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Sample records for colorectal adenocarcinoma identified

  1. Genomic sequencing of colorectal adenocarcinomas identifies a recurrent VTI1A-TCF7L2 fusion.

    PubMed

    Bass, Adam J; Lawrence, Michael S; Brace, Lear E; Ramos, Alex H; Drier, Yotam; Cibulskis, Kristian; Sougnez, Carrie; Voet, Douglas; Saksena, Gordon; Sivachenko, Andrey; Jing, Rui; Parkin, Melissa; Pugh, Trevor; Verhaak, Roel G; Stransky, Nicolas; Boutin, Adam T; Barretina, Jordi; Solit, David B; Vakiani, Evi; Shao, Wenlin; Mishina, Yuji; Warmuth, Markus; Jimenez, Jose; Chiang, Derek Y; Signoretti, Sabina; Kaelin, William G; Spardy, Nicole; Hahn, William C; Hoshida, Yujin; Ogino, Shuji; Depinho, Ronald A; Chin, Lynda; Garraway, Levi A; Fuchs, Charles S; Baselga, Jose; Tabernero, Josep; Gabriel, Stacey; Lander, Eric S; Getz, Gad; Meyerson, Matthew

    2011-09-04

    Prior studies have identified recurrent oncogenic mutations in colorectal adenocarcinoma and have surveyed exons of protein-coding genes for mutations in 11 affected individuals. Here we report whole-genome sequencing from nine individuals with colorectal cancer, including primary colorectal tumors and matched adjacent non-tumor tissues, at an average of 30.7× and 31.9× coverage, respectively. We identify an average of 75 somatic rearrangements per tumor, including complex networks of translocations between pairs of chromosomes. Eleven rearrangements encode predicted in-frame fusion proteins, including a fusion of VTI1A and TCF7L2 found in 3 out of 97 colorectal cancers. Although TCF7L2 encodes TCF4, which cooperates with β-catenin in colorectal carcinogenesis, the fusion lacks the TCF4 β-catenin-binding domain. We found a colorectal carcinoma cell line harboring the fusion gene to be dependent on VTI1A-TCF7L2 for anchorage-independent growth using RNA interference-mediated knockdown. This study shows previously unidentified levels of genomic rearrangements in colorectal carcinoma that can lead to essential gene fusions and other oncogenic events.

  2. Mitochondrial genome instability in colorectal adenoma and adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    de Araujo, Luiza F; Fonseca, Aline S; Muys, Bruna R; Plaça, Jessica R; Bueno, Rafaela B L; Lorenzi, Julio C C; Santos, Anemari R D; Molfetta, Greice A; Zanette, Dalila L; Souza, Jorge E S; Valente, Valeria; Silva, Wilson A

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is regarded as a hallmark of cancer progression. In the current study, we evaluated mitochondrial genome instability and copy number in colorectal cancer using Next Generation Sequencing approach and qPCR, respectively. The results revealed higher levels of heteroplasmy and depletion of the relative mtDNA copy number in colorectal adenocarcinoma. Adenocarcinoma samples also presented an increased number of mutations in nuclear genes encoding proteins which functions are related with mitochondria fusion, fission and localization. Moreover, we found a set of mitochondrial and nuclear genes, which cooperate in the same mitochondrial function simultaneously mutated in adenocarcinoma. In summary, these results support an important role for mitochondrial function and genomic instability in colorectal tumorigenesis.

  3. Frequent mutations of KRAS in addition to BRAF in colorectal serrated adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Stefanius, Karoliina; Ylitalo, Laura; Tuomisto, Anne; Kuivila, Rami; Kantola, Tiina; Sirniö, Päivi; Karttunen, Tuomo J; Mäkinen, Markus J

    2011-01-01

    Aims To define the occurrence of KRAS and BRAF mutations, microsatellite instability (MSI), and MGMT and hMLH1 methylation and expression in colorectal serrated adenocarcinoma. Methods and results KRAS codon 12/13 and 59/61 and BRAF V600E mutations, MSI, and MGMT and hMLH1 methylation and expression in 42 serrated adenocarcinomas and 17 serrated adenomas were compared with those in 59 non-serrated colorectal carcinomas (CRCs) and nine adenomas. KRAS and BRAF mutations were observed in 45% and 33% of serrated adenocarcinomas and in 27% and 0% of non-serrated CRCs (P < 0.001). The KRAS c12G→A transition was the predominant type of mutation in serrated adenocarcinomas. Forty-two per cent of BRAF-mutated serrated adenocarcinomas showed high-level MSI (MSI-H) (P = 0.075), 100% showed hMLH1 methylation (P = 0.001) and 90.9% showed MGMT methylation (P = 0.019). Fifty-six per cent of serrated adenocarcinomas with microsatellite stability/low-level microsatellite instability harboured KRAS mutations. In non-serrated cancers, KRAS mutations were not associated with MSI status. Conclusions A high combined mutation rate (79–82%) of KRAS and BRAF in serrated adenomas and adenocarcinomas indicates that mitogen-activated protein kinase activation is a crucial part of the serrated pathway. BRAF mutations are specific for serrated adenocarcinoma and identify a subset of serrated adenocarcinomas with gene methylation and a tendency for MSI-H. A high frequency of KRAS mutations in serrated adenocarcinomas suggests that a significant proportion of KRAS-mutated CRCs originate from serrated precursors, thus challenging the traditional model of Vogelstein. PMID:21457162

  4. Aurora Kinase A Is a Prognostic Marker in Colorectal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Hyun Min; Jang, Bo Geun; Hyun, Chang Lim; Kim, Young Sill; Hyun, Jin Won; Chang, Weon Young; Maeng, Young Hee

    2017-01-01

    Background Aurora kinase A (AURKA), or STK15/BTAK, is a member of the serine/threonine kinase family and plays important roles in mitosis and chromosome stability. This study investigated the clinical significance of AURKA expression in colorectal cancer patients in Korea. Methods AURKA protein expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in 151 patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma using tissue microarray blocks. We analyzed the relationship between clinicopathological characteristics and AURKA expression. In addition, the prognostic significance of various clinicopathological data for progression-free survival (PFS) was assessed. Also we evaluated copy number variations by array comparative genomic hybridization and AURKA gene amplification using fluorescence in situ hybridization in colorectal carcinoma tissues. Results AURKA gene amplification was found more frequently in the 20q13.2–13.33 gain-positive group than the group with no significant gain on the AURKA-containing locus. AURKA protein expression was detected in 45% of the cases (68/151). Positive staining for AURKA was observed more often in male patients (p = .035) and distally located tumors (p = .021). PFS was shorter in patients with AURKA expression compared to those with low-level AURKA expression (p < .001). Univariate analysis revealed that AURKA expression (p = .001), age (p = .034), lymphatic invasion (p = .001), perineural invasion (p = .002), and TNM stage (p = .013) significantly affected PFS. In a multivariate analysis of PFS, a Cox proportional hazard model confirmed that AURKA expression was an independent and significant prognostic factor in colorectal adenocarcinoma (hazard ratio, 3.944; p < .001). Conclusions AURKA could serve as an independent factor to predict a poor prognosis in Korean colorectal adenocarcinoma patients. PMID:28013532

  5. [Detection of T-antigen in colorectal adenocarcinoma and polyps].

    PubMed

    Xu, S; Lu, Y; Wang, Q

    1995-10-01

    Galactose oxidase method was employed to detect the beta-D-Gal (1-->3) -D-Gal NAc residue of T-antigen present in the large intestinal mucus of 156 subjects. The positive rates of the test were 84.4%, 29.1%, and 7.2% in the mucus samples obtained from 32 patients with colorectal adenocarcinomas, 55 with polyps and 69 controls respectively. Chi-square test demonstrated that there were significant differences between the group of carcinoma and control (P < 0.001) as well as between also polyp and control (P < 0.01). The test had a high sensitivity (84.4%) and specificity (92.8%) in the diagnosis of colorectal cancer and may be used as a practical mass screening test for colorectal neoplasms.

  6. Validation of Biomarkers for the Early Detection of Colorectal Adenocarcinoma (GLNE 010) — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    We propose a Phase 2 (large cross-sectional) PRoBE-compliant validation trial of stool-based and serum-based tests for the detection of colorectal neoplasia (1). The trial is powered to detect early stage colorectal adenocarcinoma or high grade dysplasia. This is the most stringent, conservative approach to the early diagnosis of colonic neoplasia and addresses the most important endpoint of identifying individuals with curable, early stage cancer and those with very high risk non-invasive neoplasia (high grade dysplasia).

  7. Migration of mitochondrial DNA in the nuclear genome of colorectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Srinivasainagendra, Vinodh; Sandel, Michael W; Singh, Bhupendra; Sundaresan, Aishwarya; Mooga, Ved P; Bajpai, Prachi; Tiwari, Hemant K; Singh, Keshav K

    2017-03-29

    Colorectal adenocarcinomas are characterized by abnormal mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number and genomic instability, but a molecular interaction between mitochondrial and nuclear genome remains unknown. Here we report the discovery of increased copies of nuclear mtDNA (NUMT) in colorectal adenocarcinomas, which supports link between mtDNA and genomic instability in the nucleus. We name this phenomenon of nuclear occurrence of mitochondrial component as numtogenesis. We provide a description of NUMT abundance and distribution in tumor versus matched blood-derived normal genomes. Whole-genome sequence data were obtained for colon adenocarcinoma and rectum adenocarcinoma patients participating in The Cancer Genome Atlas, via the Cancer Genomics Hub, using the GeneTorrent file acquisition tool. Data were analyzed to determine NUMT proportion and distribution on a genome-wide scale. A NUMT suppressor gene was identified by comparing numtogenesis in other organisms. Our study reveals that colorectal adenocarcinoma genomes, on average, contains up to 4.2-fold more somatic NUMTs than matched normal genomes. Women colorectal tumors contained more NUMT than men. NUMT abundance in tumor predicted parallel abundance in blood. NUMT abundance positively correlated with GC content and gene density. Increased numtogenesis was observed with higher mortality. We identified YME1L1, a human homolog of yeast YME1 (yeast mitochondrial DNA escape 1) to be frequently mutated in colorectal tumors. YME1L1 was also mutated in tumors derived from other tissues. We show that inactivation of YME1L1 results in increased transfer of mtDNA in the nuclear genome. Our study demonstrates increased somatic transfer of mtDNA in colorectal tumors. Our study also reveals sex-based differences in frequency of NUMT occurrence and that NUMT in blood reflects NUMT in tumors, suggesting NUMT may be used as a biomarker for tumorigenesis. We identify YME1L1 as the first NUMT suppressor gene in human and

  8. Intraoperative molecular imaging to identify lung adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Andrew D.; Kennedy, Gregory T.; Predina, Jarrod D.; Low, Philip S.

    2016-01-01

    Intraoperative molecular imaging is a promising new technology with numerous applications in lung cancer surgery. Accurate identification of small nodules and assessment of tumor margins are two challenges in pulmonary resections for cancer, particularly with increasing use of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). One potential solution to these problems is intraoperative use of a fluorescent contrast agent to improve detection of cancer cells. This technology requires both a targeted fluorescent dye that will selectively accumulate in cancer cells and a specialized imaging system to detect the cells. In several studies, we have shown that intraoperative imaging with indocyanine green (ICG) can be used to accurately identify indeterminate pulmonary nodules. The use of a folate-tagged fluorescent molecule targeted to the folate receptor-α (FRα) further improves the sensitivity and specificity of detecting lung adenocarcinomas. We have demonstrated this technology can be used as an “optical biopsy” to differentiate adenocarcinoma versus other histological subtypes of pulmonary nodules. This strategy has potential applications in assessing bronchial stump margins, identifying synchronous or metachronous lesions, and rapidly assessing lymph nodes for lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:28066672

  9. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma versus metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma: a persisting diagnostic challenge

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Aim This study attempted to distinguish primary bladder adenocarcinoma (PBA) from metastatic colonic adenocarcinomas (MCA), which is a difficult diagnostic and clinical problem. Methods Twenty-four cases of bladder adenocarcinomas (12 primary & 12 metastatic colorectal) were included in the study with urothelial carcinoma (UC) and colonic adenocarcinoma (CA) as controls. A panel of immunohistochemical (IHC) stains along with fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH), using the UroVysion probe set, was performed. Results The majority of the PBAs presented with advanced disease. Enteric histologic subtype was the most common morphological variant. Strong nuclear with cytoplasmic-membranous staining of β-catenin was seen in 75% of MCA and only 16.7% PBA (<10% staining cells). Although abnormal nuclear staining with E-cadherin was seen in both PBA and MCA, it was more frequent in former. CK-7, CK-20, villin and CDX-2 stains were not helpful in distinguishing the two entities. FISH did not reveal any unique differences in chromosomal abnormality between the two groups. Conclusion Although there was a statistically significant difference in β-catenin and E-cadherin staining between two groups, we did not find any IHC or FISH marker that was specific for PBA. Distinction between PBA and MCA remains a diagnostic problem and clinical correlation is vital before rendering a diagnosis. Virtual slides The virtual slides for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1393156268152357 PMID:23121893

  10. The implications of an incidental chronic lymphocytic leukaemia in a resection specimen for colorectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Robert J; Alberts, Justin C

    2007-10-30

    Colorectal cancer and B cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) have a significant incidence, which are increasing with the aging population. Evidence has been presented in the literature to suggest that the synchronous presentation of colorectal cancer and B cell CLL may be more than simply coincidental for these two common malignancies. We report an unusual case of a presumed B cell CLL diagnosed on the basis of histological analysis of lymph nodes recovered from a resection specimen for rectal adenocarcinoma. We considered aetiological factors which may have linked the synchronous diagnosis of the two malignancies and the potential implications for the natural history of the two malignancies on one another. A 70-year-old male underwent low anterior resection with total mesorectal excision for a rectal adenocarcinoma. His co-morbid conditions were chronic obstructive airways disease and ischaemic heart disease. General examination revealed no lymphadenopathy. Full blood count, urea and electrolytes and liver function tests were all within normal limits. As well as confirming a pT3 N1 adenocarcinoma, histological analysis showed lymph nodes with an infiltrate of small lymphoid cells. Immunohistochemical studies showed these cells to be in keeping with B cell CLL. Whilst unable to identify any common aetiological factors in the two malignancies in our patient, immunosuppression and genetic abnormalities have been identified as possible bases for an observed epidemiological association between colorectal cancer and haematological malignancies. Examples such as our case of synchronous diagnosis of two malignancies in a patient are likely to increase with the aging population. The potential affects of one malignancy on the natural history of the other warrants further study. In our case, we considered that slow progression of the B cell CLL may increase the risk of recurrent rectal adenocarcinoma.

  11. Familial colorectal adenocarcinoma and hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer: a nationwide epidemiological study from Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Hemminki, K; Li, X

    2001-01-01

    Although estimates are available of the proportion of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) among all colorectal cancer (CRC), its proportion among familial CRC is unclear. We estimated these proportions epidemiologically from the nationwide Swedish Family-Cancer Database on 9.6 million individuals. Colorectal adenocarcinomas were retrieved from the Cancer Registry covering years 1958–1996. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for offspring (aged less than 62 years) when their parent had colorectal adenocarcinoma. In 9.82% of all families, an offspring and a parent were affected, giving a population attributable proportion of 4.91% and a familial SIR of 2.00. When offspring and parents shared the anatomic site, the SIR was 2.32 for proximal and 2.00 for distal CRC. When offspring were diagnosed before age 40 years and parents before age 50 years, the SIR was 25.72 for familial proximal CRC. In older age groups familial risks did not differ between proximal and distal CRC. Familial risks were increased also for endometrial, small intestinal and gastric cancers, manifestations in HNPCC. Depending on which assumptions were made, HNPCC was calculated to account for 20 to 50% of familial CRC, corresponding to 1 or 2.5% of all CRC among 0–61-year-old individuals. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11286479

  12. Clinicopathology and Outcomes for Mucinous and Signet Ring Colorectal Adenocarcinoma: Analysis from the National Cancer Data Base

    PubMed Central

    Hyngstrom, John R.; Hu, Chung-Yuan; Xing, Yan; You, Y. Nancy; Feig, Barry W.; Skibber, John M.; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.; Cormier, Janice N.; Chang, George J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated clinical features and survival outcomes among patients with signet ring and mucinous histologies of colorectal adenocarcinoma using data from the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB). Methods Patients aged 18–90 years with colorectal adenocarcinoma diagnosed between 1998 and 2002 were identified from the NCDB. Site-stratified (colon vs rectum) survival analysis was performed using multivariate relative survival adjusted for multiple clinicopathologic and treatment variables. Results The study included 244,794 patients: 25,546 (10%) with mucinous, 2,260 (1%) with signet ring, and 216,988 (89%) with nonmucinous, non–signet ring adenocarcinoma. Mucinous and signet ring cancers were more frequently right-sided (60% and 62%, respectively) than were nonmucinous, non–signet ring adenocarcinomas (42%, P < .001). Signet ring histology was associated with a higher stage (P < .001), and 77.2% of signet ring tumors were high-grade lesions, compared with 20% of mucinous and 17% of non–signet ring, nonmucinous adenocarcinomas (P < .001). After adjustment for covariates, signet ring histology was independently associated with higher risk of death (HR 1.42, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.33-1.51, and HR 1.57, CI 1.38-1.77, for tumors located in the colon and rectum, respectively). Mucinous tumors of the rectum (HR 1.22, CI 1.16-1.29), but not the colon (HR 1.03, CI 1.00-1.06), were associated with increased risk of death. Conclusion Signet ring cell adenocarcinomas of the colon and rectum and mucinous adenocarcinomas of the rectum are associated with poorer survival. These aggressive histologic variants of colorectal adenocarcinoma should be targeted for research initiatives to improve outcomes. PMID:22476818

  13. [Perineal cutaneous metastases from adenocarcinoma after surgery for colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Placer, Carlos; Elósegui, José Luis; Irureta, Idoia; Mujika, José Andrés; Goena, Ignacio; Enríquez Navascués, José M

    2007-07-01

    The development of cutaneous metastases in the context of colorectal cancer is exceptional, especially in the absence of visceral lesions. We present the case of a 50-year-old woman who underwent surgery for a T3N0M0 tumor in the sigmoid colon, with resection of ovarian metastases at 12 months. Reoperation was performed 14 months later for local anastomotic recurrence. Four months after surgery, a nodular ulcerated lesion was observed in the perineum due to metastases from adenocarcinoma. Aggressive local surgery was performed and the patient has presented no recurrences after a 5-year follow-up. We discuss the need for correct management of the rectal or anal stump (through the use of iodine povidone wash solution) during instrumental anastomoses.

  14. Clinicopathologic and molecular features of sporadic early-onset colorectal adenocarcinoma: an adenocarcinoma with frequent signet ring cell differentiation, rectal and sigmoid involvement, and adverse morphologic features.

    PubMed

    Chang, Daniel T; Pai, Rish K; Rybicki, Lisa A; Dimaio, Michael A; Limaye, Maneesha; Jayachandran, Priya; Koong, Albert C; Kunz, Pamela A; Fisher, George A; Ford, James M; Welton, Mark; Shelton, Andrew; Ma, Lisa; Arber, Daniel A; Pai, Reetesh K

    2012-08-01

    Recent literature suggests an increasing incidence of colorectal carcinoma in young patients. We performed a histologic, molecular, and immunophenotypic analysis of patients with sporadic early-onset (≤40 years of age) colorectal carcinoma seen at our institution from the years 2000-2010 and compared these tumors to a cohort of consecutively resected colorectal carcinomas seen in patients >40 years of age. A total of 1160 primary colorectal adenocarcinomas were surgically resected for the years 2000 through 2010. Of these, 75 (6%) were diagnoses in patients ≤40 years of age of which 13 (17%) demonstrated abnormalities in DNA mismatch repair, 4 (5%) were in patients with known germline genetic disorders (two patients with familial adenomatous polyposis, one patient with juvenile polyposis, and one patient with Li-Fraumeni syndrome), and three patients (4%) had long-standing chronic inflammatory bowel disease. The sporadic early-onset colorectal carcinoma group comprised a total of 55 patients (55/1160, 5%) and were compared with a control group comprising 73 consecutively resected colorectal carcinomas with proficient DNA mismatch repair in patients >40 years of age. For the early-onset colorectal carcinoma group, most cases (33/55, 60%) were diagnosed between the age of 35 and 40 years of age. Compared with the control group, the early-onset colorectal carcinoma group was significantly different with respect to tumor location (P<0.007) with 80% (44/55 cases) identified in either the sigmoid colon (24/55, 44%) or rectum (20/55, 36%). Morphologically, early-onset colorectal carcinomas more frequently displayed adverse histologic features compared with the control colorectal carcinoma group such as signet ring cell differentiation (7/55, 13% vs 1/73, 1%, P=0.021), perineural invasion (16/55, 29% vs 8/73, 11%, P=0.009) and venous invasion (12/55, 22% vs 4/73, 6%, P=0.006). A precursor adenomatous lesion was less frequently identified in the early-onset colorectal

  15. Recognition of Intrabiliary Hepatic Metastases From Colorectal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Povoski, Stephen P.; Klimstra, David S.; Brown, Karen T.; Schwartz, Lawrence H.; Kurtz, Robert C.; Jarnagin, William R.; Fong, Yuman

    2000-01-01

    Intrinsic involvement of bile ducts, by metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma growing from within or invading the lumen of bile ducts, is not a well recognized pattern of tumor growth. Clinical, radiographic, operative, and histopathologic aspects of 15 patients with intrabiliary colorectal metastases were described. Fourteen patients were explored for possible hepatic resection. Two had jaundice, two radiographic evidence of an intrabiliary filling defect, 10 intraoperative evidence of intrabiliary tumor, and six microscopic evidence of intrabiliariy tumor. Eleven patients underwent hepatic resection. Five of the resected patients developed hepatic recurrence. Four patients were explored for possible repeat resection. One had jaundice, one radiographic evidence of an intrabiliary filling defect, all had intraoperative evidence of intrabiliary tumor, and three microscopic evidence of intrabiliary tumor. Three patients underwent repeat hepatic resection. All patients with preoperative jaundice and radiographic evidence of an intrabiliary filling defect were unresectable. Overall, actuarial five-year survival is 33% for those patients resected versus 0% for those not resected. Intraoperative recognition of intrabiliary tumor at exploration for hepatic resection was more common than clinical, radiographic, or histopathologic recognition. More diligent examination of resected liver tissue by the surgeon and pathologist may increase identification of bile duct involvement and aid in achieving adequate tumor clearance. PMID:10977117

  16. Mucinous (colloid) adenocarcinomas secrete distinct O-acylated forms of sialomucins: a histochemical study of gastric, colorectal and breast adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Sáez, C; Japón, M A; Poveda, M A; Segura, D I

    2001-12-01

    Mucinous (colloid) adenocarcinomas represent a distinct group of tumours defined by the presence of large amounts of extracellular mucins. By using histochemical methods, we analysed mucins secreted by mucinous versus non-mucinous adenocarcinomas and looked for differential secretion profiles. Sixty-four adenocarcinomas were studied (23 colorectal, 17 gastric, and 24 breast tumours). Thirty-two tumours were of the colloid type. The following methods were applied to paraffin tissue sections: (i) Alcian blue (pH 2.5) and periodic acid-Schiff (PAS); (ii) high iron diamine and Alcian blue (pH 2.5); (iii) periodic acid borohydride, potassium hydroxide, and PAS; (iv) periodic acid-thionine Schiff, potassium hydroxide, and PAS; and (v) periodic acid-borohydride and PAS. Most adenocarcinomas secreted acidic mucins, with sialomucins predominating over sulfomucins, except for non-mucinous adenocarcinomas of the breast which showed predominant neutral mucins. All mucinous adenocarcinomas contained C9-O-acyl sialic acid as mono, di(C8,C9)-, or tri(C7,C8,C9)-O-acyl forms. Acidic mucins secreted by the majority of non-colloid adenocarcinomas consisted of non-O-acylated sialomucins. C9-O-acylation of sialic acid is a characteristic feature of mucinous adenocarcinomas and can be readily detected by histochemical methods.

  17. Histopathologic parameters and DNA analysis in colorectal adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Crissman, J D; Zarbo, R J; Ma, C K; Visscher, D W

    1989-01-01

    Human colon adenocarcinomas have histological parameters that are clearly associated with prognosis. These include tumor grade, pattern of invasion, presence of lymphocytes, and vascular involvement by tumor. The latter remains controversial with respect to the relative importance of intramural and extramural vascular involvement. Some studies show a poor prognosis for intramural invasion of capillary size vascular channels by tumor. On the other hand, when veins are involved by tumor, the presence of tumor in large extramural veins appears to have a much more ominous effect than intramural tumor involvement of small veins. The results of DNA analysis of colorectal adenocarcinomas varied greatly depending on study methodology but several important points can be summarized: (1) higher stage tumors have a greater proportion of aneuploid tumors; (2) aneuploid tumors tend to have a higher growth rate (SPF) and poorer survival than diploid tumors; and (3) aneuploid tumors are associated with histological parameters indicative of a poor prognosis such as vascular invasion, but ploidy is not related to tumor grade. One of the major problems in drawing firm conclusions about the relationship of flow cytometric DNA measurements to prognosis is great variability among the reported studies. The types of variation appear to fall into two major categories: patient selection and technical problems. The former are especially relevant in retrospective studies in which there is poor patient definition (site, grade, stage, and other standard tumor definitions) and a bias for selecting early stage tumors which have improved survivals. The latter includes a spectrum of technical problems inherent in this widely but not necessarily uniformly applied laboratory procedure. This is particularly true for DNA analysis of nuclei removed from paraffin tissue blocks. For the most part, quality control measurements including cell yields, the efficiency of extraction or disaggregation of

  18. Adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) immunoreactivity in colorectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    ten Kate, J; van den Ingh, H F; Khan, P M; Bosman, F T

    1986-04-15

    Immunoreactive adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) was studied in 91 human colorectal adenocarcinomas. The expression of ADCP was correlated with that of secretory component (SC) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), with the histological grade and the Dukes' stage of the carcinomas. The histological grade was scored semi-quantitatively according to 5 structural and 4 cytological variables. ADCP expression was observed in 3 different staining patterns, namely: (1) diffuse cytoplasmic (77% of the carcinomas); (2) granular cytoplasmic (13%); and (3) membrane-associated (66%). These patterns were observed alone or in combination. Eleven percent of the carcinomas exhibited no ADCP immunoreactivity. Linear regression analysis showed that the expression of ADCP correlates with that of SC and CEA. However, no significant correlation emerged between the histological parameters or the Dukes' stage and any of the immunohistological parameters. Comparison of the histological characteristics of carcinomas exhibiting little or no ADCP immunoreactivity with those showing extensive immunoreactivity, showed that membranous ADCP immunoreactivity occurs more frequently in well-differentiated carcinomas. Structural parameters showed a better correlation with membranous ADCP expression than the cytological variables. It is concluded that membranous expression of ADCP and CEA are indicators of a high level of differentiation as reflected primarily in the structural characteristics of the tumor.

  19. Quantitative changes in adenosine deaminase isoenzymes in human colorectal adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    ten Kate, J; Wijnen, J T; van der Goes, R G; Quadt, R; Griffioen, G; Bosman, F T; Khan, P M

    1984-10-01

    Several reports have suggested that a decrease or absence of adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) is consistently associated with cancer. However, in other studies, decreased as well as increased ADCP levels were found. In the present study, we investigated ADCP levels in 37 colorectal adenocarcinomas and correlated the results with clinicopathological characteristics in individual carcinomas. The levels of adenosine deaminase (EC 3.5.4.4) and soluble ADCP were determined in tissue samples by, respectively, a spectrophotometric assay and an ADCP specific radioimmunoassay. The values in the individual tumors were compared with their histological characteristics, such as degree of differentiation, nuclear grading, and the preoperative plasma carcinoembryonic antigen levels in the patients. It was found that ADCP was decreased in about a third of the tumors but unaltered or even increased in others. However, there was an overall 40% increase of the adenosine deaminase activity in the tumors compared to normal tissue. There seems to be no simple correlation between any of the clinicopathological parameters and the ADCP or adenosine deaminase levels. Methods detecting ADCP at single cell level might be helpful in exploring its potential use as a cancer-associated marker.

  20. Prognostic impact of MGMT promoter methylation and MGMT and CD133 expression in colorectal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background New biomarkers are needed for the prognosis of advanced colorectal cancer, which remains incurable by conventional treatments. O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) methylation and protein expression have been related to colorectal cancer treatment failure and tumor progression. Moreover, the presence in these tumors of cancer stem cells, which are characterized by CD133 expression, has been associated with chemoresistance, radioresistance, metastasis, and local recurrence. The objective of this study was to determine the prognostic value of CD133 and MGMT and their possible interaction in colorectal cancer patients. Methods MGMT and CD133 expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in 123 paraffin-embedded colorectal adenocarcinoma samples, obtaining the percentage staining and intensity. MGMT promoter methylation status was obtained by using bisulfite modification and methylation-specific PCR (MSP). These values were correlated with clinical data, including overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), tumor stage, and differentiation grade. Results Low MGMT expression intensity was significantly correlated with shorter OS and was a prognostic factor independently of treatment and histopathological variables. High percentage of CD133 expression was significantly correlated with shorter DFS but was not an independent factor. Patients with low-intensity MGMT expression and ≥50% CD133 expression had the poorest DFS and OS outcomes. Conclusions Our results support the hypothesis that MGMT expression may be an OS biomarker as useful as tumor stage or differentiation grade and that CD133 expression may be a predictive biomarker of DFS. Thus, MGMT and CD133 may both be useful for determining the prognosis of colorectal cancer patients and to identify those requiring more aggressive adjuvant therapies. Future studies will be necessary to determine its clinical utility. PMID:25015560

  1. Prognostic value of the immunocytochemical detection of extramural venous invasion in Dukes' C colorectal adenocarcinomas. A preliminary study.

    PubMed Central

    Lapertosa, G.; Baracchini, P.; Fulcheri, E.; Tanzi, R.

    1989-01-01

    In postsurgical staging of colorectal adenocarcinomas, it is sometimes difficult to determine the range of possible venous spread. Distinguishing between the extramural veins (especially when the neoplastic embolus takes up the whole lumen and the endothelium cannot be identified) and the smallest extramural lymph nodes (when they are completely replaced by metastatic carcinoma, leaving the capsule alone) is also difficult. This work proposes a more precise definition of true venous invasion to improve histopathologic staging. Immunohistochemical techniques employing commercial antibodies against Factor VIII RAG, with and without enzymatic digestion, and UEA I lectin for residual endothelium detection, were applied, as well as antibodies against vimentin, desmin, and alpha sm-1 actin to detect wall components. The immunohistochemical evaluation of colorectal adenocarcinomas, in particular by anti-alpha sm-1 actin antibodies, permitted a reliable morphologic distinction of the true venous invasion. This factor proved to be relevant for survival rate prediction. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2817085

  2. The expression profiles of the galectin gene family in colorectal adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Gopalan, Vinod; Saremi, Nassim; Sullivan, Emily; Kabir, Sadiul; Lu, Cu-Tai; Salajegheh, Ali; Leung, Melissa; Smith, Robert Anthony; Lam, Alfred King-Yin

    2016-07-01

    We aim to investigate the expression profiles of galectin family genes (galectins-1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 8, 9, 10, and 11) in colorectal carcinomas. Messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of galectin family members (1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 8, 9, 10, and 12) was analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction in colorectal tissues from 201 patients (54 noncancer colorectal tissues, 49 adenomas, and 98 adenocarcinomas). Galectin-1 and galectin-3 protein expressions were determined by immunohistochemistry. In general, high galectin mRNA expression was noted in colorectal carcinomas in early stages of their pathogenesis. Significant differences in galectins-2, 3, 7, 8, and 10 mRNA expression were associated with pathologic stages (P<.05). Increased prevalence of galectins-2, 7, 8, and 10 mRNA overexpression was noted in nonmetastatic colorectal carcinomas (P<.05). Galectin-1 and galectin-3 proteins were present in the nucleus and cytoplasm of the colorectal tissues and expressed significantly higher in colorectal carcinomas when compared to colorectal adenomas (61% and 95%, respectively). Patients with colorectal carcinoma with high levels of galectin-3 mRNA and protein expression showed better prognosis (P=.052). To conclude, many novel correlations between the deregulation of galectin family genes and various clinicopathological features in colorectal adenocarcinoma were noted. Overexpression of galectins at the mRNA level and proteins were predominant in earlier stages of colorectal carcinomas. These altered expression patterns of galectin genes suggest the multifunctional role of galectin genes in the regulation of colorectal cancer development, progression, and metastasis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Association of the DNMT3B polymorphism with colorectal adenomatous polyps and adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Liwei; Wu, Mingli; Wang, Na; Liu, Yanfeng; Er, Limian; Wang, Shunping; Gao, Yang; Yu, Weifang; Xue, Hui; Xu, Zhibin; Wang, Shijie

    2010-01-01

    DNMT3B is an important enzyme to modulate the methylation status in mammalian cells. The aim of this study is to investigate the correlation of the DNMT3B G39179T polymorphism with the susceptibilities of colorectal adenomatous polyps and adenocarcinoma. This case-control study included 146 colorectal adenomatous polyps, 170 colorectal adenocarcinoma patients, and 157 normal controls. DNMT3B polymorphism was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Family history of colorectal cancer significantly increases the risk of developing colorectal adenomatous polyps and adenocarcinoma. The genotype frequency of DNMT3B polymorphism (T/T and G/T + G/G) in adenocarcinoma patients was significantly different from that in controls (P value = 0.01). Compared with DNMT3B T/T genotype, the G allelotype (G/T + G/G genotype) had lower risk to develop colorectal adenocarcinoma (OR = 0.50, 95% CI = 0.29-0.87); while there was no significant difference between the colorectal adenomatous polyps patients and controls (OR = 0.63, 95% CI = 0.37-1.09), although descending tendency could be found in this polyps group. In the stratification analysis, a significant association was confined to subgroups of age < 55 (OR = 0.31, 95% CI = 0.12-0.84) and males (OR = 0.35, 95% CI = 0.17-0.71). Meanwhile, combined G/T + G/G genotypes were found to have a lower risk in non-drinkers to develop both colorectal adenomatous polyps and adenocarcinoma (OR = 0.54, 95% CI = 0.31-0.96 and OR = 0.48, 95% CI = 0.27-0.84, respectively). This study also showed a distinct difference in the distribution of DNMT3B G39179T SNP in different ethnics. DNMT3B G39179T SNP may be a potential genetic susceptibility factor for adenocarcinoma of the colon, especially in younger Chinese Han non-drinker men.

  4. Discovery and verification of gelsolin as a potential biomarker of colorectal adenocarcinoma in a Chinese population: Examining differential protein expression using an iTRAQ labelling-based proteomics approach

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Nai-Jun; Gao, Chun-Fang; Wang, Chang-Song; Lv, Jing-Jing; Zhao, Guang; Sheng, Xin-Hua; Wang, Xiu-Li; Li, Dong-Hui; Liu, Qing-Yin; Yin, Jian

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify and validate potential biomarkers of colorectal adenocarcinoma using a proteomic approach. METHODS: Multidimensional liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry was used to analyze biological samples labelled with isobaric mass tags for relative and absolute quantitation to identify differentially expressed proteins in human colorectal adenocarcinoma and paired normal mucosa for the discovery of cancerous biomarkers. Cancerous and noncancerous samples were compared using online and offline separation. Protein identification was performed using mass spectrometry. The downregulation of gelsolin protein in colorectal adenocarcinoma samples was confirmed by Western blot analysis and validated using immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: A total of 802 nonredundant proteins were identified in colorectal adenocarcinoma samples, 82 of which fell outside the expression range of 0.8 to 1.2, and were considered to be potential cancer-specific proteins. Immunohistochemistry revealed a complete absence of gelsolin expression in 86.89% of samples and a reduction of expression in 13.11% of samples, yielding a sensitivity of 86.89% and a specificity of 100% for distinguishing colorectal adenocarcinoma from normal tissue. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that decreased expression of gelsolin is a potential biomarker of colorectal adenocarcinoma. PMID:22288069

  5. Quantitative expression analysis and prognostic significance of L-DOPA decarboxylase in colorectal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kontos, C K; Papadopoulos, I N; Fragoulis, E G; Scorilas, A

    2010-01-01

    Background: L-DOPA decarboxylase (DDC) is an enzyme that catalyses, mainly, the decarboxylation of L-DOPA to dopamine and was found to be involved in many malignancies. The aim of this study was to investigate the mRNA expression levels of the DDC gene and to evaluate its clinical utility in tissues with colorectal adenocarcinoma. Methods: Total RNA was isolated from colorectal adenocarcinoma tissues of 95 patients. After having tested RNA quality, we prepared cDNA by reverse transcription. Highly sensitive quantitative real-time PCR method for DDC mRNA quantification was developed using the SYBR Green chemistry. GAPDH served as a housekeeping gene. Relative quantification analysis was performed using the comparative CT method (2−ΔΔCT). Results: DDC mRNA expression varied remarkably among colorectal tumours examined in this study. High DDC mRNA expression levels were found in well-differentiated and Dukes' stage A and B tumours. Kaplan–Meier survival curves showed that patients with DDC-positive tumours have significantly longer disease-free survival (P=0.009) and overall survival (P=0.027). In Cox regression analysis of the entire cohort of patients, negative DDC proved to be a significant predictor of reduced disease-free (P=0.021) and overall survival (P=0.047). Conclusions: The results of the study suggest that DDC mRNA expression may be regarded as a novel potential tissue biomarker in colorectal adenocarcinoma. PMID:20424616

  6. Degree of differentiation in colorectal adenocarcinomas: a multivariate analysis of the influence on survival.

    PubMed Central

    Halvorsen, T B; Seim, E

    1988-01-01

    Three hundred and sixty eight resected colorectal adenocarcinomas were graded (WHO) retrospectively and the results correlated with estimated length of patient survival. In 30 (82%) of the tumours more than one degree of differentiation was found. Histological grade significantly influenced survival time when other explanatory variables such as tumour site and stage, age, and sex were adjusted for. The results suggested that three degrees of differentiation (well, moderate, and poor) are sufficient for the grading of colorectal carcinomas, and that grading should be based on the predominating degree of differentiation represented in the primary tumour. Images Fig 1 PMID:3384983

  7. Case of metachronous bilateral isolated adrenal metastasis from colorectal adenocarcinoma and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Yi; Chen, Zhi-Hui; Zhai, Er-Tao; Yang, Jie; Xu, Jian-Bo; Cai, Shi-Rong; Song, Wu

    2016-04-14

    Rarely has a solitary, metachronous bilateral adrenal metastasis of colorectal cancer been reported. We depict a 41-year-old man who underwent sigmoid colon cancer radical surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy for a locally ulcerative sigmoid adenocarcinoma with metachronous bilateral adrenal metastasis revealed by a computed tomography scan. Histopathological examination showed adenocarcinoma, compatible with metastasis from the rectal cancer. The level of serum carcinoembryonic antigen had indicative significance for the presence of adrenal metastasis in the reported series. We performed a literature analysis related to this pathological characteristic and attach importance to consistent, vigilant radiological surveillance of the adrenal glands in the patients' follow up for colorectal cancer with or without subsequent adrenal metastasis.

  8. Colorectal adenocarcinoma with mucinous component: relation of MMP-13, EGFR, and E-cadherin expressions to clinicopathological features and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Foda, Abd Al-Rahman Mohammad; El-Hawary, Amira Kamal; Aziz, Azza Abdel

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare colorectal adenocarcinoma with mucinous component, ordinary adenocarcinoma (OA) and mucinous adenocarcinoma (MA) regarding clinicopathological parameters, survival, EGFR, MMP-13, and E-cadherin. We studied tumor tissue specimens from 28 patients with adenocarcinoma with mucinous component, 47 with OA, and 56 with MA, who underwent radical surgery from January 2007 to January 2012 at the Gastroenterology Centre, Mansoura University, Egypt. High density manual tissue microarrays were constructed and immunohistochemistry for EGFR, MMP-13, and E-cadherin was done. Colorectal adenocarcinoma with mucinous component (AWMC) was significantly associated with more perineural invasion, lower EGFR, and MMP-13 expressions than OA, with no difference in E-cadherin expression. Conversely, only microscopic abscess formation was significantly more with colorectal AWMC than MC with no difference in EGFR, MMP-13 and E-cadherin expression between both groups. Colorectal AWMC showed a better survival than MA with no difference with OA. In a univariate analysis, EGFR, MMP-13, and E-cadherin expressions did not show a significant impact on disease-free or overall survival in patients with colorectal AWMC. Colorectal AWMC remains a vague entity that resembles OA in some clinicopathological and molecular respects as well as MA.

  9. In-depth mutational analyses of colorectal neuroendocrine carcinomas with adenoma or adenocarcinoma components.

    PubMed

    Woischke, Christine; Schaaf, Christian W; Yang, Hui-Min; Vieth, Michael; Veits, Lothar; Geddert, Helene; Märkl, Bruno; Stömmer, Peter; Schaeffer, David F; Frölich, Matthias; Blum, Helmut; Vosberg, Sebastian; Greif, Philipp A; Jung, Andreas; Kirchner, Thomas; Horst, David

    2017-01-01

    Neuroendocrine carcinomas (NECs) of the colorectum are rare but highly aggressive neoplasms. These tumors show some shared genetic alterations with colorectal adenocarcinomas, and most of them have adjacent glandular adenoma or adenocarcinoma components. However, genetic data on colorectal NECs still are sparse and insufficient for definite conclusions regarding their molecular origin. Based on morphological characterization, panel and whole-exome sequencing, we here present results from an in-depth analysis of a collection of 15 colorectal NECs with glandular components, 10 of which by definition were mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinomas (MANECs). Among shared genetic alterations of both tumor components, we most frequently found TP53, KRAS and APC mutations that also had highest allele frequencies. Mutations exclusive to glandular or neuroendocrine components outnumbered shared mutations but occurred at lower allele frequencies. Our findings not only provide additional evidence for a common clonal origin of colorectal NECs and adjacent glandular tumor components, but strongly suggest their development through the classical adenoma-carcinoma sequence. Moreover, our data imply early separation of glandular and neuroendocrine components during malignant transformation with subsequent independent mutational evolution.

  10. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS AND COLORECTAL ADENOCARCINOMA AND ITS INFLUENCE ON TUMOR STAGING AND DEGREE OF CELL DIFFERENTIATION

    PubMed Central

    PICANÇO-JUNIOR, Olavo Magalhães; OLIVEIRA, Andre Luiz Torres; FREIRE, Lucia Thereza Mascarenhas; BRITO, Rosangela Baia; VILLA, Luisa Lina; MATOS, Délcio

    2014-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer is one of the most common types of neoplasia among the worldwide adult population. Among neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract, it is ranked second in relation to prevalence and mortality, but its etiology is only known in around 5% of the cases. It is believed that 15% of malignant diseases are related to viral oncogenesis. Aim To correlate the presence of HPV with the staging and degree of cell differentiation among patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma. Methods A retrospective case-control study was conducted on 144 patients divided between a test group of 79 cases of colorectal cancer and a control group to analyze 144 patients aged 25 to 85 years (mean, 57.85 years; standard deviation, 15.27 years and median, 58 years). Eighty-six patients (59.7%) were male. For both groups, tissue samples from paraffin blocks were subjected to DNA extraction followed by the polymerase chain reaction using generic and specific primers for HPV 16 and 18. Dot blot hybridization was also performed with the aim of identifying HPV DNA. Results The groups were shown to be homogenous regarding sex, age and site of HPV findings in the samples analyzed. Out of the 41 patients with HPV, 36 (45.6%) were in the cases and five (7.7%) were in the control group (p<0.001). All the HPV cases observed comprised HPV 16, and HPV 18 was not shown in any of the cases studied. There were no significant differences in comparisons of sex, age and site regarding the presence of HPV in either of the groups. It was not observe any significant difference in relation to staging or degree of cell differentiation among the patients with colorectal cancer. Conclusion Human papillomavirus type 16 is present in individuals with colorectal carcinoma. However, its presence was unrelated to staging or degree of differentiation. PMID:25184765

  11. [Comparison of CT manifestations of primary colorectal mucinous adenocarcinoma and signet ring cell carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenhui; Zhang, Zhiping; Dong, Xingxiang; Gao, Depei; Zhang, Dafu

    2017-03-25

    To compare the difference in CT manifestations between primary colorectal mucinous adenocarcinoma and signet ring cell carcinoma in order to improve radiologic diagnosis. Clinicopathological data and CT findings of 109 patients with colorectal mucinous adenocarcinoma and 46 patients with primary colorectal signet-ring cell carcinoma confirmed by surgery and pathology from March 2008 to February 2015 in the Tumor Hospital of Yunnan Province were retrospectively collected. Differences in age, gender, tumor location, length and thickness of the involved intestinal wall, thickening pattern of the intestinal wall, lesion density, calcification, contrast-enhanced form, peri-intestinal invasion, occurrence of intestinal obstruction and metastasis of other organs were compared between the two groups. Among 109 patients with colorectal mucinous adenocarcinoma, 68 were men and 41 were women with a mean age of (56.8±15.4) years. Among 46 patients with primary colorectal signet-ring cell carcinoma, 26 were men and 20 were women with a mean age of (42.9±15.6) years. Compared with mucinous adenocarcinoma group, signet-ring cell carcinoma group showed more concentric bowel-wall thickening[93.5%(43/46) vs. 81.6%(89/109), χ(2)=9.19, P=0.030], higher lesion density [(42.0±3.0) Hu vs. (28.5±1.5) Hu, t=37.30, P=0.000], more marked enhancement [54.3%(25/46) vs. 12.8%(14/109), χ(2)=35.21, P=0.000], less vast-low-density region in enhanced CT imaging[2.2%(1/46) vs. 45.0%(49/109), χ(2)=73.31, P=0.000] and more severe peri-intestinal invasion [41.3% (19/46) vs. 17.4%(19/109), χ(2)=10.25, P=0.006]. Calcification was found in 18.3%(20/109) of mucinous adenocarcinoma cases, but was not found in signet-ring cell carcinoma cases (χ(2)=9.69, P=0.002). Target ring sign in contrast-enhanced scan was observed in 15.2%(7/46) of signet-ring cell carcinoma cases, while in none of mucinous adenocarcinoma cases (χ(2)=17.37, P=0.000). There were no statistically significant differences in

  12. Genetic ancestry is associated with colorectal adenomas and adenocarcinomas in Latino populations.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Suarez, Gustavo; Sanabria, Maria Carolina; Serrano, Marta; Herran, Oscar F; Perez, Jesus; Plata, Jose L; Zabaleta, Jovanny; Tenesa, Albert

    2014-10-01

    Colorectal cancer rates in Latin American countries are less than half of those observed in the United States. Latin Americans are the resultant of generations of an admixture of Native American, European, and African individuals. The potential role of genetic admixture in colorectal carcinogenesis has not been examined. We evaluate the association of genetic ancestry with colorectal neoplasms in 190 adenocarcinomas, 113 sporadic adenomas and 243 age- and sex-matched controls enrolled in a multicentric case-control study in Colombia. Individual ancestral genetic fractions were estimated using the STRUCTURE software, based on allele frequencies and assuming three distinct population origins. We used the Illumina Cancer Panel to genotype 1,421 sparse single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and Northern and Western European ancestry, LWJ and Han Chinese in Beijing, China populations from the HapMap project as references. A total of 678 autosomal SNPs overlapped with the HapMap data set SNPs and were used for ancestry estimations. African mean ancestry fraction was higher in adenomas (0.13, 95% confidence interval (95% CI)=0.11-0.15) and cancer cases (0.14, 95% CI=0.12-0.16) compared with controls (0.11, 95% CI=0.10-0.12). Conditional logistic regression analysis, controlling for known risk factors, showed a positive association of African ancestry per 10% increase with both colorectal adenoma (odds ratio (OR)=1.12, 95% CI=0.97-1.30) and adenocarcinoma (OR=1.19, 95% CI=1.05-1.35). In conclusion, increased African ancestry (or variants linked to it) contributes to the increased susceptibility of colorectal cancer in admixed Latin American population.

  13. Genetic ancestry is associated with colorectal adenomas and adenocarcinomas in Latino populations

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Suarez, Gustavo; Sanabria, Maria Carolina; Serrano, Marta; Herran, Oscar F; Perez, Jesus; Plata, Jose L; Zabaleta, Jovanny; Tenesa, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer rates in Latin American countries are less than half of those observed in the United States. Latin Americans are the resultant of generations of an admixture of Native American, European, and African individuals. The potential role of genetic admixture in colorectal carcinogenesis has not been examined. We evaluate the association of genetic ancestry with colorectal neoplasms in 190 adenocarcinomas, 113 sporadic adenomas and 243 age- and sex-matched controls enrolled in a multicentric case–control study in Colombia. Individual ancestral genetic fractions were estimated using the STRUCTURE software, based on allele frequencies and assuming three distinct population origins. We used the Illumina Cancer Panel to genotype 1,421 sparse single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and Northern and Western European ancestry, LWJ and Han Chinese in Beijing, China populations from the HapMap project as references. A total of 678 autosomal SNPs overlapped with the HapMap data set SNPs and were used for ancestry estimations. African mean ancestry fraction was higher in adenomas (0.13, 95% confidence interval (95% CI)=0.11–0.15) and cancer cases (0.14, 95% CI=0.12–0.16) compared with controls (0.11, 95% CI=0.10–0.12). Conditional logistic regression analysis, controlling for known risk factors, showed a positive association of African ancestry per 10% increase with both colorectal adenoma (odds ratio (OR)=1.12, 95% CI=0.97–1.30) and adenocarcinoma (OR=1.19, 95% CI=1.05–1.35). In conclusion, increased African ancestry (or variants linked to it) contributes to the increased susceptibility of colorectal cancer in admixed Latin American population. PMID:24518838

  14. KLK11 mRNA expression predicts poor disease-free and overall survival in colorectal adenocarcinoma patients.

    PubMed

    Alexopoulou, Dimitra K; Kontos, Christos K; Christodoulou, Spyridon; Papadopoulos, Iordanis N; Scorilas, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulated expression of several KLK family members has been observed in colorectal adenocarcinoma. In the present study, the prognostic value of KLK11 mRNA expression as a molecular tissue biomarker in colorectal adenocarcinoma was examined. Using quantitative real-time PCR, KLK11 mRNA expression was studied in 120 cancerous and 41 paired noncancerous colorectal specimens obtained from 120 patients with primary colorectal adenocarcinoma. A significant upregulation of KLK11 transcripts in colorectal tumors was observed. KLK11 mRNA expression was associated with the depth of tumor invasion and the histological grade. Furthermore, KLK11 mRNA expression predicted poor disease-free and overall survival, independently of patient gender, age, tumor size, location, histological subtype, grade, venous invasion, lymphatic invasion, TNM stage, radiotherapy and chemotherapy treatment. KLK11 mRNA expression could be considered as a new molecular prognostic biomarker in colorectal adenocarcinoma, with additional prognostic value in patients with highly invasive tumors and/or positive lymph nodes.

  15. Multidisciplinary management of colorectal adenocarcinoma associated with anal fistula: an Indian series.

    PubMed

    Pai, V D; Jatal, S; Engineer, R; Ostwal, V; Saklani, A P

    2015-11-01

    Adenocarcinomas associated with anal fistula are rare and often present at an advanced stage. They are often mistaken for commonly occurring benign diseases, leading to delayed diagnosis. Previous reports have predicted inferior oncological outcomes for these cases compared with sporadic rectal cancers. We are presenting our series of patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma associated with anal fistula who were treated with multimodality therapy at a tertiary cancer centre in India. This was a retrospective review of a prospectively maintained database of patients treated at our centre between 1 July 2013 and 31 March 2015. Of the 15 patients included in the study, 11 had prior intervention in the form of seton placement or fistulotomy. Fourteen patients had circumferential resection margin (CRM) involvement at initial workup and hence were given neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (NACRT). None of the patients had distant metastasis and only 15% had regional nodal involvement. All 13 patients included in the final analysis underwent abdominoperineal excision (APE). Ten patients (73%) underwent extralevator APE. Plastic reconstruction in the form of a V-Y advancement flap for perineal closure was required in six patients (46%). On histopathological examination, a mucinous component was found to be present in 11 patients (73%). The quality of total mesorectal excision was complete in 92% patients. The CRM was free in 92% of patients. Median overall survival and disease-free survival were not reached. Colorectal adenocarcinomas associated with fistula are locally aggressive malignancies with a low incidence of lymph node involvement and distant metastasis. NACRT, wider resection in the form of extralevator APE, and liberal use of plastic reconstruction may result in favourable outcomes. Colorectal Disease © 2015 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  16. p, p′-Dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene Induces Colorectal Adenocarcinoma Cell Proliferation through Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Song, Li; Liu, Jianxin; Jin, Xiaoting; Li, Zhuoyu; Zhao, Meirong; Liu, Weiping

    2014-01-01

    p, p′-Dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE), the major metabolite of Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), is an organochlorine pollutant and associated with cancer progression. The present study investigated the possible effects of p,p′-DDE on colorectal cancer and the involved molecular mechanism. The results indicated that exposure to low concentrations of p,p′-DDE from 10−10 to 10−7 M for 96 h markedly enhanced proliferations of human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines. Moreover, p,p′-DDE exposure could activate Wnt/β-catenin and Hedgehog/Gli1 signaling cascades, and the expression level of c-Myc and cyclin D1 was significantly increased. Consistently, p,p′-DDE-induced cell proliferation along with upregulated c-Myc and cyclin D1 were impeded by β-catenin siRNA or Gli1 siRNA. In addition, p,p′-DDE was able to activate NADPH oxidase, generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reduce GSH content, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and calatase (CAT) activities. Treatment with antioxidants prevented p,p′-DDE-induced cell proliferation and signaling pathways of Wnt/β-catenin and Hedgehog/Gli1. These results indicated that p,p′-DDE promoted colorectal cancer cell proliferation through Wnt/β-catenin and Hedgehog/Gli1 signalings mediated by oxidative stress. The finding suggests an association between p,p′-DDE exposure and the risk of colorectal cancer progression. PMID:25386960

  17. p, p'-Dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene induces colorectal adenocarcinoma cell proliferation through oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Song, Li; Liu, Jianxin; Jin, Xiaoting; Li, Zhuoyu; Zhao, Meirong; Liu, Weiping

    2014-01-01

    p, p'-Dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE), the major metabolite of Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), is an organochlorine pollutant and associated with cancer progression. The present study investigated the possible effects of p,p'-DDE on colorectal cancer and the involved molecular mechanism. The results indicated that exposure to low concentrations of p,p'-DDE from 10(-10) to 10(-7) M for 96 h markedly enhanced proliferations of human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines. Moreover, p,p'-DDE exposure could activate Wnt/β-catenin and Hedgehog/Gli1 signaling cascades, and the expression level of c-Myc and cyclin D1 was significantly increased. Consistently, p,p'-DDE-induced cell proliferation along with upregulated c-Myc and cyclin D1 were impeded by β-catenin siRNA or Gli1 siRNA. In addition, p,p'-DDE was able to activate NADPH oxidase, generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reduce GSH content, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and calatase (CAT) activities. Treatment with antioxidants prevented p,p'-DDE-induced cell proliferation and signaling pathways of Wnt/β-catenin and Hedgehog/Gli1. These results indicated that p,p'-DDE promoted colorectal cancer cell proliferation through Wnt/β-catenin and Hedgehog/Gli1 signalings mediated by oxidative stress. The finding suggests an association between p,p'-DDE exposure and the risk of colorectal cancer progression.

  18. ABO and Rh blood groups and risk of colorectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Urun, Yuksel; Ozdemir, Nuriye Yildirim; Utkan, Gungor; Akbulut, Hakan; Savas, Berna; Oksuzoglu, Berna; Oztuna, Derya Gokmen; Dogan, Izzet; Yalcin, Bulent; Senler, Filiz Cay; Onur, Handan; Demirkazik, Ahmet; Zengin, Nurullah; Icli, Fikri

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have observed an association between ABO blood group and risk for certain gastrointestinal malignancies, including pancreatic and gastric cancer. However, it is unclear whether there is such an association with colorectal cancer (CRC). In this study, possible relationships between ABO blood groups and Rh factor and KRAS status in patients with CRC were investigated. In 1,620 patients with CRC, blood group and Rh factor were examined and compared with the control group of 3,022,883 healthy volunteer blood donors of the Turkish Red Crescent between 2004 and 2011. The relationship of blood groups with wild type K-ras status was also evaluated. Overall distributions of ABO blood groups as well as Rh factor were comparable between patients (45% A, 7.2% AB, 16.4% B, 31.4% O, and 87.2% Rh+) and controls (42.2% A, 7.6% AB, 16.3% B, 33.9% O, and 87.7% Rh+) (p=0.099). However, there were statistically significant difference between patients and controls with respect to O vs. non O blood group (p=0.033) and marginally significant difference for A vs. non-A blood group (p=0.052). Among patients, the median age was 62 (range 17-97), 58.1% were male. There were no statistically significant differences respect to sex and K-ras status. In present study, the ABO/Rh blood groups were statistically significantly associated with the risk of CRC. There were no relationship between K-ras status and ABO blood group and Rh factor. However further studies with larger numbers of patients are needed to establish the role of blood groups and to define the mechanisms by which ABO blood type affect CRC.

  19. Analysis of differentially expressed genes in colorectal adenocarcinoma with versus without metastasis by three-dimensional oligonucleotide microarray

    PubMed Central

    Moura Franco, Rita MAM; Linhares, Marcelo M; Lustosa, Suzana S; Silva, Ismael DGC; Souza, Naiara CN; Matos, Delcio

    2014-01-01

    Background: Our objective was to examine how the gene expression profile of tumor tissue correlates with lymph node metastasis in patients with advanced colorectal adenocarcinoma (CRAC). Methods: We studied 36 patients (20 men and 16 women, 22-90 years of age) treated for CRAC (classifications of T2, T3, or T4; histological grade of G1 or G2). Amplified tumor mRNA samples were exposed to 20,000 human sequence probes and digitized images of the hybridized samples were analyzed. Results: On average, 2389 probes were detected above the background, with an average correlation R value of 0.19 between data from different patient groups (with or without lymph node invasion, colon or rectal, with or without angio-lymphatic invasion, with or without recurrence). Lymph node metastasis had a statistically significant signature according to Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM) and parametric t-tests, with a false discovery rate (FDR) = 0.1% and p = 0.001, respectively. Cross-correlation of these two tests identified 102 transcripts as being potentially related to node metastases, with fold changes in the range of 2.182-12.960. Conclusion: We identified 102 differentially expressed genes related to the presence of lymph node metastases in patients with advanced colorectal cancer. PMID:24427346

  20. Mucinous Colorectal Adenocarcinoma: Influence of EGFR and E-Cadherin Expression on Clinicopathologic Features and Prognosis.

    PubMed

    Foda, Abd AlRahman M; AbdelAziz, Azza; El-Hawary, Amira K; Hosni, Ali; Zalata, Khalid R; Gado, Asmaa I

    2015-08-01

    Previous studies have shown conflicting results on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and E-cadherin expression in colorectal carcinoma and their prognostic significance. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to investigate EGFR and E-cadherin expression, interrelation and relation to clinicopathologic, histologic parameters, and survival in rare colorectal mucinous adenocarcinoma (MA). In this study, we studied tumor tissue specimens from 150 patients with colorectal MA and nonmucinous adenocarcinoma (NMA). High-density manual tissue microarrays were constructed using modified mechanical pencil tips technique, and immunohistochemistry for EGFR and E-cadherin was performed. All relations were analyzed using established statistical methodologies. NMA expressed EGFR and E-cadherin in significantly higher rates with significant heterogenous pattern than MA. EGFR and E-cadherin positivity rates were significantly interrelated in both NMA and MA groups. In the NMA group, high EGFR expression was associated with old age, male sex, multiplicity of tumors, lack of mucinous component, and association with schistosomiasis. However, in the MA group, high EGFR expression was associated only with old age and MA subtype rather than signet ring carcinoma subtype. Conversely, high E-cadherin expression in MA cases was associated with old age, fungating tumor configuration, MA subtype, and negative intratumoral lymphocytic response. However, in the NMA cases, none of these factors was statistically significant. In a univariate analysis, neither EGFR nor E-cadherin expression showed a significant impact on disease-free or overall survival. Targeted therapy against EGFR and E-cadherin may not be useful in patients with MA. Neither EGFR nor E-cadherin is an independent prognostic factor in NMA or MA.

  1. Celecoxib pre-treatment in human colorectal adenocarcinoma patients is associated with gene expression alterations suggestive of diminished cellular proliferation.

    PubMed

    Auman, James Todd; Church, Robert; Lee, Soo-Youn; Watson, Mark A; Fleshman, James W; Mcleod, Howard L

    2008-08-01

    Cancer cells treated with the cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor celecoxib show growth inhibition and induced apoptosis. This study was conducted to determine if the same processes are relevant to celecoxib's effects on human colorectal adenocarcinomas treated in vivo. A cohort of 23 patients with primary colorectal adenocarcinomas was randomised to receive a 7-d course of celecoxib (400mg b.i.d.) or no drug prior to surgical resection. Gene expression profiling was performed on resected adenocarcinomas from the cohort of patients. Using fold change (>1.5) and p-value (<0.05) cut-offs, 190 genes were differentially expressed between adenocarcinomas from patients receiving celecoxib and those that did not. The celecoxib pre-treated samples showed decreased expression levels in multiple genes involved in cellular lipid and glutathione metabolism; changes associated with diminished cellular proliferation. Celecoxib pre-treatment for 7 d in vivo is associated with alterations in colorectal adenocarcinoma gene expression which are suggestive of diminished cellular proliferation.

  2. Celecoxib pre-treatment in human colorectal adenocarcinoma patients is associated with gene expression alterations suggestive of diminished cellular proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Auman, James Todd; Church, Robert; Lee, Soo-Youn; Watson, Mark A.; Fleshman, James W.; Mcleod, Howard L.

    2008-01-01

    Cancer cells treated with the cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor celecoxib show growth inhibition and induced apoptosis. This study was conducted to determine if the same processes are relevant to celecoxib’s effects on human colorectal adenocarcinomas treated in vivo. A cohort of 23 patients with primary colorectal adenocarcinomas was randomized to receive a 7-day course of celecoxib (400 mg b.i.d.) or no drug prior to surgical resection. Gene expression profiling was performed on resected adenocarcinomas from the cohort of patients. Using fold change (>1.5) and p-value (<0.05) cut-offs, 190 genes were differentially expressed between adenocarcinomas from patients receiving celecoxib and those that did not. The celecoxib pre-treated samples showed decreased expression levels in multiple genes involved in cellular lipid and glutathione metabolism; changes associated with diminished cellular proliferation. Celecoxib pre-treatment for 7 days in vivo is associated with alterations in colorectal adenocarcinoma gene expression which are suggestive of diminished cellular proliferation. PMID:18653328

  3. Clinicopathologic and Molecular Features of Colorectal Adenocarcinoma with Signet-Ring Cell Component.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qing; Wang, Xicheng; Gao, Jing; Li, Jian; Li, Jie; Qi, Changsong; Li, Yanyan; Li, Zhongwu; Shen, Lin

    2016-01-01

    We performed a retrospective study to assess the clinicopathological characters, molecular alterations and multigene mutation profiles in colorectal cancer patients with signet-ring cell component. Between November 2008 and January 2015, 61 consecutive primary colorectal carcinomas with signet-ring cell component were available for pathological confirmation. RAS/BRAF status was performed by direct sequencing. 14 genes associated with hereditary cancer syndromes were analyzed by targeted gene sequencing. A slight male predominance was detected in these patients (59.0%). Colorectal carcinomas with signet-ring cell component were well distributed along the large intestine. A frequently higher TNM stage at the time of diagnosis was observed, compared with the conventional adenocarcinoma. Family history of malignant tumor was remarkable with 49.2% in 61 cases. The median OS time of stage IV patients in our study was 14 months. RAS mutations were detected in 22.2% (12/54) cases with KRAS mutations in 16.7% (9/54) cases and Nras mutations in 5.4%(3/54) cases. BRAF V600E mutation was detected in 3.7% (2/54) cases. As an exploration, we analyzed 14 genes by targeted gene sequencing. These genes were selected based on their biological role in association with hereditary cancer syndromes. 79.6% cases carried at least one pathogenic mutation. Finally, the patients were classified by the percentage of signet-ring cell. 39 (63.9%) cases were composed of ≥50% signet-ring cells; 22 (36.1%) cases were composed of <50% signet-ring cells. We compared clinical parameters, molecular and genetic alterations between the two groups and found no significant differences. Colorectal adenocarcinoma with signet-ring cell component is characterized by advanced stage at diagnosis with remarkable family history of malignant tumor. It is likely a negative prognostic factor and tends to affect male patients with low rates of RAS /BRAF mutation. Colorectal patients with any component of signet

  4. Clinicopathologic and Molecular Features of Colorectal Adenocarcinoma with Signet-Ring Cell Component

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jing; Li, Jian; Li, Jie; Qi, Changsong; Li, Yanyan; Li, Zhongwu; Shen, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Background We performed a retrospective study to assess the clinicopathological characters, molecular alterations and multigene mutation profiles in colorectal cancer patients with signet-ring cell component. Methods Between November 2008 and January 2015, 61 consecutive primary colorectal carcinomas with signet-ring cell component were available for pathological confirmation. RAS/BRAF status was performed by direct sequencing. 14 genes associated with hereditary cancer syndromes were analyzed by targeted gene sequencing. Results A slight male predominance was detected in these patients (59.0%). Colorectal carcinomas with signet-ring cell component were well distributed along the large intestine. A frequently higher TNM stage at the time of diagnosis was observed, compared with the conventional adenocarcinoma. Family history of malignant tumor was remarkable with 49.2% in 61 cases. The median OS time of stage IV patients in our study was 14 months. RAS mutations were detected in 22.2% (12/54) cases with KRAS mutations in 16.7% (9/54) cases and Nras mutations in 5.4%(3/54) cases. BRAF V600E mutation was detected in 3.7% (2/54) cases. As an exploration, we analyzed 14 genes by targeted gene sequencing. These genes were selected based on their biological role in association with hereditary cancer syndromes. 79.6% cases carried at least one pathogenic mutation. Finally, the patients were classified by the percentage of signet-ring cell. 39 (63.9%) cases were composed of ≥50% signet-ring cells; 22 (36.1%) cases were composed of <50% signet-ring cells. We compared clinical parameters, molecular and genetic alterations between the two groups and found no significant differences. Conclusions Colorectal adenocarcinoma with signet-ring cell component is characterized by advanced stage at diagnosis with remarkable family history of malignant tumor. It is likely a negative prognostic factor and tends to affect male patients with low rates of RAS /BRAF mutation. Colorectal

  5. Kallikrein-related peptidase-6 (KLK6) mRNA expression is an independent prognostic tissue biomarker of poor disease-free and overall survival in colorectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Christodoulou, Spyridon; Alexopoulou, Dimitra K; Kontos, Christos K; Scorilas, Andreas; Papadopoulos, Iordanis N

    2014-05-01

    Members of the family of tissue kallikrein and kallikrein-related peptidases possess important prognostic value in cancer. Moreover, the oncogenic role of kallikrein-related peptidase-6 (KLK6) in colorectal cancer has been well documented so far. This study investigated the prognostic value of KLK6 mRNA expression as a molecular tissue biomarker in colorectal adenocarcinoma. For this purpose, KLK6 mRNA expression was studied in 110 primary colorectal adenocarcinomas and 39 paired noncancerous colorectal specimens. A dramatic upregulation of KLK6 mRNA expression was observed in colorectal tumors. KLK6 mRNA overexpression was associated with high depth of tumor invasion, presence of distant metastases, and tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage of patients. Furthermore, KLK6 mRNA expression was shown to predict poor disease-free and overall survival independently of patient gender, age, tumor size, location, histological subtype, grade, venous invasion, lymphatic invasion, TNM stage, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy treatment. Moreover, Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed that colorectal adenocarcinoma patients with negative regional lymph nodes (N0) and those without distant metastases (M0) harboring KLK6 mRNA-positive colorectal tumors tended to relapse and die earlier than N0 and M0 patients with KLK6 mRNA-negative colorectal adenocarcinoma. Thus, KLK6 mRNA expression could be considered as an independent, unfavorable molecular prognostic biomarker in colorectal adenocarcinoma, with additional prognostic value in patients without regional or distant metastases.

  6. Peripheral and mesenteric serum levels of CEA and cytokeratins, staging and histopathological variables in colorectal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ivankovics, Ivan Gregório; Fernandes, Luis César; Saad, Sarhan Sydeney; Matos, Delcio

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the differences that exist bet-ween peripheral and mesenteric serum levels of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and cytokeratins in patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma. METHODS: One hundred and thirty-eight patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma who underwent surgery at Hospital São Paulo (Discipline of Surgical Gastroenterology of UNIFESP-EPM) between December 1993 and March 2000 were retrospectively analyzed. Differences between CEA and cytokeratin (TPA-M) levels in peripheral blood (P) and in mesenteric blood (M) were studied. Associations were investigated between peripheral and mesenteric levels and the staging and histopathological variables (degree of cell differentiation, macroscopic appearance, tumor dimensions and presence of lymphatic and venous invasion). RESULTS: Differences were observed in the numerical values of the marker levels: CEA (M) (39.10 mg/L ± 121.19 mg/L) vs CEA (P) (38.5 mg/L ± 122.55 mg/L), P < 0.05; TPA-M (M) (325.06 U/L ± 527.29 U/L) vs TPA-M (P) (279.48 U/L ± 455.81 U/L), P < 0.01. The mesenteric CEA levels were higher in more advanced tumors (P < 0.01), in vegetating lesions (34.44 mg/L ± 93.07 mg/L) (P < 0.01) and with venous invasion (48.41 mg/L ± 129.86 mg/L) (P < 0.05). Peripheral CEA was higher with more advanced staging (P < 0.01) and in lesions with venous invasion (53.23 mg/L ± 158.57 mg/L) (P < 0.05). The patients demonstrated increased mesenteric and peripheral TPA-M levels with more advanced tumors (P < 0.01 and P < 0.01) and in non-ulcerated lesions [530.45 U/L ± 997.46 U/L (P < 0.05) and 457.95 U/L ± 811.36 U/L (P < 0.01)]. CONCLUSION: The mesenteric levels of the tumor markers CEA and cytokeratins were higher than the peripheral levels in these colorectal adenocarcinoma patients. Higher levels of these biologic tumor markers are associated with an advanced state of cancerous dissemination. PMID:19034974

  7. Down-regulation of telomerase activity in DLD-1 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells by tocotrienol

    SciTech Connect

    Eitsuka, Takahiro; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Miyazawa, Teruo . E-mail: miyazawa@biochem.tohoku.ac.jp

    2006-09-15

    As high telomerase activity is detected in most cancer cells, inhibition of telomerase by drug or dietary food components is a new strategy for cancer prevention. Here, we investigated the inhibitory effect of vitamin E, with particular emphasis on tocotrienol (unsaturated vitamin E), on human telomerase in cell-culture study. As results, tocotrienol inhibited telomerase activity of DLD-1 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells in time- and dose-dependent manner, interestingly, with {delta}-tocotrienol exhibiting the highest inhibitory activity. Tocotrienol inhibited protein kinase C activity, resulting in down-regulation of c-myc and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) expression, thereby reducing telomerase activity. In contrast to tocotrienol, tocopherol showed very weak telomerase inhibition. These results provide novel evidence for First time indicating that tocotrienol acts as a potent candidate regulator of telomerase and supporting the anti-proliferative function of tocotrienol.

  8. Primary colorectal adenocarcinoma metastatic to the breast: case report and review of nineteen cases.

    PubMed

    Shackelford, Rodney E; Allam-Nandyala, Pushpa; Bui, Marilyn M; Kiluk, John V; Esposito, Nicole Nicosia

    2011-01-01

    Metastases to the breast from extramammary primaries are uncommon and account for 0.5-6% of all breast malignancies (Georgiannos et al., 2001, and Vizcaíno et al., 2001). Malignant melanoma, lymphoma, and lung and gastric carcinomas are the most frequently encountered nonmammary metastases to the breast in adults (Georgiannos et al., 2001, and Chaignaud et al., 1994). Primary colorectal adenocarcinoma (CRC) metastatic to the breast is extremely rare, with the medical literature having only 19 recorded cases. Typically CRC metastatic to the breast is indicative of widely disseminated disease and a poor prognosis. Here we present a case of poorly differentiated colon cancer metastatic to the breast and review the current literature on this rare event.

  9. Dual mechanisms for telomerase inhibition in DLD-1 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells by polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Eitsuka, Takahiro; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2004-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have been reported to have antitumor activity. In this study, we have tested whether telomerase might be a target for the antitumor effect of fatty acids using DLD-1 colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. In a cell-free approach, fatty acids were added directly to cell lysates, and we confirmed that increasing fatty acid unsaturation correlates with increased inhibition of telomerase activity. Using a cell culture approach, DLD-1 cells were cultured with fatty acids. In a time and dose dependent manner, EPA and DHA suppressed cellular telomerase activity and the mRNAs encoding hTERT (human telomerase reverse transcriptase) and c-myc. Based on these observations, we suggest that PUFAs inhibit telomerase activity through dual mechanisms: direct inhibition of enzymatic activity and down regulation of hTERT, one of the telomerase components.

  10. Hypoxia in human colorectal adenocarcinoma: Comparison between extrinsic and potential intrinsic hypoxia markers

    SciTech Connect

    Goethals, Laurence; Debucquoy, Annelies; Perneel, Christiaan; Geboes, Karel; Ectors, Nadine; De Schutter, Harlinde; Penninckx, Freddy; McBride, William H.; Begg, Adrian C.; Haustermans, Karin M. . E-mail: karin.haustermans@uzleuven.be

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To detect and quantify hypoxia in colorectal adenocarcinomas by use of pimonidazole and iododeoxyuridine (IdUrd) as extrinsic markers and carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX), microvessel density (MVD), epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as intrinsic markers of hypoxia. Methods and Material: Twenty patients with an adenocarcinoma of the left colon and rectum treated by primary surgery were injected with pimonidazole and IdUrd. Serial sections of tumor biopsies were single stained for VEGF, EGFR, Ki67, and double stained for blood vessels in combination with either pimonidazole, IdUrd, or CA IX. Percentage of expression was scored as well as colocalization of pimonidazole with CA IX. Results: The median percentage of hypoxia, as judged by pimonidazole staining, was 16.7% (range, 0-52.4%). The expression of pimonidazole correlated inversely with the total MVD and endothelial cord MVD (R = -0.55, p = 0.01; R = -0.47, p = 0.04). Good colocalization was found between pimonidazole and CA IX in only 30% of tumors, with no correlation overall between pimonidazole and CA IX, VEGF, or EGFR or between the different intrinsic markers. Cells around some vessels (0.08-11%) were negative for IdUrd but positive for Ki 67, which indicated their lack of perfusion at the time of injection. Conclusion: Chronic and acute hypoxic regions are present in colorectal tumors, as shown by pimonidazole and IdUrd staining. Only in a minority of tumors did an association exist between the areas stained by pimonidazole and those positive for CA IX. Pimonidazole also did not correlate with expression of other putative intrinsic hypoxia markers (VEGF, EGFR)

  11. Effects of NVP-BEZ235 on the proliferation, migration, apoptosis and autophagy in HT-29 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Yu, Xiaofeng; Ma, Jianxia; Tong, Yili; Yao, Jianfeng

    2016-07-01

    The phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of the rapamycin (mTOR) pathway plays a significant role in colorectal adenocarcinoma. NVP-BEZ235 (dactolisib) is a novel dual inhibitor of PI3K/mTOR. The effects of NVP-BEZ235 in human colorectal adenocarcinoma are still unclear. In the present study, we aimed to explore the proliferation, migration, apoptosis and autophagy in HT-29 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. HT-29 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells were treated with NVP-BEZ235 (0, 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1 and 3 µM) for 24 and 48 h, respectively. Cells were also treated with NVP-BEZ235 (0.1 µM), DDP (100, 300 and 1,000 µM), and NVP-BEZ235 (0.1 µM) combined with DDP (100, 300 and 1,000 µM) respectively, and cultured for 24 h after treatment. MTT assay was utilized to evaluate the effects of NVP-BEZ235 alone or NVP-BEZ235 combined with cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (DDP) on proliferation of HT-29 cells. Cell wound-scratch assay was used detect cell migration. In addition, expression of microtubule-associated proteins 1A/1B light chain 3B (MAP1LC3B and LC3B) in HT-29 cells was detected by immunofluorescence at 48 h after NVP-BEZ235 (1 µM) treatment. Expression of proteins involved in cell cycle and proliferation (p-Akt, p-mTOR and cyclin D1), apoptosis (cleaved caspase-3), and autophagy (cleaved LC3B and Beclin-1) were detected by western blot analysis. NVP-BEZ235 inhibited the proliferation and migration of HT-29 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. NVP-BEZ235 decreased protein expression of p-Akt, p-mTOR and cyclin D1, and increased protein expression of cleaved caspase-3, cleaved LC3B and Beclin-1 as the concentrations and the incubation time of NVP-BEZ235 increased. In addition, NVP-BEZ235 and DDP had synergic effects in inhibiting cell proliferation and migration. The expression of protein involved in apoptosis (cleaved caspase-3) was higher in drug combination group compared to the NVP-BEZ235 single treatment group. NVP-BEZ235

  12. Selective Internal Radiation Therapy (SIRT) for liver metastases secondary to colorectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Welsh, James S; Kennedy, Andrew S; Thomadsen, Bruce

    2006-01-01

    Selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) is a relatively new commercially available microbrachytherapy technique for treatment of malignant hepatic lesions using (90)Y embedded in resin microspheres, which are infused directly into the hepatic arterial circulation. It is FDA approved for liver metastases secondary to colorectal carcinoma and is under investigation for treatment of other liver malignancies, such as hepatocellular carcinoma and neuroendocrine malignancies. A modest number of clinical trials, preclinical animal studies, and dosimetric studies have been reported. Here we review several of the more important results. High doses of beta radiation can be selectively delivered to tumors, resulting in impressive local control and survival rates. Ex vivo analyses have shown that microspheres preferentially cluster around the periphery of tumor nodules with a high tumor:normal tissue ratio of up to 200:1. Toxicity is usually mild, featuring fatigue, anorexia, nausea, abdominal discomfort, and slight elevations of liver function tests. Selective internal radiation therapy represents an effective means of controlling liver metastases from colorectal adenocarcinoma. Clinical trials have demonstrated improved local control of disease and survival with relatively low toxicity. Investigations of SIRT for other hepatic malignancies and in combination with newer chemotherapy agents and targeted biologic therapies are under way or in planning. A well-integrated team involving interventional radiology, nuclear medicine, medical oncology, surgical oncology, medical physics, and radiation oncology is essential for a successful program. Careful selection of patients through the combined expertise of the team can maximize therapeutic efficacy and reduce the potential for adverse effects.

  13. Aberrant promoter methylation of p16 in colorectal adenocarcinoma in North Indian patients

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Pooja; Kochhar, Rakesh; Vaiphei, Kim; Wig, Jai Dev; Mahmood, Safrun

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate p16 gene methylation and its expression in 30 patients with sporadic colorectal adenocarcinoma in a North Indian population. METHODS: Methylation specific polymerase chain reaction was used to detect p16 gene methylation and immunohistochemistry was used to study the p16 expression in 30 sporadic colorectal tumors as well as adjoining and normal tissue specimens. RESULTS: Aberrant promoter methylation of p16 gene was detected in 12 (40%) tumor specimens, whereas no promoter methylation was observed in adjoining and normal tissue. Immunohistochemistry showed expression of p16 protein in 26 (86.6%) colorectal tumors whereas complete loss of expression was seen in 4 (13.3%) and reduced expression was observed in 12 (40%) tumors. In the adjoining mucosa, expression of p16 was in 11 (36.6%) whereas no clear positivity for p16 protein was seen in normal tissue. There was a significant difference in the expression of p16 protein in tumor tissue and adjoining mucosa (P < 0.001). The methylation of the p16 gene had a significant effect on the expression of p16 protein (P = 0.021). There was a significant association of methylation of p16 gene with the tumor size (P = 0.015) and of the loss/reduced expression of p16 protein with the proximal site of the tumor (P = 0.047). Promoter methylation and expression of p16 had no relation with the survival of the patients (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Our study demonstrated that promoter hypermethylation of the p16 gene results in loss/reduced expression of p16 protein and this loss/reduced expression may contribute to tumor enlargement. PMID:21160660

  14. Association of MicroRNA Expression with Microsatellite Instability Status in Colorectal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Earle, Jonathan S.L.; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Romans, Angela; Abraham, Ronald; Ensor, Joe; Yao, Hui; Hamilton, Stanley R.

