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  1. Perceived Stress and Colorectal Cancer Incidence: The Japan Collaborative Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Norimasa; Nishiyama, Takeshi; Sawada, Takayuki; Wang, Chaochen; Lin, Yingsong; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Tamakoshi, Akiko; Kikuchi, Shogo

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer worldwide, and many risk factors for colorectal cancer have been established. However, it remains uncertain whether psychological stress contributes to the onset of colorectal cancer. Therefore, we conducted a large-scale prospective cohort study to confirm the association between perceived stress and colorectal cancer incidence. We identified 680 cases of colon cancer and 330 cases of rectal cancer during a maximum of 21-year follow-up of 61,563 Japanese men and women. Cox regression analysis adjusted for potential confounders revealed a significant association of perceived stress with rectal cancer incidence but not with colon cancer incidence. This finding is partly consistent with that from only one previous study that addressed an association between perceived stress and the risk of colorectal cancer. However, studies on this topic are sparse and warrant further exploration. PMID:28091607

  2. Second Cancers After Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... After Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer After Treatment Second Cancers After Colorectal Cancer Colorectal cancer survivors can be affected by a ... many of these cancers. Follow-up after colorectal cancer treatment After completing treatment for colorectal cancer, you ...

  3. Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... rectum are part of the large intestine. Colorectal cancer occurs when tumors form in the lining of ... men and women. The risk of developing colorectal cancer rises after age 50. You're also more ...

  4. Factors associated with perceived risk in automotive employees at increased risk of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Vernon, S W; Myers, R E; Tilley, B C; Li, S

    2001-01-01

    Risk perception may be an important motivator of health-related behaviors. To develop effective risk communication messages, it is important to understand both the patterns of association between perceived risk and health-related behaviors as well as the correlates of risk perception. Very little is known about whether correlates of risk perception are similar in cross-sectional data compared with prospective data. Furthermore, there are scant data on consistency of correlates of risk perception across groups who vary in objective medical risk. If correlates differ, it would underscore the need to tailor intervention messages based on subgroup characteristics as well as increase awareness of the limitations of basing intervention messages only on cross-sectional data. We analyzed data on a subset of 5042 employees who participated in The Next Step Trial, a randomized health promotion trial to encourage colorectal cancer screening and dietary change. We restricted our analysis to only those automotive workers who were white, male, and did not have colorectal cancer (4477/5042) and who returned surveys both at baseline (2,684/4,477) and at year 2 of follow-up (1955/2684). Initial analyses detected interactions between a history of polyps and several of the other covariates. Therefore, univariate and multivariable analyses were conducted separately for men with and without a personal history of colorectal polyps. Within each of the four subgroups (those with or without polyps in the baseline or follow-up analyses), we examined associations between perceived risk measured at baseline (cross-sectional analyses) and at year 2 of follow-up (prospective analyses) in relation to intervention group status, demographic, medical history, psychosocial, and worksite characteristics measured at baseline. To assess the predictive ability of the models, we computed sensitivity and specificity as measures of each model's ability to correctly classify men into their respective

  5. Stigma, perceived blame, self-blame, and depressive symptoms in men with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Sean M; Griffin, Joan M; Jackson, George L; Zafar, S Yousuf; Hellerstedt, Wendy; Stahre, Mandy; Nelson, David; Zullig, Leah L; Burgess, Diana J; van Ryn, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    We measured the prevalence of stigma, self-blame, and perceived blame from others for their illness among men with colorectal cancer (CRC) and examined whether these factors were associated with depressive symptoms, independent of clinical and sociodemographic factors. Self-administered questionnaires were returned in the fall of 2009 by 1109 eligible male US veterans who were diagnosed with CRC at any Veterans Affairs facility in 2008. Questionnaires assessed stigma, feelings of blame, and depressive symptoms as well as other facets of health, cancer characteristics, and quality and type of medical care. We report the prevalence of cancer stigma, self-blame, and perceived blame from others. We used multivariate linear regression to assess the association between these factors and a measure of depressive symptoms. Covariates included several measures of overall health, cancer progression, symptom severity, and sociodemographic factors. Thirty one percent of respondents endorsed at least one item in a measure of cancer stigma and 25% reported feeling that it was at least 'a little true' that they were to blame for their illness. All three independent variables were associated with depressive symptoms in bivariate models; cancer stigma and self-blame were significantly associated with depressive symptoms in the multivariate model. Cancer stigma and self-blame are problems for a significant minority of men with CRC and are independent predictors of depressive symptoms. They may represent an important source of stress in men with CRC. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Examining the role of perceived susceptibility on colorectal cancer screening intention and behavior.

    PubMed

    McQueen, Amy; Vernon, Sally W; Rothman, Alexander J; Norman, Gregory J; Myers, Ronald E; Tilley, Barbara C

    2010-10-01

    Although support exists for multiple psychosocial predictors of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening, little is known about the relationships among these variables. Understanding the associations between such predictors could refine health behavior theories and inform the design of interventions. In addition to direct effects, we examined whether baseline perceived susceptibility was a moderator of, or was mediated by, changes in other psychosocial determinants of CRC screening intention and behavior. Longitudinal path models were tested using data from 1,001 white male automotive workers who participated in The Next Step Trial. Our sample included workers with no history of CRC who were due for CRC screening but did not complete CRC screening prior to the assessment of hypothesized mediators at year 1 follow-up. Perceived susceptibility interacted differently with four psychosocial constructs in models predicting CRC screening intention or behavior. Perceived susceptibility was independent of perceived benefits, moderated the change in perceived barriers and self-efficacy, and was mediated by the change in family influence. The role of perceived susceptibility was not limited to direct effects but involved mediating and moderating pathways of influence.

  7. EXAMINING THE ROLE OF PERCEIVED SUSCEPTIBILITY ON COLORECTAL CANCER SCREENING INTENTION AND BEHAVIOR

    PubMed Central

    McQueen, Amy; Vernon, Sally W.; Rothman, Alexander J.; Norman, Gregory J.; Myers, Ronald E.; Tilley, Barbara C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Although support exists for multiple psychosocial predictors of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening, little is known about the relationships among these variables. Understanding the associations between such predictors could refine health behavior theories and inform the design of interventions. Purpose In addition to direct effects, we examined whether baseline perceived susceptibility was a moderator of, or was mediated by, changes in other psychosocial determinants of CRC screening intention and behavior. Methods Longitudinal path models were tested using data from 1001 white male automotive workers who participated in The Next Step Trial. Our sample included workers with no history of CRC who were due for CRC screening but did not complete CRC screening prior to the assessment of hypothesized mediators at year 1 follow-up. Results Perceived susceptibility interacted differently with four psychosocial constructs in models predicting CRC screening intention or behavior. Perceived susceptibility was independent of perceived benefits, moderated the change in perceived barriers and self-efficacy, and was mediated by the change in family influence. Conclusions The role of perceived susceptibility was not limited to direct effects, but involved mediating and moderating pathways of influence. PMID:20658212

  8. The Relationship Between Perceived Burden of Chronic Conditions and Colorectal Cancer Screening Among Appalachian Residents

    PubMed Central

    Tarasenko, Yelena N.; Fleming, Steven T.; Schoenberg, Nancy E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose As the population living with several concurrent chronic conditions or multiple morbidity (MM) increases, understanding how to effectively fit prevention efforts into disease management becomes more important, particularly among rural, underserved populations. Compared to their urban counterparts, rural residents suffer higher rates of disease, receive fewer preventive services, and often live in environments limiting access to optimal medical care. This study describes rural residents’ perceived burdens of disease management and explores the relationship between these burdens, as proxies of individuals’ competing demands, and colorectal cancer screening (CRCS). Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study, based on telephone survey data from 1,012 Appalachian residents, ages 50-75, with 1 or more chronic conditions. Measures of perceived MM burdens were developed based on 85 pilot interviews previously undertaken with providers and patients with MM residing in Appalachian Kentucky. Results Many participants (81%) agreed with 1 or more statements indicating perceived burdens of disease management effects on receiving CRCS. A higher percentage of rural (vs nonrural) Appalachians perceived burdens related to physician’s recommendation, preparation to colonoscopy, and time management and affordability of both current diseases and screening. These differences did not modify the overall association between perceiving MM as burdensome and forgoing CRCS. The negative effect on CRCS of perceived burdens related to interaction with physician and time management were lower for participants with multiple rather than single morbidity. Conclusion Future research designed to address perceived burdens of MM and improved interaction with health care providers may enhance critical prevention efforts among vulnerable populations. PMID:24383483

  9. The relationship between perceived burden of chronic conditions and colorectal cancer screening among Appalachian residents.

    PubMed

    Tarasenko, Yelena N; Fleming, Steven T; Schoenberg, Nancy E

    2014-01-01

    As the population living with several concurrent chronic conditions or multiple morbidity (MM) increases, understanding how to effectively fit prevention efforts into disease management becomes more important, particularly among rural, underserved populations. Compared to their urban counterparts, rural residents suffer higher rates of disease, receive fewer preventive services, and often live in environments limiting access to optimal medical care. This study describes rural residents' perceived burdens of disease management and explores the relationship between these burdens, as proxies of individuals' competing demands, and colorectal cancer screening (CRCS). We conducted a cross-sectional study, based on telephone survey data from 1,012 Appalachian residents, ages 50-75, with 1 or more chronic conditions. Measures of perceived MM burdens were developed based on 85 pilot interviews previously undertaken with providers and patients with MM residing in Appalachian Kentucky. Many participants (81%) agreed with 1 or more statements indicating perceived burdens of disease management effects on receiving CRCS. A higher percentage of rural (vs nonrural) Appalachians perceived burdens related to physician's recommendation, preparation to colonoscopy, and time management and affordability of both current diseases and screening. These differences did not modify the overall association between perceiving MM as burdensome and forgoing CRCS. The negative effect on CRCS of perceived burdens related to interaction with physician and time management was lower for participants with multiple rather than single morbidity. Future research designed to address perceived burdens of MM and improved interaction with health care providers may enhance critical prevention efforts among vulnerable populations. © 2013 National Rural Health Association.

  10. The Association of Perceived Provider-Patient Communication and Relationship Quality with Colorectal Cancer Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underhill, Meghan L.; Kiviniemi, Marc T.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Two-thirds of adults aged 50 years and older are adherent to recommendations for colorectal cancer screening. Provider-patient communication and characteristics of the patient-provider relationship may relate to screening behavior. Methods: The association of provider communication quality, relationship, and colorectal cancer screening…

  11. The Association of Perceived Provider-Patient Communication and Relationship Quality with Colorectal Cancer Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underhill, Meghan L.; Kiviniemi, Marc T.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Two-thirds of adults aged 50 years and older are adherent to recommendations for colorectal cancer screening. Provider-patient communication and characteristics of the patient-provider relationship may relate to screening behavior. Methods: The association of provider communication quality, relationship, and colorectal cancer screening…

  12. Perceived Life Expectancy Is Associated with Colorectal Cancer Screening in England.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Lindsay C; von Wagner, Christian; Wardle, Jane

    2017-06-01

    Cancer screening is a behavior that represents investment in future health. Such investment may depend on how much 'future' a person expects. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prospective association between perceived personal life expectancy and participation in fecal occult blood test screening for colorectal cancer (CRC) in a national program. Data were from interviews with 3975 men and women in the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA) within the eligible age range for the national screening program (60 to 74 years). Perceived life expectancy was indexed as the individual's estimate of their chance of living another 10-15 years (exact time varied by age), assessed in 2008/2009. Participation in CRC screening from 2010 to 2012/2013 was assessed in 2012/2013. Logistic regression was used to estimate the association between perceived life expectancy and screening participation, adjusted for numeracy and known mortality risk factors. Overall, 71% of respondents (2817/3975) reported completing at least one fecal occult blood test (FOBt) during the follow-up. Screening uptake was 76% (1272/1683) among those who estimated their 10-15-year life expectancy as 75-100%, compared with 52% (126/243) among those who estimated theirs as 0-25% (adjusted OR 1.74, 95% CI 1.29-2.34). A longer perceived life expectancy is associated with greater likelihood of participating in CRC screening in England. However, half of people with a low perceived life expectancy still participated in screening. Given that CRC screening is recommended for adults with a remaining life expectancy of ≥10 years, future research should investigate how to communicate the aims of screening more effectively.

  13. COLORECTAL CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Kuipers, Ernst J.; Grady, William M.; Lieberman, David; Seufferlein, Thomas; Sung, Joseph J.; Boelens, Petra G.; van de Velde, Cornelis J. H.; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer had a low incidence several decades ago. However, it has become a predominant cancer and now accounts for approximately 10% of cancer-related mortality in western countries. The ‘rise’ of colorectal cancer in developed countries can be attributed to the increasingly ageing population, unfavourable modern dietary habits and an increase in risk factors such as smoking, low physical exercise and obesity. New treatments for primary and metastatic colorectal cancer have emerged, providing additional options for patients; these treatments include laparoscopic surgery for primary disease, more-aggressive resection of metastatic disease (such as liver and pulmonary metastases), radiotherapy for rectal cancer and neoadjuvant and palliative chemotherapies. However, these new treatment options have had limited impact on cure rates and long-term survival. For these reasons, and the recognition that colorectal cancer is long preceded by a polypoid precursor, screening programmes have gained momentum. This Primer provides an overview of the current state of art knowledge on the epidemiology and mechanisms of colorectal cancer, as well as on diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27189416

  14. Narratives that Address Affective Forecasting Errors Reduce Perceived Barriers to Colorectal Cancer Screening

    PubMed Central

    Dillard, Amanda; Fagerlin, Angela; Cin, Sonya Dal; Zikmund-Fisher, Brian J; Ubel, Peter A

    2014-01-01

    Narratives from similar others may be an effective way to increase important health behaviors. In this study, we used a narrative intervention to promote colorectal cancer screening. Researchers have suggested that people may overestimate barriers to colorectal cancer screening. We recruited participants from the US, ages 49–60 who had never previously been screened for colorectal cancer, to read an educational message about screening for the disease. One-half of participants were randomly assigned to also receive a narrative within the message (control participants did not receive a narrative). The narrative intervention was developed according to predictions of affective forecasting theory. Compared to participants who received only the educational message, participants who received the message along with a narrative reported that the barriers to screening would have less of an impact on a future screening experience. The narrative also increased risk perception for colorectal cancer and interest in screening in the next year. PMID:20417005

  15. Colorectal Cancer Screening: Knowledge, Perceived Benefits and Barriers, and Intentions among College and University Employees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bajracharya, Srijana M.; Wigglesworth, Janet K.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Early detection through routine screening is critical in reducing the incidence rate of colorectal cancer (CRC). Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine college and university employees' knowledge of CRC issues, their perceptions of the benefits of and barriers to CRC screening, and their intentions toward it. Methods: This…

  16. Colorectal Cancer Screening: Knowledge, Perceived Benefits and Barriers, and Intentions among College and University Employees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bajracharya, Srijana M.; Wigglesworth, Janet K.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Early detection through routine screening is critical in reducing the incidence rate of colorectal cancer (CRC). Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine college and university employees' knowledge of CRC issues, their perceptions of the benefits of and barriers to CRC screening, and their intentions toward it. Methods: This…

  17. Colorectal cancer screening at community health centers: A survey of clinicians' attitudes, practices, and perceived barriers

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Tiffany; Lee, Ji Young; Park, Jessica; Nelson, Christine A.; McBurnie, Mary Ann; Liss, David T.; Kaleba, Erin O.; Henley, Eric; Harigopal, Padmini; Grant, Laura; Crawford, Phil; Carroll, Joseph E.; Alperovitz-Bichell, Kari; Baker, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates remain lower among some racial/ethnic groups and individuals with low income or educational attainment who are often cared for within community health centers (CHCs). We surveyed clinicians in a network of CHCs to understand their attitudes, practice patterns, and perceived barriers to CRC screening. Methods A clinician survey was conducted in 2013 within the Community Health Applied Research Network (CHARN). Results 180 clinicians completed the survey (47.9% response rate). Participants had an average of 11.5 (SD: 9.8) years in practice, 62% were female, and 57% were physicians. The majority of respondents somewhat agreed (30.2%) or strongly agreed (57.5%) that colonoscopy was the best screening test. However, only 15.8% of respondents strongly agreed and 32.2% somewhat agreed that colonoscopy was readily available for their patients. Fecal immunochemical testing (FIT), a type of fecal occult blood test (FOBT), was viewed less favorably; 24.6% rated FIT as very effective. Conclusions Although there are no data showing that screening colonoscopy is superior to FIT, CHC clinicians believe colonoscopy is the best CRC screening test for their patients, despite the high prevalence of financial barriers to colonoscopy. These attitudes could be due to lack of knowledge about the evidence supporting long-term benefits of fecal occult blood testing (FOBT), lack of awareness about the improved test characteristics of FIT compared to older guaiac-based FOBT, or the absence of systems to ensure adherence to regular FOBT screening. Interventions to improve CRC screening at CHCs must address clinicians' negative attitudes towards FIT. PMID:26844165

  18. 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... colon cancer. Photo: AP Photo/Ron Edmonds Colorectal Cancer Cancer of the colon (large intestine) or rectum ( ...

  19. Social and cultural factors are related to perceived colorectal cancer screening benefits and intentions in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Purnell, Jason Q; Katz, Mira L; Andersen, Barbara L; Palesh, Oxana; Figueroa-Moseley, Colmar; Jean-Pierre, Pascal; Bennett, Nancy

    2010-02-01

    Models that explain preventive behaviors, such as colorectal cancer (CRC) screening, do not account for social and cultural factors relevant to African Americans. This exploratory study examined the relationship between socio-cultural factors (e.g., traditional acculturative strategy, group-based medical mistrust, physician ethnicity, and group-level perceptions of susceptibility) and perceived benefits, perceived barriers, and CRC screening intentions among African Americans (N = 198; Age: M = 59.7, SD = 9.9; 65% female; 44% household income $50,000+). Hierarchical multiple regression was used to test the following models with perceived benefits, perceived barriers, and screening intentions as the outcomes: (a) traditional acculturative strategy x medical mistrust; (b) physician's ethnicity x medical mistrust; (c) group susceptibility x medical mistrust; and (d) group susceptibility x traditional acculturative strategy. Results revealed that perceiving high group susceptibility while being both more culturally traditional and less mistrustful was associated with more perception of screening benefits. Greater intention to be screened was associated with perceiving high group susceptibility while having a more traditional cultural orientation and low levels of mistrust in those with African American physicians. These results suggest that it may be beneficial to include these social and cultural factors in behavioral interventions to increase CRC screening among African Americans.

  20. Impact of risk information on perceived colorectal cancer risk: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Robb, Kathryn A; Campbell, John; Evans, Philip; Miles, Anne; Wardle, Jane

    2008-09-01

    The study sought to modify comparative optimism about colorectal cancer in a community sample using a method of providing risk information found to be effective in a laboratory setting. The 3185 adults from General Practice lists were randomized to three groups: (1) control--no information; (2) risk information leaflet; (3) risk and screening information leaflet. Significant comparative optimism and high numeric estimates of absolute risk were found. Risk factor information did not reduce optimistic beliefs nor modify estimates of risk. Interest in screening was high overall and not influenced by the information. Comparatively optimistic risk perceptions appear resistant to change in community settings.

  1. Exploration of risk taking behaviors and perceived susceptibility of colorectal cancer among Malaysian adults: a community based cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Perceived susceptibility to an illness has been shown to affect Health-risk behavior. The objective of the present study was to determine the risk taking behaviors and the demographic predictors of perceived susceptibility to colorectal cancer in a population-based sample. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out among 305 Malaysian adults in six major districts, selected from urban, semi-urban, and rural settings in one state in Malaysia. A self-administered questionnaire was used in this study. It was comprised of socio-demographics, risk-taking behaviors, and validated domains of the Health Belief Model (HBM). Results The mean (± SD) age of the respondents was 34.5 (± 9.6) and the majority (59.0%) of them were 30 years or older. Almost 20.7% of the respondents felt they were susceptible to colorectal cancer. Self-reported perceived susceptibility mirrored unsatisfactory screening behaviors owing to the lack of doctors’ recommendation, ignorance of screening modalities, procrastination, and the perception that screening was unnecessary. Factors significantly associated with perceived susceptibility to colorectal cancer were gender (OR = 1.8, 95% CI 1.0-3.3), age (OR = 2. 2, 95% CI 1.2-4.0), ethnicity (OR = 0. 3, 95% CI 0.2-0.6), family history of colorectal cancer (OR = 3. 2, 95% CI 1.4-7.4) and alcohol intake (OR = 3.9, 95% CI 2.1-7.5). Conclusion The present study revealed that screening behavior among respondents was unsatisfactory. Hence, awareness of the importance of screening to prevent colorectal cancers is imperative. PMID:24093502

  2. Exploration of risk taking behaviors and perceived susceptibility of colorectal cancer among Malaysian adults: a community based cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Al-Dubai, Sami A R; Ganasegeran, Kurubaran; Alabsi, Aied M; Shah, Shamsul A; Razali, Farid M M; Arokiasamy, John T

    2013-10-07

    Perceived susceptibility to an illness has been shown to affect Health-risk behavior. The objective of the present study was to determine the risk taking behaviors and the demographic predictors of perceived susceptibility to colorectal cancer in a population-based sample. A cross-sectional study was carried out among 305 Malaysian adults in six major districts, selected from urban, semi-urban, and rural settings in one state in Malaysia. A self-administered questionnaire was used in this study. It was comprised of socio-demographics, risk-taking behaviors, and validated domains of the Health Belief Model (HBM). The mean (± SD) age of the respondents was 34.5 (± 9.6) and the majority (59.0%) of them were 30 years or older. Almost 20.7% of the respondents felt they were susceptible to colorectal cancer. Self-reported perceived susceptibility mirrored unsatisfactory screening behaviors owing to the lack of doctors' recommendation, ignorance of screening modalities, procrastination, and the perception that screening was unnecessary. Factors significantly associated with perceived susceptibility to colorectal cancer were gender (OR = 1.8, 95% CI 1.0-3.3), age (OR = 2. 2, 95% CI 1.2-4.0), ethnicity (OR = 0. 3, 95% CI 0.2-0.6), family history of colorectal cancer (OR = 3. 2, 95% CI 1.4-7.4) and alcohol intake (OR = 3.9, 95% CI 2.1-7.5). The present study revealed that screening behavior among respondents was unsatisfactory. Hence, awareness of the importance of screening to prevent colorectal cancers is imperative.

  3. Epigenetics and Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lao, Victoria Valinluck; Grady, William M.

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths in the world. It results from an accumulation of genetic and epigenetic changes in colon epithelial cells that transforms them into adenocarcinomas. There have been major advances in our understanding of cancer epigenetics over the last decade, particularly regarding aberrant DNA methylation. Assessment of the colon cancer epigenome has revealed that virtually all colorectal cancers have aberrantly methylated genes and the average colorectal cancer methylome has hundreds to thousands of abnormally methylated genes. As with gene mutations in the cancer genome, a subset of these methylated genes, called driver genes, is presumed to play a functional role in colorectal cancer. The assessment of methylated genes in colorectal cancers has also revealed a unique molecular subgroup of colorectal cancers called CpG Island Methylator Phenotype (CIMP) cancers; these tumors have a particularly high frequency of methylated genes. The advances in our understanding of aberrant methylation in colorectal cancer has led to epigenetic alterations being developed as clinical biomarkers for diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic applications. Progress in the assessment of epigenetic alterations in colorectal cancer and their clinical applications has shown that these alterations will be commonly used in the near future as molecular markers to direct the prevention and treatment of colorectal cancer. PMID:22009203

  4. Obesity and Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jochem, Carmen; Leitzmann, Michael

    There is strong evidence that modifiable lifestyle factors such as obesity play a key role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Epidemiologic data have consistently reported a positive association between obesity and colorectal cancer. The relative risk associated with general obesity (as assessed by BMI) is higher in men than in women and for cancer of the colon than for cancer of the rectum. Abdominal obesity (as assessed by waist circumference (WC) or waist-to-hip ratio) is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer in both sexes, with stronger associations for cancer of the colon than for cancer of the rectum. Plausible biological mechanisms include insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, chronic inflammation, altered levels of growth factors, adipocytokines and steroid hormones. In addition to its effect on colorectal cancer incidence, obesity may play a role in colorectal cancer recurrence, treatment outcomes and survival. Understanding the effects of childhood and adolescent obesity and weight change over the life course in relation to future risk of colorectal cancer is incomplete but essential for targeted preventive recommendations. This chapter summarizes the current evidence on the relationship between obesity and colorectal cancer and colorectal adenoma, a common precursor lesion.

  5. Synchronous trifocal colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Charalampoudis, Petros; Kykalos, Stylianos; Stamopoulos, Paraskevas; Kouraklis, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Synchronous colorectal cancers (SCRCs) have been increasingly diagnosed due to emerging diagnostic modalities. The presence of three or more synchronous colorectal cancers has, however, only rarely been reported. A 76-year-old white man presented for management of two concurrent colorectal adenocarcinomas in the left colon evidenced on total colonoscopy. Preoperative abdominal ultrasonography and thoracoabdominal computed tomography were negative for metastatic disease. The patient underwent an elective left hemicolectomy. The pathology report ultimately showed the presence of three moderately differentiated, distinct colorectal cancers. The patient experienced an uneventful recovery. PMID:27695171

  6. Colorectal Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... linked to a decreased risk of colorectal cancer. Aspirin Studies have shown that taking aspirin lowers the ... cancer: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) other than aspirin It is not known if the use of ...

  7. [Chemoprevention of colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Herszényi, László; Juhász, Márk; Prónai, László; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2004-03-21

    Although colorectal cancer is one of the most preventable forms of cancer, it remains the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Primary prevention involves the identification and elimination of factors, which cause or promote colorectal cancer. The goal of screening is to prevent colorectal cancer mortality through the detection and treatment of premalignant adenomas and curable-stage cancer. Most colorectal cancers are believed to arise from adenomatous polyps. Early identification and removal of adenomas can prevent the development of colorectal cancer. Chemoprevention is the use of specific chemical compounds to prevent, inhibit, or reverse carcinogenesis. Several chemoprevention options have been investigated and confirmed as effective. Aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are the most widely studied agents, their use has been consistently associated with reduction in the risk of mortality and the incidence of colorectal adenomas and cancers. The selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors (coxibs) have been demonstrated to decrease the number and the size of polyps in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis syndrome. Because the gastrointestinal toxicity of coxibs is lower, it might be safer than aspirin or other non-selective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for long-term use. This review aims to summarize the recent theoretical and practical advances in the chemoprevention of colorectal cancer.

  8. The impact of direct-to-consumer personal genomic testing on perceived risk of breast, prostate, colorectal, and lung cancer: findings from the PGen study.

    PubMed

    Carere, Deanna Alexis; VanderWeele, Tyler; Moreno, Tanya A; Mountain, Joanna L; Roberts, J Scott; Kraft, Peter; Green, Robert C

    2015-10-15

    Direct access to genomic information has the potential to transform cancer risk counseling. We measured the impact of direct-to-consumer genomic risk information on changes to perceived risk (ΔPR) of breast, prostate, colorectal and lung cancer among personal genomic testing (PGT) customers. We hypothesized that ΔPR would reflect directionality of risk estimates, attenuate with time, and be modified by participant characteristics. Pathway Genomics and 23andMe customers were surveyed prior to receiving PGT results, and 2 weeks and 6 months post-results. For each cancer, PR was measured on a 5-point ordinal scale from "much lower than average" to "much higher than average." PGT results, based on genotyping of common genetic variants, were dichotomized as elevated or average risk. The relationship between risk estimate and ΔPR was evaluated with linear regression; generalized estimating equations modeled this relationship over time. With the exception of lung cancer (for which ΔPR was positive regardless of result), elevated risk results were significantly associated with positive ΔPR, and average risk results with negative ΔPR (e.g., prostate cancer, 2 weeks: least squares-adjusted ΔPR = 0.77 for elevated risk versus -0.21 for average risk; p-valuedifference < 0.0001) among 1154 participants. Large changes were rare: for each cancer, <4 % of participants overall reported a ΔPR of ±3 or more units. Effect modification by age, cancer family history, and baseline interest was observed for breast, colorectal, and lung cancer, respectively. A pattern of decreasing impact on ΔPR over time was consistently observed, but this trend was significant only in the case of colorectal cancer. We have quantified the effect on consumer risk perception of returning genetic-based cancer risk information directly to consumers without clinician mediation. Provided via PGT, this information has a measurable but modest effect on perceived cancer risk, and one that is in some

  9. Colorectal Cancer Risk Assessment Tool

    MedlinePlus

    ... Colorectal Cancer Risk Factors Download SAS and Gauss Code Page Options Print Page Quick Links Colon and Rectal Cancer Home Page Colon and Rectal Cancer: Prevention, Genetics, Causes Tests to Detect Colorectal Cancer and Polyps ...

  10. [Epidemiology of colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Bouvier, Anne-Marie; Launoy, Guy

    2015-06-01

    The incidence of colorectal cancer increased in France until the 2000s' then decreased. Time trends in incidence for this cancer varied according to its sublocation along the gut. Incidence increased for right and left colon cancers, whereas it remained stable for sigmoid cancers in males and decreased in females. Incidence decreased over time for rectal cancers. The proportion of colorectal cancer in the overall French cancer prevalence is 12%. In 2008, 121,000 patients had a colorectal cancer diagnosed in the 5 previous years. The cumulative risk of colorectal cancer increased from 3.9% for males born around 1900 to 4.9% for those born around 1930 and then slightly decreased, being 4.5% among those born around 1950. It remained at the same level for females and was 2.9% for those born around 1950. The prognosis of colorectal cancer improved over time. Net 5-year survival increased in males from 53% for cancers diagnosed between 1989 and 1991 to 58% for those diagnosed between 2001 and 2004. The highest improvement of 10 year survival rates concerned left colon and rectosigmoid junction (+19% in a decade). The progressive set up of national colorectal screening since the early 2000's and the introduction of recent immunological tests in 2015 should decrease the mortality for this cancer and, at term, should decrease its incidence too.

  11. [Obesity and colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Na, Soo-Young; Myung, Seung-Jae

    2012-01-01

    Obesity worldwide is constantly increasing. Obesity acts as an independent significant risk factor for malignant tumors of various organs including colorectal cancer. Visceral adipose tissue is physiologically more important than subcutaneous adipose tissue. The relative risk of colorectal cancer of obese patients is about 1.5 times higher than the normal-weight individuals, and obesity is also associated with premalignant colorectal adenoma. The colorectal cancer incidence of obese patients has gender-specific and site-specific characteristics that it is higher in men than women and in the colon than rectum. Obesity acts as a risk factor of colorectal carcinogenesis by several mechanisms. Isulin, insulin-like growth factor, leptin, adiponectin, microbiome, and cytokines of chronic inflammation etc. have been understood as its potential mechanisms. In addition, obesity in patients with colorectal cancer negatively affects the disease progression and response of chemotherapy. Although the evidence is not clear yet, there are some reports that weight loss as well as life-modification such as dietary change and physical activity can reduce the risk of colorectal cancer. It is very important knowledge in the point that obesity is a potentially modifiable risk factor that can alter the incidence and outcome of the colorectal cancer.

  12. Colorectal cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Chan, Pak Wo Webber; Ngu, Jing Hieng; Poh, Zhongxian; Soetikno, Roy

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer, which is the leading cancer in Singapore, can be prevented by increased use of screening and polypectomy. A range of screening strategies such as stool-based tests, flexible sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy and computed tomography colonography are available, each with different strengths and limitations. Primary care physicians should discuss appropriate screening modalities with their patients, tailored to their individual needs. Physicians, patients and the government should work in partnership to improve uptake of colorectal cancer screening to reduce the morbidity and mortality from colorectal cancer. Copyright: © Singapore Medical Association.

  13. Colorectal cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Pak Wo Webber; Ngu, Jing Hieng; Poh, Zhongxian; Soetikno, Roy

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer, which is the leading cancer in Singapore, can be prevented by increased use of screening and polypectomy. A range of screening strategies such as stool-based tests, flexible sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy and computed tomography colonography are available, each with different strengths and limitations. Primary care physicians should discuss appropriate screening modalities with their patients, tailored to their individual needs. Physicians, patients and the government should work in partnership to improve uptake of colorectal cancer screening to reduce the morbidity and mortality from colorectal cancer. PMID:28111691

  14. Adiponectin and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Otani, Kensuke; Ishihara, Soichiro; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Murono, Koji; Yasuda, Koji; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Hata, Keisuke; Kawai, Kazushige; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2017-02-01

    Colorectal cancer is an obesity-related malignancy. Adiponectin is an adipokine produced exclusively by adipose tissue, and its concentration in the serum is reduced in obesity. A low serum level of adiponectin is associated with an increased risk of various types of malignancies including colorectal cancer. These facts suggest that the epidemiological link between obesity and cancer may have a significant association with adiponectin. Although numerous studies of colorectal cancer have been reported, the results are conflicting about the anti-cancer effect of adiponectin, and how adiponectin affects carcinogenesis or cancer development remains controversial. Because adiponectin has multiple systemic effects and exists as a high serum concentration protein, the main role of adiponectin should be regulation of homeostasis, and it would not likely act as an anti-cancerous hormone. However, as epidemiological evidence shows, a low adiponectin level may be a basic risk factor for colorectal cancer. We speculate that when the colonic epithelium is stimulated or damaged by another carcinogen under the condition of a low adiponectin level, carcinogenesis is promoted and cancer development is facilitated. In this report, we summarize recent findings of the correlation between adiponectin and colorectal cancer and investigate the effect of adiponectin on colorectal cancer.

  15. Epidemiology of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Marley, Andrew R; Nan, Hongmei

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is currently the third deadliest cancer in the United States and will claim an estimated 49,190 U.S. lives in 2016. The purpose of this review is to summarize our current understanding of this disease, based on nationally published statistics and information presented in peer-reviewed journal articles. Specifically, this review will cover the following topics: descriptive epidemiology (including time and disease trends both in the United States and abroad), risk factors (environmental, genetic, and gene-environment interactions), screening, prevention and control, and treatment. Landmark discoveries in colorectal cancer risk factor research will also be presented. Based on the information reviewed for this report, we suggest that future U.S. public health efforts aim to increase colorectal cancer screening among African American communities, and that future worldwide colorectal cancer epidemiology studies should focus on researching nutrient-gene interactions towards the goal of improving personalized treatment and prevention strategies. PMID:27766137

  16. Colorectal Cancer Coalition

    MedlinePlus

    ... inspire those touched by colorectal cancer. Watch Videos Join us on the hill Attend our annual advocacy ... We always need volunteers. Browse our opportunities. Volunteer Join the Movement We have many ways to fight ...

  17. Obesity and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Aleksandrova, Krasimira; Nimptsch, Katharina; Pischon, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    This review outlines the association of obesity with risk of colorectal cancer and the potential underlying mechanisms from an epidemiological perspective. Current research indicates that there is a moderate but consistently reported association between general obesity (as determined by BMI) and colorectal cancer incidence and mortality. The relative risk associated with obesity is higher for cancer of the colon than for cancer of the rectum and it is higher in men than in women. By contrast, abdominal adiposity (as determined by waist circumference or waist-to-hip ratio) is similarly strongly associated with colon cancer in men and women, suggesting that abdominal adiposity is a more important risk factor for colon cancer than general adiposity, at least in women. Putative mechanisms that may account for the link between adiposity and colorectal cancer risk include hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, inflammation, altered immune response, oxidative stress, as well as disturbances in insulin-like growth factors, adipokines, and sex steroids. Understanding the link between obesity and colorectal cancer may pave the way for targeted prevention of colorectal cancer morbidity and mortality.

  18. Colorectal Cancer: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Past Issues Special Section: Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer: Symptoms, Diagnosis and Treatment Past Issues / Spring 2009 Table of ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Symptoms Check with your healthcare provider if you have ...

  19. Developments in Colorectal Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... tested at age 45. Read More "Colorectal Cancer" Articles Colorectal Cancer: A Personal Journey / The Importance of Early Detection / Developments in Colorectal Cancer Screening Summer 2016 Issue: Volume 11 Number 2 Page ... Us | Viewers & Players Friends of the National Library of Medicine (FNLM)

  20. Colorectal Cancer: A Personal Journey

    MedlinePlus

    ... detection is early cure!” Read More "Colorectal Cancer" Articles Colorectal Cancer: A Personal Journey / The Importance of Early Detection / Developments in Colorectal Cancer Screening Summer 2016 Issue: Volume 11 Number 2 Page ... Us | Viewers & Players Friends of the National Library of Medicine (FNLM)

  1. Differences in knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and perceived risks regarding colorectal cancer screening among Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese sub-groups.

    PubMed

    Le, T Domi; Carney, Patricia A; Lee-Lin, Frances; Mori, Motomi; Chen, Zunqiu; Leung, Holden; Lau, Christine; Lieberman, David A

    2014-04-01

    Asian ethnic subgroups are often treated as a single demographic group in studies looking at cancer screening and health disparities. To evaluate knowledge and health beliefs associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) and CRC screening among Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese subgroups, a survey assessed participants' demographic characteristics, healthcare utilization, knowledge, beliefs, attitudes associated with CRC and CRC screening. Exploratory factor analysis identified six factors accounting >60 % of the total variance in beliefs and attitudes. Cronbach's alpha coefficients assessed internal consistency. Differences among Asian subgroups were assessed using a Chi square, Fisher's exact, or Kruskal-Wallis test. Pearson's correlation coefficient assessed an association among factors. 654 participants enrolled: 238 Chinese, 217 Korean, and 199 Vietnamese. Statistically significant differences existed in demographic and health care provider characteristics, knowledge, and attitude/belief variables regarding CRC. These included knowledge of CRC screening modalities, reluctance to discuss cancer, belief that cancer is preventable by diet and lifestyle, and intention to undergo CRC screening. Chinese subjects were more likely to use Eastern medicine (52 % Chinese, 25 % Korean, 27 % Vietnamese; p < 0.001); Korean subjects were less likely to see herbs as a form of cancer prevention (34 % Chinese, 20 % Korean, 35 % Vietnamese; p < 0.001). Vietnamese subjects were less likely to consider CRC screening (95 % Chinese, 95 % Korean, 80 % Vietnamese; p < 0.0001). Important differences exist in knowledge, attitudes, and health beliefs among Asian subgroups. Understanding these differences will enable clinicians to deliver tailored, effective health messages to improve CRC screening and other health behaviors.

  2. [Nutrition and colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Ströhle, Alexander; Maike, Wolters; Hahn, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Diet plays an important role in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. Current prospective cohort studies and metaanalysis enable a reevaluation of how food or nutrients such as fiber and fat influence cancer risk. Based on the evidence criteria of the WHO/FAD, risk reduction by a high intake of fruit is assessed as possible, while a lowered risk by a high vegetable intake is probable. Especially raw vegetables and fruits seem to exert anticancer properties. The evidence of a risk reducing effect of whole grain relating to colorectal cancer is assessed as probable whereas the evidence of an increased risk by high consumption of refined white flour products and sweets is (still) insufficient despite some evidences. There is a probable risk reducing effect of milk and dairy products. e available data on eggs and red meat indicate a possible risk increasing influence. Stronger clues for a risk increasing effect have been shown for meat products leading to an evidence assessed as probable. Owing to varied interpretations of the data on fiber, the evidence of a risk reducing effect relating to colorectal cancer is assessed as possible or insufficient. The available data on alcohol consumption indicate a possible risk increasing effect. In contrast to former evaluations, diets rich in fat seem to increase colorectal cancer risk only indirectly as part of a hypercaloric diet by advancing the obesity risk. Thus, the evidence of obesity, especially visceral obesity, as a risk of colorectal cancer is judged as convincing today. Prospective cohort studies suggest that people who get higher than average amounts of folic acid from multivitamin supplements have lower risks of colorectal cancer. The evidence for a risk reducing effect of calcium, selenium, vitamin D and vitamin E on colorectal cancer is insufficient. As primary prevention, a diet rich in vegetables, fruits, whole grain products, and legumes added by low-fat dairy products, fish, and poultry can be recommended. In

  3. Radioimmunodetection of colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, E.E.; Deland, F.H.; Casper, S.; Corgan, R.L.; Primus, F.J.; Goldenberg, D.M.

    1980-03-15

    This study examines the accuracy of colorectal cancer radioimmunodetection. Twenty-seven patients with a history of histologically-confirmed colonic or rectal carcinoma received a high-titer, purified goat anti-CEA IgG labelled with /sup 131/I at a total dose of at least 1.0 ..mu..Ci. Various body views were scanned at 24 and 48 hours after administration of the radioantibody. Three additional cases were evaluated; one had a villous adenoma in the rectum and received the /sup 131/I-labeled anti-CEA IgG, while two colonic carcinoma patients received normal goat IgG labelled with /sup 131/I. All of the 7 cases with primary colorectal cancer showed true-positive tumor localization, while 20 of 25 sites of metastatic colorectal cancer detected by immune scintigraphy were corroborated by other detection measures. The sensitivity of the radioimmunodetection of colorectal cancers (primary and metastatic) was found to be 90% (true-positive rate), the putative specificity (true-negative rate) was 94%, and the apparent overall accuracy of the technique was 93%. Neither the case of a villous adenoma receiving the anti-CEA IgG nor the two cases of colonic cancer receiving normal goat IgG showed tumor radiolocalization. Very high circulating CEA titers did not appear to hinder successful tumor radiolocalization. These findings suggest that in colorectal cancers the method of CEA radioimmunodetection may be of value in preoperatively determining the location and extent of disease, in assessing possible recurrence or spread postoperatively, and in localizing the source of CEA production in patients with rising or elevated CEA titers. An ancilliary benefit could be a more tumor-specific detection test for confirming the findings of other, more conventional diagnostic measures.

  4. Differences in Knowledge, Attitudes, Beliefs, and Perceived Risks Regarding Colorectal Cancer Screening Among Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese Sub-Groups

    PubMed Central

    Le, T Domi; Lee-Lin, Frances; Mori, Motomi; Chen, Zunqiu; Leung, Holden; Lau, Christine; Lieberman, David

    2013-01-01

    Background Asian ethnic subgroups are often treated as a single demographic group in studies looking at cancer screening and health disparities. Purpose To evaluate knowledge and health beliefs associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) and CRC screening among Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese subgroups. Methods A survey assessed participants’ demographic characteristics, healthcare utilization, knowledge, beliefs, attitudes associated with CRC and CRC screening. Exploratory factor analysis identified six factors accounting >60% of the total variance in beliefs and attitudes. Cronbach’s alpha coefficients assessed internal consistency. Differences among Asian subgroups were assessed using a chi-square, Fisher’s exact, or Kruskal-Wallis test. Pearson’s correlation coefficient assessed an association among factors. Results 654 participants enrolled: 238 Chinese, 217 Korean, and 199 Vietnamese. Statistically significant differences existed in demographic and health care provider characteristics, knowledge, and attitude/belief variables regarding CRC. These included knowledge of CRC screening modalities, reluctance to discuss cancer, belief that cancer is preventable by diet and lifestyle, and intention to undergo CRC screening. Chinese subjects were more likely to use Eastern medicine (52% Chinese, 25% Korean, 27% Vietnamese; p < 0.001); Korean subjects were less likely to see herbs as a form of cancer prevention (34% Chinese, 20% Korean, 35% Vietnamese; p < 0.001). Vietnamese subjects were less likely to consider CRC screening (95% Chinese, 95% Korean, 80% Vietnamese; p < 0.0001). Conclusion Important differences exist in knowledge, attitudes, and health beliefs among Asian subgroups. Understanding these differences will enable clinicians to deliver tailored, effective health messages to improve CRC screening and other health behaviors. PMID:24142376

  5. Knowledge, Attitude, Practice, and Perceived Barriers of Colorectal Cancer Screening among Family Physicians in National Guard Health Affairs, Riyadh

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. The objective of this study is to explore the current knowledge, attitude, and practice of family physicians working in family medicine clinics in National Guard Health Affairs (NGHA), Riyadh, toward colorectal cancer (CRC) screening and to identify the barriers of the screening. Methods. Data were collected using a validated self-administered questionnaire adopted from the National Cancer Institute in USA, customized by adding and eliminating questions to be in line with the institution (NGHA) characteristics. Results. Of the 130 physicians, 56.2% of the physicians were not practicing CRC screening although 94.6% considered CRC screening effective. Board certified physicians had higher knowledge score and were practicing CRC screening more when compared to other physicians. Physicians who reported practicing CRC screening scored more on the knowledge score than those not practicing. Male physicians scored better on attitude score than female physicians. The study found that barriers were cited in higher rates among physicians not practicing CRC screening compared with practicing physicians. Lack of patients' awareness was the most cited barrier. Conclusion. Large percentage of family physicians in this study do not practice CRC screening, despite the knowledge level and the positive attitude. PMID:25328703

  6. [Colorectal cancer screening].

    PubMed

    Castells, Antoni

    2015-09-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of malignancies showing the greatest benefit from preventive measures, especially screening or secondary prevention. Several screening strategies are available with demonstrated efficacy and efficiency. The most widely used are the faecal occult blood test in countries with population-based screening programmes, and colonoscopy in those conducting opportunistic screening. The present article reviews the most important presentations on colorectal cancer screening at the annual congress of the American Gastroenterological Association held in Washington in 2015, with special emphasis on the medium-term results of faecal occult blood testing strategies and determining factors and on strategies to reduce the development of interval cancer after colonoscopy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Biology of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Arvelo, Francisco; Sojo, Felipe; Cotte, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a serious health problem, a challenge for research, and a model for studying the molecular mechanisms involved in its development. According to its incidence, this pathology manifests itself in three forms: family, hereditary, and most commonly sporadic, apparently not associated with any hereditary or familial factor. For the types having inheritance patterns and a family predisposition, the tumours develop through defined stages ranging from adenomatous lesions to the manifestation of a malignant tumour. It has been established that environmental and hereditary factors contribute to the development of colorectal cancer, as indicated by the accumulation of mutations in oncogenes, genes which suppress and repair DNA, signaling the existence of various pathways through which the appearance of tumours may occur. In the case of the suppressive and mutating tracks, these are characterised by genetic disorders related to the phenotypical changes of the morphological progression sequence in the adenoma/carcinoma. Moreover, alternate pathways through mutation in BRAF and KRAS genes are associated with the progression of polyps to cancer. This review surveys the research done at the cellular and molecular level aimed at finding specific alternative therapeutic targets for fighting colorectal cancer. PMID:25932044

  8. Colorectal cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Bessa Caserras, Xavier

    2016-09-01

    In the latest meeting of the American Gastroenterological Association, several clinical studies were presented that aimed to evaluate the various colorectal cancer screening strategies, although most assessed the various aspects of faecal immunochemical testing (FIT) and colonoscopy. Data were presented from consecutive FIT-based screening rounds, confirming the importance of adherence to consecutive screening rounds, achieving a similar or superior diagnostic yield to endoscopic studies. There was confirmation of the importance of not delaying endoscopic study after a positive result. Participants with a negative FIT (score of 0) had a low risk for colorectal cancer. Several studies seemed to confirm the importance of high-quality colonoscopy in colorectal cancer screening programmes. The implementation of high-quality colonoscopies has reduced mortality from proximal lesions and reduced interval cancers in various studies. Finally, participants with a normal colonoscopy result or with a small adenoma are at low risk for developing advanced neoplasms during follow-up. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. [Colorectal cancer screening with colonoscopy].

    PubMed

    Pereyra, Lisandro; Gómez, Estanislao J; Mella, José M; Cimmino, Daniel G; Boerr, Luis A

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death worldwide and also in Argentina. In the past few years colorectal cancer screening has become more popular and colonoscopy has been postulated as the gold standard. In this review we analyzed the evidence supporting this method in contrast with its complications and disadvantages.

  10. Colorectal cancer screening in Asia.

    PubMed

    Ng, Siew C; Wong, Sunny H

    2013-01-01

    The incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer are rapidly rising in several countries in Asia. However, screening guidelines are lacking. Review of literature and local data published in peer review journals. The incidence, anatomical distribution and mortality of colorectal cancer among Asian populations are comparable to those in Western countries. Flat and depressed colonic lesions are not uncommon. Male gender, smoking, obesity, metabolic syndrome and family history are risk factors for colorectal cancer. Certain ethnic groups in Asia have increased susceptibility to colorectal cancer. Faecal occult blood test, flexible sigmoidoscopy and colonoscopy are recommended options for colorectal cancer screening in Asia. Regular screening should start at the age of 50 years. The optimal screening method in Asia remains unclear. Faecal immunochemical test has been suggested as the first choice of screening test in countries with limited resources. The role of nurse endoscopists in performing endoscopic procedures for colorectal cancer screening in Asia has not been defined. There is low public awareness and little support by health authorities for screening and prevention of this emerging disease. Screening for colorectal cancer should be a national health priority in most Asian countries. Studies on barriers to screening, education of the public and engagement of family physicians are important strategies in promoting colorectal cancer screening. With more health-care support, increased public acceptance and better access to the general population, colorectal cancer screening in Asia can be rewarding.

  11. Perceived Barriers and Facilitators for Return to Work Among Colorectal Cancer Survivors: Malaysian Healthcare Professionals Experience- A Qualitative Inquiry.

    PubMed

    Chow, Sze Loon; Loh, Siew Yim; Su, Tin Tin

    2015-06-01

    Return to work (RTW) can be a challenging occupational health (OH) issue among previously-employed colorectal cancer survivors. This study aimed to explore the various perceived barriers and facilitators encountered during the RTW process in cancer survivorship, from the perception of healthcare professionals (HCP). Face to face, semistructured interviews were carried out on twelve HCP (government and private sectors) from various disciplines. Data collected were transcribed verbatim and data management was aided by NVivo software 8.0. A new theory from contextual data was generated using open coding, axial coding and selective coding. The HCP shared numerous barriers and facilitators associated with RTW, under four categories. The key barriers were disturbing side effects, psychological barriers (personal factor), compensation (financial factor), poor ability to multitask (work-related factor), long paid medical leaves policy, employer's lackadaisical attitude, lack of knowledge and awareness of RTW (environmental factor). Key facilitators identified were desire to resume working life and to contribute to society (personal factor), financial pressure, maintain organizational health insurance (financial factor), less physically demanding job (work-related factor), supportive workplace and strict organizational policy on medical leaves (environmental factor). While not all HCP were trained in RTW, they all agreed that RTW is important for survivors and workplace. Occupational health doctors have a direct role in helping survivors RTW. Early Intervention on RTW during survivorship should involve occupational health doctors and employers, targeting the modifiable factors (environmental and work-related) to improve RTW after cancer.

  12. Lower or Standard Dose Regorafenib in Treating Patients With Refractory Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-07-11

    Colon Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Adenocarcinoma; Stage III Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer; Stage IV Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer

  13. Colorectal cancer screening beliefs. Focus groups with first-degree relatives.

    PubMed

    Rawl, S M; Menon, U; Champion, V L; Foster, J L; Skinner, C S

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the perceived benefits and barriers to colorectal cancer screening reported by first-degree relatives of colorectal cancer patients. In this study, the authors used focus groups to identify perceived benefits and barriers to colorectal cancer screening among parents and children of colorectal cancer patients. Four focus groups were conducted with relatives of colorectal cancer patients seen at two university medical centers in the Midwest. The groups ranged in size from five to eight members each and were stratified by gender. Four benefits of colorectal cancer screening were identified by participants: finding colorectal cancer early, decreasing the chances of dying from colorectal cancer, freedom from worry about colorectal cancer, and reassurance that one was cancer-free. Four main barriers were identified that applied to all four types of colorectal cancer screening or to colorectal cancer screening in general. These included inadequate public awareness of colorectal cancer, inconsistent recommendations from healthcare providers, concerns about the efficacy of screening tests, and embarrassment. Barriers unique to each screening test also were identified. Understanding individual beliefs about the benefits and barriers to colorectal cancer screening will allow clinicians and researchers to develop effective interventions to increase screening. Results from the focus groups have been used to develop an instrument to measure benefits and barriers to colorectal cancer screening, which now needs to be tested with more culturally and socioeconomically diverse groups.

  14. Chemoprevention of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    LANGMAN, M; BOYLE, P

    1998-01-01

    Department of Medicine, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham B15 2TH, UK P BOYLE Colorectal cancer is the fourth commonest form of cancer in men with 678 000 estimated new cases per year worldwide, representing 8.9% of all new cancers. The disease is most frequent in Occidental countries and particularly so in North America, Australia, New Zealand, and parts of Europe. Prospects for colorectal cancer control are bright and a number of possible approaches could prove fruitful. Among these, pharmaceutical measures seem to be valid and logical approaches to the prevention of colorectal cancer and diminishing its impact. Such approaches could concentrate in primary prevention in at-risk subjects or be applied in altering the course of precursor or established disease. Treatments used must fulfil basic requirements of biological plausibility and safety in continued use in large numbers of subjects. Those available include vitamins and minerals, and other drugs with potential as antioxidants, immune modulators or promoters of cell differentiation or apoptosis. Of the various regimens suggested, vitamin A supplementation may even predispose to adverse outcomes, and antioxidant vitamins in general have no coherent body of evidence to support their use. N-acetylcysteine and ursodeoxycholic acid have promising characteristics but there are as yet no clinical data to support the use of the former in gut epithelial cancer, and formal dose ranging studies must be carried out before the latter is submitted to large scale trial. Folate shows promising characteristics but non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and vitamin D seem the most promising agents. Both seem to reduce the incidence of disease, and to reduce growth rates and/or induce differentiation or apoptosis in gut epithelial cancer cells. Both are also well understood pharmacologically. They may be preferred to newer selective compounds in the same class until these newer compounds are confirmed as safe for widespread

  15. Patient experience and perceived acceptability of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging for staging colorectal and lung cancer compared with current staging scans: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Stuart; Janes, Sam; Halligan, Steve; Morton, Alison; Navani, Neal; Oliver, Alf; Rockall, Andrea; Teague, Jonathan; Miles, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Objective To describe the experience and acceptability of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (WB-MRI) staging compared with standard scans among patients with highly suspected or known colorectal or lung cancer. Design Qualitative study using one-to-one interviews with thematic analysis. Setting Patients recruited from 10 hospitals in London, East and South East England between March 2013 and July 2014. Participants 51 patients (31 male, age range 40–89 years), with varying levels of social deprivation, were recruited consecutively from two parallel clinical trials comparing the diagnostic accuracy and cost-effectiveness of WB-MRI with standard scans for staging colorectal and lung cancer (‘Streamline-C’ and ‘Streamline-L’). WB-MRI was offered as an additional scan as part of the trials. Results In general WB-MRI presented a greater challenge than standard scans, although all but four patients completed the WB-MRI. Key challenges were enclosed space, noise and scan duration; reduced patient tolerance was associated with claustrophobia, pulmonary symptoms and existing comorbidities. Coping strategies facilitated scan tolerance and were grouped into (1) those intended to help with physical and emotional challenges, and (2) those focused on motivation to complete the scan, for example focusing on health benefit. Our study suggests that good staff communication could reduce anxiety and boost coping strategies. Conclusions Although WB-MRI was perceived as more challenging than standard scans, it was sufficiently acceptable and tolerated by most patients to potentially replace them if appropriate. Trial registration number ISRCTN43958015 and ISRCTN50436483. PMID:28882915

  16. Patient experience and perceived acceptability of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging for staging colorectal and lung cancer compared with current staging scans: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Evans, Ruth; Taylor, Stuart; Janes, Sam; Halligan, Steve; Morton, Alison; Navani, Neal; Oliver, Alf; Rockall, Andrea; Teague, Jonathan; Miles, Anne

    2017-09-06

    To describe the experience and acceptability of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (WB-MRI) staging compared with standard scans among patients with highly suspected or known colorectal or lung cancer. Qualitative study using one-to-one interviews with thematic analysis. Patients recruited from 10 hospitals in London, East and South East England between March 2013 and July 2014. 51 patients (31 male, age range 40-89 years), with varying levels of social deprivation, were recruited consecutively from two parallel clinical trials comparing the diagnostic accuracy and cost-effectiveness of WB-MRI with standard scans for staging colorectal and lung cancer ('Streamline-C' and 'Streamline-L'). WB-MRI was offered as an additional scan as part of the trials. In general WB-MRI presented a greater challenge than standard scans, although all but four patients completed the WB-MRI. Key challenges were enclosed space, noise and scan duration; reduced patient tolerance was associated with claustrophobia, pulmonary symptoms and existing comorbidities. Coping strategies facilitated scan tolerance and were grouped into (1) those intended to help with physical and emotional challenges, and (2) those focused on motivation to complete the scan, for example focusing on health benefit. Our study suggests that good staff communication could reduce anxiety and boost coping strategies. Although WB-MRI was perceived as more challenging than standard scans, it was sufficiently acceptable and tolerated by most patients to potentially replace them if appropriate. ISRCTN43958015 and ISRCTN50436483. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  17. Screening for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Mandel, Jack S

    2008-03-01

    Although there are several methods available for colon cancer screening, none is optimal. This article reviews methods for screening, including fecal occult blood tests, flexible sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, CT colonography, capsule endoscopy, and double contrast barium enema. A simple, inexpensive, noninvasive, and relatively sensitive screening test is needed to identify people at risk for developing advanced adenomas or colorectal cancer who would benefit from colonoscopy. It is hoped that new markers will be identified that perform better. Until then we fortunately have a variety of screening strategies that do work.

  18. Practical genetics of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Henry T; Shaw, Trudy G

    2013-06-01

    Hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC) is highly heterogeneous, both genotypically and phenotypically. The most frequently occurring hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome is Lynch syndrome, accounting for approximately 3% of the total colorectal cancer burden. Polyposis syndromes, such as familial adenomatous polyposis, account for a lesser percentage. Familial colorectal cancer, defined by family history, occurs in an estimated 20% of all colorectal cancer cases. With a worldwide annual colorectal cancer incidence of over one million, and annual mortality of over 600,000, hereditary and familial forms of colorectal cancer are a major public health problem. Lynch syndrome is attributable to DNA mismatch repair germline mutations, with the MSH2, MLH1, MSH6, and PMS2 genes being implicated. The characteristics of Lynch syndrome-associated colorectal tumors, including early age of onset and predilection to the proximal colon, mandate surveillance by colonoscopy beginning by age 20 to 25 and repeated every other year through age 40 and annually thereafter. Besides colorectal cancer, Lynch syndrome also predisposes to a litany of extracolonic cancers, foremost of which is endometrial cancer, followed by cancer of the ovary, stomach, renal pelvis and ureter, small bowel, hepatobiliary tract, pancreas, glioblastoma multiforme in the Turcot's variant, and sebaceous skin tumors in the Muir-Torre variant and, more recently identified, cancers of the breast and prostate. The most common polyposis syndrome is familial adenomatous polyposis, caused by mutations in the APC gene. Affected individuals have multiple colonic adenomas and, without treatment invariably develop colorectal cancer. Colonic surveillance with polypectomy may be pursued until the appearance of multiple colonic adenomas, at which time prophylactic colectomy should be considered. Extra-intestinal manifestations include desmoid tumor, hepatoblastoma, thyroid carcinoma, and medulloblastoma. Other polyposis

  19. Gain versus loss-framed messaging and colorectal cancer screening among African Americans: A preliminary examination of perceived racism and culturally targeted dual messaging.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Todd; Hayman, Lenwood W; Blessman, James E; Asabigi, Kanzoni; Novak, Julie M

    2016-05-01

    This preliminary study examined the effect of gain versus loss-framed messaging as well as culturally targeted personal prevention messaging on African Americans' receptivity to colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. This research also examined mechanistic functions of perceived racism in response to message framing. Community samples of African Americans (N = 132) and White Americans (N = 50) who were non-compliant with recommended CRC screening completed an online education module about CRC, and were either exposed to a gain-framed or loss-framed message about CRC screening. Half of African Americans were exposed to an additional and culturally targeted self-control message about personal prevention of CRC. Theory of planned behavior measures of attitudes, normative beliefs, perceived behavioural control, and intentions to obtain a CRC screen served as primary outcomes. The effect of messaging on perceived racism was also measured as an outcome. Consistent with prior research, White Americans were more receptive to CRC screening when exposed to a loss-framed message. However, African Americans were more receptive when exposed to a gain-framed message. The contrary effect of loss-framed messaging on receptivity to screening among African Americans was mediated by an increase in perceived racism. However, including an additional and culturally targeted prevention message mitigated the adverse effect of a loss-framed message. This study identifies an important potential cultural difference in the effect of message framing on illness screening among African Americans, while also suggesting a culturally relevant linking mechanism. This study also suggests the potential for simultaneously presented and culturally targeted messaging to alter the effects of gain and loss-framed messaging on African Americans. What is already known on this subject? African Americans are at an increased risk of both developing and dying from colorectal cancer (CRC). These disparities can be

  20. [Colorectal cancer screening].

    PubMed

    Castells, Antoni

    2013-10-01

    Colorectal cancer is the paradigm of tumoral growth that is susceptible to preventive measures, especially screening. Various screening strategies with demonstrated efficacy and efficiency are currently available, notable examples being the fecal occult blood test and endoscopic tests. In addition, new modalities have appeared in the last few years that could become viable alternatives in the near future. The present article reviews the most important presentations on colorectal screening at the annual congress of the American Gastroenterological Association held in Orlando in May 2013, with special emphasis on the medium- and long-term results of strategies using the fecal occult blood test and flexible sigmoidoscopy, as well as initial experiences with the use of new biomarkers.

  1. What's New in Colorectal Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Research? Colorectal Cancer About Colorectal Cancer What’s New in Colorectal Cancer Research? Research is always going ... ways to find colorectal cancer early by studying new types of screening tests and improving the ones ...

  2. Lysyl oxidase in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Cox, Thomas R; Erler, Janine T

    2013-11-15

    Colorectal cancer is the third most prevalent form of cancer worldwide and fourth-leading cause of cancer-related mortality, leading to ~600,000 deaths annually, predominantly affecting the developed world. Lysyl oxidase is a secreted, extracellular matrix-modifying enzyme previously suggested to act as a tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer. However, emerging evidence has rapidly implicated lysyl oxidase in promoting metastasis of solid tumors and in particular colorectal cancer at multiple stages, affecting tumor cell proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis. This emerging research has stimulated significant interest in lysyl oxidase as a strong candidate for developing and deploying inhibitors as functional efficacious cancer therapeutics. In this review, we discuss the rapidly expanding body of knowledge concerning lysyl oxidase in solid tumor progression, highlighting recent advancements in the field of colorectal cancer.

  3. Epigenetics of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Goel, Ajay; Boland, C Richard

    2012-12-01

    In the early years of the molecular biology revolution, cancer research was mainly focused on genetic changes (ie, those that altered DNA sequences). Although this has been extremely useful as our understanding of the pathogenesis and biology of cancer has grown and matured, there is another realm in tumor development that does not involve changing the sequence of cellular DNA. This field is called "epigenetics" and broadly encompasses changes in the methylation of cytosines in DNA, changes in histone and chromatin structure, and alterations in the expression of microRNAs, which control the stability of many messenger RNAs and serve as "master regulators" of gene expression. This review focuses on the epigenetics of colorectal cancer and illustrates the impact epigenetics has had on this field.

  4. [Genetics of colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Balaguer, Francesc

    2013-10-01

    Up to 5% of all cases of colorectal cancer (CRC) are due to a known hereditary syndrome. These hereditary forms often require a high degree of suspicion for their diagnosis and specific and specialized management. Moreover, a diagnosis of hereditary CRC has important consequences, not only for patients-for whom highly effective preventive measures are available-, but also for their relatives, who may be carriers of the same condition. The most significant advances in the field of hereditary CRC have been produced in the diagnosis and characterization of these syndromes and in the discovery of new causative genes.

