocol in mice. In addition, we tested the hypothesis that joining protective antigens as a fusion protein or in combination, into a multivalent vaccine, would improve the ability of the vaccine to induce protective immunity. Out of eight vaccine candidates tested in this study, Ov-103, Ov-RAL-2 and Ov-CPI-2M were shown to reproducibly induce protective immunity when administered individually, as fusion proteins or in combination. Although there was no increase in the level of protective immunity induced by combining the antigens into one vaccine, these antigens remain strong candidates for inclusion in a vaccine to control onchocerciasis in humans. PMID:24907553

  10. Effects of high doses of diethylcarbamazine on adult Onchocerca volvulus examined by the collagenase technique and by histology.

    PubMed

    Albiez, E J; Walter, G; Kaiser, A; Newland, H S; White, A T; Greene, B M; Taylor, H R; Büttner, D W

    1988-06-01

    Thirty adult male nodule carriers from a hyperendemic onchocerciasis area in the Liberian rain forest were treated with high doses of diethylcarbamazine (30 mg/kg/d) over one week. Another ten patients received placebo tablets and served as a control. All detectable nodules were removed from half of the patients at two months and from the remaining patients at ten months after chemotherapy. The adult worms in the nodules were examined for pathological alterations by the collagenase technique including embryogram, and by histology. No macrofilaricidal effect was observed at either time, and no significant reduction of microfilariae in the uteri of the female worms or in the tissue of the nodules was seen. Two months after the therapy there was a significant increase of degenerated stretched intrauterine microfilariae but this effect was no longer observed after ten months. No pathological effect was seen on the intrauterine coiled microfilariae. On the contrary, their number had significantly increased after ten months which could mean a stimulation of the embryogenesis. No effect on spermatogenesis was observed. Both techniques, the collagenase digestion and the histological examination of the nodules, provided similar results to demonstrate that there was no marked long lasting effect on O. volvulus after a treatment with high doses of diethylcarbamazine.

  11. Development of Onchocerca volvulus (Filarioidea: Onchocercidae) in the West African black fly Simulium yahense (Diptera: Simuliidae) in Liberia.

    PubMed

    Trpis, M; Wergin, W P; Murphy, C A

    2001-12-01

    Simulium yahense black flies infected with microfilaria of Onchocerca volvulus were kept in a defined insectary environment in Liberia, West Africa. A daily sample of infected flies was dissected for larvae developing in the thoracic muscles and examined for growth in stadial development. Microfilariae ingested by black flies transformed to the L1 larval stage without molting. Successive larval development included molting to the L2 stage and, finally, to the L3 stage, which was infective in humans. The cephalic cap, consisting of a laterally located hook and central stoma, occurs in the first larval stage. The caudal appendix and the laterally located anal opening are apparent in the L1 larva. In the L2 stage, the cephalic cap is lost and the large circular stoma becomes surrounded with elevated flaps. The caudal appendix was lost after larvae molted to the L3 stage, and in its place, 3 terminal papillae developed. Sense organs, such as 2 opposing phasmids and 8 papillae that were arranged into 2 circles, developed in the cephalic region of the L3 larva. The evidence of pathological consequences due to the presence of the L3 larva in the fly host are illustrated and discussed. PMID:11780809

  12. Understanding your colon cancer risk

    MedlinePlus

    Colon cancer risk factors are things that increase the chance that you could get cancer. Some risk factors ... risk factors never get cancer. Other people get colon cancer but do not have any known risk factors. ...

  13. Does percent root length colonization and soil hyphal length reflect the extent of colonization for all AMF?

    PubMed

    Hart, Miranda M; Reader, Richard J

    2002-12-01

    Percent root length colonization may not be an appropriate measure of root colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in all cases. We suggest that AMF will differ in how well percent root length colonization measures the amount of AMF colonization in the root due to differences among AMF in hyphal structure and hyphal aggregation. Although soil hyphal length accounts for hyphal density, we suggest that it does not consider differences in hyphal structure in measurements of external colonization and thus might also misrepresent the true amount of AMF in the soil. To test these suggestions, we measured and compared percent root length colonization and soil hyphal length with root ergosterol and soil ergosterol, respectively, for 21 different species of AMF from three families in a greenhouse experiment. Percent root length colonization predicted intra-radical colonization best for Glomaceae and Acaulosporaceae isolates, while soil hyphal length best represented soil ergosterol for Gigasporaceae isolates. The results show that conventional methods for estimating AMF colonization are not universal for all AMF. Caution is advised when drawing inferences for different groups of AMF.

  14. Streptococcus Adherence and Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Nobbs, Angela H.; Lamont, Richard J.; Jenkinson, Howard F.

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Streptococci readily colonize mucosal tissues in the nasopharynx; the respiratory, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary tracts; and the skin. Each ecological niche presents a series of challenges to successful colonization with which streptococci have to contend. Some species exist in equilibrium with their host, neither stimulating nor submitting to immune defenses mounted against them. Most are either opportunistic or true pathogens responsible for diseases such as pharyngitis, tooth decay, necrotizing fasciitis, infective endocarditis, and meningitis. Part of the success of streptococci as colonizers is attributable to the spectrum of proteins expressed on their surfaces. Adhesins enable interactions with salivary, serum, and extracellular matrix components; host cells; and other microbes. This is the essential first step to colonization, the development of complex communities, and possible invasion of host tissues. The majority of streptococcal adhesins are anchored to the cell wall via a C-terminal LPxTz motif. Other proteins may be surface anchored through N-terminal lipid modifications, while the mechanism of cell wall associations for others remains unclear. Collectively, these surface-bound proteins provide Streptococcus species with a “coat of many colors,” enabling multiple intimate contacts and interplays between the bacterial cell and the host. In vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated direct roles for many streptococcal adhesins as colonization or virulence factors, making them attractive targets for therapeutic and preventive strategies against streptococcal infections. There is, therefore, much focus on applying increasingly advanced molecular techniques to determine the precise structures and functions of these proteins, and their regulatory pathways, so that more targeted approaches can be developed. PMID:19721085

  15. Assessments of the transmission of Onchocerca volvulus by Simulium sanctipauli in the Upper Denkyira District, Ghana, and the intermittent disappearance of the vector.

    PubMed

    Garms, R; Badu, K; Owusu-Dabo, E; Baffour-Awuah, S; Adjei, O; Debrah, A Y; Nagel, M; Biritwum, N K; Gankpala, L; Post, R J; Kruppa, T F

    2015-03-01

    Following studies on the transmission of Onchocerca volvulus (Leuckart) by Simulium sanctipauli Vajime & Dunbar (Diptera, Simuliidae) in Upper Denkyira District in Ghana in 2001 and 2002 (Kutin et al., Med Vet Ent 18:167-173, 2004), further assessments were carried out in 2006 and 2013/2014 to determine whether transmission parameters had changed since community-directed ivermectin treatment (CDTI) began in 1999. There were no marked changes of the transmission intensities in 2006. Only slight, but non-significant, reductions were observed in infection rates of parous flies with larval stages (L1-L3) of O. volvulus from 44.1 % (of 1672 parous flies) in 2001/2002 to 42.1 % (506) in 2006 and from 6.5 to 5.9 % of flies carrying infective larvae in their heads. This suggested that there was an ongoing transmission in the area and the parasite reservoir in the human population was still high. Unexpectedly, further assessments conducted in October 2013 and March and October 2014 revealed that the vector S. sanctipauli had apparently disappeared and transmission had ceased, probably as a result of intensified gold mining activities along the rivers Ofin and Pra. The water of both rivers was extremely turbid, heavily loaded with suspended solids, probably preventing the development of blackfly larvae. Some breeding and biting of Simulium yahense Vajime & Dunbar was observed in a small tributary of the Pra, the Okumayemfuo, which is not affected by gold mining. However, the infection rate of flies was low, only 3.7 % of 163 parous flies were infected with first stage (L1) larvae of O. volvulus. PMID:25592754

  16. Characterization of a novel filarial serine protease inhibitor, Ov-SPI-1, from Onchocerca volvulus, with potential multifunctional roles during development of the parasite.

    PubMed

    Ford, Louise; Guiliano, David B; Oksov, Yelena; Debnath, Asim K; Liu, Jing; Williams, Steven A; Blaxter, Mark L; Lustigman, Sara

    2005-12-01

    A novel filarial serine protease inhibitor (SPI) from the human parasitic nematode Onchocerca volvulus, Ov-SPI-1, was identified through the analysis of a molting third-stage larvae expressed sequence tag dataset. Subsequent analysis of the expressed sequence tag datasets of O. volvulus and other filariae identified four other members of this family. These proteins are related to the low molecular weight SPIs originally isolated from Ascaris suum where they are believed to protect the parasite from host intestinal proteases. The two Ov-spi transcripts are up-regulated in the molting larvae and adult stages of the development of the parasite. Recombinant Ov-SPI-1 is an active inhibitor of serine proteases, specifically elastase, chymotrypsin, and cathepsin G. Immunolocalization of the Ov-SPI proteins demonstrates that the endogenous proteins are localized to the basal layer of the cuticle of third-stage, molting third-stage, and fourth-stage larvae, the body channels and multivesicular bodies of third-stage larvae and the processed material found between the two cuticles during molting. In O. volvulus adult worms the Ov-SPI proteins are localized to the sperm and to eggshells surrounding the developing embryos. RNA interference targeting the Ov-spi genes resulted in the specific knockdown of the transcript levels of both Ov-spi-1 and Ov-spi-2, a loss of native proteins, and a significant reduction in both molting and viability of third-stage larvae. We suggest the Ov-SPI proteins play a vital role in nematode molting by controlling the activity of an endogenous serine protease(s). The localization data in adults also indicate that these inhibitors may be involved in other processes such as embryogenesis and spermatogenesis.

  17. Assessments of the transmission of Onchocerca volvulus by Simulium sanctipauli in the Upper Denkyira District, Ghana, and the intermittent disappearance of the vector.

    PubMed

    Garms, R; Badu, K; Owusu-Dabo, E; Baffour-Awuah, S; Adjei, O; Debrah, A Y; Nagel, M; Biritwum, N K; Gankpala, L; Post, R J; Kruppa, T F

    2015-03-01

    Following studies on the transmission of Onchocerca volvulus (Leuckart) by Simulium sanctipauli Vajime & Dunbar (Diptera, Simuliidae) in Upper Denkyira District in Ghana in 2001 and 2002 (Kutin et al., Med Vet Ent 18:167-173, 2004), further assessments were carried out in 2006 and 2013/2014 to determine whether transmission parameters had changed since community-directed ivermectin treatment (CDTI) began in 1999. There were no marked changes of the transmission intensities in 2006. Only slight, but non-significant, reductions were observed in infection rates of parous flies with larval stages (L1-L3) of O. volvulus from 44.1 % (of 1672 parous flies) in 2001/2002 to 42.1 % (506) in 2006 and from 6.5 to 5.9 % of flies carrying infective larvae in their heads. This suggested that there was an ongoing transmission in the area and the parasite reservoir in the human population was still high. Unexpectedly, further assessments conducted in October 2013 and March and October 2014 revealed that the vector S. sanctipauli had apparently disappeared and transmission had ceased, probably as a result of intensified gold mining activities along the rivers Ofin and Pra. The water of both rivers was extremely turbid, heavily loaded with suspended solids, probably preventing the development of blackfly larvae. Some breeding and biting of Simulium yahense Vajime & Dunbar was observed in a small tributary of the Pra, the Okumayemfuo, which is not affected by gold mining. However, the infection rate of flies was low, only 3.7 % of 163 parous flies were infected with first stage (L1) larvae of O. volvulus.

  18. Reproductive Status of Onchocerca volvulus after Ivermectin Treatment in an Ivermectin-Naïve and a Frequently Treated Population from Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Bopda, Jean; Kengne-Ouafo, Jonas A.; Njiokou, Flobert; Prichard, Roger K.; Wanji, Samuel; Kamgno, Joseph; Boussinesq, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Background For two decades, onchocerciasis control has been based on mass treatment with ivermectin (IVM), repeated annually or six-monthly. This drug kills Onchocerca volvulus microfilariae (mf) present in the skin and the eyes (microfilaricidal effect) and prevents for 3–4 months the release of new mf by adult female worms (embryostatic effect). In some Ghanaian communities, the long-term use of IVM was associated with a more rapid than expected skin repopulation by mf after treatment. Here, we assessed whether the embryostatic effect of IVM on O. volvulus has been altered following frequent treatment in Cameroonian patients. Methodology Onchocercal nodules were surgically removed just before (D0) and 80 days (D80) after a standard dose of IVM in two cohorts with different treatment histories: a group who had received repeated doses of IVM over 13 years, and a control group with no history of large-scale treatments. Excised nodules were digested with collagenase to isolate adult worms. Embryograms were prepared with females for the evaluation of their reproductive capacities. Principal Findings Oocyte production was not affected by IVM. The mean number of intermediate embryos (morulae and coiled mf) decreased similarly in the two groups between D0 and D80. In contrast, an accumulation of stretched mf, either viable or degenerating, was observed at D80. However, it was observed that the increase in number of degenerating mf between D0 and D80 was much lower in the frequently treated group than in the control one (Incidence Rate Ratio: 0.25; 95% CI: 0.10–0.63; p = 0.003), which may indicate a reduced sequestration of mf in the worms from the frequently treated group. Conclusion/Significance IVM still had an embryostatic effect on O. volvulus, but the effect was reduced in the frequently treated cohort compared with the control population. PMID:24762816

  19. Functional characterization and immune recognition of the extracellular superoxide dismutase from the human pathogenic parasite Onchocerca volvulus (OvEC-SOD).

    PubMed

    Ajonina-Ekoti, Irene; Ndjonka, Dieudonne; Tanyi, Manchang Kingsley; Wilbertz, Meike; Younis, Abuelhassan Elshazly; Boursou, Djafsia; Kurosinski, Marc Andre; Eberle, Raphael; Lüersen, Kai; Perbandt, Markus; Breloer, Minka; Brattig, Norbert W; Liebau, Eva

    2012-10-01

    Onchocerca volvulus is a human pathogenic filarial nematode causing chronic onchocerciasis, a disease characterized by chronic skin and eye lesions. Despite attempts to control this infection from many perspectives, it still remains a threat to public health because of adverse effects of available drugs and recent reports of drug resistance. Under control of an intact immune system, O. volvulus survives for a long time in the host by employing a variety of strategies including the utility of antioxidant enzymes. In the present study, we focus on the extracellular superoxide dismutase from O. volvulus (OvEC-SOD) found in the excretory/secretory products of adult worms. Contrary to previous studies, the OvEC-SOD was found to have a 19 amino acid long signal peptide that is cleaved off during the process of maturation. To validate this result, we designed a novel method based on Caenorhabditis elegans cup5(ar465) mutants to specifically evaluate signal peptide-mediated secretion of nematodal proteins. Following purification, the recombinant OvEC-SOD was active as a dimer. Site-directed mutagenesis of the three cysteines present in the OvEC-SOD shows that enzyme activity is markedly reduced in the Cys-192 mutant. A homology model of the OvEC-SOD underlines the importance of Cys-192 for the stabilization of the adjacent active site channel. The generation of a humoral immune response to secretory OvEC-SOD was indicated by demonstrating IgG reactivity in sera from patients infected with O. volvulus while the cross-reactivity of IgG in plasma samples from cows, infected with the most closely related parasite Onchocerca ochengi, occurred only marginally. High IgG1 and IgM titres were recorded in sera from mice infected with the filaria Litomosoides sigmodontis, however, low or no cellular proliferative responses were observed. Thus, the present data suggest that secretory OvEC-SOD is a target of the humoral immune response in human onchocerciasis and induced strongest Ig

  20. Rapid Suppression of Onchocerca volvulus Transmission in Two Communities of the Southern Chiapas Focus, Mexico, Achieved by Quarterly Treatments with Mectizan

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Pérez, Mario A.; Lutzow-Steiner, Miguel A.; Segura-Cabrera, Aldo; Lizarazo-Ortega, Cristian; Domínguez-Vázquez, Alfredo; Sauerbrey, Mauricio; Richards, Frank; Unnasch, Thomas R.; Hassan, Hassan K.; Hernández-Hernández, Raymundo

    2008-01-01

    The impact of quarterly Mectizan (ivermectin) treatments on transmission, microfiladermia, and ocular lesions was evaluated in two formerly hyperendemic communities (Las Golondrinas and Las Nubes II) located in the main endemic focus for onchocerciasis in Southern Chiapas, Mexico. The data suggest that Onchocerca volvulus transmission has been suppressed after elimination of microfiladermia in these two communities. Increasing the frequency of Mectizan treatment to four times per year appears to have resulted in the rapid suppression of transmission in communities with residual transmission. PMID:18689630

  1. Selling space colonization and immortality: A psychosocial, anthropological critique of the rush to colonize Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slobodian, Rayna Elizabeth

    2015-08-01

    Extensive media coverage regarding the proposal to send four people to Mars by 2025 has exploded recently. Private enterprise has taken the reins to venture into space, which has typically only been reserved for government agencies. I argue, that with this new direction comes less regulation, raising questions regarding the ethics of sending people into outer space to colonize Mars within a decade. Marketers selling colonization to the public include perspectives such as biological drives, species survival, inclusiveness and utopian ideals. I challenge these narratives by suggesting that much of our desire to colonize space within the next decade is motivated by ego, money and romanticism. More specifically, I will examine the roles that fear and stories of immortality play within selling space and how those stories are marketed. I am passionate about space and hope that one day humanity will colonize other worlds, but the rush to settle is dangerous and careless. I assert that humanity should first gain more experience and knowledge before colonizing outer space, using this research to mitigate the risk to astronauts and proceed with careful consideration for the lives of potential astronauts.

  2. Detection of Onchocerca volvulus in Latin American black flies for pool screening PCR using high-throughput automated DNA isolation for transmission surveillance.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Pérez, Mario A; Gopal, Hemavathi; Adeleke, Monsuru Adebayo; De Luna-Santillana, Erick Jesús; Gurrola-Reyes, J Natividad; Guo, Xianwu

    2013-11-01

    The posttreatment entomological surveillance (ES) of onchocerciasis in Latin America requires quite large numbers of flies to be examined for parasite infection to prove that the control strategies have worked and that the infection is on the path of elimination. Here, we report a high-throughput automated DNA isolation of Onchocerca volvulus for PCR using a major Latin American black fly vector of onchocerciasis. The sensitivity and relative effectiveness of silica-coated paramagnetic beads was evaluated in comparison with phenol chloroform (PC) method which is known as the gold standard of DNA extraction for ES in Latin America. The automated method was optimized in the laboratory and validated in the field to detect parasite DNA in Simulium ochraceum sensu lato flies in comparison with PC. The optimization of the automated method showed that it is sensitive to detect O. volvulus with a pool size of 100 flies as compared with PC which utilizes 50 flies pool size. The validation of the automated method in comparison with PC in an endemic community showed that 5/67 and 3/134 heads pools were positive for the two methods, respectively. There was no statistical variation (P < 0.05) in the estimation of transmission indices generated by automated method when compared with PC method. The fact that the automated method is sensitive to pool size up to 100 confers advantage over PC method and can, therefore, be employed in large-scale ES of onchocerciasis transmission in endemic areas of Latin America. PMID:24030195

  3. Histochemical enzyme variation in Onchocerca volvulus microfilariae from rain-forest and Sudan-savanna areas of the Onchocerciasis Control Programme in West Africa.

    PubMed

    Omar, M S; Prost, A; Marshall, T F

    1982-01-01

    Histochemical staining methods for acid phosphatase were used to study the differences among microfilariae of various West African strains of Onchocerca volvulus in both forest and Sudan-savanna onchocerciasis zones. The results have shown statistically significant differences in the staining patterns of microfilarial populations in the two zones. In the rain-forest areas, where onchocerciasis is transmitted by Simulium yahense, S. sanctipauli, S. soubrense and S. squamosum, there were no significant differences of microfilarial staining patterns in patients, by age and sex, between the three Simulium-Onchocerca complexes studied. There was a close relationship between the "strain differences", as revealed morphoenzymatically, and the clinical picture of the disease in both the forest and the Sudan-savanna zones. The present findings are in favour of the hypothesis that there are intrinsic differences in the strains of the parasite occurring in the two areas. The application of the histochemical means of parasite characterization appears to be a useful tool in differentiating strains of O. volvulus and could contribute towards a better understanding of the epidemiology of human onchocerciasis in different bioclimatic zones where the disease is endemic.

  4. Quantitative studies on the transmission of Onchocerca volvulus by Simulium damnosum s.l. in the Tukuyu Valley, South West Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, E M; Maegga, B T

    1985-12-01

    A survey of the Simulium breeding and the transmission of Onchocerca volvulus was carried out in and around the Tukuyu valley, S.W. Tanzania, S. damnosum s.l. was found breeding in the midstretches of the main rivers in the valley and their bigger tributaries, and also in the boundary river to Malawi and the most northerly of the three rivers draining the Livingstone Mts. to Lake Nyasa (L. Malawi). A total of 19,500 S. damnosum s.l. females was caught and 13,200 dissected. The annual biting rate varied between 2,000 and 23,800. 7.6% of all the flies were infected with O. volvulus and 1.5% carried infective larvae in the head capsule, on average 2.7 per fly. The transmission was mainly in the dry season and the annual transmission potential varied between 0 and 1,120. The entomological data showed many similarities to those from the Mahenge Mts., Tanzania, and correlation of places with comparable transmission potentials suggests a similarity in the relationship parasite-human host between the West African rain forest and the two Tanzanian foci.

  5. Salmonella induces prominent gene expression in the rat colon

    PubMed Central

    Rodenburg, Wendy; Keijer, Jaap; Kramer, Evelien; Roosing, Susanne; Vink, Carolien; Katan, Martijn B; van der Meer, Roelof; Bovee-Oudenhoven, Ingeborg MJ

    2007-01-01

    Background Salmonella enteritidis is suggested to translocate in the small intestine. In vivo it induces gene expression changes in the ileal mucosa and Peyer's patches. Stimulation of Salmonella translocation by dietary prebiotics fermented in colon suggests involvement of the colon as well. However, effects of Salmonella on colonic gene expression in vivo are largely unknown. We aimed to characterize time dependent Salmonella-induced changes of colonic mucosal gene expression in rats using whole genome microarrays. For this, rats were orally infected with Salmonella enteritidis to mimic a foodborne infection and colonic gene expression was determined at days 1, 3 and 6 post-infection (n = 8 rats per time-point). As fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) affect colonic physiology, we analyzed colonic mucosal gene expression of FOS-fed versus cellulose-fed rats infected with Salmonella in a separate experiment. Colonic mucosal samples were isolated at day 2 post-infection. Results Salmonella affected transport (e.g. Chloride channel calcium activated 6, H+/K+ transporting Atp-ase), antimicrobial defense (e.g. Lipopolysaccharide binding protein, Defensin 5 and phospholipase A2), inflammation (e.g. calprotectin), oxidative stress related genes (e.g. Dual oxidase 2 and Glutathione peroxidase 2) and Proteolysis (e.g. Ubiquitin D and Proteosome subunit beta type 9). Furthermore, Salmonella translocation increased serum IFNγ and many interferon-related genes in colonic mucosa. The gene most strongly induced by Salmonella infection was Pancreatitis Associated Protein (Pap), showing >100-fold induction at day 6 after oral infection. Results were confirmed by Q-PCR in individual rats. Stimulation of Salmonella translocation by dietary FOS was accompanied by enhancement of the Salmonella-induced mucosal processes, not by induction of other processes. Conclusion We conclude that the colon is a target tissue for Salmonella, considering the abundant changes in mucosal gene expression

  6. Fungal infection of the colon

    PubMed Central

    Praneenararat, Surat

    2014-01-01

    Fungi are pathogens that commonly infect immunocompromised patients and can affect any organs of the body, including the colon. However, the literature provides limited details on colonic infections caused by fungi. This article is an intensive review of information available on the fungi that can cause colon infections. It uses a comparative style so that its conclusions may be accessible for clinical application. PMID:25364269

  7. Pathways to Colonization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smitherman, David V., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    The steps required for space colonization are many to grow from our current 3-person International Space Station, now under construction, to an infrastructure that can support hundreds and eventually thousands of people in space. This paper will summarize the author's findings from numerous studies and workshops on related subjects and identify some of the critical next steps toward space colonization. Findings will be drawn from the author s previous work on space colony design, space infrastructure workshops, and various studies that addressed space policy. In conclusion, this paper will note that significant progress has been made on space facility construction through the International Space Station program, and that significant efforts are needed in the development of new reusable Earth to Orbit transportation systems. The next key steps will include reusable in space transportation systems supported by in space propellant depots, the continued development of inflatable habitat and space elevator technologies, and the resolution of policy issues that will establish a future vision for space development.

  8. [Colonic histiocytosis (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Remmele, W; Endris, R

    1977-02-01

    Macrophages accumulating various substances can be detected in the mucosa of the small and large bowel under physiological and various pathological conditions. Among these the so-called PAS-positive macrophages have attracted much attention in recent times. Abundant occurrence of such cells in the intestinal mucosa has been termed "colonic histiocytosis". The occurrence of PAS-positive macrophages was investigated in 200 unselected and otherwise normal biopsy specimens of rectal mucosa; no correlation was found between the occurrence of these cells on the one hand and any intestinal or extraintestinal disease on the other. PAS-positive macrophages were mostly found close to the surface of the mucosa or to the cryptal epithelium as well as between the crypts. It is suggested to abandon the term "colonic histiocytosis" since it induces a false impression of a disease entity in the clinician (and may be related falsely e.g. to "histiocytosis X", and since the clinician may tend to attribute unnecessary importance to this harmless finding.

  9. A Randomized, Single-Ascending-Dose, Ivermectin-Controlled, Double-Blind Study of Moxidectin in Onchocerca volvulus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Opoku, Nicholas O.; Attah, Simon K.; Lazdins-Helds, Janis; Kuesel, Annette C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Control of onchocerciasis as a public health problem in Africa relies on annual mass ivermectin distribution. New tools are needed to achieve elimination of infection. This study determined in a small number of Onchocerca volvulus infected individuals whether moxidectin, a veterinary anthelminthic, is safe enough to administer it in a future large study to further characterize moxidectin's safety and efficacy. Effects on the parasite were also assessed. Methodology/Principal Findings Men and women from a forest area in South-eastern Ghana without ivermectin mass distribution received a single oral dose of 2 mg (N = 44), 4 mg (N = 45) or 8 mg (N = 38) moxidectin or 150 µg/kg ivermectin (N = 45) with 18 months follow up. All ivermectin and 97%–100% of moxidectin treated participants had Mazzotti reactions. Statistically significantly higher percentages of participants treated with 8 mg moxidectin than participants treated with ivermectin experienced pruritus (87% vs. 56%), rash (63% vs. 42%), increased pulse rate (61% vs. 36%) and decreased mean arterial pressure upon 2 minutes standing still after ≥5 minutes supine relative to pre-treatment (61% vs. 27%). These reactions resolved without treatment. In the 8 mg moxidectin and ivermectin arms, the mean±SD number of microfilariae/mg skin were 22.9±21.1 and 21.2±16.4 pre-treatment and 0.0±0.0 and 1.1±4.2 at nadir reached 1 and 3 months after treatment, respectively. At 6 months, values were 0.0±0.0 and 1.6±4.5, at 12 months 0.4±0.9 and 3.4±4.4 and at 18 months 1.8±3.3 and 4.0±4.8, respectively, in the 8 mg moxidectin and ivermectin arm. The reduction from pre-treatment values was significantly higher after 8 mg moxidectin than after ivermectin treatment throughout follow up (p<0.01). Conclusions/Significance The 8 mg dose of moxidectin was safe enough to initiate the large study. Provided its results confirm those from this study, availability of moxidectin to control

  10. Anatomically correct deformable colon phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, James A.; Barton, Michael D.; Davis, Brynmor J.; Bieszczad, Jerry; Meunier, Norm L.; Brown, Nathan W.; Kynor, David B.

    2011-03-01

    We describe a technique to build a soft-walled colon phantom that provides realistic lumen anatomy in computed tomography (CT) images. The technique begins with the geometry of a human colon measured during CT colonography (CTC). The three-dimensional air-filled colonic lumen is segmented and then replicated using stereolithography (SLA). The rigid SLA model includes large-scale features (e.g., haustral folds and tenia coli bands) down to small-scale features (e.g., a small pedunculated polyp). Since the rigid model represents the internal air-filled volume, a highly-pliable silicone polymer is painted onto the rigid model. This thin layer of silicone, when removed, becomes the colon wall. Small 3 mm diameter glass beads are affixed to the outer wall. These glass beads show up with high intensity in CT scans and provide a ground truth for evaluating performance of algorithms designed to register prone and supine CTC data sets. After curing, the silicone colon wall is peeled off the rigid model. The resulting colon phantom is filled with air and submerged in a water bath. CT images and intraluminal fly-through reconstructions from CTC scans of the colon phantom are compared against patient data to demonstrate the ability of the phantom to simulate a human colon.

  11. Oncostatic effects of fluoxetine in experimental colon cancer models.

    PubMed

    Kannen, Vinicius; Garcia, Sergio Britto; Silva, Wilson A; Gasser, Martin; Mönch, Romana; Alho, Eduardo Joaquim Lopes; Heinsen, Helmut; Scholz, Claus-Jürgen; Friedrich, Mike; Heinze, Katrin Gertrud; Waaga-Gasser, Ana Maria; Stopper, Helga

    2015-09-01

    Colon cancer is one of the most common tumors in the human population. Recent studies have shown a reduced risk for colon cancer in patients given the antidepressant fluoxetine (FLX). The exact mechanism by which FLX might protect from colon cancer remains however controversial. Here, FLX reduced the development of different colon tumor xenografts, as well as proliferation in hypoxic tumor areas within them. FLX treatment also decreased microvessel numbers in tumors. Although FLX did not increase serum and tumor glucose levels as much as the colon chemotherapy gold standard Fluorouracil did, lactate levels were significantly augmented within tumors by FLX treatment. The gene expression of the MCT4 lactate transporter was significantly downregulated. Total protein amounts from the third and fifth mitochondrial complexes were significantly decreased by FLX in tumors. Cell culture experiments revealed that FLX reduced the mitochondrial membrane potential significantly and disabled the reactive oxygen species production of the third mitochondrial complex. Furthermore, FLX arrested hypoxic colon tumor cells in the G0/G1 phase of the cell-cycle. The expression of key cell-cycle-related checkpoint proteins was enhanced in cell culture and in vivo experiments. Therefore, we suggest FLX impairs energy generation, cell cycle progression and proliferation in tumor cells, especially under condition of hypoxia. This then leads to reduced microvessel formation and tumor shrinkage in xenograft models. PMID:26004136

  12. Competition for space during bacterial colonization of a surface.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Diarmuid P; Allen, Rosalind J

    2015-09-01

    Competition for space is ubiquitous in the ecology of both microorganisms and macro-organisms. We introduce a bacterial model system in which the factors influencing competition for space during colonization of an initially empty habitat can be tracked directly. Using fluorescence microscopy, we follow the fate of individual Escherichia coli bacterial cell lineages as they undergo expansion competition (the race to be the first to colonize a previously empty territory), and as they later compete at boundaries between clonal territories. Our experiments are complemented by computer simulations of a lattice-based model. We find that both expansion competition, manifested as differences in individual cell lag times, and boundary competition, manifested as effects of neighbour cell geometry, can play a role in colonization success, particularly when lineages expand exponentially. This work provides a baseline for investigating how ecological interactions affect colonization of space by bacterial populations, and highlights the potential of bacterial model systems for the testing and development of ecological theory.

  13. Colon interposition for oesophageal replacement.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Pascal A; Gilardoni, Adrian; Trousse, Delphine; D'Journo, Xavier B; Avaro, Jean-Philippe; Doddoli, Christophe; Giudicelli, Roger; Fuentes, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    The choice of the colon as an oesophageal substitute results primarily from the unavailability of the stomach. However, given its durability and function, colon interposition keeps elective indications in patients with benign or malignant oesophageal disease who are potential candidates for long survival. The choice of the colonic portion used for oesophageal reconstruction depends on the required length of the graft, and the encountered colonic vascular anatomy, the last being characterised by the near-invariability of the left colonic vessels, in contrast to the vascular pattern of the right side of the colon. Accordingly, the transverse colon with all or part of the ascending colon is the substitute of choice, positioned in the isoperistaltic direction, and supplied either from the left colic vessels for long grafts or middle colic vessels for shorter grafts. Technical key points are: full mobilisation of the entire colon, identification of the main colonic vessels and collaterals, and a prolonged clamping test to ensure the permeability of the chosen nourishing pedicle. Transposition through the posterior mediastinum in the oesophageal bed is the shortest one and thereby offers the best functional results. When the oesophageal bed is not available, the retrosternal route is the preferred alternative option. The food bolus travelling mainly by gravity makes straightness of the conduit of paramount importance. The proximal anastomosis is a single-layer hand-fashioned end-to-end anastomosis to prevent narrowing. When the stomach is available, the distal anastomosis is best performed at the posterior part of the antrum for the reasons of pedicle positioning and reflux prevention, and a gastric drainage procedure is added when the oesophagus and vagus nerves have been removed. In the other cases, a Roux-en-Y jejunal loop is preferable to prevent bile reflux into the colon. Additional procedures include re-establishment of the colonic continuity, a careful closure of

  14. Gnotobiotic Human Colon Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Frank D.; Folan, David M. A.; Winter, Des C.; Folan, Michael A.; Baird, Alan W.

    2015-01-01

    Background A novel emulsion with efficacy as an agent for eliminating biofilms was selected. The aim of this study was to examine efficacy and effect of a formulation of ML:8 against commensal bacteria harvested from ex vivo human colonic tissues. Methods Mucosal sheets, obtained at the time of surgery, were exposed for 2 minutes to one of four solutions: Krebs-Hensleit (KH) solution, saline (NaCl; 0.9%), povidone iodine (1%), or ML:8 (2%); n = 4. Lumenal surfaces were swabbed for culture under aerobic or anaerobic conditions. Following treatment, each sheet was mounted in Ussing chambers and voltage clamped. Tissues were challenged with carbachol. Permeability coefficient (Papp) was determined using mannitol fluxes. At the end of each experiment, tissues were examined histologically. Results Similar colony forming units grew in aerobic and anaerobic conditions in both control and NaCl treated tissues. Iodine reduced and ML:8 virtually abolished viable bacteria. Basal electrophysiological parameters were not different between treatments. Transepithelial electrical resistance values did not differ between groups. All tissues responded to carbachol, although this was attenuated in iodine treated tissue. Papp values were slightly elevated in all treated tissues but this did not reach significance. Histopathological assessment revealed no overt damage to tissues. Conclusion Brief exposure to ML:8 reduced culturable bacterial burden from human intestinal tissues harvested at the time of surgical resection. Such gnotobiotic tissues retain structural and functional integrity. This is a novel approach to reduce bacterial burden. PMID:27785304

  15. PillCam colon capsule endoscopy (PCCE) in colonic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Diseases affecting the colon are common worldwide and can cause a major health problem. Colorectal cancer (CRC) as well as Inflammatory bowel diseases represent a major cause of morbidity and mortality in western countries. PillCam colon capsule endoscopy (PCCE) is a novel and promising technology that can be useful for the screening and monitoring of colonic diseases. In the recent years many articles examined the use of various versions of PCCE—the 1st and 2nd generation versus various other endoscopic or radiologic modalities both for detection of colonic polyps or cancer and in both ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease. The aim of the current review is to provide up to date information regarding the use and usefulness of this method in these disease.

  16. PillCam colon capsule endoscopy (PCCE) in colonic diseases.

    PubMed

    Carter, Dan; Eliakim, Rami

    2016-08-01

    Diseases affecting the colon are common worldwide and can cause a major health problem. Colorectal cancer (CRC) as well as Inflammatory bowel diseases represent a major cause of morbidity and mortality in western countries. PillCam colon capsule endoscopy (PCCE) is a novel and promising technology that can be useful for the screening and monitoring of colonic diseases. In the recent years many articles examined the use of various versions of PCCE-the 1st and 2nd generation versus various other endoscopic or radiologic modalities both for detection of colonic polyps or cancer and in both ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease. The aim of the current review is to provide up to date information regarding the use and usefulness of this method in these disease. PMID:27668227

  17. PillCam colon capsule endoscopy (PCCE) in colonic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Diseases affecting the colon are common worldwide and can cause a major health problem. Colorectal cancer (CRC) as well as Inflammatory bowel diseases represent a major cause of morbidity and mortality in western countries. PillCam colon capsule endoscopy (PCCE) is a novel and promising technology that can be useful for the screening and monitoring of colonic diseases. In the recent years many articles examined the use of various versions of PCCE—the 1st and 2nd generation versus various other endoscopic or radiologic modalities both for detection of colonic polyps or cancer and in both ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease. The aim of the current review is to provide up to date information regarding the use and usefulness of this method in these disease. PMID:27668227

  18. Recombinant Ov-ASP-1, a Th1-biased protein adjuvant derived from the helminth Onchocerca volvulus, can directly bind and activate antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    He, Yuxian; Barker, Sophie J; MacDonald, Angus J; Yu, Yu; Cao, Long; Li, Jingjing; Parhar, Ranjit; Heck, Susanne; Hartmann, Susanne; Golenbock, Douglas T; Jiang, Shibo; Libri, Nathan A; Semper, Amanda E; Rosenberg, William M; Lustigman, Sara

    2009-04-01

    We previously reported that rOv-ASP-1, a recombinant Onchocerca volvulus activation associated protein-1, was a potent adjuvant for recombinant protein or synthetic peptide-based Ags. In this study, we further evaluated the adjuvanticity of rOv-ASP-1 and explored its mechanism of action. Consistently, recombinant full-length spike protein of SARS-CoV or its receptor-binding domain in the presence of rOv-ASP-1 could effectively induce a mixed but Th1-skewed immune response in immunized mice. It appears that rOv-ASP-1 primarily bound to the APCs among human PBMCs and triggered Th1-biased proinflammatory cytokine production probably via the activation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells and the TLR, TLR2, and TLR4, thus suggesting that rOv-ASP-1 is a novel potent innate adjuvant. PMID:19299698

  19. Nested PCR to detect and distinguish the sympatric filarial species Onchocerca volvulus, Mansonella ozzardi and Mansonella perstans in the Amazon Region.

    PubMed

    Tang, Thuy-Huong Ta; López-Vélez, Rogelio; Lanza, Marta; Shelley, Anthony John; Rubio, Jose Miguel; Luz, Sérgio Luiz Bessa

    2010-09-01

    We present filaria-nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR), which is based on amplification of first internal transcribed spacer rDNA to distinguish three parasitic filarial species (Onchocerca volvulus, Mansonella ozzardi and Mansonella perstans) that can be found in the Amazon Region. Nested PCR-based identifications yielded the same results as those utilizing morphological characters. Nested PCR is highly sensitive and specific and it detects low-level infections in both humans and vectors. No cross-amplifications were observed with various other blood parasites and no false-positive results were obtained with the nested PCR. The method works efficiently with whole-blood, blood-spot and skin biopsy samples. Our method may thus be suitable for assessing the efficacy of filaria control programmes in Amazonia by recording parasite infections in both the human host and the vector. By specifically differentiating the major sympatric species of filaria, this technique could also enhance epidemiological research in the region. PMID:20945000

  20. Early Outcome of Primary Repair in Colonic Injury.

    PubMed

    Uddin, M A; Reza, E R; Islam, M S; Hoque, M R; Hussain, M F; Alam, I; Sazzad, M F; Biswas, N; Kader, M S; Malek, M S; Sultana, F; Rahman, K S

    2016-07-01

    The management of the colon injury remains controversial in spite of a number of divergent reports during the past decade. Previously surgeons were reluctant to do primary anastomosis but now-a-days they are doing primary repair with good results. The present study is designed to see the early outcomes of primary repair in colonic injury. This prospective observational study performed at Dhaka Medical College Hospital, Dhaka, Bangladesh from January 2013 to June 2013 with allocation of 50 patients with colonic injury who underwent laparotomy with primary repair of that injury in the department of Casualty Surgery. A primary repair was performed after freshening the edges or by resection and primary anastomosis with 3.0 round-body Vicryl by single layer extra mucosal interrupted suture. Data processed using software SPSS version 16.0. For all analytical results a p value <0.05 was considered significant. In this study the commonest site of injury were transvers colon and sigmoid colon 38.0% in each. Out of 50 respondents, 5(10.0%) developed burst abdomen, 1(2.0%) developed entero-cutaneous fistula with none had paralytic ileus or septicaemia or pelvic collection. No mortality observed. This study showed that the increasing in colon injury scale (CIS) score culminate into increasing rate of postoperative complication & post operative complications were more at left colon (24%). On basis of our findings, we recommend the primary repair is a safe and effective surgical technique for addressing the large gut injury. Unnecessary proximal diversions should be avoided. According to our experience, we believe that the policy of primary repair of colon injuries can be applied more liberally in majority of patients with high success rate. PMID:27612892

  1. [Lactobacilli and colon carcinoma--A review].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shumei; Zhang, Lanwei; Shan, Yujuan

    2015-06-01

    Epidemiological studies showed that incidence of colon carcinoma is increased in the world. There are many difficulties to inhibit colon carcinoma because the causes of inducing colon carcinoma were various and interactive each other. Previous evidence supported the balance of the colonic microflora was critical in inhibiting colon carcinoma and the protection by colonic microflora could be improved by ingesting lactobacilli. Therefore, the biological functions and anticancer effects of lactobacilli attract attention of researchers. In this review we discussed the causes of colon carcinoma; the anticancer mechanisms of lactobacilli on the basis of our own studies. Eventually, we summarized the effects of anticancer of different components and metabolic products extracted from lactobacilli.

  2. Mechanisms linking obesity to altered metabolism in mice colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nimri, Lili; Saadi, Janan; Peri, Irena; Yehuda-Shnaidman, Einav; Schwartz, Betty

    2015-11-10

    There are an increasing number of reports on obesity being a key risk factor for the development of colon cancer. Our goal in this study was to explore the metabolic networks and molecular signaling pathways linking obesity, adipose tissue and colon cancer. Using in-vivo experiments, we found that mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) and injected with MC38 colon cancer cells develop significantly larger tumors than their counterparts fed a control diet. In ex-vivo experiments, MC38 and CT26 colon cancer cells exposed to conditioned media (CM) from the adipose tissue of HFD-fed mice demonstrated significantly lower oxygen consumption rate as well as lower maximal oxygen consumption rate after carbonyl cyanide-4-trifluoromethoxy-phenylhydrazone treatment. In addition, in-vitro assays showed downregulated expression of mitochondrial genes in colon cancer cells exposed to CM prepared from the visceral fat of HFD-fed mice or to leptin. Interestingly, leptin levels detected in the media of adipose tissue explants co-cultured with MC38 cancer cells were higher than in adipose tissue explants cultures, indicating cross talk between the adipose tissue and the cancer cells. Salient findings of the present study demonstrate that this crosstalk is mediated at least partially by the JNK/STAT3-signaling pathway. PMID:26472027

  3. Mechanisms linking obesity to altered metabolism in mice colon carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nimri, Lili; Saadi, Janan; Peri, Irena; Yehuda-Shnaidman, Einav; Schwartz, Betty

    2015-01-01

    There are an increasing number of reports on obesity being a key risk factor for the development of colon cancer. Our goal in this study was to explore the metabolic networks and molecular signaling pathways linking obesity, adipose tissue and colon cancer. Using in-vivo experiments, we found that mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) and injected with MC38 colon cancer cells develop significantly larger tumors than their counterparts fed a control diet. In ex-vivo experiments, MC38 and CT26 colon cancer cells exposed to conditioned media (CM) from the adipose tissue of HFD-fed mice demonstrated significantly lower oxygen consumption rate as well as lower maximal oxygen consumption rate after carbonyl cyanide-4-trifluoromethoxy-phenylhydrazone treatment. In addition, in-vitro assays showed downregulated expression of mitochondrial genes in colon cancer cells exposed to CM prepared from the visceral fat of HFD-fed mice or to leptin. Interestingly, leptin levels detected in the media of adipose tissue explants co-cultured with MC38 cancer cells were higher than in adipose tissue explants cultures, indicating cross talk between the adipose tissue and the cancer cells. Salient findings of the present study demonstrate that this crosstalk is mediated at least partially by the JNK/STAT3-signaling pathway. PMID:26472027

  4. Multicongenic fate mapping quantification of dynamics of thymus colonization.

    PubMed

    Ziętara, Natalia; Łyszkiewicz, Marcin; Puchałka, Jacek; Witzlau, Katrin; Reinhardt, Annika; Förster, Reinhold; Pabst, Oliver; Prinz, Immo; Krueger, Andreas

    2015-09-21

    Postnatal T cell development depends on continuous colonization of the thymus by BM-derived T lineage progenitors. Both quantitative parameters and the mechanisms of thymus seeding remain poorly understood. Here, we determined the number of dedicated thymus-seeding progenitor niches (TSPNs) capable of supporting productive T cell development, turnover rates of niche occupancy, and feedback mechanisms. To this end, we established multicongenic fate mapping combined with mathematical modeling to quantitate individual events of thymus colonization. We applied this method to study thymus colonization in CCR7(-/-)CCR9(-/-) (DKO) mice, whose TSPNs are largely unoccupied. We showed that ∼160-200 TSPNs are present in the adult thymus and, on average, 10 of these TSPNs were open for recolonization at steady state. Preconditioning of wild-type mice revealed a similar number of TSPNs, indicating that preconditioning can generate space efficiently for transplanted T cell progenitors. To identify potential cellular feedback loops restricting thymus colonization, we performed serial transfer experiments. These experiments indicated that thymus seeding was directly restricted by the duration of niche occupancy rather than long-range effects, thus challenging current paradigms of thymus colonization. PMID:26347471

  5. Multicongenic fate mapping quantification of dynamics of thymus colonization

    PubMed Central

    Łyszkiewicz, Marcin; Puchałka, Jacek; Witzlau, Katrin; Reinhardt, Annika; Förster, Reinhold; Pabst, Oliver; Prinz, Immo

    2015-01-01

    Postnatal T cell development depends on continuous colonization of the thymus by BM-derived T lineage progenitors. Both quantitative parameters and the mechanisms of thymus seeding remain poorly understood. Here, we determined the number of dedicated thymus-seeding progenitor niches (TSPNs) capable of supporting productive T cell development, turnover rates of niche occupancy, and feedback mechanisms. To this end, we established multicongenic fate mapping combined with mathematical modeling to quantitate individual events of thymus colonization. We applied this method to study thymus colonization in CCR7−/−CCR9−/− (DKO) mice, whose TSPNs are largely unoccupied. We showed that ∼160–200 TSPNs are present in the adult thymus and, on average, 10 of these TSPNs were open for recolonization at steady state. Preconditioning of wild-type mice revealed a similar number of TSPNs, indicating that preconditioning can generate space efficiently for transplanted T cell progenitors. To identify potential cellular feedback loops restricting thymus colonization, we performed serial transfer experiments. These experiments indicated that thymus seeding was directly restricted by the duration of niche occupancy rather than long-range effects, thus challenging current paradigms of thymus colonization. PMID:26347471

  6. Multicongenic fate mapping quantification of dynamics of thymus colonization.

    PubMed

    Ziętara, Natalia; Łyszkiewicz, Marcin; Puchałka, Jacek; Witzlau, Katrin; Reinhardt, Annika; Förster, Reinhold; Pabst, Oliver; Prinz, Immo; Krueger, Andreas

    2015-09-21

    Postnatal T cell development depends on continuous colonization of the thymus by BM-derived T lineage progenitors. Both quantitative parameters and the mechanisms of thymus seeding remain poorly understood. Here, we determined the number of dedicated thymus-seeding progenitor niches (TSPNs) capable of supporting productive T cell development, turnover rates of niche occupancy, and feedback mechanisms. To this end, we established multicongenic fate mapping combined with mathematical modeling to quantitate individual events of thymus colonization. We applied this method to study thymus colonization in CCR7(-/-)CCR9(-/-) (DKO) mice, whose TSPNs are largely unoccupied. We showed that ∼160-200 TSPNs are present in the adult thymus and, on average, 10 of these TSPNs were open for recolonization at steady state. Preconditioning of wild-type mice revealed a similar number of TSPNs, indicating that preconditioning can generate space efficiently for transplanted T cell progenitors. To identify potential cellular feedback loops restricting thymus colonization, we performed serial transfer experiments. These experiments indicated that thymus seeding was directly restricted by the duration of niche occupancy rather than long-range effects, thus challenging current paradigms of thymus colonization.

  7. Taste sensing in the colon.

    PubMed

    Kaji, Izumi; Karaki, Shin-ichiro; Kuwahara, Atsukazu

    2014-01-01

    The colonic lumen is continually exposed to many compounds, including beneficial and harmful compounds that are produced by colonic microflora. The intestinal epithelia form a barrier between the internal and luminal (external) environments. Chemical receptors that sense the luminal environment are thought to play important roles as sensors and as modulators of epithelial cell functions. The recent molecular identification of various membrane receptor proteins has revealed the sensory role of intestinal epithelial cells. Nutrient sensing by these receptors in the small intestine is implicated in nutrient absorption and metabolism. However, little is known about the physiological roles of chemosensors in the large intestine. Since 1980s, researchers have examined the effects of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), the primary products of commensal bacteria, on gut motility, secretion, and incretin release, for example. In this decade, the SCFA receptor genes and their expression were identified in the mammalian colon. Furthermore, many other chemical receptors, including taste and olfactory receptors have been found in colonic epithelial cells. These findings indicate that the large intestinal epithelia express chemosensors that detect the luminal contents, particularly bacterial metabolites, and induce the host defense systems and the modulation of systemic metabolism via incretin release. In this review, we describe the local effects of chemical stimuli on the lumen associated with the expression pattern of sensory receptors. We propose that sensory receptors expressed in the colonic mucosa play important roles in luminal chemosensing to maintain homeostasis.

  8. Serrated polyps of the colon.

    PubMed

    Sugumar, Aravind; Sinicrope, Frank A

    2010-12-17

    Until recently, colonic polyps were traditionally classified as either hyperplastic or adenomatous, and only the latter were believed to have the potential to progress to carcinoma. However, it is now appreciated that a subset of serrated polyps also appear to have malignant potential. Serrated polyps are a heterogeneous group of colon polyps that include hyperplastic polyps, sessile serrated adenomas (SSAs), traditional serrated adenomas, and mixed polyps. Insights into these polyps were derived, in part, from studies of patients with the hyperplastic polyposis syndrome. SSAs show a predilection for the right colon, have a distinct histology, and their molecular genetic profile has recently been linked to a pathway for colon tumorigenesis that is characterized by microsatellite instability. Based upon available evidence, it is recommended that patients with serrated adenomas undergo colonoscopic follow-up at the same frequency as for conventional adenomas. It is important that physicians are aware of serrated polyps, particularly serrated adenomas and their relationship to colon cancer, and their proper clinical management.

