Science.gov

Sample records for colorectal cancer progression

  1. Colorectal Cancer Screening | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  2. Colorectal Cancer Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  3. Effects of Progressive Muscle Relaxation Therapy in Colorectal Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyeng Jin; Na, Yeon Kyung; Hong, Hae Sook

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to examine the effect of progressive muscle relaxation therapy (PMRT) on cortisol level, the Stress Arousal Checklist (SACL) score, blood pressure, and heart rate in colorectal cancer patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery. Forty-six patients were divided into control and experimental groups. Cortisol levels, blood pressure, and heart rate were measured before surgery and between 8:00 and 11:00 a.m. on the first, third, and fifth days after surgery. SACL score was measured before surgery and on the fifth day after surgery at the same time points. PMRT was performed twice a day for 5 days. Analyses of covariance with advanced covariate levels and t tests showed that PMRT helps colorectal cancer patients achieve a lower stress response and provides an important basis for stress control.

  4. Molecular therapy of colorectal cancer: progress and future directions.

    PubMed

    Weng, Wenhao; Feng, Junlan; Qin, Huanlong; Ma, Yanlei

    2015-02-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains one of the most common types of cancer and leading causes of cancer death worldwide. Although the introduction of cytotoxic drugs such as oxaliplatin, irinotecan and fluorouracil has improved the treatment of advanced CRC, the individual response to chemoradiotherapy varies tremendously from one patient to another. However, recent progress in CRC molecular therapies may provide new insight into the treatment of this disease. Currently, components of the EGFR, VEGF, Wnt and NF-kB pathways are the most important targets for CRC therapy. This review chronicles the development of molecular CRC therapies over the past few decades. We also provide an update on the current progress of research concerning the molecular pathways leading to CRC and discuss the possible implications for CRC therapy.

  5. The role of gelatinases in colorectal cancer progression and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Mook, Olaf R F; Frederiks, Wilma M; Van Noorden, Cornelis J F

    2004-12-17

    Various proteases are involved in cancer progression and metastasis. In particular, gelatinases, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9, have been implicated to play a role in colon cancer progression and metastasis in animal models and patients. In the present review, the clinical relevance and the prognostic value of messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) and protein expression and proenzyme activation of MMP-2 and MMP-9 are evaluated in relation to colorectal cancer. Expression of tissue inhibitors of MMPs (TIMPs) in relation with MMP expression in cancer tissues and the relevance of detection of plasma or serum levels of MMP-2 and/or MMP-9 and TIMPs for prognosis are also discussed. Furthermore, involvement of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in experimental models of colorectal cancer is reviewed. In vitro studies have suggested that gelatinase is expressed in cancer cells but animal models indicated that gelatinase expression in non-cancer cells in tumors contributes to cancer progression. In fact, interactions between cancer cells and host tissues have been shown to modulate gelatinase expression in host cells. Inhibition of gelatinases by synthetic MMP inhibitors has been considered to be an attractive approach to block cancer progression. However, despite promising results in animal models, clinical trials with MMP inhibitors have been disappointing so far. To obtain more insight in the (patho)physiological functions of gelatinases, regulation of MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression is discussed. Mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling has been shown to be involved in regulation of gelatinase expression in both cancer cells and non-cancer cells. Expression can be triggered by a variety of stimuli including growth factors, cytokines and extracellular matrix (ECM) components. On the other hand, MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity regulates bioavailability and activity of growth factors and cytokines, affects the immune response and is involved in angiogenesis. Because of the

  6. Second Cancers After Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... After Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer After Treatment Second Cancers After Colorectal Cancer Colorectal cancer survivors can be affected by a ... many of these cancers. Follow-up after colorectal cancer treatment After completing treatment for colorectal cancer, you ...

  7. Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... rectum are part of the large intestine. Colorectal cancer occurs when tumors form in the lining of ... men and women. The risk of developing colorectal cancer rises after age 50. You're also more ...

  8. Pro-inflammatory prostaglandins and progression of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dingzhi; DuBois, Raymond N.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is a risk factor for several gastrointestinal malignancies, including esophageal, gastric, hepatic, pancreatic and colorectal cancer. It has long been known that long-term use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) reduces the relative risk of developing colorectal cancer. NSAIDs exert their anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor effects primarily by inhibiting activity of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes. Cyclooxygenase enzymes catalyze the conversion of arachidonic acid into prostanoids, including prostaglandins (PGs) and thromboxanes (TXs). Emerging evidence demonstrates that prostaglandins play an important role in inflammation and cancer. In this review, we highlight recent breakthroughs in our understanding of the roles of the different prostaglandins in colorectal cancer (CRC) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). These findings may provide a rationale for the development of new anti-inflammatory therapeutic approaches to cancer prevention and/or treatment. PMID:18406516

  9. SPINK1 promotes colorectal cancer progression by downregulating Metallothioneins expression

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, R; Pandey, S K; Goel, S; Bhatia, V; Shukla, S; Jing, X; Dhanasekaran, S M; Ateeq, B

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in the world, and second leading cause of cancer deaths in the US. Although, anti-EGFR therapy is commonly prescribed for CRC, patients harboring mutations in KRAS or BRAF show poor treatment response, indicating an ardent demand for new therapeutic targets discovery. SPINK1 (serine peptidase inhibitor, Kazal type 1) overexpression has been identified in many cancers including the colon, lung, breast and prostate. Our study demonstrates the functional significance of SPINK1 in CRC progression and metastases. Stable knockdown of SPINK1 significantly decreases cell proliferation, invasion and soft agar colony formation in the colon adenocarcinoma WiDr cells. Conversely, an increase in these oncogenic phenotypes was observed on stimulation with SPINK1-enriched conditioned media (CM) in multiple benign models such as murine colonic epithelial cell lines, MSIE and YAMC (SPINK3-negative). Mechanistically, SPINK1 promotes tumorigenic phenotype by activating phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/AKT) and mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MAPK/ERK) signaling pathways, and the SPINK1-positive WiDr cells are sensitive to AKT and MEK inhibitors. Importantly, SPINK1 silencing mediated upregulation of various Metallothionein isoforms, considered as tumor suppressors in CRC, confer sensitivity to doxorubicin, which strengthens the rationale for using the combinatorial treatment approach for the SPINK1-positive CRC patients. Furthermore, in vivo studies using chicken chorioallantoic membrane assay, murine xenograft studies and metastasis models further suggest a pivotal role of SPINK1 in CRC progression and metastasis. Taken together, our study demonstrates an important role for the overexpressed SPINK1 in CRC disease progression, a phenomenon that needs careful evaluation towards effective therapeutic target development. PMID:26258891

  10. Chromothripsis and progression-free survival in metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Skuja, Elina; Kalniete, Dagnija; Nakazawa-Miklasevica, Miki; Daneberga, Zanda; Abolins, Arnis; Purkalne, Gunta; Miklasevics, Edvins

    2017-01-01

    Metastatic dissemination of the primary tumor is the major cause of death in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Multiple chromosomal breaks and chromothripsis, a phenomenon involving multiple chromosomal fragmentations occurring in a single catastrophic event, are associated with cancer genesis, progression and developing of metastases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of chromothripsis and total breakpoint count (breakpoint instability index) on progression-free survival (PFS). A total of 19 patients with metastatic CRC (mCRC) receiving FOLFOX first-line palliative chemotherapy between August, 2011 and October, 2012 were selected for this study. The results indicated that the highest breakpoint count was observed in chromosomes 1, 2 and 6. Chromothripsis was detected in 52.6% of the study patients. Furthermore, chromothripsis was associated with an increased median PFS (mPFS; 14 vs. 8 months, respectively; P=0.03), but an association with overall survival was not identified. The present study demonstrated that chromothripsis affected CRC patient survival, suggesting a role for this event as a prognostic and predictive marker in mCRC treatment. PMID:28357089

  11. Imaging in Colorectal Cancer: Progress and Challenges for the Clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Van Cutsem, Eric; Verheul, Henk M. W.; Flamen, Patrik; Rougier, Philippe; Beets-Tan, Regina; Glynne-Jones, Rob; Seufferlein, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The use of imaging in colorectal cancer (CRC) has significantly evolved over the last twenty years, establishing important roles in surveillance, diagnosis, staging, treatment selection and follow up. The range of modalities has broadened with the development of novel tracer and contrast agents, and the fusion of technologies such as positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT). Traditionally, the most widely used modality for assessing treatment response in metastasised colon and rectal tumours is CT, combined with use of the RECIST guidelines. However, a growing body of evidence suggests that tumour size does not always adequately correlate with clinical outcomes. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a more versatile technique and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI and diffusion-weighted (DW)-MRI may be used to evaluate biological and functional effects of treatment. Integrated fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET/CT combines metabolic and anatomical imaging to improve sensitivity and specificity of tumour detection, and a number of studies have demonstrated improved diagnostic accuracy of this modality in a variety of tumour types, including CRC. These developments have enabled the progression of treatment strategies in rectal cancer and improved the detection of hepatic metastatic disease, yet are not without their limitations. These include technical, economical and logistical challenges, along with a lack of robust evidence for standardisation and formal guidance. In order to successfully apply these novel imaging techniques and utilise their benefit to provide truly personalised cancer care, advances need to be clinically realised in a routine and robust manner. PMID:27589804

  12. Excessive collagen turnover products are released during colorectal cancer progression and elevated in serum from metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Kehlet, S. N.; Sanz-Pamplona, R.; Brix, S.; Leeming, D. J.; Karsdal, M. A.; Moreno, V.

    2016-01-01

    During cancer progression, the homeostasis of the extracellular matrix becomes imbalanced with an excessive collagen remodeling by matrix metalloproteinases. As a consequence, small protein fragments of degraded collagens are released into the circulation. We have investigated the potential of protein fragments of collagen type I, III and IV as novel biomarkers for colorectal cancer. Specific fragments of degraded type I, III and IV collagen (C1M, C3M, C4M) and type III collagen formation (Pro-C3) were assessed in serum from colorectal cancer patients, subjects with adenomas and matched healthy controls using well-characterized and validated ELISAs. Serum levels of the biomarkers were significantly elevated in colorectal cancer patients compared to subjects with adenomas (C1M, Pro-C3, C3M) and controls (C1M, Pro-C3). When patients were stratified according to their tumour stage, all four biomarkers were able to differentiate stage IV metastatic patients from all other stages. Combination of all markers with age and gender in a logistic regression model discriminated between metastatic and non-metastatic patients with an AUROC of 0.80. The data suggest that the levels of these collagen remodeling biomarkers may be a measure of tumour activity and invasiveness and may provide new clinical tools for monitoring of patients with advanced stage colorectal cancer. PMID:27465284

  13. Discovery of genes from feces correlated with colorectal cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chia-Long; Huang, Chi-Jung; Yang, Shung-Haur; Chang, Chun-Chao; Huang, Chi-Cheng; Chien, Chih-Cheng; Yang, Ruey-Neng

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is considered to develop slowly via a progressive accumulation of genetic mutations. Markers of CRC may serve to provide the basis for decision-making, and may assist in cancer prevention, detection and prognostic prediction. DNA and messenger (m)RNA molecules that are present in human feces faithfully represent CRC manifestations. In the present study, exogenous mouse cells verified the feasibility of total fecal RNA as a marker of CRC. Furthermore, five significant genes encoding solute carrier family 15, member 4 (SLC15A4), cluster of differentiation (CD)44, 3-oxoacid CoA-transferase 1 (OXCT1), placenta-specific 8 (PLAC8) and growth arrest-specific 2 (GAS2), which are differentially expressed in the feces of CRC patients, were verified in different CRC cell lines using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The present study demonstrated that the mRNA level of SLC15A4 was increased in the majority of CRC cell lines evaluated (SW1116, LS123, Caco-2 and T84). An increased level of CD44 mRNA was only detected in an early-stage CRC cell line, SW1116, whereas OXCT1 was expressed at higher levels in the metastatic CRC cell line CC-M3. In addition, two genes, PLAC8 and GAS2, were highly expressed in the recurrent CRC cell line SW620. Genes identified in the feces of CRC patients differed according to their clinical characteristics, and this differential expression was also detected in the corresponding CRC cell lines. In conclusion, feces represent a good marker of CRC and can be interpreted through the appropriate CRC cell lines. PMID:27900008

  14. Role of Stem Cells in Colorectal Cancer Progression and Prognostic and Predictive Characteristics of Stem Cell Markers in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Fedyanin, Mikhail; Anna, Popova; Elizaveta, Polyanskaya; Sergei, Tjulandin

    2017-01-01

    In the last decade, an increasing number of studies on tumor stem cell theory stating that there is only a small fraction of tumor cells capable of inducing tumor growth have been published. These cells can not only differentiate into more mature tumor cells, but also can maintain their own pool, that is the capacity for self-renewal. There are distinct subpopulations of cells within a tumor that express different combinations of stem cell markers and have different functions. The following markers are typically considered as markers of colorectal adenocarcinoma stem cells: CD133, CD144, CD24, CD166, CD44, CD29, ALDH1, LGR5, and CXCR4. However, data on the role of cancer stem cells in the process of colorectal cancer progression, their prognostic and predictive role are lacking. Researches on the phenotype, molecular and functional properties of this tumor cell subpopulation in both primary site and metastases of colorectal cancer are of great interest because they can allow developing new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies in the future.