  5. Self-perceived Mental Health Status and Uptake of Fecal Occult Blood Test for Colorectal Cancer Screening in Canada: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Hategekimana, Celestin; Karamouzian, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: While colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most preventable causes of cancer mortality, it is one of the leading causes of cancer death in Canada where CRC screening uptake is suboptimal. Given the increased rate of mortality and morbidity among mental health patients, their condition could be a potential barrier to CRC screening due to greater difficulties in adhering to behaviours related to long-term health goals. Using a population-based study among Canadians, we hypothesize that self-perceived mental health (SPMH) status and fecal occult blood test (FOBT) uptake for the screening of CRC are associated. Methods: The current study is cross-sectional and utilised data from the Canadian Community Health Survey 2011-2012. Multinomial logistic regression analysis was undertaken to assess whether SPMH is independently associated with FOBT uptake among a representative sample of 11 386 respondents aged 50-74 years. Results: Nearly half of the respondents reported having ever had FOBT for CRC screening, including 37.28% who have been screened within two years of the survey and 12.41% who had been screened more than two years preceding the survey. Respondents who reported excellent mental health were more likely to have ever been screened two years or more before the survey (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.08; 95% CI, 1.00-4.43) and to have been screened in the last two years preceding the survey (AOR = 1.53; 95% CI, 0.86-2.71) than those reported poor mental health status. Conclusion: This study supports the association between SPMH status and FOBT uptake for CRC screening. While the efforts to maximize CRC screening uptake should be deployed to all eligible people, those with poor mental health may need more attention. PMID:27285514

  6. Obesity and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Bardou, Marc; Barkun, Alan N; Martel, Myriam

    2013-06-01

    Excess body weight, as defined by the body mass index (BMI), has been associated with several diseases and includes subjects who are overweight (BMI ≥ 25-29.9 kg/m(2)) or obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)). Overweight and obesity constitute the fifth leading risk for overall mortality, accounting for at least 2.8 million adult deaths each year. In addition around 11% of colorectal cancer (CRC) cases have been attributed to overweight and obesity in Europe. Epidemiological data suggest that obesity is associated with a 30-70% increased risk of colon cancer in men, whereas the association is less consistent in women. Similar trends exist for colorectal adenoma, although the risk appears lower. Visceral fat, or abdominal obesity, seems to be of greater concern than subcutaneous fat obesity, and any 1 kg/m(2) increase in BMI confers additional risk (HR 1.03). Obesity might be associated with worse cancer outcomes, such as recurrence of the primary cancer or mortality. Several factors, including reduced sensitivity to antiangiogenic-therapeutic regimens, might explain these differences. Except for wound infection, obesity has no significant impact on surgical procedures. The underlying mechanisms linking obesity to CRC are still a matter of debate, but metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance and modifications in levels of adipocytokines seem to be of great importance. Other biological factors such as the gut microbiota or bile acids are emerging. Many questions still remain unanswered: should preventive strategies specifically target obese patients? Is the risk of cancer great enough to propose prophylactic bariatric surgery in certain patients with obesity?

  7. Primary Prevention of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Andrew T.; Giovannucci, Edward L.

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer has been strongly associated with a Western lifestyle. In the past several decades, much has been learned about the dietary, lifestyle, and medication risk factors for this malignancy. Although there is controversy about the role of specific nutritional factors, consideration of the dietary pattern as a whole appears useful for formulating recommendations. For example, several studies have shown that high intake of red and processed meats, highly refined grains and starches, and sugars is related to increased risk of colorectal cancer. Replacing these factors with poultry, fish, and plant sources as the primary source of protein; unsaturated fats as the primary source of fat; and unrefined grains, legumes and fruits as the primary source of carbohydrates is likely to lower risk of colorectal cancer. Although a role for supplements, including vitamin D, folate, and vitamin B6, remains uncertain, calcium supplementation is likely to be at least modestly beneficial. With respect to lifestyle, compelling evidence indicates that avoidance of smoking and heavy alcohol use, prevention of weight gain, and the maintenance of a reasonable level of physical activity are associated with markedly lower risks of colorectal cancer. Medications such as aspirin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and post-menopausal hormones for women are associated with significant reductions in colorectal cancer risk, though their utility is affected by associated risks. Taken together, modifications in diet and lifestyle should substantially reduce the risk of colorectal cancer and could complement screening in reducing colorectal cancer incidence. PMID:20420944

  8. Familial colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lung, M S; Trainer, A H; Campbell, I; Lipton, L

    2015-05-01

    Identifying individuals with a genetic predisposition to developing familial colorectal cancer (CRC) is crucial to the management of the affected individual and their family. In order to do so, the physician requires an understanding of the different gene mutations and clinical manifestations of familial CRC. This review summarises the genetics, clinical manifestations and management of the known familial CRC syndromes, specifically Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, MUTYH-associated neoplasia, juvenile polyposis syndrome and Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. An individual suspected of having a familial CRC with an underlying genetic predisposition should be referred to a familial cancer centre to enable pre-test counselling and appropriate follow up. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  9. Lipidome in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Bo; Li, Yongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Understanding its pathophysiology is essential for developing efficient strategies to treat this disease. Lipidome, the sum of total lipids, related enzymes, receptors and signaling pathways, plays crucial roles in multiple cellular processes, such as metabolism, energy storage, proliferation and apoptosis. Dysregulation of lipid metabolism and function contributes to the development of CRC, and can be used towards the evaluation of prognosis. The strategies targeting lipidome have been applied in clinical trails and showed promising results. Here we discuss recent advances in abnormal lipid metabolism in CRC, the mechanisms by which the lipidome regulates tumorigenesis and tumor progression, and suggest potential therapeutic targets for clinical trials. PMID:26967051

  10. [Colorectal cancer in spouses of colorectal cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Matsumata, T; Shikada, Y; Hasuda, S; Kishihara, F; Suehiro, T; Funahashi, S; Nagamatsu, Y; Iso, Y; Shima, I; Koga, C; Osamura, S; Ueda, M; Furuya, K; Sakino, I

    2000-06-01

    Married couples share home environments and life style for years. In the case of colorectal cancer, an association with insulin resistance was reported. We determined the presence of the insulin-resistance syndrome (IRS, 1 or more of the following: body mass index of > 25 kg/m2, diabetes, or hyperlipidemia) in 84 colorectal cancer patients, of whom 61 patients (73%) had IRS. The incidence of the distal colorectal cancer, which has been declining in the United States, was significantly higher in the IRS group than in the non-IRS group (75.4 vs 52.2%, p = 0.0400). Some mechanisms may promote the progression of mucosal lesions to invasive cancers in the distal colorectum. There were no significant differences with respect to the age (64.6 +/- 9.4 vs 64.3 +/- 11.3 yr, p = 0.8298), height (159 +/- 9 vs 157 +/- 8 cm, p = 0.1375), and body mass index (22.2 +/- 3.6 vs 22.4 +/- 2.7 kg/m2, p = 0.6364) between the patients and their spouses. In 84 couples in whom colorectal cancer develops at least in one may then not illustrate the nursery rhyme: "Jack Sprat could eat no fat, His wife could eat no lean...". The spouses had been married for an average of 38 years, and in 30 spouses who had been followed in a colorectal cancer screening, 5 developed colorectal cancer. To diminish the incidence of colorectal cancer in Japan, we might advise screening colonoscopy to the spouses of colorectal cancer patients, or déjà vu all over again?

  11. [Hereditary and familial colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Balaguer, Francesc

    2014-09-01

    Up to 5% of all colorectal cancer cases are caused by a known hereditary syndrome. These hereditary types often need a higher degree of clinical suspicion to be diagnosed and require specific and specialized management. In addition, diagnosing hereditary colorectal cancer has significant consequences not only for the patient, for whom there are effective preventative measures, but also for their families, who could be carriers of the condition. The most significant advances in the field of colorectal cancer have come from the diagnosis and characterization of these syndromes.

  12. [Multidisciplinary therapy of colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Balogh, A; Kahán, Z; Maráz, A; Mikó, T; Nagy, F; Palkó, A; Thurzó, L; Tiszlavicz, L

    2001-03-18

    A multidisciplinary program for the treatment of colorectal cancer is described. The main objective of the authors has been to define uniform up to date guidelines based on recent progress in the treatment of colorectal cancer. Preoperative diagnostic procedures are summarized which advance determination of clinical stage and prognosis. These information essentially determine care. Sequences of surgical methods, preoperative and postoperative radiotherapy and medical treatments are discussed according to tumor stages. Guidelines for surveillance following active treatment and recommendation for the screening of population at high risk for colorectal cancer are presented.

  13. Microsatellite Instability in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Boland, C. Richard; Goel, Ajay

    2011-01-01

    Microsatellite instability (MSI) is a hypermutable phenotype caused by the loss of DNA mismatch repair activity. MSI is detected in about 15% of all colorectal cancers; 3% are of these are associated with Lynch syndrome and the other 12% are caused by sporadic, acquired hypermethylation of the promoter of the MLH1 gene, which occurs in tumors with the CpG island methylator phenotype. Colorectal tumors with MSI have distinctive features, including a tendency to arise in the proximal colon, lymphocytic infiltrate, and a poorly differentiated, mucinous or signet ring appearance. They have a slightly better prognosis than colorectal tumors without MSI and do not have the same response to chemotherapeutics. Discovery of MSI in colorectal tumors has increased awareness of the diversity of colorectal cancers and implications for specialized management of patients. PMID:20420947

  14. Animal Models of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Robert L.; Fleet, James C.

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a heterogeneous disease that afflicts a large number of people in the United States. The use of animal models has the potential to increase our understanding of carcinogenesis, tumor biology, and the impact of specific molecular events on colon biology. In addition, animal models with features of specific human colorectal cancers can be used to test strategies for cancer prevention and treatment. In this review we provide an overview of the mechanisms driving human cancer, we discuss the approaches one can take to model colon cancer in animals, and we describe a number of specific animal models that have been developed for the study of colon cancer. We believe that there are many valuable animal models to study various aspects of human colorectal cancer. However, opportunities for improving upon these models exist. PMID:23076650

  15. Biomarkers for Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Takuji; Tanaka, Mayu; Tanaka, Takahiro; Ishigamori, Rikako

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common epithelial malignancy in the world. Since CRC develops slowly from removable precancerous lesions, detection of the lesion at an early stage by regular health examinations can reduce the incidence and mortality of this malignancy. Colonoscopy significantly improves the detection rate of CRC, but the examination is expensive and inconvenient. Therefore, we need novel biomarkers that are non-invasive to enable us to detect CRC quite early. A number of validation studies have been conducted to evaluate genetic, epigenetic or protein markers for identification in the stool and/or serum. Currently, the fecal occult blood test is the most widely used method of screening for CRC. However, advances in genomics and proteomics will lead to the discovery of novel non-invasive biomarkers. PMID:20957089

  16. Hereditary forms of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Castells, Antoni

    2016-09-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most frequent neoplasms in western countries; it is the third most common cancer in men after prostate and lung cancer and the second most common in women after breast cancer. Colorectal cancer is usually sporadic but in a small proportion is hereditary. The genetic cause is well established, allowing pre-symptomatic diagnosis in at-risk relatives. The present article reviews the most novel findings presented at the latest meeting of the American Gastroenterological Association on hereditary forms of colorectal cancer, especially Lynch syndrome and MUTYH-associated polyposis, as well as diverse organisational aspects that can favour the correct management of these patients and their relatives.

  17. [Surgery in complicated colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Kreisler, Esther; Biondo, Sebastiano; Martí-Ragué, Joan

    2006-07-01

    Colorectal cancer continues to have a serious social impact. A large proportion of patients are diagnosed at an advanced stage of the disease. Approximately one-third of patients with colorectal cancer will undergo emergency surgery for a complicated tumor, with a high risk of mortality and poorer long-term prognosis. The most frequent complications are obstruction and perforation, while massive hemorrhage is rare. The curative potential of surgery, whether urgent or elective, depends on how radical the resection is, among other factors. In the literature on the management of urgent colorectal disease, there are few references to the oncological criteria for resection. Uncertainly about the optimal treatment has led to wide variability in the treatment of this entity. The present article aims to provide a critical appraisal of the controversies surrounding the role of surgery and its impact on complicated colorectal cancer.

  18. Colorectal cancer statistics, 2017.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Rebecca L; Miller, Kimberly D; Fedewa, Stacey A; Ahnen, Dennis J; Meester, Reinier G S; Barzi, Afsaneh; Jemal, Ahmedin

    2017-05-06

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common malignancies in the United States. Every 3 years, the American Cancer Society provides an update of CRC incidence, survival, and mortality rates and trends. Incidence data through 2013 were provided by the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program, the National Program of Cancer Registries, and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries. Mortality data through 2014 were provided by the National Center for Health Statistics. CRC incidence rates are highest in Alaska Natives and blacks and lowest in Asian/Pacific Islanders, and they are 30% to 40% higher in men than in women. Recent temporal patterns are generally similar by race and sex, but differ by age. Between 2000 and 2013, incidence rates in adults aged ≥50 years declined by 32%, with the drop largest for distal tumors in people aged ≥65 years (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 0.50; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.48-0.52) and smallest for rectal tumors in ages 50 to 64 years (male IRR, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.85-0.96; female IRR, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.93-1.08). Overall CRC incidence in individuals ages ≥50 years declined from 2009 to 2013 in every state except Arkansas, with the decrease exceeding 5% annually in 7 states; however, rectal tumor incidence in those ages 50 to 64 years was stable in most states. Among adults aged <50 years, CRC incidence rates increased by 22% from 2000 to 2013, driven solely by tumors in the distal colon (IRR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.13-1.35) and rectum (IRR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.13-1.31). Similar to incidence patterns, CRC death rates decreased by 34% among individuals aged ≥50 years during 2000 through 2014, but increased by 13% in those aged <50 years. Progress against CRC can be accelerated by increasing initiation of screening at age 50 years (average risk) or earlier (eg, family history of CRC/advanced adenomas) and eliminating disparities in high-quality treatment. In addition, research is needed to elucidate causes

  19. Survivorship Care Plan in Promoting Physical Activity in Breast or Colorectal Cancer Survivors in Wisconsin

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-01

    Cancer Survivor; Healthy Subject; Stage I Colorectal Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer

  20. Selumetinib and Cyclosporine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Advanced or Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-28

    Recurrent Colorectal Carcinoma; Solid Neoplasm; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7

  1. Crohn's disease and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Gillen, C D; Andrews, H A; Prior, P; Allan, R N

    1994-01-01

    The colorectal cancer risk in Crohn's disease eliminating all known biases was assessed in a cohort of 281 patients with Crohn's disease who resided in the West Midlands at the time of diagnosis, and were first seen within five years of onset of symptoms between 1945-1975. All patients were 15 years of age or more at onset and were followed up from 12-35 years (total 5213 person years at risk (PYR)). The colorectal cancer risk in the series compared with the risk in the general population was computed by applying sex and age specific PYRs to the date of death or end of the study period 31 December 1991. There were six colonic and two rectal cancers. Six of the eight colorectal cancers were diagnosed 20 or more years after the onset of Crohn's disease. The relative risk (RR) of colorectal cancer for the series as a whole was 3.4 (p < 0.001), with a fivefold excess in the colon, but no significant excess in the rectum. Patients with extensive colitis showed an 18-fold increase in risk (RR = 18.2, p < 0.001), which decreased with increasing age at onset. This study shows that there is a statistical excess risk of developing colorectal cancer in patients who develop their Crohn's disease at a young age of onset (less than 30 years of age). PMID:8200559

  2. Colorectal cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Bretthauer, M

    2011-08-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cause of cancer death worldwide and a major health problem. In this review, the different approaches for CRC screening will be outlined with emphasis on evidence-based medicine. Evidence from randomized trials on the effectiveness of CRC screening is summarized. Several screening tools for CRC are available. They can be categorized according to their mode of action: early detection tools such as the faecal occult blood test (FOBT) and cancer prevention tools such as flexible sigmoidoscopy and colonoscopy. Meta-analyses of randomized trials show that FOBT screening reduces CRC mortality by 16% (risk ratio 0.84; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.78-0.9) compared with 30% (risk ratio 0.7; 95% CI 0.6-0.81) for flexible sigmoidoscopy screening. FOBT screening is cheap and noninvasive, but results in large numbers of false-positive tests and needs to be repeated frequently. Flexible sigmoidoscopy is more invasive, but is effective for once-only screening. Although colonoscopy screening is used in some countries, no randomized trials have been conducted to estimate its benefit, and therefore, it should not be recommended at the present time. Faecal occult blood test and flexible sigmoidoscopy are the two CRC screening tools that can be recommended as they have been proven to reduce CRC mortality. Colonoscopy has the potential to be superior to FOBT and flexible sigmoidoscopy, but needs to be evaluated in randomized trials before any recommendation can be provided. © 2011 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  3. Colorectal Cancer: The Importance of Early Detection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alliance : www.ccalliance.org Read More "Colorectal Cancer" Articles Colorectal Cancer: A Personal Journey / The Importance of Early Detection / Developments in Colorectal Cancer Screening Summer 2016 Issue: Volume 11 Number 2 Page ... Us | Viewers & Players Friends of the National Library of Medicine (FNLM)

  4. Colorectal Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing colorectal cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  5. Body image concerns after colorectal cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Claire

    Body image is understood to be a person's perception of his or her own physical appearance although, as this article highlights, it embraces a greater range of bodily attributes than is often appreciated. It can be significantly affected by a diagnosis of colorectal cancer and subsequent treatment, which may modify the way the body looks, feels and functions. One of the major aesthetic and functional consequences of colorectal cancer surgery is the possibility of stoma formation, which is of particular concern to many. However, the range of other bodily effects following surgery should not be overlooked, not least because of they may result in distress. While concerns about changes in body image generally decrease over time, people recovering from cancer treatment often feel their relationship with their body has been permanently altered. Specialist support is often required when adjusting to any changes in bodily appearance and function. Care outcomes can be improved by having a sound understanding of the body image concerns likely to arise following treatment, as well as the skills to identify and support patients at risk of altered body image. This article provides guidance to nurses caring for individuals who may be experiencing distress over how their body is now perceived by themselves and others following colorectal cancer surgery.

  6. Tucatinib (ONT-380) and Trastuzumab for Patients With HER2-positive Metastatic Colorectal Cancer (MOUNTAINEER)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-13

    Colorectal Cancer; Colorectal Carcinoma; Colorectal Tumors; Neoplasms, Colorectal; HER-2 Gene Amplification; Metastatic Cancer; Metastatic Colon Cancer; Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum

  7. Colorectal cancers and chlorinated water.

    PubMed

    El-Tawil, Ahmed Mahmoud

    2016-04-15

    Published reports have revealed increased risk of colorectal cancers in people exposed to chlorinated drinking water or chemical derivatives of chlorination. Oestrogen plays a dual positive functions for diminishing the possibilities of such risk by reducing the entrance, and increasing the excretion, of these chemicals. In addition, there are supplementary measures that could be employed in order to reduce this risk further, such as boiling the drinking water, revising the standard concentrations of calcium, magnesium and iron in the public drinking water and prescribing oestrogen in susceptible individuals. Hypo-methylation of genomic DNA could be used as a biological marker for screening for the potential development of colorectal cancers.

  8. Colorectal cancers and chlorinated water

    PubMed Central

    El-Tawil, Ahmed Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Published reports have revealed increased risk of colorectal cancers in people exposed to chlorinated drinking water or chemical derivatives of chlorination. Oestrogen plays a dual positive functions for diminishing the possibilities of such risk by reducing the entrance, and increasing the excretion, of these chemicals. In addition, there are supplementary measures that could be employed in order to reduce this risk further, such as boiling the drinking water, revising the standard concentrations of calcium, magnesium and iron in the public drinking water and prescribing oestrogen in susceptible individuals. Hypo-methylation of genomic DNA could be used as a biological marker for screening for the potential development of colorectal cancers. PMID:27096035

  9. Nutrients, foods, and colorectal cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Song, Mingyang; Garrett, Wendy S; Chan, Andrew T

    2015-05-01

    Diet has an important role in the development of colorectal cancer. In the past few decades, findings from extensive epidemiologic and experimental investigations have linked consumption of several foods and nutrients to the risk of colorectal neoplasia. Calcium, fiber, milk, and whole grains have been associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer, and red meat and processed meat have been associated with an increased risk. There is substantial evidence for the potential chemopreventive effects of vitamin D, folate, fruits, and vegetables. Nutrients and foods also may interact, as a dietary pattern, to influence colorectal cancer risk. Diet likely influences colorectal carcinogenesis through several interacting mechanisms. These include the direct effects on immune responsiveness and inflammation, and the indirect effects of overnutrition and obesity-risk factors for colorectal cancer. Emerging evidence also implicates the gut microbiota as an important effector in the relationship between diet and cancer. Dietary modification therefore has the promise of reducing colorectal cancer incidence.

  10. Nutrients, Foods, and Colorectal Cancer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Song, Mingyang; Garrett, Wendy S.; Chan, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    Diet has an important role in the development of colorectal cancer. In the past few decades, findings from extensive epidemiologic and experimental investigation have linked consumption of several foods and nutrients to the risk of colorectal neoplasia. Calcium, fiber, milk, and whole grain have been associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer, and red meat and processed meat with an increased risk. There is substantial evidence for the potential chemopreventive effects of vitamin D, folate, fruits and vegetables. Nutrients and foods may also interact, as a dietary pattern, to influence colorectal cancer risk. Diet likely influences colorectal carcinogenesis through several interacting mechanisms. These include the direct effects on immune responsiveness and inflammation, and the indirect effects of over-nutrition and obesity—risk factors for colorectal cancer. Emerging evidence also implicates the gut microbiota as an important effector in the relationship between diet and cancer. Dietary modification therefore has the promise of reducing colorectal cancer incidence. PMID:25575572

  11. Five Myths about Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... and processed meat you eat. If you drink alcohol, limit the amount to 1 drink per day for women, 2 per day for men. Don’t use tobacco in any form. Myth: African Americans are not at risk for colorectal cancer. Truth: African-American men and women are diagnosed ...

  12. [Systemic therapy for colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Pestalozzi, B C; Jäger, D; Knuth, A

    2005-06-01

    Drug treatment of colorectal cancer has made impressive progress during the past 10 years. In addition to the traditional 5-fluorouracil, newer anticancer drugs are available including irinotecan and oxaliplatin. Monoclonal antibodies like bevacizumab and cetuximab have been integrated into modern treatment regimens. Based on randomized clinical trials we can formulate rational treatment strategies as outlined in this article.

  13. General Aspects of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Centelles, Josep J.

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the main causes of death. Cancer is initiated by several DNA damages, affecting proto-oncogenes, tumour suppressor genes, and DNA repairing genes. The molecular origins of CRC are chromosome instability (CIN), microsatellite instability (MSI), and CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP). A brief description of types of CRC cancer is presented, including sporadic CRC, hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) or Lynch syndromes, familiar adenomatous polyposis (FAP), MYH-associated polyposis (MAP), Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS), and juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS). Some signalling systems for CRC are also described, including Wnt-β-catenin pathway, tyrosine kinase receptors pathway, TGF-β pathway, and Hedgehog pathway. Finally, this paper describes also some CRC treatments. PMID:23209942

  14. General aspects of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Centelles, Josep J

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the main causes of death. Cancer is initiated by several DNA damages, affecting proto-oncogenes, tumour suppressor genes, and DNA repairing genes. The molecular origins of CRC are chromosome instability (CIN), microsatellite instability (MSI), and CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP). A brief description of types of CRC cancer is presented, including sporadic CRC, hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) or Lynch syndromes, familiar adenomatous polyposis (FAP), MYH-associated polyposis (MAP), Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS), and juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS). Some signalling systems for CRC are also described, including Wnt-β-catenin pathway, tyrosine kinase receptors pathway, TGF-β pathway, and Hedgehog pathway. Finally, this paper describes also some CRC treatments.

  15. Telomere function in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Frías, Cristina; Morán, Alberto; de Juan, Carmen; Ortega, Paloma; Fernández-Marcelo, Tamara; Sánchez-Pernaute, Andrés; Torres, Antonio José; Díaz-Rubio, Eduardo; Benito, Manuel; Iniesta, Pilar

    2009-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common form of cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in the western world. Tumour cells acquire the hallmarks of cancer during the carcinogenic selection process. Cell immortality is one of the principal features acquired during this process which involves the stabilization of telomere length. It is achieved mainly, by telomerase activation. Thus, the discovery of telomeres and telomerase allowed an understanding of the mechanisms by which cells can become immortalized. Different studies have shown that tumour cells have shorter telomeres than nontumour cells and have detected telomerase activity in the majority of tumours. Survival studies have determined that telomere maintenance and telomerase activity are associated with poor prognosis. Taking into account all the results achieved by different groups, quantification and evaluation of telomerase activity and measurement of telomere length may be useful methods for additional biologic and prognostic staging of colorectal carcinoma. PMID:21160767

  16. Iron, microbiota and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ng, Oliver

    2016-10-01

    Iron deficiency and anaemia are common in colorectal cancer. Replacement with oral or intravenous iron effectively treats this deficiency. However, mechanistic and population studies suggest that excess iron promotes colorectal carcinogenesis. Growing research into gut microbiota and dysbiosis suggests one explanation for this association. Iron is growth limiting for many pathogenic bacteria and may promote a shift in the ratio of pathogenic to protective bacteria. This may increase the toxic bacterial metabolites, promoting inflammation and carcinogenesis. This has important implications as we seek to correct anaemia in our patients.

  17. [New drugs for colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Pestalozzi, B C; Jäger, D; Knuth, A

    2004-09-01

    Drug treatment of colorectal cancer has made impressive progress during the past 10 years. In addition to fluorouracil new anticancer drugs like irinotecan and oxaliplatin have become available. The activity of fluorouracil was optimized by using schedules of prolonged infusion. Capecitabine is an oral pro-drug of fluorouracil. When colorectal metastases are limited to the liver they should be resected if possible. Sometimes they can be reduced in size by primary chemotherapy (downstaging) and resected later. Very new and exciting are reports with the monoclonal antibody bevacizumab in combination with chemotherapy. Bevacizumab blocks angiogenesis. So far it is available only in the USA.

  18. Danish Colorectal Cancer Group Database.

    PubMed

    Ingeholm, Peter; Gögenur, Ismail; Iversen, Lene H

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the database, which has existed for registration of all patients with colorectal cancer in Denmark since 2001, is to improve the prognosis for this patient group. All Danish patients with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer who are either diagnosed or treated in a surgical department of a public Danish hospital. The database comprises an array of surgical, radiological, oncological, and pathological variables. The surgeons record data such as diagnostics performed, including type and results of radiological examinations, lifestyle factors, comorbidity and performance, treatment including the surgical procedure, urgency of surgery, and intra- and postoperative complications within 30 days after surgery. The pathologists record data such as tumor type, number of lymph nodes and metastatic lymph nodes, surgical margin status, and other pathological risk factors. The database has had >95% completeness in including patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma with >54,000 patients registered so far with approximately one-third rectal cancers and two-third colon cancers and an overrepresentation of men among rectal cancer patients. The stage distribution has been more or less constant until 2014 with a tendency toward a lower rate of stage IV and higher rate of stage I after introduction of the national screening program in 2014. The 30-day mortality rate after elective surgery has been reduced from >7% in 2001-2003 to <2% since 2013. The database is a national population-based clinical database with high patient and data completeness for the perioperative period. The resolution of data is high for description of the patient at the time of diagnosis, including comorbidities, and for characterizing diagnosis, surgical interventions, and short-term outcomes. The database does not have high-resolution oncological data and does not register recurrences after primary surgery. The Danish Colorectal Cancer Group provides high-quality data and has been documenting an

  19. Colorectal (Colon) Cancer: What Are the Risk Factors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Colorectal Cancer” Infographic Screening for Colorectal Cancer: Optimizing Quality (CME) Partners Related Links Glossary Stay Informed Cancer Home What Are the Risk Factors for Colorectal Cancer? Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend ...

  20. Familial risk and colorectal cancer screening health beliefs and attitudes in an insured population.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Richard C; Emmons, Karen M; Fletcher, Robert H; Lobb, Rebecca; Miroshnik, Irina; Kemp, James Alan; Bauer, Mark

    2007-11-01

    To examine the relationship between health beliefs and attitudes toward colorectal cancer screening, strength of family history risk, and being appropriately screened for colorectal cancer. In February 2004, 7000 randomly selected members of a multi-specialty group practice located in Boston, MA were mailed a brief survey that was used to ascertain colorectal cancer family history. A follow-up survey that contained questions representing selected constructs of the Health Belief Model, Theory of Planned Behavior, and healthcare experiences was then mailed to all 355 individuals who reported a family history in the initial survey and 710 randomly selected participants with no colorectal cancer family history. Participants who were appropriately screened had higher mean scores for perceived cancer risk, subjective norms, and perceived benefits and lower scores for perceived barriers. Multivariate findings indicate that having high perceptions of risk for colorectal cancer was a significant correlate of being screened appropriately among individuals with a strong family history. For those at greatest colorectal cancer risk due to family history, ensuring that these individuals understand their personal risk might lead to increased colorectal cancer screening participation. Future intervention research is warranted to examine if raising perceptions of risk can increase screening behaviors in individuals with colorectal cancer risk due to family history.

  1. Colorectal cancer in Jordan: prevention and care.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Muayyad M; Dardas, Latefa; Dardas, Lubna; Ahmad, Huthaifa

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the knowledge, attitudes, and practices toward colorectal cancer prevention and care in Jordan. A survey was designed to produce reliable estimates for the population's knowledge, attitudes, and practices in all 12 governorates of Jordan by using stratified random sampling. A representative sample of the adult population in Jordan completed a comprehensive tool which explored participants' knowledge about the risk factors associated with colorectal cancer, cancer prevention through lifestyle changes, and early cancer diagnosis and screening. According to the participants (n = 3196), colorectal cancer had the second highest percentage of screening recommendation (12.6%) after breast cancer (57.3%). Only 340 individuals (11%) reported ever screening for cancer. About 20% of the participants had heard of one of the screening tests for colorectal cancer. In fact, only 290 (9.1%) participants had performed the colorectal cancer screening tests. This study provides data that will help colorectal cancer prevention and treatment programs and may enhance the efficiency of colorectal cancer-controlling programs. The findings confirm the necessity of starting colorectal screening intervention that targets the most vulnerable individuals.

  2. Advances in Hereditary Colorectal and Pancreatic Cancers.

    PubMed

    Underhill, Meghan L; Germansky, Katharine A; Yurgelun, Matthew B

    2016-07-01

    Innovations in genetic medicine have led to improvements in the early detection, prevention, and treatment of cancer for patients with inherited risks of gastrointestinal cancer, particularly hereditary colorectal cancer and hereditary pancreatic cancer. This review provides an update on recent data and key advances that have improved the identification, understanding, and management of patients with hereditary colorectal cancer and hereditary pancreatic cancer. This review details recent and emerging data that highlight the developing landscape of genetics in hereditary colorectal and pancreatic cancer risk. A summary is provided of the current state-of-the-art practices for identifying, evaluating, and managing patients with suspected hereditary colorectal cancer and pancreatic cancer risk. The impact of next-generation sequencing technologies in the clinical diagnosis of hereditary gastrointestinal cancer and also in discovery efforts of new genes linked to familial cancer risk are discussed. Emerging targeted therapies that may play a particularly important role in the treatment of patients with hereditary forms of colorectal cancer and pancreatic cancer are also reviewed. Current approaches for pancreatic cancer screening and the psychosocial impact of such procedures are also detailed. Given the availability of new diagnostic, risk-reducing, and therapeutic strategies that exist for patients with hereditary risk of colorectal or pancreatic cancer, it is imperative that clinicians be vigilant about evaluating patients for hereditary cancer syndromes. Continuing to advance genetics research in hereditary gastrointestinal cancers will allow for more progress to be made in personalized medicine and prevention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Red Meat and Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Aykan, Nuri Faruk

    2015-02-10

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in men and the second in women worldwide. More than half of cases occur in more developed countries. The consumption of red meat (beef, pork, lamb, veal, mutton) is high in developed countries and accumulated evidence until today demonstrated a convincing association between the intake of red meat and especially processed meat and CRC risk. In this review, meta-analyses of prospective epidemiological studies addressed to this association, observed link of some subtypes of red meat with CRC risk, potential carcinogenic compounds, their mechanisms and actual recommendations of international guidelines are presented.

  4. Red Meat and Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in men and the second in women worldwide. More than half of cases occur in more developed countries. The consumption of red meat (beef, pork, lamb, veal, mutton) is high in developed countries and accumulated evidence until today demonstrated a convincing association between the intake of red meat and especially processed meat and CRC risk. In this review, meta-analyses of prospective epidemiological studies addressed to this association, observed link of some subtypes of red meat with CRC risk, potential carcinogenic compounds, their mechanisms and actual recommendations of international guidelines are presented. PMID:26779313

  5. Familial aggregation of colorectal cancer in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Soliman, A S; Bondy, M L; Levin, B; El-Badawy, S; Khaled, H; Hablas, A; Ismail, S; Adly, M; Mahgoub, K G; McPherson, R S; Beasley, R P

    1998-09-11

    We have investigated the familial aggregation of colorectal cancer and hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) in Egypt because of the high incidence of colorectal cancer in Egyptian children and young adults and the prevalence of consanguinity there. In a pilot study, we conducted detailed interviews with 111 Egyptian colorectal cancer patients and 111 healthy Egyptian controls about their family histories of colorectal cancer, and other cancers, consanguinity, age at diagnosis, symptoms and recurrence. Eight patients (7.2%) had one or more first- or second-degree relatives under age 40 with colorectal cancer, suggestive of HNPCC by the Amsterdam criteria. One of these families had a typical history of HNPCC, with 4 relatives having colorectal cancer in 3 generations; 3 of these relatives were younger than age 45 at colon cancer diagnosis, and other relatives had extracolonic tumors. Another 14 patients (12.6%) had a first- or second-degree relative with a family history of other neoplasms such as endometrial, urinary and hepatobiliary cancers that could also be related to HNPCC. Four patients with early-onset colon cancer and a family history of other HNPCC-related cancers reported that their parents were first-degree cousins.

  6. Perceived Barriers and Facilitators of Using a Web-Based Interactive Decision Aid for Colorectal Cancer Screening in Community Practice Settings: Findings From Focus Groups With Primary Care Clinicians and Medical Office Staff

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Information is lacking about the capacity of those working in community practice settings to utilize health information technology for colorectal cancer screening. Objective To address this gap we asked those working in community practice settings to share their perspectives about how the implementation of a Web-based patient-led decision aid might affect patient-clinician conversations about colorectal cancer screening and the day-to-day clinical workflow. Methods Five focus groups in five community practice settings were conducted with 8 physicians, 1 physician assistant, and 18 clinic staff. Focus groups were organized using a semistructured discussion guide designed to identify factors that mediate and impede the use of a Web-based decision aid intended to clarify patient preferences for colorectal cancer screening and to trigger shared decision making during the clinical encounter. Results All physicians, the physician assistant, and 8 of the 18 clinic staff were active participants in the focus groups. Clinician and staff participants from each setting reported a belief that the Web-based patient-led decision aid could be an informative and educational tool; in all but one setting participants reported a readiness to recommend the tool to patients. The exception related to clinicians from one clinic who described a preference for patients having fewer screening choices, noting that a colonoscopy was the preferred screening modality for patients in their clinic. Perceived barriers to utilizing the Web-based decision aid included patients’ lack of Internet access or low computer literacy, and potential impediments to the clinics’ daily workflow. Expanding patients’ use of an online decision aid that is both easy to access and understand and that is utilized by patients outside of the office visit was described as a potentially efficient means for soliciting patients’ screening preferences. Participants described that a system to link the

  7. Perceived barriers and facilitators of using a Web-based interactive decision aid for colorectal cancer screening in community practice settings: findings from focus groups with primary care clinicians and medical office staff.

    PubMed

    Jimbo, Masahito; Shultz, Cameron Garth; Nease, Donald Eugene; Fetters, Michael Derwin; Power, Debra; Ruffin, Mack Thomas

    2013-12-18

    Information is lacking about the capacity of those working in community practice settings to utilize health information technology for colorectal cancer screening. To address this gap we asked those working in community practice settings to share their perspectives about how the implementation of a Web-based patient-led decision aid might affect patient-clinician conversations about colorectal cancer screening and the day-to-day clinical workflow. Five focus groups in five community practice settings were conducted with 8 physicians, 1 physician assistant, and 18 clinic staff. Focus groups were organized using a semistructured discussion guide designed to identify factors that mediate and impede the use of a Web-based decision aid intended to clarify patient preferences for colorectal cancer screening and to trigger shared decision making during the clinical encounter. All physicians, the physician assistant, and 8 of the 18 clinic staff were active participants in the focus groups. Clinician and staff participants from each setting reported a belief that the Web-based patient-led decision aid could be an informative and educational tool; in all but one setting participants reported a readiness to recommend the tool to patients. The exception related to clinicians from one clinic who described a preference for patients having fewer screening choices, noting that a colonoscopy was the preferred screening modality for patients in their clinic. Perceived barriers to utilizing the Web-based decision aid included patients' lack of Internet access or low computer literacy, and potential impediments to the clinics' daily workflow. Expanding patients' use of an online decision aid that is both easy to access and understand and that is utilized by patients outside of the office visit was described as a potentially efficient means for soliciting patients' screening preferences. Participants described that a system to link the online decision aid to a computerized reminder

  8. Danish Colorectal Cancer Group Database

    PubMed Central

    Ingeholm, Peter; Gögenur, Ismail; Iversen, Lene H

    2016-01-01

    Aim of database The aim of the database, which has existed for registration of all patients with colorectal cancer in Denmark since 2001, is to improve the prognosis for this patient group. Study population All Danish patients with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer who are either diagnosed or treated in a surgical department of a public Danish hospital. Main variables The database comprises an array of surgical, radiological, oncological, and pathological variables. The surgeons record data such as diagnostics performed, including type and results of radiological examinations, lifestyle factors, comorbidity and performance, treatment including the surgical procedure, urgency of surgery, and intra- and postoperative complications within 30 days after surgery. The pathologists record data such as tumor type, number of lymph nodes and metastatic lymph nodes, surgical margin status, and other pathological risk factors. Descriptive data The database has had >95% completeness in including patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma with >54,000 patients registered so far with approximately one-third rectal cancers and two-third colon cancers and an overrepresentation of men among rectal cancer patients. The stage distribution has been more or less constant until 2014 with a tendency toward a lower rate of stage IV and higher rate of stage I after introduction of the national screening program in 2014. The 30-day mortality rate after elective surgery has been reduced from >7% in 2001–2003 to <2% since 2013. Conclusion The database is a national population-based clinical database with high patient and data completeness for the perioperative period. The resolution of data is high for description of the patient at the time of diagnosis, including comorbidities, and for characterizing diagnosis, surgical interventions, and short-term outcomes. The database does not have high-resolution oncological data and does not register recurrences after primary surgery. The Danish

  9. Economic burden of colorectal cancer in Korea.

    PubMed

    Byun, Ju-Young; Yoon, Seok-Jun; Oh, In-Hwan; Kim, Young Ae; Seo, Hye-Young; Lee, Yo-Han

    2014-03-01

    The incidence and survival rate of colorectal cancer in Korea are increasing because of improved screening, treatment technologies, and lifestyle changes. In this aging population, increases in economic cost result. This study was conducted to estimate the economic burden of colorectal cancer utilizing claims data from the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service. Economic burdens of colorectal cancer were estimated using prevalence data and patients were defined as those who received ambulatory treatment from medical institutions or who had been hospitalized due to colorectal cancer under the International Classification of Disease 10th revision codes from C18-C21. The economic burdens of colorectal cancer were calculated as direct costs and indirect costs. The prevalence rate (per 100 000 people) of those who were treated for colorectal cancer during 2010 was 165.48. The economic burdens of colorectal cancer in 2010 were 3 trillion and 100 billion Korean won (KRW), respectively. Direct costs included 1 trillion and 960 billion KRW (62.85%), respectively and indirect costs were 1 trillion and 160 billion (37.15%), respectively. Colorectal cancer has a large economic burden. Efforts should be made to reduce the economic burden of the disease through primary and secondary prevention.

  10. Tailored Telephone Counseling Increases Colorectal Cancer Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawl, Susan M.; Christy, Shannon M.; Monahan, Patrick O.; Ding, Yan; Krier, Connie; Champion, Victoria L.; Rex, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of two interventions to promote colorectal cancer screening participation and forward stage movement of colorectal cancer screening adoption among first-degree relatives of individuals diagnosed with adenomatous polyps. One hundred fifty-eight first-degree relatives of individuals diagnosed with adenomatous polyps were…

  11. Best practice in colorectal cancer care.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Claire

    Nurses need up-to-date knowledge of colorectal cancer. This article provides an overview of the aetiology and risk factors for this disease, diagnostic and staging investigations, treatment options and future care. Managing colorectal cancer is complex. Patients can have a range of healthcare needs. Nurses play an increasingly important role in informing, supporting and coordinating care to improve patients' quality of life.

  12. Tailored Telephone Counseling Increases Colorectal Cancer Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawl, Susan M.; Christy, Shannon M.; Monahan, Patrick O.; Ding, Yan; Krier, Connie; Champion, Victoria L.; Rex, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of two interventions to promote colorectal cancer screening participation and forward stage movement of colorectal cancer screening adoption among first-degree relatives of individuals diagnosed with adenomatous polyps. One hundred fifty-eight first-degree relatives of individuals diagnosed with adenomatous polyps were…

  13. Knowledge of colorectal cancer among older persons.

    PubMed

    Weinrich, S P; Weinrich, M C; Boyd, M D; Johnson, E; Frank-Stromborg, M

    1992-10-01

    Cancer screening is a national health priority, especially for colorectal cancer, the second leading cause of death due to cancer in the United States. The researchers measured colorectal cancer knowledge among 211 older Americans. A quasiexperimental pretest-posttest two-by-two factorial design was used to test the effect of knowledge on participation in fecal occult blood screening. The American Cancer Society's colorectal cancer educational slide-tape presentation served as the basis for all of the educational programs. Hemoccult II kits were distributed at no cost to the participants. Descriptive statistics, chi 2, and logistic regressions were used to analyze data. One-half of the participants had incomes below the poverty level. Almost one-half the subjects in the study sample stated that they had not received any information about colorectal cancer within the past year. Caucasians had more knowledge of colorectal cancer than African Americans [F(1, 78) = 7.92, p < 0.01] and persons with higher income had more knowledge than persons with less income [F(2, 76) = 3.01, p = 0.05]. Subjects showed significant increases in colorectal cancer knowledge 6 days after the colorectal cancer education program [t(79) = 2.59, p = 0.01] and this increased knowledge was a predictor of participation in free fecal occult blood screening [chi 2(1, n = 164) = 5.34, p = 0.02].

  14. What Is Colorectal Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lodge® Lodging Rides To Treatment Online Support Communities ACS FUNDRAISERS Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Walks Coaches ... Give Memorial Giving Planned Giving Leadership Giving About ACS Contact Us Local Offices Employment Become a Supplier ...

  15. Menopause and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Franceschi, S; Gallus, S; Talamini, R; Tavani, A; Negri, E; Vecchia, C La

    2000-01-01

    Post-menopausal women who have never used hormone replacement therapy have a higher risk of colon, but not rectal, cancer than do premenopausal women of the same age, socio-cultural class and dietary habits. Such risk increase seems to last about 10 years and to be restricted to lean women, a group who have lower levels of oestradiol after ovarian function ceases after menopause. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10839302

  16. Estrogen and colorectal cancer incidence and mortality.

    PubMed

    Lavasani, Sayeh; Chlebowski, Rowan T; Prentice, Ross L; Kato, Ikuko; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Johnson, Karen C; Young, Alicia; Rodabough, Rebecca; Hubbell, F Allan; Mahinbakht, Ali; Simon, Michael S

    2015-09-15

    The preponderance of observational studies describe an association between the use of estrogen alone and a lower incidence of colorectal cancer. In contrast, no difference in the incidence of colorectal cancer was seen in the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) randomized, placebo-controlled trial with estrogen alone after a mean intervention of 7.1 years and cumulative follow-up of 13.2 years. This study extends these findings by providing detailed analyses of the effects of estrogen alone on the histology, grade, and stage of colorectal cancer, relevant subgroups, and deaths from and after colorectal cancer. The WHI study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial involving 10,739 postmenopausal women with prior hysterectomy. Participants were assigned to conjugated equine estrogen at 0.625 mg/d (n = 5279) or a matching placebo (n = 5409). Rates of colorectal cancer diagnoses and deaths from and after colorectal cancer were assessed throughout the study. Colorectal cancer rates in the estrogen-alone and placebo groups were comparable: 0.14% and 0.12% per year, respectively (hazard ratio [HR], 1.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.83-1.58; P = .43). Bowel screening examinations were comparable between the 2 groups throughout the study. The grade, stage, and location of colorectal cancer did not differ between the randomization groups. There were more colorectal cancer deaths in the estrogen-alone group (34 [0.05%] vs 24 [0.03%]; HR, 1.46, 95% CI, 0.86-2.46; P = .16), but the difference was not statistically significant. The colorectal cancer incidence was higher for participants with a history of colon polyp removal in the estrogen-alone group (0.23% vs 0.02%; HR, 13.47; nominal 95% CI, 1.76-103.0; P < .001). The use of estrogen alone in postmenopausal women with prior hysterectomy does not influence the incidence of colorectal cancer or deaths from or after colorectal cancer. A possibly higher risk of colorectal cancer in women with

  17. Colorectal Cancer: Genetics is Changing Everything.

    PubMed

    Obuch, Joshua C; Ahnen, Dennis J

    2016-09-01

    Cancer is fundamentally a genetic disease caused by mutational or epigenetic alterations in DNA. There has been a remarkable expansion of the molecular understanding of colonic carcinogenesis in the last 30 years and that understanding is changing many aspects of colorectal cancer care. It is becoming increasingly clear that there are genetic subsets of colorectal cancer that have different risk factors, prognosis, and response to treatment. This article provides a general update on colorectal cancer and highlights the ways that genetics is changing clinical care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Management of colorectal cancer and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Caroline; Nash, Guy F; Hickish, Tamas

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is associated with diabetes mellitus and both of these common conditions are often managed together by a surgeon. The surgical focus is usually upon cancer treatment rather than diabetes management. The relationship between colorectal cancer and diabetes is a complex one and can raise problems in both diagnosis and the management of patients with both conditions. This literature review explores the relationship between diabetes, diabetic treatment and colorectal cancer and addresses the issues that arise in diagnosing and treating this patient group. By highlighting these difficulties, this review aims to improve understanding and to provide clearer insight into both surgical and non-surgical management. PMID:24334910

  19. Colorectal cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Salama, Paul; Platell, Cameron

    2009-10-01

    Somatic stem cells reside at the base of the crypts throughout the colonic mucosa. These cells are essential for the normal regeneration of the colonic epithelium. The stem cells reside within a special 'niche' comprised of intestinal sub-epithelial myofibroblasts that tightly control their function. It has been postulated that mutations within these adult colonic stem cells may induce neoplastic changes. Such cells can then dissociate from the epithelium and travel into the mesenchyme and thus form invasive cancers. This theory is based on the observation that within a colon cancer, less than 1% of the neoplastic cells have the ability to regenerate the tumour. It is this group of cells that exhibits characteristics of colonic stem cells. Although anti-neoplastic agents can induce remissions by inhibiting cell division, the stem cells appear to be remarkably resistant to both standard chemotherapy and radiotherapy. These stem cells may therefore persist after treatment and form the nucleus for cancer recurrence. Hence, future treatment modalities should focus specifically on controlling the cancer stem cells. In this review, we discuss the biology of normal and malignant colonic stem cells.

  20. Hereditary Colorectal Cancer: Genetics and Screening

    PubMed Central

    Offerhaus, G. Johan A.

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer and the third leading cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. Each year more than 140,000 new patients are diagnosed. About 30% of patients with CRC report a family history of CRC. However, only 5% of colorectal cancers arise in the setting of a well-established Mendelian inherited disorder such as Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, MUTYH-associated polyposis, juvenile polyposis, hereditary mixed polyposis, or Peutz-Jeghers. In addition, serrated polyposis is a clinically defined syndrome with multiple serrated polyps in the colorectum and an increased CRC risk for which the genetics are unknown. The majority of familial colorectal cancers arise as so called non-syndromic familial colorectal cancer and likely have a more complex multigenetic cause. This review focuses on genetic and clinical aspects of Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis and MUTYH-associated polyposis. PMID:26315524

  1. Tailored telephone counseling increases colorectal cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Rawl, Susan M.; Christy, Shannon M.; Monahan, Patrick O.; Ding, Yan; Krier, Connie; Champion, Victoria L.; Rex, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of two interventions to promote colorectal cancer screening participation and forward stage movement of colorectal cancer screening adoption among first-degree relatives of individuals diagnosed with adenomatous polyps. One hundred fifty-eight first-degree relatives of individuals diagnosed with adenomatous polyps were randomly assigned to receive one of two interventions to promote colorectal cancer screening. Participants received either a tailored telephone counseling plus brochures intervention or a non-tailored print brochures intervention. Data were collected at baseline and 3 months post-baseline. Group differences and the effect of the interventions on adherence and stage movement for colorectal cancer screening were examined using t-tests, chi-square tests, and logistic regression. Individuals in the tailored telephone counseling plus brochures group were significantly more likely to complete colorectal cancer screening and to move forward on stage of change for fecal occult blood test, any colorectal cancer test stage and stage of the risk-appropriate test compared with individuals in the non-tailored brochure group at 3 months post-baseline. A tailored telephone counseling plus brochures intervention successfully promoted forward stage movement and colorectal cancer screening adherence among first-degree relatives of individuals diagnosed with adenomatous polyps. PMID:26025212

  2. [Colonoscopies for colorectal cancer screening].

    PubMed

    Bessa Caserras, Xavier

    2014-09-01

    Colonoscopies play a vital role in population screening programs, either for initial examinations or as a test carried out after a positive result from a fecal occult blood test or sigmoidoscopy. Colonoscopies, and ancillary techniques such as polipectomies, must comply with basic quality criteria that must be reflected in the quality standards of screening programs. A quality colonoscopy is absolutely vital to avoid the occurrence of interval cancers. It is extremely important to detect any proximal lesions during a colonoscopy, especially those which are serrated, because they are difficult to identify and due to the increased risk of colorectal cancer. Regarding follow-up programs for resected colorectal polyps, current evidence of the relationship between the risk of neoplasia and certain variables (age, sex, smoker, BMI, diabetes, etc.) must allow for individualized risk and algorithms for screening and follow-up frequency to be developed for these patients. However, initial endoscopic exploration in a screening colonoscopy is essential to establishing the optimum interval and ensuring follow-up. Despite poor adherence to follow-up programs, mostly due to their overuse, follow-up colonoscopies 3 years after resection of all polypoid lesions detect clinically significant lesions as effectively as colonoscopies at one year.

  3. Colorectal Cancer Metastasis to the Thymus Gland: Rare Presentation of Colorectal Cancer as Anterior Mediastinal Mass.

    PubMed

    Peters, H Charles; Liu, Xiuli; Iqbal, Atif; Cunningham, Lisa A; Tan, Sanda A

    2017-01-01

    Despite improved screening modalities, 15-25% of newly diagnosed colorectal cancers are metastatic at the time of diagnosis. The vast majority of these cases present as hepatic metastasis; however, 22% present with concomitant extrahepatic disease. The thymus gland is an uncommon site of metastasis for any primary malignancy, particularly, colorectal cancer given its vascular and lymphatic drainage. This case report details our experience with a rare case of colorectal cancer metastasis to the thymus gland presenting as a symptomatic mediastinal mass.

  4. Calcium remodeling in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Carlos; Sobradillo, Diego; Hernández-Morales, Miriam; Núñez, Lucía

    2017-06-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most frequent form of cancer and the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. Basic and clinical data indicate that aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may prevent colon cancer but mechanisms remain unknown. Aspirin metabolite salicylate and other NSAIDs may inhibit tumor cell growth acting on store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE), suggesting an important role for this pathway in CRC. Consistently, SOCE is emerging as a novel player in different forms of cancer, including CRC. SOCE and store-operated currents (SOCs) are dramatically enhanced in CRC while Ca(2+) stores are partially empty in CRC cells. These features may contribute to CRC hallmarks including enhanced cell proliferation, migration, invasion and survival. At the molecular level, enhanced SOCE and depleted stores are mediated by overexpression of Orai1, Stromal interaction protein 1 (STIM1) and Transient receptor protein channel 1 (TRPC1) and downregulation of STIM2. In normal colonic cells, SOCE is mediated by Ca(2+)-release activated Ca(2+) channels made of STIM1, STIM2 and Orai1. In CRC cells, SOCE is mediated by different store-operated currents (SOCs) driven by STIM1, Orai1 and TRPC1. Loss of STIM2 contributes to depletion of Ca(2+) stores and enhanced resistance to cell death in CRC cells. Thus, SOCE is a novel key player in CRC and inhibition by salicylate and other NSAIDs may contribute to explain chemoprevention activity. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most frequent form of cancer worldwide. Recent evidence suggests that intracellular Ca(2+) remodeling may contribute to cancer hallmarks. In addition, aspirin and other NSAIDs might prevent CRC acting on remodeled Ca(2+) entry pathways. In this review, we will briefly describe 1) the players involved in intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis with a particular emphasis on the mechanisms involved in SOCE activation and inactivation, 2) the evidence that aspirin

  5. Circadian clock circuitry in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Papa, Gennaro; Piepoli, Ada

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the most prevalent among digestive system cancers. Carcinogenesis relies on disrupted control of cellular processes, such as metabolism, proliferation, DNA damage recognition and repair, and apoptosis. Cell, tissue, organ and body physiology is characterized by periodic fluctuations driven by biological clocks operating through the clock gene machinery. Dysfunction of molecular clockworks and cellular oscillators is involved in tumorigenesis, and altered expression of clock genes has been found in cancer patients. Epidemiological studies have shown that circadian disruption, that is, alteration of bodily temporal organization, is a cancer risk factor, and an increased incidence of colorectal neoplastic disease is reported in shift workers. In this review we describe the involvement of the circadian clock circuitry in colorectal carcinogenesis and the therapeutic strategies addressing temporal deregulation in colorectal cancer. PMID:24764658

  6. Circadian clock circuitry in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Papa, Gennaro; Piepoli, Ada

    2014-04-21

    Colorectal cancer is the most prevalent among digestive system cancers. Carcinogenesis relies on disrupted control of cellular processes, such as metabolism, proliferation, DNA damage recognition and repair, and apoptosis. Cell, tissue, organ and body physiology is characterized by periodic fluctuations driven by biological clocks operating through the clock gene machinery. Dysfunction of molecular clockworks and cellular oscillators is involved in tumorigenesis, and altered expression of clock genes has been found in cancer patients. Epidemiological studies have shown that circadian disruption, that is, alteration of bodily temporal organization, is a cancer risk factor, and an increased incidence of colorectal neoplastic disease is reported in shift workers. In this review we describe the involvement of the circadian clock circuitry in colorectal carcinogenesis and the therapeutic strategies addressing temporal deregulation in colorectal cancer.

  7. Colorectal (Colon) Cancer: Questions to Ask Your Doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Home Questions to Ask Your Doctor About Colorectal Cancer Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... adults age 50 to 75 be screened for colorectal cancer. The decision to be screened after age 75 ...

  8. Minnesota Colorectal Cancer Initiative: successful development and implementation of a community-based colorectal cancer registry.

    PubMed

    Rothenberger, David A; Dalberg, Deanna L; Leininger, Anna

    2004-10-01

    The aim of the Minnesota Colorectal Cancer Initiative is to implement risk-specific interventions to decrease colorectal cancer morbidity and mortality by 1) assisting clinicians to identify and educate individuals and families at high and increased risk for colorectal cancer; 2) providing professional and community education; 3) maintaining a database to evaluate the effectiveness of preventive intervention strategies; and 4) facilitating colorectal cancer research. Two physician groups and the University Cancer Center founded the Minnesota Colorectal Cancer Initiative as a not-for-profit organization. Health care organizations, pharmaceutical companies, a consulting firm, and other practice groups provide continuing financial and other support. A database registry, risk-assessment survey, and consent document were developed and then were approved by an institutional review board. A trial enrollment was conducted. Minnesota Colorectal Cancer Initiative services are available to the public. Participants are actively recruited through member organizations. Minnesota Colorectal Cancer Initiative assesses hereditary risk and will document family history in the medical record on request. A personally targeted reply letter reviews risk factors and recommends specific screening and surveillance strategies for participants and their family members, and when appropriate, provides information regarding genetic counseling and testing services. Minnesota Colorectal Cancer Initiative services are free to participants. Since 1999, Minnesota Colorectal Cancer Initiative has sent individually tailored reply letters providing risk-specific information about colorectal cancer to 717 participants and more than 3200 of their first-degree and second-degree relatives. More than 200 families, previously unidentified as having histories suggestive of hereditary colorectal cancer (attenuated familial polyposis and hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer), have been identified; genetic

  9. Physician–Patient Communication about Colorectal Cancer Screening

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Michael S.; Baker, David W.

    2007-01-01

    Background Despite the documented benefits of colorectal cancer screening, patient participation rates remain low. Physician recommendation has been identified as a significant predictor of screening completion. Objective The aim of this study is to investigate how primary care physicians perceive colorectal cancer screening communication tasks, as well as to explore the form and content of actual screening discussions. Design The research design includes a mailed physician survey and a separate observational study in a sample of videotaped medical encounters. Participants and Data Sources The participants were 270 primary care physicians who completed a mailed questionnaire (57.9% response rate) and 18 physician–patient encounters that included discussions of colorectal cancer screening. Measurement The questionnaire focused on perceived importance and accomplishment of communication tasks relevant to colorectal cancer screening. Two of the authors reviewed transcripts of videotaped physician encounters to determine whether the same communication tasks assessed in the survey were accomplished. Interrater reliability was high across all of the mutually exclusive coding categories (Kappa > .90). Results Physicians rated colonoscopy as the most important screening option to discuss; self-reports indicate that colonoscopy (84.8%) is more frequently mentioned than fecal occult blood test (FOBT; 49.4%), flexible sigmoidoscopy (34.1%), or computed tomography (CT) imaging (18.1%). Explaining benefits and risks, describing test procedure and frequency, eliciting patient preferences, and making a plan for screening were all viewed as very important. Self-reported accomplishment of these communication tasks was considerably higher than that observed in our separate videotape sample. Conclusion Most physicians recognize and espouse the importance of recommending colorectal cancer screening to eligible patients. However, findings from both the physician survey and

  10. 5-FU Based Maintenance Therapy in RAS Wild Type Metastatic Colorectal Cancer After Induction With FOLFOX Plus Panitumumab

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-28

    Colorectal Adenocarcinoma; RAS Wild Type; Stage III Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IV Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7

  11. Pemetrexed in advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Louvet, Christophe; de Gramont, Aimery

    2004-11-01

    Pemetrexed (Alimta) shows single-agent activity in advanced colorectal cancer. In two phase II studies in which patients received pemetrexed at 600 mg/m2 or 500 mg/m2 as first-line treatment for metastatic disease, objective response rates were 15.4% and 17.2%. These trials were conducted prior to supplementation with folic acid and vitamin B12, which markedly decreased the frequency of hematologic toxicities of pemetrexed; routine supplementation is now included in all clinical trials of the agent. The marked improvement in toxicity and tolerance with vitamin supplementation suggests the need to reexamine optimal dosing in pemetrexed combination schedules. In a National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project phase II trial in 54 patients with previously untreated advanced colorectal cancer, pemetrexed at 500 mg/m2 plus oxaliplatin (Eloxatin) at 120 mg/m2 every 21 days with folic acid/vitamin B12 supplementation resulted in an objective response of 23%. Three additionalpatients (5.6%) had unconfirmed partial response (partial response at one visit), and 27 patients (50%) had stable disease. Median progression-free survival was 5.3 months and median duration of response was 5.7 months; median overall survival was approximately 11.05 months. Grade 3/4 neutropenia was observed in only 17% of patients and treatment was well tolerated. A phase I/II study is under way to identify and assess the optimal combination of pemetrexed/irinotecan in second-line treatment of advanced colorectal cancer. Planned studies include a phase I study examining the combination of pemetrexed and oxaliplatin given every 2 weeks as first-line treatment, and a phase I/II trial to identify the optimal pemetrexed/ oxaliplatin dose in a 21-day schedule and to compare pemetrexed/ oxaliplatin with FOLFOX4 in first-line treatment of metastatic disease. All of these trials include vitamin supplementation. A phase III trial comparing the every-3-week pemetrexed/oxaliplatin regimen with FOLFOX4 as

  12. Gastrins, iron and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Graham S

    2009-09-01

    This minireview explores the connections between circulating gastrins, iron status and colorectal cancer. The peptide hormone gastrin is a major regulator of acid secretion and a potent mitogen for normal and malignant gastrointestinal cells. Gastrins bind two ferric ions with μM affinity and, in the case of non-amidated forms of the hormone, iron binding is essential for biological activity. The ferric ion ligands have been identified as glutamates 7, 8 and 9 in the 18 amino acid peptide glycine-extended gastrin. An interaction between gastrin and transferrin was first demonstrated by covalent crosslinking techniques, and has been recently confirmed by surface plasmon resonance. We have therefore proposed that gastrins act as catalysts in the loading of transferrin with iron. Several recent lines of evidence, including the facts that the concentrations of circulating gastrins are increased in mice and humans with the iron overload disease haemochromatosis, and that transferrin saturation positively correlates with circulating gastrin concentrations, suggest that gastrins may be involved in iron homeostasis. In addition the recognition that ferric ions may play an unexpected role in the biological activity of non-amidated gastrins may assist in the development of new therapies for colorectal carcinoma.

  13. Concerns, perceived need and competing priorities: a qualitative exploration of decision-making and non-participation in a population-based flexible sigmoidoscopy screening programme to prevent colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hall, N; Birt, L; Rees, C J; Elliot, S; Ritchie, M; Weller, D; Rubin, G

    2016-01-01

    Objective Optimising uptake of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening is important to achieve projected health outcomes. Population-based screening by flexible sigmoidoscopy (FS) was introduced in England in 2013 (NHS Bowel scope screening). Little is known about reactions to the invitation to participate in FS screening, as offered within the context of the Bowel scope programme. We aimed to investigate responses to the screening invitation to inform understanding of decision-making, particularly in relation to non-participation in screening. Design Qualitative analysis of semistructured in-depth interviews and written accounts. Participants and setting People from 31 general practices in the North East and East of England invited to attend FS screening as part of NHS Bowel scope screening programme were sent invitations to take part in the study. We purposively sampled interviewees to ensure a range of accounts in terms of beliefs, screening attendance, sex and geographical location. Results 20 screeners and 25 non-screeners were interviewed. Written responses describing reasons for, and circumstances surrounding, non-participation from a further 28 non-screeners were included in the analysis. Thematic analysis identified a range of reactions to the screening invitation, decision-making processes and barriers to participation. These include a perceived or actual lack of need; inability to attend; anxiety and fear about bowel preparation, procedures or hospital; inability or reluctance to self-administer an enema; beliefs about low susceptibility to bowel cancer or treatment and understanding of harm and benefits. The strength, rather than presence, of concerns about the test and perceived need for reassurance were important in the decision to participate for screeners and non-screeners. Decision-making occurs within the context of previous experiences and day-to-day life. Conclusions Understanding the reasons for non-participation in FS screening can help inform

  14. Genetic Testing for Hereditary Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... genetic condition called Lynch syndrome, also known as hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer or HNPCC. About 3% (1 ... early if you get it. Lynch syndrome is hereditary, meaning that it is caused by an inherited ...

  15. Diagnostic Approach to Hereditary Colorectal Cancer Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Kalady, Matthew F.; Heald, Brandie

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 5 to 10% of colorectal cancers develop within a known hereditary syndrome. Specific underlying genetic mutations drive the clinical phenotype and it is imperative to determine the genetic etiology to provide meaningful surveillance and intervention. Recognizing potential patients and families with a hereditary predisposition is the first step in management. Syndromes can be categorized according to polyp burden as polyposis or nonpolyposis. Clinical assessment should start with a personal and family medical history, physical examination, and evaluation for the presence and type of colorectal polyps or cancers. Key information is gained from these simple steps and should guide the specific genetic analysis for diagnosis. Genetic counseling is a critical component to any hereditary colorectal cancer program and should be conducted before genetic testing to provide education about the implications of test results. This review focuses on the thought process that drives initial clinical evaluation and guides genetic testing for patients with suspected hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes. PMID:26664327

  16. Diagnostic Approach to Hereditary Colorectal Cancer Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Kalady, Matthew F; Heald, Brandie

    2015-12-01

    Approximately 5 to 10% of colorectal cancers develop within a known hereditary syndrome. Specific underlying genetic mutations drive the clinical phenotype and it is imperative to determine the genetic etiology to provide meaningful surveillance and intervention. Recognizing potential patients and families with a hereditary predisposition is the first step in management. Syndromes can be categorized according to polyp burden as polyposis or nonpolyposis. Clinical assessment should start with a personal and family medical history, physical examination, and evaluation for the presence and type of colorectal polyps or cancers. Key information is gained from these simple steps and should guide the specific genetic analysis for diagnosis. Genetic counseling is a critical component to any hereditary colorectal cancer program and should be conducted before genetic testing to provide education about the implications of test results. This review focuses on the thought process that drives initial clinical evaluation and guides genetic testing for patients with suspected hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes.