  9. Discovery 3: A Simulation of Early American Colonization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wesley, John

    This simulation allows students to experience the mystery of exploration and the hazards and perils of colonial life. Students are divided into 4- to 6-person colonizing groups. After acquiring some background information they then become colonists. They spend the remainder of the simulation making decisions, working, coping, surviving, and…

  10. Novel aspects of cholinergic regulation of colonic ion transport

    PubMed Central

    Bader, Sandra; Diener, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic receptors are not only expressed by excitable tissues, but have been identified in various epithelia. One aim of this study was to investigate the expression of nicotinic receptors and their involvement in the regulation of ion transport across colonic epithelium. Ussing chamber experiments with putative nicotinic agonists and antagonists were performed at rat colon combined with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) detection of nicotinic receptor subunits within the epithelium. Dimethylphenylpiperazinium (DMPP) and nicotine induced a tetrodotoxin-resistant anion secretion leading to an increase in short-circuit current (Isc) across colonic mucosa. The response was suppressed by the nicotinic receptor antagonist hexamethonium. RT-PCR experiments revealed the expression of α2, α4, α5, α6, α7, α10, and β4 nicotinic receptor subunits in colonic epithelium. Choline, the product of acetylcholine hydrolysis, is known for its affinity to several nicotinic receptor subtypes. As a strong acetylcholinesterase activity was found in colonic epithelium, the effect of choline on Isc was examined. Choline induced a concentration-dependent, tetrodotoxin-resistant chloride secretion which was, however, resistant against hexamethonium, but was inhibited by atropine. Experiments with inhibitors of muscarinic M1 and M3 receptors revealed that choline-evoked secretion was mainly due to a stimulation of epithelial M3 receptors. Although choline proved to be only a partial agonist, it concentration-dependently desensitized the response to acetylcholine, suggesting that it might act as a modulator of cholinergically induced anion secretion. Thus the cholinergic regulation of colonic ion transport – up to now solely explained by cholinergic submucosal neurons stimulating epithelial muscarinic receptors – is more complex than previously assumed. PMID:26236483

  11. Physical stress and bacterial colonization

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial surface colonizers are subject to a variety of physical stresses. During the colonization of human epithelia such as on the skin or the intestinal mucosa, bacteria mainly have to withstand the mechanical stress of being removed by fluid flow, scraping, or epithelial turnover. To that end, they express a series of molecules to establish firm attachment to the epithelial surface, such as fibrillar protrusions (pili) and surface-anchored proteins that bind to human matrix proteins. In addition, some bacteria – in particular gut and urinary tract pathogens – use internalization by epithelial cells and other methods such as directed inhibition of epithelial turnover to ascertain continued association with the epithelial layer. Furthermore, many bacteria produce multi-layered agglomerations called biofilms with a sticky extracellular matrix, providing additional protection from removal. This review will give an overview over the mechanisms human bacterial colonizers have to withstand physical stresses with a focus on bacterial adhesion. PMID:25212723

  12. Bacterial colonization of percutaneous sutures.

    PubMed

    Gristina, A G; Price, J L; Hobgood, C D; Webb, L X; Costerton, J W

    1985-07-01

    The direct electron microscopic examination of 15 sutures and 15 staples removed from 10 healed surgical wounds showed, on the intradermal portions, consistent colonization by bacteria growing in adherent biofilms. This clearly demonstrable bacterial colonization of biomaterials within the wound tract had not resulted in infection or perceptible inflammation in any of the wounds. These bacterial cells were of several morphotypes, including gram-positive cocci, and all specimens yielded cultures of the autochthonous (native) skin bacterium, Staphylococcus epidermidis. The bacteria within the wound tracts were enveloped by extracellular material that appeared on scanning electron microscopy to be a condensed amorphous residue and on transmission electron microscopy to be a fibrous extracellular matrix. We suggest that this mode of growth, in which the colonizing bacteria are enveloped in a copious exopolysaccharide glycocalix, protects the bacteria from host defense factors and accounts for their persistence on the suture surfaces until they are removed with the sutures.

  13. Physical stress and bacterial colonization.

    PubMed

    Otto, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Bacterial surface colonizers are subject to a variety of physical stresses. During the colonization of human epithelia such as on the skin or the intestinal mucosa, bacteria mainly have to withstand the mechanical stress of being removed by fluid flow, scraping, or epithelial turnover. To that end, they express a series of molecules to establish firm attachment to the epithelial surface, such as fibrillar protrusions (pili) and surface-anchored proteins that bind to human matrix proteins. In addition, some bacteria--in particular gut and urinary tract pathogens--use internalization by epithelial cells and other methods such as directed inhibition of epithelial turnover to ascertain continued association with the epithelial layer. Furthermore, many bacteria produce multilayered agglomerations called biofilms with a sticky extracellular matrix, providing additional protection from removal. This review will give an overview over the mechanisms human bacterial colonizers have to withstand physical stresses with a focus on bacterial adhesion.

  14. Streptococcus salivarius K12 Limits Group B Streptococcus Vaginal Colonization.

    PubMed

    Patras, Kathryn A; Wescombe, Philip A; Rösler, Berenice; Hale, John D; Tagg, John R; Doran, Kelly S

    2015-09-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus [GBS]) colonizes the rectovaginal tract in 20% to 30% of women and during pregnancy can be transmitted to the newborn, causing severe invasive disease. Current routine screening and antibiotic prophylaxis have fallen short of complete prevention of GBS transmission, and GBS remains a leading cause of neonatal infection. We have investigated the ability of Streptococcus salivarius, a predominant member of the native human oral microbiota, to control GBS colonization. Comparison of the antibacterial activities of multiple S. salivarius strains by use of a deferred-antagonism test showed that S. salivarius strain K12 exhibited the broadest spectrum of activity against GBS. K12 effectively inhibited all GBS strains tested, including disease-implicated isolates from newborns and colonizing isolates from the vaginal tract of pregnant women. Inhibition was dependent on the presence of megaplasmid pSsal-K12, which encodes the bacteriocins salivaricin A and salivaricin B; however, in coculture experiments, GBS growth was impeded by K12 independently of the megaplasmid. We also demonstrated that K12 adheres to and invades human vaginal epithelial cells at levels comparable to GBS. Inhibitory activity of K12 was examined in vivo using a mouse model of GBS vaginal colonization. Mice colonized with GBS were treated vaginally with K12. K12 administration significantly reduced GBS vaginal colonization in comparison to nontreated controls, and this effect was partially dependent on the K12 megaplasmid. Our results suggest that K12 may have potential as a preventative therapy to control GBS vaginal colonization and thereby prevent its transmission to the neonate during pregnancy.

  15. Autonomic Nerve Regulation of Colonic Peristalsis in Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Gribovskaja-Rupp, Irena; Babygirija, Reji; Takahashi, Toku; Ludwig, Kirk

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Colonic peristalsis is mainly regulated via intrinsic neurons in guinea pigs. However, autonomic regulation of colonic motility is poorly understood. We explored a guinea pig model for the study of extrinsic nerve effects on the distal colon. Methods Guinea pigs were sacrificed, their distal colons isolated, preserving pelvic nerves (PN) and inferior mesenteric ganglia (IMG), and placed in a tissue bath. Fecal pellet propagation was conducted during PN and IMG stimulation at 10 Hz, 0.5 ms and 5 V. Distal colon was connected to a closed circuit system, and colonic motor responses were measured during PN and IMG stimulation. Results PN stimulation increased pellet velocity to 24.6 ± 0.7 mm/sec (n = 20), while IMG stimulation decreased it to 2.0 ± 0.2 mm/sec (n = 12), compared to controls (13.0 ± 0.7 mm/sec, P < 0.01). In closed circuit experiments, PN stimulation increased the intraluminal pressure, which was abolished by atropine (10−6 M) and hexamethonium (10−4 M). PN stimulation reduced the incidence of non-coordinated contractions induced by NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 10−4 M). IMG stimulation attenuated intraluminal pressure increase, which was partially reversed by alpha-2 adrenoceptor antagonist (yohimbine; 10−6 M). Conclusions PN and IMG input determine speed of pellet progression and peristaltic reflex of the guinea pig distal colon. The stimulatory effects of PN involve nicotinic, muscarinic and nitrergic pathways. The inhibitory effects of IMG stimulation involve alpha-2 adrenoceptors. PMID:24847719

  16. Streptococcus salivarius K12 Limits Group B Streptococcus Vaginal Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Patras, Kathryn A.; Wescombe, Philip A.; Rösler, Berenice; Hale, John D.; Tagg, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus [GBS]) colonizes the rectovaginal tract in 20% to 30% of women and during pregnancy can be transmitted to the newborn, causing severe invasive disease. Current routine screening and antibiotic prophylaxis have fallen short of complete prevention of GBS transmission, and GBS remains a leading cause of neonatal infection. We have investigated the ability of Streptococcus salivarius, a predominant member of the native human oral microbiota, to control GBS colonization. Comparison of the antibacterial activities of multiple S. salivarius strains by use of a deferred-antagonism test showed that S. salivarius strain K12 exhibited the broadest spectrum of activity against GBS. K12 effectively inhibited all GBS strains tested, including disease-implicated isolates from newborns and colonizing isolates from the vaginal tract of pregnant women. Inhibition was dependent on the presence of megaplasmid pSsal-K12, which encodes the bacteriocins salivaricin A and salivaricin B; however, in coculture experiments, GBS growth was impeded by K12 independently of the megaplasmid. We also demonstrated that K12 adheres to and invades human vaginal epithelial cells at levels comparable to GBS. Inhibitory activity of K12 was examined in vivo using a mouse model of GBS vaginal colonization. Mice colonized with GBS were treated vaginally with K12. K12 administration significantly reduced GBS vaginal colonization in comparison to nontreated controls, and this effect was partially dependent on the K12 megaplasmid. Our results suggest that K12 may have potential as a preventative therapy to control GBS vaginal colonization and thereby prevent its transmission to the neonate during pregnancy. PMID:26077762

  17. Streptococcus salivarius K12 Limits Group B Streptococcus Vaginal Colonization.

    PubMed

    Patras, Kathryn A; Wescombe, Philip A; Rösler, Berenice; Hale, John D; Tagg, John R; Doran, Kelly S

    2015-09-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus [GBS]) colonizes the rectovaginal tract in 20% to 30% of women and during pregnancy can be transmitted to the newborn, causing severe invasive disease. Current routine screening and antibiotic prophylaxis have fallen short of complete prevention of GBS transmission, and GBS remains a leading cause of neonatal infection. We have investigated the ability of Streptococcus salivarius, a predominant member of the native human oral microbiota, to control GBS colonization. Comparison of the antibacterial activities of multiple S. salivarius strains by use of a deferred-antagonism test showed that S. salivarius strain K12 exhibited the broadest spectrum of activity against GBS. K12 effectively inhibited all GBS strains tested, including disease-implicated isolates from newborns and colonizing isolates from the vaginal tract of pregnant women. Inhibition was dependent on the presence of megaplasmid pSsal-K12, which encodes the bacteriocins salivaricin A and salivaricin B; however, in coculture experiments, GBS growth was impeded by K12 independently of the megaplasmid. We also demonstrated that K12 adheres to and invades human vaginal epithelial cells at levels comparable to GBS. Inhibitory activity of K12 was examined in vivo using a mouse model of GBS vaginal colonization. Mice colonized with GBS were treated vaginally with K12. K12 administration significantly reduced GBS vaginal colonization in comparison to nontreated controls, and this effect was partially dependent on the K12 megaplasmid. Our results suggest that K12 may have potential as a preventative therapy to control GBS vaginal colonization and thereby prevent its transmission to the neonate during pregnancy. PMID:26077762

  18. A computational analysis of the binding mode of closantel as inhibitor of the Onchocerca volvulus chitinase: insights on macrofilaricidal drug design.

    PubMed

    Segura-Cabrera, Aldo; Bocanegra-García, Virgilio; Lizarazo-Ortega, Cristian; Guo, Xianwu; Correa-Basurto, José; Rodríguez-Pérez, Mario A

    2011-12-01

    Onchocerciasis is a leading cause of blindness with at least 37 million people infected and more than 120 million people at risk of contracting the disease; most (99%) of this population, threatened by infection, live in Africa. The drug of choice for mass treatment is the microfilaricidal Mectizan(®) (ivermectin); it does not kill the adult stages of the parasite at the standard dose which is a single annual dose aimed at disease control. However, multiple treatments a year with ivermectin have effects on adult worms. The discovery of new therapeutic targets and drugs directed towards the killing of the adult parasites are thus urgently needed. The chitinase of filarial nematodes is a new drug target due to its essential function in the metabolism and molting of the parasite. Closantel is a potent and specific inhibitor of chitinase of Onchocerca volvulus (OvCHT1) and other filarial chitinases. However, the binding mode and specificity of closantel towards OvCHT1 remain unknown. In the absence of a crystallographic structure of OvCHT1, we developed a homology model of OvCHT1 using the currently available X-ray structures of human chitinases as templates. Energy minimization and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of the model led to a high quality of 3D structure of OvCHIT1. A flexible docking study using closantel as the ligand on the binding site of OvCHIT1 and human chitinases was performed and demonstrated the differences in the closantel binding mode between OvCHIT1 and human chitinase. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulations and free-energy calculation were employed to determine and compare the detailed binding mode of closantel with OvCHT1 and the structure of human chitinase. This comparative study allowed identification of structural features and properties responsible for differences in the computationally predicted closantel binding modes. The homology model and the closantel binding mode reported herein might help guide the rational development of

  19. Dynamics of Onchocerca volvulus Microfilarial Densities after Ivermectin Treatment in an Ivermectin-naïve and a Multiply Treated Population from Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Pion, Sébastien D. S.; Nana-Djeunga, Hugues C.; Kamgno, Joseph; Tendongfor, Nicholas; Wanji, Samuel; Njiokou, Flobert; Prichard, Roger K.; Boussinesq, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Background/Objective Ivermectin has been the keystone of onchocerciasis control for the last 25 years. Sub-optimal responses to the drug have been reported in Ghanaian communities under long-term treatment. We assessed, in two Cameroonian foci, whether the microfilaricidal and/or embryostatic effects of ivermectin on Onchocerca volvulus have been altered after several years of drug pressure. Methods We compared the dynamics of O. volvulus skin microfilarial densities after ivermectin treatment in two cohorts with contrasting exposure to this drug: one received repeated treatment for 13 years whereas the other had no history of large-scale treatments (referred to as controls). Microfilarial densities were assessed 15, 80 and 180 days after ivermectin in 122 multiply treated and 127 ivermectin-naïve individuals. Comparisons were adjusted for individual factors related to microfilarial density: age and number of nodules. Findings Two weeks post ivermectin, microfilarial density dropped equally (98% reduction) in the ivermectin-naïve and multiply treated groups. Between 15 and 180 days post ivermectin, the proportion of individuals with skin microfilariae doubled (from 30.8% to 67.8%) in controls and quadrupled (from 19.8% to 76.9%) in multiply treated individuals but the mean densities remained low in both sites. In fact, between 15 and 80 days, the repopulation rate was significantly higher in the multiply treated individuals than in the controls but no such difference was demonstrated when extending the follow-up to 180 days. The repopulation rate by microfilariae was associated with host factors: negatively with age and positively with the number of nodules. Conclusion These observations may indicate that the worms from the multi-treated area recover mf productivity earlier but would be less productive than the worms from the ivermectin-naïve area between 80 and 180 days after ivermectin. Moreover, they do not support the operation of a strong cumulative effect

  20. Colonic trauma: modern civilian management and military surgical doctrine.

    PubMed Central

    Royle, C A

    1995-01-01

    Colonic trauma, traditionally the domain of the military surgeon, has become commonplace in many parts of the world, where civilian surgeons have developed considerable experience with this complex type of injury. The author highlights the differences between military and civilian management concluding with an overview of current military research into battlefield colonic trauma. This paper reviews military surgical doctrine and summarizes the evolution in civilian surgical practice since the Second World War. South African management is discussed with reference to the author's travelling fellowship visit in 1993. Colonic trauma has been the subject of a military surgical research project, since 1992, with preliminary studies establishing an anastomotic technique suitable for use in the field. This work is summarized with an outline of the research programme. PMID:8537949

  1. Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy in Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bembenek, Andreas E.; Rosenberg, Robert; Wagler, Elke; Gretschel, Stephan; Sendler, Andreas; Siewert, Joerg-Ruediger; Nährig, Jörg; Witzigmann, Helmut; Hauss, Johann; Knorr, Christian; Dimmler, Arno; Gröne, Jörn; Buhr, Heinz-Johannes; Haier, Jörg; Herbst, Hermann; Tepel, Juergen; Siphos, Bence; Kleespies, Axel; Koenigsrainer, Alfred; Stoecklein, Nikolas H.; Horstmann, Olaf; Grützmann, Robert; Imdahl, Andreas; Svoboda, Daniel; Wittekind, Christian; Schneider, Wolfgang; Wernecke, Klaus-Dieter; Schlag, Peter M.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: The clinical impact of sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) in colon cancer is still controversial. The purpose of this prospective multicenter trial was to evaluate its clinical value to predict the nodal status and identify factors that influence these results. Methods: Colon cancer patients without prior colorectal surgery or irradiation were eligible. The sentinel lymph node (SLN) was identified intraoperatively by subserosal blue dye injection around the tumor. The SLN underwent step sections and immunohistochemistry (IHC), if classified free of metastases after routine hematoxylin and eosin examination. Results: At least one SLN (median, n = 2) was identified in 268 of 315 enrolled patients (detection rate, 85%). Center experience, lymphovascular invasion, body mass index (BMI), and learning curve were positively associated with the detection rate. The false-negative rate to identify pN+ patients by SLNB was 46% (38 of 82). BMI showed a significant association to the false-negative rate (P < 0.0001), the number of tumor-involved lymph nodes was inversely associated. If only slim patients (BMI ≤24) were investigated in experienced centers (>22 patients enrolled), the sensitivity increased to 88% (14 of 16). Moreover, 21% (30 of 141) of the patients, classified as pN0 by routine histopathology, revealed micrometastases or isolated tumor cells (MM/ITC) in the SLN. Conclusions: The contribution of SLNB to conventional nodal staging of colon cancer patients is still unspecified. Technical problems have to be resolved before a definite conclusion can be drawn in this regard. However, SLNB identifies about one fourth of stage II patients to reveal MM/ITC in lymph nodes. Further studies must clarify the clinical impact of these findings in terms of prognosis and the indication of adjuvant therapy. PMID:17522509

  2. Green vegetables, red meat and colon cancer: chlorophyll prevents the cytotoxic and hyperproliferative effects of haem in rat colon.

    PubMed

    de Vogel, Johan; Jonker-Termont, Denise S M L; van Lieshout, Esther M M; Katan, Martijn B; van der Meer, Roelof

    2005-02-01

    Diets high in red meat and low in green vegetables are associated with increased colon cancer risk. This association might be partly due to the haem content of red meat. In rats, dietary haem is metabolized in the gut to a cytotoxic factor that increases colonic cytotoxicity and epithelial proliferation. Green vegetables contain chlorophyll, a magnesium porphyrin structurally analogous to haem. We studied whether green vegetables inhibit the unfavourable colonic effects of haem. First, rats were fed a purified control diet or purified diets supplemented with 0.5 mmol haem/kg, spinach (chlorophyll concentration 1.2 mmol/kg) or haem plus spinach (n = 8/group) for 14 days. In a second experiment we also studied a group that received haem plus purified chlorophyll (1.2 mmol/kg). Cytotoxicity of faecal water was determined with a bioassay and colonic epithelial cell proliferation was quantified in vivo by [methyl-(3)H]thymidine incorporation into newly synthesized DNA. Exfoliation of colonocytes was measured as the amount of rat DNA in faeces. In both studies haem increased cytotoxicity of the colonic contents approximately 8-fold and proliferation of the colonocytes almost 2-fold. Spinach or an equimolar amount of chlorophyll supplement in the haem diet inhibited these haem effects completely. Haem clearly inhibited exfoliation of colonocytes, an effect counteracted by spinach and chlorophyll. Finally, size exclusion chromatography showed that chlorophyll prevented formation of the cytotoxic haem metabolite. We conclude that green vegetables may decrease colon cancer risk because chlorophyll prevents the detrimental, cytotoxic and hyperproliferative colonic effects of dietary haem.

  3. Spatial contagion drives colonization and recruitment of frogflies on clutches of red-eyed treefrogs.

    PubMed

    Hughey, Myra C; McCoy, Michael W; Vonesh, James R; Warkentin, Karen M

    2012-10-23

    Spatial contagion occurs when the perceived suitability of neighbouring habitat patches is not independent. As a result, organisms may colonize less-preferred patches near preferred patches and avoid preferred patches near non-preferred patches. Spatial contagion may thus alter colonization dynamics as well as the type and frequency of post-colonization interactions. Studies have only recently documented the phenomenon of spatial contagion and begun to examine its consequences for local recruitment. Here, we test for spatial contagion in the colonization of arboreal egg clutches of red-eyed treefrogs by a frogfly and examine the consequences of contagion for fly recruitment. In laboratory choice experiments, flies oviposit almost exclusively on clutches containing dead frog eggs. In nature, however, flies often colonize intact clutches without dead eggs. Consistent with predictions of contagion-induced oviposition, we found that flies more frequently colonize intact clutches near damaged clutches and rarely colonize intact clutches near other intact clutches. Moreover, contagion appears to benefit flies. Flies survived equally well and suffered less parasitism on clutches lacking dead eggs. This study demonstrates how reward contagion can influence colonization dynamics and suggests that colonization patterns caused by contagion may have important population- and community-level consequences. PMID:22832129

  4. Spatial contagion drives colonization and recruitment of frogflies on clutches of red-eyed treefrogs

    PubMed Central

    Hughey, Myra C.; McCoy, Michael W.; Vonesh, James R.; Warkentin, Karen M.

    2012-01-01

    Spatial contagion occurs when the perceived suitability of neighbouring habitat patches is not independent. As a result, organisms may colonize less-preferred patches near preferred patches and avoid preferred patches near non-preferred patches. Spatial contagion may thus alter colonization dynamics as well as the type and frequency of post-colonization interactions. Studies have only recently documented the phenomenon of spatial contagion and begun to examine its consequences for local recruitment. Here, we test for spatial contagion in the colonization of arboreal egg clutches of red-eyed treefrogs by a frogfly and examine the consequences of contagion for fly recruitment. In laboratory choice experiments, flies oviposit almost exclusively on clutches containing dead frog eggs. In nature, however, flies often colonize intact clutches without dead eggs. Consistent with predictions of contagion-induced oviposition, we found that flies more frequently colonize intact clutches near damaged clutches and rarely colonize intact clutches near other intact clutches. Moreover, contagion appears to benefit flies. Flies survived equally well and suffered less parasitism on clutches lacking dead eggs. This study demonstrates how reward contagion can influence colonization dynamics and suggests that colonization patterns caused by contagion may have important population- and community-level consequences. PMID:22832129

  5. EphrinA5 suppresses colon cancer development by negatively regulating epidermal growth factor receptor stability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tong-Hong; Chang, Junn-Liang; Ho, Jar-Yi; Wu, Hsiao-Chun; Chen, Tse-Ching

    2012-01-01

    Colon cancer is one of the most common human cancers worldwide. Owing to its aggressiveness and lethality, it is necessary to determine the mechanisms regulating the carcinogenesis of colon cancer. EphrinA5 has been reported to act as a putative tumor suppressor in glioma; however, little is known concerning the role of this protein in the context of colon cancer. To elucidate the biological significance of ephrinA5 in colon cancer, we examined ephrinA5 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression profiles in both colon cancer and normal tissues, using immunohistochemistry on a 96-spot tissue microarray. Gain-of-function and loss-of-function experiments were performed on the human colon cancer cell lines SW480 and WiDr to determine the biological effects of ephrinA5 in relation to cell proliferation, survival, and migration. It was found that ephrinA5 mRNA and protein levels were significantly reduced in colon cancer as compared with normal colon tissue specimens. EphrinA5 expression was also negatively associated with tumor differentiation and clinical stage. In colon cancer cell line models, ephrinA5 exerted an inhibitory effect on EGFR by promoting c-Cbl-mediated EGFR ubiquitination and degradation. EphrinA5 did not affect the transcriptional regulation of EGFR mRNA expression in colon cancer cells. Expression of ephrinA5 suppressed colon cancer cell proliferation, migration, and chemotherapeutic resistance. In conclusion, ephrinA5 inhibited colon cancer progression by promoting c-Cbl-mediated EGFR degradation. Our findings identify a novel mechanism that could be utilized to improve the therapeutic efficiency of EGFR-targeting strategies.

  6. Drugs Approved for Colon and Rectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Colon and Rectal Cancer This page ... and rectal cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Colon Cancer Avastin (Bevacizumab) Bevacizumab Camptosar ( ...

  7. Teaching about the Colonization of Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huebner, Jay S.

    1979-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate course, The Colonization of Space, which introduces nonscience majors at the University of North Florida to current topics in the exploration, industrialization, and colonization of space. References to the audiovisual resources and literature are also included. (HM)

  8. Breast and Colon Cancer Family Registries

    Cancer.gov

    The Breast Cancer Family Registry and the Colon Cancer Family Registry were established by the National Cancer Institute as a resource for investigators to use in conducting studies on the genetics and molecular epidemiology of breast and colon cancer.

  9. Evaluating Darwin's naturalization hypothesis in experimental plant assemblages: phylogenetic relationships do not determine colonization success.

    PubMed

    Castro, Sergio A; Escobedo, Victor M; Aranda, Jorge; Carvallo, Gastón O

    2014-01-01

    Darwin's naturalization hypothesis (DNH) proposes that colonization is less likely when the colonizing species is related to members of the invaded community, because evolutionary closeness intensifies competition among species that share similar resources. Studies that have evaluated DNH from correlational evidence have yielded controversial results with respect to its occurrence and generality. In the present study we carried out a set of manipulative experiments in which we controlled the phylogenetic relatedness of one colonizing species (Lactuca sativa) with five assemblages of plants (the recipient communities), and evaluated the colonizing success using five indicators (germination, growth, flowering, survival, and recruitment). The evolutionary relatedness was calculated as the mean phylogenetic distance between Lactuca and the members of each assemblage (MPD) and by the mean phylogenetic distance to the nearest neighbor (MNND). The results showed that the colonization success of Lactuca was not affected by MPD or MNND values, findings that do not support DNH. These results disagree with experimental studies made with communities of microorganisms, which show an inverse relation between colonization success and phylogenetic distances. We suggest that these discrepancies may be due to the high phylogenetic distance used, since in our experiments the colonizing species (Lactuca) was a distant relative of the assemblage members, while in the other studies the colonizing taxa have been related at the congeneric and conspecific levels. We suggest that under field conditions the phylogenetic distance is a weak predictor of competition, and it has a limited role in determining colonization success, contrary to prediction of the DNH. More experimental studies are needed to establish the importance of phylogenetic distance between colonizing species and invaded community on colonization success.

  10. Colon Cleansing: Health or Hype?

    MedlinePlus

    ... maintain a healthy bacterial composition, known as your microflora. “Your microflora plays a crucial role in protecting your body ... potassium Kidney damage Plus, colon cleansing changes your microflora. “You may think you’re getting rid of ...

  11. One Hundred Years After Its Discovery in Guatemala by Rodolfo Robles, Onchocerca volvulus Transmission Has Been Eliminated from the Central Endemic Zone.

    PubMed

    Richards, Frank; Rizzo, Nidia; Diaz Espinoza, Carlos Enrique; Monroy, Zoraida Morales; Crovella Valdez, Carol Guillermina; de Cabrera, Renata Mendizabal; de Leon, Oscar; Zea-Flores, Guillermo; Sauerbrey, Mauricio; Morales, Alba Lucia; Rios, Dalila; Unnasch, Thomas R; Hassan, Hassan K; Klein, Robert; Eberhard, Mark; Cupp, Ed; Domínguez, Alfredo

    2015-12-01

    We report the elimination of Onchocerca volvulus transmission from the Central Endemic Zone (CEZ) of onchocerciasis in Guatemala, the largest focus of this disease in the Americas and the first to be discovered in this hemisphere by Rodolfo Robles Valverde in 1915. Mass drug administration (MDA) with ivermectin was launched in 1988, with semiannual MDA coverage reaching at least 85% of the eligible population in > 95% of treatment rounds during the 12-year period, 2000-2011. Serial parasitological testing to monitor MDA impact in sentinel villages showed a decrease in microfilaria skin prevalence from 70% to 0%, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based entomological assessments of the principal vector Simulium ochraceum s.l. showed transmission interruption by 2007. These assessments, together with a 2010 serological survey in children 9-69 months of age that showed Ov16 IgG4 antibody prevalence to be < 0.1%, meeting World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines for stopping MDA, and treatment was halted after 2011. After 3 years an entomological assessment showed no evidence of vector infection or recrudescence of transmission. In 2015, 100 years after the discovery of its presence, the Ministry of Health of Guatemala declared onchocerciasis transmission as having been eliminated from the CEZ. PMID:26503275

  12. Detection of Onchocerca volvulus in Skin Snips by Microscopy and Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction: Implications for Monitoring and Evaluation Activities.

    PubMed

    Thiele, Elizabeth A; Cama, Vitaliano A; Lakwo, Thomson; Mekasha, Sindeaw; Abanyie, Francisca; Sleshi, Markos; Kebede, Amha; Cantey, Paul T

    2016-04-01

    Microscopic evaluation of skin biopsies is the monitoring and evaluation (M and E) method currently used by multiple onchocerciasis elimination programs in Africa. However, as repeated mass drug administration suppresses microfilarial loads, the sensitivity and programmatic utility of skin snip microscopy is expected to decrease. Using a pan-filarial real-time polymerase chain reaction with melt curve analysis (qPCR-MCA), we evaluated 1) the use of a single-step molecular assay for detecting and identifying Onchocerca volvulus microfilariae in residual skin snips and 2) the sensitivity of skin snip microscopy relative to qPCR-MCA. Skin snips were collected and examined with routine microscopy in hyperendemic regions of Uganda and Ethiopia (N= 500 each) and "residual" skin snips (tissue remaining after induced microfilarial emergence) were tested with qPCR-MCA. qPCR-MCA detected Onchocerca DNA in 223 residual snips: 139 of 147 microscopy(+) and 84 among microscopy(-) snips, suggesting overall sensitivity of microscopy was 62.3% (139/223) relative to qPCR-MCA (75.6% in Uganda and 28.6% in Ethiopia). These findings demonstrate the insufficient sensitivity of skin snip microscopy for reliable programmatic monitoring. Molecular tools such as qPCR-MCA can augment sensitivity and provide diagnostic confirmation of skin biopsies and will be useful for evaluation or validation of new onchocerciasis M and E tools. PMID:26880774

  13. One Hundred Years After Its Discovery in Guatemala by Rodolfo Robles, Onchocerca volvulus Transmission Has Been Eliminated from the Central Endemic Zone.

    PubMed

    Richards, Frank; Rizzo, Nidia; Diaz Espinoza, Carlos Enrique; Monroy, Zoraida Morales; Crovella Valdez, Carol Guillermina; de Cabrera, Renata Mendizabal; de Leon, Oscar; Zea-Flores, Guillermo; Sauerbrey, Mauricio; Morales, Alba Lucia; Rios, Dalila; Unnasch, Thomas R; Hassan, Hassan K; Klein, Robert; Eberhard, Mark; Cupp, Ed; Domínguez, Alfredo

    2015-12-01

    We report the elimination of Onchocerca volvulus transmission from the Central Endemic Zone (CEZ) of onchocerciasis in Guatemala, the largest focus of this disease in the Americas and the first to be discovered in this hemisphere by Rodolfo Robles Valverde in 1915. Mass drug administration (MDA) with ivermectin was launched in 1988, with semiannual MDA coverage reaching at least 85% of the eligible population in > 95% of treatment rounds during the 12-year period, 2000-2011. Serial parasitological testing to monitor MDA impact in sentinel villages showed a decrease in microfilaria skin prevalence from 70% to 0%, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based entomological assessments of the principal vector Simulium ochraceum s.l. showed transmission interruption by 2007. These assessments, together with a 2010 serological survey in children 9-69 months of age that showed Ov16 IgG4 antibody prevalence to be < 0.1%, meeting World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines for stopping MDA, and treatment was halted after 2011. After 3 years an entomological assessment showed no evidence of vector infection or recrudescence of transmission. In 2015, 100 years after the discovery of its presence, the Ministry of Health of Guatemala declared onchocerciasis transmission as having been eliminated from the CEZ.

  14. Retarded Onchocerca volvulus L1 to L3 larval development in the Simulium damnosum vector after anti-wolbachial treatment of the human host

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The human parasite Onchocerca volvulus harbours Wolbachia endosymbionts essential for worm embryogenesis, larval development and adult survival. In this study, the development of Wolbachia-depleted microfilariae (first stage larvae) to infective third stage larvae (L3) in the insect vector Simulium damnosum was analysed. Methods Infected volunteers in Cameroon were randomly and blindly allocated into doxycycline (200 mg/day for 6 weeks) or placebo treatment groups. After treatment, blackflies were allowed to take a blood meal on the volunteers, captured and dissected for larval counting and DNA extraction for quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Results PCR results showed a clear reduction in Wolbachia DNA after doxycycline treatment in microfilariae from human skin biopsies with > 50% reduction at one month post-treatment, eventually reaching a reduction of > 80%. Larval stages recovered from the insect vector had similar levels of reduction of endosymbiotic bacteria. Larval recoveries were analysed longitudinally after treatment to follow the kinetics of larval development. Beginning at three months post-treatment, significantly fewer L3 were seen in the blackflies that had fed on doxycycline treated volunteers. Concomitant with this, the proportion of second stage larvae (L2) was significantly increased in this group. Conclusions Doxycycline treatment and the resulting decline of Wolbachia endobacteria from the microfilaria resulted in retarded development of larvae in the insect vector. Thus, anti-wolbachial treatment could have an additive effect for interrupting transmission by reducing the number of L3 that can be transmitted by blackflies. PMID:22236497

  15. Reproducing stone monument photosynthetic-based colonization under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Miller, Ana Zélia; Laiz, Leonila; Gonzalez, Juan Miguel; Dionísio, Amélia; Macedo, Maria Filomena; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo

    2008-11-01

    In order to understand the biodeterioration process occurring on stone monuments, we analyzed the microbial communities involved in these processes and studied their ability to colonize stones under controlled laboratory experiments. In this study, a natural green biofilm from a limestone monument was cultivated, inoculated on stone probes of the same lithotype and incubated in a laboratory chamber. This incubation system, which exposes stone samples to intermittently sprinkling water, allowed the development of photosynthetic biofilms similar to those occurring on stone monuments. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis was used to evaluate the major microbial components of the laboratory biofilms. Cyanobacteria, green microalgae, bacteria and fungi were identified by DNA-based molecular analysis targeting the 16S and 18S ribosomal RNA genes. The natural green biofilm was mainly composed by the Chlorophyta Chlorella, Stichococcus, and Trebouxia, and by Cyanobacteria belonging to the genera Leptolyngbya and Pleurocapsa. A number of bacteria belonging to Alphaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Verrucomicrobia were identified, as well as fungi from the Ascomycota. The laboratory colonization experiment on stone probes showed a colonization pattern similar to that occurring on stone monuments. The methodology described in this paper allowed to reproduce a colonization equivalent to the natural biodeteriorating process.

  16. Transverse Colon Diverticulitis with Calcified Fecalith

    PubMed Central

    Solak, Aynur; Solak, Ilhami; Genç, Berhan; Sahin, Neslin; Yalaz, Seyhan

    2013-01-01

    Left colonic diverticula are common in Western populations, whereas right colonic diverticulosis primarily occurs in Oriental populations. Diverticulitis of the transverse colon is very rare, with very few cases reported in the literature. Herein, we report a case of transverse colon diverticulitis caused by a calcified stone in a 69-year-old female. This was a solitary diverticulum. The signs and symptoms of the disease are similar to acute pancreatitis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing the MRI findings of a patient with trans-verse colon diverticulitis caused by a calcified stone. PMID:25610254

  17. Effect of island size, distance, and epicenter maturity on colonization in freshwater protozoan communities

    SciTech Connect

    Henebry, M.S.; Cairns, J. Jr.

    1980-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to: (a) obtain baseline data on the colonization of artificial islands in a closed laboratory system; (b) investigate effects of island area and distance from an epicenter (source of protozoa) on the colonization process, and (c) test the effect of the maturity of an epicenter on the colonization of surrounding islands. Islands which were smallest in area or closest to the epicenter had significantly greater species richness during the 7 days of the experiments. Islands exposed to epicenters of intermediate, maturity had significantly greater species richness than islands tested with mature (fully colonized) epicenters. Evidence gathered thus far strongly suggests that kinds of species during different periods of colonization are responsible for differences in species richness on islands exposed to epicenters of different maturities.

  18. Volumetric Colon Wall Unfolding Using Harmonic Differentials

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Wei; Marino, Joseph; Kaufman, Arie; Gu, Xianfeng David

    2011-01-01

    Volumetric colon wall unfolding is a novel method for virtual colon analysis and visualization with valuable applications in virtual colonoscopy (VC) and computer-aided detection (CAD) systems. A volumetrically unfolded colon enables doctors to visualize the entire colon structure without occlusions due to haustral folds, and is critical for performing efficient and accurate texture analysis on the volumetric colon wall. Though conventional colon surface flattening has been employed for these uses, volumetric colon unfolding offers the advantages of providing the needed quantities of information with needed accuracy. This work presents an efficient and effective volumetric colon unfolding method based on harmonic differentials. The colon volumes are reconstructed from CT images and are represented as tetrahedral meshes. Three harmonic 1-forms, which are linearly independent everywhere, are computed on the tetrahedral mesh. Through integration of the harmonic 1-forms, the colon volume is mapped periodically to a canonical cuboid. The method presented is automatic, simple, and practical. Experimental results are reported to show the performance of the algorithm on real medical datasets. Though applied here specifically to the colon, the method is general and can be generalized for other volumes. PMID:21765563

  19. [Lactobacilli and colon carcinoma--A review].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shumei; Zhang, Lanwei; Shan, Yujuan

    2015-06-01

    Epidemiological studies showed that incidence of colon carcinoma is increased in the world. There are many difficulties to inhibit colon carcinoma because the causes of inducing colon carcinoma were various and interactive each other. Previous evidence supported the balance of the colonic microflora was critical in inhibiting colon carcinoma and the protection by colonic microflora could be improved by ingesting lactobacilli. Therefore, the biological functions and anticancer effects of lactobacilli attract attention of researchers. In this review we discussed the causes of colon carcinoma; the anticancer mechanisms of lactobacilli on the basis of our own studies. Eventually, we summarized the effects of anticancer of different components and metabolic products extracted from lactobacilli. PMID:26562990

  20. Competition for space during bacterial colonization of a surface.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Diarmuid P; Allen, Rosalind J

    2015-09-01

    Competition for space is ubiquitous in the ecology of both microorganisms and macro-organisms. We introduce a bacterial model system in which the factors influencing competition for space during colonization of an initially empty habitat can be tracked directly. Using fluorescence microscopy, we follow the fate of individual Escherichia coli bacterial cell lineages as they undergo expansion competition (the race to be the first to colonize a previously empty territory), and as they later compete at boundaries between clonal territories. Our experiments are complemented by computer simulations of a lattice-based model. We find that both expansion competition, manifested as differences in individual cell lag times, and boundary competition, manifested as effects of neighbour cell geometry, can play a role in colonization success, particularly when lineages expand exponentially. This work provides a baseline for investigating how ecological interactions affect colonization of space by bacterial populations, and highlights the potential of bacterial model systems for the testing and development of ecological theory. PMID:26333814

  1. Competition for space during bacterial colonization of a surface

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Diarmuid P.; Allen, Rosalind J.

    2015-01-01

    Competition for space is ubiquitous in the ecology of both microorganisms and macro-organisms. We introduce a bacterial model system in which the factors influencing competition for space during colonization of an initially empty habitat can be tracked directly. Using fluorescence microscopy, we follow the fate of individual Escherichia coli bacterial cell lineages as they undergo expansion competition (the race to be the first to colonize a previously empty territory), and as they later compete at boundaries between clonal territories. Our experiments are complemented by computer simulations of a lattice-based model. We find that both expansion competition, manifested as differences in individual cell lag times, and boundary competition, manifested as effects of neighbour cell geometry, can play a role in colonization success, particularly when lineages expand exponentially. This work provides a baseline for investigating how ecological interactions affect colonization of space by bacterial populations, and highlights the potential of bacterial model systems for the testing and development of ecological theory. PMID:26333814

  2. Extended result reading window in lateral flow tests detecting exposure to Onchocerca volvulus: a new technology to improve epidemiological surveillance tools.

    PubMed

    Golden, Allison; Steel, Cathy; Yokobe, Lindsay; Jackson, Emily; Barney, Rebecca; Kubofcik, Joseph; Peck, Roger; Unnasch, Thomas R; Nutman, Thomas B; de los Santos, Tala; Domingo, Gonzalo J

    2013-01-01

    Onchocerciasis is a neglected tropical disease caused by infection with the parasite Onchocerca volvulus (Ov). An estimated 180 million people are at risk for Ov infection, and 37 million people are infected, mostly in Africa. A lateral flow-based assay to detect human IgG4 antibodies to the Ov-specific antigen Ov-16 was developed as a rapid tool to detect exposure to Ov. The test, when performed on 449 sera specimens from patients with microfiladermia and Ov-negative patients, has a sensitivity of 89.1% (95% confidence interval: 86.2%-92.0%), and specificity of 97% (95% confidence interval: 95.4%-98.6%). Because the intended use of the test is for surveillance, it is highly desirable to have a stable, long-lasting result. An extended read window is thus desirable for a high-volume, busy workflow and facilitates post-surveillance quality assurance. The main restriction on achieving an extended read window for this assay was the erythrocyte lysis that can alter the signal-to-noise ratio, especially in those with low IgG4 levels (weak positives). We describe a test housing that incorporates a user-independent feature driven by assay fluid and an expanding wick that detaches the blood separation membrane from the nitrocellulose used in the assay, but before hemolysis occurs. We demonstrated material functionality at extreme operational conditions (37°C, 80% relative humidity) and a read window of a minimum of 70 days. The fluid-driven assay device performs equally as well with whole blood as with plasma, as demonstrated with 100 spiked clinical specimens (with a correlation coefficient of 0.96). We show a novel, inexpensive, and simple approach to actuating the detachment of the blood separation membrane from the nitrocellulose test with no impact on the performance characteristics of the test. PMID:23935960

  3. The Immunomodulatory Role of Adjuvants in Vaccines Formulated with the Recombinant Antigens Ov-103 and Ov-RAL-2 against Onchocerca volvulus in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Jessica A.; Zhan, Bin; Torigian, April R.; Patton, John B.; Petrovsky, Nikolai; Zhan, Tingting; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Hotez, Peter J.; Klei, Thomas R.; Lustigman, Sara; Abraham, David

    2016-01-01

    Background In some regions in Africa, elimination of onchocerciasis may be possible with mass drug administration, although there is concern based on several factors that onchocerciasis cannot be eliminated solely through this approach. A vaccine against Onchocerca volvulus would provide a critical tool for the ultimate elimination of this infection. Previous studies have demonstrated that immunization of mice with Ov-103 and Ov-RAL-2, when formulated with alum, induced protective immunity. It was hypothesized that the levels of protective immunity induced with the two recombinant antigens formulated with alum would be improved by formulation with other adjuvants known to enhance different types of antigen-specific immune responses. Methodology/ Principal Findings Immunizing mice with Ov-103 and Ov-RAL-2 in conjunction with alum, Advax 2 and MF59 induced significant levels of larval killing and host protection. The immune response was biased towards Th2 with all three of the adjuvants, with IgG1 the dominant antibody. Improved larval killing and host protection was observed in mice immunized with co-administered Ov-103 and Ov-RAL-2 in conjunction with each of the three adjuvants as compared to single immunizations. Antigen–specific antibody titers were significantly increased in mice immunized concurrently with the two antigens. Based on chemokine levels, it appears that neutrophils and eosinophils participate in the protective immune response induced by Ov-103, and macrophages and neutrophils participate in immunity induced by Ov-RAL-2. Conclusions/Significance The mechanism of protective immunity induced by Ov-103 and Ov-RAL-2, with the adjuvants alum, Advax 2 and MF59, appears to be multifactorial with roles for cytokines, chemokines, antibody and specific effector cells. The vaccines developed in this study have the potential of reducing the morbidity associated with onchocerciasis in humans. PMID:27387453

  4. Importance of migrants infected with Onchocerca volvulus in west African river valleys protected by 14 to 15 years of Simulium control.

    PubMed

    De Sole, G; Remme, J

    1991-06-01

    A study was done to determine the importance of human migration from non-controlled endemic onchocerciasis foci to the river valleys that have been protected for the past 14 to 15 years by the vector control operations of the Onchocerciasis Control Programme in West Africa. The aim of the study was to assess the contribution of migrants to the prevalence and intensity of infection in villages from 5 major river valleys and their potential role in causing relapse of transmission once the vector is allowed to return. In Burkina Faso the migrant population varied from 0.0% to 18.1% of the village population, and averaged 4.9%. Migrants accounted only for 0.6% of the population in Ghanaian and Ivorian villages along the Black Volta river. The prevalence of infection was significantly higher in migrants (8.2%) than in non migrants (1.1%) in the surveyed villages in Burkina Faso, and 1.5% of migrants had infections with more than 16 microfilariae per snip as against 0.2% of non migrants. Nearly all infected migrants came from the south of the Côte d'Ivoire. The study shows that human migration has caused the importation of Onchocerca volvulus from non-controlled areas. However, the epidemiological importance of this phenomenon is limited because of the very small number of infected migrants per village while two-third of the infected migrants are believed to be infected with the less pathogenic forest strain of the parasite. Because migration patterns changes geographically and over time similar studies will be continued on a regular basis. PMID:1654591

  5. Importance of migrants infected with Onchocerca volvulus in west African river valleys protected by 14 to 15 years of Simulium control.

    PubMed

    De Sole, G; Remme, J

    1991-06-01

    A study was done to determine the importance of human migration from non-controlled endemic onchocerciasis foci to the river valleys that have been protected for the past 14 to 15 years by the vector control operations of the Onchocerciasis Control Programme in West Africa. The aim of the study was to assess the contribution of migrants to the prevalence and intensity of infection in villages from 5 major river valleys and their potential role in causing relapse of transmission once the vector is allowed to return. In Burkina Faso the migrant population varied from 0.0% to 18.1% of the village population, and averaged 4.9%. Migrants accounted only for 0.6% of the population in Ghanaian and Ivorian villages along the Black Volta river. The prevalence of infection was significantly higher in migrants (8.2%) than in non migrants (1.1%) in the surveyed villages in Burkina Faso, and 1.5% of migrants had infections with more than 16 microfilariae per snip as against 0.2% of non migrants. Nearly all infected migrants came from the south of the Côte d'Ivoire. The study shows that human migration has caused the importation of Onchocerca volvulus from non-controlled areas. However, the epidemiological importance of this phenomenon is limited because of the very small number of infected migrants per village while two-third of the infected migrants are believed to be infected with the less pathogenic forest strain of the parasite. Because migration patterns changes geographically and over time similar studies will be continued on a regular basis.

  6. Contribution of migrant coffee labourers infected with Onchocerca volvulus to the maintenance of the microfilarial reservoir in an ivermectin-treated area of Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Pérez, Mario A; Cabrera, Aldo Segura; Ortega, Cristian Lizarazo; Basáñez, María-Gloria; Davies, John B

    2007-01-01

    Background Since 1991, in Mexico, ivermectin has been administered twice a year to all residents in the onchocerciasis endemic foci which are mainly located in the coffee growing areas. However, the presence of a potentially infected itinerant seasonal labour force which is not treated regularly could jeopardise the attainment of the 85% coverage which is the present target for elimination of the disease. Methods The prevalence and intensity of Onchocerca volvulus microfilariae (mf), as well as their transmission from humans to vectors, were assessed during the coffee planting-clearing and harvesting seasons of 1997–1998, and 1998–1999 in two localities (I and II) of Southern Chiapas, Mexico, which regularly receive an influx of untreated migrant coffee labourers. Results Localities I and II had, respectively, an average of 391 (± 32) and 358 (± 14) resident inhabitants, and 70 (± 52) and 498 (± 289) temporary labourers. The ratio of migrants to residents ranged from 0.1:1 in locality I to 2.4:1 in locality II. The proportion of infected Simulium ochraceum s.l. parous flies was significantly lower in locality I than in locality II, and significantly higher during the stay of the migrants than before their arrival or after their departure. Parity and infection were higher in May-July than in November-February (in contrast with the latter being typically considered as the peak onchocerciasis transmission season by S. ochraceum s.l.). Conclusion The presence of significant numbers of untreated and potentially infected migrants may contribute to ongoing transmission, and their incorporation into ivermectin programmes should be beneficial for the attainment of the elimination goals of the regional initiative. However, the possibility that the results also reflect transmission patterns for the area cannot be excluded and these should be analyzed further. PMID:18088423

  7. Recurrence of Urothelial Bladder Carcinoma in the Colon Presenting as Hematochezia

    PubMed Central

    Krzyzak, Michael; Barakat, Iskandar; Deeb, Liliane

    2016-01-01

    Patients with superficial bladder cancers remain clinically indolent after treatment with even a modicum of urologic intervention. However, with more invasive disease, the majority of patients experience recurrence. The conventional route of metastasis and recurrence in primary urothelial cell carcinoma is through lymphatic system, with regional lymph nodes, lungs, liver, brain, and bone being the most common sites. Isolated intraluminal colonic recurrence in the absence of local invasion is extremely rare. We report a unique case of urothelial cell carcinoma presenting with an isolated colonic mass, which unexpectedly, on immunohistostaining, proved to be primarily of urothelial rather than colonic origin. PMID:27807561

  8. Polymers for Colon Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Rajpurohit, H.; Sharma, P.; Sharma, S.; Bhandari, A.