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNA), small noncoding RNAs, are potential diagnostic and prognostic markers, as well as therapeutic targets. miRNA profiles of colorectal carcinomas have not been studied extensively in the context of microsatellite instability (MSI) status. We therefore evaluated 55 paired colorectal adenocarcinomas (CRC) and non-neoplastic mucosa samples using a panel of 24 miRNAs selected by literature review and prior studies in our laboratory. Stem-loop reverse transcriptase quantitative (real-time) polymerase chain reaction assays were done on RNA extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue of resection specimens. When miRNA expression was compared with clinicopathologic features and MSI status, eleven miRNAs (miR-183, -31, -20, -25, -92, -93, -17, -135a, -203, -133b, and -223) were over-expressed in CRC relative to mucosa, and nine (miR-192, -215, -26b, -143, -145, -191, -196a, -16, and let-7a) were under-expressed in CRC. Relative expression of miR-92, -223, -155, -196a, -31, and -26b were significantly different among MSI subgroups, and miR-31 and miR-223 were overexpressed in CRC of patients with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer syndrome (Lynch syndrome). Our findings indicate that miRNA expression in CRC is associated with MSI subgroups, including low MSI and HNPCC-associated cancers, and that miRNAs may have posttranscriptional gene regulatory roles in these MSI subgroups and possible effects on the clinicopathologic and biomarker characteristics. PMID:20413677

  15. Leptomeningeal metastasis as initial manifestation of signet ring colorectal adenocarcinoma: a case report with review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Assi, Rita; Hamieh, Lana; Mukherji, Deborah; Haydar, Ali; Temraz, Sally; El-Dika, Imane

    2015-01-01

    Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis (LMC) is an exceedingly rare event especially as a first manifestation of an occult primary colorectal cancer and even when there is a known history of malignancy. Sensorineural hearing loss is by itself an unusual isolated presentation of LMC with unsolved pathophysiology in this setting. In this paper, we report such a case and review the literature for similar cases, focusing on postulated mechanisms of spread. In view of the poor prognosis they carry, we highly recommend that physicians be aware of the risk of rare metastasis from colorectal adenocarcinoma in order to establish an early confirmative diagnosis. PMID:26697206

  16. Tucatinib (ONT-380) and Trastuzumab for Patients With HER2-positive Metastatic Colorectal Cancer (MOUNTAINEER)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-13

    Colorectal Cancer; Colorectal Carcinoma; Colorectal Tumors; Neoplasms, Colorectal; HER-2 Gene Amplification; Metastatic Cancer; Metastatic Colon Cancer; Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum

  17. The prevalence of human papillomavirus in colorectal adenomas and adenocarcinomas: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Baandrup, Louise; Thomsen, Louise T; Olesen, Tina Bech; Andersen, Klaus Kaae; Norrild, Bodil; Kjaer, Susanne K

    2014-05-01

    The role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in colorectal cancer has been widely studied with conflicting results. We performed a systematic review and a meta-analysis to estimate the prevalence of HPV in colorectal adenocarcinomas and adenomas, and test the potential association. The pooled HPV prevalence was estimated using a random effects model and the I(2) statistic was used to describe the amount of heterogeneity. Potential sources of heterogeneity were evaluated by meta-regression and stratified analyses. For the studies on adenocarcinomas including control tissue, random effects estimates of odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Thirty-seven studies were included. Among the 2630 adenocarcinomas, the pooled HPV prevalence was 11.2% (95% CI, 4.9-19.6%) with substantial between-study heterogeneity (I(2)=97.2%). The HPV prevalence varied by geographical region with highest prevalence in South America (45.1%, 95% CI, 21.9-69.4%), Asia (39.2%, 95% CI, 20.3-60.0%) and the Middle East (32.2%, 95% CI, 1.1-79.3%), and by detection method with the highest HPV prevalence in PCR-based studies. In the eight case-control studies, the pooled HPV prevalence was 36.8% (95% CI, 21.3-53.8%) in adenocarcinomas and 1.6% (95% CI, 0.0-9.6%) in controls giving an OR of 6.0 (95% CI, 2.0-17.9%) for the association between HPV and colorectal cancer. Among the 415 adenomas, the pooled HPV prevalence was 5.1% (95% CI, 0.0-17.8%; I(2)=93.7%). HPV may be associated with a subset of colorectal cancers. Future large-scale multicenter case-control studies with data on risk factors such as lifestyle and sexual behaviour are needed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Lower or Standard Dose Regorafenib in Treating Patients With Refractory Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-07-11

    Colon Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Adenocarcinoma; Stage III Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer; Stage IV Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer

  19. Selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) for liver metastases secondary to colorectal adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, James S. . E-mail: welsh@humonc.wisc.edu; Kennedy, Andrew S.; Thomadsen, Bruce

    2006-10-01

    Introduction: Selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) is a relatively new commercially available microbrachytherapy technique for treatment of malignant hepatic lesions using {sup 9}Y embedded in resin microspheres, which are infused directly into the hepatic arterial circulation. It is FDA approved for liver metastases secondary to colorectal carcinoma and is under investigation for treatment of other liver malignancies, such as hepatocellular carcinoma and neuroendocrine malignancies. Materials/Methods: A modest number of clinical trials, preclinical animal studies, and dosimetric studies have been reported. Here we review several of the more important results. Results: High doses of beta radiation can be selectively delivered to tumors, resulting in impressive local control and survival rates. Ex vivo analyses have shown that microspheres preferentially cluster around the periphery of tumor nodules with a high tumor:normal tissue ratio of up to 200:1. Toxicity is usually mild, featuring fatigue, anorexia, nausea, abdominal discomfort, and slight elevations of liver function tests. Conclusions: Selective internal radiation therapy represents an effective means of controlling liver metastases from colorectal adenocarcinoma. Clinical trials have demonstrated improved local control of disease and survival with relatively low toxicity. Investigations of SIRT for other hepatic malignancies and in combination with newer chemotherapy agents and targeted biologic therapies are under way or in planning. A well-integrated team involving interventional radiology, nuclear medicine, medical oncology, surgical oncology, medical physics, and radiation oncology is essential for a successful program. Careful selection of patients through the combined expertise of the team can maximize therapeutic efficacy and reduce the potential for adverse effects.

  20. Correlation of p53 Overexpression with the Clinicopathological Prognostic Factors in Colorectal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Akshatha C; Mysorekar, Vijaya; Arundhathi S; Raj, Adithi; Shetty, Smitha

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Mutation in p53 gene and accumulation of p53 protein is a common genetic event in colorectal carcinomas. p53 mutation can be detected by various techniques such as DNA sequencing, polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry (IHC). However, IHC is simple and is consistent with other techniques. Aim To establish a correlation between overexpression of p53 with the clinical features, tumour histopathology and stage of Colorectal Carcinoma (CRC). Materials and Methods This prospective and retrospective study of clinical, histopathological and IHC features of CRC was conducted on colectomy and abdomino-perineal resection specimens received from January 2008 to June 2013. For each case, the clinical features, tumour morphology and p53 status (by IHC) were evaluated. Results The most common histologic type of CRC was Non-Specific Type (NST) and grade II tumours were seen predominantly (60%). Overall, 67.5% of CRCs showed p53 positivity on IHC. Intense p53 positivity was observed in 37.5% of CRCs of NST type and 33.3% of mucinous adenocarcinomas showed moderate positivity. Grade III tumours showed variable p53 positivity and those with lymph node metastasis showed moderate (55.6%) or intense positivity (53.8%). But there was no statistically significant correlation of p53 status and various clinicopathological prognostic factors. Conclusion As p53 protein overexpression is seen in a relatively high percentage of CRCs, it seems that p53 mutation plays an important role in development of CRC. However, no direct correlation could be established between p53 results and the patients’ age, sex, tumour site, size, histological type, grade, lymph node status, or TNM stage. A prolonged follow up is necessary to conclude whether p53 status has any influence on the long, term prognosis and patient survival. PMID:28208862

  1. Metabolic predispositions and increased risk of colorectal adenocarcinoma by anatomical location: a large population-based cohort study in Norway.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yunxia; Ness-Jensen, Eivind; Hveem, Kristian; Martling, Anna

    2015-11-15

    Whether different definitions of metabolic syndrome (MetS) are differently associated with colorectal adenocarcinoma (CA) by anatomical location is unclear. A population-based cohort study, the Cohort of Norway (CONOR) Study, was conducted in Norway from 1995 to 2010. Anthropometric measurements, blood samples, and lifestyle data were collected at recruitment. CAs were identified through linkage to the Norwegian Cancer Register. A composite index of MetS as defined by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) or/and the National Cholesterol Education Program's Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) and single components of MetS, including anthropometric factors, blood pressure, lipids, triglycerides, and glucose, were analyzed. Cox proportional hazards regression was performed to estimate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Significant associations between single MetS components and CA, except for reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and nonfasting glucose levels, were observed. MetS defined by 2 criteria separately showed a similar association with CA in general, and MetS defined by both the IDF and ATP III showed consistent results. Stronger associations were observed in the proximal colon among men (IDF: hazard ratio (HR) = 1.51, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.24, 1.84; ATP III: HR = 1.40, 95% CI: 1.15, 1.70) and in the rectum among women (IDF: HR = 1.42, 95% CI: 1.07, 1.89; ATP III: HR = 1.43, 95% CI: 1.08, 1.90).

  2. Analysis of colorectal cancer glyco-secretome identifies laminin β-1 (LAMB1) as a potential serological biomarker for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qifeng; Lim, Hannah S R; Lin, Hui Ling; Tan, Hwee Tong; Lim, Teck Kwang; Cheong, Wai Kit; Cheah, Peh Yean; Tang, Choong Leong; Chow, Pierce K H; Chung, Maxey C M

    2015-11-01

    The high mortality rate in colorectal cancer is mostly ascribed to metastasis, but the only clinical biomarker available for disease monitoring and prognosis is the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). However, the prognostic utility of CEA remains controversial. In an effort to identify novel biomarkers that could be potentially translated for clinical use, we collected the secretomes from the colon adenocarcinoma cell line HCT-116 and its metastatic derivative, E1, using the hollow fiber culture system, and utilized the multilectin affinity chromatography approach to enrich for the secreted glycoproteins (glyco-secretome). The HCT-116 and E1 glyco-secretomes were compared using the label-free quantitative SWATH-MS technology, and a total of 149 glycoproteins were differentially secreted in E1 cells. Among these glycoproteins, laminin β-1 (LAMB1), a glycoprotein not previously known to be secreted in colorectal cancer cells, was observed to be oversecreted in E1 cells. In addition, we showed that LAMB1 levels were significantly higher in colorectal cancer patient serum samples as compared to healthy controls when measured using ELISA. ROC analyses indicated that LAMB1 performed better than CEA at discriminating between colorectal cancer patients from controls. Moreover, the diagnostic performance was further improved when LAMB1 was used in combination with CEA.

  3. Mutations of APC, K-ras, and p53 are associated with specific chromosomal aberrations in colorectal adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Amy; Pratt, Norman R; Gillespie, Karen; Sales, Mark; Kernohan, Neil M; Smith, Gillian; Wolf, C Roland; Carey, Francis A; Steele, Robert J C

    2003-08-01

    It is widely accepted that both large-scale chromosomal abnormalities and mutation of specific genes, such as APC, K-ras, and/or p53, occur in the majority of colorectal adenocarcinomas. Whether or not a relationship exists between these different forms of genetic abnormalities was previously unknown. Using comparative genomic hybridization and mutational analysis of APC, K-ras, and p53 to evaluate 50 colorectal adenocarcinomas, we have shown that mutation of p53 is significantly associated with gain of 20q, 13q, and 8q and loss of 18q (P = 0.000, 0.02, 0.044, and 0.001, respectively). Conversely, APC mutation did not associate with any of the above-mentioned aberrations but did associate significantly with gain of 7p (P = 0.01). Gain of chromosomal arm 12p, although a less common aberration, was significantly associated with K-ras mutation (P = 0.011). The associations we have described should refine the search for candidate genes underlying chromosomal aberrations and assist in the definition of distinct pathways in colorectal tumorigenesis.

  4. Reduction in membranous immunohistochemical staining for the intracellular domain of epithelial cell adhesion molecule correlates with poor patient outcome in primary colorectal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, A.; Ramjeesingh, R.; Chen, C.H.; Hurlbut, D.; Hammad, N.; Mulligan, L.M.; Nicol, C.; Feilotter, H.E.; Davey, S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (epcam) is a multifunctional transmembrane glycoprotein expressed on both normal epithelium and epithelial neoplasms such as gastric, breast, and renal carcinomas. Recent studies have proposed that the proteolytic cleavage of the intracellular domain of epcam (epcam-icd) can trigger signalling cascades leading to aggressive tumour behavior. The expression profile of epcam-icd has not been elucidated for primary colorectal carcinoma. In the present study, we examined epcam-icd immunohistochemical staining in a large cohort of patients with primary colorectal adenocarcinoma and assessed its performance as a potential prognostic marker. Methods Immunohistochemical staining for epcam-icd was assessed on tissue microarrays consisting of 137 primary colorectal adenocarcinoma samples. Intensity of staining for each core was scored by 3 independent pathologists. The membranous epcam-icd staining score was calculated as a weighted average from 3 core samples per tumour. Univariate analysis of the average scores and clinical outcome measures was performed. Results The level of membranous epcam-icd staining was positively associated with well-differentiated tumours (p = 0.01); low preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen (p = 0.001); and several measures of survival, including 2-year (p = 0.02) and 5-year survival (p = 0.05), and length of time post-diagnosis (p = 0.03). A number of other variables—including stage, grade, and lymph node status—showed correlations with epcam staining and markers of poor outcome, but did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions Low membranous epcam-icd staining might be a useful marker to identify tumours with aggressive clinical behavior and potential poor prognosis and might help to select candidates who could potentially benefit from treatment targeting epcam. PMID:27330354

  5. Carbon Metabolism of Enterobacterial Human Pathogens Growing in Epithelial Colorectal Adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) Cells

    PubMed Central

    Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Goebel, Werner

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of the genome sequences of the major human bacterial pathogens has provided a large amount of information concerning their metabolic potential. However, our knowledge of the actual metabolic pathways and metabolite fluxes occurring in these pathogens under infection conditions is still limited. In this study, we analysed the intracellular carbon metabolism of enteroinvasive Escherichia coli (EIEC HN280 and EIEC 4608-58) and Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium (Stm 14028) replicating in epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma cells (Caco-2). To this aim, we supplied [U-13C6]glucose to Caco-2 cells infected with the bacterial strains or mutants thereof impaired in the uptake of glucose, mannose and/or glucose 6-phosphate. The 13C-isotopologue patterns of protein-derived amino acids from the bacteria and the host cells were then determined by mass spectrometry. The data showed that EIEC HN280 growing in the cytosol of the host cells, as well as Stm 14028 replicating in the Salmonella-containing vacuole (SCV) utilised glucose, but not glucose 6-phosphate, other phosphorylated carbohydrates, gluconate or fatty acids as major carbon substrates. EIEC 4608-58 used C3-compound(s) in addition to glucose as carbon source. The labelling patterns reflected strain-dependent carbon flux via glycolysis and/or the Entner-Doudoroff pathway, the pentose phosphate pathway, the TCA cycle and anapleurotic reactions between PEP and oxaloacetate. Mutants of all three strains impaired in the uptake of glucose switched to C3-substrate(s) accompanied by an increased uptake of amino acids (and possibly also other anabolic monomers) from the host cell. Surprisingly, the metabolism of the host cells, as judged by the efficiency of 13C-incorporation into host cell amino acids, was not significantly affected by the infection with either of these intracellular pathogens. PMID:20485672

  6. Perioperative Systemic Therapy and Surgery Versus Surgery Alone for Resectable Colorectal Peritoneal Metastases.

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-05

    Colorectal Cancer; Colorectal Neoplasms; Colorectal Carcinoma; Colorectal Adenocarcinoma; Colorectal Cancer Metastatic; Peritoneal Carcinoma; Peritoneal Neoplasms; Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Peritoneal Carcinomatosis; Peritoneal Metastases

  7. Coordinate up-regulation of low-density lipoprotein receptor and cyclo-oxygenase-2 gene expression in human colorectal cells and in colorectal adenocarcinoma biopsies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lum, D. F.; McQuaid, K. R.; Gilbertson, V. L.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    1999-01-01

    Many colorectal cancers have high levels of cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX-2), an enzyme that metabolizes the essential fatty acids into prostaglandins. Since the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLr) is involved in the uptake of essential fatty acids, we studied the effect of LDL on growth and gene regulation in colorectal cancer cells. DiFi cells grown in lipoprotein-deficient sera (LPDS) grew more slowly than cells with LDL. LDLr antibody caused significant inhibition of tumor cell growth but did not affect controls. In addition, LDL uptake did not change in the presence of excess LDL, suggesting that ldlr mRNA lacks normal feedback regulation in some colorectal cancers. Analysis of the ldlr mRNA showed that excess LDL in the medium did not cause down-regulation of the message even after 24 hr. The second portion of the study examined the mRNA expression of ldlr and its co-regulation with cox-2 in normal and tumor specimens from patients with colorectal adenocarcinomas. The ratio of tumor:paired normal mucosa of mRNA expression of ldlr and of cox-2 was measured in specimens taken during colonoscopy. ldlr and cox-2 transcripts were apparent in 11 of 11 carcinomas. There was significant coordinate up-regulation both of ldlr and of cox-2 in 6 of 11 (55%) tumors compared with normal colonic mucosa. There was no up-regulation of cox-2 without concomitant up-regulation of ldlr. These data suggest that the LDLr is abnormally regulated in some colorectal tumors and may play a role in the up-regulation of cox-2. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Functional Module Connectivity Map (FMCM): A Framework for Searching Repurposed Drug Compounds for Systems Treatment of Cancer and an Application to Colorectal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Feng-Hsiang; Chiang, Yun-Ru; Tseng, Ai-Lun; Sung, Yung-Chuan; Lu, Jean; Huang, Min-Chang; Ma, Nianhan; Lee, Hoong-Chien

    2014-01-01

    Drug repurposing has become an increasingly attractive approach to drug development owing to the ever-growing cost of new drug discovery and frequent withdrawal of successful drugs caused by side effect issues. Here, we devised Functional Module Connectivity Map (FMCM) for the discovery of repurposed drug compounds for systems treatment of complex diseases, and applied it to colorectal adenocarcinoma. FMCM used multiple functional gene modules to query the Connectivity Map (CMap). The functional modules were built around hub genes identified, through a gene selection by trend-of-disease-progression (GSToP) procedure, from condition-specific gene-gene interaction networks constructed from sets of cohort gene expression microarrays. The candidate drug compounds were restricted to drugs exhibiting predicted minimal intracellular harmful side effects. We tested FMCM against the common practice of selecting drugs using a genomic signature represented by a single set of individual genes to query CMap (IGCM), and found FMCM to have higher robustness, accuracy, specificity, and reproducibility in identifying known anti-cancer agents. Among the 46 drug candidates selected by FMCM for colorectal adenocarcinoma treatment, 65% had literature support for association with anti-cancer activities, and 60% of the drugs predicted to have harmful effects on cancer had been reported to be associated with carcinogens/immune suppressors. Compounds were formed from the selected drug candidates where in each compound the component drugs collectively were beneficial to all the functional modules while no single component drug was harmful to any of the modules. In cell viability tests, we identified four candidate drugs: GW-8510, etacrynic acid, ginkgolide A, and 6-azathymine, as having high inhibitory activities against cancer cells. Through microarray experiments we confirmed the novel functional links predicted for three candidate drugs: phenoxybenzamine (broad effects), GW-8510 (cell

  9. Circulating U2 small nuclear RNA fragments as a novel diagnostic biomarker for pancreatic and colorectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Baraniskin, Alexander; Nöpel-Dünnebacke, Stefanie; Ahrens, Maike; Jensen, Steffen Grann; Zöllner, Hannah; Maghnouj, Abdelouahid; Wos, Alexandra; Mayerle, Julia; Munding, Johanna; Kost, Dennis; Reinacher-Schick, Anke; Liffers, Sven; Schroers, Roland; Chromik, Ansgar M; Meyer, Helmut E; Uhl, Waldemar; Klein-Scory, Susanne; Weiss, Frank U; Stephan, Christian; Schwarte-Waldhoff, Irmgard; Lerch, Markus M; Tannapfel, Andrea; Schmiegel, Wolff; Andersen, Claus Lindbjerg; Hahn, Stephan A

    2013-01-15

    Improved non-invasive strategies for early cancer detection are urgently needed to reduce morbidity and mortality. Non-coding RNAs, such as microRNAs and small nucleolar RNAs, have been proposed as biomarkers for non-invasive cancer diagnosis. Analyzing serum derived from nude mice implanted with primary human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), we identified 15 diagnostic microRNA candidates. Of those miR-1246 was selected based on its high abundance in serum of tumor carrying mice. Subsequently, we noted a cross reactivity of the established miR-1246 assays with RNA fragments derived from U2 small nuclear RNA (RNU2-1). Importantly, we found that the assay signal discriminating tumor from controls was derived from U2 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) fragments (RNU2-1f) and not from miR-1246. In addition, we observed a remarkable stability of RNU2-1f in serum and provide experimental evidence that hsa-miR-1246 is likely a pseudo microRNA. In a next step, RNU2-1f was measured by qRT-PCR and normalized to cel-54 in 191 serum/plasma samples from PDAC and colorectal carcinoma (CRC) patients. In comparison to 129 controls, we were able to classify samples as cancerous with a sensitivity and specificity of 97.7% [95% CI = (87.7, 99.9)] and 90.6% [95% CI = (80.7, 96.5)], respectively [area under the ROC curve 0.972]. Of note, patients with CRC were detected with our assay as early as UICC Stage II with a sensitivity of 81%. In conclusion, this is the first report showing that fragments of U2 snRNA are highly stable in serum and plasma and may serve as novel diagnostic biomarker for PDAC and CRC for future prospective screening studies. Copyright © 2012 UICC.

  10. Novel purification of 1'S-1'-Acetoxychavicol acetate from Alpinia galanga and its cytotoxic plus antiproliferative activity in colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line SW480.

    PubMed

    Baradwaj, R G; Rao, M V; Senthil Kumar, T

    2017-07-01

    Alpinia galanga (L.) Willd. is a valuable medicinal crop found in specific tropical regions of southeast Asia. Its crude extracts are well known for their wide medicinal properties and many compounds identified from these extracts are of great interest currently. 1'S-1'-Acetoxychavicol acetate (ACA) obtained from rhizomes of A.galanga is one such well-illustrated compound. This study strives to progress and simplifies the purification protocol for ACA from A.galanga rhizomes. It also studies the cytotoxicity and antiproliferative activity of ACA against Dukes' type B, colorectal adenocarcinoma (SW480). HPLC standardisation was carried out for purification of ACA from rhizomes of Alpinia galanga. MTT assay was executed to estimate the IC50 value of ACA against SW480 cell line. This value was used to study the apoptosis, nuclear morphological changes and mitochondrial membrane permeability using Acridine orange/ethidium bromide, DAPI, and JC-1 staining. The DNA fragmentation assay was used to substantiate the nuclear fragmentation of DNA observed in the DAPI staining. Further, cell cycle analysis was performed using flow cytometry to study the exact stage of the cell cycle where SW480 cells are arrested due to ACA, western blot analysis of relevant genes were done to further understand at molecular level. A comprehensive 1.89g of 1'S-1'-Acetoxychavicol acetate (ACA) was recovered from 500g of A.galanga rhizomes. ACA significantly suppressed the proliferation of SW480 cells at an IC50 of 80μM (48h). The mode of SW480 cell death due to ACA was initially identified as apoptosis and cell cycle halted at G0/G1 checkpoint with considerable DNA damage and mitochondrial depolarization. The expression of p21 was increased and concomitantly Cyclin D was downregulated in ACA treated in comparison to control. This study suggests that 1'S-1'-Acetoxychavicol acetate has potent anti-colorectal adenocarcinoma activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Gene polymorphisms involved in folate and methionine metabolism and increased risk of sporadic colorectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, José Luiz Miranda; Ayrizono, Maria de Lurdes; Coy, Cláudio Saddy Rodrigues; Lima, Carmen Silvia Passos

    2011-10-01

    This pilot study has compared the polymorphic genotype frequencies of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR A1298C and C677T), methionine synthase (MTR A2756G), methionine synthase reductase (MTRR A66G), and thymidylate synthase (TS 2R/3R) in 113 patients with sporadic colorectal adenocarcinoma (SCA) and 188 healthy blood donors, used as matched controls. The aim was to assess the role of these genotypes in the increased risk of SCA among the southeastern Brazilian population. Carriers of genotype MTRR 66GG, or the combined variants MTHFR 1298AC + CC plus 677CT + TT, or MTHFR 677CT + TT plus MTR 2756AG + GG, or MTHFR 1298AC + CC plus 677CT + TT plus MTR 2756AG + GG, or yet, MTHFR 1298AC + CC plus 677CT + TT plus MTRR 66AG + GG, respectively, showed an increased risk of the order of 1.99-, 3.26-, 2.22-, 10.92-, and 14.88-fold of developing SCA when compared with carriers of the other studied polymorphic genotypes, whether in isolation or in combination. In addition, individuals with the MTHFR 677CT + TT or the MTR 2756AG + GG genotypes had a 2.12- and a 1.42-fold increased risks of SCA onset before 50 years of age. African-Brazilians with the MTRR 66GG genotype had a 1.98-fold increased risk of SCA while individuals with the MTR 2756AG + GG and the MTHFR 677CT + TT genotypes showed a 2.11- and a 1.62-fold increased risk of undifferentiated and advanced tumors at diagnosis, respectively. Carriers of genotype MTHFR 1298AC + CC or MTHFR 1298AC + CC plus MTRR 66AG + GG had a 1.42- and a 3.07-fold increased risk of rectal tumor, respectively. Additionally, carriers of MTHFR 677CT + TT or MTHFR 677CT + TT plus TS 2R/3R + 3R/3R had a 1.55- and a 5.39-fold increased risk for colon tumor, respectively, in comparison with carriers of the wild genotypes. These data suggest that all polymorphisms coding for folate and methionine-dependent enzymes, particularly when present in combination with

  12. Colorectal Adenomas Contain Multiple Somatic Mutations That Do Not Coincide with Synchronous Adenocarcinoma Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Vaqué, José P.; Martínez, Nerea; Varela, Ignacio; Fernández, Fidel; Mayorga, Marta; Derdak, Sophia; Beltrán, Sergi; Moreno, Thaidy; Almaraz, Carmen; De las Heras, Gonzalo; Bayés, Mónica; Gut, Ivo; Crespo, Javier; Piris, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    We have performed a comparative ultrasequencing study of multiple colorectal lesions obtained simultaneously from four patients. Our data show that benign lesions (adenomatous or hyperplastic polyps) contain a high mutational load. Additionally multiple synchronous colorectal lesions show non overlapping mutational signatures highlighting the degree of heterogeneity between multiple specimens in the same patient. Observations in these cases imply that considering not only the number of mutations but an effective oncogenic combination of mutations can determine the malignant progression of colorectal lesions. PMID:25775023

  13. FBXW7 missense mutation: a novel negative prognostic factor in metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Korphaisarn, Krittiya; Morris, Van Karlyle; Overman, Michael J.; Fogelman, David R.; Kee, Bryan K.; Kanwal Pratap Singh, Raghav; Manuel, Shanequa; Shureiqi, Imad; Wolff, Robert A.; Eng, Cathy; Menter, David; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Kopetz, Scott; Dasari, Arvind

    2017-01-01

    Background FBXW7 functions as a ubiquitin ligase tagging multiple dominant oncogenic proteins and commonly mutates in colorectal cancer. Data suggest missense mutations lead to greater loss of FBXW7 function than other gene aberrations do. However, the clinicopathologic factors and outcomes associated with FBXW7 missense mutations in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) have not been described. Methods Data were obtained from mCRC patients whose tumors were evaluated by next-generation sequencing for hotspot mutations at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Alterations in FBXW7 were identified, and their associations with clinicopathologic features and overall survival (OS) were evaluated. Results Of 855 mCRC patients, 571 had data on FBXW7 status; 43 (7.5%) had FBXW7 mutations, including 37 with missense mutations. R465C mutations in exon 9 were the most common missense mutations (18.6%). PIK3CA mutations were associated with FBXW7 missense mutations (p=0.012). On univariate analysis, patients with FBXW7 missense mutations had significantly worse OS (median 28.7 mo) than those with wild-type FBXW7 (median 46.6 mo; p=0.003). On multivariate analysis including other known prognostic factors such as BRAF mutations, FBXW7 missense mutations were the strongest negative prognostic factor for OS (hazard ratio 2.0; p=0.003). Conclusions In the largest clinical dataset of mCRC to date, FBXW7 missense mutations showed a strong negative prognostic association. PMID:28424412

  14. Common housekeeping proteins are upregulated in colorectal adenocarcinoma and hepatocellular carcinoma, making the total protein a better "housekeeper"

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jiekai; Yang, Xuhan; Yang, Chao; Zhou, Daizhan; Wang, Qingyu; Qin, Shengying; Yan, Xiaomei; He, Lin; Han, Dongmei; Wan, Chunling

    2016-01-01

    Housekeeping proteins are essential endogenous controls for normalization as they are expected to be stably expressed. However, the stability of the expression level of housekeeping proteins needs to be assessed considering various experimental conditions. Our study evaluated the degree of variability of 7 commonly used housekeeping proteins with regard to their potential utility as normalizers in 56 pairs of matched colorectal adenocarcinoma (CRC) tissue samples and 6 pairs of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tissue samples using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) and Western blot analyses. A comprehensive experimental design and strict statistical analysis revealed that the expression levels of these 7 housekeeping proteins were not as stable as expected and they all exhibited upregulations to varying degrees in both the CRC and the HCC tissue samples. Consequently, we verified that using the amount of total protein instead of that of an individual protein can serve as a preferable control for studies of protein expression that require normalization. PMID:27556505

  15. Cytoplasmic sequestration of the tumor suppressor p53 by a heat shock protein 70 family member, mortalin, in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Gestl, Erin E.; Anne Boettger, S.

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Eight human colorectal cell lines were evaluated for p53 and mortalin localization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Six cell lines displayed cytoplasmic sequestration of the tumor suppressor p53. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Direct interaction between mortalin and p53 was shown in five cell lines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell lines positive for p53 sequestration yielded elevated p53 expression levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study yields the first evidence of cytoplasmic sequestration p53 by mortalin. -- Abstract: While it is known that cytoplasmic retention of p53 occurs in many solid tumors, the mechanisms responsible for this retention have not been positively identified. Since heatshock proteins like mortalin have been associated with p53 inactivation in other tumors, the current study sought to characterize this potential interaction in never before examined colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines. Six cell lines, one with 3 different fractions, were examined to determine expression of p53 and mortalin and characterize their cellular localization. Most of these cell lines displayed punctate p53 and mortalin localization in the cell cytoplasm with the exception of HCT-8 and HCT116 379.2 cells, where p53 was not detected. Nuclear p53 was only observed in HCT-116 40-16, LS123, and HT-29 cell lines. Mortalin was only localized in the cytoplasm in all cell lines. Co-immunoprecipitation and immunohistochemistry revealed that p53 and mortalin were bound and co-localized in the cytoplasmic fraction of four cell lines, HCT-116 (40-16 and 386; parental and heterozygous fractions respectively of the same cell line), HT-29, LS123 and LoVo, implying that p53 nuclear function is limited in those cell lines by being restricted to the cytoplasm. Mortalin gene expression levels were higher than gene expression levels of p53 in all cell lines. Cell lines with cytoplasmic sequestration of p53, however, also displayed elevated p53

  16. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester preferentially sensitizes CT26 colorectal adenocarcinoma to ionizing radiation without affecting bone marrow radioresponse

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.-J.; Liao, H.-F.; Tsai, T.-H.; Wang, S.-Y.; Shiao, M.-S. . E-mail: msshiao@vghtpe.gov.tw

    2005-11-15

    Purpose: Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), a component of propolis, was reported capable of depleting glutathione (GSH). We subsequently examined the radiosensitizing effect of CAPE and its toxicity. Methods and Materials: The effects of CAPE on GSH level, GSH metabolism enzyme activities, NF-{kappa}B activity, and radiosensitivity in mouse CT26 colorectal adenocarcinoma cells were determined. BALB/c mouse with CT26 cells implantation was used as a syngeneic in vivo model for evaluation of treatment and toxicity end points. Results: CAPE entered CT26 cells rapidly and depleted intracellular GSH in CT26 cells, but not in bone marrow cells. Pretreatment with nontoxic doses of CAPE significantly enhanced cell killing by ionizing radiation (IR) with sensitizer enhancement ratios up to 2.2. Pretreatment of CT26 cells with N-acetyl-L-cysteine reversed the GSH depletion activity and partially blocked the radiosensitizing effect of CAPE. CAPE treatment in CT26 cells increased glutathione peroxidase, decreased glutathione reductase, and did not affect glutathione S-transferase or {gamma}-glutamyl transpeptidase activity. Radiation activated NF-{kappa}B was reversed by CAPE pretreatment. In vivo study revealed that pretreatment with CAPE before IR resulted in greater inhibition of tumor growth and prolongation of survival in comparison with IR alone. Pretreatment with CAPE neither affected body weights nor produced hepatic, renal, or hematopoietic toxicity. Conclusions: CAPE sensitizes CT26 colorectal adenocarcinoma to IR, which may be via depleting GSH and inhibiting NF-{kappa}B activity, without toxicity to bone marrow, liver, and kidney.

  17. Intraoperative Molecular Imaging of Lung Adenocarcinoma Can Identify Residual Tumor Cells at the Surgical Margins.

    PubMed

    Keating, Jane J; Okusanya, Olugbenga T; De Jesus, Elizabeth; Judy, Ryan; Jiang, Jack; Deshpande, Charuhas; Nie, Shuming; Low, Philip; Singhal, Sunil

    2016-04-01

    During lung surgery, identification of surgical margins is challenging. We hypothesized that molecular imaging with a fluorescent probe to pulmonary adenocarcinomas could enhance residual tumor during resection. Mice with flank tumors received a contrast agent targeting folate receptor alpha. Optimal dose and time of injection was established. Margin detection was compared using traditional methods versus molecular imaging. A pilot study was then performed in three humans with lung adenocarcinoma. The peak tumor-to-background ratio (TBR) of murine tumors was 3.9. Fluorescence peaked at 2 h and was not improved beyond 0.1 mg/kg. Traditional inspection identified 30% of mice with positive margins. Molecular imaging identified an additional 50% of residual tumor deposits (p < 0.05). The fluorescent probe visually enhanced all human tumors with a mean TBR of 3.5. Molecular imaging is an important adjunct to traditional inspection to identify surgical margins after tumor resection.

  18. Immunohistochemical expression of metallothionein in normal human colorectal mucosa, in adenomas and in adenocarcinomas and their associated metastases.

    PubMed

    Giuffrè, G; Barresi, G; Sturniolo, G C; Sarnelli, R; D'Incà, R; Tuccari, G

    1996-10-01

    The immunohistochemical distribution pattern of metallothionein, a low molecular weight protein with strong affinity for divalent heavy metal ions, has been investigated in normal and neoplastic conditions of the large bowel. Utilizing a monoclonal mouse antibody the following formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded surgical or biopsy samples were studied: tubulo-villous adenomas (8 cases); adenocarcinomas with various degree of differentiation (85), nine of which were mucinous-type; synchronous tubular or tubulo-villous adenomas separate from carcinomas (30); transitional mucosa (45); metastases in lymph nodes (43); and distant metastases (45). Twenty biopsies from the right and left colon of 10 patients affected by irritable bowel syndrome were also analyzed. Normal colonic mucosa as well as transitional mucosa showed metallothionein immunopositivity in enterocytes at the luminal surface and crypts. Evident nuclear and cytoplasmic staining was encountered in tubulo-villous adenomas; the same reactivity was noted in the basal glandular component of colorectal carcinomas-synchronous adenomas, while less intense staining was noted in the apical villous portions. A variable metallothionein immunostaining was observed in adenocarcinomas (62.3%), in lymph node (55.8%) and distant hepatic (17.2%) and omental (43.8%) metastases, although it was not always concordant with that reported in the corresponding primary tumour. Whether the metallothionein positivity observed in normal and neoplastic cells is the result of expression of a stable form of the protein or an accumulation in the nucleus and cytoplasm remains to be clarified.

  19. Integrative transcriptome analysis identifies deregulated microRNA-transcription factor networks in lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cinegaglia, Naiara C.; Andrade, Sonia Cristina S.; Tokar, Tomas; Pinheiro, Maísa; Severino, Fábio E.; Oliveira, Rogério A.; Hasimoto, Erica N.; Cataneo, Daniele C.; Cataneo, Antônio J.M.; Defaveri, Júlio; Souza, Cristiano P.; Marques, Márcia M.C.; Carvalho, Robson F.; Coutinho, Luiz L.; Gross, Jefferson L.; Rogatto, Silvia R.; Lam, Wan L.; Jurisica, Igor; Reis, Patricia P.

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we aimed at identifying global transcriptome microRNA (miRNA) changes and miRNA target genes in lung adenocarcinoma. Samples were selected as training (N = 24) and independent validation (N = 34) sets. Tissues were microdissected to obtain >90% tumor or normal lung cells, subjected to miRNA transcriptome sequencing and TaqMan quantitative PCR validation. We further integrated our data with published miRNA and mRNA expression datasets across 1,491 lung adenocarcinoma and 455 normal lung samples. We identified known and novel, significantly over- and under-expressed (p ≤ 0.01 and FDR≤0.1) miRNAs in lung adenocarcinoma compared to normal lung tissue: let-7a, miR-10a, miR-15b, miR-23b, miR-26a, miR-26b, miR-29a, miR-30e, miR-99a, miR-146b, miR-181b, miR-181c, miR-421, miR-181a, miR-574 and miR-1247. Validated miRNAs included let-7a-2, let-7a-3, miR-15b, miR-21, miR-155 and miR-200b; higher levels of miR-21 expression were associated with lower patient survival (p = 0.042). We identified a regulatory network including miR-15b and miR-155, and transcription factors with prognostic value in lung cancer. Our findings may contribute to the development of treatment strategies in lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:27081085

  20. Serum ghrelin is associated with risk of colorectal adenocarcinomas in the ATBC study.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Gwen; Cross, Amanda J; Dawsey, Sanford M; Stanczyk, Frank Z; Kamangar, Farin; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Taylor, Philip R; Männistö, Satu; Albanes, Demetrius; Abnet, Christian C; Freedman, Neal D

    2017-08-16

    Colorectal cancers are the third most common cancers in women and men in the USA. While dietary and lifestyle factors such as Western diet, physical inactivity and obesity have been linked to an increased risk of this malignancy, the mechanisms for these associations are unclear. GI hormones, including ghrelin, are involved in energy balance by mediating appetite and metabolism; however, the association between ghrelin and colorectal cancer has not been studied. We conducted a case-control study nested within the all-male Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study of Finnish smokers (aged 50-69 years) to examine serum ghrelin concentration and colorectal cancer risk. Data from 284 colon and 239 rectal cancers and 523 controls (matched on age, date of blood draw and serum availability) were analysed. ORs and 95% CIs were calculated using multivariable (conditional) logistic regression. Overall, low-serum ghrelin was significantly associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer (Q1 vs Q4: OR:1.57, 95% CI 1.05 to 2.34). For individuals developing tumours within 10 years of blood draw, those in the lowest quartile of serum ghrelin concentrations were statistically significantly more likely to develop colorectal cancers than those with higher serum ghrelin concentrations (OR: 10.86, 95% CI 5.01 to 23.55). However, for individuals with tumours developing more than 20 years after blood draw, low-serum ghrelin concentrations were associated with a decreased risk of colorectal cancer relative to those with the highest serum ghrelin concentrations (OR: 0.26, 95% CI 0.11 to 0.64). Low-serum ghrelin was associated with an increased colorectal cancer risk within 10 years of blood draw with a decreased risk for developing colorectal cancer more than 20 years after blood draw. These results suggest that ghrelin concentrations may vary across the carcinogenic process. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the

  1. ABCB5 identifies a therapy-refractory tumor cell population in colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Brian J.; Schatton, Tobias; Zhan, Qian; Gasser, Martin; Ma, Jie; Saab, Karim R.; Schanche, Robin; Waaga-Gasser, Ana-Maria; Gold, Jason S.; Huang, Qin; Murphy, George F.; Frank, Markus H.; Frank, Natasha Y.

    2012-01-01

    Identification and reversal of treatment resistance mechanisms of clinically refractory tumor cells is critical for successful cancer therapy. Here we show that ATP-binding cassette member B5 (ABCB5) identifies therapy-refractory tumor cells in colorectal cancer patients following fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemoradiation therapy and provide evidence for a functional role of ABCB5 in colorectal cancer 5-FU resistance. Examination of human colon and colorectal cancer specimens revealed ABCB5 to be expressed only on rare cells within healthy intestinal tissue, whereas clinical colorectal cancers exhibited substantially increased levels of ABCB5 expression. Analysis of successive, patient-matched biopsy specimens obtained prior to and following neoadjuvant 5-FU-based chemoradiation therapy in a series of colorectal cancer patients revealed markedly enhanced abundance of ABCB5-positive tumor cells when residual disease was detected. Consistent with this finding, the ABCB5-expressing tumor cell population was also treatment-refractory and exhibited resistance to 5-FU-induced apoptosis in a colorectal cancer xenograft model of 5-FU monotherapy. Mechanistically, shRNA-mediated ABCB5 knockdown significantly inhibited tumorigenic xenograft growth and sensitized colorectal cancer cells to 5-FU-induced cell killing. Our results identify ABCB5 as a novel molecular marker of therapy-refractory tumor cells in colorectal cancer patients and point to a need for consistent eradication of ABCB5-positive resistant tumor cell populations for more effective colorectal cancer therapy. PMID:21652540

  2. Tumor cell and connective tissue cell interactions in human colorectal adenocarcinoma. Transfer of platelet-derived growth factor-AB/BB to stromal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sundberg, C.; Branting, M.; Gerdin, B.; Rubin, K.

    1997-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying stimulation of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) beta-receptors expressed on connective tissue cells in human colorectal adenocarcinoma were investigated in this study. PDGF-AB/BB, but not PDGF receptors, was expressed by tumor cells in situ, as well as in tumor cell isolates of low passage from human colorectal adenocarcinoma. In an experimental co-culture system, conditioned medium from tumor cells only marginally activated PDGF beta-receptors expressed on fibroblasts. In contrast, co-culturing of the two cell types led to a marked PDGF beta-receptor activation. Functional PDGF-AB/BB was found to be associated with heparinase-I-sensitive components on the tumor cell surface. PDGF-AB/BB, isolated from heparinase-I-sensitive cell surface components, induced a marked activation of PDGF beta-receptors. Furthermore, co-culturing tumor cells together with fibroblasts led to a sustained activation of PDGF beta-receptors expressed on fibroblasts. Double immunofluorescence staining of tissue sections from human colorectal adenocarcinoma, combined with computer-aided image analysis, revealed that nonproliferating tumor cells were the predominant cellular source of PDGF-AB/BB in the tumor stroma. In addition, PDGF-AB/BB-expressing tumor cells were found juxtapositioned to microvascular cells expressing activated PDGF beta-receptors. Confocal microscopy revealed a cytoplasmic and cell-membrane-associated expression of PDGF-AB/BB in tumor cells situated in the stroma. In contrast, epithelial cells situated in normal or tumorous acinar structures revealed only a cell-membrane-associated PDGF-AB/BB expression. The is vitro and in situ results demonstrate that tumor cells not only facilitate but also have the ability to modulate connective tissue cell responsiveness to PDGF-AB/BB in a paracrine fashion, through direct cell-cell interactions in human colorectal adenocarcinoma. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9250160

  3. Prognostic model for brain metastases from lung adenocarcinoma identified with epidermal growth factor receptor mutation status.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongwei; Wang, Weili; Jia, Haixia; Lian, Jianhong; Cao, Jianzhong; Zhang, Xiaqin; Song, Xing; Jia, Sufang; Li, Zhengran; Cao, Xing; Zhou, Wei; Han, Songye; Yang, Weihua; Xi, Yanfen; Lian, Shenming

    2017-09-01

    Several indices have been developed to predict survival of brain metastases (BM) based on prognostic factors. However, such models were designed for general brain metastases from different kinds of cancers, and prognostic factors vary between cancers and histological subtypes. Recently, studies have indicated that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status may be a potential prognostic biological factor in BM from lung adenocarcinoma. Thus, we sought to define the role of EGFR mutation in prognoses and introduce a prognostic model specific for BM from lung adenocarcinoma. Data of 256 patients with BM from lung adenocarcinoma identified with EGFR mutations were collected. Independent prognostic factors were confirmed using a Cox regression model. The new prognostic model was developed based on the results of multivariable analyses. The score of each factor was calculated by six-month survival. Prognostic groups were divided into low, medium, and high risk based on the total scores. The prediction ability of the new model was compared to the three existing models. EGFR mutation and Karnofsky performance status were independent prognostic factors and were thus integrated into the new prognostic model. The new model was superior to the three other scoring systems regarding the prediction of three, six, and 12-month survival by pairwise comparison of the area under the curve. Our proposed prognostic model specific for BM from lung adenocarcinoma incorporating EGFR mutation status was valid in predicting patient survival. Further verification is warranted, with prospective testing using large sample sizes. © 2017 The Authors. Thoracic Cancer published by China Lung Oncology Group and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  4. A genome-wide association study for colorectal cancer identifies a risk locus in 14q23.1.

    PubMed

    Lemire, Mathieu; Qu, Conghui; Loo, Lenora W M; Zaidi, Syed H E; Wang, Hansong; Berndt, Sonja I; Bézieau, Stéphane; Brenner, Hermann; Campbell, Peter T; Chan, Andrew T; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Du, Mengmeng; Edlund, Christopher K; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W; Harrison, Tabitha A; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hopper, John L; Hou, Lifang; Hsu, Li; Jacobs, Eric J; Jenkins, Mark A; Jeon, Jihyoun; Küry, Sébastien; Li, Li; Lindor, Noralane M; Newcomb, Polly A; Potter, John D; Rennert, Gad; Rudolph, Anja; Schoen, Robert E; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Seminara, Daniela; Severi, Gianluca; Slattery, Martha L; White, Emily; Woods, Michael O; Cotterchio, Michelle; Le Marchand, Loïc; Casey, Graham; Gruber, Stephen B; Peters, Ulrike; Hudson, Thomas J

    2015-11-01

    Over 50 loci associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) have been uncovered by genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Identifying additional loci has the potential to help elucidate aspects of the underlying biological processes leading to better understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease. We re-evaluated a GWAS by excluding controls that have family history of CRC or personal history of colorectal polyps, as we hypothesized that their inclusion reduces power to detect associations. This is supported empirically and through simulations. Two-phase GWAS analysis was performed in a total of 16,517 cases and 14,487 controls. We identified rs17094983, a SNP associated with risk of CRC [p = 2.5 × 10(-10); odds ratio estimated by re-including all controls (OR) = 0.87, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.83-0.91; minor allele frequency (MAF) = 13%]. Results were replicated in samples of African descent (1894 cases and 4703 controls; p = 0.01; OR = 0.86, 95% CI 0.77-0.97; MAF = 16 %). Gene expression data in 195 colon adenocarcinomas and 59 normal colon tissues from two different studies revealed that this locus has genotypes that are associated with RTN1 (Reticulon 1) expression (p = 0.001), a protein-coding gene involved in survival and proliferation of cancer cells which is highly expressed in normal colon tissues but has significantly reduced expression in tumor cells (p = 1.3 × 10(-8)).

  5. Optical metabolic imaging of colorectal adenocarcinoma derived organoids: assessing cellular-level resistance to therapy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Haley M.; Prieto, Sandra P.; Greening, Gage J.; Muldoon, Timothy J.

    2017-02-01

    Locally advanced adenocarcinomas located in the distal rectum are commonly treated via 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT). The occurrence of pre-operative pathological complete response, or the absence of any histological evidence of residual cancer, is seen in 15-27% of rectal cancer cases. Response to chemotherapeutic agents varies between patients, introducing the need for a system to predict optimal drug combinations. We propose a method of utilizing optical metabolic imaging of in vitro, primary tumor-derived, three-dimensional organoid culture to create specific drug sensitivity profiles, and to rapidly assess a patient's potential response to drugs. Murine xenografts were developed in Swiss athymic nude mice, using human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines, implanted in the flank (RKO, ATCC). Tumors were excised upon reaching a volume of 500mm3 and processed for organoid culture. Organoids were subjected to longitudinal metabolic imaging of metabolic cofactors FAD and NADH for seven days. The resulting images were used to yield an optical redox value on a cell-by-cell basis, determined by the fluorescence intensity ratio of FAD/(FAD+NADH). This data infers proliferative index of the organoids. Beginning on day three, a control vehicle dimethyl sulfoxide, or the cytotoxic agent 5-FU, was added to the organoid growth media in wells, with metabolic imaging performed the same as previously stated. The optical redox values decreased due to the addition of 5-FU, which targets rapidly dividing cells and induces apoptosis. The changes in the optical redox histograms were correlated to markers of cell proliferation (Ki-67) and apoptosis (cleaved caspase-3).

  6. Association of HPV with genetic and epigenetic alterations in colorectal adenocarcinoma from Indian population.

    PubMed

    Laskar, Ruhina S; Talukdar, Fazlur R; Choudhury, Javed H; Singh, Seram Anil; Kundu, Sharbadeb; Dhar, Bishal; Mondal, Rosy; Ghosh, Sankar Kumar

    2015-06-01

    Several studies from developing countries have shown human papillomavirus to be associated with colorectal cancers, but the molecular characteristics of such cancers are poorly known. We studied the various genetic variations like microsatellite instability (MSI), oncogenic mutations and epigenetic deregulations like CpG island methylation in HPV associated and nonassociated colorectal cancer patients from Indian population. HPV DNA was detected by PCR using My09/My11 and Gp5+/Gp6+ consensus primers and typed using HPV16 and HPV18 specific primers. MSI was detected using BAT 25 and BAT 26 markers, and mutation of KRAS, TP53 and BRAF V600E were detected by direct sequencing. Methyl specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP) was used to determine promoter methylation of the classical CIMP panel markers (P16, hMLH1, MINT1, MINT2 and MINT31) and other tumour-related genes (DAPK, RASSF1, BRCA1 and GSTP1). HPV DNA was detected in 34/93 (36.5 %) colorectal tumour tissues, HPV 18 being the predominant high-risk type. MSI was detected in 7.5 % cases; KRAS codon 12, 13, BRAF V600E and TP53 mutations were detected in 36.5, 3.2 and 37.6 % of the cases, respectively. CIMP-high was observed in 44.08 % cases. HPV presence was not associated with age, stage or grade of tumours, MSI or mutations in KRAS, TP53 or BRAF genes. Higher methylation frequencies of all genes/loci under study except RASSF1, as well as significantly higher CIMP-high characteristics were observed in HPV positive tumours as compared to negative cases. HPV in association with genetic and epigenetic features might be a potent risk factor for colorectal cancer in Indian population.

  7. Small Bowel Adenocarcinoma Frequently Exhibits Lynch Syndrome-associated Mismatch Repair Protein Deficiency But Does Not Harbor Sporadic MLH1 Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Xia, Michelle; Singhi, Aatur D; Dudley, Beth; Brand, Randall; Nikiforova, Marina; Pai, Reetesh K

    2017-07-01

    Universal screening for Lynch syndrome has been advocated for colorectal carcinoma but its utility in small bowel adenocarcinoma has not been reported. We analyzed a consecutive series of 71 small bowel adenocarcinomas identified over an 8-year period for DNA mismatch repair (MMR) protein expression to (1) compare the clinicopathologic features of small bowel adenocarcinoma stratified into MMR-deficient (MMRD) and MMR-proficient (MMRP) groups and (2) examine the patterns of MMR protein expression in small bowel adenocarcinoma compared with colorectal carcinoma. Six of 71 (8.5%) small bowel adenocarcinomas and 149 of 1291 (11.5%) colorectal carcinomas demonstrated MMRD. The 6 MMRD small bowel adenocarcinomas had the following expression pattern: 3 with concurrent loss of MSH2 and MSH6, 1 with isolated loss of MSH6, and 2 with concurrent loss of MLH1 and PMS2 in patients with a family history suggestive of genetic cancer susceptibility. Histopathology suggestive of MMR protein deficiency as proposed by the revised Bethesda guidelines was commonly seen in both MMRP (63%) and MMRD (67%) small bowel adenocarcinomas (P>0.05). MMRD small bowel adenocarcinoma more frequently demonstrated abnormalities of MSH2 and/or MSH6 (4/6, 67%) compared with MMRD colorectal carcinoma (23/149, 15%) (P=0.01). None of the MMRD small bowel adenocarcinomas harbored the BRAF V600E mutation, whereas 60% of MMRD colorectal carcinomas were positive for BRAF V600E with concurrent loss of MLH1 and PMS2 expression. Small bowel adenocarcinoma more frequently harbored Lynch syndrome-associated MMRD compared with colorectal carcinoma, providing support for screening of small bowel adenocarcinoma to identify patients at risk for Lynch syndrome. In contrast to colorectal carcinoma, sporadic MLH1 deficiency is not seen in small bowel adenocarcinoma. Clinicopathologic and histologic features do not distinguish between MMRP and MMRD small bowel adenocarcinoma indicating that universal screening in small

  8. New Molecular Features of Colorectal Cancer Identified - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    Investigators from the National Cancer Institute's Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) who comprehensively analyzed 95 human colorectal tumor samples, have determined how gene alterations identified in previous analyses of the same samples

  9. LIN28 cooperates with WNT signaling to drive invasive intestinal and colorectal adenocarcinoma in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Tu, Ho-Chou; Schwitalla, Sarah; Qian, Zhirong; LaPier, Grace S; Yermalovich, Alena; Ku, Yuan-Chieh; Chen, Shann-Ching; Viswanathan, Srinivas R; Zhu, Hao; Nishihara, Reiko; Inamura, Kentaro; Kim, Sun A; Morikawa, Teppei; Mima, Kosuke; Sukawa, Yasutaka; Yang, Juhong; Meredith, Gavin; Fuchs, Charles S; Ogino, Shuji; Daley, George Q

    2015-05-15

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains a major contributor to cancer-related mortality. LIN28A and LIN28B are highly related RNA-binding protein paralogs that regulate biogenesis of let-7 microRNAs and influence development, metabolism, tissue regeneration, and oncogenesis. Here we demonstrate that overexpression of either LIN28 paralog cooperates with the Wnt pathway to promote invasive intestinal adenocarcinoma in murine models. When LIN28 alone is induced genetically, half of the resulting tumors harbor Ctnnb1 (β-catenin) mutation. When overexpressed in Apc(Min/+) mice, LIN28 accelerates tumor formation and enhances proliferation and invasiveness. In conditional genetic models, enforced expression of a LIN28-resistant form of the let-7 microRNA reduces LIN28-induced tumor burden, while silencing of LIN28 expression reduces tumor volume and increases tumor differentiation, indicating that LIN28 contributes to tumor maintenance. We detected aberrant expression of LIN28A and/or LIN28B in 38% of a large series of human CRC samples (n = 595), where LIN28 expression levels were associated with invasive tumor growth. Our late-stage CRC murine models and analysis of primary human tumors demonstrate prominent roles for both LIN28 paralogs in promoting CRC growth and progression and implicate the LIN28/let-7 pathway as a therapeutic target. © 2015 Tu et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  10. LIN28 cooperates with WNT signaling to drive invasive intestinal and colorectal adenocarcinoma in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Ho-Chou; Schwitalla, Sarah; Qian, Zhirong; LaPier, Grace S.; Yermalovich, Alena; Ku, Yuan-Chieh; Chen, Shann-Ching; Viswanathan, Srinivas R.; Zhu, Hao; Nishihara, Reiko; Inamura, Kentaro; Kim, Sun A.; Morikawa, Teppei; Mima, Kosuke; Sukawa, Yasutaka; Yang, Juhong; Meredith, Gavin; Fuchs, Charles S.; Ogino, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains a major contributor to cancer-related mortality. LIN28A and LIN28B are highly related RNA-binding protein paralogs that regulate biogenesis of let-7 microRNAs and influence development, metabolism, tissue regeneration, and oncogenesis. Here we demonstrate that overexpression of either LIN28 paralog cooperates with the Wnt pathway to promote invasive intestinal adenocarcinoma in murine models. When LIN28 alone is induced genetically, half of the resulting tumors harbor Ctnnb1 (β-catenin) mutation. When overexpressed in ApcMin/+ mice, LIN28 accelerates tumor formation and enhances proliferation and invasiveness. In conditional genetic models, enforced expression of a LIN28-resistant form of the let-7 microRNA reduces LIN28-induced tumor burden, while silencing of LIN28 expression reduces tumor volume and increases tumor differentiation, indicating that LIN28 contributes to tumor maintenance. We detected aberrant expression of LIN28A and/or LIN28B in 38% of a large series of human CRC samples (n = 595), where LIN28 expression levels were associated with invasive tumor growth. Our late-stage CRC murine models and analysis of primary human tumors demonstrate prominent roles for both LIN28 paralogs in promoting CRC growth and progression and implicate the LIN28/let-7 pathway as a therapeutic target. PMID:25956904

  11. Use of the human colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cell line for isolating respiratory viruses from nasopharyngeal aspirates.

    PubMed

    Chan, K H; Yan, M K; To, K K W; Lau, S K; Woo, P C; Cheng, V C C; Li, W S; Chan, J F W; Tse, H; Yuen, K Y

    2013-05-01

    The human colorectal adenocarcinoma-derived Caco-2 cell line was evaluated as a means isolating common respiratory viruses from nasopharyngeal aspirates for the diagnosis of respiratory diseases. One hundred eighty-nine direct immunofluorescence positive nasopharyngeal aspirates obtained from patients with various viral respiratory diseases were cultured in the presence of Caco-2 cells or the following conventional cell lines: LLC-MK2, MDCK, HEp-2, and A549. Caco-2 cell cultures effectively propagated the majority (84%) of the viruses present in nasopharyngeal aspirate samples compared with any positive cultures obtained using the panel cells (78%) or individual cell line MDCK (38%), HEp-2 (21%), LLC-MK2 (27%), or A549 (37%) cell lines. The differences against individual cell line were statistically significant (P = < 0.000001). Culture in Caco-2 cells resulted in the isolation of 85% (36/42) of viruses which were not cultivated in conventional cell lines. By contrast, 80% (24/30) of viruses not cultivated in Caco-2 cells were isolated using the conventional panel. The findings indicated that Caco-2 cells were sensitive to a wide range of viruses and can be used to culture a broad range of respiratory viruses.

  12. Dynamic Change of Polarity in Primary Cultured Spheroids of Human Colorectal Adenocarcinoma and Its Role in Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Okuyama, Hiroaki; Kondo, Jumpei; Sato, Yumi; Endo, Hiroko; Nakajima, Aya; Piulats, Jose M; Tomita, Yasuhiko; Fujiwara, Takeshi; Itoh, Yu; Mizoguchi, Akira; Ohue, Masayuki; Inoue, Masahiro

    2016-04-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells possess apical-basal polarity, which governs the exchange of nutrients and waste. Perturbation of cell polarity appears to be a general feature of cancers, although most colorectal cancers are differentiated adenocarcinomas, in which polarity is maintained to some extent. Little is known about the role of dysregulated polarity in cancer. The cancer tissue-originated spheroid method was applied to the preparation and culture of spheroids. Spheroids were cultured in suspension or in type I collagen gel. Polarity was assessed by IHC of apical markers and electron microscopy. Two types of polarity status in spheroids were observed: apical-in, with apical membrane located at cavities inside the spheroids in type I collagen gel; and apical-out, with apical membrane located at the outermost layer of spheroids in suspension. These polarities were highly interchangeable. Inhibitors of Src and dynamin attenuated the polarity switch. In patients, clusters of cancer cells that invaded vessels had both apical-in and apical-out morphologic features, whereas primary and metastatic tumors had apical-in features. In a mouse liver metastasis model, apical-out spheroids injected into the portal vein became apical-in spheroids in the liver within a few days. Inhibitors of Src and dynamin significantly decreased liver metastasis. Polarity switching was observed in spheroids and human cancer. The polarity switch was critical in an experimental liver metastasis model.

  13. Cuminaldehyde from Cinnamomum verum Induces Cell Death through Targeting Topoisomerase 1 and 2 in Human Colorectal Adenocarcinoma COLO 205 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Kuen-daw; Liu, Yi-Heng; Chen, Ta-Wei; Yang, Shu-Mei; Wong, Ho-Yiu; Cherng, Jonathan; Chou, Kuo-Shen; Cherng, Jaw-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Cinnamomum verum, also called true cinnamon tree, is employed to make the seasoning cinnamon. Furthermore, the plant has been used as a traditional Chinese herbal medication. We explored the anticancer effect of cuminaldehyde, an ingredient of the cortex of the plant, as well as the molecular biomarkers associated with carcinogenesis in human colorectal adenocarcinoma COLO 205 cells. The results show that cuminaldehyde suppressed growth and induced apoptosis, as proved by depletion of the mitochondrial membrane potential, activation of both caspase-3 and -9, and morphological features of apoptosis. Moreover, cuminaldehyde also led to lysosomal vacuolation with an upregulated volume of acidic compartment and cytotoxicity, together with inhibitions of both topoisomerase I and II activities. Additional study shows that the anticancer activity of cuminaldehyde was observed in the model of nude mice. Our results suggest that the anticancer activity of cuminaldehyde in vitro involved the suppression of cell proliferative markers, topoisomerase I as well as II, together with increase of pro-apoptotic molecules, associated with upregulated lysosomal vacuolation. On the other hand, in vivo, cuminaldehyde diminished the tumor burden that would have a significant clinical impact. Furthermore, similar effects were observed in other tested cell lines. In short, our data suggest that cuminaldehyde could be a drug for chemopreventive or anticancer therapy. PMID:27231935

  14. Changing epidemiology of colorectal cancer makes screening sigmoidoscopy less useful for identifying carriers of colorectal neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Rozen, Paul; Liphshitz, Irena; Barchana, Micha

    2012-08-01

    There is renewed interest in flexible sigmoidoscopy (FS) colorectal cancer (CRC) screening following trials showing significantly reduced CRC incidence and mortality. To evaluate the potential usefulness of FS screening in our population. We examined rectosigmoid (RS) cancer epidemiology in our Jewish population using Israel National Cancer Registry data, computed by CRC site, age groups, and gender. We also reviewed endoscopy-screening publications for prevalence of RS and proximal advanced adenomas (AAP) and having both or either. During 1980-2008, there were 64,559 CRCs registered; 31.6 % were RS cancer which has now decreased to 29 % of men's and 26 % of women's CRC (both P < 0.01). In <50 year olds, RS cancer occurred in 42 % of males' and 35 % of females' CRC, and in the last 2 decades this ratio is unchanged. In 50-74 year olds, RS cancer decreased to stable levels of 32 % of males' and 29 % females' CRC (both P < 0.01). In ≥75 year olds, RS cancer progressively decreased to 24 % of males' and 22 % females' CRC (both P < 0.001). From endoscopy screening reports in 40-79 year olds, RS AAPs occurred in 2.0-5.8 %, being least in women, most in men, and not increased with aging. Some 50-57 % of screenees had both RS and proximal AAPs, least when aged 40-49 years at 25 %, women were 35 %, and with aging 40 %, but most in men at 70 %. With the changing CRC epidemiology, having fewer RS neoplasms but more proximal cancer, the effectiveness of FS screening for identifying significant neoplasms decreases with screenees' age and especially in females. These make FS screening less suitable for our aging and increasingly female population.

  15. Next generation sequencing identifies ‘interactome’ signatures in relapsed and refractory metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, Laurence; Mahadevan, Daruka

    2017-01-01

    Background In the management of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), KRAS, NRAS and BRAF mutational status individualizes therapeutic options and identify a cohort of patients (pts) with an aggressive clinical course. We hypothesized that relapsed and refractory mCRC pts develop unique mutational signatures that may guide therapy, predict for a response and highlight key signaling pathways important for clinical decision making. Methods Relapsed and refractory mCRC pts (N=32) were molecularly profiled utilizing commercially available next generation sequencing (NGS) platforms. Web-based bioinformatics tools (Reactome/Enrichr) were utilized to elucidate mutational profile linked pathways-networks that have the potential to guide therapy. Results Pts had progressed on fluoropyrimidines, oxaliplatin, irinotecan, bevacizumab, cetuximab and/or panitumumab. Most common histology was adenocarcinoma (colon N=29; rectal N=3). Of the mutations TP53 was the most common, followed by APC, KRAS, PIK3CA, BRAF, SMAD4, SPTA1, FAT1, PDGFRA, ATM, ROS1, ALK, CDKN2A, FBXW7, TGFBR2, NOTCH1 and HER3. Pts had on average had ≥5 unique mutations. The most frequent activated signaling pathways were: HER2, fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR), p38 through BRAF-MEK cascade via RIT and RIN, ARMS-mediated activation of MAPK cascade, and VEGFR2. Conclusions Dominant driver oncogene mutations do not always equate to oncogenic dependence, hence understanding pathogenic ‘interactome(s)’ in individual pts is key to both clinically relevant targets and in choosing the next best therapy. Mutational signatures derived from corresponding ‘pathway-networks’ represent a meaningful tool to (I) evaluate functional investigation in the laboratory; (II) predict response to drug therapy; and (III) guide rational drug combinations in relapsed and refractory mCRC pts. PMID:28280605

  16. B2 adrenergic receptors and morphological changes of the enteric nervous system in colorectal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ciurea, Raluca Niculina; Rogoveanu, Ion; Pirici, Daniel; Târtea, Georgică-Costinel; Streba, Costin Teodor; Florescu, Cristina; Cătălin, Bogdan; Puiu, Ileana; Târtea, Elena-Anca; Vere, Cristin Constantin

    2017-01-01

    AIM To study the morphology of the enteric nervous system and the expression of beta-2 adrenergic (B2A) receptors in primary colorectal cancer. METHODS In this study, we included forty-eight patients with primary colorectal cancer and nine patients for control tissue from the excision of a colonic segment for benign conditions. We determined the clinicopathological features and evaluated the immunohistochemical expression pattern of B2A receptors as well as the morphological changes of the enteric nervous system (ENS). In order to assess statistical differences, we used the student t-test for comparing the means of two groups and one-way analysis of variance with Bonferroni’s post hoc analysis for comparing the means of more than two groups. Correlations were assessed using the Pearson’s correlation coefficient. RESULTS B2A receptors were significantly associated with tumor grading, tumor size, tumor invasion, lymph node metastasis (P < 0.05), while there were no statistically significant associations with gender, CRC location and gross appearance (P > 0.05). We observed, on one hand, a decrease of the relative area for both Auerbach and Meissner plexuses with the increase of the tumor grading, and on the other hand, an increase of the relative area of other nervous elements not in the Meissner plexus or in the Auerbach plexus with the tumor grading. For G1 tumors we found that epithelial B2A area showed an inverse correlation with the Auerbach plexus areas [r(14) = -0.531, P < 0.05], while for G2 tumors, epithelial B2A areas showed an indirect variation with both the Auerbach plexus areas [r(14) = -0.453, P < 0.05] and the Meissner areas [r(14) = -0.825, P < 0.01]. For G3 tumors, the inverse dependence increased for both Auerbach [r(14) = -0.587, P < 0.05] and Meissner [r(14) = -0.934, P < 0.05] plexuses. CONCLUSION B2A receptors play an important role in colorectal carcinogenesis and can be utilized as prognostic factors. Furthermore, study of the ENS in

  17. C-kit signaling promotes proliferation and invasion of colorectal mucinous adenocarcinoma in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jun; Yang, Shu; Shen, Ping; Sun, Haimei; Xiao, Jie; Wang, Yaxi; Wu, Bo; Ji, Fengqing; Yan, Jihong; Xue, Hong; Zhou, Deshan

    2015-09-29

    It was reported that the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) family often highly expressed in several mucinous carcinomas. In the present study, we established a murine model of colorectal mucinous adenocardinoma (CRMAC) by treating C57 mice [both wild type (WT) and loss-of-function c-kit mutant type (Wads-/-)] with AOM+DSS for 37 weeks and found that c-kit, a member of RTK family, clearly enhanced the tumor cell proliferation by decreasing p53 and increasing cyclin D1 through AKT pathway. Significantly, c-kit strongly promoted tumor cell invasiveness by increasing ETV4, which induced MMP7 expression and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) via ERK pathway. In vitro up- or down-regulating c-kit activation in human colorectal cancer HCT-116 cells further consolidated these results. In conclusion, our data suggested that the c-kit signaling obviously promoted proliferation and invasion of CRMAC. Therefore, targeting the c-kit signaling and its downstream molecules might provide the potential strategies for treatment of patients suffering from CRMAC in the future.

  18. Frequent gastrointestinal polyps and colorectal adenocarcinomas in prospective series of PTEN mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Heald, Brandie; Mester, Jessica; Rybicki, Lisa; Orloff, Mohammed S.; Burke, Carol A; Eng, Charis

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Germline PTEN mutations cause Cowden syndrome (CS), associated with breast and thyroid cancers. Case reports found 35–85% of CS patients had gastrointestinal (GI) hamartomas. The association of benign and malignant GI neoplasias with CS remains debatable. Our goal is to describe the GI phenotype in a prospective series of PTEN mutation carriers. METHODS Patients who met relaxed International Cowden Consortium criteria (N=2548) or with ≥5 GI polyps, ≥1 of which was hyperplastic or hamartomatous (N=397) were prospectively recruited. Germline PTEN mutation/deletion analysis was performed. Of the 2945, 127 patients having clear pathogenic PTEN mutations (123/2548+4/397) were eligible for this study. EGD and colonoscopy were performed and pathology reports reviewed. Fisher’s 2-tailed exact test, unpaired t-tests, and age- and gender-adjusted SIR were calculated. RESULTS Of 127 PTEN mutation carriers, 67 underwent ≥1 endoscopy with 62 (95%) having polyps, making GI polyps the second most common feature, after macrocephaly (74.8%). Of the 65, half had hyperplastic polyps and ¼ each with hamartomatous, ganglioneuromatous or adenomatous polyps. There were one to “innumerable” polyps in the colorectum, ileum, duodenum, stomach and/or esophagus, with 24 subjects having both upper and lower GI polyps. Nine (13%) subjects had colorectal cancer, all under the age of 50. The adjusted SIR was 224.1 (95%CI 109.3–411.3, p<0.0001). Cancers were commonly associated with adenomatous and/or hyperplastic polyps. One had gastric signet ring cell carcinoma. CONCLUSIONS PTEN-associated CS should be considered a mixed polyp syndrome, with hyperplastic polyps most prevalent, and a risk of early-onset colorectal cancer. Routine colonoscopy should be considered in PTEN-associated CS especially in the context of hyperplastic and/or adenomatous polyps. PMID:20600018

  19. Computer Aided Diagnosis for Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy in Advanced Colorectal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ştefănescu, Daniela; Streba, Costin; Cârţână, Elena Tatiana; Săftoiu, Adrian; Gruionu, Gabriel; Gruionu, Lucian Gheorghe

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) is becoming a popular method for optical biopsy of digestive mucosa for both diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Computer aided diagnosis of CLE images, using image processing and fractal analysis can be used to quantify the histological structures in the CLE generated images. The aim of this study is to develop an automatic diagnosis algorithm of colorectal cancer (CRC), based on fractal analysis and neural network modeling of the CLE-generated colon mucosa images. Materials and Methods We retrospectively analyzed a series of 1035 artifact-free endomicroscopy images, obtained during CLE examinations from normal mucosa (356 images) and tumor regions (679 images). The images were processed using a computer aided diagnosis (CAD) medical imaging system in order to obtain an automatic diagnosis. The CAD application includes image reading and processing functions, a module for fractal analysis, grey-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) computation module, and a feature identification module based on the Marching Squares and linear interpolation methods. A two-layer neural network was trained to automatically interpret the imaging data and diagnose the pathological samples based on the fractal dimension and the characteristic features of the biological tissues. Results Normal colon mucosa is characterized by regular polyhedral crypt structures whereas malignant colon mucosa is characterized by irregular and interrupted crypts, which can be diagnosed by CAD. For this purpose, seven geometric parameters were defined for each image: fractal dimension, lacunarity, contrast correlation, energy, homogeneity, and feature number. Of the seven parameters only contrast, homogeneity and feature number were significantly different between normal and cancer samples. Next, a two-layer feed forward neural network was used to train and automatically diagnose the malignant samples, based on the seven parameters tested. The neural network

  20. Computer Aided Diagnosis for Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy in Advanced Colorectal Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ştefănescu, Daniela; Streba, Costin; Cârţână, Elena Tatiana; Săftoiu, Adrian; Gruionu, Gabriel; Gruionu, Lucian Gheorghe

    2016-01-01

    Confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) is becoming a popular method for optical biopsy of digestive mucosa for both diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Computer aided diagnosis of CLE images, using image processing and fractal analysis can be used to quantify the histological structures in the CLE generated images. The aim of this study is to develop an automatic diagnosis algorithm of colorectal cancer (CRC), based on fractal analysis and neural network modeling of the CLE-generated colon mucosa images. We retrospectively analyzed a series of 1035 artifact-free endomicroscopy images, obtained during CLE examinations from normal mucosa (356 images) and tumor regions (679 images). The images were processed using a computer aided diagnosis (CAD) medical imaging system in order to obtain an automatic diagnosis. The CAD application includes image reading and processing functions, a module for fractal analysis, grey-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) computation module, and a feature identification module based on the Marching Squares and linear interpolation methods. A two-layer neural network was trained to automatically interpret the imaging data and diagnose the pathological samples based on the fractal dimension and the characteristic features of the biological tissues. Normal colon mucosa is characterized by regular polyhedral crypt structures whereas malignant colon mucosa is characterized by irregular and interrupted crypts, which can be diagnosed by CAD. For this purpose, seven geometric parameters were defined for each image: fractal dimension, lacunarity, contrast correlation, energy, homogeneity, and feature number. Of the seven parameters only contrast, homogeneity and feature number were significantly different between normal and cancer samples. Next, a two-layer feed forward neural network was used to train and automatically diagnose the malignant samples, based on the seven parameters tested. The neural network operations were cross-entropy with the

  1. Chlorpyrifos promotes colorectal adenocarcinoma H508 cell growth through the activation of EGFR/ERK1/2 signaling pathway but not cholinergic pathway.

    PubMed

    Suriyo, Tawit; Tachachartvanich, Phum; Visitnonthachai, Daranee; Watcharasit, Piyajit; Satayavivad, Jutamaad

    2015-12-02

    Aside from the effects on neuronal cholinergic system, epidemiological studies suggest an association between chlorpyrifos (CPF) exposure and cancer risk. This in vitro study examined the effects of CPF and its toxic metabolite, chlorpyrifos oxon (CPF-O), on the growth of human colorectal adenocarcinoma H508, colorectal adenocarcinoma HT-29, normal colon epithelial CCD841, liver hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2, and normal liver hepatocyte THLE-3 cells. The results showed that CPF (5-100 μM) concentration-dependently increased viability of H508 and CCD841 cells in serum-free conditions. This increasing trend was not found in HT-29, HepG2 and THLE-3 cells. In contrast, CPF-O (50-100 μM) reduced the viability of all cell lines. Cell cycle analysis showed the induction of cells in the S phase, and EdU incorporation assay revealed the induction of DNA synthesis in CPF-treated H508 cells indicating that CPF promotes cell cycle progression. Despite the observation of acetylcholinesterase activity inhibition and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, atropine (a non-selective muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist) and N-acetylcysteine (a potent antioxidant) failed to inhibit the growth-promoting effect of CPF. CPF increased the phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and its downstream effector, extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK1/2), in H508 cells. AG-1478 (a specific EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor) and U0126 (a specific MEK inhibitor) completely mitigated the growth promoting effect of CPF. Altogether, these results suggest that EGFR/ERK1/2 signaling pathway but not cholinergic pathway involves in CPF-induced colorectal adenocarcinoma H508 cell growth.

  2. Therapeutic efficacy evaluation of 111in-VNB-liposome on human colorectal adenocarcinoma HT-29/ luc mouse xenografts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wan-Chi; Hwang, Jeng-Jong; Tseng, Yun-Long; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Chang, Ya-Fang; Lu, Yi-Ching; Ting, Gann; Whang-Peng, Jaqueline; Wang, Shyh-Jen

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of the liposome encaged with vinorelbine (VNB) and 111In-oxine on human colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT-29) using HT-29/ luc mouse xenografts. HT-29 cells stably transfected with plasmid vectors containing luciferase gene ( luc) were transplanted subcutaneously into the male NOD/SCID mice. Biodistribution of the drug was performed when tumor size reached 500-600 mm 3. The uptakes of 111In-VNB-liposome in tumor and normal tissues/organs at various time points postinjection were assayed. Multimodalities, including gamma scintigraphy, bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and whole-body autoradiography (WBAR), were applied for evaluating the therapeutic efficacy when tumor size was about 100 mm 3. The tumor/blood ratios of 111In-VNB-liposome were 0.044, 0.058, 2.690, 20.628 and 24.327, respectively, at 1, 4, 24, 48 and 72 h postinjection. Gamma scinitigraphy showed that the tumor/muscle ratios were 2.04, 2.25 and 4.39, respectively, at 0, 5 and 10 mg/kg VNB. BLI showed that significant tumor control was achieved in the group of 10 mg/kg VNB ( 111In-VNB-liposome). WBAR also confirmed this result. In this study, we have demonstrated a non-invasive imaging technique with a luciferase reporter gene and BLI for evaluation of tumor treatment efficacy in vivo. The SCID mice bearing HT-29/ luc xenografts treated with 111In-VNB-liposome were shown with tumor reduction by this technique.

  3. KRAS and PIK3CA mutations in colorectal adenocarcinomas correlate with aggressive histological features and behavior.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sejin; Hong, Mineui; Shin, Mi Kyung; Kim, Byung Chun; Shin, Hyung-Sik; Yu, Eunsil; Hong, Seung-Mo; Kim, Jihun; Chun, Sung Min; Kim, Tae-Im; Choi, Kyung-Chan; Ko, Young Woong; Kim, Jeong Won

    2017-02-08

    Tumor budding (TB) in colorectal carcinoma (CRC) is related to epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and has been recently characterized as an indicator of poor prognosis along with lymphovascular tumor emboli (LVE), perineural invasion (PNI), and an infiltrative growth pattern. Mutations in the genes of the Ras-MAPK and PI3K pathways are associated with EMT and an aggressive CRC phenotype and have been used in patient stratification for anti-EGF receptor therapies; however, the impact of these mutations on CRC morphology and behavior remains unclear. In this study, using a multi-gene panel, we detected KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, TP53, and POLE mutations in 90 CRCs and investigated their associations with clinicopathological parameters, including TB. Our results showed that 21 of 34 tumors with high-grade TB had KRAS mutations (P=.001) and KRAS G12D and PIK3CA exon 9 variants were significantly associated with high-grade TB (P=.002 and .006, respectively); furthermore, tumors with KRAS mutations in exons 3 and 4 tended to have LVE and PNI (P=.044 and .049, respectively). PIK3CA exon 9 mutations indicated a tendency for shorter disease-free survival (P=.030), whereas BRAF mutations were associated with extracellular mucin deposition (P=.016). Our study revealed a correlation of KRAS mutations with high-grade TB, an association of certain KRAS and PIK3CA variants with aggressive clinicopathological features, as well as a possible relationship between BRAF mutations and mucin production in CRC.

  4. Pulmonary enteric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Handa, Yoshinori; Kai, Yuichiro; Ikeda, Takuhiro; Mukaida, Hidenori; Egawa, Hiromi; Kaneko, Mayumi

    2016-12-01

    A 70-year-old man was referred to our department due to abnormal shadows on a chest radiograph. Computed tomography of the chest revealed a 3-cm nodule in the right middle lung lobe, and bronchoscopy revealed adenocarcinoma cells with EGFR mutations. A lung resection was performed. Histological analysis revealed tumors comprising tall columnar cells that were similar to an adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid colon that had been resected 13 years previously. Metastatic colorectal carcinoma was initially considered, but immunohistochemical staining indicated pulmonary enteric adenocarcinoma. Pulmonary enteric adenocarcinoma was first described in 1991, and about 30 cases have since been described in the English literature. However, its concept and etiology are not clear. It is important to distinguish pulmonary enteric adenocarcinoma from metastatic colorectal carcinoma because of obvious differences in therapeutic strategies and prognosis, especially with a past history of colorectal carcinoma. Immunohistochemical and gene mutation analyses seemed to be helpful.

  5. Expression of pattern recognition receptor genes and mortality in patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Royse, Kathryn E; Chen, Liang; Berger, David H; Ittmann, Michael M; El-Serag, Hashem B; Balentine, Courtney J; Graham, David Y; Richardson, Peter A; Rumbaut, Rolando E; Shen, Xiaoyun; White, Donna L; Jiao, Li

    2017-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and the receptor for advanced glycation end products (AGER) are pattern recognition receptors that regulate intestinal inflammatory homeostasis. However, their relevance in colorectal cancer (CRC) prognosis is unclear. We investigated expression of TLRs, AGER, and interacting proteins in association with CRC mortality in a retrospective cohort study of 65 males diagnosed with primary resectable CRC between 2002 and 2009. Multiplex quantitative nuclease protection assay was used to quantify the expression of 19 genes in archived tissues of tumor and paired adjacent normal mucosa. We evaluated the association between log2 (tumor/normal) expression ratios for single and combined genes and all-cause mortality using multivariable Cox regression analysis. The false discovery rate adjusted q-value less than 0.10 indicated statistical significance for single gene. Five-year survival time was calculated from diagnosis of CRC to death, lost to follow-up, or December 31, 2014. Compared to paired normal mucosa, expression levels of AGER, IL1A, MYD88, and TLR5 were lower (q = 0.0002); while CXCL8 and S100P were higher (q = 0.0002) in tumor epithelia. Higher tumor expression of IL1A (HRadj = 0.68, 95% CI: 0.49-0.94), IL6 (HRadj = 0.70, 95% CI: 0.52-0.94), MyD88 (HRadj = 0.53, 95% CI: 0.30-0.93), and TLR5 (HRadj = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.52-0.98) was associated with higher mortality risk. There was a synergistic effect on lower five-year survival in lower co-expressers of IL-6 and MyD88 (P < 0.0001). Our findings suggest that a TLRs/MyD88-mediated inflammatory response may play a role in CRC prognosis. The role of pattern recognition receptor-mediated immunity in CRC mortality warrants further research.