  17. TAS-102 for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of results from an international phase III trial that compared TAS-102 with placebo in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer whose disease progressed following prior treatments or who had health conditions that prevented the re-administrati

  18. TAS-102 for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of results from an international phase III trial that compared TAS-102 with placebo in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer whose disease progressed following prior treatments or who had health conditions that prevented the re-administrati

  19. Public Awareness of Colorectal Cancer Screening: Knowledge, Attitudes, and Interventions for Increasing Screening Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Gimeno Garcia, Antonio Z.; Hernandez Alvarez Buylla, Noemi; Nicolas-Perez, David; Quintero, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer ranks as one of the most incidental and death malignancies worldwide. Colorectal cancer screening has proven its benefit in terms of incidence and mortality reduction in randomized controlled trials. In fact, it has been recommended by medical organizations either in average-risk or family-risk populations. Success of a screening campaign highly depends on how compliant the target population is. Several factors influence colorectal cancer screening uptake including sociodemographics, provider and healthcare system factors, and psychosocial factors. Awareness of the target population of colorectal cancer and screening is crucial in order to increase screening participation rates. Knowledge about this disease and its prevention has been used across studies as a measurement of public awareness. Some studies found a positive relationship between knowledge about colorectal cancer, risk perception, and attitudes (perceived benefits and barriers against screening) and willingness to participate in a colorectal cancer screening campaign. The mentioned factors are modifiable and therefore susceptible of intervention. In fact, interventional studies focused on average-risk population have tried to increase colorectal cancer screening uptake by improving public knowledge and modifying attitudes. In the present paper, we reviewed the factors impacting adherence to colorectal cancer screening and interventions targeting participants for increasing screening uptake. PMID:24729896

  20. Abdominal metastases from colorectal cancer: intraperitoneal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Guend, Hamza; Patel, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    Patients with peritoneal metastasis from colorectal cancer represent a distinct subset with regional disease rather than systemic disease. They often have poorer survival outcomes with systemic chemotherapy. Optimal cytoreductive surgery and intraperitoneal chemotherapy (IPC) offers such patients a more directed therapy with improved survival. In this review, we discuss the diagnosis, evaluation and classification, as well as rational for treatment of peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC) secondary to colorectal cancer. PMID:26697203

  1. Perspectives on colorectal cancer screening: a focus group study

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Vivek; Gray, Ross; Chart, Pam; Fitch, Marg; Saibil, Fred; Zdanowicz, Yola

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Objective  To assess attitudes and acceptability of Ontario consumers and doctors towards colorectal screening with faecal occult blood testing (FOBT) and colonoscopy. Design, setting and participants  Focus groups with gender‐specific samples of the population, high‐risk gastroenterology patients and family doctors. Method  Semi‐structured interview guides used by facilitator to lead groups through knowledge of risk factors and prevention of colorectal cancer, the screening modalities, requirements for implementing screening programmes, barriers to screening and preferences towards screening. Main findings  There were low levels of knowledge about colorectal cancer and its prevention in the general population. FOBT was an acceptable screening modality, but considerable education about its use and benefits would be necessary to implement a screening programme. Colonoscopy was not perceived to be a good choice for a primary screen in the general population. The high‐risk group supported use of FOBT in the general population and emphasized the need for education. The doctors were more reluctant about screening, requesting clear guidelines. They also identified the time and resources that would be required if a screening programme were initiated. Conclusion  While colorectal screening is acceptable in this sample, information and decision aids are required to enable consumers and providers to make effective decisions. Implementation of colorectal screening programmes requires substantial educational efforts for both consumers and doctors. PMID:14982499

  2. Dietary chemoprevention of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Forte, Angelo; De Sanctis, Rita; Leonetti, Giovanni; Manfredelli, Simone; Urbano, Vincenzo; Bezzi, Marcello

    2008-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second cause of morbidity and death in Italy. Genetic and environmental factors, i.e. inappropriate nutrition, are strongly involved in the aetiology of colon cancer. In the present review the authors analyze the possible mechanisms by which certain nutritive factors may interfere with the complex process of carcinogenesis. The authors identify studies by a literature search of Medline from January 1, 1970, through December 31, 2006. The mechanism of every protective compound is detailed, in particular the impact of antioxidant vitamins and minerals on tumor development. At present, the data suggest that vegetables are associated with lower risk and that their fbre content alone does not account for this association. Further, meat consumption is associated with an increased risk but this, too, is not explained solely by its fat content. Several microconstituents of the diet may be associated with reduced risk, including folate, methionine, calcium and vitamin D. Short chain fatty acids also contribute to colonic health. Nevertheless agricultural products contain several dangerous pesticides. Mutagenic compounds, particularly heterocyclic amines, produced when protein is cooked, plausibly explain the meat association. Healthy nutrition is a necessary but not sufficient condition for colon cancer prevention: accepted the feasibility of an accurate control on every patient's diet, fequently the difficulty encountered in nutritional chemoprevention is to establish individual metabolic profiles.

  3. Precancerous Lesions in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sandouk, Fayez; Al Jerf, Feras; Al-Halabi, M. H. D. Bassel

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cause of cancer death in the world. The incidence rate (ASR) and age distribution of this disease differ between most of African-Middle-Eastern (AMAGE) and North America and Europe for many reasons. However, in all areas, “CRC” is considered as one of the most preventable cancers, because it might develop from variant processes like polyps and IBD in addition to the genetic pathogenesis which became very well known in this disease. We tried in this paper to review all the possible reasons of the differences in incidence and age between the west and AMAGE. Also we reviewed all the mutations that lead to the hereditary and familiar clustering of this disease with the correlations with the surrounding food and environment of different areas. Then, we focused on the precancerous pathology of this disease with special focusing on early detection depending on new endoscopy technology and most important genetic studies. We lastly reviewed the evidence of some of the surveillance and put suggestions about future surveillance programs and how important those programs are on the psychological aspect of the patients and their families. PMID:23737765

  4. Nutritional status assessment in colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Joana Pedro; de Castro Cardoso Pereira, Paula Manuela; dos Reis Baltazar Vicente, Ana Filipa; Bernardo, Alexandra; de Mesquita, María Fernanda

    2013-01-01

    The present study intended to evaluate the nutritional status of Portuguese colorectal patients and associated it with surgery type as well as quality of life outcomes. Malnutrition can affect up to 85% of cancer patients and specifically 30-60% in colorectal cancer and can significantly influence health outcomes. A sample of 50 colorectal cancer patients was evaluated in what refers to several anthropometric measures, food intake, clinical history, complications rate before and after surgery procedure. The sample was divided between convention and fast-track procedures. Most of the individuals were overweight or obese but had lost weight on the past six months. Despite mild, there were signs of malnutrition in this sample with high losses of fat free mass, weight and also fat mass during the hospitalization period. These results reinforce the importance of malnutrition assessment in colorectal patients as well as consider weight loss on the past months and body composition in order to complement nutritional status evaluation.

  5. Genetics of Colorectal Cancer (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the genetics of colorectal cancer, including information about specific genes and family cancer syndromes. The summary also contains information about screening for colorectal cancer and research aimed at prevention of this disease. Psychosocial issues associated with genetic testing and counseling of individuals who may have hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome are also discussed.

  6. Genetics of Colorectal Cancer (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the genetics of colorectal cancer, including information about specific genes and family cancer syndromes. The summary also contains information about screening for colorectal cancer and research aimed at prevention of this disease. Psychosocial issues associated with genetic testing and counseling of individuals who may have hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome are also discussed.

  7. Microsatellite instability in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Iacopetta, Barry; Grieu, Fabienne; Amanuel, Benhur

    2010-12-01

    Approximately 20 percent of right-sided colon cancers and 5 percent of left-sided colon and rectal cancers have a deficient DNA mismatch repair system. This results in the widespread accumulation of mutations to nucleotide repeats, some of which occur within the coding regions of cancer-related genes such as TGFβRII and BAX. A standardized definition for microsatellite instability (MSI) based on the presence of deletions to mononucleotide repeats is gaining widespread acceptance in both research and the clinic. Colorectal cancer (CRC) with MSI are characterized histologically by an abundance of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, poor differentiation and a signet ring or mucinous phenotype. In younger patients these tumors usually develop along the chromosomal instability pathway, in which case the mismatch repair genes are inactivated by germline mutation, somatic mutation and loss of heterozygosity. In older patients MSI CRC usually develops against a background of widespread hypermethylation that includes methylation-induced silencing of the mismatch repair gene MLH1. The overall biological and clinical phenotype of MSI CRC that arise in these two pathways is likely to be different and may account for some of the discordant results reported in the literature relating to the clinical properties of these tumors. The available evidence indicates that MSI is unlikely to be a clinically useful marker for the prognostic stratification of early-stage CRC. The predictive value of MSI for response to 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy remains controversial, while for other agents the predictive value is difficult to assess because they are used in combination regimens. The MSI phenotype is being actively investigated for novel therapeutic approaches based on the principle of synthetic lethality. Finally, the MSI status of CRC is an extremely useful marker for population-based screening programs that aim to identify individuals and families with the hereditary cancer

  8. Korean Guidelines for Colorectal Cancer Screening and Polyp Detection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bo-In; Hong, Sung Pil; Kim, Seong-Eun; Kim, Se Hyung; Hong, Sung Noh; Yang, Dong-Hoon; Shin, Sung Jae; Lee, Suck-Ho; Park, Dong Il; Kim, Young-Ho; Kim, Hyun Jung; Yang, Suk-Kyun; Kim, Hyo Jong; Jeon, Hae Jeong

    2012-01-01

    Now colorectal cancer is the second most common cancer in males and the fourth most common cancer in females in Korea. Since most of colorectal cancers occur after the prolonged transformation of adenomas into carcinomas, early detection and removal of colorectal adenomas are one of the most effective methods to prevent colorectal cancer. Considering the increasing incidence of colorectal cancer and polyps in Korea, it is very important to establish Korean guideline for colorectal cancer screening and polyp detection. The guideline was developed by the Korean Multi-Society Take Force and we tried to establish the guideline by evidence-based methods. Parts of the statements were draw by systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Herein we discussed epidemiology of colorectal cancers and adenomas in Korea and optimal methods for screening of colorectal cancer and detection of adenomas including fecal occult blood tests, radiologic tests, and endoscopic examinations. PMID:22741131

  9. Worldwide burden of colorectal cancer: a review.

    PubMed

    Favoriti, Pasqualino; Carbone, Gabriele; Greco, Marco; Pirozzi, Felice; Pirozzi, Raffaele Emmanuele Maria; Corcione, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    Colorectal cancer is a major public health problem, being the third most commonly diagnosed cancer and the fourth cause of cancer death worldwide. There is wide variation over time among the different geographic areas due to variable exposure to risk factors, introduction and uptake of screening as well as access to appropriate treatment services. Indeed, a large proportion of the disparities may be attributed to socioeconomic status. Although colorectal cancer continues to be a disease of the developed world, incidence rates have been rising in developing countries. Moreover, the global burden is expected to further increase due to the growth and aging of the population and because of the adoption of westernized behaviors and lifestyle. Colorectal cancer screening has been proven to greatly reduce mortality rates that have declined in many longstanding as well as newly economically developed countries. Statistics on colorectal cancer occurrence are essential to develop targeted strategies that could alleviate the burden of the disease. The aim of this paper is to provide a review of incidence, mortality and survival rates for colorectal cancer as well as their geographic variations and temporal trends.

  10. CRCHD Launches National Colorectal Cancer Outreach and Screening Initiative

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI CRCHD launches National Screen to Save Colorectal Cancer Outreach and Screening Initiative which aims to increase colorectal cancer screening rates among racially and ethnically diverse and rural communities.

  11. [Colorectal cancer in twins. Report of two cases].

    PubMed

    Białek, Andrzej; Homa, Katarzyna; Marlicz, Krzysztof

    2003-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common neoplasms that often occurs in several members of family. In this communication we present the case of synchronous colorectal cancers with similar localization and similar clinical course in monozygotic twins.

  12. Tissue Specific Promoters in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rama, A. R.; Aguilera, A.; Melguizo, C.; Caba, O.; Prados, J.

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma is the third most prevalent cancer in the world. In the most advanced stages, the use of chemotherapy induces a poor response and is usually accompanied by other tissue damage. Significant progress based on suicide gene therapy has demonstrated that it may potentiate the classical cytotoxic effects in colorectal cancer. The inconvenience still rests with the targeting and the specificity efficiency. The main target of gene therapy is to achieve an effective vehicle to hand over therapeutic genes safely into specific cells. One possibility is the use of tumor-specific promoters overexpressed in cancers. They could induce a specific expression of therapeutic genes in a given tumor, increasing their localized activity. Several promoters have been assayed into direct suicide genes to cancer cells. This review discusses the current status of specific tumor-promoters and their great potential in colorectal carcinoma treatment. PMID:26648599

  13. Gut microbiota imbalance and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gagnière, Johan; Raisch, Jennifer; Veziant, Julie; Barnich, Nicolas; Bonnet, Richard; Buc, Emmanuel; Bringer, Marie-Agnès; Pezet, Denis; Bonnet, Mathilde

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota acts as a real organ. The symbiotic interactions between resident micro-organisms and the digestive tract highly contribute to maintain the gut homeostasis. However, alterations to the microbiome caused by environmental changes (e.g., infection, diet and/or lifestyle) can disturb this symbiotic relationship and promote disease, such as inflammatory bowel diseases and cancer. Colorectal cancer is a complex association of tumoral cells, non-neoplastic cells and a large amount of micro-organisms, and the involvement of the microbiota in colorectal carcinogenesis is becoming increasingly clear. Indeed, many changes in the bacterial composition of the gut microbiota have been reported in colorectal cancer, suggesting a major role of dysbiosis in colorectal carcinogenesis. Some bacterial species have been identified and suspected to play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis, such as Streptococcus bovis, Helicobacter pylori, Bacteroides fragilis, Enterococcus faecalis, Clostridium septicum, Fusobacterium spp. and Escherichia coli. The potential pro-carcinogenic effects of these bacteria are now better understood. In this review, we discuss the possible links between the bacterial microbiota and colorectal carcinogenesis, focusing on dysbiosis and the potential pro-carcinogenic properties of bacteria, such as genotoxicity and other virulence factors, inflammation, host defenses modulation, bacterial-derived metabolism, oxidative stress and anti-oxidative defenses modulation. We lastly describe how bacterial microbiota modifications could represent novel prognosis markers and/or targets for innovative therapeutic strategies. PMID:26811603

  14. Gut microbiota imbalance and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Gagnière, Johan; Raisch, Jennifer; Veziant, Julie; Barnich, Nicolas; Bonnet, Richard; Buc, Emmanuel; Bringer, Marie-Agnès; Pezet, Denis; Bonnet, Mathilde

    2016-01-14

    The gut microbiota acts as a real organ. The symbiotic interactions between resident micro-organisms and the digestive tract highly contribute to maintain the gut homeostasis. However, alterations to the microbiome caused by environmental changes (e.g., infection, diet and/or lifestyle) can disturb this symbiotic relationship and promote disease, such as inflammatory bowel diseases and cancer. Colorectal cancer is a complex association of tumoral cells, non-neoplastic cells and a large amount of micro-organisms, and the involvement of the microbiota in colorectal carcinogenesis is becoming increasingly clear. Indeed, many changes in the bacterial composition of the gut microbiota have been reported in colorectal cancer, suggesting a major role of dysbiosis in colorectal carcinogenesis. Some bacterial species have been identified and suspected to play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis, such as Streptococcus bovis, Helicobacter pylori, Bacteroides fragilis, Enterococcus faecalis, Clostridium septicum, Fusobacterium spp. and Escherichia coli. The potential pro-carcinogenic effects of these bacteria are now better understood. In this review, we discuss the possible links between the bacterial microbiota and colorectal carcinogenesis, focusing on dysbiosis and the potential pro-carcinogenic properties of bacteria, such as genotoxicity and other virulence factors, inflammation, host defenses modulation, bacterial-derived metabolism, oxidative stress and anti-oxidative defenses modulation. We lastly describe how bacterial microbiota modifications could represent novel prognosis markers and/or targets for innovative therapeutic strategies.

  15. Oral bisphosphonates and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Vogtmann, Emily; Corley, Douglas A; Almers, Lucy M; Cardwell, Chris R; Murray, Liam J; Abnet, Christian C

    2017-03-10

    Use of oral bisphosphonates has been associated with a decreased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), but the association may be related to residual confounding by healthy lifestyle or body mass index (BMI). Therefore, we conducted a prospective nested case-control study within the Kaiser Permanente, Northern California health system cohort. In total, 12,505 CRC cases were individually matched to 599,534 controls. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using conditional logistic regression models with adjustment for important covariates extracted from the database. Participants who had ever used oral bisphosphonates were less likely than non-users to be diagnosed with CRC (OR 0.82; 95% CI: 0.74, 0.89). Colon and rectum site-specific associations were similar to the overall association. A stronger inverse association for ever use of bisphosphonates was observed for men (OR 0.63; 95% CI: 0.47, 0.85), however when stratified by previous lower endoscopy, the association was only observed in the participants who did not have a previous lower endoscopy (OR 0.73 (0.64, 0.83)). In conclusion, we found that oral bisphosphonate use was associated with a decreased odds of CRC, however this association may be due to residual confounding by BMI or another confounder.

  16. Evidence for colorectal cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Bretthauer, Michael

    2010-08-01

    The incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) has been increasing during the past decades, and the lifetime risk for CRC in industrialised countries is about 5%. CRC is a good candidate for screening, because it is a disease with high prevalence, has recognised precursors, and early treatment is beneficial. This paper outlines the evidence for efficacy from randomised trials for the most commonly used CRC screening tests to reduce CRC incidence and mortality in the average-risk population. Four randomised trials have investigated the effect of guaiac-based fecal occult blood screening on CRC mortality, with a combined CRC mortality risk reduction of 15-17% in an intention-to-screen analysis, and 25% for those people who attended screening. Flexible sigmoidoscopy screening has been evaluated in three randomised trials. The observed reduction in CRC incidence varied between 23 and 80%, and between 27 and 67% for CRC mortality, respectively (intention-to-screen analyses) in the trials with long follow-up time. No randomised trials exist in other CRC screening tools, included colonoscopy screening. FOBT and flexible sigmoidoscopy are the two CRC screening methods which have been tested in randomised trials and shown to reduce CRC mortality. These tests can be recommended for CRC screening. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Oral bisphosphonates and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vogtmann, Emily; Corley, Douglas A.; Almers, Lucy M.; Cardwell, Chris R.; Murray, Liam J.; Abnet, Christian C.

    2017-01-01

    Use of oral bisphosphonates has been associated with a decreased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), but the association may be related to residual confounding by healthy lifestyle or body mass index (BMI). Therefore, we conducted a prospective nested case-control study within the Kaiser Permanente, Northern California health system cohort. In total, 12,505 CRC cases were individually matched to 599,534 controls. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using conditional logistic regression models with adjustment for important covariates extracted from the database. Participants who had ever used oral bisphosphonates were less likely than non-users to be diagnosed with CRC (OR 0.82; 95% CI: 0.74, 0.89). Colon and rectum site-specific associations were similar to the overall association. A stronger inverse association for ever use of bisphosphonates was observed for men (OR 0.63; 95% CI: 0.47, 0.85), however when stratified by previous lower endoscopy, the association was only observed in the participants who did not have a previous lower endoscopy (OR 0.73 (0.64, 0.83)). In conclusion, we found that oral bisphosphonate use was associated with a decreased odds of CRC, however this association may be due to residual confounding by BMI or another confounder. PMID:28281559

  18. Genetic Architecture of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Ulrike; Bien, Stephanie; Zubair, Niha

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a complex disease that develops as a consequence of both genetic and environmental risk factors. A small proportion (3–5%) of cases arises from hereditary syndromes predisposing to early onset CRC as a result of mutations in over a dozen well-defined genes. In contrast, CRC is predominantly a late-onset “sporadic” disease, developing in individuals with no obvious hereditary syndrome. In recent years genome-wide association studies have discovered over 40 genetic regions to be associated with weak effects on sporadic CRC and it has been estimated that increasingly large genome-wide scans will identify many additional novel genetic regions. Subsequent experimental validations have identified the causally related variant(s) in a limited number of these genetic regions. Further biological insight could be obtained through ethnically diverse study populations, larger genetic sequencing studies, and development of higher-throughput functional experiments. Along with inherited variation, integration of the tumour genome may shed light on the carcinogenic processes in CRC. In addition to summarizing the genetic architecture of CRC, this review discusses genetic factors that modify environmental predictors of CRC, as well as examples of how genetic insight has improved clinical surveillance, prevention, and treatment strategies. In summary, substantial progress has been made in uncovering the genetic architecture of CRC and continued research efforts are expected to identify additional genetic risk factors that further our biological understanding of this disease. PMID:26187503

  19. ACR Appropriateness Criteria colorectal cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Yee, Judy; Kim, David H; Rosen, Max P; Lalani, Tasneem; Carucci, Laura R; Cash, Brooks D; Feig, Barry W; Fowler, Kathryn J; Katz, Douglas S; Smith, Martin P; Yaghmai, Vahid

    2014-06-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. Most colorectal cancers can be prevented by detecting and removing the precursor adenomatous polyp. Individual risk factors for the development of colorectal cancer will influence the particular choice of screening tool. CT colonography (CTC) is the primary imaging test for colorectal cancer screening in average-risk individuals, whereas the double-contrast barium enema (DCBE) is now considered to be a test that may be appropriate, particularly in settings where CTC is unavailable. Single-contrast barium enema has a lower performance profile and is indicated for screening only when CTC and DCBE are not available. CTC is also the preferred test for colon evaluation following an incomplete colonoscopy. Imaging tests including CTC and DCBE are not indicated for colorectal cancer screening in high-risk patients with polyposis syndromes or inflammatory bowel disease. This paper presents the updated colorectal cancer imaging test ratings and is the result of evidence-based consensus by the ACR Appropriateness Criteria Expert Panel on Gastrointestinal Imaging. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 2 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances where evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment.

  20. Colorectal Cancer Metastasis to the Thymus Gland: Rare Presentation of Colorectal Cancer as Anterior Mediastinal Mass

    PubMed Central

    Peters, H. Charles; Liu, Xiuli; Iqbal, Atif; Cunningham, Lisa A.

    2017-01-01

    Despite improved screening modalities, 15–25% of newly diagnosed colorectal cancers are metastatic at the time of diagnosis. The vast majority of these cases present as hepatic metastasis; however, 22% present with concomitant extrahepatic disease. The thymus gland is an uncommon site of metastasis for any primary malignancy, particularly, colorectal cancer given its vascular and lymphatic drainage. This case report details our experience with a rare case of colorectal cancer metastasis to the thymus gland presenting as a symptomatic mediastinal mass. PMID:28116210

  1. The Association Between Molecular Markers in Colorectal Sessile Serrated Polyps and Colorectal Cancer Risk

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0273 TITLE: The Association between Molecular Markers in Colorectal Sessile Serrated Polyps and Colorectal Cancer...ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE August 2016 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 1 Aug 2015 - 31 July 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Association Between...molecular markers associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer in patients with sessile serrated colorectal polyps (SSPs). The project’s

  2. Sugars, sucrose and colorectal cancer risk: the Fukuoka colorectal cancer study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenjie; Uchida, Kazuhiro; Ohnaka, Keizo; Morita, Makiko; Toyomura, Kengo; Kono, Suminori; Ueki, Takashi; Tanaka, Masao; Kakeji, Yoshihiro; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Okamura, Takeshi; Ikejiri, Koji; Futami, Kitaroh; Maekawa, Takafumi; Yasunami, Yohichi; Takenaka, Kenji; Ichimiya, Hitoshi; Terasaka, Reiji

    2014-05-01

    A diet high in sugars may promote colorectal carcinogenesis, but it remains uncertain whether high intake of sugars or sucrose confers increased risk of colorectal cancer. The authors investigated the associations of sugars and sucrose intake with colorectal cancer risk in a community-based case-control study in Japan. The study subjects comprised 816 incident cases of colorectal cancer and 815 community controls. Consumption frequencies and portion sizes of 148 food and beverage items were ascertained by a computer-assisted interview. The authors used the consumption of 29 food items to estimate sugars and sucrose intake. The odds ratios of colorectal cancer risk according to intake categories were obtained using a logistic regression model with adjustment for potential confounding variables. Overall, intakes of sugars and sucrose were not related to colorectal cancer risk either in men or women. The association between sugars intake and colorectal cancer risk differed by smoking status and alcohol use in men, but not in women. In men, sugars intake tended to be associated with colorectal cancer risk inversely among never-smokers and positively among male ever-smokers (interaction p=0.01). Sugars intake was associated with an increased risk among men with no alcohol consumption, but was unrelated to the risk among male alcohol drinkers (interaction p=0.02). Body mass index did not modify the association with sugars intake in either men or women. Sugars intake was associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer among smokers and non-alcohol drinkers in men selectively.

  3. Molecular alterations and biomarkers in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Grady, William M.; Pritchard, Colin C.

    2013-01-01

    The promise of precision medicine is now a clinical reality. Advances in our understanding of the molecular genetics of colorectal cancer genetics is leading to the development of a variety of biomarkers that are being used as early detection markers, prognostic markers, and markers for predicting treatment responses. This is no more evident than in the recent advances in testing colorectal cancers for specific molecular alterations in order to guide treatment with the monoclonal antibody therapies cetuximab and panitumumab, which target the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In this review, we update a prior review published in 2010 and describe our current understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of colorectal cancer and how these alterations relate to emerging biomarkers for early detection and risk stratification (diagnostic markers), prognosis (prognostic markers), and the prediction of treatment responses (predictive markers). PMID:24178577

  4. Advanced endoscopic technologies for colorectal cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Obstein, Keith L; Valdastri, Pietro

    2013-01-28

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in men and the second most common cancer in women worldwide. Diagnosing colorectal has been increasingly successful due to advances in technology. Flexible endoscopy is considered to be an effective method for early diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal cancer, making it a popular choice for screening programs. However, millions of people who may benefit from endoscopic colorectal cancer screening fail to have the procedure performed. Main reasons include psychological barriers due to the indignity of the procedure, fear of procedure related pain, bowel preparation discomfort, and potential need for sedation. Therefore, an urgent need for new technologies addressing these issues clearly exists. In this review, we discuss a set of advanced endoscopic technologies for colorectal cancer screening that are either already available or close to clinical trial. In particular, we focus on visual-inspection-only advanced flexible colonoscopes, interventional colonoscopes with alternative propulsion mechanisms, wireless capsule colonoscopy, and technologies for intraprocedural bowel cleansing. Many of these devices have the potential to reduce exam related patient discomfort, obviate the need for sedation, increase diagnostic yield, reduce learning curves, improve access to screening, and possibly avert the need for a bowel preparation.

  5. Advanced endoscopic technologies for colorectal cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Obstein, Keith L; Valdastri, Pietro

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in men and the second most common cancer in women worldwide. Diagnosing colorectal has been increasingly successful due to advances in technology. Flexible endoscopy is considered to be an effective method for early diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal cancer, making it a popular choice for screening programs. However, millions of people who may benefit from endoscopic colorectal cancer screening fail to have the procedure performed. Main reasons include psychological barriers due to the indignity of the procedure, fear of procedure related pain, bowel preparation discomfort, and potential need for sedation. Therefore, an urgent need for new technologies addressing these issues clearly exists. In this review, we discuss a set of advanced endoscopic technologies for colorectal cancer screening that are either already available or close to clinical trial. In particular, we focus on visual-inspection-only advanced flexible colonoscopes, interventional colonoscopes with alternative propulsion mechanisms, wireless capsule colonoscopy, and technologies for intraprocedural bowel cleansing. Many of these devices have the potential to reduce exam related patient discomfort, obviate the need for sedation, increase diagnostic yield, reduce learning curves, improve access to screening, and possibly avert the need for a bowel preparation. PMID:23382621

  6. Barriers to Colorectal Cancer Screening in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Fariha; Mahmood Shah, Sayed Mustafa; Munaf, Misbah; Khan, Muhammad R; Marsia, Shayan; Haaris, Syed Muhammad; Shaikh, Muhammad Hammad; Abdur Rahim, Ismail; Anwar, Muhammad Salar; Qureshi, Kassam S; Iqbal, Maham; Qazi, Sara; Kasi, Burhanuddin A; Tahir, Mahnoor; Ur Rehman, Syed Inam; Fatima, Kaneez

    2017-07-16

    Background The prevalence of colorectal cancer (CRC) is growing in Pakistan; however, there are no national screening programs or guidelines in place to curb its development. This study was conducted with the aim of ascertaining public awareness and attitudes regarding CRC and current screening practices. Furthermore, the study assessed perceived barriers which could impact future screening processes. Methods A cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study was conducted among urban dwellers of Karachi, Pakistan. We excluded any individuals belonging to the medical profession, those diagnosed previously with CRC or having any significant co-morbidity. The validated and pre-tested questionnaire was administered among the study participants to record demographic information, awareness of CRC risk factors, symptoms and screening tests. Attitudes towards screening and perceived barriers to screening were also assessed. Data were analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS version 20.0) (IBM Corp., Armonk, NY). A knowledge score, out of a total of 14 points was calculated to reflect a participant's overall knowledge regarding CRC risk factors and signs/symptoms. Results The prevalence of CRC screening in eligible individuals (50 years or older) was 2.6% in our study population. Positive attitudes towards CRC management and screening were observed, with 75.1% (n = 296) acknowledging the preventive role of screening tests. Despite this only 14.9% (n = 58) of study participants expressed a future desire to undergo screening. Major barriers to screening were reported to be "a lack of knowledge regarding the screening procedure", a "lack of screening facilities" and that the "screening procedure is too expensive". A majority (n = 285, 72.3%) of the participants expressed a greater willingness to undergo screening if their doctor recommended it. Conclusion A national CRC screening and awareness program should be launched to promote awareness and facilitate

  7. [New advances in hereditary colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Moreira, Leticia

    2015-09-01

    Colorectal cancer is the most frequent malignancy in both sexes in Spain. Between 20% and 25% of affected individuals have a family history of the disease, and 5% to 6% have a germ mutation, i.e. the disease develops in the context of a hereditary syndrome. The importance of identifying patients with hereditary syndromes predisposing them to colorectal cancer lies in the possibility of applying preventive measures, screening, and more appropriate management of both patients and their families. The present article outlines the most important studies presented at the congress of the American Gastroenterological Association. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Get Tested for Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of fiber . Talk with your doctor about taking aspirin every day. Taking aspirin every day can lower your risk of colorectal ... 50 to 59, ask your doctor if daily aspirin is right for you . Previous section Get Tested ...

  9. Promoting Colorectal Cancer Screening Discussion

    PubMed Central

    Christy, Shannon M.; Perkins, Susan M.; Tong, Yan; Krier, Connie; Champion, Victoria L.; Skinner, Celette Sugg; Springston, Jeffrey K.; Imperiale, Thomas F.; Rawl, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Provider recommendation is a predictor of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. Purpose To compare the effects of two clinic-based interventions on patient–provider discussions about CRC screening. Design Two-group RCT with data collected at baseline and 1 week post-intervention. Participants/setting African-American patients that were non-adherent to CRC screening recommendations (n=693) with a primary care visit between 2008 and 2010 in one of 11 urban primary care clinics. Intervention Participants received either a computer-delivered tailored CRC screening intervention or a nontailored informational brochure about CRC screening immediately prior to their primary care visit. Main outcome measures Between-group differences in odds of having had a CRC screening discussion about a colon test, with and without adjusting for demographic, clinic, health literacy, health belief, and social support variables, were examined as predictors of a CRC screening discussion using logistic regression. Intervention effects on CRC screening test order by PCPs were examined using logistic regression. Analyses were conducted in 2011 and 2012. Results Compared to the brochure group, a greater proportions of those in the computer-delivered tailored intervention group reported having had a discussion with their provider about CRC screening (63% vs 48%, OR=1.81, p<0.001). Predictors of a discussion about CRC screening included computer group participation, younger age, reason for visit, being unmarried, colonoscopy self-efficacy, and family member/friend recommendation (all p-values <0.05). Conclusions The computer-delivered tailored intervention was more effective than a nontailored brochure at stimulating patient–provider discussions about CRC screening. Those who received the computer-delivered intervention also were more likely to have a CRC screening test (fecal occult blood test or colonoscopy) ordered by their PCP. Trial registration This study is registered at www

  10. Mass screening for colorectal cancer in Hungary.

    PubMed Central

    Preisich, P; Siba, S; Szakátsy, E

    1987-01-01

    Haemoccult screening for colorectal tumours was carried out in Hungary in small cities and villages around Budapest. Haemoccult slides were supplied to 17,662 individuals over 40 years of age, and 15,431 (87%) were returned. Of these, 346 (2.2%) were positive and 18 colorectal carcinomas were detected. Additionally, 24 patients with one or more polyps greater than 1 cm diameter were found. Of the screened cases of cancer 39% were in Dukes' stage A and B, a rate twice as good as when screening was not done. The cost per tumour detected amounted to about three times more than one monthly income, indicating that the costs of screening for colorectal cancer are relatively much higher in Hungary than in Western countries. All expenses were met from state funds. PMID:3625689

  11. Emerging role of vitamin D in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kang, Wonmo; Lee, Sujin; Jeon, Eunyi; Yun, Ye-Rang; Kim, Kook-Hyun; Jang, Jun-Hyeog

    2011-08-15

    Colorectal cancer is a common cancer and the fourth leading cause of death in Korea. The incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer varies according to risk factors, such as age, family history, genetic history, food habits, and physical activities. Some studies have focused on the association between vitamin D and colorectal cancer. Today, there is growing evidence that high vitamin D intake and a plasma level of 25(OH)D(3) reduce the incidence of colorectal cancer by modifying cancer angiogenesis, cell apoptosis, differentiation, and proliferation. Taken together, these results suggest that vitamin D supplementation alone, or in combination with anti-cancer agents, might reduce the incidence of colorectal cancer. In this review, we discuss the function and mechanism of vitamin D including the effect of vitamin D on colorectal cancer.

  12. Natural history of colorectal cancer in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (Lynch syndromes I and II).

    PubMed

    Lynch, H T; Watson, P; Lanspa, S J; Marcus, J; Smyrk, T; Fitzgibbons, R J; Kriegler, M; Lynch, J F

    1988-06-01

    Approximately 5 to 6 percent of the total colorectal cancer burden is accounted for by hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). Because clinical premonitory signs such as those seen in familial polyposis coli (FPC) are lacking, the clinician must recognize clinical findings and family history typical of HNPCC. The authors have described colorectal cancer expression from a survey of ten HNPCC kindreds. Kindred members with colorectal cancer differed significantly (P less than .05) from patients with sporadic colorectal cancer: 1) mean age of initial colon cancer diagnosis was 44.6 years; 2) 72.3 percent of first colon cancers were located in the right colon, and only 25 percent were in the sigmoid colon and rectum; 3) 18.1 percent had synchronous colon cancers; and 4) 24.2 percent developed metachronous colon cancer, with a risk for metachronous lesions in ten years of 40 percent. Affecteds and their first-degree relatives should undergo early intensive education and surveillance. In families with an early age of onset, colonoscopy should begin at age 25, and biannually thereafter, with fecal occult blood testing of the stool semiannually. Third-party carriers must become more responsive to the costly surveillance measures required for these otherwise healthy patients.

  13. Colorectal Cancer Presenting with Constipation During Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Povlow, Michael R

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a rare occurrence during pregnancy and can present with symptoms that are common during pregnancy such as constipation.This can make the diagnosis of colorectal cancer during pregnancy difficult. Management of colorectal cancer during pregnancy is similar to the treatment of non-pregnant patients, but with fetal safety in mind. This case report describes a 33-year-old female gravida two para one (G2P1) at 29 weeks gestation who presented with a complete bowel obstruction. Colonoscopy, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and later resection showed an obstructing malignancy which was then resected through an exploratory laparotomy with left hemicolectomy. Postoperatively, there was a concern for sepsis, so labor was induced and the baby was delivered vaginally. The patient then continued with chemotherapy with hematology-oncology. High clinical suspicion is needed to diagnose colorectal cancer during pregnancy. Once diagnosed, surgery can be considered if resectable, taking into account gestational age. Fetal safety is a major consideration during treatment. PMID:28553568

  14. Hereditary Colorectal Cancer (CRC) Program in Latvia

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study is to evaluate the incidence and phenotype - genotype characteristics of hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes in Latvia in order to develop the basis of clinical management for patients and their relatives affected by these syndromes. Materials and methods From 02/1999-09/2002 in several hospitals in Latvia cancer family histories were collected from 865 patients with CRC. In families suspected of having a history consistent with a hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome, DNA testing for MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 genes was performed. In addition immunohistochemical (IH) examination of the normal and cancer tissue from large bowel tumors for MSH2 and MSH6 protein expression was performed prior to DNA analysis. Results From the 865 CRC cases only 3 (0.35%) pedigrees fulfilled the Amsterdam II criteria of Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC) and 15 cases (1.73%) were suspected of HNPCC. In 69 cases (8%) with a cancer family aggregation (CFA) were identified. Thus far 27 IH analyses have been performed and in 3 cancers homogenous lack of MSH2 or MSH6 protein expression was found. In one of these cases a mutation in MSH6 was identified. In 18 patients suspected of HNPCC or of matching the Amsterdam II criteria, denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) followed by DNA sequencing of any heteroduplexes of the 35 exons comprising both MLH1 and MSH2 was performed revealing 3 mutations. For all of kindreds diagnosed definitively or with a high probability of being an HNPCC family appropriate recommendations concerning prophylactic measures, surveillance and treatment were provided in written form. Conclusions Existing pedigree/clinical data suggest that in Latvia the frequency of HNPCC is around 2% of consecutive colorectal cancer patients. It is crucial that genetic counseling is an integral part of cancer family syndrome management.

  15. Choroidal and skin metastases from colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Joo Young; Oh, Edward Hynseung; Jung, Moon Ki; Park, Song Ee; Kim, Ji Tak; Hwang, In Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Choroidal and skin metastasis of colon cancer is rare. In women, the frequency of cutaneous metastasis from colon cancer as the primary lesion in is 9% and skin metastasis occurs in 0.81% of all colorectal cancers. We report a patient with colonic adenocarcinoma who presented with visual disorder in her right eye and scalp pain as her initial symptoms. Contrast-enhance orbital magnetic resonance imaging with fat suppression revealed an infrabulbar mass, and skin biopsy of the posterior parietal scalp confirmed adenocarcinoma. These symptoms were diagnosed as being caused by choroidal and skin metastases of colonic adenocarcinoma. We started palliative chemotherapy with oral capecitabine (1000 mg/m2, twice a day, on days 1-14) every 3 wk, which was effective at shrinking the brain masses and improving the visual disorder. This is the first report that capecitabine is effective at reducing a choroidal and cutaneous metastatic lesion from right-sided colorectal cancer. PMID:27920486

  16. Choroidal and skin metastases from colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ha, Joo Young; Oh, Edward Hynseung; Jung, Moon Ki; Park, Song Ee; Kim, Ji Tak; Hwang, In Gyu

    2016-11-21

    Choroidal and skin metastasis of colon cancer is rare. In women, the frequency of cutaneous metastasis from colon cancer as the primary lesion in is 9% and skin metastasis occurs in 0.81% of all colorectal cancers. We report a patient with colonic adenocarcinoma who presented with visual disorder in her right eye and scalp pain as her initial symptoms. Contrast-enhance orbital magnetic resonance imaging with fat suppression revealed an infrabulbar mass, and skin biopsy of the posterior parietal scalp confirmed adenocarcinoma. These symptoms were diagnosed as being caused by choroidal and skin metastases of colonic adenocarcinoma. We started palliative chemotherapy with oral capecitabine (1000 mg/m(2), twice a day, on days 1-14) every 3 wk, which was effective at shrinking the brain masses and improving the visual disorder. This is the first report that capecitabine is effective at reducing a choroidal and cutaneous metastatic lesion from right-sided colorectal cancer.

  17. Access to Cancer Services for Rural Colorectal Cancer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Laura-Mae; Cai, Yong; Larson, Eric H.; Dobie, Sharon A.; Wright, George E.; Goodman, David C.; Matthews, Barbara; Hart, L. Gary

    2008-01-01

    Context: Cancer care requires specialty surgical and medical resources that are less likely to be found in rural areas. Purpose: To examine the travel patterns and distances of rural and urban colorectal cancer (CRC) patients to 3 types of specialty cancer care services--surgery, medical oncology consultation, and radiation oncology consultation.…

  18. Access to Cancer Services for Rural Colorectal Cancer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Laura-Mae; Cai, Yong; Larson, Eric H.; Dobie, Sharon A.; Wright, George E.; Goodman, David C.; Matthews, Barbara; Hart, L. Gary

    2008-01-01

    Context: Cancer care requires specialty surgical and medical resources that are less likely to be found in rural areas. Purpose: To examine the travel patterns and distances of rural and urban colorectal cancer (CRC) patients to 3 types of specialty cancer care services--surgery, medical oncology consultation, and radiation oncology consultation.…

  19. Epigenetics in diagnosis of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Sameer, Aga Syed; Nissar, Saniya

    2016-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a third most common epithelial carcinoma. CRC is known to develop from the early precancerous lesion to full blown malignancy via definite phases due to cumulative mutations and aberrant methylation of number of genes. The use of serum biomarkers that is non-invasive to discriminate cancer patients from healthy persons will prove to be an important tool to improve the early diagnosis of CRC. This will serve as the boon to the clinical management of the disease.

  20. Early diagnosis for colorectal cancer in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ya-Li; Zhang, Zhen-Su; Wu, Ba-Ping; Zhou, Dian-Yuan

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To review the present studies on early diagnosis of colorectal cancer. METHODS: The detective rate for early cancer is 1.7%-26.1% based on various statistical data, with much higher detective rate in endoscopy. Since early cancer means invasion involved in the mucosa or submucosa, the diagnosis can only be made when the invasive depth is identified. Pathological tissue materials from both surgical operation or endoscopic resection are suitable for early cancer evaluation. RESULTS: Incidence of polyp malignancy is 1.4%-20.4%. The various constitutive proportion of polyps may explain the different rates. Malignant incidence is higher in adenomatous polyps, that for villous polyps can reach 21.3%-58.3%. Type II early stage of colorectal carcinoma is rarely reported in China. It is shownd that majority of them were not malignant, most of type IIa being adenoma or hyperplasia, and IIb being inflammatory and IIc might be the isolated ulcers. The occurrence of malignancy of type II is far lower than that of polypoid lesion. In China, the qualitative diagnosis and classification of neoplasm generally adopted the WHO standard, including surgical excision or biopsies. There is impersonal evaluation between colorectal pre-malignancy and cancer. The former emphasizes the dysplasia of nuclei and gland, while the latter is marked with cancer invasion. Diagnosis of early stage colorectal cancer in endoscopy is made with too much caution which made the detective rate much lower. Mass screening for asymptomatic subjects and follow-up for high risk population are mainly used to find the early stage colorectal cancer in China. Fecal occult blood test is also widely made as primary screening test, galactose oxygenase test of rectal mucus (T antigen), fecal occult albumin test are also used. The detective rate of colorectal cancer is 24-36.5 per 105 mass population. CONCLUSION: Although carcinoma associated antigen in blood or stool, microsatellite DNA instability for high risk

  1. Understanding Perceived Benefit of Early Cancer Detection: Community-Partnered Research with African American Women in South Los Angeles.

    PubMed

    Bazargan, Mohsen; Lucas-Wright, Anna; Jones, Loretta; Vargas, Roberto; Vadgama, Jaydutt V; Evers-Manly, Shirley; Maxwell, Annette E

    2015-09-01

    African American women have lower 5-year cancer survival rates than non-Latino White women. Differences in perceived benefits of early cancer detection among racial/ethnic groups may affect cancer-screening behaviors. This study assessed correlates of perceived benefits of early breast, cervical and colorectal cancer detection among 513 African American women. Using a community-partnered participatory research approach, we conducted a survey on cancer screening, risk behaviors, and related knowledge and attitudes among African American parishioners at 11 churches in South Los Angeles, a neighborhood that experiences one of the highest cancer mortality rates in California. African American women who participated in this study were more likely to believe that chances for survival are very good or good after early detection of breast cancer (74%) than after early detection of colorectal (51%) and cervical cancer (52%). Multivariate analyses show that perceived benefit of early cancer detection is associated with higher cancer knowledge and having discussed one's cancer risk with a doctor. Given that 5-year survival rates for early stage breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer range from 84% to 93%, our data suggest that a substantial proportion of African American women in South Los Angeles are not aware of the benefits of early detection, particularly of colorectal and cervical cancers. Programs that increase cancer knowledge and encourage a discussion of individual's cancer risk with a doctor may be able to increase perceived benefit of early detection, a construct that has been shown to be associated with cancer screening in some studies.

  2. Screening for colorectal cancer and prostate cancer: challenges for New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Ann K; Potter, John D

    2014-06-06

    Prostate cancer and colorectal cancer are the most commonly registered cancers in New Zealanders and among the five most commonly registered cancers worldwide, but the balance of benefits and harms, and therefore appropriate screening policies, for these cancers differ. We aimed to compare the potential benefits and harms of screening for prostate cancer and colorectal cancer to aid prioritisation in New Zealand. Relevant reports from randomised controlled trials and systematic reviews of prostate cancer and colorectal cancer screening were reviewed to obtain estimates of the potential benefits and harms of screening for prostate cancer and colorectal cancer. The balance of potential benefits and harms of screening is better for colorectal cancer screening than for prostate cancer screening. For colorectal cancer, the balance of benefits and harms is better for flexible sigmoidoscopy screening than for faecal occult blood screening. In New Zealand, colorectal cancer screening should be a priority. Challenges include colonoscopy capacity, and decisions about the most appropriate screening modality.

  3. Folate-related nutrients, genetic polymorphisms, and colorectal cancer risk: the fukuoka colorectal cancer study.

    PubMed

    Morita, Makiko; Yin, Guang; Yoshimitsu, Shin-ichiro; Ohnaka, Keizo; Toyomura, Kengo; Kono, Suminori; Ueki, Takashi; Tanaka, Masao; Kakeji, Yoshihiro; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Okamura, Takeshi; Ikejiri, Koji; Futami, Kitaroh; Maekawa, Takafumi; Yasunami, Yohichi; Takenaka, Kenji; Ichimiya, Hitoshi; Terasaka, Reiji

    2013-01-01

    One-carbon metabolism plays an important role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Meta-analyses have suggested protective associations of folate and vitamin B6 intakes with colorectal cancer primarily based on studies in Caucasians, and genetic polymorphisms pertaining to the folate metabolism have been a matter of interest. Less investigated are the roles of methionine synthase (MTR) and thymidylate synthetase (TS) polymorphisms in colorectal carcinogenesis. In a study of 816 cases and 815 community controls in Japan, we investigated associations of dietary intakes of folate, methionine, vitamin B2, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12 with colorectal cancer risk. The associations with MTR 2756A>G, MTRR 66A>G, and TSER repeat polymorphism were examined in 685 cases and 778 controls. Methionine and vitamin B12 intakes were inversely associated with colorectal cancer risk, but the associations were totally confounded by dietary calcium and n-3 fatty acids. The other nutrients showed no association with the risk even without adjustment for calcium and n-3 fatty acids. The TSER 2R allele was dose-dependently associated with an increased risk. The MTR and MTRR polymorphisms were unrelated to colorectal cancer risk. There was no measurable gene-gene or gene-nutrient interaction, but increased risk associated with the TSER 2R allele seemed to be confined to individuals with high folate status. This study does not support protective associations for folate and vitamin B6. The TSER 2R allele may confer an increased risk of colorectal cancer. The role of the TSER polymorphism in colorectal carcinogenesis may differ by ethnicity.

  4. Colorectal Cancer Screening among Latinos in Three Communities on the Texas-Mexico Border

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernández, María E.; Savas, Lara S.; Wilson, Katherine M.; Byrd, Theresa L.; Atkinson, John; Torres-Vigil, Isabel; Vernon, Sally W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess colorectal cancer screening (CRCS) prevalence and psychosocial correlates of CRCS among Latinos in South Texas. Method: Using multivariable analyses, we examined the association of perceived susceptibility, self-efficacy, pros and cons, subjective norms, knowledge and fatalism on CRCS among 544 Latinos (50 years and older).…

  5. Factors Associated with Colorectal Cancer Risk Perception: The Role of Polyps and Family History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Jennifer Rider; Bertone-Johnson, Elizabeth R.; Costanza, Mary E.; Stoddard, Anne M.

    2006-01-01

    It is unclear how objective risk factors influence the factors associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) risk perception. The goals of this study were to investigate factors associated with perceived risk of CRC and to explore how these relationships were modified by personal history of polyps or family history of CRC. The study involved a mailed…

  6. Factors Associated with Colorectal Cancer Risk Perception: The Role of Polyps and Family History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Jennifer Rider; Bertone-Johnson, Elizabeth R.; Costanza, Mary E.; Stoddard, Anne M.

    2006-01-01

    It is unclear how objective risk factors influence the factors associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) risk perception. The goals of this study were to investigate factors associated with perceived risk of CRC and to explore how these relationships were modified by personal history of polyps or family history of CRC. The study involved a mailed…

  7. Colorectal Cancer Screening among Latinos in Three Communities on the Texas-Mexico Border

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernández, María E.; Savas, Lara S.; Wilson, Katherine M.; Byrd, Theresa L.; Atkinson, John; Torres-Vigil, Isabel; Vernon, Sally W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess colorectal cancer screening (CRCS) prevalence and psychosocial correlates of CRCS among Latinos in South Texas. Method: Using multivariable analyses, we examined the association of perceived susceptibility, self-efficacy, pros and cons, subjective norms, knowledge and fatalism on CRCS among 544 Latinos (50 years and older).…

  8. Colorectal cancer screening using fecal occult blood test and subsequent risk of colorectal cancer: a prospective cohort study in Japan.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Jae; Inoue, Manami; Otani, Tetsuya; Iwasaki, Motoki; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2007-01-01

    To investigate prospectively the association between colorectal cancer screening and subsequent risk of colorectal cancer death in a large-scale population-based cohort study (the JPHC study) with a 13-year follow-up period in Japan. We analyzed data from a population-based cohort of 42,150 (20,326 men and 21,824 women) subjects. Subjects who had undergone fecal occult blood test (FOBT) screening during the preceding 12 months were defined as the screened group. A total of 132 colorectal cancer deaths and 597 cases of newly diagnosed colorectal cancer were identified during the follow-up period. We observed a nearly 70% decrease in colorectal cancer mortality in screened versus unscreened subjects (RR=0.28, 95% CI=0.13-0.61). Screening participation was associated with a 30% reduced risk of death from all causes other than colorectal cancer (RR=0.70, 95% CI=0.61-0.79). However, the extent of mortality reduction was greater for colorectal cancer than other causes. A significant decrease in the incidence of advanced colorectal cancer was seen in screened subjects (RR=0.41, 95% CI=0.27-0.63), although the overall incidence rate did not differ significantly between the screened and unscreened groups. Although self-selection bias could not be fully controlled, these findings suggest that colorectal cancer screening may be associated with a reduction in mortality from colorectal cancer in the Japanese population.

  9. BRAF Mutation in Colorectal Cancer: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Barras, David

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is still one of the deadliest cancer-related diseases. About 10% of CRC patients are characterized by a mutation in the B-Raf proto-oncogene serine/threonine kinase (BRAF) gene resulting in a valine-to-glutamate change at the residue 600 (V600E). This mutation is also present in more than 60% of melanoma patients. BRAF inhibitors were developed and found to improve patient survival; however, most patients at the end of the track ultimately develop resistance to these inhibitors. Melanoma patients benefit from the combination of BRAF inhibitors with mitogen/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK) inhibitors, among others. Unfortunately, colorectal patients do not respond much efficiently, which suggests different resistance mechanisms between the two cancer types. This review aims at shedding light on recent discoveries that improve our understanding of the BRAF mutation biology in CRC. PMID:26396549

  10. [Molecular genetics of colorectal cancer and carcinogenesis].

    PubMed

    Panduro Cerda, A; Lima González, G; Villalobos, J J

    1993-01-01

    Genetic and environmental aspects play an important role in the development of colorectal cancer. However, the common molecular alteration in both hereditary and sporadic colon cancer is localized in the APC gene. the APC gene maps in the long arm of chromosome 5 and was discovered in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). The search for the APC gene led to the identification of restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) in FAP patients. Using these RFLPs in relatives of FAP patients it is possible to make the presymptomatic and prenatal diagnosis. The FAP syndrome is an interesting model of carcinogenesis in vivo. Thus the different stages involved in the FAP syndrome which include hyperproliferative epithelium, adenoma, adenocarcinoma and metastases, have allowed the analysis of molecular alterations in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. The APC gene alteration if not inherited, occurs as the earliest molecular alteration in the development of colorectal cancer whereas structural alterations of the genes myc, ras, p53, MCC and DCC are considered to be late events. All these investigations have lead to 1) a better understanding of the ethiology of cancer and 2) early diagnosis of colorectal cancer in both the hereditary and sporadic forms of the disease.

  11. Prediagnostic Plasma Adiponectin and Survival among Patients with Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chong, Dawn Q; Mehta, Raaj S; Song, Mingyang; Kedrin, Dmitriy; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A; Ng, Kimmie; Wu, Kana; Fuchs, Charles S; Giovannucci, Edward L; Ogino, Shuji; Chan, Andrew T

    2015-12-01

    Circulating adiponectin is inversely related to the risk of colorectal cancer. However, its influence on colorectal cancer survival is unclear. We conducted a prospective study to evaluate the association between prediagnostic plasma levels of adiponectin and mortality in patients with colorectal cancer. We identified 621 incident colorectal cancer cases who provided blood specimens prior to diagnosis within the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) and Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS). Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CI). After a median follow-up of 9 years, there were 269 (43%) total deaths, of which 181 (67%) were due to colorectal cancer. Compared with participants in the lowest quartile of adiponectin, those in the highest quartile had multivariate HRs of 1.89 (95% CI, 1.21-2.97; P(trend) = 0.01) for colorectal cancer-specific mortality and 1.66 (95% CI, 1.15-2.39; P(trend) = 0.009) for overall mortality. The apparent increased risk in colorectal cancer-specific mortality was more pronounced in patients with metastatic disease (HR, 3.02: 95% CI, 1.50-6.08). Among patients with colorectal cancer, prediagnostic plasma adiponectin is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer-specific and overall mortality and is more apparent in patients with metastatic disease. Adiponectin may be a marker for cancers which develop through specific pathways that may be associated with worsened prognosis. Further studies are needed to validate these findings.

  12. The Heterocellular Emergence of Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tape, Christopher J

    2017-02-01

    Tissues contain multiple different cell types and can be considered to be heterocellular systems. Signaling between different cells allows tissues to achieve phenotypes that no cell type can achieve in isolation. Such emergent tissue-level phenotypes can be said to 'supervene upon' heterocellular signaling. It is proposed here that cancer is also an emergent phenotype that supervenes upon heterocellular signaling. Using colorectal cancer (CRC) as an example, I review how heterotypic cells differentially communicate to support emergent malignancy. Studying tumors as integrated heterocellular systems - rather than as solitary expansions of mutated cells - may reveal novel ways to treat cancer.

  13. Hereditary Colorectal Cancer: Genetics and Screening.

    PubMed

    Brosens, Lodewijk A A; Offerhaus, G Johan A; Giardiello, Francis M

    2015-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer and the third leading cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. About 30% of patients with CRC report a family history of CRC. However, only 5% of CRCs arise in the setting of a well-established mendelian inherited disorder. In addition, serrated polyposis is a clinically defined syndrome with multiple serrated polyps in the colorectum and an increased CRC risk for which the genetics are unknown. This article focuses on genetic and clinical aspects of Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, and MUTYH-associated polyposis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Treatment of colorectal cancer in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Millan, Monica; Merino, Sandra; Caro, Aleidis; Feliu, Francesc; Escuder, Jordi; Francesch, Tani

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer has a high incidence, and approximately 60% of colorectal cancer patients are older than 70, with this incidence likely increasing in the near future. Elderly patients (> 70-75 years of age) are a very heterogeneous group, ranging from the very fit to the very frail. Traditionally, these patients have often been under-treated and recruited less frequently to clinical trials than younger patients, and thus are under-represented in publications about cancer treatment. Recent studies suggest that fit elderly patients can be treated in the same way as their younger counterparts, but the treatment of frail patients with comorbidities is still a matter of controversy. Many factors should be taken into account, including fitness for treatment, the wishes of the patient and family, and quality of life. This review will focus on the existing evidence for surgical, oncologic, and palliative treatment in patients over 70 years old with colorectal cancer. Careful patient assessment is necessary in order to individualize treatment approach, and this should rely on a multidisciplinary process. More well-designed controlled trials are needed in this patient population. PMID:26483875

  15. Colorectal cancer risk in hamartomatous polyposis syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Fábio Guilherme; Figueiredo, Marleny Novaes; Martinez, Carlos Augusto Real

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality around the world, and approximately 5% of them develop in a context of inherited mutations leading to some form of familial colon cancer syndromes. Recognition and characterization of these patients have contributed to elucidate the genetic basis of CRC. Polyposis Syndromes may be categorized by the predominant histological structure found within the polyps. The aim of the present paper is to review the most important clinical features of the Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes, a rare group of genetic disorders formed by the peutz-Jeghers syndrome, juvenil polyposis syndrome and PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndrome (Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalacaba and Cowden Syndromes). A literature search was performed in order to retrieve the most recent and important papers (articles, reviews, clinical cases and clinical guidelines) regarding the studied subject. We searched for terms such as “hamartomatous polyposis syndromes”, “Peutz-Jeghers syndrome”, “juvenile polyposis syndrome”, “juvenile polyp”, and “PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome” (Cowden syndrome, Bananyan-Riley-Ruvalcaba). The present article reports the wide spectrum of disease severity and extraintestinal manifestations, with a special focus on their potential to develop colorectal and other neoplasia. In the literature, the reported colorectal cancer risk for Juvenile Polyposis, Peutz-Jeghers and PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndromes are 39%-68%, 39%-57% and 18%, respectively. A review regarding cancer surveillance recommendations is also presented. PMID:25848489

  16. Colorectal cancer risk in hamartomatous polyposis syndromes.

    PubMed

    Campos, Fábio Guilherme; Figueiredo, Marleny Novaes; Martinez, Carlos Augusto Real

    2015-03-27

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality around the world, and approximately 5% of them develop in a context of inherited mutations leading to some form of familial colon cancer syndromes. Recognition and characterization of these patients have contributed to elucidate the genetic basis of CRC. Polyposis Syndromes may be categorized by the predominant histological structure found within the polyps. The aim of the present paper is to review the most important clinical features of the Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes, a rare group of genetic disorders formed by the peutz-Jeghers syndrome, juvenil polyposis syndrome and PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndrome (Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalacaba and Cowden Syndromes). A literature search was performed in order to retrieve the most recent and important papers (articles, reviews, clinical cases and clinical guidelines) regarding the studied subject. We searched for terms such as "hamartomatous polyposis syndromes", "Peutz-Jeghers syndrome", "juvenile polyposis syndrome", "juvenile polyp", and "PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome" (Cowden syndrome, Bananyan-Riley-Ruvalcaba). The present article reports the wide spectrum of disease severity and extraintestinal manifestations, with a special focus on their potential to develop colorectal and other neoplasia. In the literature, the reported colorectal cancer risk for Juvenile Polyposis, Peutz-Jeghers and PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndromes are 39%-68%, 39%-57% and 18%, respectively. A review regarding cancer surveillance recommendations is also presented.

  17. MicroRNAs: Clinical Relevance in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Joe; Ohtsuka, Masahisa; Pichler, Martin; Ling, Hui

    2015-11-25

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancer diagnoses and causes of mortality worldwide. MicroRNAs are a class of small, non-coding regulatory RNAs that have shown strong associations with colorectal cancer. Through the repression of target messenger RNAs, microRNAs modulate many cellular pathways, such as those involved in cell proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation. The utilization of microRNAs has shown significant promise in the diagnosis and prognosis of colorectal cancer, owing to their unique expression profile associations with cancer types and malignancies. Moreover, microRNA therapeutics with mimics or antagonists show great promise in preclinical studies, which encourages further development of their clinical use for colorectal cancer patients. The unique ability of microRNAs to affect multiple downstream pathways represents a novel approach for cancer therapy. Although still early in its development, we believe that microRNAs can be used in the near future as biomarkers and therapeutic targets for colorectal cancer.

  18. Dietary polyphenols and colorectal cancer risk: The Fukuoka colorectal cancer study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen-Jie; Ohnaka, Keizo; Morita, Makiko; Toyomura, Kengo; Kono, Suminori; Ueki, Takashi; Tanaka, Masao; Kakeji, Yoshihiro; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Okamura, Takeshi; Ikejiri, Koji; Futami, Kitaroh; Maekawa, Takafumi; Yasunami, Yohichi; Takenaka, Kenji; Ichimiya, Hitoshi; Terasaka, Reiji

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the associations between dietary intake of polyphenols and colorectal cancer. METHODS: The study subjects were derived from the Fukuoka colorectal cancer study, a community-based case-control study. The study subjects were 816 cases of colorectal cancer and 815 community-based controls. The consumption of 148 food items was assessed by a computer-assisted interview. We used the consumption of 97 food items to estimate dietary intakes of total, tea and coffee polyphenols. The Phenol-Explorer database was used for 92 food items. Of the 5 foods which were not listed in the Phenol-Explorer Database, polyphenol contents of 3 foods (sweet potatoes, satoimo and daikon) were based on a Japanese study and 2 foods (soybeans and fried potatoes) were estimated by ORAC-based polyphenol contents in the United States Department of Agriculture Database. Odds ratios (OR) and 95%CI of colorectal cancer risk according to quintile categories of intake were obtained by using logistic regression models with adjustment for age, sex, residential area, parental history of colorectal cancer, smoking, alcohol consumption, body mass index 10 years before, type of job, leisure-time physical activity and dietary intakes of calcium and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. RESULTS: There was no measurable difference in total or tea polyphenol intake between cases and controls, but intake of coffee polyphenols was lower in cases than in controls. The multivariate-adjusted OR of colorectal cancer according to quintile categories of coffee polyphenols (from the first to top quintile) were 1.00 (referent), 0.81 (95%CI: 0.60-1.10), 0.65 (95%CI: 0.47-0.89), 0.65 (95%CI: 0.46-0.89) and 0.82 (95%CI: 0.60-1.10), respectively (Ptrend = 0.07). Similar, but less pronounced, decreases in the OR were also noted for the third and fourth quintiles of total polyphenol intake. Tea polyphenols and non-coffee polyphenols showed no association with colorectal cancer risk. The site-specific analysis

  19. Diet and supplements and their impact on colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pericleous, Marinos; Mandair, Dalvinder

    2013-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer is the third commonest cancer and the third leading cause of cancer death among men and women. It has been proposed that dietary factors are responsible for 70-90% of colorectal cancer and diet optimization may prevent most cases. Aim To evaluate the role of dietary components and supplements in colorectal cancer. Methods Bibliographical searches were performed in Pubmed for the terms “diet and colorectal cancer”, “diet and colon cancer”, “diet and rectal cancer”, “nutrition and colorectal cancer”, “probiotics and colorectal cancer”, “prebiotics and colorectal cancer”, “alcohol and cancer” and “colorectal cancer epidemiology”. Results Consumption of processed or red meat, especially when cooked at high temperatures may be associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer. The evidence for dietary fibre is unclear but foods that contain high amounts of fibre are usually rich in polyphenols which have been shown to alter molecular processes that can encourage colorectal carcinogenesis. Meta-analyses provide evidence on the benefits of circulating, diet-derived and supplemented, vitamin D and Calcium. We also found that diets rich in Folate may prevent colorectal carcinoma. The evidence on dietary micronutrients such as Zinc and Selenium in association with colorectal cancer is not conclusive. It has been suggested that there may be a direct association between alcohol intake and colorectal cancer. In vitro and in vivo studies have highlighted a possible protective role of prebiotics and probiotics. Conclusions The lack of randomized trials and the presence of confounding factors including smoking, physical activity, obesity and diabetes may often yield inconclusive results. Carefully designed randomized trials are recommended. PMID:24294513

  20. Prevalence and correlates of strength exercise among breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Cynthia C; Blanchard, Chris M; Mummery, W Kerry; Courneya, Kerry

    2015-03-01

    To identify and compare the prevalence and correlates of strength exercise among breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer survivors.
 Cross-sectional, descriptive survey.
 Nova Scotia, Canada.
 741 breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer survivors.
. A stratified sample of 2,063 breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer survivors diagnosed from 2003-2011 were identified and mailed a questionnaire. Descriptive, chi-square, and logistic regression analyses were used to determine any correlations among the main research variables. 
 Strength exercise behavior; medical, demographic, and motivational correlates using the Theory of Planned Behavior.
 Of 741 respondents, 23% were meeting the strength exercise guidelines of two or more days per week. Cancer survivors were more likely to meet guidelines if they were younger, more educated, had a higher income, better perceived general health, fewer than two comorbidities, and a healthy body weight. In addition, those meeting guidelines had significantly more favorable affective attitude, instrumental attitude, injunctive norm, perceived behavioral control, planning, and intention. The correlates of strength exercise did not differ by cancer site.
 The prevalence of strength exercise is low among breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer survivors in Nova Scotia and the correlates are consistent across those survivor groups. 
. Nurses should take an active role in promoting strength exercise among cancer survivors using the Theory of Planned Behavior, particularly among those survivors at higher risk of not performing strength exercise. 