    2010-01-01

    The colon targeted drug delivery has a number of important implications in the field of pharmacotherapy. Oral colon targeted drug delivery systems have recently gained importance for delivering a variety of therapeutic agents for both local and systemic administration. Targeting of drugs to the colon via oral administration protect the drug from degradation or release in the stomach and small intestine. It also ensures abrupt or controlled release of the drug in the proximal colon. Various drug delivery systems have been designed that deliver the drug quantitatively to the colon and then trigger the release of drug. This review will cover different types of polymers which can be used in formulation of colon targeted drug delivery systems. PMID:21969739

  9. Primary Isolated Extramedullary Plasmacytoma in the Colon

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Hyun; Ahn, Byung-Kwon; Baek, Sung-Uhn; Chang, Hee-Kyung

    2013-01-01

    Primary isolated extramedullary plasmacytoma is a rare tumor. Although it commonly involves nasopharynx or upper respiratory tract, only 10% of cases involves the gastrointestinal tract. Stomach and small intestine are the most commonly involved sites in the gastrointestinal tract. Primary isolated extramedullary plasmacytoma of colon is extremely rare. We report a case of 45-year-old man who presented with 1-year history of lower abdominal pain. Colonoscopy showed a colonic stricture about 50 cm from the anal verge. Colonoscopic biopsy showed lymphoid hyperplasia. On computed tomography, enhancing circumferential wall thickening and luminal narrowing with pericolic lymph node enlargement in the transverse colon was identified. Patient underwent extended left hemicolectomy. Histopathologic examination of resected colon identified an isolated primary colonic plasmacytoma of 1.7 cm in diameter with regional lymph node involvement (8/50 positive). To administer adequate treatment, further study about clinical features of primary isolated extramedullary plasmacytoma of colon is necessary.

  10. Metabolism links bacterial biofilms and colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Caroline H; Dejea, Christine M; Edler, David; Hoang, Linh T; Santidrian, Antonio F; Felding, Brunhilde H; Ivanisevic, Julijana; Cho, Kevin; Wick, Elizabeth C; Hechenbleikner, Elizabeth M; Uritboonthai, Winnie; Goetz, Laura; Casero, Robert A; Pardoll, Drew M; White, James R; Patti, Gary J; Sears, Cynthia L; Siuzdak, Gary

    2015-06-01

    Bacterial biofilms in the colon alter the host tissue microenvironment. A role for biofilms in colon cancer metabolism has been suggested but to date has not been evaluated. Using metabolomics, we investigated the metabolic influence that microbial biofilms have on colon tissues and the related occurrence of cancer. Patient-matched colon cancers and histologically normal tissues, with or without biofilms, were examined. We show the upregulation of polyamine metabolites in tissues from cancer hosts with significant enhancement of N(1), N(12)-diacetylspermine in both biofilm-positive cancer and normal tissues. Antibiotic treatment, which cleared biofilms, decreased N(1), N(12)-diacetylspermine levels to those seen in biofilm-negative tissues, indicating that host cancer and bacterial biofilm structures contribute to the polyamine metabolite pool. These results show that colonic mucosal biofilms alter the cancer metabolome to produce a regulator of cellular proliferation and colon cancer growth potentially affecting cancer development and progression.

  11. The Use of Flagella and Motility for Plant Colonization and Fitness by Different Strains of the Foodborne Pathogen Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Gorski, Lisa; Duhé, Jessica M.; Flaherty, Denise

    2009-01-01

    The role of flagella and motility in the attachment of the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes to various surfaces is mixed with some systems requiring flagella for an interaction and others needing only motility for cells to get to the surface. In nature this bacterium is a saprophyte and contaminated produce is an avenue for infection. Previous studies have documented the ability of this organism to attach to and colonize plant tissue. Motility mutants were generated in three wild type strains of L. monocytogenes by deleting either flaA, the gene encoding flagellin, or motAB, genes encoding part of the flagellar motor, and tested for both the ability to colonize sprouts and for the fitness of that colonization. The motAB mutants were not affected in the colonization of alfalfa, radish, and broccoli sprouts; however, some of the flaA mutants showed reduced colonization ability. The best colonizing wild type strain was reduced in colonization on all three sprout types as a result of a flaA deletion. A mutant in another background was only affected on alfalfa. The third, a poor alfalfa colonizer was not affected in colonization ability by any of the deletions. Fitness of colonization was measured in experiments of competition between mixtures of mutant and parent strains on sprouts. Here the flaA and motAB mutants of the three strain backgrounds were impaired in fitness of colonization of alfalfa and radish sprouts, and one strain background showed reduced fitness of both mutant types on broccoli sprouts. Together these data indicate a role for flagella for some strains to physically colonize some plants, while the fitness of that colonization is positively affected by motility in almost all cases. PMID:19357783

  12. The use of flagella and motility for plant colonization and fitness by different strains of the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Gorski, Lisa; Duhé, Jessica M; Flaherty, Denise

    2009-01-01

    The role of flagella and motility in the attachment of the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes to various surfaces is mixed with some systems requiring flagella for an interaction and others needing only motility for cells to get to the surface. In nature this bacterium is a saprophyte and contaminated produce is an avenue for infection. Previous studies have documented the ability of this organism to attach to and colonize plant tissue. Motility mutants were generated in three wild type strains of L. monocytogenes by deleting either flaA, the gene encoding flagellin, or motAB, genes encoding part of the flagellar motor, and tested for both the ability to colonize sprouts and for the fitness of that colonization. The motAB mutants were not affected in the colonization of alfalfa, radish, and broccoli sprouts; however, some of the flaA mutants showed reduced colonization ability. The best colonizing wild type strain was reduced in colonization on all three sprout types as a result of a flaA deletion. A mutant in another background was only affected on alfalfa. The third, a poor alfalfa colonizer was not affected in colonization ability by any of the deletions. Fitness of colonization was measured in experiments of competition between mixtures of mutant and parent strains on sprouts. Here the flaA and motAB mutants of the three strain backgrounds were impaired in fitness of colonization of alfalfa and radish sprouts, and one strain background showed reduced fitness of both mutant types on broccoli sprouts. Together these data indicate a role for flagella for some strains to physically colonize some plants, while the fitness of that colonization is positively affected by motility in almost all cases.

  13. Arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization, plant chemistry, and aboveground herbivory on Senecio jacobaea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reidinger, Stefan; Eschen, René; Gange, Alan C.; Finch, Paul; Bezemer, T. Martijn

    2012-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) can affect insect herbivores by changing plant growth and chemistry. However, many factors can influence the symbiotic relationship between plant and fungus, potentially obscuring experimental treatments and ecosystem impacts. In a field experiment, we assessed AMF colonization levels of individual ragwort ( Senecio jacobaea) plants growing in grassland plots that were originally sown with 15 or 4 plant species, or were unsown. We measured the concentrations of carbon, nitrogen and pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs), and assessed the presence of aboveground insect herbivores on the sampled plants. Total AMF colonization and colonization by arbuscules was lower in plots sown with 15 species than in plots sown with 4 species and unsown plots. AMF colonization was positively related to the cover of oxeye daisy ( Leucanthemum vulgare) and a positive relationship between colonization by arbuscules and the occurrence of a specialist seed-feeding fly ( Pegohylemyia seneciella) was found. The occurrence of stem-boring, leaf-mining and sap-sucking insects was not affected by AMF colonization. Total PA concentrations were negatively related to colonization levels by vesicles, but did not differ among the sowing treatments. No single factor explained the observed differences in AMF colonization among the sowing treatments or insect herbivore occurrence on S. jacobaea. However, correlations across the treatments suggest that some of the variation was due to the abundance of one plant species, which is known to stimulate AMF colonization of neighbouring plants, while AMF colonization was related to the occurrence of a specialist insect herbivore. Our results thus illustrate that in natural systems, the ecosystem impact of AMF through their influence on the occurrence of specialist insects can be recognised, but they also highlight the confounding effect of neighbouring plant species identity. Hence, our results emphasise the importance of field

  14. Vibrio cholerae Response Regulator VxrB Controls Colonization and Regulates the Type VI Secretion System.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Andrew T; Ottemann, Karen M; Yildiz, Fitnat H

    2015-05-01

    Two-component signal transduction systems (TCS) are used by bacteria to sense and respond to their environment. TCS are typically composed of a sensor histidine kinase (HK) and a response regulator (RR). The Vibrio cholerae genome encodes 52 RR, but the role of these RRs in V. cholerae pathogenesis is largely unknown. To identify RRs that control V. cholerae colonization, in-frame deletions of each RR were generated and the resulting mutants analyzed using an infant mouse intestine colonization assay. We found that 12 of the 52 RR were involved in intestinal colonization. Mutants lacking one previously uncharacterized RR, VCA0566 (renamed VxrB), displayed a significant colonization defect. Further experiments showed that VxrB phosphorylation state on the predicted conserved aspartate contributes to intestine colonization. The VxrB regulon was determined using whole genome expression analysis. It consists of several genes, including those genes that create the type VI secretion system (T6SS). We determined that VxrB is required for T6SS expression using several in vitro assays and bacterial killing assays, and furthermore that the T6SS is required for intestinal colonization. vxrB is encoded in a four gene operon and the other vxr operon members also modulate intestinal colonization. Lastly, though ΔvxrB exhibited a defect in single-strain intestinal colonization, the ΔvxrB strain did not show any in vitro growth defect. Overall, our work revealed that a small set of RRs is required for intestinal colonization and one of these regulators, VxrB affects colonization at least in part through its regulation of T6SS genes.

  15. Colon Cancer Metastatic to the Biliary Tree

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, Steven B.; Markow, Michael; Mamel, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis of colon adenocarcinoma is commonly found in the lung, liver, or peritoneum. Common bile duct (CBD) tumors related to adenomas from familial adenomatous polyposis metastasizing from outside of the gastrointestinal tract have been reported. We report a case of biliary colic due to metastatic colon adenocarcinoma to the CBD. Obstructive jaundice with signs of acalculous cholecystitis on imaging in a patient with a history of colon cancer should raise suspicion for metastasis to CBD. PMID:27144209

  16. Colon tumor cells grown in NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    These photos compare the results of colon carcinoma cells grown in a NASA Bioreactor flown on the STS-70 Space Shuttle in 1995 flight and ground control experiments. The cells grown in microgravity (left) have aggregated to form masses that are larger and more similar to tissue found in the body than the cells cultured on the ground (right). The principal investigator is Milburn Jessup of the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Cell constructs grown in a rotating bioreactor on Earth (left) eventually become too large to stay suspended in the nutrient media. In the microgravity of orbit, the cells stay suspended. Rotation then is needed for gentle stirring to replenish the media around the cells. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). Credit: NASA and University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center.

  17. Spontaneous colonic adenocarcinoma in marmosets.

    PubMed

    Lushbaugh, C C; Humason, G L; Swartzendruber, D C; Richter, C B; Gengozian, N

    1978-01-01

    We find that colonic adenocarcinoma, which is an extremely rare neoplasm of all animals except man and carcinogen-treated rodents, occurs spontaneously in some marmosets. The cotton-topped Saguinus oedipus oedipus is particularly prone to develop it, but we have found it also at necropsy in Callimico goeldii (Goeldi's marmoset). Numerous metastases to regional lymph nodes develop. The cancers arise de novo in the mucosa and early invade the submucosa and lymphatic apparatus and paracolonic lymph nodes. These findings and the continuing occurrence of this cancer in our colony suggests that the marmoset may be the long-sought primate model for experimental intestinal carcinogenesis.

  18. Developmental pathways in colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Fred E.; Angus, C. William; Partis, William J.; Sigounas, George

    2012-01-01

    A hallmark of cancer is reactivation/alteration of pathways that control cellular differentiation during developmental processes. Evidence indicates that WNT, Notch, BMP and Hedgehog pathways have a role in normal epithelial cell differentiation, and that alterations in these pathways accompany establishment of the tumorigenic state. Interestingly, there is recent evidence that these pathways are intertwined at the molecular level, and these nodes of intersection may provide opportunities for effective targeted therapies. This review will highlight the role of the WNT, Notch, BMP and Hedgehog pathways in colon cancer. PMID:23032367

  19. Quantitative measurement of feline colonic transit

    SciTech Connect

    Krevsky, B.; Somers, M.B.; Maurer, A.H.; Malmud, L.S.; Knight, L.C.; Fisher, R.S.

    1988-10-01

    Colonic transit scintigraphy, a method for quantitatively evaluating the movement of the fecal stream in vivo, was employed to evaluate colonic transit in the cat. Scintigraphy was performed in duplicate in five cats and repeated four times in one cat. After instillation of an 111In marker into the cecum through a surgically implanted silicone cecostomy tube, colonic movement of the instillate was quantitated for 24 h using gamma scintigraphy. Antegrade and retrograde motion of radionuclide was observed. The cecum and ascending colon emptied rapidly, with a half-emptying time of 1.68 +/- 0.56 h (mean +/- SE). After 24 h, 25.1 +/- 5.2% of the activity remained in the transverse colon. The progression of the geometric center was initially rapid, followed later by a delayed phase. Geometric center reproducibility was found to be high when analyzed using simple linear regression (slope = 0.92; r = 0.73; P less than 0.01). Atropine (0.1 mg/kg im) was found to delay cecum and ascending colon emptying and delay progression of the geometric center. These results demonstrate both 1) the ability of colonic transit scintigraphy to detect changes in transit induced by pharmacological manipulation and 2) the fact that muscarinic blockade inhibits antegrade transit of the fecal stream. We conclude that feline colonic transit may be studied in a quantitative and reproducible manner with colonic transit scintigraphy.

  20. Estimation of AM fungal colonization - Comparability and reliability of classical methods.

    PubMed

    Füzy, Anna; Biró, Ibolya; Kovács, Ramóna; Takács, Tünde

    2015-12-01

    The characterization of mycorrhizal status in hosts can be a good indicator of symbiotic associations in inoculation experiments or in ecological research. The most common microscopic-based observation methods, such as (i) the gridline intersect method, (ii) the magnified intersections method and (iii) the five-class system of Trouvelot were tested to find the most simple, easily executable, effective and objective ones and their appropriate parameters for characterization of mycorrhizal status. In a pot experiment, white clover (Trifolium repens L.) host plant was inoculated with 6 (BEG144; syn. Rhizophagus intradices) in pumice substrate to monitor the AMF colonization properties during host growth. Eleven (seven classical and four new) colonization parameters were estimated by three researchers in twelve sampling times during plant growth. Variations among methods, observers, parallels, or individual plants were determined and analysed to select the most appropriate parameters and sampling times for monitoring. The comparability of the parameters of the three methods was also tested. As a result of the experiment classical parameters were selected for hyphal colonization: colonization frequency in the first stage or colonization density in the later period, and arbuscular richness of roots. A new parameter was recommended to determine vesicule and spore content of colonized roots at later stages of symbiosis.

  1. Partial lipectomy reduces dimethylhydrazine-induced carcinogenic initiation in the colon of rats.

    PubMed

    Kannen, Vinicius; Moreira, Mauro César Silveira; Waaga-Gasser, Ana Maria; Modiano, Patricia; Elias Junior, Jorge; Fernandes, Cleverson R; Garcia, Sérgio B

    2014-02-28

    This study investigated whether visceral adipose tissue directly modulates the development of preneoplastic lesions in the colon of carcinogen-treated rats. Wistar rats (n=64) were randomly assigned to 8 experimental groups in two experiments. In one experiment, 32 rats were exposed or not to either carcinogen treatment (dimethylhydrazine, DMH; 125 mg/kg) or high-fat diet (standard chow enriched with 14% lard) or both for 56 days. In a second experiment, 32 rats were exposed to a carcinogen or they underwent partial lipectomy or both for 30 days (partial lipectomy groups underwent ablation of mesenteric and parametrial fat pads, whereas sham groups did not; all rats were fed with standard chow). Colon was collected for histopathological analysis. After 56 experimental days a high-fat diet increased carcinogenic mutations in the colonic epithelia. Partial lipectomy reduced weight gain in carcinogen-exposed rats and decreased the de novo formation of mesenteric and parametrial fat pads. Partial lipectomy significantly inhibited the mutational process after 30 days: there were fewer colonic preneoplastic lesions and less proliferation, apoptosis, and inflammation. These data suggest that visceral adipose tissue promotes colon carcinogenesis and enhances the establishment and expansion of genetically mutated cells in colonic epithelia.

  2. Estimation of AM fungal colonization - Comparability and reliability of classical methods.

    PubMed

    Füzy, Anna; Biró, Ibolya; Kovács, Ramóna; Takács, Tünde

    2015-12-01

    The characterization of mycorrhizal status in hosts can be a good indicator of symbiotic associations in inoculation experiments or in ecological research. The most common microscopic-based observation methods, such as (i) the gridline intersect method, (ii) the magnified intersections method and (iii) the five-class system of Trouvelot were tested to find the most simple, easily executable, effective and objective ones and their appropriate parameters for characterization of mycorrhizal status. In a pot experiment, white clover (Trifolium repens L.) host plant was inoculated with 6 (BEG144; syn. Rhizophagus intradices) in pumice substrate to monitor the AMF colonization properties during host growth. Eleven (seven classical and four new) colonization parameters were estimated by three researchers in twelve sampling times during plant growth. Variations among methods, observers, parallels, or individual plants were determined and analysed to select the most appropriate parameters and sampling times for monitoring. The comparability of the parameters of the three methods was also tested. As a result of the experiment classical parameters were selected for hyphal colonization: colonization frequency in the first stage or colonization density in the later period, and arbuscular richness of roots. A new parameter was recommended to determine vesicule and spore content of colonized roots at later stages of symbiosis. PMID:26689879

  3. Plant neighborhood influences colonization of Brassicaceae by specialist and generalist aphids.

    PubMed

    Le Guigo, Pauline; Rolier, Alexandre; Le Corff, Josiane

    2012-07-01

    A plant's own characteristics, but also those of its neighbors, might have an impact on its probability of being colonized by herbivorous insects. A plant might be less colonized and experience associational resistance when it grows near repellent neighbors. In contrast, it might be more colonized and experience associational susceptibility near attractive neighbors. To date, mechanisms that drive associational defense are not really understood. In order to gain insights into the occurrence of associational resistance versus associational susceptibility under field conditions, we conducted an experiment to determine the influence of neighboring plants on the colonization of a focal plant by aphids. The focal plant was always Brassica oleracea. The neighbors were B. oleracea (control), B. napus, B. nigra, or Solanum lycopersicum, which represent contrasting levels of physical and chemical defenses. The focal plant, B. oleracea, was more colonized by the specialist aphid Brevicoryne brassicae, and experienced associational susceptibility when it was surrounded by B. nigra or B. napus. In contrast, B. oleracea was less colonized by the generalist aphid Myzus persicae, and experienced associational resistance when it was surrounded by S. lycopersicum, B. nigra or B. napus. Neighboring plants had no significant impact on host plant choice by the generalist aphid Macrosiphum euphorbiae. In conclusion, attraction or repulsion of the specialist aphid B. brassicae and the generalist aphid M. persicae by B. nigra, B. napus, and S. lycopersicum resulted in associational susceptibility or associational resistance for B. oleracea. PMID:22218942

  4. Extrahepatic biliary obstruction by metastatic colon carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Warshaw, A L; Welch, J P

    1978-11-01

    Extrahepatic biliary obstruction can be caused by cancer metastatic from the colon to the lymph nodes adjacent to the bile duct. This report details our experience with eight such cases treated at the Massachusetts General Hospital in the last seven years. The interval between resection of the primary tumor and appearance of jaundice averaged 13 months. The location of the obstruction, preferably defined preoperatively by cholangiography, was low on the common duct in three cases and high in the porta hepatis in five. Relief of biliary obstruction was accomplished by biliary-enteric bypass (four cases), internal biliary stenting by permanent indwelling tube (two cases), or by portal irradiation (two cases). In addition to palliating the symptoms of obstructive jaundice, the period of comfortable survival appears to have been extended: the bypassed patients lived 13-38 months. Erosion of tumor into the duodenum, with resulting gastrointestinal hemorrhage, was an additional problem in three patients. Our overall experience illustrates the value of distinguishing this subgroup of patients from the larger number whose jaundice results from extensive liver metastases, and of treating aggressively those with extrahepatic biliary obstruction.

  5. Mast Cell Targeted Chimeric Toxin Can Be Developed as an Adjunctive Therapy in Colon Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shan; Li, Linmei; Shi, Renren; Liu, Xueting; Zhang, Junyan; Zou, Zehong; Hao, Zhuofang; Tao, Ailin

    2016-01-01

    The association of colitis with colorectal cancer has become increasingly clear with mast cells being identified as important inflammatory cells in the process. In view of the relationship between mast cells and cancer, we studied the effect and mechanisms of mast cells in the development of colon cancer. Functional and mechanistic insights were gained from ex vivo and in vivo studies of cell interactions between mast cells and CT26 cells. Further evidence was reversely obtained in studies of mast cell targeted Fcε-PE40 chimeric toxin. Experiments revealed mast cells could induce colon tumor cell proliferation and invasion. Cancer progression was found to be related to the density of mast cells in colonic submucosa. The activation of MAPK, Rho-GTPase, and STAT pathways in colon cancer cells was triggered by mast cells during cell-to-cell interaction. Lastly, using an Fcε-PE40 chimeric toxin we constructed, we confirmed the promoting effect of mast cells in development of colon cancer. Mast cells are a promoting factor of colon cancer and thus also a potential therapeutic target. The Fcε-PE40 chimeric toxin targeting mast cells could effectively prevent colon cancer in vitro and in vivo. Consequently, these data may demonstrate a novel immunotherapeutic approach for the treatment of tumors. PMID:26978404

  6. Smart nanocomposite hydrogels based on azo crosslinked graphene oxide for oral colon-specific drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Lin; Shi, Yuyang; Jiang, Guixiang; Liu, Wei; Han, Huili; Feng, Qianhua; Ren, Junxiao; Yuan, Yujie; Wang, Yongchao; Shi, Jinjin; Zhang, Zhenzhong

    2016-08-01

    A safe and efficient nanocomposite hydrogel for colon cancer drug delivery was synthesized using pH-sensitive and biocompatible graphene oxide (GO) containing azoaromatic crosslinks as well as poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) (GO–N=N–GO/PVA composite hydrogels). Curcumin (CUR), an anti-cancer drug, was encapsulated successfully into the hydrogel through a freezing and thawing process. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy were performed to confirm the formation and morphological properties of the nanocomposite hydrogel. The hydrogels exhibited good swelling properties in a pH-sensitive manner. Drug release studies under conditions mimicking stomach to colon transit have shown that the drug was protected from being released completely into the physiological environment of the stomach and small intestine. In vivo imaging analysis, pharmacokinetics and a distribution of the gastrointestinal tract experiment were systematically studied and evaluated as colon-specific drug delivery systems. All the results demonstrated that GO–N=N–GO/PVA composite hydrogels could protect CUR well while passing through the stomach and small intestine to the proximal colon, and enhance the colon-targeting ability and residence time in the colon site. Therefore, CUR loaded GO–N=N–GO/PVA composite hydrogels might potentially provide a theoretical basis for the treatment of colon cancer with high efficiency and low toxicity.

  7. Smart nanocomposite hydrogels based on azo crosslinked graphene oxide for oral colon-specific drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Lin; Shi, Yuyang; Jiang, Guixiang; Liu, Wei; Han, Huili; Feng, Qianhua; Ren, Junxiao; Yuan, Yujie; Wang, Yongchao; Shi, Jinjin; Zhang, Zhenzhong

    2016-08-01

    A safe and efficient nanocomposite hydrogel for colon cancer drug delivery was synthesized using pH-sensitive and biocompatible graphene oxide (GO) containing azoaromatic crosslinks as well as poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) (GO-N=N-GO/PVA composite hydrogels). Curcumin (CUR), an anti-cancer drug, was encapsulated successfully into the hydrogel through a freezing and thawing process. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy were performed to confirm the formation and morphological properties of the nanocomposite hydrogel. The hydrogels exhibited good swelling properties in a pH-sensitive manner. Drug release studies under conditions mimicking stomach to colon transit have shown that the drug was protected from being released completely into the physiological environment of the stomach and small intestine. In vivo imaging analysis, pharmacokinetics and a distribution of the gastrointestinal tract experiment were systematically studied and evaluated as colon-specific drug delivery systems. All the results demonstrated that GO-N=N-GO/PVA composite hydrogels could protect CUR well while passing through the stomach and small intestine to the proximal colon, and enhance the colon-targeting ability and residence time in the colon site. Therefore, CUR loaded GO-N=N-GO/PVA composite hydrogels might potentially provide a theoretical basis for the treatment of colon cancer with high efficiency and low toxicity.

  8. Automated polyp measurement based on colon structure decomposition for CT colonography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huafeng; Li, Lihong C.; Han, Hao; Peng, Hao; Song, Bowen; Wei, Xinzhou; Liang, Zhengrong

    2014-03-01

    Accurate assessment of colorectal polyp size is of great significance for early diagnosis and management of colorectal cancers. Due to the complexity of colon structure, polyps with diverse geometric characteristics grow from different landform surfaces. In this paper, we present a new colon decomposition approach for polyp measurement. We first apply an efficient maximum a posteriori expectation-maximization (MAP-EM) partial volume segmentation algorithm to achieve an effective electronic cleansing on colon. The global colon structure is then decomposed into different kinds of morphological shapes, e.g. haustral folds or haustral wall. Meanwhile, the polyp location is identified by an automatic computer aided detection algorithm. By integrating the colon structure decomposition with the computer aided detection system, a patch volume of colon polyps is extracted. Thus, polyp size assessment can be achieved by finding abnormal protrusion on a relative uniform morphological surface from the decomposed colon landform. We evaluated our method via physical phantom and clinical datasets. Experiment results demonstrate the feasibility of our method in consistently quantifying the size of polyp volume and, therefore, facilitating characterizing for clinical management.

  9. Tumor-colonizing bacteria: a potential tumor targeting therapy.

    PubMed

    Zu, Chao; Wang, Jiansheng

    2014-08-01

    In 1813, Vautier published his observation of tumor regression in patients who had suffered from gas gangrene. Since then, many publications have described the use of bacteria as antitumor therapy. For example, Bifidobacterium and Clostridium have been shown to selectively colonize tumors and to reduce tumor size. In addition, recent studies have focused on the use of genetic engineering to induce the expression of pro-drug converting enzymes, cytokines, specific antibodies, or suicide genes in tumor-colonizing bacteria. Moreover, some animal experiments have reported the treatment of tumors with engineered bacteria, and few side effects were observed. Therefore, based on these advances in tumor targeting therapy, bacteria may represent the next generation of cancer therapy.

  10. [The intraoperative colonic irrigation in emergency surgery].

    PubMed

    Kiss, L

    2001-01-01

    Bowel preparations is frequently impossible in various ante colonic diseases, such as left-sided colonic obstruction. The goal of intraoperative colonic irrigation is to obtain, during surgery, a bowel preparation offering the possibility of primary resection with immediate anastomosis, when preoperative bowel preparation has not been feasible. Technical aspects of intra-operative colonic irrigation are described. Indications for this methods are presented: left-sided obstructing carcinomas, diverticulitis, more rarely inflammatory stenosis or functional obstruction. The surgical management of left colonic emergencies has evolved in the past few decades. Recently, there has been increasing interest in resection with primary anastomosis in selected cases. The post operative mortality rate was 13 per cent. The incidence of clinical anastomotic leakage was 6.65 per cent. PMID:12731192

  11. Evolution of phenotypic plasticity in colonizing species.

    PubMed

    Lande, Russell

    2015-05-01

    I elaborate an hypothesis to explain inconsistent empirical findings comparing phenotypic plasticity in colonizing populations or species with plasticity from their native or ancestral range. Quantitative genetic theory on the evolution of plasticity reveals that colonization of a novel environment can cause a transient increase in plasticity: a rapid initial increase in plasticity accelerates evolution of a new optimal phenotype, followed by slow genetic assimilation of the new phenotype and reduction of plasticity. An association of colonization with increased plasticity depends on the difference in the optimal phenotype between ancestral and colonized environments, the difference in mean, variance and predictability of the environment, the cost of plasticity, and the time elapsed since colonization. The relative importance of these parameters depends on whether a phenotypic character develops by one-shot plasticity to a constant adult phenotype or by labile plasticity involving continuous and reversible development throughout adult life.

  12. "Cat scratch colon" in a patient with ischemic colitis.

    PubMed

    Park, Eui Ju; Lee, Joon Seong; Lee, Tae Hee; Choi, Dae Han; Kim, Eui Bae; Jeon, Seong Ran; Hong, Su Jin; Kim, Jin-Oh

    2015-03-01

    "Cat scratch colon" is a gross finding characterized by hemorrhagic mucosal scratches on colonoscopy. It is usually associated with a normal colon and is rarely associated with collagenous colitis. In a previous report, cat scratch colon was noted in the cecum and ascending colon, but has also been observed in the distal transverse colon. The patient in this study was also diagnosed with ischemic colitis that may have played a role in the development of cat scratch colon.

  13. Molecular characterization and evaluation of Onchocerca volvulus-secreted larval acidic protein 1 (SLAP1) as a putative vaccine candidate on endemic population of lymphatic filariasis.

    PubMed

    Mahalakshmi, Natarajan; Aparnaa, Ramanathan; Ansel Vishal, Lawrance; Kaliraj, Perumal

    2013-09-01

    Filarial parasites infected nearly 160 million of the global population with onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis, and further, a billion of people are estimated to be at risk of infection, rendering them among the most prevalent infectious agents in the world today. Given the complexity of their life cycle and the immune evasion mechanisms of these organisms, development of a vaccine remains to be a long-term challenge. Though a number of immunodominant antigens have been characterized, the presence of homologous proteins in humans or the allelic variants are some of the major drawbacks. One of the extensively studied vaccine candidates is abundant larval transcripts (ALT) family of proteins for the following properties: highly regulated expression, abundance, excreted-secreted product of infective stage larvae, and essentially for parasite establishment and survival in the host. In the present study, stage-specific expression of secreted larval acidic protein 1 (SLAP1) was identified; an ALT orthologue from Onchocerca volvulus was cloned, expressed, and purified as a recombinant protein. Immunogenicity of OvSLAP1 was demonstrated with sera and peripheral blood mononuclear cells from endemic regions of Brugia malayi and Wuchereria bancrofti. OvSLAP1 antibodies were predominated by IgG1 and IgG2 in endemic normal (EN) and chronic pathology (CP) subjects. It has also induced marked cellular response as observed by lymphoproliferation assay. The study revealed that OvSLAP1 can segregate humoral (EN mean optical density (OD) = 0.87 ± 0.035, CP mean OD = 0.59 ± 0.029) and cellular (EN mean stimulation index (SI) = 5.87 ± 0.167, CP mean SI = 3.5 ± 0.134) immune responses between EN and CP individuals (P < 0.001), signifying its prophylactic ability and vitality for protection from filarial infections in endemic population. PMID:23828189

  14. The adjuvanticity of an O. volvulus-derived rOv-ASP-1 protein in mice using sequential vaccinations and in non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Tricoche, Nancy; Du, Lanying; Hunter, Meredith; Zhan, Bin; Goud, Gaddam; Didier, Elizabeth S; Liu, Jing; Lu, Lu; Marx, Preston A; Jiang, Shibo; Lustigman, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Adjuvants potentiate antigen-specific protective immune responses and can be key elements promoting vaccine effectiveness. We previously reported that the Onchocerca volvulus recombinant protein rOv-ASP-1 can induce activation and maturation of naïve human DCs and therefore could be used as an innate adjuvant to promote balanced Th1 and Th2 responses to bystander vaccine antigens in mice. With a few vaccine antigens, it also promoted a Th1-biased response based on pronounced induction of Th1-associated IgG2a and IgG2b antibody responses and the upregulated production of Th1 cytokines, including IL-2, IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-6. However, because it is a protein, the rOv-ASP-1 adjuvant may also induce anti-self-antibodies. Therefore, it was important to verify that the host responses to self will not affect the adjuvanticity of rOv-ASP-1 when it is used in subsequent vaccinations with the same or different vaccine antigens. In this study, we have established rOv-ASP-1's adjuvanticity in mice during the course of two sequential vaccinations using two vaccine model systems: the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of SARS-CoV spike protein and a commercial influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) vaccine comprised of three virus strains. Moreover, the adjuvanticity of rOv-ASP-1 was retained with an efficacy similar to that obtained when it was used for a first vaccination, even though a high level of anti-rOv-ASP-1 antibodies was present in the sera of mice before the administration of the second vaccine. To further demonstrate its utility as an adjuvant for human use, we also immunized non-human primates (NHPs) with RBD plus rOv-ASP-1 and showed that rOv-ASP-1 could induce high titres of functional and protective anti-RBD antibody responses in NHPs. Notably, the rOv-ASP-1 adjuvant did not induce high titer antibodies against self in NHPs. Thus, the present study provided a sound scientific foundation for future strategies in the development of this novel protein adjuvant.

  15. The adjuvanticity of an O. volvulus-derived rOv-ASP-1 protein in mice using sequential vaccinations and in non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Tricoche, Nancy; Du, Lanying; Hunter, Meredith; Zhan, Bin; Goud, Gaddam; Didier, Elizabeth S; Liu, Jing; Lu, Lu; Marx, Preston A; Jiang, Shibo; Lustigman, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Adjuvants potentiate antigen-specific protective immune responses and can be key elements promoting vaccine effectiveness. We previously reported that the Onchocerca volvulus recombinant protein rOv-ASP-1 can induce activation and maturation of naïve human DCs and therefore could be used as an innate adjuvant to promote balanced Th1 and Th2 responses to bystander vaccine antigens in mice. With a few vaccine antigens, it also promoted a Th1-biased response based on pronounced induction of Th1-associated IgG2a and IgG2b antibody responses and the upregulated production of Th1 cytokines, including IL-2, IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-6. However, because it is a protein, the rOv-ASP-1 adjuvant may also induce anti-self-antibodies. Therefore, it was important to verify that the host responses to self will not affect the adjuvanticity of rOv-ASP-1 when it is used in subsequent vaccinations with the same or different vaccine antigens. In this study, we have established rOv-ASP-1's adjuvanticity in mice during the course of two sequential vaccinations using two vaccine model systems: the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of SARS-CoV spike protein and a commercial influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) vaccine comprised of three virus strains. Moreover, the adjuvanticity of rOv-ASP-1 was retained with an efficacy similar to that obtained when it was used for a first vaccination, even though a high level of anti-rOv-ASP-1 antibodies was present in the sera of mice before the administration of the second vaccine. To further demonstrate its utility as an adjuvant for human use, we also immunized non-human primates (NHPs) with RBD plus rOv-ASP-1 and showed that rOv-ASP-1 could induce high titres of functional and protective anti-RBD antibody responses in NHPs. Notably, the rOv-ASP-1 adjuvant did not induce high titer antibodies against self in NHPs. Thus, the present study provided a sound scientific foundation for future strategies in the development of this novel protein adjuvant. PMID

  16. Induction of colonic aberrant crypts in mice by feeding apparent N-nitroso compounds derived from hot dogs

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Michael E; Lisowyj, Michal P; Zhou, Lin; Wisecarver, James L; Gulizia, James M; Shostrom, Valerie K; Naud, Nathalie; Corpet, Denis E; Mirvish, Sidney S

    2012-01-01

    Nitrite-preserved meats (e.g., hot dogs) may help cause colon cancer because they contain N-nitroso compounds. We tested whether purified hot-dog-derived total apparent N-nitroso compounds (ANC) could induce colonic aberrant crypts, which are putative precursors of colon cancer. We purified ANC precursors in hot dogs and nitrosated them to produce ANC. In preliminary tests, CF1 mice received 1 or 3 i.p. injections of 5mg azoxymethane (AOM)/kg. In Experiments 1 and 2, female A/J mice received ANC in diet. In Experiment 1, ANC dose initially dropped sharply because the ANC precursors had mostly decomposed but, later in Experiment 1 and throughout Experiment 2, ANC remained at 85 nmol/g diet. Mice were killed after 8 (AOM tests) or 17–34 (ANC tests) wk. Median numbers of aberrant crypts in the distal 2 cm of the colon for 1 and 3 AOM injections, CF1 controls, ANC (Experiment 1), ANC (Experiment 2),and untreated A/J mice were 31, 74, 12, 20, 12, and 5–6, with P < 0.01 for both ANC tests. Experiment 2 showed somewhat increased numbers of colonic mucin-depleted foci in the ANC-treated group. We conclude that hot-dog-derived ANC induced significant numbers of aberrant crypts in the mouse colon. PMID:22293095

  17. Dietary guar gum alters colonic microbial fermentation in azoxymethane-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Weaver, G A; Tangel, C; Krause, J A; Alpern, H D; Jenkins, P L; Parfitt, M M; Stragand, J J

    1996-08-01

    To assess the effects of guar gum on colonic microbial fermentation and cancer development, azoxymethane-treated rats were fed a partially hydrolyzed guar or control diet. Anaerobic fecal incubations were conducted at 8-wk intervals, either without added substrate or with cornstarch or hydrolyzed guar as substrates. Short-chain fatty acids in colonic contents and colonic carcinoma areas were measured at 27 wk. Fecal in vitro fermentation rates were higher for guar-fed rats than for control rats [three-way ANOVA (diet, time, in vitro substrates), P = 0.002]. Fecal in vitro butyrate production was greater for guar-fed rats than for control rats after 3-11 weeks of diet treatment (three-way ANOVA, P = 0.027). Butyrate concentrations of colonic contents at 27 wk were higher in guar-fed than in control rats and higher in the cecum than in the post-cecal colon (two-way ANOVA, P = 0.0001). A regression equation predicting colonic carcinoma area (r2 = 0.279) using propionate and butyrate concentrations of the contents of the post-cecal colon showed propionate as a positive predictor (P < 0.001) and butyrate as a negative predictor (P = 0.033). Our results show that patterns of short-chain fatty acid production may affect the results of fiber-carcinogenesis experiments. Dietary addition of hydrolyzed guar is associated with fecal fermentation low in propionate and high in butyrate; short-chain fatty acid concentrations are greater proximally than distally. These results suggest that butyrate protects against colonic neoplasia, whereas propionate enhances it, and demonstrate that colonic microbiota adapt to produce more butyrate if given time and the proper substrate.

  18. Dynamics of wood fall colonization in relation to sulfide concentration in a mangrove swamp.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Mélina C Z; Le Bris, Nadine; Gaill, Françoise; Gros, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Wood debris are an important component of mangrove marine environments. Current knowledge of the ecological role of wood falls is limited by the absence of information on metazoan colonization processes over time. The aim of this study was to provide insights to their temporal dynamics of wood eukaryotic colonization from a shallow water experiment in a mangrove swamp. Combined in situ chemical monitoring and biological surveys revealed that the succession of colonizers in the mangrove swamp relates with the rapid evolution of sulfide concentration on the wood surface. Sulfide-tolerant species are among the first colonizers and dominate over several weeks when the sulfide content is at its maximum, followed by less tolerant opportunistic species when sulfide decreases. This study supports the idea that woody debris can sustain chemosynthetic symbioses over short time-scale in tropical shallow waters.

  19. Dynamics of wood fall colonization in relation to sulfide concentration in a mangrove swamp.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Mélina C Z; Le Bris, Nadine; Gaill, Françoise; Gros, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Wood debris are an important component of mangrove marine environments. Current knowledge of the ecological role of wood falls is limited by the absence of information on metazoan colonization processes over time. The aim of this study was to provide insights to their temporal dynamics of wood eukaryotic colonization from a shallow water experiment in a mangrove swamp. Combined in situ chemical monitoring and biological surveys revealed that the succession of colonizers in the mangrove swamp relates with the rapid evolution of sulfide concentration on the wood surface. Sulfide-tolerant species are among the first colonizers and dominate over several weeks when the sulfide content is at its maximum, followed by less tolerant opportunistic species when sulfide decreases. This study supports the idea that woody debris can sustain chemosynthetic symbioses over short time-scale in tropical shallow waters. PMID:23623161

  20. Reversible Projection Technique for Colon Unfolding

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jianhua; Chowdhury, Ananda S.; Aman, Javed; Summers, Ronald M.

    2015-01-01

    Colon unfolding provides an efficient way to navigate the colon in CT colonography. Most existing unfolding techniques only computed forward projections. When radiologists find abnormalities or conduct measurements on the unfolded view (which is often quicker and easier), it is difficult to locate the corresponding region on the 3D view for further examination (which is more accurate and reliable). To address this, we propose a reversible projection technique for colon unfolding. The method makes use of advanced algorithms including rotation-minimizing frames, recursive ring sets, mesh skinning and cylindrical projection. Both forward and reverse transformations are computed for points on the colon surface. Therefore, it allows for detecting and measuring polyps on the unfolded view and mapping them back to the 3D surface. We generated realistic colon simulation incorporating most colon characteristics such as curved centerline, variable distention, haustral folds, teniae coli and colonic polyps. Our method was tested on both the simulated data and 110 clinical CT colonography data. Comparison of polyp size measurements on the unfolded view and the 3D view clearly demonstrates the importance of our reversible projection technique. PMID:20542756

  1. Clinical impact of Clostridium difficile colonization.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yuan-Pin; Lee, Jen-Chieh; Lin, Hsiao-Ju; Liu, Hsiao-Chieh; Wu, Yi-Hui; Tsai, Pei-Jane; Ko, Wen-Chien

    2015-06-01

    Clostridium difficile can cause antibiotic-associated diarrhea in hospitalized patients. Asymptomatic colonization by C. difficile is common during the neonatal period and early infancy, ranging from 21% to 48%, and in childhood. The colonization rate of C. difficile in adult hospitalized patients shows geographic variation, ranging from 4.4% to 23.2%. Asymptomatic carriage in neonates caused no further disease in many studies, whereas adult patients colonized with toxigenic C. difficile were prone to the subsequent development of C. difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD). However, the carriage of nontoxigenic C. difficile strains appears to prevent CDAD in hamsters and humans. Risk factors for C. difficile colonization include recent hospitalization, exposure to antimicrobial agents or gastric acid-suppressing drugs (such as proton-pump inhibitors and H2 blockers), a history of CDAD or cytomegalovirus infection, the presence of an underlying illness, receipt of immunosuppressants, the presence of antibodies against toxin B, and Toll-like receptor 4 polymorphisms. Asymptomatic C. difficile carriers are associated with significant skin and environmental contamination, similar to those with CDAD, and contact isolation and hand-washing practices should therefore be employed as infection control policies for the prevention of C. difficile spread. Treating patients with asymptomatic C. difficile colonization with metronidazole or vancomycin is not suggested by the currently available evidence. In conclusion, asymptomatic C. difficile colonization may lead to skin and environmental contamination by C. difficile, but more attention should be paid to the clinical impact of those with C. difficile colonization.

  2. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Colonization of Human Colonic Epithelium In Vitro and Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Steven B.; Cook, Vivienne; Tighe, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) is an important foodborne pathogen causing gastroenteritis and more severe complications, such as hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome. Pathology is most pronounced in the colon, but to date there is no direct clinical evidence showing EHEC binding to the colonic epithelium in patients. In this study, we investigated EHEC adherence to the human colon by using in vitro organ culture (IVOC) of colonic biopsy samples and polarized T84 colon carcinoma cells. We show for the first time that EHEC colonizes human colonic biopsy samples by forming typical attaching and effacing (A/E) lesions which are dependent on EHEC type III secretion (T3S) and binding of the outer membrane protein intimin to the translocated intimin receptor (Tir). A/E lesion formation was dependent on oxygen levels and suppressed under oxygen-rich culture conditions routinely used for IVOC. In contrast, EHEC adherence to polarized T84 cells occurred independently of T3S and intimin and did not involve Tir translocation into the host cell membrane. Colonization of neither biopsy samples nor T84 cells was significantly affected by expression of Shiga toxins. Our study suggests that EHEC colonizes and forms stable A/E lesions on the human colon, which are likely to contribute to intestinal pathology during infection. Furthermore, care needs to be taken when using cell culture models, as they might not reflect the in vivo situation. PMID:25534942

  3. Molecular Evolutionary Consequences of Island Colonization

    PubMed Central

    James, Jennifer E.; Lanfear, Robert; Eyre-Walker, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Island endemics are expected to have low effective population sizes (Ne), first because some may experience population bottlenecks when they are founded, and second because they have restricted ranges. Therefore, we expect island species to have reduced genetic diversity, inefficient selection, and reduced adaptive potential compared with their mainland counterparts. We used both polymorphism and substitution data to address these predictions, improving on the approach of recent studies that only used substitution data. This allowed us to directly test the assumption that island species have small values of Ne. We found that island species had significantly less genetic diversity than mainland species; however, this pattern could be attributed to a subset of island species that appeared to have undergone a recent population bottleneck. When these species were excluded from the analysis, island and mainland species had similar levels of genetic diversity, despite island species occupying considerably smaller areas than their mainland counterparts. We also found no overall difference between island and mainland species in terms of the effectiveness of selection or the mutation rate. Our evidence suggests that island colonization has no lasting impact on molecular evolution. This surprising result highlights gaps in our knowledge of the relationship between census and effective population size. PMID:27358424

  4. Mixed Adenoneuroendocrine Carcinoma Causing Colonic Intussusception

    PubMed Central

    Pinho, André Costa; Marques, Ana; Lopes, Joanne; Duarte, Alexandre; da Silva, Pedro Correia; Lopes, José Manuel; Maia, J. Costa

    2016-01-01

    Colonic intussusception is a rare cause of intestinal obstruction in adults and is caused by a malignant lesion in about 70% of cases. Early diagnosis and treatment are essential. We present a 64-year-old male patient with right colonic intussusception caused by a mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC), presenting as a giant pedunculated polyp (54 mm of largest diameter). The patient underwent right colectomy with primary anastomosis and adjuvant chemotherapy. The diagnosis of intussusception of the colon in adults is difficult because of its rarity and nonspecific clinical presentation. In this case, the cause was a rare histological type malignant tumor (MANEC). PMID:27525153

  5. Giant ascending colonic diverticulum presenting with intussusception.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ho Jin; Kim, Jin Ha; Moon, Ok In; Kim, Kyung Jong

    2013-10-01

    Diverticular disease of the colon is a common disease, and its incidence is increasing gradually. A giant colonic diverticulum (GCD) is a rare entity and is defined as a diverticulum greater than 4 cm in size. It mainly arises from the sigmoid colon, and possible etiology is a ball-valve mechanism permitting progressive enlargement. A plain abdominal X-ray can be helpful to make a diagnosis initially, and a barium enema and abdominal computed tomography may confirm the diagnosis. Surgical intervention is a definite treatment for a GCD. We report a case of an ascending GCD presenting with intussusception in a young adult.

  6. Colon perforation related to percutaneous nephrolithotomy: from diagnosis to treatment.

    PubMed

    Akbulut, Fatih; Tok, Adem; Penbegul, Necmettin; Daggulli, Mansur; Eryildirim, Bilal; Adanur, Senol; Gurbuz, Gokhan; Celik, Huseyin; Utangac, Mehmet Mazhar; Dede, Onur; Bodakcı, Mehmet Nuri; Tepeler, Abdulkadir; Sarica, Kemal

    2015-11-01

    We present our experience with the largest series of colon perforation (CP) as complication of percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL). From January 1998 to August 2014, 22 cases that presented with PNL-related CP from seven referral centers were retrospectively reviewed. The patients with CP were evaluated in terms of probable risk factors. Peri-operative and postoperative findings, timing of diagnosis, and treatment modalities of the CP were reviewed. Of the 22 patients, previous ipsilateral renal surgery (n:2) and retrorenal colon (n:5) were the risk factors for CP. The CP was directly visualized via nephroscopy during the surgery in 3 (13.6%) and with nephrostography at the end of the procedure in 4 patients (18.2%). In two patients, perforation was realized via the passage of contrast into the colon with nephrostography on the postoperative second day. Postoperative passage of feces through the nephrostomy tube was seen in six patients. The clinical signs in 13 cases directed CP diagnosis. The confirmation of the CP was achieved with a CT scan in all the patients. The patients with extraperitoneal perforation were primarily managed conservatively. Open surgical treatment was performed in cases with intraperitoneal perforation (n:5) and those with extraperitoneal perforation resistant to conservative treatment (n:5). Meticulous evaluation of the risk factors preoperatively is the initial step in the prevention of CP. Timely diagnosis plays essential role in the management of this PNL complication. Although extraperitoneal CP may be managed conservatively, surgery is required for intraperitoneal CPs. PMID:26033042

  7. Community assembly in epiphytic lichens in early stages of colonization.

    PubMed

    Gjerde, Ivar; Blom, Hans H; Lindblom, Louise; Saetersdal, Magne; Schei, Fride Høstad

    2012-04-01

    Colonization studies may function as natural experiments and have the potential of addressing important questions about community assembly. We studied colonization for a guild of epiphytic lichens in a former treeless heathland area of 170 km2 in southwest Norway. We investigated if epiphytic lichen species richness and composition on aspen (Populus tremula) trees corresponded to a random draw of lichen individuals from the regional species pool. We compared lichen communities of isolated young (55-120 yr) and old (140-200 yr) forest patches in the heathland area to those of aspen forest in an adjacent reference area that has been forested for a long time. All thalli (lichen bodies) of 32 selected lichen species on trunks of aspen were recorded in 35 aspen sites. When data for each site category (young, old, and reference) were pooled, we found the species richness by rarefaction to be similar for reference sites and old sites, but significantly lower for young sites. The depauperated species richness of young sites was accompanied by a skew in species composition and absence of several species that were common in the reference sites. In contrast, genetic variation screened with neutral microsatellite markers in the lichen species Lobaria pulmonaria showed no significant differences between site categories. Our null hypothesis of a neutral species assembly in young sites corresponding to a random draw from the regional species pool was rejected, whereas an alternative hypothesis based on differences in colonization capacity among species was supported. The results indicate that for the habitat configuration in the heathland area (isolated patches constituting < 0.4% of the area) lichen communities may need a colonization time of 100-150 yr for species richness to level off, but given enough time, isolation will not affect species richness. We suggest that this contradiction to expectations from classical island equilibrium theory results from low extinction rates.

  8. Drugs Approved for Colon and Rectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in colon cancer and rectal cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  9. Colon Cancer Risk Assessment - Gauss Program

    Cancer.gov

    An executable file (in GAUSS) that projects absolute colon cancer risk (with confidence intervals) according to NCI’s Colorectal Cancer Risk Assessment Tool (CCRAT) algorithm. GAUSS is not needed to run the program.

  10. Redefining Adjuvant Therapy for Colon Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In this trial, patients with resected stage III colon cancer are being randomly assigned to receive FOLFOX chemotherapy for either 3 or 6 months and to take either a pill called celecoxib or a matching placebo pill for 3 years.

  11. Marine worms (genus Osedax) colonize cow bones

    PubMed Central

    Jones, William J; Johnson, Shannon B; Rouse, Greg W; Vrijenhoek, Robert C

    2007-01-01

    Bone-eating worms of the genus Osedax colonized and grew on cow bones deployed at depths ranging from 385 to 2893 m in Monterey Bay, California. Colonization occurred as rapidly as two months following deployment of the cow bones, similar to the time it takes to colonize exposed whalebones. Some Osedax females found on the cow bones were producing eggs and some hosted dwarf males in their tubes. Morphological and molecular examinations of these worms confirmed the presence of six Osedax species, out of the eight species presently known from Monterey Bay. The ability of Osedax species to colonize, grow and reproduce on cow bones challenges previous notions that these worms are ‘whale-fall specialists.’ PMID:18077256

  12. Intestinal Colonization Dynamics of Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Almagro-Moreno, Salvador; Pruss, Kali; Taylor, Ronald K.