  6. Identifying candidate agents for lung adenocarcinoma by walking the human interactome

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yajiao; Zhang, Ranran; Jiang, Zhe; Xia, Rongyao; Zhang, Jingwen; Liu, Jing; Chen, Fuhui

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent advances in therapeutic strategies for lung cancer, mortality is still increasing. Therefore, there is an urgent need to identify effective novel drugs. In the present study, we implement drug repositioning for lung adenocarcinoma (LUAD) by a bioinformatics method followed by experimental validation. We first identified differentially expressed genes between LUAD tissues and nontumor tissues from RNA sequencing data obtained from The Cancer Genome Atlas database. Then, candidate small molecular drugs were ranked according to the effect of their targets on differentially expressed genes of LUAD by a random walk with restart algorithm in protein–protein interaction networks. Our method identified some potentially novel agents for LUAD besides those that had been previously reported (eg, hesperidin). Finally, we experimentally verified that atracurium, one of the potential agents, could induce A549 cells death in non-small-cell lung cancer-derived A549 cells by an MTT assay, acridine orange and ethidium bromide staining, and electron microscopy. Furthermore, Western blot assays demonstrated that atracurium upregulated the proapoptotic Bad and Bax proteins, downregulated the antiapoptotic p-Bad and Bcl-2 proteins, and enhanced caspase-3 activity. It could also reduce the expression of p53 and p21Cip1/Waf1 in A549 cells. In brief, the candidate agents identified by our approach may provide greater insights into improving the therapeutic status of LUAD. PMID:27729798

  7. Helicobacter Species Identified in Captive Sooty Mangabeys (Cercocebus atys) with Metastatic Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Esmail, Michael Y.; Bacon, Rebecca; Swennes, Alton G.; Feng, Yan; Shen, Zeli; Garcia, AnaPatricia; Sharma, Prachi; Cohen, Joyce; Fox, James G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Of all human cancers, gastric carcinoma is the one of the leading causes of death. Helicobacter pylori is considered a major etiologic agent of this disease. Spontaneously occurring gastric carcinoma is a rare diagnosis in nonhuman primates. A 2011 case report documented a high incidence of gastric adenocarcinoma in a closed colony of captive sooty mangabeys (Cercebus atys). However, H. pylori infection was not detected in these animals. Materials and Methods In this study, using archived formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded stomach sections of these animals alternative methodologies were used to identify H. pylori and other non-H. pylori Helicobacter species. In addition, two additional cases of sooty mangabeys with metastatic gastric carcinoma are characterized. Results Using fluorescent in situ hybridization, we identified gastric H. suis in 75% of archived and new gastric carcinoma cases. In the two newly reported cases, H. suis and a novel Helicobacter species were detected via PCR and sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene. H. pylori was not identified in any of the gastric carcinoma cases via FISH and/or PCR and sequence analysis of Helicobacter spp. in DNA from of available tissues. Conclusions This report is the first to characterize Helicobacter species infection in spontaneous gastric carcinoma with metastatic potential in nonhuman primates. PMID:26477442

  8. Helicobacter Species Identified in Captive Sooty Mangabeys (Cercocebus atys) with Metastatic Gastric Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Esmail, Michael Y; Bacon, Rebecca; Swennes, Alton G; Feng, Yan; Shen, Zeli; Garcia, AnaPatricia; Sharma, Prachi; Cohen, Joyce; Fox, James G

    2016-06-01

    Of all human cancers, gastric carcinoma is the one of the leading causes of death. Helicobacter pylori is considered a major etiologic agent of this disease. Spontaneously occurring gastric carcinoma is a rare diagnosis in nonhuman primates. A 2011 case report documented a high incidence of gastric adenocarcinoma in a closed colony of captive sooty mangabeys (Cercebus atys). However, H. pylori infection was not detected in these animals. In this study, using archived formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded stomach sections of these animals alternative methodologies were used to identify H. pylori and other non-H. pylori Helicobacter species. In addition, two additional cases of sooty mangabeys with metastatic gastric carcinoma are characterized. Using fluorescent in situ hybridization, we identified gastric H. suis in 75% of archived and new gastric carcinoma cases. In the two newly reported cases, H. suis and a novel Helicobacter species were detected via PCR and sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene. H. pylori was not identified in any of the gastric carcinoma cases via FISH and/or PCR and sequence analysis of Helicobacter spp. in DNA from of available tissues. This report is the first to characterize Helicobacter species infection in spontaneous gastric carcinoma with metastatic potential in nonhuman primates. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Transcriptional profiling of peripheral blood in pancreatic adenocarcinoma patients identifies diagnostic biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Caba, Octavio; Prados, Jose; Ortiz, Raúl; Jiménez-Luna, Cristina; Melguizo, Consolación; Alvarez, Pablo J; Delgado, Juan R; Irigoyen, Antonio; Rojas, Ignacio; Pérez-Florido, Javier; Torres, Carolina; Perales, Sonia; Linares, Ana; Aránega, Antonia

    2014-11-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a lethal malignancy associated with poor survival rates. Fast detection of PDAC appears to be the most relevant strategy to improve the long-term survival of patients. Our objective was to identify new markers in peripheral blood that differentiates between PDAC patients and healthy controls. Peripheral blood samples from PDAC patients (n = 18) and controls (n = 18) were analyzed by whole genome cDNA microarray hybridization. The most relevant genes were validated by quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) in the same set of samples. Finally, our gene prediction set was tested in a blinded set of new peripheral blood samples (n = 30). Microarray studies identified 87 genes differentially expressed in peripheral blood samples from PDAC patients. Four of these genes were selected for analysis by RT-qPCR, which confirmed the previously observed changes. In our blinded validation study, the combination of CLEC4D and IRAK3 predicted the diagnosis of PDAC with 93 % accuracy, with a sensitivity of 86 % and specificity of 100 %. Peripheral blood gene expression profiling is an useful tool for the diagnosis of PDAC. We present a validated four-gene predictor set (ANKRD22, CLEC4D, VNN1, and IRAK3) that may be useful in PDAC diagnosis.

  10. Signet cell adenocarcinoma of the rectum metastatic to the orbit.

    PubMed

    Charles, Norman C; Ng, Diana D; Zoumalan, Christopher I

    2012-01-01

    A 24-year-old man developed abdominal carcinomatosis from signet cell carcinoma of the rectum. His only distal metastasis involved the superior orbit. Orbital pathology showed signet cells with a characteristic immunopathologic pattern. No hereditary syndrome was found. The authors identified only 5 cases in the literature describing colorectal adenocarcinoma metastatic to the orbit, with 2 showing histopathology. The authors believe that this rare case represents the first illustrating bona fide signet cell colorectal cancer involving the orbit.

  11. The incremental benefit of EUS for identifying unresectable disease among adults with pancreatic adenocarcinoma: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    James, Paul D.; Zhang, Mei; Belletrutti, Paul J.; Mohamed, Rachid; Ghali, William; Roberts, Derek J.; Martel, Guillaume; Heitman, Steven J.

    2017-01-01

    Background and study aims It is unclear to what extent EUS influences the surgical management of patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. This systematic review sought to determine if EUS evaluation improves the identification of unresectable disease among adults with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Patients and methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, bibliographies of included articles and conference proceedings for studies reporting original data regarding surgical management and/or survival among patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma, from inception to January 7th 2017. Our main outcome was the incremental benefit of EUS for the identification of unresectable disease (IBEUS). The pooled IBEUS were calculated using random effects models. Heterogeneity was explored using stratified meta-analysis and meta-regression. Results Among 4,903 citations identified, we included 8 cohort studies (study periods from 1992 to 2007) that examined the identification of unresectable disease (n = 795). Random effects meta-analysis suggested that EUS alone identified unresectable disease in 19% of patients (95% confidence interval [CI], 10–33%). Among those studies that considered portal or mesenteric vein invasion as potentially resectable, EUS alone was able to identify unresectable disease in 14% of patients (95% CI 8–24%) after a CT scan was performed. Limitations The majority of the included studies were retrospective. Conclusions EUS evaluation is associated with increased identification of unresectable disease among adults with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:28319148

  12. Epithelial cell adhesion molecule aptamer functionalized PLGA-lecithin-curcumin-PEG nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Xiang, Dongxi; Shigdar, Sarah; Yang, Wenrong; Li, Qiong; Lin, Jia; Liu, Kexin; Duan, Wei

    2014-01-01

    To improve the efficacy of drug delivery, active targeted nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems are gaining considerable attention as they have the potential to reduce side effects, minimize toxicity, and improve efficacy of anticancer treatment. In this work CUR-NPs (curcumin-loaded lipid-polymer-lecithin hybrid nanoparticles) were synthesized and functionalized with ribonucleic acid (RNA) Aptamers (Apts) against epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) for targeted delivery to colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. These CUR-encapsulated bioconjugates (Apt-CUR-NPs) were characterized for particle size, zeta potential, drug encapsulation, stability, and release. The in vitro specific cell binding, cellular uptake, and cytotoxicity of Apt-CUR-NPs were also studied. The Apt-CUR-NP bioconjugates exhibited increased binding to HT29 colon cancer cells and enhancement in cellular uptake when compared to CUR-NPs functionalized with a control Apt (P<0.01). Furthermore, a substantial improvement in cytotoxicity was achieved toward HT29 cells with Apt-CUR-NP bioconjugates. The encapsulation of CUR in Apt-CUR-NPs resulted in the increased bioavailability of delivered CUR over a period of 24 hours compared to that of free CUR in vivo. These results show that the EpCAM Apt-functionalized CUR-NPs enhance the targeting and drug delivery of CUR to colorectal cancer cells. Further development of CUR-encapsulated, nanosized carriers will lead to improved targeted delivery of novel chemotherapeutic agents to colorectal cancer cells.

  13. Epithelial cell adhesion molecule aptamer functionalized PLGA-lecithin-curcumin-PEG nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Xiang, Dongxi; Shigdar, Sarah; Yang, Wenrong; Li, Qiong; Lin, Jia; Liu, Kexin; Duan, Wei

    2014-01-01

    To improve the efficacy of drug delivery, active targeted nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems are gaining considerable attention as they have the potential to reduce side effects, minimize toxicity, and improve efficacy of anticancer treatment. In this work CUR-NPs (curcumin-loaded lipid-polymer-lecithin hybrid nanoparticles) were synthesized and functionalized with ribonucleic acid (RNA) Aptamers (Apts) against epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) for targeted delivery to colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. These CUR-encapsulated bioconjugates (Apt-CUR-NPs) were characterized for particle size, zeta potential, drug encapsulation, stability, and release. The in vitro specific cell binding, cellular uptake, and cytotoxicity of Apt-CUR-NPs were also studied. The Apt-CUR-NP bioconjugates exhibited increased binding to HT29 colon cancer cells and enhancement in cellular uptake when compared to CUR-NPs functionalized with a control Apt (P<0.01). Furthermore, a substantial improvement in cytotoxicity was achieved toward HT29 cells with Apt-CUR-NP bioconjugates. The encapsulation of CUR in Apt-CUR-NPs resulted in the increased bioavailability of delivered CUR over a period of 24 hours compared to that of free CUR in vivo. These results show that the EpCAM Apt-functionalized CUR-NPs enhance the targeting and drug delivery of CUR to colorectal cancer cells. Further development of CUR-encapsulated, nanosized carriers will lead to improved targeted delivery of novel chemotherapeutic agents to colorectal cancer cells. PMID:24591829

  14. Differential proteomic and tissue expression analyses identify valuable diagnostic biomarkers of hepatocellular differentiation and hepatoid adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Reis, Henning; Padden, Juliet; Ahrens, Maike; Pütter, Carolin; Bertram, Stefanie; Pott, Leona L; Reis, Anna-Carinna; Weber, Frank; Juntermanns, Benjamin; Hoffmann, Andreas-C; Eisenacher, Martin; Schlaak, Joörg F; Canbay, Ali; Meyer, Helmut E; Sitek, Barbara; Baba, Hideo A

    2015-10-01

    The exact discrimination of lesions with true hepatocellular differentiation from secondary tumours and neoplasms with hepatocellular histomorphology like hepatoid adenocarcinomas (HAC) is crucial. Therefore, we aimed to identify ancillary protein biomarkers by using complementary proteomic techniques (2D-DIGE, label-free MS). The identified candidates were immunohistochemically validated in 14 paired samples of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and non-tumourous liver tissue (NT). The candidates and HepPar1/Arginase1 were afterwards tested for consistency in a large cohort of hepatocellular lesions and NT (n = 290), non-hepatocellular malignancies (n = 383) and HAC (n = 13). Eight non-redundant, differentially expressed proteins were suitable for further immunohistochemical validation and four (ABAT, BHMT, FABP1, HAOX1) for further evaluation. Sensitivity and specificity rates for HCC/HAC were as follows: HepPar1 80.2%, 94.3% / 80.2%, 46.2%; Arginase1 82%, 99.4% / 82%, 69.2%; BHMT 61.4%, 93.8% / 61.4%, 100%; ABAT 84.4%, 33.7% / 84.4%, 30.8%; FABP1 87.2%, 95% / 87.2%, 69.2%; HAOX1 95.5%, 36.3% / 95.5%, 46.2%. The best 2×/3× biomarker panels for the diagnosis of HCC consisted of Arginase1/HAOX1 and BHMT/Arginase1/HAOX1 and for HAC consisted of Arginase1/FABP1 and BHMT/Arginase1/FABP1. In summary, we successfully identified, validated and benchmarked protein biomarker candidates of hepatocellular differentiation. BHMT in particular exhibited superior diagnostic characteristics in hepatocellular lesions and specifically in HAC. BHMT is therefore a promising (panel based) biomarker candidate in the differential diagnostic process of lesions with hepatocellular aspect.

  15. The Ueno method for substaging pT1 colorectal adenocarcinoma by depth and width measurement: an interobserver study.

    PubMed

    Wang, L M; Guy, R; Fryer, E; Kartsonaki, C; Gill, P; Hughes, C; Szuts, A; Perera, R; Chetty, R; Mortensen, N

    2015-08-01

    Early pT1 polyp colorectal cancers (CRCs) present challenges for accurate pathology substaging. Haggitt and Kikuchi stages depend on polyp morphology and are often difficult to apply due to suboptimal orientation or fragmentation, or absence of the muscularis propria in polypectomy or submucosal resection specimens. European guidelines for quality assurance suggest using Ueno's more objective approach, using depth and width measurements beyond muscularis mucosae. We have investigated interobserver variation using Ueno's approach. Ten consecutive pT1 polyp CRCs were identified and the slides assessed by six gastrointestinal pathologists for depth and width of invasion. A further 60 polyps were studied by a group of specialist and general pathologists. Agreement was assessed by analysis of variance. A polyp CRC is classified as high risk if it has a depth ≥ 2000 μm or a width ≥ 4000 μm and low risk with a depth < 2000 μm or a width < 4000 μm. Concordance for the dichotomized values was assessed using the kappa statistic. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for depth was 0.83 and for width 0.56 in the 10-polyp group. The ICC for the 60-polyp CRCs was 0.67 for depth and 0.37 for width. In both groups, when polyp CRCs are divided into high- and low-risk categories based on depth, there was substantial and moderate agreement (κ = 0.80 and 0.47) but only fair agreement when based on width (κ = 0.34 and 0.35). Ueno's method has the advantage of being independent of polyp morphology. Our study shows better concordance for depth measurement and reproducibility in nonfragmented specimens, with poorer agreement when based on width. Colorectal Disease © 2015 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  16. Antiproliferative activity of New Zealand propolis and phenolic compounds vs human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Catchpole, Owen; Mitchell, Kevin; Bloor, Stephen; Davis, Paul; Suddes, Amanda

    2015-10-01

    New Zealand propolis is a "European" type propolis obtained by honey bees mainly from exudates of poplar. European type propolis is known to have anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties and this activity has been attributed to some of the main constituents such as chrysin and CAPE (caffeic acid phenethyl ester). As part of our studies on how New Zealand propolis might benefit gastro-intestinal health, we carried out in vitro bioactivity-guided fractionation of "Bio30™" propolis using both anti-inflammatory (TNF-α, COX-1, COX-2) and anti-colon cancer (DLD-1 colon cancer cell viability) assays; and determined the phenolic compounds responsible for the activity. The New Zealand wax-free Bio30™ propolis tincture solids had very high levels of the dihydroflavonoids pinocembrin and pinobanksin-3-O-acetate, and high levels of the dimethylallyl, benzyl and 3-methyl-3-butenyl caffeates relative to CAPE. The DLD-1 assays identified strong anti-proliferative activity associated with these components as well as chrysin, galangin and CAPE and a number of lesser known or lower concentration compounds including benzyl ferulate, benzyl isoferulate, pinostrobin, 5-phenylpenta-2,4-dienoic acid and tectochrysin. The phenolic compounds pinocembrin, pinobanksin-3-O-acetate, tectochrysin, dimethylallyl caffeate, 3-methyl-3-butenyl caffeate, benzyl ferulate and benzyl isoferulate also showed good broad spectrum activity in anti-proliferative assays against three other gastro-intestinal cancer cell lines; HCT-116 colon carcinoma, KYSE-30 oesophageal squamous cancer, and NCI-N87 gastric carcinoma. Activity is also observed in anti-inflammatory assays although it appears to be limited to one of the first cytokines in the inflammatory cascade, TNF-α. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Kinetic modeling of 5-fluorouracil anabolism in colorectal adenocarcinoma: a positron emission tomography study in rats.

    PubMed

    Bading, James R; Yoo, Paul B; Fissekis, John D; Alauddin, Mian M; D'Argenio, David Z; Conti, Peter S

    2003-07-01

    Drug uptake and anabolism by tumors are prerequisites of response to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Positron emission tomography (PET) with 5-[(18)F]FU (PET/5-[(18)F]FU) is potentially useful for noninvasive measurement of these processes, but is severely hampered by rapid catabolism of 5-[(18)F]FU in vivo. This study explored the combined use of PET/5-[(18)F]FU and eniluracil (5-ethynyluracil), a potent inhibitor of 5-FU catabolism, to measure the pharmacokinetics of 5-FU uptake and metabolism in tumors. Rats bearing a s.c. implanted rat colon tumor were given eniluracil and injected i.v. with 5-[(18)F]FU. Dynamic PET and arterial blood sampling were performed 0-2 h. Tumors (n = 5) were then rapidly excised, frozen, and analyzed for labeled metabolites by high performance liquid chromatography. Tumor TACs were analyzed by compartmental modeling. Compartments were identified with molecular species by comparison with ex vivo assays. Tumor extracellular fluid volume was determined in a separate group of rats. Kinetic analysis indicated partial trapping of (18)F within tumors 0-2 h after injection. Tumor time-activity curves conformed closely to a catenary 3-compartment, 5-parameter model. The model yielded values for 5-FU clearance from plasma into the trap that agreed closely with those reported previously for gastrointestinal tumors from a PET/5-[(18)F]FU + eniluracil study in humans. Tumor extracellular fluid volume as measured with (99m)Tc DTPA [(3.1 +/- 0.2) x 10(-1) ml/g; n = 5] agreed well with the distribution volume for compartment 1 of the 3-compartment, 5-parameter model [(3.7 +/- 0.3) x 10(-1) ml/g; n = 5], thus indicating that compartment 1 corresponds to tumor extracellular space. Compartment 3 closely matched the combined magnitudes of (18)F fluoronucleoside (FN) triphosphates and macromolecules in all of the cases, and compartment 2 was quantitatively consistent with the sum of intracellular 5-FU, FNs, and FN mono- and diphosphates. These observations show

  18. Meta-analysis of transcriptome data identifies a novel 5-gene pancreatic adenocarcinoma classifier

    PubMed Central

    Bhasin, Manoj K.; Ndebele, Kenneth; Bucur, Octavian; Yee, Eric U.; Otu, Hasan H.; Plati, Jessica; Bullock, Andrea; Gu, Xuesong; Castan, Eduardo; Zhang, Peng; Najarian, Robert; Muraru, Maria S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is largely incurable due to late diagnosis. Superior early detection biomarkers are critical to improving PDAC survival and risk stratification. Experimental Design Optimized meta-analysis of PDAC transcriptome datasets identified and validated key PDAC biomarkers. PDAC-specific expression of a 5-gene biomarker panel was measured by qRT-PCR in microdissected patient-derived FFPE tissues. Cell-based assays assessed impact of two of these biomarkers, TMPRSS4 and ECT2, on PDAC cells. Results A 5-gene PDAC classifier (TMPRSS4, AHNAK2, POSTN, ECT2, SERPINB5) achieved on average 95% sensitivity and 89% specificity in discriminating PDAC from non-tumor samples in four training sets and similar performance (sensitivity = 94%, specificity = 89.6%) in five independent validation datasets. This classifier accurately discriminated PDAC from chronic pancreatitis (AUC = 0.83), other cancers (AUC = 0.89), and non-tumor from PDAC precursors (AUC = 0.92) in three independent datasets. Importantly, the classifier distinguished PanIN from healthy pancreas in the PDX1-Cre;LSL-KrasG12D PDAC mouse model. Discriminatory expression of the PDAC classifier genes was confirmed in microdissected FFPE samples of PDAC and matched surrounding non-tumor pancreas or pancreatitis. Notably, knock-down of TMPRSS4 and ECT2 reduced PDAC soft agar growth and cell viability and TMPRSS4 knockdown also blocked PDAC migration and invasion. Conclusions This study identified and validated a highly accurate 5-gene PDAC classifier for discriminating PDAC and early precursor lesions from non-malignant tissue that may facilitate early diagnosis and risk stratification upon validation in prospective clinical trials. Cell-based experiments of two overexpressed proteins encoded by the panel, TMPRSS4 and ECT2, suggest a causal link to PDAC development and progression, confirming them as potential therapeutic targets. PMID:26993610

  19. Functional signaling pathway analysis of lung adenocarcinomas identifies novel therapeutic targets for KRAS mutant tumors

    PubMed Central

    Baldelli, Elisa; Bellezza, Guido; Haura, Eric B.; Crinó, Lucio; Cress, W. Douglas; Deng, Jianghong; Ludovini, Vienna; Sidoni, Angelo; Schabath, Matthew B.; Puma, Francesco; Vannucci, Jacopo; Siggillino, Annamaria; Liotta, Lance A.; Petricoin, Emanuel F.; Pierobon, Mariaelena

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the complex signaling architecture of KRAS and the interconnected RAS-driven protein-protein interactions, especially as it occurs in human clinical specimens. This study explored the activated and interconnected signaling network of KRAS mutant lung adenocarcinomas (AD) to identify novel therapeutic targets. Thirty-four KRAS mutant (MT) and twenty-four KRAS wild-type (WT) frozen biospecimens were obtained from surgically treated lung ADs. Samples were subjected to laser capture microdissection and reverse phase protein microarray analysis to explore the expression/activation levels of 150 signaling proteins along with co-activation concordance mapping. An independent set of 90 non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) was used to validate selected findings by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Compared to KRAS WT tumors, the signaling architecture of KRAS MT ADs revealed significant interactions between KRAS downstream substrates, the AKT/mTOR pathway, and a number of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases (RTK). Approximately one-third of the KRAS MT tumors had ERK activation greater than the WT counterpart (p<0.01). Notably 18% of the KRAS MT tumors had elevated activation of the Estrogen Receptor alpha (ER-α) (p=0.02). This finding was verified in an independent population by IHC (p=0.03). KRAS MT lung ADs appear to have a more intricate RAS linked signaling network than WT tumors with linkage to many RTKs and to the AKT-mTOR pathway. Combination therapy targeting different nodes of this network may be necessary to treat this group of patients. In addition, for patients with KRAS MT tumors and activation of the ER-α, anti-estrogen therapy may have important clinical implications. PMID:26468985

  20. Systematic In Vivo Inactivation of Chromatin-Regulating Enzymes Identifies Setd2 as a Potent Tumor Suppressor in Lung Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Walter, David M; Venancio, Olivia S; Buza, Elizabeth L; Tobias, John W; Deshpande, Charuhas; Gudiel, A Andrea; Kim-Kiselak, Caroline; Cicchini, Michelle; Yates, Travis J; Feldser, David M

    2017-04-01

    Chromatin-modifying genes are frequently mutated in human lung adenocarcinoma, but the functional impact of these mutations on disease initiation and progression is not well understood. Using a CRISPR-based approach, we systematically inactivated three of the most commonly mutated chromatin regulatory genes in two Kras(G12D)-driven mouse models of lung adenocarcinoma to characterize the impact of their loss. Targeted inactivation of SWI/SNF nucleosome-remodeling complex members Smarca4 (Brg1) or Arid1a had complex effects on lung adenocarcinoma initiation and progression. Loss of either Brg1 or Arid1a were selected against in early-stage tumors, but Brg1 loss continued to limit disease progression over time, whereas loss of Arid1a eventually promoted development of higher grade lesions. In contrast to these stage-specific effects, loss of the histone methyltransferase Setd2 had robust tumor-promoting consequences. Despite disparate impacts of Setd2 and Arid1a loss on tumor development, each resulted in a gene expression profile with significant overlap. Setd2 inactivation and subsequent loss of H3K36me3 led to the swift expansion and accelerated progression of both early- and late-stage tumors. However, Setd2 loss per se was insufficient to overcome a p53-regulated barrier to malignant progression, nor establish the prometastatic cellular states that stochastically evolve during lung adenocarcinoma progression. Our study uncovers differential and context-dependent effects of SWI/SNF complex member loss, identifies Setd2 as a potent tumor suppressor in lung adenocarcinoma, and establishes model systems to facilitate further study of chromatin deregulation in lung cancer. Cancer Res; 77(7); 1719-29. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. Reactive oxygen species mediate arsenic induced cell transformation and tumorigenesis through Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway in human colorectal adenocarcinoma DLD1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Zhuo; Wang Xin; Cheng Senping; Sun Lijuan; Son, Young-Ok; Yao Hua; Li Wenqi; Budhraja, Amit; Li Li; Shelton, Brent J.; Tucker, Thomas; Arnold, Susanne M.; Shi Xianglin

    2011-10-15

    Long term exposure to arsenic can increase incidence of human cancers, such as skin, lung, and colon rectum. The mechanism of arsenic induced carcinogenesis is still unclear. It is generally believed that reactive oxygen species (ROS) may play an important role in this process. In the present study, we investigate the possible linkage between ROS, {beta}-catenin and arsenic induced transformation and tumorigenesis in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line, DLD1 cells. Our results show that arsenic was able to activate p47{sup phox} and p67{sup phox}, two key proteins for activation of NADPH oxidase. Arsenic was also able to generate ROS in DLD1 cells. Arsenic increased {beta}-catenin expression level and its promoter activity. ROS played a major role in arsenic-induced {beta}-catenin activation. Treatment of DLD1 cells by arsenic enhanced both transformation and tumorigenesis of these cells. The tumor volumes of arsenic treated group were much larger than those without arsenic treatment. Addition of either superoxide dismutase (SOD) or catalase reduced arsenic induced cell transformation and tumor formation. The results indicate that ROS are involved in arsenic induced cell transformation and tumor formation possible through Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line DLD1 cells. - Highlights: > Arsenic activates NADPH oxidase and increases reactive oxygen species generation in DLD1 cells. > Arsenic increases {beta}-catenin expression. > Inhibition of ROS induced by arsenic reduce {beta}-catenin expression. > Arsenic increases cell transformation in DLD1 cells and tumorigenesis in nude mice. > Blockage of ROS decrease cell transformation and tumorigenesis induced by arsenic.

  2. Mutation of the nm23-H1 gene has a non-dominant role in colorectal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    JIN, YUELING; DAI, ZHENSHENG

    2016-01-01

    Nm23-H1 is a metastasis suppressor gene, which is has a reduced expression in patients with digestive system cancer. However, the mechanistic basis for the genetic instability remains unknown. To study the expression of the nm23-H1 gene in patients with colorectal cancer, polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism was used to analyze any point mutation, and immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of nm23-H1. Results revealed that all 63 specimens of Chinese human colorectal cancer tissues exhibit no point mutation. Among those 63 specimens, 19 (30%) exhibited positive immunostaining for the nm23-H1 protein and 44 (70%) exhibited negative immunostaining. These observations suggested that the protein and gene expression levels of nm23-H1 are reduced in colorectal cancer compared with the adjacent normal tissues, and the point mutation in the nm23-H1 gene is not the dominant cause of metastatic colorectal cancer. PMID:27330777

  3. Mismatch repair mRNA and protein expression in intestinal adenocarcinoma in sika deer (Cervus nippon) resembling heritable non-polyposis colorectal cancer in man.

    PubMed

    Jahns, H; Browne, J A

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal adenocarcinomas seen in an inbred herd of farmed sika deer (Cervus nippon) morphologically resembled human hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). Features common to both included multiple de novo sites of tumourigenesis in the proximal colon, sessile and non-polyposis mucosal changes, the frequent finding of mucinous type adenocarcinoma, lymphocyte infiltration into the neoplastic tubules and Crohn's-like lymphoid follicles at the deep margin of the tumour. HNPCC is defined by a germline mutation of mismatch repair (MMR) genes resulting in their inactivation and loss of expression. To test the hypothesis that similar MMR gene inactivation occurs in the deer tumours, the expression of the four most important MMR genes, MSH2, MLH1, MSH6 and PMS2, was examined at the mRNA level by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (n = 12) and at the protein level by immunohistochemistry (n = 40) in tumour and control tissues. All four genes were expressed equally in normal and neoplastic tissues, so MMR gene inactivation could not be implicated in the carcinogenesis of this tumour in sika deer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Mutational signature analysis identifies MUTYH deficiency in colorectal cancers and adrenocortical carcinomas [Mutational signature analysis identifies deficiency in colorectal cancers and adrenocortical carcinomas

    DOE PAGES

    Pilati, Camilla; Shinde, Jayendra; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; ...

    2017-01-27

    Germline alterations in DNA repair genes are implicated in cancer predisposition and can result in characteristic mutational signatures. However, specific mutational signatures associated with base excision repair (BER) defects remain to be characterized. Here, by analysing a series of colorectal cancers (CRCs) using exome sequencing, we identified a particular spectrum of somatic mutations characterized by an enrichment of C > A transversions in NpCpA or NpCpT contexts in three tumours from a MUTYH-associated polyposis (MAP) patient and in two cases harbouring pathogenic germline MUTYH mutations. In two series of adrenocortical carcinomas (ACCs), we identified four tumours with a similar signaturemore » also presenting germline MUTYH mutations. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that MUTYH inactivation results in a particular mutational signature, which may serve as a useful marker of BER-related genomic instability in new cancer types.« less

  5. Fine-Mapping of Common Genetic Variants Associated with Colorectal Tumor Risk Identified Potential Functional Variants

    PubMed Central

    Gala, Manish; Abecasis, Goncalo; Bezieau, Stephane; Brenner, Hermann; Butterbach, Katja; Caan, Bette J.; Carlson, Christopher S.; Casey, Graham; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Conti, David V.; Curtis, Keith R.; Duggan, David; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W.; Harrison, Tabitha A.; Hayes, Richard B.; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hopper, John L.; Hudson, Thomas J.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Küry, Sébastien; Le Marchand, Loic; Leal, Suzanne M.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Potter, John D.; Schoen, Robert E.; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Seminara, Daniela; Slattery, Martha L.; Hsu, Li; Chan, Andrew T.; White, Emily; Berndt, Sonja I.; Peters, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified many common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with colorectal cancer risk. These SNPs may tag correlated variants with biological importance. Fine-mapping around GWAS loci can facilitate detection of functional candidates and additional independent risk variants. We analyzed 11,900 cases and 14,311 controls in the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium and the Colon Cancer Family Registry. To fine-map genomic regions containing all known common risk variants, we imputed high-density genetic data from the 1000 Genomes Project. We tested single-variant associations with colorectal tumor risk for all variants spanning genomic regions 250-kb upstream or downstream of 31 GWAS-identified SNPs (index SNPs). We queried the University of California, Santa Cruz Genome Browser to examine evidence for biological function. Index SNPs did not show the strongest association signals with colorectal tumor risk in their respective genomic regions. Bioinformatics analysis of SNPs showing smaller P-values in each region revealed 21 functional candidates in 12 loci (5q31.1, 8q24, 11q13.4, 11q23, 12p13.32, 12q24.21, 14q22.2, 15q13, 18q21, 19q13.1, 20p12.3, and 20q13.33). We did not observe evidence of additional independent association signals in GWAS-identified regions. Our results support the utility of integrating data from comprehensive fine-mapping with expanding publicly available genomic databases to help clarify GWAS associations and identify functional candidates that warrant more onerous laboratory follow-up. Such efforts may aid the eventual discovery of disease-causing variant(s). PMID:27379672

  6. Clinicopathological, immunohistochemical, and mutational analyses of pulmonary enteric adenocarcinoma: usefulness of SATB2 and β-catenin immunostaining for differentiation from metastatic colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Matsushima, Jun; Yazawa, Takuya; Suzuki, Masaki; Takahashi, Yoko; Ota, Satoshi; Nakajima, Takahiro; Yoshino, Ichiro; Yokose, Tomoyuki; Inoue, Toru; Kawahara, Kunimitsu; Nakatani, Yukio

    2017-06-01

    Pulmonary enteric adenocarcinoma (PEA) is a rare variant of pulmonary adenocarcinoma; it is sometimes difficult to discriminate between PEA and metastatic colorectal carcinoma (MCRC) because of their morphological and immunohistochemical resemblance. Here, we conducted clinicopathological, immunohistochemical, and mutational analyses of PEA with special focus on its differentiation from MCRC. We comparatively analyzed 8 surgically resected PEA tumors (7 patients) and 20 cases of MCRC. Patients were aged 43-77 years (average age, 64.1 years); 5 of 7 patients were men. Tumor sizes ranged from 1.5 to 11.5 cm (average size, 4.8 cm). The follow-up period was 1-65 months; 4 patients are alive without recurrence, 2 are alive with recurrence, and 1 patient died of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Six of the tumors were pure PEA; one PEA tumor had a small mucinous adenocarcinoma component; another had a squamous cell carcinoma component. Immunohistochemically, the positive rates of PEA for each antibody were as follows: CK7, 88% (7/8); CK20, 88% (7/8); TTF-1, 13% (1/8); β-catenin, 0% (0/8, strong nuclear expression); and SATB2, 13% (1/8). The positive rates of MCRC for these antibodies were 10%, 95%, 5%, 55%, and 100%, respectively. Genetic analysis of KRAS, EGFR, and BRAF showed the G12V mutation in exon 2 of KRAS in 1 PEA. The present study's findings indicate that β-catenin and SATB2 are useful immunohistochemical markers for differentiating between PEA and MCRC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Strategies to identify the Lynch syndrome among patients with colorectal cancer: a cost-effectiveness analysis.

    PubMed

    Ladabaum, Uri; Wang, Grace; Terdiman, Jonathan; Blanco, Amie; Kuppermann, Miriam; Boland, C Richard; Ford, James; Elkin, Elena; Phillips, Kathryn A

    2011-07-19

    Testing has been advocated for all persons with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer to identify families with the Lynch syndrome, an autosomal dominant cancer-predisposition syndrome that is a paradigm for personalized medicine. To estimate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of strategies to identify the Lynch syndrome, with attention to sex, age at screening, and differential effects for probands and relatives. Markov model that incorporated risk for colorectal, endometrial, and ovarian cancers. Published literature. All persons with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer and their relatives. Lifetime. Third-party payer. Strategies based on clinical criteria, prediction algorithms, tumor testing, or up-front germline mutation testing, followed by tailored screening and risk-reducing surgery. Life-years, cancer cases and deaths, costs, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios. The benefit of all strategies accrued primarily to relatives with a mutation associated with the Lynch syndrome, particularly women, whose life expectancy could increase by approximately 4 years with hysterectomy and salpingo-oophorectomy and adherence to colorectal cancer screening recommendations. At current rates of germline testing, screening, and prophylactic surgery, the strategies reduced deaths from colorectal cancer by 7% to 42% and deaths from endometrial and ovarian cancer by 1% to 6%. Among tumor-testing strategies, immunohistochemistry followed by BRAF mutation testing was preferred, with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $36,200 per life-year gained. The number of relatives tested per proband was a critical determinant of both effectiveness and cost-effectiveness, with testing of 3 to 4 relatives required for most strategies to meet a threshold of $50,000 per life-year gained. Immunohistochemistry followed by BRAF mutation testing was preferred in 59% of iterations in probabilistic sensitivity analysis at a threshold of $100,000 per life-year gained. Screening for the

  8. A genome-wide association study for colorectal cancer identifies a risk locus in 14q23.1

    PubMed Central

    Loo, Lenora W.M.; Zaidi, Syed H.E.; Wang, Hansong; Berndt, Sonja I.; Bézieau, Stéphane; Brenner, Hermann; Campbell, Peter T.; Chan, Andrew T.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Du, Mengmeng; Edlund, Christopher K.; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W.; Harrison, Tabitha A.; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hopper, John L.; Hou, Lifang; Hsu, Li; Jacobs, Eric J.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Jeon, Jihyoun; Küry, Sébastien; Li, Li; Lindor, Noralane M.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Potter, John D.; Rennert, Gad; Rudolph, Anja; Schoen, Robert E.; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Seminara, Daniela; Severi, Gianluca; Slattery, Martha L.; White, Emily; Woods, Michael O.; Cotterchio, Michelle; Marchand, Loic Le; Casey, Graham; Gruber, Steven B.; Peters, Ulrike; Hudson, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Over 50 loci associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) have been uncovered by genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Identifying additional loci has the potential to help elucidate aspects of the underlying biological processes leading to better understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease. We re-evaluated a GWAS by excluding controls that have family history of CRC or personal history of CR polyps, as we hypothesized that their inclusion reduces power to detect associations. This is supported empirically and through simulations. Two-phase GWAS analysis was performed in a total of 16,517 cases and 14,487 controls. We identified rs17094983, a SNP associated with risk of CRC (p=2.5×10−10; odds ratio estimated by re-including all controls (OR)=0.87, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.83–0.91; minor allele frequency (MAF)=13%). Results were replicated in samples of African descent (1,894 cases and 4,703 controls; p=0.01; OR=0.86, 95% CI: 0.77–0.97; MAF=16%). Gene expression data in 195 colon adenocarcinomas and 59 normal colon tissues from two different studies revealed that this locus has genotypes that are associated with RTN1 (Reticulon 1) expression (p=0.001), a protein-coding gene involved in survival and proliferation of cancer cells that is highly expressed in normal colon tissues but has significantly reduced expression in tumor cells (p=1.3×10−8). PMID:26404086

  9. Detection of novel and potentially actionable anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangement in colorectal adenocarcinoma by immunohistochemistry screening

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Kim, Sun Young; Jang, Jiryeon; Kim, Seung Tae; Park, Joon Oh; Lim, Ho Yeong; Kang, Won Ki; Park, Young Suk; Lee, Jiyun; Lee, Woo Yong; Park, Yoon Ah; Huh, Jung Wook; Yun, Seong Hyeon; Do, In-Gu; Kim, Seok Hyung; Balasubramanian, Sohail; Stephens, Philip J.; Ross, Jeffrey S.; Li, Gang Gary; Hornby, Zachary; Ali, Siraj M.; Miller, Vincent A.; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Ou, Sai-Hong Ignatius

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangement has been detected in colorectal carcinoma (CRC) using advanced molecular diagnostics tests including exon scanning, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and next generation sequencing (NGS). We investigated if immunohistochemistry (IHC) can be used to detect ALK rearrangement in gastrointestinal malignancies. Experimental designs Tissue microarrays (TMAs) from consecutive gastric carcinoma (GC) and CRC patients who underwent surgical resection at Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Korea were screened by IHC using ALK monoclonal antibody 5A4. IHC positive cases were confirmed by FISH, nCounter assays, and NGS-based comprehensive genomic profiling (CGP). ALK IHC was further applied to CRC patients enrolled in a pathway-directed therapeutic trial. Results Four hundred thirty-two GC and 172 CRC cases were screened by IHC. No GC sample was ALK IHC positive. One CRC (0.6%) was ALK IHC positive (3+) that was confirmed by ALK FISH and a novel CAD-ALK (C35; A20) fusion variant that resulted from a paracentric inversion event inv(2)(p22–21p23) was identified by CGP. One out of 50 CRC patients enrolled in a pathway-directed therapeutic trial was ALK IHC positive (3+) confirmed by ALK FISH and found to harbor the EML4-ALK (E21, A20) fusion variant by CGP. Growth of a tumor cell line derived from this EML4-ALK CRC patient was inhibited by ALK inhibitors crizotinib and entrectinib. Conclusions ALK IHC is a viable screening strategy for identifying ALK rearrangement in CRC. ALK rearrangement is a potential actionable driver mutation in CRC based on survival inhibition of patient tumor-derived cell line by potent ALK inhibitors. PMID:26172300

  10. Relation of glypican-3 and E-cadherin expressions to clinicopathological features and prognosis of mucinous and non-mucinous colorectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Foda, Abd Al-Rahman Mohammad; Mohammad, Mie Ali; Abdel-Aziz, Azza; El-Hawary, Amira Kamal

    2015-06-01

    Glypican-3 (GPC3) is a member of the membrane-bound heparin sulfate proteoglycans. E-cadherin is an adhesive receptor that is believed to act as a tumor suppressor gene. Many studies had investigated E-cadherin expressions in colorectal carcinoma (CRC) while only one study had investigated GPC3 expression in CRC. This study aims to investigate expression of GCP3 and E-cadherin in colorectal mucinous carcinoma (MA) and non-mucinous adenocarcinoma (NMA) using manual tissue microarray technique. Tumor tissue specimens are collected from 75 cases of MC and 75 cases of NMA who underwent radical surgery from Jan 2007 to Jan 2012 at the Gastroenterology Centre, Mansoura University, Egypt. Their clinicopathological parameters and survival data were revised and analyzed using established statistical methodologies. High-density manual tissue microarrays were constructed using modified mechanical pencil tip technique and immunohistochemistry for GPC3 and E-cadherin was done. NMA showed higher expression of GPC3 than MA with no statistically significant relation. NMA showed a significantly higher E-cadherin expression than MA. GPC3 and E-cadherin positivity rates were significantly interrelated in NMA, but not in MA, group. In NMA group, there was no significant relation between either GPC3 or E-cadherin expression and the clinicopathological features. In a univariate analysis, neither GPC3 nor E-cadherin expression showed a significant impact on disease-free survival (DFS) or overall survival (OS). GPC3 and E-cadherin expressions are not independent prognostic factors in CRC. However, expressions of both are significantly interrelated in NMA patients, suggesting an excellent interplay between both, in contrast to MA. Further molecular studies are needed to further explore the relationship between GCP3 and E-cadherin in colorectal carcinogenesis.

  11. Exome sequencing identifies potential novel candidate genes in patients with unexplained colorectal adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Spier, Isabel; Kerick, Martin; Drichel, Dmitriy; Horpaopan, Sukanya; Altmüller, Janine; Laner, Andreas; Holzapfel, Stefanie; Peters, Sophia; Adam, Ronja; Zhao, Bixiao; Becker, Tim; Lifton, Richard P; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Perner, Sven; Thiele, Holger; Nöthen, Markus M; Hoffmann, Per; Timmermann, Bernd; Schweiger, Michal R; Aretz, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    In up to 30% of patients with colorectal adenomatous polyposis, no germline mutation in the known genes APC, causing familial adenomatous polyposis, MUTYH, causing MUTYH-associated polyposis, and POLE or POLD1, causing Polymerase-Proofreading-associated polyposis can be identified, although a hereditary etiology is likely. To uncover new causative genes, exome sequencing was performed using DNA from leukocytes and a total of 12 colorectal adenomas from seven unrelated patients with unexplained sporadic adenomatous polyposis. For data analysis and variant filtering, an established bioinformatics pipeline including in-house tools was applied. Variants were filtered for rare truncating point mutations and copy-number variants assuming a dominant, recessive, or tumor suppressor model of inheritance. Subsequently, targeted sequence analysis of the most promising candidate genes was performed in a validation cohort of 191 unrelated patients. All relevant variants were validated by Sanger sequencing. The analysis of exome sequencing data resulted in the identification of rare loss-of-function germline mutations in three promising candidate genes (DSC2, PIEZO1, ZSWIM7). In the validation cohort, further variants predicted to be pathogenic were identified in DSC2 and PIEZO1. According to the somatic mutation spectra, the adenomas in this patient cohort follow the classical pathways of colorectal tumorigenesis. The present study identified three candidate genes which might represent rare causes for a predisposition to colorectal adenoma formation. Especially PIEZO1 (FAM38A) and ZSWIM7 (SWS1) warrant further exploration. To evaluate the clinical relevance of these genes, investigation of larger patient cohorts and functional studies are required.

  12. GWAS-identified common variants for obesity are not associated with the risk of developing colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Sainz, Juan; Frank, Bernd; da Silva Filho, Miguel I; Hoffmeister, Michael; Rudolph, Anja; Butterbach, Katja; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Brenner, Hermann; Hemminki, Kari; Försti, Asta

    2014-06-01

    Observational studies have consistently associated obesity with colorectal cancer risk. Because both traits are genetically determined and share some metabolic biomarkers, we hypothesized that obesity-related polymorphisms could also influence the risk of developing colorectal cancer. We conducted a comprehensive population-based case-control study in 1,792 German colorectal cancer cases and 1,805 controls to explore associations between 28 obesogenic variants identified through genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and colorectal cancer risk. We also evaluated interactions between polymorphisms and body mass index (BMI), type II diabetes (T2D), and gender. No evidence of association between obesogenic variants and colorectal cancer risk was observed after correction for multiple testing. There was only a remarkable interaction between the LTArs1041981 polymorphism and gender, which modified the risk of colorectal cancer [Pinteraction = 0.002; males: odds ratio (OR), 1.14; 95% confidence intervals (CI), 1.00-1.30 vs. females: OR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.71-0.97]. Our findings showed that obesogenic variants are not a major pathogenetic risk factor for colorectal cancer. This comprehensive population-based case-control study does not provide evidence of a shared genetic component between obesity and colorectal cancer. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Gene-environment interaction involving recently identified colorectal cancer susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Kantor, Elizabeth D.; Hutter, Carolyn M.; Minnier, Jessica; Berndt, Sonja I.; Brenner, Hermann; Caan, Bette J.; Campbell, Peter T.; Carlson, Christopher S.; Casey, Graham; Chan, Andrew T.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J.; Cotterchio, Michelle; Du, Mengmeng; Duggan, David; Fuchs, Charles S.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Gong, Jian; Harrison, Tabitha A.; Hayes, Richard B.; Henderson, Brian E.; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hopper, John L.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Jiao, Shuo; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Le Marchand, Loic; Lemire, Mathieu; Ma, Jing; Newcomb, Polly A.; Ochs-Balcom, Heather M.; Pflugeisen, Bethann M.; Potter, John D.; Rudolph, Anja; Schoen, Robert E.; Seminara, Daniela; Slattery, Martha L.; Stelling, Deanna L.; Thomas, Fridtjof; Thornquist, Mark; Ulrich, Cornelia M.; Warnick, Greg S.; Zanke, Brent W.; Peters, Ulrike; Hsu, Li; White, Emily

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Genome-wide association studies have identified several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). Prior research has evaluated the presence of gene-environment interaction involving the first 10 identified susceptibility loci, but little work has been conducted on interaction involving SNPs at recently identified susceptibility loci, including: rs10911251, rs6691170, rs6687758, rs11903757, rs10936599, rs647161, rs1321311, rs719725, rs1665650, rs3824999, rs7136702, rs11169552, rs59336, rs3217810, rs4925386, and rs2423279. METHODS Data on 9160 cases and 9280 controls from the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium (GECCO) and Colon Cancer Family Registry (CCFR) were used to evaluate the presence of interaction involving the above-listed SNPs and sex, body mass index (BMI), alcohol consumption, smoking, aspirin use, post-menopausal hormone (PMH) use, as well as intake of dietary calcium, dietary fiber, dietary folate, red meat, processed meat, fruit, and vegetables. Interaction was evaluated using a fixed-effects meta-analysis of an efficient Empirical Bayes estimator, and permutation was used to account for multiple comparisons. RESULTS None of the permutation-adjusted p-values reached statistical significance. CONCLUSIONS The associations between recently identified genetic susceptibility loci and CRC are not strongly modified by sex, BMI, alcohol, smoking, aspirin, PMH use, and various dietary factors. IMPACT Results suggest no evidence of strong gene-environment interactions involving the recently identified 16 susceptibility loci for CRC taken one at a time. PMID:24994789

  14. TFF3-dependent resistance of human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells HT-29/B6 to apoptosis is mediated by miR-491-5p regulation of lncRNA PRINS.

    PubMed

    Hanisch, Carlos; Sharbati, Jutta; Kutz-Lohroff, Barbara; Huber, Otmar; Einspanier, Ralf; Sharbati, Soroush

    2017-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is a double-edged cytokine associated with pathogenesis of inflammatory-related cancers being also able to induce cancer cell death. In the process of tumour development or metastasis, cancer cells can become resistant to TNF-α. In trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) overexpressing colorectal adenocarcinoma cells (HT-29/B6), we observed enhanced resistance against TNF-α/interferon gamma-induced apoptosis. TFF3 is a secreted small peptide that supports intestinal tissue repair but is also involved in intestinal tumour progression and scattering. We hypothesised that TFF3 rescues intestinal epithelial cancer cells from TNF-α-induced apoptosis by involving regulatory RNA networks. In silico-based expression analysis revealed TFF3-mediated regulation of selected microRNAs as well as long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), whereas miR-491-5p was identified to target the lncRNA 'psoriasis susceptibility-related RNA gene induced by stress' (PRINS). RNA interference-based gain- and loss-of-function experiments examined miR-491-PRINS axis to exert the TFF3-mediated phenotype. Chemical inhibition of selected pathways showed that phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT accounts for TFF3-mediated downregulation of miR-491-5p and accumulation of PRINS. Moreover, we showed that PRINS colocalises with PMAIP1 (NOXA) in nuclei of HT-29/B6 possessing inhibitory effects. Immunoprecipitation experiments proved molecular interaction of PMAIP1 with PRINS. Our study provides an insight into RNA regulatory networks that determine resistance of colorectal cancer cells to apoptosis.

  15. TFF3-dependent resistance of human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells HT-29/B6 to apoptosis is mediated by miR-491-5p regulation of lncRNA PRINS

    PubMed Central

    Hanisch, Carlos; Sharbati, Jutta; Kutz-Lohroff, Barbara; Huber, Otmar; Einspanier, Ralf; Sharbati, Soroush

    2017-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is a double-edged cytokine associated with pathogenesis of inflammatory-related cancers being also able to induce cancer cell death. In the process of tumour development or metastasis, cancer cells can become resistant to TNF-α. In trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) overexpressing colorectal adenocarcinoma cells (HT-29/B6), we observed enhanced resistance against TNF-α/interferon gamma-induced apoptosis. TFF3 is a secreted small peptide that supports intestinal tissue repair but is also involved in intestinal tumour progression and scattering. We hypothesised that TFF3 rescues intestinal epithelial cancer cells from TNF-α-induced apoptosis by involving regulatory RNA networks. In silico-based expression analysis revealed TFF3-mediated regulation of selected microRNAs as well as long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), whereas miR-491-5p was identified to target the lncRNA ‘psoriasis susceptibility-related RNA gene induced by stress’ (PRINS). RNA interference-based gain- and loss-of-function experiments examined miR-491-PRINS axis to exert the TFF3-mediated phenotype. Chemical inhibition of selected pathways showed that phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT accounts for TFF3-mediated downregulation of miR-491-5p and accumulation of PRINS. Moreover, we showed that PRINS colocalises with PMAIP1 (NOXA) in nuclei of HT-29/B6 possessing inhibitory effects. Immunoprecipitation experiments proved molecular interaction of PMAIP1 with PRINS. Our study provides an insight into RNA regulatory networks that determine resistance of colorectal cancer cells to apoptosis. PMID:28149533

  16. Strategies to Identify the Lynch Syndrome Among Patients With Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ladabaum, Uri; Wang, Grace; Terdiman, Jonathan; Blanco, Amie; Kuppermann, Miriam; Boland, C. Richard; Ford, James; Elkin, Elena; Phillips, Kathryn A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Testing has been advocated for all persons with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer to identify families with the Lynch syndrome, an autosomal dominant cancer-predisposition syndrome that is a paradigm for personalized medicine. Objective To estimate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of strategies to identify the Lynch syndrome, with attention to sex, age at screening, and differential effects for probands and relatives. Design Markov model that incorporated risk for colorectal, endometrial, and ovarian cancers. Data Sources Published literature. Target Population All persons with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer and their relatives. Time Horizon Lifetime. Perspective Third-party payer. Intervention Strategies based on clinical criteria, prediction algorithms, tumor testing, or up-front germline mutation testing, followed by tailored screening and risk-reducing surgery. Outcome Measures Life-years, cancer cases and deaths, costs, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios. Results of Base-Case Analysis The benefit of all strategies accrued primarily to relatives with a mutation associated with the Lynch syndrome, particularly women, whose life expectancy could increase by approximately 4 years with hysterectomy and salpingo-oophorectomy and adherence to colorectal cancer screening recommendations. At current rates of germline testing, screening, and prophylactic surgery, the strategies reduced deaths from colorectal cancer by 7% to 42% and deaths from endometrial and ovarian cancer by 1% to 6%. Among tumor-testing strategies, immunohistochemistry followed by BRAF mutation testing was preferred, with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $36 200 per life-year gained. Results of Sensitivity Analysis The number of relatives tested per proband was a critical determinant of both effectiveness and cost-effectiveness, with testing of 3 to 4 relatives required for most strategies to meet a threshold of $50 000 per life-year gained. Immunohistochemistry

  17. Cytotoxicity and intracellular fate of PLGA and chitosan-coated PLGA nanoparticles in Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) and human colorectal adenocarcinoma (Colo 205) cells.

    PubMed

    Trif, Mihaela; Florian, Paula E; Roseanu, Anca; Moisei, Magdalena; Craciunescu, Oana; Astete, Carlos E; Sabliov, Cristina M

    2015-11-01

    Polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) are known to facilitate intracellular uptake of drugs to improve their efficacy, with minimum bioreactivity. The goal of this study was to assess cellular uptake and trafficking of PLGA NPs and chitosan (Chi)-covered PLGA NPs in Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) and human colorectal adenocarcinoma (Colo 205) cells. Both PLGA and Chi-PLGA NPs were not cytotoxic to the studied cells at concentrations up to 2500 μg/mL. The positive charge conferred by the chitosan deposition on the PLGA NPs improved NPs uptake by MDBK cells. In this cell line, Chi-PLGA NPs colocalized partially with early endosomes compartment and showed a more consistent perinuclear localization than PLGA NPs. Kinetic uptake of PLGA NPs by Colo 205 was slower than that by MDBK cells, detected only at 24 h, exceeding that of Chi-PLGA NPs. This study offers new insights on NP interaction with target cells supporting the use of NPs as novel nutraceuticals/drug delivery systems in metabolic disorders or cancer therapy. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 103A: 3599-3611, 2015.

  18. Synergistic association of Notch and NFκB signaling and role of Notch signaling in modulating epithelial to mesenchymal transition in colorectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, Natarajan; Sivasithamparam, Niranjali Devaraj; Devaraj, Halagowder

    2014-12-01

    Notch1 signaling plays a key role in normal developmental processes and in cancer. The association between Notch activation and development of cancer has been well documented. Notch activation and outcome of the disease depend upon the crosstalk with other regulatory pathways including Nuclear Factor kappa B (NFκB) pathway. In this study, we have investigated the interaction of Notch intracellular domain (NICD) with NFκBp65 in colorectal cancer which resulted in the upregulation of Bcl-xL resulting in the inhibition of apoptosis. Mesenchymal marker Slug expression and down regulation of E-cadherin, an epithelial phenotypic marker were demonstrated in colon cancer tissues. The study was also illustrated by using the gamma secretase inhibitor, N-[N-(3,5-difluorophenacetyl)-L-alanyl]-S-phenylglycine t-butyl ester (DAPT) in HT29 cells. Immunohistochemistry (NICD, NFκBp65, and Slug) and double immunofluorescence analysis (NICD, NFκBp65) revealed that NICD and NFκBp65 were highly expressed in HT29 cells and in tumor tissue compared to normal tissue. Slug and Bcl-xL protein expressions were significantly reduced in DAPT treated HT 29 cells. Immunoprecipitation and dual staining emphasized the strong interaction of NICD with NFκBp65 in adenocarcinoma than in normal tissue. It appeared that Notch1 and NFκB could independently contribute to tumor progression. However, their interaction and synergism might be the determinants that would affect the outcome of the disease and therapeutic interventions.

  19. Pleomorphic adenoma gene like-2 induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition via Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in human colorectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-Peng; Guo, Peng-Tao; Zhu, Zhi; Zhang, Hao; Xu, Yan; Chen, Yu-Ze; Liu, Fang; Ma, Si-Ping

    2017-04-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a critical step in the acquisition of metastatic and invasive power for tumor cells. Colorectal adenocarcinoma (CRC) is a common cancer where metastasis is directly linked to patient survival. Recent studies show that pleomorphic adenoma gene like-2 (PLAGL2) could induce tumor EMT and is an independent predictive factor associated with poor prognosis in cancer. In the present study, we confirmed the role of PLAGL2 in the prognosis of CRC patients and provide molecular evidence of PLAGL2 promoted EMT in CRC cell line SW480. We found that PLAGL2 expression was upregulated in the paraffin-embedded CRC tissues compared to borderline or benign tissues. Experimental EMT induced by PLAGL2 plasmid transfection proved PLAGL2 protein overexpression could enhance the cell scratch wound-healing and transwell ability and significantly upregulated mesenchymal marker proteins, N-cadherin and vimentin and concurrently downregulated epithelial marker of E-cadherin. Subsequently, through western blot assay, we found that PLAGL2 could activate the wnt-signaling component β-catenin in the nuclei. More CRC cell metastasis to the lungs was observed when the PLAGL2 overexpressing SW480 cells were injected into the tail vein of rats, compared with the cell control and PLAGL2 silence group. Our findings indicated that PLAGL2 might be a very upstream key molecule regulating EMT involved in Wnt/β‑catenin signaling pathway.

  20. Immunohistochemical localization of adenosine deaminase complexing protein in intestinal mucosa and in colorectal adenocarcinoma as a marker for tumour cell heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Ten Kate, J; Wijnen, J T; Boldewijn, J; Khan, P M; Bosman, F T

    1985-01-01

    Adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP), a dimeric glycoprotein, has been reported to be decreased or deficient in transformed or cancer-derived cell lines, indicating its potential significance as an indicator of malignant transformation. A similar deficiency was reported in total homogenates of tumours of colon, kidney, lung and liver. In previous biochemical studies we failed to confirm the consistent reduction in ADCP concentration in cancer tissues. A possible explanation for our findings was thought to be intercellular heterogeneity in ADCP expression in individual tumour cells. To study ADCP expression in individual cells, we developed an immunohistochemical method which was applied to tissue sections. Paraformaldehyde--lysine--periodate (PLP) solution was found to be a suitable fixative. Fixed tissue samples were paraffin-embedded, sectioned and stained for ADCP, using an indirect peroxidase-labelled antibody procedure. The protein was localized in normal colonic mucosa, mainly in the brush border region of the luminal epithelium and in cytoplasmic granules. Intense ADCP immunoreactivity was found also in the basal part of some cells. In cancer cells, three staining patterns were observed: membranous, diffuse cytoplasmic and granular cytoplasmic. The adenocarcinomas exhibited significant intratumour and intertumour heterogeneity in their staining types. Further studies on ADCP expression in colorectal cancer in relation to clinical and histopathological characteristics are warranted in order to fully evaluate the potential significance of ADCP as a cancer associated antigen.

  1. Molecular evidence of high-risk human papillomavirus infection in colorectal tumours from Cuban patients

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Yudira; Limia, Celia Maria; González, Licet; Grá, Bienvenido; Hano, Olga Marina; Martínez, Pedro Ariel; Kourí, Vivian

    2016-01-01

    The association between colorectal cancer and human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is still unproven. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) DNA in colorectal tissues from Cuban patients. A total of 63 colorectal formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues were studied (24 adenocarcinoma, 18 adenoma, and 21 colorectal tissues classified as benign colitis). DNA from colorectal samples was analysed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction to detect the most clinically relevant high HR-HPV types (HPV-16, -18, -31, -33, -45, -52, and -58). Associations between histologic findings and other risk factors were also analysed. Overall, HPV DNA was detected in 23.8% (15/63) of the samples studied. Viral infections were detected in 41.7% of adenocarcinoma (10/24) and 27.7% of adenoma cases (5/18). HPV DNA was not found in any of the negative cases. An association between histological diagnosis of adenocarcinoma and HPV infection was observed (odd ratio = 4.85, 95% confidence interval = 1.40-16.80, p = 0.009). The only genotypes identified were HPV 16 and 33. Viral loads were higher in adenocarcinoma, and these cases were associated with HPV 16. This study provides molecular evidence of HR-HPV infection in colorectal adenocarcinoma tissues from Cuban patients. PMID:27812599

  2. Expression Profiling Identifies Bezafibrate as Potential Therapeutic Drug for Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinyan; Yang, Xiaoqin; Chen, Xinmei; Zhang, Yantao; Pan, Xuebin; Wang, Guiping; Ye, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Drug-induced gene expression patterns that invert disease profiles have recently been illustrated to be a new strategy for drug-repositioning. In the present study, we validated this approach and focused on prediction of novel drugs for lung adenocarcinoma (AC), for which there is a pressing need to find novel therapeutic compounds. Firstly, connectivity map (CMap) analysis computationally predicted bezafibrate as a putative compound against lung AC. Then this hypothesis was verified by in vitro assays of anti-proliferation and cell cycle arrest. In silico docking evidence indicated that bezafibrate could target cyclin dependent kinase 2(CDK2), which regulates progression through the cell cycle. Furthermore, we found that bezafibrate can significantly down-regulate the expression of CDK2 mRNA and p-CDK2. Using a nude mice xenograft model, we also found that bezafibrate could inhibit tumor growth of lung AC in vivo. In conclusion, this study proposed bezafibrate as a potential therapeutic option for lung AC patients, illustrating the potential of in silico drug screening. PMID:26535062

  3. Regulation of Tumor Necrosis Factor Gene Expression in Colorectal Adenocarcinoma: In vivo Analysis by in situ Hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beissert, Stefan; Bergholz, Michael; Waase, Inge; Lepsien, Gerd; Schauer, Alfred; Pfizenmaier, Klaus; Kronke, Martin

    1989-07-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) produced by macrophages is thought to contribute to the host defense against development of cancer. However, since tumor cells themselves are able to produce TNF, it is conceivable that TNF may also play an adverse pathological role in carcinogenesis. To better understand the functional significance of TNF in neoplastic disease, we have determined the cellular source of TNF activity produced in 10 patients with colorectal cancer. Northern blot analysis of RNAs extracted from fresh biopsy specimens revealed detectable TNF mRNA levels in all instances. By using in situ hybridization of frozen sections, scattered cells expressing TNF mRNA could be discerned. Based on morphological criteria, these TNF-positive cells most likely belong to the macrophage lineage. Macrophages in normal tissue surrounding the tumor did not express TNF mRNA, suggesting that macrophage activation occurs locally at the site of neoplastic transformation. Immunohistochemistry using anti-TNF monoclonal antibodies revealed that less than 1% of tumor-infiltrating macrophages synthesize TNF protein. Thus we present evidence that in colorectal cancer only a small proportion of tumor-infiltrating macrophages produces TNF, indicating that the microenvironment of the tumor provides adequate, yet suboptimal, conditions for macrophage activation.

  4. Identifying Communication Barriers to Colorectal Cancer Screening Adherence among Appalachian Kentuckians.

    PubMed

    Bachman, Audrey Smith; Cohen, Elisia L; Collins, Tom; Hatcher, Jennifer; Crosby, Richard; Vanderpool, Robin C

    2017-08-18

    Utilizing data from 40 in-depth interviews, this article identifies both barriers and facilitators to colorectal screening guideline adherence among Appalachian Kentucky adults recruited through a community-based research network. Key findings identify (a) varying levels of knowledge about screening guidelines, (b) reticence to engage in screening processes, and (c) nuanced communication with healthcare providers and family members regarding screening adherence. What participants knew about the screening process was often derived from personal stories or recalled stories from family members about their screening experiences. Reticence to engage in screening processes reflected reports of cumbersome preparation, privacy issues, embarrassment, medical mistrust, fear of receiving a cancer diagnosis, and lack of symptoms. Participants cited many ways to enhance patient-centered communication, and the findings from this study have implications for health communication message design and communication strategies for healthcare practices in Appalachian Kentucky clinics.

  5. Global phosphotyrosine proteomics identifies PKCδ as a marker of responsiveness to Src inhibition in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    McKinley, Eliot T; Liu, Huiling; McDonald, W Hayes; Luo, Weifeng; Zhao, Ping; Coffey, Robert J; Hanks, Steven K; Manning, H Charles

    2013-01-01

    Sensitive and specific biomarkers of protein kinase inhibition can be leveraged to accelerate drug development studies in oncology by associating early molecular responses with target inhibition. In this study, we utilized unbiased shotgun phosphotyrosine (pY) proteomics to discover novel biomarkers of response to dasatinib, a small molecule Src-selective inhibitor, in preclinical models of colorectal cancer (CRC). We performed unbiased mass spectrometry shotgun pY proteomics to reveal the pY proteome of cultured HCT-116 colonic carcinoma cells, and then extended this analysis to HCT-116 xenograft tumors to identify pY biomarkers of dasatinib-responsiveness in vivo. Major dasatinib-responsive pY sites in xenograft tumors included sites on delta-type protein kinase C (PKCδ), CUB-domain-containing protein 1 (CDCP1), Type-II SH2-domain-containing inositol 5-phosphatase (SHIP2), and receptor protein-tyrosine phosphatase alpha (RPTPα). The pY313 site PKCδ was further supported as a relevant biomarker of dasatinib-mediated Src inhibition in HCT-116 xenografts by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting with a phosphospecific antibody. Reduction of PKCδ pY313 was further correlated with dasatinib-mediated inhibition of Src and diminished growth as spheroids of a panel of human CRC cell lines. These studies reveal PKCδ pY313 as a promising readout of Src inhibition in CRC and potentially other solid tumors and may reflect responsiveness to dasatinib in a subset of colorectal cancers.

  6. Global Phosphotyrosine Proteomics Identifies PKCδ as a Marker of Responsiveness to Src Inhibition in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, W. Hayes; Luo, Weifeng; Zhao, Ping; Coffey, Robert J.; Hanks, Steven K.; Manning, H. Charles

    2013-01-01

    Sensitive and specific biomarkers of protein kinase inhibition can be leveraged to accelerate drug development studies in oncology by associating early molecular responses with target inhibition. In this study, we utilized unbiased shotgun phosphotyrosine (pY) proteomics to discover novel biomarkers of response to dasatinib, a small molecule Src-selective inhibitor, in preclinical models of colorectal cancer (CRC). We performed unbiased mass spectrometry shotgun pY proteomics to reveal the pY proteome of cultured HCT-116 colonic carcinoma cells, and then extended this analysis to HCT-116 xenograft tumors to identify pY biomarkers of dasatinib-responsiveness in vivo. Major dasatinib-responsive pY sites in xenograft tumors included sites on delta-type protein kinase C (PKCδ), CUB-domain-containing protein 1 (CDCP1), Type-II SH2-domain-containing inositol 5-phosphatase (SHIP2), and receptor protein-tyrosine phosphatase alpha (RPTPα). The pY313 site PKCδ was further supported as a relevant biomarker of dasatinib-mediated Src inhibition in HCT-116 xenografts by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting with a phosphospecific antibody. Reduction of PKCδ pY313 was further correlated with dasatinib-mediated inhibition of Src and diminished growth as spheroids of a panel of human CRC cell lines. These studies reveal PKCδ pY313 as a promising readout of Src inhibition in CRC and potentially other solid tumors and may reflect responsiveness to dasatinib in a subset of colorectal cancers. PMID:24260357

  7. Risk of eighteen genome-wide association study-identified genetic variants for colorectal cancer and colorectal adenoma in Han Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yanqin; Zhou, Jiaojiao; Zheng, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identified eighteen single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to be significantly associated with the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, overall results of the following replications are inconsistent and little is known about whether these associations also exit in colorectal adenomas (CRA). Methods The SNP genotyping was performed using a Sequenom MassARRAY to investigate the association of these eighteen SNPs with colorectal neoplasm in a case-control study consisted of 1049 colorectal cancers, 283 adenomas, and 1030 controls. Results Two of these SNPs, rs10505477 and rs719725, showed evidence of an association in both CRC and CRA in our study population. Besides, seven SNPs (rs10808555, rs7014346, rs7837328, rs704017, rs11196172, rs4779584, and rs7229639) were significantly associated with CRC, and another one SNP rs11903757 was over-represented in CRA compared with controls. The strongest association was provided by rs11196172 (OR = 2.02, 95% CI = 1.66 - 2.46, P < 0.0001) and rs11903757 (OR = 1.96, 95% CI = 1.28 - 3.00, P = 0.0026). Conclusion These results suggest that some previously reported SNP associations also have impact on CRC and CRA predispositions in the Han Chinese population. A part of genetic risk to CRC is possibly mediated by susceptibility to adenomas. PMID:27769063

  8. 5-FU Based Maintenance Therapy in RAS Wild Type Metastatic Colorectal Cancer After Induction With FOLFOX Plus Panitumumab

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-28

    Colorectal Adenocarcinoma; RAS Wild Type; Stage III Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IV Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7

  9. [Prognostic value of the grade of cellular differentiation, of mucus presence and the growth pattern of the invasive margin in colorectal adenocarcinomas Dukes B].

    PubMed

    Henrique-Filho, Clodoaldo; Bromberg, Sansom Henrique; Barreto, Elci; Godoy, Antônio Claudio de; Mattosinho-França, Luís Celso

    2004-01-01

    The unfavorable evolution of approximately 1/3 of the patients with colorectal cancer, classified in the Dukes B stage, shows to be desirable the addition of another approaches morphologic prognostics. The reports of the literature about prognostic significance of cellular differentiation, mucus presence and the pattern of growth of the invasive margin in colorectal cancer were controversial. To evaluate the prognostic significance of tumor differentiation, mucus presence and the growth pattern of the invasive margin in patients with colorectal carcinomas classified in Dukes B stage. A retrospective study of 156 patients who had undergone curative resection for colorectal cancer was made at the Department of Gastroenterology Surgery of the "Hospital do Servidor Público Estadual", in São Paulo, SP, Brazil. Their mean age was 58 (range 28-83) years and consisted of 94 (60.26%) women and 62 (39.74%) men. The cellular differentiation was classified in two degrees: low and high malignancy degree, in agreement with the area of predominant differentiation of the tumor. Tumors with at least 60% of its volume in mucus were called mucinous carcinoma. The growth of the invasive margin was classified as expanding when the tumor showed a well-delineated and circumscribed border pushing the adjacent structures and infiltrating when the tumor advances by a process of seemingly effortless dissection between the normal structures of the bowel wall. There were predominance of tumors of low malignancy (139 (89.10%)), non-mucinous (142 (91.03%)) and with margin of the infiltrating type (123 (78.85%)). Only the growth of the invasive margin influenced the survival of 5 years. Patients with tumor exhibiting margin of the expanding type, presented a favorable outcome than those with margin of the infiltrating type -- 81.82% x 60.98%. The type of growth of the invasive tumor margin may help to identify the prognosis of low and high-risk subgroups of patients.

  10. Downregulation of MDM2 expression by RNAi inhibits LoVo human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells growth and the treatment of LoVo cells with mdm2siRNA3 enhances the sensitivity to cisplatin

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Yan . E-mail: gyfyuyan@hotmail.com; Sun Ping . E-mail: sunny19750502@hotmail.com; Sun Lichun; Liu Guoyi; Chen Guohua . E-mail: olivebranch_82@hotmail.com; Shang Lihua . E-mail: leval1000@sina.com; Wu Hongbo . E-mail: whpwl@sina.com; Hu Jing; Li Yue; Mao Yinling; Sui Guangjie; Sun Xiwen

    2006-01-06

    To investigate the biological effect of mdm2 in human colorectal adenocarcinoma LoVo cells, three mdm2siRNA constructions were recombinated and transient transfected into human colorectal adenocarcinoma LoVo cells with low differentiation character in vitro. The results showed that mdm2siRNA3 reduced mRNA level of mdm2 and protein level of mdm2, leading to proliferation inhibition on LoVo cells, and reduced tumor growth in nude mice. It was found that depletion of MDM2 in this pattern promoted apoptosis of LoVo cells and Cisplatin (DDP) treated in the mdm2siRNA3 transfected cell population would result in a substantial decrease by MTT colorimetry. Decreasing the MDM2 protein level in LoVo cells by RNAi could significantly inhibit tumor growth both in vitro and in vivo, which indicated that mdm2 gene played a definite role in the development and aggressiveness of human colon carcinoma. It also could be a therapeutic target in colorectal carcinoma. The synergistic activation of RNAi and cell toxicity agents indicated that the combination of chemotherapy and gene therapy will be a promising approach in the future.

  11. Capture Hi-C identifies the chromatin interactome of colorectal cancer risk loci.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Roland; Migliorini, Gabriele; Henrion, Marc; Kandaswamy, Radhika; Speedy, Helen E; Heindl, Andreas; Whiffin, Nicola; Carnicer, Maria J; Broome, Laura; Dryden, Nicola; Nagano, Takashi; Schoenfelder, Stefan; Enge, Martin; Yuan, Yinyin; Taipale, Jussi; Fraser, Peter; Fletcher, Olivia; Houlston, Richard S

    2015-02-19

    Multiple regulatory elements distant from their targets on the linear genome can influence the expression of a single gene through chromatin looping. Chromosome conformation capture implemented in Hi-C allows for genome-wide agnostic characterization of chromatin contacts. However, detection of functional enhancer-promoter interactions is precluded by its effective resolution that is determined by both restriction fragmentation and sensitivity of the experiment. Here we develop a capture Hi-C (cHi-C) approach to allow an agnostic characterization of these physical interactions on a genome-wide scale. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with complex diseases often reside within regulatory elements and exert effects through long-range regulation of gene expression. Applying this cHi-C approach to 14 colorectal cancer risk loci allows us to identify key long-range chromatin interactions in cis and trans involving these loci.

  12. Modified clearing technique to identify lymph node metastases in post-irradiated surgical specimens from rectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, W; Luna-Perez, P; Alvarado, I; Labastida, S; Herrera, L

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe a modification of the original method of clearing lymph nodes in specimens from rectal adenocarcinoma and its yield in comparison to a control group whose specimens were studied by a manual technique. There were 32 consecutive patients with locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma. All patients received preoperative radiation therapy (PRT) at doses of 45 Gy, concomitant with 5-fluorouracil at the doses of 450 mg/m2 IV bolus, days 1-5 and 28-33 of PRT; 4-8 weeks later radical surgery with a curative intent was performed. Twenty two specimens were studied by a manual technique consisting of fixation in 10% formalin. Ten specimens were studied with the modified clearing technique consisting of administration through the inferior mesenteric artery of methylene blue; fixation with 10% formalin plus 0.01% of methylene blue; clearing the fat with a sequence of 95% alcohol-100% acetone-100% xylene. In the 32 specimens, 413 lymph nodes were found. Using the manual technique 104 lymph nodes were found (average 4.7 lymph nodes per specimen); 309 lymph nodes by the modified clearing technique (average 30.9 lymph nodes per specimen), (p < 0.0001). Using the manual technique 23 out of 104 lymph nodes (22%) contained metastases. All metastatic lymph nodes measured > 5 mm; 18 out of 23 metastatic lymph nodes were located on the perirectal area (level 2); and five were located in the root of the inferior mesenteric artery (level 5). Using the modified clearing technique 278 out of 309 (89%) lymph nodes measured < 5 mm; 15 out of 309 (4.8%) lymph nodes contained metastases; 9 out of 15 (60%) measured > 5 mm and were located on levels 2 and 5; and six, located on level 5, measured < 5 mm. The modified clearing technique is a quick, easy and reproducible method for identifying lymph nodes in post-irradiated surgical specimens. In comparison to the traditional manual method of searching for lymph nodes, it improves in the detection of small lymph

  13. [Inherited colorectal cancer predisposition syndromes identified in the Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Neoplasicas (INEN), Lima, Peru;].

    PubMed

    Castro-Mujica, María del Carmen; Sullcahuamán-Allende, Yasser; Barreda-Bolaños, Fernando; Taxa-Rojas, Luis

    2014-04-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the fourth most common cancer in the world and is classified according to their origin in sporadic CRC (~ 70%) and genetic CRC (~ 30%), this latter involves cases of familial aggregation and inherited síndromes that predispose to CRC. To describe inherited CRC predisposition syndromes, polyposic and non-polyposic, identified in the Oncogenetics Unit at National Institute of Cancer Disease (INEN). A descriptive observational record from the attentions of the Oncogenetics Unit at INEN during 2009 to 2013. We included patients with personal or familiar history of CRC and/or colonic polyposis who were referred for clinical assessment to the Oncogenetics Unitat INEN. 59.3 % were female, 40.7 % male, 69.8% under 50 years old, 60.5% had a single CRC, 23.2% had more than one CRC or CRC associated with other extracolonic neoplasia and 32.6% had a familiar history of cancer with autosomal dominant inheritance. According to the clinical genetic diagnosis, 93.1% of the included cases were inherited syndromes that predispose to CRC, with 33.8% of colonic polyposis syndromes, 23.3% of hereditary nonpolyposis CRC syndromes (HNPCC) and 36.0% of CCRHNP probable cases. Clinical genetic evaluation of patients with personal or familiar history of CRC and/or colonic polyposis can identify inherited colorectal cancer predisposition syndromes and provide an appropriategenetic counseling to patients and relatives at risk, establishing guidelines to follow-up and prevention strategies to prevent morbidity and mortality by cancer.

  14. Image segmentation of pyramid style identifier based on Support Vector Machine for colorectal endoscopic images.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Takumi; Koide, Tetsushi; Sugi, Koki; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Anh-Tuan Hoang; Tamaki, Toru; Raytchev, Bisser; Kaneda, Kazufumi; Kominami, Yoko; Yoshida, Shigeto; Mieno, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Shinji

    2015-08-01

    With the increase of colorectal cancer patients in recent years, the needs of quantitative evaluation of colorectal cancer are increased, and the computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system which supports doctor's diagnosis is essential. In this paper, a hardware design of type identification module in CAD system for colorectal endoscopic images with narrow band imaging (NBI) magnification is proposed for real-time processing of full high definition image (1920 × 1080 pixel). A pyramid style image segmentation with SVMs for multi-size scan windows, which can be implemented on an FPGA with small circuit area and achieve high accuracy, is proposed for actual complex colorectal endoscopic images.