  1. Physical impairments and quality of life of colorectal cancer survivors: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Jiménez, A; Cantarero-Villanueva, I; Delgado-García, G; Molina-Barea, R; Fernández-Lao, C; Galiano-Castillo, N; Arroyo-Morales, M

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the study is to determine the physical performance, quality of life and fatigue in colorectal cancer survivors compared with healthy controls. Twenty-three colorectal cancer survivors and 22 matched controls were recruited for this case-control study. Fitness level (muscle trunk flexor endurance test, 6-min walk test, chair sit and reach test and flamingo test) was assessed in both groups. Participants completed the European Organization of Research and Treatment of Cancer, the Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-C30), the Piper Fatigue Scale (PFS) and the International Fitness Scale (IFIS). Significant differences between groups were found for all fitness parameters (P < 0.05). In addition, the anova revealed significant differences in all of the IFIS scores (P < 0.001), PFS (P < 0.01) and functioning scores of the QLQ-C30 (P < 0.05) between colorectal cancer survivors and the control group. The Mann-Whitney U-test showed a significant increase in symptom scores such as fatigue, dyspnoea and diarrhoea in the cancer survivors (P < 0.05). This study shows the existence of perceived and objective deterioration of health-related fitness level, presence of moderate cancer fatigue and reduced perceived quality of life in colorectal cancer survivors compared with healthy controls. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Genetics, Cytogenetics, and Epigenetics of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Migliore, Lucia; Migheli, Francesca; Spisni, Roberto; Coppedè, Fabio

    2011-01-01

    Most of the colorectal cancer (CRC) cases are sporadic, only 25% of the patients have a family history of the disease, and major genes causing syndromes predisposing to CRC only account for 5-6% of the total cases. The following subtypes can be recognized: MIN (microsatellite instability), CIN (chromosomal instability), and CIMP (CpG island methylator phenotype). CIN occurs in 80–85% of CRC. Chromosomal instability proceeds through two major mechanisms, missegregation that results in aneuploidy through the gain or loss of whole chromosomes, and unbalanced structural rearrangements that lead to the loss and/or gain of chromosomal regions. The loss of heterozygosity that occur in the first phases of the CRC cancerogenesis (in particular for the genes on 18q) as well as the alteration of methylation pattern of multiple key genes can drive the development of colorectal cancer by facilitating the acquisition of multiple tumor-associated mutations and the instability phenotype. PMID:21490705

  3. COGENT (COlorectal cancer GENeTics) revisited

    PubMed Central

    Houlston, Richard S.

    2012-01-01

    Many colorectal cancers (CRCs) develop in genetically susceptible individuals most of whom are not carriers of germ line mismatch repair or APC gene mutations and much of the heritable risk of CRC appears to be attributable to the co-inheritance of multiple low-risk variants. The accumulated experience to date in identifying this class of susceptibility allele has highlighted the need to conduct statistically and methodologically rigorous studies and the need for the multi-centre collaboration. This has been the motivation for establishing the COGENT (COlorectal cancer GENeTics) consortium which now includes over 20 research groups in Europe, Australia, the Americas, China and Japan actively working on CRC genetics. Here, we review the rationale for identifying low-penetrance variants for CRC and the current and future challenges for COGENT. PMID:22294761

  4. Improving colorectal cancer screening: fact and fantasy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dam, Jacques

    2008-02-01

    Premalignant diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, such as Barrett's esophagus, long-standing ulcerative colitis, and adenomatous polyps, have a significantly increased risk for development of adenocarcinoma, most often through an intermediate stage of dysplasia. Adenocarcinoma of the colon is the second most common cancer in the United States. Because patients with colorectal cancer often present with advanced disease, the outcomes are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Effective methods of early detection are essential. As non-polypoid dysplasia is not visible using conventional endoscopy, surveillance of patients with Barrett's esophagus and ulcerative colitis is performed via a system in which multiple random biopsies are obtained at prescribed intervals. Sampling error and missed diagnoses occur frequently and render current screening methods inadequate. Also, the examination of a tissue biopsy is time consuming and costly, and significant intra- and inter-observer variation may occur. The newer methods discussed herein demonstrate the potential to solve these problems by early detection of disease with high sensitivity and specificity. Conventional endoscopy is based on the observation of white light reflected off the tissue surface. Subtle changes in color and shadow reveal structural changes. New developments in optical imaging go beyond white light, exploiting other properties of light. Several promising methods will be discussed at this meeting and shall be briefly discussed below. However, few such imaging modalities have arrived at our clinical practice. Some much more practical methods to improve colorectal cancer screening are currently being evaluated for their clinical impact. These methods seek to overcome limitations other than those of detecting dysplasia not visible under white light endoscopy. The current standard practice of colorectal cancer screening utilizes colonoscopy, an uncomfortable, sometimes difficult medical

  5. Clinical guideline seom: hereditary colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Guillén-Ponce, C; Serrano, R; Sánchez-Heras, A B; Teulé, A; Chirivella, I; Martín, T; Martínez, E; Morales, R; Robles, L

    2015-12-01

    Genetic mutations have been identified as the cause of inherited cancer risk in some colon cancer; these mutations are estimated to account for only 5-6 % of colorectal cancer (CRC) cases overall. Up to 25-30 % of patients have a family history of CRC that suggests a hereditary component, common exposures among family members, or a combination of both. Cancers in people with a hereditary predisposition typically occur at an earlier age than in sporadic cases. A predisposition to CRC may include a predisposition to other cancers, such as endometrial cancer. We describe genetics, current diagnosis and management of CRC hereditary syndromes pointing to a multidisciplinary approach to achieve the best results in patients and family outcomes.

  6. Advances in treatment of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    McCafferty, Michael H

    2005-10-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide the practicing surgeon with an outline of several significant developments in colorectal cancer treatment that have affected the care of patients. This review is not intended to report on every important publication of the past few years nor is it intended to be encyclopedic. The author simply hopes to provide a useful reference for surgeons in their daily practice.

  7. Genetic factors and colorectal cancer in Ashkenazi Jews.

    PubMed

    Locker, Gershon Y; Lynch, Henry T

    2004-01-01

    The observed increased incidence of colorectal cancer in Ashkenazi Jews compared to other populations is unexplained but likely has a genetic component. The I1307K APC polymorphism/mutation is carried by 6-8% of Ashkenazim and increases the risk of colorectal cancer 1.5-2 fold. There are few differences between the phenotype of colorectal cancer in I1307K carriers and sporadic cases. It is estimated that the mutation accounts for 6% of cases of colorectal cancer in Jews of Eastern European heritage. It should not be the subject of mass screening in Ashkenazi Jews, although it may be important in cases of familial colorectal cancer. Even rarer is the 1906G-->C MSH2 mutation carried by less than 1% of Ashkenazim, but as with other HNPCC mutations likely associated with a high risk of malignancy. Mutations at 15q13-14 are associated with the colorectal adenoma and carcinoma syndrome (CRAC) described in Ashkenazi families. The prevalence of the mutation is not known, nor its significance as a cause of colorectal cancer. Despite the paucity of genetic explanations for the high risk of colorectal cancer in Ashkenazim, that risk warrants aggressive colorectal cancer screening and particular attention to family history of malignancy in all Jews of Ashkenazi descent.

  8. Circulating tumor cells in colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Torino, Francesco; Bonmassar, Enzo; Bonmassar, Laura; De Vecchis, Liana; Barnabei, Agnese; Zuppi, Cecilia; Capoluongo, Ettore; Aquino, Angelo

    2013-11-01

    The availability of sensitive methods has allowed the detailed study of circulating tumor cells only recently. Evolving evidence support the prognostic and predictive role of these cells in patients affected by several solid tumors, including colorectal cancer. Ongoing studies are aimed at confirming that the molecular characterization of circulating tumor cells in peripheral blood and in bone marrow of patients is a powerful tool to improve the patient risk-stratification, to monitor activity of the drugs, to develop more appropriate targeted therapies and tailored treatments. In parallel, results from these correlative studies promise to gain a better biological understanding of the metastatic process. The clinical utility of the detection of circulating tumor cells in patients affected by colorectal cancer is still hampered by a number of specific hurdles. Improvement in sensitivity and specificity of the available methods of detection, standardization of these methods and functional characterization of circulating tumor cells in well designed and statistically well powered studies are the key steps to reach these ambitious objectives in colorectal cancer patients as well. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Polymorphisms within inflammatory genes and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Landi, Stefano; Gemignani, Federica; Bottari, Fabio; Gioia-Patricola, Lydie; Guino, Elisabet; Cambray, María; Biondo, Sebastiano; Capella, Gabriel; Boldrini, Laura; Canzian, Federico; Moreno, Victor

    2006-01-01

    Background Chronic inflammation is a risk factor for colorectal cancer and polymorphisms in the inflammatory genes could modulate the levels of inflammation. We have investigated ten single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the following inflammation-related genes: TLR4 (Asp299Gly), CD14 (-260 T>C), MCP1 (-2518 A>G), IL12A (+7506 A>T, +8707 A>G, +9177 T>A, +9508 G>A), NOS2A (+524T>C), TNF (-857C>T), and PTGS1 (V444I) in 377 colorectal (CRC) cancer cases and 326 controls from Barcelona (Spain). Results There was no statistically significant association between the SNPs investigated and colorectal cancer risk. Conclusion The lack of association may show that the inflammatory genes selected for this study are not involved in the carcinogenic process of colorectum. Alternatively, the negative results may derive from no particular biological effect of the analysed polymorphisms in relation to CRC. Otherwise, the eventual biological effect is so little to go undetected, unless analysing a much larger sample size. PMID:17062130

  10. KISS1 expression in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kostakis, Ioannis D; Agrogiannis, George; Vaiopoulos, Aristeidis G; Mylona, Eleni; Patsouris, Efstratios; Kouraklis, Gregory; Koutsilieris, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Kisspeptins, the products of the KISS1 gene, are involved in cancer invasion, migration, metastasis and angiogenesis, while they induce apoptosis in various cancers. Herein, we studied KISS1 expression in colorectal cancer. We analyzed KISS1 expression using immunohistochemistry and image analysis in normal and malignant tissue samples from 60 patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma. The results correlated with various clinicopathological parameters. The expression of KISS1 was much higher in normal than in malignant colonic mucosa. However, among malignant tissues, KISS1 expression was higher in larger tumors (>4 cm) than in smaller ones (≤4 cm) and in stages III and IV than in stages I and II. In addition, it was higher in patients with lymph node metastases. Moreover, KISS1 levels in the normal mucosa and their difference from those in the malignant mucosa were higher in the right part of the large intestine than in the left one. KISS1 expression is reduced during the malignant transformation of the colonic mucosa and there is a difference in the expression pattern between the right and the left part of the large intestine. However, larger and advanced colorectal tumors express higher KISS1 levels than smaller and localized ones.

  11. Soy food and isoflavone intake and colorectal cancer risk: the Fukuoka Colorectal Cancer Study.

    PubMed

    Budhathoki, Sanjeev; Joshi, Amit Man; Ohnaka, Keizo; Yin, Guang; Toyomura, Kengo; Kono, Suminori; Mibu, Ryuichi; Tanaka, Masao; Kakeji, Yoshihiro; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Okamura, Takeshi; Ikejiri, Koji; Futami, Kitaroh; Maekawa, Takafumi; Yasunami, Yohichi; Takenaka, Kenji; Ichimiya, Hitoshi; Terasaka, Reiji

    2011-02-01

    It has been suggested that soy food and isoflavone intake may be protective against the risk of colorectal cancer. However, epidemiologic evidence remains sparse and inconsistent. We addressed this issue in the Fukuoka Colorectal Cancer Study. The study subjects were the 816 incident cases of histologically confirmed colorectal cancer and 815 community controls. Intakes of soy foods and isoflavones were assessed by in-person interview using a computer-assisted dietary method. Logistic regression analysis was applied to estimate odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of colorectal cancer with adjustment for dietary intakes of calcium and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids as well as for body mass index, physical activity, alcohol use, and other lifestyle factors. Energy-adjusted intakes of soy foods (dry weight) and isoflavones were inversely associated with colorectal cancer risk in men and postmenopausal women, but not in premenopausal women. The multivariate-adjusted OR for the highest versus lowest quintile was 0.65 (95% CI 0.41-1.03, p for trend = 0.03) for soy foods and 0.68 (95% CI 0.42-1.10, p for trend = 0.051) for isoflavones in men. The corresponding values for postmenopausal women were 0.60 (95% CI 0.29-1.25, p for trend = 0.053) and 0.68 (95% CI 0.33-1.40, p for trend = 0.049). The site-specific analysis showed inverse associations of soy foods (p for trend = 0.007) and isoflavones (p for trend = 0.02) with rectal cancer in men. The findings add to epidemiologic evidence for protective effects of soy foods and isoflavones in colorectal carcinogenesis.

  12. Immunotherapy and immunoescape in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mazzolini, Guillermo; Murillo, Oihana; Atorrasagasti, Catalina; Dubrot, Juan; Tirapu, Iñigo; Rizzo, Miguel; Arina, Ainhoa; Alfaro, Carlos; Azpilicueta, Arantza; Berasain, Carmen; Perez-Gracia, José L; Gonzalez, Alvaro; Melero, Ignacio

    2007-01-01

    Immunotherapy encompasses a variety of interventions and techniques with the common goal of eliciting tumor cell destructive immune responses. Colorectal carcinoma often presents as metastatic disease that impedes curative surgery. Novel strategies such as active immunization with dendritic cells (DCs), gene transfer of cytokines into tumor cells or administration of immunostimulatory monoclonal antibodies (such as anti-CD137 or anti-CTLA-4) have been assessed in preclinical studies and are at an early clinical development stage. Importantly, there is accumulating evidence that chemotherapy and immunotherapy can be combined in the treatment of some cases with colorectal cancer, with synergistic potentiation as a result of antigens cross-presented by dendritic cells and/or elimination of competitor or suppressive T lymphocyte populations (regulatory T-cells). However, genetic and epigenetic unstable carcinoma cells frequently evolve mechanisms of immunoevasion that are the result of either loss of antigen presentation, or an active expression of immunosuppressive substances. Some of these actively immunosuppressive mechanisms are inducible by cytokines that signify the arrival of an effector immune response. For example, induction of 2, 3 indoleamine dioxygenase (IDO) by IFNγ in colorectal carcinoma cells. Combinational and balanced strategies fostering antigen presentation, T-cell costimulation and interference with immune regulatory mechanisms will probably take the stage in translational research in the treatment of colorectal carcinoma. PMID:17990348

  13. [Colorectal cancer screening: situation and prospect].

    PubMed

    Guo, Chunguang; Liu, Qian; Dai, Min

    2015-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the fourth most common cause of cancer death in China and the incidence has been increasing during the decades. It is reported to take decades for adenoma to transform to carcinoma, which is known as the main CRC pre-cancer lesion. It is important to carry out mass screening in the average risk populations to find the pre-cancer lesion and early cancer, which was the key approach to improve CRC survival. Fecal occult blood test and flexible sigmoidoscopy are the two CRC screening methods, which have been shown to reduce CRC mortality. It still needs to be confirmed in random clinical trials that the value of colonoscopy in CRC screening. In China, the most CRC screening experience was drawn from the works in Zhejiang province in 1970s. Consequently, the Chinese CRC treatment and guideline was founded to provide standard for the CRC screening project.

  14. History, evolution, and current status of radiologic imaging tests for colorectal cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Levine, Marc S; Yee, Judy

    2014-11-01

    Colorectal cancer screening is thought to be an effective tool with which to reduce the mortality from colorectal cancer through early detection and removal of colonic adenomas and early colon cancers. In this article, we review the history, evolution, and current status of imaging tests of the colon-including single-contrast barium enema, double-contrast barium enema, computed tomographic (CT) colonography, and magnetic resonance (MR) colonography-for colorectal cancer screening. Despite its documented value in the detection of colonic polyps, the double-contrast barium enema has largely disappeared as a screening test because it is widely perceived as a labor-intensive, time-consuming, and technically demanding procedure. In the past decade, the barium enema has been supplanted by CT colonography as the major imaging test in colorectal cancer screening in the United States, with MR colonography emerging as another viable option in Europe. Although MR colonography does not require ionizing radiation, the radiation dose for CT colonography has decreased substantially, and regular screening with this technique has a high benefit-to-risk ratio. In recent years, CT colonography has been validated as an effective tool for use in colorectal cancer screening that is increasingly being disseminated.

  15. Epigenetics in diagnosis of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sameer, Aga Syed; Nissar, Saniya

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a third most common epithelial carcinoma. CRC is known to develop from the early precancerous lesion to full blown malignancy via definite phases due to cumulative mutations and aberrant methylation of number of genes. The use of serum biomarkers that is non-invasive to discriminate cancer patients from healthy persons will prove to be an important tool to improve the early diagnosis of CRC. This will serve as the boon to the clinical management of the disease. PMID:27844020

  16. Genetic Basis for Colorectal Cancer Disparities

    PubMed Central

    Nayani, Rahul; Ashktorab, Hassan; Brim, Hassan; Laiyemo, Adeyinka O.

    2015-01-01

    African Americans suffer the highest burden from colorectal cancer (CRC) in the USA. Studies have suggested that healthcare access and poorer utilization of preventive services may be playing more of a role in this disparity. However, African Americans also tend to develop CRC at younger ages and are more likely to have proximal cancers. This raises the possibility of higher genetic predisposition to CRC among African Americans and this has not been well studied. In this article, we reviewed possible genetic basis underpinning biological differences in CRC burden in the USA. PMID:26997937

  17. Immune cell interplay in colorectal cancer prognosis.

    PubMed

    Norton, Samuel E; Ward-Hartstonge, Kirsten A; Taylor, Edward S; Kemp, Roslyn A

    2015-10-15

    The immune response to colorectal cancer has proven to be a reliable measure of patient outcome in several studies. However, the complexity of the immune response in this disease is not well understood, particularly the interactions between tumour-associated cells and cells of the innate and adaptive immune system. This review will discuss the relationship between cancer associated fibroblasts and macrophages, as well as between macrophages and T cells, and demonstrate how each population may support or prevent tumour growth in a different immune environment.

  18. Genomics of Colorectal Cancer in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Brim, Hassan; Ashktorab, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide studies are increasingly becoming a must, especially for complex diseases such as cancer where multiple genes and diverse molecular mechanisms are known to be involved in genes’ function alteration. In this review, we report our latest genomic and epigenomic findings in African-American colorectal cancer patients. This population suffers a higher burden of the disease and most investigators in this field are looking for the underlying genetic and epigenetic targets that might be responsible for this disparity. We here report genome-wide copy number variations, single nucleotide mutations and DNA methylation findings that might be specific to this population. PMID:27917406

  19. Aspirin Metabolomics in Colorectal Cancer Chemoprevention | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Substantial evidence supports the effectiveness of aspirin for cancer chemoprevention in addition to its well-established role in cardiovascular protection. In recent meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials in humans, daily aspirin use reduced incidence, metastasis and mortality from several common types of cancer, especially colorectal cancer. The mechanism(s) by which aspirin exerts an anticancer benefit is uncertain;numerous effects have been described involving both cyclooxygenase-dependent and -independent pathways. |

  20. Perceived Neighborhood Quality and Cancer Screening Behavior: Evidence from the Survey of the Health of Wisconsin.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Kirsten M M; Malecki, Kristen M; Hoormann, Kelly A; Szabo, Aniko; Nattinger, Ann B

    2016-02-01

    Socioeconomic disparities in colorectal and breast cancer screening persist, partially accounting for disparities in cancer outcomes. Some neighborhood characteristics--particularly area level socioeconomic factors--have been linked to cancer screening behavior, but few studies have examined the relationship between perceived neighborhood quality and screening behavior, which may provide more insight into the ways in which neighborhood environments shape cancer related behaviors. This study examines the relationship between several aspects of the perceived neighborhood environment and breast and colorectal cancer screening behavior among a population-based sample of Wisconsin residents. A sub-goal was to compare the relevance of different perceived neighborhood factors for different screening tests. This is a cross-sectional study of 2008-2012 data from the Survey of the Health of Wisconsin, a population-based annual survey of Wisconsin residents. An average risk sample of Black, Hispanic and White women age 50 and older (n = 1265) were selected. Survey regression analyses examined predictors of screening, as well as adherence to screening guidelines. Models controlled for individual socio-demographic information and insurance status. Perceptions of social and physical disorder, including fear of crime and visible garbage, were associated with screening rates. Findings emphasize the particular importance of these factors for colorectal cancer screening, indicating the necessity of improving screening rates in areas characterized by social disorganization, crime, and physical disorder. Additional work should be done to further investigate the pathways that explain the linkage between neighborhood conditions, perceived neighborhood risks and cancer screening behavior.

  1. Perceived Neighborhood Quality and Cancer Screening Behavior: Evidence from the Survey of the Health of Wisconsin

    PubMed Central

    Beyer, Kirsten M. M.; Malecki, Kristen M.; Hoormann, Kelly A.; Szabo, Aniko; Nattinger, Ann B.

    2016-01-01

    Socioeconomic disparities in colorectal and breast cancer screening persist, partially accounting for disparities in cancer outcomes. Some neighborhood characteristics – particularly area level socioeconomic factors – have been linked to cancer screening behavior, but few studies have examined the relationship between perceived neighborhood quality and screening behavior, which may provide more insight into the ways in which neighborhood environments shape cancer related behaviors. This study examines the relationship between several aspects of the perceived neighborhood environment and breast and colorectal cancer screening behavior among a population-based sample of Wisconsin residents. A sub-goal was to compare the relevance of different perceived neighborhood factors for different screening tests. This is a cross-sectional study of 2008–2012 data from the Survey of the Health of Wisconsin (SHOW), a population-based annual survey of Wisconsin residents. An average risk sample of Black, Hispanic and White women age 50 and older (n=1265) were selected. Survey regression analyses examined predictors of screening, as well as adherence to screening guidelines. Models controlled for individual socio-demographic information and insurance status. Perceptions of social and physical disorder, including fear of crime and visible garbage, were associated with screening rates. Findings emphasize the particular importance of these factors for colorectal cancer screening, indicating the necessity of improving screening rates in areas characterized by social disorganization, crime, and physical disorder. Additional work should be done to further investigate the pathways that explain the linkage between neighborhood conditions, perceived neighborhood risks and cancer screening behavior. PMID:26275881

  2. [Colorectal cancer screening: evidence and implementation].

    PubMed

    Brenner, H; Hoffmeister, M

    2014-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cancer among both men and women in Germany. Owing to its relatively slow growth, perspectives for effective early detection are much better than for other forms of cancer. To summarize the evidence on effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of CRC screening, and to provide an overview on the current state and perspectives for effective CRC screening. Summary and critical review of evidence from randomized trials and observational epidemiological studies. A reduction in CRC mortality by offering annual fecal occult blood tests or once-only flexible sigmoidoscopy has been demonstrated in randomized trials. Novel fecal immunochemical tests for hemoglobin in stool have been shown to be more sensitive than traditional fecal occult blood tests and could substantially improve noninvasive CRC screening. Epidemiological studies suggest that the majority of CRC cases and deaths could be prevented by colonoscopy and removal of colorectal adenomas. However, adherence to screening offered outside organized screening programs is low. The National Cancer Plan recommends an organized CRC screening program in Germany. The law on the early detection of cancer from April 2013 has paved the way for its implementation. The great potential for CRC prevention by early detection has so far only been realized to a very limited extent in Germany. Introduction of an organized screening program and the offer of enhanced noninvasive screening tests could strongly enhance the utilization and effectiveness of CRC screening in Germany. The political frame has been set, and timely quality-assured implementation is required.

  3. Cognitive mediators linking social support networks to colorectal cancer screening adherence.

    PubMed

    Honda, Keiko; Kagawa-Singer, Marjorie

    2006-10-01

    This paper argues that normative considerations are more important than attitudinal factors in engaging colorectal cancer screening, and tests a model explaining how unique cultural expressions of social networks influence screening adherence. Structural equation modeling was used to understand colorectal cancer screening in a population-based sample of 341 Japanese Americans aged 50 and over. The model accounted for 25% of the variance in screening adherence. Adherence was most strongly associated with family/friend subjective norms about colorectal cancer screening use. Emotional family support, but not the size of the networks, was indirectly related to adherence via increased family/friend subjective norms, while emotional friend support was directly related to adherence. While usual source of care was directly associated with adherence, better provider-patient communication was directly and indirectly associated with adherence via increased perceived benefits. The findings of this study support strengthening informal support networks to enhance adherence among Japanese Americans at risk.

  4. Determinants of exercise during colorectal cancer treatment: an application of the theory of planned behavior.

    PubMed

    Courneya, K S; Friedenreich, C M

    1997-01-01

    To examine determinants of exercise during colorectal cancer treatment using the theory of planned behavior. A retrospective survey. Cancer Registry of Alberta, Canada. Randomly selected survivors of colorectal cancer (N = 110) diagnosed between 1992 and 1995 who had undergone adjuvant therapy. Participants' ages ranged from 26 to 77 years (mean = 61 years; SD = 11), 63% were male, and 85% were disease stage II or III. Initial open-ended elicitation questionnaire to determine salient beliefs, a mailed main questionnaire, a postcard reminder one week later, and a second questionnaire three weeks later. Exercise was assessed by the Godin Leisure Time Exercise Questionnaire. Exercise during cancer treatment, intention, perceived behavioral control, attitude, subjective norm, and salient beliefs. Exercise during cancer treatment was determined by intention and perceived behavioral control. Intention was determined solely by attitude. Salient beliefs about exercise were different for patients with cancer as compared to a healthy population. The theory of planned behavior may be a viable framework on which to base interventions to promote exercise in patients with colorectal cancer. Oncology nurses need to have an understanding of motivational factors related to exercise during cancer treatment to be able to assist patients with cancer to initiate and maintain exercise.

  5. Designing effective vaccines for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sandip P; Osada, Takuya; Lyerly, H Kim; Morse, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Achieving long-term control of colorectal cancers with therapeutic vaccines that generate potent anti-tumor T cell and antibody responses has been a goal for more than two decades. To date, clinical trials of these vaccines have demonstrated induction of immune responses, but clinical benefit has been limited. Improved vector delivery systems with enhanced immunostimulatory properties, decreased immunogenicity against vector and improved antigen presentation are some of the key features of modern tumor vaccines. Furthermore, an improved understanding of the various immunosuppressive factors in the tumor microenvironment and regional lymph nodes, coupled with a burgeoning ability to impair inhibitory immune synapses, highlights a growing opportunity to induce beneficial antigen-specific responses against tumor. The combination of improved antigenic delivery systems, coupled with therapeutic immune activation, represents state-of-the-art colorectal vaccine design concepts with the goal of augmenting immune responses against tumor and improving clinical outcomes.

  6. Toward the Elimination of Colorectal Cancer Disparities Among African Americans.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, Steven S; Blumenthal, Daniel S; Seay, Shirley Jordan; Smith, Selina A

    2016-12-01

    In the USA, race and socioeconomic status are well-known factors associated with colorectal cancer incidence and mortality rates. These are higher among blacks than whites and other racial/ethnic groups. In this article, we review opportunities to address disparities in colorectal cancer incidence, mortality, and survivorship among African Americans. First, we summarize the primary prevention of colorectal cancer and recent advances in the early detection of the disease and disparities in screening. Then, we consider black-white disparities in colorectal cancer treatment and survival including factors that may contribute to such disparities and the important roles played by cultural competency, patient trust in one's physician, and health literacy in addressing colorectal cancer disparities, including the need for studies involving the use of colorectal cancer patient navigators who are culturally competent. To reduce these disparities, intervention efforts should focus on providing high-quality screening and treatment for colorectal cancer and on educating African Americans about the value of diet, weight control, screening, and treatment. Organized approaches for delivering colorectal cancer screening should be accompanied by programs and policies that provide access to diagnostic follow-up and treatment for underserved populations.

  7. Toward the Elimination of Colorectal Cancer Disparities Among African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Blumenthal, Daniel S.; Seay, Shirley Jordan; Smith, Selina A.

    2015-01-01

    Background In the USA, race and socioeconomic status are well-known factors associated with colorectal cancer incidence and mortality rates. These are higher among blacks than whites and other racial/ethnic groups. Methods In this article, we review opportunities to address disparities in colorectal cancer incidence, mortality, and survivorship among African Americans. Results First, we summarize the primary prevention of colorectal cancer and recent advances in the early detection of the disease and disparities in screening. Then, we consider black-white disparities in colorectal cancer treatment and survival including factors that may contribute to such disparities and the important roles played by cultural competency, patient trust in one’s physician, and health literacy in addressing colorectal cancer disparities, including the need for studies involving the use of colorectal cancer patient navigators who are culturally competent. Conclusion To reduce these disparities, intervention efforts should focus on providing high-quality screening and treatment for colorectal cancer and on educating African Americans about the value of diet, weight control, screening, and treatment. Organized approaches for delivering colorectal cancer screening should be accompanied by programs and policies that provide access to diagnostic follow-up and treatment for underserved populations. PMID:27294749

  8. High FOXRED1 expression predicted good prognosis of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Weiqiang; Liu, Shuiping; Hu, Xiaotong

    2016-01-01

    The human FAD-dependent oxidoreductase domain containing 1 (FOXRED1) protein is reported as an assembly factor which promotes the correct assembly and stability of mitochondrial Complex I (CI). Alterations of mitochondrial CI might cause tumorigenesis and metastasis, but it’s molecular mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we selected 145 cases of colorectal cancer for immunohistochemistry to explore the role of FOXRED1 played in the tumor progression of colorectal cancer. The relationship between FOXRED1 expression and clinicopathological features of colorectal cancers was evaluated. FOXRED1 mainly localized in the cytoplasm in the colorectal cancer tissues, and had significant association with histopathological grading, depth of invasion, lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis and TNM stage (P<0.05 for each). However, age, gender and tumor location was not found to be associated with FOXRED1 expression. Colorectal cancer patients with higher expression of FOXRED1 had the higher 3 year survival rate (P=0.003). Moreover, FOXRED1 had potentiality to be an independent prognostic factor for survival in colorectal cancer (P=0.04). Low FOXRED1 expression correlated with poor prognosis of colorectal cancer and targeting this molecular will be a potential treatment strategy for colorectal cancer. PMID:27904784

  9. From dinosaurs to DNA: a history of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Mulcahy, Hugh E; Hyland, John; O'Donoghue, Diarmuid P

    2003-05-01

    The roots of colorectal cancer date back to antiquity. In this short history of colorectal cancer we trace its clinical and research origins from ancient times through the dark ages, middle ages, to the scientific and medical advances of the seventeenth to twentieth centuries and into the twenty-first century.

  10. Colorectal cancer and consumption of beef and fat.

    PubMed Central

    Enstrom, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    Secular, socioeconomic and urban-rural gradients and geographical differences in beef and fat consumption within the United States of America are compared with corresponding data on colorectal cancer incidence and mortality rates. These results, together with the results of most previous epidemiological studies, appear to contradict the hypothesis that beef and fat consumption are involved in the aetiology of colorectal cancer. PMID:1212410

  11. NIH study finds sigmoidoscopy reduces colorectal cancer rates

    Cancer.gov

    Study finds that flexible sigmoidoscopy is effective in reducing the rates of new cases and deaths due to colorectal cancer. Researchers found that overall colorectal cancer mortality was reduced by 26 percent and incidence was reduced by 21 percent as a

  12. Urinary nucleosides as biological markers for patients with colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yu-Fang; Yang, Jun; Zhao, Xin-Jie; Feng, Bo; Kong, Hong-Wei; Chen, Ying-Jie; Lv, Shen; Zheng, Min-Hua; Xu, Guo-Wang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Fourteen urinary nucleosides, primary degradation products of tRNA, were evaluated to know the potential as biological markers for patients with colorectal cancer. METHODS: The concentrations of 14 kinds of urinary nucleosides from 52 patients with colorectal cancer, 10 patients with intestinal villous adenoma and 60 healthy adults were determined by column switching high performance liquid chromatography method. RESULTS: The mean levels of 12 kinds of urinary nucleosides (except uridine and guanosine) in the patients with colorectal cancer were significantly higher than those in patients with intestinal villous adenoma or the healthy adults. Using the levels of 14 kinds of urinary nucleosides as the data vectors for principal component analysis, 71% (37/52) patients with colorectal cancer were correctly classified from healthy adults, in which the identification rate was much higher than that of CEA method (29%). Only 10% (1/10) of patients with intestinal villous adenoma were indistinguishable from patients with colorectal cancer. The levels of m1G, Pseu and m1A were positively related with tumor size and Duke’s stages of colorectal cancer. When monitoring the changes in urinary nucleoside concentrations of patients with colorectal cancer associated with surgery, it was found that the overall correlations with clinical assessment were 84% (27/32) and 91% (10/11) in response group and progressive group, respectively. CONCLUSION: These findings indicate that urinary nucleosides determined by column switching high performance liquid chromatography method may be useful as biological markers for colorectal cancer. PMID:15991285

  13. The Notch pathway in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Vinson, Kaitlyn E; George, Dennis C; Fender, Alexander W; Bertrand, Fred E; Sigounas, George

    2016-04-15

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third leading cause of cancer death worldwide. It is also the third most common cancer diagnosis among men, and the second most common cancer diagnosis among women. Globally, CRC can account for nearly 694,000 annual deaths. It is widely appreciated that CRC is the result of dysregulated cellular pathways that promote an inappropriate stem-cell-like phenotype, apoptotic resistance, unchecked proliferation and metastatic spread. While no single pathway is responsible for all of these attributes, an array of recent studies suggests a pivotal role for abnormal Notch-1 signaling in CRC, in part due to interconnectivity of Notch with other pathways. This review will summarize recent evidence for a role of Notch signaling in CRC, will consider interconnectivity between Notch and other pathways involved in CRC and will discuss the possible utility of targeting Notch as a CRC therapeutic.

  14. Occupation-related risks for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Spiegelman, D; Wegman, D H

    1985-11-01

    Several population data bases were used to generate hypotheses about associations between colorectal cancer and workplace exposures. The Third National Cancer Survey interview sample was used to select 343 male and 208 female cases and 626 male and 1,235 female cancer controls. Potential work exposures were assigned with the use of data from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health National Occupational Hazard Survey. Dietary factors were modeled from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data. Work-related stress was considered with the use of a model based on the U.S. Department of Labor's Quality of Employment Survey. Other risk factors included age, race, ponderosity, and menopausal status. Logistic analysis yielded hypotheses for colon cancer risk in males with potentially high exposure to solvents, abrasives, and fuel oil and in those in jobs with high demand and low control (high "stress"). Hypotheses emerged for females with potentially high exposure to dyes, solvents, and grinding wheel dust.

  15. [Attitudes of primary health care users to a colorectal cancer screening program].

    PubMed

    Ramos, Maria; Taltavull, Maria; Piñeiro, Pilar; Nieto, Raquel; Llagostera, Maria

    2013-01-01

    To describe the cultural, social and gender features that determine attitudes to colorectal cancer screening in a target group of patients aged 50 to 69 years old in the primary health care setting. We performed a qualitative ethnographic study from a gender perspective. Participants consisted of men and women aged 50 to 69 years old in the Balearic Islands and Barcelona. Group discussion and a field diary were used. The key element was diagnosis at an early stage. Until recently, cancer was considered an incurable disease but is currently perceived as a serious health problem that can be cured if diagnosed promptly. The participants requested more information on cancer and felt they were at risk, mainly because of their age. Men tended to pay attention to symptoms while women tended to ignore them. Attitudes to colorectal cancer screening were generally positive, even to colonoscopy. Some barriers to screening were identified in women, such as a fear of having cancer. The opportunity for early diagnosis is the key element in promoting participation in a colorectal cancer screening program. Perceptions-and hence willingness to participate in screening-differ between men and women. Factors to be taken into account in the design of population-based colorectal cancer programs are health concerns in men and fear of a cancer diagnosis in women. Copyright © 2012 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Applications of genomic tools to colorectal cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Auman, J Todd; McLeod, Howard L

    2008-12-01

    Clinically and histopathologically similar colorectal cancers exhibit considerable variability in their responses to chemotherapeutics. The advent of genomic technologies has enabled the unbiased determination of changes in DNA and RNA, alterations that may be responsible for, or predictive of the variability in response to chemotherapy. This review highlights several advances made in applying genomic tools toward colorectal cancer therapeutics. Progress has been made using gene expression profiling to identify which colorectal cancer patients would benefit most from adjuvant chemotherapy. In addition, advances have been made in colorectal cancer pharmacogenomics by identifying gene expression patterns associated with sensitivity to specific chemotherapeutic agents. Lastly, the use of genome-wide mutation screening of individual tumor samples to identify the profiles of mutated genes is explored. Future research toward integrating genomic information with clinical and histopathological data is expected to lead to improved therapeutic management of colorectal cancer.

  17. Self-renewal molecular mechanisms of colorectal cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Tianhui; Xu, Jinghong; Zhu, Yongliang

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer stem cells (CCSCs) represent a small fraction of the colorectal cancer cell population that possess self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation potential and drive tumorigenicity. Self-renewal is essential for the malignant biological behaviors of colorectal cancer stem cells. While the self-renewal molecular mechanisms of colorectal cancer stem cells are not yet fully understood, the aberrant activation of signaling pathways, such as Wnt, Notch, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)/bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and Hedgehog-Gli (HH-GLI), specific roles mediated by cell surface markers and micro-environmental factors are involved in the regulation of self-renewal. The elucidation of the molecular mechanisms behind self-renewal may lead to the development of novel targeted interventions for the treatment of colorectal cancer. PMID:27909729

  18. [Colorectal cancer mass screening: present and future].

    PubMed

    Bretagne, Jean-François; Manfredi, Sylvain; Heresbach, Denis

    2007-01-01

    Hemoccult II is the only method of screening for colorectal cancer whose effectiveness in reducing specific mortality has been proved by randomized controlled trials. The first experience of French districts based on this strategy reproduced on a population scale the results of the experimental studies. Expanding screening in France to the general public is a public health priority. Large-scale media campaigns, which currently do not exist, could then be launched, and prevention opportunities seized. Immunological tests identifying the presence of blood in the stool have better sensitivity than the guaiac smear tests, especially for the diagnosis of adenomas and to a lesser extent, for that of cancers as a whole. These tests may constitute an alternative to guaiac tests, but are more expensive. Total colonoscopy, proposed every 10 years from the age of 50 years or once in a lifetime around the age of 60 years, is not a realistic method because of its cost and its risks. Sigmoidoscopies are under evaluation in several countries in randomized controlled trials but do not seem appropriate to either the epidemiologic trends of colorectal cancer or to the practice of endoscopy in France. Virtual colonoscopy is an attractive alternative to searching for blood in stool. The evaluation now underway should not interfere with the broad expansion of methods of proven efficacy. Virtual colonoscopy may face competition from numerous emerging techniques of endoscopic exploration of the colon, including the video-capsule. To obtain widespread participation in colorectal cancer screening, policy-makers must take the opinions of healthcare professionals and of the public into account. The medicoeconomic data will be a decisive factor in the choice between these new strategies.

  19. TRP genes family expression in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Sozucan, Y; Kalender, M E; Sari, I; Suner, A; Oztuzcu, S; Arman, K; Yumrutas, O; Bozgeyik, I; Cengiz, B; Igci, Y Z; Balakan, O; Camci, C

    2015-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the most common cancer of the gastrointestinal tract. Different factors are responsible for the development of CRC. Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) which is an important component of calcium channel is associated with several pathological conditions like cancer, neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. Thirty members of the family of TRP ion channel in mammals have been determined till now. The aim of this study is to investigate TRPM, TRPV and TRPC gene expression levels in tumor tissues of CRC patients and to analyze the relationship of expression in tumor tissue of CRC with other known prognostic factors. In this study, 93 CRC patients were included. The level of TRP gene expression in paraffin blocks of normal and cancerous colorectal tissue samples were studied at the level of mRNA with Real-time PCR. The mRNA expression level of TRPV3, TRPV4, TRPV5, TRPM4 and TRPC6 genes in 37 female and 56 male patients diagnosed with CRC was revealed lower in tumor tissue as compared to normal tissue (p < 0.05). No statistically significant differences of mRNA expression levels of other TRP genes were found. TRP gene family like TRPV3, TRPV4, TRPV5, TRPM4 and TRPC6 may be thought as potential genes contributing to tumorigenesis as their expression decreases in CRC as compared to normal tissues.

  20. Lifestyle factors associated with survival after colorectal cancer diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, T; Fritschi, L; Platell, C; Heyworth, J

    2013-01-01

    Background: Aside from tumour stage and treatment, little is known about potential factors that may influence survival in colorectal cancer patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between physical activity, obesity and smoking and disease-specific and overall mortality after a colorectal cancer diagnosis. Methods: A cohort of 879 colorectal cancer patients, diagnosed in Western Australia between 2005 and 2007, were followed up to 30 June 2012. Cox's regression models were used to estimate the hazard ratios (HR) for colorectal cancer-specific and overall mortality associated with self-reported pre-diagnosis physical activity, body mass index (BMI) and smoking. Results: Significantly lower overall and colorectal cancer-specific mortality was seen in females who reported any level of recent physical activity than in females reporting no activity. The colorectal cancer-specific mortality HR for increasing levels of physical activity in females were 0.34 (95% CI=0.15, 0.75), 0.37 (95% CI=0.17, 0.81) and 0.41 (95% CI=0.18, 0.90). Overweight and obese women had almost twice the risk of dying from any cause or colorectal cancer compared with women of normal weight. Females who were current smokers had worse overall and colorectal cancer-specific mortality than never smokers (overall HR=2.64, 95% CI=1.18, 5.93; colorectal cancer-specific HR=2.70, 95% CI=1.16, 6.29). No significant associations were found in males. Conclusion: Physical activity, BMI and smoking may influence survival after a diagnosis of colorectal cancer, with more pronounced results found for females than for males. PMID:23787918

  1. Hereditary Colorectal Cancer Syndromes in Hong Kong: a Registry's Perspective

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Established in 1995, the Hereditary Gastrointestinal Cancer Registry aimed at cancer prevention due to hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes in Hong Kong through early detection, timely treatment, education and ongoing research. This article details the history, structure and work of the Registry. A summary is also provided on the results of various research work conducted by the Registry which facilitates the clinical management of hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes in Hong Kong Chinese families. PMID:20223041

  2. Singapore Cancer Network (SCAN) Guidelines for Systemic Therapy of Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    2015-10-01

    The SCAN colorectal cancer systemic therapy workgroup aimed to develop Singapore Cancer Network (SCAN) clinical practice guidelines for systemic therapy for colorectal cancer in Singapore. The workgroup utilised a modified ADAPTE process to calibrate high quality international evidence-based clinical practice guidelines to our local setting. Five international guidelines were evaluated-those developed by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network for colon (2014) and rectal (2014) cancer, the European Society of Medical Oncology for advanced (2012) and early (2013) cancer and the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (2011). Recommendations on systemic therapy in colorectal cancer were produced. These adapted guidelines form the SCAN Guidelines 2015 for systemic therapy of colorectal cancer.

  3. Assessing global transitions in human development and colorectal cancer incidence.

    PubMed

    Fidler, Miranda M; Bray, Freddie; Vaccarella, Salvatore; Soerjomataram, Isabelle

    2017-06-15

    Colorectal cancer incidence has paralleled increases in human development across most countries. Yet, marked decreases in incidence are now observed in countries that have attained very high human development. Thus, in this study, we explored the relationship between human development and colorectal cancer incidence, and in particular assessed whether national transitions to very high human development are linked to temporal patterns in colorectal cancer incidence. For these analyses, we utilized the Human Development Index (HDI) and annual incidence data from regional and national cancer registries. Truncated (30-74 years) age-standardized incidence rates were calculated. Yearly incidence rate ratios and HDI ratios, before and after transitioning to very high human development, were also estimated. Among the 29 countries investigated, colorectal cancer incidence was observed to decrease after reaching the very high human development threshold for 12 countries; decreases were also observed in a further five countries, but the age-standardized incidence rates remained higher than that observed at the threshold. Such declines or stabilizations are likely due to colorectal cancer screening in some populations, as well as varying levels of exposure to protective factors. In summary, it appears that there is a threshold at which human development predicts a stabilization or decline in colorectal cancer incidence, though this pattern was not observed for all countries assessed. Future cancer planning must consider the increasing colorectal cancer burden expected in countries transitioning towards higher levels of human development, as well as possible declines in incidence among countries reaching the highest development level. © 2017 UICC.

  4. Peritumoral eosinophils predict recurrence in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Harbaum, Lars; Pollheimer, Marion J; Kornprat, Peter; Lindtner, Richard A; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Langner, Cord

    2015-03-01

    In colorectal cancer, the presence and extent of eosinophil granulocyte infiltration may render important prognostic information. However, it remains unclear whether an increasing number of eosinophils might simply be linked to the overall inflammatory cell reaction or represent a self-contained, antitumoral mechanism that needs to be documented and promoted therapeutically. Peri- and intratumoral eosinophil counts were retrospectively assessed in 381 primary colorectal cancers from randomly selected patients. Tumors were diagnosed in American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC)/Union Internationale Contre le Cancer (UICC) stage I in 21%, stage II in 32%, stage III in 33%, and stage IV in 14%. Presence and extent of eosinophils was related to various histopathological parameters as well as patients' outcome. Overall, peri- and intratumoral eosinophils were observed in 86 and 75% cancer specimens. The peritumoral eosinophil count correlated strongly with the intratumoral eosinophil count (R=0.69; P<0.001) and with the intensity of the overall inflammatory cell reaction (R=0.318; P<0.001). Both increasing peri- and intratumoral eosinophil counts were significantly associated with lower T and N classification, better tumor differentiation, absence of vascular invasion, as well as improved progression-free and cancer-specific survival. However, only peritumoral eosinophils, but not intratumoral, were an independent prognosticator of favorable progression-free (hazard ratio 0.75; 95% confidence interval 0.58-0.98; P=0.04) and cancer-specific survival (hazard ratio 0.7; 95% confidence interval 0.52-0.93; P=0.01)-independent of the intensity of overall inflammatory cell reaction. This was also found for patients with AJCC/UICC stage II disease, wherein the presence of peritumoral eosinophils was significantly associated with favorable outcome. In conclusion, the number of peritumoral eosinophils had a significant favorable impact on prognosis of colorectal cancer patients

  5. Colorectal cancer screening with virtual colonoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Yaorong; Vining, David J.; Ahn, David K.; Stelts, David R.

    1999-05-01

    Early detection and removal of colorectal polyps have been proven to reduce mortality from colorectal carcinoma (CRC), the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. Unfortunately, traditional techniques for CRC examination (i.e., barium enema, sigmoidoscopy, and colonoscopy) are unsuitable for mass screening because of either low accuracy or poor public acceptance, costs, and risks. Virtual colonoscopy (VC) is a minimally invasive alternative that is based on tomographic scanning of the colon. After a patient's bowel is optimally cleansed and distended with gas, a fast tomographic scan, typically helical computed tomography (CT), of the abdomen is performed during a single breath-hold acquisition. Two-dimensional (2D) slices and three-dimensional (3D) rendered views of the colon lumen generated from the tomographic data are then examined for colorectal polyps. Recent clinical studies conducted at several institutions including ours have shown great potential for this technology to be an effective CRC screening tool. In this paper, we describe new methods to improve bowel preparation, colon lumen visualization, colon segmentation, and polyp detection. Our initial results show that VC with the new bowel preparation and imaging protocol is capable of achieving accuracy comparable to conventional colonoscopy and our new algorithms for image analysis contribute to increased accuracy and efficiency in VC examinations.

  6. Association of hyperplastic polyposis syndrome, colorectal cancer and meningioma.

    PubMed

    Muzaffar, Mahvish; Irlam, John; Mohamed, Iman

    2011-01-01

    Recent research has provided compelling evidence that a subset of hyperplastic polyps may be associated with a risk of colorectal cancer. Colorectal cancer with extracolonic manifestation is usually seen in a hereditary syndrome setting, but some association with meningioma has been reported. The association of colorectal cancer with hyperplastic polyposis and meningioma is extremely rare. This report in a 57-year-old female with no family history of colon cancer or polyps, could be the first case of hyperplastic polyposis syndrome, colorectal cancer and meningioma. Hyperplastic polyposis syndrome was diagnosed as per WHO criteria at the time of colon cancer diagnosis. Within 4 months of colon cancer diagnosis she developed seizures. Imaging of the brain revealed meningioma of the left cerebellopontine angle. The patient underwent surgery followed by chemotherapy.

  7. Screening for colorectal cancer: the business case.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Robert H; Colditz, Graham A; Pawlson, L Greg; Richman, Howard; Rosenthal, David; Salber, Patricia R

    2002-06-01

    Colorectal cancer screening is advocated by expert groups based on strong evidence of effectiveness, yet only approximately 1 in 3 Americans are screened. For a screening program to be effective, it is necessary for providers to offer and patients to accept screening, insurers to pay for screening, and provider groups to have monitoring and reminder systems and the expertise and facilities to perform the tests well. Whether and when such screening programs become successful depends on the priorities of healthcare decision makers as much as on the efforts of individual physicians and patients. There are strong arguments for decision makers giving colorectal cancer screening programs high priority: it saves as many lives as other services now in common use; it is a good use of scarce resources, costing less than $20,000 per year of life saved; and members of insurance programs increasingly expect screening benefits and programs, and failure to offer them might lead to member dissatisfaction and malpractice claims. Screening is costly, however, taking into account the cost of screening, follow-up tests, and treatments, and the costs occur many years before the benefits. Programs that are promoted to members but not fully implemented could create disappointment and backlash. Also, this screening can cause medical complications. Nevertheless, successful programs have been developed, proving that they are feasible in today's cost-conscious environment. We believe that colorectal cancer screening programs are integral to any organization purporting to provide high-quality care. Organizations without such programs should give them high priority for implementation.

  8. Extended Cancer Education for Longer-Term Survivors in Primary Care for Patients With Stage I-II Breast or Prostate Cancer or Stage I-III Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-01

    Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage I Colorectal Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage I Prostate Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage II Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage II Prostate Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIA Prostate Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIB Prostate Cancer; Stage IIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage III Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7

  9. Crafting Appealing Text Messages to Encourage Colorectal Cancer Screening Test Completion: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Shellie D; Denizard-Thompson, Nancy; Kronner, Donna; Miller, David P

    2015-01-01

    Background mHealth interventions that incorporate text messages have great potential to increase receipt of preventive health services such as colorectal cancer screening. However, little is known about older adult perspectives regarding the receipt of text messages from their health care providers. Objective To assess whether older adults would value and access text messages from their physician’s practice regarding colorectal cancer screening. Methods We conducted four focus groups with 26 adults, aged 50 to 75 years, who had either recently completed or were overdue for colorectal cancer screening. A trained moderator followed a semistructured interview guide covering participant knowledge and attitudes regarding colorectal cancer screening, potential barriers to colorectal cancer screening, attitudes about receiving electronic communications from a doctor’s office, and reactions to sample text messages. Results Participant responses to three primary research questions were examined: (1) facilitators and barriers to colorectal cancer screening, (2) attitudes toward receiving text messages from providers, and (3) characteristics of appealing text messages. Two themes related to facilitators of colorectal cancer screening were perceived benefits/need and family experiences and encouragement. Themes related to barriers included unpleasantness, discomfort, knowledge gaps, fear of complications, and system factors. Four themes emerged regarding receipt of text messages from health care providers: (1) comfort and familiarity with technology, (2) privacy concerns/potential for errors, (3) impact on patient-provider relationship, and (4) perceived helpfulness. Many participants expressed initial reluctance to receiving text messages but responded favorably when shown sample messages. Participants preferred messages that contained content that was important to them and were positive and reassuring, personalized, and friendly to novice texters (eg, avoided the use of

  10. Serrated pathway: Alternative route to colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Patai, Árpád V; Molnár, Béla; Tulassay, Zsolt; Sipos, Ferenc

    2013-01-01

    Serrated polyps have been an area of intense focus for gastroenterologists over the past several years. Contrary to what was thought before, a growing body of literature indicates that these polyps can be precursors of colorectal cancer (CRC). Most of these lesions, particularly those in the proximal colon, have so far been under-recognized and missed during colonoscopy, qualifying these lesions to be the main cause of interval cancers. It is estimated that 10%-20% of CRCs evolve through this alternative, serrated pathway, with a distinct genetic and epigenetic profile. Aberrant DNA methylation plays a central role in the development of this CRC subtype. This characteristic molecular background is reflected in a unique pathological and clinical manifestation different from cancers arising via the traditional pathway. In this review we would like to highlight morphological, molecular and clinical features of this emerging pathway that are essential for gastroenterologists and may influence their everyday practice. PMID:23431044

  11. Regulation of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Johnston, S J; Ridge, S A; Cassidy, J; McLeod, H L

    1999-09-01

    Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) is responsible for degradation of the pyrimidines uracil and thymine and the inactivation of the chemotherapeutic agent 5-fluorouracil. DPD activity is highly variable in cancer populations, and this variation may influence the antitumor efficacy of 5-fluorouracil. However, little is known about the regulation of DPD mRNA expression in any tissues. Using a reverse transcription competitive PCR assay, we quantified DPD mRNA levels in 10 matched colorectal tumors and adjacent normal mucosae and 7 colorectal liver metastases and adjacent normal livers. Lower levels of DPD mRNA expression were observed in colorectal tumor compared with adjacent normal colon mucosa (median, 0.01 versus 0.37 amole/microg total RNA, P = 0.02). DPD mRNA expression was also lower in metastases than adjacent normal liver tissue (median, 0.11 versus 1.17 amole/microg total RNA, P = 0.001). DPD mRNA expression was higher in normal liver than normal colonic mucosa (median, 1.17 versus 0.37 amole/microg total RNA, P = 0.02). A significant relationship was observed between DPD mRNA and catalytic activity (r(s) = 0.66, P<0.001). The tumor:normal ratio for DPD mRNA, protein, and activity was relatively stable in liver (0.25, 0.55, and 0.51, respectively) but varied considerably in colon (0.085, 0.9, and 1.25, respectively), consistent with enhanced translation of DPD transcript in primary colorectal tumor. This suggests that DPD can be regulated at the levels of both transcription and translation.

  12. Management of Colorectal Cancer in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Joleen M

    2016-02-01

    Treatment for colorectal cancer should not be based on age alone. Pooled analyses from clinical trials show that fit older adults are able to tolerate treatment well with similar efficacy as younger adults. When an older adult is considered for treatment, the clinical encounter must evaluate for deficits in physical and cognitive function, and assess comorbidities, medications, and the degree of social support, all which have may affect tolerance of treatment. Based on the degree of fitness of the patient, multiple alternatives to aggressive treatment regimens and strategies exist to minimize toxicity and preserve quality of life during treatment.

  13. Biomechanical investigation of colorectal cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmieri, Valentina; Lucchetti, Donatella; Maiorana, Alessandro; Papi, Massimiliano; Maulucci, Giuseppe; Ciasca, Gabriele; Svelto, Maria; De Spirito, Marco; Sgambato, Alessandro

    2014-09-01

    The nanomechanical properties of SW480 colon cancer cells were investigated using Atomic Force Microscopy. SW480 cells are composed of two sub-populations with different shape and invasiveness. These two cells populations showed similar adhesion properties while appeared significantly different in term of cells stiffness. Since cell stiffness is related to invasiveness and growth, we suggest elasticity as a useful parameter to distinguish invasive cells inside the colorectal tumor bulk and the high-resolution mechanical mapping as a promising diagnostic tool for the identification of malignant cells.

  14. Nut consumption and risk of colorectal cancer in women

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Meng; Hu, Frank B.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Stampfer, Meir J.; Willett, Walter C.; Fuchs, Charles S.; Wu, Kana; Bao, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives Increasing nut consumption has been associated with reduced risk of obesity and type II diabetes, which are risk factors for colorectal cancer. However, the association between nut consumption and colorectal cancer risk is unclear. We aimed to examine the association of long-term nut consumption with risk of colorectal cancer. Subjects/Methods We prospectively followed 75,680 women who were free of cancer at baseline in the Nurses’ Health Study, and examined the association between nut consumption and colorectal cancer risk. Nut consumption was assessed at baseline and updated every 2 to 4 years. Relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. Results During 2,103,037 person-years of follow-up, we identified 1,503 colorectal cancer cases. After adjustment for other known or suspected risk factors, women who consumed nuts 2 or more times per week (i.e., ≥56 grams per week) had a 13% lower risk of colorectal cancer compared to those who rarely consumed nuts, but the association was not statistically significant (RR: 0.87; 95% CI: 0.72, 1.05; P trend: 0.06). No association was observed for peanut butter. Conclusions In this large prospective cohort of women, frequent nut consumption was not significantly associated with colorectal cancer risk after adjusting for other risk factors. PMID:25944181

  15. Anticancer effects of fucoxanthin and fucoxanthinol on colorectal cancer cell lines and colorectal cancer tissues.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kazuto; Hosokawa, Masashi; Kasajima, Hiroyuki; Hatanaka, Kazuteru; Kudo, Kazuhiro; Shimoyama, Norihiko; Miyashita, Kazuo

    2015-09-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most malignant neoplasms worldwide. Fucoxanthin is a carotenoid present in the chloroplasts of brown seaweeds. In the present study, the anticancer effects of fucoxanthin and its metabolite, fucoxanthinol, on 6 colorectal cancer cell lines and 20 tissue samples from surgically resected clinical colorectal cancer specimens were examined using a collagen-gel droplet embedded culture drug sensitivity test (CD-DST). The in vitro sensitivity to fucoxanthin, fucoxanthinol and the anticancer drugs is expressed as T/C (%), where T is the absorbance of cells which stained by neutral red treated with carotenoids and C is the absorbance of non-staining cells. Fucoxanthin and fucoxanthinol decreased the T/C (%) of Caco-2, WiDr, HCT116, and DLD-1 cell lines at doses of 20 µM. Fucoxanthinol also decreased the T/C (%) of SW620 cells, while the T/C (%) of Colo205 cells was not reduced by treatment with either carotenoid. Specifically, the T/C (%) of Caco-2 and WiDr cells, which were incubated in carotenoid-free medium for 6 days following treatment with 20 µM fucoxanthinol for 24 h, was markedly decreased to 1.4±0.2 and 12.0±0.3%, respectively. Furthermore, fucoxanthin and fucoxanthinol decreased the T/C (%) in colorectal cancer tissue samples. Notably, 20 µM fucoxanthinol treatment resulted in a higher proportion of colorectal cancer samples with a T/C (%) of <50% (13/20, 65%) compared with samples treated with 20 µM fucoxanthin (2/20, 10%). The median T/C (%) value of 35.1% for the 20 cancers specimens treated with 20 µM fucoxanthinol was lower than the median T/C (%) values of 86.3% and 75.8% for those treated with fluorouracil and paclitaxel, respectively. These results suggested that fucoxanthin and fucoxanthinol may be of use as chemotherapeutic agents in colorectal cancer.

  16. Food groups and colorectal cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Levi, F; Pasche, C; La Vecchia, C; Lucchini, F; Franceschi, S

    1999-01-01

    Most studies of diet and colorectal cancer have considered nutrients and micronutrients, but the role of foods or food groups remains open to debate. To elucidate the issue, we examined data from a case–control study conducted between 1992 and 1997 in the Swiss canton of Vaud. Cases were 223 patients (142 men, 81 women) with incident, histologically confirmed colon (n = 119) or rectal (n = 104) cancer (median age 63 years), linked with the Cancer Registry of the Swiss Canton of Vaud, and controls were 491 subjects (211 men, 280 women, median age 58 years) admitted to the same university hospital for a wide spectrum of acute non-neoplastic conditions unrelated to long-term modifications of diet. Odds ratios (OR) were obtained after allowance for age, sex, education, smoking, alcohol, body mass index, physical activity and total energy intake. Significant associations were observed for refined grain (OR = 1.32 for an increase of one serving per day), and red meat (OR = 1.54), pork and processed meat (OR = 1.27), alcohol (OR = 1.28), and significant protections for whole grain (OR = 0.85), raw (OR = 0.85) and cooked vegetables (OR = 0.69), citrus (OR = 0.86) and other fruits (OR = 0.85), and for coffee (OR = 0.73). Garlic was also protective (OR = 0.32 for the highest tertile of intake). These findings in a central European population support the hypothesis that a diet rich in refined grains and red meat increases the risk of colorectal cancer; they, therefore, support the recommendation to substitute whole grains for refined grain, to limit meat intake, and to increase fruit and vegetable consumption. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10098773

  17. Adipokines linking obesity with colorectal cancer risk in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Ho, Gloria Y F; Wang, Tao; Gunter, Marc J; Strickler, Howard D; Cushman, Mary; Kaplan, Robert C; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Xue, Xiaonan; Rajpathak, Swapnil N; Chlebowski, Rowan T; Vitolins, Mara Z; Scherer, Philipp E; Rohan, Thomas E

    2012-06-15

    Mechanistic associations between obesity and colorectal cancer remain unclear. In this study, we investigated whether adipokines are risk factors for colorectal cancer and whether they may mediate its association with obesity. In a case-cohort study nested within the Women's Health Initiative cohort of postmenopausal women, baseline plasma samples from 457 colorectal cancer cases and 841 subcohort subjects were assayed for seven adipokines-adiponectin, leptin, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), resistin, hepatocyte growth factor, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and TNF-α. Serum insulin and estradiol values measured previously were also available for data analysis. After adjusting for age, race, smoking, colonoscopy history, and estrogen level, a low level of anti-inflammatory adiponectin and high levels of proinflammatory leptin, PAI-1, and IL-6 were associated with increased colorectal cancer risk, though only leptin remained significant after further adjustment for insulin [HRs comparing extreme quartiles (HR(Q4-Q1)), 1.84; 95% CI, 1.17-2.90]. Mediation analyses showed that leptin and insulin partially explained the association between waist circumference and colorectal cancer and attenuated it by 25% and 37%, respectively, with insulin being a significant mediator (P = 0.041). Our findings support the conclusion that adipokines involved in inflammation are associated with colorectal cancer risk, but that their effects may be mediated mostly by insulin, with leptin exerting an independent effect. Hyperinsulinemia and hyperleptinemia may therefore partially explain the adiposity association with colorectal cancer in postmenopausal women.

  18. Fusobacterium nucleatum Promotes Chemoresistance to Colorectal Cancer by Modulating Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Yu, TaChung; Guo, Fangfang; Yu, Yanan; Sun, Tiantian; Ma, Dan; Han, Jixuan; Qian, Yun; Kryczek, Ilona; Sun, Danfeng; Nagarsheth, Nisha; Chen, Yingxuan; Chen, Haoyan; Hong, Jie; Zou, Weiping; Fang, Jing-Yuan

    2017-07-27

    Gut microbiota are linked to chronic inflammation and carcinogenesis. Chemotherapy failure is the major cause of recurrence and poor prognosis in colorectal cancer patients. Here, we investigated the contribution of gut microbiota to chemoresistance in patients with colorectal cancer. We found that Fusobacterium (F.) nucleatum was abundant in colorectal cancer tissues in patients with recurrence post chemotherapy, and was associated with patient clinicopathological characterisitcs. Furthermore, our bioinformatic and functional studies demonstrated that F. nucleatum promoted colorectal cancer resistance to chemotherapy. Mechanistically, F. nucleatum targeted TLR4 and MYD88 innate immune signaling and specific microRNAs to activate the autophagy pathway and alter colorectal cancer chemotherapeutic response. Thus, F. nucleatum orchestrates a molecular network of the Toll-like receptor, microRNAs, and autophagy to clinically, biologically, and mechanistically control colorectal cancer chemoresistance. Measuring and targeting F. nucleatum and its associated pathway will yield valuable insight into clinical management and may ameliorate colorectal cancer patient outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Adipokines Linking Obesity with Colorectal Cancer Risk in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Gloria Y.F.; Wang, Tao; Gunter, Marc J.; Strickler, Howard D.; Cushman, Mary; Kaplan, Robert C.; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Xue, Xiaonan; Rajpathak, Swapnil N.; Chlebowski, Rowan T.; Vitolins, Mara Z.; Scherer, Philipp E.; Rohan, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanistic associations between obesity and colorectal cancer remain unclear. In this study, we investigated whether adipokines are risk factors for colorectal cancer and whether they may mediate its association with obesity. In a case–cohort study nested within the Women’s Health Initiative cohort of postmenopausal women, baseline plasma samples from 457 colorectal cancer cases and 841 subcohort subjects were assayed for seven adipokines—adiponectin, leptin, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), resistin, hepatocyte growth factor, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and TNF-α. Serum insulin and estradiol values measured previously were also available for data analysis. After adjusting for age, race, smoking, colonoscopy history, and estrogen level, a low level of antiinflammatory adiponectin and high levels of proinflammatory leptin, PAI-1, and IL-6 were associated with increased colorectal cancer risk, though only leptin remained significant after further adjustment for insulin [HRs comparing extreme quartiles (HRQ4–Q1), 1.84; 95% CI, 1.17–2.90]. Mediation analyses showed that leptin and insulin partially explained the association between waist circumference and colorectal cancer and attenuated it by 25% and 37%, respectively, with insulin being a significant mediator (P = 0.041). Our findings support the conclusion that adipokines involved in inflammation are associated with colorectal cancer risk, but that their effects may be mediated mostly by insulin, with leptin exerting an independent effect. Hyperinsulinemia and hyperleptinemia may therefore partially explain the adiposity association with colorectal cancer in postmenopausal women. PMID:22511581

  20. The association between serum ferritin with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhe; Chen, Ji-Wei; Feng, Jian-Hua; Shen, Fei; Cai, Wen-Song; Cao, Jie; Xu, Bo

    2015-01-01

    There are conflicting reports on the correlation between serum levels of ferritin with colorectal cancer. The purpose of the present study is to clarify the association between serum ferritin with colorectal cancer using a meta-analysis approach. We searched articles indexed in Pubmed published as of July 2015 that met our predefined criteria. Six eligible articles involving 927 subjects were identified. Overall, pooled analysis indicated that subjects with colorectal cancer had lower serum level of ferritin than the healthy controls (SMD=-1.569, 95% CI=[-2.718, -0.420], P= 0.007). Further subgroup analysis found lower serum level of ferritin among patients with colorectal cancer in eastern country (SMD=-1.956, 95% CI=[-3.750, -0.162], P=0.033), but not in western country (SMD=-1.285, 95% CI=[-2.778, 0.207], P=0.091). In conclusion, this meta-analysis supports a significant association between serum ferritin with colorectal cancer. However, the subgroup analysis found that there was significant effect modification of ferritin level by ethnic. Thus this finding needs further confirmation by trans-regional multicenter, long-term observation in a cohort design to obtain better understanding of causal relationships between serum ferrintin levels and colorectal cancer, through measuring ferritin at baseline to investigate whether the highest ferritin category versus lowest is associated with colorectal cancer risk.