  15. Epigenetics and Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lao, Victoria Valinluck; Grady, William M.

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths in the world. It results from an accumulation of genetic and epigenetic changes in colon epithelial cells that transforms them into adenocarcinomas. There have been major advances in our understanding of cancer epigenetics over the last decade, particularly regarding aberrant DNA methylation. Assessment of the colon cancer epigenome has revealed that virtually all colorectal cancers have aberrantly methylated genes and the average colorectal cancer methylome has hundreds to thousands of abnormally methylated genes. As with gene mutations in the cancer genome, a subset of these methylated genes, called driver genes, is presumed to play a functional role in colorectal cancer. The assessment of methylated genes in colorectal cancers has also revealed a unique molecular subgroup of colorectal cancers called CpG Island Methylator Phenotype (CIMP) cancers; these tumors have a particularly high frequency of methylated genes. The advances in our understanding of aberrant methylation in colorectal cancer has led to epigenetic alterations being developed as clinical biomarkers for diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic applications. Progress in the assessment of epigenetic alterations in colorectal cancer and their clinical applications has shown that these alterations will be commonly used in the near future as molecular markers to direct the prevention and treatment of colorectal cancer. PMID:22009203

  16. Netrin-1 up-regulation in inflammatory bowel diseases is required for colorectal cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Paradisi, Andrea; Maisse, Carine; Coissieux, Marie-May; Gadot, Nicolas; Lépinasse, Florian; Delloye-Bourgeois, Céline; Delcros, Jean-Guy; Svrcek, Magali; Neufert, Clemens; Fléjou, Jean-François; Scoazec, Jean-Yves; Mehlen, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Chronic inflammation and cancer are intimately associated. This is particularly true for inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, which show a major increased risk for colorectal cancer. While the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of IBD has recently improved, the mechanisms that link these chronic inflammatory states to colorectal cancer development are in large part unknown. One of these mechanisms is NF-κB pathway activation which in turn may contribute to tumor formation by providing anti-apoptotic survival signals to the epithelial cells. Based on the observation that netrin-1, the anti-apoptotic ligand for the dependence receptors DCC and UNC5H is up-regulated in colonic crypts in response to NF-κB, we show here that colorectal cancers from inflammatory bowel diseases patients have selected up-regulation of netrin-1. Moreover, we demonstrate that this inflammation-driven netrin-1 up-regulation is causal for colorectal cancer development as interference with netrin-1 autocrine loop in a mouse model for ulcerative colitis-associated colorectal cancer, while showing no effect on inflammation, inhibits colorectal cancer progression. PMID:19721007

  17. Netrin-1 up-regulation in inflammatory bowel diseases is required for colorectal cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Paradisi, Andrea; Maisse, Carine; Coissieux, Marie-May; Gadot, Nicolas; Lépinasse, Florian; Delloye-Bourgeois, Céline; Delcros, Jean-Guy; Svrcek, Magali; Neufert, Clemens; Fléjou, Jean-François; Scoazec, Jean-Yves; Mehlen, Patrick

    2009-10-06

    Chronic inflammation and cancer are intimately associated. This is particularly true for inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, which show a major increased risk for colorectal cancer. While the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of IBD has recently improved, the mechanisms that link these chronic inflammatory states to colorectal cancer development are in large part unknown. One of these mechanisms is NF-kappaB pathway activation which in turn may contribute to tumor formation by providing anti-apoptotic survival signals to the epithelial cells. Based on the observation that netrin-1, the anti-apoptotic ligand for the dependence receptors DCC and UNC5H is up-regulated in colonic crypts in response to NF-kappaB, we show here that colorectal cancers from inflammatory bowel diseases patients have selected up-regulation of netrin-1. Moreover, we demonstrate that this inflammation-driven netrin-1 up-regulation is causal for colorectal cancer development as interference with netrin-1 autocrine loop in a mouse model for ulcerative colitis-associated colorectal cancer, while showing no effect on inflammation, inhibits colorectal cancer progression.

  18. Colorectal cancer screening: 20 years of development and recent progress

    PubMed Central

    Zavoral, Miroslav; Suchanek, Stepan; Majek, Ondrej; Fric, Premysl; Minarikova, Petra; Minarik, Marek; Seifert, Bohumil; Dusek, Ladislav

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cancer in Europe and its incidence is steadily increasing. This trend could be reversed through timely secondary prevention (screening). In the last twenty years, CRC screening programs across Europe have experienced considerable improvements (fecal occult blood testing; transition from opportunistic to population based program settings). The Czech Republic is a typical example of a country with a long history of nationwide CRC screening programs in the face of very high CRC incidence and mortality rates. Each year, approximately 8000 people are diagnosed with CRC and some 4000 die from this malignancy. Twenty years ago, the first pilot studies on CRC screening led to the introduction of the opportunistic Czech National Colorectal Cancer Screening Program in 2000. Originally, this program was based on the guaiac fecal occult blood test (FOBT) offered by general practitioners, followed by colonoscopy in cases of FOBT positivity. The program has continuously evolved, namely with the implementation of immunochemical FOBTs and screening colonoscopy, as well as the involvement of gynecologists. Since the establishment of the Czech CRC Screening Registry in 2006, 2405850 FOBTs have been performed and 104565 preventive colonoscopies recorded within the screening program. The overall program expanded to cover 25.0% of the target population by 2011. However, stagnation in the annual number of performed FOBTs lately has led to switching to the option of a population-based program with personal invitation, which is currently being prepared. PMID:24744575

  19. COLORECTAL CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Kuipers, Ernst J.; Grady, William M.; Lieberman, David; Seufferlein, Thomas; Sung, Joseph J.; Boelens, Petra G.; van de Velde, Cornelis J. H.; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer had a low incidence several decades ago. However, it has become a predominant cancer and now accounts for approximately 10% of cancer-related mortality in western countries. The ‘rise’ of colorectal cancer in developed countries can be attributed to the increasingly ageing population, unfavourable modern dietary habits and an increase in risk factors such as smoking, low physical exercise and obesity. New treatments for primary and metastatic colorectal cancer have emerged, providing additional options for patients; these treatments include laparoscopic surgery for primary disease, more-aggressive resection of metastatic disease (such as liver and pulmonary metastases), radiotherapy for rectal cancer and neoadjuvant and palliative chemotherapies. However, these new treatment options have had limited impact on cure rates and long-term survival. For these reasons, and the recognition that colorectal cancer is long preceded by a polypoid precursor, screening programmes have gained momentum. This Primer provides an overview of the current state of art knowledge on the epidemiology and mechanisms of colorectal cancer, as well as on diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27189416

  20. Carcinoembryonic antigen promotes colorectal cancer progression by targeting adherens junction complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Bajenova, Olga; Chaika, Nina; Tolkunova, Elena; Davydov-Sinitsyn, Alexander; Gapon, Svetlana; Thomas, Peter; O’Brien, Stephen

    2014-06-10

    Oncomarkers play important roles in the detection and management of human malignancies. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, CEACAM5) and epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) are considered as independent tumor markers in monitoring metastatic colorectal cancer. They are both expressed by cancer cells and can be detected in the blood serum. We investigated the effect of CEA production by MIP101 colorectal carcinoma cell lines on E-cadherin adherens junction (AJ) protein complexes. No direct interaction between E-cadherin and CEA was detected; however, the functional relationships between E-cadherin and its AJ partners: α-, β- and p120 catenins were impaired. We discovered a novel interaction between CEA and beta-catenin protein in the CEA producing cells. It is shown in the current study that CEA overexpression alters the splicing of p120 catenin and triggers the release of soluble E-cadherin. The influence of CEA production by colorectal cancer cells on the function of E-cadherin junction complexes may explain the link between the elevated levels of CEA and the increase in soluble E-cadherin during the progression of colorectal cancer. - Highlights: • Elevated level of CEA increases the release of soluble E-cadherin during the progression of colorectal cancer. • CEA over-expression alters the binding preferences between E-cadherin and its partners: α-, β- and p120 catenins in adherens junction complexes. • CEA produced by colorectal cancer cells interacts with beta-catenin protein. • CEA over-expression triggers the increase in nuclear beta-catenin. • CEA over-expression alters the splicing of p120 catenin protein.

  1. Impact of chromosomal instability on colorectal cancer progression and outcome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It remains presently unclear whether disease progression in colorectal carcinoma (CRC), from early, to invasive and metastatic forms, is associated to a gradual increase in genetic instability and to a scheme of sequentially occurring Copy Number Alterations (CNAs). Methods In this work we set to determine the existence of such links between CRC progression and genetic instability and searched for associations with patient outcome. To this aim we analyzed a set of 162 Chromosomal Instable (CIN) CRCs comprising 131 primary carcinomas evenly distributed through stage 1 to 4, 31 metastases and 14 adenomas by array-CGH. CNA profiles were established according to disease stage and compared. We, also, asked whether the level of genomic instability was correlated to disease outcome in stage 2 and 3 CRCs. Two metrics of chromosomal instability were used; (i) Global Genomic Index (GGI), corresponding to the fraction of the genome involved in CNA, (ii) number of breakpoints (nbBP). Results Stage 1, 2, 3 and 4 tumors did not differ significantly at the level of their CNA profiles precluding the conventional definition of a progression scheme based on increasing levels of genetic instability. Combining GGI and nbBP,we classified genomic profiles into 5 groups presenting distinct patterns of chromosomal instability and defined two risk classes of tumors, showing strong differences in outcome and hazard risk (RFS: p = 0.012, HR = 3; OS: p < 0.001, HR = 9.7). While tumors of the high risk group were characterized by frequent fractional CNAs, low risk tumors presented predominantly whole chromosomal arm CNAs. Searching for CNAs correlating with negative outcome we found that losses at 16p13.3 and 19q13.3 observed in 10% (7/72) of stage 2–3 tumors showed strong association with early relapse (p < 0.001) and death (p < 0.007, p < 0.016). Both events showed frequent co-occurrence (p < 1x10-8) and could, therefore, mark for stage 2–3 CRC

  2. [Epidemiology of colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Bouvier, Anne-Marie; Launoy, Guy

    2015-06-01

    The incidence of colorectal cancer increased in France until the 2000s' then decreased. Time trends in incidence for this cancer varied according to its sublocation along the gut. Incidence increased for right and left colon cancers, whereas it remained stable for sigmoid cancers in males and decreased in females. Incidence decreased over time for rectal cancers. The proportion of colorectal cancer in the overall French cancer prevalence is 12%. In 2008, 121,000 patients had a colorectal cancer diagnosed in the 5 previous years. The cumulative risk of colorectal cancer increased from 3.9% for males born around 1900 to 4.9% for those born around 1930 and then slightly decreased, being 4.5% among those born around 1950. It remained at the same level for females and was 2.9% for those born around 1950. The prognosis of colorectal cancer improved over time. Net 5-year survival increased in males from 53% for cancers diagnosed between 1989 and 1991 to 58% for those diagnosed between 2001 and 2004. The highest improvement of 10 year survival rates concerned left colon and rectosigmoid junction (+19% in a decade). The progressive set up of national colorectal screening since the early 2000's and the introduction of recent immunological tests in 2015 should decrease the mortality for this cancer and, at term, should decrease its incidence too.

  3. [Obesity and colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Na, Soo-Young; Myung, Seung-Jae

    2012-01-01

    Obesity worldwide is constantly increasing. Obesity acts as an independent significant risk factor for malignant tumors of various organs including colorectal cancer. Visceral adipose tissue is physiologically more important than subcutaneous adipose tissue. The relative risk of colorectal cancer of obese patients is about 1.5 times higher than the normal-weight individuals, and obesity is also associated with premalignant colorectal adenoma. The colorectal cancer incidence of obese patients has gender-specific and site-specific characteristics that it is higher in men than women and in the colon than rectum. Obesity acts as a risk factor of colorectal carcinogenesis by several mechanisms. Isulin, insulin-like growth factor, leptin, adiponectin, microbiome, and cytokines of chronic inflammation etc. have been understood as its potential mechanisms. In addition, obesity in patients with colorectal cancer negatively affects the disease progression and response of chemotherapy. Although the evidence is not clear yet, there are some reports that weight loss as well as life-modification such as dietary change and physical activity can reduce the risk of colorectal cancer. It is very important knowledge in the point that obesity is a potentially modifiable risk factor that can alter the incidence and outcome of the colorectal cancer.

  4. Colonic and colorectal cancer stem cells: progress in the search for putative biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Naomi D; Przyborski, Stefan A; Hutchison, Christopher J; Wilson, Robert G

    2008-01-01

    The maintenance of healthy colonic crypts is dependent on the integrity of the adult epithelial stem cells located within them. Perturbations in stem cell dynamics are generally believed to represent the first step towards colorectal tumorigenesis. Experimental manipulation of intestinal stem cells has greatly increased our understanding of them, but further progress has been slowed due to the absence of a reliable stem cell biomarker. In this review we discuss the candidate colonic stem cell biomarkers which have been proposed. Furthermore, we investigate the putative biomarkers for so-called colorectal cancer stem cells, a highly aggressive subpopulation of cells considered to drive tumour development. PMID:18638071

  5. Spontaneous initiation, promotion and progression of colorectal cancer in the novel A/J Min/+ mouse.

    PubMed

    Sødring, Marianne; Gunnes, Gjermund; Paulsen, Jan Erik

    2016-04-15

    The C57BL/6J multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min/+) mouse is a widely used murine model for familial adenomatous polyposis, a hereditary form of human colorectal cancer. However, it is a questionable model partly because the vast majority of tumors arise in the small intestine, and partly because the fraction of tumors that progress to invasive carcinomas is minuscule. A/J mice are typically more susceptible to carcinogen-induced colorectal cancer than C57BL/6J mice. To investigate whether the novel Min/+ mouse on the A/J genetic background could be a better model for colorectal cancer, we examined the spontaneous intestinal tumorigenesis in 81 A/J Min/+ mice ranging in age from 4 to 60 weeks. The A/J Min/+ mouse exhibited a dramatic increase in number of colonic lesions when compared to what has been reported for the conventional Min/+ mouse; however, an increase in small intestinal lesions did not occur. In addition, this novel mouse model displayed a continual development of colonic lesions highlighted by the transition from early lesions (flat ACF) to tumors over time. In mice older than 40 weeks, 13 colonic (95% CI: 8.7-16.3) and 21 small intestinal (95% CI: 18.6-24.3) tumors were recorded. Notably, a considerable proportion of those lesions progressed to carcinomas in both the colon (21%) and small intestine (51%). These findings more closely reflect aspects of human colorectal carcinogenesis. In conclusion, the novel A/J Min/+ mouse may be a relevant model for initiation, promotion and progression of colorectal cancer.