  15. Integrated Analysis of DNA Methylation and mRNA Expression Profiles Data to Identify Key Genes in Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xiang; Li, Xiaodan; Guan, Yinghui

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Lung adenocarcinoma (LAC) is the most frequent type of lung cancer and has a high metastatic rate at an early stage. This study is aimed at identifying LAC-associated genes. Materials and Methods. GSE62950 downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus included a DNA methylation dataset and an mRNA expression profiles dataset, both of which included 28 LAC tissue samples and 28 adjacent normal tissue samples. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were screened by Limma package in R, and their functions were predicted by enrichment analysis using TargetMine online tool. Then, protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was constructed using STRING and Cytoscape. Finally, LAC-associated methylation sites were identified by CpGassoc package in R and mapped to the DEGs to obtain LAC-associated DEGs. Results. Total 913 DEGs were identified in LAC tissues. In the PPI networks, MAD2L1, AURKB, CCNB2, CDC20, and WNT3A had higher degrees, and the first four genes might be involved in LAC through interaction. Total 8856 LAC-associated methylation sites were identified and mapped to the DEGs. And there were 29 LAC-associated methylation sites located in 27 DEGs (e.g., SH3GL2, BAI3, CDH13, JAM2, MT1A, LHX6, and IGFBP3). Conclusions. These key genes might play a role in pathogenesis of LAC. PMID:27610375

  16. Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound with VEGFR2-Targeted Microbubbles for Monitoring Regorafenib Therapy Effects in Experimental Colorectal Adenocarcinomas in Rats with DCE-MRI and Immunohistochemical Validation

    PubMed Central

    Clevert, Dirk-Andre; Hirner-Eppeneder, Heidrun; Ingrisch, Michael; Moser, Matthias; Schuster, Jessica; Tadros, Dina; Schneider, Moritz; Kazmierczak, Philipp Maximilian; Reiser, Maximilian; Cyran, Clemens C.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To investigate contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) with VEGFR2-targeted microbubbles for monitoring therapy effects of regorafenib on experimental colon carcinomas in rats with correlation to dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and immunohistochemistry. Materials and Methods Human colorectal adenocarcinoma xenografts (HT-29) were implanted subcutaneously in n = 21 (n = 11 therapy group; n = 10 control group) female athymic nude rats (Hsd: RH-Foxn1rnu). Animals were imaged at baseline and after a one-week daily treatment with regorafenib or a placebo (10 mg/kg bodyweight), using CEUS with VEGFR2-targeted microbubbles and DCE-MRI. In CEUS tumor perfusion was assessed during an early vascular phase (wash-in area under the curve = WiAUC) and VEGFR2-specific binding during a late molecular phase (signal intensity after 8 (SI8min) and 10 minutes (SI10min)), using a conventional 15L8 linear transducer (transmit frequency 7 MHz, dynamic range 80 dB, depth 25 mm). In DCE-MRI functional parameters plasma flow (PF) and plasma volume (PV) were quantified. For validation purposes, CEUS parameters were correlated with DCE-MRI parameters and immunohistochemical VEGFR2, CD31, Ki-67 and TUNEL stainings. Results CEUS perfusion parameter WiAUC decreased significantly (116,989 ± 77,048 a.u. to 30,076 ± 27,095a.u.; p = 0.005) under therapy with no significant changes (133,932 ± 65,960 a.u. to 84,316 ± 74,144 a.u.; p = 0.093) in the control group. In the therapy group, the amount of bound microbubbles in the late phase was significantly lower in the therapy than in the control group on day 7 (SI8min: 283 ± 191 vs. 802 ± 460 a.u.; p = 0.006); SI10min: 226 ± 149 vs. 645 ± 461 a.u.; p = 0.009). PF and PV decreased significantly (PF: 147 ± 58 mL/100 mL/min to 71 ± 15 mL/100 mL/min; p = 0.003; PV: 13 ± 3% to 9 ± 4%; p = 0.040) in the therapy group. Immunohistochemistry revealed significantly fewer VEGFR2 (7.2 ± 1.8 vs. 17.8 ± 4.6; p < 0.001), CD31 (8.1 ± 3.0 vs

  17. Differential expression of Yes-associated protein and phosphorylated Yes-associated protein is correlated with expression of Ki-67 and phospho-ERK in colorectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Seok-Hyung; Lee, Ok-Jun; Huang, Song-Mei; Kwon, Ju-Lee; Kim, Jin Man; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Seong, In Ock; Song, Kyu Sang; Kim, Kyung-Hee

    2013-11-01

    Yes-associated protein (YAP) is a transcriptional co-activator and functions as a nuclear downstream effector of the Hippo pathway. Differential expression of YAP and phosphorylated Yes-associated protein (pYAP), which are involved in the expression of Ki-67 and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK) in colorectal adenocarcinoma (CRAC), is not clear. Herein, we hypothesized that nuclear expression of YAP could predict cell proliferation and poor prognosis, while cytoplasmic expression of pYAP would show a reverse correlation with cell proliferation. Paraffin-embedded samples from 144 CRAC patients were studied using immunohistochemistry for YAP, pYAP, Ki-67 and pERK. Frozen samples from 20 CRAC patients were examined for YAP mRNA in tumor and non-tumor tissues, using quantitative real-time PCR. High nuclear YAP expression coincided with high Ki-67 expression (P=0.002). The high nuclear YAP expression group tended to display a poor overall and disease-free survival (P=0.089 and P=0.089, respectively), but YAP mRNA levels in the 20 CRAC tissues were not significantly different in comparison with the 20 non-tumor tissues (P=0.929). We observed an inverse correlation between high cytoplasmic pYAP expression and high Ki-67 expression (P=0.001). Nuclear pERK expression was positively correlated with nuclear YAP expression, but negatively correlated with cytoplasmic pYAP expression (P=0.017 and P=0.020, respectively). Activated nuclear YAP and inactivated cytoplasmic pYAP in CRAC showed a positive correlation with Ki-67 and nuclear pERK expression, suggesting that the expression of YAP and pYAP is a possible predictor of tumor cell proliferation and prognosis in CRAC.

  18. Transcriptional profiling revealed the anti-proliferative effect of MFN2 deficiency and identified risk factors in lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lou, Yuqing; Zhang, Yanwei; Li, Rong; Gu, Ping; Xiong, Liwen; Zhong, Hua; Zhang, Wei; Han, Baohui

    2016-07-01

    Mitofusin-2 (MFN2) was initially identified as a hyperplasia suppressor in hyper-proliferative vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) of hypertensive rat arteries, which has also been implicated in various cancers. There exists a controversy in whether it is an oncogene or exerting anti-proliferative effect on tumor cells. Our previous cell cycle analysis and MTT assay showed that cell proliferation was inhibited in MFN2 deficient A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells, without investigating the changes in regulatory network or addressing the underlying mechanisms. Here, we performed expression profiling in MFN2 knockdown A549 cells and found that cancer-related pathways were among the most susceptible pathways to MFN2 deficiency. Through comparison with expression profiling of a cohort consisting of 61 pairs of tumor-normal matched samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), we teased out the specific pathways to address the impact that MFN2 ablation had on A549 cells, as well as identified a few genes whose expression level associated with clinicopathologic parameters. In addition, transcriptional factor target enrichment analysis identified E2F as a potential transcription factor that was deregulated in response to MFN2 deficiency. Although bioinformatics analysis usually entail further verification, our study provided considerable information for future scientific inquiries in related areas as well as a paradigm for characterizing perturbation in regulatory network.

  19. DNA hypomethylation of CBS promoter induced by folate deficiency is a potential noninvasive circulating biomarker for colorectal adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Xue, Geng; Lu, Chao-Jing; Pan, Shu-Jun; Zhang, Yin-Ling; Miao, Hui; Shan, Shi; Zhu, Xiao-Ting; Zhang, Yi

    2017-08-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation patterns, which induced by folate deficiency, play important roles in tumorigenesis of colorectal cancer (CRC). Some DNA methylation alterations can also be detected in cell-free DNA (cfDNA) of patients' plasma, making cfDNA an ideal noninvasive circulating biomarker. However, exact DNA methylation alterations induced by folate deficiency in tumorigenesis of CRC and exact potential circulating cfDNA methylation biomarker are still unclear. Therefore, DNA methylation patterns of the normal human colon mucosal epithelial cell line (NCM460), cultured with normal or low folate content, were screened and the DNA hypomethylation of cystathionine-beta-synthase (CBS) promoter was further validated in vitro and vivo. Then, the correlation analysis between folate level, DNA methylation alteration in promoter and expression of CBS was carried out in vitro and vivo. Further, the methylation patterns of CBS promoter in plasma cfDNA were detected and statistically correlated with pathological parameters and clinical outcome. Our study showed that DNA hypomethylation in CBS promoter, induced by folate deficiency, would lead to up-regulation of CBS both in vitro and vivo. Patients with cfDNA hypomethylation of CBS promoter in plasma were correlated with high tumor stage and poor clinical outcome. In addition, cfDNA hypomethylation of CBS promoter in plasma was shown to be an independent prognostic factor for recurrence and cancer-related death in CRC. Our results indicated that DNA hypomethylation of CBS promoter induced by folate deficiency could serve as a potential noninvasive circulating biomarker and may be helpful in developing more effective prognostic markers for CRC.

  20. Genome-wide association analyses in East Asians identify new susceptibility loci for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Wei-Hua; Zhang, Ben; Matsuo, Keitaro; Shin, Aesun; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Jee, Sun Ha; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Ren, Zefang; Cai, Qiuyin; Long, Jirong; Shi, Jiajun; Wen, Wanqing; Yang, Gong; Delahanty, Ryan J.; Ji, Bu-Tian; Pan, Zhi-Zhong; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Gao, Yu-Tang; Oh, Jae Hwan; Ahn, Yoon-Ok; Park, Eun Jung; Li, Hong-Lan; Park, Ji Won; Jo, Jaeseong; Jeong, Jin-Young; Hosono, Satoyo; Casey, Graham; Peters, Ulrike; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Zheng, Wei

    2013-01-01

    To identify novel genetic factors for colorectal cancer (CRC), we conducted a genome-wide association study in East Asians. By analyzing genome-wide data in 2,098 cases and 5,749 controls, we selected 64 promising SNPs for replication in an independent set of samples including up to 5,358 cases and 5,922 controls. We identified four SNPs with a P-value of 8.58 × 10−7 to 3.77 × 10−10 in the combined analysis of all East Asian samples. Three of the four SNPs were replicated in a study conducted among 26,060 European descendants with a combined P-value of 1.22 × 10−10 for rs647161 (5q31.1), 6.64 × 10−9 for rs2423279 (20p12.3), and 3.06 × 10−8 for rs10774214 (12p13.32 near the CCND2 gene), respectively, derived from the meta-analysis of data from both East Asian and European populations. This study identified three new CRC susceptibility loci and provides additional insight into the genetics and biology of CRC. PMID:23263487

  1. Novel histopathologic feature identified through image analysis augments stage II colorectal cancer clinical reporting

    PubMed Central

    Caie, Peter D.; Zhou, Ying; Turnbull, Arran K.; Oniscu, Anca; Harrison, David J.

    2016-01-01

    A number of candidate histopathologic factors show promise in identifying stage II colorectal cancer (CRC) patients at a high risk of disease-specific death, however they can suffer from low reproducibility and none have replaced classical pathologic staging. We developed an image analysis algorithm which standardized the quantification of specific histopathologic features and exported a multi-parametric feature-set captured without bias. The image analysis algorithm was executed across a training set (n = 50) and the resultant big data was distilled through decision tree modelling to identify the most informative parameters to sub-categorize stage II CRC patients. The most significant, and novel, parameter identified was the ‘sum area of poorly differentiated clusters’ (AreaPDC). This feature was validated across a second cohort of stage II CRC patients (n = 134) (HR = 4; 95% CI, 1.5– 11). Finally, the AreaPDC was integrated with the significant features within the clinical pathology report, pT stage and differentiation, into a novel prognostic index (HR = 7.5; 95% CI, 3–18.5) which improved upon current clinical staging (HR = 4.26; 95% CI, 1.7– 10.3). The identification of poorly differentiated clusters as being highly significant in disease progression presents evidence to suggest that these features could be the source of novel targets to decrease the risk of disease specific death. PMID:27322148

  2. [Application of genome-wide genechip for screening and identifying genes related to CD133(+)CD200(+) colorectal cancer stem cells].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shanshan; Li, Lixuan; Huang, Zaiwei; Xin, Xiaomin; Xiao, Bing

    2013-12-01

    To screen and identity genes related to CD133(+)CD200(+) colorectal cancer stem cells. The two subpopulations of colorectal cancer cells, namely CD133(+)CD200(+) and CD133(-)CD200(-) cells, were sorted and verified by flow cytometry. The gene expression profiles of CD133(+)CD200(+)and CD133(-)CD200(-) colorectal cancer cells were examined using Affymetrix Human U133 Plus2.0 genome-wide genechip. The differentially expressed genes between the two cell subpopulations were analyzed to identify the genes responsible for the main effect in association with colorectal cancer stem cells. Real-time quantitative PCR was performed to confirm some of the differentially expressed genes identified by genechip. The genechip result showed that 655 genes were differentially expressed in CD133(+)CD200(+) colorectal cancer stem cells by at least 3 folds, including 290 up-regulated and 365 down-regulated ones. Bioinformatics analysis and gene co-expression network building identified 3 genes (MDM2, PRKACG, and CACNA1G) with specific expression in CD133(+)CD200(+) colorectal cancer stem cells, and this result was confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR analysis. A specific gene expression profile of colorectal cancer stem cells has been established through screening and identifying genes related to CD133(+)CD200(+)colorectal cancer stem cells by gene genechip technique, which provides a basis for further study of gene targeting therapy of colorectal cancer.

  3. A genomic strategy for the functional validation of colorectal cancer genes identifies potential therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Grade, Marian; Hummon, Amanda B; Camps, Jordi; Emons, Georg; Spitzner, Melanie; Gaedcke, Jochen; Hoermann, Patrick; Ebner, Reinhard; Becker, Heinz; Difilippantonio, Michael J; Ghadimi, B Michael; Beissbarth, Tim; Caplen, Natasha J; Ried, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    Genes that are highly overexpressed in tumor cells can be required for tumor cell survival and have the potential to be selective therapeutic targets. In an attempt to identify such targets, we combined a functional genomics and a systems biology approach to assess the consequences of RNAi-mediated silencing of overexpressed genes that were selected from 140 gene expression profiles from colorectal cancers (CRCs) and matched normal mucosa. In order to identify credible models for in-depth functional analysis, we first confirmed the overexpression of these genes in 25 different CRC cell lines. We then identified five candidate genes that profoundly reduced the viability of CRC cell lines when silenced with either siRNAs or short-hairpin RNAs (shRNAs), i.e., HMGA1, TACSTD2, RRM2, RPS2 and NOL5A. These genes were further studied by systematic analysis of comprehensive gene expression profiles generated following siRNA-mediated silencing. Exploration of these RNAi-specific gene expression signatures allowed the identification of the functional space in which the five genes operate and showed enrichment for cancer-specific signaling pathways, some known to be involved in CRC. By comparing the expression of the RNAi signature genes with their respective expression levels in an independent set of primary rectal carcinomas, we could recapitulate these defined RNAi signatures, therefore, establishing the biological relevance of our observations. This strategy identified the signaling pathways that are affected by the prominent oncogenes HMGA1 and TACSTD2, established a yet unknown link between RRM2 and PLK1 and identified RPS2 and NOL5A as promising potential therapeutic targets in CRC.

  4. A six-microRNA panel in plasma was identified as a potential biomarker for lung adenocarcinoma diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wei; Xu, Jing; Guo, Renhua; Cheng, Wenfang; Wang, Fang; Qi, Lian-Wen; Chen, Yan; Huang, Zebo; Wang, Tongshan; Zhu, Danxia; Liu, Ping; Shu, Yongqian

    2017-01-01

    Differently expressed microRNAs (miRNAs) in the plasma of lung adenocarcinoma (LA) patients might serve as biomarkers for LA detection. MiRNA expression profiling was performed using Exiqon panels followed by the verification (30 LA VS. 10 healthy controls (HCs)) with quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) in the screening phase. Identified miRNAs were confirmed through training (42 LA VS. 32 HCs) and testing stages (66 LA VS. 62 HCs) by using qRT-PCR based absolute quantification methods. A total of six up-regulated plasma miRNAs (miR-19b-3p, miR-21-5p, miR-221-3p, miR-409-3p, miR-425-5p and miR-584-5p) were identified. The six-miRNA panel could discriminate LA patients from HCs with areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.72, 0.74 and 0.84 for the training, testing and the external validation stage (33 LA VS. 30 HCs), respectively. All the miRNAs identified except miR-584-5p were significantly up-regulated in LA tissues. MiR-19-3p, miR-21-5p, miR-409-3p and miR-425-5p showed high expression in arterial plasma with borderline significance. Additionally, miR-19-3p, miR-21-5p and miR-221-3p were significantly up-regulated in exosomes extracted from LA peripheral plasma samples. In conclusion, we identified a six-miRNA panel in peripheral plasma which might give assistance to the detection of LA at least for Asian population to a certain extent. PMID:28036284

  5. The roles of JK-1 (FAM134B) expressions in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kasem, Kais; Gopalan, Vinod; Salajegheh, Ali; Lu, Cu-Tai; Smith, Robert A; Lam, Alfred K-Y

    2014-08-01

    The aims of the present study are to investigate the clinicopathological correlations of JK-1(FAM134B) expression and its relationship to carcinogenesis in a colorectal adenoma-adenocarcinoma model. JK-1(FAM134B) protein expression was studied in a colon cancer cell line by Western blot and immunocytochemistry. JK-1(FAM134B) expression profiles at mRNA and protein levels were investigated in cancer tissues from 236 patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma and 32 patients with colorectal adenoma using real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. The findings were then correlated with the clinicopathological features of these tumours. JK-1(FAM134B) protein was demonstrated in the colon cancer cells by Western blot. The protein was located in the nuclei of the tumour cells at both cellular and tissue levels. In colorectal adenocarcinomas, lower levels of JK-1(FAM134B) protein expression were associated with younger age (p=0.032), larger tumour size (p=0.004), advanced cancer stages (p=0.016) and higher rates of cancer recurrence (p=0.04). Also, lower levels of JK-1(FAM134B) mRNA expression were associated with advanced cancer stages (p=0.02) and presence of lymphovascular invasion (p=0.014). Higher JK-1(FAM134B) mRNA and protein expression levels were identified in adenomas and non-neoplastic mucosae, compared to carcinomas (p=0.005). To conclude, JK-1(FAM134B) mRNA expression and JK1 (FAM134B) protein levels varied with the different stages of progression of colorectal tumours. The expression levels of the gene were associated with clinicopathological features in patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma suggesting that JK-1(FAM134B) gene has roles in controlling some steps in the development of the invasive phenotypes from colorectal adenoma to early staged as well as advanced staged colorectal adenocarcinomas.

  6. RNA sequencing of esophageal adenocarcinomas identifies novel fusion transcripts, including NPC1-MELK, arising from a complex chromosomal rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhixiong; Cheng, Yulan; Abraham, John M; Yan, Rong; Liu, Xi; Chen, Wei; Ibrahim, Sariat; Schroth, Gary P; Ke, Xiquan; He, Yulong; Meltzer, Stephen J

    2017-06-22

    Studies of chromosomal rearrangements and fusion transcripts have elucidated mechanisms of tumorigenesis and led to targeted cancer therapies. This study was aimed at identifying novel fusion transcripts in esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). To identify new fusion transcripts associated with EAC, targeted RNA sequencing and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) verification were performed in 40 EACs and matched nonmalignant specimens from the same patients. Genomic PCR and Sanger sequencing were performed to find the breakpoint of fusion genes. Five novel in-frame fusion transcripts were identified and verified in 40 EACs and in a validation cohort of 15 additional EACs (55 patients in all): fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2)-GRB2-associated binding protein 2 (GAB2) in 2 of 55 or 3.6%, Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1)-maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK) in 2 of 55 or 3.6%, ubiquitin-specific peptidase 54 (USP54)-calcium/calmodulin dependent protein kinase II γ (CAMK2G) in 2 of 55 or 3.6%, megakaryoblastic leukemia (translocation) 1 (MKL1)-fibulin 1 (FBLN1) in 1 of 55 or 1.8%, and CCR4-NOT transcription complex subunit 2 (CNOT2)-chromosome 12 open reading frame 49 (C12orf49) in 1 of 55 or 1.8%. A genomic analysis indicated that NPC1-MELK arose from a complex interchromosomal translocation event involving chromosomes 18, 3, and 9 with 3 rearrangement points, and this was consistent with chromoplexy. These data indicate that fusion transcripts occur at a stable frequency in EAC. Furthermore, our results indicate that chromoplexy is an underlying mechanism that generates fusion transcripts in EAC. These and other fusion transcripts merit further study as diagnostic markers and potential therapeutic targets in EAC. Cancer 2017. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  7. Whole-exome sequencing to identify somatic mutations in peritoneal metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma: A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yu; Li, Tingting; Huang, Haipeng; Lin, Tian; Hu, Yanfeng; Qi, Xiaolong; Yu, Jiang; Li, Guoxin

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal metastasis occurs in more than half of patients with unresectable or recurrent gastric cancer and is associated with the worst prognosis. The associated genomic events and pathogenesis remain ambiguous. The aim of the present study was to characterize the mutation spectrum of gastric cancer with peritoneal metastasis and provide a basis for the identification of new biomarkers and treatment targets. Matched pairs of normal gastric mucosa and peritoneal tissue and matched pairs of primary tumor and peritoneal metastasis were collected from one patient for whole-exome sequencing (WES); Sanger sequencing was employed to confirm the somatic mutations. G>A and C>T mutations were the two most frequent transversions among the somatic mutations. We confirmed 48somatic mutations in the primary site and 49 in the peritoneal site. Additionally, 25 non-synonymous somatic variations (single-nucleotide variants, SNVs) and 2 somatic insertions/deletions (INDELs) were confirmed in the primary tumor, and 30 SNVs and 5 INDELs were verified in the peritoneal metastasis. Approximately 59% of the somatic mutations were shared between the primary and metastatic site. Five genes (TP53, BAI1, THSD1, ARID2, and KIAA2022) verified in our study were also mutated at a frequency greater than 5%in the COSMIC database. We also identified 9genes (ERBB4, ZNF721, NT5E, PDE10A, CA1, NUMB, NBN, ZFYVE16, and NCAM1) that were only mutated in metastasis and are expected to become treatment targets. In conclusion, we observed that the majority of the somatic mutations in the primary site persisted in metastasis, whereas several single-nucleotide polymorphisms occurred de novo at the second site. PMID:27270314

  8. Adenocarcinoma of the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Dadhania, Vipulkumar; Czerniak, Bogdan; Guo, Charles C

    2015-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma is an uncommon malignancy in the urinary bladder which may arise primarily in the bladder as well as secondarily from a number of other organs. Our aim is to provide updated information on primary and secondary bladder adenocarcinomas, with focus on pathologic features, differential diagnosis, and clinical relevance. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma exhibits several different growth patterns, including enteric, mucinous, signet-ring cell, not otherwise specified, and mixed patterns. Urachal adenocarcinoma demonstrates similar histologic features but it can be distinguished from bladder adenocarcinoma on careful pathologic examination. Secondary bladder adenocarcinomas may arise from the colorectum, prostate, endometrium, cervix and other sites. Immunohistochemical study is valuable in identifying the origin of secondary adenocarcinomas. Noninvasive neoplastic glandular lesions, adenocarcinoma in situ and villous adenoma, are frequently associated with bladder adenocarcinoma. It is also important to differentiate bladder adenocarcinoma from a number of nonneoplastic lesions in the bladder. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma has a poor prognosis largely because it is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage. Urachal adenocarcinoma shares similar histologic features with bladder adenocarcinoma, but it has a more favorable prognosis than bladder adenocarcinoma, partly due to the relative young age of patients with urachal adenocarcinoma.

  9. Adenocarcinoma of the urinary bladder

    PubMed Central

    Dadhania, Vipulkumar; Czerniak, Bogdan; Guo, Charles C

    2015-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma is an uncommon malignancy in the urinary bladder which may arise primarily in the bladder as well as secondarily from a number of other organs. Our aim is to provide updated information on primary and secondary bladder adenocarcinomas, with focus on pathologic features, differential diagnosis, and clinical relevance. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma exhibits several different growth patterns, including enteric, mucinous, signet-ring cell, not otherwise specified, and mixed patterns. Urachal adenocarcinoma demonstrates similar histologic features but it can be distinguished from bladder adenocarcinoma on careful pathologic examination. Secondary bladder adenocarcinomas may arise from the colorectum, prostate, endometrium, cervix and other sites. Immunohistochemical study is valuable in identifying the origin of secondary adenocarcinomas. Noninvasive neoplastic glandular lesions, adenocarcinoma in situ and villous adenoma, are frequently associated with bladder adenocarcinoma. It is also important to differentiate bladder adenocarcinoma from a number of nonneoplastic lesions in the bladder. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma has a poor prognosis largely because it is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage. Urachal adenocarcinoma shares similar histologic features with bladder adenocarcinoma, but it has a more favorable prognosis than bladder adenocarcinoma, partly due to the relative young age of patients with urachal adenocarcinoma. PMID:26309895

  10. An Evaluation of Algorithms for Identifying Metastatic Breast, Lung, or Colorectal Cancer in Administrative Claims Data.

    PubMed

    Whyte, Joanna L; Engel-Nitz, Nicole M; Teitelbaum, April; Gomez Rey, Gabriel; Kallich, Joel D

    2015-07-01

    Administrative health care claims data are used for epidemiologic, health services, and outcomes cancer research and thus play a significant role in policy. Cancer stage, which is often a major driver of cost and clinical outcomes, is not typically included in claims data. Evaluate algorithms used in a dataset of cancer patients to identify patients with metastatic breast (BC), lung (LC), or colorectal (CRC) cancer using claims data. Clinical data on BC, LC, or CRC patients (between January 1, 2007 and March 31, 2010) were linked to a health care claims database. Inclusion required health plan enrollment ≥3 months before initial cancer diagnosis date. Algorithms were used in the claims database to identify patients' disease status, which was compared with physician-reported metastases. Generic and tumor-specific algorithms were evaluated using ICD-9 codes, varying diagnosis time frames, and including/excluding other tumors. Positive and negative predictive values, sensitivity, and specificity were assessed. The linked databases included 14,480 patients; of whom, 32%, 17%, and 14.2% had metastatic BC, LC, and CRC, respectively, at diagnosis and met inclusion criteria. Nontumor-specific algorithms had lower specificity than tumor-specific algorithms. Tumor-specific algorithms' sensitivity and specificity were 53% and 99% for BC, 55% and 85% for LC, and 59% and 98% for CRC, respectively. Algorithms to distinguish metastatic BC, LC, and CRC from locally advanced disease should use tumor-specific primary cancer codes with 2 claims for the specific primary cancer >30-42 days apart to reduce misclassification. These performed best overall in specificity, positive predictive values, and overall accuracy to identify metastatic cancer in a health care claims database.

  11. Human SLURP-1 and SLURP-2 Proteins Acting on Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors Reduce Proliferation of Human Colorectal Adenocarcinoma HT-29 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lyukmanova, E. N.; Shulepko, M. A.; Bychkov, M. L.; Shenkarev, Z. O.; Paramonov, A. S.; Chugunov, A. O.; Arseniev, A. S.; Dolgikh, D. A.; Kirpichnikov, M. P.

    2014-01-01

    Human secreted Ly-6/uPAR related proteins (SLURP-1 and SLURP-2) are produced by various cells, including the epithelium and immune system. These proteins act as autocrine/paracrine hormones regulating the growth and differentiation of keratinocytes and are also involved in the control of inflammation and malignant cell transformation. These effects are assumed to be mediated by the interactions of SLURP-1 and SLURP-2 with the α7 and α3β2 subtypes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), respectively. Available knowledge about the molecular mechanism underling the SLURP-1 and SLURP-2 effects is very limited. SLURP-2 remains one of the most poorly studied proteins of the Ly-6/uPAR family. In this study, we designed for the first time a bacterial system for SLURP-2 expression and a protocol for refolding of the protein from cytoplasmic inclusion bodies. Milligram quantities of recombinant SLURP-2 and its 13C-15N-labeled analog were obtained. The recombinant protein was characterized by NMR spectroscopy, and a structural model was developed. A comparative study of the SLURP-1 and SLURP-2 effects on the epithelial cell growth was conducted using human colorectal adenocarcinoma HT-29 cells, which express only α7-nAChRs. A pronounced antiproliferative effect of both proteins was observed. Incubation of cells with 1 μM SLURP-1 and 1 μM SLURP-2 during 48 h led to a reduction in the cell number down to ~ 54 and 63% relative to the control, respectively. Fluorescent microscopy did not reveal either apoptotic or necrotic cell death. An analysis of the dose-response curve revealed the concentration-dependent mode of the SLURP-1 and SLURP-2 action with EC50 ~ 0.1 and 0.2 nM, respectively. These findings suggest that the α7-nAChR is the main receptor responsible for the antiproliferative effect of SLURP proteins in epithelial cells. PMID:25558396

  12. Evaluation of an online family history tool for identifying hereditary and familial colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kallenberg, F G J; Aalfs, C M; The, F O; Wientjes, C A; Depla, A C; Mundt, M W; Bossuyt, P M M; Dekker, E

    2017-09-21

    Identifying a hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC) syndrome or familial CRC (FCC) in a CRC patient may enable the patient and relatives to enroll in surveillance protocols. As these individuals are insufficiently recognized, we evaluated an online family history tool, consisting of a patient-administered family history questionnaire and an automated genetic referral recommendation, to facilitate the identification of patients with hereditary CRC or FCC. Between 2015 and 2016, all newly diagnosed CRC patients in five Dutch outpatient clinics, were included in a trial with a stepped-wedge design, when first visiting the clinic. Each hospital continued standard procedures for identifying patients at risk (control strategy) and then, after a predetermined period, switched to offering the family history tool to included patients (intervention strategy). After considering the tool-based recommendation, the health care provider could decide on and arrange the referral. Primary outcome was the relative number of CRC patients who received screening or surveillance recommendations for themselves or relatives because of hereditary CRC or FCC, provided by genetic counseling. The intervention effect was evaluated using a logit-linear model. With the tool, 46/489 (9.4%) patients received a screening or surveillance recommendation, compared to 35/292 (12.0%) in the control group. In the intention-to-treat-analysis, accounting for time trends and hospital effects, this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.58). A family history tool does not necessarily assist in increasing the number of CRC patients and relatives enrolled in screening or surveillance recommendations for hereditary CRC or FCC. Other interventions should be considered.

  13. DNA Methylation Identifies Loci Distinguishing Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer Without Germ-Line MLH1/MSH2 Mutation from Sporadic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chung-Hsing; Sheng Jiang, Shih; Hsieh, Ling-Ling; Tang, Reiping; Hsiung, Chao A; Tsai, Hui-Ju; Chang, I-Shou

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Roughly half of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) cases are Lynch syndrome and exhibit germ-line mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes; the other half are familial colorectal cancer (CRC) type X (FCCTX) and are MMR proficient. About 70% of Lynch syndrome tumors have germ-line MLH1 or MSH2 mutations. The clinical presentation, histopathological features, and carcinogenesis of FCCTX resemble those of sporadic MMR-proficient colorectal tumors. It is of interest to obtain biomarkers that distinguish FCCTX from sporadic microsatellite stable (MSS) CRC, to develop preventive strategies. Methods: The tumors and adjacent normal tissues of 40 patients with HNPCC were assayed using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation27 (HM27) BeadChip to assess the DNA methylation level at about 27,000 loci. The germ-line mutation status of MLH1 and MSH2 and the microsatellite instability status in these patients were obtained. Genome-wide DNA methylation measurements of three groups of patients with general CRC were downloaded from public domain databases. Probes with DNA methylation levels that differed significantly between patients with sporadic MSS CRC and FCCTX were examined, to explore their potential as biomarkers. Results: We found that MSS HNPCC tumors were overwhelmingly hypomethylated compared with those from patient groups with other types of CRC, including germ-line MLH1/MSH2-mutated HNPCC and sporadic MSS CRC. Five gene-marker panels that exhibited a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity higher than 90% in both discovery and validation cohorts were proposed to distinguish MSS HNPCC tumors from sporadic MSS CRC. Conclusions: Our results warrant further investigation and validation. The loci identified here may become useful biomarkers for distinguishing between FCCTX and sporadic MSS CRC tumors. PMID:27977020

  14. Genome-wide association study of colorectal cancer identifies six new susceptibility loci.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Fredrick R; Schmit, Stephanie L; Jiao, Shuo; Edlund, Christopher K; Wang, Hansong; Zhang, Ben; Hsu, Li; Huang, Shu-Chen; Fischer, Christopher P; Harju, John F; Idos, Gregory E; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Manion, Frank J; McDonnell, Kevin; McNeil, Caroline E; Melas, Marilena; Rennert, Hedy S; Shi, Wei; Thomas, Duncan C; Van Den Berg, David J; Hutter, Carolyn M; Aragaki, Aaron K; Butterbach, Katja; Caan, Bette J; Carlson, Christopher S; Chanock, Stephen J; Curtis, Keith R; Fuchs, Charles S; Gala, Manish; Giovannucc, Edward L; Giocannucci, Edward L; Gogarten, Stephanie M; Hayes, Richard B; Henderson, Brian; Hunter, David J; Jackson, Rebecca D; Kolonel, Laurence N; Kooperberg, Charles; Küry, Sébastien; Kury, Sebastian; LaCroix, Andrea; Laurie, Cathy C; Laurie, Cecelia A; Lemire, Mathieu; Lemire, Mathiew; Levine, David; Ma, Jing; Makar, Karen W; Qu, Conghui; Taverna, Darin; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Wu, Kana; Kono, Suminori; West, Dee W; Berndt, Sonja I; Bezieau, Stéphane; Brenner, Hermann; Campbell, Peter T; Chan, Andrew T; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Conti, David V; Duggan, David; Figueiredo, Jane C; Fortini, Barbara K; Gallinger, Steven J; Gauderman, W James; Giles, Graham; Green, Roger; Haile, Robert; Harrison, Tabitha A; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hopper, John L; Hudson, Thomas J; Jacobs, Eric; Iwasaki, Motoki; Jee, Sun Ha; Jenkins, Mark; Jia, Wei-Hua; Joshi, Amit; Li, Li; Lindor, Noralene M; Matsuo, Keitaro; Moreno, Victor; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Newcomb, Polly A; Potter, John D; Raskin, Leon; Rennert, Gad; Rosse, Stephanie; Severi, Gianluca; Schoen, Robert E; Seminara, Daniela; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Slattery, Martha L; Tsugane, Shoichiro; White, Emily; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Zanke, Brent W; Zheng, Wei; Le Marchand, Loic; Casey, Graham; Gruber, Stephen B; Peters, Ulrike

    2015-07-07

    Genetic susceptibility to colorectal cancer is caused by rare pathogenic mutations and common genetic variants that contribute to familial risk. Here we report the results of a two-stage association study with 18,299 cases of colorectal cancer and 19,656 controls, with follow-up of the most statistically significant genetic loci in 4,725 cases and 9,969 controls from two Asian consortia. We describe six new susceptibility loci reaching a genome-wide threshold of P<5.0E-08. These findings provide additional insight into the underlying biological mechanisms of colorectal cancer and demonstrate the scientific value of large consortia-based genetic epidemiology studies.

  15. Genome-wide association study of colorectal cancer identifies six new susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Schmit, Stephanie L.; Jiao, Shuo; Edlund, Christopher K.; Wang, Hansong; Zhang, Ben; Hsu, Li; Huang, Shu-Chen; Fischer, Christopher P.; Harju, John F.; Idos, Gregory E.; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Manion, Frank J.; McDonnell, Kevin; McNeil, Caroline E.; Melas, Marilena; Rennert, Hedy S.; Shi, Wei; Thomas, Duncan C.; Van Den Berg, David J.; Hutter, Carolyn M.; Aragaki, Aaron K.; Butterbach, Katja; Caan, Bette J.; Carlson, Christopher S.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Curtis, Keith R.; Fuchs, Charles S.; Gala, Manish; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Gogarten, Stephanie M.; Hayes, Richard B.; Henderson, Brian; Hunter, David J.; Jackson, Rebecca D.; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Kooperberg, Charles; Küry, Sébastien; LaCroix, Andrea; Laurie, Cathy C.; Laurie, Cecelia A.; Lemire, Mathieu; Levine, David; Ma, Jing; Makar, Karen W.; Qu, Conghui; Taverna, Darin; Ulrich, Cornelia M.; Wu, Kana; Kono, Suminori; West, Dee W.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Bezieau, Stéphane; Brenner, Hermann; Campbell, Peter T.; Chan, Andrew T.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Coetzee, Gerhard A.; Conti, David V.; Duggan, David; Figueiredo, Jane C.; Fortini, Barbara K.; Gallinger, Steven J.; Gauderman, W. James; Giles, Graham; Green, Roger; Haile, Robert; Harrison, Tabitha A.; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hopper, John L.; Hudson, Thomas J.; Jacobs, Eric; Iwasaki, Motoki; Jee, Sun Ha; Jenkins, Mark; Jia, Wei-Hua; Joshi, Amit; Li, Li; Lindor, Noralene M.; Matsuo, Keitaro; Moreno, Victor; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Newcomb, Polly A.; Potter, John D.; Raskin, Leon; Rennert, Gad; Rosse, Stephanie; Severi, Gianluca; Schoen, Robert E.; Seminara, Daniela; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Slattery, Martha L.; Tsugane, Shoichiro; White, Emily; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Zanke, Brent W.; Zheng, Wei; Le Marchand, Loic; Casey, Graham; Gruber, Stephen B.; Peters, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Genetic susceptibility to colorectal cancer is caused by rare pathogenic mutations and common genetic variants that contribute to familial risk. Here we report the results of a two-stage association study with 18,299 cases of colorectal cancer and 19,656 controls, with follow-up of the most statistically significant genetic loci in 4,725 cases and 9,969 controls from two Asian consortia. We describe six new susceptibility loci reaching a genome-wide threshold of P<5.0E-08. These findings provide additional insight into the underlying biological mechanisms of colorectal cancer and demonstrate the scientific value of large consortia-based genetic epidemiology studies. PMID:26151821

  16. Systems Biology Approach to Identify Gene Network Signatures for Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sonachalam, Madhankumar; Shen, Jeffrey; Huang, Hui; Wu, Xiaogang

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we integrated prior knowledge from gene signatures and protein interactions with gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA), and gene/protein network modeling together to identify gene network signatures from gene expression microarray data. We demonstrated how to apply this approach into discovering gene network signatures for colorectal cancer (CRC) from microarray datasets. First, we used GSEA to analyze the microarray data through enriching differential genes in different CRC-related gene sets from two publicly available up-to-date gene set databases – Molecular Signatures Database (MSigDB) and Gene Signatures Database (GeneSigDB). Second, we compared the enriched gene sets through enrichment score, false-discovery rate, and nominal p-value. Third, we constructed an integrated protein–protein interaction (PPI) network through connecting these enriched genes by high-quality interactions from a human annotated and predicted protein interaction database, with a confidence score labeled for each interaction. Finally, we mapped differential gene expressions onto the constructed network to build a comprehensive network model containing visualized transcriptome and proteome data. The results show that although MSigDB has more CRC-relevant gene sets than GeneSigDB, the integrated PPI network connecting the enriched genes from both MSigDB and GeneSigDB can provide a more complete view for discovering gene network signatures. We also found several important sub-network signatures for CRC, such as TP53 sub-network, PCNA sub-network, and IL8 sub-network, corresponding to apoptosis, DNA repair, and immune response, respectively. PMID:22629282

  17. Utility of the Edmonton Frail Scale in identifying frail elderly patients during treatment of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Brandon M; Al-Shamsi, Humaid O; Rask, Sara; Yelamanchili, Radhika; Phillips, Callista M; Papaioannou, Alexandra; Pond, Gregory R; Jeyabalan, Neera; Zbuk, Kevin M; Dhesy-Thind, Sukhbinder Kaur

    2017-02-01

    Frailty has been proposed by geriatricians as an indicator of functional age. The Edmonton Frail Scale (EFS) is a 15-point incremental scale; it is quick (<5 min), and simple to administer. We conducted an exploratory study to establish if the EFS add utility to clinician's expertise by determining if there was an association between EFS and receipt of chemotherapy in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. The EFS was administered to stage II-IV CRC patients ≥70 years. EFS assessment was completed by one of the investigators, with the treating oncology team blinded to the results. A total of 46 patients were enrolled, and the EFS was reproduced in 32 patients at two visits (r=0.81; 95% CI: 0.64-0.90, P<0.0001). There was no correlation between the EFS and receipt of chemotherapy for the study population as a whole; however, exclusion of stage II patients showed a reduced likelihood of receiving chemotherapy with higher EFS scores (odds ratio 0.56; 95% CI: 0.37-0.85, P<0.01 per unit increment). A similar effect was observed after multivariable analysis (adjusting for performance status, age, stage and gender, odds ratio 0.41 95% CI: 0.18-0.96, P<0.05 per unit increment). This exploratory study suggests that EFS can identify patients that oncologists may have thought were too frail for chemotherapy, independent of PS. Therefore, the EFS has the potential to add a reproducible, and quantifiable measure of frailty to the clinician's decision making toolset. A follow up study will employ the EFS in real-time, and determine if using the EFS can minimize complications and unplanned health care utilization in elderly cancer patients.

  18. Utility of the Edmonton Frail Scale in identifying frail elderly patients during treatment of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, Brandon M.; Al-Shamsi, Humaid O.; Rask, Sara; Yelamanchili, Radhika; Phillips, Callista M.; Papaioannou, Alexandra; Pond, Gregory R.; Jeyabalan, Neera; Zbuk, Kevin M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Frailty has been proposed by geriatricians as an indicator of functional age. The Edmonton Frail Scale (EFS) is a 15-point incremental scale; it is quick (<5 min), and simple to administer. We conducted an exploratory study to establish if the EFS add utility to clinician’s expertise by determining if there was an association between EFS and receipt of chemotherapy in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Methods The EFS was administered to stage II–IV CRC patients ≥70 years. EFS assessment was completed by one of the investigators, with the treating oncology team blinded to the results. Results A total of 46 patients were enrolled, and the EFS was reproduced in 32 patients at two visits (r=0.81; 95% CI: 0.64–0.90, P<0.0001). There was no correlation between the EFS and receipt of chemotherapy for the study population as a whole; however, exclusion of stage II patients showed a reduced likelihood of receiving chemotherapy with higher EFS scores (odds ratio 0.56; 95% CI: 0.37–0.85, P<0.01 per unit increment). A similar effect was observed after multivariable analysis (adjusting for performance status, age, stage and gender, odds ratio 0.41 95% CI: 0.18–0.96, P<0.05 per unit increment). Conclusions This exploratory study suggests that EFS can identify patients that oncologists may have thought were too frail for chemotherapy, independent of PS. Therefore, the EFS has the potential to add a reproducible, and quantifiable measure of frailty to the clinician’s decision making toolset. A follow up study will employ the EFS in real-time, and determine if using the EFS can minimize complications and unplanned health care utilization in elderly cancer patients. PMID:28280606

  19. Hop proanthocyanidins induce apoptosis, protein carbonylation, and cytoskeleton disorganization in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells via reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Chung, Woon-Gye; Miranda, Cristobal L; Stevens, Jan F; Maier, Claudia S

    2009-04-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PCs) have been shown to suppress the growth of diverse human cancer cells and are considered as promising additions to the arsenal of chemopreventive phytochemicals. An oligomeric mixture of PCs from hops (Humulus lupulus) significantly decreased cell viability of human colon cancer HT-29 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Hop PCs, at 50 or 100 microg/ml, exhibited apoptosis-inducing properties as shown by the increase in caspase-3 activity. Increased levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was accompanied by an augmented accumulation of protein carbonyls. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis in combination with 2-alkenal-specific immunochemical detection identified beta-actin and protein disulfide isomerase as major putative targets of acrolein adduction. Incubation of HT-29 cells with hop PCs resulted in morphological changes that indicated disruption of the actin cytoskeleton. PC-mediated hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) formation in the cell culture media was also quantified; but, the measured H2O2 levels would not explain the observed changes in the oxidative modifications of actin. These findings suggest new modes of action for proanthocyandins as anticarcinogenic agents in human colon cancer cells, namely, promotion of protein oxidative modifications and cytoskeleton derangement.

  20. Hop proanthocyanidins induce apoptosis, protein carbonylation, and cytoskeleton disorganization in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells via reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Woon-Gye; Miranda, Cristobal L.; Stevens, Jan F.; Maier, Claudia S.

    2009-01-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PCs) have been shown to suppress the growth of diverse human cancer cells and are considered as promising additions to the arsenal of chemopreventive phytochemicals. An oligomeric mixture of PCs from hops (Humulus lupulus) significantly decreased cell viability of human colon cancer HT-29 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Hop PCs, at 50 or 100 μg/ml, exhibited apoptosis-inducing properties as shown by the increase in caspase-3 activity. Increased levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was accompanied by an augmented accumulation of protein carbonyls. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis in combination with 2-alkenal-specific immunochemical detection identified β-actin and protein disulfide isomerase as major putative targets of acrolein adduction. Incubation of HT-29 cells with hop PCs resulted in morphological changes that indicated disruption of the actin cytoskeleton. PC-mediated hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) formation in the cell culture media was also quantified; but, the measured H2O2 levels would not explain the observed changes in the oxidative modifications of actin. These findings suggest new modes of action for proanthocyandins as antitumorgenic agents in human colon cancer cells, namely, promotion of protein oxidative modifications and cytoskeleton derangement. PMID:19271284

  1. Synchronous trifocal colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Charalampoudis, Petros; Kykalos, Stylianos; Stamopoulos, Paraskevas; Kouraklis, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Synchronous colorectal cancers (SCRCs) have been increasingly diagnosed due to emerging diagnostic modalities. The presence of three or more synchronous colorectal cancers has, however, only rarely been reported. A 76-year-old white man presented for management of two concurrent colorectal adenocarcinomas in the left colon evidenced on total colonoscopy. Preoperative abdominal ultrasonography and thoracoabdominal computed tomography were negative for metastatic disease. The patient underwent an elective left hemicolectomy. The pathology report ultimately showed the presence of three moderately differentiated, distinct colorectal cancers. The patient experienced an uneventful recovery. PMID:27695171

  2. Two-round coamplification at lower denaturation temperature-PCR (COLD-PCR)-based sanger sequencing identifies a novel spectrum of low-level mutations in lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin; Milbury, Coren A; Li, Cheng; Makrigiorgos, G Mike

    2009-11-01

    Reliable identification of cancer-related mutations in TP53 is often problematic, as these mutations can be randomly distributed throughout numerous codons and their relative abundance in clinical samples can fall below the sensitivity limits of conventional sequencing. To ensure the highest sensitivity in mutation detection, we adapted the recently described coamplification at lower denaturation temperature-PCR (COLD-PCR) method to employ two consecutive rounds of COLD-PCR followed by Sanger sequencing. Using this highly sensitive approach we screened 48 nonmicrodissected lung adenocarcinoma samples for TP53 mutations. Twenty-four missense/frameshift TP53 mutations throughout exons 5 to 8 were identified in 23 out of 48 (48%) lung adenocarcinoma samples examined, including eight low-level mutations at an abundance of approximately 1 to 17%, most of which would have been missed using conventional methodologies. The identified alterations include two rare lung adenocarcinoma mutations, one of which is a "disruptive" mutation currently undocumented in the lung cancer mutation databases. A sample harboring a low-level mutation ( approximately 2% abundance) concurrently with a clonal mutation (80% abundance) revealed intratumoral TP53 mutation heterogeneity. The ability to identify and sequence low-level mutations in the absence of elaborate microdissection, via COLD-PCR-based Sanger sequencing, provides a platform for accurate mutation profiling in clinical specimens and the use of TP53 as a prognostic/predictive biomarker, evaluation of cancer risk, recurrence, and further understanding of cancer biology.

  3. Identifying and quantifying the stromal fibrosis in muscularis propria of colorectal carcinoma by multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sijia; Yang, Yinghong; Jiang, Weizhong; Feng, Changyin; Chen, Zhifen; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Guan, Guoxian; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-10-01

    The examination of stromal fibrosis within colorectal cancer is overlooked, not only because the routine pathological examinations seem to focus more on tumour staging and precise surgical margins, but also because of the lack of efficient diagnostic methods. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) can be used to study the muscularis stroma of normal and colorectal carcinoma tissue at the molecular level. In this work, we attempt to show the feasibility of MPM for discerning the microstructure of the normal human rectal muscle layer and fibrosis colorectal carcinoma tissue practicably. Three types of muscularis propria stromal fibrosis beneath the colorectal cancer infiltration were first observed through the MPM imaging system by providing intercellular microstructural details in fresh, unstained tissue samples. Our approach also presents the capability of quantifying the extent of stromal fibrosis from both amount and orientation of collagen, which may further characterize the severity of fibrosis. By comparing with the pathology analysis, these results show that the MPM has potential advantages in becoming a histological tool for detecting the stromal fibrosis and collecting prognosis evidence, which may guide subsequent therapy procedures for patients into good prognosis.

  4. Proteomic screening identifies calreticulin as a miR-27a direct target repressing MHC class I cell surface exposure in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Colangelo, T; Polcaro, G; Ziccardi, P; Pucci, B; Muccillo, L; Galgani, M; Fucci, A; Milone, M R; Budillon, A; Santopaolo, M; Votino, C; Pancione, M; Piepoli, A; Mazzoccoli, G; Binaschi, M; Bigioni, M; Maggi, C A; Fassan, M; Laudanna, C; Matarese, G; Sabatino, L; Colantuoni, V

    2016-01-01

    Impairment of the immune response and aberrant expression of microRNAs are emerging hallmarks of tumour initiation/progression, in addition to driver gene mutations and epigenetic modifications. We performed a preliminary survey of independent adenoma and colorectal cancer (CRC) miRnoma data sets and, among the most dysregulated miRNAs, we selected miR-27a and disclosed that it is already upregulated in adenoma and further increases during the evolution to adenocarcinoma. To identify novel genes and pathways regulated by this miRNA, we employed a differential 2DE-DIGE proteome analysis. We showed that miR-27a modulates a group of proteins involved in MHC class I cell surface exposure and, mechanistically, demonstrated that calreticulin is a miR-27a direct target responsible for most downstream effects in epistasis experiments. In vitro miR-27a affected cell proliferation and angiogenesis; mouse xenografts of human CRC cell lines expressing different miR-27a levels confirmed the protein variations and recapitulated the cell growth and apoptosis effects. In vivo miR-27a inversely correlated with MHC class I molecules and calreticulin expression, CD8+ T cells infiltration and cytotoxic activity (LAMP-1 exposure and perforin release). Tumours with high miR-27a, low calreticulin and CD8+ T cells' infiltration were associated with distant metastasis and poor prognosis. Our data demonstrate that miR-27a acts as an oncomiRNA, represses MHC class I expression through calreticulin downregulation and affects tumour progression. These results may pave the way for better diagnosis, patient stratification and novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:26913609

  5. Hierarchical cluster analysis and chemical characterisation of Myrtus communis L. essential oil from Yemen region and its antimicrobial, antioxidant and anti-colorectal adenocarcinoma properties.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Sirajudheen; Crouch, Rebecca A; Awadh Ali, Nasser A; Al-Fatimi, Mohamed A; Setzer, William N; Wessjohann, Ludger

    2017-09-01

    The hydrodistilled essential oil obtained from the dried leaves of Myrtus communis, collected in Yemen, was analysed by GC-MS. Forty-one compounds were identified, representing 96.3% of the total oil. The major constituents of essential oil were oxygenated monoterpenoids (87.1%), linalool (29.1%), 1,8-cineole (18.4%), α-terpineol (10.8%), geraniol (7.3%) and linalyl acetate (7.4%). The essential oil was assessed for its antimicrobial activity using a disc diffusion assay and resulted in moderate to potent antibacterial and antifungal activities targeting mainly Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans. The oil moderately reduced the diphenylpicrylhydrazyl radical (IC50 = 4.2 μL/mL or 4.1 mg/mL). In vitro cytotoxicity evaluation against HT29 (human colonic adenocarcinoma cells) showed that the essential oil exhibited a moderate antitumor effect with IC50 of 110 ± 4 μg/mL. Hierarchical cluster analysis of M. communis has been carried out based on the chemical compositions of 99 samples reported in the literature, including Yemeni sample.

  6. Novel quality indicators for metastatic colorectal cancer management identify significant variations in these measures across treatment centers in Australia.

    PubMed

    Turner, Natalie Heather; Wong, Hui-Li; Field, Kathryn; Wong, Rachel; Shapiro, Jeremy; Yip, Desmond; Nott, Louise; Tie, Jeanne; Kosmider, Suzanne; Tran, Ben; Desai, Jayesh; McKendrick, Joseph; Zimet, Allan; Richardson, Gary; Iddawela, Mahesh; Gibbs, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Defining multidisciplinary quality of care indicators (QCIs) for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) could improve understanding of variations in routine practice care. This may identify areas of below-average performance, which could then be addressed by clinicians to improve the quality of care delivered. This study aimed to define a panel of QCIs in mCRC and, based on these QCIs, to evaluate quality of care across multiple Australian sites. A panel of clinicians with expertise in colorectal cancer defined evidence-based or best practice-based QCIs relevant to the routine multidisciplinary management of mCRC patients through structured consensus discussion. Related data were extracted from the Treatment of Recurrent and Advanced Colorectal Cancer (TRACC) registry, a prospectively maintained database recording comprehensive details on consecutive mCRC patients across multiple Australian hospitals. Variations in QCIs across sites were explored. Of 13 QCIs defined, data related to 10 were reliably extracted from TRACC. Analysis of data on 1276 patients across 10 sites demonstrated low rates of screening for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer in young patients and significant variation in surveillance-detected recurrences, lung resection rates and palliative chemotherapy use. Exploratory analyses suggested correlation between liver resection rates and survival. We have defined a novel set of mCRC QCIs and have demonstrated wide variation in the quality of care of mCRC across multiple Australian sites. With further validation to confirm a direct correlation between QCI and patient outcomes, these QCIs could be applied to improve the quality of care received by all mCRC patients. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. From Genotype to Functional Phenotype: Unraveling the Metabolomic Features of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bathe, Oliver F.; Farshidfar, Farshad

    2014-01-01

    Much effort in recent years has been expended in defining the genomic and epigenetic alterations that characterize colorectal adenocarcinoma and its subtypes. However, little is known about the functional ramifications related to various subtypes. Metabolomics, the study of small molecule intermediates in disease, provides a snapshot of the functional phenotype of colorectal cancer. Data, thus far, have characterized some of the metabolic perturbations that accompany colorectal cancer. However, further studies will be required to identify biologically meaningful metabolic subsets, including those corresponding to specific genetic aberrations. Moreover, further studies are necessary to distinguish changes due to tumor and the host response to tumor. PMID:25055199

  8. Tumor-specific usage of alternative transcription start sites in colorectal cancer identified by genome-wide exon array analysis.

    PubMed

    Thorsen, Kasper; Schepeler, Troels; Øster, Bodil; Rasmussen, Mads H; Vang, Søren; Wang, Kai; Hansen, Kristian Q; Lamy, Philippe; Pedersen, Jakob Skou; Eller, Asger; Mansilla, Francisco; Laurila, Kirsti; Wiuf, Carsten; Laurberg, Søren; Dyrskjøt, Lars; Ørntoft, Torben F; Andersen, Claus L

    2011-10-14

    Approximately half of all human genes use alternative transcription start sites (TSSs) to control mRNA levels and broaden the transcriptional output in healthy tissues. Aberrant expression patterns promoting carcinogenesis, however, may arise from alternative promoter usage. By profiling 108 colorectal samples using exon arrays, we identified nine genes (TCF12, OSBPL1A, TRAK1, ANK3, CHEK1, UGP2, LMO7, ACSL5, and SCIN) showing tumor-specific alternative TSS usage in both adenoma and cancer samples relative to normal mucosa. Analysis of independent exon array data sets corroborated these findings. Additionally, we confirmed the observed patterns for selected mRNAs using quantitative real-time reverse-transcription PCR. Interestingly, for some of the genes, the tumor-specific TSS usage was not restricted to colorectal cancer. A comprehensive survey of the nine genes in lung, bladder, liver, prostate, gastric, and brain cancer revealed significantly altered mRNA isoform ratios for CHEK1, OSBPL1A, and TCF12 in a subset of these cancer types.To identify the mechanism responsible for the shift in alternative TSS usage, we antagonized the Wnt-signaling pathway in DLD1 and Ls174T colorectal cancer cell lines, which remarkably led to a shift in the preferred TSS for both OSBPL1A and TRAK1. This indicated a regulatory role of the Wnt pathway in selecting TSS, possibly also involving TP53 and SOX9, as their transcription binding sites were enriched in the promoters of the tumor preferred isoforms together with their mRNA levels being increased in tumor samples. Finally, to evaluate the prognostic impact of the altered TSS usage, immunohistochemistry was used to show deregulation of the total protein levels of both TCF12 and OSBPL1A, corresponding to the mRNA levels observed. Furthermore, the level of nuclear TCF12 had a significant correlation to progression free survival in a cohort of 248 stage II colorectal cancer samples. Alternative TSS usage in colorectal adenoma and

  9. Same difference: A pilot study of cyclin D1, bcl-2, AMACR, and ALDH-1 identifies significant differences in expression between primary colon adenocarcinoma and its metastases.

    PubMed

    Oakley, Gerard J; Denning, Krista L; Graffeo, Vincent; Griswold, Doreen C; Davis, Adam R; Brown, Linda G

    2016-11-01

    Tumor heterogeneity implies the possibility of significantly different expression of key pathways between primary and metastatic clones. Colon adenocarcinoma is one of the few tumors where current practice includes resection of primary and isolated organ metastases simultaneously without neoadjuvant therapy. We performed a pilot study on 28 cases of colon adenocarcinoma resected simultaneously with metastases in patients with no history of neoadjuvant therapy. We assayed matched primary and metastatic tumors from each patient with common diagnostic antibodies to Bcl-2, Cyclin D1, AMACR, and ALDH-1 by immunohistochemistry with semi-quantitative interpretation on archived formalin fixed, paraffin embedded samples. We were powered for large, consistent differences between primary and metastatic expression, and found 21 of 28 had a significant difference in expression of at least one of the four proteins, accounting for multiplicity of testing. Cyclin D1 had significantly more cases with differential metastatic:primary expression than would be expected by chance alone (p-value 0.0043), favoring higher expression in the metastatic sample. Bcl-2 and ALDH-1 had trends in this direction (p-value 0.078 each). Proportionately more cases with significant differences were identified when a liver metastasis was tested. We conclude differences in expression between metastatic and primary colon adenocarcinoma within the same patient exist, and may have therapeutic and biomarker testing consequences.

  10. Association between GWAS-identified lung adenocarcinoma susceptibility loci and EGFR mutations in never-smoking Asian women, and comparison with findings from Western populations.

    PubMed

    Seow, Wei Jie; Matsuo, Keitaro; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Shiraishi, Kouya; Song, Minsun; Kim, Hee Nam; Wong, Maria Pik; Hong, Yun-Chul; Hosgood, H Dean; Wang, Zhaoming; Chang, I-Shou; Wang, Jiu-Cun; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Tucker, Margaret; Wei, Hu; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Zheng, Wei; Kim, Jin Hee; Zhou, Baosen; Caporaso, Neil E; Albanes, Demetrius; Shin, Min-Ho; Chung, Lap Ping; An, She-Juan; Wang, Ping; Zheng, Hong; Yatabe, Yasushi; Zhang, Xu-Chao; Kim, Young Tae; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Kim, Young-Chul; Bassig, Bryan A; Chang, Jiang; Ho, James Chung Man; Ji, Bu-Tian; Kubo, Michiaki; Daigo, Yataro; Ito, Hidemi; Momozawa, Yukihide; Ashikawa, Kyota; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Honda, Takayuki; Sakamoto, Hiromi; Kunitoh, Hideo; Tsuta, Koji; Watanabe, Shun-Ichi; Nokihara, Hiroshi; Miyagi, Yohei; Nakayama, Haruhiko; Matsumoto, Shingo; Tsuboi, Masahiro; Goto, Koichi; Yin, Zhihua; Shi, Jianxin; Takahashi, Atsushi; Goto, Akiteru; Minamiya, Yoshihiro; Shimizu, Kimihiro; Tanaka, Kazumi; Wu, Tangchun; Wei, Fusheng; Wong, Jason Y Y; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Su, Jian; Kim, Yeul Hong; Oh, In-Jae; Song, Fengju; Lee, Victor Ho Fun; Su, Wu-Chou; Chen, Yuh-Min; Chang, Gee-Chen; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Lin, Hsien-Chih; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Seow, Adeline; Park, Jae Yong; Kweon, Sun-Seog; Chen, Chien-Jen; Li, Haixin; Gao, Yu-Tang; Wu, Chen; Qian, Biyun; Lu, Daru; Liu, Jianjun; Jeon, Hyo-Sung; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Sung, Jae Sook; Tsai, Ying-Huang; Jung, Yoo Jin; Guo, Huan; Hu, Zhibin; Wang, Wen-Chang; Chung, Charles C; Lawrence, Charles; Burdett, Laurie; Yeager, Meredith; Jacobs, Kevin B; Hutchinson, Amy; Berndt, Sonja I; He, Xingzhou; Wu, Wei; Wang, Junwen; Li, Yuqing; Choi, Jin Eun; Park, Kyong Hwa; Sung, Sook Whan; Liu, Li; Kang, Chang Hyun; Hu, Lingmin; Chen, Chung-Hsing; Yang, Tsung-Ying; Xu, Jun; Guan, Peng; Tan, Wen; Wang, Chih-Liang; Sihoe, Alan Dart Loon; Chen, Ying; Choi, Yi Young; Hung, Jen-Yu; Kim, Jun Suk; Yoon, Ho-Il; Cai, Qiuyin; Lin, Chien-Chung; Park, In Kyu; Xu, Ping; Dong, Jing; Kim, Christopher; He, Qincheng; Perng, Reury-Perng; Chen, Chih-Yi; Vermeulen, Roel; Wu, Junjie; Lim, Wei-Yen; Chen, Kun-Chieh; Chan, John K C; Chu, Minjie; Li, Yao-Jen; Li, Jihua; Chen, Hongyan; Yu, Chong-Jen; Jin, Li; Lo, Yen-Li; Chen, Ying-Hsiang; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Liu, Jie; Yamaji, Taiki; Yang, Yang; Hicks, Belynda; Wyatt, Kathleen; Li, Shengchao A; Dai, Juncheng; Ma, Hongxia; Jin, Guangfu; Song, Bao; Wang, Zhehai; Cheng, Sensen; Li, Xuelian; Ren, Yangwu; Cui, Ping; Iwasaki, Motoki; Shimazu, Taichi; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Zhu, Junjie; Jiang, Gening; Fei, Ke; Wu, Guoping; Chien, Li-Hsin; Chen, Hui-Ling; Su, Yu-Chun; Tsai, Fang-Yu; Chen, Yi-Song; Yu, Jinming; Stevens, Victoria L; Laird-Offringa, Ite A; Marconett, Crystal N; Lin, Dongxin; Chen, Kexin; Wu, Yi-Long; Landi, Maria Teresa; Shen, Hongbing; Rothman, Nathaniel; Kohno, Takashi; Chanock, Stephen J; Lan, Qing

    2016-12-26

    To evaluate associations by EGFR mutation status for lung adenocarcinoma risk among never-smoking Asian women, we conducted a meta-analysis of 11 loci previously identified in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Genotyping in an additional 10,780 never-smoking cases and 10,938 never-smoking controls from Asia confirmed associations with eight known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Two new signals were observed at genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10(-8)), namely, rs7216064 (17q24.3, BPTF), for overall lung adenocarcinoma risk, and rs3817963 (6p21.3, BTNL2) which is specific to cases with EGFR mutations. In further sub-analyses by EGFR status, rs9387478 (ROS1/DCBLD1) and rs2179920 (HLA-DPB1) showed stronger estimated associations in EGFR-positive compared to EGFR-negative cases. Comparison of the overall associations with published results in Western populations revealed that the majority of these findings were distinct, underscoring the importance of distinct contributing factors for smoking and non-smoking lung cancer. Our results extend the catalogue of regions associated with lung adenocarcinoma in non-smoking Asian women and highlight the importance of how the germline could inform risk for specific tumour mutation patterns, which could have important translational implications.

  11. miR-625-3p regulates oxaliplatin resistance by targeting MAP2K6-p38 signalling in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Mads Heilskov; Lyskjær, Iben; Jersie-Christensen, Rosa Rakownikow; Tarpgaard, Line Schmidt; Primdal-Bengtson, Bjarke; Nielsen, Morten Muhlig; Pedersen, Jakob Skou; Hansen, Tine Plato; Hansen, Flemming; Olsen, Jesper Velgaard; Pfeiffer, Per; Ørntoft, Torben Falck; Andersen, Claus Lindbjerg

    2016-01-01

    Oxaliplatin resistance in colorectal cancers (CRC) is a major medical problem, and predictive markers are urgently needed. Recently, miR-625-3p was reported as a promising predictive marker. Herein, we show that miR-625-3p functionally induces oxaliplatin resistance in CRC cells, and identify the signalling networks affected by miR-625-3p. We show that the p38 MAPK activator MAP2K6 is a direct target of miR-625-3p, and, accordingly, is downregulated in non-responder patients of oxaliplatin therapy. miR-625-3p-mediated resistance is reversed by anti-miR-625-3p treatment and ectopic expression of a miR-625-3p insensitive MAP2K6 variant. In addition, reduction of p38 signalling by using siRNAs, chemical inhibitors or expression of a dominant-negative MAP2K6 protein induces resistance to oxaliplatin. Transcriptome, proteome and phosphoproteome profiles confirm inactivation of MAP2K6-p38 signalling as one likely mechanism of oxaliplatin resistance. Our study shows that miR-625-3p induces oxaliplatin resistance by abrogating MAP2K6-p38-regulated apoptosis and cell cycle control networks, and corroborates the predictive power of miR-625-3p. PMID:27526785

  12. Case-control study for colorectal cancer genetic susceptibility in EPICOLON: previously identified variants and mucins

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer death in developed countries. Familial aggregation in CRC is also important outside syndromic forms and, in this case, a polygenic model with several common low-penetrance alleles contributing to CRC genetic predisposition could be hypothesized. Mucins and GALNTs (N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase) are interesting candidates for CRC genetic susceptibility and have not been previously evaluated. We present results for ten genetic variants linked to CRC risk in previous studies (previously identified category) and 18 selected variants from the mucin gene family in a case-control association study from the Spanish EPICOLON consortium. Methods CRC cases and matched controls were from EPICOLON, a prospective, multicenter, nationwide Spanish initiative, comprised of two independent stages. Stage 1 corresponded to 515 CRC cases and 515 controls, whereas stage 2 consisted of 901 CRC cases and 909 controls. Also, an independent cohort of 549 CRC cases and 599 controls outside EPICOLON was available for additional replication. Genotyping was performed for ten previously identified SNPs in ADH1C, APC, CCDN1, IL6, IL8, IRS1, MTHFR, PPARG, VDR and ARL11, and 18 selected variants in the mucin gene family. Results None of the 28 SNPs analyzed in our study was found to be associated with CRC risk. Although four SNPs were significant with a P-value < 0.05 in EPICOLON stage 1 [rs698 in ADH1C (OR = 1.63, 95% CI = 1.06-2.50, P-value = 0.02, recessive), rs1800795 in IL6 (OR = 1.62, 95% CI = 1.10-2.37, P-value = 0.01, recessive), rs3803185 in ARL11 (OR = 1.58, 95% CI = 1.17-2.15, P-value = 0.007, codominant), and rs2102302 in GALNTL2 (OR = 1.20, 95% CI = 1.00-1.44, P-value = 0.04, log-additive 0, 1, 2 alleles], only rs3803185 achieved statistical significance in EPICOLON stage 2 (OR = 1.34, 95% CI = 1.06-1.69, P-value = 0.01, recessive). In the joint analysis for both stages, results were only significant for rs

  13. In Vivo Selection Against Human Colorectal Cancer Xenografts Identifies an Aptamer That Targets RNA Helicase Protein DHX9

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Jing; Ray, Partha; Liu, Jenny; Kuan, Chien-Tsun; Xu, Jennifer; Hsu, David; Sullenger, Bruce A; White, Rebekah R; Clary, Bryan M

    2016-01-01

    The ability to selectively target disease-related tissues with molecules is critical to the design of effective therapeutic and diagnostic reagents. Recognizing the differences between the in vivo environment and in vitro conditions, we employed an in vivo selection strategy to identify RNA aptamers (targeting motifs) that could localize to tumor in situ. One of the selected molecules is an aptamer that binds to the protein DHX9, an RNA helicase that is known to be upregulated in colorectal cancer. Upon systemic administration, the aptamer preferentially localized to the nucleus of cancer cells in vivo and thus has the potential to be used for targeted delivery. PMID:27115840

  14. Facial Paralysis Secondary to Extensive Perineural Spread of Adenocarcinoma of the Parotid Gland Identified by PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Achong, Dwight M; Zloty, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Brain MRI in an 82-year-old man with presumed Bell's palsy revealed a clinically unsuspected right parotid gland mass but no other acute findings. Biopsy revealed poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. Staging F-FDG PET/CT revealed an FDG-avid parotid mass, abnormal FDG uptake along the course of the facial nerve from mass to skull base, and multiple FDG-avid right level II neck lymph nodes and hepatic metastases. The PET/CT findings and prolonged clinical course suggest that diffuse perineural spread of tumor from a smoldering parotid neoplasm, and not idiopathic Bell's palsy, was responsible for the patient's facial paralysis.

  15. Label-free monitoring of colorectal adenoma-carcinoma sequence based on multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. X.; Li, H. S.; Chen, Z. F.; Feng, C. Y.; Yang, Y. H.; Jiang, W. Z.; Guan, G. X.; Zhu, X. Q.; Zhuo, S. M.; Xu, J.

    2014-06-01

    The monitoring and evaluation of colorectal adenoma-carcinoma sequence during endoscopy are important for endoscopic resection of precursor lesions to disrupt the adenoma-carcinoma sequence and halt progression to invasive neoplastic disease. In this study, multiphoton microscopy (MPM) was used to identify different stages during the development of colorectal adenocarcinoma including adenoma with low-grade and high-grade dysplasia, and adenocarcinoma invading the submucosa. It was found that by combining two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) imaging and second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging, MPM can reveal the morphological changes of the epithelial cells and glands, identify the invasive position and depth of atypical glands and quantitatively describe the change of the cellular nucleus and the nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratio during the stepwise progression of colorectal adenocarcinoma. These are important pathological findings for pathologists when diagnosing colorectal lesions. With the advancement of a compact and flexible multiphoton endoscope for in vivo imaging and clinical applications, MPM has the potential to provide immediate histological diagnosis for the monitoring and evaluation of the colorectal adenoma-carcinoma sequence during endoscopy.

  16. Candidate Serum Biomarkers for Prostate Adenocarcinoma Identified by mRNA Differences in Prostate Tissue and Verified with Protein Measurements in Tissue and Blood

    PubMed Central

    Klee, Eric W.; Bondar, Olga P.; Goodmanson, Marcia K.; Dyer, Roy B.; Erdogan, Sibel; Bergstralh, Eric J.; Bergen, H. Robert; Sebo, Thomas J.; Klee, George G.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Improved tests are needed for detection and management of prostate cancer. We hypothesized that differential gene expression in prostate tissue could help identify candidate blood biomarkers for prostate cancer and that blood from men with advanced prostate disease could be used to verify their presence in circulation. METHODS Candidate markers were identified using mRNA expression patterns from laser-capture microdissected prostate tissue. Tissue expression was confirmed using immunohistochemistry (IHC) for the subset of candidates having commercial antisera. Tissue extracts were analyzed with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Blood concentrations were measured using immunoassays and MS/MS of trypsin-digested, immuno-extracted peptides. RESULTS Thirty-five novel candidate prostate adenocarcinoma biomarkers were selected. Tissue expression was confirmed for all of the 13 markers having commercial antisera for IHC and six of these markers showed statistical discrimination between normal and malignant tissue. Only 5 of these markers were detected in tissue extracts using MS/MS. Sixteen of the 35 candidate markers were successfully assayed in blood. Four of eight biomarkers measured with ELISA and 3 of 10 biomarkers measured by targeted MS showed statistically significant increases in blood concentrations of advanced prostate cancer cases, compared to controls. CONCLUSION Seven novel biomarkers identified by gene expression profiles in prostate tissue were shown to have statistically significant increased levels in blood from men with advanced prostate adenocarcinoma compared to controls: APOC1, ASPN, COMP, CXCL11, CXCL9, F5, and PCSK6. PMID:22247499

  17. Diabetes Insipidus: An Unusual Presentation of Adenocarcinoma of the Lung in a Patient with no Identifiable Lung Mass.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Shuchi; Kiefer, Christoper; Karim, Nagla Abdel

    2015-10-01

    Lung cancers are known to metastasize to unusual sites. Despite this knowledge often times the diagnosis of a primary lung cancer gets delayed especially when the patient presents without respiratory symptoms. The patient discussed in our review is a 47-year-old female, smoker who had presented to several hospitals with months of headache, nausea and intermittent episodes of vomiting. She was noted to have hypernatremia due to diabetes insipidus and a pituitary lesion on her magnetic resonance images. The pituitary mass on biopsy was found to represent a metastatic focus from a primary lung adenocarcinoma. Clinicians should be aware of malignancies that are well known to metastasize to the posterior pituitary. Conversely, since not every patient presents with symptoms of metastasis, there is a need to recognize the clinical syndromes (e. g., diabetes insipidus-like symptoms or more subtle symptoms like cranial nerve palsies) associated with potential metastasis to the pituitary.

  18. Patterns of somatic uniparental disomy identify novel tumor suppressor genes in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Torabi, Keyvan; Miró, Rosa; Fernández-Jiménez, Nora; Quintanilla, Isabel; Ramos, Laia; Prat, Esther; del Rey, Javier; Pujol, Núria; Killian, J Keith; Meltzer, Paul S; Fernández, Pedro Luis; Ried, Thomas; Lozano, Juan José; Camps, Jordi; Ponsa, Immaculada

    2015-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is characterized by specific patterns of copy number alterations (CNAs), which helped with the identification of driver oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes (TSGs). More recently, the usage of single nucleotide polymorphism arrays provided information of copy number neutral loss of heterozygosity, thus suggesting the occurrence of somatic uniparental disomy (UPD) and uniparental polysomy (UPP) events. The aim of this study is to establish an integrative profiling of recurrent UPDs/UPPs and CNAs in sporadic CRC. Our results indicate that regions showing high frequencies of UPD/UPP mostly coincide with regions typically involved in genomic losses. Among them, chromosome arms 3p, 5q, 9q, 10q, 14q, 17p, 17q, 20p, 21q and 22q preferentially showed UPDs/UPPs over genomic losses suggesting that tumor cells must maintain the disomic state of certain genes to favor cellular fitness. A meta-analysis using over 300 samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas confirmed our findings. Several regions affected by recurrent UPDs/UPPs contain well-known TSGs, as well as novel candidates such as ARID1A, DLC1, TCF7L2 and DMBT1. In addition, VCAN, FLT4, SFRP1 and GAS7 were also frequently involved in regions of UPD/UPP and displayed high levels of methylation. Finally, sequencing and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of the gene APC underlined that a somatic UPD event might represent the second hit to achieve biallelic inactivation of this TSG in colorectal tumors. In summary, our data define a profile of somatic UPDs/UPPs in sporadic CRC and highlights the importance of these events as a mechanism to achieve the inactivation of TSGs.

  19. Patterns of somatic uniparental disomy identify novel tumor suppressor genes in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Torabi, Keyvan; Miró, Rosa; Fernández-Jiménez, Nora; Quintanilla, Isabel; Ramos, Laia; Prat, Esther; del Rey, Javier; Pujol, Núria; Killian, J. Keith; Meltzer, Paul S.; Fernández, Pedro Luis; Ried, Thomas; Lozano, Juan José; Camps, Jordi; Ponsa, Immaculada

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is characterized by specific patterns of copy number alterations (CNAs), which helped with the identification of driver oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes (TSGs). More recently, the usage of single nucleotide polymorphism arrays provided information of copy number neutral loss of heterozygosity, thus suggesting the occurrence of somatic uniparental disomy (UPD) and uniparental polysomy (UPP) events. The aim of this study is to establish an integrative profiling of recurrent UPDs/UPPs and CNAs in sporadic CRC. Our results indicate that regions showing high frequencies of UPD/UPP mostly coincide with regions typically involved in genomic losses. Among them, chromosome arms 3p, 5q, 9q, 10q, 14q, 17p, 17q, 20p, 21q and 22q preferentially showed UPDs/UPPs over genomic losses suggesting that tumor cells must maintain the disomic state of certain genes to favor cellular fitness. A meta-analysis using over 300 samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas confirmed our findings. Several regions affected by recurrent UPDs/UPPs contain well-known TSGs, as well as novel candidates such as ARID1A, DLC1, TCF7L2 and DMBT1. In addition, VCAN, FLT4, SFRP1 and GAS7 were also frequently involved in regions of UPD/UPP and displayed high levels of methylation. Finally, sequencing and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of the gene APC underlined that a somatic UPD event might represent the second hit to achieve biallelic inactivation of this TSG in colorectal tumors. In summary, our data define a profile of somatic UPDs/UPPs in sporadic CRC and highlights the importance of these events as a mechanism to achieve the inactivation of TSGs. PMID:26243311

  20. Mutational signature analysis identifies MUTYH deficiency in colorectal cancers and adrenocortical carcinomas: Mutational signature associated with MUTYH deficiency in cancers

    DOE PAGES

    Pilati, Camilla; Shinde, Jayendra; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; ...

    2017-03-29

    Germline alterations in DNA repair genes are implicated in cancer predisposition and can result in characteristic mutational signatures. However, specific mutational signatures associated with base excision repair (BER) defects remain to be characterized. Here, by analysing a series of colorectal cancers (CRCs) using exome sequencing, we identified a particular spectrum of somatic mutations characterized by an enrichment of C > A transversions in NpCpA or NpCpT contexts in three tumours from a MUTYH-associated polyposis (MAP) patient and in two cases harbouring pathogenic germline MUTYH mutations. In two series of adrenocortical carcinomas (ACCs), we identified four tumours with a similar signaturemore » also presenting germline MUTYH mutations. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that MUTYH inactivation results in a particular mutational signature, which may serve as a useful marker of BER-related genomic instability in new cancer types.« less

  1. Large-scale genetic study in East Asians identifies six new loci associated with colorectal cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ben; Jia, Wei-Hua; Matsuda, Koichi; Kweon, Sun-Seog; Matsuo, Keitaro; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Shin, Aesun; Jee, Sun Ha; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Cai, Qiuyin; Long, Jirong; Shi, Jiajun; Wen, Wanqing; Yang, Gong; Zhang, Yanfeng; Li, Chun; Li, Bingshan; Guo, Yan; Ren, Zefang; Ji, Bu-Tian; Pan, Zhi-Zhong; Takahashi, Atsushi; Shin, Min-Ho; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Gao, Yu-Tang; Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Soriul; Ahn, Yoon-Ok; Chan, Andrew T; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Slattery, Martha L.; Gruber, Stephen B.; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Stenzel, Stephanie L.; Casey, Graham; Kim, Hyeong-Rok; Jeong, Jin-Young; Park, Ji Won; Li, Hong-Lan; Hosono, Satoyo; Cho, Sang-Hee; Kubo, Michiaki; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Zheng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Known genetic loci explain only a small proportion of the familial relative risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). We conducted the largest genome-wide association study in East Asians with 14,963 CRC cases and 31,945 controls and identified six new loci associated with CRC risk (P = 3.42 × 10−8 to 9.22 × 10−21) at 10q22.3, 10q25.2, 11q12.2, 12p13.31, 17p13.3 and 19q13.2. Two of these loci map to genes (TCF7L2 and TGFB1) with established roles in colorectal tumorigenesis. Four other loci are located in or near genes involved in transcription regulation (ZMIZ1), genome maintenance (FEN1), fatty acid metabolism (FADS1 and FADS2), cancer cell motility and metastasis (CD9) and cell growth and differentiation (NXN). We also found suggestive evidence for three additional loci associated with CRC risk near genome-wide significance at 8q24.11, 10q21.1 and 10q24.2. Furthermore, we replicated 22 previously reported CRC loci. Our study provides insights into the genetic basis of CRC and suggests new biological pathways. PMID:24836286

  2. Large-scale genetic study in East Asians identifies six new loci associated with colorectal cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ben; Jia, Wei-Hua; Matsuda, Koichi; Kweon, Sun-Seog; Matsuo, Keitaro; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Shin, Aesun; Jee, Sun Ha; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Cai, Qiuyin; Long, Jirong; Shi, Jiajun; Wen, Wanqing; Yang, Gong; Zhang, Yanfeng; Li, Chun; Li, Bingshan; Guo, Yan; Ren, Zefang; Ji, Bu-Tian; Pan, Zhi-Zhong; Takahashi, Atsushi; Shin, Min-Ho; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Gao, Yu-Tang; Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Soriul; Ahn, Yoon-Ok; Chan, Andrew T; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Slattery, Martha L; Gruber, Stephen B; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Stenzel, Stephanie L; Casey, Graham; Kim, Hyeong-Rok; Jeong, Jin-Young; Park, Ji Won; Li, Hong-Lan; Hosono, Satoyo; Cho, Sang-Hee; Kubo, Michiaki; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Zheng, Wei

    2014-06-01

    Known genetic loci explain only a small proportion of the familial relative risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). We conducted a genome-wide association study of CRC in East Asians with 14,963 cases and 31,945 controls and identified 6 new loci associated with CRC risk (P = 3.42 × 10(-8) to 9.22 × 10(-21)) at 10q22.3, 10q25.2, 11q12.2, 12p13.31, 17p13.3 and 19q13.2. Two of these loci map to genes (TCF7L2 and TGFB1) with established roles in colorectal tumorigenesis. Four other loci are located in or near genes involved in transcriptional regulation (ZMIZ1), genome maintenance (FEN1), fatty acid metabolism (FADS1 and FADS2), cancer cell motility and metastasis (CD9), and cell growth and differentiation (NXN). We also found suggestive evidence for three additional loci associated with CRC risk near genome-wide significance at 8q24.11, 10q21.1 and 10q24.2. Furthermore, we replicated 22 previously reported CRC-associated loci. Our study provides insights into the genetic basis of CRC and suggests the involvement of new biological pathways.