    2015-01-01

    To cause the diarrheal disease cholera, Vibrio cholerae must effectively colonize the small intestine. In order to do so, the bacterium needs to successfully travel through the stomach and withstand the presence of agents such as bile and antimicrobial peptides in the intestinal lumen and mucus. The bacterial cells penetrate the viscous mucus layer covering the epithelium and attach and proliferate on its surface. In this review, we discuss recent developments and known aspects of the early stages of V. cholerae intestinal colonization and highlight areas that remain to be fully understood. We propose mechanisms and postulate a model that covers some of the steps that are required in order for the bacterium to efficiently colonize the human host. A deeper understanding of the colonization dynamics of V. cholerae and other intestinal pathogens will provide us with a variety of novel targets and strategies to avoid the diseases caused by these organisms. PMID:25996593

  13. Preventing Second Cancers in Colon Cancer Survivors

    Cancer.gov

    In this phase III trial, people who have had curative surgery for colon cancer will be randomly assigned to take sulindac and a placebo, eflornithine and a placebo, both sulindac and eflornithine, or two placebo pills for 36 months.

  14. [Ultrasonography in the diagnosis of colonic obstruction].

    PubMed

    Legostaeva, T B; Klassovskaia, N Iu

    2007-01-01

    The authors of the present paper outline the results of studying the use of routine transabdominal sonography and ultrasound irrigoscopy (UI) in the diagnosis of acute colonic obstruction (ACO) in 70 patients. The cause of ACO was tumor-induced colonic luminal obturation in 55 patients and colonic evacuatory dysfunction due to congenital anomalies and acquired constrictions of inflammatory genesis in 15 cases. UI was used to determine the presence, degree, and causes of colonic obstruction. The paper details the UI procedure developed by the authors and the ultrasound semiotics of ACO, shown by routine transabdominal sonography and UI. Analysis of the results of the studies allows the authors to state that UI is as highly informative as X-ray irrigoscopy in the diagnosis of ACO and may be included into a diagnostic algorithm in these patients.

  15. Giant colonic diverticulum: radiographic and MDCT characteristics.

    PubMed

    Zeina, Abdel-Rauf; Mahamid, Ahmad; Nachtigal, Alicia; Ashkenazi, Itamar; Shapira-Rootman, Mika

    2015-12-01

    Giant colonic diverticulum (GCD), defined as a diverticulum larger than 4 cm, is a rare entity that is generally a manifestation of colonic diverticular disease. Because of its rarity and its variable and non-specific presentation, the diagnosis of GCD depends mainly on imaging findings. Knowledge of the spectrum of radiographic and CT features of the GCD is important in making the correct diagnosis and potentially preventing complications. This review focuses on imaging findings characteristic of GCD as well as its complications and radiographic mimics. Teaching points • Giant colonic diverticulum is a rare complication of diverticulosis.• The most common symptom is abdominal pain presenting in approximately 70 % of patients.• Diagnosis is based on imaging findings with plain abdominal radiographs and MDCT.• Treatment consists of en bloc resection of the diverticulum and affected adjacent colon.

  16. Targeting the metabolic pathway of human colon cancer overcomes resistance to TRAIL-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Ryan M; Qiao, Guilin; Qin, Jianzhong; Jayaraman, Sundararajan; Prabhakar, Bellur S; Maker, Ajay V

    2016-01-01

    Colon cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality for which targeted therapy is needed; however, trials using apoptosis-inducing ligand monotherapy to overcome resistance to apoptosis have not shown clinical responses. Since colon cancer cells selectively uptake and rapidly metabolize glucose, a property utilized for clinical staging, we investigated mechanisms to alter glucose metabolism in order to selectively target the cancer cells and to overcome evasion of apoptosis. We demonstrate TRAIL (tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) resistance in the majority of human colon cancers tested and utilize the glucose analog 2-deoxy-d-glucose to sensitize TRAIL-resistant gastrointestinal adenocarcinoma cells, and not normal gastrointestinal epithelial cells, to TRAIL-induced apoptosis through enhanced death receptor 5 expression, downstream modulation of MAPK signaling and subsequent miRNA expression modulation by increasing the expression of miR-494 via MEK activation. Further, established human colon cancer xenografts treated with this strategy experience anti-tumor responses. These findings in colon adenocarcinoma support further investigation of manipulation of cellular energetics to selectively overcome resistance to apoptosis and to impart tumor regressions in established colon cancer tumors. PMID:27648301

  17. The role of competition – colonization tradeoffs and spatial heterogeneity in promoting trematode coexistence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mordecai, Erin A.; Jaramillo, Alejandra G.; Ashford, Jacob E.; Hechinger, Ryan F.; Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2016-01-01

    Competition – colonization tradeoffs occur in many systems, and theory predicts that they can strongly promote species coexistence. However, there is little empirical evidence that observed competition – colonization tradeoffs are strong enough to maintain diversity in natural systems. This is due in part to a mismatch between theoretical assumptions and biological reality in some systems. We tested whether a competition – colonization tradeoff explains how a diverse trematode guild coexists in California horn snail populations, a system that meets the requisite criteria for the tradeoff to promote coexistence. A field experiment showed that subordinate trematode species tended to have higher colonization rates than dominant species. This tradeoff promoted coexistence in parameterized models but did not fully explain trematode diversity and abundance, suggesting a role of additional diversity maintenance mechanisms. Spatial heterogeneity is an alternative way to promote coexistence if it isolates competing species. We used scale transition theory to expand the competition – colonization tradeoff model to include spatial variation. The parameterized model showed that spatial variation in trematode prevalence did not isolate most species sufficiently to explain the overall high diversity, but could benefit some rare species. Together, the results suggest that several mechanisms combine to maintain diversity, even when a competition – colonization tradeoff occurs.

  18. Targeting the metabolic pathway of human colon cancer overcomes resistance to TRAIL-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Carr, Ryan M; Qiao, Guilin; Qin, Jianzhong; Jayaraman, Sundararajan; Prabhakar, Bellur S; Maker, Ajay V

    2016-01-01

    Colon cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality for which targeted therapy is needed; however, trials using apoptosis-inducing ligand monotherapy to overcome resistance to apoptosis have not shown clinical responses. Since colon cancer cells selectively uptake and rapidly metabolize glucose, a property utilized for clinical staging, we investigated mechanisms to alter glucose metabolism in order to selectively target the cancer cells and to overcome evasion of apoptosis. We demonstrate TRAIL (tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) resistance in the majority of human colon cancers tested and utilize the glucose analog 2-deoxy-d-glucose to sensitize TRAIL-resistant gastrointestinal adenocarcinoma cells, and not normal gastrointestinal epithelial cells, to TRAIL-induced apoptosis through enhanced death receptor 5 expression, downstream modulation of MAPK signaling and subsequent miRNA expression modulation by increasing the expression of miR-494 via MEK activation. Further, established human colon cancer xenografts treated with this strategy experience anti-tumor responses. These findings in colon adenocarcinoma support further investigation of manipulation of cellular energetics to selectively overcome resistance to apoptosis and to impart tumor regressions in established colon cancer tumors. PMID:27648301

  19. Identification and characterization of Helicobacter pylori genes essential for gastric colonization.

    PubMed

    Kavermann, Holger; Burns, Brendan P; Angermuller, Katrin; Odenbreit, Stefan; Fischer, Wolfgang; Melchers, Klaus; Haas, Rainer

    2003-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori causes one of the most common, chronic bacterial infections and is a primary cause of severe gastric disorders. To unravel the bacterial factors necessary for the process of gastric colonization and pathogenesis, signature tagged mutagenesis (STM) was adapted to H. pylori. The Mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus) was used as model system to screen a set of 960 STM mutants. This resulted in 47 H. pylori genes, assigned to 9 different functional categories, representing a set of biological functions absolutely essential for gastric colonization, as verified and quantified for many mutants by competition experiments. Identification of previously known colonization factors, such as the urease and motility functions validated this method, but also novel and several hypothetical genes were found. Interestingly, a secreted collagenase, encoded by hp0169, could be identified and functionally verified as a new essential virulence factor for H. pylori stomach colonization. Furthermore, comB4, encoding a putative ATPase being part of a DNA transformation-associated type IV transport system of H. pylori was found to be absolutely essential for colonization, but natural transformation competence was apparently not the essential function. Thus, this first systematic STM application identified a set of previously unknown H. pylori colonization factors and may help to potentiate the development of novel therapies against gastric Helicobacter infections. PMID:12668646

  20. Targeting the metabolic pathway of human colon cancer overcomes resistance to TRAIL-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Ryan M; Qiao, Guilin; Qin, Jianzhong; Jayaraman, Sundararajan; Prabhakar, Bellur S; Maker, Ajay V

    2016-01-01

    Colon cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality for which targeted therapy is needed; however, trials using apoptosis-inducing ligand monotherapy to overcome resistance to apoptosis have not shown clinical responses. Since colon cancer cells selectively uptake and rapidly metabolize glucose, a property utilized for clinical staging, we investigated mechanisms to alter glucose metabolism in order to selectively target the cancer cells and to overcome evasion of apoptosis. We demonstrate TRAIL (tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) resistance in the majority of human colon cancers tested and utilize the glucose analog 2-deoxy-d-glucose to sensitize TRAIL-resistant gastrointestinal adenocarcinoma cells, and not normal gastrointestinal epithelial cells, to TRAIL-induced apoptosis through enhanced death receptor 5 expression, downstream modulation of MAPK signaling and subsequent miRNA expression modulation by increasing the expression of miR-494 via MEK activation. Further, established human colon cancer xenografts treated with this strategy experience anti-tumor responses. These findings in colon adenocarcinoma support further investigation of manipulation of cellular energetics to selectively overcome resistance to apoptosis and to impart tumor regressions in established colon cancer tumors.

  1. The role of competition--colonization tradeoffs and spatial heterogeneity in promoting trematode coexistence.

    PubMed

    Mordecai, Erin A; Jaramillo, Alejandra G; Ashford, Jacob E; Hechinger, Ryan F; Lafferty, Kevin D

    2016-06-01

    Competition - colonization tradeoffs occur in many systems, and theory predicts that they can strongly promote species coexistence. However, there is little empirical evidence that observed competition - colonization tradeoffs are strong enough to maintain diversity in natural systems. This is due in part to a mismatch between theoretical assumptions and biological reality in some systems. We tested whether a competition - colonization tradeoff explains how a diverse trematode guild coexists in California horn snail populations, a system that meets the requisite criteria for the tradeoff to promote coexistence. A field experiment showed that subordinate trematode species tended to have higher colonization rates than dominant species. This tradeoff promoted coexistence in parameterized models but did not fully explain trematode diversity and abundance, suggesting a role of additional diversity maintenance mechanisms. Spatial heterogeneity is an alternative way to promote coexistence if it isolates competing species. We used scale transition theory to expand the competition - colonization tradeoff model to include spatial variation. The parameterized model showed that spatial variation in trematode prevalence did not isolate most species sufficiently to explain the overall high diversity, but could benefit some rare species. Together, the results suggest that several mechanisms combine to maintain diversity, even when a competition - colonization tradeoff occurs. PMID:27459779

  2. A simple, quantitative method using alginate gel to determine rat colonic tumor volume in vivo.

    PubMed

    Irving, Amy A; Young, Lindsay B; Pleiman, Jennifer K; Konrath, Michael J; Marzella, Blake; Nonte, Michael; Cacciatore, Justin; Ford, Madeline R; Clipson, Linda; Amos-Landgraf, James M; Dove, William F

    2014-04-01

    Many studies of the response of colonic tumors to therapeutics use tumor multiplicity as the endpoint to determine the effectiveness of the agent. These studies can be greatly enhanced by accurate measurements of tumor volume. Here we present a quantitative method to easily and accurately determine colonic tumor volume. This approach uses a biocompatible alginate to create a negative mold of a tumor-bearing colon; this mold is then used to make positive casts of dental stone that replicate the shape of each original tumor. The weight of the dental stone cast correlates highly with the weight of the dissected tumors. After refinement of the technique, overall error in tumor volume was 16.9% ± 7.9% and includes error from both the alginate and dental stone procedures. Because this technique is limited to molding of tumors in the colon, we utilized the Apc(Pirc/+) rat, which has a propensity for developing colonic tumors that reflect the location of the majority of human intestinal tumors. We have successfully used the described method to determine tumor volumes ranging from 4 to 196 mm³. Alginate molding combined with dental stone casting is a facile method for determining tumor volume in vivo without costly equipment or knowledge of analytic software. This broadly accessible method creates the opportunity to objectively study colonic tumors over time in living animals in conjunction with other experiments and without transferring animals from the facility where they are maintained.

  3. Interleukin-8 as an autocrine growth factor for human colon carcinoma cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Brew, R; Erikson, J S; West, D C; Kinsella, A R; Slavin, J; Christmas, S E

    2000-01-01

    Cell lines derived from human colon carcinomas secrete interleukin 8 (IL-8) in vitro and this chemokine has also been detected immunohistochemically in human colon carcinoma specimens, in which it is tumour cell associated. In these experiments, IL-8 was shown to comprise an important component of the angiogenic activity of colon carcinoma cell line supernatants. The effect of modulating IL-8 activity upon the growth of the colon carcinoma cell lines HCT116A, HT29 and CaCo2 was investigated. Supplementing endogenously produced IL-8 by recombinant chemokine led to stimulation of cell growth. Neutralization of the effect of endogenously produced IL-8, either with the specific antagonist peptide AcRRWWCR or with blocking anti-IL-8 antibody, resulted in around 50% inhibition of cell growth (P<0.05). All of the colon carcinoma cell lines tested expressed mRNA for both IL-8RA and RB when grown at confluence. At the protein level, all cell lines expressed IL-8RA. Expression of IL-8RB was weak, although increased expression was seen in HCT116A cells as they approached confluence. Antibodies to IL-8RA and RB did not affect proliferation at low cell density but were strongly inhibitory when cells were cultured at a higher density. These data suggest that IL-8 acts as an autocrine growth factor for colon carcinoma cell lines and would support the concept that a similar autocrine loop operates in vivo.

  4. A Simple, Quantitative Method Using Alginate Gel to Determine Rat Colonic Tumor Volume In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Irving, Amy A; Young, Lindsay B; Pleiman, Jennifer K; Konrath, Michael J; Marzella, Blake; Nonte, Michael; Cacciatore, Justin; Ford, Madeline R; Clipson, Linda; Amos-Landgraf, James M; Dove, William F

    2014-01-01

    Many studies of the response of colonic tumors to therapeutics use tumor multiplicity as the endpoint to determine the effectiveness of the agent. These studies can be greatly enhanced by accurate measurements of tumor volume. Here we present a quantitative method to easily and accurately determine colonic tumor volume. This approach uses a biocompatible alginate to create a negative mold of a tumor-bearing colon; this mold is then used to make positive casts of dental stone that replicate the shape of each original tumor. The weight of the dental stone cast correlates highly with the weight of the dissected tumors. After refinement of the technique, overall error in tumor volume was 16.9% ± 7.9% and includes error from both the alginate and dental stone procedures. Because this technique is limited to molding of tumors in the colon, we utilized the ApcPirc/+ rat, which has a propensity for developing colonic tumors that reflect the location of the majority of human intestinal tumors. We have successfully used the described method to determine tumor volumes ranging from 4 to 196 mm3. Alginate molding combined with dental stone casting is a facile method for determining tumor volume in vivo without costly equipment or knowledge of analytic software. This broadly accessible method creates the opportunity to objectively study colonic tumors over time in living animals in conjunction with other experiments and without transferring animals from the facility where they are maintained. PMID:24674588

  5. Lunar Colonization and NASA's Exploration Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavert, Raymond B.

    2006-01-01

    Space colonization is not part of NASA's mission planning. NASA's exploration vision, mission goals and program implementations, however, can have an important affect on private lunar programs leading towards colonization. NASA's exploration program has been described as a journey not a race. It is not like the Apollo mission having tight schedules and relatively unchanging direction. NASA of this era has competing demands from the areas of aeronautics, space science, earth science, space operations and, there are competing demands within the exploration program itself. Under the journey not a race conditions, an entrepreneur thinking about building a hotel on the Moon, with a road to an exploration site, might have difficulty determining where and when NASA might be at a particular place on the Moon. Lunar colonization advocates cannot depend on NASA or other nations with space programs to lead the way to colonization. They must set their own visions, mission goals and schedules. In implementing their colonization programs they will be resource limited. They would be like ``hitchhikers'' following the programs of spacefaring nations identifying programs that might have a fit with their vision and be ready to switch to other programs that may take them in the colonization direction. At times they will have to muster their own limited resources and do things themselves where necessary. The purpose of this paper is to examine current changes within NASA, as a lunar colonization advocate might do, in order to see where there might be areas for fitting into a lunar colonization strategy. The approach will help understand how the ``hitchhiking'' technique might be better utilized.

  6. Triclosan promotes Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization.

    PubMed

    Syed, Adnan K; Ghosh, Sudeshna; Love, Nancy G; Boles, Blaise R

    2014-01-01

    The biocide triclosan is used in many personal care products, including toothpastes, soaps, clothing, and medical equipment. Consequently, it is present as a contaminant in the environment and has been detected in some human fluids, including serum, urine, and milk. Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen that colonizes the noses and throats of approximately 30% of the population. Colonization with S. aureus is known to be a risk factor for several types of infection. Here we demonstrate that triclosan is commonly found in the nasal secretions of healthy adults and the presence of triclosan trends positively with nasal colonization by S. aureus. We demonstrate that triclosan can promote the binding of S. aureus to host proteins such as collagen, fibronectin, and keratin, as well as inanimate surfaces such as plastic and glass. Lastly, triclosan-exposed rats are more susceptible to nasal colonization with S. aureus. These data reveal a novel factor that influences the ability of S. aureus to bind surfaces and alters S. aureus nasal colonization. IMPORTANCE Triclosan has been used as a biocide for over 40 years, but the broader effects that it has on the human microbiome have not been investigated. We demonstrate that triclosan is present in nasal secretions of a large portion of a test population and its presence correlates with Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization. Triclosan also promotes the binding of S. aureus to human proteins and increases the susceptibility of rats to nasal colonization by S. aureus. These findings are significant because S. aureus colonization is a known risk factor for the development of several types of infections. Our data demonstrate the unintended consequences of unregulated triclosan use and contribute to the growing body of research demonstrating inadvertent effects of triclosan on the environment and human health. PMID:24713325

  7. Oncolytic reovirus against ovarian and colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Hirasawa, Kensuke; Nishikawa, Sandra G; Norman, Kara L; Alain, Tommy; Kossakowska, Anna; Lee, Patrick W K

    2002-03-15

    Reovirus selectively replicates in and destroys cancer cells with an activated Ras signaling pathway. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of using reovirus (serotype 3, strain Dearing) as an antihuman colon and ovarian cancer agent. In in vitro studies, reovirus infection in human colon and ovarian cell lines was assessed by cytopathic effect as detected by light microscopy, [(35)S]Methionine labeling of infected cells for viral protein synthesis and progeny virus production by plaque assay. We observed that reovirus efficiently infected all five human colon cancer cell lines (Caco-2, DLD-1, HCT-116, HT-29, and SW48) and four human ovarian cancer cell lines (MDAH2774, PA-1, SKOV3, and SW626) which were tested, but not a normal colon cell line (CCD-18Co) or a normal ovarian cell line (NOV-31). We also observed that the Ras activity in the human colon and ovarian cancer cell lines was elevated compared with that in normal colon and ovarian cell lines. In animal models, intraneoplastic as well as i.v. inoculation of reovirus resulted in significant regression of established s.c. human colon and ovarian tumors implanted at the hind flank. Histological studies revealed that reovirus infection in vivo was restricted to tumor cells, whereas the surrounding normal tissue remained uninfected. Additionally, in an i.p. human ovarian cancer xenograft model, inhibition of ascites tumor formation and the survival of animals treated with live reovirus was significantly greater than of control mice treated with UV-inactivated reovirus. Reovirus infection in ex vivo primary human ovarian tumor surgical samples was also confirmed, further demonstrating the potential of reovirus therapy. These results suggest that reovirus holds promise as a novel agent for human colon and ovarian cancer therapy. PMID:11912142

  8. Osteopathic manipulative treatment for colonic inertia.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Lewe, Adam

    2013-03-01

    Surgical treatment options for patients with colonic inertia are costly and do not always relieve the pain associated with the condition. The author describes a case of a 41-year-old woman with colonic inertia who received osteopathic manipulative treatment targeted at the neuromusculoskeletal and gastrointestinal systems. The patient reported temporary improvement in pain and bowel function without pharmacotherapy or surgical intervention. Osteopathic manipulative treatment should be considered in patients with visceral as well as neuromusculoskeletal symptoms.

  9. Accessory spleen hypertrophy mimicking colon cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Ates, I; Yazici, O; Yazilitas, D; Ozdemir, N; Zengin, N

    2016-09-01

    Accessory spleen is a congenital form of an ectopic splenic tissue. In this report, we present a case of a patient who was followed with the diagnosis of rectal and sigmoid colon cancer and an accessory spleen hypertrophy, which was thought to be colon cancer metastasis in the left hypochondriac region. After colectomy and splenectomy, accessory spleen that mimics cancer metastasis was diffrentially diagnosed using scintigraphy. PMID:27685531

  10. Triclosan promotes Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization.

    PubMed

    Syed, Adnan K; Ghosh, Sudeshna; Love, Nancy G; Boles, Blaise R

    2014-04-08

    The biocide triclosan is used in many personal care products, including toothpastes, soaps, clothing, and medical equipment. Consequently, it is present as a contaminant in the environment and has been detected in some human fluids, including serum, urine, and milk. Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen that colonizes the noses and throats of approximately 30% of the population. Colonization with S. aureus is known to be a risk factor for several types of infection. Here we demonstrate that triclosan is commonly found in the nasal secretions of healthy adults and the presence of triclosan trends positively with nasal colonization by S. aureus. We demonstrate that triclosan can promote the binding of S. aureus to host proteins such as collagen, fibronectin, and keratin, as well as inanimate surfaces such as plastic and glass. Lastly, triclosan-exposed rats are more susceptible to nasal colonization with S. aureus. These data reveal a novel factor that influences the ability of S. aureus to bind surfaces and alters S. aureus nasal colonization. IMPORTANCE Triclosan has been used as a biocide for over 40 years, but the broader effects that it has on the human microbiome have not been investigated. We demonstrate that triclosan is present in nasal secretions of a large portion of a test population and its presence correlates with Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization. Triclosan also promotes the binding of S. aureus to human proteins and increases the susceptibility of rats to nasal colonization by S. aureus. These findings are significant because S. aureus colonization is a known risk factor for the development of several types of infections. Our data demonstrate the unintended consequences of unregulated triclosan use and contribute to the growing body of research demonstrating inadvertent effects of triclosan on the environment and human health.

  11. Clinical utility of colonic manometry in slow transit constipation

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Siddharth; Heady, Sarah; Coss-Adame, Enrique; Rao, Satish S.C.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims The clinical significance of colorectal sensori-motor evaluation in patients with slow transit constipation (STC) is unclear. We investigated whether colonic manometric evaluation is useful for characterizing colonic sensorimotor dysfunction and for guiding therapy in STC. Methods 24-hour ambulatory colonic manometry was performed in 80 patients (70 females) with STC by placing a 6 sensor solid state probe, along with assessment of colonic sensation with barostat. Anorectal manometry was also performed. Manometrically, patients were categorized as having colonic neuropathy or myopathy based on gastrocolonic response, waking response and high amplitude propagated contractions (HAPC); and based on colonic sensation, as colonic hyposensitivity or hypersensitivity. Clinical response to pharmacological, biofeedback and surgical treatment was assessed at 1yr and correlated with manometric findings. Results 59% of patients had abnormal colonic manometry with features suggestive of neuropathy (26%), and myopathy (33%); 41% had normal colonic manometry. 74% patients had abnormal colonic sensation and 61% had overlapping dyssynergic defecation. Patients with neuropathy were more likely to have colonic hyposensitivity. 64% of patients with colonic myopathy or normal manometry improved with medical/biofeedback therapy when compared to 15% with colonic neuropathy (p<0.01). Selected patients with colonic neuropathy had excellent response to surgery, but many developed bacterial overgrowth. Conclusions Colonic manometry demonstrates significant colonic sensori-motor dysfunction in STC patients and reveals considerable pathophysiological heterogeneity. It can be useful for characterizing the underlying pathophysiology and for guiding clinical management in STC, especially surgery. PMID:23384415

  12. Butyrate modulates antioxidant enzyme expression in malignant and non-malignant human colon tissues.

    PubMed

    Jahns, Franziska; Wilhelm, Anne; Jablonowski, Nadja; Mothes, Henning; Greulich, Karl Otto; Glei, Michael

    2015-04-01

    The induction of antioxidant enzymes is an important mechanism in colon cancer chemoprevention, but the response of human colon tissue to butyrate, a gut fermentation product derived from dietary fiber, remains largely unknown. Therefore, our study investigated the effect of a butyrate treatment on catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD2) in matched human colon tissues of different transformation stages (n = 3-15 in each group) ex vivo. By performing quantitative real-time PCR, Western blot, and spectrophotometric measurements, we found an increase in SOD2 at expression and activity level in colonic adenocarcinomas (mRNA: 1.96-fold; protein: 1.41-fold, activity: 1.8-fold; P < 0.05). No difference was detectable for CAT between normal, adenoma, and carcinoma colon tissues. Treatment of normal colon epithelium (12 h) with a physiologically relevant concentration of butyrate (10 mM) resulted in a significant increase (P < 0.05) in CAT mRNA (1.24-fold) and protein (1.39-fold), without affecting the enzymatic activity. Consequently, preliminary experiments failed to show any protective effect of butyrate against H2 O2 -mediated DNA damage. Despite a significantly lowered SOD2 transcript (0.51-fold, P < 0.01) and, to a lesser extent, protein level (0.86-fold) after butyrate exposure of normal colon cells, the catalytic activity was significantly enhanced (1.19-fold, P < 0.05), suggesting an increased protection against tissue superoxide radicals. In malignant tissues, greater variations in response to butyrate were observed. Furthermore, both enzymes showed an age-dependent decrease in activity in normal colon epithelium (CAT: r = -0.49, P = 0.09; SOD2: r = -0.58, P = 0.049). In conclusion, butyrate exhibited potential antioxidant features ex vivo but cellular consequences need to be investigated more in depth.

  13. Malakoplakia and colonic adenoma: a rare association.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Elena; Sandmeier, Dominique; Hack, Isabelle; Matter, Maurice; Bouzourene, Hanifa

    2004-12-01

    We report the case of a 73-year-old woman who presented respectively a caecal adenocarcinoma, two high-grade dysplastic tubulo-villous adenomas of the right colon, and a well differentiated adenocarcinoma developed on a high-grade dysplastic tubulo-villous adenoma of the left colon. One of the right colonic adenomas was ulcerated and showed typical foci of malakoplakia in the lamina propria. Malakoplakia is a histiocytic inflammatory response that may be associated with inflammatory and infectious diseases, immunosuppressive therapy, or colorectal carcinoma. Association of malakoplakia with colonic adenoma is rare; only three cases have been described in the literature thus far. To verify if this association is more common than usually suspected, we reviewed 100 colonic adenomas measuring at least 2 cm. No other case of malakoplakia associated with adenoma was found. The patient did not suffer from any other inflammatory or infectious disease and she was not under any medication or immunosuppressive therapy. Our observation confirms the isolated association of malakoplakia and colonic adenomas and the rarity of this association.

  14. Radionuclide transit in patients with colon interposition

    SciTech Connect

    Isolauri, J.; Koskinen, M.O.; Markkula, H.

    1987-10-01

    To assess radionuclide transit in interposed segments of the colon, we examined 25 patients with colon interposition for benign esophageal disease. No such assessment has been reported previously. The most common indications for operation were esophageal strictures that developed after lye ingestion and reflux strictures not responding to other treatment. The operations were performed without thoracotomy by blunt esophageal dissection in 80% of the patients. There were 18 antiperistaltic and seven isoperistaltic colon grafts. A large-field gamma camera and computer system were used. Data were collected at time intervals of 0.5 second during the first 30 seconds and at intervals of 30 seconds up to 20 minutes. The 5% and 90% stomach filling times, times to 50% and 25% activity levels, and residual activity levels as a percentage of the maxima were calculated in the upper, middle, and lower thirds of the colon grafts and of the normal esophagus of 10 healthy control subjects. The examinations were performed with the subject in a sitting position. All parameters showed that emptying of the colon graft was markedly slower than that of the normal esophagus. The intra-abdominal third of the graft had a residual activity of 50.5% +/- 15.7% after 20 minutes' observation. No differences between antiperistaltic and isoperistaltic grafts were observed. Reconstruction with proximal cologastric anastomosis and a short intra-abdominal colon graft segments is suggested.

  15. Colonic microbiome is altered in alcoholism

    PubMed Central

    Mutlu, Ece A.; Gillevet, Patrick M.; Rangwala, Huzefa; Sikaroodi, Masoumeh; Naqvi, Ammar; Engen, Phillip A.; Kwasny, Mary; Lau, Cynthia K.

    2012-01-01

    Several studies indicate the importance of colonic microbiota in metabolic and inflammatory disorders and importance of diet on microbiota composition. The effects of alcohol, one of the prominent components of diet, on colonic bacterial composition is largely unknown. Mounting evidence suggests that gut-derived bacterial endotoxins are cofactors for alcohol-induced tissue injury and organ failure like alcoholic liver disease (ALD) that only occur in a subset of alcoholics. We hypothesized that chronic alcohol consumption results in alterations of the gut microbiome in a subgroup of alcoholics, and this may be responsible for the observed inflammatory state and endotoxemia in alcoholics. Thus we interrogated the mucosa-associated colonic microbiome in 48 alcoholics with and without ALD as well as 18 healthy subjects. Colonic biopsy samples from subjects were analyzed for microbiota composition using length heterogeneity PCR fingerprinting and multitag pyrosequencing. A subgroup of alcoholics have an altered colonic microbiome (dysbiosis). The alcoholics with dysbiosis had lower median abundances of Bacteroidetes and higher ones of Proteobacteria. The observed alterations appear to correlate with high levels of serum endotoxin in a subset of the samples. Network topology analysis indicated that alcohol use is correlated with decreased connectivity of the microbial network, and this alteration is seen even after an extended period of sobriety. We show that the colonic mucosa-associated bacterial microbiome is altered in a subset of alcoholics. The altered microbiota composition is persistent and correlates with endotoxemia in a subgroup of alcoholics. PMID:22241860

  16. Colonic microbiome is altered in alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Ece A; Gillevet, Patrick M; Rangwala, Huzefa; Sikaroodi, Masoumeh; Naqvi, Ammar; Engen, Phillip A; Kwasny, Mary; Lau, Cynthia K; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2012-05-01

    Several studies indicate the importance of colonic microbiota in metabolic and inflammatory disorders and importance of diet on microbiota composition. The effects of alcohol, one of the prominent components of diet, on colonic bacterial composition is largely unknown. Mounting evidence suggests that gut-derived bacterial endotoxins are cofactors for alcohol-induced tissue injury and organ failure like alcoholic liver disease (ALD) that only occur in a subset of alcoholics. We hypothesized that chronic alcohol consumption results in alterations of the gut microbiome in a subgroup of alcoholics, and this may be responsible for the observed inflammatory state and endotoxemia in alcoholics. Thus we interrogated the mucosa-associated colonic microbiome in 48 alcoholics with and without ALD as well as 18 healthy subjects. Colonic biopsy samples from subjects were analyzed for microbiota composition using length heterogeneity PCR fingerprinting and multitag pyrosequencing. A subgroup of alcoholics have an altered colonic microbiome (dysbiosis). The alcoholics with dysbiosis had lower median abundances of Bacteroidetes and higher ones of Proteobacteria. The observed alterations appear to correlate with high levels of serum endotoxin in a subset of the samples. Network topology analysis indicated that alcohol use is correlated with decreased connectivity of the microbial network, and this alteration is seen even after an extended period of sobriety. We show that the colonic mucosa-associated bacterial microbiome is altered in a subset of alcoholics. The altered microbiota composition is persistent and correlates with endotoxemia in a subgroup of alcoholics. PMID:22241860

  17. Colon cancer: genomics and apoptotic events.

    PubMed

    Rupnarain, Charleen; Dlamini, Zodwa; Naicker, Sarala; Bhoola, Kanti

    2004-06-01

    Colon cancer is the third most common cancer globally. The risk of developing colon cancer is influenced by a number of factors that include age and diet, but is primarily a genetic disease, resulting from oncogene over-expression and tumour suppressor gene inactivation. The induction and progression of the disease is briefly outlined, as are the cellular changes that occur in its progression. While colon cancer is uniformly amenable to surgery if detected at the early stages, advanced carcinomas are usually lethal, with metastases to the liver being the most common cause of death. Oncogenes and genetic mutations that occur in colon cancer are featured. The molecules and signals that act to eradicate or initiate the apoptosis cascade in cancer cells, are elucidated, and these include caspases, Fas, Bax, Bid, APC, antisense hTERT, PUMA, 15-LOX-1, ceramide, butyrate, tributyrin and PPARgamma, whereas the molecules which promote colon cancer cell survival are p53 mutants, Bcl-2, Neu3 and COX-2. Cancer therapies aimed at controlling colon cancer are reviewed briefly. PMID:15255176

  18. The colon: from banal to brilliant.

    PubMed

    Sellers, Rani S; Morton, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The colon serves as the habitat for trillions of microbes, which it must maintain, regulate, and sequester. This is managed by what is termed the mucosal barrier. The mucosal barrier separates the gut flora from the host tissues; regulates the absorption of water, electrolytes, minerals, and vitamins; and facilitates host-flora interactions. Colonic homeostasis depends on a complex interaction between the microflora and the mucosal epithelium, immune system, vasculature, stroma, and nervous system. Disruptions in the colonic microenvironment such as changes in microbial composition, epithelial cell function/proliferation/differentiation, mucus production/makeup, immune function, diet, motility, or blood flow may have substantial local and systemic consequences. Understanding the complex activities of the colon in health and disease is important in drug development, as xenobiotics can impact all segments of the colon. Direct and indirect effects of pharmaceuticals on intestinal function can produce adverse findings in laboratory animals and humans and can negatively impact drug development. This review will discuss normal colon homeostasis with examples, where applicable, of xenobiotics that disrupt normal function. PMID:24129758

  19. Doxycycline Leads to Sterility and Enhanced Killing of Female Onchocerca volvulus Worms in an Area With Persistent Microfilaridermia After Repeated Ivermectin Treatment: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind Trial

    PubMed Central

    Debrah, Alexander Yaw; Specht, Sabine; Klarmann-Schulz, Ute; Batsa, Linda; Mand, Sabine; Marfo-Debrekyei, Yeboah; Fimmers, Rolf; Dubben, Bettina; Kwarteng, Alexander; Osei-Atweneboana, Mike; Boakye, Daniel; Ricchiuto, Arcangelo; Büttner, Marcelle; Adjei, Ohene; Mackenzie, Charles D.; Hoerauf, Achim

    2015-01-01

    Background. Ivermectin (IVM) has been the drug of choice for the treatment of onchocerciasis. However, there have been reports of persistent microfilaridermia in individuals from an endemic area in Ghana after many rounds of IVM, raising concerns of suboptimal response or even the emergence of drug resistance. Because it is considered risky to continue relying only on IVM to combat this phenomenon, we assessed the effect of targeting the Onchocerca volvulus Wolbachia endosymbionts with doxycycline for these individuals with suboptimal response. Methods. One hundred sixty-seven patients, most of them with multiple rounds of IVM, were recruited in areas with IVM suboptimal response and treated with 100 mg/day doxycycline for 6 weeks. Three and 12 months after doxycycline treatment, patients took part in standard IVM treatment. Results. At 20 months after treatment, 80% of living female worms from the placebo group were Wolbachia positive, whereas only 5.1% in the doxycycline-treated group contained bacteria. Consistent with interruption of embryogenesis, none of the nodules removed from doxycycline-treated patients contained microfilariae, and 97% of those patients were without microfilaridermia, in contrast to placebo patients who remained at pretreatment levels (P < .001). Moreover, a significantly enhanced number of dead worms were observed after doxycycline. Conclusions. Targeting the Wolbachia in O. volvulus is effective in clearing microfilariae in the skin of onchocerciasis patients with persistent microfilaridermia and in enhanced killing of adult worms after repeated standard IVM treatment. Strategies can now be developed that include doxycycline to control onchocerciasis in areas where infections persist despite the frequent use of IVM. Clinical Trials Registration. ISRCTN 66649839. PMID:25948064

  20. Effects of morphine and naloxone on feline colonic transit

    SciTech Connect

    Krevsky, B.; Libster, B.; Maurer, A.H.; Chase, B.J.; Fisher, R.S.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of endogenous and exogenous opioid substances on feline colonic transit were evaluated using colonic transit scintigraphy. Naloxone accelerated emptying of the cecum and ascending colon, and filling of the transverse colon. Endogenous opioid peptides thus appear to play a significant role in the regulation of colonic transit. At a moderate dose of morphine cecum and ascending colon transit was accelerated, while at a larger dose morphine had no effect. Since naloxone, a relatively nonspecific opioid antagonist, and morphine, a principally mu opioid receptor agonist, both accelerate proximal colonic transit, a decelerating role for at least one of the other opioid receptors is inferred.

  1. Laparoscopic colon surgery: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Martel, Guillaume; Boushey, Robin P

    2006-08-01

    Since its first described case in 1991, laparoscopic colon surgery has lagged behind minimally invasive surgical methods for solid intra-abdominal organs in terms of acceptability, dissemination, and ease of learning. In colon cancer, initial concerns over port site metastases and adequacy of oncologic resection have considerably dampened early enthusiasm for this procedure. Only recently, with the publication of several large, randomized controlled trials, has the incidence of port site metastases been shown to be equivalent to that of open resection. Laparoscopic surgery for colon cancer has also been demonstrated to be at least equivalent to traditional laparotomy in terms of adequacy of oncologic resection, disease recurrence, and long-term survival. In addition, numerous reports have validated short-term benefits following laparoscopic resection for cancer, including shorter hospital stay, shorter time to recovery of bowel function, and decreased analgesic requirements, as well as other postoperative variables. In benign colonic disease, much less high-quality literature exists supporting the use of laparoscopic methods. Two recent randomized controlled trials have demonstrated some short-term benefits to laparoscopic ileocolic resection for CD, in addition to evident cosmetic advantages. On the other hand, the current evidence on laparoscopic surgery for UC does not support its routine use among nonexpert surgeons outside of specialized centers. Laparoscopic colonic resection for diverticular disease appears to provide several short-term benefits, although these advantages may not translate to cases of complicated diverticulitis. Despite the increasing acceptability of minimally invasive methods for the management of benign and malignant colonic pathologies, laparoscopic colon resection remains a prohibitively difficult technique to master. Numerous technological innovations have been introduced onto the market in an effort to decrease the steep learning

  2. Serosurveillance to monitor onchocerciasis elimination: the Ugandan experience.

    PubMed

    Oguttu, David; Byamukama, Edson; Katholi, Charles R; Habomugisha, Peace; Nahabwe, Christine; Ngabirano, Monica; Hassan, Hassan K; Lakwo, Thomson; Katabarwa, Moses; Richards, Frank O; Unnasch, Thomas R

    2014-02-01

    Uganda is the only African country whose onchocerciasis elimination program uses a two-pronged approach of vector control and mass drug distribution. The Ugandan program relies heavily upon the use of serosurveys of children to monitor progress toward elimination. The program has tested over 39,000 individuals from 11 foci for Onchocerca volvulus exposure, using the Ov16 ELISA test. The data show that the Ov16 ELISA is a useful operational tool to monitor onchocerciasis transmission interruption in Africa at the World Health Organization (WHO) recommended threshold of < 0.1% in children. The Ugandan experience has also resulted in a re-examination of the statistical methods used to estimate the boundary of the upper 95% confidence interval for the WHO prevalence threshold when all samples tested are negative. This has resulted in the development of Bayesian and hypergeometric statistical methods that reduce the number of individuals who must be tested to meet the WHO criterion. PMID:24343885

  3. Management of acute perioperative myocardial infarction: a case report of concomitant acute myocardial infarction and tumor bleeding in the transverse colon

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu-Feng; Gao, Wen-Qian; Li, Yuan-Xin; Feng, Quan-Zhou; Zhu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction complicated by bleeding colon tumor is problematic with regard to management, and appropriate balance of antiplatelet or anticoagulation therapy and hemostasis or surgery is crucial for effective treatment. Here, we present a case of concomitant acute myocardial infarction and bleeding tumor in the transverse colon, and share our experience of successfully balancing anticoagulation therapy and hemostasis. PMID:26937182

  4. Temperature and Redox Effect on Mineral Colonization in Juan de Fuca Ridge Flank Subsurface Crustal Fluids.

    PubMed

    Baquiran, Jean-Paul M; Ramírez, Gustavo A; Haddad, Amanda G; Toner, Brandy M; Hulme, Samuel; Wheat, Charles G; Edwards, Katrina J; Orcutt, Beth N

    2016-01-01

    To examine microbe-mineral interactions in subsurface oceanic crust, we evaluated microbial colonization on crustal minerals that were incubated in borehole fluids for 1 year at the seafloor wellhead of a crustal borehole observatory (IODP Hole U1301A, Juan de Fuca Ridge flank) as compared to an experiment that was not exposed to subsurface crustal fluids (at nearby IODP Hole U1301B). In comparison to previous studies at these same sites, this approach allowed assessment of the effects of temperature, fluid chemistry, and/or mineralogy on colonization patterns of different mineral substrates, and an opportunity to verify the approach of deploying colonization experiments at an observatory wellhead at the seafloor instead of within the borehole. The Hole U1301B deployment did not have biofilm growth, based on microscopy and DNA extraction, thereby confirming the integrity of the colonization design against bottom seawater intrusion. In contrast, the Hole U1301A deployment supported biofilms dominated by Epsilonproteobacteria (43.5% of 370 16S rRNA gene clone sequences) and Gammaproteobacteria (29.3%). Sequence analysis revealed overlap in microbial communities between different minerals incubated at the Hole U1301A wellhead, indicating that mineralogy did not separate biofilm structure within the 1-year colonization experiment. Differences in the Hole U1301A wellhead biofilm community composition relative to previous studies from within the borehole using similar mineral substrates suggest that temperature and the diffusion of dissolved oxygen through plastic components influenced the mineral colonization experiments positioned at the wellhead. This highlights the capacity of low abundance crustal fluid taxa to rapidly establish communities on diverse mineral substrates under changing environmental conditions such as from temperature and oxygen. PMID:27064928

  5. Temperature and Redox Effect on Mineral Colonization in Juan de Fuca Ridge Flank Subsurface Crustal Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Baquiran, Jean-Paul M.; Ramírez, Gustavo A.; Haddad, Amanda G.; Toner, Brandy M.; Hulme, Samuel; Wheat, Charles G.; Edwards, Katrina J.; Orcutt, Beth N.

    2016-01-01

    To examine microbe-mineral interactions in subsurface oceanic crust, we evaluated microbial colonization on crustal minerals that were incubated in borehole fluids for 1 year at the seafloor wellhead of a crustal borehole observatory (IODP Hole U1301A, Juan de Fuca Ridge flank) as compared to an experiment that was not exposed to subsurface crustal fluids (at nearby IODP Hole U1301B). In comparison to previous studies at these same sites, this approach allowed assessment of the effects of temperature, fluid chemistry, and/or mineralogy on colonization patterns of different mineral substrates, and an opportunity to verify the approach of deploying colonization experiments at an observatory wellhead at the seafloor instead of within the borehole. The Hole U1301B deployment did not have biofilm growth, based on microscopy and DNA extraction, thereby confirming the integrity of the colonization design against bottom seawater intrusion. In contrast, the Hole U1301A deployment supported biofilms dominated by Epsilonproteobacteria (43.5% of 370 16S rRNA gene clone sequences) and Gammaproteobacteria (29.3%). Sequence analysis revealed overlap in microbial communities between different minerals incubated at the Hole U1301A wellhead, indicating that mineralogy did not separate biofilm structure within the 1-year colonization experiment. Differences in the Hole U1301A wellhead biofilm community composition relative to previous studies from within the borehole using similar mineral substrates suggest that temperature and the diffusion of dissolved oxygen through plastic components influenced the mineral colonization experiments positioned at the wellhead. This highlights the capacity of low abundance crustal fluid taxa to rapidly establish communities on diverse mineral substrates under changing environmental conditions such as from temperature and oxygen. PMID:27064928

  6. [Colonization-outbreak of two clonally different strains of Serratia marcescens in a neonatal intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    Schulz-Stübner, S; Zimmer, P; Leonards, P; Knipp, U; Michels, H; Kunitz, O; Thomas, W

    2015-02-01

    We describe an outbreak of two clonally different strains of Serratia marcescens in a neonatal intensive care unit. Three colonization cases in the first outbreak phase were related to contact transmission from an index patient during emergency respiratory treatment while eight colonizations in the second phase were caused by contaminated bathing lotion. All transmissions resulted in colonization only and no infections were recorded. Based on our experience and the literature review sufficient staffing levels, basic hygiene and a goal-directed investigation of the environment are the cornerstones of a rapid outbreak termination. The epidemiological search for parallels in cases should be assisted by sophisticated electronic records.

  7. Colon centerline extraction in fragmented segmentations.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Karthik; Madrosiya, Akshay; Desai, Nasir

    2015-08-01

    In virtual colonoscopy, the clinical need is a smooth centered path from the rectum to the cecum, for interactive navigation along the colonic lumen. The primary challenge is breakages in the colon, due to fecal residue, abnormalities, poor insufflation and inadequate electronic cleansing. Here we propose a method, that is a modification of the classic energy minimized geodesic, that extracts centered paths through fragmented colons. To begin, we perform electronic cleansing, automatically localize 4 points: rectum, cecum, sphlenic and hepatic flexures; followed by region growing and heuristic approaches to generate the initial segmentation. This is followed by a daisy chaining procedure to link possibly large colon blobs that may have been missed as weaker candidate segmentations. We then perform a front propagation to extract a minimal energy path through the ordered set of points. This propagation is guided by multiple forces: (a) A strong force given by the distance to the colon segmentation surface (b) A weak force derived from the CT intensity (c) A weak force from the distance to the surface of weaker candidate colon segmentations (d) A geodesic repulsive force, where the other points exhibit an repelling force in their voronoi partition, the force proportional to the geodesic distance to the point. Our contribution is a path extraction method for the colon that is the energy minimized geodesic (a) favouring centeredness (b) punching through gaps, traversing in so far as possible through lower intensity regions and possibly centered within these gaps (c) ordered through the feature points. Results show improvements of the method over the standard minimal energy path approach. PMID:26736927

  8. Differences in AM fungal root colonization between populations of perennial Aster species have genetic reasons.

    PubMed

    Pánková, Hana; Münzbergová, Zuzana; Rydlová, Jana; Vosátka, Miroslav

    2008-08-01

    We tested the hypothesis whether differences between plant populations in root colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi could be caused by genetic differentiation between populations. In addition, we investigated whether the response to AM fungi differs between plants from different populations and if it is affected by the soil in which the plants are cultivated. We used Aster amellus, which occurs in fragmented dry grasslands, as a model species and we studied six different populations from two regions, which varied in soil nutrient concentration. We found significant differences in the degree of mycorrhizal colonization of plant roots between regions in the field. To test if these differences were due to phenotypic plasticity or had a genetic basis, we performed a greenhouse experiment. The results suggested that Aster amellus is an obligate mycotrophic plant species with a high dependency upon mycorrhiza. Plant biomass was affected only by soil, and not by population or the interaction between the population and the soil. Mycorrhizal colonization was significantly affected by all three factors (soil, population, interaction of soil and population). Plants from the population originating from the soil with lower nutrient availability developed more mycorrhiza even when grown in soil with higher nutrient availability. The correspondence between mycorrhizal colonization of plants in the field and in both soils in the pot experiment suggests that the observed differences in root colonization have a genetic basis.

  9. Biotic interactions affect the colonization behavior of aquatic detritivorous macroinvertebrates in a heterogeneous environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verschut, Thomas A.; Meineri, Eric; Basset, Alberto

    2015-05-01

    It has previously been suggested that macroinvertebrates actively search for suitable patches to colonize. However, it is not well understood how the spatial arrangement of patches can affect colonization rates. In this study, we determined the importance of the environmental factors (distance, connectivity and resource availability) for patch colonization in an experimental system using Gammarus aequicauda (Amphipoda), Lekanesphaera hookeri (Isopoda) and Ecrobia ventrosa (Gastropoda). Furthermore, we also assessed how the relative importance of each of these environmental factors differed in interactions between the three species. The single species experiments showed that distance was the most important factor for G. aequicauda and E. ventrosa. However, while E. ventrosa preferred patches close to the release point, G. aequicauda strongly preferred patches further from the release point. High resource availability was a strong determinant for the patch colonization of G. aequicauda and L. hookeri. Connectivity was only of moderate importance in the study system for L. hookeri and E. ventrosa. The effects of the environmental factors were strongly affected by interspecific interactions in the multispecies experiments. For G. aequicauda, the distance preference was lowered in the presence of E. ventrosa. Moreover, while for L. hookeri the effect of resource availability was ruled out by the species interactions, resource availability gained importance for E. ventrosa in the presence of any of the other species. Our results suggest a strong link between environmental factors and biotic interactions in the colonization of habitat patches and indicate that the effect of biotic interactions is especially important for species sharing similar traits.