  6. Somatic microsatellite variability as a predictive marker for colorectal cancer and liver cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Vaksman, Zalman; Garner, Harold R.

    2015-01-01

    Microsatellites (MSTs) are short tandem repeated genetic motifs that comprise ~3% of the genome. MST instability (MSI), defined as acquired/lost primary alleles at a small subset of microsatellite loci (e.g. Bethesda markers), is a clinically relevant marker for colorectal cancer. However, these markers are not applicable to other types of cancers, specifically, for liver cancer which has a high mortality rate. Here we show that somatic MST variability (SMV), defined as the presence of additional, non-primary (aka minor) alleles at MST loci, is a complementary measure of MSI, and a genetic marker for colorectal and liver cancer. Re-analysis of Illumina sequenced exomes from The Cancer Genome Atlas indicates that SMV may distinguish a subpopulation of African American patients with colorectal cancer, which represents ~33% of the population in this study. Further, for liver cancer, a higher rate of SMV may be indicative of an earlier age of onset. The work presented here suggests that classical MSI should be expanded to include SMV, going beyond alterations of the primary alleles at a small number of microsatellite loci. This measure of SMV may represent a potential new diagnostic for a variety of cancers and may provide new information for colorectal cancer patients. PMID:25691061

  7. MicroRNA biomarkers predicting risk, initiation and progression of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyungjin; Ferguson, Lynnette R

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a major global cause of morbidity and mortality. Current strategies employed to increase detection of early, curable stages of this disease are contributing to a reduction of the negative health impact from it. While there is a genetic component to the risk of disease, diet and environment are known to have major effects on the risk of an individual for developing the disease. However, there is the potential to reduce the impact of this disease further by preventing disease development. Biomarkers which can either predict the risk for or early stages of colorectal cancer could allow intervention at a time when prospects could be modified by environmental factors, including lifestyle and diet choices. Thus, such biomarkers could be used to identify high risk individuals who would benefit from lifestyle and dietary interventions to prevent this disease. This review will give an overview on one type of biomarker in the form of microRNAs, which have the potential to predict an individual’s risk for colorectal cancer, as well as providing a highly sensitive and non-invasive warning of disease presence and/or progression. MicroRNA biomarkers which have been studied and whose levels look promising for this purpose include MiR-18a, MiR-21, MiR-92a, MiR-135b, MiR-760, MiR-601. Not only have several individual microRNAs appeared promising as biomarkers, but panels of these may be even more useful. Furthermore, understanding dietary sources and ways of dietary modulation of these microRNAs might be fruitful in reducing the incidence and slowing the progression of colorectal cancer. PMID:27672263

  8. Multi-state relative survival modelling of colorectal cancer progression and mortality.

    PubMed

    Gilard-Pioc, Séverine; Abrahamowicz, Michal; Mahboubi, Amel; Bouvier, Anne-Marie; Dejardin, Olivier; Huszti, Ella; Binquet, Christine; Quantin, Catherine

    2015-06-01

    Accurate identification of factors associated with progression of colorectal cancer remains a challenge. In particular, it is unclear which statistical methods are most suitable to separate the effects of putative prognostic factors on cancer progression vs cancer-specific and other cause mortality. To address these challenges, we analyzed 10 year follow-up data for patients who underwent curative surgery for colorectal cancer in 1985-2000. Separate analyses were performed in two French cancer registries. Results of three multivariable models were compared: Cox model with recurrence as a time-dependent variable, and two multi-state models, which separated prognostic factor effects on recurrence vs death, with or without recurrence. Conventional multi-state model analyzed all-cause mortality while new relative survival multi-state model focused on cancer-specific mortality. Among the 2517 and 2677 patients in the two registries, about 50% died without a recurrence, and 28% had a recurrence, of whom almost 90% died. In both multi-state models men had significantly increased risk of cancer recurrence in both registries (HR=0.79; 95% CI: 0.68-0.92 and HR=0.83; 95% CI: 0.71-0.96). However, the two multi-state models identified different prognostic factors for mortality without recurrence. In contrast to the conventional model, in the relative survival analyses gender had no independent association with cancer-specific mortality whereas patients diagnosed with stage III cancer had significantly higher risks in both registries (HR=1.67; 95% CI: 1.27-2.22 and HR=2.38; 95% CI: 1.29-3.27). In conclusion, relative survival multi-state model revealed that different factors may be associated with cancer recurrence vs cancer-specific mortality either after or without a recurrence.

  9. 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... colon cancer. Photo: AP Photo/Ron Edmonds Colorectal Cancer Cancer of the colon (large intestine) or rectum ( ...

  10. Inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factors limits tumor progression in a mouse model of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Simon, M.Celeste

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) accumulate in both neoplastic and inflammatory cells within the tumor microenvironment and impact the progression of a variety of diseases, including colorectal cancer. Pharmacological HIF inhibition represents a novel therapeutic strategy for cancer treatment. We show here that acriflavine (ACF), a naturally occurring compound known to repress HIF transcriptional activity, halts the progression of an autochthonous model of established colitis-associated colon cancer (CAC) in immunocompetent mice. ACF treatment resulted in decreased tumor number, size and advancement (based on histopathological scoring) of CAC. Moreover, ACF treatment corresponded with decreased macrophage infiltration and vascularity in colorectal tumors. Importantly, ACF treatment inhibited the hypoxic induction of M-CSFR, as well as the expression of the angiogenic factor (vascular endothelial growth factor), a canonical HIF target, with little to no impact on the Nuclear factor-kappa B pathway in bone marrow-derived macrophages. These effects probably explain the observed in vivo phenotypes. Finally, an allograft tumor model further confirmed that ACF treatment inhibits tumor growth through HIF-dependent mechanisms. These results suggest pharmacological HIF inhibition in multiple cell types, including epithelial and innate immune cells, significantly limits tumor growth and progression. PMID:24408928

  11. The role of Snail1 transcription factor in colorectal cancer progression and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Brzozowa, Marlena; Michalski, Marek; Wyrobiec, Grzegorz; Piecuch, Adam; Dittfeld, Anna; Harabin-Słowińska, Marzena; Boroń, Dariusz; Wojnicz, Romuald

    2015-01-01

    Snail1 is a zinc-finger transcription factor, which plays a role in colorectal cancer development by silencing E-cadherin expression and inducing epithelialmesenchymal transition (EMT). During EMT tumour cells acquire a mesenchymal phenotype that is responsible for their invasive activities. Consequently, Snail1 expression in colorectal cancer is usually associated with progression and metastasis. Some studies revealed that about 77% of colon cancer samples display Snail1 immunoreactivity both in activated fibroblasts and in carcinoma cells that have undergone EMT. Therefore, expression of this factor in the stroma may indicate how many cells possess the abilities to escape from the primary tumour mass, invade the basal lamina and colonise distant target organs. Blocking snail proteins activity has the potential to avert cancer cell metastasis by interfering with such cellular processes as remodelling of the actin cytoskeleton, migration and invasion, which are clearly associated with the aggressive phenotype of the disease. Moreover, the link between factors from the snail family and cancer stem cells suggests that inhibitory agents may also prove their potency as inhibitors of cancer recurrence.

  12. The role of Snail1 transcription factor in colorectal cancer progression and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Michalski, Marek; Wyrobiec, Grzegorz; Piecuch, Adam; Dittfeld, Anna; Harabin-Słowińska, Marzena; Boroń, Dariusz; Wojnicz, Romuald

    2015-01-01

    Snail1 is a zinc-finger transcription factor, which plays a role in colorectal cancer development by silencing E-cadherin expression and inducing epithelialmesenchymal transition (EMT). During EMT tumour cells acquire a mesenchymal phenotype that is responsible for their invasive activities. Consequently, Snail1 expression in colorectal cancer is usually associated with progression and metastasis. Some studies revealed that about 77% of colon cancer samples display Snail1 immunoreactivity both in activated fibroblasts and in carcinoma cells that have undergone EMT. Therefore, expression of this factor in the stroma may indicate how many cells possess the abilities to escape from the primary tumour mass, invade the basal lamina and colonise distant target organs. Blocking snail proteins activity has the potential to avert cancer cell metastasis by interfering with such cellular processes as remodelling of the actin cytoskeleton, migration and invasion, which are clearly associated with the aggressive phenotype of the disease. Moreover, the link between factors from the snail family and cancer stem cells suggests that inhibitory agents may also prove their potency as inhibitors of cancer recurrence. PMID:26557772

  13. Overexpression of Id-1 protein is a marker in colorectal cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zeng-Ren; Zhang, Zhi-Yong; Zhang, Hong; Jiang, Li; Wang, Ming-Wei; Sun, Xiao-Feng

    2008-02-01

    The inhibitor of differentiation/DNA binding 1 (Id-1), a negative regulator of basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors, plays an important role in the regulation of cell proliferation and differentiation. We examined the Id-1 expression by immunohistochemistry in 9 adenomas, 79 primary colorectal adenocarcinomas matched with 40 adjacent normal mucosa specimens and its relationship with clinicopathological factors. The Id-1 expression was increased in the carcinoma compared to the adjacent normal mucosa either in the unmatched and matched samples or to the adenoma. There was no significant difference in the Id-1 expression between normal mucosa and adenoma. The Id-1 expression of carcinoma was increased from Dukes' stages A to B, to C and to D. The cases with lymph node metastasis had a higher rate of a stronger Id-1 expression than those without lymph node metastasis. In conclusion, Id-1 overexpression plays an important role in colorectal cancer progression.

  14. FOXQ1 mediates the crosstalk between TGF-β and Wnt signaling pathways in the progression of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xudong; Luo, Zan; Kang, Qingjie; Deng, Dawei; Wang, Qiang; Peng, Hongxia; Wang, Shan; Wei, Zhengqiang

    2015-01-01

    A wide variety of signaling transduction pathways contribute to tumorigenesis. Forkhead box Q1 (FOXQ1) is a member of the forkhead transcription factor family and its upregulation is closely correlated with tumor progression and prognosis of multiple cancer types, including colorectal cancer. However, the molecular mechanisms by which FOXQ1 promotes tumorigenesis, especially cancer cell invasion and metastasis in colorectal cancer, have not been fully elucidated. In the present study, we demonstrate that FOXQ1 is overexpressed in colorectal tumor tissues and its expression level is closely correlated with the stage and lymph node metastasis of colorectal cancer. In in vitro cultured SW480 colorectal cancer cells, knockdown of FOXQ1 expression by small interfering RNA greatly diminished the aggressive tumor behaviors of SW480 cells, including angiogenesis, invasion, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and resistance to chemotherapy drug-induced apoptosis. Further mechanistic investigation showed that FOXQ1 silencing prevents the nuclear translocation of β-catenin, thus reducing the activity of Wnt signaling. Moreover, TGF-β1 induced the expression of FOXQ1 as well as the migration and invasion of SW480 cells, which was partially prevented following knockdown of FOXQ1. Our results demonstrate that FOXQ1 plays a critical role during the tumorigenesis of colorectal cancer and is a mediator of the crosstalk between Wnt and TGF-β signaling pathways. Our findings provide further insight into the cancer biology of colorectal cancer and suggest that FOXQ1 is a potential therapeutic target for the development of therapies for colorectal cancer. PMID:25955104

  15. Interleukin-6 promotes tumor progression in colitis-associated colorectal cancer through HIF-1α regulation

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jun; Xi, Qiulei; Meng, Qingyang; Liu, Jingzheng; Zhang, Yongxian; Han, Yusong; Zhuang, Qiulin; Jiang, Yi; Ding, Qiurong; Wu, Guohao

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a well-known etiological factor of colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CAC) and has a significant role in CAC progression. In addition, hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) serves a primary role in the progression of CAC. However, the association between IL-6 and HIF-1α during the progression of CAC remains unclear. To investigate this association, the present study induced CAC in a mouse model using azoxymethane and dextran sulfate sodium. In addition, an anti-IL-6 receptor antibody was used to inhibit IL-6. In this model, anti-IL-6 receptor antibody treatment significantly inhibited the development of CAC and the expression of HIF-1α, in colorectal adenomas and adenocarcinomas. In patients with CAC, the HIF-1α gene was demonstrated to be overexpressed in tumor tissue compared with adjacent non-malignant tissue. Furthermore, HIF-1α mRNA expression was positively correlated with serum IL-6 concentration. The results of the present study suggest that IL-6 promotes CAC progression, in the early stage of the disease, through HIF-1α regulation. PMID:28105173

  16. Mesenchymal stem cells promote colorectal cancer progression through AMPK/mTOR-mediated NF-κB activation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiao-Bing; Liu, Yang; Wang, Gui-Hua; Xu, Xiao; Cai, Yang; Wang, Hong-Yi; Li, Yan-Qi; Meng, Hong-Fang; Dai, Fu; Jin, Ji-De

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) exert a tumor-promoting effect in a variety of human cancers. This study was designed to identify the molecular mechanisms related to the tumor-promoting effect of MSCs in colorectal cancer. In vitro analysis of colorectal cancer cell lines cultured in MSC conditioned media (MSC-CM) showed that MSC-CM significantly promoted the progression of the cancer cells by enhancing cell proliferation, migration and colony formation. The tumorigenic effect of MSC-CM was attributed to altered expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins and inhibition of apoptosis. Furthermore, MSC-CM induced high level expression of a number of pluripotency factors in the cancer cells. ELISAs revealed MSC-CM contained higher levels of IL-6 and IL-8, which are associated with the progression of cancer. Moreover, MSC-CM downregulated AMPK mRNA and protein phosphorylation, but upregulated mTOR mRNA and protein phosphorylation. The NF-κB pathway was activated after addition of MSC-CM. An in vivo model in Balb/C mice confirmed the ability of MSC-CM to promote the invasion and proliferation of colorectal cancer cells. This study indicates that MSCs promote the progression of colorectal cancer via AMPK/mTOR-mediated NF-κB activation. PMID:26892992

  17. MicroRNA-17~92 inhibits colorectal cancer progression by targeting angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Huabin; Pan, Jin-Shui; Jin, Li-Xin; Wu, Jianfeng; Ren, Yan-Dan; Chen, Pengda; Xiao, Changchun; Han, Jiahuai

    2016-07-01

    The miR-17~92 microRNA (miRNA) cluster host gene is upregulated in a broad spectrum of human cancers including colorectal cancer (CRC). Previous studies have shown that miR-17~92 promotes tumorigenesis and cancer angiogenesis in some tumor models. However, its role in the initiation and progression of CRC remains unknown. In this study, we found that transgenic mice overexpressing miR-17~92 specifically in epithelial cells of the small and large intestines exhibited decreased tumor size and tumor angiogenesis in azoxymethane and dextran sulfate sodium salt (AOM-DSS)-induced CRC model as compared to their littermates control. Further study showed that miR-17~92 inhibited the progression of CRC via suppressing tumor angiogenesis through targeting multiple tumor angiogenesis-inducing genes, TGFBR2, HIF1α, and VEGFA in vivo and in vitro. Collectively, we demonstrated that miR-17~92 suppressed tumor progression by inhibiting tumor angiogenesis in a genetically engineered mouse model, indicating the presence of cellular context-dependent pro- and anti-cancer effects of miR-17~92.