  3. Cancer Genomics Identifies Regulatory Gene Networks Associated with the Transition from Dysplasia to Advanced Lung Adenocarcinomas Induced by c-Raf-1

    PubMed Central

    Rohrbeck, Astrid; Borlak, Jürgen

    2009-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer morbidity. To improve an understanding of molecular causes of disease a transgenic mouse model was investigated where targeted expression of the serine threonine kinase c-Raf to respiratory epithelium induced initialy dysplasia and subsequently adenocarcinomas. This enables dissection of genetic events associated with precancerous and cancerous lesions. Methodology/Principal Findings By laser microdissection cancer cell populations were harvested and subjected to whole genome expression analyses. Overall 473 and 541 genes were significantly regulated, when cancer versus transgenic and non-transgenic cells were compared, giving rise to three distinct and one common regulatory gene network. At advanced stages of tumor growth predominately repression of gene expression was observed, but genes previously shown to be up-regulated in dysplasia were also up-regulated in solid tumors. Regulation of developmental programs as well as epithelial mesenchymal and mesenchymal endothelial transition was a hall mark of adenocarcinomas. Additionaly, genes coding for cell adhesion, i.e. the integrins and the tight and gap junction proteins were repressed, whereas ligands for receptor tyrosine kinase such as epi- and amphiregulin were up-regulated. Notably, Vegfr- 2 and its ligand Vegfd, as well as Notch and Wnt signalling cascades were regulated as were glycosylases that influence cellular recognition. Other regulated signalling molecules included guanine exchange factors that play a role in an activation of the MAP kinases while several tumor suppressors i.e. Mcc, Hey1, Fat3, Armcx1 and Reck were significantly repressed. Finally, probable molecular switches forcing dysplastic cells into malignantly transformed cells could be identified. Conclusions/Significance This study provides insight into molecular pertubations allowing dysplasia to progress further to adenocarcinoma induced by exaggerted c-Raf kinase activity. PMID:19812696

  4. Connectivity mapping using a combined gene signature from multiple colorectal cancer datasets identified candidate drugs including existing chemotherapies

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background While the discovery of new drugs is a complex, lengthy and costly process, identifying new uses for existing drugs is a cost-effective approach to therapeutic discovery. Connectivity mapping integrates gene expression profiling with advanced algorithms to connect genes, diseases and small molecule compounds and has been applied in a large number of studies to identify potential drugs, particularly to facilitate drug repurposing. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a commonly diagnosed cancer with high mortality rates, presenting a worldwide health problem. With the advancement of high throughput omics technologies, a number of large scale gene expression profiling studies have been conducted on CRCs, providing multiple datasets in gene expression data repositories. In this work, we systematically apply gene expression connectivity mapping to multiple CRC datasets to identify candidate therapeutics to this disease. Results We developed a robust method to compile a combined gene signature for colorectal cancer across multiple datasets. Connectivity mapping analysis with this signature of 148 genes identified 10 candidate compounds, including irinotecan and etoposide, which are chemotherapy drugs currently used to treat CRCs. These results indicate that we have discovered high quality connections between the CRC disease state and the candidate compounds, and that the gene signature we created may be used as a potential therapeutic target in treating the disease. The method we proposed is highly effective in generating quality gene signature through multiple datasets; the publication of the combined CRC gene signature and the list of candidate compounds from this work will benefit both cancer and systems biology research communities for further development and investigations. PMID:26356760

  5. A colorectal cancer genome-wide association study in a Spanish cohort identifies two variants associated with colorectal cancer risk at 1p33 and 8p12

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a disease of complex aetiology, with much of the expected inherited risk being due to several common low risk variants. Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS) have identified 20 CRC risk variants. Nevertheless, these have only been able to explain part of the missing heritability. Moreover, these signals have only been inspected in populations of Northern European origin. Results Thus, we followed the same approach in a Spanish cohort of 881 cases and 667 controls. Sixty-four variants at 24 loci were found to be associated with CRC at p-values <10-5. We therefore evaluated the 24 loci in another Spanish replication cohort (1481 cases and 1850 controls). Two of these SNPs, rs12080929 at 1p33 (Preplication=0.042; Ppooled=5.523x10-03; OR (CI95%)=0.866(0.782-0.959)) and rs11987193 at 8p12 (Preplication=0.039; Ppooled=6.985x10-5; OR (CI95%)=0.786(0.705-0.878)) were replicated in the second Phase, although they did not reach genome-wide statistical significance. Conclusions We have performed the first CRC GWAS in a Southern European population and by these means we were able to identify two new susceptibility variants at 1p33 and 8p12 loci. These two SNPs are located near the SLC5A9 and DUSP4 loci, respectively, which could be good functional candidates for the association signals. We therefore believe that these two markers constitute good candidates for CRC susceptibility loci and should be further evaluated in other larger datasets. Moreover, we highlight that were these two SNPs true susceptibility variants, they would constitute a decrease in the CRC missing heritability fraction. PMID:23350875

  6. Epigenetics and Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lao, Victoria Valinluck; Grady, William M.

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths in the world. It results from an accumulation of genetic and epigenetic changes in colon epithelial cells that transforms them into adenocarcinomas. There have been major advances in our understanding of cancer epigenetics over the last decade, particularly regarding aberrant DNA methylation. Assessment of the colon cancer epigenome has revealed that virtually all colorectal cancers have aberrantly methylated genes and the average colorectal cancer methylome has hundreds to thousands of abnormally methylated genes. As with gene mutations in the cancer genome, a subset of these methylated genes, called driver genes, is presumed to play a functional role in colorectal cancer. The assessment of methylated genes in colorectal cancers has also revealed a unique molecular subgroup of colorectal cancers called CpG Island Methylator Phenotype (CIMP) cancers; these tumors have a particularly high frequency of methylated genes. The advances in our understanding of aberrant methylation in colorectal cancer has led to epigenetic alterations being developed as clinical biomarkers for diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic applications. Progress in the assessment of epigenetic alterations in colorectal cancer and their clinical applications has shown that these alterations will be commonly used in the near future as molecular markers to direct the prevention and treatment of colorectal cancer. PMID:22009203

  7. Comparative profiling between primary colorectal carcinomas and metastases identifies heterogeneity on drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shigang; Wu, Xuefang; Chen, Meixiang; Zhong, Xueyun; Liu, Kunping

    2016-01-01

    Metastases cause recurrence and mortality for patients with colorectal carcinomas (CRC). In present study, we evaluated heterogeneity on drug resistance and its underlying mechanism between metastatic and primary CRC. Immunohistochemical results from clinical tissue microarray (TMA) suggested that the expression concordance rates of cancer stem cells (CSCs) and drug resistance relative proteins between lymph-node metastatic and primary CRC foci were low. The apoptotic and proliferation indexes in metastasis CRC specimens were decreased compared with primary. In vitro experimental results indicated that the migration and invasion abilities were upregulated in metastatic cells SW620 compared with primary cells SW480, the cellular efflux ability and WNT/β-catenin activity were also upregulated in SW620 cells. After 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu) treatment, the reduction in the proportion of cell apoptosis, CD133 and TERT expression levels in SW620 were lower than that in SW480 cells. Bioinformatics analysis in whole-genome transcriptional profiling results between metastatic and primary CRC cells suggested that differentially expressed genes were mainly centered on well-characterized signaling pathways including WNT/β-catenin, cell cycle and cell junction. Collectively, heterogeneity of drug resistant was present between metastatic and primary CRC specimens and cell lines, the abnormal activation of WNT/β-catenin signaling pathway could be a potential molecular leading to drug resistant ability enhancing in metastatic CRC cells. PMID:27613840

  8. Peritoneal expression of matrilysin helps identify early post-operative recurrence of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sica, Giuseppe S.; Fiorani, Cristina; Stolfi, Carmine; Monteleone, Giovanni; Candi, Eleonora; Amelio, Ivano; Catani, Valeria; Sibio, Simone; Divizia, Andrea; Tema, Giorgia; Iaculli, Edoardo; Gaspari, Achille L.

    2015-01-01

    Recurrence of colorectal cancer (CRC) following a potentially curative resection is a challenging clinical problem. Matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7) is over-expressed by CRC cells and supposed to play a major role in CRC cell diffusion and metastasis. MMP-7 RNA expression was assessed by real-time PCR using specific primers in peritoneal washing fluid obtained during surgical procedure. After surgery, patients underwent a regular follow up for assessing recurrence. transcripts for MMP-7 were detected in 31/57 samples (54%). Patients were followed-up (range 20–48 months) for recurrence prevention. Recurrence was diagnosed in 6 out of 55 patients (11%) and two patients eventually died because of this. Notably, all the six patients who had relapsed were positive for MMP-7. Sensitivity and specificity of the test were 100% and 49% respectively. Data from patients have also been corroborated by computational approaches. Public available coloncarcinoma datasets have been employed to confirm MMP7 clinical impact on the disease. Interestingly, MMP-7 expression appeared correlated to Tgfb-1, and correlation of the two factors represented a poor prognostic factor. This study proposes positivity of MMP-7 in peritoneal cavity as a novel biomarker for predicting disease recurrence in patients with CRC. PMID:25596746

  9. Peritoneal expression of Matrilysin helps identify early post-operative recurrence of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Sica, Giuseppe S; Fiorani, Cristina; Stolfi, Carmine; Monteleone, Giovanni; Candi, Eleonora; Amelio, Ivano; Catani, Valeria; Sibio, Simone; Divizia, Andrea; Tema, Giorgia; Iaculli, Edoardo; Gaspari, Achille L

    2015-05-30

    Recurrence of colorectal cancer (CRC) following a potentially curative resection is a challenging clinical problem. Matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7) is over-expressed by CRC cells and supposed to play a major role in CRC cell diffusion and metastasis. MMP-7 RNA expression was assessed by real-time PCR using specific primers in peritoneal washing fluid obtained during surgical procedure. After surgery, patients underwent a regular follow up for assessing recurrence. transcripts for MMP-7 were detected in 31/57 samples (54%). Patients were followed-up (range 20-48 months) for recurrence prevention. Recurrence was diagnosed in 6 out of 55 patients (11%) and two patients eventually died because of this. Notably, all the six patients who had relapsed were positive for MMP-7. Sensitivity and specificity of the test were 100% and 49% respectively. Data from patients have also been corroborated by computational approaches. Public available coloncarcinoma datasets have been employed to confirm MMP7 clinical impact on the disease. Interestingly, MMP-7 expression appeared correlated to Tgfb-1, and correlation of the two factors represented a poor prognostic factor. This study proposes positivity of MMP-7 in peritoneal cavity as a novel biomarker for predicting disease recurrence in patients with CRC.

  10. Trans-ethnic genome-wide association study of colorectal cancer identifies a new susceptibility locus in VTI1A

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hansong; Burnett, Terrilea; Kono, Suminori; Haiman, Christopher A.; Iwasaki, Motoki; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Loo, Lenora W.M.; Berg, David Van Den; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Henderson, Brian E.; Keku, Temitope O.; Sandler, Robert S.; Signorello, Lisa B.; Blot, William J.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Pande, Mala; Amos, Christopher I.; West, Dee W.; Bézieau, Stéphane; Berndt, Sonja I.; Zanke, Brent W.; Hsu, Li; Lindor, Noralane M.; Haile, Robert W.; Hopper, John L.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Gallinger, Steven; Casey, Graham; Stenzel, Stephanie L.; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Peters, Ulrike; Gruber, Stephen B.; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Stram, Daniel O.; Marchand, Loïc Le

    2014-01-01

    The genetic basis of sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC) is not well explained by known risk polymorphisms. Here we perform a meta-analysis of two genome-wide association studies in 2,627 cases and 3,797 controls of Japanese ancestry and 1,894 cases and 4,703 controls of African ancestry, to identify genetic variants that contribute to CRC susceptibility. We replicate genome-wide statistically significant associations (P < 5×10−8) in 16,823 cases and 18,211 controls of European ancestry. This study reveals a new pan-ethnic CRC risk locus at 10q25 (rs12241008, intronic to VTI1A; P=1.4×10−9), providing additional insight into the etiology of CRC and highlighting the value of association mapping in diverse populations. PMID:25105248

  11. Molecular dissection of colorectal cancer in pre-clinical models identifies biomarkers predicting sensitivity to EGFR inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Schütte, Moritz; Risch, Thomas; Abdavi-Azar, Nilofar; Boehnke, Karsten; Schumacher, Dirk; Keil, Marlen; Yildiriman, Reha; Jandrasits, Christine; Borodina, Tatiana; Amstislavskiy, Vyacheslav; Worth, Catherine L.; Schweiger, Caroline; Liebs, Sandra; Lange, Martin; Warnatz, Hans- Jörg; Butcher, Lee M.; Barrett, James E.; Sultan, Marc; Wierling, Christoph; Golob-Schwarzl, Nicole; Lax, Sigurd; Uranitsch, Stefan; Becker, Michael; Welte, Yvonne; Regan, Joseph Lewis; Silvestrov, Maxine; Kehler, Inge; Fusi, Alberto; Kessler, Thomas; Herwig, Ralf; Landegren, Ulf; Wienke, Dirk; Nilsson, Mats; Velasco, Juan A.; Garin-Chesa, Pilar; Reinhard, Christoph; Beck, Stephan; Schäfer, Reinhold; Regenbrecht, Christian R. A.; Henderson, David; Lange, Bodo; Haybaeck, Johannes; Keilholz, Ulrich; Hoffmann, Jens; Lehrach, Hans; Yaspo, Marie-Laure

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma represents a heterogeneous entity, with only a fraction of the tumours responding to available therapies, requiring a better molecular understanding of the disease in precision oncology. To address this challenge, the OncoTrack consortium recruited 106 CRC patients (stages I–IV) and developed a pre-clinical platform generating a compendium of drug sensitivity data totalling >4,000 assays testing 16 clinical drugs on patient-derived in vivo and in vitro models. This large biobank of 106 tumours, 35 organoids and 59 xenografts, with extensive omics data comparing donor tumours and derived models provides a resource for advancing our understanding of CRC. Models recapitulate many of the genetic and transcriptomic features of the donors, but defined less complex molecular sub-groups because of the loss of human stroma. Linking molecular profiles with drug sensitivity patterns identifies novel biomarkers, including a signature outperforming RAS/RAF mutations in predicting sensitivity to the EGFR inhibitor cetuximab. PMID:28186126

  12. An Integrated Molecular Analysis of Lung Adenocarcinomas Identifies Potential Therapeutic Targets among TTF1-Negative Tumors, Including DNA Repair Proteins and Nrf2.

    PubMed

    Cardnell, Robert J G; Behrens, Carmen; Diao, Lixia; Fan, YouHong; Tang, Ximing; Tong, Pan; Minna, John D; Mills, Gordon B; Heymach, John V; Wistuba, Ignacio I; Wang, Jing; Byers, Lauren A

    2015-08-01

    Thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF1) immunohistochemistry (IHC) is used clinically to differentiate primary lung adenocarcinomas (LUAD) from squamous lung cancers and metastatic adenocarcinomas from other primary sites. However, a subset of LUAD (15%-20%) does not express TTF1, and TTF1-negative patients have worse clinical outcomes. As there are no established targeted agents with activity in TTF1-negative LUAD, we performed an integrated molecular analysis to identify potential therapeutic targets. Using two clinical LUAD cohorts (274 tumors), one from our institution (PROSPECT) and The Cancer Genome Atlas, we interrogated proteomic profiles (by reverse phase protein array, RPPA), gene expression, and mutational data. Drug response data from 74 cell lines were used to validate potential therapeutic agents. Strong correlations were observed between TTF1 IHC and TTF1 measurements by RPPA (Rho = 0.57, P < 0.001) and gene expression (NKX2-1, Rho = 0.61, P < 0.001). Established driver mutations (e.g., BRAF and EGFR) were associated with high TTF1 expression. In contrast, TTF1-negative LUAD had a higher frequency of inactivating KEAP1 mutations (P = 0.001). Proteomic profiling identified increased expression of DNA repair proteins (e.g., Chk1 and the DNA repair score) and suppressed PI3k/mTOR signaling among TTF1-negative tumors, with differences in total proteins confirmed at the mRNA level. Cell line analysis showed drugs targeting DNA repair to be more active in TTF1-low cell lines. Combined genomic and proteomic analyses demonstrated infrequent alteration of validated lung cancer targets (including the absence of BRAF mutations in TTF1-negative LUAD), but identified novel potential targets for TTF1-negative LUAD, including KEAP1/Nrf2 and DNA repair pathways. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Composite biomarkers defined by multiparametric immunofluorescence analysis identify ALK-positive adenocarcinoma as a potential target for immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Roussel, Hélène; De Guillebon, Eléonore; Biard, Lucie; Mandavit, Marion; Gibault, Laure; Fabre, Elisabeth; Antoine, Martine; Hofman, Paul; Beau-Faller, Michèle; Blons, Hélène; Danel, Claire; Barthes, Françoise Le Pimpec; Gey, Alain; Granier, Clémence; Wislez, Marie; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Oudard, Stéphane; Bruneval, Patrick; Badoual, Cécile; Cadranel, Jacques; Tartour, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitors have been successfully developed for non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) displaying chromosomal rearrangements of the ALK gene, but unfortunately resistance invariably occurs. Blockade of the PD-1-PD-L1/2 inhibitory pathway constitutes a breakthrough for the treatment of NSCLC. Some predictive biomarkers of clinical response to this therapy are starting to emerge, such as PD-L1 expression by tumor/stromal cells and infiltration by CD8(+) T cells expressing PD-1. To more effectively integrate all of these potential biomarkers of clinical response to immunotherapy, we have developed a multiparametric immunofluorescence technique with automated immune cell counting to comprehensively analyze the tumor microenvironment of ALK-positive adenocarcinoma (ADC). When analyzed as either a continuous or a dichotomous variable, the mean number of tumor cells expressing PD-L1 (p = 0.012) and the percentage of tumor cells expressing PD-L1 were higher in ALK-positive ADC than in EGFR-mutated ADC or WT (non-EGFR-mutated and non-KRAS-mutated) NSCLC. A very strong correlation between PD-L1 expression on tumor cells and intratumoral infiltration by CD8(+) T cells was observed, suggesting that an adaptive mechanism may partly regulate this expression. A higher frequency of tumors combining positive PD-L1 expression and infiltration by intratumoral CD8(+) T cells or PD-1(+)CD8(+) T cells was also observed in ALK-positive lung cancer patients compared with EGFR-mutated (p = 0.03) or WT patients (p = 0.012). These results strongly suggest that a subgroup of ALK-positive lung cancer patients may constitute good candidates for anti-PD-1/-PD-L1 therapies.

  14. MET Amplification Identifies a Small and Aggressive Subgroup of Esophagogastric Adenocarcinoma With Evidence of Responsiveness to Crizotinib

    PubMed Central

    Lennerz, Jochen K.; Kwak, Eunice L.; Ackerman, Allison; Michael, Michael; Fox, Stephen B.; Bergethon, Kristin; Lauwers, Gregory Y.; Christensen, James G.; Wilner, Keith D.; Haber, Daniel A.; Salgia, Ravi; Bang, Yung-Jue; Clark, Jeffrey W.; Solomon, Benjamin J.; Iafrate, A. John

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Amplification of the MET proto-oncogene in gastroesophageal cancer (GEC) may constitute a molecular marker for targeted therapy. We examined a GEC cohort with follow-up and reported the clinical response of four additional patients with MET-amplified tumors to the small molecule inhibitor crizotinib as part of an expanded phase I cohort study. Patients and Methods From 2007 to 2009, patients with GEC were genetically screened as a consecutive series of 489 tumors (stages 0, I, and II, 39%; III, 25%; IV, 36%; n = 222 esophageal, including n = 21 squamous carcinomas). MET, EGFR, and HER2 amplification status was assessed by using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Results Ten (2%) of 489 patients screened harbored MET amplification; 23 (4.7%) harbored EGFR amplification; 45 (8.9%) harbored HER2 amplification; and 411 (84%) were wild type for all three genes (ie, negative). MET-amplified tumors were typically high-grade adenocarcinomas that presented at advanced stages (5%; n = 4 of 80). EGFR-amplified tumors showed the highest fraction of squamous cell carcinoma (17%; n = 4 of 23). HER2, MET, and EGFR amplification were, with one exception (MET and EGFR positive), mutually exclusive events. Survival analysis in patients with stages III and IV disease showed substantially shorter median survival in MET/EGFR-amplified groups, with a rank order for all groups by median survival (from most to least aggressive): MET (7.1 months; P < .001) less than EGFR (11.2 months; P = .16) less than HER2 (16.9 months; P = .89) when compared with the negative group (16.2 months). Two of four patients with MET-amplified tumors treated with crizotinib experienced tumor shrinkage (−30% and −16%) and experienced progression after 3.7 and 3.5 months. Conclusion MET amplification defines a small and aggressive subset of GEC with indications of transient sensitivity to the targeted MET inhibitor crizotinib (PF-02341066). PMID:22042947

  15. Diallyl disulphide, a beneficial component of garlic oil, causes a redistribution of cell-cycle growth phases, induces apoptosis, and enhances butyrate-induced apoptosis in colorectal adenocarcinoma cells (HT-29).

    PubMed

    Altonsy, Mohammed O; Andrews, Simon C

    2011-01-01

    Colon cancer is a leading and expanding cause of death worldwide. A major contributory factor to this disease is diet composition; some components are beneficial (e.g, dietary fiber), whereas others are detrimental (e.g., alcohol). Garlic oil is a prominent dietary constituent that prevents the development of colorectal cancer. This effect is believed to be mainly due to diallyl disulphide (DADS), which selectively induces redox stress in cancerous (rather than normal) cells that leads to apoptotic cell death. However, the detailed mechanism by which DADS causes apoptosis remains unclear. We show that DADS treatment of colonic adenocarcinoma cells (HT-29) initiates a cascade of molecular events characteristic of apoptosis. These include a decrease in cellular proliferation, translocation of phosphatidylserine to the plasma-membrane outer-layer, activation of caspase-3 and -9, genomic DNA fragmentation, and G(2)/M phase cell-cycle arrest. Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), particularly butyrate (abundantly produced in the gut by bacterial fermentation of dietary polysaccharides), enhance colonic cell integrity but, in contrast, inhibit colonic cancer cell growth. Combining DADS with butyrate augmented the apoptotic effect of butyrate on HT-29 cells. These results suggest that the anticancerous properties of DADS afford greater benefit when supplied with other favorable dietary factors (short chain fatty acids/polysaccharides) that likewise reduce colonic tumor development.

  16. SPON2, a newly identified target gene of MACC1, drives colorectal cancer metastasis in mice and is prognostic for colorectal cancer patient survival.

    PubMed

    Schmid, F; Wang, Q; Huska, M R; Andrade-Navarro, M A; Lemm, M; Fichtner, I; Dahlmann, M; Kobelt, D; Walther, W; Smith, J; Schlag, P M; Stein, U

    2016-11-17

    MACC1 (metastasis associated in colon cancer 1) is a prognostic biomarker for tumor progression, metastasis and survival of a variety of solid cancers including colorectal cancer (CRC). Here we aimed to identify the MACC1-induced transcriptome and key players mediating the MACC1-induced effects in CRC. We performed microarray analyses using CRC cells ectopically overexpressing MACC1. We identified more than 1300 genes at least twofold differentially expressed, including the gene SPON2 (Spondin 2) as 90-fold upregulated transcriptional target of MACC1. MACC1-dependent SPON2 expression regulation was validated on mRNA and protein levels in MACC1 high (endogenously or ectopically) and low (endogenously or by knockdown) expressing cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated the binding of MACC1 to the gene promoter of SPON2. In cell culture, ectopic SPON2 overexpression induced cell viability, migration, invasion and colony formation in endogenously MACC1 and SPON2 low expressing cells, whereas SPON2 knockdown reduced proliferative, migratory and invasive abilities in CRC cells with high endogenous MACC1 and SPON2 expression. In intrasplenically transplanted NOD/SCID mice, metastasis induction was analyzed with control or SPON2-overexpressing CRC cells. Tumors with SPON2 overexpression induced liver metastasis (vs control animals without any metastases, P=0.0036). In CRC patients, SPON2 expression was determined in primary tumors (stages I-III), and survival time was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier method. CRC patients with high SPON2 expressing primary tumors demonstrated 8 months shorter metastasis-free survival (MFS) compared with patients with low SPON2 levels (P=0.053). Combining high levels of SPON2 and MACC1 improved the identification of high-risk patients with a 20-month shorter MFS vs patients with low biomarker expression. In summary, SPON2 is a transcriptional target of the metastasis gene MACC1. SPON2 induces cell motility in vitro and CRC

  17. The validation of electronic health records in accurately identifying patients eligible for colorectal cancer screening in safety net clinics.

    PubMed

    Petrik, Amanda F; Green, Beverly B; Vollmer, William M; Le, Thuy; Bachman, Barbara; Keast, Erin; Rivelli, Jennifer; Coronado, Gloria D

    2016-12-01

    While electronic health records (EHRs) play a key role in increasing colorectal cancer (CRC) screening by identifying individuals who are overdue, important shortfalls remain. As part of the Strategies and Opportunities to STOP Colon Cancer (STOP CRC) study, we assessed the accuracy of EHR codes in identifying patients eligible for CRC screening. We selected a stratified random sample of 800 study participants from 26 participating clinics, in the Pacific Northwest region of the USA. We compared data obtained through codes in the EHR to conduct a manual chart audit. A trained chart abstractor completed the abstraction of eligible and ineligible patients. Of 520 individuals in need of CRC screening, identified via the EHR, 459 were confirmed through chart review (positive predictive value = 88%). Of 280 individuals flagged as up-to-date in their screening per EHR data, 269 were confirmed through chart review (negative predictive value = 96%). Among the 61 patients incorrectly classified as eligible, 83.6% of disagreements were due to evidence of a prior colonoscopy or referral that was not captured in recognizable fields in the EHR. Our findings highlight importance of better capture of past screening events in the EHR. While the need for better population-based data is not unique to CRC screening, it provides an important example of the use of population-based data not only for tracking care, but also for delivering interventions. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Use of an Oncolytic Virus Secreting GM-CSF as Combined Oncolytic and Immunotherapy for Treatment of Colorectal and Hepatic Adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Sandeep; Kim, Teresa; Zager, Jonathan; Bennett, Joseph; Ebright, Michael; D’Angelica, Michael; Fong, Yuman

    2007-01-01

    Oncolytic cancer therapy using herpes simplex viruses (HSV) that have direct tumoricidal effects and cancer immunotherapy using the cytokine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) have each been effective in preclinical testing. NV1034 is a multi-mutated oncolytic HSV carrying the gene for murine GM-CSF that attempts to combine these two anticancer strategies. The purpose of this study was to compare NV1034 to NV1023, the parent HSV mutants lacking GM-CSF, in order to determine if such combined oncolytic and immunotherapy using a single vector has advantages over oncolytic therapy alone. In vitro, expression GM-CSF did not alter the infectivity, in vitro cytotoxicity, or replication of NV1034 compared to the non-cytokine secreting control. Tumors infected with NV1034 produced GM-CSF in picogram quantities. In vivo efficacy of the viruses against murine colorectal carcinoma CT26 and murine hepatoma Hepa l–6 was then tested in subcutaneous tumors in syngeneic Balb/c and C57 L/J mice respectively. In these immune competent models, NV1034 or NV1023 each demonstrated potent antitumor activity. Treatment with NV1034 had significantly better antitumor effect compared to treatment with NV1023. Furthermore, in mice depleted of CD4+ and CD8+ T-lymphocytes, there was no difference in the antitumor efficacy of these viruses. Viral vectors combining oncolytic and immunotherapy are promising agents in treatment of colorectal carcinoma and hepatoma. PMID:17383529

  19. A qualitative focus group study to identify the needs of survivors of stage II and III colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ho, Maria Y; McBride, Mary L; Gotay, Carolyn; Grunfeld, Eva; Earle, Craig C; Relova, Sharon; Tsonis, Miranda; Ruan, Jenny Y; Chang, Jennifer T; Cheung, Winson Y

    2016-12-01

    Prior survivorship research has largely focused on issues faced by survivors of childhood tumors, breast cancers, or hematologic malignancies. Relatively little is known about the needs of other prevalent survivor groups. Our aim was to identify the specific concerns of colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors in the key domains of physical functioning, psychological wellbeing, and social relationships. We conducted focus groups with stage II and III CRC survivors who had completed their primary active anti-cancer treatments. Patients were asked to describe how their diagnosis and treatment impacted their lives, to outline deficiencies in the care that they received, and to suggest ways of addressing any unmet needs. A content analysis was subsequently conducted to identify major themes. Thirty CRC survivors participated in six focus groups. Individuals reported some degree of dissatisfaction with the amount and type of diagnostic and treatment information they received at their initial clinic visit. Distress from toxicities, such as peripheral neuropathy, was also common among the survivors. Similarly, the majority faced challenges adjusting to their lives and daily activities, especially in caring for their colostomy. Having survived CRC, many survivors expressed an interest in advocacy and health promotion of CRC. CRC survivors face many barriers after their cancer treatment. Issues with colostomy are unique to this survivor group. Interventions to improve CRC survivorship care should also incorporate opportunities for patient advocacy. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. A new GWAS and meta-analysis with 1000Genomes imputation identifies novel risk variants for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Al-Tassan, Nada A.; Whiffin, Nicola; Hosking, Fay J.; Palles, Claire; Farrington, Susan M.; Dobbins, Sara E.; Harris, Rebecca; Gorman, Maggie; Tenesa, Albert; Meyer, Brian F.; Wakil, Salma M.; Kinnersley, Ben; Campbell, Harry; Martin, Lynn; Smith, Christopher G.; Idziaszczyk, Shelley; Barclay, Ella; Maughan, Timothy S.; Kaplan, Richard; Kerr, Rachel; Kerr, David; Buchannan, Daniel D.; Ko Win, Aung; Hopper, John; Jenkins, Mark; Lindor, Noralane M.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Gallinger, Steve; Conti, David; Schumacher, Fred; Casey, Graham; Dunlop, Malcolm G.; Tomlinson, Ian P.; Cheadle, Jeremy P.; Houlston, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of colorectal cancer (CRC) have identified 23 susceptibility loci thus far. Analyses of previously conducted GWAS indicate additional risk loci are yet to be discovered. To identify novel CRC susceptibility loci, we conducted a new GWAS and performed a meta-analysis with five published GWAS (totalling 7,577 cases and 9,979 controls of European ancestry), imputing genotypes utilising the 1000 Genomes Project. The combined analysis identified new, significant associations with CRC at 1p36.2 marked by rs72647484 (minor allele frequency [MAF] = 0.09) near CDC42 and WNT4 (P = 1.21 × 10−8, odds ratio [OR] = 1.21 ) and at 16q24.1 marked by rs16941835 (MAF = 0.21, P = 5.06 × 10−8; OR = 1.15) within the long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) RP11-58A18.1 and ~500 kb from the nearest coding gene FOXL1. Additionally we identified a promising association at 10p13 with rs10904849 intronic to CUBN (MAF = 0.32, P = 7.01 × 10-8; OR = 1.14). These findings provide further insights into the genetic and biological basis of inherited genetic susceptibility to CRC. Additionally, our analysis further demonstrates that imputation can be used to exploit GWAS data to identify novel disease-causing variants. PMID:25990418

  1. Somatic Mutation Profiles of MSI and MSS Colorectal Cancer Identified by Whole Exome Next Generation Sequencing and Bioinformatics Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Roehr, Christina; Fischer, Axel; Isau, Melanie; Boerno, Stefan T.; Wunderlich, Andrea; Barmeyer, Christian; Seemann, Petra; Koenig, Jana; Lappe, Michael; Kuss, Andreas W.; Garshasbi, Masoud; Bertram, Lars; Trappe, Kathrin; Werber, Martin; Herrmann, Bernhard G.; Zatloukal, Kurt; Lehrach, Hans; Schweiger, Michal R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is with approximately 1 million cases the third most common cancer worldwide. Extensive research is ongoing to decipher the underlying genetic patterns with the hope to improve early cancer diagnosis and treatment. In this direction, the recent progress in next generation sequencing technologies has revolutionized the field of cancer genomics. However, one caveat of these studies remains the large amount of genetic variations identified and their interpretation. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we present the first work on whole exome NGS of primary colon cancers. We performed 454 whole exome pyrosequencing of tumor as well as adjacent not affected normal colonic tissue from microsatellite stable (MSS) and microsatellite instable (MSI) colon cancer patients and identified more than 50,000 small nucleotide variations for each tissue. According to predictions based on MSS and MSI pathomechanisms we identified eight times more somatic non-synonymous variations in MSI cancers than in MSS and we were able to reproduce the result in four additional CRCs. Our bioinformatics filtering approach narrowed down the rate of most significant mutations to 359 for MSI and 45 for MSS CRCs with predicted altered protein functions. In both CRCs, MSI and MSS, we found somatic mutations in the intracellular kinase domain of bone morphogenetic protein receptor 1A, BMPR1A, a gene where so far germline mutations are associated with juvenile polyposis syndrome, and show that the mutations functionally impair the protein function. Conclusions/Significance We conclude that with deep sequencing of tumor exomes one may be able to predict the microsatellite status of CRC and in addition identify potentially clinically relevant mutations. PMID:21203531

  2. Absence of myeloperoxidase and CD8 positive cells in colorectal cancer infiltrates identifies patients with severe prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Däster, Silvio; Eppenberger-Castori, Serenella; Hirt, Christian; Soysal, Savas D; Delko, Tarik; Nebiker, Christian A; Weixler, Benjamin; Amicarella, Francesca; Iezzi, Giandomenica; Governa, Valeria; Padovan, Elisabetta; Mele, Valentina; Sconocchia, Giuseppe; Heberer, Michael; Terracciano, Luigi; Kettelhack, Christoph; Oertli, Daniel; Spagnoli, Giulio C; von Holzen, Urs; Tornillo, Luigi; Droeser, Raoul A

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) infiltration by cells expressing myeloperoxidase (MPO) or CD8 positive T lymphocytes has been shown to be independently associated with favorable prognosis. We explored the relationship occurring between CD8+ and MPO+ cell CRC infiltration, its impact on clinical-pathological features and its prognostic significance in a tissue microarray (TMA) including 1,162 CRC. We observed that CRC showing high MPO+ cell infiltration are characterized by a prognosis as favorable as that of cancers with high CD8+ T cell infiltration. However, MPO+ and CD8+ CRC infiltrating cells did not synergize in determining a more favorable outcome, as compared with cancers showing MPOhigh/CD8low or MPOlow/CD8high infiltrates. Most importantly, we identified a subgroup of CRC with MPOlow/CD8low tumor infiltration characterized by a particularly severe prognosis. Intriguingly, although MPO+ and CD8+ cells did not co-localize in CRC infiltrates, an increased expression of TIA-1 and granzyme-B was detectable in T cells infiltrating CRC with high MPO+ cell density. PMID:26587320

  3. Deep Phospho- and Phosphotyrosine Proteomics Identified Active Kinases and Phosphorylation Networks in Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines Resistant to Cetuximab.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yuichi; Nagano, Maiko; Kuga, Takahisa; Tada, Asa; Isoyama, Junko; Adachi, Jun; Tomonaga, Takeshi

    2017-09-05

    Abnormality in cellular phosphorylation is closely related to oncogenesis. Thus, kinase inhibitors, especially tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), have been developed as anti-cancer drugs. Genomic analyses have been used in research on TKI sensitivity, but some types of TKI resistance have been unclassifiable by genomic data. Therefore, global proteomic analysis, especially phosphotyrosine (pY) proteomic analysis, could contribute to predict TKI sensitivity and overcome TKI-resistant cancer. In this study, we conducted deep phosphoproteomic analysis to select active kinase candidates in colorectal cancer intrinsically resistant to Cetuximab. The deep phosphoproteomic data were obtained by performing immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography-based phosphoproteomic and highly sensitive pY proteomic analyses. Comparison between sensitive (LIM1215 and DLD1) and resistant cell lines (HCT116 and HT29) revealed active kinase candidates in the latter, most of which were identified by pY proteomic analysis. Remarkably, genomic mutations were not assigned in most of these kinases. Phosphorylation-based signaling network analysis of the active kinase candidates indicated that SRC-PRKCD cascade was constitutively activated in HCT116 cells. Treatment with an SRC inhibitor significantly inhibited proliferation of HCT116 cells. In summary, our results based on deep phosphoproteomic data led us to propose novel therapeutic targets against cetuximab resistance and showed the potential for anti-cancer therapy.

  4. Expression of the hyaluronan-mediated motility receptor RHAMM in tumor budding cells identifies aggressive colorectal cancers.

    PubMed

    Koelzer, Viktor Hendrik; Huber, Bettina; Mele, Valentina; Iezzi, Giandomenica; Trippel, Mafalda; Karamitopoulou, Eva; Zlobec, Inti; Lugli, Alessandro

    2015-11-01

    Expression of the hyaluronan-mediated motility receptor (RHAMM, CD168) predicts adverse clinicopathological features and decreased survival for colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Using full tissue sections, we investigated the expression of RHAMM in tumor budding cells of 103 primary CRCs to characterize the biological processes driving single-cell invasion and early metastatic dissemination. RHAMM expression in tumor buds was analyzed with clinicopathological data, molecular features and survival. Tumor budding cells at the invasive front of CRC expressed RHAMM in 68% of cases. Detection of RHAMM-positive tumor budding cells was significantly associated with poor survival outcome (P = .0312), independent of TNM stage and adjuvant therapy in multivariate analysis (P = .0201). RHAMM-positive tumor buds were associated with frequent lymphatic invasion (P = .0007), higher tumor grade (P = .0296), and nodal metastasis (P = .0364). Importantly, the prognostic impact of RHAMM expression in tumor buds was maintained independently of the number of tumor buds found in an individual case (P = .0246). No impact of KRAS/BRAF mutation, mismatch repair deficiency and CpG island methylation was observed. RHAMM expression identifies an aggressive subpopulation of tumor budding cells and is an independent adverse prognostic factor for CRC patients. These data support ongoing efforts to develop RHAMM as a target for precision therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Detailed analysis of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and tumor budding identifies predictors of long-term survival in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Ilona; Bronsert, Peter; Timme, Sylvia; Werner, Martin; Brabletz, Thomas; Hopt, Ulrich Theodor; Schilling, Oliver; Bausch, Dirk; Keck, Tobias; Wellner, Ulrich Friedrich

    2015-03-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is characterized by aggressive biology and poor prognosis even after resection. Long-term survival is very rare and cannot be reliably predicted. Experimental data suggest an important role of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in invasion and metastasis of PDAC. Tumor budding is regarded as the morphological correlate of local invasion and cancer cell dissemination. The aim of this study was to evaluate the biological and prognostic implications of EMT and tumor budding in PDAC of the pancreatic head. Patients were identified from a prospectively maintained database, and baseline, operative, histopathological, and follow-up data were extracted. Serial tissue slices stained for Pan-Cytokeratin served for analysis of tumor budding, and E-Cadherin, Beta-Catenin, and Vimentin staining for analysis of EMT. Baseline, operative, standard pathology, and immunohistochemical parameters were evaluated for prediction of long-term survival (≥ 30 months) in uni- and multivariate analysis. Intra- and intertumoral patterns of EMT marker expression and tumor budding provide evidence of partial EMT induction at the tumor-host interface. Lymph node ratio and E-Cadherin expression in tumor buds were independent predictors of long-term survival in multivariate analysis. Detailed immunohistochemical assessment confirms a relationship between EMT and tumor budding at the tumor-host interface. A small group of patients with favorable prognosis can be identified by combined assessment of lymph node ratio and EMT in tumor buds. © 2015 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. Proteomic analysis reveals overexpression of moesin and cytokeratin 17 proteins in colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chan Yong; Jung, Woon Yong; Lee, Hyun Joo; Kim, Han Kyeom; Kim, Aeree; Shin, Bong Kyung

    2012-03-01

    The study of tumor biomarkers was gradually facilitated by the adoption of proteomic strategies due to less invasiveness and higher sensitivity. Colorectal cancer is one of the most commonly occurring cancers worldwide and its incidence has markedly increased in Korea. While the adoption of proteomic strategies facilitated the study of tumor biomarkers, to date, no common agreement has been derived from proteomic investigations regarding tumor markers of colorectal cancer. This study was designed to find molecules differentially expressed in colorectal cancer compared to non-tumor mucosa. Four colorectal adenocarcinoma and corresponding non-tumor tissue samples were analyzed to find previously unknown proteins via two-dimensional electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/MS spectrometry. Western blot assays and tissue microarray (TMA) immunohistochemistry were performed to validate the identified proteins. Among the twelve up-regulated and one down-regulated proteins identified, moesin, cytokeratin (KRT) 17 and carbonic anhydrase I were validated by western blot analysis and/or immunohistochemistry. On immunohistochemistry, both moesin and KRT17 demonstrated a tendency of increased expression as pT stage advanced. Both moesin and KRT17 were not expressed in normal colorectal epithelium. These two proteins may play a role in cancer invasion and/or metastasis in colorectal carcinoma, and could be candidate biomarkers for the diagnosis and prognosis of colorectal cancer.

  7. NONO and RALY proteins are required for YB-1 oxaliplatin induced resistance in colon adenocarcinoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background YB-1 is a multifunctional protein that affects transcription, splicing, and translation. Overexpression of YB-1 in breast cancers causes cisplatin resistance. Recent data have shown that YB-1 is also overexpress in colorectal cancer. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that YB-1 also confers oxaliplatin resistance in colorectal adenocarcinomas. Results We show for the first time that transfection of YB-1 cDNA confers oxaliplatin resistance in two colorectal cancer cell lines (SW480 and HT29 cell lines). Furthermore, we identified by mass spectrometry analyses important YB-1 interactors required for such oxaliplatin resistance in these colorectal cancer cell lines. A tagged YB-1 construct was used to identify proteins interacting directly to YB-1 in such cells. We then focused on proteins that are potentially involved in colorectal cancer progression based on the Oncomine microarray database. Genes encoding for these YB-1 interactors were also examined in the public NCBI comparative genomic hybridization database to determine whether these genes are localized to regions of chromosomes rearranged in colorectal cancer tissues. From these analyses, we obtained a list of proteins interacting with YB-1 and potentially involved in oxaliplatin resistance. Oxaliplatin dose response curves of SW480 and HT29 colorectal cancer cell lines transfected with several siRNAs corresponding to each of these YB-1 interactors were obtained to identify proteins significantly affecting oxaliplatin sensitivity upon gene silencing. Only the depletion of either NONO or RALY sensitized both colorectal cancer cell lines to oxaliplatin. Furthermore, depletion of NONO or RALY sensitized otherwise oxaliplatin resistant overexpressing YB-1 SW480 or HT29 cells. Conclusion These results suggest knocking down NONO or RALY significant counteracts oxaliplatin resistance in colorectal cancers overexpressing the YB-1 protein. PMID:22118625

  8. Eradication of HT-29 colorectal adenocarcinoma cells by controlled photorelease of CO from a CO-releasing polymer (photoCORP-1) triggered by visible light through an optical fiber-based device.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Miguel N; Chakraborty, Indranil; Sandoval, Cosme; Mascharak, Pradip K

    2017-10-28

    The gaseous signaling molecule carbon monoxide (CO) has recently been recognized for its wide range of physiological activity as well as its antineoplastic properties. However, site-specific delivery of this noxious gas presents a major challenge in hospital settings. In this work, a visible light-sensitive CO-releasing molecule (photoCORM) derived from manganese(I) and 2-(quinolyl)benzothiazole (qbt) namely, [Mn(CO)3(qbt)(4-vpy)](CF3SO3) (1), has been co-polymerized within a gas-permeable HEMA/EGDMA hydrogel. The resulting photoactive CO-releasing polymer (photoCORP-1) incorporates 1 such that neither the carbonyl complex nor its photoproduct(s) exits the polymer at any time. The material can be triggered to photorelease CO remotely by low-power broadband visible light (<1mWcm(-2)) with the aid of fiber optics technology. The CO photorelease rates of photoCORP-1 (determined by spectrophotometry) can be modulated by both the concentration of 1 in the hydrogel and the intensity of the light. A CO-delivery device has been assembled to deliver CO to a suspension of human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells (HT-29) under the control of visible light and the extent of CO-induced apoptotic death of the cancer cells has been determined via Annexin V/Propidium iodide stain and flow cytometry. This photoactive CO-releasing polymer could find use in delivering controlled doses of CO to cellular targets such as malignant tissues in remote parts of the body. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Genome-wide association study identifies a new SMAD7 risk variant associated with colorectal cancer risk in East Asians.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ben; Jia, Wei-Hua; Matsuo, Keitaro; Shin, Aesun; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Matsuda, Koichi; Jee, Sun Ha; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Cheah, Peh Yean; Ren, Zefang; Cai, Qiuyin; Long, Jirong; Shi, Jiajun; Wen, Wanqing; Yang, Gong; Ji, Bu-Tian; Pan, Zhi-Zhong; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Gao, Yu-Tang; Oh, Jae Hwan; Ahn, Yoon-Ok; Kubo, Michiaki; Thean, Lai Fun; Park, Eun Jung; Li, Hong-Lan; Park, Ji Won; Jo, Jaeseong; Jeong, Jin-Young; Hosono, Satoyo; Nakamura, Yusuke; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Zheng, Wei

    2014-08-15

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of colorectal cancer (CRC) have been conducted primarily in European descendants. In a GWAS conducted in East Asians, we first analyzed approximately 1.7 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in four studies with 1,773 CRC cases and 2,642 controls. We then selected 66 promising SNPs for replication and genotyped them in three independent studies with 3,612 cases and 3,523 controls. Five SNPs were further evaluated using data from four additional studies including up to 3,290 cases and 4,339 controls. SNP rs7229639 in the SMAD7 gene was found to be associated with CRC risk with an odds ratio (95% confidence interval) associated with the minor allele (A) of 1.22 (1.15-1.29) in the combined analysis of all 11 studies (p = 2.93 × 10(-11) ). SNP rs7229639 is 2,487 bp upstream from rs4939827, a risk variant identified previously in a European-ancestry GWAS in relation to CRC risk. However, these two SNPs are not correlated in East Asians (r(2)  = 0.008) nor in Europeans (r(2)  = 0.146). The CRC association with rs7229639 remained statistically significant after adjusting for rs4939827 as well as three additional CRC risk variants (rs58920878, rs12953717 and rs4464148) reported previously in this region. SNPs rs7229639 and rs4939827 explained approximately 1% of the familial relative risk of CRC in East Asians. This study identifies a new CRC risk variant in the SMAD7 gene, further highlighting the significant role of this gene in the etiology of CRC.

  10. Genome-Wide miRNA Analysis Identifies miR-188-3p as a Novel Prognostic Marker and Molecular Factor Involved in Colorectal Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Pichler, Martin; Stiegelbauer, Verena; Vychytilova-Faltejskova, Petra; Ivan, Cristina; Ling, Hui; Winter, Elke; Zhang, Xinna; Goblirsch, Matthew; Wulf-Goldenberg, Annika; Ohtsuka, Masahisa; Haybaeck, Johannes; Svoboda, Marek; Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Gerger, Armin; Hoefler, Gerald; Goel, Ajay; Slaby, Ondrej; Calin, George Adrian

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Characterization of colorectal cancer transcriptome by high-throughput techniques has enabled the discovery of several differentially expressed genes involving previously unreported miRNA abnormalities. Here, we followed a systematic approach on a global scale to identify miRNAs as clinical outcome predictors and further validated them in the clinical and experimental setting. Experimental Design Genome-wide miRNA sequencing data of 228 colorectal cancer patients from The Cancer Genome Atlas dataset were analyzed as a screening cohort to identify miRNAs significantly associated with survival according to stringent prespecified criteria. A panel of six miRNAs was further validated for their prognostic utility in a large independent validation cohort (n = 332). In situ hybridization and functional experiments in a panel of colorectal cancer cell lines and xenografts further clarified the role of clinical relevant miRNAs. Results Six miRNAs (miR-92b-3p, miR-188-3p, miR-221-5p, miR-331-3p, miR-425-3p, and miR-497-5p) were identified as strong predictors of survival in the screening cohort. High miR-188-3p expression proves to be an independent prognostic factor [screening cohort: HR = 4.137; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.568–10.917; P = 0.004; validation cohort: HR = 1.538; 95% CI, 1.107–2.137; P = 0.010, respectively]. Forced miR-188-3p expression increased migratory behavior of colorectal cancer cells in vitro and metastases formation in vivo (P < 0.05). The promigratory role of miR-188-3p is mediated by direct interaction with MLLT4, a novel identified player involved in colorectal cancer cell migration. Conclusions miR-188-3p is a novel independent prognostic factor in colorectal cancer patients, which can be partly explained by its effect on MLLT4 expression and migration of cancer cells. PMID:27601590

  11. Multi-parametric profiling of renal cell, colorectal, and ovarian cancer identifies tumour-type-specific stroma phenotypes and a novel vascular biomarker.

    PubMed

    Corvigno, Sara; Frödin, Magnus; Wisman, G Bea A; Nijman, Hans W; Van der Zee, Ate Gj; Jirström, Karin; Nodin, Björn; Hrynchyk, Ina; Edler, David; Ragnhammar, Peter; Johansson, Martin; Dahlstrand, Hanna; Mezheyeuski, Artur; Östman, Arne

    2017-07-01

    A novel set of integrated procedures for quantification of fibroblast-rich stroma and vascular characteristics has recently been presented allowing discovery of novel perivascular and stromal biomarkers in colorectal, renal cell, and ovarian cancer. In the present study, data obtained through these procedures from clinically well-annotated collections of these three tumour types have been used to address two novel questions. First, data have been used to investigate if the three tumour types demonstrate significant differences regarding features such as vessel diameter, vessel density, and perivascular marker expression. Second, analyses of the cohorts have been used to explore the prognostic significance of a novel vascular metric, 'vessel distance inter-quartile range (IQR)' that describes intra-case heterogeneity regarding vessel distribution. The comparisons between the three tumour types demonstrated a set of significant differences. Vessel density of renal cell cancer was statistically significantly higher than in colorectal and ovarian cancer. Vessel diameter was statistically significantly higher in ovarian cancer. Concerning perivascular status, colorectal cancer displayed significantly higher levels of perivascular PDGFR-β expression than the other two tumour types. Intra-case heterogeneity of perivascular PDGFR-β expression was also higher in colorectal cancer. Notably, these fibroblast-dominated stroma phenotypes matched previously described experimental tumour stroma characteristics, which have been linked to differential sensitivity to anti-VEGF drugs. High 'vessel distance IQR' was significantly associated with poor survival in both renal cell cancer and colorectal cancer. In renal cell cancer, this characteristic also acted as an independent prognostic marker according to multivariate analyses including standard clinico-pathological characteristics. Explorative subset analyses indicated particularly strong prognostic significance of 'vessel

  12. Evaluation of the Adenocarcinoma-Associated Gene AGR2 and the Intestinal Stem Cell Marker LGR5 as Biomarkers in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Valladares-Ayerbes, Manuel; Blanco-Calvo, Moisés; Reboredo, Margarita; Lorenzo-Patiño, María J.; Iglesias-Díaz, Pilar; Haz, Mar; Díaz-Prado, Silvia; Medina, Vanessa; Santamarina, Isabel; Pértega, Sonia; Figueroa, Angélica; Antón-Aparicio, Luis M.

    2012-01-01

    We aim to estimate the diagnostic performances of anterior gradient homolog-2 (AGR2) and Leucine-rich repeat-containing-G-protein-coupled receptor 5 (LGR5) in peripheral blood (PB) as mRNA biomarkers in colorectal cancer (CRC) and to explore their prognostic significance. Real-time PCR was used to analyze AGR2 and LGR5 in 54 stages I-IV CRC patients and 19 controls. Both mRNAs were significantly increased in PB from CRC patients compared to controls. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curves were 0.722 (p = 0.006), 0.376 (p = 0.123) and 0.767 (p = 0.001) for AGR2, LGR5 and combined AGR2/LGR5, respectively. The AGR2/LGR5 assay resulted in 67.4% sensitivity and 94.7% specificity. AGR2 correlated with pT3–pT4 and high-grade tumors. LGR5 correlated with metastasis, R2 resections and high-grade. The progression-free survival (PFS) of patients with high AGR2 was reduced (p = 0.037; HR, 2.32), also in the stage I-III subgroup (p = 0.046). LGR5 indicated a poor prognosis regarding both PFS (p = 0.007; HR, 1.013) and overall survival (p = 0.045; HR, 1.01). High AGR2/LGR5 was associated with poor PFS (p = 0.014; HR, 2.8) by multivariate analysis. Our findings indicate that the assessment of AGR2 and LGR5 in PB might reflect the presence of circulating tumor cells (CTC) and stem cell like CTC in CRC. Increased AGR2 and LGR5 are associated with poor outcomes. PMID:22605983

  13. Toxicity and early outcomes of regorafenib in multiply pre-treated metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma-experience from a tertiary cancer centre in India.

    PubMed

    Zanwar, Saurabh; Ostwal, Vikas; Gupta, Sudeep; Sirohi, Bhawna; Toshniwal, Anup; Shetty, Nitin; Banavali, Shripad

    2016-02-01

    Regorafenib is a multikinase inhibitor (MKI) approved for use in multiply pre-treated metastatic colorectal cancers (mCRC). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of regorafenib from India. Records of 23 cases treated with regorafenib at our centre between June 2013 till September 2015 were reviewed. All had received at least two non cross resistant lines of therapy prior to regorafenib. Toxicity was recorded using CTCAE version 4.03. Responses were assessed using RECIST 1.1 criteria. Response evaluation was done every three months or earlier if clinically indicated. Five patients were still on therapy at the time of this report. The median age was 50 years. Thirty-nine percent (9/23) had upfront metastatic disease. Twenty-six percent (6/23) and 39% (9/23) patients had received prior treatment with cetuximab and bevacizumab respectively. Mean duration of regorafenib treatment was 3.8 months. At least one grade III/IV toxicity was noted in 65% (15/23) cases. The most common were handfoot syndrome (HFS) and fatigue seen in 86.9% (20/23) patients. Grade II and III HFS was seen in 65% patients. One patient required stoppage of treatment due to grade III hepatotoxicity. Dose reduction was required for 86.9% (20/23) patients. Best response noted was stable disease in 34.8% (8/23), partial response in 8.7% (2/23) patients and progression in 56.5% (13/23). Median progression free survival was 3 months and median follow-up was 4.5 months. Regorafenib, although an effective treatment strategy in multiply pre-treated mCRC, is associated with significant side effects.

  14. The Italian external quality assessment for RAS testing in colorectal carcinoma identifies methods-related inter-laboratory differences.

    PubMed

    Normanno, Nicola; Pinto, Carmine; Castiglione, Francesca; Fenizia, Francesca; Barberis, Massimo; Marchetti, Antonio; Fontanini, Gabriella; De Rosa, Gaetano; Taddei, Gian Luigi

    2015-09-03

    In 2014 the European Medicines Agency included exon 2, 3 and 4 KRAS and NRAS testing for the selection of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients eligible for the therapy with anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies. The Italian Association of Medical Oncology (AIOM) and the Italian Society of Pathology and Cytology (SIAPEC) organized an external quality assessment (EQA) scheme for CRC to evaluate inter-laboratory consistency and to ensure standardization of the results in the transition from KRAS to all-RAS testing. Ten formalin fixed paraffin embedded specimens including KRAS/NRAS (exons 2, 3, 4) and BRAF (codon 600) mutations were validated by three referral laboratories and sent to 88 participant centers. Molecular pathology sample reports were also requested to each laboratory. A board of assessors from AIOM and SIAPEC evaluated the results according to a predefined scoring system. The scheme was composed of two rounds. In the first round 36% of the 88 participants failed, with 23 centers having at least one false positive or false negative while 9 centers did not meet the deadline. The genotyping error rate was higher when Sanger sequencing was employed for testing as compared with pyrosequencing (3 vs 1.3%; p = 0.01; Pearson Chi Square test). In the second round, the laboratories improved their performance, with 23/32 laboratories passing the round. Overall, 79/88 participants passed the RAS EQA scheme. Standardized Human Genome Variation Society nomenclature was incorrectly used to describe the mutations identified and relevant variations were noticed in the genotype specification. The results of the Italian RAS EQA scheme indicate that the mutational analyses are performed with good quality in many Italian centers, although significant differences in the methods used were highlighted. The relatively high number of centers failing the first round underlines the fundamental role in continued education covered by EQA schemes.

  15. Genome-scale analysis of DNA methylation in lung adenocarcinoma and integration with mRNA expression

    PubMed Central

    Selamat, Suhaida A.; Chung, Brian S.; Girard, Luc; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Ying; Campan, Mihaela; Siegmund, Kimberly D.; Koss, Michael N.; Hagen, Jeffrey A.; Lam, Wan L.; Lam, Stephen; Gazdar, Adi F.; Laird-Offringa, Ite A.

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide, and adenocarcinoma is its most common histological subtype. Clinical and molecular evidence indicates that lung adenocarcinoma is a heterogeneous disease, which has important implications for treatment. Here we performed genome-scale DNA methylation profiling using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation27 platform on 59 matched lung adenocarcinoma/non-tumor lung pairs, with genome-scale verification on an independent set of tissues. We identified 766 genes showing altered DNA methylation between tumors and non-tumor lung. By integrating DNA methylation and mRNA expression data, we identified 164 hypermethylated genes showing concurrent down-regulation, and 57 hypomethylated genes showing increased expression. Integrated pathways analysis indicates that these genes are involved in cell differentiation, epithelial to mesenchymal transition, RAS and WNT signaling pathways, and cell cycle regulation, among others. Comparison of DNA methylation profiles between lung adenocarcinomas of current and never-smokers showed modest differences, identifying only LGALS4 as significantly hypermethylated and down-regulated in smokers. LGALS4, encoding a galactoside-binding protein involved in cell–cell and cell–matrix interactions, was recently shown to be a tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer. Unsupervised analysis of the DNA methylation data identified two tumor subgroups, one of which showed increased DNA methylation and was significantly associated with KRAS mutation and to a lesser extent, with smoking. Our analysis lays the groundwork for further molecular studies of lung adenocarcinoma by identifying novel epigenetically deregulated genes potentially involved in lung adenocarcinoma development/progression, and by describing an epigenetic subgroup of lung adenocarcinoma associated with characteristic molecular alterations. PMID:22613842

  16. Solitary Psoas Muscle Metastasis of Gastroesphageal Junction Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Azadeh, Payam; Yaghobi Joybari, Ali; Sarbaz, Samaneh; Ghiasi, Hosein Ali; Farasatinasab, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis of gastroesphageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma in skeletal muscle is rare and primary sites for skeletal muscle metastases are usually lung, renal and colorectal cancer. We have encountered with the first case report of solitary psoas muscle metastasis of GEJ adenocarcinoma. Here we describe a 65 years old man was diagnosed with GEJ adenocarcinoma in Gastroenterology Department, Imam Hussein Hospital, Tehran, Iran in February 2014. We were not able to use PET techniques due to lack of access. Staging CT scans demonstrated a small mass lateral to right psoas muscle. A CT-guided core needle biopsy of right psoas muscle was performed that supported a diagnosis of adenocarcinoma consistent with primary adenocarcinoma of the GEJ. Distant metastasis to skeletal muscle rarely occurs in patients with GEJ adenocarcinoma, but heightened awareness to these soft tissue lesions is warranted. CT or MR imaging could show findings suggestive of metastatic disease, although PET is preferable modality. PMID:26870148

  17. Multi-Scale Genomic, Transcriptomic and Proteomic Analysis of Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines to Identify Novel Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Briffa, Romina; Um, Inhwa; Faratian, Dana; Zhou, Ying; Turnbull, Arran K.; Langdon, Simon P.; Harrison, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Selecting colorectal cancer (CRC) patients likely to respond to therapy remains a clinical challenge. The objectives of this study were to establish which genes were differentially expressed with respect to treatment sensitivity and relate this to copy number in a panel of 15 CRC cell lines. Copy number variations of the identified genes were assessed in a cohort of CRCs. IC50’s were measured for 5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and BEZ-235, a PI3K/mTOR inhibitor. Cell lines were profiled using array comparative genomic hybridisation, Illumina gene expression analysis, reverse phase protein arrays, and targeted sequencing of KRAS hotspot mutations. Frequent gains were observed at 2p, 3q, 5p, 7p, 7q, 8q, 12p, 13q, 14q, and 17q and losses at 2q, 3p, 5q, 8p, 9p, 9q, 14q, 18q, and 20p. Frequently gained regions contained EGFR, PIK3CA, MYC, SMO, TRIB1, FZD1, and BRCA2, while frequently lost regions contained FHIT and MACROD2. TRIB1 was selected for further study. Gene enrichment analysis showed that differentially expressed genes with respect to treatment response were involved in Wnt signalling, EGF receptor signalling, apoptosis, cell cycle, and angiogenesis. Stepwise integration of copy number and gene expression data yielded 47 candidate genes that were significantly correlated. PDCD6 was differentially expressed in all three treatment responses. Tissue microarrays were constructed for a cohort of 118 CRC patients and TRIB1 and MYC amplifications were measured using fluorescence in situ hybridisation. TRIB1 and MYC were amplified in 14.5% and 7.4% of the cohort, respectively, and these amplifications were significantly correlated (p≤0.0001). TRIB1 protein expression in the patient cohort was significantly correlated with pERK, Akt, and Caspase 3 expression. In conclusion, a set of candidate predictive biomarkers for 5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and BEZ235 are described that warrant further study. Amplification of the putative oncogene TRIB1 has been described for

  18. The role of whole-body positron emission tomography with [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose in identifying operable colorectal cancer metastases to the liver.

    PubMed

    Lai, D T; Fulham, M; Stephen, M S; Chu, K M; Solomon, M; Thompson, J F; Sheldon, D M; Storey, D W

    1996-07-01

    To compare the accuracy of whole-body position emission tomography (PET)using [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) with conventional radiological imaging techniques in identifying operable colorectal cancer metastases to the liver. A double-blind comparative study of FDG-PET as the criterion standard vs conventional radiological imaging methods as the criterion standard, in staging of recurrent colorectal cancer. Institutional practice in a tertiary referral center. Thirty-four consecutive patients with suspected colorectal cancer metastases recruited for the study between May 1993 and October 1994. Conventional radiological methods of cancer staging included abdominal computed tomography (CT) (n = 34), chest x-rays (n = 15), and chest CT (n = 19) to evaluate extrahepatic disease. Twenty-seven patients were subsequently considered to have apparently isolated cancer metastases to the liver. Anatomical resectability was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (n = 24) or CT angiography (n = 3) in all study patients. The FDG-PET studies (n = 34) were performed within 8 weeks of conventional radiological imaging. Malignancy of suspected lesions detected by means of FDG-PET and conventional radiological imaging was confirmed by histopathologic examination of resected specimens and percutaneous biopsy specimens and by serial CT scans demonstrating progression of disease. Unsuspected extrahepatic malignant disease that was missed by conventional radiological imaging was detected by FDG-PET in 11 patients (32%). The PET-detected extrahepatic malignant disease included retroperitoneal nodal metastases (n = 6), pulmonary metastases (n = 3), and locoregional cancer recurrences (n = 2). The additional information afforded by PET consequently had an influence on the clinical management in 10 patients (29%). The FDG-PET method enabled selection of patients with apparently curable colorectal cancer metastases to the liver for hepatic resection.

  19. Deafness and blindness as a presentation of colorectal meningeal carcinomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Beau B.; Tehrani, Mahtab; Newman, Nancy J.; Biousse, Valérie

    2013-01-01

    We present a unique case of a patient with deafness and blindness secondary to carcinomatous meningitis from colorectal adenocarcinoma with accompanying radiologic and pathologic images and a brief review of the relevant literature. PMID:20966893

  20. A model-based assessment of the cost-utility of strategies to identify Lynch syndrome in early-onset colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Snowsill, Tristan; Huxley, Nicola; Hoyle, Martin; Jones-Hughes, Tracey; Coelho, Helen; Cooper, Chris; Frayling, Ian; Hyde, Chris

    2015-04-25

    Lynch syndrome is an autosomal dominant cancer predisposition syndrome caused by mutations in the DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2. Individuals with Lynch syndrome have an increased risk of colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer, ovarian and other cancers. Lynch syndrome remains underdiagnosed in the UK. Reflex testing for Lynch syndrome in early-onset colorectal cancer patients is proposed as a method to identify more families affected by Lynch syndrome and offer surveillance to reduce cancer risks, although cost-effectiveness is viewed as a barrier to implementation. The objective of this project was to estimate the cost-utility of strategies to identify Lynch syndrome in individuals with early-onset colorectal cancer in the NHS. A decision analytic model was developed which simulated diagnostic and long-term outcomes over a lifetime horizon for colorectal cancer patients with and without Lynch syndrome and for relatives of those patients. Nine diagnostic strategies were modelled which included microsatellite instability (MSI) testing, immunohistochemistry (IHC), BRAF mutation testing (methylation testing in a scenario analysis), diagnostic mutation testing and Amsterdam II criteria. Biennial colonoscopic surveillance was included for individuals diagnosed with Lynch syndrome and accepting surveillance. Prophylactic hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (H-BSO) was similarly included for women diagnosed with Lynch syndrome. Costs from NHS and Personal Social Services perspective and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) were estimated and discounted at 3.5% per annum. All strategies included for the identification of Lynch syndrome were cost-effective versus no testing. The strategy with the greatest net health benefit was MSI followed by BRAF followed by diagnostic genetic testing, costing £5,491 per QALY gained over no testing. The effect of prophylactic H-BSO on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is uncertain and could outweigh

  1. Colorectal surgery in Italy. Criteria to identify the hospital units and the tertiary referral centers entitled to perform it.

    PubMed

    Ruffo, Giacomo; Barugola, Giuliano; Rossini, Roberto; Sartori, Carlo Augusto

    2016-06-01

    Improving the quality and effectiveness of care is a key priority of any health policy. The outcomes of health care can be considered as indicators of effectiveness or quality. The scientific literature that evaluates the association between the volume of activity and the outcome of health interventions has greatly developed over the past decade, but, for practical reasons, ethical and social issues, a few randomized controlled studies were made to evaluate this association, although there are numerous observational studies of outcome and systematic reviews of the studies themselves. The colorectal surgery is the most studied area and it represents the ideal testing ground to determine the effectiveness of the quality indicators because of the high incidence of the disease and the wide spread in the territory of the structures that aim to tackle these issues. Numerous studies have documented an association between the large number of colo-rectal surgical procedures and the quality of results. In particular, the volume of activity is one of the characteristics of measurable process that can have a significant impact on the outcome of health care. In conclusion, the ability to use volume thresholds as a proxy for quality is very tempting but it is only part of reality. Infact, the volume-outcome relationship strictly depends on the type of cancer (colon vs rectum) and it appears somehow stronger for the individual surgeon than for the hospital; especially for the 5-year overall survival, operative mortality and number of permanent stoma.

  2. Metastatic adenocarcinoma of unknown primary origin.

    PubMed

    Hammar, S P

    1998-12-01

    Adenocarcinomas account for up to 60% of all metastatic neoplasms of unknown primary origin. In general, adenocarcinomas are the most difficult metastatic tumor to accurately identify the primary site. Some metastatic adenocarcinomas have distinctive histological features that allow for their site determination (eg, colonic adenocarcinoma, bronchioloalveolar cell carcinoma), although the majority of metastatic adenocarcinomas have histological features that are not distinctive enough to allow for a specific diagnosis of their origin. For this reason, electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry have been used to help identify the exact type (origin) of metastatic adenocarcinomas. Relatively specific ultrastructural features used to diagnose metastatic adenocarcinomas of unknown primary origin include tubular myelin, intranuclear surfactant apoprotein tubular inclusions, Clara cell granules, uniform short microvilli with filamentous cores and core rootlets, Langerhans cells associated with neoplastic cells, cytoplasmic hyaline globules, lipid droplets, glycogen, and cytoplasmic crystals. Only a few of these ultrastructural features are absolutely specific. Relatively specific immunohistochemical tests used to diagnose metastatic adenocarcinomas of unknown primary origin include prostate-specific antigen, thyroglobulin, estrogen and progesterone receptor proteins, thyroid transcription factor-I, and surfactant apoproteins. Of these, prostate-specific antigen and thyroglobulin are the most specific. The purpose of this article is to discuss the use of electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry in the site-specific diagnosis of metastatic adenocarcinomas of unknown primary origin.

  3. Enhanced dependency of KRAS-mutant colorectal cancer cells on RAD51-dependent homologous recombination repair identified from genetic interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kalimutho, Murugan; Bain, Amanda L; Mukherjee, Bipasha; Nag, Purba; Nanayakkara, Devathri M; Harten, Sarah K; Harris, Janelle L; Subramanian, Goutham N; Sinha, Debottam; Shirasawa, Senji; Srihari, Sriganesh; Burma, Sandeep; Khanna, Kum Kum

    2017-02-07

    Activating KRAS mutations drive colorectal cancer tumorigenesis and influence response to anti-EGFR-targeted therapy. Despite recent advances in understanding Ras signaling biology and the revolution in therapies for melanoma using BRAF inhibitors, no targeted agents have been effective in KRAS-mutant cancers, mainly due to activation of compensatory pathways. Here, by leveraging the largest synthetic lethal genetic interactome in yeast, we identify that KRAS-mutated colorectal cancer cells have augmented homologous recombination repair (HRR) signaling. We found that KRAS mutation resulted in slowing and stalling of the replication fork and accumulation of DNA damage. Moreover, we found that KRAS-mutant HCT116 cells have an increase in MYC-mediated RAD51 expression with a corresponding increase in RAD51 recruitment to irradiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) compared to genetically complemented isogenic cells. MYC depletion using RNA interference significantly reduced IR-induced RAD51 foci formation and HRR. On the contrary, overexpression of either HA-tagged wild-type (WT) MYC or phospho-mutant S62A increased RAD51 protein levels and hence IR-induced RAD51 foci. Likewise, depletion of RAD51 selectively induced apoptosis in HCT116-mutant cells by increasing DSBs. Pharmacological inhibition targeting HRR signaling combined with PARP inhibition selectivity killed KRAS-mutant cells. Interestingly, these differences were not seen in a second isogenic pair of KRAS WT and mutant cells (DLD-1), likely due to their nondependency on the KRAS mutation for survival. Our data thus highlight a possible mechanism by which KRAS-mutant-dependent cells drive HRR in vitro by upregulating MYC-RAD51 expression. These data may offer a promising therapeutic vulnerability in colorectal cancer cells harboring otherwise nondruggable KRAS mutations, which warrants further investigation in vivo.

  4. Systematic large-scale meta-analysis identifies a panel of two mRNAs as blood biomarkers for colorectal cancer detection

    PubMed Central

    Rodia, Maria Teresa; Ugolini, Giampaolo; Mattei, Gabriella; Montroni, Isacco; Zattoni, Davide; Ghignone, Federico; Veronese, Giacomo; Marisi, Giorgia; Lauriola, Mattia; Strippoli, Pierluigi; Solmi, Rossella

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in the world. A significant survival rate is achieved if it is detected at an early stage. A whole blood screening test, without any attempt to isolate blood fractions, could be an important tool to improve early detection of colorectal cancer. We searched for candidate markers with a novel approach based on the Transcriptome Mapper (TRAM), aimed at identifying specific RNAs with the highest differential expression ratio between colorectal cancer tissue and normal blood samples. This tool permits a large-scale systematic meta-analysis of all available data obtained by microarray experiments. The targeting of RNA took into consideration that tumour phenotypic variation is associated with changes in the mRNA levels of genes regulating or affecting this variation. A real time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT- PCR) was applied to the validation of candidate markers in the blood of 67 patients and 67 healthy controls. The expression of genes: TSPAN8, LGALS4, COL1A2 and CEACAM6 resulted as being statistically different. In particular ROC curves attested for TSPAN8 an AUC of 0.751 with a sensitivity of 83.6% and a specificity of 58.2% at a cut off of 10.85, while the panel of the two best genes showed an AUC of 0.861 and a sensitivity of 92.5% with a specificity of 67.2%. Our preliminary study on a total of 134 subjects showed promising results for a blood screening test to be validated in a larger cohort with the staging stratification and in patients with other gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:26993598

  5. Anal metastasis of rectal cancer-adenocarcinoma of squamous cells: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Shun; Sugiyama, Masahiko; Nakaji, Yu; Nakanishi, Ryota; Nakashima, Yuichiro; Saeki, Hiroshi; Oki, Eiji; Oda, Yoshinao; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2017-12-01

    Anal metastasis of colorectal cancer is very rare and is usually associated with a history of anal disease, including anal fistula, fissure, hemorrhoidectomy, and anastomotic injury. We report a case of rectal cancer with a synchronous anal metastasis consisting of adenocarcinoma of squamous cells without a history of anal disease. A 60-year-old woman had a chief complaint of melena. She had a 1.5-cm anal tumor on the perianal skin, and a Bollman type 2 rectal tumor on the Ra portion was found on colonoscopy. Biopsy of both tumors revealed a similar histology of well- to moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. There was no sign of metastases in lymph nodes or other organs. For the purpose of diagnosis and treatment, transperineal local resection of the anal tumor was performed, and it was histologically identified as adenocarcinoma of squamous cells with no invasion to muscles, lymph ducts, or microvessels. The pathological margin was free. Then, to achieve radical cure, laparoscopic low anterior resection (LAR) with D3 lymphadenectomy was performed. The histological diagnosis of the anal tumor was adenocarcinoma of squamous cells without invasion to muscles, lymph ducts, or vessels. The surgical margin was completely free. Immunohistochemical analysis of both tumors revealed similar staining patterns, and the final diagnosis was rectal cancer with metastasis to the anal skin. The patient received no postoperative therapy, and no recurrences have been observed 12 months after surgery. We expect that our sphincter-preserving surgical strategy provided a good prognosis for the synchronous rectal cancer and anal metastasis. This is a rare report of a case with an anal metastasis of colorectal cancer on perianal squamous cells without a history of anal disease that was resected while preserving anal function.

  6. Altered JS-2 expression in colorectal cancers and its clinical pathological relevance.

    PubMed

    Lam, Alfred King-Yin; Gopalan, Vinod; Nassiri, Mohammad Reza; Kasim, Kais; Dissanayake, Jayampathy; Tang, Johnny Chuek-On; Smith, Robert Anthony

    2011-10-01

    JS-2 is a novel gene located at 5p15.2 and originally detected in primary oesophageal cancer. There is no study on the role of JS-2 in colorectal cancer. The aim of this study is to determine the gene copy number and expression of JS-2 in a large cohort of patients with colorectal tumours and correlate these to the clinicopathological features of the cancer patients. We evaluated the DNA copy number and mRNA expression of JS-2 in 176 colorectal tissues (116 adenocarcinomas, 30 adenomas and 30 non-neoplastic tissues) using real-time polymerase chain reaction. JS-2 expression was also evaluated in two colorectal cancer cell lines and a benign colorectal cell line. JS-2 amplification was noted in 35% of the colorectal adenocarcinomas. Significant differences in relative expression levels for JS-2 mRNA between different colorectal tissues were noted (p = 0.05). Distal colorectal adenocarcinoma had significantly higher copy number than proximal adenocarcinoma (p = 0.005). The relative expression level of JS-2 was different between colonic and rectal adenocarcinoma (p = 0.007). Mucinous adenocarcinoma showed higher JS-2 expression than non-mucinous adenocarcinoma (p = 0.02). Early T-stage cancers appear to have higher JS-2 copy number and lower expression of JS-2 mRNA than later stage cancers (p = 0.001 and 0.03 respectively). Colorectal cancer cell lines showed lower expression of JS-2 than the benign colorectal cell line. JS-2 copy number change and expression were shown for the first time to be altered in the carcinogenesis of colorectal cancer. In addition, genetic alteration of JS-2 was found to be related to location, pathological subtypes and staging of colorectal cancer.

  7. Stathmin, a new target of PRL-3 identified by proteomic methods, plays a key role in progression and metastasis of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ping; Liu, Yong-Xia; Chen, Lin; Liu, Xun-Hua; Xiao, Zheng-Quan; Zhao, Liang; Li, Guang-Qiu; Zhou, Jun; Ding, Yan-Qing; Li, Jian-Ming

    2010-10-01

    To better understand the role of PRL-3 in progression and metastasis of colorectal cancer (CRC), we searched for PRL-3 associated proteins using proteomic methods. We identified 39 PRL-3 associated proteins based on proteomic strategy. Stathmin, a key oncoprotein, was proved to be a new PRL-3 associated protein. Notably, co-immunoprecipitation assays in both endogenous CRC cell lines and CRC tissues indicated that PRL-3 could interact with stathmin. And, both stathmin and PRL-3 contributed to microtubule (MT) destabilization of CRC cells. Moreover, gain-of-function and loss-of-function analyses revealed that stathmin promoted proliferation, cell adhesion, and migration of human CRC cells. Immunohistochemical analysis of 149 colorectal tumor samples showed that overexpression of stathmin was strongly correlated with tumor differentiation (P = 0.035), tumor invasion (P = 0.024), lymph node status (P < 0.001), Dukes classification (P < 0.001), and TNM staging (P < 0.001) of CRC patients. Univariate and multivariate survival analyses further supported that overexpression of stathmin protein was a potential independent poor prognostic factor for CRC. Our results reveal many PRL-3 associated proteins for the first time. The oncoprotein stathmin plays a key role in CRC as a new target of PRL-3. Interaction between PRL-3 and stathmin leads to MT destabilization of CRC cells, which contributes to progression and metastasis of CRC.

  8. Performance analysis of a machine learning flagging system used to identify a group of individuals at a high risk for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kinar, Yaron; Akiva, Pinchas; Choman, Eran; Kariv, Revital; Shalev, Varda; Levin, Bernard; Narod, Steven A.; Goshen, Ran

    2017-01-01

    Individuals with colorectal cancer (CRC) have a tendency to intestinal bleeding which may result in mild to severe iron deficiency anemia, but for many colon cancer patients hematological abnormalities are subtle. The fecal occult blood test (FOBT) is used as a pre-screening test whereby those with a positive FOBT are referred to colonscopy. We sought to determine if information contained in the complete blood count (CBC) report coud be processed automatically and used to predict the presence of occult colorectal cancer (CRC) in the setting of a large health services plan. Using the health records of the Maccabi Health Services (MHS) we reviewed CBC reports for 112,584 study subjects of whom 133 were diagnosed with CRC in 2008 and analysed these with the MeScore tool. The odds ratio for being diagnosed with CRC in 2008 was calculated with regards to the MeScore, using cutoff levels of 97% and 99% percentiles. For individuals in the highest one percentile, the odds ratio for CRC was 21.8 (95% CI 13.8 to 34.2). For the majority of the individuals with cancer, CRC was not suspected at the time of the blood draw. Frequent use of anticoagulants, the presence of other gastrointestinal pathologies and non-GI malignancies were assocaitged with false positive MeScores. The MeScore can help identify individuals in the population who would benefit most from CRC screening, including those with no clinical signs or symptoms of CRC. PMID:28182647

  9. Subglottic Metastatic Rectal Adenocarcinoma: A Specialist Multidisciplinary Airway Team Approach for Optimized Voice and Airway Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Balakumar, Ramkishan; Ramdoo, Krishan; Tatla, Taran

    2017-01-01

    A 56-year-old female with a background of metastatic rectal adenocarcinoma presented with a subglottic mass causing biphasic stridor. Transoral laser microsurgery and the use of fibrin glue prevented the need for tracheostomy. Six months postoperatively there was no evidence of recurrence. Laryngeal metastasis of colorectal adenocarcinoma, although remarkably rare, is perhaps more prevalent than commonly perceived and the presence of laryngeal symptoms in a patient with colorectal adenocarcinoma should raise concern. This case is presented to aid physicians should they encounter a similar presentation of metastasis to the subglottis. PMID:28154767

  10. Metabolomics and transcriptomics identify pathway differences between visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue in colorectal cancer patients: the ColoCare study.

    PubMed

    Liesenfeld, David B; Grapov, Dmitry; Fahrmann, Johannes F; Salou, Mariam; Scherer, Dominique; Toth, Reka; Habermann, Nina; Böhm, Jürgen; Schrotz-King, Petra; Gigic, Biljana; Schneider, Martin; Ulrich, Alexis; Herpel, Esther; Schirmacher, Peter; Fiehn, Oliver; Lampe, Johanna W; Ulrich, Cornelia M

    2015-08-01

    Metabolic and transcriptomic differences between visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) compartments, particularly in the context of obesity, may play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis. We investigated the differential functions of their metabolic compositions. Biochemical differences between adipose tissues (VAT compared with SAT) in patients with colorectal carcinoma (CRC) were investigated by using mass spectrometry metabolomics and gene expression profiling. Metabolite compositions were compared between VAT, SAT, and serum metabolites. The relation between patients' tumor stage and metabolic profiles was assessed. Presurgery blood and paired VAT and SAT samples during tumor surgery were obtained from 59 CRC patients (tumor stages I-IV) of the ColoCare cohort. Gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry were used to measure 1065 metabolites in adipose tissue (333 identified compounds) and 1810 metabolites in serum (467 identified compounds). Adipose tissue gene expression was measured by using Illumina's HumanHT-12 Expression BeadChips. Compared with SAT, VAT displayed elevated markers of inflammatory lipid metabolism, free arachidonic acid, phospholipases (PLA2G10), and prostaglandin synthesis-related enzymes (PTGD/PTGS2S). Plasmalogen concentrations were lower in VAT than in SAT, which was supported by lower gene expression of FAR1, the rate-limiting enzyme for ether-lipid synthesis in VAT. Serum sphingomyelin concentrations were inversely correlated (P = 0.0001) with SAT adipose triglycerides. Logistic regression identified lipids in patients' adipose tissues, which were associated with CRC tumor stage. As one of the first studies, we comprehensively assessed differences in metabolic, lipidomic, and transcriptomic profiles between paired human VAT and SAT and their association with CRC tumor stage. We identified markers of inflammation in VAT, which

  11. Metabolomics and transcriptomics identify pathway differences between visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue in colorectal cancer patients: the ColoCare study12

    PubMed Central

    Liesenfeld, David B; Grapov, Dmitry; Fahrmann, Johannes F; Salou, Mariam; Scherer, Dominique; Toth, Reka; Habermann, Nina; Böhm, Jürgen; Schrotz-King, Petra; Gigic, Biljana; Schneider, Martin; Ulrich, Alexis; Herpel, Esther; Schirmacher, Peter; Fiehn, Oliver; Lampe, Johanna W; Ulrich, Cornelia M

    2015-01-01

    Background: Metabolic and transcriptomic differences between visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) compartments, particularly in the context of obesity, may play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis. We investigated the differential functions of their metabolic compositions. Objectives: Biochemical differences between adipose tissues (VAT compared with SAT) in patients with colorectal carcinoma (CRC) were investigated by using mass spectrometry metabolomics and gene expression profiling. Metabolite compositions were compared between VAT, SAT, and serum metabolites. The relation between patients’ tumor stage and metabolic profiles was assessed. Design: Presurgery blood and paired VAT and SAT samples during tumor surgery were obtained from 59 CRC patients (tumor stages I–IV) of the ColoCare cohort. Gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry were used to measure 1065 metabolites in adipose tissue (333 identified compounds) and 1810 metabolites in serum (467 identified compounds). Adipose tissue gene expression was measured by using Illumina’s HumanHT-12 Expression BeadChips. Results: Compared with SAT, VAT displayed elevated markers of inflammatory lipid metabolism, free arachidonic acid, phospholipases (PLA2G10), and prostaglandin synthesis–related enzymes (PTGD/PTGS2S). Plasmalogen concentrations were lower in VAT than in SAT, which was supported by lower gene expression of FAR1, the rate-limiting enzyme for ether-lipid synthesis in VAT. Serum sphingomyelin concentrations were inversely correlated (P = 0.0001) with SAT adipose triglycerides. Logistic regression identified lipids in patients’ adipose tissues, which were associated with CRC tumor stage. Conclusions: As one of the first studies, we comprehensively assessed differences in metabolic, lipidomic, and transcriptomic profiles between paired human VAT and SAT and their association with CRC

  12. Gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ajani, Jaffer A; Lee, Jeeyun; Sano, Takeshi; Janjigian, Yelena Y; Fan, Daiming; Song, Shumei

    2017-06-01

    Gastric cancers, with gastric adenocarcinoma (GAC) as the most common histological type, impose a considerable global health burden. Although the screening strategies for early detection have been shown to be successful in Japan and South Korea, they are either not implemented or not feasible in most of the world, leading to late diagnosis in most patients. Helicobacter pylori infection contributes to the development of many endemic GACs, and pre-emptive eradication or early treatment of this bacterial infection might provide effective primary prevention. GACs are phenotypically and genotypically heterogeneous. Localized (clinical stage I) GAC is best treated either endoscopically or with limited surgical resection, but clinical stage II or stage III tumours require multidisciplinary adjunctive approaches in addition to surgery. Although GAC is highly treatable in its early stages, advanced (clinical stage IV) GAC has a median survival of just ∼9-10 months. However, detailed molecular and immune profiling of GAC is yielding promise; early studies with immune checkpoint inhibitors suggest that GAC is amenable to immune modulation. Molecular studies have yielded a vast quantity of new information for potential exploitation. Nevertheless, advances against GACs have lagged compared with other tumours of similar incidence, and more research is necessary to overcome the obstacles to prolong survival.