  1. Colorectal Cancer Screening | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  2. Colorectal Cancer Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  3. Dietary flavonoid intake and risk of stomach and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Hae Dong; Kim, Jeongseon

    2013-01-01

    Stomach and colorectal cancers are common cancers and leading causes of cancer deaths. Because the alimentary tract can interact directly with dietary components, stomach and colorectal cancer may be closely related to dietary intake. We systematically searched published literature written in English via PubMed by searching for terms related to stomach and colorectal cancer risk and dietary flavonoids up to June 30, 2012. Twenty-three studies out of 209 identified articles were finally selected for the analysis. Log point effect estimates and the corresponding standard errors were calculated using covariate-adjusted point effect estimates and 95%CIs from the selected studies. Total dietary flavonoid intake was not associated with a reduced risk of colorectal or stomach cancer [odds ratio (OR) (95%CI) = 1.00 (0.90-1.11) and 1.07 (0.70-1.61), respectively]. Among flavonoid subclasses, the intake of flavonols, flavan-3-ols, anthocyanidins, and proanthocyanidins showed a significant inverse association with colorectal cancer risk [OR (95%CI) = 0.71 (0.63-0.81), 0.88 (0.79-0.97), 0.68 (0.56-0.82), and 0.72 (0.61-0.85), respectively]. A significant association was found only between flavonols and stomach cancer risk based on a limited number of selected studies [OR (95%CI) = 0.68 (0.46-0.99)]. In the summary estimates from case-control studies, all flavonoid subclasses except flavones and flavanones were inversely associated with colorectal cancer risk, whereas neither total flavonoids nor any subclasses of flavonoids were associated with colorectal cancer risk in the summary estimates based on the cohort studies. The significant association between flavonoid subclasses and cancer risk might be closely related to bias derived from the case-control design. There was no clear evidence that dietary flavonoids are associated with reduced risk of stomach and colorectal cancer. PMID:23467443

  4. Dietary flavonoid intake and risk of stomach and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Woo, Hae Dong; Kim, Jeongseon

    2013-02-21

    Stomach and colorectal cancers are common cancers and leading causes of cancer deaths. Because the alimentary tract can interact directly with dietary components, stomach and colorectal cancer may be closely related to dietary intake. We systematically searched published literature written in English via PubMed by searching for terms related to stomach and colorectal cancer risk and dietary flavonoids up to June 30, 2012. Twenty-three studies out of 209 identified articles were finally selected for the analysis. Log point effect estimates and the corresponding standard errors were calculated using covariate-adjusted point effect estimates and 95%CIs from the selected studies. Total dietary flavonoid intake was not associated with a reduced risk of colorectal or stomach cancer [odds ratio (OR) (95%CI) = 1.00 (0.90-1.11) and 1.07 (0.70-1.61), respectively]. Among flavonoid subclasses, the intake of flavonols, flavan-3-ols, anthocyanidins, and proanthocyanidins showed a significant inverse association with colorectal cancer risk [OR (95%CI) = 0.71 (0.63-0.81), 0.88 (0.79-0.97), 0.68 (0.56-0.82), and 0.72 (0.61-0.85), respectively]. A significant association was found only between flavonols and stomach cancer risk based on a limited number of selected studies [OR (95%CI) = 0.68 (0.46-0.99)]. In the summary estimates from case-control studies, all flavonoid subclasses except flavones and flavanones were inversely associated with colorectal cancer risk, whereas neither total flavonoids nor any subclasses of flavonoids were associated with colorectal cancer risk in the summary estimates based on the cohort studies. The significant association between flavonoid subclasses and cancer risk might be closely related to bias derived from the case-control design. There was no clear evidence that dietary flavonoids are associated with reduced risk of stomach and colorectal cancer.

  5. Colorectal cancer prognosis twenty years later

    PubMed Central

    Bujanda, Luis; Sarasqueta, Cristina; Hijona, Elisabeth; Hijona, Lander; Cosme, Angel; Gil, Ines; Elorza, Jose Luis; Asensio, Jose I; Larburu, Santiago; Enríquez-Navascués, José M; Jover, Rodrigo; Balaguer, Francesc; Llor, Xavier; Bessa, Xavier; Andreu, Montserrat; Paya, Artemio; Castells, Antoni; Association, Gastrointestinal Oncology Group of the Spanish Gastroenterological

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate changes in colorectal cancer (CRC) survival over the last 20 years. METHODS: We compared two groups of consecutive CRC patients that were prospectively recruited: Group I included 1990 patients diagnosed between 1980 and 1994. Group II included 871 patients diagnosed in 2001. RESULTS: The average follow up time was 21 mo (1-229) for Group I and 50 mo (1-73.4) for Group II. Overall median survival was significantly longer in Group II than in Group I (73 mo vs 25 mo, P < 0.001) and the difference was significant for all tumor stages. Post surgical mortality was 8% for Group Iand 2% for Group II (P < 0.001). Only 17% of GroupI patients received chemotherapy compared with 50% of Group II patients (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Survival in colorectal cancer patients has doubled over the past 20 years. This increase seems to be partly due to the generalization in the administration of chemotherapy and to the decrease of post surgical mortality. PMID:20143465

  6. Posttraumatic growth after cancer: The role of perceived threat and cognitive processing.

    PubMed

    Caspari, Jennifer M; Raque-Bogdan, Trisha L; McRae, Cynthia; Simoneau, Teresa L; Ash-Lee, Susan; Hultgren, Kristin

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the relation between perceived cognitive and physical threat after a cancer diagnosis and posttraumatic growth (PTG). In total, 169 breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer survivors completed questionnaires. Hierarchical regression models found after controlling for demographic and medical variables, depression, anxiety, and perceived threat account for 41.8% of the variance of positive cognitive processing, and these variables along with positive cognitive processing accounted for 42.7% of the variance of PTG. Positive cognitive processing mediated the pathways between perceived physical threat and PTG. Cognitive processing appears to play a key role in the emergence of PTG following cancer. By exploring survivors' cognitions and perceived threat, psychosocial providers may help cancer survivors cultivate PTG.

  7. Role of Physical Activity and Diet After Colorectal Cancer Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Van Blarigan, Erin L.; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    This review summarizes the evidence regarding physical activity and diet after colorectal cancer diagnosis in relation to quality of life, disease recurrence, and survival. There have been extensive reports on adiposity, inactivity, and certain diets, particularly those high in red and processed meats, and increased risk of colorectal cancer. Only in the past decade have data emerged on how such lifestyle factors are associated with outcomes in colorectal cancer survivors. Prospective observational studies have consistently reported that physical activity after colorectal cancer diagnosis reduces mortality. A meta-analysis estimated that each 15 metabolic equivalent task-hour per week increase in physical activity after colorectal cancer diagnosis was associated with a 38% lower risk of mortality. No randomized controlled trials have been completed to confirm that physical activity lowers risk of mortality among colorectal cancer survivors; however, trials have shown that physical activity, including structured exercise, is safe for colorectal cancer survivors (localized to metastatic stage, during and after treatment) and improves cardiorespiratory fitness and physical function. In addition, prospective observational studies have suggested that a Western dietary pattern, high carbohydrate intake, and consuming sugar-sweetened beverages after diagnosis may increase risk of colorectal cancer recurrence and mortality, but these data are limited to single analyses from one of two US cohorts. Additional data from prospective studies and randomized controlled trials are needed. Nonetheless, on the basis of the available evidence, it is reasonable to counsel colorectal cancer survivors to engage in regular physical activity and limit consumption of refined carbohydrates, red and processed meats, and sugar-sweetened beverages. PMID:25918293

  8. Role of physical activity and diet after colorectal cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Van Blarigan, Erin L; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A

    2015-06-01

    This review summarizes the evidence regarding physical activity and diet after colorectal cancer diagnosis in relation to quality of life, disease recurrence, and survival. There have been extensive reports on adiposity, inactivity, and certain diets, particularly those high in red and processed meats, and increased risk of colorectal cancer. Only in the past decade have data emerged on how such lifestyle factors are associated with outcomes in colorectal cancer survivors. Prospective observational studies have consistently reported that physical activity after colorectal cancer diagnosis reduces mortality. A meta-analysis estimated that each 15 metabolic equivalent task-hour per week increase in physical activity after colorectal cancer diagnosis was associated with a 38% lower risk of mortality. No randomized controlled trials have been completed to confirm that physical activity lowers risk of mortality among colorectal cancer survivors; however, trials have shown that physical activity, including structured exercise, is safe for colorectal cancer survivors (localized to metastatic stage, during and after treatment) and improves cardiorespiratory fitness and physical function. In addition, prospective observational studies have suggested that a Western dietary pattern, high carbohydrate intake, and consuming sugar-sweetened beverages after diagnosis may increase risk of colorectal cancer recurrence and mortality, but these data are limited to single analyses from one of two US cohorts. Additional data from prospective studies and randomized controlled trials are needed. Nonetheless, on the basis of the available evidence, it is reasonable to counsel colorectal cancer survivors to engage in regular physical activity and limit consumption of refined carbohydrates, red and processed meats, and sugar-sweetened beverages. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  9. Colorectal cancer in Iran: Epidemiology and morphology trends

    PubMed Central

    Rafiemanesh, Hosein; Pakzad, Reza; Abedi, Mehdi; Kor, Yones; Moludi, Jalal; Towhidi, Farhad; Reza Makhsosi, Behnam; Salehiniya, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers in different countries, including Iran. No comprehensive study has been done in the country for colorectal cancer, but information on the incidence and trends is essential to planning. This study aimed to evaluate the occurrence and morphology of colorectal cancer and its trend in Iran. This study was conducted using data from the national cancer registry system in Iran from 2003-2008. We used joinpoint regression analysis for assessing incidence time trends and morphology change percentage. Of all cases of colorectal cancer, 61.83 % were colon cancer, 27.54 % rectal cancer, 7.46 % rectosigmoid cancer, and 3.10 anal cancer. The most common histological types with the frequencies of 80.85 % was related to adenocarcinoma, NOS. The Annual percentage changes (APC) in ASIR for colorectal cancer significantly increased in both men and women. APC in ASIR was 13.7 (CI: 10.5-17.1) in women and 16.4 (CI: 12.4-20.5) in men. APC of adenocarcinoma in villous adenoma showed significant declining trend (p<0.05), while APC of adenocarcinoma, NOS had a constant trend. The incidence of the cancer in recent years has increased in Iran because of changes in lifestyle and diet. Therefore, further studies are necessary to detect the cause of this cancer and perform preventive measures. PMID:28337105

  10. Gut microbiota, inflammation and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jun; Kato, Ikuko

    2016-01-01

    Although genes contribute to colorectal cancer, the gut microbiota are an important player. Accumulating evidence suggests that chronic infection and the ensuing inflammation contributes to tumor initiation and tumor progression. A variety of bacterial species and tumor-promoting virulence mechanisms have been investigated. Significant advances have been made in understanding the composition and functional capabilities of the gut microbiota and its roles in cancer. In the current review, we discuss the novel roles of microbiota in the progression of colon cancer. Although microbiota technically include organisms other than bacteria e.g., viruses and fungi, this review will primarily focus on bacteria. We summarize epidemiological studies of human microbiome and colon cancer. We discuss the progress in the scientific understanding of the interplay between the gut microbiota, barrier function, and host responses in experimental models. Further, we discuss the potential application in prevention, diagnosis, and therapy of colon cancer by targeting microbiota. We discuss the challenges lie ahead and the future direction in studying gut microbiome in colon cancer to close the gap between the basic sciences and clinical application. PMID:28078319

  11. DNA Mismatch Repair Status Predicts Need for Future Colorectal Surgery for Metachronous Neoplasms in Young Individuals Undergoing Colorectal Cancer Resection.

    PubMed

    Aronson, Melyssa; Holter, Spring; Semotiuk, Kara; Winter, Laura; Pollett, Aaron; Gallinger, Steven; Cohen, Zane; Gryfe, Robert

    2015-07-01

    The treatment of colorectal cancer in young patients involves both management of the incident cancer and consideration of the possibility of Lynch syndrome and the development of metachronous colorectal cancers. This study aims to assess the prognostic role of DNA mismatch repair deficiency and extended colorectal resection for metachronous colorectal neoplasia risk in young patients with colorectal cancer. This is a retrospective review of 285 patients identified in our GI cancer registry with colorectal cancer diagnosed at 35 years or younger in the absence of polyposis. Using univariate and multivariate analysis, we assessed the prognostic role of mismatch repair deficiency and standard clinicopathologic characteristics, including the extent of resection, on the rate of developing metachronous colorectal neoplasia requiring resection. Mismatch repair deficiency was identified in biospecimens from 44% of patients and was significantly associated with an increased risk for metachronous colorectal neoplasia requiring resection (10-year cumulative risk, 13.5% ± 4.2%) compared with 56% of patients with mismatch repair-intact colorectal cancer (10-year cumulative risk, 5.8% ± 3.3%; p = 0.011). In multivariate analysis, mismatch repair deficiency was associated with a HR of 3.65 (95% CI, 1.44-9.21; p = 0.006) for metachronous colorectal neoplasia, whereas extended resection with ileorectal or ileosigmoid anastomosis significantly decreased the risk of metachronous colorectal neoplasia (HR, 0.21; 95% CI, 0.05-0.90; p = 0.036). This study had a retrospective design, and, therefore, recommendations for colorectal cancer surgery and screening were not fully standardized. Quality of life after colorectal cancer surgery was not assessed. Young patients with colorectal cancer with molecular hallmarks of Lynch syndrome were at significantly higher risk for the development of subsequent colorectal neoplasia. This risk was significantly reduced in those who underwent extended

  12. Probiotics, prebiotics and colorectal cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Ambalam, Padma; Raman, Maya; Purama, Ravi Kiran; Doble, Mukesh

    2016-02-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC), the third major cause of mortality among various cancer types in United States, has been increasing in developing countries due to varying diet and dietary habits and occupational hazards. Recent evidences showed that composition of gut microbiota could be associated with the development of CRC and other gut dysbiosis. Modulation of gut microbiota by probiotics and prebiotics, either alone or in combination could positively influence the cross-talk between immune system and microbiota, would be beneficial in preventing inflammation and CRC. In this review, role of probiotics and prebiotics in the prevention of CRC has been discussed. Various epidemiological and experimental studies, specifically gut microbiome research has effectively improved the understanding about the role of probiotics and microbial treatment as anticarcinogenic agents. A few human studies support the beneficial effect of probiotics and prebiotics; hence, comprehensive understanding is urgent to realize the clinical applications of probiotics and prebiotics in CRC prevention.

  13. The gastrointestinal microbiota and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dulal, Santosh; Deveaux, April; Jovov, Biljana; Han, Xuesong

    2014-01-01

    The human gut is home to a complex and diverse microbiota that contributes to the overall homeostasis of the host. Increasingly, the intestinal microbiota is recognized as an important player in human illness such as colorectal cancer (CRC), inflammatory bowel diseases, and obesity. CRC in itself is one of the major causes of cancer mortality in the Western world. The mechanisms by which bacteria contribute to CRC are complex and not fully understood, but increasing evidence suggests a link between the intestinal microbiota and CRC as well as diet and inflammation, which are believed to play a role in carcinogenesis. It is thought that the gut microbiota interact with dietary factors to promote chronic inflammation and CRC through direct influence on host cell physiology, cellular homeostasis, energy regulation, and/or metabolism of xenobiotics. This review provides an overview on the role of commensal gut microbiota in the development of human CRC and explores its association with diet and inflammation. PMID:25540232

  14. The gastrointestinal microbiota and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Keku, Temitope O; Dulal, Santosh; Deveaux, April; Jovov, Biljana; Han, Xuesong

    2015-03-01

    The human gut is home to a complex and diverse microbiota that contributes to the overall homeostasis of the host. Increasingly, the intestinal microbiota is recognized as an important player in human illness such as colorectal cancer (CRC), inflammatory bowel diseases, and obesity. CRC in itself is one of the major causes of cancer mortality in the Western world. The mechanisms by which bacteria contribute to CRC are complex and not fully understood, but increasing evidence suggests a link between the intestinal microbiota and CRC as well as diet and inflammation, which are believed to play a role in carcinogenesis. It is thought that the gut microbiota interact with dietary factors to promote chronic inflammation and CRC through direct influence on host cell physiology, cellular homeostasis, energy regulation, and/or metabolism of xenobiotics. This review provides an overview on the role of commensal gut microbiota in the development of human CRC and explores its association with diet and inflammation.

  15. Role of phytochemicals in colorectal cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Hua; Niu, Yin-Bo; Sun, Yang; Zhang, Feng; Liu, Chang-Xu; Fan, Lei; Mei, Qi-Bing

    2015-08-21

    Although the incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) has been declining in recent decades, it remains a major public health issue as a leading cause of cancer mortality and morbidity worldwide. Prevention is one milestone for this disease. Extensive study has demonstrated that a diet containing fruits, vegetables, and spices has the potential to prevent CRC. The specific constituents in the dietary foods which are responsible for preventing CRC and the possible mechanisms have also been investigated extensively. Various phytochemicals have been identified in fruits, vegetables, and spices which exhibit chemopreventive potential. In this review article, chemopreventive effects of phytochemicals including curcumin, polysaccharides (apple polysaccharides and mushroom glucans), saponins (Paris saponins, ginsenosides and soy saponins), resveratrol, and quercetin on CRC and the mechanisms are discussed. This review proposes the need for more clinical evidence for the effects of phytochemicals against CRC in large trials. The conclusion of the review is that these phytochemicals might be therapeutic candidates in the campaign against CRC.

  16. The current thinking on colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Spreadborough, P; Doran, C

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the fourth most common cancer in the UK and the incidence has increased over recent decades. Although only 1.5% of cases are diagnosed in those aged under 40 years, it remains an important condition to be aware of in the military population. Patients who are genetically predisposed can have a lifetime risk of 80-100% of developing CRC and are likely to develop symptoms during their service. 20% of patients will present with metastatic disease. While surgical and oncological treatments have improved outcomes, early diagnosis of CRC is essential to reducing mortality. This paper provides an overview of the aetiology, investigations and treatment options for CRC. Explanation of primary surgical options and the principles of adjuvant therapies are included to aid informed discussions with patients.

  17. Colorectal cancer carcinogenesis: a review of mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Kanwal; Ghias, Kulsoom

    2016-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cancer in women and the third most common in men globally. CRC arises from one or a combination of chromosomal instability, CpG island methylator phenotype, and microsatellite instability. Genetic instability is usually caused by aneuploidy and loss of heterozygosity. Mutations in the tumor suppressor or cell cycle genes may also lead to cellular transformation. Similarly, epigenetic and/or genetic alterations resulting in impaired cellular pathways, such as DNA repair mechanism, may lead to microsatellite instability and mutator phenotype. Non-coding RNAs, more importantly microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs have also been implicated at various CRC stages. Understanding the specific mechanisms of tumorigenesis and the underlying genetic and epigenetic traits is critical in comprehending the disease phenotype. This paper reviews these mechanisms along with the roles of various non-coding RNAs in CRCs.

  18. Colorectal Cancer Chemoprevention: Is This the Future of Colorectal Cancer Prevention?

    PubMed Central

    Manzano, A.; Pérez-Segura, P.

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is presently one of the most common causes of cancer-related death in our setting and affects a great number of people each year. Screening strategies are commonly used but they do not seem enough to avoid CRC development or prevent completely its mortality. Because of this fact other prevention strategies have gained interest in recent years. Chemoprevention seems to be an attractive option in this setting and several drugs have been studied in this field. This review is focused on salicylates, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and cycloxygenase-2 inhibitors (COXIBs), whose mechanism of action could be directly related to colon cancer chemoprevention. PMID:22649288

  19. Colorectal Cancer Molecular Biology Moves Into Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, Colin C.; Grady, William M.

    2010-01-01

    The promise of personalized medicine is now a clinical reality, with colorectal cancer genetics at the forefront of this next major advance in clinical medicine. This is no more evident than in the recent advances in testing of colorectal cancers for specific molecular alterations in order to guide treatment with the monoclonal antibody therapies cetuximab and panitumumab, which target the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In this review, we examine genetic mechanisms of colorectal cancer and how these alterations relate to emerging biomarkers for early detection and risk stratification (diagnostic markers), prognosis (prognostic markers), and the prediction of treatment responses (predictive markers). PMID:20921207

  20. Tea, coffee, and milk consumption and colorectal cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Green, Chadwick John; de Dauwe, Palina; Boyle, Terry; Tabatabaei, Seyed Mehdi; Fritschi, Lin; Heyworth, Jane Shirley

    2014-01-01

    Data regarding the effects of tea, coffee, and milk on the risk of colorectal cancer are inconsistent. We investigated associations of tea, coffee, and milk consumption with colorectal cancer risk and attempted to determine if these exposures were differentially associated with the risks of proximal colon, distal colon, and rectal cancers. Data from 854 incident cases and 948 controls were analyzed in a case-control study of colorectal cancer in Western Australia during 2005-07. Multivariable logistic regression was used to analyze the associations of black tea (with and without milk), green tea, herbal tea, hot coffee, iced coffee, and milk with colorectal cancer. Consumption of 1 or more cups of herbal tea per week was associated with a significantly decreased risk of distal colon cancer (adjusted odds ratio, 0.37; 95% CI, 0.16-0.82; PTrend = 0.044), and consumption of 1 or more cups of iced coffee per week was associated with increased risk of rectal cancer (adjusted odds ratio, 1.52; 95% CI, 0.91-2.54; PTrend = 0.004). Neither herbal tea nor iced coffee was associated with the risk of proximal colon cancer. Hot coffee was associated with a possible increased risk of distal colon cancer. Black tea (with or without milk), green tea, decaffeinated coffee, and milk were not significantly associated with colorectal cancer risk. Consumption of herbal tea was associated with reduced risk of distal colon cancer, and consumption of iced coffee was associated with increased rectal cancer risk.

  1. Apoptotic pathways as a therapeutic target for colorectal cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Abraha, Aman M; Ketema, Ezra B

    2016-08-15

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer among adults. The disease begins as a benign adenomatous polyp, which develops into an advanced adenoma with high-grade dysplasia and then progresses to an invasive cancer. Appropriate apoptotic signaling is fundamentally important to preserve a healthy balance between cell death and cell survival and in maintaining genome integrity. Evasion of apoptotic pathway has been established as a prominent hallmark of several cancers. During colorectal cancer development, the balance between the rates of cell growth and apoptosis that maintains intestinal epithelial cell homeostasis gets progressively disturbed. Evidences are increasingly available to support the hypothesis that failure of apoptosis may be an important factor in the evolution of colorectal cancer and its poor response to chemotherapy and radiation. The other reason for targeting apoptotic pathway in the treatment of cancer is based on the observation that this process is deregulated in cancer cells but not in normal cells. As a result, colorectal cancer therapies designed to stimulate apoptosis in target cells would play a critical role in controlling its development and progression. A better understanding of the apoptotic signaling pathways, and the mechanisms by which cancer cells evade apoptotic death might lead to effective therapeutic strategies to inhibit cancer cell proliferation with minimal toxicity and high responses to chemotherapy. In this review, we analyzed the current understanding and future promises of apoptotic pathways as a therapeutic target in colorectal cancer treatment.

  2. Primary prevention of colorectal cancer: lifestyle, nutrition, exercise.

    PubMed

    Martínez, María Elena

    2005-01-01

    The past two decades have provided a vast amount of literature related to the primary prevention of colorectal cancer. Large international variation in colorectal cancer incidence and mortality rates and the prominent increases in the incidence of colorectal cancer in groups that migrated from low- to high-incidence areas provided important evidence that lifestyle factors influence the development of this malignancy. Moreover, there is convincing evidence from epidemiological and experimental studies that dietary intake is an important etiological factor in colorectal neoplasia. Although the precise mechanisms have not been clarified, several lifestyle factors are likely to have a major impact on colorectal cancer development. Physical inactivity and to a lesser extent, excess body weight, are consistent risk factors for colon cancer. Exposure to tobacco products early in life is associated with a higher risk of developing colorectal neoplasia. Diet and nutritional factors are also clearly important. Diets high in red and processed meat increase risk. Excess alcohol consumption, probably in combination with a diet low in some micronutrients such as folate and methionine, appear to increase risk. There is also recent evidence supporting a protective effect of calcium and vitamin D in the etiology of colorectal neoplasia. The relationship between intake of dietary fiber and risk of colon cancer has been studied for three decades but the results are still inconclusive. However, some micronutrients or phytochemicals in fiber-rich foods may be important; folic acid is one such micronutrient that has been shown to protect against the development of colorectal neoplasia and is currently being studied in intervention trials of adenoma recurrence. The overwhelming evidence indicates that primary prevention of colon cancer is feasible. Continued focus on primary prevention of colorectal cancer, in combination with efforts aimed at screening and surveillance, will be vital in

  3. Broadening the examination of sociocultural constructs relevant to African-American colorectal cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Thompson, V L Sanders; Harris, J; Clark, E M; Purnell, J; Deshpande, A D

    2015-01-01

    The importance of sociocultural constructs as influences on cancer attitudes and screening has been established in the literature. This paper reports on the efforts to explore alternatives to sociocultural constructs previously associated with African-American cancer screening, but with low acceptance among community members or incomplete measurement (empowerment and collectivism) and develop a measure for a recently identified construct of interest (privacy). We report preliminary psychometric data on these sociocultural scales and their associations with cancer attitudes. African-Americans (N = 1021), 50-75 years of age participated in this study. Participants were identified via a listed sample and completed a telephone survey administered via call center. Sociocultural attitudes were assessed using items identified through computerized database searches, reviewed by advisory panels, edited and tested using cognitive response strategies. Cancer screening pros and cons, cancer worry, perceived cancer risk, colorectal cancer (CRC) screening subjective norms, and perceived self-efficacy for colorectal cancer screening (CRCS) were also assessed. Confirmatory factor analyses and multivariate analyses were conducted to provide support for the validity of the constructs and to understand the associations among the selected sociocultural constructs (empowerment, collectivism, and privacy) and cancer beliefs and attitudes (CRC perceived benefits and barriers, perceived risks, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control/self-efficacy). Consistent with the literature, the factor analytic model (RMSEA for the model was .062; 90% CI: .060-.065) provided support for the empowerment, collectivism, and privacy constructs. The modified collectivism and privacy scales had acceptable reliability. The privacy scale demonstrated the strongest associations with measures of cancer beliefs and attitudes. The implication of the findings and need for further scale

  4. Broadening the examination of socio-cultural constructs relevant to African American colorectal cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Sanders Thompson, V. L.; Harris, J.; Clark, E.M.; Purnell, J.; Deshpande, A.D.

    2014-01-01

    The importance of socio-cultural constructs as influences on cancer attitudes and screening has been established in the literature. This paper reports on efforts to explore alternatives to constructs previously associated with African American cancer screening, but with low acceptance among community members or incomplete measurement (empowerment and collectivism) and develop a measure for a recently identified construct of interest (privacy). We report preliminary psychometric data on these socio-cultural scales and their associations with cancer attitudes. African Americans (N=1021), 50 to 75 years of age participated in this study. Participants were identified via a listed sample and completed a telephone survey administered via call center. Socio-cultural attitudes were assessed using items identified through computerized database searches, reviewed by advisory panels, edited and tested using cognitive response strategies. Cancer screening pros and cons, cancer worry, perceived cancer risk, colorectal cancer screening subjective norms, and perceived self-efficacy for colorectal cancer screening were also assessed. Confirmatory factor analyses and multivariate analyses were conducted to provide support for the validity of the constructs and to understand the associations among the selected socio-cultural constructs (empowerment, collectivism and empowerment) and cancer beliefs and attitudes (CRC perceived benefits and barriers, perceived risks, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control/self-efficacy). Consistent with the literature, the factor analytic model (RMSEA for the model was 0.062; 90% CI: 0.060-0.065) provided support for the empowerment, collectivism and privacy constructs. The modified collectivism and privacy scales had acceptable reliability. The privacy scale demonstrated the strongest associations with measures of cancer beliefs and attitudes. The implication of the findings and need for further scale development activities is discussed

  5. Primary and Secondary Prevention of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tárraga López, Pedro J; Albero, Juan Solera; Rodríguez-Montes, José Antonio

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Cancer is a worldwide problem as it will affect one in three men and one in four women during their lifetime. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most frequent cancer in men, after lung and prostate cancer, and is the second most frequent cancer in women after breast cancer. It is also the third cause of death in men and women separately, and is the second most frequent cause of death by cancer if both genders are considered together. CRC represents approximately 10% of deaths by cancer. Modifiable risk factors of CRC include smoking, physical inactivity, being overweight and obesity, eating processed meat, and drinking alcohol excessively. CRC screening programs are possible only in economically developed countries. However, attention should be paid in the future to geographical areas with ageing populations and a western lifestyle.19,20 Sigmoidoscopy screening done with people aged 55–64 years has been demonstrated to reduce the incidence of CRC by 33% and mortality by CRC by 43%. OBJECTIVE To assess the effect on the incidence and mortality of CRC diet and lifestyle and to determine the effect of secondary prevention through early diagnosis of CRC. METHODOLOGY: A comprehensive search of Medline and Pubmed articles related to primary and secondary prevention of CRC and subsequently, a meta-analysis of the same blocks are performed. RESULTS 225 articles related to primary or secondary prevention of CRC were retrieved. Of these 145 were considered valid on meta-analysis: 12 on epidemiology, 56 on diet and lifestyle, and over 77 different screenings for early detection of CRC. Cancer is a worldwide problem as it will affect one in three men and one in four women during their lifetime. There is no doubt whatsoever which environmental factors, probably diet, may account for these cancer rates. Excessive alcohol consumption and cholesterol-rich diet are associated with a high risk of colon cancer. A diet poor in folic acid and vitamin B6 is also

  6. Chemoprevention, chemotherapy, and chemoresistance in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Marin, Jose J G; Sanchez de Medina, Fermin; Castaño, Beatriz; Bujanda, Luis; Romero, Marta R; Martinez-Augustin, Olga; Moral-Avila, Rosario Del; Briz, Oscar

    2012-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in industrialized countries. Chemoprevention is a promising approach, but studies demonstrating their usefulness in large populations are still needed. Among several compounds with chemopreventive ability, cyclooxygenase inhibitors have received particular attention. However, these agents are not without side effects, which must be weighed against their beneficial actions. Early diagnosis is critical in the management of CRC patients, because, in early stages, surgery is curative in >90% of cases. If diagnosis occurs at stages II and III, which is often the case, neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy before surgery are, in a few cases, recommended. Because of the high risk of recurrence in advanced cancers, chemotherapy is maintained after tumor resection. Chemotherapy is also indicated when the patient has metastases and in advanced cancer located in the rectum. In the last decade, the use of anticancer drugs in monotherapy or in combined regimens has markedly increased the survival of patients with CRC at stages III and IV. Although the rate of success is higher than in other gastrointestinal tumors, adverse effects and development of chemoresistance are important limitations to pharmacological therapy. Genetic profiling regarding mechanisms of chemoresistance are needed to carry out individualized prediction of the lack of effectiveness of pharmacological regimens. This would minimize side effects and prevent the selection of aggressive, cross-resistant clones, as well as avoiding undesirable delays in the use of the most efficient therapeutic approaches to treat these patients.

  7. Epigenetic Alterations in Colorectal Cancer: Emerging Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Grady, William M.; Goel, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. One of the fundamental processes driving the initiation and progression of CRC is the accumulation of a variety of genetic and epigenetic changes in colon epithelial cells. Over the past decade, major advances have been made in our understanding of cancer epigenetics, particularly regarding aberrant DNA methylation, microRNA (miRNA) and noncoding RNA deregulation, and alterations in histone modification states. Assessment of the colon cancer “epigenome” has revealed that virtually all CRCs have aberrantly methylated genes and altered miRNA expression. The average CRC methylome has hundreds to thousands of abnormally methylated genes and dozens of altered miRNAs. As with gene mutations in the cancer genome, a subset of these epigenetic alterations, called driver events, is presumed to have a functional role in CRC. In addition, the advances in our understanding of epigenetic alterations in CRC have led to these alterations being developed as clinical biomarkers for diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic applications. Progress in this field suggests that these epigenetic alterations will be commonly used in the near future to direct the prevention and treatment of CRC. PMID:26216839

  8. Eicosanoid pathway in colorectal cancer: Recent updates

    PubMed Central

    Tuncer, Sinem; Banerjee, Sreeparna

    2015-01-01

    Enzymatic metabolism of the 20C polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) arachidonic acid (AA) occurs via the cyclooxygenase (COX) and lipoxygenase (LOX) pathways, and leads to the production of various bioactive lipids termed eicosanoids. These eicosanoids have a variety of functions, including stimulation of homeostatic responses in the cardiovascular system, induction and resolution of inflammation, and modulation of immune responses against diseases associated with chronic inflammation, such as cancer. Because chronic inflammation is essential for the development of colorectal cancer (CRC), it is not surprising that many eicosanoids are implicated in CRC. Oftentimes, these autacoids work in an antagonistic and highly temporal manner in inflammation; therefore, inhibition of the pro-inflammatory COX-2 or 5-LOX enzymes may subsequently inhibit the formation of their essential products, or shunt substrates from one pathway to another, leading to undesirable side-effects. A better understanding of these different enzymes and their products is essential not only for understanding the importance of eicosanoids, but also for designing more effective drugs that solely target the inflammatory molecules found in both chronic inflammation and cancer. In this review, we have evaluated the cancer promoting and anti-cancer roles of different eicosanoids in CRC, and highlighted the most recent literature which describes how those molecules affect not only tumor tissue, but also the tumor microenvironment. Additionally, we have attempted to delineate the roles that eicosanoids with opposing functions play in neoplastic transformation in CRC through their effects on proliferation, apoptosis, motility, metastasis, and angiogenesis. PMID:26557000

  9. Chemotherapy for colorectal cancer in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Han

    2015-05-07

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death in the elderly. However, elderly patients with CRC tend to be under-presented in clinical trials and undertreated in clinical practice. Advanced age alone should not be the only criteria to preclude effective therapy in elderly patients with CRC. The best guide about optimal cancer treatment can be provided by comprehensive geriatric assessment. Elderly patients with stage III colon cancer can enjoy the same benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin or capecitabine as younger patients, without a substantial increase in toxicity. With conflicting results of retrospective studies and a lack of data available from randomized studies, combined modality treatment should be used with great caution in elderly patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Combination chemotherapy can be considered for older patients with metastatic CRC. For elderly patients who are frail or vulnerable, however, monotherapy or a stop-and-go strategy may be desirable. The use of targeted therapies in older patients with metastatic CRC appears to be promising in view of their better efficacy and toxicity. Treatment should be individualized based on the nature of the disease, the physiologic or functional status, and the patient's preference.

  10. Microbiota disbiosis is associated with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhiguang; Guo, Bomin; Gao, Renyuan; Zhu, Qingchao; Qin, Huanlong

    2015-01-01

    The dysbiosis of the human intestinal microbiota is linked to sporadic colorectal carcinoma (CRC). The present study was designed to investigate the gut microbiota distribution features in CRC patients. We performed pyrosequencing based analysis of the 16S rRNA gene V3 region to investigate microbiota of the cancerous tissue and adjacent non-cancerous normal tissue in proximal and distal CRC samples. The results revealed that the microbial structures of the CRC patients and healthy individuals differed significantly. Firmicutes and Fusobacteria were over-represented whereas Proteobacteria was under-represented in CRC patients. In addition, Lactococcus and Fusobacterium exhibited a relatively higher abundance while Pseudomonas and Escherichia-Shigella was reduced in cancerous tissues compared to adjacent non-cancerous tissues. Meanwhile, the overall microbial structures of proximal and distal colon cancerous tissues were similar; but certain potential pro-oncogenic pathogens were different. These results suggested that the mucosa-associated microbiota is dynamically associated with CRC, which may provide evidences for microbiota-associated diagnostic, prognostic, preventive, and therapeutic strategies for CRC.

  11. Estrogen Plus Progestin and Colorectal Cancer Incidence and Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Michael S.; Chlebowski, Rowan T.; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Johnson, Karen C.; Muskovitz, Andrew; Kato, Ikuko; Young, Alicia; Hubbell, F. Allan; Prentice, Ross L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose During the intervention phase in the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) clinical trial, use of estrogen plus progestin reduced the colorectal cancer diagnosis rate, but the cancers were found at a substantially higher stage. To assess the clinical relevance of the findings, analyses of the influence of combined hormone therapy on colorectal cancer incidence and colorectal cancer mortality were conducted after extended follow-up. Patients and Methods The WHI study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial involving 16,608 postmenopausal women with an intact uterus who were randomly assigned to daily 0.625 mg conjugated equine estrogen plus 2.5 mg medroxyprogesterone acetate (n = 8,506) or matching placebo (n = 8,102). Colorectal cancer diagnosis rates and colorectal cancer mortality were assessed. Results After a mean of 5.6 years (standard deviation [SD], 1.03 years) of intervention and 11.6 years (SD, 3.1 years) of total follow-up, fewer colorectal cancers were diagnosed in the combined hormone therapy group compared with the placebo group (diagnoses/year, 0.12% v 0.16%; hazard ratio [HR], 0.72; 95% CI, 0.56 to 0.94; P = .014). Bowel screening examinations were comparable between groups throughout. Cancers in the combined hormone therapy group more commonly had positive lymph nodes (50.5% v 28.6%; P < .001) and were at higher stage (regional or distant, 68.8% v 51.4%; P = .003). Although not statistically significant, there was a higher number of colorectal cancer deaths in the combined hormone therapy group (37 v 27 deaths; 0.04% v 0.03%; HR, 1.29; 95% CI, 0.78 to 2.11; P = .320). Conclusion The findings, suggestive of diagnostic delay, do not support a clinically meaningful benefit for combined hormone therapy on colorectal cancer. PMID:23008295

  12. Is Month of Birth a Risk Factor for Colorectal Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, N. J.; Noble, E.; Cortina-Borja, M.; Salib, E.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. The developmental origins of health and disease hypothesis and season of birth have been linked to a wide variety of later life conditions including cancer. Whether any relationship between month and season of birth and colorectal cancer exists is unknown. Methods. A case-control study was performed with month of birth extracted from a dedicated colorectal cancer database. Age and gender matched patients were used as a control group. Generalised linear models were fitted with Poisson and negative binomial responses and logarithmic links. A forward stepwise approach was followed adding seasonal components with 6- and 12-month periods. Results. 1019 colorectal cancer patients and 1277 randomly selected age and gender matched controls were included. For both men and women there is an excess of colorectal cancer in those born in autumn and a corresponding reduction of risk among those born in spring (p = 0.026). For the identified September peak, the excess risk for colorectal cancer was 14.8% (95% CI 5.6–32.3%) larger than the spring trough. Conclusion. There is a seasonal effect in the monthly birth rates of people who are operated for colorectal cancer with a disproportionate excess of cancer in those born in September. Further large studies are required to validate these findings. PMID:28133478

  13. Is Month of Birth a Risk Factor for Colorectal Cancer?

    PubMed

    Francis, N K; Curtis, N J; Noble, E; Cortina-Borja, M; Salib, E

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. The developmental origins of health and disease hypothesis and season of birth have been linked to a wide variety of later life conditions including cancer. Whether any relationship between month and season of birth and colorectal cancer exists is unknown. Methods. A case-control study was performed with month of birth extracted from a dedicated colorectal cancer database. Age and gender matched patients were used as a control group. Generalised linear models were fitted with Poisson and negative binomial responses and logarithmic links. A forward stepwise approach was followed adding seasonal components with 6- and 12-month periods. Results. 1019 colorectal cancer patients and 1277 randomly selected age and gender matched controls were included. For both men and women there is an excess of colorectal cancer in those born in autumn and a corresponding reduction of risk among those born in spring (p = 0.026). For the identified September peak, the excess risk for colorectal cancer was 14.8% (95% CI 5.6-32.3%) larger than the spring trough. Conclusion. There is a seasonal effect in the monthly birth rates of people who are operated for colorectal cancer with a disproportionate excess of cancer in those born in September. Further large studies are required to validate these findings.

  14. Prospective Investigation of Body Mass Index, Colorectal Adenoma, and Colorectal Cancer in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kitahara, Cari M.; Berndt, Sonja I.; de González, Amy Berrington; Coleman, Helen G.; Schoen, Robert E.; Hayes, Richard B.; Huang, Wen-Yi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Obesity has consistently been linked to an increased risk of colorectal cancer, particularly among men. Whether body mass index (BMI) differentially influences the risk across the stages of colorectal cancer development remains unclear. We evaluated the associations of BMI with colorectal adenoma incidence, adenoma recurrence, and cancer in the context of a large screening trial, in which cases and controls had an equal chance for disease detection. Methods We prospectively evaluated the association between baseline BMI and the risk of incident distal adenoma (1,213 cases), recurrent adenoma (752 cases), and incident colorectal cancer (966 cases) among men and women, ages 55 to 74 years, randomly assigned to receive flexible sigmoidoscopy screening as part of the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CIs for adenoma incidence and recurrence, and hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs for colorectal cancer incidence, using multivariable-adjusted models. Results Compared with normal-weight men (18.5 to 24.9 kg/m2), obese men (≥ 30 kg/m2) had significantly higher risk of incident adenoma (OR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.65) and colorectal cancer (HR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.16 to 1.89) and a borderline increased risk of recurrent adenoma (OR, 1.50; 95% CI, 0.98 to 2.30). No associations were observed for either adenoma or cancer in women. Conclusion Data from this large prospective study suggest that obesity is important throughout the natural history of colorectal cancer, at least in men, and colorectal cancer prevention efforts should encourage the achievement and maintenance of a healthy body weight in addition to regular screenings. PMID:23715565

  15. Prospective investigation of body mass index, colorectal adenoma, and colorectal cancer in the prostate, lung, colorectal, and ovarian cancer screening trial.

    PubMed

    Kitahara, Cari M; Berndt, Sonja I; de González, Amy Berrington; Coleman, Helen G; Schoen, Robert E; Hayes, Richard B; Huang, Wen-Yi

    2013-07-01

    Obesity has consistently been linked to an increased risk of colorectal cancer, particularly among men. Whether body mass index (BMI) differentially influences the risk across the stages of colorectal cancer development remains unclear. We evaluated the associations of BMI with colorectal adenoma incidence, adenoma recurrence, and cancer in the context of a large screening trial, in which cases and controls had an equal chance for disease detection. We prospectively evaluated the association between baseline BMI and the risk of incident distal adenoma (1,213 cases), recurrent adenoma (752 cases), and incident colorectal cancer (966 cases) among men and women, ages 55 to 74 years, randomly assigned to receive flexible sigmoidoscopy screening as part of the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CIs for adenoma incidence and recurrence, and hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs for colorectal cancer incidence, using multivariable-adjusted models. Compared with normal-weight men (18.5 to 24.9 kg/m(2)), obese men (≥ 30 kg/m(2)) had significantly higher risk of incident adenoma (OR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.65) and colorectal cancer (HR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.16 to 1.89) and a borderline increased risk of recurrent adenoma (OR, 1.50; 95% CI, 0.98 to 2.30). No associations were observed for either adenoma or cancer in women. Data from this large prospective study suggest that obesity is important throughout the natural history of colorectal cancer, at least in men, and colorectal cancer prevention efforts should encourage the achievement and maintenance of a healthy body weight in addition to regular screenings.

  16. Molecular Taxonomy and Tumourigenesis of Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Biswas, S; Holyoake, D; Maughan, T S

    2016-02-01

    Over the last 5 years there has been a surge in interest in the molecular classification of colorectal cancer. The effect of molecular subtyping on current treatment decisions is limited to avoidance of adjuvant 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy in stage II microsatellite unstable-high disease and avoidance of epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted antibodies in extended RAS mutant tumours. The emergence of specific novel combination therapy for the BRAF-mutant cohort and of the microsatellite unstable-high cohort as a responsive group to immune checkpoint inhibition shows the growing importance of a clinically relevant molecular taxonomy. Clinical trials such as the Medical Research Council FOCUS4 trial using biomarkers to select patients for specific therapies are currently open and testing such approaches. The integration of mutation, gene expression and pathological analyses is refining our understanding of the biological subtypes within colorectal cancer. Sharing of data sets of parallel sequencing and gene expression of thousands of cancers among independent groups has allowed the description of disease subsets and the need for a validated consensus classification has become apparent. This biological understanding of the disease is a key step forward in developing a stratified approach to patient management. The discovery of stratifiers that predict a response to existing and emerging therapies will enable better use of these treatments. Improved scientific understanding of the biological characteristics of poorly responsive subgroups will facilitate the design of novel biologically rational combinations. Novel treatment regimens, including the combination of new drugs with radiation, and the discovery and validation of their associated predictive biomarkers will gradually lead to improved outcomes from therapy. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Clinical and molecular analysis of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer in Chinese colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Luo, Mao-Hong; Zhang, Zuo-Xing; Zhang, Pei-Da; Jiang, Xi-Li; Ma, Dong-Wang; Suo, Rong-Zeng; Zhao, Li-Zhong; Qi, Qing-Hui

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the frequency of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) in Chinese colorectal cancer (CRC) patients, and to discuss the value of microsatellite instability (MSI) and/or immunohistochemistry (IHC) for MSH2/MLH1 protein analysis as pre-screening tests in China. METHODS: The Amsterdam criteriaIandII(clinical diagnosis) and/or germline hMLH1/hMSH2 mutations (genetic diagnosis) were used to classify HNPCC families. Genetic tests, including microsatellite instability, immunohistochemistry for MSH2/MLH1 proteins and hMSH2/hMLH1 genes, were performed in each proband. RESULTS: From July 2000 to June 2004, 1988 patients with colorectal cancer were analysed and 114 CRC patients (5.7%) from 48 families were categorized as having HNPCC, including 76 from 26 families diagnosed clinically and 38 from the other 22 families diagnosed genetically. The sensitivity and specificity of high MSI and IHC for predicting mutations were 100% and 54%, and 79% and 77%, respectively. CONCLUSION: The frequency of HNPCC is approximately 10% among all Chinese CRC cases. The MSI and IHC detections for hMSH2/hMLH1 proteins are reliable pre-screening tests for hMLH1/hMSH2 germline mutations in families suspected of having HNPCC. PMID:17461458

  18. Gastrins, iron homeostasis and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kovac, Suzana; Anderson, Gregory J; Baldwin, Graham S

    2011-05-01

    The peptide hormone gastrin has been identified as a major regulator of acid secretion and a potent mitogen for normal and malignant gastrointestinal cells. The importance of gastric acid in the absorption of dietary iron first became evident 50 years ago when iron deficiency anemia was recognized as a long-term consequence of partial gastrectomy. This review summarizes the connections between circulating gastrins, iron status and colorectal cancer. Gastrins bind two ferric ions with micromolar affinity and, in the case of non-amidated forms of the hormone, iron binding is essential for biological activity in vitro and in vivo. The demonstration of an interaction between gastrin and transferrin by biochemical techniques led to the proposal that gastrins catalyze the loading of transferrin with iron. Several lines of evidence, including the facts that the concentrations of circulating gastrins are increased in mice and humans with the iron overload disease hemochromatosis and that transferrin saturation positively correlates with circulating gastrin concentration, suggest the potential involvement of gastrins in iron homeostasis. Conversely, recognition that ferric ions play an unexpected role in the biological activity of gastrins may assist in the development of useful therapies for colorectal carcinoma and other disorders of mucosal proliferation in the gastrointestinal tract. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 11th European Symposium on Calcium.

  19. Radiotherapy and brachytherapy for recurrent colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nag, S. )

    1991-05-01

    Radical surgical excision of locoregional recurrence of colorectal carcinoma usually produces the best survival and should be attempted whenever possible. However, recurrences are often unresectable; hence palliative local therapy may be indicated. There are several options for the radiation therapy of local, unresectable, recurrent, or metastatic colorectal cancer. Whole pelvis irradiation of 4,000-5,000 cGy followed by a coned-down boost of 1,000-1,500 cGy generally provides good symptomatic palliation in 80-90% of patients, but long-term control or cure is rarely achieved. External beam irradiation of 2,000-3,000 cGy to the whole liver with or without concurrent chemotherapy may be used for palliation of metastatic disease to the liver. A combination of intraoperative radiation therapy applied directly to the tumor bed and external beam irradiation may improve local control and survival rates. Multiple options are available for the intraoperative use of brachytherapy which can deliver high radiation doses to the residual tumor, or tumor bed, sparing normal tissue.

  20. Gastrins, Iron Homeostasis and Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kovac, Suzana; Anderson, Gregory J.; Baldwin, Graham S.

    2011-01-01

    The peptide hormone gastrin has been identified as a major regulator of acid secretion and a potent mitogen for normal and malignant gastrointestinal cells. The importance of gastric acid in the absorption of dietary iron first became evident 50 years ago when iron-deficiency anemia was recognised as a long-term consequence of partial gastrectomy. This review summarises the connections between circulating gastrins, iron status and colorectal cancer. Gastrins bind two ferric ions with micromolar affinity and, in the case of non-amidated forms of the hormone, iron-binding is essential for biological activity in vitro and in vivo. The demonstration of an interaction between gastrin and transferrin by biochemical techniques led to the proposal that gastrins catalyse the loading of transferrin with iron. Several lines of evidence, including the facts that the concentrations of circulating gastrins are increased in mice and humans with the iron-overload disease hemochromatosis and that transferrin saturation positively correlates with circulating gastrin concentration, suggest the potential involvement of gastrins in iron homeostasis. Conversely, recognition that ferric ions play an unexpected role in the biological activity of gastrins may assist in the development of useful therapies for colorectal carcinoma and other disorders of mucosal proliferation in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:21320535

  1. Colorectal Cancer Screening: Stool DNA and Other Noninvasive Modalities.

    PubMed

    Bailey, James R; Aggarwal, Ashish; Imperiale, Thomas F

    2016-03-01

    Colorectal cancer screening dates to the discovery of precancerous adenomatous tissue. Screening modalities and guidelines directed at prevention and early detection have evolved and resulted in a significant decrease in the prevalence and mortality of colorectal cancer via direct visualization or using specific markers. Despite continued efforts and an overall reduction in deaths attributed to colorectal cancer over the last 25 years, colorectal cancer remains one of the most common causes of malignancy-associated deaths. In attempt to further reduce the prevalence of colorectal cancer and associated deaths, continued improvement in screening quality and adherence remains key. Noninvasive screening modalities are actively being explored. Identification of specific genetic alterations in the adenoma-cancer sequence allow for the study and development of noninvasive screening modalities beyond guaiac-based fecal occult blood testing which target specific alterations or a panel of alterations. The stool DNA test is the first noninvasive screening tool that targets both human hemoglobin and specific genetic alterations. In this review we discuss stool DNA and other commercially available noninvasive colorectal cancer screening modalities in addition to other targets which previously have been or are currently under study.

  2. Colorectal Cancer Screening (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Cancer.gov

    There are five types of tests that are used to screen for colorectal cancer: fecal occult blood test, sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, virtual colonoscopy, and DNA stool test. Learn more about these and other tests in this expert-reviewed summary.

  3. Intra-operative peritoneal lavage for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Passot, Guillaume; Mohkam, Kayvan; Cotte, Eddy; Glehen, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Free cancer cells can be detected in peritoneal fluid at the time of colorectal surgery. Peritoneal lavage in colorectal surgery for cancer is not used in routine, and the prognostic significance of intraperitoneal free cancer cells (IPCC) remains unclear. Data concerning the technique of peritoneal lavage to detect IPCC and its timing regarding colorectal resection are scarce. However, positive IPCC might be the first step of peritoneal spread in colorectal cancers, which could lead to early specific treatments. Because of the important heterogeneity of IPCC determination in reported studies, no treatment have been proposed to patients with positive IPCC. Herein, we provide an overview of IPCC detection and its impact on recurrence and survival, and we suggest further multi-institutional studies to evaluate new treatment strategies. PMID:24616569

  4. Intra-operative peritoneal lavage for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Passot, Guillaume; Mohkam, Kayvan; Cotte, Eddy; Glehen, Olivier

    2014-02-28

    Free cancer cells can be detected in peritoneal fluid at the time of colorectal surgery. Peritoneal lavage in colorectal surgery for cancer is not used in routine, and the prognostic significance of intraperitoneal free cancer cells (IPCC) remains unclear. Data concerning the technique of peritoneal lavage to detect IPCC and its timing regarding colorectal resection are scarce. However, positive IPCC might be the first step of peritoneal spread in colorectal cancers, which could lead to early specific treatments. Because of the important heterogeneity of IPCC determination in reported studies, no treatment have been proposed to patients with positive IPCC. Herein, we provide an overview of IPCC detection and its impact on recurrence and survival, and we suggest further multi-institutional studies to evaluate new treatment strategies.

  5. Natural Product Shows Effectiveness in Combating Colorectal Cancer | FNLCR Staging

    Cancer.gov

    An herbal extract used for centuries to prevent heart disease has now been shown to be effective against colorectal cancer when tested in laboratory cell cultures. From left to right: Weidong Li, principal investigator, China Academy of Chinese Medic

  6. Immune reaction and colorectal cancer: Friends or foes?

    PubMed Central

    Formica, Vincenzo; Cereda, Vittore; Nardecchia, Antonella; Tesauro, Manfredi; Roselli, Mario

    2014-01-01

    The potential clinical impact of enhancing antitumor immunity is increasingly recognized in oncology therapeutics for solid tumors. Colorectal cancer is one of the most studied neoplasms for the tumor-host immunity relationship. Although immune cell populations involved in such a relationship and their prognostic role in colorectal cancer development have clearly been identified, still no approved therapies based on host immunity intensification have so far been introduced in clinical practice. Moreover, a recognized risk in enhancing immune reaction for colitis-associated colorectal cancer development has limited the emphasis of this approach. The aim of the present review is to discuss immune components involved in the host immune reaction against colorectal cancer and analyze the fine balance between pro-tumoral and anti-tumoral effect of immunity in this model of disease. PMID:25253941

  7. [How I treat colorectal cancer. I. Prevention and adjuvant treatment].

    PubMed

    Bours, V; Jerusalem, G; Fillet, G

    1998-04-01

    Colorectal adenocarcinoma is a major cause of cancer-related morbidity and mortality in Belgium and in other western countries. Prevention implies a modification of alimentation and maybe a chronic uptake of acetylsalicylic acid. Treatment of colorectal cancers is based on surgery and the prognosis is determined by the locoregional or metastatic tumor spread. Complete resection of any Astler Coller stage C colorectal malignant tumor has to be followed by a 5-fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy. In these protocols, 5-fluorouracil is administered together with folinic acid or levamisole. The administration of an adjuvant chemotherapy could also be considered for stage BII diseases. As rectal cancers are characterized by high local relapse rates, their treatment should associate radiotherapy, given either post-surgery or preferentially pre-surgery, with resection and chemotherapy. Appropriate treatment of colorectal cancers thus requires a concerted multidisciplinary approach.

  8. RET is a potential tumor suppressor gene in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yanxin; Tsuchiya, Karen D.; Park, Dong Il; Fausel, Rebecca; Kanngurn, Samornmas; Welcsh, Piri; Dzieciatkowski, Slavomir; Wang, Jianping; Grady, William M.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer arises as the consequence of mutations and epigenetic alterations that activate oncogenes and inactivate tumor suppressor genes. Through a genome-wide screen for methylated genes in colon neoplasms, we identified aberrantly methylated RET in colorectal cancer. RET, a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase and a receptor for the GDNF-family ligands, was one of the first oncogenes to be identified and has been shown to be an oncogene in thyroid cancer and pheochromocytoma. However, unexpectedly, we found RET is methylated in 27% of colon adenomas and in 63% of colorectal cancers, and now provide evidence that RET has tumor suppressor activity in colon cancer. The aberrant methylation of RET correlates with decreased RET expression, whereas the restoration of RET in colorectal cancer cell lines results in apoptosis. Furthermore, in support of a tumor suppressor function of RET, mutant RET has also been found in primary colorectal cancer. We now show that these mutations inactivate RET, which is consistent with RET being a tumor suppressor gene in the colon. These findings suggest that the aberrant methylation of RET and the mutational inactivation of RET promote colorectal cancer formation and that RET can serve as a tumor suppressor gene in the colon. Moreover, the increased frequency of methylated RET in colon cancers compared to adenomas suggests RET inactivation is involved in the progression of colon adenomas to cancer. PMID:22751117

  9. [Flow cytometry in datecting lymph node micrometastasis in colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Sun, Q; Ding, Y; Zhang, J

    2001-01-25

    To study the methodology and significance of flow cytometry in detecting lymph node micrometastasis of colorectal cancer. One hundred sixty-two cellular suspensions were prepared with lymph nodes which were resected radically on 25 patients with colorectal cancer and in which no cancer cells were found by HE staining. Different concentrations of cultured Lovo colorectal cancer cells were added into the celular suspension prepared from lymph node tissue of persons without colorectal cancer in order to prepare a control model. Dual staining with CK/FTTC and PI was made to the sedimetns from those 2 kinds of suspension. Flow cytometry was used to detect cancer cells. An ideal correlation was obtained between the detection value and the theoretical value of cancer cells in the specimen suspensions and control models (r = 0.097 6) with a sensitivity rate of 10/10(5). Cancer cells were detected from 7 out of the 25 patients and 30 of the 162 cellular suspensions. The detection rate was correlated with the size and infiltrating depth of the cancer. Flow cytometry is a reliable, rapid, and quantitative method for detecting lymph node micrometastasis in colorectal cancer.

  10. Intrahepatic therapy for liver-dominant metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    De Groote, Kerlijne; Prenen, Hans

    2015-01-01

    In patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, the liver is the most common site of metastatic disease. In patients with liver-dominant disease, consideration needs to be given to locoregional treatments such as hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy, transarterial chemoembolisation and selective internal radiation therapy because hepatic metastases are a major cause of liver failure especially in chemorefractory disease. In this review we provide insights on the published literature for locoregional treatment of liver metastases in metastatic colorectal cancer. PMID:26380058

  11. A common genetic risk factor for colorectal and prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Haiman, Christopher A; Le Marchand, Loïc; Yamamato, Jennifer; Stram, Daniel O; Sheng, Xin; Kolonel, Laurence N; Wu, Anna H; Reich, David; Henderson, Brian E

    2008-01-01

    Variants on chromosome 8q24 contribute risk for prostate cancer; here, we tested whether they also modulate risk for colorectal cancer. We studied 1,807 affected individuals and 5,511 controls and found that one variant, rs6983267, is also significantly associated with colorectal cancer (odds ratio = 1.22; P = 4.4 × 10−6) and that the apportionment of risk among the variants differs significantly between the two cancers. Comprehensive testing in the region uncovered variants capturing significant additional risk. Our results show that variants at 8q24 have different effects on cancer development that depend on the tissue type. PMID:17618282

  12. Pharmacologic resistance in colorectal cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, William A.; Swaika, Abhisek; Mody, Kabir

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) persists as one of the most prevalent and deadly tumor types in both men and women worldwide. This is in spite of widespread, effective measures of preventive screening, and also major advances in treatment options. Despite advances in cytotoxic and targeted therapy, resistance to chemotherapy remains one of the greatest challenges in long-term management of incurable metastatic disease and eventually contributes to death as tumors accumulate means of evading treatment. We performed a comprehensive literature search on the data available through PubMed, Medline, Scopus, and the ASCO Annual Symposium abstracts through June 2015 for the purpose of this review. We discuss the current state of knowledge of clinically relevant mechanisms of resistance to cytotoxic and targeted therapies now in use for the treatment of CRC. PMID:26753006

  13. Colorectal Cancer Screening in 3 Racial Groups

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Kimberly M.; Dickinson, Stephanie L.; DeGraffinreid, Cecilia R.; Tatum, Cathy M.; Paskett, Electra D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To understand predictors of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening in African Americans, European Americans, and Native Americans as these groups differ in CRC incidence and mortality. Methods Participants were surveyed for knowledge, beliefs, and behaviors related to CRC. Results Predictive regression modeling found, after adjusting for race, CRC risk, and CRC worry, the odds of screening within guidelines were increased for men, those receiving doctor’s recommendation, those with polyp/tumor history, those under 70, those with more knowledge about CRC, and those with fewer barriers to screening. CRC screening rates did not differ by race. Conclusions These results reiterate the importance of knowledge, barriers, and physician recommendation for CRC screening in all racial groups. PMID:17555381

  14. Towards personalized medicine of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Mohammad Azhar; Yousef, Zeyad; Saleh, Ayman M; Mohammad, Sameer; Al Knawy, Bandar

    2017-10-01

    Efforts in colorectal cancer (CRC) research aim to improve early detection and treatment for metastatic stages which could translate into better prognosis of this disease. One of the major challenges that hinder these efforts is the heterogeneous nature of CRC and involvement of diverse molecular pathways. New large-scale 'omics' technologies are making it possible to generate, analyze and interpret biological data from molecular determinants of CRC. The developments of sophisticated computational analyses would allow information from different omics platforms to be integrated, thus providing new insights into the biology of CRC. Together, these technological advances and an improved mechanistic understanding might allow CRC to be clinically managed at the level of the individual patient. This review provides an account of the current challenges in CRC management and an insight into how new technologies could allow the development of personalized medicine for CRC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Stool Testing for Colorectal Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Douglas J; Imperiale, Thomas F

    2015-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening has been shown to reduce CRC incidence and mortality and is widely recommended. However, despite the demonstrated benefits of screening and ongoing efforts to improve screening rates, a large percentage of the population remains unscreened. Noninvasive stool based tests offer great opportunity to enhance screening uptake. The evidence supporting the use of both fecal immunochemical testing (FIT) and stool DNA (sDNA) has been growing rapidly and both tests are now commercially available for use. Other stool biomarkers (eg, RNA and protein based) are also actively under study both for use independently and as adjuncts to the currently available tests. This mini review provides current, state of the art knowledge about noninvasive stool based screening. It includes a more detailed examination of those tests currently in use (ie, FIT and sDNA) but also provides an overview of stool testing options under development (ie, protein and RNA).