  18. Interferon-induced transmembrane protein 1 (IFITM1) is required for the progression of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Phi, Lan Thi Hanh; Kim, Hyungjoo; Baek, Moo Jun; Jeong, Dongjun; Kwon, Hyog Young

    2016-01-01

    Interferon-induced transmembrane protein 1 (IFITM1) has been shown to be implicated in multiple cancers, yet little is known about biological significance of IFITM1 in colorectal cancer. Here, we show that IFITM1 is highly expressed in metastatic colorectal cancer cell lines as well as colorectal patient-derived tumor samples, and its expression is associated with a poor prognosis of the disease. Also, IFITM1 depletion resulted in a significant reduction in the mobility of cancer cell lines, whereas ectopic expression of IFITM1 promoted the migration of cancer cells. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) signature was dysregulated by both loss and gain of function of IFITM1, which was partially reverted by Caveolin-1 (CAV1). Therefore, these results suggest that IFITM1 may be a prognostic marker and an attractive target to achieve better therapeutic outcomes in colorectal cancer. PMID:27852071

  19. Breast, Cervical, and Colorectal Cancers - Early Detection Summary Table | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  20. Bladder, Breast, and Colorectal Cancer- Treatment Summary Table | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  1. Quantitative proteomic analysis exploring progression of colorectal cancer: Modulation of the serpin family.

    PubMed

    Peltier, Julien; Roperch, Jean-Pierre; Audebert, Stéphane; Borg, Jean-Paul; Camoin, Luc

    2016-10-04

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains a major cause of cancer related-death in developed countries. The mortality risk is correlated with the stage of CRC determined at the primary diagnosis and early diagnosis is associated with enhanced survival rate. Currently, only faecal occult blood tests are used to screen for CRC. Consequently, there is an incentive to identify specific markers of CRC. We used quantitative proteomic analysis of serum samples to characterize protein profiles in adenoma, CRC and healthy control samples. We identified 89 distinct proteins modulated between normal, colorectal adenoma and carcinoma patients. This list emphasizes proteins involved in enzyme regulator activities and in particular the serpin family. In serum samples, protein profiles of three members of the serpin family (SERPINA1, SERPINA3 and SERPINC1) were confirmed by ELISA assays. We obtained sensitivity/specificity values of 95%/95% for both SERPINA1 and SERPINC1, and 95%/55% for SERPINA3. This study supports the idea that serum proteins can discriminate adenoma and CRC patients from unaffected patients and reveals a panel of regulated proteins that might be useful for selecting patients for colonoscopy. By evaluating SERPINA1, SERPINA3 and SERPINC1, we highlight the potential role of the serpin family during the development and progression of CRC. Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains a major cause of cancer mortality throughout the world. However, very few CRC biomarkers have satisfactory sensitivity and specificity in clinical practice. To the best of our knowledge our study is the first to profile sera proteomes between adenoma, CRC and healthy patients. We report a comprehensive list of proteins that may be used as early diagnostic biomarkers of CRC. It is noteworthy that 17% of these modulated proteins have been previously described as candidate biomarkers in CRC. Enzyme regulator activity was found to be the main molecular function among these proteins and, in particular, there

  2. Transketolase-Like 1 Expression Is Modulated during Colorectal Cancer Progression and Metastasis Formation

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Moralli, Santiago; Tarrado-Castellarnau, Miriam; Alenda, Cristina; Castells, Antoni; Cascante, Marta

    2011-01-01

    Background Transketolase-like 1 (TKTL1) induces glucose degradation through anaerobic pathways, even in presence of oxygen, favoring the malignant aerobic glycolytic phenotype characteristic of tumor cells. As TKTL1 appears to be a valid biomarker for cancer prognosis, the aim of the current study was to correlate its expression with tumor stage, probability of tumor recurrence and survival, in a series of colorectal cancer patients. Methodolody/Principal Findings Tumor tissues from 63 patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer at different stages of progression were analyzed for TKTL1 by immunohistochemistry. Staining was quantified by computational image analysis, and correlations between enzyme expression, local growth, lymph-node involvement and metastasis were assessed. The highest values for TKTL1 expression were detected in the group of stage III tumors, which showed significant differences from the other groups (Kruskal-Wallis test, P = 0.000008). Deeper analyses of T, N and M classifications revealed a weak correlation between local tumor growth and enzyme expression (Mann-Whitney test, P = 0.029), a significant association of the enzyme expression with lymph-node involvement (Mann-Whitney test, P = 0.0014) and a significant decrease in TKTL1 expression associated with metastasis (Mann-Whitney test, P = 0.0004). Conclusions/Significance To our knowledge, few studies have explored the association between variations in TKTL1 expression in the primary tumor and metastasis formation. Here we report downregulation of enzyme expression when metastasis appears, and a correlation between enzyme expression and regional lymph-node involvement in colon cancer. This finding may improve our understanding of metastasis and lead to new and more efficient therapies against cancer. PMID:21980427

  3. Epigenetic silencing of TPM2 contributes to colorectal cancer progression upon RhoA activation.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ji; Cai, Yonghua; Hu, Ying; Huang, Zenghong; Luo, Yanxin; Kaz, Andrew M; Yang, Zihuan; Chen, Dianke; Fan, Xinjuan; Grady, William M; Wang, Jianping

    2016-09-01

    Beta-tropomyosin (β-tropomyosin, TPM2) has been found to be downregulated in colorectal cancer (CRC) in previous studies. In this study, we aimed to investigate the mechanisms and potential biological consequences of the downregulation of TPM2 in colorectal cancer. TPM2 expression in colorectal cancer was assessed by qRT-PCR and immunostaining. The biological functions of TPM2 were assessed in cell lines either overexpressing or underexpressingTPM2. Aberrant DNA methylation in the promoter region is associated with suppression of TPM2 expression in primary colorectal cancer tissue samples. Treatment with the demethylation agent 5-AZA can induceTPM2 expression in colorectal cancer cell lines. Reconstitution of TPM2 suppresses cell proliferation and migration in colorectal cancer cell lines, whereas the loss of TPM2 expression is associated with increased tumor proliferation and migration in vitro, which was accompanied by RhoA activation. In summary, our findings indicate that TPM2 appears to be commonly silenced by aberrant DNA methylation in colon cancer. TPM2 loss is associated with RhoA activation and tumor proliferation.

  4. Lysyl oxidase in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Cox, Thomas R; Erler, Janine T

    2013-11-15

    Colorectal cancer is the third most prevalent form of cancer worldwide and fourth-leading cause of cancer-related mortality, leading to ~600,000 deaths annually, predominantly affecting the developed world. Lysyl oxidase is a secreted, extracellular matrix-modifying enzyme previously suggested to act as a tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer. However, emerging evidence has rapidly implicated lysyl oxidase in promoting metastasis of solid tumors and in particular colorectal cancer at multiple stages, affecting tumor cell proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis. This emerging research has stimulated significant interest in lysyl oxidase as a strong candidate for developing and deploying inhibitors as functional efficacious cancer therapeutics. In this review, we discuss the rapidly expanding body of knowledge concerning lysyl oxidase in solid tumor progression, highlighting recent advancements in the field of colorectal cancer.

  5. Aberrant DNA methylation of WNT pathway genes in the development and progression of CIMP-negative colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Galamb, Orsolya; Kalmár, Alexandra; Péterfia, Bálint; Csabai, István; Bodor, András; Ribli, Dezső; Krenács, Tibor; Patai, Árpád V; Wichmann, Barnabás; Barták, Barbara Kinga; Tóth, Kinga; Valcz, Gábor; Spisák, Sándor; Tulassay, Zsolt; Molnár, Béla

    2016-08-02

    The WNT signaling pathway has an essential role in colorectal carcinogenesis and progression, which involves a cascade of genetic and epigenetic changes. We aimed to analyze DNA methylation affecting the WNT pathway genes in colorectal carcinogenesis in promoter and gene body regions using whole methylome analysis in 9 colorectal cancer, 15 adenoma, and 6 normal tumor adjacent tissue (NAT) samples by methyl capture sequencing. Functional methylation was confirmed on 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine-treated colorectal cancer cell line datasets. In parallel with the DNA methylation analysis, mutations of WNT pathway genes (APC, β-catenin/CTNNB1) were analyzed by 454 sequencing on GS Junior platform. Most differentially methylated CpG sites were localized in gene body regions (95% of WNT pathway genes). In the promoter regions, 33 of the 160 analyzed WNT pathway genes were differentially methylated in colorectal cancer vs. normal, including hypermethylated AXIN2, CHP1, PRICKLE1, SFRP1, SFRP2, SOX17, and hypomethylated CACYBP, CTNNB1, MYC; 44 genes in adenoma vs. NAT; and 41 genes in colorectal cancer vs. adenoma comparisons. Hypermethylation of AXIN2, DKK1, VANGL1, and WNT5A gene promoters was higher, while those of SOX17, PRICKLE1, DAAM2, and MYC was lower in colon carcinoma compared to adenoma. Inverse correlation between expression and methylation was confirmed in 23 genes, including APC, CHP1, PRICKLE1, PSEN1, and SFRP1. Differential methylation affected both canonical and noncanonical WNT pathway genes in colorectal normal-adenoma-carcinoma sequence. Aberrant DNA methylation appears already in adenomas as an early event of colorectal carcinogenesis.

  6. Radiation Promotes Colorectal Cancer Initiation and Progression by Inducing Senescence-Associated Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Bum; Bozeman, Ronald; Kaisani, Aadil; Kim, Wanil; Zhang, Lu; Richardson, James A.; Wright, Woodring E.; Shay, Jerry W.

    2015-01-01

    Proton radiotherapy is becoming more common since protons induce more precise DNA damage at the tumor site with reduced side effects to adjacent normal tissues. However, the long-term biological effects of proton irradiation in cancer initiation compared to conventional photon irradiation are poorly characterized. In this study, using a human familial adenomatous polyposis syndrome susceptible mouse model, we show that whole body irradiation with protons are more effective in inducing senescence-associated inflammatory responses (SIR) which are involved in colon cancer initiation and progression. After proton irradiation, a subset of SIR genes (Troy, Sox17, Opg, Faim2, Lpo, Tlr2 and Ptges) and a gene known to be involved in invasiveness (Plat), along with the senescence associated gene (P19Arf) are markedly increased. Following these changes loss of Casein kinase Iα (CKIα) and induction of chronic DNA damage and TP53 mutations are increased compared to x-ray irradiation. Proton irradiation also increases the number of colonic polyps, carcinomas and invasive adenocarcinomas. Pretreatment with the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, CDDO-EA, reduces proton irradiation associated SIR and tumorigenesis. Thus, exposure to proton irradiation elicits significant changes in colorectal cancer initiation and progression that can be mitigated using CDDO-EA. PMID:26477319

  7. [Multidisciplinary therapy of colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Balogh, A; Kahán, Z; Maráz, A; Mikó, T; Nagy, F; Palkó, A; Thurzó, L; Tiszlavicz, L

    2001-03-18

    A multidisciplinary program for the treatment of colorectal cancer is described. The main objective of the authors has been to define uniform up to date guidelines based on recent progress in the treatment of colorectal cancer. Preoperative diagnostic procedures are summarized which advance determination of clinical stage and prognosis. These information essentially determine care. Sequences of surgical methods, preoperative and postoperative radiotherapy and medical treatments are discussed according to tumor stages. Guidelines for surveillance following active treatment and recommendation for the screening of population at high risk for colorectal cancer are presented.