  10. Colonic Patch and colonic SILT development are independent and differentially-regulated events

    PubMed Central

    Baptista, AP; Olivier, BJ; Goverse, G; Greuter, M; Knippenberg, M; Kusser, K; Domingues, RG.; Veiga-Fernandes, H; Luster, AD; Lugering, A; Randall, TD; Cupedo, T; Mebius, RE

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal lymphoid tissues have to simultaneously ensure protection against pathogens and tolerance towards commensals. Despite such vital functions, their development in the colon is poorly understood. Here, we show that the two distinct lymphoid tissues of the colon–colonic patches and colonic SILTs–can easily be distinguished based on anatomical location, developmental timeframe and cellular organization. Furthermore, whereas colonic patch development depended on CXCL13-mediated LTi cell clustering followed by LTα-mediated consolidation, early LTi clustering at SILT anlagen did not require CXCL13, CCR6 or CXCR3. Subsequent dendritic cell recruitment to and gp38+VCAM-1+ lymphoid stromal cell differentiation within SILTs required LTα; B cell recruitment and follicular dendritic cell differentiation depended on MyD88-mediated signalling, but not the microflora. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that different mechanisms, mediated mainly by programmed stimuli, induce the formation of distinct colonic lymphoid tissues, therefore suggesting that these tissues may have different functions. PMID:22990625

  11. Transcriptional recapitulation and subversion of embryonic colon development by mouse colon tumor models and human colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Sergio; Park, Young-Kyu; Franklin, Jeffrey L; Halberg, Richard B; Yu, Ming; Jessen, Walter J; Freudenberg, Johannes; Chen, Xiaodi; Haigis, Kevin; Jegga, Anil G; Kong, Sue; Sakthivel, Bhuvaneswari; Xu, Huan; Reichling, Timothy; Azhar, Mohammad; Boivin, Gregory P; Roberts, Reade B; Bissahoyo, Anika C; Gonzales, Fausto; Bloom, Greg C; Eschrich, Steven; Carter, Scott L; Aronow, Jeremy E; Kleimeyer, John; Kleimeyer, Michael; Ramaswamy, Vivek; Settle, Stephen H; Boone, Braden; Levy, Shawn; Graff, Jonathan M; Doetschman, Thomas; Groden, Joanna; Dove, William F; Threadgill, David W; Yeatman, Timothy J; Coffey, Robert J; Aronow, Bruce J

    2007-01-01

    Background The expression of carcino-embryonic antigen by colorectal cancer is an example of oncogenic activation of embryonic gene expression. Hypothesizing that oncogenesis-recapitulating-ontogenesis may represent a broad programmatic commitment, we compared gene expression patterns of human colorectal cancers (CRCs) and mouse colon tumor models to those of mouse colon development embryonic days 13.5-18.5. Results We report here that 39 colon tumors from four independent mouse models and 100 human CRCs encompassing all clinical stages shared a striking recapitulation of embryonic colon gene expression. Compared to normal adult colon, all mouse and human tumors over-expressed a large cluster of genes highly enriched for functional association to the control of cell cycle progression, proliferation, and migration, including those encoding MYC, AKT2, PLK1 and SPARC. Mouse tumors positive for nuclear β-catenin shifted the shared embryonic pattern to that of early development. Human and mouse tumors differed from normal embryonic colon by their loss of expression modules enriched for tumor suppressors (EDNRB, HSPE, KIT and LSP1). Human CRC adenocarcinomas lost an additional suppressor module (IGFBP4, MAP4K1, PDGFRA, STAB1 and WNT4). Many human tumor samples also gained expression of a coordinately regulated module associated with advanced malignancy (ABCC1, FOXO3A, LIF, PIK3R1, PRNP, TNC, TIMP3 and VEGF). Conclusion Cross-species, developmental, and multi-model gene expression patterning comparisons provide an integrated and versatile framework for definition of transcriptional programs associated with oncogenesis. This approach also provides a general method for identifying pattern-specific biomarkers and therapeutic targets. This delineation and categorization of developmental and non-developmental activator and suppressor gene modules can thus facilitate the formulation of sophisticated hypotheses to evaluate potential synergistic effects of targeting within- and

  12. CT evaluation of the colon: inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Horton, K M; Corl, F M; Fishman, E K

    2000-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is valuable for detection and characterization of many inflammatory conditions of the colon. At CT, a dilated, thickened appendix is suggestive of appendicitis. A 1-4-cm, oval, fatty pericolic lesion with surrounding mesenteric inflammation is diagnostic of epiploic appendagitis. The key to distinguishing diverticulitis from other inflammatory conditions of the colon is the presence of diverticula in the involved segment. In typhlitis, CT demonstrates cecal distention and circumferential thickening of the cecal wall, which may have low attenuation secondary to edema. In radiation colitis, the clinical history is the key to suggesting the diagnosis because the CT findings can be nonspecific. The location of the involved segment and the extent and appearance of wall thickening may help distinguish Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis. In ischemic colitis, CT typically demonstrates circumferential, symmetric wall thickening with fold enlargement. CT findings of graft-versus-host disease include small bowel and colonic wall thickening, which may result in luminal narrowing and separation of bowel loops. In infectious colitis, the site and thickness of colon affected may suggest a specific organism. The amount of wall thickening in pseudomembranous colitis is typically greater than in any other inflammatory disease of the colon except Crohn disease. PMID:10715339

  13. Space Colonization-Benefits for the World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegfried, W. H.

    2003-01-01

    We have begun to colonize space, even to the extent of early space tourism. Our early Vostok, Mercury, Gemini, Apollo, Skylab, Spacehab, Mir and now ISS are humankind's first ventures toward colonization. Efforts are underway to provide short space tours, and endeavors such as the X-Prize are encouraging entrepreneurs to provide new systems. Many believe that extended space travel (colonization) will do for the 21st century what aviation did for the 20th. Our current concerns including terrorism, hunger, disease, and problems of air quality, safe abundant water, poverty, and weather vagaries tend to overshadow long-term activities such as Space Colonization in the minds of many. Our leading ``think tanks'' such as the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and the Brookings Institute do not rate space travel high on lists of future beneficial undertakings even though many of the concerns listed above are prominently featured. It is the contention of this paper that Space Colonization will lead toward solutions to many of the emerging problems of our Earth, both technological and sociological. The breadth of the enterprise far exceeds the scope of our normal single-purpose missions and, therefore, its benefits will be greater.

  14. Crater lake colonization by neotropical cichlid fishes.

    PubMed

    Elmer, Kathryn R; Lehtonen, Topi K; Fan, Shaohua; Meyer, Axel

    2013-01-01

    Volcanic crater lakes are isolated habitats that are particularly well suited to investigating ecological and evolutionary divergence and modes of speciation. However, the mode, frequency, and timing of colonization of crater lakes have been difficult to determine. We used a statistical comparative phylogeographic approach, based on a mitochondrialDNA dataset, to infer the colonization history of two Nicaraguan crater lakes by populations of genetically and ecologically divergent cichlid lineages: Midas (Amphilophus cf. citrinellus complex) and moga (Hypsophrys nematopus). We compared estimates of diversity among populations within the two cichlid lineages and found that Midas were the most genetically diverse. From an approximate Bayesian computation analysis, we inferred that the crater lakes were each founded by both cichlid lineages in single waves of colonization: Masaya 5800 ± 300 years ago and Xiloá 5400 ± 750 years ago. We conclude that natural events are likely to have a dominant role in colonization of the crater lakes. Further, our findings suggest that the higher species richness and more rapid evolution of the Midas species complex, relative to other lineages of fishes in the same crater lakes, cannot be explained by earlier or more numerous colonization events.

  15. Nuclear microscopy of rat colon epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, M.; Rajendran, Reshmi; Ng, Mary; Udalagama, Chammika; Rodrigues, Anna E.; Watt, Frank; Jenner, Andrew Michael

    2011-10-01

    Using Nuclear microscopy, we have investigated iron distributions in the colons of Sprague Dawley rats, in order to elucidate heme uptake. Four groups of five Sprague Dawley rats (mean weight 180 g) were fed different purified diets containing either heme diet (2.5% w/w hemoglobin), high fat diet (HFD) (18% w/w fat, 1% w/w cholesterol), 'western' diet (combination of hemoglobin 2.5% and 18% fat, 1% cholesterol) or control diet (7% w/w fat). After 4 weeks, animals were sacrificed by exsanguination after anaesthesia. Thin sections of frozen colon tissue were taken, freeze dried and scanned using nuclear microscopy utilising the techniques PIXE, RBS and STIM. The new data acquisition system (IonDaq) developed in CIBA was used to obtain high resolution images and line scans were used to map the iron distributions across the colon boundaries. The nuclear microscope results indicate that when HFD is given in addition to heme, the iron content of the epithelial cells that line the colon decreases, and the zinc in the smooth muscle wall increases. This implies that the level of heme and fat in diet has an important role in colon health, possibly by influencing epithelial cells directly or changing luminal composition such as bacterial flora or levels of metabolites and cytotoxins.

  16. Peripheral and central P2X3 receptor contributions to colon mechanosensitivity and hypersensitivity in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Shinoda, Masamichi; Feng, Bin; Gebhart, G. F.

    2009-01-01

    Background & Aims Irritable bowel syndrome is characterized by altered sensory qualities, namely discomfort/pain and colorectal hypersensitivity. In mice, we examined the role of P2X3 receptors in colon mechanosensitivity and intracolonic zymosan-produced hypersensitivity, a model of persistent colon hypersensitivity without colon inflammation. Methods The visceromotor response (VMR) to colon distension (15 – 60 mmHg) was determined before and after intracolonic saline or zymosan (30 mg/mL, 0.1 mL, daily for 3 days) treatment. Colon pathology and intracolonic ATP release was assessed in parallel experiments. To examine P2X3 receptor contributions to colon mechanosensation and hypersensitivity, electrophysiological experiments were performed using an in vitro colon-pelvic nerve preparation. Results VMRs to distension were significantly reduced in P2X3+/−and P2X3−/− mice relative to wildtype mice. Colon hypersensitivity produced by zymosan was virtually absent in P2X3−/− relative to wildtype or P2X3+/− mice. Intralumenal release of the endogenous P2X receptor ligand ATP did not differ between wildtype and P2X3−/− mice or change after intracolonic zymosan treatment. Responses of muscular and muscular-mucosal pelvic nerve afferents to mechanical stretch did not differ between P2X3−/− and wildtype mice. Both muscular and muscular-mucosal afferents in wildtype mice sensitized to application of an inflammatory soup, whereas only muscular-mucosal afferents did so in P2X3−/− mice. Conclusions These results suggest differential roles for peripheral and central P2X3 receptors in colon mechanosensory transduction and hypersensitivity. PMID:19549524

  17. Beyond Recovery: Colonization, Health and Healing for Indigenous People in Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavallee, Lynn F.; Poole, Jennifer M.

    2010-01-01

    How do we limit our focus to mental health when Indigenous teaching demands a much wider lens? How do we respond to mental health recovery when Indigenous experience speaks to a very different approach to healing, and how can we take up the health of Indigenous people in Canada without a discussion of identity and colonization? We cannot, for the…

  18. PET-MRI in Diagnosing Patients With Colon or Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-25

    Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  19. Order of arrival structures arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization of plants.

    PubMed

    Werner, Gijsbert D A; Kiers, E Toby

    2015-03-01

    Priority effects - the impact of a species' arrival on subsequent community development - have been shown to influence species composition in many organisms. Whether priority effects among arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) structure fungal root communities is not well understood. Here, we investigated whether priority effects influence the success of two closely related AMF species (Rhizophagus irregularis and Glomus aggregatum), hypothesizing that a resident AMF suppresses invader success, this effect is time-dependent and a resident will experience reduced growth when invaded. We performed two glasshouse experiments using modified pots, which permitted direct inoculation of resident and invading AMF on the roots. We quantified intraradical AMF abundances using quantitative PCR and visual colonization percentages. We found that both fungi suppressed the invading species and that this effect was strongly dependent on the time lag between inoculations. In contrast to our expectations, neither resident AMF was negatively affected by invasion. We show that order of arrival can influence the abundance of AMF species colonizing a host. These priority effects can have important implications for AMF ecology and the use of fungal inocula in sustainable agriculture.

  20. Stercoral perforation of the colon during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Tomoko; Yumoto, Yasuo; Fukushima, Kotaro; Hojo, Satoshi; Ohishi, Yoshihiro; Inoue, Shigetaka; Wake, Norio

    2011-11-01

    A 39-year-old Japanese woman was referred to our hospital for severe abdominal pain at 22 weeks and 2 days of gestation. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) suggested perforation of the gastrointestinal tract and emergency surgery was conducted. There was a fibrous adhesion between an enlarged uterus and the sigmoid colon. There was a 5.0-cm perforation near the adhesion in the posterior wall of the sigmoid colon. We performed a partial resection of the sigmoid colon and Hartmann's procedure with copious intraperitoneal lavage. Five hours following the laparotomy, uterine contractions could not be controlled and the patient delivered vaginally. The neonate died almost immediately after delivery. We conclude that although stercoral bowel perforation is rare, poor prognosis after perforation emphasizes the need to carry out a CT scan for patients who present with undiagnosed severe abdominal pain and compatible medical history, even if the patient is pregnant.

  1. The Actinobacterial Colonization of Etruscan Paintings

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Herraiz, Marta; Jurado, Valme; Cuezva, Soledad; Laiz, Leonila; Pallecchi, Pasquino; Tiano, Piero; Sanchez-Moral, Sergio; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo

    2013-01-01

    The paintings from Tomba della Scimmia, in Tuscany, are representative of the heavy bacterial colonization experienced in most Etruscan necropolises. The tomb remained open until the late 70′s when it was closed because of severe deterioration of the walls, ceiling and paintings after decades of visits. The deterioration is the result of environmental changes and impacts suffered since its discovery in 1846. We show scanning electron microscopy and molecular studies that reveal the extent and nature of the biodeterioration. Actinobacteria, mainly Nocardia and Pseudonocardia colonize and grow on the tomb walls and this process is linked to the availability of organic matter, phyllosilicates (e.g. clay minerals) and iron oxides. Nocardia is found metabolically active in the paintings. The data confirm the specialization of the genera Nocardia and Pseudonocardia in the colonization of subterranean niches. PMID:23486535

  2. Adhesive bacterial colonization of exposed traumatized tendon.

    PubMed

    Webb, L X; Hobgood, C D; Meredith, J W; Gristina, A G

    1987-05-01

    Recent studies of compromised or damaged tissues, as well as biomaterials, have shown that they provide a particularly fertile substratum for bacterial colonization. Colonization in these environments is mediated by a process of microbial adhesion to surfaces of the substrata. In this report, we present electron microscopic studies of a portion of damaged and infected tendon. These studies demonstrate colonies of bacteria surrounded by a ruthenium red-staining exopolysaccharide biofilm and adhesion to the surface of the tendon by means of an exopolysaccharide polymer. We suggest that this adhesive form of bacterial colonization may partially explain the resistance of exposed tendon to effective debridement by simple mechanical measures and to coverage with granulation tissue, partial-thickness skin grafts, and vascularized tissue grafts.

  3. Pneumocystis jirovecii colonization in chronic pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, S.; Respaldiza, N.; Campano, E.; Martínez-Risquez, M.T.; Calderón, E.J.; De La Horra, C.

    2011-01-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii causes pneumonia in immunosuppressed individuals. However, it has been reported the detection of low levels of Pneumocystis DNA in patients without signs and symptoms of pneumonia, which likely represents colonization. Several studies performed in animals models and in humans have demonstrated that Pneumocystis induces a local and a systemic response in the host. Since P. jirovecii colonization has been found in patients with chronic pulmonary diseases it has been suggested that P. jirovecii may play a role in the physiopathology and progression of those diseases. In this report we revise P. jirovecii colonization in different chronic pulmonary diseases such us, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, interstitial lung diseases, cystic fibrosis and lung cancer. PMID:21678787

  4. The actinobacterial colonization of Etruscan paintings.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Herraiz, Marta; Jurado, Valme; Cuezva, Soledad; Laiz, Leonila; Pallecchi, Pasquino; Tiano, Piero; Sanchez-Moral, Sergio; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo

    2013-01-01

    The paintings from Tomba della Scimmia, in Tuscany, are representative of the heavy bacterial colonization experienced in most Etruscan necropolises. The tomb remained open until the late 70's when it was closed because of severe deterioration of the walls, ceiling and paintings after decades of visits. The deterioration is the result of environmental changes and impacts suffered since its discovery in 1846. We show scanning electron microscopy and molecular studies that reveal the extent and nature of the biodeterioration. Actinobacteria, mainly Nocardia and Pseudonocardia colonize and grow on the tomb walls and this process is linked to the availability of organic matter, phyllosilicates (e.g. clay minerals) and iron oxides. Nocardia is found metabolically active in the paintings. The data confirm the specialization of the genera Nocardia and Pseudonocardia in the colonization of subterranean niches.

  5. The mRNA of L-Type Calcium Channel Elevated in Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xi-Tao; Nagaba, Yasushi; Cross, Heide S.; Wrba, Fritz; Zhang, Lin; Guggino, Sandra E.

    2000-01-01

    Previous reports indicate that the mRNA for the cardiac isoform of the voltage-gated L-type calcium channel (α1C) is elevated in colon cancer. The aim of these experiments was to verify that the mRNA for α1C was significantly increased in tumors of two separate populations of patients when compared to normal adjacent mucosa. The second aim was to measure the distribution of α1C using immunocytochemistry in normal human colon and in colon cancer and to determine what might regulate the channel expression. Biopsies were taken from patients with various stages of colon cancer and nearby normal mucosa were used as control. RNA was prepared and mRNA level measured by semiquantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The mRNA of the calcium channel was compared with other markers including β-actin. The mRNA for α1C was increased significantly in colon cancers compared to nearby adjacent mucosa. Using confocal microscopy α1C was localized mainly at the apical membrane in the surface epithelium of normal human colon with less distribution on the lateral and basal membranes. The channel was localized on the lateral and basal membranes in crypt cells. Calcium channel localization appeared to be nearer nuclei in colon cancer samples, in part because of the smaller size of the cells. Likewise, cultured Caco-2 and T84 cells showed a membrane distribution. Western blotting indicated that α1C protein was increased in nonconfluent cultures of colonic carcinoma cells compared to confluent cells and immunocytochemistry confirms that there is more calcium channel protein in cells that are nonconfluent. We conclude that the increase in mRNA of α1 subunit of the cardiac isoform of the L-type calcium channel may be a useful marker of colon cancer compared to other markers because the increase is large and this increase can be documented on small samples using a simple semiquantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. We found that α1C protein is

  6. Prehistoric human colonization of India.

    PubMed

    Misra, V N

    2001-11-01

    Human colonization in India encompasses a span of at least half-a-million years and is divided into two broad periods, namely the prehistoric (before the emergence of writing) and the historic (after writing). The prehistoric period is divided into stone, bronze and iron ages. The stone age is further divided into palaeolithic, mesolithic and neolithic periods. As the name suggests, the technology in these periods was primarily based on stone. Economically, the palaeolithic and mesolithic periods represented a nomadic, hunting-gathering way of life, while the neolithic period represented a settled, food-producing way of life. Subsequently copper was introduced as a new material and this period was designated as the chalcolithic period. The invention of agriculture, which took place about 8000 years ago, brought about dramatic changes in the economy, technology and demography of human societies. Human habitat in the hunting-gathering stage was essentially on hilly, rocky and forested regions, which had ample wild plant and animal food resources. The introduction of agriculture saw it shifting to the alluvial plains which had fertile soil and perennial availability of water. Hills and forests, which had so far been areas of attraction, now turned into areas of isolation. Agriculture led to the emergence of villages and towns and brought with it the division of society into occupational groups. The first urbanization took place during the bronze age in the arid and semi-arid region of northwest India in the valleys of the Indus and the Saraswati rivers, the latter represented by the now dry Ghaggar-Hakra bed. This urbanization is known as the Indus or Harappan civilization which flourished during 3500-1500 B.C. The rest of India during this period was inhabited by neolithic and chalcolithic farmers and mesolithic hunter-gatherers. With the introduction of iron technology about 3000 years ago, the focus of development shifted eastward into the Indo-Gangetic divide and

  7. Prehistoric human colonization of India.

    PubMed

    Misra, V N

    2001-11-01

    Human colonization in India encompasses a span of at least half-a-million years and is divided into two broad periods, namely the prehistoric (before the emergence of writing) and the historic (after writing). The prehistoric period is divided into stone, bronze and iron ages. The stone age is further divided into palaeolithic, mesolithic and neolithic periods. As the name suggests, the technology in these periods was primarily based on stone. Economically, the palaeolithic and mesolithic periods represented a nomadic, hunting-gathering way of life, while the neolithic period represented a settled, food-producing way of life. Subsequently copper was introduced as a new material and this period was designated as the chalcolithic period. The invention of agriculture, which took place about 8000 years ago, brought about dramatic changes in the economy, technology and demography of human societies. Human habitat in the hunting-gathering stage was essentially on hilly, rocky and forested regions, which had ample wild plant and animal food resources. The introduction of agriculture saw it shifting to the alluvial plains which had fertile soil and perennial availability of water. Hills and forests, which had so far been areas of attraction, now turned into areas of isolation. Agriculture led to the emergence of villages and towns and brought with it the division of society into occupational groups. The first urbanization took place during the bronze age in the arid and semi-arid region of northwest India in the valleys of the Indus and the Saraswati rivers, the latter represented by the now dry Ghaggar-Hakra bed. This urbanization is known as the Indus or Harappan civilization which flourished during 3500-1500 B.C. The rest of India during this period was inhabited by neolithic and chalcolithic farmers and mesolithic hunter-gatherers. With the introduction of iron technology about 3000 years ago, the focus of development shifted eastward into the Indo-Gangetic divide and

  8. Colon Necrosis Due to Sodium Polystyrene Sulfonate with and without Sorbitol: An Experimental Study in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ayoub, Isabelle; Oh, Man S.; Gupta, Raavi; McFarlane, Michael; Babinska, Anna; Salifu, Moro O.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Based on a single rat study by Lillemoe et al, the consensus has been formed to implicate sorbitol rather than sodium polystyrene sulfonate (SPS) as the culprit for colon necrosis in humans treated with SPS and sorbitol. We tested the hypothesis that colon necrosis by sorbitol in the experiment was due to the high osmolality and volume of sorbitol rather than its chemical nature. Methods 26 rats underwent 5/6 nephrectomy. They were divided into 6 groups and given enema solutions under anesthesia (normal saline, 33% sorbitol, 33% mannitol, SPS in 33% sorbitol, SPS in normal saline, and SPS in distilled water). They were sacrificed after 48 hours of enema administration or earlier if they were very sick. The gross appearance of the colon was visually inspected, and then sliced colon tissues were examined under light microscopy. Results 1 rat from the sorbitol and 1 from the mannitol group had foci of ischemic colonic changes. The rats receiving SPS enema, in sorbitol, normal saline, distilled water, had crystal deposition with colonic necrosis and mucosal erosion. All the rats not given SPS survived until sacrificed at 48 h whereas 11 of 13 rats that received SPS in sorbitol, normal saline or distilled water died or were clearly dying and sacrificed sooner. There was no difference between sorbitol and mannitol when given without SPS. Conclusions In a surgical uremic rat model, SPS enema given alone or with sorbitol or mannitol seemed to cause colon necrosis and high mortality rate, whereas 33% sorbitol without SPS did not. PMID:26413782

  9. Microbial colonization of post eruptive vents on the EPR at 9N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetriani, C.

    2008-12-01

    The overarching goal of this project is to understand the role of microbial colonists at newly formed vents as "mediators" in the transfer of energy from the geothermal source to the higher trophic levels, and their role in altering fluid chemistry and in "conditioning" the vent environment for metazoans to settle. Following the 2005-06 volcanic eruption along the East Pacific Rise (EPR) ridge crest between 9°N and 9°N, we had several opportunities to investigate the microbial colonization of the post-eruptive vents: in 2006 (about six months after the eruption), in January 2007 (one year after the eruption), and in December 2007/January 2008 (two years after the eruption). In order to investigate microbial colonization, we designed and deployed several experimental microbial colonizers on active diffuse flow vents characterized by different temperatures (approximate range 20-60°C) chemical (different redox conditions), and biological (e.g., presence or absence of metazoan colonists) regimes. Analyses of the 16S rRNA and fuctional gene transcripts from the colonizing communities indicated that Epsilonproteobacteria represented the dominant and active fraction of the chemosynthetic early microbial colonists, and that they expressed in-situ the genes involved in carbon dioxide fixation and nitrate respiration. However, data from our semi quantitative culture experiments indicated that Epsilonproteobacteria were not the only microorganisms that attached to basalts or to the experimental colonizers during the early phases of colonization. Sulfur dependent, chemosynthetic members of the Gamma- and Alphaproteobacteria were isolated from up to 10-5 dilutions of original samples along with heterotrophic Gammaproteobacteria capable of growth on n-alkanes as their sole carbon source. We propose a model that links the chemistry of hydrothermal fluids to the colonization of newly formed vents and suggests a role for chemosynthetic and heterotrophic bacteria in the

  10. Effects of female steroid hormones on A-type K+ currents in murine colon

    PubMed Central

    Beckett, Elizabeth A H; McCloskey, Conor; O'Kane, Neil; Sanders, Kenton M; Don Koh, Sang

    2006-01-01

    Idiopathic constipation is higher in women of reproductive age than postmenopausal women or men, suggesting that female steroid hormones influence gastrointestinal motility. How female hormones affect motility is unclear. Colonic motility is regulated by ion channels in colonic myocytes. Voltage-dependent K+ channels serve to set the excitability of colonic muscles. We investigated regulation of Kv4.3 channel expression in response to acute or chronic changes in female hormones. Patch clamp experiments and quantitative PCR were used to compare outward currents and transcript expression in colonic myocytes from male, non-pregnant, pregnant and ovariectomized mice. Groups of ovariectomized mice received injections of oestrogen or progesterone to investigate the effects of hormone replacement. The capacitance of colonic myocytes from non-pregnant females was larger than in males. Net outward current density in male and ovariectomized mice was higher than in non-pregnant females and oestrogen-treated ovariectomized mice. Current densities in late pregnancy were lower than in female controls. Progesterone had no effect on outward currents. A-type currents were decreased in non-pregnant females compared with ovariectomized mice, and were further decreased by pregnancy or oestrogen replacement. Kv4.3 transcripts did not differ significantly between groups; however, expression of the potassium channel interacting protein KChIP1 was elevated in ovariectomized mice compared with female controls and oestrogen-treated ovariectomized mice. Delayed rectifier currents were not affected by oestrogen. In the mouse colon, oestrogen suppresses A-type currents, which are important for regulating excitability. These observations suggest a possible link between female hormones and altered colonic motility associated with menses, pregnancy and menopause. PMID:16581861

  11. Metastatic colonization by circulating tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Massagué, Joan; Obenauf, Anna C

    2016-01-21

    Metastasis is the main cause of death in people with cancer. To colonize distant organs, circulating tumour cells must overcome many obstacles through mechanisms that we are only now starting to understand. These include infiltrating distant tissue, evading immune defences, adapting to supportive niches, surviving as latent tumour-initiating seeds and eventually breaking out to replace the host tissue. They make metastasis a highly inefficient process. However, once metastases have been established, current treatments frequently fail to provide durable responses. An improved understanding of the mechanistic determinants of such colonization is needed to better prevent and treat metastatic cancer.

  12. How to improve colon cancer screening rates.

    PubMed

    Alberti, Luiz Ronaldo; Garcia, Diego Paim Carvalho; Coelho, Debora Lucciola; De Lima, David Correa Alves; Petroianu, Andy

    2015-12-15

    Colorectal carcinoma is a common cause of death throughout the world and may be prevented by routine control, which can detect precancerous neoplasms and early cancers before they undergo malignant transformation or metastasis. Three strategies may improve colon cancer screening rates: convince the population about the importance of undergoing a screening test; achieve higher efficacy in standard screening tests and make them more available to the community and develop new more sensitive and efficacious screening methods and make them available as routine tests. In this light, the present study seeks to review these three means through which to increase colon cancer screening rates. PMID:26688708

  13. How to improve colon cancer screening rates

    PubMed Central

    Alberti, Luiz Ronaldo; Garcia, Diego Paim Carvalho; Coelho, Debora Lucciola; De Lima, David Correa Alves; Petroianu, Andy

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma is a common cause of death throughout the world and may be prevented by routine control, which can detect precancerous neoplasms and early cancers before they undergo malignant transformation or metastasis. Three strategies may improve colon cancer screening rates: convince the population about the importance of undergoing a screening test; achieve higher efficacy in standard screening tests and make them more available to the community and develop new more sensitive and efficacious screening methods and make them available as routine tests. In this light, the present study seeks to review these three means through which to increase colon cancer screening rates. PMID:26688708

  14. Colonic biogeography in health and ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Lavelle, Aonghus; Lennon, Grainne; Winter, Desmond C; O'Connell, P Ronan

    2016-09-01

    The relevance of biogeography to the distal gut microbiota has been investigated in both health and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), however multiple factors, including sample type and methodology, microbiota characterization and interpersonal variability make the construction of a core model of colonic biogeography challenging. In addition, how phylogenetic classification relates to immunogenicity and whether consistent alterations in the microbiota are associated with ulcerative colitis (UC) remain open questions. This addendum seeks to review the human colonic microbiota in health and UC as currently understood, in the broader context of the human microbiome. PMID:27662587

  15. Experimental ulcerative disease of the colon.

    PubMed

    Watt, J; Marcus, R

    1975-01-01

    The oral administration to guinea-pigs of an aqueous solution of carrageenan derived from the red seaweed, Eucheuma spinosum, provides a useful, readily available experimental model for the study of ulcerative disease of the colon. Two types of ulcerative disease can be produced within a 4-6 week period, viz., ulceration localised mainly to the caecum by using 1% undegraded carrageenan in the drinking fluid, and extensive ulceration involving caecum, colon, and rectum by using 5% degraded carrageenan. Ulceration is probably due to the local action of carrageenan in the bowel. PMID:1202321

  16. Knockdown of PFTAIRE Protein Kinase 1 (PFTK1) Inhibits Proliferation, Invasion, and EMT in Colon Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiankang; Liu, Chongzhong; Liu, Fengyue; Wang, Yadong; Zhu, Min

    2016-01-01

    PFTK1 is a member of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) family and is upregulated in many types of tumors. However, its expression and role in colon cancer remain unclear. In this study, we aimed to investigate the expression and function of PFTK1 in colon cancer. Our results showed that PFTK1 was highly expressed in colon cancer cell lines. The in vitro experiments demonstrated that knockdown of PFTK1 inhibited the proliferation, migration, and invasion of colon cancer cells as well as the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) progress. Furthermore, knockdown of PFTK1 suppressed the expression of Shh as well as Smo, Ptc, and Gli-1 in colon cancer cells. Taken together, these results suggest that knockdown of PFTK1 inhibited the proliferation and invasion of colon cancer cells as well as the EMT progress by suppressing the Sonic hedgehog signaling pathway. Therefore, these findings reveal that PFTK1 may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of colon cancer. PMID:27458094

  17. Effect of co-administration of probiotics with polysaccharide based colon targeted delivery systems to optimize site specific drug release.

    PubMed

    Prudhviraj, G; Vaidya, Yogyata; Singh, Sachin Kumar; Yadav, Ankit Kumar; Kaur, Puneet; Gulati, Monica; Gowthamarajan, K

    2015-11-01

    Significant clinical success of colon targeted dosage forms has been limited by their inappropriate release profile at the target site. Their failure to release the drug completely in the colon may be attributed to changes in the colonic milieu because of pathological state, drug effect and psychological stress accompanying the diseased state or, a combination of these. Alteration in normal colonic pH and bacterial picture leads to incomplete release of drug from the designed delivery system. We report the effectiveness of a targeted delivery system wherein the constant replenishment of the colonic microbiota is achieved by concomitant administration of probiotics along with the polysaccharide based drug delivery system. Guar gum coated spheroids of sulfasalazine were prepared. In the dissolution studies, these spheroids showed markedly higher release in the simulated colonic fluid. In vivo experiments conducted in rats clearly demonstrated the therapeutic advantage of co-administration of probiotics with guar gum coated spheroids. Our results suggest that concomitant use of probiotics along with the polysaccharide based delivery systems can be a simple strategy to achieve satisfactory colon targeting of drugs.

  18. Importance of Glutamate Dehydrogenase (GDH) in Clostridium difficile Colonization In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Girinathan, Brintha Parasumanna; Braun, Sterling; Sirigireddy, Apoorva Reddy; Lopez, Jose Espinola; Govind, Revathi

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the principal cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Major metabolic requirements for colonization and expansion of C. difficile after microbiota disturbance have not been fully determined. In this study, we show that glutamate utilization is important for C. difficile to establish itself in the animal gut. When the gluD gene, which codes for glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), was disrupted, the mutant C. difficile was unable to colonize and cause disease in a hamster model. Further, from the complementation experiment it appears that extracellular GDH may be playing a role in promoting C. difficile colonization and disease progression. Quantification of free amino acids in the hamster gut during C. difficile infection showed that glutamate is among preferred amino acids utilized by C. difficile during its expansion. This study provides evidence of the importance of glutamate metabolism for C. difficile pathogenesis. PMID:27467167

  19. Local fractal dimension based approaches for colonic polyp classification.

    PubMed

    Häfner, Michael; Tamaki, Toru; Tanaka, Shinji; Uhl, Andreas; Wimmer, Georg; Yoshida, Shigeto

    2015-12-01

    This work introduces texture analysis methods that are based on computing the local fractal dimension (LFD; or also called the local density function) and applies them for colonic polyp classification. The methods are tested on 8 HD-endoscopic image databases, where each database is acquired using different imaging modalities (Pentax's i-Scan technology combined with or without staining the mucosa) and on a zoom-endoscopic image database using narrow band imaging. In this paper, we present three novel extensions to a LFD based approach. These extensions additionally extract shape and/or gradient information of the image to enhance the discriminativity of the original approach. To compare the results of the LFD based approaches with the results of other approaches, five state of the art approaches for colonic polyp classification are applied to the employed databases. Experiments show that LFD based approaches are well suited for colonic polyp classification, especially the three proposed extensions. The three proposed extensions are the best performing methods or at least among the best performing methods for each of the employed databases. The methods are additionally tested by means of a public texture image database, the UIUCtex database. With this database, the viewpoint invariance of the methods is assessed, an important features for the employed endoscopic image databases. Results imply that most of the LFD based methods are more viewpoint invariant than the other methods. However, the shape, size and orientation adapted LFD approaches (which are especially designed to enhance the viewpoint invariance) are in general not more viewpoint invariant than the other LFD based approaches.

  20. Lack of CD24 expression in mice reduces the number of leukocytes in the colon.

    PubMed

    Bretz, Niko P; Salnikov, Alexei V; Doberstein, Kai; Garbi, Natalio; Kloess, Volker; Joumaa, Safwan; Naumov, Inna; Boon, Louis; Moldenhauer, Gerhard; Arber, Nadir; Altevogt, Peter

    2014-09-01

    CD24 is an extensively glycosylated membrane protein that is linked to the membrane via a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchor. In mice, CD24 is expressed by hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cells. CD24-/- mice do not have gross immunological defects, but detailed analysis revealed strongly reduced responses in an experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model and a massive proliferation of T cells under lymphopenic conditions. It was also demonstrated that preB cells from CD24-/- mice are impaired in α4-integrin-mediated cell binding. Here we report that CD24-/- mice have strongly reduced numbers of leukocytes in the colon compared to wildtype mice. The reduction comprized all subpopulations. Leukocyte counts in spleen, mesenteric lymph nodes or small intestine were not significantly different. We find that beside leukocytes, CD24 is widely expressed in EpCAM+ epithelial and CD31+ endothelial cells of colon and small intestine. However, in CD24-/- mice the number of CD31+ endothelial cells in colons was strongly reduced and the number of epithelial cells was augmented. Leukocyte transfer experiments provided evidence that the CD24 status of recipient mice, rather than of the transferred cells, is crucial for leukocyte recruitment to the colon. We hypothesize that CD24 on colonic epithelial and endothelial cells is required for the retention and positioning of leukocytes most likely by affecting integrin function.

  1. Effect of supplemental vitamin A on colon anastomotic healing in rats given preoperative irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Winsey, K.; Simon, R.J.; Levenson, S.M.; Seifter, E.; Demetriou, A.A.

    1987-02-01

    We studied the effect of dietary supplementation with vitamin A on the healing of colon anastomoses in irradiated bowel. Rats were divided into two groups. Those in the first group were fed a standard chow diet and those in the second group were fed the same diet supplemented with 150 IU vitamin A/g of chow. The rats were maintained on their respective diets throughout the experiment. After 7 days, half the rats in each group underwent abdominal irradiation (200 rads). Seven days later, all of the rats underwent distal colon division and anastomosis under pentobarbital anesthesia. All rats were killed 7 days postoperatively, the colons excised, and bursting strength and hydroxyproline determinations performed on both the anastomotic segment and a normal proximal segment of adjacent colon. There was a significant decrease in the bursting strength at the colon anastomosis (p less than 0.02) and in the collagen content (p less than 0.02) after preoperative irradiation. This effect was mitigated by dietary vitamin A supplementation.

  2. Researchers Get Closer to Test Predicting Colon Cancer's Return

    MedlinePlus

    ... Get Closer to Test Predicting Colon Cancer's Return DNA-based screen would aid treatment decisions for people ... News) -- A blood test that detects bits of DNA shed from colon cancers may someday help doctors ...

  3. To Help Prevent Colon Cancer, 'Listen to Your Gut'

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_161185.html To Help Prevent Colon Cancer, 'Listen to Your Gut' Belly pain and black ... between life and death, especially for people with colon cancer, researchers report. People who pay attention to their ...

  4. Chemotherapy for Stage II Colon Cancer.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Anna

    2015-12-01

    The adjuvant treatment of patients with stage II colon cancer is an area of controversy in medical oncology. Adjuvant chemotherapy aims to eradicate micrometastatic disease present at the time of surgery, preventing the development of distant metastatic disease and thereby curing those patients of their cancer. National and international guidelines for the adjuvant treatment of stage II colon cancer recommend a range of treatment options from observation to chemotherapy with single-agent or combination regimens, depending on the presence or absence of high-risk features (poorly differentiated histology, presence of lymphovascular invasion, presence of perineural invasion, report of < 12 lymph nodes, bowel obstruction, localized perforation, or positive margins). In the one prospective study designed to address the role of adjuvant chemotherapy in stage II colon cancer, a small but statistically significant benefit in overall survival was seen for those patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy; however, multiple meta-analyses and retrospective subgroup analyses have called these findings into question. Though there may be a role for adjuvant chemotherapy in the treatment of patients with stage II colon cancer, its incremental benefit is small, at best, and comes with the risks of real and rarely fatal complications of chemotherapy. PMID:26648796

  5. Coffee, colon function and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Vitaglione, Paola; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Pellegrini, Nicoletta

    2012-09-01

    For several years the physiological effects of coffee have been focused on its caffeine content, disregarding the hundreds of bioactive coffee components, such as polyphenols, melanoidins, carbohydrates, diterpenes, etc. These compounds may exert their protection against colorectal cancer (CRC), the third most common cancer worldwide. However, the amount and type of compounds ingested with the beverage may be highly different depending on the variety of coffee used, the roasting degree, the type of brewing method as well as the serving size. In this frame, this paper reviews the mechanisms by which coffee may influence the risk of CRC development focusing on espresso and filtered coffee, as well as on the components that totally or partially reach the colon i.e. polyphenols and dietary fiber, including melanoidins. In particular the effects of coffee on some colon conditions whose deregulation may lead to cancer, namely microbiota composition and lumen reducing environment, were considered. Taken together the discussed studies indicated that, due to their in vivo metabolism and composition, both coffee chlorogenic acids and dietary fiber, including melanoidins, may reduce CRC risk, increasing colon motility and antioxidant status. Further studies should finally assess whether the coffee benefits for colon are driven through a prebiotic effect.

  6. Colonic myoelectrical activity in IBS painless diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Frexinos, J; Fioramonti, J; Bueno, L

    1987-12-01

    Colonic myoelectrical activity was recorded during 24 hours in 23 patients with painless diarrhoea and compared with a control group of 10 healthy subjects without digestive functional disorders. Diurnal fasting activity showed no significant difference in the total long spike bursts activity (LSB lasting greater than 7 seconds), but short spike bursts activity (SSB, lasting less than 7 seconds) was significantly lower (p less than 0.05) in diarrhoeal patients. A striking difference was observed in colonic response to eating, with an increased number of migrating long spike bursts (MLSB: mass movements) during the first postprandial hour in diarrhoeal patients (p less than 0.001), while short spike bursts (segmental activity) were almost absent in the rectosigmoid area. A marked decrease in the retrograde LSB activity was also observed in eight patients. During the night (from 2200 h to 0600 h) the number of migrating long spike bursts was increased in the diarrhoea group, but almost absent in controls (p less than 0.001). This study shows that colonic motor activity was altered in painless diarrhoea. These disturbances were not limited to the decreased SSB activity in the sigmoid, but involved the whole colon, with lower SSB activity and abnormal increase of migrating long spike bursts activity (MLSB) in postprandial and nocturnal periods.

  7. Cancer of the Colon and Rectum

    MedlinePlus

    ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2016 134,490 % of All New Cancer Cases 8.0% Estimated Deaths in 2016 49,190 % of All Cancer ... of This Cancer : In 2013, there were an estimated 1,177,556 people living with colon and ...

  8. Pedunculated colonic lipoma prolapsing through the anus

    PubMed Central

    Ghanem, Omar M; Slater, Julia; Singh, Puneet; Heitmiller, Richard F; DiRocco, Joseph D

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal lipomas are the second most common benign tumors of the colon. These masses are typically incidental findings with over 94% being asymptomatic. Symptoms-classically abdominal pain, bleeding per rectum and alterations in bowel habits-may arise when lipomas become larger than 2 cm in size. Colonic lipomas are most often noted incidentally by colonoscopy. They may also be identified by abdominal imaging such as computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. We report a case of a sixty-one years old male who presented to our emergency room with a 6.7 cm × 6.3 cm soft tissue mucosal mass protruding transanally. The patient was stable with a benign abdominal examination. The mass was initially thought to be a rectal prolapse; however, a limited digital rectal exam was able to identify this as distinct from the anal canal. Since the mass was irreducible, it was elected to be resected under anesthesia. At surgery, manipulation of the mass identified that the lesion was pedunculated with a long and thickened stalk. A laparoscopic linear cutting stapler was used to resect the mass at its stalk. Pathology showed a polypoid submucosal lipoma of the colon with overlying ulceration and necrosis. We report this case to highlight this rare but possible presentation of colonic lipomas; an incarcerated, trans-anal mass with features suggesting rectal prolapse. Trans-anal resection is simple and effective treatment. PMID:25984520

  9. Vitamin D resistance and colon cancer prevention

    PubMed Central

    Giardina, Charles; Madigan, James P.; Godman Tierney, Cassandra A.; M. Brenner, Bruce; Rosenberg, Daniel W.

    2012-01-01

    Observational studies have been largely consistent in showing an inverse association between vitamin D and an individual’s risk of developing colorectal cancer. Vitamin D protection is further supported by a range of preclinical colon cancer models, including carcinogen, genetic and dietary models. A large number of mechanistic studies in both humans and rodents point to vitamin D preventing cancer by regulating cell proliferation. Counterbalancing this mostly positive data are the results of human intervention studies in which supplemental vitamin D was found to be ineffective for reducing colon cancer risk. One explanation for these discrepancies is the timing of vitamin D intervention. It is possible that colon lesions may progress to a stage where they become unresponsive to vitamin D. Such a somatic loss in vitamin D responsiveness bears the hallmarks of an epigenetic change. Here, we review data supporting the chemopreventive effectiveness of vitamin D and discuss how gene silencing and other molecular changes somatically acquired during colon cancer development may limit the protection that may otherwise be afforded by vitamin D via dietary intervention. Finally, we discuss how understanding the mechanisms by which vitamin D protection is lost might be used to devise strategies to enhance its chemopreventive actions. PMID:22180570

  10. Colonic Fermentation Promotes Decompression sickness in Rats

    PubMed Central

    de Maistre, Sébastien; Vallée, Nicolas; Gempp, Emmanuel; Lambrechts, Kate; Louge, Pierre; Duchamp, Claude; Blatteau, Jean-Eric

    2016-01-01

    Massive bubble formation after diving can lead to decompression sickness (DCS). During dives with hydrogen as a diluent for oxygen, decreasing the body’s H2 burden by inoculating hydrogen-metabolizing microbes into the gut reduces the risk of DCS. So we set out to investigate if colonic fermentation leading to endogenous hydrogen production promotes DCS in fasting rats. Four hours before an experimental dive, 93 fasting rats were force-fed, half of them with mannitol and the other half with water. Exhaled hydrogen was measured before and after force-feeding. Following the hyperbaric exposure, we looked for signs of DCS. A higher incidence of DCS was found in rats force-fed with mannitol than in those force-fed with water (80%, [95%CI 56, 94] versus 40%, [95%CI 19, 64], p < 0.01). In rats force-fed with mannitol, metronidazole pretreatment reduced the incidence of DCS (33%, [95%CI 15, 57], p = 0.005) at the same time as it inhibited colonic fermentation (14 ± 35 ppm versus 118 ± 90 ppm, p = 0.0001). Pre-diveingestion of mannitol increased the incidence of DCS in fasting rats when colonic fermentation peaked during the decompression phase. More generally, colonic fermentation in rats on a normal diet could promote DCS through endogenous hydrogen production. PMID:26853722

  11. Colonization factors of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Madhavan, T P Vipin; Sakellaris, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major cause of life-threatening diarrheal disease around the world. The major aspects of ETEC virulence are colonization of the small intestine and the secretion of enterotoxins which elicit diarrhea. Intestinal colonization is mediated, in part, by adhesins displayed on the bacterial cell surface. As colonization of the intestine is the critical first step in the establishment of an infection, it represents a potential point of intervention for the prevention of infections. Therefore, colonization factors (CFs) have been important subjects of research in the field of ETEC virulence. Research in this field has revealed that ETEC possesses a large array of serologically distinct CFs that differ in composition, structure, and function. Most ETEC CFs are pili (fimbriae) or related fibrous structures, while other adhesins are simple outer membrane proteins lacking any macromolecular structure. This chapter reviews the genetics, structure, function, and regulation of ETEC CFs and how such studies have contributed to our understanding of ETEC virulence and opened up potential opportunities for the development of preventive and therapeutic interventions. PMID:25596032

  12. Colonic stenting in malignant large bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Rajadurai, Vinita A; Levitt, Michael

    2016-06-01

    In patients who are surgical candidates, colonic stenting is beneficial for preoperative decompression in large bowel obstruction, as it can convert a surgical procedure from an emergent two-step approach into an elective one-step resection with a primary anastomosis. PMID:27398210

  13. Prostate, Lung, Colon, and Ovary Prospective Study

    Cancer.gov

    A large cohort study of etiologic determinants of cancer carried out within an NCI trial for the evaluation of screening procedures for the early detection of prostate, lung, colon, and ovarian cancer (the PLCO Trial) at 10 U.S. screening centers

  14. Colonic perianastomotic carcinogenesis in an experimental model

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Holanda, Sergio; Rodrigo, Luis; Pinyol-Felis, Carme; Vinyas-Salas, Joan

    2008-01-01

    Background To examine the effect of anastomosis on experimental carcinogenesis in the colon of rats. Methods Forty-three 10-week-old male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were operated on by performing an end-to-side ileorectostomy. Group A:16 rats received no treatment. Group B: 27 rats received 18 subcutaneous injections weekly at a dose of 21 mg/kg wt of 1–2 dimethylhydrazine (DMH), from the eighth day after the intervention. Animals were sacrificed between 25–27 weeks. The number of tumours, their localization, size and microscopic characteristics were recorded. A paired chi-squared analysis was performed comparing tumoral induction in the perianastomotic zone with the rest of colon with faeces. Results No tumours appeared in the dimethylhydrazine-free group. The percentage tumoral area was greater in the perianastomotic zone compared to tumours which had developed in the rest of colon with faeces (p = 0.014). Conclusion We found a cocarcinogenic effect due to the creation of an anastomosis, when using an experimental model of colonic carcinogenesis induced by DMH in rats. PMID:18667092

  15. Colonizing Mars - The new human migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Gary A., Jr.

    1993-09-01

    A four-step plan for colonizing Mars is discussed. The provision of water and oxygen by the colonists from Martian sources is addressed along with the need for terraforming. An argument is made for the immediate planning of such a colony.

  16. Colonic Fermentation Promotes Decompression sickness in Rats.

    PubMed

    de Maistre, Sébastien; Vallée, Nicolas; Gempp, Emmanuel; Lambrechts, Kate; Louge, Pierre; Duchamp, Claude; Blatteau, Jean-Eric

    2016-01-01

    Massive bubble formation after diving can lead to decompression sickness (DCS). During dives with hydrogen as a diluent for oxygen, decreasing the body's H2 burden by inoculating hydrogen-metabolizing microbes into the gut reduces the risk of DCS. So we set out to investigate if colonic fermentation leading to endogenous hydrogen production promotes DCS in fasting rats. Four hours before an experimental dive, 93 fasting rats were force-fed, half of them with mannitol and the other half with water. Exhaled hydrogen was measured before and after force-feeding. Following the hyperbaric exposure, we looked for signs of DCS. A higher incidence of DCS was found in rats force-fed with mannitol than in those force-fed with water (80%, [95%CI 56, 94] versus 40%, [95%CI 19, 64], p < 0.01). In rats force-fed with mannitol, metronidazole pretreatment reduced the incidence of DCS (33%, [95%CI 15, 57], p = 0.005) at the same time as it inhibited colonic fermentation (14 ± 35 ppm versus 118 ± 90 ppm, p = 0.0001). Pre-diveingestion of mannitol increased the incidence of DCS in fasting rats when colonic fermentation peaked during the decompression phase. More generally, colonic fermentation in rats on a normal diet could promote DCS through endogenous hydrogen production.

  17. Noninvasive measurement of human ascending colon volume.

    PubMed

    Badley, A D; Camilleri, M; O'Connor, M K

    1993-06-01

    The capacitance and motor functions of the colon are important determinants of its overall function. A simple, noninvasive method to quantify regional colonic volume is required for further physiologic and pharmacologic studies. Our aim was to determine whether measurements of human ascending colon (AC) volume using two-dimensional (2-D) images are as accurate as estimates using three-dimensional (3-D) images. Five healthy male volunteers each ingested a methacrylate-coated capsule containing 99Tcm-labelled Amberlite pellets. Two-and 3-D images were obtained using a gamma camera with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) capability. Ascending colon volume was estimated by a variable region of interest (VROI) program and by full-width half-maximum (FWHM) analysis, and results were compared to the volume estimates by SPECT. Full-width half-maximum analysis yielded volume estimates that were not significantly different from SPECT (slope = 1.093; t = 0.51; P > 0.5), whereas VROI estimates were significantly different from volume measurements by SPECT and, hence, considered less accurate (slope = 0.438; t = 4.93; P < 0.02). Thus, the less expensive and more easily available planar imaging technique with analysis by FWHM estimates AC volume as accurately as SPECT.

  18. Space colonization - Some physiological perspectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkler, L. H.

    1978-01-01

    Physiological criteria determining the design of the habitat for a space colony with 10,000 people are discussed. Centrifugally generated earth-normal gravity, maximum ionizing radiation dose standards less than or equal to 0.5 rem/year (obtained with passive shielding), and an atmosphere with reduced nitrogen partial pressures were established as design requirements for the habitat. However, further research is needed to determine whether humans experience complete adaptation to weightlessness and whether there are long-term effects of breathing various atmospheric mixtures and pressures.