  16. The Consensus Molecular Subtypes of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guinney, Justin; Dienstmann, Rodrigo; Wang, Xin; de Reyniès, Aurélien; Schlicker, Andreas; Soneson, Charlotte; Marisa, Laetitia; Roepman, Paul; Nyamundanda, Gift; Angelino, Paolo; Bot, Brian M.; Morris, Jeffrey S.; Simon, Iris M.; Gerster, Sarah; Fessler, Evelyn; de Sousa e Melo, Felipe; Missiaglia, Edoardo; Ramay, Hena; Barras, David; Homicsko, Krisztian; Maru, Dipen; Manyam, Ganiraju C.; Broom, Bradley; Boige, Valerie; Perez-Villamil, Beatriz; Laderas, Ted; Salazar, Ramon; Gray, Joe W.; Hanahan, Douglas; Tabernero, Josep; Bernards, Rene; Friend, Stephen H.; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Medema, Jan Paul; Sadanandam, Anguraj; Wessels, Lodewyk; Delorenzi, Mauro; Kopetz, Scott; Vermeulen, Louis; Tejpar, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a frequently lethal disease with heterogeneous outcomes and drug responses. To resolve inconsistencies among the reported gene expression–based CRC classifications and facilitate clinical translation, we formed an international consortium dedicated to large-scale data sharing and analytics across expert groups. We show marked interconnectivity between six independent classification systems coalescing into four consensus molecular subtypes (CMS) with distinguishing features: CMS1 (MSI Immune, 14%), hypermutated, microsatellite unstable, strong immune activation; CMS2 (Canonical, 37%), epithelial, chromosomally unstable, marked WNT and MYC signaling activation; CMS3 (Metabolic, 13%), epithelial, evident metabolic dysregulation; and CMS4 (Mesenchymal, 23%), prominent transforming growth factor β activation, stromal invasion, and angiogenesis. Samples with mixed features (13%) possibly represent a transition phenotype or intra-tumoral heterogeneity. We consider the CMS groups the most robust classification system currently available for CRC – with clear biological interpretability – and the basis for future clinical stratification and subtype–based targeted interventions. PMID:26457759

  17. Probe-guided surgery for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lechner, P; Lind, P; Snyder, M; Haushofer, H

    2000-01-01

    Anti-CEA-scintigraphy turned out to be very reliable in detecting primary and recurrent colorectal cancer, its overall accuracy being more than 90%. The intraoperative application of this technology should provide similar results when focussing at extrahepatic tumor deposits, for example in lymph nodes, thus allowing accurate staging of the underlying disease. To test this hypothesis we launched the following feasibility study the results of which are compared to those reported in the recent literature. We investigated 20 patients, six with rectum and 14 with colon cancer. 24 hours before surgery they were intravenously given 1 ml of a fab'-fragment-antibody to CEA, labeled with 25 mCi of 99mTc (CEA-Scan). During surgery the radioactivity in lymph glands regional to the tumors was measured and compared to the much lower activity in healthy nodes. For this we used a scintillation probe (C-Trak, Care Wise, Inc., Morgan Hill, CA). All lymph nodes of interest were then excised and submitted to frozen section pathology. In 7 out of 20 cases scintimetry led to an up-staging of the disease. In addition we found metastatic spread to lymph nodes that were basically not regional to the primary tumor (retroperitoneum, renal hilum etc.). Scintimetry can precisely identify even very small tumor deposits. So it leads to accurate staging while surgery is still ongoing. In a further step the concept of sentinel node diagnosis, which is right now being clinically evaluated, may some day be applied in colorectal surgical oncology.

  18. Tropism between hepatic and pulmonary metastases in colorectal cancers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Hyun; Choi, So-Jung; Park, Joon Suk; Lee, Jinseon; Cho, Yong Beom; Kang, Min-Woong; Lee, Woo Yong; Choi, Yong Soo; Kim, Hong Kwan; Han, Joungho; Chun, Ho-Kyung; Kim, Jhingook

    2012-08-01

    In metastatic colorectal cancers, tumor cells are disseminated prior to surgical resection of the primary tumor but remain dormant until proper colonization mechanisms are activated. To identify the colonization mechanisms of the metastatic tumors, we conducted a pairwise comparison between primary colorectal cancers and metastatic tumors (n=12 pairs), including six hepatic pairs and six pulmonary pairs. The mRNA levels of 224 genes previously reported to be associated with metastasis, cytokines and angiogenesis were quantitatively determined by PCR arrays. Among them, 27 genes were duplicated or triplicated to show consistent expression. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of the Ct values of metastasis-related genes revealed that liver metastases were indistinguishable from primary colorectal cancers (n=5/6), whereas lung metastases were highly diversified from one another and from the primary tumors (n=6/6). Cytokines and receptor gene expression array data also confirmed the divergence of pulmonary metastases from primary colorectal cancers (n=6/6). Heat map analyses of ΔCt values of the metastasis-related genes identified a 17-gene tropism signature that was sufficient not only to distinguish liver and the lung metastases, but also reconstituted the clustering of primary tumors with the hepatic metastases (n=17/18). In this pilot experiment, pulmonary metastases were significantly diverged from hepatic metastases that were indistinguishable from primary colorectal cancers. Further genomic and clinical studies are in progress to evaluate the potential of the tropism signature as a therapeutic target to inhibit the colonization of metastatic colorectal cancers.

  19. Colorectal cancer screening: Opportunities to improve uptake, outcomes, and disparities

    PubMed Central

    Shahidi, Neal; Cheung, Winson Y

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer screening has become a standard of care in industrialized nations for those 50 to 75 years of age, along with selected high-risk populations. While colorectal cancer screening has been shown to reduce both the incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer, it is a complex multi-disciplinary process with a number of important steps that require optimization before tangible improvements in outcomes are possible. For both opportunistic and programmatic colorectal cancer screening, poor participant uptake remains an ongoing concern. Furthermore, current screening modalities (such as the guaiac based fecal occult blood test, fecal immunochemical test and colonoscopy) may be used or performed suboptimally, which can lead to missed neoplastic lesions and unnecessary endoscopic evaluations. The latter poses the risk of adverse events, such as perforation and post-polypectomy bleeding, as well as financial impacts to the healthcare system. Moreover, ongoing disparities in colorectal cancer screening persist among marginalized populations, including specific ethnic minorities (African Americans, Hispanics, Asians, Indigenous groups), immigrants, and those who are economically disenfranchised. Given this context, we aimed to review the current literature on these important areas pertaining to colorectal cancer screening, particularly focusing on the guaiac based fecal occult blood test, the fecal immunochemical test and colonoscopy. PMID:28042387

  20. Detection of colorectal cancer using time-resolved autofluorescence spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Sheng; Kwek, Leong-Chuan; Chia, Teck-Chee; Lim, Chu-Sing; Tang, Choong-Leong; Ang, Wuan-Suan; Zhou, Miao-Chang; Loke, Po-Ling

    2006-04-01

    As we know Quantum mechanics is a mathematical theory that can describe the behavior of objects that are at microscopic level. Time-resolved autofluorescence spectrometer monitors events that occur during the lifetime of the excited state. This time ranges from a few picoseconds to hundreds of nanoseconds. That is an extremely important advance as it allows environmental parameters to be monitored in a spatially defined manner in the specimen under study. This technique is based on the application of Quantum Mechanics. This principle is applied in our project as we are trying to use different fluorescence spectra to detect biological molecules commonly found in cancerous colorectal tissue and thereby differentiate the cancerous and non-cancerous colorectal polyps more accurately and specifically. In this paper, we use Fluorescence Lifetime Spectrometer (Edinburgh Instruments FL920) to measure decay time of autofluorescence of colorectal cancerous and normal tissue sample. All specimens are from Department of Colorectal Surgery, Singapore General Hospital. The tissues are placed in the time-resolved autofluorescence instrument, which records and calculates the decay time of the autofluorescence in the tissue sample at the excitation and emission wavelengths pre-determined from a conventional spectrometer. By studying the decay time,τ, etc. for cancerous and normal tissue, we aim to present time-resolved autofluorescence as a feasible technique for earlier detection of malignant colorectal tissues. By using this concept, we try to contribute an algorithm even an application tool for real time early diagnosis of colorectal cancer for clinical services.

  1. Coffee Consumption and the Incidence of Colorectal Cancer in Women

    PubMed Central

    Groessl, Erik J.; Allison, Matthew A.; Larson, Joseph C.; Ho, Samuel B.; Snetslaar, Linda G.; Lane, Dorothy S.; Tharp, Katie M.; Stefanick, Marcia L.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Higher coffee consumption has been associated with decreased incidence of colorectal cancer. Our objective was to examine the relationship of coffee intake to colorectal cancer incidence in a large observational cohort of postmenopausal US women. Methods. Data were collected for the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study providing a follow-up period of 12.9 years. The mean age of our sample (N = 83,778 women) was 63.5 years. Daily coffee intake was grouped into 3 categories: None, moderate (>0–<4 cups), and high (4+ cups). Proportional hazards modeling was used to evaluate the relationship between coffee intake and colorectal cancer. Results. There were 1,282 (1.53%) new cases of colorectal cancer during follow-up. Compared to nondrinkers, moderate and high coffee drinkers had an increased incidence of colorectal cancer in multivariate analysis (HR 1.15, 1.02–1.29; HR 1.14, 0.93–1.38). Moderate drip brew coffee intake (HR 1.20, 1.05–1.36) and high nondrip brew coffee intake (HR 1.43, 1.01–2.02) were associated with increased odds. Conclusion. Our results suggesting increased incidence of colorectal cancer associated with higher coffee consumption contradict recent meta-analyses but agree with a number of other studies showing that coffee increases risk or has no effect. Brew method results are novel and warrant further research. PMID:27239197

  2. Geographic disparities in colorectal cancer survival

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Kevin A; Niu, Xiaoling; Boscoe, Francis P

    2009-01-01

    Background Examining geographic variation in cancer patient survival can help identify important prognostic factors that are linked by geography and generate hypotheses about the underlying causes of survival disparities. In this study, we apply a recently developed spatial scan statistic method, designed for time-to-event data, to determine whether colorectal cancer (CRC) patient survival varies by place of residence after adjusting survival times for several prognostic factors. Methods Using data from a population-based, statewide cancer registry, we examined a cohort of 25,040 men and women from New Jersey who were newly diagnosed with local or regional stage colorectal cancer from 1996 through 2003 and followed to the end of 2006. Survival times were adjusted for significant prognostic factors (sex, age, stage at diagnosis, race/ethnicity and census tract socioeconomic deprivation) and evaluated using a spatial scan statistic to identify places where CRC survival was significantly longer or shorter than the statewide experience. Results Age, sex and stage adjusted survival times revealed several areas in the northern part of the state where CRC survival was significantly different than expected. The shortest and longest survival areas had an adjusted 5-year survival rate of 73.1% (95% CI 71.5, 74.9) and 88.3% (95% CI 85.4, 91.3) respectively, compared with the state average of 80.0% (95% CI 79.4, 80.5). Analysis of survival times adjusted for age, sex and stage as well as race/ethnicity and area socioeconomic deprivation attenuated the risk of death from CRC in several areas, but survival disparities persisted. Conclusion The results suggest that in areas where additional adjustments for race/ethnicity and area socioeconomic deprivation changed the geographic survival patterns and reduced the risk of death from CRC, the adjustment factors may be contributing causes of the disparities. Further studies should focus on specific and modifiable individual and

  3. Colorectal Cancer Screening Among Latinos in Three Communities on the Texas–Mexico Border

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, María E.; Savas, Lara S.; Wilson, Katherine M.; Byrd, Theresa L.; Atkinson, John; Torres-Vigil, Isabel; Vernon, Sally W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess colorectal cancer screening (CRCS) prevalence and psychosocial predictors among Texas Latinos in South Texas. Method Using multivariable analysis, we examined adjusted effects of perceived susceptibility, self-efficacy, pros and cons of CRCS, subjective norms, knowledge and fatalism on CRCS, in 544 Latinos (50 years and older). Results In this socioeconomically disadvantaged population 40% had never heard of any CRCS test and only34% reported ever completing a CRCS test. Insurance status, perceived cons, and self-efficacy were significantly associated with CRCS. Conclusion CRCS interventions in this population should focus on improving access, increasing self-efficacy and decreasing negative perceptions of CRCS. PMID:24786793

  4. Symptom burden among young adults with breast or colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Stacy D; Zhao, Fengmin; Salsman, John M; Chang, Victor T; Wagner, Lynne I; Fisch, Michael J

    2014-08-01

    Cancer incidence has increased among young adults (YAs) and survival rates have not improved compared with other age groups. Patient-reported outcomes may enhance our understanding of this vulnerable population. In a multisite prospective study, patients completed a cancer symptom inventory at the time of enrollment (T1) and 4 weeks to 5 weeks later (T2). YAs (those aged ≤ 39 years) with breast or colorectal cancer were compared with older adults (those aged ≥ 40 years) with breast or colorectal cancer with regard to symptom severity, symptom interference, changes over time, and medical care. Participants included 1544 patients with breast cancer (96 of whom were YAs) and 718 patients with colorectal cancer (37 of whom were YAs). Compared with older adults, YAs with breast cancer were more likely to report moderate/severe drowsiness, hair loss, and symptom interference with relationships at T1. YAs with colorectal cancer were more likely to report moderate/severe pain, fatigue, nausea, distress, drowsiness, shortness of breath, and rash plus interference in general activity, mood, work, relationships, and life enjoyment compared with older adults. Compared with older adults, shortness of breath, appetite, and sore mouth were more likely to improve in YAs with breast cancer; vomiting was less likely to improve in YAs with colorectal cancer. Referrals for supportive care were few, especially among patients with colorectal cancer. YAs with breast cancer were somewhat more likely to be referred to nutrition and psychiatry services than older patients. YAs reported symptom severity, symptom interference, and variations over time that were distinct from older patients. Distinctions were found to differ by diagnostic group. These findings enhance the understanding of symptom burden in YAs and inform the development of targeted interventions and future research. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  5. Lack of communication about familial colorectal cancer risk associated with colorectal adenomas (United States).

    PubMed

    Pho, K; Geller, A; Schroy, P C

    2000-07-01

    Sufficient evidence has accumulated to suggest that the first-degree relatives of patients diagnosed with colorectal adenomas before the age of 60 are at increased risk of colorectal cancer. The principal objective of this study was to assess the extent to which channels of communication exist between physicians, patients and their at-risk first-degree relatives regarding both familial risk and screening recommendations. A telephone survey was conducted among 79 patients (age < or = 60 years) with newly diagnosed colorectal adenomas. Information regarding patient demographics, awareness of familial risk, physician recommendations, and extent of communication with family members about their risk status and need for screening was ascertained. Forty-four (56%) of the 79 eligible subjects completed the survey. Only 18 (41%) responders were aware that their first-degree relatives were at increased risk of colorectal cancer, and the majority claimed to have gained their awareness through sources other than their physicians. Only five (28%) of the 18 knowledgeable patients notified their at-risk relatives of their status, and only two (11%) communicated the need for screening. This survey demonstrates poor communication about familial colorectal cancer risk associated with colorectal adenomas, and highlights the need for novel strategies to both promote awareness and facilitate screening of at-risk relatives.

  6. Coffee, colon function and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Vitaglione, Paola; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Pellegrini, Nicoletta

    2012-09-01

    For several years the physiological effects of coffee have been focused on its caffeine content, disregarding the hundreds of bioactive coffee components, such as polyphenols, melanoidins, carbohydrates, diterpenes, etc. These compounds may exert their protection against colorectal cancer (CRC), the third most common cancer worldwide. However, the amount and type of compounds ingested with the beverage may be highly different depending on the variety of coffee used, the roasting degree, the type of brewing method as well as the serving size. In this frame, this paper reviews the mechanisms by which coffee may influence the risk of CRC development focusing on espresso and filtered coffee, as well as on the components that totally or partially reach the colon i.e. polyphenols and dietary fiber, including melanoidins. In particular the effects of coffee on some colon conditions whose deregulation may lead to cancer, namely microbiota composition and lumen reducing environment, were considered. Taken together the discussed studies indicated that, due to their in vivo metabolism and composition, both coffee chlorogenic acids and dietary fiber, including melanoidins, may reduce CRC risk, increasing colon motility and antioxidant status. Further studies should finally assess whether the coffee benefits for colon are driven through a prebiotic effect.

  7. Cytokine-Induced Modulation of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mager, Lukas F.; Wasmer, Marie-Hélène; Rau, Tilman T.; Krebs, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of novel immunomodulatory cancer therapies over the last decade, above all immune checkpoint blockade, has significantly advanced tumor treatment. For colorectal cancer (CRC), a novel scoring system based on the immune cell infiltration in tumors has greatly improved disease prognostic evaluation and guidance to more specific therapy. These findings underline the relevance of tumor immunology in the future handling and therapeutic approach of malignant disease. Inflammation can either promote or suppress CRC pathogenesis and inflammatory mediators, mainly cytokines, critically determine the pro- or anti-tumorigenic signals within the tumor environment. Here, we review the current knowledge on the cytokines known to be critically involved in CRC development and illustrate their mechanisms of action. We also highlight similarities and differences between CRC patients and murine models of CRC and point out cytokines with an ambivalent role for intestinal cancer. We also identify some of the future challenges in the field that should be addressed for the development of more effective immunomodulatory therapies. PMID:27148488

  8. Current status of screening for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Garborg, K; Holme, Ø; Løberg, M; Kalager, M; Adami, H O; Bretthauer, M

    2013-08-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer morbidity and mortality. A well-defined precursor lesion (adenoma) and a long preclinical course make CRC a candidate for screening. This paper reviews the current evidence for the most important tests that are widely used or under development for population-based screening. In this narrative review, we scrutinized all papers we have been aware of, and carried out searches in PubMed and Cochrane library for relevant literature. Two screening methods have been shown to reduce CRC mortality in randomised trials: repetitive faecal occult blood testing (FOBT) reduces CRC mortality by 16%; once-only flexible sigmoidoscopy (FS) by 28%. FS screening also reduces CRC incidence (by 18%), FOBT does not. Colonoscopy screening has a potentially larger effect on CRC incidence and mortality, but randomised trials are lacking. New screening methods are on the horizon but need to be tested in large clinical trials before implementation in population screening. FS screening reduces CRC incidence and CRC mortality by removal of adenomas; FOBT reduces CRC mortality by early detection of cancer. Several other tests are available, but none has been evaluated in randomised trials. Screening strategies differ considerably across countries.

  9. Colorectal cancer screening: will non-invasive procedures triumph?

    PubMed

    Church, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    In the US, colorectal cancer is the fourth most common cancer and the second most deadly. Screening is recommended, not only to reduce mortality, but to prevent cancer by detecting precancerous polyps. Many screening methods are available now, and newer methods based on molecular markers show promise for the future.

  10. The potential of statins for individualized colorectal cancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Rutger J; Kodach, Liudmila L; Hardwick, James C H

    2011-12-01

    Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of death by cancer in the western world. Despite major progress, even new chemotherapeutic regimens have had relatively little impact on long term survival in the approximately 50% of patients with advanced disease at presentation meaning that prevention is the only realistic way to reduce the burden of this disease. Many countries have implemented population-based screening methods to prevent colorectal cancer by the physical removal of its precursor lesion the adenoma, or to detect cancer at an earlier stage when it is amenable to surgical cure. However these programs have only been shown to reduce colorectal cancer deaths by 30% in those screened and therefore new or complimentary approaches are needed. One such approach is chemoprevention. A number of compounds have shown potential in reducing the incidence of colorectal cancer. Most widely known are NSAIDs but recently inhibitors of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, also known as statins, commonly prescribed medications that lower serum cholesterol, have been shown to reduce colorectal cancer incidence. A critical issue in chemoprevention is the weighing of benefits against risks. In chemoprevention this balance is likely to be unfavourable when used in a wide unselected population even for the safest of compounds. Therapy should therefore be tailored to the individual patient. The balance will be more favourable in high risk groups such as individuals especially susceptible to neoplasia because of environmental risk factors, patients with inflammatory bowel disease, those with a hereditary predisposition and patients with a previous history of colorectal cancer or polyps. Furthermore colorectal cancer is not one disease but a heterogeneous group of diseases with different underlying molecular mechanisms. It is likely that both prevention and therapy will need to be tailored to the molecular subtype of the cancer in question. This may explain

  11. Colorectal-cancer incidence and mortality with screening flexible sigmoidoscopy.

    PubMed

    Schoen, Robert E; Pinsky, Paul F; Weissfeld, Joel L; Yokochi, Lance A; Church, Timothy; Laiyemo, Adeyinka O; Bresalier, Robert; Andriole, Gerald L; Buys, Saundra S; Crawford, E David; Fouad, Mona N; Isaacs, Claudine; Johnson, Christine C; Reding, Douglas J; O'Brien, Barbara; Carrick, Danielle M; Wright, Patrick; Riley, Thomas L; Purdue, Mark P; Izmirlian, Grant; Kramer, Barnett S; Miller, Anthony B; Gohagan, John K; Prorok, Philip C; Berg, Christine D

    2012-06-21

    The benefits of endoscopic testing for colorectal-cancer screening are uncertain. We evaluated the effect of screening with flexible sigmoidoscopy on colorectal-cancer incidence and mortality. From 1993 through 2001, we randomly assigned 154,900 men and women 55 to 74 years of age either to screening with flexible sigmoidoscopy, with a repeat screening at 3 or 5 years, or to usual care. Cases of colorectal cancer and deaths from the disease were ascertained. Of the 77,445 participants randomly assigned to screening (intervention group), 83.5% underwent baseline flexible sigmoidoscopy and 54.0% were screened at 3 or 5 years. The incidence of colorectal cancer after a median follow-up of 11.9 years was 11.9 cases per 10,000 person-years in the intervention group (1012 cases), as compared with 15.2 cases per 10,000 person-years in the usual-care group (1287 cases), which represents a 21% reduction (relative risk, 0.79; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.72 to 0.85; P<0.001). Significant reductions were observed in the incidence of both distal colorectal cancer (479 cases in the intervention group vs. 669 cases in the usual-care group; relative risk, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.64 to 0.80; P<0.001) and proximal colorectal cancer (512 cases vs. 595 cases; relative risk, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.76 to 0.97; P=0.01). There were 2.9 deaths from colorectal cancer per 10,000 person-years in the intervention group (252 deaths), as compared with 3.9 per 10,000 person-years in the usual-care group (341 deaths), which represents a 26% reduction (relative risk, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.63 to 0.87; P<0.001). Mortality from distal colorectal cancer was reduced by 50% (87 deaths in the intervention group vs. 175 in the usual-care group; relative risk, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.38 to 0.64; P<0.001); mortality from proximal colorectal cancer was unaffected (143 and 147 deaths, respectively; relative risk, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.77 to 1.22; P=0.81). Screening with flexible sigmoidoscopy was associated with a significant decrease in

  12. Colorectal-Cancer Incidence and Mortality with Screening Flexible Sigmoidoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Schoen, Robert E.; Pinsky, Paul F.; Weissfeld, Joel L.; Yokochi, Lance A.; Church, Timothy; Laiyemo, Adeyinka O.; Bresalier, Robert; Andriole, Gerald L.; Buys, Saundra S.; Crawford, E. David; Fouad, Mona N.; Isaacs, Claudine; Johnson, Christine C.; Reding, Douglas J.; O'Brien, Barbara; Carrick, Danielle M.; Wright, Patrick; Riley, Thomas L.; Purdue, Mark P.; Izmirlian, Grant; Kramer, Barnett S.; Miller, Anthony B.; Gohagan, John K.; Prorok, Philip C.; Berg, Christine D.

    2013-01-01

    Background The benefits of endoscopic testing for colorectal-cancer screening are uncertain. We evaluated the effect of screening with flexible sigmoidoscopy on colorectal-cancer incidence and mortality. Methods From 1993 through 2001, we randomly assigned 154,900 men and women 55 to 74 years of age either to screening with flexible sigmoidoscopy, with a repeat screening at 3 or 5 years, or to usual care. Cases of colorectal cancer and deaths from the disease were ascertained. Results Of the 77,445 participants randomly assigned to screening (intervention group), 83.5% underwent baseline flexible sigmoidoscopy and 54.0% were screened at 3 or 5 years. The incidence of colorectal cancer after a median follow-up of 11.9 years was 11.9 cases per 10,000 person-years in the intervention group (1012 cases), as compared with 15.2 cases per 10,000 person-years in the usual-care group (1287 cases), which represents a 21% reduction (relative risk, 0.79; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.72 to 0.85; P<0.001). Significant reductions were observed in the incidence of both distal colorectal cancer (479 cases in the intervention group vs. 669 cases in the usual-care group; relative risk, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.64 to 0.80; P<0.001) and proximal colorectal cancer (512 cases vs. 595 cases; relative risk, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.76 to 0.97; P = 0.01). There were 2.9 deaths from colorectal cancer per 10,000 person-years in the intervention group (252 deaths), as compared with 3.9 per 10,000 person-years in the usual-care group (341 deaths), which represents a 26% reduction (relative risk, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.63 to 0.87; P<0.001). Mortality from distal colorectal cancer was reduced by 50% (87 deaths in the intervention group vs. 175 in the usual-care group; relative risk, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.38 to 0.64; P<0.001); mortality from proximal colorectal cancer was unaffected (143 and 147 deaths, respectively; relative risk, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.77 to 1.22; P = 0.81). Conclusions Screening with flexible sigmoidoscopy was

  13. MicroRNAs: Clinical Relevance in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Joe; Ohtsuka, Masahisa; Pichler, Martin; Ling, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancer diagnoses and causes of mortality worldwide. MicroRNAs are a class of small, non-coding regulatory RNAs that have shown strong associations with colorectal cancer. Through the repression of target messenger RNAs, microRNAs modulate many cellular pathways, such as those involved in cell proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation. The utilization of microRNAs has shown significant promise in the diagnosis and prognosis of colorectal cancer, owing to their unique expression profile associations with cancer types and malignancies. Moreover, microRNA therapeutics with mimics or antagonists show great promise in preclinical studies, which encourages further development of their clinical use for colorectal cancer patients. The unique ability of microRNAs to affect multiple downstream pathways represents a novel approach for cancer therapy. Although still early in its development, we believe that microRNAs can be used in the near future as biomarkers and therapeutic targets for colorectal cancer. PMID:26602923

  14. Alcohol consumption and risk of colorectal cancer: the Findrink study.

    PubMed

    Toriola, Adetunji T; Kurl, Sudhir; Laukanen, Jari A; Mazengo, Charles; Kauhanen, Jussi

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the association between alcohol consumption and colorectal cancer because previous studies have yielded conflicting results. As part of the Findrink study, data from the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease (KIHD) Risk Factor Study were analysed. The KIHD study is a cohort of 2,682 men from Eastern Finland with no history of cancer at baseline. The men were grouped into five groups according to their weekly alcohol intake in grams. Association between alcohol and colorectal cancer was examined using Cox proportional hazard models. There were 59 cases of colorectal cancer during an average follow up of 16.7 years. Men within the highest quintile of alcohol consumption had a median weekly alcohol intake of 198.8 g. Age and examination year adjusted risk ratio of colorectal cancer among men within the highest quintile of alcohol consumption was 4.4 (95% CI: 1.6-11.9, P-value = 0.004). After adjusting for potential confounders, such as vegetable consumption, fibre intake, smoking, family history of cancer, socio-economic status, leisure time physical activity, men with the highest amount of alcohol consumption still had a 3.5-fold (95% CI: 1.2-9.9, P-value = 0.021) increased risk of colorectal cancer. Exclusion of men diagnosed with colorectal cancer during the first 2 years of follow up from the analyses did not alter the risk increase. In conclusion, this study gives further evidence of a positive association between alcohol consumption and the risk of colorectal cancer.

  15. Colorectal cancer: From prevention to personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Binefa, Gemma; Rodríguez-Moranta, Francisco; Teule, Àlex; Medina-Hayas, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a very heterogeneous disease that is caused by the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. CRC develops through a gradual accumulation of genetic and epigenetic changes, leading to the transformation of normal colonic mucosa into invasive cancer. CRC is one of the most prevalent and incident cancers worldwide, as well as one of the most deadly. Approximately 1235108 people are diagnosed annually with CRC, and 609051 die from CRC annually. The World Health Organization estimates an increase of 77% in the number of newly diagnosed cases of CRC and an increase of 80% in deaths from CRC by 2030. The incidence of CRC can benefit from different strategies depending on its stage: health promotion through health education campaigns (when the disease is not yet present), the implementation of screening programs (for detection of the disease in its early stages), and the development of nearly personalized treatments according to both patient characteristics (age, sex) and the cancer itself (gene expression). Although there are different strategies for screening and although the number of such strategies is increasing due to the potential of emerging technologies in molecular marker application, not all strategies meet the criteria required for screening tests in population programs; the three most accepted tests are the fecal occult blood test (FOBT), colonoscopy and sigmoidoscopy. FOBT is the most used method for CRC screening worldwide and is also the primary choice in most population-based screening programs in Europe. Due to its non-invasive nature and low cost, it is one of the most accepted techniques by population. CRC is a very heterogeneous disease, and with a few exceptions (APC, p53, KRAS), most of the genes involved in CRC are observed in a small percentage of cases. The design of genetic and epigenetic marker panels that are able to provide maximum coverage in the diagnosis of colorectal neoplasia seems a reasonable strategy

  16. Importance of sexuality in colorectal cancer: predictors, changes, and response to an intimacy enhancement intervention.

    PubMed

    Reese, Jennifer Barsky; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A

    2016-10-01

    The primary objectives were (1) to examine the importance of sexuality within the self-view and cross-sectional correlates for 120 colorectal cancer patients and (2) to determine whether the importance of sexuality changed for 46 colorectal cancer patients and partners participating in an intimacy enhancement intervention. Two newly developed items assessed importance of sexuality within the self-view (1) currently and (2) before cancer; a calculated change score assessed perceived change. In the cross-sectional sample, associations between importance of sexuality and demographic and medical factors and sexual function status were examined. Intervention participants' importance ratings before and after participation were used to calculate effect sizes. For patients, importance of sexuality before cancer was greater (M = 65.7) than current importance (M = 56.8, p = .001). Greater current importance of sexuality was associated with partnered status, non-metastatic disease, and not being in treatment. Scoring in the sexually functional range was associated with greater current importance of sexuality for men and a smaller perceived change in importance for both men and women (p values <.05). Sexual function status also significantly predicted current importance independent of covariates. Small to medium effect sizes for intervention patients (.37) and partners (.60) were found for increases in importance of sexuality. Items showed evidence of test-retest reliability and construct validity. Coping with sexual concerns is important to those affected by colorectal cancer. Findings suggest that the importance of sexuality can decrease through colorectal cancer and associated sexual problems and can increase through participating in an intimacy-focused intervention.

  17. Microbial Dysbiosis in Colorectal Cancer (CRC) Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sobhani, Iradj; Tap, Julien; Roudot-Thoraval, Françoise; Roperch, Jean P.; Letulle, Sophie; Langella, Philippe; Corthier, Gérard; Van Nhieu, Jeanne Tran; Furet, Jean P.

    2011-01-01

    The composition of the human intestinal microbiota is linked to health status. The aim was to analyze the microbiota of normal and colon cancer patients in order to establish cancer-related dysbiosis. Patients and Methods Stool bacterial DNA was extracted prior to colonoscopy from 179 patients: 60 with colorectal cancer, and 119 with normal colonoscopy. Bacterial genes obtained by pyrosequencing of 12 stool samples (6 Normal and 6 Cancer) were subjected to a validated Principal Component Analysis (PCA) test. The dominant and subdominant bacterial population (C. leptum, C. coccoides, Bacteroides/Prevotella, Lactobacillus/Leuconostoc/Pediococcus groups, Bifidobacterium genus, and E. coli, and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii species) were quantified in all individuals using qPCR and specific IL17 producer cells in the intestinal mucosa were characterized using immunohistochemistry. Findings Pyrosequencing (Minimal sequence 200 nucleotide reads) revealed 80% of all sequences could be assigned to a total of 819 taxa based on default parameter of Classifier software. The phylogenetic core in Cancer individuals was different from that in Normal individuals according to the PCA analysis, with trends towards differences in the dominant and subdominant families of bacteria. Consequently, All-bacteria [log10 (bacteria/g of stool)] in Normal, and Cancer individuals were similar [11.88±0.35, and 11.80±0.56, respectively, (P = 0.16)], according to qPCR values whereas among all dominant and subdominant species only those of Bacteroides/Prevotella were higher (All bacteria-specific bacterium; P = 0.009) in Cancer (-1.04±0.55) than in Normal (-1.40±0.83) individuals. IL17 immunoreactive cells were significantly expressed more in the normal mucosa of cancer patients than in those with normal colonoscopy. Conclusion This is the first large series to demonstrate a composition change in the microbiota of colon cancer patients with possible impact on mucosal immune response

  18. Evaluation of a 5-Marker Blood Test for Colorectal Cancer Early Detection in a Colorectal Cancer Screening Setting.

    PubMed

    Werner, Simone; Krause, Friedemann; Rolny, Vinzent; Strobl, Matthias; Morgenstern, David; Datz, Christian; Chen, Hongda; Brenner, Hermann

    2016-04-01

    In initial studies that included colorectal cancer patients undergoing diagnostic colonoscopy, we had identified a serum marker combination able to detect colorectal cancer with similar diagnostic performance as fecal immunochemical test (FIT). In this study, we aimed to validate the results in participants of a large colorectal cancer screening study conducted in the average-risk, asymptomatic screening population. We tested serum samples from 1,200 controls, 420 advanced adenoma patients, 4 carcinoma in situ patients, and 36 colorectal cancer patients with a 5-marker blood test [carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)+anti-p53+osteopontin+seprase+ferritin]. The diagnostic performance of individual markers and marker combinations was assessed and compared with stool test results. AUCs for the detection of colorectal cancer and advanced adenomas with the 5-marker blood test were 0.78 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.68-0.87] and 0.56 (95% CI, 0.53-0.59), respectively, which now is comparable with guaiac-based fecal occult blood test (gFOBT) but inferior to FIT. With cutoffs yielding specificities of 80%, 90%, and 95%, the sensitivities for the detection of colorectal cancer were 64%, 50%, and 42%, and early-stage cancers were detected as well as late-stage cancers. For osteopontin, seprase, and ferritin, the diagnostic performance in the screening setting was reduced compared with previous studies in diagnostic settings while CEA and anti-p53 showed similar diagnostic performance in both settings. Performance of the 5-marker blood test under screening conditions is inferior to FIT even though it is still comparable with the performance of gFOBT. CEA and anti-p53 could contribute to the development of a multiple marker blood-based test for early detection of colorectal cancer. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Blood donation and colorectal cancer incidence and mortality in men.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuehong; Ma, Jing; Wu, Kana; Chan, Andrew T; Fuchs, Charles S; Giovannucci, Edward L

    2012-01-01

    Although blood donations may reduce body iron stores, to date, prospective data on frequent blood donation and colorectal cancer risk are limited. We tested whether frequent blood donation is associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. We prospectively followed 35,121 men who provide the information on lifetime number of blood donations in 1992 through 2008. Serum ferritin levels were measured in a random sample of 305 men. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to calculate the multivariable relative risks (RRs, 95%CIs) after adjusting for age and other established colorectal cancer risk factors. We documented 684 incident colorectal cancer cases and 224 deaths from colorectal cancer. The mean serum ferritin levels varied from 178 µg/L for men who did not donate blood to 98 µg/L for men who had at least 30 donations. Age-adjusted results for both incidence and mortality were essentially the same as the multivariable-adjusted results. Comparing with non-donors, the multivariable RRs (95%CIs) for colorectal cancer incidence were 0.92 (0.77, 1.11) for 1-5 donation, 0.85 (0.64, 1.11) for 6-9 donations, 0.96 (0.73, 1.26) for 10-19 donations, 0.91 (0.63, 1.32) for 20-29 donations, and 0.97 (0.68, 1.38) for at least 30 donations (P(trend) = 0.92). The multivariable RRs for colorectal cancer mortality were 0.99 (0.72, 1.36) for 1-5 donation, 0.93 (0.57, 1.51) for 6-9 donations, 0.85 (0.50, 1.42) for 10-19 donations, and 1.14 (0.72, 1.83) for at least 20 donations (P(trend) = 0.82). The results did not vary by cancer sub-sites, intake levels of total iron, heme iron, or family history of colorectal cancer. Frequent blood donations were not associated with colorectal cancer incidence and mortality in men. Our results do not support an important role of body iron stores in colorectal carcinogenesis.

  20. Vegetarian dietary patterns and the risk of colorectal cancers.

    PubMed

    Orlich, Michael J; Singh, Pramil N; Sabaté, Joan; Fan, Jing; Sveen, Lars; Bennett, Hannelore; Knutsen, Synnove F; Beeson, W Lawrence; Jaceldo-Siegl, Karen; Butler, Terry L; Herring, R Patti; Fraser, Gary E

    2015-05-01

    Colorectal cancers are a leading cause of cancer mortality, and their primary prevention by diet is highly desirable. The relationship of vegetarian dietary patterns to colorectal cancer risk is not well established. To evaluate the association between vegetarian dietary patterns and incident colorectal cancers. The Adventist Health Study 2 (AHS-2) is a large, prospective, North American cohort trial including 96,354 Seventh-Day Adventist men and women recruited between January 1, 2002, and December 31, 2007. Follow-up varied by state and was indicated by the cancer registry linkage dates. Of these participants, an analytic sample of 77,659 remained after exclusions. Analysis was conducted using Cox proportional hazards regression, controlling for important demographic and lifestyle confounders. The analysis was conducted between June 1, 2014, and October 20, 2014. Diet was assessed at baseline by a validated quantitative food frequency questionnaire and categorized into 4 vegetarian dietary patterns (vegan, lacto-ovo vegetarian, pescovegetarian, and semivegetarian) and a nonvegetarian dietary pattern. The relationship between dietary patterns and incident cancers of the colon and rectum; colorectal cancer cases were identified primarily by state cancer registry linkages. During a mean follow-up of 7.3 years, 380 cases of colon cancer and 110 cases of rectal cancer were documented. The adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) in all vegetarians combined vs nonvegetarians were 0.78 (95% CI, 0.64-0.95) for all colorectal cancers, 0.81 (95% CI, 0.65-1.00) for colon cancer, and 0.71 (95% CI, 0.47-1.06) for rectal cancer. The adjusted HR for colorectal cancer in vegans was 0.84 (95% CI, 0.59-1.19); in lacto-ovo vegetarians, 0.82 (95% CI, 0.65-1.02); in pescovegetarians, 0.57 (95% CI, 0.40-0.82); and in semivegetarians, 0.92 (95% CI, 0.62-1.37) compared with nonvegetarians. Effect estimates were similar for men and women and for black and nonblack individuals. Vegetarian diets are

  1. Vegetarian Dietary Patterns and the Risk of Colorectal Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Orlich, Michael J.; Singh, Pramil N.; Sabaté, Joan; Fan, Jing; Sveen, Lars; Bennett, Hannelore; Knutsen, Synnove F.; Beeson, W. Lawrence; Jaceldo-Siegl, Karen; Butler, Terry L.; Herring, R. Patti; Fraser, Gary E.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Colorectal cancers are a leading cause of cancer mortality, and their primary prevention by diet is highly desirable. The relationship of vegetarian dietary patterns to colorectal cancer risk is not well established. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the association between vegetarian dietary patterns and incident colorectal cancers. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS The Adventist Health Study 2 (AHS-2) is a large, prospective, North American cohort trial including 96 354 Seventh-Day Adventist men and women recruited between January 1, 2002, and December 31, 2007. Follow-up varied by state and was indicated by the cancer registry linkage dates. Of these participants, an analytic sample of 77 659 remained after exclusions. Analysis was conducted using Cox proportional hazards regression, controlling for important demographic and lifestyle confounders. The analysis was conducted between June 1, 2014, and October 20, 2014. EXPOSURES Diet was assessed at baseline by a validated quantitative food frequency questionnaire and categorized into 4 vegetarian dietary patterns (vegan, lacto-ovo vegetarian, pescovegetarian, and semivegetarian) and a nonvegetarian dietary pattern. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The relationship between dietary patterns and incident cancers of the colon and rectum; colorectal cancer cases were identified primarily by state cancer registry linkages. RESULTS During a mean follow-up of 7.3 years, 380 cases of colon cancer and 110 cases of rectal cancer were documented. The adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) in all vegetarians combined vs nonvegetarians were 0.78 (95% CI, 0.64–0.95) for all colorectal cancers, 0.81 (95%CI, 0.65–1.00) for colon cancer, and 0.71 (95% CI, 0.47–1.06) for rectal cancer. The adjusted HR for colorectal cancer in vegans was 0.84 (95% CI, 0.59–1.19); in lacto-ovo vegetarians, 0.82 (95% CI, 0.65–1.02); in pescovegetarians, 0.57 (95% CI, 0.40–0.82); and in semivegetarians, 0.92 (95% CI, 0.62–1.37) compared with

  2. Autofluorescence polarization spectroscopy of cancerous and normal colorectal tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genova, Ts.; Borisova, E.; Penkov, N.; Vladimirov, B.; Terziev, I.; Zhelyazkova, Al.; Avramov, L.

    2016-01-01

    The wide spread of colorectal cancer and high mortality rate among the patients, brings it to a level of high public health concern. Implementation of standard endoscopic surveillance proves to be effective for reduction of colorectal cancer patients' mortality, since its early diagnosis allows eradication of the disease prior to invasive cancer development, but its application in common clinical practice is still limited. Therefore the development of complimentary diagnostic techniques of the standard white-light endoscopy is on high demand. The non-invasive and highly informative nature of the fluorescence spectroscopy allow to use it as the most realistic prospect of an add-on "red flag" technique for early endoscopy detection of colorectal cancer. Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS) is a steady-state approach that is used for evaluation of specific fluorescence characteristics of cancerous colorectal tissues in our studies. The feasibility of polarization fluorescence technique to enhance the contrast between normal and cancerous tissues was investigated as well. Additional linear polarizing optics was used on the way of the excitation and emission fluorescence light beams. The polarizing effects were investigated in parallel and perpendicular linear polarization modes respectively. The excitation applied was in the region of 280 - 440 nm, with 10 nm scanning step, and the fluorescence emission was detected in the region of 300 - 800 nm. Our previous experience with SFS technique showed its great potential for accurate, highly sensitive and specific discrimination between cancerous and normal colorectal tissue. Since one of the major sources of endogenous fluorescence with diagnostic meaning is the structural protein - collagen, which is characterized with high anisotropy, we've expected and observed an enhancement of the spectral differences between cancerous and normal colorectal tissue, which could be beneficial for the colorectal tumour' diagnostics

  3. Increased risk of colorectal cancer after obesity surgery.

    PubMed

    Derogar, Maryam; Hull, Mark A; Kant, Prashant; Östlund, Magdalena; Lu, Yunxia; Lagergren, Jesper

    2013-12-01

    The purpose was to determine whether obesity surgery is associated with a long-term increased risk of colorectal cancer. Long-term cancer risk after obesity surgery is not well characterized. Preliminary epidemiological observations and human tissue biomarker studies recently suggested an increased risk of colorectal cancer after obesity surgery. A nationwide retrospective register-based cohort study in Sweden was conducted in 1980-2009. The long-term risk of colorectal cancer in patients who underwent obesity surgery, and in an obese no surgery cohort, was compared with that of the age-, sex- and calendar year-matched general background population between 1980 and 2009. Obese individuals were stratified into an obesity surgery cohort and an obese no surgery cohort. The standardized incidence ratio (SIR), with 95% confidence interval (CI), was calculated. Of 77,111 obese patients, 15,095 constituted the obesity surgery cohort and 62,016 constituted the obese no surgery cohort. In the obesity surgery cohort, we observed 70 patients with colorectal cancer, rendering an overall SIR of 1.60 (95% CI 1.25-2.02). The SIR for colorectal cancer increased with length of time after surgery, with a SIR of 2.00 (95% CI 1.48-2.64) after 10 years or more. In contrast, the overall SIR in the obese no surgery cohort (containing 373 colorectal cancers) was 1.26 (95% CI 1.14-1.40) and remained stable with increasing follow-up time. Obesity surgery seems to be associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer over time. These findings would prompt evaluation of colonoscopy surveillance for the increasingly large population who undergo obesity surgery.

  4. The Expression and Significance of Feces Cyclooxygensae-2 mRNA in Colorectal Cancer and Colorectal Adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaofeng; Kong, Lixia; Liao, Suhuan; Lu, Jing; Ma, Lin; Long, Xiaohua

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aim: This study aims to explore the expression and significance of feces cyclooxygensae-2 (COX-2) mRNA in colorectal cancer and colorectal adenomas. Materials and Methods: The expression of feces COX-2 mRNA in colorectal cancer (n = 28), colorectal adenomas (n = 54), and normal control group (n = 11) were examined by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The positive rate of fecal occult blood test (FOBT) were detected in colorectal cancer (n = 30), colorectal adenomas (n = 56), and normal control group (n = 11); the sensitivity of the two methods was also compared. Results: The positive rate of feces COX-2 mRNA in colorectal cancer was 82.1% (25/28), which was significantly higher than colorectal adenomas 59.3% (32/54), and normal tissues 18.2% (2/11), the difference being significant between the three groups (χ2= 13.842, P = 0.001). The positive rate of FOBT in colorectal cancer was 73.3% (10/30), which was significantly higher than colorectal adenomas 10.7% (6/56) and normal tissues 9.1% (1/11), the difference being significant between these three groups (χ2= 7.525, P = 0.023). There was no significant association between feces COX-2 expression and various clinical pathological features of colorectal cancer and colorectal adenomas (P > 0.05). The sensitivity of the RT-PCR method is higher than FOBT, however, the specificity of FOBT is slightly higher than RT-PCR. Conclusions: High expression of feces COX-2 mRNA in colorectal adenomas and colorectal cancer is a common event; it is an early event in the development of colorectal adenomas to colorectal cancer. Feces COX-2 mRNA has a high sensitivity for detect colorectal cancer; combination with FOBT will be the best alternative. Feces COX-2 can be potentially used in the early diagnosis and screening of colorectal cancer. PMID:28139497

  5. Minimally Invasive Colorectal Cancer Surgery in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Babaei, Masoud; Balavarca, Yesilda; Jansen, Lina; Gondos, Adam; Lemmens, Valery; Sjövall, Annika; B⊘rge Johannesen, Tom; Moreau, Michel; Gabriel, Liberale; Gonçalves, Ana Filipa; Bento, Maria José; van de Velde, Tony; Kempfer, Lana Raffaela; Becker, Nikolaus; Ulrich, Alexis; Ulrich, Cornelia M.; Schrotz-King, Petra; Brenner, Hermann

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) of colorectal cancer (CRC) was first introduced over 20 years ago and recently has gained increasing acceptance and usage beyond clinical trials. However, data on dissemination of the method across countries and on long-term outcomes are still sparse. In the context of a European collaborative study, a total of 112,023 CRC cases from 3 population-based (N = 109,695) and 4 institute-based clinical cancer registries (N = 2328) were studied and compared on the utilization of MIS versus open surgery. Cox regression models were applied to study associations between surgery type and survival of patients from the population-based registries. The study considered adjustment for potential confounders. The percentage of CRC patients undergoing MIS differed substantially between centers and generally increased over time. MIS was significantly less often used in stage II to IV colon cancer compared with stage I in most centers. MIS tended to be less often used in older (70+) than in younger colon cancer patients. MIS tended to be more often used in women than in men with rectal cancer. MIS was associated with significantly reduced mortality among colon cancer patients in the Netherlands (hazard ratio [HR] 0.66, 95% confidence interval [CI] (0.63–0.69), Sweden (HR 0.68, 95% CI 0.60–0.76), and Norway (HR 0.73, 95% CI 0.67–0.79). Likewise, MIS was associated with reduced mortality of rectal cancer patients in the Netherlands (HR 0.74, 95% CI 0.68–0.80) and Sweden (HR 0.77, 95% CI 0.66–0.90). Utilization of MIS in CRC resection is increasing, but large variation between European countries and clinical centers prevails. Our results support association of MIS with substantially enhanced survival among colon cancer patients. Further studies controlling for selection bias and residual confounding are needed to establish role of MIS in survival of patients. PMID:27258522

  6. Cancer risk analysis in families with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Köküer, Münevver; Naguib, Raouf N G; Jancovic, Peter; Younghusband, H Banfield; Green, Roger C

    2006-07-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common fatal cancers in developed countries and represents a significant public-health issue. About 3%-5% of patients with CRC have hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). Cancer morbidity and mortality can be reduced if early and intensive screening is pursued. However, despite advances in screening, population-wide genetic screening for HNPCC is not currently considered feasible due to its complexity and expense. If the risk of a family having HNPCC can be identified/assessed, then only the high-risk fraction of the population would undergo intensive screening. This identification is currently performed by a genetic counselor/physician who makes the decision based on some pre-defined criteria. Here, we report on a system to identify the risk of a family having HNPCC based on its history. We compare artificial neural networks and statistical approaches for assessing the risk of a family having HNPCC and discuss the experimental results obtained by these two approaches.

  7. BRACHYURY confers cancer stem cell characteristics on colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Debalina; Shields, Brian; Davies, Melanie L; Müller, Jürgen; Wakeman, Jane A

    2012-01-15

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are initiating cells in colorectal cancer (CRC). Colorectal tumours undergo epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT)-like processes at the invasive front, enabling invasion and metastasis, and recent studies have linked this process to the acquisition of stem cell-like properties. It is of fundamental importance to understand the molecular events leading to the establishment of cancer initiating cells and how these mechanisms relate to cellular transitions during tumourigenesis. We use an in vitro system to recapitulate changes in CRC cells at the invasive front (mesenchymal-like cells) and central mass (epithelial-like cells) of tumours. We show that the mesoderm inducer BRACHYURY is expressed in a subpopulation of CRC cells that resemble invasive front mesenchymal-like cells, where it acts to impose characteristics of CSCs in a fully reversible manner, suggesting reversible formation and modulation of such cells. BRACHYURY, itself regulated by the oncogene β-catenin, influences NANOG and other 'stemness' markers including a panel of markers defining CRC-CSC whose presence has been linked to poor patient prognosis. Similar regulation of NANOG through BRACHYURY was observed in other cells lines, suggesting this might be a pathway common to cancer cells undergoing mesenchymal transition. We suggest that BRACHYURY may regulate NANOG in mesenchymal-like CRC cells to impose a 'plastic-state', allowing competence of cells to respond to signals prompting invasion or metastasis.

  8. Immediately modifiable risk factors attributable to colorectal cancer in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Naing, Cho; Lai, Pei Kuan; Mak, Joon Wah

    2017-08-04

    This study aimed to estimate potential reductions in case incidence of colorectal cancer attributable to the modifiable risk factors such as alcohol consumption, overweight and physical inactivity amongst the Malaysian population. Gender specific population-attributable fractions (PAFs) for colorectal cancer in Malaysia were estimated for the three selected risk factors (physical inactivity, overweight, and alcohol consumptions). Exposure prevalence were sourced from a large-scale national representative survey. Risk estimates of the relationship between the exposure of interest and colorectal cancer were obtained from published meta-analyses. The overall PAF was then estimated, using the 2013 national cancer incidence data from the Malaysian Cancer Registry. Overall, the mean incidence rate for colorectal cancer in Malaysia from 2008 to 2013 was 21.3 per 100,000 population, with the mean age of 61.6 years (±12.7) and the majority were men (56.6%). Amongst 369 colorectal cancer cases in 2013, 40 cases (20 men, 20 women), 10 cases (9 men, 1 woman) or 20 cases (16 men,4 women) would be prevented, if they had done physical exercises, could reduce their body weight to normal level or avoided alcohol consumption, assuming that these factors are causally related to colorectal cancer. It was estimated that 66 (17.8%;66/369) colorectal cancer cases (42 men, 24 women) who had all these three risk factors for the last 10 years would have been prevented, if they could control these three risk factors through effective preventive measures. Findings suggest that approximately 18% of colorectal cancer cases in Malaysia would be prevented through appropriate preventive measures such as doing regular physical exercises, reducing their body weight to normal level and avoiding alcohol consumption, if these factors are causally related to colorectal cancer. Scaling-up nationwide public health campaigns tailored to increase physical activity, controlling body weight within normal

  9. Awareness of Dietary and Alcohol Guidelines Among Colorectal Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Nikki A; Berkowitz, Zahava; Rodriguez, Juan L

    2015-12-01

    Although dietary habits can affect colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors' health, it is unclear how familiar survivors are with dietary guidelines, what they believe about healthy eating and alcohol consumption, and what hinders healthy dietary habits after cancer. This study assessed CRC survivors' familiarity with dietary guidelines, their eating and drinking habits, and perceived facilitators and barriers to healthy eating after cancer, including social support and self-efficacy for maintaining a healthy diet and limiting alcohol. A total of 593 individuals (50% female; mean age, 74 years) diagnosed with CRC approximately 6 years prior to study entry in early 2010 were identified through California Cancer Registry records and participated in a cross-sectional mailed survey assessing health behavior after cancer (46% adjusted response rate). Analyses were conducted in 2014-2015. Survivors were most familiar with-and most likely to follow-recommendations to choose low-fat foods; 15% had never heard of recommendations to limit alcohol. Survivors were more aware of recommendations involving messages to limit/avoid versus approach/choose certain foods. The most common barrier to a healthy diet involved the effort required (26%). Survivors received more family/friend support and provider recommendations for healthy eating than limiting alcohol. Results provide an overview of awareness of and adherence to dietary recommendations among CRC survivors, highlighting the need for increasing awareness of recommendations that are especially relevant for survivors. Suggestions are made for modifying diet-related messages to facilitate comprehension and recall among CRC survivors, and increasing awareness among groups with the lowest awareness levels. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. GST gene polymorphisms and the risk of colorectal cancer development.

    PubMed

    Klusek, Justyna; Głuszek, Stanisław; Klusek, Jolanta

    2014-01-01

    Increasingly often, molecular studies of colorectal cancer focus on low penetrance genes. Among the factors potentially modifying the risk of contracting colorectal cancer is the glutathione S-transferase (GST) gene family, encoding enzymes of the glutathione transferase type. Proteins of the GST family (glutathione S-transferases) are enzymes detoxifying a wide range of hazardous substances, such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) or xenobionts. Thus, their role, among other things, is the protection of DNA against oxidative damage, which may lead to mutations, and in consequence, favour carcinogenesis. GST gene polymorphisms may affect the functioning of the encoded enzymes, exerting an effect on the level of DNA damage, and therefore may have an indirect influence on the risk of the development of cancer. At present, there are many studies available concerning GST gene polymorphisms as factors modulating the risk of developing cancer, including colorectal cancer.

  11. Pro-inflammatory prostaglandins and progression of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dingzhi; DuBois, Raymond N.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is a risk factor for several gastrointestinal malignancies, including esophageal, gastric, hepatic, pancreatic and colorectal cancer. It has long been known that long-term use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) reduces the relative risk of developing colorectal cancer. NSAIDs exert their anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor effects primarily by inhibiting activity of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes. Cyclooxygenase enzymes catalyze the conversion of arachidonic acid into prostanoids, including prostaglandins (PGs) and thromboxanes (TXs). Emerging evidence demonstrates that prostaglandins play an important role in inflammation and cancer. In this review, we highlight recent breakthroughs in our understanding of the roles of the different prostaglandins in colorectal cancer (CRC) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). These findings may provide a rationale for the development of new anti-inflammatory therapeutic approaches to cancer prevention and/or treatment. PMID:18406516

  12. Colorectal cancer surveillance in Hodgkin lymphoma survivors at increased risk of therapy-related colorectal cancer: study design.

    PubMed

    Rigter, Lisanne S; Spaander, Manon C W; Moons, Leon M; Bisseling, Tanya M; Aleman, Berthe M P; de Boer, Jan Paul; Lugtenburg, Pieternella J; Janus, Cecile P M; Petersen, Eefke J; Roesink, Judith M; Raemaekers, John M M; van der Maazen, Richard W M; Cats, Annemieke; Bleiker, Eveline M A; Snaebjornsson, Petur; Carvalho, Beatriz; Lansdorp-Vogelaar, Iris; Jóźwiak, Katarzyna; Te Riele, Hein; Meijer, Gerrit A; van Leeuwen, Flora E; van Leerdam, Monique E

    2017-02-07

    Second primary malignancies are a major cause of excess morbidity and mortality in cancer survivors. Hodgkin lymphoma survivors who were treated with infradiaphragmatic radiotherapy and/or high-dose procarbazine have an increased risk to develop colorectal cancer. Colonoscopy surveillance plays an important role in colorectal cancer prevention by removal of the precursor lesions (adenomas) and early detection of cancer, resulting in improved survival rates. Therefore, Hodgkin lymphoma survivors treated with infradiaphragmatic radiotherapy and/or high-dose procarbazine could benefit from colonoscopy, or other surveillance modalities, which are expected to reduce colorectal cancer incidence and mortality. Current knowledge on clinicopathological and molecular characteristics of therapy-related colorectal cancer is limited. The pathogenesis of such colorectal cancers might be different from the pathogenesis in the general population and therefore these patients might require a different clinical approach. We designed a study with the primary aim to assess the diagnostic yield of a first surveillance colonoscopy among Hodgkin lymphoma survivors at increased risk of colorectal cancer and to compare these results with different screening modalities in the general population. Secondary aims include assessment of the test characteristics of stool tests and evaluation of burden, acceptance and satisfaction of CRC surveillance through two questionnaires. This prospective multicenter cohort study will include Hodgkin lymphoma survivors who survived ≥8 years after treatment with infradiaphragmatic radiotherapy and/or procarbazine (planned inclusion of 259 participants). Study procedures will consist of a surveillance colonoscopy with removal of precursor lesions (adenomas) and 6-8 normal colonic tissue biopsies, a fecal immunochemical test and a stool DNA test. All neoplastic lesions encountered will be classified using relevant histomorphological, immunohistochemical and

  13. Meat, fish and fat intake in relation to subsite-specific risk of colorectal cancer: The Fukuoka Colorectal Cancer Study.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yasumi; Kono, Suminori; Toyomura, Kengo; Nagano, Jun; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Moore, Malcolm A; Mibu, Ryuichi; Tanaka, Masao; Kakeji, Yoshihiro; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Okamura, Takeshi; Ikejiri, Koji; Futami, Kitaroh; Yasunami, Yohichi; Maekawa, Takafumi; Takenaka, Kenji; Ichimiya, Hitoshi; Imaizumi, Nobutoshi

    2007-04-01

    High intake of red meat has been associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer in Western countries. There has been much interest in the role of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in colorectal cancer prevention, but epidemiological findings are limited and inconsistent. The objective of our study was to examine associations of meat, fish and fat intake with risk of colorectal cancer, paying particular attention to the subsite within the colorectum. Data were from the Fukuoka Colorectal Cancer Study, a population-based case-control study, covering 782 cases and 793 controls. Diet was assessed by interview, using newly developed personal-computer software for registering semiquantitative food frequencies. The intake of beef/pork, processed meat, total fat, saturated fat or n-6 PUFA showed no clear association with the overall or subsite-specific risk of colorectal cancer. There was an almost significant inverse association between n-3 PUFA and the risk of colorectal cancer; the covariate-adjusted odds ratio for the highest (median 3.94 g/day) versus lowest (median 1.99 g/day) quintile of energy-adjusted intake was 0.74 (95% confidence interval 0.52-1.06, trend P=0.050). The consumption of fish and fish products was similarly inversely related to the risk although the association was not statistically significant. These associations were more evident for distal colon cancer; adjusted odds ratio for the highest versus lowest quintile of n-3 PUFA intake was 0.56 (95% confidence interval 0.34-0.92, trend P=0.02). Our findings do not support the hypothesis that consumption of red meat increases colorectal cancer risk but do suggest that high intake of fish may decrease the risk, particularly of distal colon cancer.

  14. Cervical Cancer Screening and Perceived Information Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whynes, David K.; Clarke, Katherine; Philips, Zoe; Avis, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To identify women's sources of information about cervical cancer screening, information which women report receiving during Pap consultations, information they would like to receive, and the relationships between perceived information needs, personal characteristics and information sources. Design/methodology/approach: Logistic regression…

  15. Cervical Cancer Screening and Perceived Information Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whynes, David K.; Clarke, Katherine; Philips, Zoe; Avis, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To identify women's sources of information about cervical cancer screening, information which women report receiving during Pap consultations, information they would like to receive, and the relationships between perceived information needs, personal characteristics and information sources. Design/methodology/approach: Logistic regression…

  16. Modeling and Control of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Song, Li-Peng; Wang, Hao-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal Cancer (CRC) is becoming a major threat to people’s life in China. Screening methods adopted by many other countries as effective counter-cancer methods have not been explicitly explored for people there. Thus, we present a Markov model with detailed precancerous adenoma states and then evaluate various screening strategies in this paper. Different from current researches, our model considers the population’s heterogeneous risk of developing adenomas and observation-based screening strategies. Furthermore, we also give a new cost-effectiveness metric. After calibrating, the model is simulated using the Monte Carlo method. Numerical results show that there are threshold values of compliance rates below which strategy with every ten-year colonoscopy becomes the most cost-effective method; otherwise, an observation-based screening strategy is the most cost-effective. We also find that strategy with single colonoscopy for adenoma-free individuals and every three-year colonoscopy for those with adenoma is recommended when the observation-based strategy is not considered. Our findings give an explicit and complete instruction in CRC screening protocol in average-risk Chinese. PMID:27536786

  17. New genes emerging for colorectal cancer predisposition

    PubMed Central

    Esteban-Jurado, Clara; Garre, Pilar; Vila, Maria; Lozano, Juan José; Pristoupilova, Anna; Beltrán, Sergi; Abulí, Anna; Muñoz, Jenifer; Balaguer, Francesc; Ocaña, Teresa; Castells, Antoni; Piqué, Josep M; Carracedo, Angel; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Bessa, Xavier; Andreu, Montserrat; Bujanda, Luis; Caldés, Trinidad; Castellví-Bel, Sergi

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most frequent neoplasms and an important cause of mortality in the developed world. This cancer is caused by both genetic and environmental factors although 35% of the variation in CRC susceptibility involves inherited genetic differences. Mendelian syndromes account for about 5% of the total burden of CRC, with Lynch syndrome and familial adenomatous polyposis the most common forms. Excluding hereditary forms, there is an important fraction of CRC cases that present familial aggregation for the disease with an unknown germline genetic cause. CRC can be also considered as a complex disease taking into account the common disease-commom variant hypothesis with a polygenic model of inheritance where the genetic components of common complex diseases correspond mostly to variants of low/moderate effect. So far, 30 common, low-penetrance susceptibility variants have been identified for CRC. Recently, new sequencing technologies including exome- and whole-genome sequencing have permitted to add a new approach to facilitate the identification of new genes responsible for human disease predisposition. By using whole-genome sequencing, germline mutations in the POLE and POLD1 genes have been found to be responsible for a new form of CRC genetic predisposition called polymerase proofreading-associated polyposis. PMID:24587672

  18. Hypercalcemia of Malignancy and Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Galindo, Rodolfo J; Romao, Isabela; Valsamis, Ageliki; Weinerman, Stuart; Harris, Yael Tobi

    2016-02-01

    Our aim is to describe the association between colorectal cancer (CRC) and humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy (HHM). Causes of hypercalcemia of malignancy include parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP) secretion, local osteolysis, calcitriol production and ectopic parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion. Hypercalcemia of malignancy in patients with CRCs is a rare scenario. A patient with anal squamous cell carcinoma was admitted with hypercalcemia, suppressed PTH and hypophosphatemia. He was found to have metastatic anal squamous cell carcinoma to the liver. Further evaluation revealed elevated PTHrP and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D and low 25-hydroxyvitamin D. Over a 5-month course, the hypercalcemia responded poorly to bisphosphonates, transiently to prednisone, but showed marked improvement with chemotherapy. A review of English language publications in Pubmed and a reference search of retrieved articles revealed 29 cases of CRC causing PTHrP-mediated hypercalcemia. Most patients were middle-aged men (mean ± SD: 56.7 ± 13.4 years), with advanced metastatic cancer (85% with hepatic metastasis) and severe hypercalcemia (mean ± SD: 15.6 ± 1.9 mg/dL, 62% with Ca > 14). This condition is associated with high mortality (79%) and short survival (median 54.5 days, CI: 21 - 168). Despite being uncommon, HHM (PTHrP-mediated) should be considered in patients with metastatic CRC presenting with hypercalcemia. Clinicians should be aware that combined etiologies may be present, particularly in cases of resistant hypercalcemia. Treatment of the underlying malignancy is essential for calcium control.

  19. Genomic landscape of metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Haan, Josien C; Labots, Mariette; Rausch, Christian; Koopman, Miriam; Tol, Jolien; Mekenkamp, Leonie J M; van de Wiel, Mark A; Israeli, Danielle; van Essen, Hendrik F; van Grieken, Nicole C T; Voorham, Quirinus J M; Bosch, Linda J W; Qu, Xueping; Kabbarah, Omar; Verheul, Henk M W; Nagtegaal, Iris D; Punt, Cornelis J A; Ylstra, Bauke; Meijer, Gerrit A

    2014-11-14

    Response to drug therapy in individual colorectal cancer (CRC) patients is associated with tumour biology. Here we describe the genomic landscape of tumour samples of a homogeneous well-annotated series of patients with metastatic CRC (mCRC) of two phase III clinical trials, CAIRO and CAIRO2. DNA copy number aberrations of 349 patients are determined. Within three treatment arms, 194 chromosomal subregions are associated with progression-free survival (PFS; uncorrected single-test P-values <0.005). These subregions are filtered for effect on messenger RNA expression, using an independent data set from The Cancer Genome Atlas which returned 171 genes. Three chromosomal regions are associated with a significant difference in PFS between treatment arms with or without irinotecan. One of these regions, 6q16.1-q21, correlates in vitro with sensitivity to SN-38, the active metabolite of irinotecan. This genomic landscape of mCRC reveals a number of DNA copy number aberrations associated with response to drug therapy.