  8. Cholesterol Enhances Colorectal Cancer Progression via ROS Elevation and MAPK Signaling Pathway Activation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Caihua; Li, Peiwei; Xuan, Junmei; Zhu, Chunpeng; Liu, Jingjing; Shan, Lizhen; Du, Qin; Ren, Yuezhong; Ye, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Elevated serum cholesterol levels were linked to a higher risk of colorectal adenoma and colorectal cancer (CRC), while the effect of cholesterol on CRC metastasis has not been widely studied. CRC patients were enrolled to evaluate the association between low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) and CRC metastases, and LDL receptor (LDLR) level of the CRC tissue was assessed by immunohistochemistry. The effects of LDL on cell proliferation, migration and stemness were assessed in CRC cells in vitro, and the effects of high fat diet (HFD) on tumor growth and intestinal tumorigenicity were investigated in vivo. ROS assays, gene expression array analysis and western blot were used to explore the mechanisms of LDL in CRC progression. The level of LDL was positively correlated with liver metastases, and a higher level of LDL receptor (LDLR) expression was associated with advanced N and M stages of CRC. In vitro, LDL promoted the migration and sphere formation of CRC cells and induced upregulated expression of "stemness" genes including Sox2, Oct4, Nanog and Bmi 1. High-fat diet (HFD) significantly enhanced tumor growth in vivo, and was associated with a shorter intestinal length in azoxymethane/dextran sodium sulfate (AOM/DSS)-treated mice. Furthermore, LDL significantly elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and Whole Human Genome Microarray found 87 differentially expressed genes between LDL-treated CRC cells and controls, which were largely clustered in the MAP kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. LDL enhances intestinal inflammation and CRC progression via activation of ROS and signaling pathways including the MAPK pathway. Inflammation is strongly associated with cancer initiation, and the role of LDL in intestinal tumorigenicity should be further explored. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Biology of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Arvelo, Francisco; Sojo, Felipe; Cotte, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a serious health problem, a challenge for research, and a model for studying the molecular mechanisms involved in its development. According to its incidence, this pathology manifests itself in three forms: family, hereditary, and most commonly sporadic, apparently not associated with any hereditary or familial factor. For the types having inheritance patterns and a family predisposition, the tumours develop through defined stages ranging from adenomatous lesions to the manifestation of a malignant tumour. It has been established that environmental and hereditary factors contribute to the development of colorectal cancer, as indicated by the accumulation of mutations in oncogenes, genes which suppress and repair DNA, signaling the existence of various pathways through which the appearance of tumours may occur. In the case of the suppressive and mutating tracks, these are characterised by genetic disorders related to the phenotypical changes of the morphological progression sequence in the adenoma/carcinoma. Moreover, alternate pathways through mutation in BRAF and KRAS genes are associated with the progression of polyps to cancer. This review surveys the research done at the cellular and molecular level aimed at finding specific alternative therapeutic targets for fighting colorectal cancer. PMID:25932044

  10. The effects of NOS3 Glu298Asp variant on colorectal cancer risk and progression in Turkish population.

    PubMed

    Arıkan, Soykan; Cacina, Canan; Guler, Erkan; Çulcu, Serdar; Tuna, Gulay; Yaylım-Eraltan, Ilhan

    2012-03-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), coded by the gene NOS3, may play an important role in uncontrollable cellular growth in several cancer types. Our study was performed to test the association between Glu298Asp polymorphisms in the NOS3 gene and colorectal cancer risk and progression. In this study, NOS3 Glu298Asp polymorphism was genotyped in 84 patients with colorectal cancer and 99 healthy subjects using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis. There were significant differences in the distribution of NOS3 genotypes and frequencies of the alleles between colorectal cancer patients and controls (P = 0.016, P = 0.006, respectively). The increased frequency of NOS3 Glu298Asp homozygotes genotypes in patients who had advanced tumour stage was statistically significant (P = 0.042). Our findings have suggested that NOS3 Glu298Asp polymorphism might be associated with the risk and progression of colorectal cancer in Turkish population.

  11. Portal vein embolization and its effect on tumour progression for colorectal cancer liver metastases.

    PubMed

    Simoneau, E; Hassanain, M; Shaheen, M; Aljiffry, M; Molla, N; Chaudhury, P; Anil, S; Khashper, A; Valenti, D; Metrakos, P

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term outcomes of patients with colorectal cancer liver metastasis (CRCLM) exhibiting disease progression after portal vein embolization (PVE). Patients with CRCLM requiring PVE before hepatectomy between 2003 and 2014 were included. Clinical variables, and liver and tumour volumes determined by three-dimensional CT volumetry were assessed before and after PVE. Overall and disease-free survival data were obtained. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to identify predictors of tumour progression after PVE. Of 141 patients who underwent PVE, 93 (66.0 per cent) had tumour progression and 17 (12.1 per cent) developed new contralateral lesions. Significantly fewer patients had resectable disease in the group with disease progression than among those with stable disease: 43 (46 per cent) of 93 versus 36 (75 per cent) of 48 respectively (P = 0.001). Median survival was similar in patients with and without tumour growth after PVE: 22.5 versus 26.0 months for patients with unresectable tumours (P = 0.706) and 46.2 versus 52.2 months for those with resectable disease (P = 0.953). However, disease-free survival for patients with tumour progression after PVE was shorter than that for patients with stable disease (6.0 versus 20.2 months; P = 0.045). Response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy was the only significant factor associated with tumour progression in multivariable analysis. Tumour progression after PVE did not affect overall survival, but patients with resected tumours who had tumour growth after embolization experienced earlier recurrence. A borderline response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy seemed to be associated with tumour progression after PVE. © 2015 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. MicroRNA-203-mediated posttranscriptional deregulation of CPEB4 contributes to colorectal cancer progression

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Xiaohua; Xiao, Yipin; Chen, Chao Wei, Xiuwen; Hu, Chen; Ling, Xukun; Liu, Xinbin

    2015-10-16

    Elevated cytoplasmic polyadenylation element-binding 4 (CPEB4) is aberrantly expressed in several malignant cancers. However, its expression pattern, clinical significance, and biological function in colorectal cancer are still unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that CPEB4 is abundantly overexpressed in colorectal cancers and has the potential to be used for predicting clinical outcomes of colorectal cancer patients. We suppressed CPEB4 expression by small interfering RNA (siRNA) in SW480 and LOVO cells to clarify the role of CPEB4 on the cell apoptosis and proliferation in vitro. Further study revealed that knockdown of CPEB4 decreased the expression of anti-apoptotic protein B-cell lymphoma-extra large (Bcl-XL), but enhanced the expression of B-cell lymphoma-2-associated X (Bax). In addition, we indicated that CPEB4 is a novel target of miR-203, a tumor suppressive microRNA. Notably, restoration of CPEB4 in SW480 cells inhibited miR-203-induced apoptosis signaling pathway, which in turn enhanced cell proliferation and suppressed cell apoptosis. Taken together, our findings imply that posttranscriptional deregulation of CPEB4 contributes to the inhibited cell proliferation and the enhanced cell apoptosis in colorectal cancer, and directly targeting CPEB4 by miR-203 might be a novel strategy in colorectal cancer treatment. - Highlights: • CPEB4 is aberrantly expressed in human colorectal cancers. • Knockdown of CPEB4 inhibited colorectal cancer cell proliferation and enhanced apoptosis. • CPEB4 is a direct target of miR-203 and inversely correlates with miR-203 expression. • miR-203 inhibited cell growth and enhanced cell apoptosis in CPEB4 dependent manner. • miR-203 is an upstream regulator of the CPEB4-induced apoptosis pathway.

  13. Research progress on chemopreventive effects of phytochemicals on colorectal cancer and their mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Teng-Fei; Wang, Min; Qing, Ying; Lin, Ying-Min; Wu, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a type of cancer with high morbidity and mortality rates worldwide and has become a global health problem. The conventional radiotherapy and chemotherapy regimen for CRC not only has a low cure rate but also causes side effects. Many studies have shown that adequate intake of fruits and vegetables in the diet may have a protective effect on CRC occurrence, possibly due to the special biological protective effect of the phytochemicals in these foods. Numerous in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated that phytochemicals play strong antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer roles by regulating specific signaling pathways and molecular markers to inhibit the occurrence and development of CRC. This review summarizes the progress on CRC prevention using the phytochemicals sulforaphane, curcumin and resveratrol, and elaborates on the specific underlying mechanisms. Thus, we believe that phytochemicals might provide a novel therapeutic approach for CRC prevention, but future clinical studies are needed to confirm the specific preventive effect of phytochemicals on cancer. PMID:27610016

  14. Intrarectal vaccination with recombinant vaccinia virus expressing carcinoembronic antigen induces mucosal and systemic immunity and prevents progression of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim-Schulze, Seunghee; Kim, Hong Sung; Wainstein, Alberto; Kim, Dae Won; Yang, Wein Cui; Moroziewicz, Dorota; Mong, Phyllus Y; Bereta, Michal; Taback, Bret; Wang, Qin; Kaufman, Howard L

    2008-12-01

    The gastrointestinal mucosa contains an intact immune system that protects the host from pathogens and communicates with the systemic immune system. Absorptive epithelial cells in the mucosa give rise to malignant tumors although the interaction between tumor cells and the mucosal immune system is not well defined. The pathophysiology of colorectal cancer has been elucidated through studies of hereditary syndromes, such as familial adenomatous polyposis, a cancer predisposition syndrome caused by germline mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli tumor suppressor gene. Patients with FAP develop adenomas and inevitably progress to invasive carcinomas by the age of 40. To better delineate the role of mucosal immunity in colorectal cancer, we evaluated the efficacy of intrarectal recombinant vaccinia virus expressing the human carcinoembryonic Ag (CEA) in a murine FAP model in which mice are predisposed to colorectal cancer and also express human CEA in the gut. Mucosal vaccination reduced the incidence of spontaneous adenomas and completely prevented progression to invasive carcinoma. The therapeutic effects were associated with induction of mucosal CEA-specific IgA Ab titers and CD8(+) CTLs. Mucosal vaccination was also associated with an increase in systemic CEA-specific IgG Ab titers, CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses and resulted in growth inhibition of s.c. implanted CEA-expressing tumors suggesting communication between mucosal and systemic immune compartments. Thus, intrarectal vaccination induces mucosal and systemic antitumor immunity and prevents progression of spontaneous colorectal cancer. These results have implications for the prevention of colorectal cancer in high-risk individuals.

  15. Changes in cellular mechanical properties during onset or progression of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ciasca, Gabriele; Papi, Massimiliano; Minelli, Eleonora; Palmieri, Valentina; De Spirito, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) development represents a multistep process starting with specific mutations that affect proto-oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes. These mutations confer a selective growth advantage to colonic epithelial cells that form first dysplastic crypts, and then malignant tumours and metastases. All these steps are accompanied by deep mechanical changes at the cellular and the tissue level. A growing consensus is emerging that such modifications are not merely a by-product of the malignant progression, but they could play a relevant role in the cancer onset and accelerate its progression. In this review, we focus on recent studies investigating the role of the biomechanical signals in the initiation and the development of CRC. We show that mechanical cues might contribute to early phases of the tumour initiation by controlling the Wnt pathway, one of most important regulators of cell proliferation in various systems. We highlight how physical stimuli may be involved in the differentiation of non-invasive cells into metastatic variants and how metastatic cells modify their mechanical properties, both stiffness and adhesion, to survive the mechanical stress associated with intravasation, circulation and extravasation. A deep comprehension of these mechanical modifications may help scientist to define novel molecular targets for the cure of CRC. PMID:27621568

  16. OTX1 promotes colorectal cancer progression through epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Kun; Cai, Xin-Yi; Li, Qiang; Yang, Zhi-Bin; Xiong, Wei; Shen, Tao; Wang, Wei-Ya; Li, Yun-Feng

    2014-01-31

    Highlights: • OTX1 is overexpression in colorectal cancer tissues. • Overexpression of OTX1 promotes colorectal cancer cell proliferation and invasion in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. • Depletion of OTX1 inhibits colorectal cancer cell proliferation and invasion in vitro. • Overexpression of OTX1 is linked to the EMT-like phenotype. - Abstract: Orthodenticle homeobox 1 (OTX1), a transcription factor containing a bicoid-like homeodomain, plays a role in brain and sensory organ development. In this study, we report that OTX1 is overexpressed in human colorectal cancer (CRC) and OTX1 overexpression is associated with higher stage. Functional analyses reveal that overexpression of OTX1 results in accumulation of CRC cell proliferation and invasion in vitro and tumor growth in vivo, whereas ablation of OTX1 expression significantly inhibits the proliferative and invasive capability of CRC cells in vitro. Together, our results indicate that OTX1 is involved in human colon carcinogenesis and may serve as a potential therapeutic target for human colorectal cancer.

  17. Clinicopathological significance of SPC18 in colorectal cancer: SPC18 participates in tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Takuya; Sentani, Kazuhiro; Naohide, Oue; Sakamoto, Naoya; Yasui, Wataru

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide. In order to identify novel prognostic markers or therapeutic targets for CRC, we searched for candidate genes in our comprehensive gene expression libraries, and focused on SEC11A, which encodes the SPC18 protein. SPC18 plays a key role in the endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi secretory pathway and presumably regulates the secretion of various secretory proteins. An immunohistochemical analysis of SPC18 in 137 CRC tissue samples demonstrated that 79 (58%) CRC cases were positive for SPC18. SPC18-positive CRC cases were more advanced in terms of N classification (P = 0.0315) and tumor stage (P = 0.0240) than SPC18-negative CRC cases. Furthermore, the expression of SPC18 was an independent prognostic classifier for CRC patients. The cell growth and invasiveness of SPC18 siRNA-transfected CRC cell lines was less than that of the negative control siRNA-transfected cell lines. The levels of phosphorylated epidermal growth factor receptor, Erk and Akt were lower in SPC18 siRNA-transfected CRC cells than in control cells. The expression of SPC18 was colocalized with β-catenin nuclear localization and MMP7 at the invasive front. An immunohistochemical analysis of human colorectal polyp specimens revealed a sequential increase in the expression of SPC18 through the conventional adenoma-carcinoma pathway, while SPC18 was not expressed or was expressed to a lesser extent in serrated pathway-related tumors. These results suggest that SPC18 is involved in tumor progression, and is an independent prognostic classifier in patients with CRC.