  19. Staphylococcus aureus Colonization of the Mouse Gastrointestinal Tract Is Modulated by Wall Teichoic Acid, Capsule, and Surface Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Misawa, Yoshiki; Kelley, Kathryn A.; Wang, Xiaogang; Wang, Linhui; Park, Wan Beom; Birtel, Johannes; Saslowsky, David; Lee, Jean C.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus colonizes the nose, throat, skin, and gastrointestinal (GI) tract of humans. GI carriage of S. aureus is difficult to eradicate and has been shown to facilitate the transmission of the bacterium among individuals. Although staphylococcal colonization of the GI tract is asymptomatic, it increases the likelihood of infection, particularly skin and soft tissue infections caused by USA300 isolates. We established a mouse model of persistent S. aureus GI colonization and characterized the impact of selected surface antigens on colonization. In competition experiments, an acapsular mutant colonized better than the parental strain Newman, whereas mutants defective in sortase A and clumping factor A showed impaired ability to colonize the GI tract. Mutants lacking protein A, clumping factor B, poly-N-acetyl glucosamine, or SdrCDE showed no defect in colonization. An S. aureus wall teichoic acid (WTA) mutant (ΔtagO) failed to colonize the mouse nose or GI tract, and the tagO and clfA mutants showed reduced adherence in vitro to intestinal epithelial cells. The tagO mutant was recovered in lower numbers than the wild type strain in the murine stomach and duodenum 1 h after inoculation. This reduced fitness correlated with the in vitro susceptibility of the tagO mutant to bile salts, proteases, and a gut-associated defensin. Newman ΔtagO showed enhanced susceptibility to autolysis, and an autolysin (atl) tagO double mutant abrogated this phenotype. However, the atl tagO mutant did not survive better in the mouse GI tract than the tagO mutant. Our results indicate that the failure of the tagO mutant to colonize the GI tract correlates with its poor adherence and susceptibility to bactericidal factors within the mouse gut, but not to enhanced activity of its major autolysin. PMID:26201029

  20. [Brazilian colonization in the Paraguayan agricultural frontier].

    PubMed

    Neupert, R F

    1991-04-01

    This work briefly describes Brazilian colonization of the Paraguayan agricultural frontier, analyzes factors responsible for expelling population from Brazil and for attracting Brazilians to Paraguay, and assesses the economic and social consequences of immigration to the area. Paraguay's vast and sparsely populated agricultural frontier in areas outside the Central subregion underwent a process of intense colonization from the early 1960s to the mid-1980s. The Paraguayan government initiated an ambitious colonization program in 1963 to increase production, relieve population pressure and subdivision of small parcels in the Central subregion, encourage agricultural modernization, and produce a more diversified agriculture. Paraguayan agriculture in the early 1960s suffered from excessive concentration of land in a few hands and resulting exclusion of around 3/4 of workers from ownership and from any possibility of obtaining credit to fund technological improvements. Results of studies 2 decades after implementation of the colonization plan suggest that it has failed in significant areas. Although a considerable population redistribution alleviated pressure in the Central subregion, it apparently resulted more from spontaneous movement of peasants outside the colonization areas than from the official program. Concentration of lands is now occurring in the colonization area. Assistance for agricultural modernization and diversification of production in the peasant sector has been minimal. On the other hand, production of soy, wheat, and cotton for export increased substantially, because of an entrepreneurial agriculture capitalized by foreign as well as national interests The unmet goals of the colonization program would have required structural reforms rather than simple spatial redistribution of the population. Many of the colonists in the 1970s were Brazilian families displaced by mechanized agriculture in the southern states of Parana, Santa Catarina, and Rio

  1. [Surgical therapy of right colon cancer].

    PubMed

    Turoldo, A; Balani, A; Tonello, C; Scaramucci, M; Roseano, M

    1999-01-01

    The debate about the management of frequent advanced right colon cancer is still opened: the opportunity of extended resections when the surrounding organs or tissues are infiltrated, the lymphadenectomy extension and its role, the possibility of identifying prognostic factors that could be useful to decide adjuvant therapy, the definition of the role of laparoscopy. Considering these problems, we have reviewed a series of 159 operations performed by the Institute of Clinical Surgery of the University of Trieste from 1980. 112 of these operations had a curative goal. The reconstruction of intestinal continuity was carried out manually in 28 cases and with mechanical stapler in 78. As far as the curative resection are concerned, in 89 of them an extended lymphadenectomy was performed (D3), while in 18 cases the lymphadenectomy was limited to the lymph nodes of first and second level due to the general bed conditions of the patient. 27 of the curative exeresis were performed in patients with T4 tumor infiltrating the nearby tissues. Referring to Dukes' classification, 8 were included in stage A, 59 in stage B and 40 in stage C, while as far as the depth of wall infiltration is concerned 2 were categorized as T1, 9 as T2, 69 as T3 and 27 as T4. The overall operative mortality was of 5 patients, the overall morbidity of 14%, that specific of 4.6%. The final incidence of local recurrences was 13.8% for Dukes A cancers, 10.9% for Dukes B and 120.5% for Dukes C (p = 0.0614). Half of the recurrences (50%) occurred in patients with a cancer infiltrating the nearby tissues. The 5 year survival rate for patients with Dukes A lesions was 100%, for patients with Dukes B lesions 73.4% and for Dukes C 52.3% (p = 0.00510). With Cox' multivariate analysis only the stage disease, T and grading showed a significative correlation with the survival rate. Our experience, therefore, suggests the execution of an exeresis with lymphadenectomy D3 in each cases where the local site of the

  2. Colonic mucosectomy using laser photodynamic therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.G.; Rypins, E.B.; Watson, L.R.; Nelson, J.S.; Berns, M.W.

    1989-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) involves photosensitizing tissue and then activating it with monochromatic light, causing necrosis. Precise control of the extent of injury should be possible by varying the energy density of the light applied to the target tissue. We tested the sensitivity of colonic tissue to PDT by injecting 10 mg/kg Photofrin II intraperitoneally in 10 rats. After 24 hr the left colon was opened and cleansed. A 1.0-cm2 area of mucosa was exposed to 630 nm (red) light produced by an argon-pumped dye laser. Pairs of rats were treated with energy densities of either 10, 20, 40, 60, or 80 J/cm2, controlled by varying exposure times. After 48 hr, we sacrificed the rats and fixed, sectioned, and stained the left colons. The depth of injury was measured with an ocular micrometer and expressed as a percentage of normal bowel wall thickness. A curve was fit to the data points by computerized nonlinear regression. The relationship between depth of injury (Y) and energy density (X) was found to fit the equation Y = 1 - aebx, where constants a = 1.15 and b = -0.0353, (R2 = 0.93, P less than 0.001). The relationship between injury and energy density is biphasic, rising rapidly from 0 to 40 J/cm2 and more slowly after this point, suggesting that colonic mucosa is more sensitive to PDT than muscularis, providing a margin of safety against perforation. Bowel perforation did not occur in this study but is predicted by extrapolation for energy densities of 100 J/cm2 or greater. These data indicate that photodynamic colonic mucosectomy is possible.

  3. Dynamic occupancy models for explicit colonization processes.

    PubMed

    Broms, Kristin M; Hooten, Mevin B; Johnson, Devin S; Altwegg, Res; Conquest, Loveday L

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic, multi-season occupancy model framework has become a popular tool for modeling open populations with occupancies that change over time through local colonizations and extinctions. However, few versions of the model relate these probabilities to the occupancies of neighboring sites or patches. We present a modeling framework that incorporates this information and is capable of describing a wide variety of spatiotemporal colonization and extinction processes. A key feature of the model is that it is based on a simple set of small-scale rules describing how the process evolves. The result is a dynamic process that can account for complicated large-scale features. In our model, a site is more likely to be colonized if more of its neighbors were previously occupied and if it provides more appealing environmental characteristics than its neighboring sites. Additionally, a site without occupied neighbors may also become colonized through the inclusion of a long-distance dispersal process. Although similar model specifications have been developed for epidemiological applications, ours formally accounts for detectability using the well-known occupancy modeling framework. After demonstrating the viability and potential of this new form of dynamic occupancy model in a simulation study, we use it to obtain inference for the ongoing Common Myna (Acridotheres tristis) invasion in South Africa. Our results suggest that the Common Myna continues to enlarge its distribution and its spread via short distance movement, rather than long-distance dispersal. Overall, this new modeling framework provides a powerful tool for managers examining the drivers of colonization including short- vs. long-distance dispersal, habitat quality, and distance from source populations. PMID:27008788

  4. Dynamic occupancy models for explicit colonization processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Broms, Kristin M.; Hooten, Mevin B.; Johnson, Devin S.; Altwegg, Res; Conquest, Loveday

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic, multi-season occupancy model framework has become a popular tool for modeling open populations with occupancies that change over time through local colonizations and extinctions. However, few versions of the model relate these probabilities to the occupancies of neighboring sites or patches. We present a modeling framework that incorporates this information and is capable of describing a wide variety of spatiotemporal colonization and extinction processes. A key feature of the model is that it is based on a simple set of small-scale rules describing how the process evolves. The result is a dynamic process that can account for complicated large-scale features. In our model, a site is more likely to be colonized if more of its neighbors were previously occupied and if it provides more appealing environmental characteristics than its neighboring sites. Additionally, a site without occupied neighbors may also become colonized through the inclusion of a long-distance dispersal process. Although similar model specifications have been developed for epidemiological applications, ours formally accounts for detectability using the well-known occupancy modeling framework. After demonstrating the viability and potential of this new form of dynamic occupancy model in a simulation study, we use it to obtain inference for the ongoing Common Myna (Acridotheres tristis) invasion in South Africa. Our results suggest that the Common Myna continues to enlarge its distribution and its spread via short distance movement, rather than long-distance dispersal. Overall, this new modeling framework provides a powerful tool for managers examining the drivers of colonization including short- vs. long-distance dispersal, habitat quality, and distance from source populations.

  5. Radioimmunotoxin Therapy of Experimental Colon and Ovarian Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Buchsbaum, Donald J.; Vallera, Daniel A.

    2006-02-09

    mixed with the EpCam sFv that was synthesized without any toxin attached. The proliferation studies showed that EpCam sFv was able to block the killing of the EpCam expressing cells by DTEpCam. An irrelevant control protein, 1D10Fc was unable to block. Together, these studies indicated that EpCam was exquisitely selective. In order to produce an IT of even greater potency, we used a toxin containing the Golgi retention sequence KDEL. The same EpCam sFv was spliced to truncated PE containing the terminal KDEL sequence. The addition of KDEL enhanced the potency of the EpCam sFv IT at least 6 logs or 1000-fold with an IC50 of 2 to 7 x 10-8 nM. This conjugate was also shown to be highly selective. Taken together, all of these studies indicate that in vitro experiments have shown that we have a highly potent IT that selectively kills colon cancer cells. The next step was to show that the EpCam IT had the ability to inhibit the growth of flank tumors in vivo in nude mice. The same human colon tumor cells, HT29 used in the in vitro studies were injected into the flank of nude mice. Tumor cells were injected into groups of mice and when tumors reached the size of 0.5 cm3, we injected our best-performing EpCam IT called EpCamKDEL intratumorally. There was a significant drop in tumor size indicating that this agent was very effective against human colon cancer. Since the EpCamKDEL was injected intratumorally, it did not have to travel through the systemic circulation to find its target. Our next step will be to inject EpCamKDEL intravenously into mice with flank tumors to determine if EpCamKDEL has the ability to migrate to the tumor systemically. The next step was to radiolabel EpCamKDEL to see whether it could serve as an RIT. We radiolabeled EpCam with 111In as a surrogate for 90Y and then incubated it with HT29. The labeling efficiency was over 90% indicating that a high percentage of the protein molecules could be readily radiolabeled. However, the immunoreactivity was only

  6. Chemoembolization Using Irinotecan in Treating Patients With Liver Metastases From Metastatic Colon or Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-10

    Liver Metastases; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  7. Effect of relative humidity on fungal colonization of fiberglass insulation.

    PubMed Central

    Ezeonu, I M; Noble, J A; Simmons, R B; Price, D L; Crow, S A; Ahearn, D G

    1994-01-01

    Fiberglass duct liners and fiberglass duct boards from eight buildings whose occupants complained of unacceptable or moldy odors in the air were found to be heavily colonized by fungi, particularly by Aspergillus versicolor. Unused fiberglass was found to be susceptible to fungal colonization in environmental chambers dependent upon relative humidity. No colonization was observed at relative humidities below 50%. Images PMID:8031101

  8. Growth hormone is permissive for neoplastic colon growth.

    PubMed

    Chesnokova, Vera; Zonis, Svetlana; Zhou, Cuiqi; Recouvreux, Maria Victoria; Ben-Shlomo, Anat; Araki, Takako; Barrett, Robert; Workman, Michael; Wawrowsky, Kolja; Ljubimov, Vladimir A; Uhart, Magdalena; Melmed, Shlomo

    2016-06-01

    Growth hormone (GH) excess in acromegaly is associated with increased precancerous colon polyps and soft tissue adenomas, whereas short-stature humans harboring an inactivating GH receptor mutation do not develop cancer. We show that locally expressed colon GH is abundant in conditions predisposing to colon cancer and in colon adenocarcinoma-associated stromal fibroblasts. Administration of a GH receptor (GHR) blocker in acromegaly patients induced colon p53 and adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), reversing progrowth GH signals. p53 was also induced in skin fibroblasts derived from short-statured humans with mutant GHR. GH-deficient prophet of pituitary-specific positive transcription factor 1 (Prop1)(-/-) mice exhibited induced colon p53 levels, and cross-breeding them with Apc(min+/-) mice that normally develop intestinal and colon tumors resulted in GH-deficient double mutants with markedly decreased tumor number and size. We also demonstrate that GH suppresses p53 and reduces apoptosis in human colon cell lines as well as in induced human pluripotent stem cell-derived intestinal organoids, and confirm in vivo that GH suppresses colon mucosal p53/p21. GH excess leads to decreased colon cell phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN), increased cell survival with down-regulated APC, nuclear β-catenin accumulation, and increased epithelial-mesenchymal transition factors and colon cell motility. We propose that GH is a molecular component of the "field change" milieu permissive for neoplastic colon growth. PMID:27226307

  9. Colon cancer prediction with genetic profiles using intelligent techniques.

    PubMed

    Alladi, Subha Mahadevi; P, Shinde Santosh; Ravi, Vadlamani; Murthy, Upadhyayula Suryanarayana

    2008-01-01

    Micro array data provides information of expression levels of thousands of genes in a cell in a single experiment. Numerous efforts have been made to use gene expression profiles to improve precision of tumor classification. In our present study we have used the benchmark colon cancer data set for analysis. Feature selection is done using t-statistic. Comparative study of class prediction accuracy of 3 different classifiers viz., support vector machine (SVM), neural nets and logistic regression was performed using the top 10 genes ranked by the t-statistic. SVM turned out to be the best classifier for this dataset based on area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and total accuracy. Logistic Regression ranks as the next best classifier followed by Multi Layer Perceptron (MLP). The top 10 genes selected by us for classification are all well documented for their variable expression in colon cancer. We conclude that SVM together with t-statistic based feature selection is an efficient and viable alternative to popular techniques.

  10. Colon cancer prediction with genetic profiles using intelligent techniques

    PubMed Central

    Alladi, Subha Mahadevi; P, Shinde Santosh; Ravi, Vadlamani; Murthy, Upadhyayula Suryanarayana

    2008-01-01

    Micro array data provides information of expression levels of thousands of genes in a cell in a single experiment. Numerous efforts have been made to use gene expression profiles to improve precision of tumor classification. In our present study we have used the benchmark colon cancer data set for analysis. Feature selection is done using t‐statistic. Comparative study of class prediction accuracy of 3 different classifiers viz., support vector machine (SVM), neural nets and logistic regression was performed using the top 10 genes ranked by the t‐statistic. SVM turned out to be the best classifier for this dataset based on area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and total accuracy. Logistic Regression ranks as the next best classifier followed by Multi Layer Perceptron (MLP). The top 10 genes selected by us for classification are all well documented for their variable expression in colon cancer. We conclude that SVM together with t-statistic based feature selection is an efficient and viable alternative to popular techniques. PMID:19238250

  11. Colonic patch and colonic SILT development are independent and differentially regulated events.

    PubMed

    Baptista, A P; Olivier, B J; Goverse, G; Greuter, M; Knippenberg, M; Kusser, K; Domingues, R G; Veiga-Fernandes, H; Luster, A D; Lugering, A; Randall, T D; Cupedo, T; Mebius, R E

    2013-05-01

    Intestinal lymphoid tissues have to simultaneously ensure protection against pathogens and tolerance toward commensals. Despite such vital functions, their development in the colon is poorly understood. Here, we show that the two distinct lymphoid tissues of the colon-colonic patches and colonic solitary intestinal lymphoid tissues (SILTs)-can easily be distinguished based on anatomical location, developmental timeframe, and cellular organization. Furthermore, whereas colonic patch development depended on CXCL13-mediated lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi) cell clustering followed by LTα-mediated consolidation, early LTi clustering at SILT anlagen did not require CXCL13, CCR6, or CXCR3. Subsequent dendritic cell recruitment to and gp38(+)VCAM-1(+) lymphoid stromal cell differentiation within SILTs required LTα; B-cell recruitment and follicular dendritic cell differentiation depended on MyD88-mediated signaling, but not the microflora. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that different mechanisms, mediated mainly by programmed stimuli, induce the formation of distinct colonic lymphoid tissues, therefore suggesting that these tissues may have different functions.

  12. Colonic resection in the setting of damage control laparotomy: is delayed anastomosis safe?

    PubMed

    Miller, Preston R; Chang, Michael C; Hoth, J Jason; Holmes, James H; Meredith, J Wayne

    2007-06-01

    Based on a large body of literature concerning the subject, trauma surgeons are becoming more comfortable with anastomosis rather than stoma creation in patients with destructive colon injuries requiring resection. This literature was largely generated before the widespread acceptance of the importance of damage control laparotomy (DCL). Thus, when such injuries occur in patients initially left in colonic discontinuity after DCL, the question of anastomosis versus stoma becomes more difficult, and there are no data to guide management decisions. The goal of this report is to describe the results of our early experience with delayed anastomosis (DA) after destructive colon injury in the setting of DCL. We reviewed the records of patients with destructive colon injuries at our Level I trauma center over a 5.5-year period for demographics, injury characteristics, and outcome. Studied outcomes included anastomotic leak, intra-abdominal abscess, and colon injury-related death. The decision to proceed with DA was based on individual surgeon opinion at the time of re-exploration. From January 1, 2000 to July 31, 2006, 92 patients sustained colon injury, 55 of which required resection (31 blunt mechanism and 24 penetrating). Twenty-two resections occurred in the setting of DCL. Six of these patients underwent stoma creation and 11 underwent DA. Three died before reoperation, and two had an anastomosis created during the initial DCL. The remaining 33 resections occurred during initial definitive operation, and 21 underwent anastomosis, whereas 12 had a stoma created. Comparing the 11 patients undergoing DA with the 21 undergoing immediate anastomosis, the anastomotic leak rate (0% vs 5%), abscess rate (36% vs 24%), and colon related-death rate (9% vs 0%; all P > 0.05) were similar. Six patients undergoing DA had a right hemicolectomy with ileocolonic anastomosis, four had a segmental left colon resection, and one had a near total abdominal colectomy with ileosigmoid

  13. Inhibition of SW620 human colon cancer cells by upregulating miRNA-145

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chen; Xu, Na; Li, Yu-Qiang; Wang, Yu; Zhu, Zhi-Tu

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the targeted inhibition of proliferation and migration of SW620 human colon cancer cells by upregulating miRNA-145 (miR-145). METHODS: Forty-five samples of colon cancer tissues and 45 normal control samples were obtained from the biological database of the First Affiliated Hospital of Liaoning Medical University. We performed quantitative analysis of miR-145 and N-ras expression in tissues; reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis of miR-145 expression in SW620 colon cancer cells and normal colonic epithelial cells; construction of miR-145 lentiviral vector and determination of miR-145 expression in SW620 cells transduced with miR-145 vector; analysis of the effect of miR-145 overexpression on SW620 cell proliferation; analysis of the effect of miR-145 overexpression on SW620 cell migration using a wound healing assay; and analysis of the effect of miR-145 on N-ras expression using Western blotting. RESULTS: miR-145 expression was significantly downregulated in colon cancer tissues, with its expression in normal colonic tissues being 4-5-fold higher (two sample t test, P < 0.05), whereas N-ras expression showed the opposite trend. miR-145 expression in SW620 cells was downregulated, which was significantly lower compared to that in colonic epithelial cells (two sample t test, P < 0.05). miR-145 vector and control were successfully packaged; expression of miR-145 in SW620 cells transduced with miR-145 was 8.2-fold of that in control cells (two sample t test, P < 0.05). The proliferation of miR-145-transduced SW620 cells was significantly decreased compared to control cells (two sample t test, P < 0.05). At 48 h in the wound healing experiment, the migration indexes and controls were (97.27% ± 9.25%) and (70.22% ± 6.53%), respectively (two sample t test, P < 0.05). N-ras expression in miR-145-tranduced SW620 cells was significantly lower than others (one-way analysis of variance, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: miR-145 is important in

  14. A 4-cm lipoma of the transverse colon causing colonic intussusception: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, XIAO-CONG; HU, KE-QIONG; JIANG, YI

    2014-01-01

    Colonic lipomas are rare benign tumors. Colonic intussusception is an uncommon complication of colonic lipoma. The current study presents an unusual case of a 4-cm symptomatic lipoma of the transverse colon causing colonic intussusception. A 65-year-old female was admitted to Wenzhou Central Hospital (Wenzhou, Zhejiang, China) with intermittent pain in the left abdomen that had been present for two weeks. Colonoscopy revealed a 4×5-cm intraluminal spherical mass with erosional mucosa 60 cm above the anal verge, indicating the presence of a malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumor. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed a well-defined fatty tissue mass of 4 cm in diameter in the distal transverse colon proximal to the splenic flexure, with intussusception. The patient underwent segmental resection of the transverse colon and intraoperative frozen sections were obtained. The intraoperative frozen sections revealed a submucosal lipoma of the transverse colon and thus, a conclusive diagnosis was achieved. The patient was followed up for one year and 10 months following the segmental resection of the transverse colon, with a good prognosis. This study may increase clinical awareness with regard to colonic lipomas. Furthermore, open surgery combined with use of intraoperative frozen sections should be recommended for large symptomatic colonic lipomas accompanied by colonic intussusception, thus avoiding unnecessary radical resection and improving patient prognosis. PMID:25120663

  15. Rhizosphere Colonization and Control of Meloidogyne spp. by Nematode-trapping Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Persson, Christina; Jansson, Hans-Börje

    1999-01-01

    The ability of nematode-trapping fungi to colonize the rhizosphere of crop plants has been suggested to be an important factor in biological control of root-infecting nematodes. In this study, rhizosphere colonization was evaluated for 38 isolates of nematode-trapping fungi representing 11 species. In an initial screen, Arthrobotrys dactyloides, A. superba, and Monacrosporium ellipsosporum were most frequently detected in the tomato rhizosphere. In subsequent pot experiments these fungi and the non-root colonizing M. geophyropagum were introduced to soil in a sodium alginate matrix, and further tested both for establishment in the tomato rhizosphere and suppression of root-knot nematodes. The knob-forming M. ellipsosporum showed a high capacity to colonize the rhizosphere both in the initial screen and the pot experiments, with more than twice as many fungal propagules in the rhizosphere as in the root-free soil. However, neither this fungus nor the other nematode-trapping fungi tested reduced nematode damage to tomato plants. PMID:19270886

  16. Experimental warming decreases arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal colonization in prairie plants along a Mediterranean climate gradient

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Bart R.; Bohannan, Brendan; Pfeifer-Meister, Laurel; Mueller, Rebecca; Bridgham, Scott D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) provide numerous services to their plant symbionts. Understanding climate change effects on AMF, and the resulting plant responses, is crucial for predicting ecosystem responses at regional and global scales. We investigated how the effects of climate change on AMF-plant symbioses are mediated by soil water availability, soil nutrient availability, and vegetation dynamics. Methods: We used a combination of a greenhouse experiment and a manipulative climate change experiment embedded within a Mediterranean climate gradient in the Pacific Northwest, USA to examine this question. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to determine the direct and indirect effects of experimental warming on AMF colonization. Results: Warming directly decreased AMF colonization across plant species and across the climate gradient of the study region. Other positive and negative indirect effects of warming, mediated by soil water availability, soil nutrient availability, and vegetation dynamics, canceled each other out. Discussion: A warming-induced decrease in AMF colonization would likely have substantial consequences for plant communities and ecosystem function. Moreover, predicted increases in more intense droughts and heavier rains for this region could shift the balance among indirect causal pathways, and either exacerbate or mitigate the negative, direct effect of increased temperature on AMF colonization. PMID:27280074

  17. Isolation and phenotypic characterization of colonic macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Rogler, G; Hausmann, M; Vogl, D; Aschenbrenner, E; Andus, T; Falk, W; Andreesen, R; SchÖlmerich, J; Gross, V

    1998-01-01

    Macrophages play an important role in the intestinal mucosal immune system. However, they are a poorly defined cell population. We therefore determined their phenotype in normal colonic mucosa. Macrophages were isolated from colonic biopsies and surgical specimens by collagenase digestion. Colonic macrophages were positively sorted by anti-CD33 magnetic beads. Flow cytometric triple fluorescence analysis was applied to study CD14, CD16, CD33, CD44, CD11b, CD11c, CD64, HLA-DR, CD80, CD86 and CD3/CD19 expression. CD33 was evaluated as a positive marker for intestinal macrophages. CD33+ cells isolated from normal colonic mucosa showed co-expression of the established intracellular macrophage marker CD68 in FACS analysis. CD33+ cells were capable of phagocytosis. Isolation of this cell population by magnetic anti-CD33 beads and culture resulted in a 4.2–40-fold increase in IL-1β and 4.5–44-fold increase in tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) secretion compared with unsorted lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMC). Of the CD33+ cells, 90.9 ± 6.9% (mean ± s.d.) were CD44+. However, macrophages from colonic mucosa showed only a low expression of CD14 (10.5 ± 3.8%), CD16 (10.1 ± 3.9%), HLA-DR (27.3 ± 9.2%), CD11b (17.4 ± 6.8%), CD11c (17.8 ± 10.4%). Furthermore, expression of CD80 (9.2 ± 4.2%) and CD86 (15.1 ± 7.3%) was low, suggesting a low ability of normal intestinal macrophages to activate T cells and T cell-mediated immune responses. We conclude that CD33 is useful for the isolation and flow cytometric characterization of colonic macrophages. These cells exhibit a single phenotype in normal mucosa (CD33++, CD44++, CD14−, CD16−, CD11b−, CD11c−, HLA-DRlow, CD80−, CD86−) lacking lipopolysaccharide (LPS) receptor and costimulatory molecules. PMID:9649182

  18. Cell colonization in degradable 3D porous matrices

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Benjamin J

    2008-01-01

    Cell colonization is an important in a wide variety of biological processes and applications including vascularization, wound healing, tissue engineering, stem cell differentiation and biosensors. During colonization porous 3D structures are used to support and guide the ingrowth of cells into the matrix. In this review, we summarize our understanding of various factors affecting cell colonization in three-dimensional environment. The structural, biological and degradation properties of the matrix all play key roles during colonization. Further, specific scaffold properties such as porosity, pore size, fiber thickness, topography and scaffold stiffness as well as important cell material interactions such as cell adhesion and mechanotransduction also influence colonization. PMID:19262124

  19. Induction of protection against divergent H5N1 influenza viruses using a recombinant fusion protein linking influenza M2e to Onchocerca volvulus activation associated protein-1 (ASP-1) adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guangyu; Du, Lanying; Xiao, Wenjun; Sun, Shihui; Lin, Yongping; Chen, Min; Kou, Zhihua; He, Yuxian; Lustigman, Sara; Jiang, Shibo; Zheng, Bo-Jian; Zhou, Yusen

    2010-10-18

    Our previous studies have shown the adjuvanticity of an Onchocerca volvulus recombinant protein, Ov-ASP-1 (ASP-1), when administered in an aqueous formulation with bystander vaccine antigens or commercial vaccines. In this study, we reported a novel formulation that took advantage of the protein nature of the ASP-1 adjuvant by creating recombinant fusion protein vaccines linking the highly conserved extracellular domain of M2 protein (M2e) consensus sequence of H5N1 influenza viruses with the ASP-1 adjuvant. Two recombinant fusion proteins designated M2e-ASP-1 and M2e3-ASP-1 were studied, in which ASP-1 was fused with one or three tandem copies of the M2e antigen. Our results show that these novel recombinant influenza vaccines, particularly M2e3-ASP-1, induced strong anti-M2e-specific humoral and cellular immune responses in the established mouse model. Furthermore, M2e3-ASP-1 was able to provide significant cross-clade protection against divergent H5N1 viruses. Consequently, this study has demonstrated a potential novel vaccine formulation that could provide a complementary prophylactic strategy in preventing the threat of future influenza outbreak resulting from rapid evolution of the H5N1 virus and co-circulation of multiple antigenic variants in various regions.

  20. Small bowel volvulus after transabdominal preperitoneal hernia repair due to improper use of V-Loc™ barbed absorbable wire – do we always “read the instructions first”?

    PubMed Central

    Filser, Joerg; Reibetanz, Joachim; Krajinovic, Katica; Germer, Christoph-Thomas; Dietz, Ulrich Andreas; Seyfried, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Transabdominal preperitoneal endoscopic hernia repair (TAPP) is part of primary surgical health care. While both, the reported recurrence rate and procedure specific morbidity are consistently low, rare serious complications occur. Presentiation of case A 36-year-old male patient developed bowel obstruction three days after both-sided TAPP for inguinal hernia repair. A computer tomography scan of the abdomen revealed a small bowel volvulus in the right lower quadrant of the abdomen requiring urgent revisional surgery. Intraoperatively, the small bowel and its mesenterial vessels were found to be twisted around a 5 cm long V-Loc™ barbed absorbable suturing wire. After successful laparoscopic adhesiolysis, removal of the wire and detorquing of the bowel conglomerate, resection of small intestine was not necessary. The patient's further postoperative recovery was uneventful. Discussion Due to the barbed configuration of the V-Loc™ wire, a gapless continuous suturing of the peritoneum without laparoscopic knotting is easily and fast to accomplish. In this case the recommendation of the manufacturer to shorten the wire was not strictly followed and neither had the suture stump been extraperitonealized in order to avoid such rare complications. Conclusion Surgeons need to be aware of relevant “tricks and traps” of routinely performed procedures and have to know all tools and material they use very well. This case may therefore increase our attention when it comes to little things which actually do matter. PMID:25704567

  1. Effects of dietary supplementation with fructooligosaccharides on colonic microbiota populations and epithelial cell proliferation in neonatal pigs.

    PubMed

    Howard, M D; Gordon, D T; Pace, L W; Garleb, K A; Kerley, M S

    1995-10-01

    Two experiments were conducted with neonatal pigs to determine the effects of feeding fructooligosaccharides on cecal and colonic microbiota, proliferation of cecal and colonic epithelial mucosa, and short-chain fatty acid concentrations in the cecum. Experiment 1 consisted of feeding neonatal pigs diets containing either 0 or 3 g fructooligosaccharies/L of formula for 15 days and then examining the large intestine for changes in cecal and proximal colonic microbiota; cecal pH; short-chain fatty acid concentrations; morphology of cecal, proximal, and distal colonic epithelial mucosa; gross necropsy; and histopathology. Supplementation with fructooligosacchariudes (FOS) did not alter cell counts of viable bifidobacterial organisms or total anaerobic microbiota, cecal pH, or concentrations of short-chain fatty acids. Cecal mucosal cell density and labeled cells increased with FOS consumption. Proximal colonic mucosal crypt height, leading edge, labeled cells, proliferation zone, and labeling index increased with FOS consumption. Distal colonic mucosal crypt height, leading edge, cell density, labeling index, and labeled cells increased with FOS consumption. Gross necropsy and histopathology found no significan lesions. In Experiment 2, neonatal pigs were fed diets containing either 0 or 3 g fructooligosaccharides/L of formula for 6 days. Fecal samples were collected on the first full day of feeding and on days 3 and 6 after initiation of feeding. On days 1 and 3, concentrations of bifidobacteria were similar between diets; however, on day 6, pigs consuming FOS tended to have greater numbers of bifidobacteria (p = 0.08). These data suggest dietary consumption of FOS will enhance bifidobacteria populations and prevent colonic epithelial mucosa atrophy in neonates fed an elemental diet.

  2. [Thyroid metastasis due to right colonic carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Rauber, E; Pancrazio, F; Spivach, A; Stanta, G

    1998-12-01

    Clinical evident metastases to the thyroid gland are rarely found antemortem. A case of a 62 year-old man with a history of right colonic carcinoma, who presented a mass in the right lobe of his thyroid gland one year after the removal of a metachronous metastasis in his right lung, is presented. The tumour of the thyroid was found to be metastatic adenocarcinoma from his previous colonic cancer. The clinical finding of metastases to the thyroid gland is rare, particularly from a colorectal primary neoplasm. However, the possibility of a tumour of the thyroid gland representing a secondary malignancy is to be considered in any patient with a prior history of cancer.

  3. [The development process of colon cancer centres].

    PubMed

    Sahm, M; Wesselmann, S; Kube, R; Schöffel, N; Pross, M; Lippert, H; Kahl, S

    2013-02-01

    Colon carcinomas are the most common malignant tumours in the Western world. Important findings about the overall quality of medical care have been reported in multi-centre observational studies. A quality enhancement of therapeutic care can be achieved by an additional increase in diagnostic and therapeutic measures in the interdisciplinary setting. The development of colon cancer centres improves the chance to objectively observe the results of medical care induced by the development of an interdisciplinary and cross-sectoral unit that includes a comprehensive medical care for patients. The implementation of the current medical findings based on evidence in clinical routine, the inspection of the usage of guidelines by external specialists as part of an audit and the continuous correction of analysed deficits in the course of treatment guarantee a continuous improvement of service.

  4. Pink Breast Milk: Serratia marcescens Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Valle, Cipatli Ayuzo del; Salinas, Emilio Treviño

    2014-01-01

    Background Breast milk can turn pink with Serratia marcescens colonization, this bacterium has been associated with several diseases and even death. It is seen most commonly in the intensive care settings. Discoloration of the breast milk can lead to premature termination of nursing. We describe two cases of pink-colored breast milk in which S. marsescens was isolated from both the expressed breast milk. Antimicrobial treatment was administered to the mothers. Return to breastfeeding was successful in both the cases. Conclusions Pink breast milk is caused by S. marsescens colonization. In such cases,early recognition and treatment before the development of infection is recommended to return to breastfeeding. PMID:25452881

  5. Space habitats. [prognosis for space colonization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. D.

    1978-01-01

    Differences between space industrialization and space colonization are outlined along with the physiological, psychological, and esthetic needs of the inhabitants of a space habitat. The detrimental effects of zero gravity on human physiology are reviewed, and the necessity of providing artificial gravity, an acceptable atmosphere, and comfortable relative humidity and temperature in a space habitat is discussed. Consideration is also given to social organization and governance, supply of food and water, and design criteria for space colonies.

  6. Human Colon Cancer Cells Cultivated in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Within five days, bioreactor cultivated human colon cancer cells (shown) grown in Microgravity on the STS-70 mission in 1995, had grown 30 times the volume of the control specimens on Earth. The samples grown in space had a higher level of cellular organization and specialization. Because they more closely resemble tumors found in the body, microgravity grown cell cultures are ideal for research purposes.

  7. ANALYSIS OF BIOMECHANICAL PARAMETERS IN COLONIC ANASTOMOSIS

    PubMed Central

    IWANAGA, Tiago Cavalcanti; AGUIAR, José Lamartine de Andrade; MARTINS-FILHO, Euclides Dias; KREIMER, Flávio; SILVA-FILHO, Fernando Luiz; de ALBUQUERQUE, Amanda Vasconcelos

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The use of measures in colonic anastomoses to prevent dehiscences is of great medical interest. Sugarcane molasses, which has adequate tolerability and compatibility in vivo, has not yet been tested for this purpose. Aim: To analyze the biomechanical parameters of colonic suture in rats undergoing colectomy, using sugarcane molasses polysaccharide as tape or gel. Methods: 45 Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus albinus) were randomized into three groups of 15 animals: irrigation of enteric sutures with 0.9% saline solution; application of sugarcane molasses polysaccharide as tape; and sugarcane molasses polysaccharide as gel. The rats underwent colon ressection, with subsequent reanastomosis using polypropylene suture; they were treated according to their respective groups. Five rats from each group were evaluated at different times after the procedure: 30, 90 and 180 days postoperatively. The following variables were evaluated: maximum rupture force, modulus of elasticity and specific deformation of maximum force. Results: The biomechanical variables among the scheduled times and treatment groups were statistically calculated. The characteristics of maximum rupture force and modulus of elasticity of the specimens remained identical, regardless of treatment with saline, polysaccharide gel or tape, and treatment time. However, it was found that the specific deformation of maximum force of the intestinal wall was higher after 180 days in the group treated with sugarcane polysaccharide gel (p=0.09). Conclusion: Compared to control, it was detected greater elasticity of the intestinal wall in mice treated with sugarcane polysaccharide gel, without changing other biomechanical characteristics, regardless of type or time of treatment. PMID:27438033

  8. Modulation of colon cancer by nutmeg.

    PubMed

    Li, Fei; Yang, Xiu-Wei; Krausz, Kristopher W; Nichols, Robert G; Xu, Wei; Patterson, Andrew D; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2015-04-01

    Colon cancer is the most common cancer and the third leading cause of cancer mortality in humans. Using mass spectrometry-based metabolomics, the current study revealed the accumulation of four uremic toxins (cresol sulfate, cresol glucuronide, indoxyl sulfate, and phenyl sulfate) in the serum of mice harboring adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene mutation-induced colon cancer. These uremic toxins, likely generated from the gut microbiota, were associated with an increase in the expression of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-6 and a disorder of lipid metabolism. Nutmeg, which exhibits antimicrobial activity, attenuated the levels of uremic toxins and decreased intestinal tumorigenesis in Apc(min/+) mice. Nutmeg-treated Apc(min/+) mice had decreased IL-6 levels and normalized dysregulated lipid metabolism, suggesting that uremic toxins are responsible, in part, for the metabolic disorders that occur during tumorigenesis. These studies demonstrate a potential biochemical link among gut microbial metabolism, inflammation, and metabolic disorders and suggest that modulation of gut microbiota and lipid metabolism using dietary intervention or drugs may be effective in colon cancer chemoprevention strategies.

  9. Splenic flexure colon cancers: minimally invasive treatment.

    PubMed

    Fiscon, Valentino; Portale, Giuseppe; Migliorini, Giovanni; Frigo, Flavio

    2015-03-01

    Optimal treatment of splenic flexure (SF) colon cancer-less than 10% of all colorectal cancers is a matter of debate, in particular with regard to the optimal extent of radical surgery, according to the oncological principles of curative resection. Aims of this study were to assess the clinicopathological characteristics and report operative data and survival of patients with SF colon cancers. Short- and mid-term outcome of patients undergoing laparoscopic curative resection for SF colon cancer between June 2005 and September 2011 was assessed. The analysis considered 16 patients: 10 underwent segmental resection, 4 left hemicolectomy and 2 subtotal colectomy. There were no intraoperative deaths or major morbidity. The median operative time was 185 min. The median number of lymph nodes harvested was 17. Disease-free survival rate at 30-month follow-up was 75%. Laparoscopic resection of SF cancer is feasible and safe. Oncological principles of disease-free margins and minimum node harvest can be respected even with segmental resection.

  10. [Colonic microbial biocenosis in rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Gul'neva, M Iu; Noskov, S M

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the work was to study colonic microbial biocenosis and colonizing ability of opportunistic bacteria in 32 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 30 healthy subjects. RA was diagnosed based on the American Rheumatism Association criteria (1987). Qualitative and quantitative composition of the microflora was detected by a bacteriological method. StatSoft Statistics 6.0 was used to treat the data obtained. RA was associated with significant modification of the intestinal flora, viz. decrease in lactobacteria and significant increase of enterococci, clostridia, colibacteria showing reduced enzymatic activity, and opportunistic species. Also, symbiotic relationships between microorganisms altered. The fraction of bifidobacteria, bacteroids, and lactopositive colibacteria reduced while the abundance of opportunistic enterobacteria and staphylococci was elevated. Opportunistic Enterobacteriaceae were present in urine and nasal mucosa which suggested their translocation from the intestines. It is concluded that changes in intestinal microflora and colonization by opportunistic bacteria enhance the risk of development of co-morbid conditions in patients with RA. PMID:21932563

  11. Modulation of colon cancer by nutmeg.

    PubMed

    Li, Fei; Yang, Xiu-Wei; Krausz, Kristopher W; Nichols, Robert G; Xu, Wei; Patterson, Andrew D; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2015-04-01

    Colon cancer is the most common cancer and the third leading cause of cancer mortality in humans. Using mass spectrometry-based metabolomics, the current study revealed the accumulation of four uremic toxins (cresol sulfate, cresol glucuronide, indoxyl sulfate, and phenyl sulfate) in the serum of mice harboring adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene mutation-induced colon cancer. These uremic toxins, likely generated from the gut microbiota, were associated with an increase in the expression of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-6 and a disorder of lipid metabolism. Nutmeg, which exhibits antimicrobial activity, attenuated the levels of uremic toxins and decreased intestinal tumorigenesis in Apc(min/+) mice. Nutmeg-treated Apc(min/+) mice had decreased IL-6 levels and normalized dysregulated lipid metabolism, suggesting that uremic toxins are responsible, in part, for the metabolic disorders that occur during tumorigenesis. These studies demonstrate a potential biochemical link among gut microbial metabolism, inflammation, and metabolic disorders and suggest that modulation of gut microbiota and lipid metabolism using dietary intervention or drugs may be effective in colon cancer chemoprevention strategies. PMID:25712450

  12. Elevated Colonization of Microborers at a Volcanically Acidified Coral Reef

    PubMed Central

    Enochs, Ian C.; Manzello, Derek P.; Tribollet, Aline; Valentino, Lauren; Kolodziej, Graham; Donham, Emily M.; Fitchett, Mark D.; Carlton, Renee; Price, Nichole N.

    2016-01-01

    Experiments have demonstrated that ocean acidification (OA) conditions projected to occur by the end of the century will slow the calcification of numerous coral species and accelerate the biological erosion of reef habitats (bioerosion). Microborers, which bore holes less than 100 μm diameter, are one of the most pervasive agents of bioerosion and are present throughout all calcium carbonate substrates within the reef environment. The response of diverse reef functional groups to OA is known from real-world ecosystems, but to date our understanding of the relationship between ocean pH and carbonate dissolution by microborers is limited to controlled laboratory experiments. Here we examine the settlement of microborers to pure mineral calcium carbonate substrates (calcite) along a natural pH gradient at a volcanically acidified reef at Maug, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI). Colonization of pioneer microborers was higher in the lower pH waters near the vent field. Depth of microborer penetration was highly variable both among and within sites (4.2–195.5 μm) over the short duration of the study (3 mo.) and no clear relationship to increasing CO2 was observed. Calculated rates of biogenic dissolution, however, were highest at the two sites closer to the vent and were not significantly different from each other. These data represent the first evidence of OA-enhancement of microboring flora colonization in newly available substrates and provide further evidence that microborers, especially bioeroding chlorophytes, respond positively to low pH. The accelerated breakdown and dissolution of reef framework structures with OA will likely lead to declines in structural complexity and integrity, as well as possible loss of essential habitat. PMID:27467570

  13. Elevated Colonization of Microborers at a Volcanically Acidified Coral Reef.

    PubMed

    Enochs, Ian C; Manzello, Derek P; Tribollet, Aline; Valentino, Lauren; Kolodziej, Graham; Donham, Emily M; Fitchett, Mark D; Carlton, Renee; Price, Nichole N

    2016-01-01

    Experiments have demonstrated that ocean acidification (OA) conditions projected to occur by the end of the century will slow the calcification of numerous coral species and accelerate the biological erosion of reef habitats (bioerosion). Microborers, which bore holes less than 100 μm diameter, are one of the most pervasive agents of bioerosion and are present throughout all calcium carbonate substrates within the reef environment. The response of diverse reef functional groups to OA is known from real-world ecosystems, but to date our understanding of the relationship between ocean pH and carbonate dissolution by microborers is limited to controlled laboratory experiments. Here we examine the settlement of microborers to pure mineral calcium carbonate substrates (calcite) along a natural pH gradient at a volcanically acidified reef at Maug, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI). Colonization of pioneer microborers was higher in the lower pH waters near the vent field. Depth of microborer penetration was highly variable both among and within sites (4.2-195.5 μm) over the short duration of the study (3 mo.) and no clear relationship to increasing CO2 was observed. Calculated rates of biogenic dissolution, however, were highest at the two sites closer to the vent and were not significantly different from each other. These data represent the first evidence of OA-enhancement of microboring flora colonization in newly available substrates and provide further evidence that microborers, especially bioeroding chlorophytes, respond positively to low pH. The accelerated breakdown and dissolution of reef framework structures with OA will likely lead to declines in structural complexity and integrity, as well as possible loss of essential habitat. PMID:27467570

  14. [Colonization characteristics of endophytic bacteria NJ13 in Panax ginseng and its biocontrol efficiency against Alternaria leaf spot of ginseng].

    PubMed

    Chen, Chang-Qing; Li, Tong; Li, Xin-Lian; Jiang, Yun; Tian, Lei; Xu, Peng

    2014-05-01

    To reveal the colonization characteristics in host of endophytic biocontrol bacteria NJ13 isolated from Panax ginseng, this study obtained the marked strain NJ13-R which was double antibiotic resistant to rifampicin and streptomycin through enhancing the method of inducing antibiotic. The colonization characteristics in ginseng and its biocontrol efficiency against Alternaria spot of ginseng in the field were studied. The results showed that the strain could colonize in root, stem and leaf of ginseng and the colonization amount was positive correlated with inoculation concentration. Meanwhile, the strain could infect and then transfer in different tissues of ginseng The colonization amount of strain in roots and leaves of ginseng increased first and then decreased. However, the tendency of colonization amount of strain in stems was ascend at first and then descend slowly, and was more than that in roots and leaves along with time, which had a preference to specific tissue of its host. In field experiment, the endophytic bacteria NJ13 was proved to be effective in controlling Alternaria leaf spot of ginseng. The biocontrol efficiency of fermentation broth at the concentration of 0.76 x 10(8) cfu x mL(-1) reached 75.62%, which was close to the controlling level (73.06%) of 0.67 mg x L(-1) 50% cyprodinil WG.

  15. [Cases of Obstructive Colon Cancer for Which Elective Surgery Was Performed after Colonic Stent Placement].

    PubMed

    Maruo, Hirotoshi; Nakamura, Koichi; Higashi, Yukihiro; Shoji, Tsuyoshi; Yamazaki, Masanori; Nishiyama, Raisuke; Koike, Kota; Kubota, Hiroyuki

    2015-11-01

    The present study investigated the short-term outcomes of 20 patients with obstructive colon cancer who underwent colonic stent placement as a bridge to surgery (BTS) during the 3-year period between April 2012 and March 2015. Subjects comprised 13 men and 7 women, with a mean age of 68.3 years. Placement and decompression were successfully achieved in all of the patients. Oral ingestion became possible from a mean of 2.7 days after placement. No serious complications associated with placement were encountered. Total colonoscopy was performed after placement in 17 patients (85%), and independent advanced cancer was seen in the proximal portion of the colon in 1 patient. Elective surgery was performed for all of the patients after placement. Excluding the 2 patients for whom preoperative chemotherapy or treatment of another disease was prioritized, the mean interval to surgery for the remaining 18 patients was 23.2 days. The operative procedure performed was laparoscopic surgery in 8 patients (40%). Although minor leakage (n=1) and abdominal wall abscess (n=1) were observed as postoperative complications, the patients generally had an uneventful course. Colonic stent placement for obstructive colon cancer is relatively easy and safe, and may be considered as an effective treatment method that enables favorable intestinal decompression preoperatively and one-stage resection. PMID:26805323

  16. Malignant transformation of colonic epithelial cells by a colon-derived long noncoding RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Franklin, Jeffrey L.; Rankin, Carl R.; Levy, Shawn; Snoddy, Jay R.; Zhang, Bing; Washington, Mary Kay; Thomson, J. Michael; Whitehead, Robert H.; Coffey, Robert J.

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: •Non-coding RNAs are found in the colonic crypt progenitor compartment. •Colonocytes transformed by ncNRFR are highly invasive and metastatic. •ncNRFR has a region similar to the miRNA, let-7 family. •ncNRFR expression alters let-7 activity as measured by reporter construct. •ncNRFR expression upregulates let-7b targets. -- Abstract: Recent progress has been made in the identification of protein-coding genes and miRNAs that are expressed in and alter the behavior of colonic epithelia. However, the role of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in colonic homeostasis is just beginning to be explored. By gene expression profiling of post-mitotic, differentiated tops and proliferative, progenitor-compartment bottoms of microdissected adult mouse colonic crypts, we identified several lncRNAs more highly expressed in crypt bottoms. One identified lncRNA, designated non-coding Nras functional RNA (ncNRFR), resides within the Nras locus but appears to be independent of the Nras coding transcript. Stable overexpression of ncNRFR in non-transformed, conditionally immortalized mouse colonocytes results in malignant transformation, as determined by growth in soft agar and formation of highly invasive tumors in nude mice. Moreover, ncNRFR appears to inhibit the function of the tumor suppressor let-7. These results suggest precise regulation of ncNRFR is necessary for proper cell growth in the colonic crypt, and its misregulation results in neoplastic transformation.