  13. The prognostic value of the immunohistochemical expression and mutational pattern of the key mediator of Wnt signaling: beta-catenin in Tunisian patients with colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Khiari, Meriem; Arfaoui, Amira; Kriaa, Lilia; Chaar, Inés; Amara, Sameh; Lounis, Med Amine; Sammoud, Souraya; Dhraeif, Monia; Gharbi, Lassaad; Mzabi-Regaya, Sabeh; Bouraoui, Saadia

    2012-01-01

    Beta-catenin plays a critical role with E-cadherin in cell-cell adhesion and is also a key molecule of the highly conserved Wnt signaling pathway that regulates cell proliferation and differentiation. Abrogation of this pathway is implicated in the carcinogenesis of several malignancies, especially colorectal cancer. The objective of this study was to determine the prognostic value of β-catenin/E-cadherin complex in Tunisian patients with colorectal cancer. Matched primary tumors from 150 patients with sporadic colorectal adenocarcinomas were stained for β-catenin and E-cadherin by using immunohistochemistry. Deletion of exon 3 of CTNNB1 gene was performed by polymerase chain reaction. Our results showed that β-catenin and E-cadherin expressions were related inversely to tumor differentiation. Furthermore, the nuclear expression of β-catenin was considerably increased in advanced colorectal adenocarcinomas and was highly associated with shorter survival of patients. Deletion of exon 3 of CTNNB1 was identified in 2 cases by using polymerase chain reaction and was significantly related to tumor invasion and aberrant expression of E-cadherin. The major finding of this study is that activation of β-catenin gene by deletions involving exon 3 may be considered as an advanced event in colorectal tumorigenesis in Tunisian patients, in contrast to some worldwide studies. Moreover, disruption of β-catenin/E-cadherin complex may be considered as a dependent predictor of disease outcome.

  14. A rank-based transcriptional signature for predicting relapse risk of stage II colorectal cancer identified with proper data sources

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wenyuan; Chen, Beibei; Guo, Xin; Wang, Ruiping; Chang, Zhiqiang; Dong, Yu; Song, Kai; Wang, Wen; Qi, Lishuang; Gu, Yunyan; Wang, Chenguang; Yang, Da; Guo, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    The irreproducibility problem seriously hinders the studies on transcriptional signatures for predicting relapse risk of early stage colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Through reviewing recently published 34 literatures for the development of CRC prognostic signatures based on gene expression profiles, we revealed a surprising phenomenon that 33 of these studies analyzed CRC samples with and without adjuvant chemotherapy together in the training and/or validation datasets. This data misuse problem could be partially attributed to the unclear and incomplete data annotation in public data sources. Furthermore, all the signatures proposed by these studies were based on risk scores summarized from gene expression levels, which are sensitive to experimental batch effects and risk compositions of the samples analyzed together. To avoid the above-mentioned problems, we carefully selected three qualified large datasets to develop and validate a signature consisting of three pairs of genes. The within-sample relative expression orderings of these gene pairs could robustly predict relapse risk of stage II CRC samples assessed in different laboratories. The transcriptional and functional analyses provided clear evidence that the high risk patients predicted by the proposed signature represent patients with micro-metastases. PMID:26967049

  15. Maintenance of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC)-mutant colorectal cancer is dependent on Wnt/beta-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Scholer-Dahirel, Alix; Schlabach, Michael R; Loo, Alice; Bagdasarian, Linda; Meyer, Ronald; Guo, Ribo; Woolfenden, Steve; Yu, Kristine K; Markovits, Judit; Killary, Karen; Sonkin, Dmitry; Yao, Yung-Mae; Warmuth, Markus; Sellers, William R; Schlegel, Robert; Stegmeier, Frank; Mosher, Rebecca E; McLaughlin, Margaret E

    2011-10-11

    Persistent expression of certain oncogenes is required for tumor maintenance. This phenotype is referred to as oncogene addiction and has been clinically validated by anticancer therapies that specifically inhibit oncoproteins such as BCR-ABL, c-Kit, HER2, PDGFR, and EGFR. Identifying additional genes that are required for tumor maintenance may lead to new targets for anticancer drugs. Although the role of aberrant Wnt pathway activation in the initiation of colorectal cancer has been clearly established, it remains unclear whether sustained Wnt pathway activation is required for colorectal tumor maintenance. To address this question, we used inducible β-catenin shRNAs to temporally control Wnt pathway activation in vivo. Here, we show that active Wnt/β-catenin signaling is required for maintenance of colorectal tumor xenografts harboring APC mutations. Reduced tumor growth upon β-catenin inhibition was due to cell cycle arrest and differentiation. Upon reactivation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway colorectal cancer cells resumed proliferation and reacquired a crypt progenitor phenotype. In human colonic adenocarcinomas, high levels of nuclear β-catenin correlated with crypt progenitor but not differentiation markers, suggesting that the Wnt/β-catenin pathway may also control colorectal tumor cell fate during the maintenance phase of tumors in patients. These results support efforts to treat human colorectal cancer by pharmacological inhibition of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway.

  16. iTRAQ analysis of colorectal cancer cell lines suggests Drebrin (DBN1) is overexpressed during liver metastasis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qifeng; Tan, Hwee Tong; Lim, Teck Kwang; Khoo, Avery; Lim, Kiat Hon; Chung, Maxey C M

    2014-06-01

    Colorectal cancer is currently the third in cancer incidence worldwide and the fourth most common cause of cancer deaths. Mortality in colorectal cancer is often ascribed to liver metastasis. In an effort to elucidate the proteins involved in colorectal cancer liver metastasis, we compared the proteome profiles of the human colon adenocarcinoma cell line HCT-116 with its metastatic derivative E1, using the iTRAQ labelling technology, coupled to 2D-LC and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. A total of 547 proteins were identified, of which 31 of them were differentially expressed in the E1 cell line. Among these proteins, the differential expressions of translationally controlled tumour protein 1, A-kinase anchor protein 12 and Drebrin (DBN1) were validated using Western blot. In particular, DBN1, a protein not previously known to be involved in colorectal cancer metastasis, was found to be overexpressed in E1 as compared to HCT-116 cells. The overexpression of DBN1 was further validated using immunohistochemistry on colorectal cancer tissue sections with matched lymph node and liver metastasis tissues. DBN1 is currently believed to be involved in actin cytoskeleton reorganisation and suppresses actin filament cross-linking and bundling. Since actin reorganisation is an important process for tumour cell migration and invasion, DBN1 may have an important role during colorectal cancer metastasis.

  17. Helicobacter pylori in colorectal neoplasms: is there an aetiological relationship?

    PubMed

    Jones, Mary; Helliwell, Peter; Pritchard, Colin; Tharakan, Joseph; Mathew, Joseph

    2007-05-12

    This pilot study was carried out to determine whether Helicobacter pylori can be detected in normal colon or in association with colorectal neoplasia. Paraffin processed colonic tissue blocks of normal colonic mucosa (n = 60), and patients diagnosed as adenoma (n = 60), and adenocarcinoma (n = 60) were retrieved from our archive; the adenoma group included tubular (n = 20), tubulovillous (n = 20) and villous adenomas (n = 20). 4 mum sections were stained by immunohistochemical methods using anti-Helicobacter pylori antibodies (polyclonal NCL-HPp and monoclonal NCL-C-jejuni). Significant numbers of Helicobacter pylori were identified in tubular adenomas (OR = 11.13; 95%CI = 1.62-76.70), tubulovillous adenomas (OR = 10.45; 95%CI = 1.52-71.52) and adenocarcinomas (OR = 8.13; 95%CI = 1.40-46.99) compared to controls: there was no association in numbers of Helicobacter pylori and villous adenomas (OR = 2.95; 95%CI = 0.29-9.96). We conclude that although, in this pilot study, there appears to be an association in the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori with some, but not all, colorectal neoplasms, we can not infer causality from these results. These findings need to be further substantiated with a prospective study and the use of molecular biological techniques to determine a causal association.

  18. NTRK3 Is a Potential Tumor Suppressor Gene Commonly Inactivated by Epigenetic Mechanisms in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yanxin; Kaz, Andrew M.; Kanngurn, Samornmas; Welsch, Piri; Morris, Shelli M.; Wang, Jianping; Lutterbaugh, James D.; Markowitz, Sanford D.; Grady, William M.

    2013-01-01

    NTRK3 is a member of the neurotrophin receptor family and regulates cell survival. It appears to be a dependence receptor, and thus has the potential to act as an oncogene or as a tumor suppressor gene. NTRK3 is a receptor for NT-3 and when bound to NT-3 it induces cell survival, but when NT-3 free, it induces apoptosis. We identified aberrantly methylated NTRK3 in colorectal cancers through a genome-wide screen for hypermethylated genes. This discovery led us to assess whether NTRK3 could be a tumor suppressor gene in the colon. NTRK3 is methylated in 60% of colon adenomas and 67% of colon adenocarcinomas. NTRK3 methylation suppresses NTRK3 expression. Reconstitution of NTRK3 induces apoptosis in colorectal cancers, if NT-3 is absent. Furthermore, the loss of NTRK3 expression associates with neoplastic transformation in vitro and in vivo. We also found that a naturally occurring mutant NTRK3 found in human colorectal cancer inhibits the tumor suppressor activity of NTRK3. In summary, our findings suggest NTRK3 is a conditional tumor suppressor gene that is commonly inactivated in colorectal cancer by both epigenetic and genetic mechanisms whose function in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer depends on the expression status of its ligand, NT-3. PMID:23874207

  19. Heterogeneity of colorectal cancer risk by tumour characteristics: Large prospective study of UK women.

    PubMed

    Burón Pust, Andrea; Alison, Rupert; Blanks, Roger; Pirie, Kirstin; Gaitskell, Kezia; Barnes, Isobel; Gathani, Toral; Reeves, Gillian; Beral, Valerie; Green, Jane

    2017-03-01

    Associations between behavioural and other personal factors and colorectal cancer risk have been reported to vary by tumour characteristics, but evidence is inconsistent. In a large UK-based prospective study we examined associations of 14 postulated risk factors with colorectal cancer risk overall, and across three anatomical sites and four morphological subtypes. Among 1.3 million women, 18,518 incident colorectal cancers were identified during 13.8 (SD 3.4) years follow-up via record linkage to national cancer registry data. Cox regression yielded adjusted relative risks. Statistical significance was assessed using correction for multiple testing. Overall, colorectal cancer risk was significantly associated with height, body mass index (BMI), smoking, alcohol intake, physical activity, parity and menopausal hormone therapy use. For smoking there was substantial heterogeneity across morphological types; relative risks around two or greater were seen in current smokers both for signet ring cell and for neuroendocrine tumours. Obese women were also at higher risk for signet ring cell tumours. For adenocarcinomas, the large majority of colorectal cancers in the cohort, all risk factor associations were weak. There was little or no heterogeneity in risk between tumours of the right colon, left colon and rectum for any of the 14 factors examined. These epidemiological findings complement an emerging picture from molecular studies of possible different developmental pathways for different tumour types. © 2016 UICC.

  20. Heterogeneity of colorectal cancer risk by tumour characteristics: Large prospective study of UK women

    PubMed Central

    Burón Pust, Andrea; Alison, Rupert; Blanks, Roger; Pirie, Kirstin; Gaitskell, Kezia; Barnes, Isobel; Gathani, Toral; Reeves, Gillian; Beral, Valerie

    2017-01-01

    Associations between behavioural and other personal factors and colorectal cancer risk have been reported to vary by tumour characteristics, but evidence is inconsistent. In a large UK‐based prospective study we examined associations of 14 postulated risk factors with colorectal cancer risk overall, and across three anatomical sites and four morphological subtypes. Among 1.3 million women, 18,518 incident colorectal cancers were identified during 13.8 (SD 3.4) years follow‐up via record linkage to national cancer registry data. Cox regression yielded adjusted relative risks. Statistical significance was assessed using correction for multiple testing. Overall, colorectal cancer risk was significantly associated with height, body mass index (BMI), smoking, alcohol intake, physical activity, parity and menopausal hormone therapy use. For smoking there was substantial heterogeneity across morphological types; relative risks around two or greater were seen in current smokers both for signet ring cell and for neuroendocrine tumours. Obese women were also at higher risk for signet ring cell tumours. For adenocarcinomas, the large majority of colorectal cancers in the cohort, all risk factor associations were weak. There was little or no heterogeneity in risk between tumours of the right colon, left colon and rectum for any of the 14 factors examined. These epidemiological findings complement an emerging picture from molecular studies of possible different developmental pathways for different tumour types. PMID:27859268

  1. Rectal mucosal endometriosis primarily misinterpreted as adenocarcinoma: a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui; Luo, Qiuping; Liu, Shaoyan; Xiong, Hanzhen; Jiang, Qingping

    2015-01-01

    Endometriosis involving intestinal mucosa is relatively uncommon. It poses a diagnostic challenge for clinicians and pathologists. We herein report a case of colonoscopic specimen revealing rectal mucosal endometriosis. A 39-year-old woman complained of red rectal bleeding and intermittent abdominal pain. Colonoscopic examination showed a rectal mass with ulceration and circum wall involvement. Biopsy was processed in the suspicious of carcinoma. Morphologically, irregular glands replaced residual colorectal ones, displayed mucin depletion, nuclear stratification and subtile subnuclear vacuoles. The stroma was full of spindle cells with abundant pink cytoplasm and unclear boundary. Due to subjectively interpreting as dysplastic glands in desmoplastic setting, primary rectal adenocarcinoma was firstly raised. Immunohistochemically, CK7, ER and CD10 identified the essence of ectopic endometrium. CK20 and CDX2 highlighted residual glands. In case of misdiagnosis, any pathologists should be aware of intestinal endometriosis for each female’s colorectal biopsy, especially for that morphology not typical for primary adenocarcinoma or endometriosis. Reading slides carefully combined with a panel of immunomarkers would solve the pitfall. PMID:26191316

  2. Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... rectum are part of the large intestine. Colorectal cancer occurs when tumors form in the lining of ... men and women. The risk of developing colorectal cancer rises after age 50. You're also more ...

  3. Variation at 2q35 (PNKD and TMBIM1) influences colorectal cancer risk and identifies a pleiotropic effect with inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Orlando, Giulia; Law, Philip J.; Palin, Kimmo; Tuupanen, Sari; Gylfe, Alexandra; Hänninen, Ulrika A.; Cajuso, Tatiana; Tanskanen, Tomas; Kondelin, Johanna; Kaasinen, Eevi; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Kaprio, Jaakko; Eriksson, Johan G.; Rissanen, Harri; Knekt, Paul; Pukkala, Eero; Jousilahti, Pekka; Salomaa, Veikko; Ripatti, Samuli; Palotie, Aarno; Järvinen, Heikki; Renkonen-Sinisalo, Laura; Lepistö, Anna; Böhm, Jan; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Al-Tassan, Nada A.; Palles, Claire; Martin, Lynn; Barclay, Ella; Tenesa, Albert; Farrington, Susan; Timofeeva, Maria N.; Meyer, Brian F.; Wakil, Salma M.; Campbell, Harry; Smith, Christopher G.; Idziaszczyk, Shelley; Maughan, Timothy S.; Kaplan, Richard; Kerr, Rachel; Kerr, David; Buchanan, Daniel D.; Ko Win, Aung; Hopper, John; Jenkins, Mark; Lindor, Noralane M.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Gallinger, Steve; Conti, David; Schumacher, Fred; Casey, Graham; Taipale, Jussi; Cheadle, Jeremy P.; Dunlop, Malcolm G.; Tomlinson, Ian P.; Aaltonen, Lauri A.; Houlston, Richard S.

    2016-01-01

    To identify new risk loci for colorectal cancer (CRC), we conducted a meta-analysis of seven genome-wide association studies (GWAS) with independent replication, totalling 13 656 CRC cases and 21 667 controls of European ancestry. The combined analysis identified a new risk association for CRC at 2q35 marked by rs992157 (P = 3.15 × 10−8, odds ratio = 1.10, 95% confidence interval = 1.06–1.13), which is intronic to PNKD (paroxysmal non-kinesigenic dyskinesia) and TMBIM1 (transmembrane BAX inhibitor motif containing 1). Intriguingly this susceptibility single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) is in strong linkage disequilibrium (r2 = 0.90, D′ = 0.96) with the previously discovered GWAS SNP rs2382817 for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Following on from this observation we examined for pleiotropy, or shared genetic susceptibility, between CRC and the 200 established IBD risk loci, identifying an additional 11 significant associations (false discovery rate [FDR]) < 0.05). Our findings provide further insight into the biological basis of inherited genetic susceptibility to CRC, and identify risk factors that may influence the development of both CRC and IBD. PMID:27005424

  4. Variation at 2q35 (PNKD and TMBIM1) influences colorectal cancer risk and identifies a pleiotropic effect with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Orlando, Giulia; Law, Philip J; Palin, Kimmo; Tuupanen, Sari; Gylfe, Alexandra; Hänninen, Ulrika A; Cajuso, Tatiana; Tanskanen, Tomas; Kondelin, Johanna; Kaasinen, Eevi; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Kaprio, Jaakko; Eriksson, Johan G; Rissanen, Harri; Knekt, Paul; Pukkala, Eero; Jousilahti, Pekka; Salomaa, Veikko; Ripatti, Samuli; Palotie, Aarno; Järvinen, Heikki; Renkonen-Sinisalo, Laura; Lepistö, Anna; Böhm, Jan; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Al-Tassan, Nada A; Palles, Claire; Martin, Lynn; Barclay, Ella; Tenesa, Albert; Farrington, Susan; Timofeeva, Maria N; Meyer, Brian F; Wakil, Salma M; Campbell, Harry; Smith, Christopher G; Idziaszczyk, Shelley; Maughan, Timothy S; Kaplan, Richard; Kerr, Rachel; Kerr, David; Buchanan, Daniel D; Ko Win, Aung; Hopper, John; Jenkins, Mark; Lindor, Noralane M; Newcomb, Polly A; Gallinger, Steve; Conti, David; Schumacher, Fred; Casey, Graham; Taipale, Jussi; Cheadle, Jeremy P; Dunlop, Malcolm G; Tomlinson, Ian P; Aaltonen, Lauri A; Houlston, Richard S

    2016-06-01

    To identify new risk loci for colorectal cancer (CRC), we conducted a meta-analysis of seven genome-wide association studies (GWAS) with independent replication, totalling 13 656 CRC cases and 21 667 controls of European ancestry. The combined analysis identified a new risk association for CRC at 2q35 marked by rs992157 (P = 3.15 × 10(-8), odds ratio = 1.10, 95% confidence interval = 1.06-1.13), which is intronic to PNKD (paroxysmal non-kinesigenic dyskinesia) and TMBIM1 (transmembrane BAX inhibitor motif containing 1). Intriguingly this susceptibility single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) is in strong linkage disequilibrium (r(2) = 0.90, D' = 0.96) with the previously discovered GWAS SNP rs2382817 for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Following on from this observation we examined for pleiotropy, or shared genetic susceptibility, between CRC and the 200 established IBD risk loci, identifying an additional 11 significant associations (false discovery rate [FDR]) < 0.05). Our findings provide further insight into the biological basis of inherited genetic susceptibility to CRC, and identify risk factors that may influence the development of both CRC and IBD.

  5. Germline MLH1 Mutations Are Frequently Identified in Lynch Syndrome Patients With Colorectal and Endometrial Carcinoma Demonstrating Isolated Loss of PMS2 Immunohistochemical Expression.

    PubMed

    Dudley, Beth; Brand, Randall E; Thull, Darcy; Bahary, Nathan; Nikiforova, Marina N; Pai, Reetesh K

    2015-08-01

    Current guidelines on germline mutation testing for patients suspected of having Lynch syndrome are not entirely clear in patients with tumors demonstrating isolated loss of PMS2 immunohistochemical expression. We analyzed the clinical and pathologic features of patients with tumors demonstrating isolated loss of PMS2 expression in an attempt to (1) determine the frequency of germline MLH1 and PMS2 mutations and (2) correlate mismatch-repair protein immunohistochemistry and tumor histology with germline mutation results. A total of 3213 consecutive colorectal carcinomas and 215 consecutive endometrial carcinomas were prospectively analyzed for DNA mismatch-repair protein expression by immunohistochemistry. In total, 32 tumors from 31 patients demonstrated isolated loss of PMS2 immunohistochemical expression, including 16 colorectal carcinomas and 16 endometrial carcinomas. Microsatellite instability (MSI) polymerase chain reaction was performed in 29 tumors from 28 patients with the following results: 28 tumors demonstrated high-level MSI, and 1 tumor demonstrated low-level MSI. Twenty of 31 (65%) patients in the study group had tumors demonstrating histopathology associated with high-level MSI. Seventeen patients underwent germline mutation analysis with the following results: 24% with MLH1 mutations, 35% with PMS2 mutations, 12% with PMS2 variants of undetermined significance, and 29% with no mutations in either MLH1 or PMS2. Three of the 4 patients with MLH1 germline mutations had a mutation that results in decreased stability and quantity of the MLH1 protein that compromises the MLH1-PMS2 protein complex, helping to explain the presence of immunogenic but functionally inactive MLH1 protein within the tumor. The high frequency of MLH1 germline mutations identified in our study has important implications for testing strategies in patients suspected of having Lynch syndrome and indicates that patients with tumors demonstrating isolated loss of PMS2 expression

  6. Choroidal and skin metastases from colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Joo Young; Oh, Edward Hynseung; Jung, Moon Ki; Park, Song Ee; Kim, Ji Tak; Hwang, In Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Choroidal and skin metastasis of colon cancer is rare. In women, the frequency of cutaneous metastasis from colon cancer as the primary lesion in is 9% and skin metastasis occurs in 0.81% of all colorectal cancers. We report a patient with colonic adenocarcinoma who presented with visual disorder in her right eye and scalp pain as her initial symptoms. Contrast-enhance orbital magnetic resonance imaging with fat suppression revealed an infrabulbar mass, and skin biopsy of the posterior parietal scalp confirmed adenocarcinoma. These symptoms were diagnosed as being caused by choroidal and skin metastases of colonic adenocarcinoma. We started palliative chemotherapy with oral capecitabine (1000 mg/m2, twice a day, on days 1-14) every 3 wk, which was effective at shrinking the brain masses and improving the visual disorder. This is the first report that capecitabine is effective at reducing a choroidal and cutaneous metastatic lesion from right-sided colorectal cancer. PMID:27920486

  7. Choroidal and skin metastases from colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ha, Joo Young; Oh, Edward Hynseung; Jung, Moon Ki; Park, Song Ee; Kim, Ji Tak; Hwang, In Gyu

    2016-11-21

    Choroidal and skin metastasis of colon cancer is rare. In women, the frequency of cutaneous metastasis from colon cancer as the primary lesion in is 9% and skin metastasis occurs in 0.81% of all colorectal cancers. We report a patient with colonic adenocarcinoma who presented with visual disorder in her right eye and scalp pain as her initial symptoms. Contrast-enhance orbital magnetic resonance imaging with fat suppression revealed an infrabulbar mass, and skin biopsy of the posterior parietal scalp confirmed adenocarcinoma. These symptoms were diagnosed as being caused by choroidal and skin metastases of colonic adenocarcinoma. We started palliative chemotherapy with oral capecitabine (1000 mg/m(2), twice a day, on days 1-14) every 3 wk, which was effective at shrinking the brain masses and improving the visual disorder. This is the first report that capecitabine is effective at reducing a choroidal and cutaneous metastatic lesion from right-sided colorectal cancer.

  8. Colorectal cancer and 18FDG-PET/CT: What about adding the T to the N parameter in loco-regional staging?

    PubMed Central

    Mainenti, Pier Paolo; Iodice, Delfina; Segreto, Sabrina; Storto, Giovanni; Magliulo, Mario; Palma, Giovanni Domenico De; Salvatore, Marco; Pace, Leonardo

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate whether FDG-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) may be an accurate technique in the assessment of the T stage in patients with colorectal cancer. METHODS: Thirty four consecutive patients (20 men and 14 women; mean age: 63 years) with a histologically proven diagnosis of colorectal adenocarcinoma and scheduled for surgery in our hospital were enrolled in this study. All patients underwent FDG-PET/CT preoperatively. The primary tumor site and extent were evaluated on PET/CT images. Colorectal wall invasion was analysed according to a modified T classification that considers only three stages (≤ T2, T3, T4). Assessment of accuracy was carried out using 95% confidence intervals for T. RESULTS: Thirty five/37 (94.6%) adenocarcinomas were identified and correctly located on PET/CT images. PET/CT correctly staged the T of 33/35 lesions identified showing an accuracy of 94.3% (95% CI: 87%-100%). All T1, T3 and T4 lesions were correctly staged, while two T2 neoplasms were overstated as T3. CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that FDG-PET/CT may be an accurate modality for identifying primary tumor and defining its local extent in patients with colorectal cancer. PMID:21472100

  9. Morphologic reappraisal of serrated colorectal polyps.

    PubMed

    Torlakovic, Emina; Skovlund, Eva; Snover, Dale C; Torlakovic, Goran; Nesland, Jahn M

    2003-01-01

    The "hyperplastic polyp" is considered a benign lesion with no malignant potential, whereas "serrated adenoma" is a precursor of adenocarcinoma. The morphologic complexity of the serrated adenoma varies from being clearly adenomatous to being difficult to distinguish from hyperplastic polyp, which creates a need for more detailed morphologic analysis of all serrated polyps. We evaluated 24 morphologic variables in 289 serrated polyps from the colon and rectum. Cluster analysis and discriminant analysis were performed. A subset of polyps was immunostained for hMLH1 and hMSH2. Major differences were found between right-sided and left-sided polyps. A distinct group of serrated polyps with abnormal proliferation was identified throughout the colon and rectum. These polyps demonstrated decreased expression of hMHL1 and hMSH2 compared with polyps with normal proliferation. Left-sided serrated polyps with normal proliferation further clustered into three groups: vesicular cell-type, goblet cell-type, and mucin-poor-type. We recommend evaluation of the localization, size, and morphologic features when serrated polyps are included in colorectal carcinogenesis research. Polyps with abnormal proliferation are similar to the polyps in "hyperplastic polyposis" and, because of their decreased expression of hMLH1 and hMSH2, may be the subset of polyps associated with the development of colorectal carcinoma via the microsatellite instability pathway.

  10. Fifth-year surveillance computed tomography scanning after potentially curative resections for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Walter, Catherine J; Al-Allak, Asmaa; Borley, Neil; Goodman, Anthony; Wheeler, James M D

    2013-02-01

    Optimal follow-up after colorectal resection for adenocarcinoma is yet to be determined. The aim of this study was to examine the role of a fifth-year surveillance Computed Tomography (CT) scan in detecting recurrence in our population. A retrospective analysis of all patients who had undergone potentially curative resections of colorectal adenocarcinomas between 2003 and 2004 was performed using electronic and casenote records. Data analysis was performed using Microsoft Office Excel 2007 and GnuPSPP statistical software. Two hundred and seven patients (111 male and 96 female) with a median age of 74 years (IQR 66-80) undergoing colorectal resections were studied. One hundred and twenty-one patients (58%) were alive and disease free at 5 years of whom 81 (67%) had received a fifth-year surveillance CT scan. Fifth-year scanning did not demonstrate any new colorectal metastases. However 6 (7%) scans revealed new, undiagnosed, non-colorectal malignancies. Thirty-four patients developed metastatic disease. All metastasis were diagnosed by 3½ years of follow-up. Eleven of these 34 cases presented after their second-year surveillance CT scan. Those patients with asymptomatic metastasis at the time of their discovery demonstrated improved likelihood of five year survival. This study showed no role for a fifth-year surveillance CT scan in the detection of resectable metastases, however there was a 7% pick up rate for detecting new malignancies. CT scanning beyond 2 years was needed to identify about one-third of the recurrences reported in this study. Copyright © 2012 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Characteristics of Differently Located Colorectal Cancers Support Proximal and Distal Classification: A Population-Based Study of 57,847 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jiao; Du, Xiang lin; Li, Shu ting; Wang, Bi yuan; Wu, Yin ying; Chen, Zhe ling; Lv, Meng; Shen, Yan wei; Wang, Xin; Dong, Dan feng; Li, Dan; Wang, Fan; Li, En xiao; Yi, Min

    2016-01-01

    Background It has been suggested that colorectal cancer be regarded as several subgroups defined according to tumor location rather than as a single entity. The current study aimed to identify the most useful method for grouping colorectal cancer by tumor location according to both baseline and survival characteristics. Methods Cases of pathologically confirmed colorectal adenocarcinoma diagnosed from 2000 to 2012 were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database and categorized into three groups: right colon cancer (RCC), left colon cancer (LCC), and rectal cancer (ReC). Adjusted hazard ratios for known predictors of disease-specific survival (DSS) in colorectal cancer were obtained using a Cox proportional hazards regression model. Results The study included 57847 patients: 43.5% with RCC, 37.7% with LCC, and 18.8% with ReC. Compared with LCC and ReC, RCC was more likely to affect old patients and women, and to be at advanced stage, poorly differentiated or un-differentiated, and mucinous. Patients with LCC or ReC had better DSS than those with RCC in subgroups including stage III or IV disease, age ≤70 years and non-mucinous adenocarcinoma. Conversely, patients with LCC or ReC had worse DSS than those with RCC in subgroups including age ˃70 years and mucinous adenocarcinoma. Conclusions RCC differed from both LCC and ReC in several clinicopathologic characteristics and in DSS. It seems reasonable to group colorectal cancer into right-sided (i.e., proximal) and left-sided (i.e., distal) ones. PMID:27936129

  12. Frequent activation of the β-catenin gene in sporadic colorectal carcinomas: A mutational & expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Mumtaz; Kochhar, Rakesh; Singh, Rajinder; Bhatia, Alka; Vaiphei, Kim; Mahmood, Akhtar; Mahmood, Safrun

    2016-11-01

    β-catenin (CTNNB1), an oncogene/onco-protein and an adhesion molecule is a key effector in colorectal cancer (CRC). Its activation, and subsequent up-regulation of Wnt-signaling, is an important event in the development of certain human cancers including CRC. Mutations in the β-catenin gene in the region of serine-threonine glycogen kinase (GSK)-3β phosphorylation target sites have been identified in colorectal cancer in humans. In the current study, we investigated 60 sporadic colorectal adenocarcinomas along with adjoining and normal mucosa cases in humans for β-catenin mutations. Thirteen of sixty colorectal tumors from humans had point mutations with a frequency of 21.66% at codons 24, 26, 27, 32, 34, 35, 41, 42,43, 46, 49, 54, 55, or 67 sites which are mutated in colorectal cancer and some of these sites in other cancers. Thus, there appears to be a key involvement of β-catenin activation in human colorectal carcinogenesis. mRNA expression analysis using q-Real Time PCR showed 21.5-fold up-regulation of β-catenin mRNA in tumor tissue compared to normal and adjoining mucosa. Protein expression analysis using immunohistochemistry, confocal microscopy, and Western blot confirmed aberrant accumulation of β-catenin protein along the nucleus and cytoplasm following mutation. The observed mutations and up-regulation of mRNA in tumors, and the increased expression of β-catenin protein in CRC suggest that these alterations are early and prognostic events in sporadic colorectal carcinogenesis in humans. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Genome-wide association scan identifies a colorectal cancer susceptibility locus on 11q23 and replicates risk loci at 8q24 and 18q21

    PubMed Central

    Tenesa, Albert; Farrington, Susan M; Prendergast, James GD; Porteous, Mary E; Walker, Marion; Haq, Naila; Barnetson, Rebecca A; Theodoratou, Evropi; Cetnarskyj, Roseanne; Cartwright, Nicola; Semple, Colin; Clark, Andrew J; Reid, Fiona JL; Smith, Lorna A; Kavoussanakis, Kostas; Koessler, Thibaud; Pharoah, Paul DP; Buch, Stephan; Schafmayer, Clemens; Tepel, Jürgen; Schreiber, Stefan; Völzke, Henry; Schmidt, Carsten O; Hampe, Jochen; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hoffmeister, Michael; Brenner, Hermann; Wilkening, Stefan; Canzian, Federico; Capella, Gabriel; Moreno, Victor; Deary, Ian J; Starr, John M; Tomlinson, Ian PM; Kemp, Zoe; Howarth, Kimberley; Carvajal-Carmona, Luis; Webb, Emily; Broderick, Peter; Vijayakrishnan, Jayaram; Houlston, Richard S; Rennert, Gad; Ballinger, Dennis; Rozek, Laura; Gruber, Stephen B; Matsuda, Koichi; Kidokoro, Tomohide; Nakamura, Yusuke; Zanke, Brent W; Greenwood, Celia MT; Rangrej, Jagadish; Kustra, Rafal; Montpetit, Alexandre; Hudson, Thomas J; Gallinger, Steven; Campbell, Harry; Dunlop, Malcolm G

    2009-01-01

    In a genome-wide association study to identify loci associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) risk, we genotyped 555,510 SNPs in 1,012 early-onset Scottish CRC cases and 1,012 controls (phase 1.) In phase 2, we genotyped the 15,008 highest-ranked SNPs in 2,057 Scottish cases and 2,111 controls. We then genotyped the five highest-ranked SNPs from the joint phase 1 and 2 analysis in 14,500 cases and 13,294 controls from seven populations, and identified a previously unreported association, rs3802842 on 11q23 (OR = 1.1; P = 5.8 × 10-10), showing population differences in risk. We also replicated and fine-mapped associations at 8q24 (rs7014346; OR = 1.19; P = 8.6 × 10-26) and 18q21 (rs4939827; OR = 1.2; P = 7.8 × 10-28). Risk was greater for rectal than for colon cancer for rs3802842 (P < 0.008) and rs4939827 (P < 0.009). Carrying all six possible risk alleles yielded OR = 2.6 (95% CI = 1.75-3.89) for CRC. These findings extend our understanding of the role of common genetic variation in CRC etiology. PMID:18372901

  14. SVM-T-RFE: a novel gene selection algorithm for identifying metastasis-related genes in colorectal cancer using gene expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaobo; Peng, Sihua; Chen, Jian; Lü, Bingjian; Zhang, Honghe; Lai, Maode

    2012-03-09

    Although metastasis is the principal cause of death cause for colorectal cancer (CRC) patients, the molecular mechanisms underlying CRC metastasis are still not fully understood. In an attempt to identify metastasis-related genes in CRC, we obtained gene expression profiles of 55 early stage primary CRCs, 56 late stage primary CRCs, and 34 metastatic CRCs from the expression project in Oncology (http://www.intgen.org/expo/). We developed a novel gene selection algorithm (SVM-T-RFE), which extends support vector machine recursive feature elimination (SVM-RFE) algorithm by incorporating T-statistic. We achieved highest classification accuracy (100%) with smaller gene subsets (10 and 6, respectively), when classifying between early and late stage primary CRCs, as well as between metastatic CRCs and late stage primary CRCs. We also compared the performance of SVM-T-RFE and SVM-RFE gene selection algorithms on another large-scale CRC dataset and the five public microarray datasets. SVM-T-RFE bestowed SVM-RFE algorithm in identifying more differentially expressed genes, and achieving highest prediction accuracy using equal or smaller number of selected genes. A fraction of selected genes have been reported to be associated with CRC development or metastasis.

  15. Analysis of Mucosa-Associated Microbiota in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kehan; Jiang, Bo

    2017-09-14

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to compare the microbiota community structure, assess differences in intestinal bacterial types, and identify metagenomic biomarkers for disparate stages of colorectal cancer formation. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 160 individuals were recruited: 61 cases with non-tumor colon were regarded as the normal group, 47 cases with histology-substantiated colorectal adenomas were regarded as the adenoma group, and 52 cases with invasive adenocarcinomas were regarded as the cancer group. Biopsy on the mucosa was performed on each subject. USEARCH was used to process the sequences data and generate OTUs. Gut mucosal microbiota from healthy controls, adenoma patients, and carcinoma patients were analyzed. RESULTS Principal coordinate analysis of unweighted and weighted UniFrac distance showed a separation in composition of microbiota in the 3 groups. Bacteria with potential tumorigenesis, like Bacteroides fragilis and Fusobacterium, were more common in the carcinoma group, while some SCFA (short chain fatty acids) - producing microbes were enriched in the normal group. The commensal Escherichia were more abundant in adenoma patients. CONCLUSIONS Our study provides insights into possible function of gut microbiota in diagnosis and treatment of colorectal cancer. Some bacteria, such as Butyricicoccus, E. coli, and Fusobacterium, can be used as potential biomarkers for normal, adenoma, and cancer groups, respectively.

  16. Pooled Sample-Based GWAS: A Cost-Effective Alternative for Identifying Colorectal and Prostate Cancer Risk Variants in the Polish Population

    PubMed Central

    Gaj, Pawel; Maryan, Natalia; Hennig, Ewa E.; Ledwon, Joanna K.; Paziewska, Agnieszka; Majewska, Aneta; Karczmarski, Jakub; Nesteruk, Monika; Wolski, Jan; Antoniewicz, Artur A.; Przytulski, Krzysztof; Rutkowski, Andrzej; Teumer, Alexander; Homuth, Georg; Starzyńska, Teresa; Regula, Jaroslaw; Ostrowski, Jerzy

    2012-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer (PCa) and colorectal cancer (CRC) are the most commonly diagnosed cancers and cancer-related causes of death in Poland. To date, numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with susceptibility to both cancer types have been identified, but their effect on disease risk may differ among populations. Methods To identify new SNPs associated with PCa and CRC in the Polish population, a genome-wide association study (GWAS) was performed using DNA sample pools on Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP 6.0 arrays. A total of 135 PCa patients and 270 healthy men (PCa sub-study) and 525 patients with adenoma (AD), 630 patients with CRC and 690 controls (AD/CRC sub-study) were included in the analysis. Allele frequency distributions were compared with t-tests and χ2-tests. Only those significantly associated SNPs with a proxy SNP (p<0.001; distance of 100 kb; r2>0.7) were selected. GWAS marker selection was conducted using PLINK. The study was replicated using extended cohorts of patients and controls. The association with previously reported PCa and CRC susceptibility variants was also examined. Individual patients were genotyped using TaqMan SNP Genotyping Assays. Results The GWAS selected six and 24 new candidate SNPs associated with PCa and CRC susceptibility, respectively. In the replication study, 17 of these associations were confirmed as significant in additive model of inheritance. Seven of them remained significant after correction for multiple hypothesis testing. Additionally, 17 previously reported risk variants have been identified, five of which remained significant after correction. Conclusion Pooled-DNA GWAS enabled the identification of new susceptibility loci for CRC in the Polish population. Previously reported CRC and PCa predisposition variants were also identified, validating the global nature of their associations. Further independent replication studies are required to confirm significance of the newly uncovered

  17. Secretomic Analysis Identifies Alpha-1 Antitrypsin (A1AT) as a Required Protein in Cancer Cell Migration, Invasion, and Pericellular Fibronectin Assembly for Facilitating Lung Colonization of Lung Adenocarcinoma Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ying-Hua; Lee, Shu-Hui; Liao, I-Chuang; Huang, Shin-Huei; Cheng, Hung-Chi; Liao, Pao-Chi

    2012-01-01

    Metastasis is a major obstacle that must be overcome for the successful treatment of lung cancer. Proteins secreted by cancer cells may facilitate the progression of metastasis, particularly within the phases of migration and invasion. To discover metastasis-promoting secretory proteins within cancer cells, we used the label-free quantitative proteomics approach and compared the secretomes from the lung adenocarcinoma cell lines CL1-0 and CL1-5, which exhibit low and high metastatic properties, respectively. By employing quantitative analyses, we identified 660 proteins, 68 of which were considered to be expressed at different levels between the two cell lines. High levels of A1AT were secreted by CL1-5, and the roles of A1AT in the influence of lung adenocarcinoma metastasis were investigated. Molecular and pathological confirmation demonstrated that altered expression of A1AT correlates with the metastatic potential of lung adenocarcinoma. The migration and invasion properties of CL1-5 cells were significantly diminished by reducing the expression and secretion of their A1AT proteins. Conversely, the migration and invasion properties of CL1-0 cells were significantly increased through the overexpression and secretion of A1AT proteins. Furthermore, the assembly levels of the metastasis-promoting pericellular fibronectin (FN1), which facilitates colonization of lung capillary endothelia by adhering to the cell surface receptor dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP IV), were higher on the surfaces of suspended CL1-5 cells than on those of the CL1-0 cells. This discovery reflects previous findings in breast cancer. In line with this finding, FN1 assembly and the lung colonization of suspended CL1-5 cells were inhibited when endogenous A1AT protein was knocked down using siRNA. The major thrust of this study is to demonstrate the effects of coupling the label-free proteomics strategy with the secretomes of cancer cells that differentially exhibit invasive and metastatic

  18. A gene browser of colorectal cancer with literature evidence and pre-computed regulatory information to identify key tumor suppressors and oncogenes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Min; Liu, Yining; Huang, Fuda; Qu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a cancer of growing incidence that associates with a high mortality rate worldwide. There is a poor understanding of the heterogeneity of CRC with regard to causative genetic mutations and gene regulatory mechanisms. Previous studies have identified several susceptibility genes in small-scale experiments. However, the information has not been comprehensively and systematically compiled and interpreted. In this study, we constructed the gbCRC, the first literature-based gene resource for investigating CRC-related human genes. The features of our database include: (i) manual curation of experimentally-verified genes reported in the literature; (ii) comprehensive integration of five reliable data sources; and (iii) pre-computed regulatory patterns involving transcription factors, microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs. In total, 2067 genes associating with 2819 PubMed abstracts were compiled. Comprehensive functional annotations associated with all the genes, including gene expression profiles, homologous genes in other model species, protein-protein interactions, somatic mutations, and potential methylation sites. These comprehensive annotations and this pre-computed regulatory information highlighted the importance of the gbCRC with regard to the unexplored regulatory network of CRC. This information is available in a plain text format that is free to download. PMID:27477450

  19. In compressed lung tissue microscopic sections of adenocarcinoma in situ may mimic papillary adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Thunnissen, Erik; Beliën, Jeroen A M; Kerr, Keith M; Chung, Jin-Haeng; Flieder, Douglas B; Noguchi, Masayuki; Yatabe, Yasushi; Hwang, David M; Lely, Rutger J; Hartemink, Koen J; Meijer-Jorna, Lorine B; Tsao, Ming-Sound

    2013-12-01

    Surgical removal and pathologic handling of lung tissue has a compressive effect upon its architecture. The effect of surgical atelectasis on morphology has not been examined in depth, especially with respect to lung adenocarcinomas. To examine the influence of surgical atelectasis on morphologic lepidic growth pattern, mimicking papillary adenocarcinoma pattern. In 2 cases serial sections of resected pulmonary adenocarcinoma were used, as was a 3-dimensional reconstruction. Elastin stains were performed on primary and metastatic adenocarcinomas. Perfusion fixation of another case showed marked morphologic differences of less compressed peripheral lung tissue, emphasizing the preexisting alveolar structure. An elastic stain may help identify true lesional architecture. We demonstrate that microscopic sections of adenocarcinoma in situ in compressed/collapsed tissue may give rise to a pseudopapillary pattern mimicking invasive adenocarcinoma. Accurate appreciation of different tumor architecture in lung adenocarcinoma has important biologic and clinical implications. Pathologists should be aware of the possibility of misclassification of adenocarcinoma pattern due to tissue artifacts caused by lung tissue handling.

  20. Synchronous Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor and Colon Adenocarcinoma: Case Reports and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Winn, Jessica N.; Sathyamurthy, Anjana; Kneib, Jessica L.; Ibdah, Jamal A.; Tahan, Veysel

    2017-01-01

    Case series Patient: Male, 40; Male, 70 Final Diagnosis: Synchronous gastrointestinal carcinoid tumor and colon adenocarcinoma Symptoms: Weakness Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Colonoscopy Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Coexistence of carcinoid tumor and colorectal adenocarcinoma is rare. In this report, we present two cases and review the current literature for synchronous carcinoid tumor and colorectal carcinoma occurrence. Case Reports: In both cases, the rectal carcinoid tumors and sigmoid colon adenocarcinomas were detected by colonoscopy. The colon adenocarcinomas were effectively treated with a laparoscopic sigmoidectomy and the carcinoids were successfully removed endoscopically. Our 40-year-old patient was the youngest among 17 reported patient cases. Conclusions: These two cases demonstrate that the diagnosis of gastrointestinal carcinoid requires a complete assessment of the remainder of the colon for another primary cancer to achieve a timely treatment management strategy. PMID:28579603

  1. Diagnostic accuracy and tolerability of contrast enhanced CT colonoscopy in symptomatic patients with increased risk for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ozsunar, Yelda; Coskun, Gülten; Delibaş, Naciye; Uz, Burcin; Yükselen, Vahit

    2009-09-01

    We compared the accuracy and tolerability of intravenous contrast enhanced spiral computed tomography colonography (CTC) and optical colonoscopy (OC) for the detection of colorectal neoplasia in symptomatic patients for colorectal neoplasia. A prospective study was performed in 48 patients with symptomatic patients with increased risk for colorectal cancer. Spiral CTC was performed in supine and prone positions after colonic cleansing. The axial, 2D MPR and virtual endoluminal views were analyzed. Results of spiral CTC were compared with OC which was done within 15 days. The psychometric tolerance test was asked to be performed for both CTC and colonoscopy after the procedure. Ten lesions in 9 of 48 patients were found in CTC and confirmed with OC. Two masses and eight polyps, consisted of 1 tubulovillous, 1 tubular, 2 villous adenoma, 4 adenomatous polyp, 4 adenocarcinoma, were identified. Lesion prevalence was 21%. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive and negative predictive values were found 100%, 87%, 89%, 67% and 100%, respectively. Psychometric tolerance test showed that CTC significantly more comfortable comparing with OC (p=0.00). CTC was the preferred method in 37% while OC was preferred in 6% of patients. In both techniques, the most unpleasant part was bowel cleansing. Contrast enhanced CTC is a highly accurate method in detecting colorectal lesions. Since the technique was found to be more comfortable and less time consuming compare to OE, it may be preferable in management of symptomatic patients with increased risk for colorectal cancer.

  2. ToP: a trend-of-disease-progression procedure works well for identifying cancer genes from multi-state cohort gene expression data for human colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Chung, Feng-Hsiang; Lee, Henry Hsin-Chung; Lee, Hoong-Chien

    2013-01-01

    Significantly expressed genes extracted from microarray gene expression data have proved very useful for identifying genetic biomarkers of diseases, including cancer. However, deriving a disease related inference from a list of differentially expressed genes has proven less than straightforward. In a systems disease such as cancer, how genes interact with each other should matter just as much as the level of gene expression. Here, in a novel approach, we used the network and disease progression properties of individual genes in state-specific gene-gene interaction networks (GGINs) to select cancer genes for human colorectal cancer (CRC) and obtain a much higher hit rate of known cancer genes when compared with methods not based on network theory. We constructed GGINs by integrating gene expression microarray data from multiple states--healthy control (Nor), adenoma (Ade), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and CRC--with protein-protein interaction database and Gene Ontology. We tracked changes in the network degrees and clustering coefficients of individual genes in the GGINs as the disease state changed from one to another. From these we inferred the state sequences Nor-Ade-CRC and Nor-IBD-CRC both exhibited a trend of (disease) progression (ToP) toward CRC, and devised a ToP procedure for selecting cancer genes for CRC. Of the 141 candidates selected using ToP, ∼50% had literature support as cancer genes, compared to hit rates of 20% to 30% for standard methods using only gene expression data. Among the 16 candidate cancer genes that encoded transcription factors, 13 were known to be tumorigenic and three were novel: CDK1, SNRPF, and ILF2. We identified 13 of the 141 predicted cancer genes as candidate markers for early detection of CRC, 11 and 2 at the Ade and IBD states, respectively.

  3. A systematic SNP selection approach to identify mechanisms underlying disease aetiology: linking height to post-menopausal breast and colorectal cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Elands, Rachel J. J.; Simons, Colinda C. J. M.; Riemenschneider, Mona; Isaacs, Aaron; Schouten, Leo J.; Verhage, Bas A.; Van Steen, Kristel; Godschalk, Roger W. L.; van den Brandt, Piet A.; Stoll, Monika; Weijenberg, Matty P.

    2017-01-01

    Data from GWAS suggest that SNPs associated with complex diseases or traits tend to co-segregate in regions of low recombination, harbouring functionally linked gene clusters. This phenomenon allows for selecting a limited number of SNPs from GWAS repositories for large-scale studies investigating shared mechanisms between diseases. For example, we were interested in shared mechanisms between adult-attained height and post-menopausal breast cancer (BC) and colorectal cancer (CRC) risk, because height is a risk factor for these cancers, though likely not a causal factor. Using SNPs from public GWAS repositories at p-values < 1 × 10−5 and a genomic sliding window of 1 mega base pair, we identified SNP clusters including at least one SNP associated with height and one SNP associated with either post-menopausal BC or CRC risk (or both). SNPs were annotated to genes using HapMap and GRAIL and analysed for significantly overrepresented pathways using ConsensuspathDB. Twelve clusters including 56 SNPs annotated to 26 genes were prioritised because these included at least one height- and one BC risk- or CRC risk-associated SNP annotated to the same gene. Annotated genes were involved in Indian hedgehog signalling (p-value = 7.78 × 10−7) and several cancer site-specific pathways. This systematic approach identified a limited number of clustered SNPs, which pinpoint potential shared mechanisms linking together the complex phenotypes height, post-menopausal BC and CRC. PMID:28117334

  4. Systemic analysis of different colorectal cancer cell lines and TCGA datasets identified IGF-1R/EGFR-PPAR-CASPASE axis as important indicator for radiotherapy sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Zhu, Zhe; Gao, Wei; Jiang, Qixin; Yu, Jiangming; Fu, Chuangang

    2017-09-05

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) is proved to contribute the development of many types of cancers. But, little is known about its roles in radio-resistance of colorectal cancer (CRC). Here, we demonstrated that low IGF-1R expression value was associated with the better radiotherapy sensitivity of CRC. Besides, through Quantitative Real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), the elevated expression value of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was observed in CRC cell lines (HT29, RKO) with high radio-sensitivity compared with those with low sensitivity (SW480, LOVO). The irradiation induced apoptosis rates of wild type and EGFR agonist (EGF) or IGF-1R inhibitor (NVP-ADW742) treated HT29 and SW480 cells were quantified by flow cytometry. As a result, the apoptosis rate of EGF and NVP-ADW742 treated HT29 cells was significantly higher than that of those wild type ones, which indicated that high EGFR and low IGF-1R expression level in CRC was associated with the high sensitivity to radiotherapy. We next conducted systemic bioinformatics analysis of genome-wide expression profiles of CRC samples from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Differential expression analysis between IGF-1R and EGFR abnormal CRC samples, i.e. CRC samples with higher IGF-1R and lower EGFR expression levels based on their median expression values, and the rest of CRC samples identified potential genes contribute to radiotherapy sensitivity. Functional enrichment of analysis of those differential expression genes (DEGs) in the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID) indicated PPAR signaling pathway as an important pathway for the radio-resistance of CRC. Our study identified the potential biomarkers for the rational selection of radiotherapy for CRC patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Screening key genes and miRNAs in early-stage colon adenocarcinoma by RNA-sequencing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jixi; Liu, Fang; Li, Xiaoou; Song, Xin; Zhou, Lei; Jie, Jianzheng

    2017-07-01

    Colon adenocarcinoma is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths across the world, developing novel and non-invasive diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers for the early-stage colon adenocarcinoma at molecular level is essential. In our study, RNA-sequencing was performed to identify the differentially expressed genes and miRNAs (DEmiRNAs) in early-stage colon adenocarcinoma compared to tissues of precancerous lesions, colonic intraepithelial neoplasia. The DEmiRNA-target interaction network was constructed and functional annotation of targets of DEmiRNAs was performed. The Cancer Genome Atlas was used to verify the expression of selected differentially expressed genes. The receiver operating characteristic analyses of selected differentially expressed genes was performed. In total, 865 differentially expressed genes, 26 DEmiRNAs, and 329 DEmiRNA-target pairs were obtained. Based on the early-stage colon adenocarcinoma network, miR-548c-5p, miR-548i, and miR-548am-5p were the top three DEmiRNAs that covered most differentially expressed genes. NTRK2, DTNA, and BTG2 were the top three differentially expressed genes regulated by most DEmiRNAs. Cancer and colorectal cancer pathways were two significantly enriched pathways in early-stage colon adenocarcinoma. The common differentially expressed genes in both the pathways were AXIN2, Smad2, Smad4, PIK3R1, and BCL2. The expression levels of eight differentially expressed genes (NTRK2, DTNA, BTG2, COL11A1, Smad2, Smad4, PIK3R1, and BCL2) in The Cancer Genome Atlas database were compatible with our RNA-sequencing. All these eight differentially expressed genes and AXIN2 had the potential diagnosis value for Colon adenocarcinoma. In conclusion, a total of ten differentially expressed genes (NTRK2, DTNA, BTG2, COLCA1, COL11A1, AXIN2, Smad2, Smad4, PIK3R1, and BCL2) and four DEmiRNAs (miR-548c-5p, miR-548i, mir-424-5p, and miR-548am-5p) may be involved in the pathogenesis of early-stage colon adenocarcinoma which may

  6. Mismatch repair status may predict response to adjuvant chemotherapy in resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Riazy, Maziar; Kalloger, Steve E; Sheffield, Brandon S; Peixoto, Renata D; Li-Chang, Hector H; Scudamore, Charles H; Renouf, Daniel J; Schaeffer, David F

    2015-10-01

    Deficiencies in DNA mismatch repair have been associated with inferior response to 5-FU in colorectal cancer. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is similarly treated with pyrimidine analogs, yet the predictive value of mismatch repair status for response to these agents has not been examined in this malignancy. A tissue microarray with associated clinical outcome, comprising 254 resected pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients was stained for four mismatch repair proteins (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2). Mismatch repair deficiency and proficiency was determined by the absence or presence of uniform nuclear staining in tumor cells, respectively. Cases identified as mismatch repair deficient on the tissue microarray were confirmed by immunohistochemistry on whole slide sections. Of the 265 cases, 78 (29%) received adjuvant treatment with a pyrimidine analog and 41 (15%) showed a mismatch repair-deficient immunoprofile. Multivariable disease-specific survival in the mismatch repair-proficient cohort demonstrated that adjuvant chemotherapy, regional lymph-node status, gender, and the presence of tumor budding were significant independent prognostic variables (P≤0.04); however, none of the eight clinico-pathologic covariates examined in the mismatch repair-deficient cohort were of independent prognostic significance. Univariable assessment of disease-specific survival revealed an almost identical survival profile for both treated and untreated patients with a mismatch repair-deficient profile, while treatment in the mismatch repair-proficient cohort conferred a greater than 10-month median disease-specific survival advantage over their untreated counterparts (P=0.0018). In this cohort, adjuvant chemotherapy with a pyrimidine analog conferred no survival advantage to mismatch repair-deficient pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients. Mismatch repair immunoprofiling is a feasible predictive marker in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients, and further prospective

  7. Prevalence and management of colorectal neoplasia in surgically treated esophageal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Daisuke; Koide, Naohiko; Komatsu, Daisuke; Suzuki, Akira; Miyagawa, Shinichi

    2015-05-01

    The existence of other primary tumors during the treatment of esophageal cancer patients has been an important issue. Our aim is to investigate the prevalence and management of colorectal neoplasia (CRN) in surgically treated esophageal cancer patients. Between 2002 and 2008, 93 patients with esophageal cancer were surgically treated. Seventy-three patients underwent subtotal esophagectomy and 20 underwent lower esophagectomy for esophageal cancer. Colonoscopy was available for detecting CRN before and after surgery. Eighty-nine (95.7%) of the 93 patients were screened by colonoscopy preoperatively or within a year from the operation. Thirty-nine patients (43.8%) with CRN were synchronously identified: adenoma in 34 (38.2%) and adenocarcinoma in 5 patients (5.6%). Eleven adenomas with high grade-dysplasia and 8 adenomas with low grade-dysplasia were removed endoscopically. Three superficial adenocarcinomas were endoscopically removed before surgery, and 2 adenocarcinomas were surgically removed. Seventy-four patients (83.1%) were followed using colonoscopy, and 11 subsequent CRN, including 2 superficial adenocarcinomas, were endoscopically detected in 8 patients (10.8%). The size of esophageal cancer was larger in the patients with than without CRN (p = 0.036). The body mass index in esophageal cancer patients with CRN tended to be higher than in those without CRN (p = 0.065). We noted that esophageal cancer is frequently associated with synchronous and/or metachronous colorectal cancer and adenomas. Colonoscopy is useful to detect and manage CRN before and after esophagectomy, although a few limitations exist. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A proteomics approach to identifying novel protein targets involved in erinacine A-mediated inhibition of colorectal cancer cells' aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ko-Chao; Kuo, Hsing-Chun; Shen, Chien-Heng; Lu, Chien-Chang; Huang, Wen-Shih; Hsieh, Meng-Chiao; Huang, Cheng-Yi; Kuo, Yi-Hung; Hsieh, Yung-Yu; Teng, Chih-Chuan; Lee, Li-Ya; Tung, Shui-Yi

    2017-03-01

    Erinacine A, a major active component of a diterpenoid derivative isolated from Hericium erinaceus mycelium, has been demonstrated to exert anticancer effects. Herein, we present an investigation of the molecular mechanism of erinacine A induction associated with cancer cells' aggressive status and death. A proteomic approach was used to purify and identify the differentially expressed proteins following erinacine A treatment and the mechanism of its action in apoptotic and the targets of erinacine A. Our results demonstrate that erinacine A treatment of HCT-116 and DLD-1 cells increased cell cytotoxicity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production as well as decreased cell proliferation and invasiveness. Ten differentially displayed proteins were determined and validated in vitro and in vivo between the erinacine A-treated and untreated groups. In addition, erinacine A time-dependent induction of cell death and inhibitory invasiveness was associated with sustained phosphorylation of the PI3K/mTOR/p70S6K and ROCK1/LIMK2/Cofilin pathways. Furthermore, we demonstrated that erinacine A-induced HCT-116 and DLD-1 cells viability and anti-invasion properties by up-regulating the activation of PI3K/mTOR/p70S6K and production of ROS. Experiments involving specific inhibitors demonstrated that the differential expression of cofilin-1 (COFL1) and profilin-1 (PROF1) during erinacine A treatment could be involved in the mechanisms of HCT-116 and DLD-1 cells death and decreased aggressiveness, which occurred via ROCK1/LIMK2/Cofilin expression, with activation of the PI3K/mTOR/p70S6K signalling pathway. These findings elucidate the mechanism of erinacine A inhibiting the aggressive status of cells by activating PI3K/mTOR/p70S6K downstream signalling and the novel protein targets COF1 and PROF1; this could be a good molecular strategy to limit the aggressiveness of CRC cells. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and

  9. VEGF, Flt-1, and microvessel density in primary tumors as predictive factors of colorectal cancer prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Zygoń, Justyna; Szajewski, Mariusz; Kruszewski, Wiesław Janusz; Rzepko, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Angiogenesis in the primary tumor is known to be necessary for tumor progression in adenocarcinomas of the colon. However, whether angiogenesis in the primary tumors of patients with colorectal cancer affects their prognosis has yet to be fully elucidated. The aim of the present study was to assess the association between selected pathoclinical parameters and overall survival of resectable colorectal cancer patients with the expression of angiogenesis-promoting factors, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and Fms-like tyrosine kinase receptor (Flt-1), and microvessel density (MVD) in the primary tumor. VEGF and Flt-1 expression were assessed, as well as MVD (with anti-CD34) by immunohistochemistry in 139 archived primary colorectal cancer tissue samples. These results were compared with the overall survival of the patients and potential prognostic pathoclinical parameters. A higher MVD in the tumors expressing Flt-1 (P=0.04) was identified. However, there was no correlation between the pathoclinical parameters of colon cancer and Flt-1 expression, VEGF expression, or MVD in the tumor. Furthermore, the intensity of VEGF expression, Flt-1 expression and tumor MVD did not correlate with the overall survival of the patients. Therefore, although increased expression of VEGF and Flt-1 was correlated with an increased expression of MVD in the primary tumors of resectable colorectal cancer patients, these factors were not correlated with prognostic pathoclinical factors and overall survival. PMID:28357103

  10. Development and validation of a scoring system to identify individuals at high risk for advanced colorectal neoplasms who should undergo colonoscopy screening.

    PubMed

    Tao, Sha; Hoffmeister, Michael; Brenner, Hermann

    2014-03-01

    Screening the population for colorectal cancer (CRC) by colonoscopy could reduce the disease burden. However, targeted screening of individuals at high risk could increase its cost effectiveness. We developed a scoring system to identify individuals with at least 1 advanced adenoma, based on easy-to-collect risk factors among 7891 participants of the German screening colonoscopy program. The system was validated in an independent sample of 3519 participants. Multiple logistic regression was used to develop the algorithm, and the regression coefficient-based scores were used to determine individual risks. Relative risk and numbers of colonoscopies needed for detecting one or more advanced neoplasm(s) were calculated for quintiles of the risk score. The predictive ability of the scoring system was quantified by the area under the curve. We identified 9 risk factors (sex, age, first-degree relatives with a history of CRC, cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, red meat consumption, ever regular use [at least 2 times/wk for at least 1 y] of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, previous colonoscopy, and previous detection of polyps) that were associated significantly with risk of advanced neoplasms. The developed score was associated strongly with the presence of advanced neoplasms. In the validation sample, individuals in the highest quintile of scores had a relative risk for advanced neoplasm of 3.86 (95% confidence interval, 2.71-5.49), compared with individuals in the lowest quintile. The number needed to screen to detect 1 or more advanced neoplasm(s) varied from 20 to 5 between quintiles of the risk score. In the validation sample, the scoring system identified patients with CRC or any advanced neoplasm with area under the curve values of 0.68 and 0.66, respectively. We developed a scoring system, based on easy-to-collect risk factors, to identify individuals most likely to have advanced neoplasms. This system might be used to stratify individuals for CRC

  11. Metachronous bilateral isolated adrenal metastasis from rectal adenocarcinoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Jabir, H; Tawfiq, N; Moukhlissi, M; Akssim, M; Guensi, A; Kadiri, B; Bouchbika, Z; Taleb, A; Benchekroun, N; Jouhadi, H; Sahraoui, S; Zamiati, S; Benider, A

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of adrenal metastasis from colorectal cancer in a 54-year-old woman. Nine months after resection for advanced rectal carcinoma, a computed tomography scan revealed bilateral adrenal metastasis. The level of serum carcinoembryonic antigen was normal. A bilateral adrenalectomy was performed after chemotherapy. Histopathological examination showed adenocarcinoma, compatible with metastasis from the rectal cancer. Adrenal metastasis should be considered in the patients' follow-up for colorectal cancer.

  12. hERG1 positivity and Glut-1 negativity identifies high-risk TNM stage I and II colorectal cancer patients, regardless of adjuvant chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Muratori, Leonardo; Petroni, Giulia; Antonuzzo, Lorenzo; Boni, Luca; Iorio, Jessica; Lastraioli, Elena; Bartoli, Gianluca; Messerini, Luca; Di Costanzo, Francesco; Arcangeli, Annarosa

    2016-01-01

    Background The identification of early-stage colorectal cancer (CRC) with high risk of progression is one major clinical challenge, mainly due to lack of validated biomarkers. The aims of the present study were to analyze the prognostic impact of three molecular markers belonging to the ion channels and transporters family: the ether-à-go-go-related gene 1 (hERG1) and the calcium-activated KCa3.1 potassium channels, as well as the glucose transporter 1 (Glut-1); and to define the impact of adjuvant chemotherapy in conjunction with the abovementioned biomarkers, in a cohort of radically resected stage I–III CRC patients. Patients and methods The expressions of hERG1, KCa3.1, and Glut-1 were tested by immunohistochemistry on 162 surgical samples of nonmetastatic, stage I–III CRC patients. The median follow-up was 32 months. The association between biological markers, clinicopathological features, and survival outcomes was investigated by evaluating both disease-free survival and overall survival. Results Although no prognostic valence emerged for KCa3.1, evidence of a negative impact of hERG1 expression on survival outcomes was provided. On the contrary, Glut-1 expression had a positive impact. According to the results of the multivariate analysis, patients were stratified in four risk groups, based on TNM stage and hERG1/Glut-1 expression. After adjusting for adjuvant therapy, stage I and II, Glut-1-negative, and hERG1-positive patients showed the worst survival experience. Conclusion This study strongly indicates that the combination of hERG1 positivity and Glut-1 negativity behaves as a prognostic biomarker in radically resected CRC patients. This combination identifies a group of stage I and II CRC patients with a bad prognosis, even worse than that of stage III patients, regardless of adjuvant therapy accomplishment. PMID:27789963

  13. A Colorectal Cancer Susceptibility New Variant at 4q26 in the Spanish Population Identified by Genome-Wide Association Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Real, Luis M.; Ruiz, Agustín; Gayán, Javier; González-Pérez, Antonio; Sáez, María E.; Ramírez-Lorca, Reposo; Morón, Francisco J.; Velasco, Juan; Marginet-Flinch, Ruth; Musulén, Eva; Carrasco, José M.; Moreno-Rey, Concha; Vázquez, Enrique; Chaves-Conde, Manuel; Moreno-Nogueira, Jose A.; Hidalgo-Pascual, Manuel; Ferrero-Herrero, Eduardo; Castellví-Bel, Sergi; Castells, Antoni; Fernandez-Rozadilla, Ceres; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Carracedo, Angel; González, Beatriz; Alonso, Sergio; Perucho, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC) is a complex disorder resulting from the combination of genetic and non-genetic factors. Genome–wide association studies (GWAS) are useful for identifying such genetic susceptibility factors. However, the single loci so far associated with CRC only represent a fraction of the genetic risk for CRC development in the general population. Therefore, many other genetic risk variants alone and in combination must still remain to be discovered. The aim of this work was to search for genetic risk factors for CRC, by performing single-locus and two-locus GWAS in the Spanish population. Results A total of 801 controls and 500 CRC cases were included in the discovery GWAS dataset. 77 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP)s from single-locus and 243 SNPs from two-locus association analyses were selected for replication in 423 additional CRC cases and 1382 controls. In the meta-analysis, one SNP, rs3987 at 4q26, reached GWAS significant p-value (p = 4.02×10−8), and one SNP pair, rs1100508 CG and rs8111948 AA, showed a trend for two-locus association (p = 4.35×10−11). Additionally, our GWAS confirmed the previously reported association with CRC of five SNPs located at 3q36.2 (rs10936599), 8q24 (rs10505477), 8q24.21(rs6983267), 11q13.4 (rs3824999) and 14q22.2 (rs4444235). Conclusions Our GWAS for CRC patients from Spain confirmed some previously reported associations for CRC and yielded a novel candidate risk SNP, located at 4q26. Epistasis analyses also yielded several novel candidate susceptibility pairs that need to be validated in independent analyses. PMID:24978480

  14. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies common susceptibility polymorphisms for colorectal and endometrial cancer near SH2B3 and TSHZ1

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Timothy HT; Thompson, Deborah; Painter, Jodie; O’Mara, Tracy; Gorman, Maggie; Martin, Lynn; Palles, Claire; Jones, Angela; Buchanan, Daniel D.; Ko Win, Aung; Hopper, John; Jenkins, Mark; Lindor, Noralane M.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Gallinger, Steve; Conti, David; Schumacher, Fred; Casey, Graham; Giles, Graham G; Pharoah, Paul; Peto, Julian; Cox, Angela; Swerdlow, Anthony; Couch, Fergus; Cunningham, Julie M; Goode, Ellen L; Winham, Stacey J; Lambrechts, Diether; Fasching, Peter; Burwinkel, Barbara; Brenner, Hermann; Brauch, Hiltrud; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Salvesen, Helga B.; Kristensen, Vessela; Darabi, Hatef; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Tao; Lindblom, Annika; Hall, Per; de Polanco, Magdalena Echeverry; Sans, Monica; Carracedo, Angel; Castellvi-Bel, Sergi; Rojas-Martinez, Augusto; Aguiar Jnr, Samuel; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Dunning, Alison M; Dennis, Joe; Otton, Geoffrey; Proietto, Tony; Holliday, Elizabeth; Attia, John; Ashton, Katie; Scott, Rodney J; McEvoy, Mark; Dowdy, Sean C; Fridley, Brooke L; Werner, Henrica MJ; Trovik, Jone; Njolstad, Tormund S; Tham, Emma; Mints, Miriam; Runnebaum, Ingo; Hillemanns, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Amant, Frederic; Schrauwen, Stefanie; Hein, Alexander; Beckmann, Matthias W; Ekici, Arif; Czene, Kamila; Meindl, Alfons; Bolla, Manjeet K; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Wang, Qin; Ahmed, Shahana; Healey, Catherine S; Shah, Mitul; Annibali, Daniela; Depreeuw, Jeroen; Al-Tassan, Nada A.; Harris, Rebecca; Meyer, Brian F.; Whiffin, Nicola; Hosking, Fay J; Kinnersley, Ben; Farrington, Susan M.; Timofeeva, Maria; Tenesa, Albert; Campbell, Harry; Haile, Robert W.; Hodgson, Shirley; Carvajal-Carmona, Luis; Cheadle, Jeremy P.; Easton, Douglas; Dunlop, Malcolm; Houlston, Richard; Spurdle, Amanda; Tomlinson, Ian

    2015-01-01

    High-risk mutations in several genes predispose to both colorectal cancer (CRC) and endometrial cancer (EC). We therefore hypothesised that some lower-risk genetic variants might also predispose to both CRC and EC. Using CRC and EC genome-wide association series, totalling 13,265 cancer cases and 40,245 controls, we found that the protective allele [G] at one previously-identified CRC polymorphism, rs2736100 near TERT, was associated with EC risk (odds ratio (OR) = 1.08, P = 0.000167); this polymorphism influences the risk of several other cancers. A further CRC polymorphism near TERC also showed evidence of association with EC (OR = 0.92; P = 0.03). Overall, however, there was no good evidence that the set of CRC polymorphisms was associated with EC risk, and neither of two previously-reported EC polymorphisms was associated with CRC risk. A combined analysis revealed one genome-wide significant polymorphism, rs3184504, on chromosome 12q24 (OR = 1.10, P = 7.23 × 10−9) with shared effects on CRC and EC risk. This polymorphism, a missense variant in the gene SH2B3, is also associated with haematological and autoimmune disorders, suggesting that it influences cancer risk through the immune response. Another polymorphism, rs12970291 near gene TSHZ1, was associated with both CRC and EC (OR = 1.26, P = 4.82 × 10−8), with the alleles showing opposite effects on the risks of the two cancers. PMID:26621817

  15. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies common susceptibility polymorphisms for colorectal and endometrial cancer near SH2B3 and TSHZ1.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Timothy H T; Thompson, Deborah; Painter, Jodie; O'Mara, Tracy; Gorman, Maggie; Martin, Lynn; Palles, Claire; Jones, Angela; Buchanan, Daniel D; Ko Win, Aung; Hopper, John; Jenkins, Mark; Lindor, Noralane M; Newcomb, Polly A; Gallinger, Steve; Conti, David; Schumacher, Fred; Casey, Graham; Giles, Graham G; Pharoah, Paul; Peto, Julian; Cox, Angela; Swerdlow, Anthony; Couch, Fergus; Cunningham, Julie M; Goode, Ellen L; Winham, Stacey J; Lambrechts, Diether; Fasching, Peter; Burwinkel, Barbara; Brenner, Hermann; Brauch, Hiltrud; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Salvesen, Helga B; Kristensen, Vessela; Darabi, Hatef; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Tao; Lindblom, Annika; Hall, Per; de Polanco, Magdalena Echeverry; Sans, Monica; Carracedo, Angel; Castellvi-Bel, Sergi; Rojas-Martinez, Augusto; Aguiar Jnr, Samuel; Teixeira, Manuel R; Dunning, Alison M; Dennis, Joe; Otton, Geoffrey; Proietto, Tony; Holliday, Elizabeth; Attia, John; Ashton, Katie; Scott, Rodney J; McEvoy, Mark; Dowdy, Sean C; Fridley, Brooke L; Werner, Henrica M J; Trovik, Jone; Njolstad, Tormund S; Tham, Emma; Mints, Miriam; Runnebaum, Ingo; Hillemanns, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Amant, Frederic; Schrauwen, Stefanie; Hein, Alexander; Beckmann, Matthias W; Ekici, Arif; Czene, Kamila; Meindl, Alfons; Bolla, Manjeet K; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Wang, Qin; Ahmed, Shahana; Healey, Catherine S; Shah, Mitul; Annibali, Daniela; Depreeuw, Jeroen; Al-Tassan, Nada A; Harris, Rebecca; Meyer, Brian F; Whiffin, Nicola; Hosking, Fay J; Kinnersley, Ben; Farrington, Susan M; Timofeeva, Maria; Tenesa, Albert; Campbell, Harry; Haile, Robert W; Hodgson, Shirley; Carvajal-Carmona, Luis; Cheadle, Jeremy P; Easton, Douglas; Dunlop, Malcolm; Houlston, Richard; Spurdle, Amanda; Tomlinson, Ian

    2015-12-01

    High-risk mutations in several genes predispose to both colorectal cancer (CRC) and endometrial cancer (EC). We therefore hypothesised that some lower-risk genetic variants might also predispose to both CRC and EC. Using CRC and EC genome-wide association series, totalling 13,265 cancer cases and 40,245 controls, we found that the protective allele [G] at one previously-identified CRC polymorphism, rs2736100 near TERT, was associated with EC risk (odds ratio (OR) = 1.08, P = 0.000167); this polymorphism influences the risk of several other cancers. A further CRC polymorphism near TERC also showed evidence of association with EC (OR = 0.92; P = 0.03). Overall, however, there was no good evidence that the set of CRC polymorphisms was associated with EC risk, and neither of two previously-reported EC polymorphisms was associated with CRC risk. A combined analysis revealed one genome-wide significant polymorphism, rs3184504, on chromosome 12q24 (OR = 1.10, P = 7.23 × 10(-9)) with shared effects on CRC and EC risk. This polymorphism, a missense variant in the gene SH2B3, is also associated with haematological and autoimmune disorders, suggesting that it influences cancer risk through the immune response. Another polymorphism, rs12970291 near gene TSHZ1, was associated with both CRC and EC (OR = 1.26, P = 4.82 × 10(-8)), with the alleles showing opposite effects on the risks of the two cancers.

  16. Analysis of colorectal cancers in British Bangladeshi identifies early onset, frequent mucinous histotype and a high prevalence of RBFOX1 deletion

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Prevalence of colorectal cancer (CRC) in the British Bangladeshi population (BAN) is low compared to British Caucasians (CAU). Genetic background may influence mutations and disease features. Methods We characterized the clinicopathological features of BAN CRCs and interrogated their genomes using mutation profiling and high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays and compared findings to CAU CRCs. Results Age of onset of BAN CRC was significantly lower than for CAU patients (p=3.0 x 10-5) and this difference was not due to Lynch syndrome or the polyposis syndromes. KRAS mutations in BAN microsatellite stable (MSS) CRCs were comparatively rare (5.4%) compared to CAU MSS CRCs (25%; p=0.04), which correlates with the high percentage of mucinous histotype observed (31%) in the BAN samples. No BRAF mutations was seen in our BAN MSS CRCs (CAU CRCs, 12%; p=0.08). Array data revealed similar patterns of gains (chromosome 7 and 8q), losses (8p, 17p and 18q) and LOH (4q, 17p and 18q) in BAN and CAU CRCs. A small deletion on chromosome 16p13.2 involving the alternative splicing factor RBFOX1 only was found in significantly more BAN (50%) than CAU CRCs (15%) cases (p=0.04). Focal deletions targeting the 5’ end of the gene were also identified. Novel RBFOX1 mutations were found in CRC cell lines and tumours; mRNA and protein expression was reduced in tumours. Conclusions KRAS mutations were rare in BAN MSS CRC and a mucinous histotype common. Loss of RBFOX1 may explain the anomalous splicing activity associated with CRC. PMID:23286373

  17. Pulmonary adenocarcinoma with mucin production modulates phenotype according to common genetic traits: a reappraisal of mucinous adenocarcinoma and colloid adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sonzogni, Angelica; Bianchi, Fabrizio; Fabbri, Alessandra; Cossa, Mara; Rossi, Giulio; Cavazza, Alberto; Tamborini, Elena; Perrone, Federica; Busico, Adele; Capone, Iolanda; Picciani, Benedetta; Valeri, Barbara; Pastorino, Ugo

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Whether invasive mucinous adenocarcinoma (IMA) and colloid adenocarcinoma (ICA) of the lung represent separate tumour entities, or simply lie within a spectrum of phenotypic variability, is worth investigating. Fifteen ICA, 12 IMA, 9 ALK‐rearranged adenocarcinomas (ALKA), 8 non‐mucinous KRAS‐mutated adenocarcinomas (KRASA) and 9 mucinous breast adenocarcinomas (MBA) were assessed by immunohistochemistry for alveolar (TTF1, cytoplasmic MUC1), intestinal (CDX‐2, MUC2), gastric (membrane MUC1, MUC6), bronchial (MUC5AC), mesenchymal (vimentin), neuroendocrine (chromogranin A, synaptophysin), sex steroid hormone‐related (oestrogen and progesterone receptors), pan‐mucinous (HNF4A) and pan‐epithelial (keratin 7) lineage biomarkers and by targeted next generation sequencing (TNGS) for 50 recurrently altered cancer genes. Unsupervised clustering analysis using molecular features identified cluster 1 (IMA and ICA), cluster 2 (ALKA and KRASA) and cluster 3 (MBA) (p < 0.0001). Cluster 1 showed four histology‐independent sub‐clusters (S1 to S4) pooled by HFN4A and MUC5AC but diversely reacting for TTF1, MUC1, MUC2, MUC6 and CDX2. Sub‐cluster S1 predominantly featured intestinal‐alveolar, S2 gastrointestinal, S3 gastric and S4 alveolar differentiation. In turn, KRASA and ALKA shared alveolar lineage alongside residual MUC5AC expression, with additional focal CDX2 and diffuse vimentin, respectively. A proximal‐to‐distal scheme extending from terminal (TB) and respiratory (RB) bronchioles to alveolar cells was devised, where S3 originated from distal TB (cellular mucinous adenocarcinoma), S2 from proximal RB (secreting mucinous adenocarcinoma), S1 from intermediate RB (mucin lake‐forming colloid adenocarcinoma), S4 from distal RB (colloid alveolar adenocarcinoma), KRASA from juxta‐alveolar RB (KRAS‐mutated non‐mucinous adenocarcinoma) and ALKA from juxta‐bronchial alveolar cells (ALK‐translocated adenocarcinoma). TNGS analysis

  18. Small Bowel Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Thomas; Zaanan, Aziz; Mary, Florence; Afchain, Pauline; Manfredi, Sylvain; Evans, Thomas Ronald Jeffry

    2016-09-01

    Small bowel adenocarcinomas (SBAs) are rare tumors, but their incidence is increasing. The most common primary location is the duodenum. Even though SBAs are more often sporadic, some diseases are risk factors. Early diagnosis of small bowel adenocarcinoma remains difficult, despite significant radiologic and endoscopic progress. After R0 surgical resection, the main prognostic factor is lymph node invasion. An international randomized trial (BALLAD [Benefit of Adjuvant Chemotherapy For Small Bowel Adenocarcinoma] study) will evaluate the benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy. For metastatic disease, retrospectives studies suggest that platinum-based chemotherapy is the most effective treatment. Phase II studies are ongoing to evaluate targeted therapy in metastatic SBA.