  18. Oral administration of FAK inhibitor TAE226 inhibits the progression of peritoneal dissemination of colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Hui-fang; Takaoka, Munenori; Bao, Xiao-hong; Wang, Zhi-gang; Tomono, Yasuko; Sakurama, Kazufumi; Ohara, Toshiaki; Fukazawa, Takuya; Yamatsuji, Tomoki; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Naomoto, Yoshio

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A novel FAK inhibitor TAE226 suppressed FAK activity in HCT116 colon cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TAE226 suppressed proliferation and migration, with a modest effect on adhesion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silencing of FAK by siRNA made no obvious difference on cancer cell attachment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TAE226 treatment suppressed the progression of peritoneal dissemination. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oral administration of TAE226 prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing mice. -- Abstract: Peritoneal dissemination is one of the most terrible types of colorectal cancer progression. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) plays a crucial role in the biological processes of cancer, such as cell attachment, migration, proliferation and survival, all of which are essential for the progression of peritoneal dissemination. Since we and other groups have reported that the inhibition of FAK activity exhibited a potent anticancer effect in several cancer models, we hypothesized that TAE226, a novel ATP-competitive tyrosine kinase inhibitor designed to target FAK, can prevent the occurrence and progression of peritoneal dissemination. In vitro, TAE226 greatly inhibited the proliferation and migration of HCT116 colon cancer cells, while their adhesion on the matrix surface was minimally inhibited when FAK activity and expression was suppressed by TAE226 and siRNA. In vivo, when HCT116 cells were intraperitoneally inoculated in mice, the cells could attach to the peritoneum and begin to grow within 24 h regardless of the pretreatment of cells with TAE226 or FAK-siRNA, suggesting that FAK is not essential, at least for the initial integrin-matrix contact. Interestingly, the treatment of mice before and after inoculation significantly suppressed cell attachment to the peritoneum. Furthermore, oral administration of TAE226 greatly reduced the size of disseminated tumors and prolonged survival in tumor-bearing mice. Taken

  19. Genetic dissection of colorectal cancer progression by orthotopic transplantation of engineered cancer organoids

    PubMed Central

    Fumagalli, Arianna; Drost, Jarno; Suijkerbuijk, Saskia J. E.; van Boxtel, Ruben; de Ligt, Joep; Offerhaus, G. Johan; Begthel, Harry; Beerling, Evelyne; Tan, Ee Hong; Sansom, Owen J.; Clevers, Hans; van Rheenen, Jacco

    2017-01-01

    In the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, it is proposed that intestinal polyps evolve through a set of defined mutations toward metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). Here, we dissect this adenoma-carcinoma sequence in vivo by using an orthotopic organoid transplantation model of human colon organoids engineered to harbor different CRC mutation combinations. We demonstrate that sequential accumulation of oncogenic mutations in Wnt, EGFR, P53, and TGF-β signaling pathways facilitates efficient tumor growth, migration, and metastatic colonization. We show that reconstitution of specific niche signals can restore metastatic growth potential of tumor cells lacking one of the oncogenic mutations. Our findings imply that the ability to metastasize—i.e., to colonize distant sites—is the direct consequence of the loss of dependency on specific niche signals. PMID:28270604

  20. Differential microRNA expression tracks neoplastic progression in inflammatory bowel disease-associated colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kanaan, Ziad; Rai, Shesh N.; Eichenberger, M. Robert; Barnes, Christopher; Dworkin, Amy M.; Weller, Clayton; Cohen, Eric; Roberts, Henry; Keskey, Bobby; Petras, Robert E.; Crawford, Nigel P.S.; Galandiuk, Susan

    2012-01-01

    One of the most serious complications faced by inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is the potential development of colorectal cancer (CRC). There is a compelling need to enhance the accuracy of cancer screening of IBD patients. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-protein-coding RNAs that play important roles in CRC oncogenesis. In this study, we report differential miRNA expression in IBD patients with associated CRC, from non-neoplastic tissue to dysplasia and eventually cancer. In addition, we identify and examine the role of dysregulated miRNAs in the TP53 pathway. In our CD patients, six miRNAs were up-regulated from non-neoplastic tissue to dysplasia, but down-regulated from dysplasia to cancer (miR-122, miR-181a, miR-146b-5p, let-7e, miR-17, miR-143) (p<0.001). Six differentially expressed miRNAs affected the TP53 pathway (miR-122, miR-214, miR-372, miR-15b, let-7e, miR-17) (p<0.001). Using two human colon cancer cell lines (HT-29 and HCT-116), E2F1, an upstream regulator of TP53, was down-regulated in both cell lines transfected with let-7e (p<0.05) as well as in HCT-116 cells transfected with miR-17 (p<0.05). Additionally, cyclin G, a cell-cycle regulator miR-122 target was down-regulated in both cell lines (p<0.05). Unique differentially expressed miRNAs were observed in CD-associated CRC progression. Six of these miRNAs had a tumorigenic effect on the TP53 pathway; the effect of three of which was studied using cell lines. PMID:22241525

  1. Role of CDH13 promoter methylation in the carcinogenesis, progression, and prognosis of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Meng; Huang, Tao; Li, Jinyun; Zhou, Chongchang; Yang, Ping; Ni, Chao; Chen, Si

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: H-cadherin (CDH13) is commonly downregulated through promoter methylation in various cancers. However, the role of CDH13 promoter methylation status in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) remains to be clarified. Methods: Eligible articles were identified from online electronic database based on the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) statement criteria. The pooled odds ratio (OR) and the corresponding 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were calculated and analyzed. Results: Eventually, a total of nine studies were included in this meta-analysis, including 488 CRC, 298 adjacent, 144 normal, 68 premalignant tissues. The results demonstrated that CDH13 promoter methylation was notably higher in CRC than in normal, adjacent, and premalignant tissues (cancer tissues vs normal tissues: OR = 16.94, P < 0.001; cancer tissues vs adjacent tissues: OR = 20.06, P < 0.001; cancer tissues vs premalignant tissues: OR = 2.23, P = 0.038). CDH13 promoter methylation had a significantly increased risk for poorly differentiated CRC (OR = 4.07, P = 0.001). CDH13 promoter methylation was not associated with sex status, tumor stage, and lymph node status (all P > 0.05). One study with 85 CRC patients reported that CDH13 promoter methylation was correlated with poor prognosis in overall survival (OS). Conclusions: CDH13 promoter methylation may play an important role in the initiation and progression of CRC, and may be correlated with OS of patients with CRC. Additional studies with large sample sizes are needed to further confirm our findings in the future. PMID:28121942

  2. MicroRNA-613 targets FMNL2 and suppresses progression of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bai; Xie, Zhongshi; Li, Zhihong; Chen, Si; Li, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that dysregulation of miRNAs is involved in the initiation and progression of colorectal cancer (CRC). MicroRNA (miR)-613 has been reported to function as a tumor suppressor in many cancers. However, the precise role of miR-613 in CRC progression is unclear. This study aimed to investigate the role and underlying mechanism of miR-613 in growth and metastasis of CRC. Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) and western blot techniques were used to assess expression of miR-613 and formin-like 2 (FMNL2) in CRC cell lines and tissues. Luciferase reporter assays were conducted to investigate the association between miR-613 and FMNL2. Proliferation, wound healing, and transwell invasion assays, as well as flow cytometric analysis, were performed to evaluate the effect of miR-613 on proliferation, migration, invasion, and cell-cycle status, respectively, of CRC cells. We found that miR-613 was significantly downregulated in CRC cell lines and tissue samples, and correlated closely with TNM stage. miR-613 suppressed CRC cell proliferation, migration, and invasion, and induced cell-cycle arrest at G1 phase. FMNL2 was identified as a direct target of miR-613 in CRC cells. Importantly, FMNL2 overexpression rescued miR-613-induced suppression of proliferation, migration, and invasion of CRC cells. These results suggest that miR-613 functions as a tumor suppressor in the progression of CRC by regulating FMNL2. PMID:28078018

  3. Serum LDH predicts benefit from bevacizumab beyond progression in metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Marmorino, Federica; Salvatore, Lisa; Barbara, Cecilia; Allegrini, Giacomo; Antonuzzo, Lorenzo; Masi, Gianluca; Loupakis, Fotios; Borelli, Beatrice; Chiara, Silvana; Banzi, Maria Chiara; Miraglio, Emanuela; Amoroso, Domenico; Dargenio, Francesco; Bonetti, Andrea; Martignetti, Angelo; Paris, Myriam; Tomcikova, Daniela; Boni, Luca; Falcone, Alfredo; Cremolini, Chiara

    2017-01-01

    Different antiangiogenics are currently indicated in the second-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), following a first-line bevacizumab-containing treatment. The magnitude of benefit is limited, but no predictors of benefit have been identified. A total of 184 mCRC patients progressing to a first-line bevacizumab-containing treatment were randomised in the BEBYP study to continue or not the antiangiogenic in combination with a second-line chemotherapy. A subgroup analysis according to baseline serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels was carried out. A significant interaction effect between LDH levels and treatment was found in terms of progression-free survival (PFS; P=0.002). Although patients with low LDH levels achieved significant PFS benefit from the continuation of bevacizumab (HR: 0.39 (95% CI: 0.23-0.65)), patients with high levels did not (HR: 1.10 (95% CI: 0.74-1.64)). Consistent results were reported in overall survival (OS; P=0.075). As preclinical evidence suggests that serum LDH may be a marker of tumour angiogenesis activation, low levels may indicate that bevacizumab is still efficacious in inhibiting angiogenesis. Validation of present results in subgroup analyses of other randomised trials of second-line angiogenesis inhibitors is warranted.

  4. [Colorectal cancer in spouses of colorectal cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Matsumata, T; Shikada, Y; Hasuda, S; Kishihara, F; Suehiro, T; Funahashi, S; Nagamatsu, Y; Iso, Y; Shima, I; Koga, C; Osamura, S; Ueda, M; Furuya, K; Sakino, I

    2000-06-01

    Married couples share home environments and life style for years. In the case of colorectal cancer, an association with insulin resistance was reported. We determined the presence of the insulin-resistance syndrome (IRS, 1 or more of the following: body mass index of > 25 kg/m2, diabetes, or hyperlipidemia) in 84 colorectal cancer patients, of whom 61 patients (73%) had IRS. The incidence of the distal colorectal cancer, which has been declining in the United States, was significantly higher in the IRS group than in the non-IRS group (75.4 vs 52.2%, p = 0.0400). Some mechanisms may promote the progression of mucosal lesions to invasive cancers in the distal colorectum. There were no significant differences with respect to the age (64.6 +/- 9.4 vs 64.3 +/- 11.3 yr, p = 0.8298), height (159 +/- 9 vs 157 +/- 8 cm, p = 0.1375), and body mass index (22.2 +/- 3.6 vs 22.4 +/- 2.7 kg/m2, p = 0.6364) between the patients and their spouses. In 84 couples in whom colorectal cancer develops at least in one may then not illustrate the nursery rhyme: "Jack Sprat could eat no fat, His wife could eat no lean...". The spouses had been married for an average of 38 years, and in 30 spouses who had been followed in a colorectal cancer screening, 5 developed colorectal cancer. To diminish the incidence of colorectal cancer in Japan, we might advise screening colonoscopy to the spouses of colorectal cancer patients, or déjà vu all over again?

  5. Cadherin-12 enhances proliferation in colorectal cancer cells and increases progression by promoting EMT.

    PubMed

    Ma, Junjun; Zhao, Jingkun; Lu, Jun; Wang, Puxiongzhi; Feng, Hao; Zong, Yaping; Ou, Baochi; Zheng, Minhua; Lu, Aiguo

    2016-07-01

    Cadherin-12 (CDH12) is a subtype of N-cadherin family. In this study, we investigated the expression of CDH12 and the role of CDH12 in prognosis of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. In addition, we observed the influence of CDH12 on proliferation and progression of CRC cell lines. By using immunohistochemical staining, we analyzed CRC samples and adjacent non-tumor tissues collected from 78 patients who underwent laparoscopic surgery in Shanghai Minimally Invasive Center, China. Statistical analyses were used to analyze relationship between CDH12 and tumor features. Kaplan-Meier method was used to analyze patients' survival. Proliferation ability of CRC cells was tested by CCK-8 assay, and transwell assays were performed to detect migration and invasion ability. Western blot assay was performed to investigate epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) variants. We found that expression of CDH12 in tumor tissue was higher than in adjacent normal tissue. High expression of CDH12 was associated with tumor invasion depth and predicts poor prognosis of CRC patients. Ectopic/repressing expression of CDH12 increased/decreased the proliferation and migration ability of CRC cells. CDH12 is able to increase cancer cell migration and invasion via promoting EMT by targeting transcriptional factor Snail. These findings may conclude that CDH12 may act as a predictor in CRC patients' prognosis and an oncogene in CRC cell proliferation and migration. CDH12 may influence CRC cell progression through promoting EMT by targeting Snail. In addition, CDH12 is promoted by MCP1 through induction of MCPIP.

  6. Obesity and Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jochem, Carmen; Leitzmann, Michael

    There is strong evidence that modifiable lifestyle factors such as obesity play a key role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Epidemiologic data have consistently reported a positive association between obesity and colorectal cancer. The relative risk associated with general obesity (as assessed by BMI) is higher in men than in women and for cancer of the colon than for cancer of the rectum. Abdominal obesity (as assessed by waist circumference (WC) or waist-to-hip ratio) is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer in both sexes, with stronger associations for cancer of the colon than for cancer of the rectum. Plausible biological mechanisms include insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, chronic inflammation, altered levels of growth factors, adipocytokines and steroid hormones. In addition to its effect on colorectal cancer incidence, obesity may play a role in colorectal cancer recurrence, treatment outcomes and survival. Understanding the effects of childhood and adolescent obesity and weight change over the life course in relation to future risk of colorectal cancer is incomplete but essential for targeted preventive recommendations. This chapter summarizes the current evidence on the relationship between obesity and colorectal cancer and colorectal adenoma, a common precursor lesion.