  17. Microbes on a Bottle: Substrate, Season and Geography Influence Community Composition of Microbes Colonizing Marine Plastic Debris

    PubMed Central

    Osborn, A. Mark

    2016-01-01

    Plastic debris pervades in our oceans and freshwater systems and the potential ecosystem-level impacts of this anthropogenic litter require urgent evaluation. Microbes readily colonize aquatic plastic debris and members of these biofilm communities are speculated to include pathogenic, toxic, invasive or plastic degrading-species. The influence of plastic-colonizing microorganisms on the fate of plastic debris is largely unknown, as is the role of plastic in selecting for unique microbial communities. This work aimed to characterize microbial biofilm communities colonizing single-use poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) drinking bottles, determine their plastic-specificity in contrast with seawater and glass-colonizing communities, and identify seasonal and geographical influences on the communities. A substrate recruitment experiment was established in which PET bottles were deployed for 5–6 weeks at three stations in the North Sea in three different seasons. The structure and composition of the PET-colonizing bacterial/archaeal and eukaryotic communities varied with season and station. Abundant PET-colonizing taxa belonged to the phylum Bacteroidetes (e.g. Flavobacteriaceae, Cryomorphaceae, Saprospiraceae—all known to degrade complex carbon substrates) and diatoms (e.g. Coscinodiscophytina, Bacillariophytina). The PET-colonizing microbial communities differed significantly from free-living communities, but from particle-associated (>3 μm) communities or those inhabiting glass substrates. These data suggest that microbial community assembly on plastics is driven by conventional marine biofilm processes, with the plastic surface serving as raft for attachment, rather than selecting for recruitment of plastic-specific microbial colonizers. A small proportion of taxa, notably, members of the Cryomorphaceae and Alcanivoraceae, were significantly discriminant of PET but not glass surfaces, conjuring the possibility that these groups may directly interact with the

  18. A nanomedicine-promising approach to provide an appropriate colon-targeted drug delivery system for 5-fluorouracil

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sima; Kotla, Niranjan G; Tomar, Sonia; Maddiboyina, Balaji; Webster, Thomas J; Sharma, Dinesh; Sunnapu, Omprakash

    2015-01-01

    Targeted drug delivery plays a significant role in disease treatment associated with the colon, affording therapeutic responses for a prolonged period of time with low side effects. Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in both men and women with an estimated 102,480 cases of colon cancer and 40,340 cases of rectal cancer in 2013 as reported by the American Cancer Society. In the present investigation, we developed an improved oral delivery system for existing anticancer drugs meant for colon cancer via prebiotic and probiotic approaches. The system comprises three components, namely, nanoparticles of drug coated with natural materials such as guar gum, xanthan gum (that serve as prebiotics), and probiotics. The natural gums play a dual role of protecting the drug in the gastric as well as intestinal conditions to allow its release only in the colon. In vitro results obtained from these experiments indicated the successful targeted delivery of 5-fluorouracil to the colon. Electron microscopy results demonstrated that the prepared nanoparticles were spherical in shape and 200 nm in size. The in vitro release data indicated that the maximum release occurs at pH 7.2 and 7.4 with 93% of the drug released in the presence of 4% (w/v) of rat cecal content. In vivo results conclude a practical mechanism to maintain the integrity and intactness of the intestinal/colonic microflora, in the face of a “chemical attack” by oral colon-targeted drug delivery for colon cancer treatment. PMID:26648721

  19. Microbes on a Bottle: Substrate, Season and Geography Influence Community Composition of Microbes Colonizing Marine Plastic Debris.

    PubMed

    Oberbeckmann, Sonja; Osborn, A Mark; Duhaime, Melissa B

    2016-01-01

    Plastic debris pervades in our oceans and freshwater systems and the potential ecosystem-level impacts of this anthropogenic litter require urgent evaluation. Microbes readily colonize aquatic plastic debris and members of these biofilm communities are speculated to include pathogenic, toxic, invasive or plastic degrading-species. The influence of plastic-colonizing microorganisms on the fate of plastic debris is largely unknown, as is the role of plastic in selecting for unique microbial communities. This work aimed to characterize microbial biofilm communities colonizing single-use poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) drinking bottles, determine their plastic-specificity in contrast with seawater and glass-colonizing communities, and identify seasonal and geographical influences on the communities. A substrate recruitment experiment was established in which PET bottles were deployed for 5-6 weeks at three stations in the North Sea in three different seasons. The structure and composition of the PET-colonizing bacterial/archaeal and eukaryotic communities varied with season and station. Abundant PET-colonizing taxa belonged to the phylum Bacteroidetes (e.g. Flavobacteriaceae, Cryomorphaceae, Saprospiraceae-all known to degrade complex carbon substrates) and diatoms (e.g. Coscinodiscophytina, Bacillariophytina). The PET-colonizing microbial communities differed significantly from free-living communities, but from particle-associated (>3 μm) communities or those inhabiting glass substrates. These data suggest that microbial community assembly on plastics is driven by conventional marine biofilm processes, with the plastic surface serving as raft for attachment, rather than selecting for recruitment of plastic-specific microbial colonizers. A small proportion of taxa, notably, members of the Cryomorphaceae and Alcanivoraceae, were significantly discriminant of PET but not glass surfaces, conjuring the possibility that these groups may directly interact with the PET

  20. A nanomedicine-promising approach to provide an appropriate colon-targeted drug delivery system for 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sima; Kotla, Niranjan G; Tomar, Sonia; Maddiboyina, Balaji; Webster, Thomas J; Sharma, Dinesh; Sunnapu, Omprakash

    2015-01-01

    Targeted drug delivery plays a significant role in disease treatment associated with the colon, affording therapeutic responses for a prolonged period of time with low side effects. Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in both men and women with an estimated 102,480 cases of colon cancer and 40,340 cases of rectal cancer in 2013 as reported by the American Cancer Society. In the present investigation, we developed an improved oral delivery system for existing anticancer drugs meant for colon cancer via prebiotic and probiotic approaches. The system comprises three components, namely, nanoparticles of drug coated with natural materials such as guar gum, xanthan gum (that serve as prebiotics), and probiotics. The natural gums play a dual role of protecting the drug in the gastric as well as intestinal conditions to allow its release only in the colon. In vitro results obtained from these experiments indicated the successful targeted delivery of 5-fluorouracil to the colon. Electron microscopy results demonstrated that the prepared nanoparticles were spherical in shape and 200 nm in size. The in vitro release data indicated that the maximum release occurs at pH 7.2 and 7.4 with 93% of the drug released in the presence of 4% (w/v) of rat cecal content. In vivo results conclude a practical mechanism to maintain the integrity and intactness of the intestinal/colonic microflora, in the face of a "chemical attack" by oral colon-targeted drug delivery for colon cancer treatment. PMID:26648721

  1. Microbes on a Bottle: Substrate, Season and Geography Influence Community Composition of Microbes Colonizing Marine Plastic Debris.

    PubMed

    Oberbeckmann, Sonja; Osborn, A Mark; Duhaime, Melissa B

    2016-01-01

    Plastic debris pervades in our oceans and freshwater systems and the potential ecosystem-level impacts of this anthropogenic litter require urgent evaluation. Microbes readily colonize aquatic plastic debris and members of these biofilm communities are speculated to include pathogenic, toxic, invasive or plastic degrading-species. The influence of plastic-colonizing microorganisms on the fate of plastic debris is largely unknown, as is the role of plastic in selecting for unique microbial communities. This work aimed to characterize microbial biofilm communities colonizing single-use poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) drinking bottles, determine their plastic-specificity in contrast with seawater and glass-colonizing communities, and identify seasonal and geographical influences on the communities. A substrate recruitment experiment was established in which PET bottles were deployed for 5-6 weeks at three stations in the North Sea in three different seasons. The structure and composition of the PET-colonizing bacterial/archaeal and eukaryotic communities varied with season and station. Abundant PET-colonizing taxa belonged to the phylum Bacteroidetes (e.g. Flavobacteriaceae, Cryomorphaceae, Saprospiraceae-all known to degrade complex carbon substrates) and diatoms (e.g. Coscinodiscophytina, Bacillariophytina). The PET-colonizing microbial communities differed significantly from free-living communities, but from particle-associated (>3 μm) communities or those inhabiting glass substrates. These data suggest that microbial community assembly on plastics is driven by conventional marine biofilm processes, with the plastic surface serving as raft for attachment, rather than selecting for recruitment of plastic-specific microbial colonizers. A small proportion of taxa, notably, members of the Cryomorphaceae and Alcanivoraceae, were significantly discriminant of PET but not glass surfaces, conjuring the possibility that these groups may directly interact with the PET

  2. Differences in colonic tone and phasic response to a meal in the transverse and sigmoid human colon.

    PubMed Central

    Ford, M J; Camilleri, M; Wiste, J A; Hanson, R B

    1995-01-01

    It is not yet clear whether the regional differences in the physical properties of the colon influence its motor responses. Tonic and phasic colonic motility and compliance of the transverse and sigmoid colon were therefore assessed using a combined barostat-manometry assembly in 22 healthy subjects. Measured colonic compliance was corrected by subtraction of the compliance of the closed barostat system. The mean (SEM) preprandial colonic volumes in the transverse and sigmoid colon were similar (150 (12) and 128 (13) ml, p = NS), corresponding to calculated mean (SEM) colonic diameters of 4.3 cm and 4.0 cm respectively. The mean increase in colonic tone postprandially was significantly greater in the transverse (24.1% (3.5)) than in the sigmoid colon (13.1% (3.0), p < 0.01). The mean increase in phasic contractility was significantly greater, however, in the sigmoid than in the transverse colon (1270 (210) and 425 (60) mm Hg/90 min respectively, p < 0.01). Compliance was greater in the transverse than sigmoid colon (7.6 (0.44) and 4.1 (0.15) ml/mm Hg, p < 0.001). The fasting volume of the colon was significantly correlated with the magnitude of the tonic response to the meal in the transverse and sigmoid colon (p < 0.001 for both). In conclusion, there are quantitatively different but qualitatively similar phasic and tonic responses to the meal in the two colonic regions. Differences in the viscoelastic and luminal dimensions may partly account for these differences in tonic responses. PMID:7557579

  3. Relationship between oxidative damage and colon carcinogenesis in irradiated rats: influence of dietary countermeasures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Nancy; Sanders, Lisa; Wu, Guoyao; Davidson, Laurie; Ford, John; Braby, Leslie; Carroll, Raymond; Chapkin, Robert; Lupton, Joanne

    Galactic cosmic radiation not only kills colon epithelial cells, it also generates a cellular environment that can lead to oxidative DNA damage. We previously demonstrated that a diet containing fish oil and pectin protects against initiation of colon cancer by enhancing apoptotic removal of cells with oxidative DNA adducts (8-OHdG), and that apoptosis was highly correlated with colon cancer suppression. We hypothesized this diet combination will mitigate the oxidative damage occurring from radiation and thus reduce colon cancer. The experiment tested the effect of radiation (± 1 Gy, 1 GeV/n Fe ions) on redox balance, apoptosis, and 8-OHdG levels at initiation and colon tumor incidence. Diets contained fish oil or corn oil, and cellulose or pectin (2x2 factorial design). Rats received the diets 3 wk before irradiation (half of the rats), followed by azoxymethane (AOM) injections 10 and 17 d later (all rats). Just prior to AOM injection, irradiated fish oil/pectin rats had a more reduced redox state in colonocytes (lower GSSG, P < 0.05; higher GSH/GSSG ratio), which was not observed in irradiated corn oil/cellulose rats. A shift to a more oxidative state (lower GSH and GSH/GSSG ratio, P < 0.05) occurred between 6 and 12 h after AOM in the fish oil/pectin irradiated rats. Changes in redox balance likely contributed to lower 8-OHdG levels in colonocytes from rats consuming the fish oil diets. Dietary pectin enhanced (P < 0.04) apoptosis induction 12 h after AOM injection in irradiated rats. Similar to the 8-OHdG results, colon tumor incidence was 42% higher (P < 0.05) in rats fed corn oil vs fish oil diets. In summary, fish oil/pectin diets created a more reduced colon environment in irradiated rats that was evident 10 d after irradiation. The ensuing oxidative shift in those rats after AOM injection may have enhanced apoptosis; effectively eliminating more DNA damaged cells. Thus, inclusion of fish oil and pectin in diets for long-duration space flights should help

  4. Clinical significance of HOTAIR expression in colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Zhi-Fen; Zhao, Dan; Li, Xi-Qing; Cui, Yong-Xia; Ma, Ning; Lu, Chuang-Xin; Liu, Ming-Yue; Zhou, Yun

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To detect the expression of the long noncoding RNA HOTAIR in colon cancer and analyze its relationship with clinicopathological parameters of colon cancer. METHODS: Total RNA was extracted from 80 colon cancer tissues and matched tumor-adjacent normal colon tissues and reverse transcribed. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to detect the expression of HOTAIR. The relationship between the expression of HOTAIR and clinicopathological parameters of colon cancer was analyzed. RESULTS: The expression of HOTAIR was significantly higher in colon cancer tissues than in matched tumor-adjacent normal colon tissues (P < 0.05). HOTAIR expression was significantly higher in cases with lymph node metastasis than in those without metastasis; in lowly differentiated and undifferentiated cases than in highly and moderately differentiated cases; and in stages III + IV cases than in stages I + II cases (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: HOTAIR expression is upregulated in colon cancer, suggesting that HOTAIR plays an important role in the tumorigenesis, development and metastasis of colon cancer. HOTAIR may act as an oncogene and represents a new molecular target for the treatment of colon cancer. PMID:27298568

  5. Expression of TFF3 during multistep colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    John, R; El-Rouby, N M; Tomasetto, C; Rio, M-C; Karam, S M

    2007-07-01

    The pathogenesis of colon cancer is not well understood. This common type of cancer is generally believed to occur in a multistep process which involves alterations of various tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes during the progression through benign lesions towards carcinoma. TFF3 is a product of the colonic epithelium and has been implicated in colonic mucosal protection and also in the aggressiveness of colon cancer cells. The aim of this study was to analyze the expression of TFF3 during propagation towards cancer development in the human colon. Colonic tissues representing colitis, adenomatous polyposis, tubulovillous adenoma, and mucoid/adeno-carcinomas were processed for immunohistochemistry using an antibody specific for human TFF3. The results were correlated with those of PCNA-labeling, quantified, and compared with those of control tissues obtained from the safe margin of macroscopically normal colonic mucosa of patients with colon cancer. The data showed marked down-regulation of TFF3 expression in adenomatous polyposis, then TFF3 expression returns to about control level during adenoma and remains high during mucoid- and adeno-carcinomas. Colonic tissues with highly invasive cancer cells were characterized by statistically significant down-regulation of TFF3 expression. The changes observed in expression of TFF3 showed an inverse correlation with cell proliferation and suggest that it might play a protective role against colon carcinogenesis.

  6. Detection of colonic polyp candidates with level set-based thickness mapping over the colon wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Hao; Li, Lihong; Duan, Chaijie; Zhao, Yang; Wang, Huafeng; Liang, Zhengrong

    2015-03-01

    Further improvement of computer-aided detection (CADe) of colonic polyps is vital to advance computed tomographic colonography (CTC) toward a screening modality, where the detection of flat polyps is especially challenging because limited image features can be extracted from flat polyps, and the traditional geometric features-based CADe methods usually fail to detect such polyps. In this paper, we present a novel pipeline to automatically detect initial polyp candidates (IPCs), especially flat polyps, from CTC images. First, the colon wall mucosa was extracted via a partial volume segmentation approach as a volumetric layer, where the inner border of colon wall can be obtained by shrinking the volumetric layer using level set based adaptive convolution. Then the outer border of colon wall (or the colon wall serosa) was segmented via a combined implementation of geodesic active contour and Mumford-Shah functional in a coarse-to-fine manner. Finally, the wall thickness was estimated along a unique path between the segmented inner and outer borders with consideration of the volumetric layers and was mapped onto a patient-specific three-dimensional (3D) colon wall model. The IPC detection results can usually be better visualized in a 2D image flattened from the 3D model, where abnormalities were detected by Z-score transformation of the thickness values. The proposed IPC detection approach was validated on 11 patients with 22 CTC scans, and each scan has at least one flat poly annotation. The above presented novel pipeline was effective to detect some flat polyps that were missed by our CADe system while keeping false detections in a relative low level. This preliminary study indicates that the presented pipeline can be incorporated into an existing CADe system to enhance the polyp detection power, especially for flat polyps.

  7. Caecal transcriptome analysis of colonized and non-colonized chickens within two genetic lines that differ in caecal colonization by Campylobacter jejuni

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Campylobacter jejuni (C. jejuni) is one of the most common causes of human bacterial enteritis worldwide. The molecular mechanisms of the host responses of chickens to C. jejuni colonization have not been well understood. We have previously shown differences in C. jejuni colonization at 7 days pos...

  8. In vivo deep tissue fluorescence imaging of the murine small intestine and colon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosignani, Viera; Dvornikov, Alexander; Aguilar, Jose S.; Stringari, Chiara; Edwards, Roberts; Mantulin, Williams; Gratton, Enrico

    2012-03-01

    Recently we described a novel technical approach with enhanced fluorescence detection capabilities in two-photon microscopy that achieves deep tissue imaging, while maintaining micron resolution. This technique was applied to in vivo imaging of murine small intestine and colon. Individuals with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), commonly presenting as Crohn's disease or Ulcerative Colitis, are at increased risk for developing colorectal cancer. We have developed a Giα2 gene knock out mouse IBD model that develops colitis and colon cancer. The challenge is to study the disease in the whole animal, while maintaining high resolution imaging at millimeter depth. In the Giα2-/- mice, we have been successful in imaging Lgr5-GFP positive stem cell reporters that are found in crypts of niche structures, as well as deeper structures, in the small intestine and colon at depths greater than 1mm. In parallel with these in vivo deep tissue imaging experiments, we have also pursued autofluorescence FLIM imaging of the colon and small intestine-at more shallow depths (roughly 160μm)- on commercial two photon microscopes with excellent structural correlation (in overlapping tissue regions) between the different technologies.

  9. Background matching and color-change plasticity in colonizing freshwater sculpin populations following rapid deglaciation.

    PubMed

    Whiteley, Andrew R; Gende, Scott M; Gharrett, Anthony J; Tallmon, David A

    2009-06-01

    Anthropogenic-induced change is forcing organisms to shift their distributions and colonize novel habitats at an increasing rate, which leads to complex interactions among evolutionary processes. Coastrange sculpin (Cottus aleuticus) have colonized recently deglaciated streams of Glacier Bay in Alaska within the last 220 years. We examined divergence among populations in background matching coloration and tested the hypothesis that observed variation is due to morphological color plasticity. To examine how color-change plasticity has interacted with other evolutionary processes, we also determined the influence of colonization on neutral genetic diversity. We observed clinal variation in substrate-matching fish color along the chronological continuum of streams. Microsatellites provided little evidence of genetic subdivision among sculpin populations. Fish color was significantly correlated to substrate color, but was not correlated to neutral population genetic structure. Furthermore, a laboratory experiment revealed that morphological color plasticity could explain much, but not all, of the observed fish color divergence. Our study demonstrates that sculpin in Glacier Bay have colonized and adapted to recently deglaciated habitat and suggests that color change plasticity has aided in this process. This research, therefore, highlights the important role phenotypic plasticity may play in the adaptation of species to rapid climate change.

  10. Local and remote lesions in horses subjected to small colon distension and decompression

    PubMed Central

    Faleiros, Rafael R.; Macoris, Delphim G.; Alves, Geraldo Eleno S.; Souza, Danielle G.; Teixeira, Mauro M.; Moore, Rustin M.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to observe and characterize colonic and lung lesions in horses subjected to experimental distension and decompression of the small colon. Sixteen healthy adult horses were divided into 2 groups: 9 horses that were subjected to distension of the small colon by means of a latex balloon surgically implanted in the lumen and inflated to a pressure of 40 mm Hg for 4 h, and 7 horses in which the balloon was implanted but not inflated. Colonic biopsy specimens were collected before balloon implantation, at the end of the period of obstruction, and 1.5 and 12 h after decompression and were examined for hemorrhage, edema, and neutrophil infiltration; myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and hemoglobin concentration were measured as well. At the end of the experiment, lung samples were also collected and examined for neutrophil accumulation and MPO activity. The mucosa was not affected by luminal distension; lesions were restricted to the seromuscular layer. Neutrophil accumulation and edema were observed in the samples from both groups of horses but were greater in those from the distension group, in which there was also hemorrhage, fibrin deposition, and increased MPO activity in the seromuscular layer. Similarly, there was greater accumulation of neutrophils in the lung samples from the distension group than in those from the sham-operated group, as determined by histologic evaluation and MPO assay. These findings provide new evidence of reperfusion injury and a systemic inflammatory response, followed by remote lesions, in horses with intestinal obstruction. PMID:18214165

  11. Strain-specific colonization pattern of Rhizoctonia antagonists in the root system of sugar beet.

    PubMed

    Zachow, Christin; Fatehi, Jamshid; Cardinale, Massimiliano; Tilcher, Ralf; Berg, Gabriele

    2010-10-01

    To develop effective biocontrol strategies, basic knowledge of plant growth promotion (PGP) and root colonization by antagonists is essential. The survival and colonization patterns of five different biocontrol agents against Rhizoctonia solani AG2-2IIIB in the rhizosphere of greenhouse-grown sugar beet plants were analysed in single and combined treatments. The study included bacteria (Pseudomonas fluorescens L13-6-12, Pseudomonas trivialis RE(*) 1-1-14, Serratia plymuthica 3Re4-18) as well as fungi (Trichoderma gamsii AT1-2-4, Trichoderma velutinum G1/8). Microscopic analysis by confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed different colonization patterns for each DsRed2/green fluorescent protein-labelled strain. Bacteria and T. velutinum G1/8 colonized the root surface and the endorhiza in single and co-culture, while for T. gamsii AT1-2-4, only the transfer of spores was observed. Whereas Pseudomonas strains formed large microcolonies consisting of hundreds of cells, S. plymuthica was arranged in small endophytic clusters or clouds around the entire root system. In co-culture, each strain showed its typical pattern and occupied specific niches on the root, without clear evidence of morphological interactions. PGP was only observed for four strains with rhizosphere competence and not for T. gamsii AT1-2-4. The results provide useful information on which combination of strains to test in larger biocontrol experiments directed to applications.

  12. Matrix habitat and plant damage influence colonization of purple loosestrife patches by specialist leaf-beetles.

    PubMed

    Dávalos, A; Blossey, B

    2011-10-01

    The characteristics of the matrix, that is, the unsuitable habitat connecting host-plant patches may facilitate or limit herbivore movement thus affecting their population dynamics. We evaluated the effect of matrix habitat, distance between patches, and plant damage on movement of two leaf-beetles (Galerucella calmariensis Linnaeus and G. pusilla Duft) introduced to North America as biocontrol agents of the invasive purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria Linnaeus). Mark-recapture/resight experiments indicated (1) that leaf-beetles are more likely to colonize purple loosestrife patches surrounded by meadow than forest; (2) that previously attacked purple loosestrife plants are more likely to be colonized by Galerucella spp. than unattacked plants, especially in the forest habitat; and (3) that leaf beetle colonization of purple loosestrife decreased with distance from release point. Low colonization rates of purple loosestrife patches embedded in forests suggest either insufficient detection or active avoidance of such habitats. Biological control programs intend to manage dispersal of specialized insect herbivores for the purpose of sufficient and sustained control of their host plants. Such management needs to be informed by knowledge of interactions of habitat structure, plant damage, and dispersal capabilities of herbivores to facilitate release programs and control at the local and regional level.

  13. Influence of myeloperoxidase on colon tumor occurrence in inflamed versus non-inflamed colons of ApcMin/+ mice☆

    PubMed Central

    Al-Salihi, Mazin; Reichert, Ethan; Fitzpatrick, F.A.

    2015-01-01

    Control of colorectal cancer needs to be tailored to its etiology. Tumor promotion mechanisms in colitis-associated colon cancer differ somewhat from the mechanisms involved in hereditary and sporadic colorectal cancer. Unlike sporadic or inherited tumors, some experimental models show that colitis-associated colon tumors do not require cyclooxygenase (COX) expression for progression, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) which prevent sporadic or inherited colon cancer do not prevent colitis-associated colon cancer. We report that myeloperoxidase (MPO), an ancestor of the COX isoenzymes, is a determinant of colitis-associated colon tumors in ApcMin/+ mice. During experimentally induced colitis, inhibition of MPO by resorcinol dampened colon tumor development. Conversely, in the bowels of ApcMin/+ mice without colitis, resorcinol administration or ‘knockout’ of MPO gene coincided with a slight, but discernible increase in colon tumor incidence. Acrolein, a by-product of MPO catalysis, formed a covalent adduct with the phosphatase tensin homolog (PTEN) tumor suppressor and enhanced the activity of the Akt kinase proto-oncogene in vitro and in vivo. Thus, MPO may be an important determinant of diet and inflammation on colon cancer risk via its effect on endogenous exposure to oxidants and acrolein. We propose a hypothetical model to explain an apparent dichotomy between colon tumor occurrence and MPO inhibition in inflamed versus non-inflamed colons. PMID:26262998

  14. Optical properties of human colon tissues in the 350 – 2500 nm spectral range

    SciTech Connect

    Bashkatov, A N; Genina, E A; Kochubey, V I; Kolesnikova, E A; Tuchin, V V; Rubtsov, V S

    2014-08-31

    We present the optical characteristics of the mucosa and submucosa of human colon tissue. The experiments are performed in vitro using a LAMBDA 950 spectrophotometer in the 350 – 2500 nm spectral range. The absorption and scattering coefficients and the scattering anisotropy factor are calculated based on the measured diffuse reflectance and total and collimated transmittance spectra using the inverse Monte Carlo method. (laser biophotonics)

  15. Colonization of overlaying water by bacteria from dry river sediments.

    PubMed

    Fazi, Stefano; Amalfitano, Stefano; Piccini, Claudia; Zoppini, Annamaria; Puddu, Alberto; Pernthaler, Jakob

    2008-10-01

    We studied the diversity, community composition and activity of the primary microbial colonizers of the water above freshly re-wetted sediments from a temporary river. Dried sediments, collected from Mulargia River (Sardinia, Italy), were covered with sterile freshwater in triplicate microcosms, and changes of the planktonic microbial assemblage were monitored over a 48 h period. During the first 9 h bacterial abundance was low (1.5 x 10(4) cells ml(-1)); it increased to 3.4 x 10(6) cells ml(-1) after 28 h and did not change thereafter. Approximately 20% of bacteria exhibited DNA de novo synthesis already after 9 h of incubation. Changes of the ratios of (3)H-leucine to (3)H-thymidine incorporation rates indicated a shift of growth patterns during the experiment. Extracellular enzyme activity showed a maximum at 48 h with aminopeptidase activity (430.8 +/- 22.6 nmol MCA l(-1) h(-1)) significantly higher than alkaline phosphatase (98.6 +/- 4.3 nmol MUF l(-1) h(-1)). The primary microbial colonizers of the overlaying water - as determined by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis - were related to at least six different phylogenetic lineages of Bacilli and to Alphaproteobacteria (Brevundimonas spp. and Caulobacter spp.). Large bacterial cells affiliated to one clade of Bacillus sp. were rare in the dried sediments, but constituted the majority of the planktonic microbial assemblage and of cells with detectable DNA-synthesis until 28 h after re-wetting. Their community contribution decreased in parallel with a rise of flagellated and ciliated protists. Estimates based on cell production rates suggested that the rapidly enriched Bacillus sp. suffered disproportionally high loss rates from selective predation, thus favouring the establishment of a more heterogenic assemblage of microbes (consisting of Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Cytophaga-Flavobacteria). Our results suggest that the primary microbial colonizers of the water above dried sediments are passively released

  16. [Colonic response to the meal of the right colon, the left colon, the rectosigmoid and the rectosigmoidal junction in digestive functional disorders].

    PubMed

    Dapoigny, M; Trolese, J F; Bommelaer, G; Tournut, R

    1988-04-01

    The aim of this work was to answer the two following questions: 1) is there any difference between the right colonic, the left colonic, and the rectosigmoid motility? 2) does the rectosigmoid junction (radiological and endoscopic entity) exhibit a specific motility pattern? Colonic motility was assessed by electromyography. We used an intraluminal probe supporting 15 groups of 3 ring electrodes. Inside the probe a lead pellet was placed opposite each electrode. The probe was inserted through the colon by colonoscopy. A visual analysis of the signal was performed and we distinguished: Long Spike Bursts (LSB) activity (propagating in oral or aboral direction or not propagating) from Short Spike Bursts (SSB) activity as previously described. Twenty patients suffering from the irritable bowel syndrome included in a subgroup defined as abdominal pain, were studied, and two groups were defined as follows: the tip of the probe was positioned in the caecum in 9: group "Right colon" patients. An electrode was specifically located on the rectosigmoid junction in 15: group "Junction" patients. In the "Right colon" group, the postprandial increase of LSB activity in the rectosigmoid lasted longer than in the right and left colons. During the postprandial period, the right colon exhibited a lower LSB activity than the rectosigmoid (p less than 0.01). After the meal LSB activity propagating in aboral direction was increased in the right colon while it was inhibited in the rectosigmoid. LSB activity propagating in the oral direction was increased both in the right colon and rectosigmoid after the meal. In the "Junction" group, we observed a specific myoelectrical activity at the rectosigmoid junction.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Nutraceuticals as potential therapeutic agents for colon cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Kuppusamy, Palaniselvam; Yusoff, Mashitah M.; Maniam, Gaanty Pragas; Ichwan, Solachuddin Jauhari Arief; Soundharrajan, Ilavenil; Govindan, Natanamurugaraj

    2014-01-01

    Colon cancer is a world-wide health problem and the second-most dangerous type of cancer, affecting both men and women. The modern diet and lifestyles, with high meat consumption and excessive alcohol use, along with limited physical activity has led to an increasing mortality rate for colon cancer worldwide. As a result, there is a need to develop novel and environmentally benign drug therapies for colon cancer. Currently, nutraceuticals play an increasingly important role in the treatment of various chronic diseases such as colon cancer, diabetes and Alzheimer׳s disease. Nutraceuticals are derived from various natural sources such as medicinal plants, marine organisms, vegetables and fruits. Nutraceuticals have shown the potential to reduce the risk of colon cancer and slow its progression. These dietary substances target different molecular aspects of colon cancer development. Accordingly, this review briefly discusses the medicinal importance of nutraceuticals and their ability to reduce the risk of colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:26579381

  18. Colonization Rates in a Metacommunity Altered by Competition

    PubMed Central

    Jeganmohan, Shajini; Tucker, Caroline; Cadotte, Marc W.

    2014-01-01

    Competition and colonization are two mechanisms that are important for determining coexistence and species diversity in spatially structured habitats. However, these mechanisms may not be independent as species can exhibit behavioral or physiological changes in response to competition that alters their colonization rates. This study examines the effect of interspecific interactions on the colonization rates of four microscopic species (three ciliates and a rotifer) in aquatic microcosms. Two species showed significant reductions in the time to colonize patches when confronted with a competitor, one was a good disperser (Colpidium striatum) and the other was the slowest disperser (Philodina spp.). These results indicate that species’ colonization rates in a metacommunity can vary depending on the presence of competitors. Thus, we suggest that predictions based on heuristic tradeoffs between competition and colonization should consider effects of common biotic interactions such as competition. PMID:24551094

  19. Colonization and epithelial adhesion in the pathogenesis of neonatal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Bendel, Catherine M

    2003-10-01

    Candida species are important nosocomial pathogens in the newborn population, particularly among the premature very-low-birth-weight infants in neonatal intensive care units. Candida colonization of the neonatal skin and gastrointestinal tract is an important first step in the pathogenesis of invasive disease. C albicans is the most commonly isolated species in colonized or infected infants. Over the past decade the incidence of both colonization and infection with other Candida species, particularly C parapsilosis, has risen dramatically. Colonization of the infant occurs early in life and is affected by a variety of common practices in neonatal intensive care. Microbial factors also augment colonization, including the ability of Candida to adhere to human epithelium. A better understanding of the complex interactions between host risk factors and virulence traits of colonizing yeast may allow the risk of systemic spread to be reduced in the population of premature infants.

  20. Acarbose enhances human colonic butyrate production.

    PubMed

    Weaver, G A; Tangel, C T; Krause, J A; Parfitt, M M; Jenkins, P L; Rader, J M; Lewis, B A; Miller, T L; Wolin, M J

    1997-05-01

    Earlier studies suggest that butyrate has colonic differentiating and nutritional effects and that acarbose increases butyrate production. To determine the effects of acarbose on colonic fermentation, subjects were given 50-200 mg acarbose or placebo (cornstarch), three times per day, with meals in a double-blind crossover study. Fecal concentrations of starch and starch-fermenting bacteria were measured and fecal fermentation products determined after incubation of fecal suspensions with and without added substrate for 6 and 24 h. Substrate additions were cornstarch, cornstarch plus acarbose and potato starch. Dietary starch consumption was similar during acarbose and placebo treatment periods, but fecal starch concentrations were found to be significantly greater with acarbose treatment. Ratios of starch-fermenting to total anaerobic bacteria were also significantly greater with acarbose treatment. Butyrate in feces, measured either as concentration or as percentage of total short-chain fatty acids, was significantly greater with acarbose treatment than with placebo treatment. Butyrate ranged from 22.3 to 27.5 mol/100 mol for the 50-200 mg, three times per day doses of acarbose compared with 18.3-19.3 mol/100 mol for the comparable placebo periods. The propionate in fecal total short-chain fatty acids was significantly less with acarbose treatment (10.7-12.1 mol/100 mol) than with placebo treatment (13.7-14.2 mol/100 mol). Butyrate production was significantly greater in fermentations in samples collected during acarbose treatment, whereas production of acetate and propionate was significantly less. Fermentation decreased when acarbose was added directly to cornstarch fermentations. Acarbose effectively augmented colonic butyrate production by several mechanisms; it reduced starch absorption, expanded concentrations of starch-fermenting and butyrate-producing bacteria and inhibited starch use by acetate- and propionate-producing bacteria.

  1. Dietary resistant starch type 3 prevents tumor induction by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine and alters proliferation, apoptosis and dedifferentiation in rat colon.

    PubMed

    Bauer-Marinovic, Morana; Florian, Simone; Müller-Schmehl, Katrin; Glatt, Hansruedi; Jacobasch, Gisela

    2006-09-01

    Some epidemiological and experimental studies suggest that consumption of resistant starch is preventive against colon cancer. Resistant starch leads to a fermentation-mediated increase in the formation of short-chain fatty acids, with a particularly high butyrate fraction in large bowel. Butyrate is considered to be protective against colon cancer because it causes growth arrest and apoptosis and regulates expression of proteins involved in cellular dedifferentiation in various tumor cell lines in culture. We sought to investigate these processes under conditions of a carcinogenicity experiment in vivo. In the present study, 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-treated Sprague-Dawley rats were fed standard diet (n=12) or diet with 10% hydrothermally modified Novelose 330, a resistant starch type 3 (RS3), replacing digestible starch (n=8). After 20 weeks tumor number, epithelial proliferation, apoptosis, immunoreactivity of carcinogenesis-related proteins [protein kinase C-delta (PKC-delta), heat shock protein 25 (HSP25) and gastrointestinal glutathione peroxidase (GI-GPx)], as well as mucin properties were evaluated in proximal and distal colon in situ. No tumors developed under RS3 diet, compared to a tumor incidence of 0.6+/-0.6 (P<0.05) under the standard diet. RS3 decreased the number of proliferating cells, the length of the proliferation zone and the total length of the crypt in the distal colon, but not proximal colon, and enhanced apoptosis in both colonic segments. It induced PKC-delta and HSP25 expression, but inhibited GI-GPx expression in the epithelium of distal colon. RS3 increased the number of predominantly acidic mucin containing goblet cells in the distal colon, but had no effect on the goblet cell count. We conclude that hydrothermally treated RS3 prevented colon carcinogenesis, and that this effect was mediated by enhanced apoptosis of damaged cells accompanied by changes in parameters of dedifferentiation in colonic mucosa.

  2. Colon atresia, facial hemiaplasia, and anophthalmia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Szavay, Philipp O; Schliephake, Henning; Hubert, Oliver; Glüer, Sylvia

    2002-10-01

    A case of a newborn with atresia of the transverse colon and right facial hemiaplasia, anophthalmia, and cerebral dysfunction is reported. Colon atresia is a rare cause of congenital bowel obstruction and often associated with other malformations such as abdominal wall defects, gastrointestinal, cardiac, urogenital, and musculosceletal lesions. Facial hemiaplasia may arise in frame of chromosomal defects or as a result of neurovascular compromise caused by congenital amniotic bands. However, the combination of colon atresia and facial hemiaplasia has not been reported before.

  3. Water and electrolyte absorption by the colon in tropical sprue.

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishna, B S; Mathan, V I

    1982-01-01

    A defect in colonic absorption of electrolytes and water was demonstrated in patients with tropical sprue by perfusing the colon with normal saline containing a non-absorbable marker. Colonic water absorption correlated negatively with stool weight and was abnormal in patients with steatorrhoea. The possible mechanisms producing this defect are discussed. This defect may be related to colonocyte damage produced by unabsorbed unsaturated fatty acids in patients with steatorrhoea. PMID:7117904

  4. Computed tomography identification of an exophytic colonic liposarcoma.

    PubMed

    Chou, Chung Kuao; Chen, Sung-Ting

    2016-09-01

    It may be difficult to ascertain the relationship between a large intra-abdominal tumor and the adjacent organs if they are close together. In the current case, a definitive preoperative diagnosis of an exophytic colonic tumor was obtained by the demonstration of obtuse angles between the tumor and colon and by distinct recognition of the mucosa-submucosa of the colonic wall on computed tomography; the accuracy of this preoperative diagnosis was subsequently confirmed by pathologic findings. PMID:27594941

  5. Registered report: Wnt activity defines colon cancer stem cells and is regulated by the microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Evans, James; Essex, Anthony; Xin, Hong; Amitai, Nurith; Brinton, Lindsey; Griner, Erin; Iorns, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology seeks to address growing concerns about reproducibility in scientific research by replicating selected results from a substantial number of high-profile papers in the field of cancer biology. The papers, which were published between 2010 and 2012, were selected on the basis of citations and Altmetric scores (Errington et al., 2014). This Registered report describes the proposed replication plan of key experiments from ‘Wnt activity defines colon cancer stem cells and is regulated by the microenvironment’ by Vermeulen and colleagues, published in Nature Cell Biology in 2010 (Vermeulen et al., 2010). The key experiments that will be replicated are those reported in Figures 2F, 6D, and 7E. In these experiments, Vermeulen and colleagues utilize a reporter for Wnt activity and show that colon cancer cells with high levels of Wnt activity also express cancer stem cell markers (Figure 2F; Vermeulen et al., 2010). Additionally, treatment either with conditioned medium derived from myofibroblasts or with hepatocyte growth factor restored clonogenic potential in low Wnt activity colon cancer cells in vitro (Figure 6D; Vermeulen et al., 2010) and in vivo (Figure 7E; Vermeulen et al., 2010). The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology is a collaboration between the Center for Open Science and Science Exchange and the results of the replications will be published in eLife. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07301.001 PMID:26287525

  6. Microbial Colonization of Earth's Subsurface: A Thermodynamically Consistent Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bethke, C. M.; Sanford, R. A.; Jin, Q.; Kirk, M. F.

    2014-12-01

    The nature of how anaerobic microbes have come to distribute themselves within Earth's crust is an ecologic question that must be posed subject to the laws of thermodynamics, but a question that cannot be understood in light of thermodynamics alone. We use here the results of theory and quantitative modeling, field observations, and long-term laboratory experiments to argue that subsurface communities are composed of groups of microbes that cooperate as well as compete, and whose existence reflects a tight balance between reproduction and cell death. The most significant functional groups colonizing the anoxic crust, classified by electron accepting process, are the methanogens, sulfate reducers, and ferric iron reducers. An anaerobe can harvest the energy it needs to live and reproduce only to the extent that energy available to it in the environment exceeds the cell's internal levels. When methanogens transfer or dismutate electrons, they capture little energy, so as to preserve a thermodynamic drive for their catabolic reaction. In this way, they maximize their environmental range, but grow slowly. Sulfate reducers adopt a different strategy, striving to capture energy quickly and grow rapidly. Iron reduction consumes acid, so the energy available to iron reducers varies sharply with pH. The iron reducers can grow rapidly under acidic conditions, but an alkaline environment may leave them insufficient energy to live. Methane producers are vulnerable to exclusion in the subsurface, as is broadly appreciated, but not because of energetic limitations. Instead, the methanogens require abundant energy substrates in order to reproduce quickly enough to replace cells as they die. Sulfate reducers and iron reducers, instead of working to exclude each other by competing for limited energy sources, as is commonly believed, thrive in mutualistic communities. The three functional groups by necessity compete in their environments for limited sources of energy, but the manner

  7. Cilengitide inhibits metastatic bone colonization in a nude rat model.

    PubMed

    Bretschi, Maren; Merz, Maximilian; Komljenovic, Dorde; Berger, Martin R; Semmler, Wolfhard; Bäuerle, Tobias

    2011-10-01

    Integrins αvβ3 and αvβ5 are considered to play an important role in the pathogenesis of breast cancer bone metastases. This study investigates the effects of the αvβ3/αvβ5 integrin-specific inhibitor cilengitide during early metastatic bone colonization. The impact of cilengitide on the migration, invasion and proliferation of MDA-MB-231 human breast carcinoma cells as well as on bone resorption by osteoclasts was investigated in vitro. For in vivo experiments, nude rats were treated with cilengitide for 30 days starting one day after site-specific tumor cell inoculation in the hind leg, and the course of metastatic changes in bone was followed using flat-panel volumetric computed tomography (VCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Vascular changes in bone metastases were investigated using dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE-) MRI-derived parameters amplitude A and exchange rate coefficient kep. In vitro, cilengitide treatment resulted in a decrease in proliferation, migration and invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells, as well as of osteoclast activity. In vivo, the development of bone metastasis in the hind leg of rats was not prevented by adjuvant cilengitide treatment, but cilengitide reduced the volumes of osteolytic lesions and respective soft tissue tumors of developing bone metastases as assessed with VCT and MRI, respectively. DCE-MRI revealed significant changes in the A and kep parameters including decreased relative blood volume and increased vessel permeability after cilengitide treatment indicating vessel remodeling. In conclusion, during early pathogenic processes of bone colonization, cilengitide treatment exerted effects on tumor cells, osteoclasts and vasculature reducing the skeletal lesion size of experimental skeletal metastases. PMID:21725616

  8. Detection of colon cancer by terahertz techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahaia, Faustino; Valusis, Gintaras; Bernardo, Luis M.; Almeida, Abílio; Moreira, J. Agostinho; Lopes, Patricia C.; Macutkevic, Jan; Kasalynas, Irmantas; Seliuta, Dalius; Adomavicius, Ramunas; Henrique, Rui; Lopes, Machado

    2011-05-01

    Normal and cancer affected samples of colon tissue have been measured using transmission time-domain terahertz spectroscopy and continuous wave terahertz imaging. We show that it is possible to distinguish between normal and cancerous regions in the samples when they are fixed in formalin or embedded in paraffin. Plots of the refractive index of normal and cancer affected tissues as well as 2-D transmission THz images are shown. Experimental results will be presented and the conditions for discrimination between normal and affected tissue will be discussed.

  9. Colon carcinoma metastatic to the thyroid gland

    SciTech Connect

    Lester, J.W. Jr.; Carter, M.P.; Berens, S.V.; Long, R.F.; Caplan, G.E.

    1986-09-01

    Metastatic carcinoma to the thyroid gland rarely is encountered in clinical practice; however, autopsy series have shown that it is not a rare occurrence. A case of adenocarcinoma of the colon with metastases to the thyroid is reported. A review of the literature reveals that melanoma, breast, renal, and lung carcinomas are the most frequent tumors to metastasize to the thyroid. Metastatic disease must be considered in the differential diagnosis of cold nodules on radionuclide thyroid scans, particularly in patients with a known primary.

  10. Regulatory T cell response to enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis colonization triggers IL-17-dependent colon carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Geis, Abby L.; Fan, Hongni; Wu, Xinqun; Wu, Shaoguang; Huso, David L.; Wolfe, Jaime L.; Sears, Cynthia L.; Pardoll, Drew M.; Housseau, Franck

    2015-01-01

    Many epithelial cancers are associated with chronic inflammation. However, the features of inflammation that are pro-carcinogenic are not fully understood. Tregs typically restrain overt inflammatory responses and maintain intestinal immune homeostasis. Their immune suppressive activity can inhibit inflammation-associated cancers. Paradoxically, we show that colonic Tregs initiate IL-17-mediated carcinogenesis in multiple intestinal neoplasia mice colonized with the human symbiote ETBF. Depletion of Tregs in ETBF-colonized C57BL/6 Foxp3DTR mice enhanced colitis but diminished tumorigenesis associated with shifting of mucosal cytokine profile from IL-17 to IFN-γ; inhibition of ETBF-induced colon tumorigenesis was dependent on reduced IL-17 inflammation and IFN-γ-independent. Treg enhancement of IL-17 production is cell-extrinsic. IL-2 blockade restored Th17 responses and tumor formation in Treg-depleted animals. Our findings demonstrate that Tregs limit the availability of IL-2 in the local microenvironment, allowing Th17 development necessary to promote ETBF-triggered neoplasia and thus unveil a new mechanism whereby Treg responses to intestinal bacterial infection can promote tumorigenesis. PMID:26201900

  11. Recent advances in the treatment of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, R; Zhou, B; Fung, P C W; Li, X

    2006-08-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Although surgical resection is still the only treatment capable of curing colon cancer, adjuvant therapy continues to play an important role in preventing recurrence and metastasis. In recent years remarkable progress has been made in the treatment of colon cancer. This review discusses recent advances in adjuvant therapy for colon cancer, including chemotherapy, immunotherapy, antiangiogenic therapy and apoptosis induction. In the meantime, molecular therapy is also elucidated in the above methods. All these new advances will provide new promises for patients of colon cancer. PMID:16691539

  12. Colon capsule endoscopy: Current status and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Tal, Andrea O; Vermehren, Johannes; Albert, Jörg G

    2014-01-01

    Colon capsule endoscopy (CCE; PillCam Colon; Given Imaging; Yoqneam, Israel) is a minimally invasive wireless technique for the visualization of the colon. With the recent introduction of the second generation colon capsule the diagnostic accuracy of CCE for polyp detection has significantly improved and preliminary data suggest it may be useful to monitor mucosal inflammation in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Limitations include the inability to take biopsies and the procedural costs. However, given the potentially higher acceptance within an average risk colorectal cancer (CRC) screening population, its usefulness as a screening tool with regard to CRC prevention should be further evaluated. PMID:25469027

  13. Diagnosis of colon cancer using frequency domain fluorescence imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinish, U. S.; Gulati, P.; Murukeshan, V. M.; Seah, L. K.

    2007-03-01

    Early detection and treatment of colon cancer has been associated with better disease prognosis. Conventional and reported optical techniques have limitations in detecting early stages of colon cancer growth. In this paper, a homodyne signal processing assisted frequency domain (FD) fluorescence imaging methodology is proposed for the early diagnosis of colon cancer. Simulated phantom tissues representing the biopsy samples at different stages of colon cancer growth are prepared and used for the imaging study. Selective imaging of healthy and diseased sites simulated in the samples was achieved even for fluorescence emissions having close lifetimes and wavelength values. Possible extension of the methodology for in vivo investigations is also discussed.

  14. Vertebral Metastasis as the Initial Manifestation of Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Tushina; Williams, Renee; Liechty, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Oncology guidelines currently recommend against performing colonoscopies in the workup of adenocarcinoma of unknown primary unless colonic malignancy is otherwise suggested by clinical signs or symptoms. We present 2 cases of metastatic colonic adenocarcinoma that presented only with neurologic symptoms from vertebral metastasis. Although bony metastases are a rare presentation of colon cancer and colonoscopy is not warranted in the initial workup of adenocarcinoma of unknown primary, we describe these cases as a reminder that bony metastases do not rule out a colon cancer diagnosis. PMID:27807574

  15. Data from a proteomic analysis of colonic fibroblasts secretomes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sun-Xia; Xu, Xiao-En; Wang, Xiao-Qing; Cui, Shu-Jian; Xu, Lei-Lei; Jiang, Ying-Hua; Zhang, Yang; Yan, Hai-Bo; Zhang, Qian; Qiao, Jie; Yang, Peng-Yuan; Liu, Feng

    2014-01-01

    The tumor cell proliferation, migration and invasion were influenced by the interaction between the cancer cells and their microenvironment. In current study, we established two pairs of the primary fibroblast cultures from colorectal adenocarcinoma tissues and the normal counterparts and identified 227 proteins in the colonic fibroblast secretomes; half of these proteins were novel. The mass spectrometry data and analyzed results presented here provide novel insights into the molecular characteristics and modulatory role of colon cancer associated fibroblasts. The data is related to “Identification of colonic fibroblast secretomes reveals secretory factors regulating colon cancer cell proliferation” by Chen et al. [1]. PMID:26217680

  16. Laparoscopic resection of colonic lipomas: When and why?

    PubMed Central

    Böler, Deniz Eren; Baca, Bilgi; Uras, Cihan

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Male, >60 Final Diagnosis: Colonic lipoma Symptoms: Rectal bleeding • abdominal pain • fatique • abdominal distention Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Laparoscopic resection Specialty: General surgery Objective We aimed to review and discuss the clinical picture and management of 4 patients who underwent laparoscopic colonic resection with a definitive pathology of colonic lipoma Background: Colonic lipomas are rare benign nonepithelial tumors of the colon. They begin to be symptomatic when they reach a certain size, although the presentation can vary. Different endoscopic and surgical treatment strategies have been reported in the literature. Case Reports: Four male patients who underwent laparoscopic colonic resection and had definitive diagnosis of colonic lipoma were included in this report. All patients were over 60 years old. The first case presented with massive rectal bleeding. Obstructive symptoms and intermittent bleeding were prominent in the second and third cases. Abdominal pain and discomfort was present in the forth case. In the first 2 cases, abdominal CTs were suggestive of colonic lipoma and laparoscopic ileocecal resection was performed. However, malignancy could not be ruled out in the other 2 cases due to large size and heterogeneous appearance of the lesions and inconclusive endoscopic biopsies consisted of ulcer with exudate and inflammatory cells. Laparoscopic left and right hemicolectomy was performed in the third and forth cases, respectively. There were no complications in any patients. Conclusions: Laparoscopic resection can be the first choice in treatment of colonic lipomas with various presentations. Wider resections should be considered in cases with uncertain diagnosis. PMID:23901354

  17. Evaluation of recombinant Onchocerca volvulus activation associated protein-1 (ASP-1) as a potent Th1-biased adjuvant with a panel of protein or peptide-based antigens and commercial inactivated vaccines.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wenjun; Du, Lanying; Liang, Chao; Guan, Jie; Jiang, Shibo; Lustigman, Sara; He, Yuxian; Zhou, Yusen

    2008-09-15

    Alum, the only adjuvant approved for clinical applications, can induce strong humoral (Th2) but weak cellular (Th1) immune responses. It is necessary to develop safe and effective adjuvants capable of inducing both humoral and cellular immune responses. We previously showed that activation-associated protein-1 (ASP-1) derived from Onchocerca volvulus has potent adjuvant activity. In this study, we have further evaluated the adjuvanticity of recombinant ASP-1 using a panel of recombinant proteins or synthetic peptide-based antigens, including ovalbumin (OVA), synthetic HIV peptide (HIV-p), recombinant HIV gp41 (rgp41) and HBV HBsAg, as well as three commercially available inactivated vaccines against haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS), Influenza and Rabies. Our results indicate that ASP-1 induced significantly higher IgG1 (Th2-associated) and IgG2a (Th1-associated) responses than alum adjuvant against OVA antigen, HIV-p, and rgp41. Consistently, it induced similar level of IgG1 responses as alum but higher level of IgG2a and IFN-gamma-producing T cell responses than alum adjuvant against HBsAg. Further, ASP-1 improved both IgG1 and IgG2a responses to three commercial inactivated vaccines when used separately or in combination. In conclusion, the recombinant ASP-1, unlike alum adjuvant, is able to induce both Th1 and Th2-associated humoral responses and Th1 cellular responses, suggesting that it can be further developed as a promising adjuvant for subunit-based and inactivated vaccines. PMID:18675867

  18. Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri infection activates colonic FoxP3+ T cells enhancing their capacity to prevent colitis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Helminthic infections protect mice from colitis in murine models of inflammatory bowel disease and also may protect people. Helminths like Heligmosomoides bakeri (Hpb) can induce Tregs. Experiments explored if Hpb infection could protect mice from colitis through activation of colonic Treg and exam...