  19. Primary appendiceal mucinous adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Behera, Prativa Kumari; Rath, Pramod Kumar; Panda, Rabiratna; Satpathi, Sanghamitra; Behera, Rajan

    2011-04-01

    Primary Adenocarcinomas of the appendix are extremely rare tumor. We report a case of primary mucinous adenocarcinoma in a 40 year old lady misdiagnosed as having acute appendicitis. All the routine investigations were within normal limit. USG of abdomen showed dilated appendix with little fluid collection adjacent to it and no other abnormality was seen which suggested acute appendicitis. Appendicectomy was done and excised appendix was sent for histopathological examination. Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the appendix was confirmed after histopathological examination. Right hemicolectomy was done as a second stage procedure. As some cases are incidentally discovered, this case emphasizes that histological examination of all appendicectomy specimens is mandatory.

  20. Adenocarcinoma in an ano-vaginal fistula in Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Alfa-Wali, Maryam; Atinga, Angela; Mohsen, Yasser; Anthony, Andrew; Myers, Alistair

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Fistulas are a relatively common occurrence in Crohn's disease (CD), and often present early in the disease process. Additionally, patients suffering from either CD or ulcerative colitis are shown to have an increased risk of colorectal malignancies compared with the general population. PRESENTATION OF CASE We present a case of adenocarcinoma in an ano-vaginal fistula in a patient with longstanding CD. DISCUSSION Various pathogenic mechanisms for the development of carcinoma in fistulas have been suggested, but there is no consensus and indeed this risk may be cumulative. In this case report, we also discuss the pathogenesis of mucinous adenocarcinoma in fistulas secondary to CD. CONCLUSION Better detection of adenocarcinoma in patients presenting with persistent non-resolving fistulas in the presence of CD should be undertaken with regular biopsies following examinations under anaesthetic of the anorectum. PMID:23702362

  1. APE1/Ref-1 knockdown in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma: Characterizing gene expression changes and identifying novel pathways using single-cell RNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Shah, Fenil; Goossens, Emery; Atallah, Nadia M; Grimard, Michelle; Kelley, Mark R; Fishel, Melissa L

    2017-09-18

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/redox factor-1 (APE1/Ref-1 or APE1) is a multifunctional protein that regulates numerous transcription factors associated with cancer-related pathways. Because APE1 is essential for cell viability, generation of APE1 knockout cell lines and determining a comprehensive list of genes regulated by APE1 has not been possible. To circumvent this challenge, we utilized single-cell RNA Sequencing to identify differentially expressed genes in relation to APE1 protein levels within the cell. Using a straight forward yet novel statistical design, we identified 2,837 genes whose expression is significantly changed following APE1 knockdown. Using this gene expression profile, we identified multiple new pathways not previously linked to APE1, including the EIF2 signaling and mTOR pathways and a number of mitochondrial-related pathways. We demonstrate that APE1 has an effect on modifying gene expression up to a threshold of APE1 expression, demonstrating that it is not necessary to completely knockout APE1 in cells to accurately study APE1 function. We validated the findings using a selection of the differentially expressed genes along with siRNA knockdown and qRT-PCR. Testing additional patient-derived pancreatic cancer cells reveal particular genes (ITGA1, TNFAIP2, COMMD7, RAB3D) that respond to APE1 knockdown similarly across all the cell lines. Furthermore, we verified that the redox function of APE1 was responsible for driving gene expression of mitochondrial genes such as PRDX5 and genes that are important for proliferation such as SIPA1 and RAB3D by treating with APE1 redox specific inhibitor, APX3330. Our study identifies several novel genes and pathways affected by APE1, as well as tumor sub-type specificity. These findings will allow for hypothesis driven approaches to generate combination therapies using, for example, APE1 inhibitor APX3330 with other approved FDA drugs in an innovative manner for pancreatic and other cancer

  2. Dicarbonyl/L-xylulose reductase: a potential biomarker identified by laser-capture microdissection-micro serial analysis of gene expression of human prostate adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cho-Vega, Jeong Hee; Tsavachidis, Spiridon; Do, Kim-Anh; Nakagawa, Junichi; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; McDonnell, Timothy J

    2007-12-01

    To identify genes involved in prostate carcinogenesis, we used laser-capture microdissection-micro serial analysis of gene expression to construct libraries of paired cancer and normal cells from human tissue samples. After computational comparison of the two libraries, we identified dicarbonyl/l-xylulose reductase (DCXR), an enzyme that catalyzes alpha-dicarbonyl and l-xylulose, as being significantly up-regulated in prostate cancer cells. The specificity of DCXR up-regulation for prostate cancer tissues was confirmed by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR, virtual Northern blot, and Western blot analyses. Furthermore, DCXR expression at the protein level was assessed using fresh-frozen tissues and a tissue microarray consisting of 46 cases of organ-confined early-stage prostate cancer and 29 cases of chemohormonally treated prostate cancer. In most normal prostate epithelial cells, DCXR was expressed at low levels and was localized predominantly in the cytoplasmic membrane. In contrast, in virtually all grades of early-stage prostate cancer and in all chemohormonally treated cases, DCXR was strikingly overexpressed and was localized predominantly in the cytoplasm and nucleus. In all samples, the stromal cells were completely devoid of DCXR expression. Based on these findings, we suggest that DCXR overexpression has the potential to be an additional useful biomarker for prostate cancer.

  3. Ex-vivo analysis of CD8+ T cells infiltrating colorectal tumors identifies a major effector-memory subset with low perforin content.

    PubMed

    Ye, Sheng-Wei; Wang, Yu; Valmori, Danila; Ayyoub, Maha; Han, Yan; Xu, Xiao-Lan; Zhao, Ai-Lian; Qu, Li; Gnjatic, Sacha; Ritter, Gerd; Old, Lloyd J; Gu, Jin

    2006-09-01

    Previous studies have indicated that the infiltration of CD8+ T cells in colorectal cancer is an independent predictor of increased survival but clinical observations have suggested that the cytotoxic function of CD8+ T cells infiltrating colorectal cancer may often be limited. In this study, we have assessed the phenotype of colorectal cancer CD8+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) isolated ex vivo from tumor tissue, and assessed the perforin content of TIL with respect to their location using immunohistochemistry. We found that CD8+ T cells TILs isolated from colorectal cancer are mainly composed of antigen-experienced cells of effector memory type (TEM, CD45RA-CCR7-, and CD27+/CD28- or CD27-/CD28-), and contain only minor proportions of terminally differentiated CD8+ T cells (TEMRA, CD45RA+CCR7-). The perforin content of these TILs, however, is significantly lower than that of antigen-experienced T cells in PBMCs due to the much lower levels of perforin found in the CD27-CD28- subset in TILs compared with CD8+ T cells of similar phenotype in PBMCs.

  4. A Phase II, Randomized, Double‐Blind, Placebo‐Controlled Study of Simtuzumab in Combination with FOLFIRI for the Second‐Line Treatment of Metastatic KRAS Mutant Colorectal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Al B.; Vyushkov, Dmitry; Yang, Yingsi; Bendell, Johanna; Verma, Udit

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Lessons Learned. The safety profile in the patient groups who received FOLFIRI and simtuzumab did not differ from that in the FOLFIRI and placebo group.The addition of simtuzumab to chemotherapy with FOLFIRI does not improve clinical outcomes in patients with metastatic KRAS mutant colorectal carcinoma. Background. Simtuzumab, a humanized IgG4 monoclonal antibody to lysyl oxidase‐like 2 (LOXL2), blocks desmoplastic reaction in colorectal carcinoma (CRC) cells in vitro. Methods. Patients with metastatic Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) mutant CRC were randomized to receive second‐line 5‐fluorouracil, leucovorin, and irinotecan (FOLFIRI) with either 200 or 700 mg simtuzumab or placebo every 2 weeks in cycles of 28 days. Progression‐free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), objective response rate (ORR), and safety were assessed. Results. In total, 249 patients were randomized and treated with FOLFIRI/simtuzumab 700 mg (n = 84), FOLFIRI/simtuzumab 200 mg (n = 85), and FOLFIRI/placebo (n = 80). After a median follow‐up of 5.1, 3.8, and 5.5 months, respectively, median PFS for each of the respective treatment groups was 5.5 months (adjusted HR [95% CI], p value versus placebo; 1.32 [0.92, 1.89]; p = .10), 5.4 months (1.45 [1.01, 2.06]; p = .04), and 5.8 months. Median OS was 11.4 months (1.23 [0.80, 1.91]; p = .25), 10.5 months (1.50 [0.98, 2.30]; p = .06), and 16.3 months, respectively. ORR was 11.9%, 5.9%, and 10%, respectively. Simtuzumab was tolerable in metastatic KRAS mutant CRC patients. Conclusion. The addition of simtuzumab to FOLFIRI did not improve clinical outcomes in patients with metastatic KRAS mutant CRC. PMID:28246207

  5. Second Cancers After Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... After Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer After Treatment Second Cancers After Colorectal Cancer Colorectal cancer survivors can be affected by a ... many of these cancers. Follow-up after colorectal cancer treatment After completing treatment for colorectal cancer, you ...

  6. Optimal lymphadenectomy for esophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Oezcelik, A

    2013-08-01

    Recently published data have shown that an extended lymphadenectomy during the en bloc esophagectomy leads to a significant increased long-term survival for esophageal adenocarcinoma. On the other hand some studies indicate that the increased survival is based on stage migration and that the surgical complication rate is increased after extended lymphadenectomy. The aim of this review was to give an overview about all aspects of an extended lymphadenectomy in patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma. The review of the literature shows clearly that the number of involved lymph nodes is an independent prognostic factor in patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma. Furthermore, an extended lymphadenectomy leads to an increased long-term survival. Some studies describe that 23 lymph nodes should be removed to predict survival; other studies 18 lymph nodes or 15 lymph nodes. Opponents indicate that the survival benefit is based on stage migration. The studies with a large study population have performed a Cox regression analyzes and identified the number of lymph nodes removed as an independent factor for improved survival, which means it is significant independently from other parameters. Under these circumstances is stage migration not an option to explain the survival benefit. An important difficulty is, that there is no standardized definition of an extended lymphadenectomy, which means the localization and number of removed lymph nodes differ depending from the performing centre. The controversies regarding the survival benefit of the lymphadenectomy is based on the lack of standardisation of the lymphadenectomy. The main goal of further studies should be to generate a clear definition of an extended lymphadenectomy in patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma.

  7. Prostate Ductal Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Amin, Ali

    2017-03-30

    Prostate ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is a rare subtype of prostate adenocarcinoma that shows more aggressive behavior than conventional prostatic acinar adenocarcinoma. PDA demonstrates similar clinical and paraclinical features such as prostatic acinar adenocarcinoma; therefore, clinical distinction of the 2 entities is very difficult (if not impossible) and histopathology plays an important role in the diagnosis of the disease. This review discusses all the necessary information needed for the diagnosis and prognosis of PDA including the morphologic features of PDA, an introduction about the known variants of PDA with helpful hints in grading of each variant, tips on differential diagnosis of PDA from the common morphologic mimickers, a detailed discussion on the value of immunohistochemistry in the diagnosis of PDA, and pathologic features that are helpful in determining the outcome.

  8. Ciliated adenocarcinomas of the lung: a tumor of non-terminal respiratory unit origin.

    PubMed

    Park, Won Young; Kim, Mi Hyun; Shin, Dong Hoon; Lee, Jung Hee; Choi, Kyung Un; Kim, Jee Yeon; Park, Do Youn; Lee, Chang Hun; Sol, Mee Young

    2012-09-01

    Whereas most carcinomas occur through a sequential step, atypical adenomatous hyperplasia and bronchioloalveolar carcinoma pathway is known for pulmonary adenocarcinoma. This type is known as terminal respiratory unit adenocarcinoma. Based on our observation of transitions from normal ciliated columnar cells to adenocarcinoma via dysplastic mucous columnar cells, we reviewed our archive of pulmonary adenocarcinoma. Terminal respiratory unit type adenocarcinoma was defined as adenocarcinoma with type II pneumocyte, Clara cell, or bronchiolar cell morphology according to previous reports. Among 157 cases, 121 cases have been identified as terminal respiratory unit type adenocarcinoma and 36 cases as non-terminal respiratory unit type adenocarcinoma. Among non-terminal respiratory unit type adenocarcinoma, 24 cases revealed mucous columnar cell changes that were continuous with bronchial ciliated columnar cells. The mucous columnar cells became dysplastic showing loss of cilia, disorientation, and enlarged nuclei. Adenocarcinoma arose from these dysplastic mucous columnar cells and, characteristically, this type of adenocarcinoma showed acute inflammation, and honeycombing changes in the background. TTF1 immunostaining was consistently negative. In a case study with 14 males and 10 females, including 12 smokers or ex-smokers, EGFR and KRAS mutations were detected in 3 and 6 patients, respectively. We think that this kind of adenocarcinoma arising through mucous columnar cell change belongs to non-terminal respiratory unit type adenocarcinoma, and mucous columnar cell change is a precursor lesion of pulmonary adenocarcinoma.

  9. Transcriptomic Microenvironment of Lung Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bossé, Yohan; Sazonova, Olga; Gaudreault, Nathalie; Bastien, Nathalie; Conti, Massimo; Pagé, Sylvain; Trahan, Sylvain; Couture, Christian; Joubert, Philippe

    2017-03-01

    Background: Tissues surrounding tumors are increasingly studied to understand the biology of cancer development and identify biomarkers.Methods: A unique geographic tissue sampling collection was obtained from patients that underwent curative lobectomy for stage I pulmonary adenocarcinoma. Tumor and nontumor lung samples located at 0, 2, 4, and 6 cm away from the tumor were collected. Whole-genome gene expression profiling was performed on all samples (n = 5 specimens × 12 patients = 60). Analyses were carried out to identify genes differentially expressed in the tumor compared with adjacent nontumor lung tissues at different distances from the tumor as well as to identify stable and transient genes in nontumor tissues with respect to tumor proximity.Results: The magnitude of gene expression changes between tumor and nontumor sites was similar with increasing distance from the tumor. A total of 482 up- and 843 downregulated genes were found in tumors, including 312 and 566 that were consistently differentially expressed across nontumor sites. Twenty-nine genes induced and 34 knocked-down in tumors were also identified. Tumor proximity analyses revealed 15,700 stable genes in nontumor lung tissues. Gene expression changes across nontumor sites were subtle and not statistically significant.Conclusions: This study describes the transcriptomic microenvironment of lung adenocarcinoma and adjacent nontumor lung tissues collected at standardized distances relative to the tumor.Impact: This study provides further insights about the molecular transitions that occur from normal tissue to lung adenocarcinoma and is an important step to develop biomarkers in nonmalignant lung tissues. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(3); 389-96. ©2016 AACR.

  10. Antimicrobial peptide m2163 or m2386 identified from Lactobacillus casei ATCC 334 can trigger apoptosis in the human colorectal cancer cell line SW480.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsung-Lin; Li, An-Chieh; Chen, Yi-Chieh; Liao, Yi-Shun; Lin, Thy-Hou

    2015-05-01

    Ribosomal synthesized antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are widely distributed in nature and are toxic to certain microorganisms. Some of these AMPs are found to exhibit cytotoxic activity against the growth of cancer cells and thus have obvious anticancer potential. Here, we have studied the antiproliferation on the human colorectal cancer cell line SW480 of two AMPs, namely m2163 and m2386, identified by us from a lactic acid bacterium Lactobacillus casei ATCC 334 previously. A half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 40 μg/ml is determined first using the MTT (3-(4, 5-cimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) assay for either peptide m2163 or m2386. The apoptosis in treated SW480 cells by either peptide m2163 or m2386 is analyzed using flow cytometry with annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and propidium iodide double staining. These analyses show that a substantial population of treated SW480 cells can undergo apoptosis by either peptide m2163 or m2386. The real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and Western blot analyses are subsequently used to study how the apoptosis is induced in the treated SW480 cells by either peptide m2163 or m2386. While m2163 is found to induce the expression of Fas and TRAILR1, the expression of Fas, TNFR1, and TRAILR1 death receptors on the cell surface of treated SW480 cells is found to be induced by m2386. Further, the expression of some mitochondria-related apoptosis proteins such as Smac is found to be also induced, suggesting that either peptide m2163 or m2386 can trigger both the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptosis pathways. The cell membrane permeability is greatly enhanced upon treatment with either peptide m2163 or m2386 as analyzed by the flow cytometry using both FITC-labeled peptides. The flow cytometry is also used to analyze the fluorescence intensity given by FITC-m2163 in either the mitochondria or cytoplasm fraction of the treated and fractionated SW480 cells. It is found that

  11. Dietary fiber intake and subsequent risk of colorectal cancer: the Japan Public Health Center-based prospective study.

    PubMed

    Otani, Tetsuya; Iwasaki, Motoki; Ishihara, Junko; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Inoue, Manami; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2006-09-15

    Results on the association of dietary fiber intake with colorectal cancer risk were inconsistent among previous large prospective studies, but studies in non-Western populations are lacking. Consequently, the authors investigated the association between dietary fiber intake and the subsequent risk of colorectal cancer in a prospective cohort study of a Japanese population. Dietary fiber intake was estimated from food-frequency questionnaires comprising 44 or 52 items at the baseline survey and 138 food items at a 5-year follow-up survey. The authors identified 907 cases of colorectal adenocarcinoma diagnosed pathologically in 86,412 subjects during a 10-year follow-up from the baseline survey. After the 5-year follow-up survey, 522 cases were identified in 78,326 subjects during a 5.8-year follow-up. The authors estimated the multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios of colorectal cancer for dietary fiber intake using Cox's proportional hazards model. The authors found no statistically significant association between dietary fiber intake and colorectal cancer in analyses using data either from the baseline survey or from the 5-year follow-up survey. However, the risk of only the lowest quintile was high, compared with the second to the fifth quintiles. Furthermore, the lowest subtertile in the lowest quintile was associated with an increased risk in women (hazard ratio(Sub1 vs. Q5), 2.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.0-5.2). In conclusion, although a minor effect cannot be ruled out, the results did not support a hypothesis of a dose-dependent protective effect of dietary fiber intake against colorectal cancer.

  12. Synchronous polyps predict metachronous colorectal lesions after curative resection of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Pozza, Anna; Ruffolo, Cesare; Fiorot, Alain; Padoan, Luigi; Erroi, Francesca; Massani, Marco; Caratozzolo, Ezio; Bonariol, Luca; Ferrara, Francesco; Norberto, Lorenzo; Castoro, Carlo; Bassi, Nicolò; Scarpa, Marco

    2016-08-01

    The principal aim of endoscopic follow-up programs after curative resection of colorectal cancer (CRC) is to improve survival and identify local recurrence and metachronous CRC. The aim of our study was to identify the possible predictors of metachronous colorectal lesions. The records of 348 consecutive patients with CRC and who completed at least 1 year of endoscopic follow-up after surgery were analyzed. In this group, 336 patients underwent surgery for primitive CRC and 12 for metachronous cancer. Patients' characteristics, operative details, and endoscopical follow-up findings were retrieved. Multivariate survival analyses were used to identify patient categories at risk of metachronous colonic lesions. 128 patients presented a metachronous lesion: 118 adenomas and 10 adenocarcinomas. At multivariate analysis, active smoke (HR = 1.84, p = 0.03), neoadjuvant therapy (HR = 0.24, p = 0.01), and presence of synchronous polyps (HR = 1.55, p = 0.04) resulted independent predictors of metachronous adenoma after CRC removal while neoadjuvant therapy (HR = 0.25, p = 0.02), active smoke (HR = 1.54, p = 0.04), and presence of synchronous polyps (HR = 1.86, p = 0.02) resulted independent predictors of metachronous lesions after CRC removal. This study demonstrated a high rate of metachronous lesions in the early follow-up after curative CRC resection. The negative effects of synchronous polyps should be carefully evaluated when planning patients' follow-up.

  13. Practical genetics of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Henry T; Shaw, Trudy G

    2013-06-01

    Hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC) is highly heterogeneous, both genotypically and phenotypically. The most frequently occurring hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome is Lynch syndrome, accounting for approximately 3% of the total colorectal cancer burden. Polyposis syndromes, such as familial adenomatous polyposis, account for a lesser percentage. Familial colorectal cancer, defined by family history, occurs in an estimated 20% of all colorectal cancer cases. With a worldwide annual colorectal cancer incidence of over one million, and annual mortality of over 600,000, hereditary and familial forms of colorectal cancer are a major public health problem. Lynch syndrome is attributable to DNA mismatch repair germline mutations, with the MSH2, MLH1, MSH6, and PMS2 genes being implicated. The characteristics of Lynch syndrome-associated colorectal tumors, including early age of onset and predilection to the proximal colon, mandate surveillance by colonoscopy beginning by age 20 to 25 and repeated every other year through age 40 and annually thereafter. Besides colorectal cancer, Lynch syndrome also predisposes to a litany of extracolonic cancers, foremost of which is endometrial cancer, followed by cancer of the ovary, stomach, renal pelvis and ureter, small bowel, hepatobiliary tract, pancreas, glioblastoma multiforme in the Turcot's variant, and sebaceous skin tumors in the Muir-Torre variant and, more recently identified, cancers of the breast and prostate. The most common polyposis syndrome is familial adenomatous polyposis, caused by mutations in the APC gene. Affected individuals have multiple colonic adenomas and, without treatment invariably develop colorectal cancer. Colonic surveillance with polypectomy may be pursued until the appearance of multiple colonic adenomas, at which time prophylactic colectomy should be considered. Extra-intestinal manifestations include desmoid tumor, hepatoblastoma, thyroid carcinoma, and medulloblastoma. Other polyposis

  14. Colorectal cancer in Iran: Epidemiology and morphology trends

    PubMed Central

    Rafiemanesh, Hosein; Pakzad, Reza; Abedi, Mehdi; Kor, Yones; Moludi, Jalal; Towhidi, Farhad; Reza Makhsosi, Behnam; Salehiniya, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers in different countries, including Iran. No comprehensive study has been done in the country for colorectal cancer, but information on the incidence and trends is essential to planning. This study aimed to evaluate the occurrence and morphology of colorectal cancer and its trend in Iran. This study was conducted using data from the national cancer registry system in Iran from 2003-2008. We used joinpoint regression analysis for assessing incidence time trends and morphology change percentage. Of all cases of colorectal cancer, 61.83 % were colon cancer, 27.54 % rectal cancer, 7.46 % rectosigmoid cancer, and 3.10 anal cancer. The most common histological types with the frequencies of 80.85 % was related to adenocarcinoma, NOS. The Annual percentage changes (APC) in ASIR for colorectal cancer significantly increased in both men and women. APC in ASIR was 13.7 (CI: 10.5-17.1) in women and 16.4 (CI: 12.4-20.5) in men. APC of adenocarcinoma in villous adenoma showed significant declining trend (p<0.05), while APC of adenocarcinoma, NOS had a constant trend. The incidence of the cancer in recent years has increased in Iran because of changes in lifestyle and diet. Therefore, further studies are necessary to detect the cause of this cancer and perform preventive measures. PMID:28337105

  15. COLORECTAL CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Kuipers, Ernst J.; Grady, William M.; Lieberman, David; Seufferlein, Thomas; Sung, Joseph J.; Boelens, Petra G.; van de Velde, Cornelis J. H.; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer had a low incidence several decades ago. However, it has become a predominant cancer and now accounts for approximately 10% of cancer-related mortality in western countries. The ‘rise’ of colorectal cancer in developed countries can be attributed to the increasingly ageing population, unfavourable modern dietary habits and an increase in risk factors such as smoking, low physical exercise and obesity. New treatments for primary and metastatic colorectal cancer have emerged, providing additional options for patients; these treatments include laparoscopic surgery for primary disease, more-aggressive resection of metastatic disease (such as liver and pulmonary metastases), radiotherapy for rectal cancer and neoadjuvant and palliative chemotherapies. However, these new treatment options have had limited impact on cure rates and long-term survival. For these reasons, and the recognition that colorectal cancer is long preceded by a polypoid precursor, screening programmes have gained momentum. This Primer provides an overview of the current state of art knowledge on the epidemiology and mechanisms of colorectal cancer, as well as on diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27189416

  16. Progression of Barrett’s esophagus toward esophageal adenocarcinoma: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Schoofs, Nele; Bisschops, Raf; Prenen, Hans

    2017-01-01

    In Barrett’s esophagus, normal squamous epithelium is replaced by a metaplastic columnar epithelium as a consequence of chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease. There is a strong association with esophageal adenocarcinoma. In view of the increasing incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma in the western world, it is important that more attention be paid to the progression of Barrett’s esophagus toward esophageal adenocarcinoma. Recently, several molecular factors have been identified that contribute to the sequence towards adenocarcinoma. This might help identify patients at risk and detect new targets for the prevention and treatment of esophageal adenocarcinoma in the future. PMID:28042232

  17. SATB2 Expression Distinguishes Ovarian Metastases of Colorectal and Appendiceal Origin From Primary Ovarian Tumors of Mucinous or Endometrioid Type.

    PubMed

    Moh, Michelle; Krings, Gregor; Ates, Deniz; Aysal, Anil; Kim, Grace E; Rabban, Joseph T

    2016-03-01

    The primary origin of some ovarian mucinous tumors may be challenging to determine, because some metastases of extraovarian origin may exhibit gross, microscopic, and immunohistochemical features that are shared by some primary ovarian mucinous tumors. Metastases of primary colorectal, appendiceal, gastric, pancreatic, and endocervical adenocarcinomas may simulate primary ovarian mucinous cystadenoma, mucinous borderline tumor, or mucinous adenocarcinoma. Recently, immunohistochemical expression of SATB2, a transcriptional regulator involved in osteoblastic and neuronal differentiation, has been shown to be a highly sensitive marker of normal colorectal epithelium and of colorectal adenocarcinoma. SATB2 expression has not been reported in normal epithelium of the female reproductive tract. Therefore, we hypothesized that SATB2 may be of value in distinguishing ovarian metastases of colorectal adenocarcinoma from primary ovarian mucinous tumors and from primary ovarian endometrioid tumors. Among primary ovarian tumors, SATB2 staining was observed in 0/22 mucinous cystadenomas that lacked a component of mature teratoma, 4/12 mucinous cystadenomas with mature teratoma, 1/60 mucinous borderline tumors, 0/17 mucinous adenocarcinomas, 0/3 endometrioid borderline tumors, and 0/72 endometrioid adenocarcinomas. Among ovarian metastases, SATB2 staining was observed in 24/32 (75%) colorectal adenocarcinomas; 8/10 (80%) low-grade appendiceal mucinous neoplasms; and 4/4 (100%) high-grade appendiceal adenocarcinomas. No SATB2 staining was observed in any ovarian metastasis of pancreatic, gastric, gallbladder, or endocervical origin. Evaluation of primary extraovarian tumors showed the highest incidences of SATB2 staining among primary colorectal adenocarcinomas (71%), primary appendiceal low-grade mucinous neoplasms (100%), and primary appendiceal high-grade adenocarcinomas (100%). Similar to their metastatic counterparts, none of the primary pancreatic or gastric

  18. Viral expression associated with gastrointestinal adenocarcinomas in TCGA high-throughput sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Up to 20% of cancers worldwide are thought to be associated with microbial pathogens, including bacteria and viruses. The widely used methods of viral infection detection are usually limited to a few a priori suspected viruses in one cancer type. To our knowledge, there have not been many broad screening approaches to address this problem more comprehensively. Methods In this study, we performed a comprehensive screening for viruses in nine common cancers using a multistep computational approach. Tumor transcriptome and genome sequencing data were available from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Nine hundred fifty eight primary tumors in nine common cancers with poor prognosis were screened against a non-redundant database of virus sequences. DNA sequences from normal matched tissue specimens were used as controls to test whether each virus is associated with tumors. Results We identified human papilloma virus type 18 (HPV-18) and four human herpes viruses (HHV) types 4, 5, 6B, and 8, also known as EBV, CMV, roseola virus, and KSHV, in colon, rectal, and stomach adenocarcinomas. In total, 59% of screened gastrointestinal adenocarcinomas (GIA) were positive for at least one virus: 26% for EBV, 21% for CMV, 7% for HHV-6B, and 20% for HPV-18. Over 20% of tumors were co-infected with multiple viruses. Two viruses (EBV and CMV) were statistically significantly associated with colorectal cancers when compared to the matched healthy tissues from the same individuals (p = 0.02 and 0.03, respectively). HPV-18 was not detected in DNA, and thus, no association testing was possible. Nevertheless, HPV-18 expression patterns suggest viral integration in the host genome, consistent with the potentially oncogenic nature of HPV-18 in colorectal adenocarcinomas. The estimated counts of viral copies were below one per cell for all identified viruses and approached the detection limit. Conclusions Our comprehensive screening for viruses in multiple cancer types using next

  19. The prevalence and associated factors of colorectal neoplasms in acromegaly: a single center based study.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Masaaki; Fukuoka, Hidenori; Iguchi, Genzo; Matsumoto, Ryusaku; Takahashi, Michiko; Nishizawa, Hitoshi; Suda, Kentaro; Bando, Hironori; Takahashi, Yutaka

    2015-06-01

    Colorectal neoplasms are well known to be a complication in cases of acromegaly; however, data on the prevalence of colorectal neoplasms in Asian patients with acromegaly are limited. Further, the factors associated with colorectal neoplasms in cases of acromegaly are controversial. Therefore, we aimed to clarify the prevalence of and factors associated with colorectal neoplasms in Japanese patients with acromegaly in a single center. We analyzed consecutive 57 patients who had undergone full-length colonoscopy at the time of diagnosis at Kobe University Hospital between 1986 and 2012. Of the 57 patients, 22 (38.6%), 18 (31.6%) and 3 (5.3%) patients were diagnosed with hyperplastic polyps, adenomas, and adenocarcinomas, respectively and the prevalence was significantly higher than in a historical control group, Chinese patients with irritable bowel syndrome (The odds ratio was 4.0, 8.7, and 17.5, respectively). The prevalence of adenocarcinomas was also significantly higher in these patients than in the general Japanese population (odds ratio 14.5). Patients with acromegaly who had colorectal neoplasms had longer disease duration than those without colorectal neoplasms. Of note, the area under the growth hormone (GH) concentration-time curve (GH AUC) during the oral glucose tolerance test was significantly higher in patients with adenocarcinomas than in those with no colonic lesion or those with hyperplastic polyps. Japanese patients with acromegaly exhibited an increased risk of colorectal neoplasms, especially colorectal adenocarcinomas. An increased GH AUC was associated with an increased risk for colon adenocarcinomas in patients with acromegaly.

  20. Serrated pathway in colorectal carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yamane, Letícia; Scapulatempo-Neto, Cristovam; Reis, Rui Manuel; Guimarães, Denise Peixoto

    2014-01-01

    Serrated adenocarcinoma is a recently described subset of colorectal cancer (CRC), which account for about 10% of all CRCs and follows an alternative pathway in which serrated polyps replace the traditional adenoma as the precursor lesion to CRC. Serrated polyps form a heterogeneous group of colorectal lesions that includes hyperplastic polyps (HPs), sessile serrated adenoma (SSA), traditional serrated adenoma (TSA) and mixed polyps. HPs are the most common serrated polyp followed by SSA and TSA. This distinct histogenesis is believed to have a major influence in prevention strategies, patient prognosis and therapeutic impact. Genetically, serrated polyps exhibited also a distinct pattern, with KRAS and BRAF having an important contribution to its development. Two other molecular changes that have been implicated in the serrated pathway include microsatellite instability and the CpG island methylator phenotype. In the present review we will address the current knowledge of serrated polyps, clinical pathological features and will update the most recent findings of its molecular pathways. The understanding of their biology and malignancy potential is imperative to implement a surveillance approach in order to prevent colorectal cancer development. PMID:24627599

  1. Colorectal cancer outcomes in patients aged over 85 years.

    PubMed

    Ng, O; Watts, E; Bull, C A; Morris, R; Acheson, A; Banerjea, A

    2016-03-01

    The prevalence of colorectal cancer is increasing in the elderly. We examined the treatment and outcomes in our institution of patients aged over 85 years with proven colorectal adenocarcinoma. One hundred and five patients were identified and stratified by treatment received: curative surgery (CS), other treatments (OT) or best supportive care (BSC). Data on demographics, staging, treatment and survival was collected and analysed. Forty two patients received CS, 36 OT and 27 BSC. While the treated groups (CS and OT) were similar in terms of age (p=0.35) and staging (p=0.16), BSC patients were significantly older and had higher stage disease (p<0.01). Survival was significantly poorer among BSC patients, at a mean of 9.7 months (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.7-14.7) versus 41.6 months (95% CI 32.5-50.7) and OT 27.3 months (95% CI 20.4-34.1) for the CS and OT groups (p<0.001). There was no significant survival difference between CS and OT groups within 2 years of treatment (p=0.12). Thereafter, OT patients had a very similar 5-year survival to that of the BSC group, at 13% versus 43% in CS patients (p<0.001). These data suggest that, up to 2 years following treatment, the risks of resectional surgery for colorectal cancer may neutralise any benefit. However, those that survive beyond this period show improvements. The challenge of improving patient selection is most acute in the growing ageing population, and highlights the current focus on presenting all treatment options to 'a reasonable patient'.

  2. Adenoma detection rate and risk of colorectal cancer and death.

    PubMed

    Corley, Douglas A; Jensen, Christopher D; Marks, Amy R; Zhao, Wei K; Lee, Jeffrey K; Doubeni, Chyke A; Zauber, Ann G; de Boer, Jolanda; Fireman, Bruce H; Schottinger, Joanne E; Quinn, Virginia P; Ghai, Nirupa R; Levin, Theodore R; Quesenberry, Charles P

    2014-04-03

    The proportion of screening colonoscopic examinations performed by a physician that detect one or more adenomas (the adenoma detection rate) is a recommended quality measure. However, little is known about the association between this rate and patients' risks of a subsequent colorectal cancer (interval cancer) and death. Using data from an integrated health care delivery organization, we evaluated the associations between the adenoma detection rate and the risks of colorectal cancer diagnosed 6 months to 10 years after colonoscopy and of cancer-related death. With the use of Cox regression, our estimates of attributable risk were adjusted for the demographic characteristics of the patients, indications for colonoscopy, and coexisting conditions. We evaluated 314,872 colonoscopies performed by 136 gastroenterologists; the adenoma detection rates ranged from 7.4 to 52.5%. During the follow-up period, we identified 712 interval colorectal adenocarcinomas, including 255 advanced-stage cancers, and 147 deaths from interval colorectal cancer. The unadjusted risks of interval cancer according to quintiles of adenoma detection rates, from lowest to highest, were 9.8, 8.6, 8.0, 7.0, and 4.8 cases per 10,000 person-years of follow-up, respectively. Among patients of physicians with adenoma detection rates in the highest quintile, as compared with patients of physicians with detection rates in the lowest quintile, the adjusted hazard ratio for any interval cancer was 0.52 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.39 to 0.69), for advanced-stage interval cancer, 0.43 (95% CI, 0.29 to 0.64), and for fatal interval cancer, 0.38 (95% CI, 0.22 to 0.65). Each 1.0% increase in the adenoma detection rate was associated with a 3.0% decrease in the risk of cancer (hazard ratio, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.96 to 0.98). The adenoma detection rate was inversely associated with the risks of interval colorectal cancer, advanced-stage interval cancer, and fatal interval cancer. (Funded by the Kaiser Permanente

  3. Familial risk of small intestinal carcinoid and adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kharazmi, Elham; Pukkala, Eero; Sundquist, Kristina; Hemminki, Kari

    2013-08-01

    Small intestinal cancer (SIC) is rare, and its etiology is poorly understood. We compared clusters of families with SICs of different histologic subtypes. By using the nationwide family cancer data sets of Sweden and Finland, we identified a cohort of 9964 first-degree relatives of 1799 patients with SIC, diagnosed from 1961 through 2009. Data were collected from time periods as long as 47 years (mean, 35.4 y), and cancer incidence was determined. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated and stratified by sex, age, time period, and cancer type, using the incidence rates for the entire national population as the reference. Among the 1799 SIC cases, 1.1% had a sibling with SIC, so the SIR was 11.8 (95% confidence interval [CI], 7.2-18.2); 1.1% had a parent or child with SIC (SIR, 3.5; 95% CI, 2.0-5.6). The SIR of concordant carcinoid histology of SIC among siblings was 28.4 (95% CI, 14.7-49.6; n = 12) and in parent-child pairs was 9.9 (95% CI, 5.4-16.6; n = 14). The familial risk of concordant histologic subtypes increased for siblings diagnosed with adenocarcinoma, but only 2 familial cases were identified. In family members of patients with SIC of the adenocarcinoma subtype, risks of colorectal and bladder cancer were modestly but significantly increased compared with the general population. Family members of patients with SIC of the carcinoid subtype had an increased risk for kidney cancer and polycythemia vera. Based on data from our population-based study, first-degree relatives of patients with small intestinal carcinoid tumors have developed these tumors with high incidence. Because of the rareness of this tumor, the absolute risk remains moderate even within families. Gastroenterologists could inform patients with small intestinal carcinoids about the familial risk and encourage counseling for their first-degree relatives. Studies are needed to identify genetic factors that affect susceptibility to SIC. Copyright © 2013 AGA Institute. Published

  4. MicroRNA expression profiles associated with pancreatic adenocarcinoma and ampullary adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Nicolai A; Werner, Jens; Willenbrock, Hanni; Roslind, Anne; Giese, Nathalia; Horn, Thomas; Wøjdemann, Morten; Johansen, Julia S

    2012-12-01

    MicroRNAs have potential as diagnostic cancer biomarkers. The aim of this study was (1) to define microRNA expression patterns in formalin-fixed parafin-embedded tissue from pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, ampullary adenocarcinoma, normal pancreas and chronic pancreatitis without using micro-dissection and (2) to discover new diagnostic microRNAs and combinations of microRNAs in cancer tissue. The expression of 664 microRNAs in tissue from 170 pancreatic adenocarcinomas and 107 ampullary adenocarcinomas were analyzed using a commercial microRNA assay. Results were compared with chronic pancreatitis, normal pancreas and duodenal adenocarcinoma. In all, 43 microRNAs had higher and 41 microRNAs reduced expression in pancreatic cancer compared with normal pancreas. In all, 32 microRNAs were differently expressed in pancreatic adenocarcinoma compared with chronic pancreatitis (17 higher; 15 reduced). Several of these microRNAs have not before been related to diagnosis of pancreatic cancer (eg, miR-492, miR-614, miR-622). MiR-614, miR-492, miR-622, miR-135b and miR-196 were most differently expressed. MicroRNA profiles of pancreatic and ampullary adenocarcinomas were correlated (0.990). MicroRNA expression profiles for pancreatic cancer described in the literature were consistent with our findings, and the microRNA profile for pancreatic adenocarcinoma (miR-196b-miR-217) was validated. We identified a more significant expression profile, the difference between miR-411 and miR-198 (P=2.06 × 10(-54)) and a diagnostic LASSO classifier using 19 microRNAs (sensitivity 98.5%; positive predictive value 97.8%; accuracy 97.0%). We also identified microRNA profiles to subclassify ampullary adenocarcinomas into pancreatobiliary or intestinal type. In conclusion, we found that combinations of two microRNAs could roughly separate neoplastic from non-neoplastic samples. A diagnostic 19 microRNA classifier was constructed which without micro-dissection could discriminate pancreatic

  5. Solid adenocarcinoma

    Cancer.gov

    Uniformly solid character of the lesions is usually indicative of a well differentiated tumor. No solid adenocarcinomas have observed in our series. However, rare cases have been described by others. In human pathology this diagnosis is usually based on detection of mucin after periodic acid-Schiff reaction with diastase (α-amylase) digestion.

  6. Outcomes after Surgery for Spinal Metastasis of Colorectal Origin: Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Leach, Matthew R; Lau, Darryl; La Marca, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical management and outcomes of patients who underwent surgical intervention for metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma of the spine. Overview of Literature Gastrointestinal (GI) cancer metastasis to the spine are relatively rare and represent later manifestations of the disease. Studies and reports on the outcomes of patients who undergo surgery for spinal metastasis of GI origin are scarce. Methods A retrospective chart review of all patients who underwent surgery for spinal metastasis of colorectal origin was performed. Four patients were identified. Patient characteristics, outcomes, and survival were analyzed. Results Two patients experienced improvement in pain or myelopathic symptoms. Although the mean survival was 15.3 months, this average included a patient still living at 57.1 months. The mean survival was just 1.3 months for the 3 patients who expired. Conclusions In certain cases, symptomatic improvement with prolonged survival is possible after surgery for metastatic spinal lesions of colorectal origin; however, survival is poor in the majority of cases. PMID:24967040

  7. Invasive Adenocarcinoma of the Lung is Associated with the Upper Lung Regions

    PubMed Central

    Kinsey, C. Matthew; Estepar, Raul San Jose; Zhao, Yang; Yu, Xiaojin; Diao, Nancy; Heist, Rebecca Suk; Wain, John C.; Mark, Eugene J.; Washko, George; Christiani, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We postulated that ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) relationships within the lung might influence where lung cancer occurs. To address this hypothesis we evaluated the location of lung adenocarcinoma, by both tumor lobe and superior-inferior regional distribution, and associated variables such as emphysema. Materials and Methods One hundred fifty-nine cases of invasive adenocarcinoma and adenocarcinoma with lepidic features were visually evaluated to identify lobar or regional tumor location. Regions were determined by automated division of the lungs into three equal volumes: (upper region, middle region, or lower region). Automated densitometry was used to measure radiographic emphysema. Results The majority of invasive adenocarcinomas occurred in the upper lobes (69%), with 94% of upper lobe adenocarcinomas occurring in the upper region of the lung. The distribution of adenocarcinoma, when classified as upper or lower lobe, was not different between invasive adenocarcinoma and adenocarcinoma with lepidic features (formerly bronchioloalveolar cell carcinoma, P=0.08). Regional distribution of tumor was significantly different between invasive adenocarcinoma and adenocarcinoma with lepidic features (P = 0.001). Logistic regression analysis with the outcome of invasive adenocarcinoma histology was used to adjust for confounders. Tumor region continued to be a significant predictor (OR 8.5, P=0.008, compared to lower region), whereas lobar location of tumor was not (P=0.09). In stratified analysis, smoking was not associated with region of invasive adenocarcinoma occurrence (p=0.089). There was no difference in total emphysema scores between invasive adenocarcinoma cases occurring in each of the three regions (P=0.155). There was also no difference in the distribution of region of adenocarcinoma occurrence between quartiles of emphysema (P=0.217). Conclusion Invasive adenocarcinoma of the lung is highly associated with the upper lung regions. This association is

  8. Invasive adenocarcinoma of the lung is associated with the upper lung regions.

    PubMed

    Kinsey, C Matthew; Estepar, Raul San Jose; Zhao, Yang; Yu, Xiaojin; Diao, Nancy; Heist, Rebecca Suk; Wain, John C; Mark, Eugene J; Washko, George; Christiani, David C

    2014-05-01

    We postulated that ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) relationships within the lung might influence where lung cancer occurs. To address this hypothesis we evaluated the location of lung adenocarcinoma, by both tumor lobe and superior-inferior regional distribution, and associated variables such as emphysema. One hundred fifty-nine cases of invasive adenocarcinoma and adenocarcinoma with lepidic features were visually evaluated to identify lobar or regional tumor location. Regions were determined by automated division of the lungs into three equal volumes: (upper region, middle region, or lower region). Automated densitometry was used to measure radiographic emphysema. The majority of invasive adenocarcinomas occurred in the upper lobes (69%), with 94% of upper lobe adenocarcinomas occurring in the upper region of the lung. The distribution of adenocarcinoma, when classified as upper or lower lobe, was not different between invasive adenocarcinoma and adenocarcinoma with lepidic features (formerly bronchioloalveolar cell carcinoma, P = 0.08). Regional distribution of tumor was significantly different between invasive adenocarcinoma and adenocarcinoma with lepidic features (P = 0.001). Logistic regression analysis with the outcome of invasive adenocarcinoma histology was used to adjust for confounders. Tumor region continued to be a significant predictor (OR 8.5, P = 0.008, compared to lower region), whereas lobar location of tumor was not (P = 0.09). In stratified analysis, smoking was not associated with region of invasive adenocarcinoma occurrence (P = 0.089). There was no difference in total emphysema scores between invasive adenocarcinoma cases occurring in each of the three regions (P = 0.155). There was also no difference in the distribution of region of adenocarcinoma occurrence between quartiles of emphysema (P = 0.217). Invasive adenocarcinoma of the lung is highly associated with the upper lung regions. This association is not related to smoking, history of COPD

  9. Cell-surface markers for colon adenoma and adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sewda, Kamini; Coppola, Domenico; Enkemann, Steven; Yue, Binglin; Kim, Jongphil; Lopez, Alexis S; Wojtkowiak, Jonathan W; Stark, Valerie E; Morse, Brian; Shibata, David; Vignesh, Shivakumar; Morse, David L

    2016-04-05

    Early detection of colorectal cancer (CRC) is crucial for effective treatment. Among CRC screening techniques, optical colonoscopy is widely considered the gold standard. However, it is a costly and invasive procedure with a low rate of compliance. Our long-term goal is to develop molecular imaging agents for the non-invasive detection of CRC by molecular imaging-based colonoscopy using CT, MRI or fluorescence. To achieve this, cell surface targets must be identified and validated. Here, we report the discovery of cell-surface markers that distinguish CRC from surrounding tissues that could be used as molecular imaging targets. Profiling of mRNA expression microarray data from patient tissues including adenoma, adenocarcinoma, and normal gastrointestinal tissues was used to identify potential CRC specific cell-surface markers. Of the identified markers, six were selected for further validation (CLDN1, GPR56, GRM8, LY6G6D/F, SLCO1B3 and TLR4). Protein expression was confirmed by immunohistochemistry of patient tissues. Except for SLCO1B3, diffuse and low expression was observed for each marker in normal colon tissues. The three markers with the greatest protein overexpression were CLDN1, LY6G6D/F and TLR4, where at least one of these markers was overexpressed in 97% of the CRC samples. GPR56, LY6G6D/F and SLCO1B3 protein expression was significantly correlated with the proximal tumor location and with expression of mismatch repair genes. Marker expression was further validated in CRC cell lines. Hence, three cell-surface markers were discovered that distinguish CRC from surrounding normal tissues. These markers can be used to develop imaging or therapeutic agents targeted to the luminal surface of CRC.

  10. Cell-surface markers for colon adenoma and adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sewda, Kamini; Coppola, Domenico; Enkemann, Steven; Yue, Binglin; Kim, Jongphil; Lopez, Alexis S.; Wojtkowiak, Jonathan W.; Stark, Valerie E.; Morse, Brian; Shibata, David; Vignesh, Shivakumar; Morse, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Early detection of colorectal cancer (CRC) is crucial for effective treatment. Among CRC screening techniques, optical colonoscopy is widely considered the gold standard. However, it is a costly and invasive procedure with a low rate of compliance. Our long-term goal is to develop molecular imaging agents for the non-invasive detection of CRC by molecular imaging-based colonoscopy using CT, MRI or fluorescence. To achieve this, cell surface targets must be identified and validated. Here, we report the discovery of cell-surface markers that distinguish CRC from surrounding tissues that could be used as molecular imaging targets. Profiling of mRNA expression microarray data from patient tissues including adenoma, adenocarcinoma, and normal gastrointestinal tissues was used to identify potential CRC specific cell-surface markers. Of the identified markers, six were selected for further validation (CLDN1, GPR56, GRM8, LY6G6D/F, SLCO1B3 and TLR4). Protein expression was confirmed by immunohistochemistry of patient tissues. Except for SLCO1B3, diffuse and low expression was observed for each marker in normal colon tissues. The three markers with the greatest protein overexpression were CLDN1, LY6G6D/F and TLR4, where at least one of these markers was overexpressed in 97% of the CRC samples. GPR56, LY6G6D/F and SLCO1B3 protein expression was significantly correlated with the proximal tumor location and with expression of mismatch repair genes. Marker expression was further validated in CRC cell lines. Hence, three cell-surface markers were discovered that distinguish CRC from surrounding normal tissues. These markers can be used to develop imaging or therapeutic agents targeted to the luminal surface of CRC. PMID:26894861

  11. Danish Colorectal Cancer Group Database.

    PubMed

    Ingeholm, Peter; Gögenur, Ismail; Iversen, Lene H

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the database, which has existed for registration of all patients with colorectal cancer in Denmark since 2001, is to improve the prognosis for this patient group. All Danish patients with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer who are either diagnosed or treated in a surgical department of a public Danish hospital. The database comprises an array of surgical, radiological, oncological, and pathological variables. The surgeons record data such as diagnostics performed, including type and results of radiological examinations, lifestyle factors, comorbidity and performance, treatment including the surgical procedure, urgency of surgery, and intra- and postoperative complications within 30 days after surgery. The pathologists record data such as tumor type, number of lymph nodes and metastatic lymph nodes, surgical margin status, and other pathological risk factors. The database has had >95% completeness in including patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma with >54,000 patients registered so far with approximately one-third rectal cancers and two-third colon cancers and an overrepresentation of men among rectal cancer patients. The stage distribution has been more or less constant until 2014 with a tendency toward a lower rate of stage IV and higher rate of stage I after introduction of the national screening program in 2014. The 30-day mortality rate after elective surgery has been reduced from >7% in 2001-2003 to <2% since 2013. The database is a national population-based clinical database with high patient and data completeness for the perioperative period. The resolution of data is high for description of the patient at the time of diagnosis, including comorbidities, and for characterizing diagnosis, surgical interventions, and short-term outcomes. The database does not have high-resolution oncological data and does not register recurrences after primary surgery. The Danish Colorectal Cancer Group provides high-quality data and has been documenting an

  12. [How I treat colorectal cancer. I. Prevention and adjuvant treatment].

    PubMed

    Bours, V; Jerusalem, G; Fillet, G

    1998-04-01

    Colorectal adenocarcinoma is a major cause of cancer-related morbidity and mortality in Belgium and in other western countries. Prevention implies a modification of alimentation and maybe a chronic uptake of acetylsalicylic acid. Treatment of colorectal cancers is based on surgery and the prognosis is determined by the locoregional or metastatic tumor spread. Complete resection of any Astler Coller stage C colorectal malignant tumor has to be followed by a 5-fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy. In these protocols, 5-fluorouracil is administered together with folinic acid or levamisole. The administration of an adjuvant chemotherapy could also be considered for stage BII diseases. As rectal cancers are characterized by high local relapse rates, their treatment should associate radiotherapy, given either post-surgery or preferentially pre-surgery, with resection and chemotherapy. Appropriate treatment of colorectal cancers thus requires a concerted multidisciplinary approach.

  13. Point Mutations in Exon 1B of APC Reveal Gastric Adenocarcinoma and Proximal Polyposis of the Stomach as a Familial Adenomatous Polyposis Variant.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Woods, Susan L; Healey, Sue; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Lee, Jason S; Sivakumaran, Haran; Wayte, Nicci; Nones, Katia; Waterfall, Joshua J; Pearson, John; Patch, Anne-Marie; Senz, Janine; Ferreira, Manuel A; Kaurah, Pardeep; Mackenzie, Robertson; Heravi-Moussavi, Alireza; Hansford, Samantha; Lannagan, Tamsin R M; Spurdle, Amanda B; Simpson, Peter T; da Silva, Leonard; Lakhani, Sunil R; Clouston, Andrew D; Bettington, Mark; Grimpen, Florian; Busuttil, Rita A; Di Costanzo, Natasha; Boussioutas, Alex; Jeanjean, Marie; Chong, George; Fabre, Aurélie; Olschwang, Sylviane; Faulkner, Geoffrey J; Bellos, Evangelos; Coin, Lachlan; Rioux, Kevin; Bathe, Oliver F; Wen, Xiaogang; Martin, Hilary C; Neklason, Deborah W; Davis, Sean R; Walker, Robert L; Calzone, Kathleen A; Avital, Itzhak; Heller, Theo; Koh, Christopher; Pineda, Marbin; Rudloff, Udo; Quezado, Martha; Pichurin, Pavel N; Hulick, Peter J; Weissman, Scott M; Newlin, Anna; Rubinstein, Wendy S; Sampson, Jone E; Hamman, Kelly; Goldgar, David; Poplawski, Nicola; Phillips, Kerry; Schofield, Lyn; Armstrong, Jacqueline; Kiraly-Borri, Cathy; Suthers, Graeme K; Huntsman, David G; Foulkes, William D; Carneiro, Fatima; Lindor, Noralane M; Edwards, Stacey L; French, Juliet D; Waddell, Nicola; Meltzer, Paul S; Worthley, Daniel L; Schrader, Kasmintan A; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2016-05-05

    Gastric adenocarcinoma and proximal polyposis of the stomach (GAPPS) is an autosomal-dominant cancer-predisposition syndrome with a significant risk of gastric, but not colorectal, adenocarcinoma. We mapped the gene to 5q22 and found loss of the wild-type allele on 5q in fundic gland polyps from affected individuals. Whole-exome and -genome sequencing failed to find causal mutations but, through Sanger sequencing, we identified point mutations in APC promoter 1B that co-segregated with disease in all six families. The mutations reduced binding of the YY1 transcription factor and impaired activity of the APC promoter 1B in luciferase assays. Analysis of blood and saliva from carriers showed allelic imbalance of APC, suggesting that these mutations lead to decreased allele-specific expression in vivo. Similar mutations in APC promoter 1B occur in rare families with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Promoter 1A is methylated in GAPPS and sporadic FGPs and in normal stomach, which suggests that 1B transcripts are more important than 1A in gastric mucosa. This might explain why all known GAPPS-affected families carry promoter 1B point mutations but only rare FAP-affected families carry similar mutations, the colonic cells usually being protected by the expression of the 1A isoform. Gastric polyposis and cancer have been previously described in some FAP-affected individuals with large deletions around promoter 1B. Our finding that GAPPS is caused by point mutations in the same promoter suggests that families with mutations affecting the promoter 1B are at risk of gastric adenocarcinoma, regardless of whether or not colorectal polyps are present.

  14. Point Mutations in Exon 1B of APC Reveal Gastric Adenocarcinoma and Proximal Polyposis of the Stomach as a Familial Adenomatous Polyposis Variant

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Woods, Susan L.; Healey, Sue; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Lee, Jason S.; Sivakumaran, Haran; Wayte, Nicci; Nones, Katia; Waterfall, Joshua J.; Pearson, John; Patch, Anne-Marie; Senz, Janine; Ferreira, Manuel A.; Kaurah, Pardeep; Mackenzie, Robertson; Heravi-Moussavi, Alireza; Hansford, Samantha; Lannagan, Tamsin R.M.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Simpson, Peter T.; da Silva, Leonard; Lakhani, Sunil R.; Clouston, Andrew D.; Bettington, Mark; Grimpen, Florian; Busuttil, Rita A.; Di Costanzo, Natasha; Boussioutas, Alex; Jeanjean, Marie; Chong, George; Fabre, Aurélie; Olschwang, Sylviane; Faulkner, Geoffrey J.; Bellos, Evangelos; Coin, Lachlan; Rioux, Kevin; Bathe, Oliver F.; Wen, Xiaogang; Martin, Hilary C.; Neklason, Deborah W.; Davis, Sean R.; Walker, Robert L.; Calzone, Kathleen A.; Avital, Itzhak; Heller, Theo; Koh, Christopher; Pineda, Marbin; Rudloff, Udo; Quezado, Martha; Pichurin, Pavel N.; Hulick, Peter J.; Weissman, Scott M.; Newlin, Anna; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Sampson, Jone E.; Hamman, Kelly; Goldgar, David; Poplawski, Nicola; Phillips, Kerry; Schofield, Lyn; Armstrong, Jacqueline; Kiraly-Borri, Cathy; Suthers, Graeme K.; Huntsman, David G.; Foulkes, William D.; Carneiro, Fatima; Lindor, Noralane M.; Edwards, Stacey L.; French, Juliet D.; Waddell, Nicola; Meltzer, Paul S.; Worthley, Daniel L.; Schrader, Kasmintan A.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2016-01-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma and proximal polyposis of the stomach (GAPPS) is an autosomal-dominant cancer-predisposition syndrome with a significant risk of gastric, but not colorectal, adenocarcinoma. We mapped the gene to 5q22 and found loss of the wild-type allele on 5q in fundic gland polyps from affected individuals. Whole-exome and -genome sequencing failed to find causal mutations but, through Sanger sequencing, we identified point mutations in APC promoter 1B that co-segregated with disease in all six families. The mutations reduced binding of the YY1 transcription factor and impaired activity of the APC promoter 1B in luciferase assays. Analysis of blood and saliva from carriers showed allelic imbalance of APC, suggesting that these mutations lead to decreased allele-specific expression in vivo. Similar mutations in APC promoter 1B occur in rare families with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Promoter 1A is methylated in GAPPS and sporadic FGPs and in normal stomach, which suggests that 1B transcripts are more important than 1A in gastric mucosa. This might explain why all known GAPPS-affected families carry promoter 1B point mutations but only rare FAP-affected families carry similar mutations, the colonic cells usually being protected by the expression of the 1A isoform. Gastric polyposis and cancer have been previously described in some FAP-affected individuals with large deletions around promoter 1B. Our finding that GAPPS is caused by point mutations in the same promoter suggests that families with mutations affecting the promoter 1B are at risk of gastric adenocarcinoma, regardless of whether or not colorectal polyps are present. PMID:27087319

  15. Predictive cytogenetic biomarkers for colorectal neoplasia in medium risk patients

    PubMed Central

    Ionescu, EM; Nicolaie, T; Ionescu, MA; Becheanu, G; Andrei, F; Diculescu, M; Ciocirlan, M

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: DNA damage and chromosomal alterations in peripheral lymphocytes parallels DNA mutations in tumor tissues. Objective: The aim of our study was to predict the presence of neoplastic colorectal lesions by specific biomarkers in “medium risk” individuals (age 50 to 75, with no personal or family of any colorectal neoplasia). Methods and Results: We designed a prospective cohort observational study including patients undergoing diagnostic or opportunistic screening colonoscopy. Specific biomarkers were analyzed for each patient in peripheral lymphocytes - presence of micronuclei (MN), nucleoplasmic bridges (NPB) and the Nuclear Division Index (NDI) by the cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay (CBMN). Of 98 patients included, 57 were “medium risk” individuals. MN frequency and NPB presence were not significantly different in patients with neoplastic lesions compared to controls. In “medium risk” individuals, mean NDI was significantly lower for patients with any neoplastic lesions (adenomas and adenocarcinomas, AUROC 0.668, p 00.5), for patients with advanced neoplasia (advanced adenoma and adenocarcinoma, AUROC 0.636 p 0.029) as well as for patients with adenocarcinoma (AUROC 0.650, p 0.048), for each comparison with the rest of the population. For a cut-off of 1.8, in “medium risk” individuals, an NDI inferior to that value may predict any neoplastic lesion with a sensitivity of 97.7%, an advanced neoplastic lesion with a sensitivity of 97% and adenocarcinoma with a sensitivity of 94.4%. Discussion: NDI score may have a role as a colorectal cancer-screening test in “medium risk” individuals. Abbreviations: DNA = deoxyribonucleic acid; CRC = colorectal cancer; EU = European Union; WHO = World Health Organization; FOBT = fecal occult blood test; CBMN = cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay; MN = micronuclei; NPB = nucleoplasmic bridges; NDI = Nuclear Division Index; FAP = familial adenomatous polyposis; HNPCC = hereditary non

  16. [Sinonasal adenocarcinomas: our experience].

    PubMed

    Llorente, José Luis; Núñez, Faustino; Rodrigo, Juan Pablo; Fernández León, Ramón; Alvarez, César; Hermsen, Mario; Suárez, Carlos

    2008-05-01

    Sinonasal adenocarcinoma is a rare epithelial cancer of the nasal cavities and paranasal sinuses and exposure to sawdust particles is a strong aetiological factor. Seventy-nine patients (78 men and 1 woman) operated on between 1986 and 2002 were studied. In 62 patients (78.5 %) there was a history of exposure to wood dust. The clinical factors presenting statistical significance in the multivariate analysis with prognosis were: the exclusive invasion of the middle concha (as good prognosis), recurrence and invasion of the dura mater (as bad prognosis). The actuarial survival rate was 36 % at 5 years falling to 28 % at 10 years. Exposure to wood dust, even over a short period of time, must be considered as a high risk factor for the development of a sinonasal adenocarcinoma. This tumour must be ruled out in all patients suffering any type of sinonasal pathology.

  17. Aberrant expressions of c-KIT and DOG-1 in mucinous and nonmucinous colorectal carcinomas and relation to clinicopathologic features and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Foda, Abd Al-Rahman Mohammad; Mohamed, Mie Ali

    2015-10-01

    c-KIT and DOG-1 are 2 highly expressed proteins in gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Few studies had investigated c-KIT, but not DOG-1, expression in colorectal carcinoma (CRC). This study aims to investigate expressions of c-KIT and DOG-1 in colorectal mucinous carcinoma and nonmucinous carcinoma using manual tissue microarray technique. In this work, we studied tumor tissue specimens from 150 patients with colorectal mucinous (MA) and nonmucinous adenocarcinoma (NMA). High-density manual tissue microarrays were constructed using modified mechanical pencil tip technique, and immunohistochemistry for c-KIT and DOG-1 was done. We found that aberrant c-KIT expression was detected in 12 cases (8%); 6 cases (4%) showed strong expression. Aberrant DOG-1 expression was detected in 15 cases (10%); among them, only 4 cases (2.7%) showed strong expression. Nonmucinous adenocarcinoma showed a significantly high expression of c-KIT, but not DOG-1, than MA. Aberrant c-KIT and DOG-1 expressions were significantly unrelated but were associated with excessive microscopic abscess formation. Neither c-KIT nor DOG-1 expression showed a significant impact on disease-free survival or overall survival. In conclusion, aberrant c-KIT and DOG-1 expressions in CRC are rare events, either in NMA or MA. Nonmucinous adenocarcinoma showed a significantly higher expression of c-KIT, but not DOG-1, than MA. The expressions of both in CRC are significantly unrelated but are associated with microscopic abscess formation. Neither c-KIT nor DOG-1 expression showed a significant impact on disease-free survival or overall survival. So, c-KIT and DOG-1 immunostaining is not a cost-effective method of identifying patients with CRC who may benefit from treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

  18. Tomato powder impedes the development of azoxymethane-induced colorectal cancer in rats through suppression of COX-2 expression via NF-κB and regulating Nrf2/HO-1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Tuzcu, Mehmet; Aslan, Abdullah; Tuzcu, Zeynep; Yabas, Mehmet; Bahcecioglu, Ibrahim Halil; Ozercan, Ibrahim Hanifi; Kucuk, Omer; Sahin, Kazim

    2012-09-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Since dietary factors have been connected to a reduced risk of a diversity of human cancers, in this study we investigated the effects of tomato powder (TP) on the development of azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colorectal cancer in Wistar rats, and possible mechanism(s) by which TP shows its chemopreventive activity. Here we show that TP added to feed at 5% rate decreases the rate of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and reduces the development of adenocarcinoma and growth of AOM-induced colorectal cancer in rats. In addition, we demonstrate that TP supplementation shows its chemopreventive activities through inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression via NF-κB pathway and promotion of apoptosis, as well as regulating Nrf2/HO-1 signaling pathway in colorectal tissue of AOM-treated rats. Our findings identify an intimate connection between dietary supplementation of TP and the decreased risk of colorectal cancer in rats, and suggest that consumption of TP would be a natural candidate for the prevention of colorectal cancer in men.

  19. Do mesothelin/MUC16 interactions facilitate adenocarcinoma metastases to intracranial meningiomas?

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Mahlon D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Meningiomas have been shown to express mesothelin, a high affinity binding site for MUC16, a transmembrane protein on adenocarcinoma cells. The mechanisms underlying adenocarcinoma metastases to meningiomas may provide insight into tumor-to-tumor metastases and adenocarcinoma metastases to leptomeningeal cells. Methods: Two meningiomas containing metastases from adenocarcinomas were identified and evaluated immunohistochemically for the expression and localization of mesothelin and MUC16. Results: Both meningiomas show extensive mesothelin immunoreactivity, and the adenocarcinomas metastatic to the meningiomas show mesothelin and MUC16 immunoreactivity at the interface with meningioma. Conclusions: Interactions between MUC16 and/or mesothelin on the cell membrane of adenocarcinoma cells with mesothelin on meningioma cells may facilitate adenocarcinoma metastases to meningiomas and possibly the leptomeninges. PMID:28144481

  20. Laparoscopic low anterior resection for hematogenous rectal metastasis from gastric adenocarcinoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sang Woo; Huh, Jung Wook; Kim, Young Jin; Kim, Hyeong Rok

    2011-11-11

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignancies in the world and is the second most common cause of cancer-related death in Korea. Colorectal metastases from gastric adenocarcinoma are known to be very rare. We report an unusual case of rectal metastasis of gastric adenocarcinoma. We report a case of a 43-year-old female patient with gastric cancer who first presented with epigastric pain. The endoscopic and radiologic findings were suggestive of Borrmann type III advanced gastric cancer with linitis plastica. Radical total gastrectomy with D2 lymph node dissection was performed. The pathology report was AJCC TNM Stage II gastric adenocarcinoma (T3N0M0). On follow up at 34 months after surgery, the patient complained of difficulty in defecation. On colonoscopy, a hard, indurated extraluminal mass was detected 7 cm proximal to the anal verge. The biopsy demonstrated chronic nonspecific colitis. Abdominal CT, rectal MRI and PET-CT revealed rectal metastasis from gastric cancer. Laparoscopic ultralow anterior resection with diverting ileostomy was performed. The pathology report was metastatic adenocarcinoma, and this diagnosis was identical to the gastric pathology reported in the previous pathology report. The patient was discharged after the 11th postoperative day with no adverse events. Rectal metastasis from gastric cancer is known to be very rare. However, metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma should be considered as a differential diagnosis for patients presenting with a colorectal mass and a past history of gastric cancer.

  1. Villoglandular papillary adenocarcinoma: case report

    PubMed Central

    Salek, Ghizlane; Lalya, Issam; Rahali, Driss Moussaoui; Dehayni, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Villoglandular papillary adenocarcinoma (VPA) is a very rare subtype of adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix, but a well-recognized variant of cervical adenocarcinoma with a favorable prognosis and generally occurring in women of child-bearing age. Herein, we report a case of VPA diagnosed and managed successfully with conservative measure. This management is particularly desirable in young women to preserve reproductive capability. PMID:28293348

  2. Out of the blue finger ischaemia and occult colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Schattner, Ami

    2017-03-08

    A woman aged 66 years with a history of unprovoked deep venous thrombosis (DVT) presented with persistent digital ischaemic changes of 2 of her right hand fingers. Physical examination was otherwise normal and extensive laboratory and imaging studies were unremarkable. A history of unprovoked DVT and the current episode of digital ischaemia prompted concern for underlying occult malignancy. Repeated history-taking revealed a strongly positive family history suggesting an occult colorectal cancer. Colonoscopy with biopsy revealed adenocarcinoma. Adenocarcinoma of the colon has rarely been associated with paraneoplastic acral vascular syndrome. This report suggests that occult malignancy needs to be considered in patients with focal digital ischaemia as this association is poorly unrecognised.

  3. [Mesocolic excision for colonic adenocarcinoma].

    PubMed

    Debove, Clotilde; Lefèvre, Jérémie H; Parc, Yann

    2017-02-01

    On the same principle than total mesorectal excision in rectal cancer, the effect of complete mesocolic excision on short and long-term outcomes is actually evaluated for colonic adenocarcinoma. This method, usually performed for left colectomy, offers a surgical specimen of higher quality, with a larger number of lymph nodes harvested. For right colectomy, surgical specifications make it less common complete mesocolic excision and conventional surgery offer comparable outcomes, as regards to postoperative morbidity and mortality rates. No differences are identified between laparoscopic and open surgery. On oncologic outcomes, only two studies report a higher free-disease survival after complete mesocolic excision. Then, there is evidence that complete mesocolic excision offers a higher rate of specimen with extensive lymph node resection, without increased morbidity rate. However, there is limited evidence that it leads to improve long-term oncological outcomes.

  4. Hyperspectral imaging fluorescence excitation scanning for detecting colorectal cancer: pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leavesley, Silas J.; Wheeler, Mikayla; Lopez, Carmen; Baker, Thomas; Favreau, Peter F.; Rich, Thomas C.; Rider, Paul F.; Boudreaux, Carole W.

    2016-03-01

    Optical spectroscopy and hyperspectral imaging have shown the theoretical potential to discriminate between cancerous and non-cancerous tissue with high sensitivity and specificity. To date, these techniques have not been able to be effectively translated to endoscope platforms. Hyperspectral imaging of the fluorescence excitation spectrum represents a new technology that may be well-suited for endoscopic implementation. However, the feasibility of detecting differences between normal and cancerous mucosa using fluorescence excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging has not been evaluated. The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate the changes in the fluorescence excitation spectrum of resected specimen pairs of colorectal adenocarcinoma and normal colorectal mucosa. Patients being treated for colorectal adenocarcinoma were enrolled. Representative adenocarcinoma and normal colonic mucosa specimens were collected from each case. Specimens were flash frozen in liquid nitrogen. Adenocarcinoma was confirmed by histologic evaluation of H&E permanent sections. Hyperspectral image data of the fluorescence excitation of adenocarcinoma and surrounding normal tissue were acquired using a custom microscope configuration previously developed in our lab. Results demonstrated consistent spectral differences between normal and cancerous tissues over the fluorescence excitation spectral range of 390-450 nm. We conclude that fluorescence excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging may offer an alternative approach for differentiating adenocarcinoma and surrounding normal mucosa of the colon. Future work will focus on expanding the number of specimen pairs analyzed and will utilize fresh tissues where possible, as flash freezing and reconstituting tissues may have altered the autofluorescence properties.

  5. Automated labelling of cancer textures in colorectal histopathology slides using quasi-supervised learning.

    PubMed

    Onder, Devrim; Sarioglu, Sulen; Karacali, Bilge

    2013-04-01

    Quasi-supervised learning is a statistical learning algorithm that contrasts two datasets by computing estimate for the posterior probability of each sample in either dataset. This method has not been applied to histopathological images before. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the performance of the method to identify colorectal tissues with or without adenocarcinoma. Light microscopic digital images from histopathological sections were obtained from 30 colorectal radical surgery materials including adenocarcinoma and non-neoplastic regions. The texture features were extracted by using local histograms and co-occurrence matrices. The quasi-supervised learning algorithm operates on two datasets, one containing samples of normal tissues labelled only indirectly, and the other containing an unlabeled collection of samples of both normal and cancer tissues. As such, the algorithm eliminates the need for manually labelled samples of normal and cancer tissues for conventional supervised learning and significantly reduces the expert intervention. Several texture feature vector datasets corresponding to different extraction parameters were tested within the proposed framework. The Independent Component Analysis dimensionality reduction approach was also identified as the one improving the labelling performance evaluated in this series. In this series, the proposed method was applied to the dataset of 22,080 vectors with reduced dimensionality 119 from 132. Regions containing cancer tissue could be identified accurately having false and true positive rates up to 19% and 88% respectively without using manually labelled ground-truth datasets in a quasi-supervised strategy. The resulting labelling performances were compared to that of a conventional powerful supervised classifier using manually labelled ground-truth data. The supervised classifier results were calculated as 3.5% and 95% for the same case. The results in this series in comparison with the benchmark

  6. DNA Methylation Changes in Atypical Adenomatous Hyperplasia, Adenocarcinoma In Situ, and Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Selamat, Suhaida A.; Galler, Janice S.; Joshi, Amit D.; Fyfe, M. Nicky; Campan, Mihaela; Siegmund, Kimberly D.; Kerr, Keith M.; Laird-Offringa, Ite A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Aberrant DNA methylation is common in lung adenocarcinoma, but its timing in the phases of tumor development is largely unknown. Delineating when abnormal DNA methylation arises may provide insight into the natural history of lung adenocarcinoma and the role that DNA methylation alterations play in tumor formation. Methodology/Principal Findings We used MethyLight, a sensitive real-time PCR-based quantitative method, to analyze DNA methylation levels at 15 CpG islands that are frequently methylated in lung adenocarcinoma and that we had flagged as potential markers for non-invasive detection. We also used two repeat probes as indicators of global DNA hypomethylation. We examined DNA methylation in 249 tissue samples from 93 subjects, spanning the putative spectrum of peripheral lung adenocarcinoma development: histologically normal adjacent non-tumor lung, atypical adenomatous hyperplasia (AAH), adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS, formerly known as bronchioloalveolar carcinoma), and invasive lung adenocarcinoma. Comparison of DNA methylation levels between the lesion types suggests that DNA hypermethylation of distinct loci occurs at different time points during the development of lung adenocarcinoma. DNA methylation at CDKN2A ex2 and PTPRN2 is already significantly elevated in AAH, while CpG islands at 2C35, EYA4, HOXA1, HOXA11, NEUROD1, NEUROD2 and TMEFF2 are significantly hypermethylated in AIS. In contrast, hypermethylation at CDH13, CDX2, OPCML, RASSF1, SFRP1 and TWIST1 and global DNA hypomethylation appear to be present predominantly in invasive cancer. Conclusions/Significance The gradual increase in DNA methylation seen for numerous loci in progressively more transformed lesions supports the model in which AAH and AIS are sequential stages in the development of lung adenocarcinoma. The demarcation of DNA methylation changes characteristic for AAH, AIS and adenocarcinoma begins to lay out a possible roadmap for aberrant DNA methylation events in tumor

  7. Cross-species analysis of genetically engineered mouse models of MAPK-driven colorectal cancer identifies hallmarks of the human disease.

    PubMed

    Belmont, Peter J; Budinska, Eva; Jiang, Ping; Sinnamon, Mark J; Coffee, Erin; Roper, Jatin; Xie, Tao; Rejto, Paul A; Derkits, Sahra; Sansom, Owen J; Delorenzi, Mauro; Tejpar, Sabine; Hung, Kenneth E; Martin, Eric S

    2014-06-01

    Effective treatment options for advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) are limited, survival rates are poor and this disease continues to be a leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Despite being a highly heterogeneous disease, a large subset of individuals with sporadic CRC typically harbor relatively few established 'driver' lesions. Here, we describe a collection of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) of sporadic CRC that combine lesions frequently altered in human patients, including well-characterized tumor suppressors and activators of MAPK signaling. Primary tumors from these models were profiled, and individual GEMM tumors segregated into groups based on their genotypes. Unique allelic and genotypic expression signatures were generated from these GEMMs and applied to clinically annotated human CRC patient samples. We provide evidence that a Kras signature derived from these GEMMs is capable of distinguishing human tumors harboring KRAS mutation, and tracks with poor prognosis in two independent human patient cohorts. Furthermore, the analysis of a panel of human CRC cell lines suggests that high expression of the GEMM Kras signature correlates with sensitivity to targeted pathway inhibitors. Together, these findings implicate GEMMs as powerful preclinical tools with the capacity to recapitulate relevant human disease biology, and support the use of genetic signatures generated in these models to facilitate future drug discovery and validation efforts.

  8. Epidemiology, Management, and Survival of Peritoneal Carcinomatosis from Colorectal Cancer: A Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Quere, P; Facy, O; Manfredi, S; Jooste, V; Faivre, J; Lepage, C; Bouvier, A-M

    2015-08-01

    Modern chemotherapy aims to improve long-term survival for selected patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis. Publications suggest promising results, but the spread of these new aggressive treatment strategies in the general population is not well known. The aim of this study was to draw a picture of epidemiology, management, and survival in synchronous and metachronous peritoneal carcinomatosis from colorectal cancer. The cumulative risk of metachronous peritoneal carcinomatosis was estimated in patients resected for cure. Net survival rates were calculated for synchronous and metachronous peritoneal carcinomatosis. The study was conducted with the use of the Burgundy Digestive Cancer Registry. Overall, 9174 primary colorectal cancers registered between 1976 and 2011 by the population-based digestive cancer registry were considered. In total, 7% of patients were diagnosed with synchronous peritoneal carcinomatosis. The 5-year cumulative risk of metachronous peritoneal carcinomatosis was 6%, and the stage of the colorectal cancer at diagnosis was the major risk factor. Other independent risk factors were mucinous adenocarcinoma, ulceroinfiltrating tumors, and diagnosis after obstruction or perforation. The proportion of patients resected for cure was 11% and 9% for synchronous and metachronous peritoneal carcinomatosis, and 3-year overall net survival was 8% and 5%. The corresponding rates after resection for cure were 21% and 17%. There was a dramatic increase in the proportion of patients receiving systemic chemotherapy: from 11% before 1997 to 48% in 2011 for synchronous peritoneal carcinomatosis and from 3% to 38% for metachronous peritoneal carcinomatosis. This is a retrospective observational population-based study. Peritoneal carcinomatosis complicating colorectal cancer is a major reason for treatment failure. This study identified patients at a high risk of developing peritoneal carcinomatosis who may benefit from specific surveillance. New therapeutic

  9. Type II oestrogen binding sites in human colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Piantelli, M; Ricci, R; Larocca, L M; Rinelli, A; Capelli, A; Rizzo, S; Scambia, G; Ranelletti, F O

    1990-01-01

    Seven cases of colorectal adenocarcinomas were investigated for the presence of oestrogen receptors and progesterone receptors. The tumours specifically bound oestradiol. This binding almost exclusively resulted from the presence of high numbers of type II oestrogen binding sites. Oestrogen receptors were absent or present at very low concentrations. Immunohistochemical investigation of nuclear oestrogen receptors gave negative results. This indicates that antioestrogen receptor antibodies recognise oestrogen receptors but not type II oestrogen binding sites. The presence of specific type II oestrogen binding sites and progesterone binding offers further evidence for a potential role for these steroids and their receptors in colorectal carcinoma. PMID:2266171

  10. Screening for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Mandel, Jack S

    2008-03-01

    Although there are several methods available for colon cancer screening, none is optimal. This article reviews methods for screening, including fecal occult blood tests, flexible sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, CT colonography, capsule endoscopy, and double contrast barium enema. A simple, inexpensive, noninvasive, and relatively sensitive screening test is needed to identify people at risk for developing advanced adenomas or colorectal cancer who would benefit from colonoscopy. It is hoped that new markers will be identified that perform better. Until then we fortunately have a variety of screening strategies that do work.

  11. Loss of heterozygosity at chromosomes 1p35-pter, 4q, and 18q and protein expression differences between adenocarcinomas of the distal stomach and gastric cardia.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan; Man, Xiaohui; Lv, Zhi; Li, Deming; Sun, Zhe; Chen, Hong; Wang, Zhenning; Luo, Yang; Xu, Huimian

    2012-12-01

    Loss of heterozygosity of 1p35-pter, 4q, and 18q is frequent in gastric carcinoma, suggesting that these regions harbor tumor suppressor genes. However, the differences in these genetic alterations between adenocarcinoma of the gastric cardia and adenocarcinoma of the distal stomach remain unclear. In this study, loss of heterozygosity at chromosomes 1p35-pter, 4q, and 18q were analyzed in adenocarcinoma of the gastric cardia and adenocarcinoma of the distal stomach samples acquired by laser capture microdissection. The expression of several tumor suppressor gene proteins, runt-related transcription factor 3 (1p36), annexin A10 (4q33), SMAD family member 4 (18q21.1), and deleted in colorectal carcinoma (18q21.3), was evaluated immunohistochemically. The adenocarcinoma of the distal stomach and adenocarcinoma of the gastric cardia lesions had a similar trend in total deletion frequency for chromosomes 1p35-pter (36.5% for adenocarcinoma of the distal stomach and 32.5% for adenocarcinoma of the gastric cardia), 4q (42.3% for adenocarcinoma of the distal stomach and 47.5% for adenocarcinoma of the gastric cardia), and 18q (38.5% for adenocarcinoma of the distal stomach and 45% for adenocarcinoma of the gastric cardia). However, loss of heterozygosity patterns were clearly different in the 2 adenocarcinomas. Deletion mapping indicated that 4q32.2-4q34.3, 18q21.2-21.31, 18q22.3-23, and 1p35.2-1p36.13 were involved in adenocarcinoma of the distal stomach, whereas 4q13.3-4q22.3, 4q31.21-4q32.2, 18q21.31-18q22.1, and 1p35.2-1p36.13 were involved in adenocarcinoma of the gastric cardia. Expression of ANXA10 (P = .038), SMAD family member 4 (P = .028), and deleted in colorectal carcinoma (P = .004) was less common in adenocarcinoma of the distal stomach than in adenocarcinoma of the gastric cardia. Expression of runt-related transcription factor 3 (P = .795) showed no significant difference in the 2 tumors. The tumors differed in the profile of genetic alterations and

  12. Effect of chemotherapy on the impact of FDG-PET/CT in selection of patients for surgical resection of colorectal liver metastases: single center analysis of PET-CAM randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Metser, Ur; Halankar, Jaydeep; Langer, Deanna; Mohan, Ravi; Hussey, Douglas; Hadas, Moshonov; Tamir, Shlomit

    2017-02-01

    The largest randomized controlled trial (RCT) on the effect of FDG-PET on surgical management for metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma to liver ("PET-CAM") reported only a modest change in surgical management (8%).