  7. Synchronous trifocal colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Charalampoudis, Petros; Kykalos, Stylianos; Stamopoulos, Paraskevas; Kouraklis, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Synchronous colorectal cancers (SCRCs) have been increasingly diagnosed due to emerging diagnostic modalities. The presence of three or more synchronous colorectal cancers has, however, only rarely been reported. A 76-year-old white man presented for management of two concurrent colorectal adenocarcinomas in the left colon evidenced on total colonoscopy. Preoperative abdominal ultrasonography and thoracoabdominal computed tomography were negative for metastatic disease. The patient underwent an elective left hemicolectomy. The pathology report ultimately showed the presence of three moderately differentiated, distinct colorectal cancers. The patient experienced an uneventful recovery. PMID:27695171

  8. Differential role of intravenous anesthetics in colorectal cancer progression: implications for clinical application

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaofei; Yao, Xueqing; Chen, Yeming; Tao, Tao; Sun, Xuegang; Xu, Lijun; Tang, Jing; Zhao, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Anesthetics are unavoidable to colorectal cancer (CRC) patients who underwent surgical treatment. Thus, the molecular mechanisms underlying the role of the intravenous anesthetics in CRC metastasis are still unclear. In this study, the effects of intravenous anesthetics, such as propofol, etomidate and dexmedetomidine, on cell migration were determined. The migration of CRC cells was inhibited by propofol in vitro, but not in vivo. Etomidate, however, promoted the migration of CRC cells both in vitro and in vivo. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) mediated the promotive effect of propofol and etomidate on the migration of CRC cells through PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. Dexmedetomidine alone or in combination with propofol or etomidate had minor effect on the migration of CRC cells. These findings indicate that propofol inhibites CRC cell migration in vitro. Etomidate playes a role for prompting CRC metastasis progression by activating (PI3K)/AKT signaling and inducing EMT. It provides an important hint for the clinical application of these anesthetics. PMID:27780923

  9. Colorectal Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... linked to a decreased risk of colorectal cancer. Aspirin Studies have shown that taking aspirin lowers the ... cancer: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) other than aspirin It is not known if the use of ...

  10. [Chemoprevention of colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Herszényi, László; Juhász, Márk; Prónai, László; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2004-03-21

    Although colorectal cancer is one of the most preventable forms of cancer, it remains the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Primary prevention involves the identification and elimination of factors, which cause or promote colorectal cancer. The goal of screening is to prevent colorectal cancer mortality through the detection and treatment of premalignant adenomas and curable-stage cancer. Most colorectal cancers are believed to arise from adenomatous polyps. Early identification and removal of adenomas can prevent the development of colorectal cancer. Chemoprevention is the use of specific chemical compounds to prevent, inhibit, or reverse carcinogenesis. Several chemoprevention options have been investigated and confirmed as effective. Aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are the most widely studied agents, their use has been consistently associated with reduction in the risk of mortality and the incidence of colorectal adenomas and cancers. The selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors (coxibs) have been demonstrated to decrease the number and the size of polyps in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis syndrome. Because the gastrointestinal toxicity of coxibs is lower, it might be safer than aspirin or other non-selective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for long-term use. This review aims to summarize the recent theoretical and practical advances in the chemoprevention of colorectal cancer.

  11. Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... higher than among whites. Nanotechnology—the branch of engineering that deals with the manipulation of individual atoms ... research is to characterize all of the key genetic changes associated with tumor initiation and progression. The ...

  12. Local tumor progression patterns after radiofrequency ablation of colorectal cancer liver metastases

    PubMed Central

    Napoleone, Marc; Kielar, Ania Z.; Hibbert, Rebecca; Saif, Sameh; Kwan, Benjamin Y.M.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate patterns of local tumor progression (LTP) after radiofrequency ablation (RF ablation) of colorectal cancer liver metastases (CRCLM) and to highlight the percentage of LTP not attributable to lesion size or RF ablation procedure-related factors (heat sink or insufficient ablation margin). METHODS CRCLM treated by RF ablation at a single tertiary care center from 2004–2012, with a minimum of six months of postprocedure follow-up, were included in this retrospective study. LTP morphology was classified as focal nodular (<90° of ablation margin), circumferential (>270°), or crescentic (90°–270°). Initial metastasis size, minimum ablation margin size, morphology of LTP, presence of a heat sink, and time to progression were recorded independently by two radiologists. RESULTS Thirty-two of 127 RF ablation treated metastases (25%) with a mean size of 23 mm (standard deviation 12 mm) exhibited LTP. Fifteen of 32 LTPs (47%) were classified as focal nodular, with seven having no procedure-related factor to explain recurrence. Ten of 32 LTPs (31%) were circumferential, with four having no procedure-related factor to explain recurrence. Seven of 32 LTPs (22%) were crescentic, with two having no procedure-related factor to explain recurrence. Of the 13 lesions without any obvious procedure-related reason for LTP, six (46%) were <3 cm in size. CONCLUSION Although LTP in RF ablation treated CRCLM can often be explained by procedure-related factors or size of the lesion, in this study up to six (5%) of the CRCLM we treated showed LTP without any reasonable cause. PMID:27705879

  13. Alternative splicing of spleen tyrosine kinase differentially regulates colorectal cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Beibei; Hu, Jun; Chen, Dianke; Li, Li; Chen, Daici; Wang, Jianping; Wang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK) has been reported as a potential tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the role of alternative splicing of SYK in carcinogenesis remains unclear. In the present study, SYK isoforms were overexpressed in the human CRC HCT 116 cell line using lentiviral expression vectors to investigate the biological functions of full length SYK [SYK(L)] and short form SYK [SYK(S)] in CRC. Real-time cellular analysis and the 5-ethynyl-2-deoxyuridine assay were used to detect the effects of SYK(L) and SYK(S) on cell proliferation. Cell cycle progression and migration were assessed via flow cytometry and Transwell assays, respectively. The results revealed that the recombinant lentivirus with SYK(L) overexpression significantly suppressed the proliferation and metastasis of CRC cells, while SYK(S) overexpression did not. In addition, MTS assays demonstrated that SYK(L) and SYK(S) increased the cellular sensitivity to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), suggesting that SYK(L) and 5-FU produce a significant synergistic effect on CRC cell proliferation, while SYK(S) has an effect on modulating CRC 5-FU sensitivity. Furthermore, quantitative polymerase chain reaction results revealed that SYK(L) was downregulated in 69% of 26 pairs of CRC and adjacent non-cancerous tissues, whereas SYK(S) exhibited no significant differences between tumor and normal tissues. Overall, the present data provides evidence that SYK(L) is a tumor suppressor in CRC, and both SYK(L) and SYK(S) may serve as important predictors in the chemotherapeutic treatment of CRC. PMID:27602108

  14. Colorectal Cancer Risk Assessment Tool

    MedlinePlus

    ... Colorectal Cancer Risk Factors Download SAS and Gauss Code Page Options Print Page Quick Links Colon and Rectal Cancer Home Page Colon and Rectal Cancer: Prevention, Genetics, Causes Tests to Detect Colorectal Cancer and Polyps ...

  15. Colorectal cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Chan, Pak Wo Webber; Ngu, Jing Hieng; Poh, Zhongxian; Soetikno, Roy

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer, which is the leading cancer in Singapore, can be prevented by increased use of screening and polypectomy. A range of screening strategies such as stool-based tests, flexible sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy and computed tomography colonography are available, each with different strengths and limitations. Primary care physicians should discuss appropriate screening modalities with their patients, tailored to their individual needs. Physicians, patients and the government should work in partnership to improve uptake of colorectal cancer screening to reduce the morbidity and mortality from colorectal cancer. Copyright: © Singapore Medical Association.

  16. Colorectal cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Pak Wo Webber; Ngu, Jing Hieng; Poh, Zhongxian; Soetikno, Roy

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer, which is the leading cancer in Singapore, can be prevented by increased use of screening and polypectomy. A range of screening strategies such as stool-based tests, flexible sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy and computed tomography colonography are available, each with different strengths and limitations. Primary care physicians should discuss appropriate screening modalities with their patients, tailored to their individual needs. Physicians, patients and the government should work in partnership to improve uptake of colorectal cancer screening to reduce the morbidity and mortality from colorectal cancer. PMID:28111691

  17. Adiponectin and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Otani, Kensuke; Ishihara, Soichiro; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Murono, Koji; Yasuda, Koji; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Hata, Keisuke; Kawai, Kazushige; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2017-02-01

    Colorectal cancer is an obesity-related malignancy. Adiponectin is an adipokine produced exclusively by adipose tissue, and its concentration in the serum is reduced in obesity. A low serum level of adiponectin is associated with an increased risk of various types of malignancies including colorectal cancer. These facts suggest that the epidemiological link between obesity and cancer may have a significant association with adiponectin. Although numerous studies of colorectal cancer have been reported, the results are conflicting about the anti-cancer effect of adiponectin, and how adiponectin affects carcinogenesis or cancer development remains controversial. Because adiponectin has multiple systemic effects and exists as a high serum concentration protein, the main role of adiponectin should be regulation of homeostasis, and it would not likely act as an anti-cancerous hormone. However, as epidemiological evidence shows, a low adiponectin level may be a basic risk factor for colorectal cancer. We speculate that when the colonic epithelium is stimulated or damaged by another carcinogen under the condition of a low adiponectin level, carcinogenesis is promoted and cancer development is facilitated. In this report, we summarize recent findings of the correlation between adiponectin and colorectal cancer and investigate the effect of adiponectin on colorectal cancer.

  18. [Systemic therapy for colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Pestalozzi, B C; Jäger, D; Knuth, A

    2005-06-01

    Drug treatment of colorectal cancer has made impressive progress during the past 10 years. In addition to the traditional 5-fluorouracil, newer anticancer drugs are available including irinotecan and oxaliplatin. Monoclonal antibodies like bevacizumab and cetuximab have been integrated into modern treatment regimens. Based on randomized clinical trials we can formulate rational treatment strategies as outlined in this article.

  19. Lipidome in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Bo; Li, Yongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Understanding its pathophysiology is essential for developing efficient strategies to treat this disease. Lipidome, the sum of total lipids, related enzymes, receptors and signaling pathways, plays crucial roles in multiple cellular processes, such as metabolism, energy storage, proliferation and apoptosis. Dysregulation of lipid metabolism and function contributes to the development of CRC, and can be used towards the evaluation of prognosis. The strategies targeting lipidome have been applied in clinical trails and showed promising results. Here we discuss recent advances in abnormal lipid metabolism in CRC, the mechanisms by which the lipidome regulates tumorigenesis and tumor progression, and suggest potential therapeutic targets for clinical trials. PMID:26967051

  20. Epidemiology of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Marley, Andrew R; Nan, Hongmei

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is currently the third deadliest cancer in the United States and will claim an estimated 49,190 U.S. lives in 2016. The purpose of this review is to summarize our current understanding of this disease, based on nationally published statistics and information presented in peer-reviewed journal articles. Specifically, this review will cover the following topics: descriptive epidemiology (including time and disease trends both in the United States and abroad), risk factors (environmental, genetic, and gene-environment interactions), screening, prevention and control, and treatment. Landmark discoveries in colorectal cancer risk factor research will also be presented. Based on the information reviewed for this report, we suggest that future U.S. public health efforts aim to increase colorectal cancer screening among African American communities, and that future worldwide colorectal cancer epidemiology studies should focus on researching nutrient-gene interactions towards the goal of improving personalized treatment and prevention strategies. PMID:27766137

  1. KISS1 methylation and expression as predictors of disease progression in colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shao-Qin; Chen, Zhi-Hua; Lin, Su-Yong; Dai, Qi-Bao; Fu, Leng-Xi; Chen, Rui-Qing

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To examine the effect of aberrant methylation of the KISS1 promoter on the development of colorectal cancer (CRC) and to investigate reversing aberrant methylation of the KISS1 promoter as a potential therapeutic target. METHODS: KISS1 promoter methylation, mRNA expression and protein expression were detected by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR), real-time quantitative PCR and Western blotting, respectively, in 126 CRC tissues and 142 normal colorectal tissues. Human CRC cells with KISS1 promoter hypermethylation and poor KISS1 expression were treated in vitro with 5-aza-2’-deoxycytidine (5-Aza-CdR). After treatment, KISS1 promoter methylation, KISS1 mRNA and protein expression and cell migration and invasion were evaluated. RESULTS: Hypermethylation of KISS1 occurred frequently in CRC samples (83.1%, 105/126), but was infrequent in normal colorectal tissues (6.34%, 9/142). Moreover, KISS1 methylation was associated with tumor differentiation, the depth of invasion, lymph node metastasis and distant metastasis (P < 0.001). KISS1 methylation was also associated with low KISS1 expression (P < 0.001). Furthermore, we observed re-expression of the KISS1 gene and decreased cell migration after 5-Aza-CdR treatment in a CRC cell line. CONCLUSION: These data suggest that KISS1 is down-regulated in cancer tissues via promoter hypermethylation and therefore may represent a candidate target for treating metastatic CRC. PMID:25110434

  2. Colorectal Cancer Coalition

    MedlinePlus

    ... inspire those touched by colorectal cancer. Watch Videos Join us on the hill Attend our annual advocacy ... We always need volunteers. Browse our opportunities. Volunteer Join the Movement We have many ways to fight ...

  3. MicroRNA-224 is associated with colorectal cancer progression and response to 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy by KRAS-dependent and -independent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Amankwatia, E B; Chakravarty, P; Carey, F A; Weidlich, S; Steele, R J C; Munro, A J; Wolf, C R; Smith, G

    2015-01-01

    Background: Colorectal cancers arise from benign adenomas, although not all adenomas progress to cancer and there are marked interpatient differences in disease progression. We have previously associated KRAS mutations with disease progression and reduced survival in colorectal cancer patients. Methods: We used TaqMan low-density array (TLDA) qRT–PCR analysis to identify miRNAs differentially expressed in normal colorectal mucosa, adenomas and cancers and in isogeneic KRAS WT and mutant HCT116 cells, and used a variety of phenotypic assays to assess the influence of miRNA expression on KRAS activity, chemosensitivity, proliferation and invasion. Results: MicroRNA-224 was differentially expressed in dysplastic colorectal disease and in isogeneic KRAS WT and mutant HCT116 cells. Antagomir-mediated miR-224 silencing in HCT116 KRAS WT cells phenocopied KRAS mutation, increased KRAS activity and ERK and AKT phosphorylation. 5-FU chemosensitivity was significantly increased in miR-224 knockdown cells, and in NIH3T3 cells expressing KRAS and BRAF mutant proteins. Bioinformatics analysis of predicted miR-224 target genes predicted altered cell proliferation, invasion and epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotypes that were experimentally confirmed in miR-224 knockdown cells. Conclusions: We describe a novel mechanism of KRAS regulation, and highlight the clinical utility of colorectal cancer-specific miRNAs as disease progression or clinical response biomarkers. PMID:25919696

  4. Obesity and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Aleksandrova, Krasimira; Nimptsch, Katharina; Pischon, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    This review outlines the association of obesity with risk of colorectal cancer and the potential underlying mechanisms from an epidemiological perspective. Current research indicates that there is a moderate but consistently reported association between general obesity (as determined by BMI) and colorectal cancer incidence and mortality. The relative risk associated with obesity is higher for cancer of the colon than for cancer of the rectum and it is higher in men than in women. By contrast, abdominal adiposity (as determined by waist circumference or waist-to-hip ratio) is similarly strongly associated with colon cancer in men and women, suggesting that abdominal adiposity is a more important risk factor for colon cancer than general adiposity, at least in women. Putative mechanisms that may account for the link between adiposity and colorectal cancer risk include hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, inflammation, altered immune response, oxidative stress, as well as disturbances in insulin-like growth factors, adipokines, and sex steroids. Understanding the link between obesity and colorectal cancer may pave the way for targeted prevention of colorectal cancer morbidity and mortality.