  19. Autofluorescence ratio imaging of human colonic adenomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imaizumi, Katsuichi; Harada, Yoshinori; Wakabayashi, Naoki; Yamaoka, Yoshihisa; Dai, Ping; Tanaka, Hideo; Takamatsu, Tetsuro

    2011-02-01

    Recently autofluorescence imaging (AFI) endoscopy, visualizing tissue fluorescence in combination with reflected light, has been adopted as a technique for detecting neoplasms in the colon and other organs. However, autofluorescence colonoscopy is not infallible, and improvement of the detection method can be expected to enhance the performance. Colonic mucosa contains metabolism-related fluorophores, such as reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, which may be useful for visualizing neoplasia in autofluorescence endoscopy. We examined sliced cross-sections of endoscopically resected tubular adenomas under a microscope. Fluorescence images acquired at 365-nm excitation (F365ex) and 405-nm excitation (F405ex), and reflectance images acquired at 550 nm (R550) were obtained. Fluorescence ratio (F365ex/F405ex) images and reflectance/fluorescence ratio (R550/F405ex) images were calculated from the acquired images. The fluorescence ratio images could distinguish adenomatous mucosa from normal mucosa more clearly than the reflectance/fluorescence ratio images. The results showed that the autofluorescence ratio imaging is a potential technique for increasing the diagnostic power of autofluorescence endoscopy.

  20. Gaia and the colonization of Mars.

    PubMed

    Margulis, L; West, O

    1993-11-01

    The Gaia hypothesis states that the atmosphere, hydrosphere, surface sediments, and life on Earth behave dynamically as a single integrated physiological system. What has been traditionally viewed as the passive environment is a highly active, integral part of the gaian system. Aspects of the surface temperature and chemistry are regulated by the sum of life, the biota. Formulated first by James E. Lovelock, in the late 1960s, the Gaia hypothesis has been in the scientific literature for more than 25 years. Because of its properties of exponential growth and propagation, life is a powerful geologic force. A useful aspect of the Gaia idea is that it requires integration of scientific disciplines for the study of Earth. The recently touted Earth system science is broadly parallel with the gaian concept of the physiochemical regulation of Earth's surface. We discuss here, in a gaian context, the colonization of Mars by Earth organisms. Although colonizing Mars may be impossible, its accomplishment would be exactly equivalent to "the reproduction of Gaia by budding."

  1. Gaia and the colonization of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margulis, L.; West, O.

    1993-01-01

    The Gaia hypothesis states that the atmosphere, hydrosphere, surface sediments, and life on Earth behave dynamically as a single integrated physiological system. What has been traditionally viewed as the passive environment is a highly active, integral part of the gaian system. Aspects of the surface temperature and chemistry are regulated by the sum of life, the biota. Formulated first by James E. Lovelock, in the late 1960s, the Gaia hypothesis has been in the scientific literature for more than 25 years. Because of its properties of exponential growth and propagation, life is a powerful geologic force. A useful aspect of the Gaia idea is that it requires integration of scientific disciplines for the study of Earth. The recently touted Earth system science is broadly parallel with the gaian concept of the physiochemical regulation of Earth's surface. We discuss here, in a gaian context, the colonization of Mars by Earth organisms. Although colonizing Mars may be impossible, its accomplishment would be exactly equivalent to "the reproduction of Gaia by budding.".

  2. Radioimmunoguided surgery in primary colon cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nieroda, C.A.; Mojzisik, C.; Sardi, A.; Ferrara, P.J.; Hinkle, G.; Thurston, M.O.; Martin, E.W. Jr. )

    1990-01-01

    Radioimmunoguided surgery (RIGS), the intraoperative use of a hand-held gamma detecting probe (GDP) to identify tissue containing radiolabeled monoclonal antibody (MAb), was performed upon 30 patients with primary colon carcinoma. Each patient received an intravenous injection of MAb B72.3 (1.0 to 0.25 mg) radiolabeled with {sup 125}I (5.0 to 1.0 mCi) 8 to 34 days before exploration. The GDP was used to measure radioactivity in colon tissue, tumor bed, nodal drainage areas, and areas of suspected metastases. Antibody localized to histologically documented tumor in 23 of 30 patients (77%). Tumor margins were more clearly defined in 20 of 30 patients (67%). GDP counts led to major alterations in surgical resection in five patients (17%) and changes in adjuvant therapy in four (14%). GDP counts identified occult liver metastases in two patients (7%) and correctly indicated the benign nature of liver masses in three (10%). In four patients (13%), occult nodal metastases were identified. RIGS can precisely delineate tumor margins, define the extent of nodal involvement, and localize occult tumor, providing a method of immediate intraoperative staging that may lessen recurrences and produce higher survival rates.

  3. [Colonic microenvironment in familial helicobacter infection].

    PubMed

    Shcherbakov, P L; Vorob'ev, A A; Nesvizhskiĭ, Iu V; Mitrokhin, S D; Kudriavtseva, L V; Minaev, V I; Filin, V A; Petrova, N N; Zaĭtseva, S V

    1998-01-01

    To elucidate the significance of the familial microenvironment in the genesis of Helicobacter infection, a clinical and instrumental investigation was made of 13 families selected by the probands who had digestive diseases associated with H. pylori: gastroduodenitis and duodenal ulcer disease. The occurrence of Helicobacter infection and gastritis in the family members was ascertained to be largely determined by their concurrent residence in the limited area, i.e. by the way of life. The contribution of the "family" factor in antral gastritis, fundal gastritis, and H. pylori infection was 60.0, 40.0, and about 90.0%, respectively. The patients with gastroenterological abnormalities associated with H. pylori were found to show changes in the species-specific and quantitative composition of the colonic microbiocenosis, which were symptomatic and revealed by bacteriological studies in 47.5% of cases and severe in 32.5%. When antihelicobacter therapy is planned, a through treatment of all family members and, if possible, pets should be made. Colonic microbiocenosis should be monitored while treating Helicobacter infection.

  4. Colonization of second trimester placenta parenchyma

    PubMed Central

    Onderdonk, Andrew B.; Hecht, Jonathan L.; McElrath, Thomas F.; Delaney, Mary L.; Allred, Elizabeth N.; Leviton, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Objective The overtly healthy, non-pregnant uterus harbors bacteria, Mycoplasma and Ureaplasma. The extent of colonization remains elusive, as are relationships between isolated microorganisms, preterm labor and fetal inflammation. Study Design Biopsies of chorion parenchyma from 1083 placentas delivered before the beginning of the 28th week of gestation were cultured, and the placenta was examined histologically. The frequencies of individual microorganisms and groups of microorganisms were evaluated in strata of processes leading to preterm delivery, routes of delivery, gestational age, and placenta morphology Results Placentas delivered by cesarean section with preeclampsia had the lowest bacterial recovery rate (25%). Preterm labor had the highest rates, which decreased with increasing gestational age from 79% at 23 weeks to 43% at 27 weeks. The presence of microorganisms in placenta parenchyma was associated with the presence of neutrophils in the fetal stem vessels of the chorion and the vessels of the umbilical cord. Conclusions The high rate of colonization appears to coincide with phenomena associated with preterm delivery and gestational age. The presence of microorganisms within placenta parenchyma is biologically important. PMID:18313635

  5. Uremic toxins originating from colonic microbial metabolism.

    PubMed

    Evenepoel, Pieter; Meijers, Bjorn K I; Bammens, Bert R M; Verbeke, Kristin

    2009-12-01

    Numerous molecules, which are either excreted or metabolized by the kidney, accumulate in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). These uremic retention molecules (URMs), contributing to the syndrome of uremia, may be classified according to their site of origin, that is, endogenous metabolism, microbial metabolism, or exogenous intake. It is increasingly recognized that bacterial metabolites, such as phenols, indoles, and amines, may contribute to uremic toxicity. In vitro studies have implicated bacterial URMs in CKD progression, cardiovascular disease, and bone and mineral disorders. Furthermore, several observational studies have demonstrated a link between serum levels of bacterial URMs and clinical outcomes. Bacterial metabolism may therefore be an important therapeutic target in CKD. There is evidence that besides reduced renal clearance, increased colonic generation and absorption explain the high levels of bacterial URMs in CKD. Factors promoting URM generation and absorption include an increased ratio of dietary protein to carbohydrate due to insufficient intake of fiber and/or reduced intestinal protein assimilation, as well as prolonged colonic transit time. Two main strategies exist to reduce bacterial URM levels: interventions that modulate intestinal bacterial growth (e.g., probiotics, prebiotics, dietary modification) and adsorbent therapies that bind bacterial URMs in the intestines to reduce their absorption (e.g., AST-120, sevelamer). The efficacy and clinical benefit of these strategies are currently an active area of interest. PMID:19946322

  6. Fucose sensing regulates bacterial intestinal colonization.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Alline R; Curtis, Meredith M; Ritchie, Jennifer M; Munera, Diana; Waldor, Matthew K; Moreira, Cristiano G; Sperandio, Vanessa

    2012-12-01

    The mammalian gastrointestinal tract provides a complex and competitive environment for the microbiota. Successful colonization by pathogens requires scavenging nutrients, sensing chemical signals, competing with the resident bacteria and precisely regulating the expression of virulence genes. The gastrointestinal pathogen enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) relies on inter-kingdom chemical sensing systems to regulate virulence gene expression. Here we show that these systems control the expression of a novel two-component signal transduction system, named FusKR, where FusK is the histidine sensor kinase and FusR the response regulator. FusK senses fucose and controls expression of virulence and metabolic genes. This fucose-sensing system is required for robust EHEC colonization of the mammalian intestine. Fucose is highly abundant in the intestine. Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron produces multiple fucosidases that cleave fucose from host glycans, resulting in high fucose availability in the gut lumen. During growth in mucin, B. thetaiotaomicron contributes to EHEC virulence by cleaving fucose from mucin, thereby activating the FusKR signalling cascade, modulating the virulence gene expression of EHEC. Our findings suggest that EHEC uses fucose, a host-derived signal made available by the microbiota, to modulate EHEC pathogenicity and metabolism.

  7. Epithelial NAIPs protect against colonic tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Allam, Ramanjaneyulu; Maillard, Michel H; Tardivel, Aubry; Chennupati, Vijaykumar; Bega, Hristina; Yu, Chi Wang; Velin, Dominique; Schneider, Pascal; Maslowski, Kendle M

    2015-03-01

    NLR family apoptosis inhibitory proteins (NAIPs) belong to both the Nod-like receptor (NLR) and the inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) families. NAIPs are known to form an inflammasome with NLRC4, but other in vivo functions remain unexplored. Using mice deficient for all NAIP paralogs (Naip1-6(Δ/Δ)), we show that NAIPs are key regulators of colorectal tumorigenesis. Naip1-6(Δ/Δ) mice developed increased colorectal tumors, in an epithelial-intrinsic manner, in a model of colitis-associated cancer. Increased tumorigenesis, however, was not driven by an exacerbated inflammatory response. Instead, Naip1-6(Δ/Δ) mice were protected from severe colitis and displayed increased antiapoptotic and proliferation-related gene expression. Naip1-6(Δ/Δ) mice also displayed increased tumorigenesis in an inflammation-independent model of colorectal cancer. Moreover, Naip1-6(Δ/Δ) mice, but not Nlrc4-null mice, displayed hyper-activation of STAT3 and failed to activate p53 18 h after carcinogen exposure. This suggests that NAIPs protect against tumor initiation in the colon by promoting the removal of carcinogen-elicited epithelium, likely in a NLRC4 inflammasome-independent manner. Collectively, we demonstrate a novel epithelial-intrinsic function of NAIPs in protecting the colonic epithelium against tumorigenesis. PMID:25732303

  8. Gaia and the colonization of Mars.

    PubMed

    Margulis, L; West, O

    1993-11-01

    The Gaia hypothesis states that the atmosphere, hydrosphere, surface sediments, and life on Earth behave dynamically as a single integrated physiological system. What has been traditionally viewed as the passive environment is a highly active, integral part of the gaian system. Aspects of the surface temperature and chemistry are regulated by the sum of life, the biota. Formulated first by James E. Lovelock, in the late 1960s, the Gaia hypothesis has been in the scientific literature for more than 25 years. Because of its properties of exponential growth and propagation, life is a powerful geologic force. A useful aspect of the Gaia idea is that it requires integration of scientific disciplines for the study of Earth. The recently touted Earth system science is broadly parallel with the gaian concept of the physiochemical regulation of Earth's surface. We discuss here, in a gaian context, the colonization of Mars by Earth organisms. Although colonizing Mars may be impossible, its accomplishment would be exactly equivalent to "the reproduction of Gaia by budding." PMID:11540252

  9. Enhancing Soybean Rhizosphere Colonization by Rhizobium japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, A. K. Maqbul; Alexander, Martin

    1984-01-01

    A study was conducted to seek means to increase the colonization of the rhizosphere of soybeans (Glycine max L. Merrill) by Rhizobium japonicum. For this purpose, a strain of R. japonicum that was resistant to benomyl, streptomycin, and erythromycin was used. The numbers of R. japonicum rose quickly in the first 2 days after soybean seeds were planted in soil and then rapidly fell. The decline was slower if the seeds were coated with benomyl. This fungicide reduced the numbers of bacteria and protozoa in the rhizosphere, but the effect became less or disappeared as the plants grew. In sterile soil inoculated with R. japonicum and a mixture of microorganisms, the numbers of R. japonicum were usually lower if protozoa were present than if they were absent. Nodulation and plant yield were increased by the addition of benomyl to soybean seeds sown in sterile soil inoculated with R. japonicum and a mixture of microorganisms. The addition of streptomycin and erythromycin to soil stimulated the growth of R. japonicum but inhibited other bacteria in the presence or absence of soybeans. The data indicate that colonization can be increased by the use of antimicrobial agents and R. japonicum strains resistant to those inhibitors. PMID:16346616

  10. SMAD4 Haploinsufficiency Associates with Augmented Colonic Inflammation in Select Humans and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Szigeti, Reka; Pangas, Stephanie A.; Nagy-Szakal, Dorottya; Dowd, Scot E.; Shulman, Robert J.; Olive, Anthony P.; Popek, Edwina J.; Finegold, Milton J.; Kellermayer, Richard

    2013-01-01

    SMAD4 is a common mediator of the TGF-beta signaling pathway. One of the members of this pathway, TGF-beta 1, has an important role in controlling gut inflammation in relation to the continuous stimulation of the intestinal microbiota. SMAD4 haploinsufficiency in humans has been linked to juvenile polyposis hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia syndrome (JP/HHT; OMIM#17505). Hematochezia and colonic mucosal inflammation suggestive of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) have been reported in JP/HHT. Stimulated by recent experience with two affected pediatric patients presented here, we explored the potential role of Smad4 haploinsufficiency in a murine model of colonic inflammation. Smad4+/− mice were maintained on a mixed C57/129SvEv background. Chronic colitis was induced with repeated administration of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in drinking water. The colonic mucosal microbiota was interrogated by massively parallel pyrosequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. 66.7% of Smad4+/− mice were sensitive to DSS colitis compared to 14.3% of wild type (Chi-Square p=0.036). The augmented colitis was associated with microbiota separation in the Smad4+/− mice. Enterococcus and Enterococcus faecalis specifically was increased in abundance in the colitis-prone animals. Smad4 haploinsufficiency can associate with increased susceptibility to large bowel inflammation in mammals with variable penetrance in association with the colonic mucosal microbiota. These findings may reveal implications not only towards colonic inflammation in the setting of SMAD4 haploinsufficiency, but for colorectal cancer as well. PMID:23090737

  11. Responses of pond-breeding amphibians to wildfire: Short-term patterns in occupancy and colonization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hossack, B.R.; Corn, P.S.

    2007-01-01

    Wildland fires are expected to become more frequent and severe in many ecosystems, potentially posing a threat to many sensitive species. We evaluated the effects of a large, stand-replacement wildfire on three species of pond-breeding amphibians by estimating changes in occupancy of breeding sites during the three years before and after the fire burned 42 of 83 previously surveyed wetlands. Annual occupancy and colonization for each species was estimated using recently developed models that incorporate detection probabilities to provide unbiased parameter estimates. We did not find negative effects of the fire on the occupancy or colonization rates of the long-toed salamander (Ambystoma macrodactylum). Instead, its occupancy was higher across the study area after the fire, possibly in response to a large snowpack that may have facilitated colonization of unoccupied wetlands. Naïve data (uncorrected for detection probability) for the Columbia spotted frog (Rana luteiventris) initially led to the conclusion of increased occupancy and colonization in wetlands that burned. After accounting for temporal and spatial variation in detection probabilities, however, it was evident that these parameters were relatively stable in both areas before and after the fire. We found a similar discrepancy between naïve and estimated occupancy of A. macrodactylum that resulted from different detection probabilities in burned and control wetlands. The boreal toad (Bufo boreas) was not found breeding in the area prior to the fire but colonized several wetlands the year after they burned. Occupancy by B. boreas then declined during years 2 and 3 following the fire. Our study suggests that the amphibian populations we studied are resistant to wildfire and that B. boreas may experience short-term benefits from wildfire. Our data also illustrate how naïve presence–non-detection data can provide misleading results.

  12. Effect of nitrergic system on colonic motility in a rat model of irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Temiz, Tijen Kaya; Demir, Omer; Simsek, Fatma; Kaplan, Yusuf Cem; Bahceci, Selen; Karadas, Barıs; Celik, Aslı; Koyluoglu, Gokhan

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is to investigate whether nitric oxide (NO)-mediated colonic motility was altered in rat irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) model, using different isoforms of NO-synthase (NOS) inhibitors. Materials and Methods: The animal model of IBS-like visceral hypersensitivity was induced by intra-colonic infusion of 0.5% acetic acid (AA) in saline once daily from postnatal days 8 to 21. Control animals received saline instead of AA. Experiments were performed at the end of 8 weeks. Distal colon tissues were resected and direct effects of different NOS inhibitors; N-omega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride, (L-NAME), ARL-17477 dihydrochloride hydrate (ARL 17477), N-[3-(Aminomethyl) phenyl] methyl]-ethanimidamidedihydrochloride (1400 W), and N5-(1-Iminoethyl)-L-ornithine dihydrochloride (L-NIO) were evaluated concentration-dependently in vitro tissue bath. Besides, morphology of both groups was assessed with hematoxylin and eosin (H and E) staining and the impact of NO antibodies was determined using the immunohistochemical method. Results: The mean pressure values of spontaneous contractions and KCL (80 mmol/L) responses of distal colonic segments were similar in normal and IBS rats. L-NAME and ARL-17477 significantly increased the mean pressure of spontaneous colonic contractions in normal rats versus own base values (P < 0.05), but this increase did not significantly different when compared to IBS rats. In H and E staining, there was no difference with regard to morphology between two groups. Neuronal NOS (nNOS) immunoreactivity was found to be significantly decreased in IBS when compared to control groups (P < 0.05). Conclusion: L-NAME and ARL-17477 mediated mean pressure values were found to be slightly decreased in IBS rats. These findings may be related to a decrease in nNOS level in IBS. PMID:27756955

  13. A New Model to Study the Role of Arachidonic Acid in Colon Cancer Pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yang-Yi; Callaway, Evelyn; M Monk, Jennifer; S Goldsby, Jennifer; Yang, Peiying; Vincent, Logan; S Chapkin, Robert

    2016-09-01

    A significant increase in cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) gene expression has been shown to promote cylcooxygenase-dependent colon cancer development. Controversy associated with the role of COX2 inhibitors indicates that additional work is needed to elucidate the effects of arachidonic acid (AA)-derived (cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase) eicosanoids in cancer initiation, progression, and metastasis. We have recently developed a novel Fads1 knockout mouse model that allows for the investigation of AA-dependent eicosanoid deficiency without the complication of essential fatty acid deficiency. Interestingly, the survival rate of Fads1-null mice is severely compromised after 2 months on a semi-purified AA-free diet, which precludes long-term chemoprevention studies. Therefore, in this study, dietary AA levels were titrated to determine the minimal level required for survival, while maintaining a distinct AA-deficient phenotype. Null mice supplemented with AA (0.1%, 0.4%, 0.6%, 2.0%, w/w) in the diet exhibited a dose-dependent increase (P < 0.05) in AA, PGE2, 6-keto PGF1α, TXB2, and EdU-positive proliferative cells in the colon. In subsequent experiments, null mice supplemented with 0.6% AA diet were injected with a colon-specific carcinogen (azoxymethane) in order to assess cancer susceptibility. Null mice exhibited significantly (P < 0.05) reduced levels/multiplicity of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) as compared with wild-type sibling littermate control mice. These data indicate that (i) basal/minimal dietary AA supplementation (0.6%) expands the utility of the Fads1-null mouse model for long-term cancer prevention studies and (ii) that AA content in the colonic epithelium modulates colon cancer risk. Cancer Prev Res; 9(9); 750-7. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27339171

  14. Colonization of plants by human pathogenic bacteria in the course of organic vegetable production

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Andreas; Fischer, Doreen; Hartmann, Anton; Schmid, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, increasing numbers of outbreaks caused by the consumption of vegetables contaminated with human pathogenic bacteria were reported. The application of organic fertilizers during vegetable production is one of the possible reasons for contamination with those pathogens. In this study laboratory experiments in axenic and soil systems following common practices in organic farming were conducted to identify the minimal dose needed for bacterial colonization of plants and to identify possible factors like bacterial species or serovariation, plant species or organic fertilizer types used, influencing the success of plant colonization by human pathogenic bacteria. Spinach and corn salad were chosen as model plants and were inoculated with different concentrations of Salmonella enterica sv. Weltevreden, Listeria monocytogenes sv. 4b and EGD-E sv. 1/2a either directly (axenic system) or via agricultural soil amended with spiked organic fertilizers (soil system). In addition to PCR- and culture-based detection methods, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was applied in order to localize bacteria on or in plant tissues. Our results demonstrate that shoots were colonized by the pathogenic bacteria at inoculation doses as low as 4 × 10 CFU/ml in the axenic system or 4 × 105 CFU/g in the soil system. In addition, plant species dependent effects were observed. Spinach was colonized more often and at lower inoculation doses compared to corn salad. Differential colonization sites on roots, depending on the plant species could be detected using FISH-CLSM analysis. Furthermore, the transfer of pathogenic bacteria to plants via organic fertilizers was observed more often and at lower initial inoculation doses when fertilization was performed with inoculated slurry compared to inoculated manure. Finally, it could be shown that by introducing a simple washing step, the bacterial contamination was reduced in most cases or even was removed completely in some cases

  15. The Histidine Kinase BinK Is a Negative Regulator of Biofilm Formation and Squid Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, John F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial colonization of animal epithelial tissue is a dynamic process that relies on precise molecular communication. Colonization of Euprymna scolopes bobtail squid by Vibrio fischeri bacteria requires bacterial aggregation in host mucus as the symbiont transitions from a planktonic lifestyle in seawater to a biofilm-associated state in the host. We have identified a gene, binK (biofilm inhibitor kinase; VF_A0360), which encodes an orphan hybrid histidine kinase that negatively regulates the V. fischeri symbiotic biofilm (Syp) in vivo and in vitro. We identified binK mutants as exhibiting a colonization advantage in a global genetic screen, a phenotype that we confirmed in controlled competition experiments. Bacterial biofilm aggregates in the host are larger in strains lacking BinK, whereas overexpression of BinK suppresses biofilm formation and squid colonization. Signaling through BinK is required for temperature modulation of biofilm formation at 28°C. Furthermore, we present evidence that BinK acts upstream of SypG, the σ54-dependent transcriptional regulator of the syp biofilm locus. The BinK effects are dependent on intact signaling in the RscS-Syp biofilm pathway. Therefore, we propose that BinK antagonizes the signal from RscS and serves as an integral component in V. fischeri biofilm regulation. IMPORTANCE Bacterial lifestyle transitions underlie the colonization of animal hosts from environmental reservoirs. Formation of matrix-enclosed, surface-associated aggregates (biofilms) is common in beneficial and pathogenic associations, but investigating the genetic basis of biofilm development in live animal hosts remains a significant challenge. Using the bobtail squid light organ as a model, we analyzed putative colonization factors and identified a histidine kinase that negatively regulates biofilm formation at the host interface. This work reveals a novel in vivo biofilm regulator that influences the transition of bacteria from their

  16. Gene Signature in Sessile Serrated Polyps Identifies Colon Cancer Subtype.

    PubMed

    Kanth, Priyanka; Bronner, Mary P; Boucher, Kenneth M; Burt, Randall W; Neklason, Deborah W; Hagedorn, Curt H; Delker, Don A

    2016-06-01

    Sessile serrated colon adenoma/polyps (SSA/P) are found during routine screening colonoscopy and may account for 20% to 30% of colon cancers. However, differentiating SSA/Ps from hyperplastic polyps (HP) with little risk of cancer is challenging and complementary molecular markers are needed. In addition, the molecular mechanisms of colon cancer development from SSA/Ps are poorly understood. RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) was performed on 21 SSA/Ps, 10 HPs, 10 adenomas, 21 uninvolved colon, and 20 control colon specimens. Differential expression and leave-one-out cross-validation methods were used to define a unique gene signature of SSA/Ps. Our SSA/P gene signature was evaluated in colon cancer RNA-Seq data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) to identify a subtype of colon cancers that may develop from SSA/Ps. A total of 1,422 differentially expressed genes were found in SSA/Ps relative to controls. Serrated polyposis syndrome (n = 12) and sporadic SSA/Ps (n = 9) exhibited almost complete (96%) gene overlap. A 51-gene panel in SSA/P showed similar expression in a subset of TCGA colon cancers with high microsatellite instability. A smaller 7-gene panel showed high sensitivity and specificity in identifying BRAF-mutant, CpG island methylator phenotype high, and MLH1-silenced colon cancers. We describe a unique gene signature in SSA/Ps that identifies a subset of colon cancers likely to develop through the serrated pathway. These gene panels may be utilized for improved differentiation of SSA/Ps from HPs and provide insights into novel molecular pathways altered in colon cancer arising from the serrated pathway. Cancer Prev Res; 9(6); 456-65. ©2016 AACR.

  17. Only fibres promoting a stable butyrate producing colonic ecosystem decrease the rate of aberrant crypt foci in rats

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, P; Pierre, F; Patry, Y; Champ, M; Berreur, M; Pradal, G; Bornet, F; Meflah, K; Menanteau, J

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Dietary fibres have been proposed as protective agents against colon cancer but results of both epidemiological and experimental studies are inconclusive.
AIMS—Hypothesising that protection against colon cancer may be restricted to butyrate producing fibres, we investigated the factors needed for long term stable butyrate production and its relation to susceptibility to colon cancer.
METHODS—A two part randomised blinded study in rats, mimicking a prospective study in humans, was performed using a low fibre control diet (CD) and three high fibre diets: starch free wheat bran (WB), type III resistant starch (RS), and short chain fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS). Using a randomised block design, 96 inbred rats were fed for two, 16, 30, or 44 days to determine the period of adaptation to the diets, fermentation profiles, and effects on the colon, including mucosal proliferation on day 44. Subsequently, 36 rats fed the same diets for 44 days were injected with azoxymethane and checked for aberrant crypt foci 30 days later.
RESULTS—After fermentation had stabilised (44 days), only RS and FOS produced large amounts of butyrate, with a trophic effect in the large intestine. No difference in mucosal proliferation between the diets was noted at this time. In the subsequent experiment one month later, fewer aberrant crypt foci were present in rats fed high butyrate producing diets (RS, p=0.022; FOS, p=0.043).
CONCLUSION—A stable butyrate producing colonic ecosystem related to selected fibres appears to be less conducive to colon carcinogenesis.


Keywords: fibre; fermentation; butyrate; colon carcinogenesis; aberrant crypt foci; rat PMID:11115823

  18. Understanding Antegrade Colonic Enema (ACE) Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Podcasts Tools & Quizzes Health Learning Modules Research & Innovations Online Learning Center Health Information Events Calendar RSS ... Programs & Services Patient Experience Measurement Patient Experience: Empathy & Innovation Summit Patient Stories Contact Office of Patient Experience ...

  19. Efficient colonization of plant roots by the plant growth promoting bacterium Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42, engineered to express green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ben; Chen, Xiao Hua; Budiharjo, Anto; Bleiss, Wilfrid; Vater, Joachim; Borriss, Rainer

    2011-02-20

    A single copy of the gfp gene linked with the P(spac) promoter and flanked by the terminal FZB42 amyE sequences was stably integrated into the chromosome of plant growth promoting bacterium Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42 via homologous recombination. A spontaneous mutant, FB01mut, emitting bright fluorescence was detected among the transformants and found suitable for colonization experiments performed with Zea mays, Arabidopsis thaliana and Lemna minor. Real-time RT-PCR revealed that FB01mut expressed 2.5 times more of the gfp transcript than the original GFP-labeled strain. Confocal laser scanning microscopy of plant roots infected with gfp+ tagged FZB42 revealed that the bacterium behaves different in colonizing surfaces of plant roots of different species. In contrast to maize, FZB42 colonized preferentially root tips when colonizing Arabidopsis. FZB42 colonized heavily Lemna fronds and roots by forming biofilms consisting of extracellular matrix and cells with altered morphology. Surfactin, but no other lipopeptide or polyketide synthesized by FZB42 under laboratory conditions, was detected in extracts of Lemna plantlets colonized by FZB42. Due to its stable and long-lasting emission of bright fluorescence without antibiotic pressure FB01mut is an excellent tool for studying plant colonization under competitive, environmental conditions.

  20. Colonization pressure as a risk factor for colonization by multiresistant Acinetobacter spp and carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in an intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    DalBen, Mirian Freitas; Basso, Mariusa; Garcia, Cilmara Polido; Figueiredo Costa, Silvia; Maria Toscano, Cristiana; Robert Jarvis, William; Lobo, Renata Desordi; Oliveira, Maura Salaroli; Levin, Anna Sara

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine factors associated with colonization by carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and multiresistant Acinetobacter spp. METHODS: Surveillance cultures were collected from patients admitted to the intensive care unit at admission, on the third day after admission and weekly until discharge. The outcome was colonization by these pathogens. Two interventions were implemented: education and the introduction of alcohol rubs. Compliance with hand hygiene, colonization pressure, colonization at admission and risk factors for colonization were evaluated. RESULTS: The probability of becoming colonized increased during the study. The incidence density of colonization by carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa and multiresistant Acinetobacter spp. and colonization pressure were different between periods, increasing gradually throughout the study. The increase in colonization pressure was due to patients already colonized at admission. The APACHE II score, colonization pressure in the week before the outcome and male gender were independent risk factors for colonization. Every 1% increase in colonization pressure led to a 2% increase in the risk of being colonized. CONCLUSION: Colonization pressure is a risk factor for carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa and multiresistant Acinetobacter spp. colonization. When this pressure reaches critical levels, efforts primarily aimed at hand hygiene may not be sufficient to prevent transmission. PMID:24037009

  1. miRNA Expression in Colon Polyps Provides Evidence for a Multihit Model of Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Oberg, Ann L.; French, Amy J.; Sarver, Aaron L.; Subramanian, Subbaya; Morlan, Bruce W.; Riska, Shaun M.; Borralho, Pedro M.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Boardman, Lisa A.; Wang, Liang; Smyrk, Thomas C.; Asmann, Yan; Steer, Clifford J.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.

    2011-01-01

    Changes in miRNA expression are a common feature in colon cancer. Those changes occurring in the transition from normal to adenoma and from adenoma to carcinoma, however, have not been well defined. Additionally, miRNA changes among tumor subgroups of colon cancer have also not been adequately evaluated. In this study, we examined the global miRNA expression in 315 samples that included 52 normal colonic mucosa, 41 tubulovillous adenomas, 158 adenocarcinomas with proficient DNA mismatch repair (pMMR) selected for stage and age of onset, and 64 adenocarcinomas with defective DNA mismatch repair (dMMR) selected for sporadic (n = 53) and inherited colon cancer (n = 11). Sporadic dMMR tumors all had MLH1 inactivation due to promoter hypermethylation. Unsupervised PCA and cluster analysis demonstrated that normal colon tissue, adenomas, pMMR carcinomas and dMMR carcinomas were all clearly discernable. The majority of miRNAs that were differentially expressed between normal and polyp were also differentially expressed with a similar magnitude in the comparison of normal to both the pMMR and dMMR tumor groups, suggesting a stepwise progression for transformation from normal colon to carcinoma. Among the miRNAs demonstrating the largest fold up- or down-regulated changes (≥4), four novel (miR-31, miR-1, miR-9 and miR-99a) and two previously reported (miR-137 and miR-135b) miRNAs were identified in the normal/adenoma comparison. All but one of these (miR-99a) demonstrated similar expression differences in the two normal/carcinoma comparisons, suggesting that these early tumor changes are important in both the pMMR- and dMMR-derived cancers. The comparison between pMMR and dMMR tumors identified four miRNAs (miR-31, miR-552, miR-592 and miR-224) with statistically significant expression differences (≥2-fold change). PMID:21694772

  2. The Effect of Experimental Fusarium Mycotoxicosis on Microbiota Diversity in Porcine Ascending Colon Contents

    PubMed Central

    Piotrowska, Małgorzata; Śliżewska, Katarzyna; Nowak, Adriana; Zielonka, Łukasz; Żakowska, Zofia; Gajęcka, Magdalena; Gajęcki, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the effect of exposure of pigs to the Fusarium mycotoxins zearalenone (ZEN) and deoxynivalenol (DON), administered together and separately, on the colon microbiota. An experiment was conducted for 42 days on gilts, randomly assigned to four groups and administered either ZEN, DON, ZEN+DON, or a placebo. The number of aerobic mesophilic bacteria, yeasts, molds, anaerobic Clostridium perfringens, fecal streptococci, Enterobacteriaceae, Escherichia coli, and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were determined in the contents of the ascending colon. The influence of mycotoxins on the functional diversity of the colonic microbiota was assessed using EcoPlate tests (Biolog). Analysis revealed the predominance of LAB in all groups of pigs. Zearalenone, administered separately and together with DON, was found to have an adverse effect on mesophilic aerobic bacteria, but only after long exposure to this mycotoxin. During the six weeks of the experiment, the concentration of C. perfringens, E. coli, and other bacteria in the family Enterobacteriaceae was most considerably reduced in the experimental groups exposed to zearalenone, both separately and together with DON. Mycotoxins also affected the functional biodiversity of microorganisms. Both Shannon’s diversity index and the number of catabolized substrates in Biolog plate (the R index) were much higher in the group subjected to mixed mycotoxicosis. PMID:25025709

  3. Diet, genes, and microbes: complexities of colon cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Birt, Diane F; Phillips, Gregory J

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths in the United States, and generally, as countries climb the economic ladder, their rates of colon cancer increase. Colon cancer was an early disease where key genetic mutations were identified as important in disease progression, and there is considerable interest in determining whether specific mutations sensitize the colon to cancer prevention strategies. Epidemiological studies have revealed that fiber- and vegetable-rich diets and physical activity are associated with reduced rates of colon cancer, while consumption of red and processed meat, or alcoholic beverages, and overconsumption as reflected in obesity are associated with increased rates. Animal studies have probed these effects and suggested directions for further refinement of diet in colon cancer prevention. Recently a central role for the microorganisms in the gastrointestinal tract in colon cancer development is being probed, and it is hypothesized that the microbes may integrate diet and host genetics in the etiology of the disease. This review provides background on dietary, genetic, and microbial impacts on colon cancer and describes an ongoing project using rodent models to assess the ability of digestion-resistant starch in the integration of these factors with the goal of furthering colon cancer prevention.

  4. Colonization of broilers by Campylobacter jejuni internalized within Acanthamoeba castellanii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We present the first report that Campylobacter jejuni, internalized within Acanthamoeba castellanii, colonized broilers. After 1, 3, 7 and 14 days post challenge none of the broilers challenged with negative controls were colonized, but were with internalized C. jejuni. The biology of protozoa-Cam...

  5. Colonic Fermentation: A Neglected Topic in Human Physiology Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valeur, Jorgen; Berstad, Arnold

    2010-01-01

    Human physiology textbooks tend to limit their discussion of colonic functions to those of absorbing water and electrolytes and storing waste material. However, the colon is a highly active metabolic organ, containing an exceedingly complex society of microbes. By means of fermentation, gastrointestinal microbes break down nutrients that cannot be…

  6. Triptolide ameliorates colonic fibrosis in an experimental rat model.

    PubMed

    Tao, Qingsong; Wang, Baochai; Zheng, Yu; Li, Guanwei; Ren, Jianan

    2015-08-01

    Triptolide is known to exert anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities; however, its impact on intestinal fibrosis has not been previously examined. Based on our previous studies of the suppressive activity of triptolide on human colonic subepithelial myofibroblasts and the therapeutic efficacy of triptolide in Crohn's disease, it was hypothesized that triptolide may have beneficial effects on intestinal fibrosis. In the present study, colonic fibrosis was induced in rats by 6 weekly repeated administration with a low-dose of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) and was then treated with triptolide or PBS daily (control) simultaneously. Extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition in the colon was examined with image analysis of Masson Trichrome staining. Total collagen levels in colonic homogenates were measured by a Sircol assay. Collagen Iα1 transcripts and collagen I protein were measured ex vivo in the isolated colonic subepithelial myofibroblasts by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunoblot analysis, respectively. The results indicated that triptolide decreased ECM deposition and collagen production in the colon, and inhibited collagen Iα1 transcripts and collagen I protein expression in the isolated subepithelial myofibroblasts of the rats with colonic fibrosis. In conclusion, triptolide ameliorates colonic fibrosis in the experimental rat model, suggesting triptolide may be a promising compound for inflammatory bowel disease treatment. PMID:25845760

  7. Triptolide ameliorates colonic fibrosis in an experimental rat model

    PubMed Central

    TAO, QINGSONG; WANG, BAOCHAI; ZHENG, YU; LI, GUANWEI; REN, JIANAN

    2015-01-01

    Triptolide is known to exert anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities; however, its impact on intestinal fibrosis has not been previously examined. Based on our previous studies of the suppressive activity of triptolide on human colonic subepithelial myofibroblasts and the therapeutic efficacy of triptolide in Crohn’s disease, it was hypothesized that triptolide may have beneficial effects on intestinal fibrosis. In the present study, colonic fibrosis was induced in rats by 6 weekly repeated administration with a low-dose of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) and was then treated with triptolide or PBS daily (control) simultaneously. Extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition in the colon was examined with image analysis of Masson Trichrome staining. Total collagen levels in colonic homogenates were measured by a Sircol assay. Collagen Iα1 transcripts and collagen I protein were measured ex vivo in the isolated colonic subepithelial myofibroblasts by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunoblot analysis, respectively. The results indicated that triptolide decreased ECM deposition and collagen production in the colon, and inhibited collagen Iα1 transcripts and collagen I protein expression in the isolated subepithelial myofibroblasts of the rats with colonic fibrosis. In conclusion, triptolide ameliorates colonic fibrosis in the experimental rat model, suggesting triptolide may be a promising compound for inflammatory bowel disease treatment. PMID:25845760

  8. Corridor Length and Patch Colonization by a Butterfly Junonia coenia

    SciTech Connect

    Nick Haddad

    2000-06-01

    Habitat corridors have been proposed to reduce patch isolation and increase population persistence in fragmented landscapes. This study tested whether patch colonization was increased by the presence and various length corridors. The specific butterfly species tested has been shown to use corridors, however, the results indicate that neither the distance between patches or the presence of a corridor influenced colonization.

  9. 21 CFR 876.5220 - Colonic irrigation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Colonic irrigation system. 876.5220 Section 876.5220 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5220 Colonic irrigation...

  10. 21 CFR 876.5220 - Colonic irrigation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Colonic irrigation system. 876.5220 Section 876.5220 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5220 Colonic irrigation...

  11. 21 CFR 876.5220 - Colonic irrigation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Colonic irrigation system. 876.5220 Section 876.5220 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5220 Colonic irrigation...

  12. 21 CFR 876.5220 - Colonic irrigation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Colonic irrigation system. 876.5220 Section 876.5220 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5220 Colonic irrigation...

  13. Investigation of computer-aided colonic crypt pattern analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Xin; Pan, Yinsheng; Sivak, Michael V., Jr.; Olowe, Kayode; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2007-02-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Approximately 50% of these deaths could be prevented by earlier detection through screening. Magnification chromoendoscopy is a technique which utilizes tissue stains applied to the gastrointestinal mucosa and high-magnification endoscopy to better visualize and characterize lesions. Prior studies have shown that shapes of colonic crypts change with disease and show characteristic patterns. Current methods for assessing colonic crypt patterns are somewhat subjective and not standardized. Computerized algorithms could be used to standardize colonic crypt pattern assessment. We have imaged resected colonic mucosa in vitro (N = 70) using methylene blue dye and a surgical microscope to approximately simulate in vivo imaging with magnification chromoendoscopy. We have developed a method of computerized processing to analyze the crypt patterns in the images. The quantitative image analysis consists of three steps. First, the crypts within the region of interest of colonic tissue are semi-automatically segmented using watershed morphological processing. Second, crypt size and shape parameters are extracted from the segmented crypts. Third, each sample is assigned to a category according to the Kudo criteria. The computerized classification is validated by comparison with human classification using the Kudo classification criteria. The computerized colonic crypt pattern analysis algorithm will enable a study of in vivo magnification chromoendoscopy of colonic crypt pattern correlated with risk of colorectal cancer. This study will assess the feasibility of screening and surveillance of the colon using magnification chromoendoscopy.

  14. Hierarchical spatial structure of stream fish colonization and extinction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hitt, N.P.; Roberts, J.H.

    2012-01-01

    Spatial variation in extinction and colonization is expected to influence community composition over time. In stream fish communities, local species richness (alpha diversity) and species turnover (beta diversity) are thought to be regulated by high extinction rates in headwater streams and high colonization rates in downstream areas. We evaluated the spatiotemporal structure of fish communities in streams originally surveyed by Burton and Odum 1945 (Ecology 26: 182-194) in Virginia, USA and explored the effects of species traits on extinction and colonization dynamics. We documented dramatic changes in fish community structure at both the site and stream scales. Of the 34 fish species observed, 20 (59%) were present in both time periods, but 11 (32%) colonized the study area and three (9%) were extirpated over time. Within streams, alpha diversity increased in two of three streams but beta diversity decreased dramatically in all streams due to fish community homogenization caused by colonization of common species and extirpation of rare species. Among streams, however, fish communities differentiated over time. Regression trees indicated that reproductive life-history traits such as spawning mound construction, associations with mound-building species, and high fecundity were important predictors of species persistence or colonization. Conversely, native fishes not associated with mound-building exhibited the highest rates of extirpation from streams. Our results demonstrate that stream fish colonization and extinction dynamics exhibit hierarchical spatial structure and suggest that mound-building fishes serve as keystone species for colonization of headwater streams.

  15. 21 CFR 876.5220 - Colonic irrigation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Colonic irrigation system. 876.5220 Section 876.5220 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5220 Colonic irrigation...

  16. Fiber, intestinal sterols, and colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Huang, C T; Gopalakrishna, G S; Nichols, B L

    1978-03-01

    It has been postulated that dietary fiber's protective effect against the development of colon cancer, diverticular disease, and atherosclerosis may be due to the adsorption and/or dilution of intestinal sterols such as bile acids and neural sterols and their bacterial metabolites by component(s) of fiber. Dietary fiber is made up of four major components-cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, and pectin. There is evidence that hemicellulose and pectin may induce an increase in fecal bile acid excretion in man which may be accompanied by a decrease in serum cholesterol. Natural fibers, such as rolled oats, alfalfa, guar gum, and Bengal gram have been shown to have hypocholesterolemic properties of alfalfa, wheat straw, and some other fibers found considerable amounts of bile acids in vitro. On the other hand, wheat bran, oat hulls, and all the synthetic fibers tested bound only negligible amounts of bile acids under the same conditions. Vegetarians in the United States have lower plasma lipids and different plasma lipoprotein patterns than those of comparable control populations on regular mixed diet. They also have smaller daily fractional turnover rates of cholic acid and deoxycholic acid pool size. In addition, populations on a mixed Western diet, where the rate of large bowel cancer is high (North American, English, Scottish, etc.) degraded and excreted cholesterol and bile acid metabolites to a greater degree than populations where the rate of colon cancer is comparatively low (Ugandan, Japanese, etc). It cannot be denied that the fiber theory linking fiber deficiency with the development of colon cancer and other diseases, is simple, attractive and appears to be firmly based in common sense. When subjected to research studies, however, the situation appears much more complex than expected. Although some progress is being made, the data are often contradictory and confusing, probably due to lack of adequate documentation of fiber intake (e.g., use of dietary fiber

  17. Toxic effects of cadmium and zinc on ectomycorrhizal colonization of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) from soil inoculum

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley-Whitaker, J.; Cairney, J.W.G.; Meharg, A.A.

    2000-03-01

    Scots pine seedlings colonized by ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi from natural soil inoculum were exposed to a range of Cd or Zn concentrations to investigate the effects of metals on ECM fungi-Scots pine associations in a realistic soil environment. Experiments focused on the relationship between the sensitivity of ECM fungi and their host plants, the influence of metals on ECM community dynamics on Scots pine roots, and the effects of metal exposure on ECM colonization from soil-borne propagules. Ectomycorrhizal colonization was inhibited by Cd and Zn, with a decrease in the proportion of ECM-colonized root tips. Shoot and root biomass, total root length, and total root-tip density, however, were unaffected by Cd or Zn. A decrease in the diversity of ECM morphotypes also occurred, which could have a negative effect on tree vigor. Overall, colonization by ECM fungi was more sensitive than seedling growth to Cd and Zn, and this could have serious implications for successful tree establishment on metal-contaminated soils.

  18. Molecular Epidemiology of Colonizing and Infecting Isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Rebekah M.; Cao, Jie; Brisse, Sylvain; Passet, Virginie; Wu, Weisheng; Zhao, Lili; Malani, Preeti N.; Rao, Krishna

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Klebsiella pneumoniae is among the most common causes of hospital-acquired infections and has emerged as an urgent threat to public health due to carbapenem antimicrobial resistance. K. pneumoniae commonly colonizes hospitalized patients and causes extraintestinal infections such as urinary tract infection, bloodstream infection (septicemia), and pneumonia. If colonization is an intermediate step before infection, then detection and characterization of colonizing isolates could enable strategies to prevent or empirically treat K. pneumoniae infections in hospitalized patients. However, the strength of the association between colonization and infection is unclear. To test the hypothesis that hospitalized patients become infected with their colonizing strain, 1,765 patients were screened for rectal colonization with K. pneumoniae, and extraintestinal isolates from these same patients were collected over a 3-month period in a cohort study design. The overall colonization prevalence was 23.0%. After adjustment for other patient factors, colonization was significantly associated with subsequent infection: 21 of 406 (5.2%) colonized patients later had extraintestinal infection, compared to 18 of 1,359 (1.3%) noncolonized patients (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 4.01; 95% confidence interval, 2.08 to 7.73; P < 0.001). Despite a high diversity of colonizing isolates, 7/7 respiratory, 4/4 urinary, and 2/5 bloodstream isolates from colonized patients matched the patient corresponding rectal swab isolates, based on wzi capsular typing, multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and whole-genome sequence analysis. These results suggest that K. pneumoniae colonization is directly associated with progression to extraintestinal infection. IMPORTANCE K. pneumoniae commonly infects hospitalized patients, and these infections are increasingly resistant to carbapenems, the antibiotics of last resort for life-threatening bacterial infections. To prevent and treat these infections, we

  19. An endoscope with integrated transparent bioelectronics and theranostic nanoparticles for colon cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunjae; Lee, Youngsik; Song, Changyeong; Cho, Hye Rim; Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Choi, Tae Kyu; Kim, Kyung Hoon; Lee, Young Bum; Ling, Daishun; Lee, Hyuk; Yu, Su Jong; Choi, Seung Hong; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Kim, Dae-Hyeong

    2015-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is a challenging anatomical target for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures for bleeding, polyps and cancerous growths. Advanced endoscopes that combine imaging and therapies within the gastrointestinal tract provide an advantage over stand-alone diagnostic or therapeutic devices. However, current multimodal endoscopes lack the spatial resolution necessary to detect and treat small cancers and other abnormalities. Here we present a multifunctional endoscope-based interventional system that integrates transparent bioelectronics with theranostic nanoparticles, which are photoactivated within highly localized space near tumours or benign growths. These advanced electronics and nanoparticles collectively enable optical fluorescence-based mapping, electrical impedance and pH sensing, contact/temperature monitoring, radio frequency ablation and localized photo/chemotherapy, as the basis of a closed-loop solution for colon cancer treatment. In vitro, ex vivo and in vivo experiments highlight the utility of this technology for accurate detection, delineation and rapid targeted therapy of colon cancer or precancerous lesions.

  20. Endoscopic resection of giant colonic lipoma: case series with partial resection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gun Woo; Kwon, Chang-Il; Song, Sang Hee; Jin, Sun Mi; Kim, Kyung Ho; Moon, Jie Hye; Hong, Sung Pyo; Park, Pil Won

    2013-09-01

    Colonic lipoma, a very rare form of benign tumor, is typically detected incidentally in asymptomatic patients. The size of lipoma is reported variously from 2 mm to 30 cm, with higher likelihood of symptoms as the size is bigger. Cases with symptom or bigger lesion are surgically resected in principle; endoscopic resection, which has developed recently with groundbreaking advance of endoscopic excision technology, is being used more often but with rare report of success due to high chance of complications such as bowel perforation or bleeding. The authors report here, together with a literature review, our experiences of three cases of giant colonic lipomas showing complete remission after aggressive unroofing technique, at certain intervals, using snare catheter at the origin of the lipoma so that the remaining lipoma could be drained out of the exposed surface spontaneously, in order to reduce complications.