  13. Osteoporosis self-assessment tool for Asians as a simple risk index of identifying a poor prognosis in women surgically treated for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao-Wen; Tsai, Hsiang-Lin; Yeh, Yung-Sung; Lin, Hsing-Lin; Huang, Ching-Wen; Chen, Chin-Fan; Chang, Yu-Tang; Lou, Yun-Ting; Wang, Jaw-Yuan

    2013-05-01

    Osteoporosis and colorectal cancer (CRC) in older women are considered enormous public health burdens. The effects of osteoporosis on the oncologic outcome of CRC surgery are poorly understood. We evaluated the use of the Osteoporosis Self-assessment Tool for Asians (OSTA) for predicting postoperative outcome in older women after receiving surgical treatment of CRC. The present single-institution retrospective study analyzed patients who had undergone surgery for CRC in 2002-2008. To characterize the major population of women with osteoporosis, which consists of postmenopausal women, only patients aged 50 years and older were analyzed. Their OSTA scores were evaluated for correlations with cancer-specific survival after surgery for CRC by performing univariate, multivariate, and survival analyses. During a 7-year period, 440 women were studied. The cancer-specific mortality and overall mortality rate was 28.4% and 33.4%, respectively. The univariate analyses revealed that significant predictors of cancer-specific mortality after CRC surgery were the International Union Against Cancer (UICC) stage, OSTA category, histologic grading, lymph node metastases, and tumor invasion depth. After risk adjustment, the UICC stage and OSTA risk index were independent predictors of mortality. A comparison of OSTA risk index among patients with different UICC stages showed that the accuracy of the index in predicting cancer-specific survival after CRC surgery was greatest for patients with stage II and III disease. The UICC stage and OSTA risk status showed independent positive associations with postoperative mortality in aged female patients with CRC. Moreover, the OSTA index had a particularly strong association with cancer-specific mortality in patients with UICC stage II and III. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Meta-analysis of three genome-wide association studies identifies susceptibility loci for colorectal cancer at 1q41, 3q26.2, 12q13.13 and 20q13.33

    PubMed Central

    Houlston, Richard S; Cheadle, Jeremy; Dobbins, Sara E; Tenesa, Albert; Jones, Angela M; Howarth, Kimberley; Spain, Sarah L; Broderick, Peter; Domingo, Enric; Farrington, Susan; Prendergast, James GD; Pittman, Alan M; Theodoratou, Evi; Smith, Christopher G; Olver, Bianca; Walther, Axel; Barnetson, Rebecca A; Churchman, Michael; Jaeger, Emma EM; Penegar, Steven; Barclay, Ella; Martin, Lynn; Gorman, Maggie; Mager, Rachel; Johnstone, Elaine; Midgley, Rachel; Niittymäki, Iina; Tuupanen, Sari; Colley, James; Idziaszczyk, Shelley; Thomas, Huw JM; Lucassen, Anneke M; Evans, D Gareth R; Maher, Eamonn R; Maughan, Timothy; Dimas, Antigone; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; Aaltonen, Lauri A; Pharoah, Paul; Kerr, David J; Carvajal-Carmona, Luis G; Campbell, Harry; Dunlop, Malcolm G; Tomlinson, Ian PM

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have thus far identified 10 loci at which common variants influence the risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC). To enhance power to identify additional loci, we conducted a meta-analysis of three GWA studies from the UK totalling 3,334 cases and 4,628 controls, followed by multiple validation analyses, involving a total of 18,095 CRC cases and 20,197 controls. We identified new associations at 4 CRC risk loci: 1q41 (rs6691170, OR=1.06, P=9.55x10-10; rs6687758, OR=1.09, P=2.27x10-9); 3q26.2 (rs10936599, OR=0.93, P=3.39x10-8); 12q13.13 (rs11169552, OR=0.92, P=1.89x10-10; rs7136702, OR=1.06, P=4.02=x10-8); and 20q13.33 (rs4925386, OR=0.93, P=1.89x10-10). As well as identifying multiple new CRC risk loci this analysis provides evidence that additional CRC-associated variants of similar effect size remain to be discovered. PMID:20972440

  15. p53 controls colorectal cancer cell invasion by inhibiting the NF-κB-mediated activation of Fascin

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Haimei; Wang, Chan; Zhou, Jichun; Han, Weidong; Wang, Xian; Fang, Yong; Xu, Yinghua; Li, Da; Chen, Rui; Ma, Junhong; Jing, Zhao; Gu, Xidong; Pan, Hongming; He, Chao

    2015-01-01

    p53 mutation is known to contribute to cancer progression. Fascin is an actin-bundling protein and has been recently identified to promote cancer cell migration and invasion through its role in formation of cellular protrusions such as filopodia and invadopodia. However, the relationship between p53 and Fascin is not understood. Here, we have found a new link between them. In colorectal adenocarcinomas, p53 mutation correlated with high NF-κB, Fascin and low E-cadherin expression. Moreover, this expression profile was shown to contribute to poor overall survival in patients with colorectal cancer. Wild-type p53 could inhibit NF-κB activity that repressed the expression of Fascin and cancer cell invasiveness. In contrast, in p53-deficient primary cultured cells, NF-κB activity was enhanced and then activation of NF-κB increased the expression of Fascin. In further analysis, we showed that NF-κB was a key determinant for p53 deletion-stimulated Fascin expression. Inhibition of NF-κB /p65 expression by pharmacological compound or p65 siRNA suppressed Fascin activity in p53-deficient cells. Moreover, restoration of p53 expression decreased the activation of Fascin through suppression of the NF-κB pathway. Taken together, these data suggest that a negative-feedback loop exists, whereby p53 can suppress colorectal cancer cell invasion by inhibiting the NF-κB-mediated activation of Fascin. PMID:26362504

  16. Genomic Alteration During Metastasis of Lung Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tan, Qiang; Cui, Jian; Huang, Jia; Ding, Zhengping; Lin, Hao; Niu, Xiaomin; Li, Zhiming; Wang, Guan; Luo, Qingquan; Lu, Shun

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent gene mutation has been identified by the analysis of exonic DNA from lung adenocarcinoma, but its progression has not been extensively profiled. The investigation of the mutational landscape of tumors provides new insights into cancer genome evolution and further discovers the interplay of somatic mutation, adaptation of clones to their environment and natural selection. Cancer development involves cycles of genomic damage, epigenetic deregulation, and increased cellular proliferation that eventually culminate in the carcinoma phenotype. Comparative whole exome sequencing of both primary and metastatic tumor tissues from four patients of stage IV lung adenocarcinoma patients with chest wall metastasis was performed. Both primary and metastatic tumors were diagnosed through biopsy followed by surgical resection. All tumor specimens were cut into several pieces to assess potential heterogenic clones within the tumor tissue. Adjacent normal lung tissue was also obtained to provide germline mutation background. By modeling and analyzing progression of the cancer metastasis based on non-synonymous variants, we defined the extent of heterogeneity of cancer genomes and identified similar cancer evolution pattern in the four patients: metastasis was an early event occurring right after the primary cancer formation and evolution in the metastatic tumor was continuously and simultaneously in progression with that in the primary tumor. By characterizing the clonal hierarchy of genetic lesions, we further charted a pathway of oncogenic events along which genes may drive lung adenocarcinoma metastasis, such as TAS2R31 and UMODL1, involving in G-protein coupled receptor protein signaling pathway. The candidate genes identified in this study may become targets for the treatment of lung adenocarcinoma metastasis. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. DNA Mismatch Repair Status Predicts Need for Future Colorectal Surgery for Metachronous Neoplasms in Young Individuals Undergoing Colorectal Cancer Resection.

    PubMed

    Aronson, Melyssa; Holter, Spring; Semotiuk, Kara; Winter, Laura; Pollett, Aaron; Gallinger, Steven; Cohen, Zane; Gryfe, Robert

    2015-07-01

    The treatment of colorectal cancer in young patients involves both management of the incident cancer and consideration of the possibility of Lynch syndrome and the development of metachronous colorectal cancers. This study aims to assess the prognostic role of DNA mismatch repair deficiency and extended colorectal resection for metachronous colorectal neoplasia risk in young patients with colorectal cancer. This is a retrospective review of 285 patients identified in our GI cancer registry with colorectal cancer diagnosed at 35 years or younger in the absence of polyposis. Using univariate and multivariate analysis, we assessed the prognostic role of mismatch repair deficiency and standard clinicopathologic characteristics, including the extent of resection, on the rate of developing metachronous colorectal neoplasia requiring resection. Mismatch repair deficiency was identified in biospecimens from 44% of patients and was significantly associated with an increased risk for metachronous colorectal neoplasia requiring resection (10-year cumulative risk, 13.5% ± 4.2%) compared with 56% of patients with mismatch repair-intact colorectal cancer (10-year cumulative risk, 5.8% ± 3.3%; p = 0.011). In multivariate analysis, mismatch repair deficiency was associated with a HR of 3.65 (95% CI, 1.44-9.21; p = 0.006) for metachronous colorectal neoplasia, whereas extended resection with ileorectal or ileosigmoid anastomosis significantly decreased the risk of metachronous colorectal neoplasia (HR, 0.21; 95% CI, 0.05-0.90; p = 0.036). This study had a retrospective design, and, therefore, recommendations for colorectal cancer surgery and screening were not fully standardized. Quality of life after colorectal cancer surgery was not assessed. Young patients with colorectal cancer with molecular hallmarks of Lynch syndrome were at significantly higher risk for the development of subsequent colorectal neoplasia. This risk was significantly reduced in those who underwent extended

  18. p53 exon 7 mutations as a predictor of poor prognosis in patients with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Iniesta, P; Vega, F J; Caldés, T; Massa, M; de Juan, C; Cerdán, F J; Sánchez, A; López, J A; Torres, A J; Balibrea, J L; Benito, M

    1998-08-14

    We have studied 61 resected colorectal adenocarcinomas in order to investigate p53 mutations as a prognostic factor for this pathology. Mutations in exons 5-9 of the p53 gene were analyzed by the polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) technique followed by sequencing. Our data indicate that p53 exon 7 mutations were prevalent in the latest stages of colorectal carcinogenesis and patients bearing this alteration had the worst prognosis. Therefore, according to our results, mutations affecting exon 7 of the p53 gene could be considered as a useful marker of biological aggressiveness for colorectal cancer.

  19. [Intraoperative staging of colorectal tumors].

    PubMed

    Abdurakhmonov, Iu B; Mel'nikov, O R; Egorenkov, V V; Moiseenko, V M

    2007-01-01

    The effectiveness of intraoperative staging of tumor by sentinel node staining with lymphotropic dyes was evaluated in 60 patients with colorectal tumors (colon carcinoma -39, rectal cancer- 21). High sensitivity (84.6% and 87.5%, respectively) and specificity (100% and 100%, respectively) for regional lymph node assessment were identified for both colonic and rectal cancer.

  20. Colorectal Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing colorectal cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  1. Perianal Paget's Disease Co-Associated with Anorectal Adenocarcinoma: Primary or Secondary Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Xiujun; Mao, Weiming; Lin, A'Li

    2014-01-01

    Perianal Paget's disease (PPD) represents a skin neoplasm which can be either primary or secondary to carcinoma from an adjacent internal organ. PPD with underlying colorectal adenocarcinoma is usually looked upon as a secondary disease. We report a rare case of co-associated PPD and anorectal adenocarcinoma. The PPD was found to be located near the anorectal adenocarcinoma with normal tissues between them. Immunohistochemical stains demonstrated that the Paget's cells were CK7+/GCDFP-15–/CK20–/MUC2–/CDX2–, whereas the anorectal adenocarcinoma was shown to be CK7+/GCDFP-15–/CK20+/MUC2+/CDX2+. This immunological phenotypic profile supported the notion that PPD and anorectal adenocarcinoma were of different origins, but could not define the exact origins of PPD. In our determination, this case was a primary PPD with anorectal adenocarcinoma. PPD remains a heterogeneous and complex pathology, and additional studies are required to differentiate between the various possible origins. PMID:24932167

  2. Colorectal cancer screening beliefs. Focus groups with first-degree relatives.

    PubMed

    Rawl, S M; Menon, U; Champion, V L; Foster, J L; Skinner, C S

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the perceived benefits and barriers to colorectal cancer screening reported by first-degree relatives of colorectal cancer patients. In this study, the authors used focus groups to identify perceived benefits and barriers to colorectal cancer screening among parents and children of colorectal cancer patients. Four focus groups were conducted with relatives of colorectal cancer patients seen at two university medical centers in the Midwest. The groups ranged in size from five to eight members each and were stratified by gender. Four benefits of colorectal cancer screening were identified by participants: finding colorectal cancer early, decreasing the chances of dying from colorectal cancer, freedom from worry about colorectal cancer, and reassurance that one was cancer-free. Four main barriers were identified that applied to all four types of colorectal cancer screening or to colorectal cancer screening in general. These included inadequate public awareness of colorectal cancer, inconsistent recommendations from healthcare providers, concerns about the efficacy of screening tests, and embarrassment. Barriers unique to each screening test also were identified. Understanding individual beliefs about the benefits and barriers to colorectal cancer screening will allow clinicians and researchers to develop effective interventions to increase screening. Results from the focus groups have been used to develop an instrument to measure benefits and barriers to colorectal cancer screening, which now needs to be tested with more culturally and socioeconomically diverse groups.

  3. Mutational analysis and clinical correlation of metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Russo, Andrea L; Borger, Darrell R; Szymonifka, Jackie; Ryan, David P; Wo, Jennifer Y; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S; Kwak, Eunice L; Allen, Jill N; Wadlow, Raymond C; Zhu, Andrew X; Murphy, Janet E; Faris, Jason E; Dias-Santagata, Dora; Haigis, Kevin M; Ellisen, Leif W; Iafrate, Anthony J; Hong, Theodore S

    2014-05-15

    Early identification of mutations may guide patients with metastatic colorectal cancer toward targeted therapies that may be life prolonging. The authors assessed tumor genotype correlations with clinical characteristics to determine whether mutational profiling can account for clinical similarities, differences, and outcomes. Under Institutional Review Board approval, 222 patients with metastatic colon adenocarcinoma (n = 158) and rectal adenocarcinoma (n = 64) who underwent clinical tumor genotyping were reviewed. Multiplexed tumor genotyping screened for >150 mutations across 15 commonly mutated cancer genes. The chi-square test was used to assess genotype frequency by tumor site and additional clinical characteristics. Cox multivariate analysis was used to assess the impact of genotype on overall survival. Broad-based tumor genotyping revealed clinical and anatomic differences that could be linked to gene mutations. NRAS mutations were associated with rectal cancer versus colon cancer (12.5% vs 0.6%; P < .001) and with age ≥56 years (7% vs 0.9%; P = .02). Conversely, v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (BRAF) mutations were associated with colon cancer (13% vs 3%; P = .024) and older age (15.8% vs 4.6%; P = .006). TP53 mutations were associated with rectal cancer (30% vs 18%; P = .048), younger age (14% vs 28.7%; P = .007), and men (26.4% vs 14%; P = .03). Lung metastases were associated with PIK3CA mutations (23% vs 8.7%; P = .004). Only mutations in BRAF were independently associated with decreased overall survival (hazard ratio, 2.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-5.27; P = .029). The current study suggests that underlying molecular profiles can differ between colon and rectal cancers. Further investigation is warranted to assess whether the differences identified are important in determining the optimal treatment course for these patients. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  4. Quantitative CT Analysis of Pulmonary Ground-Glass Opacity Nodules for the Distinction of Invasive Adenocarcinoma from Pre-Invasive or Minimally Invasive Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Son, Ji Ye; Lee, Ho Yun; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kim, Jae-Hun; Han, Joungho; Jeong, Ji Yun; Kwon, O Jung; Shim, Young Mog

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to analyze the CT findings of ground-glass opacity nodules diagnosed pathologically as adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS), minimally invasive adenocarcinoma (MIA), and invasive adenocarcinoma in order to investigate whether quantitative CT parameters enable distinction of invasive adenocarcinoma from pre-invasive or minimally invasive adenocarcinoma. Methods We reviewed CT images and pathologic specimens from 191 resected ground-glass opacity nodules with little or no solid component at CT. Nodule size, volume, density, mass, skewness/kurtosis, and CT attenuation values at the 2.5th–97.5th percentiles on histogram, and texture parameters (uniformity and entropy) were assessed from CT datasets. Results Of 191 tumors, 38 were AISs (20%), 61 were MIAs (32%), and 92 (48%) were invasive adenocarcinomas. Multivariate logistic regression analysis helped identify the 75th percentile CT attenuation value (P = 0.04) and entropy (P<0.01) as independent predictors for invasive adenocarcinoma, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.780. Conclusion Quantitative analysis of preoperative CT imaging metrics can help distinguish invasive adenocarcinoma from pre-invasive or minimally invasive adenocarcinoma. PMID:25102064

  5. Minnesota Colorectal Cancer Initiative: successful development and implementation of a community-based colorectal cancer registry.

    PubMed

    Rothenberger, David A; Dalberg, Deanna L; Leininger, Anna

    2004-10-01

    The aim of the Minnesota Colorectal Cancer Initiative is to implement risk-specific interventions to decrease colorectal cancer morbidity and mortality by 1) assisting clinicians to identify and educate individuals and families at high and increased risk for colorectal cancer; 2) providing professional and community education; 3) maintaining a database to evaluate the effectiveness of preventive intervention strategies; and 4) facilitating colorectal cancer research. Two physician groups and the University Cancer Center founded the Minnesota Colorectal Cancer Initiative as a not-for-profit organization. Health care organizations, pharmaceutical companies, a consulting firm, and other practice groups provide continuing financial and other support. A database registry, risk-assessment survey, and consent document were developed and then were approved by an institutional review board. A trial enrollment was conducted. Minnesota Colorectal Cancer Initiative services are available to the public. Participants are actively recruited through member organizations. Minnesota Colorectal Cancer Initiative assesses hereditary risk and will document family history in the medical record on request. A personally targeted reply letter reviews risk factors and recommends specific screening and surveillance strategies for participants and their family members, and when appropriate, provides information regarding genetic counseling and testing services. Minnesota Colorectal Cancer Initiative services are free to participants. Since 1999, Minnesota Colorectal Cancer Initiative has sent individually tailored reply letters providing risk-specific information about colorectal cancer to 717 participants and more than 3200 of their first-degree and second-degree relatives. More than 200 families, previously unidentified as having histories suggestive of hereditary colorectal cancer (attenuated familial polyposis and hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer), have been identified; genetic

  6. Tumor Budding in Intestinal Type Gastric Adenocarcinoma is Associated with Nodal Metastasis and Recurrence.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Stephen; Linda, Jin; Fields, Ryan C; Yan, Yan; Nalbantoglu, ILKe

    2017-04-17

    Gastric adenocarcinoma (GAC) is a common cause of cancer-related death worldwide. GAC can be classified as intestinal or diffuse. Intestinal type cancers are common and reported to have a better prognosis compared to diffuse cancers. Studies have shown the presence and amount of tumor budding in intestinal carcinomas of the colon and esophagus to predict nodal metastasis and recurrence. Our aim is to determine if tumor budding in intestinal type GAC correlates with prognostic features. One hundred four patients treated with primary surgical excision between 1999-2013 were identified. Histologic type (intestinal, diffuse, or mixed), tumor grade, T-stage, and lymph node status were evaluated. Tumor bud scores were assigned to all intestinal type cancers using methods previously described for colorectal adenocarcinoma. Scores of <1 were designated as low and ≥1 as high. Tumor characteristics were as follows: 52 intestinal (50%), 36 diffuse (35%) and 16 mixed (15%). Of the 52 cases with intestinal histology, 4 were well (8%), 28 were moderately (54%), and 20 were poorly differentiated (38%). Thirty-three (63%) of the intestinal tumors had high tumor bud scores. Cases with high scores were associated with higher T-stage, N-stage, and grade (P<.001, P<.001, and P=.002). These also had a higher likelihood of recurrence (P=.007). In our cohort, high tumor bud scores in intestinal type GAC have higher T-stage, N-stage, grade, and likelihood of recurrence. Assessment of tumor budding may guide clinical management in a subset of patients. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Small bowel adenocarcinoma in Lynch syndrome: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ke-Kang; Liu, Gang; Shen, Xiaojun; Wu, Xiaoyang

    2016-01-01

    Small bowel adenocarcinoma is part of the tumor spectrum of Lynch syndrome, which is caused by germline mutations in the mismatch repair genes. The present study describes the case of a 51-year-old man fulfilling the Amsterdam II criteria for Lynch syndrome, who had a 15-mm early-stage colorectal cancer resected endoscopically from the ascending colon. Due to upper abdominal discomfort after eating and consequent anorexia, a computed tomography scan performed 1 month later showed a tumoral mass of the upper jejunum with local lymphadenopathy. The laparotomy revealed a completely obstructing mass. Intraoperative frozen section showed a small bowel adenocarcinoma. Subsequent genetic testing confirmed the germline mutation of mutL homolog 1. The patient received 6 cycles of an adjuvant folinic acid, fluorouracil and ocaliplatin chemotherapy regimen. The latest CT scan, 16 months after the chemotherapy, did not show any recurrence. This case highlights the importance of considering the possibility of small bowel adenocarcinoma in patients with upper bowel obstruction, particularly for patients with Lynch syndrome. PMID:27446478

  8. Incidental adenocarcinoma in patients undergoing surgery for stricturing Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Kristo, Ivan; Riss, Stefan; Argeny, Stanislaus; Maschke, Svenja; Chitsabesan, Praminthra; Stift, Anton

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate frequency and clinical course of incidental adenocarcinoma in patients with stricturing Crohn's disease (CD). METHODS In this study, consecutive patients, who were operated on for stricturing CD between 1997-2012, were included at an academic tertiary referral center. Demographic data and clinical course were obtained by an institutional database and individual chart review. Besides baseline characteristics, intraoperative findings and CD related history were also recorded. Colorectal cancer was classified and staged according to the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC). RESULTS During the study period 484 patients underwent resections due to stricturing CD. Incidental adenocarcinoma was histologically confirmed in 6 (1.2%) patients (4 males, 2 females). Patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer had a median age of 43 (27-66) years and a median history of CD of 16 (7-36) years. Malignant lesions were found in the rectum (n = 4, 66.7%), descending colon (n = 1, 16.7%) and ileocolon (n = 1, 16.7%). According to the UICC classification two patients were stages as I (33.3%), whereas the other patients were classified as stage IIA (16.7%), stage IIIB (16.7%), stage IIIC (16.7%) and stage IV (16.7%), respectively. After a median follow-up of 2 (0.03-8) years only 1 patient is still alive. CONCLUSION The frequency of incidental colorectal cancer in patients, who undergo surgery for stenotic CD, is low but associated with poor prognosis. However, surgeons need to be aware about the possibility of malignancy in stricturing CD, especially if localized in the rectum. PMID:28210083

  9. Intestinal differentiated mucinous adenocarcinoma of the endometrium with sporadic MSI high status: a case report.

    PubMed

    Trippel, Mafalda; Imboden, Sara; Papadia, Andrea; Mueller, Michael D; Mertineit, Nando; Härmä, Kirsi; Nicolae, Alina; Vassella, Erik; Rau, Tilman T

    2017-05-12

    Intestinal differentiation of primary mucinous adenocarcinoma of the uterine corpus is exceedingly rare in comparison to the approximately 25% rate in endocervical and ovarian mucinous carcinoma. Additionally, little is known about the related genetic and epigenetic alterations, even though large-scale molecular characterisation of the different types of endometrial cancer took place in the TCGA project along the entities defined by the recent WHO classification. We present a 62-year-old patient harbouring a primary mucinous carcinoma of the uterine corpus with a morphological resemblance to mucinous colorectal adenocarcinoma. The intestinal differentiation was substantiated by CDX2 and CK20 positivity in the absence of PAX8, p16, WT1, p53, ER, PgR, AFP, SALL4 and Glypican3. A high MSI status with MLH1 hypermethylation was revealed by molecular testing. Intestinal differentiation of mucinous adenocarcinoma of the endometrium is a unique observation. Besides morphology, it obviously can share molecular features of sporadic MSI colorectal cancers. It can be speculated that either CDX2 positive morula formation or intestinal metaplasia of the endometrium as rare conditions might be the origin of carcinogenesis for this type II endometrial cancer. Both conditions were not detectable in this case. Of note, categorising endometrial cancers in genetic subgroups like MSI high cancers alone might lead to the integration of likewise morphologically different tumours like the case presented here with intestinal differentiation. Hence, careful genotype-phenotype correlations are warranted for studies of mucinous adenocarcinoma of the endometrium.

  10. Laparoscopy in the management of gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Burke, E C; Karpeh, M S; Conlon, K C; Brennan, M F

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors determined the accuracy of laparoscopy in detecting metastatic disease in patients with gastric adenocarcinoma. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The majority of patients with gastric adenocarcinoma in the United States present with advanced disease. They are at high risk for intraabdominal metastatic spread. METHODS: One hundred eleven patients with gastric adenocarcinoma underwent laparoscopy at Memorial-Sloan Kettering Cancer Center from December 1991 to December 1995. All were judged to be free of intra-abdominal metastatic disease on preoperative computed tomographic scan imaging. RESULTS: Laparoscopic exploration was successful in 110 of 111 patients and accurately staged 94% of the patients with respect to metastatic disease with a sensitivity of 84% and a specificity of 100%. The prevalence rate of metastatic disease was 37%. Twenty-four patients underwent laparoscopy only and were discharged in an average 1.4 days versus 6.5 days in patients undergoing exploratory laparotomy without resection (p < 0.05). No patients undergoing laparoscopy only have returned for palliative surgery. CONCLUSIONS: Laparoscopy should be performed in nonobstructed, nonbleeding patients with advanced gastric cancer in the United States. More than one third of these patients have unsuspected metastatic disease at time of operation. Laparoscopy is highly accurate in detecting occult metastases and identifies a unique population of stage IV patients who may benefit from newer induction chemotherapeutic approaches while avoiding unnecessary laparotomy. Images Figure 4. PMID:9060581

  11. Colorectal polyps and polyposis syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Shussman, Noam; Wexner, Steven D.

    2014-01-01

    A polyp is defined as any mass protruding into the lumen of a hollow viscus. Colorectal polyps may be classified by their macroscopic appearance as sessile (flat, arising directly from the mucosal layer) or pedunculated (extending from the mucosa through a fibrovascular stalk). Colorectal polyps may also be histologically classified as neoplastic or as non-neoplastic (hyperplastic, hamartomatous, or inflammatory). The neoplastic polyps are of primary importance because they harbor a malignant potential, which represents a stage in the development of colorectal cancer. For this reason, it is essential to identify these polyps at a sufficiently early stage, when a simple outpatient procedure to remove them can interrupt the development of colorectal cancer and prevent disease and death. When invasive carcinoma arises in a polyp, careful consideration must be given to ensuring the adequacy of treatment. Although most neoplastic polyps do not evolve into cancer, it is well accepted that the majority of colorectal carcinomas evolve from adenomatous polyps; the sequence of events leading to this transformation is referred to as the adenoma-to-carcinoma sequence. The presence of a systemic process that promotes the development of multiple gastro-intestinal polyps is termed ‘polyposis’. Hereditary gastro-intestinal polyposis syndromes account for approximately 1% of all cases of colorectal cancer and are associated with a broad spectrum of extra-colonic tumors. Early detection and accurate classification of these syndromes are essential, in order to initiate a surveillance program for the early detection of cancer. Several polyposis syndromes have been described, each having its own genetic basis and characteristic polyp distribution, clinical presentation, and malignancy risk. Diagnostic modalities and treatment options for neoplastic polyps—as well as the most prevalent polyposis syndromes—are reviewed below. PMID:24760231

  12. Colorectal Cancer Associated with Streptococcus anginosus Bacteremia and Liver Abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Masood, Umair; Sharma, Anuj; Lowe, Dhruv; Khan, Rashad; Manocha, Divey

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus anginosus is part of the normal flora of the human gastrointestinal tract. Their ability to cause abscesses is very unique and sets them apart from the rest of the streptococci groups. While an association of group D streptococcus bacteremia and endocarditis with colorectal carcinoma is well established, S. anginosus infections are rarely implicated with colonic malignancy. We present a case of a 62-year-old male who presented to the hospital with fatigue and generalized abdominal pain. Computed tomography of the abdomen revealed multiple liver abscesses and rectal thickening. Blood cultures were found to grow S. anginosus bacteria. Colonoscopy revealed a rectal mass which was later confirmed to be rectal adenocarcinoma. This case presents an association between S. anginosus bacteremia and presence of colorectal cancer which has been highlighted in only a few case reports in literature. This should prompt clinicians to screen for colorectal cancer in patients with S. anginosus bacteremia. PMID:28100999

  13. Dynamic Tumor Growth Patterns in a Novel Murine Model of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Terrah J. Paul; Hadac, Jamie N.; Sievers, Chelsie K.; Leystra, Alyssa A.; Deming, Dustin A.; Zahm, Christopher D.; Albrecht, Dawn M.; Nomura, Alice; Nettekoven, Laura A.; Plesh, Lauren K.; Clipson, Linda; Sullivan, Ruth; Newton, Michael A.; Schelman, William R.; Halberg, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) often arises from adenomatous colonic polyps. Polyps can grow and progress to cancer, but may also remain static in size, regress, or resolve. Predicting which progress and which remain benign is difficult. We developed a novel long-lived murine model of CRC with tumors that can be followed by colonoscopy. Our aim was to assess whether these tumors have similar growth patterns and histologic fates to human colorectal polyps to identify features to aid in risk-stratification of colonic tumors. Long-lived ApcMin/+ mice were treated with dextran sodium sulfate to promote colonic tumorigenesis. Tumor growth patterns were characterized by serial colonoscopy with biopsies obtained for immunohistochemistry and gene expression profiling. Tumors grew, remained static, regressed, or resolved over time with different relative frequencies. Newly developed tumors demonstrated higher rates of growth and resolution than more established tumors that tended to remain static in size. Colonic tumors were hyperplastic lesions (3%), adenomas (73%), intramucosal carcinomas (20%), or adenocarcinomas (3%). Interestingly, the level of β-catenin was higher in adenomas that became intratumoral carcinomas as compared to those that failed to progress. In addition, differentially expressed genes between adenomas and intramucosal carcinomas were identified. This novel murine model of intestinal tumorigenesis develops colonic tumors that can be monitored by serial colonoscopy, mirror growth patterns seen in human colorectal polyps, and progress to CRC. Further characterization of cellular and molecular features are needed to determine which features can be used to risk-stratify polyps for progression to CRC and potentially guide prevention strategies. PMID:24196829

  14. Construction and analysis of three networks of genes and microRNAs in adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    NING, JIAHUI; GUO, XIAOXIN; WANG, NING; XUE, LUCHEN

    2015-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma is one of the most serious diseases that threaten human health. Numerous studies have investigated adenocarcinoma and have obtained a considerable amount of data regarding genes and microRNA (miRNA) in adenocarcinoma. However, studies have only focused on one or a small number of genes and miRNAs, and the data is stored in a scattered form, making it challenging to summarize and assess the associations between the genes and miRNAs. In the present study, three networks of genes and miRNAs in adenocarcinoma were focused on. This enabled the construction of networks of elements involved in adenocarcinoma and the analysis of these networks, rather than only discussing one gene. Transcription factors (TFs), miRNAs, and target and host genes of miRNAs in adenocarcinoma, and the regulatory associations between these elements were identified in the present study. These elements and associations were then used to construct three networks, which consisted of the differentially-expressed, associated and global networks. The similarities and differences between the three networks were compared and analyzed. In total, 3 notable TFs, consisting of TP53, phosphatase and tensin homolog and SMAD4, were identified in adenocarcinoma. These TFs were able to regulate the differentially-expressed genes and the majority of the differentially-expressed miRNAs. Certain important regulatory associations were also found in adenocarcinoma, in addition to self-regulating associations between TFs and miRNAs. The upstream and downstream elements of the differentially-expressed genes and miRNAs were recorded, which revealed the regulatory associations between genes and miRNAs. The present study clearly revealed components of the pathogenesis of adenocarcinoma and the regulatory associations between the elements in adenocarcinoma. The present study may aid the investigation of gene therapy in adenocarcinoma and provides a theoretical basis for studies of gene therapy methods as a

  15. [Uterine metastasis revealing gastric adenocarcinoma].

    PubMed

    Mambrini, P; Giovanini, M; Seitz, J F; Perrier, H; Allemand, I; Rabia, I; Monges, G; Lebreuil, G

    1995-01-01

    We report a case of metastasis to the uterine corpus revealing a primary gastric adenocarcinoma. A 26-year-old woman suffered from weight loss, vaginal bleeding, abdominal pain. An endometrial curettage showed apparently metastatic adenocarcinoma. The primary site of the tumour was gastric. The upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed an ulcus and aspect of linitis plastica in the fundus. Biopsies showed diffuse type adenocarcinoma. Because of extensive disease, laparotomy was not performed and exclusive palliative chemotherapy was started. The patient died 10 months after the diagnosis. Metastasis from primary gastric cancer to the female genital tract are rare and are usually observed in young premenopausal women with diffuse type gastric adenocarcinoma. This case report underlines the interest, for those patients of careful gynaecologic examination at the initial staging and after treatment.

  16. Danish Colorectal Cancer Group Database

    PubMed Central

    Ingeholm, Peter; Gögenur, Ismail; Iversen, Lene H

    2016-01-01

    Aim of database The aim of the database, which has existed for registration of all patients with colorectal cancer in Denmark since 2001, is to improve the prognosis for this patient group. Study population All Danish patients with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer who are either diagnosed or treated in a surgical department of a public Danish hospital. Main variables The database comprises an array of surgical, radiological, oncological, and pathological variables. The surgeons record data such as diagnostics performed, including type and results of radiological examinations, lifestyle factors, comorbidity and performance, treatment including the surgical procedure, urgency of surgery, and intra- and postoperative complications within 30 days after surgery. The pathologists record data such as tumor type, number of lymph nodes and metastatic lymph nodes, surgical margin status, and other pathological risk factors. Descriptive data The database has had >95% completeness in including patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma with >54,000 patients registered so far with approximately one-third rectal cancers and two-third colon cancers and an overrepresentation of men among rectal cancer patients. The stage distribution has been more or less constant until 2014 with a tendency toward a lower rate of stage IV and higher rate of stage I after introduction of the national screening program in 2014. The 30-day mortality rate after elective surgery has been reduced from >7% in 2001–2003 to <2% since 2013. Conclusion The database is a national population-based clinical database with high patient and data completeness for the perioperative period. The resolution of data is high for description of the patient at the time of diagnosis, including comorbidities, and for characterizing diagnosis, surgical interventions, and short-term outcomes. The database does not have high-resolution oncological data and does not register recurrences after primary surgery. The Danish

  17. Nuclear maspin expression: A biomarker for budding assessment in colorectal cancer specimens.

    PubMed

    Banias, Laura; Gurzu, Simona; Kovacs, Zsolt; Bara, Tivadar; Bara, Tivadar; Jung, Ioan

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the maspin expression in colorectal carcinomas (CRC) and its possible role in quantification of the tumor budding. The tumor budding was prospectively quantified in 49 consecutive cases of patients that underwent surgical resection for CRC. The cases were divided in two groups: group A (n=23) - low budding (<5 tumor buds per high microscopic field) and group B (n=26) - high budding CRCs (≥5 buds). Maspin expression was evaluated in the tumor core and the buds from the hot spot area in 44 of the microsatellite stable adenocarcinomas. Its expression was quantified as negative, cytoplasmic only, nuclear only or mixed expression (cytoplasm and nucleus). Compared with group A, a higher pT (p <0.0001) and pN stage (p=0.0001) and infiltrating aspect at macroscopic evaluation (p=0.0081) was identified in group B. No correlation between the maspin expression in the tumore core and the budding grade was noted (p=0.14). Compared with the tumor core, the cytoplasm to nuclear translocation of maspin was more frequently observed in cases from group B than A (n=0.0063). For the colorectal carcinomas, the infiltrative aspect at macroscopic evaluation and nuclear maspin in the buds might be used as indicators of risk for lymph node metastases. Maspin nuclear expression in the buds may be helpful for a proper budding assessment and may serve as a negative prognostic factor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Human papillomavirus DNA and oncogene alterations in colorectal tumors.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Luis Orlando; Barbisan, Gisela; Ottino, Anabel; Pianzola, Horacio; Golijow, Carlos Daniel

    2010-09-01

    The aim of the present study is to determine the presence and molecular integrity of high-risk HPV types in colorectal adenocarcinomas and to assess whether viral DNA is related to common proto-oncogene alterations, such as k-ras mutations and c-myc gene amplification, in colorectal cancer. Seventy-five colorectal adenocarcinomas were screened for HPV infection using nested-PCR (MY09/11-GP5+/6+). HPV typing was performed by type-specific PCR for HPV 16 and HPV 18 DNA. Unidentified samples were subsequently sequenced to determine the viral genotype. The physical status of HPV was determined by a nested PCR approach for type-specific E2 sequences. C-myc amplification was assessed by co-amplification with β-globin as control locus, and mutation in k-ras codons 12 and 13 by ARMS-PCR. Overall, HPV was detected in thirty-three colorectal specimens (44%). HPV 16 was the prevalent type (16/75), followed by HPV 18 (15/75), HPV 31 (1/75) and HPV 66 (1/75). E2 disruption was detected in 56.3% of HPV 16 and in 40% of HPV 18 positive tumors. C-myc amplification was detected in 29.4% of cases, while k-ras mutations in 30.7%. There was no significant trend for HPV infection in tumors harboring either k-ras or c-myc alterations. This study demonstrates HPV DNA and viral integration in colorectal tumors, suggesting a potential role of this virus in colorectal carcinogenesis. There was no concurrence, however, of k-ras and c-myc activation with viral infection.

  19. Colorectal smartphone apps: opportunities and risks.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, S; Brady, R R W

    2012-09-01

    The increased utilization of smartphones within the clinical environment together with connected applications (apps) provides opportunity for doctors, including coloproctologists, to integrate such technology into clinical practice. However, the reliability of unregulated medical apps has recently been called into question. Here, we review contemporary medical apps specifically themed towards colorectal diseases and assess levels of medical professional involvement in their design and content. The most popular smartphone app stores (iPhone, Android, Blackberry, Nokia, Windows and Samsung) were searched for colorectal disease themed apps, using the disease terms colorectal cancer, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, diverticulitis, haemorrhoids, anal fissure, bowel incontinence and irritable bowel syndrome. A total of 68 individual colorectal themed apps were identified, amongst which there were five duplicates. Only 29% of colorectal apps had had customer satisfaction ratings and 32% had named medical professional involvement in their development or content. The benefits of apps are offset by lack of colorectal specification. There is little medical professional involvement in their design. Increased regulation is required to improve accountability of app content. © 2012 The Authors. Colorectal Disease © 2012 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  20. CD133+, CD166+CD44+, and CD24+CD44+ phenotypes fail to reliably identify cell populations with cancer stem cell functional features in established human colorectal cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Muraro, Manuele Giuseppe; Mele, Valentina; Däster, Silvio; Han, Junyi; Heberer, Michael; Cesare Spagnoli, Giulio; Iezzi, Giandomenica

    2012-08-01

    Increasing evidence that cancers originate from small populations of so-called cancer stem cells (CSCs), capable of surviving conventional chemotherapies and regenerating the original tumor, urges the development of novel CSC-targeted treatments. Screening of new anticancer compounds is conventionally conducted on established tumor cell lines, providing sufficient material for high-throughput studies. Whether tumor cell lines might comprise CSC populations resembling those of primary tumors, however, remains highly debated. We have analyzed the expression of defined phenotypic profiles, including CD133+, CD166+CD44+, and CD24+CD44+, reported as CSC-specific in human primary colorectal cancer (CRC), on a panel of 10 established CRC cell lines and evaluated their correlation with CSC properties. None of the putative CSC phenotypes consistently correlated with stem cell-like features, including spheroid formation ability, clonogenicity, aldehyde dehydrogenase-1 activity, and side population phenotype. Importantly, CRC cells expressing putative CSC markers did not exhibit increased survival when treated with chemotherapeutic drugs in vitro or display higher tumorigenicity in vivo. Thus, the expression of CD133 or the coexpression of CD166/CD44 or CD24/CD44 did not appear to reliably identify CSC populations in established CRC cell lines. Our findings question the suitability of cell lines for the screening of CSC-specific therapies and underline the urgency of developing novel platforms for anticancer drug discovery.

  1. Significance of signet ring cells in high-grade mucinous adenocarcinoma of the peritoneum from appendiceal origin☆,☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Sirintrapun, S. Joseph; Blackham, Aaron U.; Russell, Greg; Votanopoulos, Konstantinos; Stewart, John H.; Shen, Perry; Levine, Edward A.; Geisinger, Kim R.; Bergman, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Summary Significance of signet ring cells in mucinous adenocarcinoma of the peritoneum from appendiceal origin has never been specifically studied. We retrospectively reviewed cases of mucinous adenocarcinoma of the peritoneum from appendiceal origin (n = 55) and collected clinical follow-up data. Signet ring cells were identified in 29 of 55 cases. No low-grade mucinous adenocarcinoma case (n = 11) had signet ring cells, whereas 29 of 44 high-grade mucinous adenocarcinoma cases did. Cases of high-grade mucinous adenocarcinoma were subdivided into 3 groups: (1) high-grade mucinous adenocarcinoma without signet ring cells (n = 15), (2) high-grade mucinous adenocarcinoma with signet ring cells only within mucin pools (n = 20), and (3) high-grade mucinous adenocarcinoma with signet ring cells invading tissue (n = 9). Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival were subsequently evaluated. Five-year OS for cases of high-grade mucinous adenocarcinoma without signet ring cells and high-grade mucinous adenocarcinoma with signet ring cells within mucin pools were similar at 31.8% (SE, 14.4%) and 35.8% (SE, 13.9%), respectively. A significant survival difference was seen for cases of high-grade mucinous adenocarcinoma with signet ring cells invading tissue with a median OS of 0.5 years versus 2.9 and 2.4 years (P = .04 and P = .03), respectively, for cases of high-grade mucinous adenocarcinoma without signet ring cells and high-grade mucinous adenocarcinoma with signet ring cells within mucin pools. Finding signet ring cells floating in extracellular mucin pools made no prognostic difference when compared with cases of high-grade mucinous adenocarcinoma without signet ring cells. In contrast, high-grade mucinous adenocarcinoma with signet ring cells invading tissue was significant for worse survival, and thus, we propose reporting signet ring cell tissue invasion particularly when extensive. PMID:24814804

  2. Significance of signet ring cells in high-grade mucinous adenocarcinoma of the peritoneum from appendiceal origin.

    PubMed

    Sirintrapun, S Joseph; Blackham, Aaron U; Russell, Greg; Votanopoulos, Konstantinos; Stewart, John H; Shen, Perry; Levine, Edward A; Geisinger, Kim R; Bergman, Simon

    2014-08-01

    Significance of signet ring cells in mucinous adenocarcinoma of the peritoneum from appendiceal origin has never been specifically studied. We retrospectively reviewed cases of mucinous adenocarcinoma of the peritoneum from appendiceal origin (n = 55) and collected clinical follow-up data. Signet ring cells were identified in 29 of 55 cases. No low-grade mucinous adenocarcinoma case (n = 11) had signet ring cells, whereas 29 of 44 high-grade mucinous adenocarcinoma cases did. Cases of high-grade mucinous adenocarcinoma were subdivided into 3 groups: (1) high-grade mucinous adenocarcinoma without signet ring cells (n = 15), (2) high-grade mucinous adenocarcinoma with signet ring cells only within mucin pools (n = 20), and (3) high-grade mucinous adenocarcinoma with signet ring cells invading tissue (n = 9). Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival were subsequently evaluated. Five-year OS for cases of high-grade mucinous adenocarcinoma without signet ring cells and high-grade mucinous adenocarcinoma with signet ring cells within mucin pools were similar at 31.8% (SE, 14.4%) and 35.8% (SE, 13.9%), respectively. A significant survival difference was seen for cases of high-grade mucinous adenocarcinoma with signet ring cells invading tissue with a median OS of 0.5 years versus 2.9 and 2.4 years (P = .04 and P = .03), respectively, for cases of high-grade mucinous adenocarcinoma without signet ring cells and high-grade mucinous adenocarcinoma with signet ring cells within mucin pools. Finding signet ring cells floating in extracellular mucin pools made no prognostic difference when compared with cases of high-grade mucinous adenocarcinoma without signet ring cells. In contrast, high-grade mucinous adenocarcinoma with signet ring cells invading tissue was significant for worse survival, and thus, we propose reporting signet ring cell tissue invasion particularly when extensive. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Proteomic Analysis to Identify Functional Molecules in Drug Resistance Caused by E-Cadherin Knockdown in 3D-Cultured Colorectal Cancer Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    including IMAC and TiO2 that are widely used to enrich phosphopeptides from the peptide mixtures for phosphoproteomic studies. We first optimized the TiO2 ...or IMAC bead to peptide ratios to achieve the best performance of the beads (Figure 2). The results show that TiO2 beads perform best with the TiO2 ...lysate. (A) Optimization of TiO2 to peptide ratio. (B). Optimization of peptide to IMAC ratio. Identified total peptide numbers with different TiO2

  4. Intratumor heterogeneity in localized lung adenocarcinomas delineated by multiregion sequencing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianjun; Fujimoto, Junya; Zhang, Jianhua; Wedge, David C; Song, Xingzhi; Zhang, Jiexin; Seth, Sahil; Chow, Chi-Wan; Cao, Yu; Gumbs, Curtis; Gold, Kathryn A; Kalhor, Neda; Little, Latasha; Mahadeshwar, Harshad; Moran, Cesar; Protopopov, Alexei; Sun, Huandong; Tang, Jiabin; Wu, Xifeng; Ye, Yuanqing; William, William N; Lee, J Jack; Heymach, John V; Hong, Waun Ki; Swisher, Stephen; Wistuba, Ignacio I; Futreal, P Andrew

    2014-10-10

    Cancers are composed of populations of cells with distinct molecular and phenotypic features, a phenomenon termed intratumor heterogeneity (ITH). ITH in lung cancers has not been well studied. We applied multiregion whole-exome sequencing (WES) on 11 localized lung adenocarcinomas. All tumors showed clear evidence of ITH. On average, 76% of all mutations and 20 out of 21 known cancer gene mutations were identified in all regions of individual tumors, which suggested that single-region sequencing may be adequate to identify the majority of known cancer gene mutations in localized lung adenocarcinomas. With a median follow-up of 21 months after surgery, three patients have relapsed, and all three patients had significantly larger fractions of subclonal mutations in their primary tumors than patients without relapse. These data indicate that a larger subclonal mutation fraction may be associated with increased likelihood of postsurgical relapse in patients with localized lung adenocarcinomas.

  5. miR-297 acts as an oncogene by targeting GPC5 in lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yunchuan; Zhao, Jianyong; Yin, Xiaoming; Yuan, Xiangkun; Guo, Jianfei; Bi, Jianqiang

    2016-10-01

    Emerging studies have demonstrated that microRNAs (miRNAs) play crucial roles in carcinogenesis of many developing human tumours. However, the functions and mechanisms of miR-297 in lung cancer have, up to now, been largely undefined. Here, miR-297 expression was measured in lung adenocarcinoma tissues and cell lines, using qRT-PCR. Lung adenocarcinoma cell line was treated with an miR-297 mimic. MTT and colony analysis were performed to detect cell proliferation and colony formation. The direct target gene of miR-297 was assessed by qRT-PCR, Western blotting and luciferase assays. We demonstrated that miR-297 expression was upregulated in lung adenocarcinomas compared to adjacent normal tissues. Expression of miR-297 was also upregulated in tested lung adenocarcinoma cell lines. Ectopic expression of miR-297 enhanced lung adenocarcinoma cell proliferation and colony formation. Furthermore, overexpression of miR-297 promoted cell migration and invasion. In addition, we identified Glypican-5 (GPC5) as a direct target gene of miR-297 in lung adenocarcinoma cells. Expression of GPC5 was downregulated in both lung adenocarcinoma tissues and cell lines. Moreover, expression of GPC5 was inversely associated with expression of miR-297 in lung adenocarcinoma tissues. These results suggest that miR-297 acted as an oncogenic miRNA, partly by targeting GPC5, adenocarcinoma of the lung. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Improving colorectal cancer screening: fact and fantasy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dam, Jacques

    2008-02-01

    Premalignant diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, such as Barrett's esophagus, long-standing ulcerative colitis, and adenomatous polyps, have a significantly increased risk for development of adenocarcinoma, most often through an intermediate stage of dysplasia. Adenocarcinoma of the colon is the second most common cancer in the United States. Because patients with colorectal cancer often present with advanced disease, the outcomes are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Effective methods of early detection are essential. As non-polypoid dysplasia is not visible using conventional endoscopy, surveillance of patients with Barrett's esophagus and ulcerative colitis is performed via a system in which multiple random biopsies are obtained at prescribed intervals. Sampling error and missed diagnoses occur frequently and render current screening methods inadequate. Also, the examination of a tissue biopsy is time consuming and costly, and significant intra- and inter-observer variation may occur. The newer methods discussed herein demonstrate the potential to solve these problems by early detection of disease with high sensitivity and specificity. Conventional endoscopy is based on the observation of white light reflected off the tissue surface. Subtle changes in color and shadow reveal structural changes. New developments in optical imaging go beyond white light, exploiting other properties of light. Several promising methods will be discussed at this meeting and shall be briefly discussed below. However, few such imaging modalities have arrived at our clinical practice. Some much more practical methods to improve colorectal cancer screening are currently being evaluated for their clinical impact. These methods seek to overcome limitations other than those of detecting dysplasia not visible under white light endoscopy. The current standard practice of colorectal cancer screening utilizes colonoscopy, an uncomfortable, sometimes difficult medical

  7. [Molecular genetics of colorectal cancer and carcinogenesis].

    PubMed

    Panduro Cerda, A; Lima González, G; Villalobos, J J

    1993-01-01

    Genetic and environmental aspects play an important role in the development of colorectal cancer. However, the common molecular alteration in both hereditary and sporadic colon cancer is localized in the APC gene. the APC gene maps in the long arm of chromosome 5 and was discovered in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). The search for the APC gene led to the identification of restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) in FAP patients. Using these RFLPs in relatives of FAP patients it is possible to make the presymptomatic and prenatal diagnosis. The FAP syndrome is an interesting model of carcinogenesis in vivo. Thus the different stages involved in the FAP syndrome which include hyperproliferative epithelium, adenoma, adenocarcinoma and metastases, have allowed the analysis of molecular alterations in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. The APC gene alteration if not inherited, occurs as the earliest molecular alteration in the development of colorectal cancer whereas structural alterations of the genes myc, ras, p53, MCC and DCC are considered to be late events. All these investigations have lead to 1) a better understanding of the ethiology of cancer and 2) early diagnosis of colorectal cancer in both the hereditary and sporadic forms of the disease.

  8. KISS1 expression in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kostakis, Ioannis D; Agrogiannis, George; Vaiopoulos, Aristeidis G; Mylona, Eleni; Patsouris, Efstratios; Kouraklis, Gregory; Koutsilieris, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Kisspeptins, the products of the KISS1 gene, are involved in cancer invasion, migration, metastasis and angiogenesis, while they induce apoptosis in various cancers. Herein, we studied KISS1 expression in colorectal cancer. We analyzed KISS1 expression using immunohistochemistry and image analysis in normal and malignant tissue samples from 60 patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma. The results correlated with various clinicopathological parameters. The expression of KISS1 was much higher in normal than in malignant colonic mucosa. However, among malignant tissues, KISS1 expression was higher in larger tumors (>4 cm) than in smaller ones (≤4 cm) and in stages III and IV than in stages I and II. In addition, it was higher in patients with lymph node metastases. Moreover, KISS1 levels in the normal mucosa and their difference from those in the malignant mucosa were higher in the right part of the large intestine than in the left one. KISS1 expression is reduced during the malignant transformation of the colonic mucosa and there is a difference in the expression pattern between the right and the left part of the large intestine. However, larger and advanced colorectal tumors express higher KISS1 levels than smaller and localized ones.

  9. Location of colorectal cancer: colonoscopy versus surgery. Yield of colonoscopy in predicting actual location.

    PubMed

    Blum-Guzman, Juan Pablo; Wanderley de Melo, Silvio

    2017-07-01

     Recent studies suggest that differences in biological characteristics and risk factors across cancer site within the colon and rectum may translate to differences in survival. It can be challenging at times to determine the precise anatomical location of a lesion with a luminal view during colonoscopy. The aim of this study is to determine if there is a significant difference between the location of colorectal cancers described by gastroenterologists in colonoscopies and the actual anatomical location noted on operative and pathology reports after colon surgery.  A single-center retrospective analysis of colonoscopies of patient with reported colonic masses from January 2005 to April 2014 (n = 380) was carried. Assessed data included demography, operative and pathology reports. Findings were compared: between the location of colorectal cancers described by gastroenterologists in colonoscopies and the actual anatomical location noted on operative reports or pathology samples.  We identified 380 colonic masses, 158 were confirmed adenocarcinomas. Of these 123 underwent surgical resection, 27 had to be excluded since no specific location was reported on their operative or pathology report. An absolute difference between endoscopic and surgical location was found in 32 cases (33 %). Of these, 22 (23 %) differed by 1 colonic segment, 8 (8 %) differed by 2 colonic segments and 2 (2 %) differed by 3 colonic segments.  There is a significant difference between the location of colorectal cancers reported by gastroenterologists during endoscopy and the actual anatomical location noted on operative or pathology reports after colon surgery. Endoscopic tattooing should be used when faced with any luminal lesions of interest.

  10. Central nervous system metastasis secondary to colorectal cancer: a retrospective cohort study of 20 cases

    PubMed Central

    Mondaca, Sebastián; Hornig, Valentina; Munoz-Schuffenegger, Pablo; Acevedo, Francisco; Garrido, Marcelo; Nervi, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Involvement of the central nervous system (CNS) secondary to colorectal cancer is infrequent and associated with a poor prognosis. Its treatment is extrapolated from metastases of other origins as the information available on this scenario is limited. The goal of this study is to assess the clinical characteristics of a series of patients and determine the results in terms of progression-free survival (PFS) and global survival. Method The records of patients with CNS metastasis of colorectal origin who were treated in this facility between the years 2001 and 2016 were reviewed retrospectively. Results 20 patients with CNS lesions of this origin were identified. Of these, 45% were male and 55% were female (average age 65.5 years). The histology corresponded to tubular adenocarcinoma in 95% of cases. Around 85% of the patients showed a neurological deficit, and their recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) classifications were 1 in 20%, 2 in 55%, and 3 in 25% of the cases studied. The treatments provided were: holocerebral radiotherapy (45%), stereotactic radiosurgery (25%), surgery followed by holocerebral radiotherapy (25%), and exclusively palliative care (5%). The PFS was 2.6 months from treatment of the CNS lesion, while the median survival was 3.8 months. The survival times for patients receiving different treatments were as follows: surgery plus holocerebral radiotherapy 16.2 months, stereotactic radiotherapy 12 months, and holocerebral radiotherapy 2.4 months (p = 0.003). Conclusion The prognosis for patients with metastasis of colorectal origin is poor. The patients treated with surgery or stereotactic radiotherapy can have a greater survival. PMID:28105076

  11. Coexistence of gastrointestinal stromal tumors and gastric adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yan; Li, Ziyu; Liu, Yiqiang; Zhang, Lianhai; Li, Jiyou; Ji, Jiafu

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to detect the clinicopathology of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) occurring synchronously with gastric adenocarcinomas and to unveil the potential underlying relationship between the synchronous GIST and gastric adenocarcinoma. This study included 15 patients with incidental GISTs found during operations for gastric adenocarcinoma and 30 patients who underwent gastrectomy for gastric cancer without discovering GIST between January 2005 and December 2010 at the Beijing Cancer Institute. We collected the clinicopathological data and analyzed the KIT/PDGFRA mutational status of GISTs, corresponding gastric adenocarcinoma specimens, and the normal tissue around the cancer lesions. Additionally, as a control group, the mutational status of the patients with gastric adenocarcinoma and no other tumors was assayed. Overall, 18 GISTs were found in 15 gastric adenocarcinoma patients. Multiple GIST lesions were found in three cases (20 %). The patients' age ranged from 46 to 85 years, with an average of 67.6 years. The average size of the GISTs was 0.85 cm. All mesenchymal lesions showed low proliferative activity, were of low or very low risk, and were identified as CD117-positive by immunostaining. In GIST lesions, mutations in KIT were detected in 7 out of 13 cases, and of these mutations, 6 were found in exon 11 (46.2 %), and 1 was found in exon 9 (7.7 %). A total of five deletions and one point mutation were in exon 11, and one insertion was in exon 9. Mutations were not detected in exon 17 or 13 of KIT. There was no remarkable mutation analyzed in the gastric adenocarcinoma lesions or normal tissues from either the test or control groups. Clinicopathological profiles and molecular analysis of KIT/PDGFRA showed no obvious relationship between gastric cancer and GISTs in tumor genesis, such as similar oncogene mutations.

  12. Colorectal cancer screening using fecal occult blood test and subsequent risk of colorectal cancer: a prospective cohort study in Japan.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Jae; Inoue, Manami; Otani, Tetsuya; Iwasaki, Motoki; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2007-01-01

    To investigate prospectively the association between colorectal cancer screening and subsequent risk of colorectal cancer death in a large-scale population-based cohort study (the JPHC study) with a 13-year follow-up period in Japan. We analyzed data from a population-based cohort of 42,150 (20,326 men and 21,824 women) subjects. Subjects who had undergone fecal occult blood test (FOBT) screening during the preceding 12 months were defined as the screened group. A total of 132 colorectal cancer deaths and 597 cases of newly diagnosed colorectal cancer were identified during the follow-up period. We observed a nearly 70% decrease in colorectal cancer mortality in screened versus unscreened subjects (RR=0.28, 95% CI=0.13-0.61). Screening participation was associated with a 30% reduced risk of death from all causes other than colorectal cancer (RR=0.70, 95% CI=0.61-0.79). However, the extent of mortality reduction was greater for colorectal cancer than other causes. A significant decrease in the incidence of advanced colorectal cancer was seen in screened subjects (RR=0.41, 95% CI=0.27-0.63), although the overall incidence rate did not differ significantly between the screened and unscreened groups. Although self-selection bias could not be fully controlled, these findings suggest that colorectal cancer screening may be associated with a reduction in mortality from colorectal cancer in the Japanese population.

  13. Lymph Node Positivity in Appendiceal Adenocarcinoma: Should Size Matter?

    PubMed

    Gahagan, John V; Whealon, Matthew D; Phelan, Michael J; Mills, Steven; Pigazzi, Alessio; Stamos, Michael J; Nguyen, Ninh T; Carmichael, Joseph C

    2017-07-01

    The management algorithm for appendiceal adenocarcinoma is not well defined. This study sought to determine whether tumor size or depth of invasion better correlates with the presence of lymph node metastases in appendiceal adenocarcinoma, and to compare these rates with colon adenocarcinoma. A retrospective review of the National Cancer Database was performed to identify patients with appendiceal or colonic adenocarcinoma from 2004 to 2013 who underwent surgical resection. Cases were categorized by tumor size and by T stage. Rates of lymph node metastases were examined as a function of size and T stage. A total of 3,402 appendiceal and 314,864 colonic cases were identified. For appendiceal adenocarcinoma, larger tumor size was associated with higher T stage: Pearson correlation of 0.41 (95% CI 0.408 to 0.414; p < 0.001). Lymph node metastases were present in 19.1%, 27.8%, 39.6%, 39.4%, 42.4% and 39.1% for tumor sizes <1 cm, >1 to 2 cm, >2 to 3 cm, >3 to 4 cm, >4 to 5 cm, and >5 cm, respectively. Lymph node metastases were present in 0%, 11.2%, 12.3%, 35.5%, and 40.0% for in situ, T1, T2, T3, and T4 tumors, respectively. There was no difference in the rates of lymph node metastases between appendiceal and colonic adenocarcinoma for tumor sizes <3 cm, or for in situ and T1 tumors. Rates of lymph node metastases are higher in colonic adenocarcinoma for tumor sizes >3 cm and for T2, T3, and T4 tumors (p < 0.01). In appendiceal adenocarcinoma, the rate of lymph node metastases is substantial, even for small tumors. Tumor size should play no role in the decision of whether to perform a hemicolectomy. Appendectomy alone does not produce an adequate lymph node sample. Right hemicolectomy should be performed for all appendiceal adenocarcinomas. Copyright © 2017 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Utility of Genomic Analysis in Differentiating Synchronous and Metachronous Lung Adenocarcinomas from Primary Adenocarcinomas with Intrapulmonary Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Saab, Jad; Zia, Hamid; Mathew, Susan; Kluk, Michael; Narula, Navneet; Fernandes, Helen

    2017-06-01

    Distinguishing synchronous and metachronous primary lung adenocarcinomas from adenocarcinomas with intrapulmonary metastasis is essential for optimal patient management. In this study, multiple lung adenocarcinomas occurring in the same patient were evaluated using comprehensive histopathologic evaluation supplemented with molecular analysis. The cohort included 18 patients with a total of 52 lung adenocarcinomas. Eleven patients had a new diagnosis of multiple adenocarcinomas in the same lobe (n=5) or different lobe (n=6). Seven patients had a history of lung cancer and developed multiple new tumors. The final diagnosis was made in resection specimens (n=49), fine needle aspiration (n=2), and biopsy (n=1). Adenocarcinomas were non-mucinous, and histopathologic comparison of tumors was performed. All tumors save for one were subjected to ALK gene rearrangement testing and targeted Next Generation Sequencing (NGS). Using clinical, radiologic, and morphologic features, a confident conclusion favoring synchronous/metachronous or metastatic disease was made in 65% of patients. Cases that proved challenging included ones with more than three tumors showing overlapping growth patterns and lacking a predominant lepidic component. Genomic signatures unique to each tumor were helpful in determining the relationship of multiple carcinomas in 72% of patients. Collectively, morphologic and genomic data proved to be of greater value and achieved a conclusive diagnosis in 94% of patients. Assessment of the genomic profiles of multiple lung adenocarcinomas complements the histological findings, enabling a more comprehensive assessment of synchronous, metachronous, and metastatic lesions in most patients, thereby improving staging accuracy. Targeted NGS can identify genetic alterations with therapeutic implications. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Prognostic Significance of Adenocarcinoma in situ, Minimally Invasive Adenocarcinoma, and Nonmucinous Lepidic Predominant Invasive Adenocarcinoma of the Lung in Patients with Stage I Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kadota, Kyuichi; Villena-Vargas, Jonathan; Yoshizawa, Akihiko; Motoi, Noriko; Sima, Camelia S.; Riely, Gregory J.; Rusch, Valerie W.; Adusumilli, Prasad S.; Travis, William D.

    2014-01-01

    According to the IASLC/ATS/ERS classification, the lepidic predominant pattern consists of 3 subtypes: adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS), minimally invasive adenocarcinoma (MIA), and nonmucinous lepidic predominant invasive adenocarcinoma. We reviewed tumor slides from 1038 patients with stage I lung adenocarcinoma, recording the percentage of each histologic pattern and measuring invasive tumor size. Tumors were classified according to the IASLC/ATS/ERS classification: 2 were AIS, 34 MIA, and 103 lepidic predominant invasive. Cumulative incidence of recurrence (CIR) was used to estimate the probability of recurrence. Patients with AIS and MIA experienced no recurrences. Patients with lepidic predominant invasive tumors had a lower risk of recurrence (5-year CIR, 8%) than non-lepidic predominant tumors (n=899; 19%; P=0.003). Patients with >50% lepidic pattern tumors experienced no recurrences (n=84), those with >10%–50% lepidic pattern tumors had an intermediate risk of recurrence (n=344; 5-year CIR, 12%), and those with ≤10% lepidic pattern tumors had the highest risk (n=610; 22%; P<0.001). CIR was lower for patients with ≤2 cm tumors than for those with >2–3 cm tumors (for both total and invasive tumor size), with the difference more pronounced for invasive tumor size (5-year CIR, 13% vs. 21% [total size; P=0.022] and 12% vs. 27% [invasive size; P<0.001]). Most patients with lepidic predominant adenocarcinoma who experienced a recurrence had potential risk factors, including sublobar resection with close margins (≤0.5 cm; n=2), 20%–30% micropapillary component (n=2), and lymphatic or vascular invasion (n=2). It therefore may be possible to identify lepidic predominant adenocarcinomas that carry a low or high risk of recurrence. PMID:24472852

  16. Radiologic Evaluation of Small Lepidic Adenocarcinomas to Guide Decision Making in Surgical Resection.

    PubMed

    Wilshire, Candice L; Louie, Brian E; Manning, Kristin A; Horton, Matthew P; Castiglioni, Massimo; Gorden, Jed A; Aye, Ralph W; Farivar, Alexander S; Vallières, Eric

    2015-09-01

    The International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society classification of pulmonary adenocarcinomas identifies indolent lesions associated with low recurrence, superior survival, and the potential for sublobar resection. The distinction, however, is determined on the pathologic evaluation, limiting preoperative surgical planning. We sought to determine whether preoperative computed tomography (CT) characteristics could guide decisions about the extent of the pulmonary resection. We reviewed the preoperative CT scans for 136 patients identified to have adenocarcinomas with lepidic features on the final pathologic evaluation. The solid component on CT was substituted for the invasive component, and patients were radiologically classified as adenocarcinoma in situ, 3 cm or less with no solid component; minimally invasive adenocarcinoma, 3 cm or less with a solid component of 5 mm or less; or invasive adenocarcinoma, exceeding 3 cm or solid component exceeding 5 mm, or both. Analysis of variance, t test, χ(2) test, and Kaplan-Meier methods were used for analysis. The radiologic classification identified 35 adenocarcinomas in situ (26%) and 12 minimally invasive (9%) and 89 invasive adenocarcinoma (65%) lesions. At a 32-month median follow-up, patient outcomes associated with the radiologic classification were similar to the pathologic-based classification: the radiologic classification identified 14 of 16 patients with recurrent disease and all 6 who died of lung cancer. In addition, patients with radiologic adenocarcinoma in situ and minimally invasive adenocarcinoma who underwent sublobar resections had no recurrence and 100% disease-free and overall survival at 5 years. The radiologic classification of patients with lepidic adenocarcinomas is associated with similar oncologic and survival outcomes compared with the pathologic classification and may guide decision making in the approach to surgical resection

  17. How Is Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma Staged?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging How Is Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma Staged? Staging is a process that tells ... distant m etastasis (M). T categories for small intestine adenocarcinoma T categories of small intestine cancer describe ...

  18. Adenomas with high-grade dysplasia and early adenocarcinoma are more likely to be sessile in the proximal colon.

    PubMed

    Sawhney, M S; Dickstein, J; LeClair, J; Lembo, C; Yee, E

    2015-08-01

    Size and the sessile morphology of an adenoma may explain why colonoscopy is less effective in preventing proximal colonic cancer than distal cancers. We wanted to determine if advanced polypoid neoplasms (APNs, i.e. adenoma with high-grade dysplasia or early adenocarcinoma) are more likely to be sessile and/or smaller in the proximal colon. We searched our institution's pathology database from 2004 to 2012 and identified patients with APNs. Polyps were categorized by size, morphology and location in the colon. Average polyp size and morphology were determined for each location. During the study period, 564 patients with APNs were identified. Of these, adenocarcinoma was noted in 21.6% and high-grade dysplasia in 78.4%. The average patient age was 64.4 years and 54.9% were men. The proportion of APNs that were ≤ 5 mm was 1.7%, ≤ 10 mm 19.3% and ≤ 15 mm 39%. APNs in the proximal colon were larger than those in the distal colon, but the difference was not statistically significant (27 vs 24 mm; P = 0.06). Eighty-three per cent of APNs in the proximal colon were sessile vs 57% in the distal colon (P = 0.001). APNs in the proximal colon were almost four times more likely to be sessile than in the distal colon (OR = 3.7). A similar association was noted for polyps ≤ 20 mm or polyps with high-grade dysplasia. APNs in the proximal colon were almost four-times more likely to be sessile than those in the distal colon. No difference in the size of polyps was noted. Colorectal Disease © 2015 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  19. ATM protein is deficient in over 40% of lung adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Villaruz, Liza C; Jones, Helen; Dacic, Sanja; Abberbock, Shira; Kurland, Brenda F; Stabile, Laura P; Siegfried, Jill M; Conrads, Thomas P; Smith, Neil R; O'Connor, Mark J; Pierce, Andrew J; Bakkenist, Christopher J

    2016-09-06

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the USA and worldwide, and of the estimated 1.2 million new cases of lung cancer diagnosed every year, over 30% are lung adenocarcinomas. The backbone of 1st-line systemic therapy in the metastatic setting, in the absence of an actionable oncogenic driver, is platinum-based chemotherapy. ATM and ATR are DNA damage signaling kinases activated at DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and stalled and collapsed replication forks, respectively. ATM protein is lost in a number of cancer cell lines and ATR kinase inhibitors synergize with cisplatin to resolve xenograft models of ATM-deficient lung cancer. We therefore sought to determine the frequency of ATM loss in a tissue microarray (TMA) of lung adenocarcinoma. Here we report the validation of a commercial antibody (ab32420) for the identification of ATM by immunohistochemistry and estimate that 61 of 147 (41%, 95% CI 34%-50%) cases of lung adenocarcinoma are negative for ATM protein expression. As a positive control for ATM staining, nuclear ATM protein was identified in stroma and immune infiltrate in all evaluable cases. ATM loss in lung adenocarcinoma was not associated with overall survival. However, our preclinical findings in ATM-deficient cell lines suggest that ATM could be a predictive biomarker for synergy of an ATR kinase inhibitor with standard-of-care cisplatin. This could improve clinical outcome in 100,000's of patients with ATM-deficient lung adenocarcinoma every year.

  20. Oxaliplatin induces different cellular and molecular chemoresistance patterns in colorectal cancer cell lines of identical origins

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cancer cells frequently adopt cellular and molecular alterations and acquire resistance to cytostatic drugs. Chemotherapy with oxaliplatin is among the leading treatments for colorectal cancer with a response rate of 50%, inducing intrastrand cross-links on the DNA. Despite of this drug’s efficiency, resistance develops in nearly all metastatic patients. Chemoresistance being of crucial importance for the drug’s clinical efficiency this study aimed to contribute to the identification and description of some cellular and molecular alterations induced by prolonged oxaliplatin therapy. Resistance to oxaliplatin was induced in Colo320 (Colo320R) and HT-29 (HT-29R) colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines by exposing the cells to increasing concentrations of the drug. Alterations in morphology, cytotoxicity, DNA cross-links formation and gene expression profiles were assessed in the parental and resistant variants with microscopy, MTT, alkaline comet and pangenomic microarray assays, respectively. Results Morphology analysis revealed epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in the resistant vs parental cells suggesting alterations of the cells’ adhesion complexes, through which they acquire increased invasiveness and adherence. Cytotoxicity measurements demonstrated resistance to oxaliplatin in both cell lines; Colo320 being more sensitive than HT-29 to this drug (P < 0.001). The treatment with oxaliplatin caused major DNA cross-links in both parental cell lines; in Colo320R small amounts of DNA cross-links were still detectable, while in HT-29R not. We identified 441 differentially expressed genes in Colo320R and 613 in HT-29R as compared to their parental counterparts (at least 1.5 -fold up- or down- regulation, p < 0.05). More disrupted functions and pathways were detected in HT-29R cell line than in Colo320R, involving genes responsible for apoptosis inhibition, cellular proliferation and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Several upstream

  1. Potential roles of microRNAs and ROS in colorectal cancer: diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jingmei; Chuang, Chia-Chen; Zuo, Li

    2017-01-01

    As one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers worldwide, colorectal adenocarcinoma often occurs sporadically in individuals aged 50 or above and there is an increase among younger patients under 50. Routine screenings are recommended for this age group to improve early detection. The multifactorial etiology of colorectal cancer consists of both genetic and epigenetic factors. Recently, studies have shown that the development and progression of colorectal cancer can be attributed to aberrant expression of microRNA. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) that play a key role in cancer cell survival, can also lead to carcinogenesis and cancer exacerbations. Given the rapid accumulating knowledge in the field, an updated review regarding microRNA and ROS in colorectal cancer is necessary. An extensive literature search has been conducted in PubMed/Medline databases to review the roles of microRNAs and ROS in colorectal cancer. Unique microRNA expression in tumor tissue, peripheral blood, and fecal samples from patients with colorectal cancer is outlined. Therapeutic approaches focusing on microRNA and ROS in colorectal cancer treatment is also delineated. This review aims to summarize the newest knowledge on the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer in the hopes of discovering novel diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic techniques. PMID:28061475

  2. Numb chin syndrome secondary to leptomeningeal carcinomatosis from gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Riesgo, Vincent J.; Poveda, Julio; Rammohan, Kottil

    2015-01-01

    Numb chin syndrome (NCS) can be a sign of malignancy. Its association with gastric adenocarcinoma is rare. We report a case of a 27-year-old Hispanic female that presented with complaint of left sided headache associated with numbness of the left side of chin and lower gingiva. Initial brain MRI, whole body gallium scan, high resolution CT of chest and elevated protein in the CSF were suggestive of sarcoidosis. She was treated with IV steroids with transient clinical improvement. Two weeks later, her symptoms worsened and further evaluation revealed the diagnosis of a poorly differentiated metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma with leptomeningeal involvement. This case report aims to emphasize the importance of identifying NCS as a possible indication of an underlying malignant condition. Reported cases of NCS associated with metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma are very rare. PMID:25830044

  3. Immunohistochemically detectable p53 and mdm-2 oncoprotein expression in colorectal carcinoma: prognostic significance

    PubMed Central

    Öfner, D; Maier, H; Riedmann, B; Holzberger, P; Nogler, M; Tötsch, M; Bankfalvi, A; Winde, G; Böcker, W; Schmid, K W

    1995-01-01

    Aims—To investigate the correlation between the expression of the p53 and mdm-2 oncoproteins and to assess their prognostic value in colorectal cancer. Methods—Using a polyclonal (CM1) and a monoclonal antibody directed against p53 and mdm-2, respectively, these oncoproteins were stained immunohistochemically in 109 colorectal adenocarcinomas. Results—p53 was detected in less than 10% of tumour cells in 11 of 109 adenocarcinomas, in 10-50% of tumour cells, in 17 of 109 adenocarcinomas, and in more than 50% of tumour cells in 32 of 109 adenocarcinomas. Expression of mdm-2 was detected in 22 of 109 (20%) cases investigated, of which 19 showed concomitant p53 expression. In most cases mdm-2 immunoreactivity was strongly associated with a small proportion of p53 positive tumour cells. Both p53 and mdm-2 expression lacked statistical significance when correlated with common staging and grading parameters. Conclusions—Detection of p53 and mdm-2 oncoprotein expression, detected using immunohistochemistry, is of no prognostic value in colorectal cancer. However, the close correlation between mdm-2 immunoreactivity and the proportion of p53 positive cells provides further evidence that the mdm-2 gene product interacts with p53 protein. PMID:16695968

  4. Colorectal Stents: Current Status

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong-Mi

    2015-01-01

    A self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) is an effective and safe method for the decompression of colon obstruction. Based on recent evidence, colorectal SEMS is now recommended for the palliation of patients with colonic obstruction from incurable colorectal cancer or extracolonic malignancy and also as a bridge to surgery in those who are a high surgical risk. Prophylactic SEMS insertion in patients with no obstruction symptoms is not recommended. Most colorectal SEMS are inserted endoscopically under fluoroscopic guidance. The technical and clinical success rates of colorectal SEMS are high, and the complication rate is acceptable. Advances in this technology will make the insertion of colorectal SEMS better and may expand the indications of colorectal SEMS in the future. PMID:26064818

  5. Current State of Colorectal Surgery Training: A Survey of Program Directors, Current and Recently Matched Colorectal Residents, and Recent Colorectal Graduates.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Matthew B; Miller, Peter E; Pawlak, Stephanie E; Thomas, Michael S; Beck, David E; Vargas, H David; Whitlow, Charles B; Margolin, David A

    2016-02-01

    Colorectal residency has become one of the more competitive postgraduate training opportunities; however, little information is available to guide potential applicants in gauging their competitiveness. The aim of this study was to identify the current trends colorectal residency training and to identify what factors are considered most important in ranking a candidate highly. We hypothesized that there was a difference in what program directors, current and recently matched colorectal residents, and recent graduates consider most important in making a candidate competitive for a colorectal residency position. Three 10-question anonymous surveys were sent to 59 program directors, 87 current and recently matched colorectal residents, and 119 recent graduates in March 2015. The study was conducted as an anonymous internet survey. Current trends in applying for a colorectal residency, competitiveness of recent colorectal residents, factors considered most important in ranking a candidate highly, and what future colorectal surgeons can expect after finishing their training were measured. The study had an overall response rate of 43%, with 28 (47%) of 59 program directors, 46 (53%) of 87 current and recently matched colorectal residents, and 39 (33%) of 119 recent graduates responding. The majority of program directors felt that a candidate's performance during the interview process was the most important factor in making a candidate competitive, followed by contact from a colleague, letters of recommendation, American Board of Surgery In-Training Exam scores, and number of publications/presentations. The majority of current and recently matched colorectal residents felt that a recommendation/telephone call from a colleague was the most important factor, whereas the majority of recent graduates favored letters of recommendation as the most important factor in ranking a candidate highly. Limitations to the study include its small sample size, selection bias, responder

  6. Familial colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lung, M S; Trainer, A H; Campbell, I; Lipton, L

    2015-05-01

    Identifying individuals with a genetic predisposition to developing familial colorectal cancer (CRC) is crucial to the management of the affected individual and their family. In order to do so, the physician requires an understanding of the different gene mutations and clinical manifestations of familial CRC. This review summarises the genetics, clinical manifestations and management of the known familial CRC syndromes, specifically Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, MUTYH-associated neoplasia, juvenile polyposis syndrome and Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. An individual suspected of having a familial CRC with an underlying genetic predisposition should be referred to a familial cancer centre to enable pre-test counselling and appropriate follow up. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  7. Differential Measurements of Oxidatively Modified Proteins in Colorectal Adenopolyps

    PubMed Central

    Mehrabi, Sharifeh; Wallace, Lashanale; Cohen, Shakeria; Yao, Xuebiao; Aikhionbare, Felix O.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Adenopolyps patients have a three-fold higher risk of colon cancer over the general population, which increases to six-fold if the polyps are multiple and with lower survival among African American population. Currently, 6% of CRC can be ascribed to mutations in particular genes. Moreover, the optimal management of patients with colorectal adenopolyps depends on the accuracy of appropriate staging strategies because patients with similar colorectal adenocarcinoma architecture display heterogeneity in the course and outcome of the disease. Oxidative stress, due to an imbalance between reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidant capacities as well as a disruption of redox signaling, causes a wide range of damage to DNA, proteins, and lipids which promote tumor formation. Objective/Method This study applied spectrophotometric, dinitrophenylhydrazone (DNPH) assay, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and western blot analyses to assess the levels of oxidatively modified proteins in 41 pairs of primary colorectal tissues including normal/surrounding, adenopolyps (tubular, tubulovillous, villous, polypvillous) and carcinoma. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Student’s t-tests were utilized for the resulting data set. Results Our data showed that the levels of reactive protein carbonyl groups significantly increased as colorectal adenopolyps progresses to malignancy. No significant differences were found in the levels of carbonyl proteins between gender samples analyzed. For African American patients, there were, relative to Caucasians, 10% higher levels of reactive carbonyls in proteins of tubulovillous tissue samples (P < 0.05) and over 36% higher in levels in adenocarcinomas (P < 0.05). In normal tissues and tubular, there were no significant differences between the two groups in levels of protein carbonyls. Differences in the levels of protein carbonyl expression within individual patient samples with different number of tumor cells were notably

  8. Applications of genomic tools to colorectal cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Auman, J Todd; McLeod, Howard L

    2008-12-01

    Clinically and histopathologically similar colorectal cancers exhibit considerable variability in their responses to chemotherapeutics. The advent of genomic technologies has enabled the unbiased determination of changes in DNA and RNA, alterations that may be responsible for, or predictive of the variability in response to chemotherapy. This review highlights several advances made in applying genomic tools toward colorectal cancer therapeutics. Progress has been made using gene expression profiling to identify which colorectal cancer patients would benefit most from adjuvant chemotherapy. In addition, advances have been made in colorectal cancer pharmacogenomics by identifying gene expression patterns associated with sensitivity to specific chemotherapeutic agents. Lastly, the use of genome-wide mutation screening of individual tumor samples to identify the profiles of mutated genes is explored. Future research toward integrating genomic information with clinical and histopathological data is expected to lead to improved therapeutic management of colorectal cancer.

  9. [Expression of CD10 in tumor-associated fibroblast of cancerized or recurrent colorectal adenomas].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jiangjiang; Zhu, Yin; Li, Changshui; Li, Yinya; Nie, Qianqian; Zhu, Ziling; Deng, Hong

    2016-05-25

    Objective: To investigate the expression of CD10 in tumor-associated fibroblasts (TAF) in colorectal adenomas and its relation to cancerization and recurrence of adenoma. Methods: Tissue samples of low-grade adenoma (n=50), high-grade adenoma (n=50) and colorectal adenocarcinoma (n=50) were collected, and tissue samples at the distal margin of corresponding colorectal lesions were taken as controls. The expression of CD10 in the stromal TAFs, and the expressions of β-catenin, Ki-67, p53 and CyclinD1 in tumor cells were detected by immunohistochemistry (Envision). The correlation of CD10 expression in stromal TAFs with the expressions of β-catenin, Ki-67, p53 and CyclinD1 in tumor cells was analyzed by Spearmen. One hundred samples of low-grade colorectal adenoma were collected, including 57 non-recurrent cases and 43 recurrent cases (16 cases of recurrent adenoma and 27 cases of recurrent adenocarcinoma); the expression of stromal TAF CD10 were determined and compared among groups. Results: There was no TAF in normal colorectal mucosa. The expression rates of TAF CD10 in low-grade adenoma, high-grade adenoma and colorectal adenocarcinoma were 22%, 50% and 78%, respectively (all P<0.05). The expression of Ki-67 and β-catenin in low-grade adenoma, high-grade adenoma, colorectal adenocarcinoma was on a rising trend (all P<0.01). The expression of CyclinD1 in high-grade aden