  20. Genomic landscape of metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Haan, Josien C.; Labots, Mariette; Rausch, Christian; Koopman, Miriam; Tol, Jolien; Mekenkamp, Leonie J. M.; van de Wiel, Mark A.; Israeli, Danielle; van Essen, Hendrik F.; van Grieken, Nicole C. T.; Voorham, Quirinus J. M.; Bosch, Linda J. W.; Qu, Xueping; Kabbarah, Omar; Verheul, Henk M. W.; Nagtegaal, Iris D.; Punt, Cornelis J. A.; Ylstra, Bauke; Meijer, Gerrit A.

    2014-01-01

    Response to drug therapy in individual colorectal cancer (CRC) patients is associated with tumour biology. Here we describe the genomic landscape of tumour samples of a homogeneous well-annotated series of patients with metastatic CRC (mCRC) of two phase III clinical trials, CAIRO and CAIRO2. DNA copy number aberrations of 349 patients are determined. Within three treatment arms, 194 chromosomal subregions are associated with progression-free survival (PFS; uncorrected single-test P-values <0.005). These subregions are filtered for effect on messenger RNA expression, using an independent data set from The Cancer Genome Atlas which returned 171 genes. Three chromosomal regions are associated with a significant difference in PFS between treatment arms with or without irinotecan. One of these regions, 6q16.1–q21, correlates in vitro with sensitivity to SN-38, the active metabolite of irinotecan. This genomic landscape of mCRC reveals a number of DNA copy number aberrations associated with response to drug therapy. PMID:25394515

  1. Lifestyle and Sporadic Colorectal Cancer in India.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rupal; Doval, Dinesh Chandra; Hussain, Showket; Kumar, Kapil; Singh, Shivendra; Basir, Seemi Farhat; Bharadwaj, Mausumi

    2015-01-01

    The study evaluated the patient, lifestyle and tumor profile in patients undergoing upfront surgery for sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC) in Indian population. One hundred consecutive patients were included. Details related to their demographic profile, habits, signs and symptoms, tumor profile, further treatment and follow up were recorded. The majority of the patients had colonic cancer (68%), advanced tumor stage 3 and 4 (46%), moderately differentiated tumors (70%) with absence of lymphatic invasion (60%) and metastasis (90%). Correlations between tumor location and abdominal pain (p-value 0.002), bleeding per rectum (p-value <0.001), difficulty in micturition (p-value 0.012) and constipation (p-value 0.007) were found to be statistically significant. Abdominal pain was more frequently reported in patients with metastasis (p-value 0.031). Loss of weight statistically correlated with absence of lymphatic invasion (p-value 0.047). Associations between tumor stage and alcohol intake (p-value 0.050) and non vegetarian diet (p-value 0.006); lymphatic invasion and intake of spicy food (p-value 0.040) and non vegetarian diet (p-value 0.001) and metastasis and alcohol intake (p-value 0.041) were also observed. Age and tumor grade were also correlated (p-value 0.020). Minimizing the adverse lifestyle factors can help in reducing the overall incidence of CRC in the Indian population.

  2. Multiple roles of angiotensin in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kuniyasu, Hiroki

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) cells express renin and chymase through which they can activate angiotensin. Renin expression is induced by hyperglycemic conditions. As angiotensinogen is produced in the liver, CRC cells that can activate angiotensin have an enhanced ability to metastasize to this organ. In human CRC cases, patients with diabetes have higher activities of rennin and angiotensin-II in primary tumors, and on average, have a more progressed disease stage, especially with respect to liver metastasis. These patients exhibit a stronger association with Hemoglobin A1c levels and metastasis compared to patients without diabetes. In a combined diabetes/CRC liver metastasis mouse model, concurrent treatment with anti-angiotensin and hypoglycemic agents shows a synergic effect in terms of reduced liver metastasis and improved survival. The effect of anti-angiotensin treatment and blood sugar control as a baseline management for colon cancer patients with diabetes needs to be examined in clinical trials to establish whether it can prevent liver metastasis. PMID:23293754

  3. Novel RNA variants in colorectal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Alagaratnam, Sharmini; Zhao, Sen; Nome, Torfinn; Løvf, Marthe; Bakken, Anne C.; Hektoen, Merete; Sveen, Anita; Lothe, Ragnhild A.; Skotheim, Rolf I.

    2015-01-01

    With an annual estimated incidence of 1.4 million, and a five-year survival rate of 60%, colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major clinical burden. To identify novel RNA variants in CRC, we analyzed exon-level microarray expression data from a cohort of 202 CRCs. We nominated 25 genes with increased expression of their 3′ parts in at least one cancer sample each. To efficiently investigate underlying transcript structures, we developed an approach using rapid amplification of cDNA ends followed by high throughput sequencing (RACE-seq). RACE products from the targeted genes in 23 CRC samples were pooled together and sequenced. We identified VWA2-TCF7L2, DHX35-BPIFA2 and CASZ1-MASP2 as private fusion events, and novel transcript structures for 17 of the 23 other candidate genes. The high-throughput approach facilitated identification of CRC specific RNA variants. These include a recurrent read-through fusion transcript between KLK8 and KLK7, and a splice variant of S100A2. Both of these were overrepresented in CRC tissue and cell lines from external RNA-seq datasets. PMID:26474385

  4. Prevention of colorectal cancer with vitamin D.

    PubMed

    Rheem, Dae S; Baylink, David J; Olafsson, Snorri; Jackson, Christian S; Walter, Michael H

    2010-08-01

    The fact that colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States emphasizes the need for more effective preventive and therapeutic modalities. There is growing evidence that vitamin D may reduce the incidence of CRC. Results of epidemiologic, in vitro, in vivo animal and clinical studies suggest that a low serum vitamin D level may be a serious risk factor for CRC and a high serum vitamin D level may reduce the risk of CRC. On a molecular level, vitamin D suppresses CRC development and growth by affecting cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and angiogenesis. Vitamin D insufficiency and CRC are common in the elderly population. Vitamin D insufficiency is simple to screen for and treatable with vitamin D supplementation. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (calcidiol) is the best measure of vitamin D status and should be checked routinely for individuals with risk factors for CRC. Maintaining serum concentrations of calcidiol above 32 ng/ml (80 nmol/l) in individuals whose serum calcidiol level is low may help prevent CRC as well as osteoporosis, fractures, infections, and cardiovascular disease. Daily calcidiol intake of 1000 International Units can increase serum vitamin D to sufficient levels in most elderly persons and, based on available data, may substantially lower the incidence of CRC with minimal risks.

  5. Targeting histone methylation for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tao; Lin, Chengyuan; Zhong, Linda L. D.; Zhao, Ling; Zhang, Ge; Lu, Aiping; Wu, Jiang; Bian, Zhaoxiang

    2016-01-01

    As a leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide, colorectal cancer (CRC) results from accumulation of both genetic and epigenetic alterations. Disruption of epigenetic regulation in CRC, particularly aberrant histone methylation mediated by histone methyltransferases (HMTs) and demethylases (HDMs), have drawn increasing interest in recent years. In this paper, we aim to review the roles of histone methylation and associated enzymes in the pathogenesis of CRC, and the development of small-molecule modulators to regulate histone methylation for treating CRC. Multiple levels of evidence suggest that aberrant histone methylations play important roles in CRC. More than 20 histone-methylation enzymes are found to be clinically relevant to CRC, including 17 oncoproteins and 8 tumor suppressors. Inhibitors of EZH2 and DOT1L have demonstrated promising therapeutic effects in preclinical CRC treatment. Potent and selective chemical probes of histone-methylation enzymes are required for validation of their functional roles in carcinogenesis and clinical translations as CRC therapies. With EZH2 inhibitor EPZ-6438 entering into phase I/II trials for advanced solid tumors, histone methylation is emerging as a promising target for CRC. PMID:28286564

  6. Temporal Trends in Colorectal Cancer Screening among Asian Americans.

    PubMed

    Fedewa, Stacey A; Sauer, Ann Goding; Siegel, Rebecca L; Smith, Robert A; Torre, Lindsey A; Jemal, Ahmedin

    2016-06-01

    Asian Americans (AA) are less likely to be screened for colorectal cancer compared with non-Hispanic Whites (NHW), with a widening disparity for some AA subgroups in the early 2000s. Whether these patterns have continued in more recent years is unknown. We examined temporal trends in colorectal cancer screening among AA overall compared with NHWs and by AA subgroup (Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Filipino, South Asian, Vietnamese) using data from the 2003, 2005, 2007, and 2009 California Health Interview Surveys. Unadjusted (PR) and adjusted (aPR) prevalence ratios for colorectal cancer screening, accounting for sociodemographic, health care, and acculturation factors, were calculated for respondents ages 50 to 75 years (NHW n = 60,125; AA n = 6,630). Between 2003 and 2009, colorectal cancer screening prevalence increased from 43.3% to 64.6% in AA (P ≤ 0.001) and from 58.1% to 71.4% in NHW (P ≤ 0.001). Unadjusted colorectal cancer screening was significantly lower among AA compared with NHW in 2003 [PR = 0.74; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.68-0.82], 2005 (PR = 0.78; 95% CI, 0.72-0.84), 2007 (PR = 0.91; 95% CI, 0.85-0.96), and 2009 (PR = 0.90; 95% CI, 0.84-0.97), though disparities narrowed over time. After adjustment, there were no significant differences in colorectal cancer screening between the two groups, except in 2003. In subgroup analyses, between 2003 and 2009, colorectal cancer screening significantly increased by 22% in Japanese, 56% in Chinese, 47% in Filipino, and 94% in Koreans. In our study of California residents, colorectal cancer screening disparities between AA and NHW narrowed, but were not eliminated and screening prevalence among AA remains below nationwide goals, including the Healthy People 2020 goal of increasing colorectal cancer screening prevalence to 70.5%. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(6); 995-1000. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. Television Watching and Colorectal Cancer Survival in Men

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yin; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A.; Chan, Andrew T.; Wu, Kana; Fuchs, Charles S.; Giovannucci, Edward L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess the association between pre- and postdiagnostic time spent sitting watching TV as well as other sedentary behaviors (other sitting at home and at work/driving) and mortality from colorectal cancer or other causes, and overall mortality. Methods We followed stage I-III colorectal cancer patients from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (1986–2010). Cox models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results 926 and 714 patients were included in the analysis of pre- and postdiagnostic TV watching respectively, and 471 and 325 died during follow-up. Prolonged prediagnostic TV viewing was associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer-specific mortality independent of leisure-time physical activity. The HRs (95% CIs) for 0–6, 7–13,14–20 and ≥21 h/wk were 1.00 (referent), 0.84 (0.56–1.25), 1.15 (0.75–1.78), 2.13 (1.31–3.45) (Ptrend=0.01). The association was observed primarily among overweight and obese individuals. Prediagnostic TV watching was also associated with overall mortality within 5 years of diagnosis, largely due to the association with colorectal cancer mortality. Other prediagnostic sitting at home or at work/driving was not associated with mortality. Postdiagnostic TV viewing was associated with non-significant increased risk of colorectal cancer-specific mortality (HR for ≥21 vs 0–6 h/wk=1.45; 95% CI 0.73–2.87) adjusting for TV viewing before diagnosis. Conclusion Prolonged prediagnostic TV watching is associated with higher colorectal cancer-specific mortality independent of leisure-time physical activity among colorectal cancer patients. PMID:26293240

  8. Alcohol intake and mortality among survivors of colorectal cancer: The Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort.

    PubMed

    Yang, Baiyu; Gapstur, Susan M; Newton, Christina C; Jacobs, Eric J; Campbell, Peter T

    2017-06-01

    Alcohol consumption is associated with a higher risk of colorectal cancer, but to the authors' knowledge its influence on survival after a diagnosis of colorectal cancer is unclear. The authors investigated associations between prediagnosis and postdiagnosis alcohol intake with mortality among survivors of colorectal cancer. The authors identified 2458 men and women who were diagnosed with invasive, nonmetastatic colorectal cancer between 1992 (enrollment into the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort) and 2011. Alcohol consumption was self-reported at baseline and updated in 1997, 1999, 2003, and 2007. Postdiagnosis alcohol data were available for 1599 participants. Of the 2458 participants diagnosed with colorectal cancer, 1156 died during follow-up through 2012. Prediagnosis and postdiagnosis alcohol consumption were not found to be associated with all-cause mortality, except for an association between prediagnosis consumption of <2 drinks per day and a slightly lower risk of all-cause mortality (relative risk [RR], 0.86; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.74-1.00) compared with never drinking. Alcohol use was generally not associated with colorectal cancer-specific mortality, although there was some suggestion of increased colorectal cancer-specific mortality with postdiagnosis drinking (RR, 1.27 [95% CI, 0.87-1.86] for current drinking of <2 drinks/day and RR, 1.44 [95% CI, 0.80-2.60] for current drinking of ≥2 drinks/day). The results of the current study do not support an association between alcohol consumption and all-cause mortality among individuals with nonmetastatic colorectal cancer. The association between postdiagnosis drinking and colorectal cancer-specific mortality should be examined in larger studies of individuals diagnosed with nonmetastatic colorectal cancer. Cancer 2017;123:2006-2013. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  9. Familial colorectal adenocarcinoma and hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer: a nationwide epidemiological study from Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Hemminki, K; Li, X

    2001-01-01

    Although estimates are available of the proportion of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) among all colorectal cancer (CRC), its proportion among familial CRC is unclear. We estimated these proportions epidemiologically from the nationwide Swedish Family-Cancer Database on 9.6 million individuals. Colorectal adenocarcinomas were retrieved from the Cancer Registry covering years 1958–1996. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for offspring (aged less than 62 years) when their parent had colorectal adenocarcinoma. In 9.82% of all families, an offspring and a parent were affected, giving a population attributable proportion of 4.91% and a familial SIR of 2.00. When offspring and parents shared the anatomic site, the SIR was 2.32 for proximal and 2.00 for distal CRC. When offspring were diagnosed before age 40 years and parents before age 50 years, the SIR was 25.72 for familial proximal CRC. In older age groups familial risks did not differ between proximal and distal CRC. Familial risks were increased also for endometrial, small intestinal and gastric cancers, manifestations in HNPCC. Depending on which assumptions were made, HNPCC was calculated to account for 20 to 50% of familial CRC, corresponding to 1 or 2.5% of all CRC among 0–61-year-old individuals. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11286479

  10. miR-31 affects colorectal cancer cells by inhibiting autophagy in cancer-associated fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuyu; Wu, Yong; Wu, Yongyou; Zhao, Kui; Xing, Chungen; Cao, Jianping; Zhu, Hong; Li, Ming; Ye, Zhenyu; Peng, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a double-edged sword in tumor development. Recent studies have found that miRNAs have an inhibitory effect on the regulation of autophagy. It has been reported that miR-31 plays an important role in the development of colorectal cancer. However, what role miR-31 plays in colorectal cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) has not been determined. In this study, we confirmed that the expression of miR-31 in CAFs was higher than in normal colorectal fibroblasts (NFs). We also found that treatment of CAFs with miR-31 mimic inhibited the expression of the autophagy-related genes Beclin-1, ATG, DRAM and LC3. In addition, we found up-regulation of miR-31 significantly affected colorectal cancer cell behaviors, including proliferation, invasion and apoptosis. Also, up-regulation of miR-31 in CAF could increase the radiosensitivity of colorectal cancer cells co-cultured with CAF. In summary, miR-31 can inhibit autophagy in colorectal CAFs, affect colorectal cancer development, and increase the radiosensitivity of colorectal cancer cells co-cultured with CAF. We hypothesize that miR-31 may become a new target of treatments for colorectal cancer. PMID:27793031

  11. Map syndrome (MYH Associated Polyposis) colorectal cancer, etiopathological connections

    PubMed Central

    Ion, D; Stoian, RV; Serban, MB

    2011-01-01

    The case presented raised our scientific curiosity and it is worthy of being brought in front of the medical audience because of several reasons presented below. Presently, there are 3 hereditary syndromes that have a demonstrated etiological relationship with the colorectal cancer: Familiar Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP syndrome), HNPCC syndrome (Hereditary Nonpoliposis Colorectal Cancer) and MAP syndrome. Discovered only in 2002, the MAP syndrome (MYH associated polyposis) is the first hereditary syndrome that has autosomal recessive transmission. The APC gene can be mutated in several ways during the colonic oncogenesis: congenital in the FAP syndrome, somatic in sporadic colorectal cancers and secondary to the MYH gene inactivation in MAP syndrome. MAP phenotype is similar to the FAP phenotype because of the somatic mutations to the APC gene. Colonic polyposis is lower than FAP syndrome and appeared later, in the 40's and 50's. Colorectal cancers are frequent and discovered in the same moment as the colonic polyposis. Patients are diagnosed mostly in cancer stages. Colonoscopy shows polyps disseminated around the entire colic frame. Treatment in these cases is total rectocolectomy with ileoanal anastomosis. When working in a general emergency surgery clinic, physicians are often faced with colorectal cancers in different evolutive stages, and mostly they are faced with their complications. PMID:21505584

  12. Strong correlation between diet and development of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Cappellani, Alessandro; Zanghì, Antonio; Di Vita, Maria; Cavallaro, Andrea; Piccolo, Gaetano; Veroux, Pierfrancesco; Lo Menzo, Emanuele; Cavallaro, Vincenzo; de Paoli, Paolo; Veroux, Massimiliano; Berretta, Massimiliano

    2013-01-01

    Multiple factors have been described among the causes of non-hereditary colorectal cancer. In Western countries, the most common risk factors include upper-middle socioeconomic status and dietary regimens rich in proteins and animal fats. High consumption of red meats, smoked foods, cold cuts, or canned foods is believed to contribute to carcinogenesis as they directly affect epithlial turnover and cause metabolism of biliary acids. Dietary fibers have protective effects in that they capture the fats and biliary acids, thereby inhibiting their activity. Tobacco smoking acts both locally and systemically on the colorectal mucosa through the production of carcinogenic agents. Finally, the action of alcohol, in association with nicotine addiction, also increases the risk of developing colorectal tumors. Knowledge of dietary and environmental factors is of paramount importance in implementing preventive strategies for colorectal cancer.

  13. APN401 in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, or Other Solid Tumors That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-02

    Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Brain; Metastatic Solid Neoplasm; Recurrent Colorectal Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Recurrent Solid Neoplasm; Stage IV Colorectal Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVB Pancreatic Cancer; Unresectable Solid Neoplasm

  14. Is the phenotype mixed or mistaken? Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer and hyperplastic polyposis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jarrar, Awad M; Church, James M; Fay, Susan; Kalady, Matthew F

    2009-12-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer is a hereditary syndrome defined by personal and family history of colorectal and other cancers. Some patients with this condition have multiple serrated polyps, which are the hallmark of hyperplastic polyposis syndrome, a rare colorectal cancer syndrome characterized by multiple hyperplastic/serrated polyps and an increased risk of colorectal cancer. We hypothesized that this may represent a unique group of patients, and this study investigates a possible association between the two syndromes. A hereditary colorectal cancer registry was reviewed for patients who fit hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer or familial colorectal cancer and hyperplastic polyposis syndrome criteria. Twelve patients from seven families were identified. Four families had more than one person meeting the criteria. All patients were white, and four were women. Ten of 12 patients fit Amsterdam criteria, and two were designated with familial colorectal cancer. The median cumulative number of hyperplastic polyps resected per patient was 6, half of which were located in the right colon. Seven of the 12 patients developed colorectal cancer. Ten patients had personal or family history of other cancers: prostate, breast, testicular, salivary gland, lung, and Hodgkin's disease. Patients meeting criteria for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer may also carry a diagnosis of hyperplastic polyposis syndrome. Possible explanations include: 1) two hereditary syndromes are present in the same patient, 2) serrated polyps are part of the phenotype of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, or 3) hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer is potentially misdiagnosed in some families who do, in fact, have hyperplastic polyposis.

  15. Breast Cancer Survivorship Care: Targeting a Colorectal Cancer Education Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Homan, Sherri G.; Yun, Shumei; Stewart, Bob R.; Armer, Jane M.

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer survivors are at risk of developing a second primary cancer. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading second primary cancers, and it is often preventable. We developed a multi-component educational tool to inform and encourage women breast cancer survivors to engage in CRC screening. To assess the strengths and weakness of the tool and to improve the relevancy to the target audience, we convened four focus groups of women breast cancer survivors in Missouri. We also assessed the potential impact of the tool on the knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs regarding CRC and collected information on the barriers to CRC screening through pre- and post-focus groups’ questionnaires. A total of 43 women breast cancer survivors participated and provided very valuable suggestions on design and content to update the tool. Through the process and comparing pre- and post-focus group assessments, a significantly higher proportion of breast cancer survivors strongly agreed or agreed that CRC is preventable (78.6% vs. 96.9%, p = 0.02) and became aware that they were at a slightly increased risk for CRC (18.6% vs. 51.7%, p = 0.003). The most cited barrier was the complexity of preparation for colonoscopy. PMID:26258794

  16. Interval cancers in a national colorectal cancer screening programme

    PubMed Central

    Stanners, Greig; Lang, Jaroslaw; Brewster, David H; Carey, Francis A; Fraser, Callum G

    2016-01-01

    Background Little is known about interval cancers (ICs) in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. Objective The purpose of this study was to identify IC characteristics and compare these with screen-detected cancers (SCs) and cancers in non-participants (NPCs) over the same time period. Design This was an observational study done in the first round of the Scottish Bowel Screening Programme. All individuals (772,790), aged 50–74 years, invited to participate between 1 January 2007 and 31 May 2009 were studied by linking their screening records with confirmed CRC records in the Scottish Cancer Registry (SCR). Characteristics of SC, IC and NPC were determined. Results There were 555 SCs, 502 ICs and 922 NPCs. SCs were at an earlier stage than ICs and NPCs (33.9% Dukes’ A as against 18.7% in IC and 11.3% in NPC), screening preferentially detected cancers in males (64.7% as against 52.8% in IC and 59.7% in NPC): this was independent of a different cancer site distribution in males and females. SC in the colon were less advanced than IC, but not in the rectum. Conclusion ICs account for 47.5% of the CRCs in the screened population, indicating approximately 50% screening test sensitivity: guaiac faecal occult blood testing (gFOBT) sensitivity is less for women than for men and gFOBT screening may not be effective for rectal cancer. PMID:27536369

  17. Breast Cancer Survivorship Care: Targeting a Colorectal Cancer Education Intervention.

    PubMed

    Homan, Sherri G; Yun, Shumei; Stewart, Bob R; Armer, Jane M

    2015-08-06

    Breast cancer survivors are at risk of developing a second primary cancer. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading second primary cancers, and it is often preventable. We developed a multi-component educational tool to inform and encourage women breast cancer survivors to engage in CRC screening. To assess the strengths and weakness of the tool and to improve the relevancy to the target audience, we convened four focus groups of women breast cancer survivors in Missouri. We also assessed the potential impact of the tool on the knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs regarding CRC and collected information on the barriers to CRC screening through pre- and post-focus groups' questionnaires. A total of 43 women breast cancer survivors participated and provided very valuable suggestions on design and content to update the tool. Through the process and comparing pre- and post-focus group assessments, a significantly higher proportion of breast cancer survivors strongly agreed or agreed that CRC is preventable (78.6% vs. 96.9%, p = 0.02) and became aware that they were at a slightly increased risk for CRC (18.6% vs. 51.7%, p = 0.003). The most cited barrier was the complexity of preparation for colonoscopy.

  18. Risk assessment and clinical decision making for colorectal cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Schroy, Paul C; Caron, Sarah E; Sherman, Bonnie J; Heeren, Timothy C; Battaglia, Tracy A

    2015-10-01

    Shared decision making (SDM) related to test preference has been advocated as a potentially effective strategy for increasing adherence to colorectal cancer (CRC) screening, yet primary care providers (PCPs) are often reluctant to comply with patient preferences if they differ from their own. Risk stratification advanced colorectal neoplasia (ACN) provides a rational strategy for reconciling these differences. To assess the importance of risk stratification in PCP decision making related to test preference for average-risk patients and receptivity to use of an electronic risk assessment tool for ACN to facilitate SDM. Mixed methods, including qualitative key informant interviews and a cross-sectional survey. PCPs at an urban, academic safety-net institution. Screening preferences, factors influencing patient recommendations and receptivity to use of a risk stratification tool. Nine PCPs participated in interviews and 57 completed the survey. Despite an overwhelming preference for colonoscopy by 95% of respondents, patient risk (67%) and patient preferences (63%) were more influential in their decision making than patient comorbidities (31%; P < 0.001). Age was the single most influential risk factor (excluding family history), with <20% of respondents choosing factors other than age. Most respondents reported that they would be likely to use a risk stratification tool in their practice either 'often' (43%) or sometimes (53%). Risk stratification was perceived to be important in clinical decision making, yet few providers considered risk factors other than age for average-risk patients. Providers were receptive to the use of a risk assessment tool for ACN when recommending an appropriate screening test for select patients. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Nutrigenetics in cancer research--folate metabolism and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Cornelia M

    2005-11-01

    The B vitamin folate is essential for one-carbon transfer reactions, including those related to the methylation of DNA or other substrates and nucleotide synthesis. Epidemiologic and experimental studies implicate low-folate intakes in elevated risk of colorectal neoplasia and suggest that biologic mechanisms underlying this relation include disturbances in DNA methylation patterns or adverse effects on DNA synthesis and repair. With the completion of the Human Genome Project, a vast amount of data on inherited genetic variability has become available. This genetic information can be used in studies of molecular epidemiology to provide information on multiple aspects of folate metabolism. First, studies linking polymorphisms in folate metabolism to an altered risk of cancer provide evidence for a causal link between this pathway and colorectal carcinogenesis. Second, studies on genetic characteristics can help clarify whether certain individuals may benefit from higher or lower intakes of folate or nutrients relevant to folate metabolism. Third, studies on genetic polymorphisms can generate hypotheses regarding possible biologic mechanisms that connect this pathway to carcinogenesis. Last, genetic variability in folate metabolism may predict survival after a cancer diagnosis, possibly via pharmacogenetic effects. To solve the puzzle of the folate-cancer relation, a transdisciplinary approach is needed that integrates knowledge from epidemiology, clinical studies, experimental nutrition, and mathematical modeling. This review illustrates knowledge that can be gained from molecular epidemiology in the context of nutrigenetics, and the questions that this approach can answer or raise.

  20. Non-coding landscapes of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ragusa, Marco; Barbagallo, Cristina; Statello, Luisa; Condorelli, Angelo Giuseppe; Battaglia, Rosalia; Tamburello, Lucia; Barbagallo, Davide; Di Pietro, Cinzia; Purrello, Michele

    2015-01-01

    For two decades Vogelstein’s model has been the paradigm for describing the sequence of molecular changes within protein-coding genes that would lead to overt colorectal cancer (CRC). This model is now too simplistic in the light of recent studies, which have shown that our genome is pervasively transcribed in RNAs other than mRNAs, denominated non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). The discovery that mutations in genes encoding these RNAs [i.e., microRNAs (miRNAs), long non-coding RNAs, and circular RNAs] are causally involved in cancer phenotypes has profoundly modified our vision of tumour molecular genetics and pathobiology. By exploiting a wide range of different mechanisms, ncRNAs control fundamental cellular processes, such as proliferation, differentiation, migration, angiogenesis and apoptosis: these data have also confirmed their role as oncogenes or tumor suppressors in cancer development and progression. The existence of a sophisticated RNA-based regulatory system, which dictates the correct functioning of protein-coding networks, has relevant biological and biomedical consequences. Different miRNAs involved in neoplastic and degenerative diseases exhibit potential predictive and prognostic properties. Furthermore, the key roles of ncRNAs make them very attractive targets for innovative therapeutic approaches. Several recent reports have shown that ncRNAs can be secreted by cells into the extracellular environment (i.e., blood and other body fluids): this suggests the existence of extracellular signalling mechanisms, which may be exploited by cells in physiology and pathology. In this review, we will summarize the most relevant issues on the involvement of cellular and extracellular ncRNAs in disease. We will then specifically describe their involvement in CRC pathobiology and their translational applications to CRC diagnosis, prognosis and therapy. PMID:26556998

  1. Cancer worries, risk perceptions and associations with interest in DNA testing and clinic satisfaction in a familial colorectal cancer clinic.

    PubMed

    Collins, V; Halliday, J; Warren, R; Williamson, R

    2000-12-01

    Multi-disciplinary familial cancer clinics are becoming an integral part of cancer services. It is, therefore, important to assess how attendance at these clinics impacts on cancer-related concerns, risk perceptions and behavioural intentions, and how the clinic services are being received by those using them. This study has assessed a familial colorectal cancer clinic with respect to cancer-related worries and risk perceptions and their impact on interest in DNA testing and overall satisfaction with the clinic. Pre- and post-clinic questionnaires were completed by 127 patients and relatives attending the clinic. After attending the clinic, the proportion of people 'very' or 'extremely' worried about developing bowel cancer reduced from 49 (pre-clinic) to 34% (p = 0.002). Worry about bowel cancer was positively associated with younger age, higher education level and higher perceived risk of developing cancer. A reduction in level of risk perception correlated with a lower likelihood of feeling 'very worried' about developing bowel cancer. Of those intending to go ahead with DNA testing, 58% were 'very worried' about bowel cancer compared with 15% of those not intending to proceed with testing, suggesting that worry was a motivation for interest in DNA testing. One-third of participants indicated another session of genetic counselling would be helpful. Within this group, a higher proportion was very worried about bowel cancer (43%) than for those who did not want another session (17%). Attendance at this familial colorectal cancer clinic alleviated worry for many individuals, partly due to improved information about risk of colorectal cancer.

  2. Tea, Coffee, and Milk Consumption and Colorectal Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Green, Chadwick John; de Dauwe, Palina; Boyle, Terry; Tabatabaei, Seyed Mehdi; Fritschi, Lin; Heyworth, Jane Shirley

    2014-01-01

    Background Data regarding the effects of tea, coffee, and milk on the risk of colorectal cancer are inconsistent. We investigated associations of tea, coffee, and milk consumption with colorectal cancer risk and attempted to determine if these exposures were differentially associated with the risks of proximal colon, distal colon, and rectal cancers. Methods Data from 854 incident cases and 948 controls were analyzed in a case-control study of colorectal cancer in Western Australia during 2005–07. Multivariable logistic regression was used to analyze the associations of black tea (with and without milk), green tea, herbal tea, hot coffee, iced coffee, and milk with colorectal cancer. Results Consumption of 1 or more cups of herbal tea per week was associated with a significantly decreased risk of distal colon cancer (adjusted odds ratio, 0.37; 95% CI, 0.16–0.82; PTrend = 0.044), and consumption of 1 or more cups of iced coffee per week was associated with increased risk of rectal cancer (adjusted odds ratio, 1.52; 95% CI, 0.91–2.54; PTrend = 0.004). Neither herbal tea nor iced coffee was associated with the risk of proximal colon cancer. Hot coffee was associated with a possible increased risk of distal colon cancer. Black tea (with or without milk), green tea, decaffeinated coffee, and milk were not significantly associated with colorectal cancer risk. Conclusions Consumption of herbal tea was associated with reduced risk of distal colon cancer, and consumption of iced coffee was associated with increased rectal cancer risk. PMID:24531002

  3. Curing patients with liver metastases from colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    2011-04-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third commonest malignancy worldwide and the second commonest cause of cancer-related deaths.1,2 Around 15-25% of patients with colorectal cancer have metastases at presentation, and a further 20-25% develop them subsequently.3 Management for metastatic disease is mainly palliative and traditionally 5-year survival has been rare.3-5 In colorectal cancer, metastases mostly occur in the liver and in 30-50% of patients with liver involvement, this is the only site of spread. For those with liver-only metastases, resection of these lesions provides a chance of longer-term survival or even cure (e.g. 5-year survival 25-71%).4,6-13 Here we focus on recent advances in chemotherapy for patients with initially unresectable liver metastases, aimed at rendering such lesions operable, with potential improvements in survival.4,13,14.

  4. Angiogenesis factors involved in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Mihalache, A; Rogoveanu, I

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer stands at the top of oncologic pathology in the world, and in the same measure in Romania because is the third most frequent cancer diagnosed in men and women. Colorectal cancer develops as a result of mutations in genes that control proliferation and cell death. It was established that in the development of a tumor there is originally a prevascular phase followed by a phase of tumor angiogenesis. In the future it is necessary to develop new clinical protocols that angiogenesis inhibitors are associated with chemo or radiotherapy, conventional or other methods such as immunotherapy and gene therapy.

  5. Angiogenesis Factors Involved in the Pathogenesis of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    MIHALACHE, A.; ROGOVEANU, I.

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer stands at the top of oncologic pathology in the world, and in the same measure in Romania because is the third most frequent cancer diagnosed in men and women. Colorectal cancer develops as a result of mutations in genes that control proliferation and cell death. It was established that in the development of a tumor there is originally a prevascular phase followed by a phase of tumor angiogenesis. In the future it is necessary to develop new clinical protocols that angiogenesis inhibitors are associated with chemo or radiotherapy, conventional or other methods such as immunotherapy and gene therapy. PMID:24791198

  6. Coffee Consumption and the Risk of Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Schmit, Stephanie L; Rennert, Hedy S; Rennert, Gad; Gruber, Stephen B

    2016-04-01

    Coffee contains several bioactive compounds relevant to colon physiology. Although coffee intake is a proposed protective factor for colorectal cancer, current evidence remains inconclusive. We investigated the association between coffee consumption and risk of colorectal cancer in 5,145 cases and 4,097 controls from the Molecular Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer (MECC) study, a population-based case-control study in northern Israel. We also examined this association by type of coffee, by cancer site (colon and rectum), and by ethnic subgroup (Ashkenazi Jews, Sephardi Jews, and Arabs). Coffee data were collected by interview using a validated, semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Coffee consumption was associated with 26% lower odds of developing colorectal cancer [OR (drinkers vs. non-drinkers), 0.74; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.64-0.86; P < 0.001]. The inverse association was also observed for decaffeinated coffee consumption alone (OR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.68-0.99; P = 0.04) and for boiled coffee (OR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.71-0.94; P = 0.004). Increasing consumption of coffee was associated with lower odds of developing colorectal cancer. Compared with <1 serving/day, intake of 1 to <2 servings/day (OR, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.68-0.90; P < 0.001), 2 to 2.5 servings/day (OR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.51-0.68; P < 0.001), and >2.5 servings/day (OR, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.39-0.54; P < 0.001) were associated with significantly lower odds of colorectal cancer (Ptrend < 0.001), and the dose-response trend was statistically significant for both colon and rectal cancers. Coffee consumption may be inversely associated with risk of colorectal cancer in a dose-response manner. Global coffee consumption patterns suggest potential health benefits of the beverage for reducing the risk of colorectal cancer. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(4); 634-9. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. 42 CFR 410.37 - Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for...) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.37 Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and...) Colorectal cancer screening tests means any of the following procedures furnished to an individual for the...

  8. 42 CFR 410.37 - Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for...) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.37 Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and...) Colorectal cancer screening tests means any of the following procedures furnished to an individual for the...

  9. 42 CFR 410.37 - Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for...) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.37 Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and...) Colorectal cancer screening tests means any of the following procedures furnished to an individual for the...

  10. 42 CFR 410.37 - Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for...) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.37 Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and...) Colorectal cancer screening tests means any of the following procedures furnished to an individual for the...

  11. 42 CFR 410.37 - Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for...) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.37 Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and...) Colorectal cancer screening tests means any of the following procedures furnished to an individual for the...

  12. Accuracy of reporting of family history of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, R J; Brewster, D; Campbell, H; Porteous, M E M; Wyllie, A H; Bird, C C; Dunlop, M G

    2004-01-01

    Background and aims: Family history is used extensively to estimate the risk of colorectal cancer but there is considerable potential for recall bias and inaccuracy. Hence we systematically assessed the accuracy of family history reported at interview compared with actual cancer experience in relatives. Methods: Using face to face interviews, we recorded family history from 199 colorectal cancer cases and 133 community controls, totalling 5637 first and second degree relatives (FDRs/SDRs). We linked computerised cancer registry data to interview information to determine the accuracy of family history reporting. Results: Cases substantially underreported colorectal cancer arising both in FDRs (sensitivity 0.566 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.433, 0.690); specificity 0.990 (95% CI 0.983, 0.994)) and SDRs (sensitivity 0.271 (95% CI 0.166, 0.410); specificity 0.996 (95% CI 0.992, 0.998)). There was no observable difference in accuracy of reporting family history between case and control interviewees. Control subjects similarly underreported colorectal cancer in FDRs (sensitivity 0.529 (95% CI 0.310, 0.738); specificity 0.995 (95% CI 0.989, 0.998)) and SDRs (sensitivity 0.333 (95% CI 0.192, 0.512); specificity 0.995 (95% CI 0.991, 0.995)). To determine practical implications of inaccurate family history, we applied family history criteria before and after record linkage. Only two of five families reported at interview to meet surveillance criteria did so after validation, whereas only two of six families that actually merited surveillance were identified by interview. Conclusions: This study has quantified the inaccuracy of interview in identifying people at risk of colorectal cancer due to a family history. Colorectal cancer was substantially underreported and so family history information should be interpreted with caution. These findings have considerable relevance to identifying patients who merit surveillance colonoscopy and to epidemiological studies. PMID

  13. Screening for colorectal cancer on the front line.

    PubMed

    Lemon, Stephenie C; Zapka, Jane G; Estabrook, Barbara; Erban, Stephen; Luckmann, Roger

    2003-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess knowledge, beliefs, and practices of primary care clinicians regarding colorectal cancer screening. We surveyed 77 primary care providers in six clinics in central Massachusetts to evaluate several factors related to colorectal cancer screening. Most agreed with guidelines for fecal occult blood test (97%) and sigmoidoscopy (87%), which were reported commonly as usual practice. Although the majority (86%) recommended colonoscopy as a colorectal cancer screening test, it was infrequently reported as usual practice. Also, 36% considered barium enema a colorectal cancer screening option, and it was rarely reported as usual practice. Despite lack of evidence supporting effectiveness, digital rectal examinations and in-office fecal occult blood test were commonly reported as usual practice. However, these were usually reported in combination with a guideline-endorsed testing option. Although only 10% reported that fecal occult blood test/home was frequently refused, 60% reported sigmoidoscopy was. Frequently cited patient barriers to sigmoidoscopy compliance included fear the procedure would hurt and that patients assume symptoms occur if there is a problem. Perceptions of health systems barriers to sigmoidoscopy were less strong. Most providers recommended guideline-endorsed colorectal cancer screening. However, patient refusal for sigmoidoscopy was common. Results indicate that multiple levels of intervention, including patient and provider education and systems strategies, may help increase prevalence.

  14. Iranian Dietary Patterns and Risk of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Azizi, Hosein; Asadollahi, Khairollah; Davtalab Esmaeili, Elham; Mirzapoor, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Role of diet on colorectal cancer (CRC) has been considered in terms of single foods and nutrients, but less frequently in terms of dietary patterns in Iran. The objective of this study was to determine the association between Iranian dietary patterns and CRC. Methods: This case–control study was conducted in four hospitals in Tabriz City of Iran including 414 participants aged 35–75 years:207 cases with CRC confirmed by pathology and colonoscopy findings were selected and 207 controls free of neoplastic conditions and diet-related chronic diseases (from the same hospital at the same period for the cases). Dietary data were assessed using a 123-item semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Two dietary patterns were found by using of Principal Component Analysis (PCA) method;“Healthy pattern”and “Iranian pattern”. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (OR) for relationship between dietary patterns and colorectal cancer. Results: After adjusting for confounding factors, the Iranian dietary pattern was significantly associated with an increased odds of colorectal cancer (OR= 1.46; 95% Confidenec Interval (CI)=1.05–2.19) while a reduced odds of colorectal cancer was observed with the Healthy dietary pattern (OR=0.18; 95% CI= 0.091-0.47). Conclusion: Iranian dietary pattern (IDP) seems to increase the odds of colorectal cancer and protective effect of Healthy dietary pattern. PMID:26000248

  15. Microwave ablation as palliative treatment of locally recurrent colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, W; Ye, X; Yang, X; Li, Y; Huang, G; Wang, J; Han, X; Ni, X; Wei, Z; Zheng, A; Meng, M

    2015-12-01

    Patients suffering local recurrence of colorectal cancer which cannot be surgically removed are troubled with severe pain and poor quality of life. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of computed tomography (CT)-guided microwave ablation (MWA) as palliative treatment for recurrent unresectable colorectal cancer. Thirty-one patients were suffering locally recurrent colorectal cancer underwent MWA with CT guidance. The MWA power was set at 60-80 W, 6-8 min. Effectiveness was evaluated by visual analog scale (VAS) with a follow-up of 6-month. Complications were also recorded. Technical success was achieved in all patients. Mean VAS preprocedure was 7.10. Mean VAS postprocedure were as follows: 1 week, 2.65 (P < 0.001); 1 month, 0.81 (P < 0.001); 3 months 0.45 (P < 0.001); and 6 months 0.19 (P < 0.001). No serious complications were observed including intestinal fistulas, bladder fistulas, or peripheral vascular or nerve injury. CT-guided MWA as treatment of recurrent colorectal cancer can quickly and effectively relieve pain. It is a minimally invasive, safe, and efficient palliative treatment of recurrent colorectal cancer.

  16. Folate status and colorectal cancer risk: a 2016 update

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The consensus of epidemiologic evidence indicates that an abundant intake of foodstuffs rich in folate conveys protection against the development of colorectal cancer, and perhaps some other common cancers as well. Pre-clinical models substantiate that the relationship is a genuinely causal one. Pre...

  17. [Indications for radiotherapy and chemotherapy in colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Vanhaelen, C

    2001-09-01

    The treatment of colorectal cancer is undergoing serious transformation. Surgical techniques have evolved, the role of adjuvant radio- and chemotherapy has been confirmed as an essential part of the current treatment of these cancer and new drugs, established in advanced disease are now being introduced in combination schemes of promise in both palliative and adjuvant chemotherapy.

  18. Lifestyle modification: A primary prevention approach to colorectal cancer

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Early detection of cancer through screening is an important step in decreasing both morbidity and mortality. Likewise, specific modifiable lifestyle behaviors are associated with reduced risk of colorectal cancer. Lifestyle practices have also been shown to maximize health after the primary treatmen...

  19. CDC Vital Signs: Colorectal Cancer Tests Save Lives

    MedlinePlus

    ... The three main tests–colonoscopy, FOBT/FIT, and flexible sigmoidoscopy are all effective at finding cancer early. ... Tested for Colorectal Cancer? [PSA - 0:60 seconds] Screen for Life: Meryl Streep/Control [0:60 seconds] ...

  20. Rural-Urban Differences in Colorectal Cancer Screening Barriers in Nebraska.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Alejandro G; Watanabe-Galloway, Shinobu; Schnell, Paulette; Soliman, Amr S

    2015-12-01

    Nebraska ranks 36th nationally in colorectal cancer screening. Despite recent increases in CRC screening rates, rural areas in Nebraska have consistently shown lower rates of CRC screening uptake, compared to urban areas. The objective of this study was to investigate reasons for lower CRC screening rates among Nebraska residents, especially among rural residents. We developed a questionnaire based on Health Belief Model (HBM) constructs to identify factors associated with the use of CRC screening. The questionnaire was mailed in 2014 to adults aged 50-75 years in an urban community in the east and a rural community in the west regions of the state. Multiple logistic regression models were created to assess the effects of HBM constructs, rural residence, and demographic factors on CRC screening use. Of the 1200 surveys mailed, 393 were returned (rural n = 200, urban n = 193). Rural respondents were more likely to perceive screening cost as a barrier. Rural residents were also more likely to report that CRC cannot be prevented and it would change their whole life. In multiple regression models, rural residence, perceived embarrassment, and perceived unpleasantness about screening were significantly associated with reduced odds of receiving colonoscopy. Older age (62 years and older), having a personal doctor, and perceived risk of getting CRC were significantly associated with increased odds of receiving colonoscopy. Interventions to increase uptake of colorectal cancer screening in rural residents should be tailored to acknowledge unique perceptions of screening methods and barriers to screening.

  1. Aetiology of colorectal cancer and relevance of monogenic inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Ponz de Leon, M; Benatti, P; Borghi, F; Pedroni, M; Scarselli, A; Di Gregorio, C; Losi, L; Viel, A; Genuardi, M; Abbati, G; Rossi, G; Menigatti, M; Lamberti, I; Ponti, G; Roncucci, L

    2004-01-01

    Background and aims: Although diet and lifestyle are associated with the development of colorectal malignancies, the only clearly identified aetiological factors in colorectal cancer are inheritance (hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) and familial polyposis), inflammatory bowel diseases, papillomavirus, and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Our aim was to determine what proportion of colorectal neoplasms could be attributed to these specific factors. Patients and methods: Data from a colorectal cancer registry were analysed over a 15 year period, during which nearly 2500 cases were recorded. In patients with suspected HNPCC, microsatellite instability and immunohistochemical expression of proteins encoded by the main DNA mismatch repair genes were assessed. In families with unstable neoplasms, constitutional mutations of the mismatch repair genes hMSH2, hMLH1, and hMSH6 were evaluated by single strand conformation polymorphism analysis and sequencing. Results: Inflammatory bowel diseases, familial polyposis, and AIDS were rare causes of colorectal cancer (three, three, and one case, respectively). Anal squamous carcinoma developed in 27 patients (1.0%) and could be attributed to papillomavirus infection. In 58 patients (from 34 families) a clinical diagnosis of HNPCC was established (2.4%). In total, cases with a known aetiology were 92 (3.7% of all patients). Microsatellite instability was detected in 15 cancers from HNPCC families, and germline mutations in six families (12 patients, 0.5% of the total). Families with unstable tumours, with or without mutations, were clinically similar, suggesting the involvement of the mismatch repair system even when mutations were not detected. Conclusions: The study suggests that the aetiology of colorectal malignancies remains elusive in the large majority of cases. Among specific causes, HNPCC represents the most frequent. However, with a population based approach, constitutional mutations of the

  2. Healthcare system factors and colorectal cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Zapka, Jane G; Puleo, Elaine; Vickers-Lahti, Maureen; Luckmann, Roger

    2002-07-01

    Developing effective programs to promote colorectal cancer (CRC) screening requires understanding of the effect of healthcare system factors on access to screening and adherence to guidelines. This study assessed the role of insurance status, type of plan, the frequency of preventive health visits, and provider recommendation on utilization of CRC screening tests using a cross-sectional, random-digit-dial survey of 1002 Massachusetts residents aged > or =50. A broad definition of CRC screening status included colonoscopy or barium enema (screening or diagnostic) within 10 years, flexible sigmoidoscopy (FSIG) within 5 years, and fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) in the past year as options; 51.7% of subjects aged 50 to 64 and 61.5% of older subjects were current. The uninsured had the lowest current testing rate. Among insured participants, type of insurance had little impact on CRC testing; older subjects enrolled in HMOs had marginally higher rates, although not statistically significant. Increased frequency of preventive health visits and ever receiving a physician's recommendation for FSIG or ever receiving FOBT cards were associated with higher rates of CRC screening among both age groups. Even when broad criteria are used to define current CRC screening status, a substantial proportion of the age-eligible population remains underscreened. Obtaining regular preventive care and receiving a physician's recommendation for screening appear to be potent facilitators of screening that should be considered in designing promotional efforts.

  3. Cell Surface Markers in Colorectal Cancer Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Belov, Larissa; Zhou, Jerry; Christopherson, Richard I.

    2011-01-01

    The classification of colorectal cancers (CRC) is currently based largely on histologically determined tumour characteristics, such as differentiation status and tumour stage, i.e., depth of tumour invasion, involvement of regional lymph nodes and the occurrence of metastatic spread to other organs. These are the conventional prognostic factors for patient survival and often determine the requirement for adjuvant therapy after surgical resection of the primary tumour. However, patients with the same CRC stage can have very different disease-related outcomes. For some, surgical removal of early-stage tumours leads to full recovery, while for others, disease recurrence and metastasis may occur regardless of adjuvant therapy. It is therefore important to understand the molecular processes that lead to disease progression and metastasis and to find more reliable prognostic markers and novel targets for therapy. This review focuses on cell surface proteins that correlate with tumour progression, metastasis and patient outcome, and discusses some of the challenges in finding prognostic protein markers in CRC. PMID:21339979

  4. Phytate, reactive oxygen species and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Owen, R W; Spiegelhalder, B; Bartsch, H

    1998-05-01

    Reproducible high-performance liquid chromatography methods have been developed and validated which allow an accurate quantification of phytic acid in faeces and food and reactive oxygen species in an in vitro model system and in faecal specimens. When applied to the evaluation of reactive oxygen species generation by faeces, this method has shown that 1:100 dilutions of matrix obtained from stool samples of adenoma patients are capable of generating significant quantities of reactive oxygen species as evinced by the production of diphenols from salicylic acid. Moreover, it has been shown that the major product of HO. attack on salicylic acid is 2,5-dihydroxy benzoic acid and not 2, 3-dihydroxy benzoic acid as previously reported. In the presence of the antioxidant ascorbic acid the inhibitory capacity of phytic acid on the generation of reactive oxygen species is completely subverted. Therefore, the kinetics of reactive oxygen species production by faeces is currently under further investigation by high-performance liquid chromatography and chemiluminescence in various patient groups and may give an insight into the role of reactive oxygen species in the aetiology of colorectal cancer.

  5. Colorectal cancer diagnosis: Pitfalls and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Vega, Pablo; Valentín, Fátima; Cubiella, Joaquín

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major health problem in the Western world. The diagnostic process is a challenge in all health systems for many reasons: There are often no specific symptoms; lower abdominal symptoms are very common and mostly related to non-neoplastic diseases, not CRC; diagnosis of CRC is mainly based on colonoscopy, an invasive procedure; and the resource for diagnosis is usually scarce. Furthermore, the available predictive models for CRC are based on the evaluation of symptoms, and their diagnostic accuracy is limited. Moreover, diagnosis is a complex process involving a sequence of events related to the patient, the initial consulting physician and the health system. Understanding this process is the first step in identifying avoidable factors and reducing the effects of diagnostic delay on the prognosis of CRC. In this article, we describe the predictive value of symptoms for CRC detection. We summarize the available evidence concerning the diagnostic process, as well as the factors implicated in its delay and the methods proposed to reduce it. We describe the different prioritization criteria and predictive models for CRC detection, specifically addressing the two-week wait referral guideline from the National Institute of Clinical Excellence in terms of efficacy, efficiency and diagnostic accuracy. Finally, we collected information on the usefulness of biomarkers, specifically the faecal immunochemical test, as non-invasive diagnostic tests for CRC detection in symptomatic patients. PMID:26690833

  6. [Cost-effectiveness of colorectal cancer screening].

    PubMed

    Heresbach, Denis; Manfrédi, Sylvain; Branger, Bernard; Bretagne, Jean-François

    2006-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening in France is based on a faecal occult blood test every two years in average risk subjects 50-74 years of age while other endoscopic or non-endoscopic screening methods are used in Europe and in the USA. Beside the reduced incidence of and mortality from CRC found in available studies, cost-effectiveness data need to be taken into account. Because of the delay between randomized controlled trials and clinical results, transitional probabilistic models of screening programs are useful for public health policy makers. The aim of the present review was to promote the implementation of cost-effectiveness studies, to provide a guide to analyze cost-effectiveness studies on CRC screening and, to propose a French cost effectiveness study comparing CRC screening strategies. Most of these trials were performed by US or UK authors and demonstrate that the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio varies between 5 000 and 15 000 US dollars/one year life gained, with wide variations: these results were highly dependent on the unit costs of the different devices as well as the predictive values of the screening tests. Although CRC screening programs have been implemented in several administrative districts of France since 2002, and the results of these randomized controlled trials using fecal occult blood have been updated, cost-effectiveness criteria need to be integrated; especially since the results of screening campaigns based on other tools such as flexible sigmoidoscopy should be available in 2007.

  7. Screening for colorectal cancer: spoiled for choice?

    PubMed

    Sarfati, Diana; Shaw, Caroline; McLeod, Melissa; Blakely, Tony; Bissett, Ian

    2016-08-19

    There are many different potential screening strategies for colorectal cancer (CRC) that vary both in the likely magnitude of their benefits on CRC mortality and their impact on health services. Many approaches to CRC screening are cost-effective, but there is substantial uncertainty about the optimal approach. Decision models using Markov or microsimulation modelling that compare the cost-effectiveness of different screening strategies are useful in this regard. We have reviewed recent decision models that compare the cost-effectiveness of one-off flexible sigmoidoscopy screening with immunochemical faecal occult blood (FIT) based screening. Models consistently show that any population-based screening is cost-effective compared with no screening, and that FIT-based screening is more effective than one-off sigmoidoscopy screening. The combination of one-off sigmoidoscopy with FIT is more effective in saving lives than either modality alone, but has the greatest impact on health service resources. The recent decision to proceed with biennial FIT-based screening is consistent with current evidence.

  8. Colorectal Cancer in African Americans: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Renee; White, Pascale; Nieto, Jose; Vieira, Dorice; Francois, Fritz; Hamilton, Frank

    2016-01-01

    This review is an update to the American College of Gastroenterology (ACG) Committee on Minority Affairs and Cultural Diversity's paper on colorectal cancer (CRC) in African Americans published in 2005. Over the past 10 years, the incidence and mortality rates of CRC in the United States has steadily declined. However, reductions have been strikingly much slower among African Americans who continue to have the highest rate of mortality and lowest survival when compared with all other racial groups. The reasons for the health disparities are multifactorial and encompass physician and patient barriers. Patient factors that contribute to disparities include poor knowledge of benefits of CRC screening, limited access to health care, insurance status along with fear and anxiety. Physician factors include lack of knowledge of screening guidelines along with disparate recommendations for screening. Earlier screening has been recommended as an effective strategy to decrease observed disparities; currently the ACG and American Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopists recommend CRC screening in African Americans to begin at age 45. Despite the decline in CRC deaths in all racial and ethnic groups, there still exists a significant burden of CRC in African Americans, thus other strategies including educational outreach for health care providers and patients and the utilization of patient navigation systems emphasizing the importance of screening are necessary. These strategies have been piloted in both local communities and Statewide resulting in notable significant decreases in observed disparities. PMID:27467183

  9. Dietary flavonoids, lignans and colorectal cancer prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Zamora-Ros, Raul; Guinó, Elisabeth; Henar Alonso, M.; Vidal, Carmen; Barenys, Mercè; Soriano, Antonio; Moreno, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Flavonoids and lignans are polyphenol classes with anticarcinogenic activities against colorectal cancer (CRC). However, very limited epidemiological evidence exists on their effects on CRC prognosis. This study aimed to evaluate the association between flavonoid and lignan intakes with the risk of CRC recurrence and overall survival in CRC patients. The study followed incident histologically confirmed CRC cases in Barcelona (Spain). Validated dietary questionnaires and lifestyle information were collected at recruitment. An ad hoc food composition database on flavonoids and lignans was compiled by using data from the US Department of Agriculture and Phenol-Explorer databases. Adjusted hazards ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using multivariable Cox models. After 8.6 years of mean follow-up, 133 of 409 (32.5%) participants died and 77 of 319 (24.1%) had a CRC recurrence. Total flavonoids were associated neither with CRC recurrence (HR comparing extreme tertiles 1.13, 95% CI 0.64–2.02; P-trend 0.67) nor with overall survival (HRT3vsT1 1.06, 95% CI 0.69–1.65; P-trend 0.78) in the multivariable models. No associations were also observed with either total lignans or any flavonoid subclass intake. In conclusion, the results of the current study do not support a role of flavonoid and lignan intake in the CRC prognosis. PMID:26369380

  10. Colorectal cancer screening among Chinese American immigrants.

    PubMed

    Kim, Karen; Chapman, Christopher; Vallina, Helen

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the factors determining fecal occult blood test (FOBT) uptake in Chinese American immigrants. This study used a prospective, cross-sectional design with convenience sampling. An educational session on colorectal cancer screening (CRS) was provided to the participants during a health fair, and each participant was offered a no-cost FOBT kit. Data was collected over two consecutive years during three different health fairs. A questionnaire was used to collect demographic data. A total of 113 participants were recruited and 72% of them returned the FOBT kit. There was a significant association between having a primary-care physician (PCP) and having CRS in the past, even after controlling for age, gender and the length of time in the US (P = .009). Participants who visited a doctor for health maintenance were less likely to participate in the FOBT, compared to participants who never visited a doctor or who only visited a doctor when they were sick (P = .001). The length of time in the US had a significant effect on having a PCP (P = .002). However, having a PCP or having CRS in the past was not associated with participating in the screening and so was feeling at risk for CRC. In fact, 49% of Chinese women and 45% of Chinese men felt no risk of CRC. Future research and interventions that address knowledge deficits and focus on recent immigrants and their access to health care may have the potential to increase CRS among Chinese American immigrants.

  11. Distributions of colorectal cancer in two Chinese cities with contrasting colorectal cancer epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Leung, Wai K; Chen, Wei-Qing; Gu, Li; Long, Dan; Law, W L

    2015-12-01

    The incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) is rising rapidly in Chinese. We studied the anatomic distributions and characteristics of CRC in Hong Kong (HK) and Chongqing (CQ) with different CRC epidemiology. It was a retrospective study conducted in three large regional hospitals of the two cities. We identified all patients newly diagnosed with CRC between 2003 and 2012. The distribution and characteristics of CRC of the two cities were compared. Of CRC, 3664 new cases were diagnosed within the study period. CRC was more common in men (>56%) in both cities. The mean age at diagnosis was significantly younger in CQ, the lower prevalence area, than in HK (62.1 vs 70.4 years; P < 0.001). Rectal cancer was the predominant (61.3%) cancer in CQ, but only 18% of cancers in HK were rectal cancer (P = 0.0001). Right-sided colonic cancer, however, was more common in HK than CQ (27.2% vs 17.4%; P < 0.001). Women had more right-sided colonic cancer than men in both cities (P < 0.002), and there was an age-related increase in right-sided colonic cancer in HK but not in CQ. Multivariate analysis showed that older age, female, and living in HK were independent risk factors associated with right-sided colonic cancer. There are significant differences in the distribution of CRC between HK and CQ. The discrepancy may be partly accounted by older population and an increase in proximal colonic cancer, particularly in women, in HK. © 2015 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  12. Early-onset colorectal cancer: a sporadic or inherited disease?

    PubMed

    Stigliano, Vittoria; Sanchez-Mete, Lupe; Martayan, Aline; Anti, Marcello

    2014-09-21

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer diagnosed worldwide. Although epidemiology data show a marked variability around the world, its overall incidence rate shows a slow but steady decrease, mainly in developed countries. Conversely, early-onset colorectal cancer appears to display an opposite trend with an overall prevalence in United States and European Union ranging from 3.0% and 8.6%. Colorectal cancer has a substantial proportion of familial cases. In particular, early age at onset is especially suggestive of hereditary predisposition. The clinicopathological and molecular features of colorectal cancer cases show a marked heterogeneity not only between early- and late-onset cases but also within the early-onset group. Two distinct subtypes of early-onset colorectal cancers can be identified: a "sporadic" subtype, usually without family history, and an inherited subtype arising in the context of well defined hereditary syndromes. The pathogenesis of the early-onset disease is substantially well characterized in the inherited subtype, which is mainly associated to the Lynch syndrome and occasionally to other rare mendelian diseases, whereas in the "sporadic" subtype the origin of the disease may be attributed to the presence of various common/rare genetic variants, so far largely unidentified, displaying variable penetrance. These variants are thought to act cumulatively to increase the risk of colorectal cancer, and presumably to also anticipate its onset. Efforts are ongoing in the attempt to unravel the intricate genetic basis of this "sporadic" early-onset disease. A better knowledge of molecular entities and pathways may impact on family-tailored prevention and clinical management strategies.

  13. Hypercalcemia of Malignancy and Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Galindo, Rodolfo J.; Romao, Isabela; Valsamis, Ageliki; Weinerman, Stuart; Harris, Yael Tobi

    2016-01-01

    Our aim is to describe the association between colorectal cancer (CRC) and humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy (HHM). Causes of hypercalcemia of malignancy include parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP) secretion, local osteolysis, calcitriol production and ectopic parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion. Hypercalcemia of malignancy in patients with CRCs is a rare scenario. A patient with anal squamous cell carcinoma was admitted with hypercalcemia, suppressed PTH and hypophosphatemia. He was found to have metastatic anal squamous cell carcinoma to the liver. Further evaluation revealed elevated PTHrP and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D and low 25-hydroxyvitamin D. Over a 5-month course, the hypercalcemia responded poorly to bisphosphonates, transiently to prednisone, but showed marked improvement with chemotherapy. A review of English language publications in Pubmed and a reference search of retrieved articles revealed 29 cases of CRC causing PTHrP-mediated hypercalcemia. Most patients were middle-aged men (mean ± SD: 56.7 ± 13.4 years), with advanced metastatic cancer (85% with hepatic metastasis) and severe hypercalcemia (mean ± SD: 15.6 ± 1.9 mg/dL, 62% with Ca > 14). This condition is associated with high mortality (79%) and short survival (median 54.5 days, CI: 21 - 168). Despite being uncommon, HHM (PTHrP-mediated) should be considered in patients with metastatic CRC presenting with hypercalcemia. Clinicians should be aware that combined etiologies may be present, particularly in cases of resistant hypercalcemia. Treatment of the underlying malignancy is essential for calcium control. PMID:26998187

  14. Lessons learned from the CDC's Colorectal Cancer Screening Demonstration Program.

    PubMed

    Seeff, Laura C; Rohan, Elizabeth A

    2013-08-01

    This report briefly summarizes 13 articles in this dedicated supplement to Cancer documenting the full implementation and evaluation of CDC's Colorectal Cancer Screening Demonstration Program (CRCSDP). The supplement includes 3 articles that describe clinical and quality outcomes; 2 articles that describe programmatic and clinical costs; 3 that were based on a multiple case study, using qualitative methods to describe the overall implementation experience of this initiative; and 4 articles written by and about individual program sites. The comprehensive, multi-methods evaluation conducted alongside the program produced many important lessons regarding the design, start-up, and implementation of colorectal cancer screening in this high-need population, and paved the way for the CDC to establish a larger, population-based colorectal cancer control initiative, broadly aligned with expectations of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act through its population-based emphasis on using a health systems approach to increase colorectal cancer screening. Cancer 2013;119(15 suppl):2817-9. © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  15. CpG island methylator phenotype in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Toyota, Minoru; Ahuja, Nita; Ohe-Toyota, Mutsumi; Herman, James G.; Baylin, Stephen B.; Issa, Jean-Pierre J.

    1999-01-01

    Aberrant methylation of promoter region CpG islands is associated with transcriptional inactivation of tumor-suppressor genes in neoplasia. To understand global patterns of CpG island methylation in colorectal cancer, we have used a recently developed technique called methylated CpG island amplification to examine 30 newly cloned differentially methylated DNA sequences. Of these 30 clones, 19 (63%) were progressively methylated in an age-dependent manner in normal colon, 7 (23%) were methylated in a cancer-specific manner, and 4 (13%) were methylated only in cell lines. Thus, a majority of CpG islands methylated in colon cancer are also methylated in a subset of normal colonic cells during the process of aging. In contrast, methylation of the cancer-specific clones was found exclusively in a subset of colorectal cancers, which appear to display a CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP). CIMP+ tumors also have a high incidence of p16 and THBS1 methylation, and they include the majority of sporadic colorectal cancers with microsatellite instability related to hMLH1 methylation. We thus define a pathway in colorectal cancer that appears to be responsible for the majority of sporadic tumors with mismatch repair deficiency. PMID:10411935

  16. Risk factors for metachronous colorectal cancer following a primary colorectal cancer: A prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Jayasekara, Harindra; Reece, Jeanette C; Buchanan, Daniel D; Rosty, Christophe; Dashti, S Ghazaleh; Ait Ouakrim, Driss; Winship, Ingrid M; Macrae, Finlay A; Boussioutas, Alex; Giles, Graham G; Ahnen, Dennis J; Lowery, Jan; Casey, Graham; Haile, Robert W; Gallinger, Steven; Le Marchand, Loic; Newcomb, Polly A; Lindor, Noralane M; Hopper, John L; Parry, Susan; Jenkins, Mark A; Win, Aung Ko

    2016-09-01

    Individuals diagnosed with colorectal cancer (CRC) are at risk of developing a metachronous CRC. We examined the associations between personal, tumour-related and lifestyle risk factors, and risk of metachronous CRC. A total of 7,863 participants with incident colon or rectal cancer who were recruited in the USA, Canada and Australia to the Colon Cancer Family Registry during 1997-2012, except those identified as high-risk, for example, Lynch syndrome, were followed up approximately every 5 years. We estimated the risk of metachronous CRC, defined as the first new primary CRC following an interval of at least one year after the initial CRC diagnosis. Observation time started at the age at diagnosis of the initial CRC and ended at the age at diagnosis of the metachronous CRC, last contact or death whichever occurred earliest, or were censored at the age at diagnosis of any metachronous colorectal adenoma. Cox regression was used to derive hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). During a mean follow-up of 6.6 years, 142 (1.81%) metachronous CRCs were diagnosed (mean age at diagnosis 59.8; incidence 2.7/1,000 person-years). An increased risk of metachronous CRC was associated with the presence of a synchronous CRC (HR = 2.73; 95% CI: 1.30-5.72) and the location of cancer in the proximal colon at initial diagnosis (compared with distal colon or rectum, HR = 4.16; 95% CI: 2.80-6.18). The presence of a synchronous CRC and the location of the initial CRC might be useful for deciding the intensity of surveillance colonoscopy for individuals diagnosed with CRC.

  17. Is cervical cancer a risk factor for colorectal neoplasia? Prevalence of colorectal adenoma in Korean patients with cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun Jung; Kim, Eun Soo; Lee, Jeong Eun; Park, Woo Young; Kwon, Jee Suk; Park, Kyung Sik; Cho, Kwang Bum; Jang, Byoung Kuk; Chung, Woo Jin; Hwang, Jae Seok; Park, Joon Cheol

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between colorectal neoplasia and cervical cancer has not been evaluated. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of colorectal adenoma in patients with cervical cancer and compare it with that of control subjects. Between January 2005 and December 2009, the medical records of patients diagnosed with cervical cancer were retrospectively reviewed. Patients undergoing sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy for the preoperative evaluation of the colon were enrolled in this study. Age-matched female healthy subjects who underwent colonoscopy for screening purposes were included as control subjects. We compared demographic and clinicopathological characteristics between the groups. Overall, 285 patients with cervical cancer and 284 healthy subjects were included (age, 56.93±11.92 vs. 56.10±9.31 years). The mean body weight, body mass index (BMI), the incidence of diabetes mellitus and impaired fasting glucose were not statistically different between the 2 groups. The prevalence of colorectal adenoma was not different between the patient and control groups, regardless of examination extent. Multivariate analysis showed that age and BMI were significant independent risk factors for colorectal adenomatous polyps (age, p<0.001; BMI, p=0.002). There might not be any significant association between cervical cancer and colorectal adenomatous polyps.

  18. Expression and clinical significance of Sirt1 in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Deng-Feng; Jiang, Su-Juan; Pan, Zhi-Peng; Cheng, Wei-Dong; Zhang, Wen-Jun; Yao, Xiao-Kun; Li, Yu-Cheng; Lun, Yong-Zhi

    2016-02-01

    The objective of the present study was to examine the expression of Silent information regulator 1 (Sirt1) in colorectal cancer and peritumoral normal mucosa tissue, and therefore analyze the role and molecular mechanism of Sirt1 in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. Colorectal cancer tissue specimens were employed as the experimental group, and adjacent normal mucosa tissues >5 cm from tumor lesions were used as the control group. The expression of Sirt1 was detected by the immunohistochemical streptavidin peroxidase detection method in paraffin-embedded sections, whilst Sirt1 protein expression was examined by western blot analysis in the fresh tissues. Sirt1 protein was primarily expressed in the nuclei of the tumor cells, and positive staining was brownish-yellow in color. The relative expression quantities of Sirt1 in the peritumoral normal rectal mucosa and rectal carcinoma were 1.15 and 2.62, and the differences between the two groups were statistically significant (P<0.05). The expression level of Sirt1 in colorectal carcinoma was significantly associated with the depth of tumor invasion, differentiation and tumor size (P<0.05). Sirt1 expression was also found to be associated with tumor tissue type, lymph node metastasis, Duke's stage and patient age. These characteristics combined may therefore be used as markers for the early diagnosis of colorectal cancer pathogenesis.

  19. [Gut microbial influence and probiotics on colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Myung, Dae Seong; Joo, Young Eun

    2012-11-01

    The human intestinal microbiota is a community of 10(13)-10(14) microorganisms that harbor in the intestine and normally participate in a symbiotic relationship with human. Technical and conceptual advances have enabled rapid progress in characterizing the taxonomic composition, metabolic capacity and immunomodulatory activity of the human intestinal microbiota. Their collective genome, defined as microbiome, is estimated to contain ≥150 times as many genes as 2.85 billion base pair human genome. The intestinal microbiota and its microbiome form a diverse and complex ecological community that profoundly impact intestinal homeostasis and disease states. It is becoming increasingly evident that the large and complex bacterial population of the large intestine plays an important role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Numerous studies show that gut immunity and inflammation have impact on the development of colorectal cancer. Additionally, bacteria have been linked to colorectal cancer by the production of toxic and genotoxic bacterial metabolite. In this review, we discuss the multifactorial role of intestinal microbiota in colorectal cancer and role for probiotics in the prevention of colorectal cancer.

  20. Celebrity appeal: reaching women to promote colorectal cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Crystale Purvis; Gelb, Cynthia A; Lobb, Kathleen

    2015-03-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Screen for Life: National Colorectal Cancer Action Campaign works with the Entertainment Industry Foundation's National Colorectal Cancer Research Alliance to develop public service announcements (PSAs) featuring celebrities. Selection of Screen for Life celebrity spokespersons is based on a variety of factors, including their general appeal and personal connection to colorectal cancer. Screen for Life PSAs featuring celebrities have been disseminated exclusively through donated media placements and have been formatted for television, radio, print, and out-of-home displays such as dioramas in airports, other transit stations, and shopping malls. A 2012 national survey with women aged 50-75 years (n=772) investigated reported exposure to Screen for Life PSAs featuring actor Terrence Howard. In total, 8.3% of women recalled exposure to the PSAs. Celebrity spokespersons can attract the attention of both target audiences and media gatekeepers who decide which PSAs will receive donated placements.

  1. Targeting Angiogenesis in Colorectal Cancer: Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kircher, Sheetal Mehta; Nimeiri, Halla S; Benson, Al B

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is commonly diagnosed throughout the world, and treatment options have greatly expanded over the last 2 decades. Targeting angiogenesis has been a major focus of study in a variety of malignancy types. Targeting angiogenesis has been achieved by several mechanisms in colorectal cancer, including use of antiangiogenic small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). There have been many attempts and failures to prove efficacy of TKIs in the treatment of colorectal cancer including sorafenib, sunitinib, vatalanib, and tivozanib. Regorafenib was the first TKI to demonstrate efficacy and is an orally active inhibitor of angiogenic (including the vascular endothelial growth factor receptors 1, 2, and 3), stromal, and oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinases. There are ongoing investigations of both regorafenib and ninetanib; however, there remains a critical need to better understand novel combinations with TKIs that could prove more efficacious than available options.

  2. Health-related quality of life and life satisfaction in colorectal cancer survivors: trajectories of adjustment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This longitudinal study describes the five year trajectories of health-related quality of life (HR-QOL) and life satisfaction in long term colorectal cancer survivors. Patients and methods A population-based sample of 1966 colorectal cancer survivors were surveyed at six time points from five months to five years post-diagnosis. Predictor variables were: socio-demographic variables, optimism; cancer threat appraisal; perceived social support. Quality of life was assessed with the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Colorectal (HR-QOL); and the Satisfaction with Life Scale. Growth mixture models were applied to identify trajectory classes and their predictors. Results Distinct adjustment trajectories were identified for HR-QOL and life satisfaction. Lower optimism, poorer social support, a more negative cognitive appraisal, and younger age were associated with poorer life satisfaction, while survivors with less than 8 years of education had higher life satisfaction. This pattern was similar for overall HR-QOL except that educational level was not a significant predictor and later stage disease and female gender emerged as related to poorer outcomes. One in five survivors reported poorer constant HR-QOL (19.2%) and a small group had poor life satisfaction (7.2%); 26.2% reported constant high HR-QOL and 48.8% had high constant life satisfaction. Socioeconomic disadvantage and remoteness of residence uniquely predicted poorer outcomes in the colorectal cancer specific HR-QOL sub domain. Conclusion Although HR-QOL and subjective cognitive QOL share similar antecedents their trajectory patterns suggested they are distinct adjustment outcomes; with life satisfaction emerging as temporally stable phenomenon. Unique patterns of risk support suggest the need to account for heterogeneity in adjustment in longitudinal QOL studies with cancer survivors. PMID:23497387

  3. Health-related quality of life and life satisfaction in colorectal cancer survivors: trajectories of adjustment.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Jeff; Ng, Shu Kay; Breitbart, William; Aitken, Joanne; Youl, Pip; Baade, Peter D; Chambers, Suzanne K

    2013-03-14

    This longitudinal study describes the five year trajectories of health-related quality of life (HR-QOL) and life satisfaction in long term colorectal cancer survivors. A population-based sample of 1966 colorectal cancer survivors were surveyed at six time points from five months to five years post-diagnosis. Predictor variables were: socio-demographic variables, optimism; cancer threat appraisal; perceived social support. Quality of life was assessed with the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Colorectal (HR-QOL); and the Satisfaction with Life Scale. Growth mixture models were applied to identify trajectory classes and their predictors. Distinct adjustment trajectories were identified for HR-QOL and life satisfaction. Lower optimism, poorer social support, a more negative cognitive appraisal, and younger age were associated with poorer life satisfaction, while survivors with less than 8 years of education had higher life satisfaction. This pattern was similar for overall HR-QOL except that educational level was not a significant predictor and later stage disease and female gender emerged as related to poorer outcomes. One in five survivors reported poorer constant HR-QOL (19.2%) and a small group had poor life satisfaction (7.2%); 26.2% reported constant high HR-QOL and 48.8% had high constant life satisfaction. Socioeconomic disadvantage and remoteness of residence uniquely predicted poorer outcomes in the colorectal cancer specific HR-QOL sub domain. Although HR-QOL and subjective cognitive QOL share similar antecedents their trajectory patterns suggested they are distinct adjustment outcomes; with life satisfaction emerging as temporally stable phenomenon. Unique patterns of risk support suggest the need to account for heterogeneity in adjustment in longitudinal QOL studies with cancer survivors.

  4. Incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer in individuals with a family history of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Schoen, Robert E; Razzak, Anthony; Yu, Kelly J; Berndt, Sonja I; Firl, Kevin; Riley, Thomas L; Pinsky, Paul F

    2015-11-01

    Little is known about the change in risk conferred by family history of colorectal cancer (CRC) as a person ages. We evaluated the effect of family history on CRC incidence and mortality after 55 years of age, when the risk of early onset cancer had passed. We collected data from participants in the randomized, controlled Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian cancer screening trial of flexible sigmoidoscopy versus usual care (55-74 years old, no history of CRC), performed at 10 US centers from 1993 to 2001. A detailed family history of colorectal cancer was obtained at enrollment, and subjects were followed for CRC incidence and mortality for up to 13 years. Among 144,768 participants, 14,961 subjects (10.3%) reported a family of CRC. Of 2090 incident cases, 273 cases (13.1%) had a family history of CRC; among 538 deaths from CRC, 71 (13.2%) had a family history of CRC. Overall, family history of CRC was associated with an increased risk of CRC incidence (hazard ratio [HR], 1.30; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10-1.50; P<.0001) and increased mortality (HR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.02-1.69; P = .03). Subjects with 1 first degree relative (FDR) with CRC (n = 238; HR, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.07-1.42) or ≥2 FDRs with CRC (n = 35; HR, 2.04; 95% CI, 1.44-2.86) were at increased risk for incident CRC. However, among individuals with 1 FDR with CRC, there were no differences in risk based on age at diagnosis in the FDR (for FDR <60 years of age: HR, 1.27; 95% CI, 0.97-1.63; for FDR 60-70 years of age: HR, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.06-1.62; for FDR >70 years of age: HR, 1.14; 95% CI, 0.93-1.45; P trend = .59). After 55 years of age, subjects with 1 FDR with CRC had only a modest increase in risk for CRC incidence and death; age of onset in the FDR was not significantly associated with risk. Individuals with ≥2 FDRs with CRC had continued increased risk in older age. Guidelines and clinical practice for subjects with a family history of CRC should be modified to align CRC testing to risk

  5. Characterisation and protein expression profiling of annexins in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Duncan, R; Carpenter, B; Main, L C; Telfer, C; Murray, G I

    2008-01-29

    The annexins are family of calcium-regulated phospholipid-binding proteins with diverse roles in cell biology. Individual annexins have been implicated in tumour development and progression, and in this investigation a range of annexins have been studied in colorectal cancer. Annexins A1, A2, A4 and A11 were identified by comparative proteomic analysis to be overexpressed in colorectal cancer. Annexins A1, A2, A4 and A11 were further studied by immunohistochemistry with a colorectal cancer tissue microarray containing primary and metastatic colorectal cancer and also normal colon. There was significant increase in expression in annexins A1 (P=0.01), A2 (P<0.001), A4 (P<0.001) and A11 (P<0.001) in primary tumours compared with normal colon. There was increasing expression of annexins A2 (P=0.001), A4 (P=0.03) and A11 (P=0.006) with increasing tumour stage. An annexin expression profile was identified by k-means cluster analysis, and the annexin profile was associated with tumour stage (P=0.01) and also patient survival. Patients in annexin cluster group 1 (low annexin expression) had a better survival (log rank=5.33, P=0.02) than patients in cluster group 2 (high annexins A4 and A11 expression). In conclusion, this study has shown that individual annexins are present in colorectal cancer, specific annexins are overexpressed in colorectal cancer and the annexin expression profile is associated with survival.

  6. Patient perceptions regarding the likelihood of cure after surgical resection of lung and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yuhree; Winner, Megan; Page, Andrew; Tisnado, Diana M; Martinez, Kathryn A; Buettner, Stefan; Ejaz, Aslam; Spolverato, Gaya; Morss Dy, Sydney E; Pawlik, Timothy M

    2015-10-15

    The objective of the current study was to characterize the prevalence of the expectation that surgical resection of lung or colorectal cancer might be curative. The authors sought to assess patient-level, tumor-level, and communication-level factors associated with the perception of cure. Between 2003 and 2005, a total of 3954 patients who underwent cancer-directed surgery for lung (30.3%) or colorectal (69.7%) cancer were identified from a population-based and health system-based survey of participants from multiple US regions. Approximately 80.0% of patients with lung cancer and 89.7% of those with colorectal cancer responded that surgery would cure their cancer. Even 57.4% and 79.8% of patients with stage IV lung and colorectal cancer, respectively, believed surgery was likely to be curative. On multivariable analyses, the odds ratio (OR) of the perception of curative intent was found to be higher among patients with colorectal versus lung cancer (OR, 2.27). Patients who were female, with an advanced tumor stage, unmarried, and having a higher number of comorbidities were less likely to believe that surgery would cure their cancer; educational level, physical function, and insurance status were not found to be associated with perception of cure. Patients who reported optimal physician communication scores (reference score, 0-80; score of 80-100 [OR, 1.40] and score of 100 [OR, 1.89]) and a shared role in decision-making with their physician (OR, 1.16) or family (OR, 1.17) had a higher odds of perceiving surgery would be curative, whereas patients who reported physician-controlled (OR, 0.56) or family-controlled (OR, 0.72) decision-making were less likely to believe surgery would provide a cure. Greater focus on patient-physician engagement, communication, and barriers to discussing goals of care with patients who are diagnosed with cancer is needed. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  7. Impact of age and comorbidity on survival in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    van Eeghen, Elmer E.; Bakker, Sandra D.; van Bochove, Aart

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with colorectal cancer are often excluded from clinical trials based on age or a poor performance score. However, 70% of colorectal cancer is diagnosed in patients over 65. Evaluation on the influence of age and comorbidity on survival and cause of death in a non-selected population. Methods Included were 621 consecutive patients with colorectal cancer. An extensive chart review was performed for 392 patients with colon cancer and 143 patients with rectal cancer. Analyses were performed separately for both groups. Results Median survival of colon cancer patients was 5.13 years, 131 patients (34.3%) died from tumour progression. Age and comorbidity were significant predictors for overall survival (P<0.001). Age was also a significant predictor of cause of death (P=0.001). In rectal cancer patients median survival was 4.67 years, 51 (35.7%) of patients died from tumour progression. Neither age nor comorbidity was significant predictors of survival. Age was a significant predictor of cause of death (P<0.001). Conclusions In colon cancer patient age and comorbidity predict survival. This represents possible bias or a reduced survival benefit of treatment, and is an indication that colon cancer is not the prognosis defining illness in the majority of patients. In rectal cancer patients neither age or comorbidity significantly impacted survival. PMID:26697191

  8. Immunotherapy in colorectal cancer: What have we learned so far?

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Castañón, María; Er, Tze-Kiong; Bujanda, Luis; Herreros-Villanueva, Marta

    2016-09-01

    After decades of progress based on chemotherapy and targeted agents, patients with metastatic colorectal cancer still have low long-term survival, with more than 500,000 deaths occurring worldwide every year. Recent results showing clinical evidence of efficacy using immunotherapy in other types of tumors, such as melanoma and lung cancer, have also made this a viable therapy for evaluation in colorectal cancer in clinical trials. The development of cancer immunotherapies is progressing quickly, with a variety of technological approaches. This review summarizes the current status of clinical trials testing immunotherapy in colorectal cancer and discusses what has been learned based on previous results. Immunotherapy strategies, such as various models of vaccines, effector-cell therapy and checkpoint inhibitor antibodies, provide protection against progression for a limited subset of patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer. A better understanding of particular immune cell types and pathways in each patient is still needed. These findings will enable the development of novel biomarkers to select the appropriate subset of patients to be treated with a particular immunotherapy, and the tendencies determined from recent results can guide clinical practice for oncologists in this new therapeutic area and in the design of the next round of clinical trials.

  9. Genetic inactivation of ADAMTS15 metalloprotease in human colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Viloria, Cristina G; Obaya, Alvaro J; Moncada-Pazos, Angela; Llamazares, María; Astudillo, Aurora; Capellá, Gabriel; Cal, Santiago; López-Otín, Carlos

    2009-06-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases have been traditionally linked to cancer dissemination through their ability to degrade most extracellular matrix components, thus facilitating invasion and metastasis of tumor cells. However, recent functional studies have revealed that some metalloproteases, including several members of the ADAMTS family, also exhibit tumor suppressor properties. In particular, ADAMTS1, ADAMTS9, and ADAMTS18 have been found to be epigenetically silenced in malignant tumors of different sources, suggesting that they may function as tumor suppressor genes. Herein, we show that ADAMTS15 is genetically inactivated in colon cancer. We have performed a mutational analysis of the ADAMTS15 gene in human colorectal carcinomas, with the finding of four mutations in 50 primary tumors and 6 colorectal cancer cell lines. Moreover, functional in vitro and in vivo studies using HCT-116 and SW-620 colorectal cancer cells and severe combined immunodeficient mice have revealed that ADAMTS15 restrains tumor growth and invasion. Furthermore, the presence of ADAMTS15 in human colorectal cancer samples showed a negative correlation with the histopathologic differentiation grade of the corresponding tumors. Collectively, these results provide evidence that extracellular proteases, including ADAMTS15, may be targets of inactivating mutations in human cancer and further validate the concept that secreted metalloproteases may show tumor suppressor properties.

  10. Quality indicators for colorectal cancer screening for colonoscopy(.)

    PubMed

    Schoenfeld, Philip S; Cohen, Jonathan

    2013-04-01

    The growing importance of colonoscopy in the prevention of colorectal cancer has stimulated an effort to identify and track quality indicators for this procedure. Several factors have been identified so far which are readily measurable and in many cases have been associated with improved patient outcomes. There is also ample evidence of variations in performance of this procedure. As a result, gathering data about quality indicators may play a vital role in the process of continuous quality improvement. Quality indicators for colonoscopy in colorectal cancer prevention are described along with the evidence that supports their use in benchmarking, quality reporting, and continuous quality improvement.

  11. [Effect of cimetidine with chemotherapy on stage IV colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Yoshimatsu, Kazuhiko; Ishibashi, Keiichiro; Hashimoto, Masahiko; Umehara, Arihiro; Yokomizo, Hajime; Yoshida, Kiyohito; Fujimoto, Takashi; Iwasaki, Kiyo; Ogawa, Kenji

    2003-10-01

    We herein report the result of a prospective study to investigate the efficacy of cimetidine administration in conjunction with chemotherapy for stage IV colorectal cancer. Sixty-two patients treated with Leucovorin/5-fluorouracil therapy were enrolled from 1996 to 2000. Both groups were well matched for pre-treatment characteristics. There was no difference in survival in cur B patients. However, the cimetidine group had significantly prolonged survival in the patients with cur C or non-resectable carcinoma. This study suggests that cimetidine treatment may improve the survival of patients with non-curative surgery for stage IV colorectal cancer.

  12. Exceptional bilateral adrenalectomy after secondaries from colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Elola, A; Moreno-Gonzalez, E; Alonso-Casado, O; Meneu-Diaz, J C; García-García, I; Abradelo-Usera, M

    2004-01-01

    We report a very uncommon case of bilateral adrenal metastasis treated at our institution. The patient was 65 years old, with a history of low anterior resection for colorectal cancer in 2001. One year later, he was diagnosed with bilateral adrenal metastasis, based on the results of abdominal computed tomography-scan. A bilateral adrenalectomy extended to distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy was performed. Postoperative course was uneventful. He is alive and free of disease 12 months after adrenalectomy. We conclude adrenal metastasis from colorectal cancer should be managed surgically, even if they are bilateral.

  13. Identification of Patients at Risk for Hereditary Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Nitin; Hall, Jason

    2012-01-01

    Diagnosis of hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes requires clinical suspicion and knowledge of such syndromes. Lynch syndrome is the most common cause of hereditary colorectal cancer. Other less common causes include familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS), juvenile polyposis syndrome, and others. There have been a growing number of clinical and molecular tools used to screen and test at risk individuals. Screening tools include diagnostic clinical criteria, family history, genetic prediction models, and tumor testing. Patients who are high risk based on screening should be referred for genetic testing. PMID:23730221

  14. Mutator gene and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer

    DOEpatents

    de la Chapelle, Albert; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W.

    2008-02-05

    The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error.sup.+ (RER.sup.+) tumor cells.

  15. American Cancer Society Colorectal Cancer Survivorship Care Guidelines.

    PubMed

    El-Shami, Khaled; Oeffinger, Kevin C; Erb, Nicole L; Willis, Anne; Bretsch, Jennifer K; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Cannady, Rachel S; Wong, Sandra L; Rose, Johnie; Barbour, April L; Stein, Kevin D; Sharpe, Katherine B; Brooks, Durado D; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer and third leading cause of cancer death in both men and women and second leading cause of cancer death when men and women are combined in the United States (US). Almost two-thirds of CRC survivors are living 5 years after diagnosis. Considering the recent decline in both incidence and mortality, the prevalence of CRC survivors is likely to increase dramatically over the coming decades with the increase in rates of CRC screening, further advances in early detection and treatment and the aging and growth of the US population. Survivors are at risk for a CRC recurrence, a new primary CRC, other cancers, as well as both short-term and long-term adverse effects of the CRC and the modalities used to treat it. CRC survivors may also have psychological, reproductive, genetic, social, and employment concerns after treatment. Communication and coordination of care between the treating oncologist and the primary care clinician is critical to effectively and efficiently manage the long-term care of CRC survivors. The guidelines in this article are intended to assist primary care clinicians in delivering risk-based health care for CRC survivors who have completed active therapy.

  16. [Inflammation and cancer - colorectal carcinoma as an example].

    PubMed

    Väyrynen, Juha; Böhm, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Immune system contributes to the pathogenesis of cancer. Immunoediting describes a process in which the immune system can recognize transformed cancer cells and establish an anti-tumor response, potentially leading to the selection of less immunogenic tumor cells. Additionally, inflammation may contribute to cancer progression by activating angiogenesis and oncogenic signaling pathways. In colorectal cancer, dense inflammatory infiltrate in tumor samples is generally associated with improved prognosis but this association is dependent on the type of immune cells and their location. In future, increased knowledge on cancer immunology is expected to benefit the diagnostics, prognostication, follow-up and treatment of cancer.

  17. Natural Product Shows Effectiveness in Combating Colorectal Cancer | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    An herbal extract used for centuries to prevent heart disease has now been shown to be effective against colorectal cancer when tested in laboratory cell cultures. Scientists from NCI at Frederick found that the natural extract cryptotanshinone (CPT) stops the uncontrolled cell growth characteristic of cancer by interfering with a protein that has been implicated in several cancers, including those of the colon and rectum. The results appear in the journal Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry.

  18. Natural Product Shows Effectiveness in Combating Colorectal Cancer | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    An herbal extract used for centuries to prevent heart disease has now been shown to be effective against colorectal cancer when tested in laboratory cell cultures. Scientists from NCI at Frederick found that the natural extract cryptotanshinone (CPT) stops the uncontrolled cell growth characteristic of cancer by interfering with a protein that has been implicated in several cancers, including those of the colon and rectum. The results appear in the journal Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry.

  19. Second primary colorectal cancer in the era of prevalent screening and imaging.

    PubMed

    Bae, Susie; Asadi, Muslim; Jones, Ian; McLaughlin, Stephen; Bui, Andrew; Steele, Malcolm; Tie, Jeanne; Gibbs, Peter

    2013-12-01

    Oncology literature is increasingly recognizing prevalence of second primary cancers including several longitudinal studies showing an increased risk of colorectal cancer following a prostate cancer diagnosis. A retrospective study was conducted to examine the relationship between prior prostate cancer diagnoses and subsequent colorectal cancer diagnoses. A multi-centre prospective colorectal cancer registry was queried for patients with a prior history of prostate, breast or lung cancer. Characteristics of these patients were compared to patients with colorectal cancer and no prior cancer history. Of 4660 cases of colorectal cancer diagnosed between 1998 and 2011, 2665 (57.2%) were male, median age was 68 years. For patients with a history of prostate cancer (n = 111), breast cancer (n = 61) and lung cancer (n = 23), the great majority of subsequent colorectal cancer diagnoses occurred in the initial 2 to 4 years after the first cancer diagnosis. This was accompanied by an increased rate of asymptomatic colorectal cancer at presentation, due to both screen detected and incidental cancer diagnoses. There was no clear relationship between any prostate cancer treatment and subsequent colorectal cancer risk, location or timing. In the modern era, there is an increased rate of colorectal cancer diagnosis in years shortly following another common cancer history. This is consistently seen across different primary tumour streams including prostate, breast and lung cancers and in part contributed by screen detected and incidental colorectal cancer diagnoses. Future studies should consider this potential confounding factor when asserting an increased rate of colorectal cancer as a second primary cancer. © 2013 The Authors. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2013 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  20. Perceptions of Malaysian colorectal cancer patients regarding dietary intake: a qualitative exploration.

    PubMed

    Yusof, Afzaninawati Suria; Isa, Zaleha Md; Shah, Shamsul Azhar

    2013-01-01

    Changes in dietary practices are known to be associated with changes in the health and disease pattern of a population. This study aimed to qualitatively explore the perception of colorectal cancer patients regarding causes of colorectal cancer and the influence of diet. Twelve respondents from three major ethnicities in Malaysia were selected from the quantitative study on dietary pattern and colorectal cancer carried out earlier in this study. In-depth interviews (IDI), conducted from April until June 2012, were mainly in the Malay language with additional use of English and continued until the saturation point was reached. All interviews were autorecorded so that verbatim transcriptions could be created. Causes of colorectal cancer were categorized into internal and external factors. The majority of respondents agreed that there is an association between Western foods and colorectal cancer. Malaysian traditional diet was not related to colorectal cancer as less preservative agents were used. Malaysian diet preparation consisting of taste of cooking (spicy, salty and sour foods) plus type of cooking (fry, grilled and smoked) were considered causes of colorectal cancer. All respondents changed their dietary pattern to healthy food after being diagnosed with colorectal cancer. Advice from doctors regarding suitable food for colorectal cancer was useful in this regard. Eating outside, use of food flavoring ingredients and preservative agents were considered to be the main factors causing colorectal cancer. All respondents admitted that they changed to a healthy diet after being diagnosed with colorectal cancer.

  1. Risk analysis of colorectal cancer incidence by gene expression analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shangkuan, Wei-Chuan; Lin, Hung-Che; Chang, Yu-Tien; Jian, Chen-En; Fan, Hueng-Chuen; Chen, Kang-Hua; Liu, Ya-Fang; Hsu, Huan-Ming; Chou, Hsiu-Ling; Yao, Chung-Tay

    2017-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading cancers worldwide. Several studies have performed microarray data analyses for cancer classification and prognostic analyses. Microarray assays also enable the identification of gene signatures for molecular characterization and treatment prediction. Objective Microarray gene expression data from the online Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database were used to to distinguish colorectal cancer from normal colon tissue samples. Methods We collected microarray data from the GEO database to establish colorectal cancer microarray gene expression datasets for a combined analysis. Using the Prediction Analysis for Microarrays (PAM) method and the GSEA MSigDB resource, we analyzed the 14,698 genes that were identified through an examination of their expression values between normal and tumor tissues. Results Ten genes (ABCG2, AQP8, SPIB, CA7, CLDN8, SCNN1B, SLC30A10, CD177, PADI2, and TGFBI) were found to be good indicators of the candidate genes that correlate with CRC. From these selected genes, an average of six significant genes were obtained using the PAM method, with an accuracy rate of 95%. The results demonstrate the potential of utilizing a model with the PAM method for data mining. After a detailed review of the published reports, the results confirmed that the screened candidate genes are good indicators for cancer risk analysis using the PAM method. Conclusions Six genes were selected with 95% accuracy to effectively classify normal and colorectal cancer tissues. We hope that these results will provide the basis for new research projects in clinical practice that aim to rapidly assess colorectal cancer risk using microarray gene expression analysis. PMID:28229027

  2. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Gastric Adenoma and Gastric Cancer in Colorectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hyun Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims. To evaluate the incidence of gastric adenoma and gastric cancer in colorectal cancer patients, as well as the clinicopathological features that affect their incidence. Methods. Among patients who underwent surgery after being diagnosed with colorectal cancer between January 2004 and December 2013 at Chungnam National University Hospital, 142 patients who underwent follow-up upper gastrointestinal endoscopy were assigned to the patient group. The control group included 426 subjects randomly selected. The patient group was subdivided into two: one that developed gastric adenoma or cancer and one that did not. Clinicopathological characteristics were compared between these groups. Results. In total, 35 (24.6%) colorectal cancer patients developed a gastric adenoma or gastric cancer, which was higher than the number in the control group (20 [4.7%] patients; p < 0.001). Age, alcohol history, and differentiation of colorectal cancer were associated with higher risks of gastric adenoma or gastric cancer, with odds ratios of 1.062, 6.506, and 5.901, respectively. Conclusions. In colorectal cancer patients, screening with upper gastrointestinal endoscopy is important, even if no lesions are noted in the upper gastrointestinal tract at colorectal cancer diagnosis. Endoscopic screening is particularly important with increasing age, history of alcohol consumption, and poor cancer differentiation. PMID:28105047

  3. Incidence of colorectal cancer in young patients.

    PubMed

    Campos, Fábio Guilherme C M DE; Figueiredo, Marleny Novaes; Monteiro, Mariane; Nahas, Sérgio Carlos; Cecconello, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC) is traditionally diagnosed after de sixth decade of life, although a small percentage of cases are diagnosed in patients under 40 years of age, and incidence is increasing. There exists a great volume of controversy regarding clinical outcome of young patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer (CRC) when compared to elder counterparts. Our aims were to evaluate the rate of CRC in young patients, to review the pertaining literature and to discuss outcomes and clinical prognosis. A retrospective review involving patients with CRC was undertaken, focusing on age at diagnosis. The information extracted from this literature review showed a trend towards a decreased incidence in older people with an opposite effect among adolescents and young adults. Moreover, biological aggressiveness in young adults diagnosed with CRC has not been fully recognized, although it is usually diagnosed later and in association with adverse histological features. Besides that, these features don't affect outcome. These apparent increase in CRC incidence among young patients during the last decades raises the need for a greater suspicious when evaluating common symptoms in this group. Thus, educational programs should widespread information for both population and physicians to improve prevention and early diagnosis results. RESUMO O câncer colorretal (CCR) esporádico é tradicionalmente diagnosticado após a sexta década de vida, embora uma pequena porcentagem de casos seja diagnosticada em doentes abaixo dos 40 anos de idade, e a incidência está aumentando. Existe uma grande controvérsia a respeito da evolução clínica de doentes jovens portadores de CCR em comparação aos mais idosos. Os objetivos deste estudo foram avaliar a prevalência de CCR em doentes jovens, rever a literatura pertinente e discutir suas características mais importantes nesta faixa etária. Para tanto realizou-se revisão da literatura envolvendo doentes com CCR com foco na

  4. Determining the familial risk distribution of colorectal cancer: a data mining approach.

    PubMed

    Chau, Rowena; Jenkins, Mark A; Buchanan, Daniel D; Ait Ouakrim, Driss; Giles, Graham G; Casey, Graham; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W; Le Marchand, Loic; Newcomb, Polly A; Lindor, Noralane M; Hopper, John L; Win, Aung Ko

    2016-04-01

    This study was aimed to characterize the distribution of colorectal cancer risk using family history of cancers by data mining. Family histories for 10,066 colorectal cancer cases recruited to population cancer registries of the Colon Cancer Family Registry were analyzed using a data mining framework. A novel index was developed to quantify familial cancer aggregation. Artificial neural network was used to identify distinct categories of familial risk. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of colorectal cancer were calculated for each category. We identified five major, and 66 minor categories of familial risk for developing colorectal cancer. The distribution the major risk categories were: (1) 7% of families (SIR = 7.11; 95% CI 6.65-7.59) had a strong family history of colorectal cancer; (2) 13% of families (SIR = 2.94; 95% CI 2.78-3.10) had a moderate family history of colorectal cancer; (3) 11% of families (SIR = 1.23; 95% CI 1.12-1.36) had a strong family history of breast cancer and a weak family history of colorectal cancer; (4) 9 % of families (SIR = 1.06; 95 % CI 0.96-1.18) had strong family history of prostate cancer and weak family history of colorectal cancer; and (5) 60% of families (SIR = 0.61; 95% CI 0.57-0.65) had a weak family history of all cancers. There is a wide variation of colorectal cancer risk that can be categorized by family history of cancer, with a strong gradient of colorectal cancer risk between the highest and lowest risk categories. The risk of colorectal cancer for people with the highest risk category of family history (7% of the population) was 12-times that for people in the lowest risk category (60%) of the population. Data mining was proven an effective approach for gaining insight into the underlying cancer aggregation patterns and for categorizing familial risk of colorectal cancer.

  5. Perspectives of Colorectal Cancer Risk and Screening among Dominicans and Puerto Ricans: Stigma and Misperceptions

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Roberta E.; Diaz, Joseph A.; Kim, Ivone

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second most common cancer among Latinos, but a lower percentage of Latinos are screened than Whites and Blacks. Along with recognized economic barriers, differences in knowledge and perceptions might impede colorectal screening among Latinos. We conducted 147 individual, qualitative interviews with Dominicans and Puerto Ricans in the northeastern United States to explore their explanatory models for colorectal cancer and screening barriers. Many participants had not previously heard of colorectal cancer. The most commonly mentioned cause of colorectal cancer was anal sex. Also considered risks were “bad food,” digestion leading to constipation, and strained bowel movements. Screening barriers included stigma, misperceptions, embarrassment, and machismo. Progress toward increasing colorectal cancer screening requires normalization of this screening among Latinos. Higher patient familiarity, along with improved physician counseling and referral, might contribute to reducing stigma and other barriers, and to enhancing knowledge and Latino community support of colorectal cancer screening. PMID:19776255

  6. Perspectives of colorectal cancer risk and screening among Dominicans and Puerto Ricans: stigma and misperceptions.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Roberta E; Diaz, Joseph A; Kim, Ivone

    2009-11-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second most common cancer among Latinos, but a lower percentage of Latinos are screened than Whites and Blacks. Along with recognized economic barriers, differences in knowledge and perceptions might impede colorectal screening among Latinos. We conducted 147 individual, qualitative interviews with Dominicans and Puerto Ricans in the northeastern United States to explore their explanatory models for colorectal cancer and screening barriers. Many participants had not previously heard of colorectal cancer. The most commonly mentioned cause of colorectal cancer was anal sex. Also considered risks were "bad food," digestion leading to constipation, and strained bowel movements. Screening barriers included stigma, misperceptions, embarrassment, and machismo. Progress toward increasing colorectal cancer screening requires normalization of this screening among Latinos. Higher patient familiarity, along with improved physician counseling and referral, might contribute to reducing stigma and other barriers, and to enhancing knowledge and Latino community support of colorectal cancer screening.

  7. Quantifying the utility of single nucleotide polymorphisms to guide colorectal cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Mark A; Makalic, Enes; Dowty, James G; Schmidt, Daniel F; Dite, Gillian S; MacInnis, Robert J; Ait Ouakrim, Driss; Clendenning, Mark; Flander, Louisa B; Stanesby, Oliver K; Hopper, John L; Win, Aung K; Buchanan, Daniel D

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To determine whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) can be used to identify people who should be screened for colorectal cancer. Methods: We simulated one million people with and without colorectal cancer based on published SNP allele frequencies and strengths of colorectal cancer association. We estimated 5-year risks of colorectal cancer by number of risk alleles. Results: We identified 45 SNPs with an average 1.14-fold increase colorectal cancer risk per allele (range: 1.05–1.53). The colorectal cancer risk for people in the highest quintile of risk alleles was 1.81-times that for the average person. Conclusion: We have quantified the extent to which known susceptibility SNPs can stratify the population into clinically useful colorectal cancer risk categories. PMID:26846999

  8. Somatic mutations, acetylator status, and prognosis in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hardingham, J; Butler, W; Roder, D; Dobrovic, A; Dymock, R; Sage, R; Roberts-Thomson, I

    1998-01-01

    Background—Somatic mutations in K-ras and TP53 may be associated with both acetylator status and prognosis in colorectal cancer. 
Aims—To determine whether cancers with somatic mutations are more frequent in fast acetylators and whether mutations or acetylator status influence prognosis after colorectal surgery. 
Patients—One hundred consecutive subjects undergoing elective surgery for colorectal cancer. 
Methods—Acetylator status was determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) genotyping for polymorphism in the N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) gene. Mutations in K-ras (codon 12) and TP53 were determined by PCR analysis using restriction enzyme digestion and single strand conformation polymorphism respectively. Survival from colorectal cancer for up to five years after diagnosis was analysed using the Kaplan-Meier product limit estimator. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to compare survival rates after adjusting for tumour stage. 
Results—Mutations in K-ras and TP53 were independent of acetylator status. By log rank test, survival was significantly reduced in subjects with TP53 mutations (p=0.003) but was not significantly related to acetylator status or the presence of K-ras mutations. After adjustment for tumour stage, subjects with both TP53 and K-ras mutations had a 4.2-fold case fatality (95% confidence interval 1.5 to 11.6) when compared with that of a TP53 negative reference group. 
Conclusion—The presence of both TP53 and K-ras mutations in colorectal tumours is an adverse prognostic marker which is independent of tumour stage. 

 Keywords: colorectal cancer; TP53 and K-ras mutations; acetylator status; prognosis PMID:9659162

  9. Molecular markers for colorectal cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Brandon T.; Kisiel, John; Ahlquist, David A.; Grady, William M.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC), although a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, has seen a declining incidence and mortality in countries with programmatic screening. Fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) and endoscopic approaches are the predominant screening methods currently. The discovery of the adenoma→carcinoma sequence and a greater understanding of the genetic and epigenetic changes that drive the formation of CRC have contributed to innovative research to identify molecular markers for highly accurate, non-invasive screening tests for CRC. DNA, proteins, messenger RNA, and micro-RNA have all been evaluated. The observation of tumor cell exfoliation into the mucocellular layer of the colonic epithelium and proven stability of DNA in a harsh stool environment make stool DNA a particularly promising marker. The development of a clinically useful stool DNA test has required numerous technical advances, including optimization in DNA stabilization, the development of assays with high analytical sensitivity, and the identification of specific and broadly informative molecular markers. A multi-target stool DNA (MT-sDNA) test, which combines both mutant and methylated DNA markers and a fecal immunochemical test (FIT), recently performed favorably in a large cross-sectional validation study and has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the screening of asymptomatic, average risk individuals. The ultimate way in which molecular marker screening assays will be used in clinical practice will require additional studies to determine optimal screening intervals, factors affecting compliance, management of false positive results, and the use of these assays in high-risk populations, as well as other considerations. PMID:25994221

  10. Molecular markers for colorectal cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Brandon T; Kisiel, John; Ahlquist, David A; Grady, William M

    2015-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC), although a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, has seen a declining incidence and mortality in countries with programmatic screening. Faecal occult blood testing and endoscopic approaches are the predominant screening methods currently. The discovery of the adenoma-carcinoma sequence and a greater understanding of the genetic and epigenetic changes that drive the formation of CRC have contributed to innovative research to identify molecular markers for highly accurate, non-invasive screening tests for CRC. DNA, proteins, messenger RNA and micro-RNA have all been evaluated. The observation of tumour cell exfoliation into the mucocellular layer of the colonic epithelium and proven stability of DNA in a harsh stool environment make stool DNA a particularly promising marker. The development of a clinically useful stool DNA test has required numerous technical advances, including optimisation in DNA stabilisation, the development of assays with high analytical sensitivity, and the identification of specific and broadly informative molecular markers. A multitarget stool DNA test, which combines mutant and methylated DNA markers and a faecal immunochemical test, recently performed favourably in a large cross-sectional validation study and has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the screening of asymptomatic, average-risk individuals. The ultimate way in which molecular marker screening assays will be used in clinical practice will require additional studies to determine optimal screening intervals, factors affecting compliance, management of false-positive results, and the use of these assays in high-risk populations, as well as other considerations.

  11. Moderate Alcohol Consumption and Colorectal Cancer Risk.

    PubMed

    Klarich, DawnKylee S; Brasser, Susan M; Hong, Mee Young

    2015-08-01

    Heavy alcohol drinking is a risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC); previous studies have shown a linear dose-dependent association between alcohol intake and CRC. However, some studies suggest that moderate alcohol consumption may have a protective effect, similar to that seen in cardiovascular disease. Other factors may interact with alcohol and contribute additional risk for CRC. We aimed to determine the association between moderate alcohol consumption, limited to 30 g of alcohol per day, by beverage type on CRC risk and to assess the effects of other factors that interact with alcohol to influence CRC risk. The PubMed database was used to find articles published between 2008 and 2014 related to alcohol and CRC. Twenty-one relevant articles were evaluated and summarized, including 11 articles reporting on CRC risk associated with moderate intake and 10 articles focusing on genetic interactions associated with alcohol and CRC risk. The association between alcohol and increased risk for CRC was found when intakes exceeded 30 g/d alcohol. Nonsignificant results were consistently reported for intakes <30 g/d. Additional risks for CRC were found to be related to obesity and folate status for regular alcohol consumers. Some significant results suggest that the development of CRC is dependent on the interaction of gene and environment. The association between the amount of alcohol consumed and the incidence of CRC was not significant at moderate intake levels. Moderate alcohol consumption was associated with a reduced CRC risk in study populations with greater adherence to a Mediterranean diet, where wine contributed substantially to the alcoholic beverage consumed. Other factors such as obesity, folate deficiency, and genetic susceptibility may contribute additional CRC risk for those consuming alcohol. To minimize CRC risk, appropriate recommendations should encourage intakes below 30 g of alcohol each day. Copyright © 2015 by the Research Society on

  12. [Cost-effectiveness analysis on colorectal cancer screening program].

    PubMed

    Huang, Q C; Ye, D; Jiang, X Y; Li, Q L; Yao, K Y; Wang, J B; Jin, M J; Chen, K

    2017-01-10

    Objective: To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of colorectal cancer screening program in different age groups from the view of health economics. Methods: The screening compliance rates, detection rates in different age groups were calculated by using the data from colorectal cancer screening program in Jiashan county, Zhejiang province. The differences in indicator among age groups were analyzed with χ(2) test or trend χ(2) test. The ratios of cost to the number of case were calculated according to cost statistics. Results: The detection rates of immunochemical fecal occult blood test (iFOBT) positivity, advanced adenoma and colorectal cancer and early stage cancer increased with age, while the early diagnosis rates were negatively associated with age. After exclusion the younger counterpart, the cost-effectiveness of individuals aged >50 years could be reduced by 15%-30%. Conclusion: From health economic perspective, it is beneficial to start colorectal cancer screening at age of 50 years to improve the efficiency of the screening.

  13. Intake of mulberry 1-deoxynojirimycin prevents colorectal cancer in mice.

    PubMed

    E, Shuang; Yamamoto, Kazushi; Sakamoto, Yu; Mizowaki, Yui; Iwagaki, Yui; Kimura, Toshiyuki; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Miyazawa, Teruo; Tsuduki, Tsuyoshi

    2017-07-01

    The effect of 1-deoxynojirimycin, a caloric restriction mimetic, was examined in ICR mice with azoxymethane dextran sodium sulfate-induced colorectal cancer. Azoxymethane is a carcinogen (10 mg/kg body weight), and 2% dextran sodium sulfate (w/v) used as a colitis-inducing agent. Mice were separated into 5 groups: a group without colorectal cancer fed a normal diet (CO- group), and groups with colorectal cancer fed a normal diet (CO+ group), a calorie-restricted diet (caloric restriction group), and diets including 0.02% and 0.1% 1-deoxynojirimycin (l-1-deoxynojirimycin and H-1-deoxynojirimycin groups). The tumor incidence and number were reduced significantly in the caloric restriction group compared to the CO+ group, and were also suppressed in a dose-dependent manner by 1-deoxynojirimycin. mRNA for anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 was decreased and that for pro-apoptotic Bax was increased in the carcinoma tissue of CR, l-1-deoxynojirimycin and H-1-deoxynojirimycin groups. These results suggest that caloric restriction and 1-deoxynojirimycin inhibit growth of colorectal cancer by inducing apoptosis in an induced cancer model in mice.

  14. Intake of mulberry 1-deoxynojirimycin prevents colorectal cancer in mice

    PubMed Central

    E, Shuang; Yamamoto, Kazushi; Sakamoto, Yu; Mizowaki, Yui; Iwagaki, Yui; Kimura, Toshiyuki; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Miyazawa, Teruo; Tsuduki, Tsuyoshi

    2017-01-01

    The effect of 1-deoxynojirimycin, a caloric restriction mimetic, was examined in ICR mice with azoxymethane dextran sodium sulfate-induced colorectal cancer. Azoxymethane is a carcinogen (10 mg/kg body weight), and 2% dextran sodium sulfate (w/v) used as a colitis-inducing agent. Mice were separated into 5 groups: a group without colorectal cancer fed a normal diet (CO– group), and groups with colorectal cancer fed a normal diet (CO+ group), a calorie-restricted diet (caloric restriction group), and diets including 0.02% and 0.1% 1-deoxynojirimycin (l-1-deoxynojirimycin and H-1-deoxynojirimycin groups). The tumor incidence and number were reduced significantly in the caloric restriction group compared to the CO+ group, and were also suppressed in a dose-dependent manner by 1-deoxynojirimycin. mRNA for anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 was decreased and that for pro-apoptotic Bax was increased in the carcinoma tissue of CR, l-1-deoxynojirimycin and H-1-deoxynojirimycin groups. These results suggest that caloric restriction and 1-deoxynojirimycin inhibit growth of colorectal cancer by inducing apoptosis in an induced cancer model in mice. PMID:28751809

  15. Aberrant methylation patterns in colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Durso, Danielle Fernandes; Bacalini, Maria Giulia; do Valle, Ítalo Faria; Pirazzini, Chiara; Bonafé, Massimiliano; Castellani, Gastone; Faria, Ana Maria Caetano; Franceschi, Claudio; Garagnani, Paolo; Nardini, Christine

    2017-02-21

    Colorectal cancer is among the leading causes of cancer death worldwide. Despite numerous molecular characterizations of the phenomenon, the exact dynamics of its onset and progression remain elusive. Colorectal cancer onset has been characterized by changes in DNA methylation profiles, that, owing to the stability of their patterns, are promising candidates to shed light on the molecular events laying at the base of this phenomenon.To exploit this stability and reinforce it, we conducted a meta-analysis on publicly available DNA methylation datasets generated on: normal colorectal, adenoma (ADE) and adenocarcinoma (CRC) samples using the Illumina 450k array, in the systems medicine frame, searching for tumor gene episignatures, to produce a carefully selected list of potential drivers, markers and targets of the disease. The analysis proceeds from a differential meta-analysis of the methylation profiles using an analytical pipeline recently developed by our group [1], through network reconstruction, topological and functional analyses, to finally highlight relevant epigenomic features. Our results show that genes already highlighted for their genetic or transcriptional alteration in colorectal cancer are also differentially methylated, reinforcing -regardless of the level of cellular control- their role in the complex of alterations involved in tumorigenesis.These findings were finally validated in an independent cohort from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA).

  16. Polymorphic CAG Repeat and Protein Expression of Androgen Receptor Gene in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rui; Wang, Guiyu; Song, Yanni; Wang, Feng; Zhu, Bing; Tang, Qingchao; Liu, Zheng; Chen, Yinggang; Zhang, Qian; Muhammad, Shan; Wang, Xishan

    2015-04-01

    Although somatic alterations in CAG repeats in the androgen receptor (AR) gene have been suggested to predispose to colorectal cancer, less is known about AR in colorectal cancer carcinogenesis. Because of lack of relevant analysis on CAG repeat length and AR expression in colorectal cancer, we aimed to investigate the prognostic value of polymorphic CAG and protein expression of the AR gene in patients with colorectal cancer. A case-control study was carried out on 550 patients with colorectal cancer and 540 healthy controls to investigate whether polymorphic CAG within the AR gene is linked to increased risk for colorectal cancer. Polymorphic CAG and AR expression were analyzed to clarify their relationship with clinicopathologic and prognostic factors in patients with colorectal cancer. The study showed that the AR gene in patients with colorectal cancer had a longer CAG repeat sequence than those in the control group, as well as increased risk for colorectal cancer among females (P = 0.013), males (P = 0.002), and total colorectal cancer population (P < 0.001), respectively. AR expression exhibited a significant difference in long CAG repeat sequence among males (P < 0.001), females (P < 0.001), and total colorectal cancer study population (P < 0.001). Both long CAG repeat sequence and negative AR expression were associated with a short 5-year overall survival (OS) rate in colorectal cancer. Long CAG repeat sequences and the absence of AR expression were closely related to the development of colorectal cancer. Both long CAG and decreased AR expression were correlated with the poor 5-year OS in patients with colorectal cancer.

  17. Pharmacological cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors: Implications for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Archana; Vyas, Arpita; Deshpande, Kaivalya; Vyas, Dinesh

    2016-02-21

    Colorectal cancer accounts for a significant proportion of cancer deaths worldwide. The need to develop more chemotherapeutic agents to combat this disease is critical. Cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs), along with its binding partner cyclins, serve to control the growth of cells through the cell cycle. A new class of drugs, termed CDK inhibitors, has been studied in preclinical and now clinical trials. These inhibitors are believed to act as an anti-cancer drug by blocking CDKs to block the uncontrolled cellular proliferation that is hallmark of cancers like colorectal cancer. CDK article provides overview of the emerging drug class of CDK inhibitors and provides a list of ones that are currently in clinical trials.

  18. Implications of miRNAs in Colorectal Cancer Chemoresistance.

    PubMed

    Ju, Jingfang

    2011-01-01

    With the exponential growth of research efforts on non-coding microRNAs (miRNAs) in the past decade, miRNAs have been demonstrated to be important in many major human diseases, including diabetes, heart disease, and cancer. Due to the broad regulatory function of miRNAs, alterations of their expression can have profound consequences on multiple critical genes and pathways. One of the major issues related to the success of treating advanced colorectal cancer is chemoresistance. In this review, we will present some of the recent advancements in miRNA research related to chemoresistance mechanisms to 5-FU based chemotherapy in colorectal cancer and cancer stem cells. We believe that this miRNA-mediated resistance mechanism will offer novel strategies to develop future anti-cancer therapies.

  19. A Comprehensive Study of Extramural Venous Invasion in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, David; Murray, Graeme I

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a common malignancy and a leading cause of cancer related death. Cancer staging following resection is key to determining any adjuvant therapy in those patients with high risk disease. In colorectal cancer, tumour stage and lymph node stage are the main pathological factors which have been considered to influence outcome. Increasing emphasis is now being placed on other factors, especially the presence of extramural venous invasion (EMVI). It is important to understand the relationship of EMVI with other pathological factors and to confirm that in an individual centre that EMVI is being detected at an appropriate rate and is of prognostic significance. This comprehensive study assesses the reporting and prognostic significance of EMVI in a single centre, using prospectively collected data from histopathology reports of a cohort of 2405 patients who underwent surgery for colorectal cancer over a nine year period. Overall, EMVI was reported in 27.9% of colorectal cancer excision specimens. In tumours (n = 1928) that had not received neoadjuvant therapy, the presence of EMVI varied significantly depending on tumour site (χ2 = 12.03, p<0.005), tumour stage (χ2 = 268.188, p<0.001), lymph node stage (χ2 = 294.368, p<0.001) and Dukes’ stage (χ2 = 253.753, p<0.001). Multivariate analysis confirmed EMVI as a significant independent prognostic indicator (p<0.001). In conclusion, the presence of EMVI as an independent prognostic indicator is shown and is related to other pathological and prognostic factors. This study emphasises the requirement for the accurate identification of EMVI in colorectal cancer excision specimens and also understanding the relationship of EMVI with other prognostic factors. PMID:26671331

  20. CDKL1 promotes tumor proliferation and invasion in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Chunzhi; Ren, Li; Ji, Meiling; Lv, Shixu; Wei, Ye; Zhu, Dexiang; Lin, Qi; Xu, Pingping; Chang, Wenju; Xu, Jianmin

    2017-01-01

    Background CDKL1 is a member of the cell division cycle 2 (CDC2)-related serine threonine protein kinase family and is overexpressed in malignant tumors such as melanoma, breast cancer, and gastric cancer. Objective This study aimed to evaluate whether CDKL1 can serve as a potential molecular target for colorectal cancer therapy. Materials and methods Expression of CDKL1 in colorectal cancer tissues and cell lines was measured by immunohistochemistry and Western blot, respectively. To investigate the role of CDKL1 in colorectal cancer, CDKL1-small hairpin RNA-expressing lentivirus was constructed and infected into HCT116 and Caco2 cells. The effects of RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated CDKL1 downregulation on cell proliferation and invasion were assessed by CCK-8, colony formation, transwell, and tumorigenicity assays in nude mice. The effects of CDKL1 downregulation on cell cycle and apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry. Furthermore, microarray method and data analysis elucidated the molecular mechanisms underlying the phenomenon. Results CDKL1 protein was overexpressed in colorectal cancer tissues compared with paired normal tissues. Knockdown of CDKL1 in HCT116 and Caco2 significantly inhibited cell growth, colony formation ability, tumor invasion, and G1–S phase transition of the cell cycle. The knockdown of CDKL1 stimulated the upregulation of p15 and retinoblastoma protein. Conclusion CDKL1 plays a vital role in tumor proliferation and invasion in colorectal cancer in vitro and in vivo and, thus, may be considered as a valuable target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:28352193

  1. Development and validation of an instrument to measure factors related to colorectal cancer screening adherence.

    PubMed

    Vernon, S W; Myers, R E; Tilley, B C

    1997-10-01

    This report describes the development and refinement of a set of scales for use in research on predictors of colorectal cancer screening adherence. The study population included 2693 of 4490 eligible white male automotive employees who answered a mailed questionnaire (60% response rate) on beliefs and attitudes related to colorectal cancer and screening. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses and multitrait scaling analysis were used to evaluate the construct validity of a priori scales developed to measure salience and coherence, perceived susceptibility, worries about screening, screening efficacy, social influence, and intention. Analyses supported the construct validity of scales for salience and coherence, perceived susceptibility, and worries about screening. Four items originally assigned to the salience and coherence construct loaded on a separate factor that appeared to measure self-efficacy. There was no empirical support for scales measuring screening efficacy and social influence, and there was limited empirical support for a scale measuring intention. Confirmatory factor analysis of the scales measuring salience and coherence, self-efficacy, perceived susceptibility, and worries about screening showed a similar factor structure in white men with and without a personal history of polyps, indicating that the scales may be useful for studies of both colorectal cancer screening and surveillance. Multitrait scaling analysis showed some support for internal consistency reliability of those scales in women (n = 42) and in African-American men (n = 56), and there was some support for the factor structure in those two subgroups. Future studies should evaluate the psychometric properties of these and similar scales in diverse population subgroups.

  2. Colorectal Cancer Associated with Streptococcus anginosus Bacteremia and Liver Abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Masood, Umair; Sharma, Anuj; Lowe, Dhruv; Khan, Rashad; Manocha, Divey

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus anginosus is part of the normal flora of the human gastrointestinal tract. Their ability to cause abscesses is very unique and sets them apart from the rest of the streptococci groups. While an association of group D streptococcus bacteremia and endocarditis with colorectal carcinoma is well established, S. anginosus infections are rarely implicated with colonic malignancy. We present a case of a 62-year-old male who presented to the hospital with fatigue and generalized abdominal pain. Computed tomography of the abdomen revealed multiple liver abscesses and rectal thickening. Blood cultures were found to grow S. anginosus bacteria. Colonoscopy revealed a rectal mass which was later confirmed to be rectal adenocarcinoma. This case presents an association between S. anginosus bacteremia and presence of colorectal cancer which has been highlighted in only a few case reports in literature. This should prompt clinicians to screen for colorectal cancer in patients with S. anginosus bacteremia. PMID:28100999

  3. Colorectal cancer screening among Korean American immigrants: unraveling the influence of culture.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee Yun; Im, Hyojin

    2013-05-01

    Screening for colorectal cancer (CRC) is underutilized among ethnic minority groups, particularly among Korean American immigrants. To explore the role of cultural and health beliefs in CRC screening, a structured questionnaire was administered to 281 Korean American immigrants aged between 50 and 88 in the New York metropolitan area. Results showed that 20% of the sample had undergone a fecal occult blood test within the past year, and 35% of the respondents had received a sigmoidoscopy and/or colonoscopy within the previous five years. Binary logistic regression analyses revealed significant predictors including health belief constructs, such as perceived seriousness of cancer and confidence in screening uptake, and gender-specific cultural beliefs and attitudes about CRC screening. Perceived helplessness lowered CRC screening among the women, while fatalism lowered it among the men. The findings reinforce a need for cultural-and gender-specific intervention strategies to increase CRC screening in this particularly vulnerable population.

  4. Identification of hydrophobic proteins as biomarker candidates for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Chaver, Paula; Rodríguez-Piñeiro, Ana M; Rodríguez-Berrocal, Francisco J; Martínez-Zorzano, Vicenta S; Páez de la Cadena, María

    2007-01-01

    Nowadays, colorectal cancer is one of the major causes of cancer death in Western countries. Due to the lack of biomarkers with clinical utility for this pathology, and considering that membrane and hydrophobic proteins have not been studied in depth, we performed a prefractionation of colorectal tissues prior to two-dimensional gel electrophoresis in order to identify hydrophobic proteins differentially expressed in colorectal cancer patients. Fractions enriched in hydrophobic proteins were obtained from healthy mucosa and tumor tissue by a specific extraction method based on temperature-dependent phase partitioning with Triton X-114. Proteins were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and gels were silver-stained, scanned and compared using the PDQuest software. Those spots presenting significantly different abundance were submitted to mass spectrometry for protein identification. Alterations in the expression of cytoskeletal proteins, including a decrease of vimentin and the absence of desmin, were found. We also detected alterations in antioxidant and transport proteins, chaperones, and in two isoforms of the calcium-binding protein S100A6. On the other hand, vimentin was chosen to corroborate the electrophoretic results by specific immunodetection. Most of the altered proteins have been related to cellular membranes, many of them to lipid rafts microdomains in the plasma membrane, and they have also been implicated in the control of cell proliferation, apoptosis, or metastasis. In conclusion, all the proteins found altered in colorectal tumor samples could be considered as candidates for future studies focused on their utility as markers for colorectal diagnosis and prognosis, or as targets for colorectal cancer therapy.

  5. [SURGICAL TREATMENT OF THE LIVER METASTASES FROM COLORECTAL CANCER

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Eloy; Celis, Juan; Berrospi, Francisco; Payet, Eduardo

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In the absence of extra hepatic disease, the hepatic resection is the treatment of choice for liver metastases from colorectal carcinoma, but a no treatment attitude or the use of chemotherapy still persists in some health centers. This study was done to evaluate the peri operative morbi-mortality and survival after resection of hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer in our institution.METHODS: Clinical, pathologic and outcome data of patients undergoing liver resection for metastatic colorectal cancer at the Instituto de Enfermedades Neoplasicas de Lima Peru between January 1986 and July 2000 was examined.RESULTS: Of 300 liver resections, 24 were performed in patients with liver metastases of colorectal cancer; 17 patients were men and 7 women, who ranged in age from 21 to 79 years ( a mean of 52.66 years), the site of primary disease was the rectum in 7 and colon in 17, 20 patients were Dukes C and 4 Dukes B.Synchronous secondary disease were found in 9 patients and metachronous lesions were found in 15 patients Forty nine metastases were resected (Mean size 4.5 cm, range 1.5 cm 24 cm)Seven patients underwent right hepatectomy, one right hepatectomy plus non anatomic wedge resection, two right trisegmentectomy, 4 left lobectomy and ten a non anatomical resection.The overall post operative morbidity was 8% and the 30 day post operative mortality rate was 0% Estimated three and five year survival rates using Kaplan-Meier method was 50 % and 20% respectively.CONCLUSION: Hepatic resection for a secondary malignant liver growth from colorectal cancer is relatively safe with low morbidity and mortality rates, an remains the only potentially curative treatment. We continue to recommend an aggressive surgical approach to hepatic metastases of colorectal origin in the abscense of extra hepatic disease.

  6. Colorectal and interval cancers of the Colorectal Cancer Screening Program in the Basque Country (Spain)

    PubMed Central

    Portillo, Isabel; Arana-Arri, Eunate; Idigoras, Isabel; Bilbao, Isabel; Martínez-Indart, Lorea; Bujanda, Luis; Gutierrez-Ibarluzea, Iñaki

    2017-01-01

    AIM To assess proportions, related conditions and survival of interval cancer (IC). METHODS The programme has a linkage with different clinical databases and cancer registers to allow suitable evaluation. This evaluation involves the detection of ICs after a negative faecal inmunochemical test (FIT), interval cancer FIT (IC-FIT) prior to a subsequent invitation, and the detection of ICs after a positive FIT and confirmatory diagnosis without colorectal cancer (CRC) detected and before the following recommended colonoscopy, IC-colonoscopy. We conducted a retrospective observational study analyzing from January 2009 to December 2015 1193602 invited people onto the Programme (participation rate of 68.6%). RESULTS Two thousand five hundred and eighteen cancers were diagnosed through the programme, 18 cases of IC-colonoscopy were found before the recommended follow-up (43542 colonoscopies performed) and 186 IC-FIT were identified before the following invitation of the 769200 negative FITs. There was no statistically significant relation between the predictor variables of ICs with sex, age and deprivation index, but there was relation between location and stage. Additionally, it was observed that there was less risk when the location was distal rather than proximal (OR = 0.28, 95%CI: 0.20-0.40, P < 0.0001), with no statistical significance when the location was in the rectum as opposed to proximal. When comparing the screen-detected cancers (SCs) with ICs, significant differences in survival were found (P < 0.001); being the 5-years survival for SCs 91.6% and IC-FIT 77.8%. CONCLUSION These findings in a Population Based CRC Screening Programme indicate the need of population-based studies that continue analyzing related factors to improve their detection and reducing harm. PMID:28487610

  7. Role of colonic stents in the management of colorectal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Sagar, Jayesh

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the commonly encountered cancers across the Western World. In United Kingdom, this constitutes third most common ranked cancer and second most common ranked cause of cancer related deaths. Its acute presentation as a malignant colonic obstruction imposes challenges in its management. Colonic stent has been used for many years to alleviate acute obstruction in such cases allowing optimisation of patient’s physiological status and adequate staging of cancer. In this review, current literature evidence regarding use of colonic stent in acute malignant colonic obstruction is critically appraised and recommendations on the use of colonic stent are advocated. PMID:26962401

  8. Adenoma detection rate and risk of colorectal cancer and death.

    PubMed

    Corley, Douglas A; Jensen, Christopher D; Marks, Amy R;