  5. The upstream components of the Wnt signalling pathway in the dynamic EMT and MET associated with colorectal cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Vincan, Elizabeth; Barker, Nick

    2008-01-01

    The constitutive activation of beta-catenin-dependent ('canonical') Wnt signalling is a necessary initiating event in the genesis of most colorectal cancers. As this constitutive activation occurs through genetic mutation of one of the down-stream components of the signalling pathway, it was presumed that additional regulation of beta-catenin-dependent Wnt signalling would be inconsequential. However, it is now recognised that additional modulation of beta-catenin-dependent Wnt signalling is involved in tumour progression, and many of the genes associated with tumour invasion and metastasis are beta-catenin/TCF transcriptional target genes that are dynamically regulated during cancer progression. Intriguingly, the demonstration that naturally occurring inhibitors of Wnt-Frizzled (FZD) interaction are bona fide tumour suppressors in this cancer suggests that additional modulation of Wnt signalling is via the upstream components of the pathway. This is corroborated by recent studies that demonstrate tumour-promoting roles for Wnt and FZD per se. Moreover, both beta-catenin-dependent and beta-catenin-independent Wnt/FZD-mediated signalling is implicated during the dynamic and reversible EMT and MET that underscore colorectal cancer progression. Importantly, therapeutic targeting of the Wnt signalling pathway at the plasma membrane is clearly indicated by the profound anti-tumour activity of small molecule inhibitors and dominant-negative receptor constructs that target the receptor complex. The potential to effectively target EMT and MET processes at the plasma membrane via the upstream components of the Wnt signalling pathway offers new hope for anti-cancer therapy.

  6. TAS-102 for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of results from an international phase III trial that compared TAS-102 with placebo in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer whose disease progressed following prior treatments or who had health conditions that prevented the re-administrati

  7. TAS-102 for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of results from an international phase III trial that compared TAS-102 with placebo in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer whose disease progressed following prior treatments or who had health conditions that prevented the re-administrati

  8. Advances in Hereditary Colorectal and Pancreatic Cancers.

    PubMed

    Underhill, Meghan L; Germansky, Katharine A; Yurgelun, Matthew B

    2016-07-01

    Innovations in genetic medicine have led to improvements in the early detection, prevention, and treatment of cancer for patients with inherited risks of gastrointestinal cancer, particularly hereditary colorectal cancer and hereditary pancreatic cancer. This review provides an update on recent data and key advances that have improved the identification, understanding, and management of patients with hereditary colorectal cancer and hereditary pancreatic cancer. This review details recent and emerging data that highlight the developing landscape of genetics in hereditary colorectal and pancreatic cancer risk. A summary is provided of the current state-of-the-art practices for identifying, evaluating, and managing patients with suspected hereditary colorectal cancer and pancreatic cancer risk. The impact of next-generation sequencing technologies in the clinical diagnosis of hereditary gastrointestinal cancer and also in discovery efforts of new genes linked to familial cancer risk are discussed. Emerging targeted therapies that may play a particularly important role in the treatment of patients with hereditary forms of colorectal cancer and pancreatic cancer are also reviewed. Current approaches for pancreatic cancer screening and the psychosocial impact of such procedures are also detailed. Given the availability of new diagnostic, risk-reducing, and therapeutic strategies that exist for patients with hereditary risk of colorectal or pancreatic cancer, it is imperative that clinicians be vigilant about evaluating patients for hereditary cancer syndromes. Continuing to advance genetics research in hereditary gastrointestinal cancers will allow for more progress to be made in personalized medicine and prevention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [New drugs for colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Pestalozzi, B C; Jäger, D; Knuth, A

    2004-09-01

    Drug treatment of colorectal cancer has made impressive progress during the past 10 years. In addition to fluorouracil new anticancer drugs like irinotecan and oxaliplatin have become available. The activity of fluorouracil was optimized by using schedules of prolonged infusion. Capecitabine is an oral pro-drug of fluorouracil. When colorectal metastases are limited to the liver they should be resected if possible. Sometimes they can be reduced in size by primary chemotherapy (downstaging) and resected later. Very new and exciting are reports with the monoclonal antibody bevacizumab in combination with chemotherapy. Bevacizumab blocks angiogenesis. So far it is available only in the USA.

  10. Targeting the tumor microenvironment as a potential therapeutic approach in colorectal cancer: Rational and progress.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Afsane; Khazaei, Majid; Hassanian, Seyed Mahdi; ShahidSales, Soodabeh; Joudi-Mashhad, Mona; Maftouh, Mina; Jazayeri, Mir Hadi; Parizade, Mohammad Reza; Ferns, Gordon A; Avan, Amir

    2017-06-02

    Colorectal cancer (CC) is often diagnosed at a late stage when tumor metastasis may have already occurred. Current treatments are often ineffective in metastatic disease, and consequently late diagnosis is often associated with poor outcomes in CC. Alternative strategies are therefore urgently required. An interaction between epithelial cancer cells and their tissue microenvironment is a contributor to metastasis, and therefore recent studies are beginning to focus on the properties of the tumor microenvironment and the mechanism by which the metastatic cells exploit the tumor microenvironment for survival, immune evasion, and growth. We have reviewed the development of the combined therapeutic approaches that have focused on targeting the microenvironment of CC. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Colorectal Cancer: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Past Issues Special Section: Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer: Symptoms, Diagnosis and Treatment Past Issues / Spring 2009 Table of ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Symptoms Check with your healthcare provider if you have ...

  12. Regorafenib with a fluoropyrimidine for metastatic colorectal cancer after progression on multiple 5-FU-containing combination therapies and regorafenib monotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Eric I.; Tan, Carlyn; Zhang, Jun; Zhou, Lanlan; Yang, Zhaohai; Scicchitano, Angelique; El-Deiry, Wafik S.

    2015-01-01

    We present 2 patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who had progressed despite treatment with first-line FOLFOX and second-line FOLFIRI combination chemotherapy regimens. After failing these fluoropyrimidine-based regimens, both patients received additional cytotoxic and targeted therapies with eventual disease progression. These therapies included capecitabine plus dabrafenib and trametinib, regorafenib monotherapy, and regorafenib with panitumumab. After exhausting available options, both patients were offered regorafenib with either 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) or capecitabine. These therapies are individually approved for the treatment of colorectal cancer but have not yet been studied in combination. This regimen produced stable disease in both patients with acceptable toxicity. One patient continued therapy for 17 months. Although these patients previously progressed during treatment with regorafenib, capecitabine or 5-FU, the combination had some activity in both cases of refractory metastatic colorectal cancer and may be considered in the palliative setting. In bedside-to-bench cell culture experiments performed after the clinical observations, we observed sensitivity of human colorectal cancer cell lines (N = 4) to single agent regorafenib or 5-FU and evidence of synergy with the combination therapy. Synergistic effects were noted in colorectal cancer cells with KRAS mutation, BRAF mutation, and p53 mutation, as well as mismatch repair deficient cells. Regorafenib suppressed Mcl-1 and Bcl-XL in treated cancer cells that may have contributed to the anticancer efficacy including in combination with 5-FU. The safety and efficacy of regorafenib with 5-FU or capecitabine in combination should be further investigated as a therapy for patients with refractory metastatic colorectal cancer, including individuals who had progressed on regorafenib monotherapy. PMID:26561209

  13. TUSC3 promotes colorectal cancer progression and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) through WNT/β-catenin and MAPK signalling.

    PubMed

    Gu, Ye; Wang, Qian; Guo, Kang; Qin, Weizhao; Liao, Wenting; Wang, Shuang; Ding, Yanqing; Lin, Jie

    2016-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common malignancies and is the second leading cause of cancer death in humans. Tumour suppressor candidate 3 (TUSC3) plays an important role in embryogenesis and metabolism. Deletion of TUSC3 often causes non-syndromic mental retardation. Even though TUSC3 deregulation is frequently observed in epithelial cancers, the function of TUSC3 in CRC has remained unknown. In this study, we observed greater expression of TUSC3 at the mRNA and protein level in clinical colorectal tumour samples compared with paired normal tissues. Gain- and loss-of-function analyses were performed to evaluate the functional significance of TUSC3 in CRC initiation and progression. Immunoblotting, immunofluorescence, and co-immunoprecipitation analyses were used to identify potential pathways with which TUSC3 might be involved. Overexpression of TUSC3 in CRC cells induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in CRC cells, accompanied by down-regulation of the epithelial marker, E-cadherin, and up-regulation of the mesenchymal marker, vimentin. Increased proliferation, migration, and invasion, as well as accelerated xenograft tumour growth, were observed in TUSC3-overexpressing CRC cells, while opposite effects were achieved in TUSC3-silenced cells. In conclusion, our study demonstrated the oncogenic role of TUSC3 in CRC and showed that TUSC3 may be responsible for alternations in the proliferation ability, aggressiveness, and invasive/metastatic potential of CRC through regulating the MAPK, PI3K/Akt, and Wnt/β-catenin signalling pathways.

  14. Developments in Colorectal Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... tested at age 45. Read More "Colorectal Cancer" Articles Colorectal Cancer: A Personal Journey / The Importance of Early Detection / Developments in Colorectal Cancer Screening Summer 2016 Issue: Volume 11 Number 2 Page ... Us | Viewers & Players Friends of the National Library of Medicine (FNLM)

  15. Colorectal Cancer: A Personal Journey

    MedlinePlus

    ... detection is early cure!” Read More "Colorectal Cancer" Articles Colorectal Cancer: A Personal Journey / The Importance of Early Detection / Developments in Colorectal Cancer Screening Summer 2016 Issue: Volume 11 Number 2 Page ... Us | Viewers & Players Friends of the National Library of Medicine (FNLM)

  16. Colorectal cancer statistics, 2017.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Rebecca L; Miller, Kimberly D; Fedewa, Stacey A; Ahnen, Dennis J; Meester, Reinier G S; Barzi, Afsaneh; Jemal, Ahmedin

    2017-05-06

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common malignancies in the United States. Every 3 years, the American Cancer Society provides an update of CRC incidence, survival, and mortality rates and trends. Incidence data through 2013 were provided by the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program, the National Program of Cancer Registries, and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries. Mortality data through 2014 were provided by the National Center for Health Statistics. CRC incidence rates are highest in Alaska Natives and blacks and lowest in Asian/Pacific Islanders, and they are 30% to 40% higher in men than in women. Recent temporal patterns are generally similar by race and sex, but differ by age. Between 2000 and 2013, incidence rates in adults aged ≥50 years declined by 32%, with the drop largest for distal tumors in people aged ≥65 years (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 0.50; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.48-0.52) and smallest for rectal tumors in ages 50 to 64 years (male IRR, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.85-0.96; female IRR, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.93-1.08). Overall CRC incidence in individuals ages ≥50 years declined from 2009 to 2013 in every state except Arkansas, with the decrease exceeding 5% annually in 7 states; however, rectal tumor incidence in those ages 50 to 64 years was stable in most states. Among adults aged <50 years, CRC incidence rates increased by 22% from 2000 to 2013, driven solely by tumors in the distal colon (IRR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.13-1.35) and rectum (IRR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.13-1.31). Similar to incidence patterns, CRC death rates decreased by 34% among individuals aged ≥50 years during 2000 through 2014, but increased by 13% in those aged <50 years. Progress against CRC can be accelerated by increasing initiation of screening at age 50 years (average risk) or earlier (eg, family history of CRC/advanced adenomas) and eliminating disparities in high-quality treatment. In addition, research is needed to elucidate causes

  17. [Nutrition and colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Ströhle, Alexander; Maike, Wolters; Hahn, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Diet plays an important role in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. Current prospective cohort studies and metaanalysis enable a reevaluation of how food or nutrients such as fiber and fat influence cancer risk. Based on the evidence criteria of the WHO/FAD, risk reduction by a high intake of fruit is assessed as possible, while a lowered risk by a high vegetable intake is probable. Especially raw vegetables and fruits seem to exert anticancer properties. The evidence of a risk reducing effect of whole grain relating to colorectal cancer is assessed as probable whereas the evidence of an increased risk by high consumption of refined white flour products and sweets is (still) insufficient despite some evidences. There is a probable risk reducing effect of milk and dairy products. e available data on eggs and red meat indicate a possible risk increasing influence. Stronger clues for a risk increasing effect have been shown for meat products leading to an evidence assessed as probable. Owing to varied interpretations of the data on fiber, the evidence of a risk reducing effect relating to colorectal cancer is assessed as possible or insufficient. The available data on alcohol consumption indicate a possible risk increasing effect. In contrast to former evaluations, diets rich in fat seem to increase colorectal cancer risk only indirectly as part of a hypercaloric diet by advancing the obesity risk. Thus, the evidence of obesity, especially visceral obesity, as a risk of colorectal cancer is judged as convincing today. Prospective cohort studies suggest that people who get higher than average amounts of folic acid from multivitamin supplements have lower risks of colorectal cancer. The evidence for a risk reducing effect of calcium, selenium, vitamin D and vitamin E on colorectal cancer is insufficient. As primary prevention, a diet rich in vegetables, fruits, whole grain products, and legumes added by low-fat dairy products, fish, and poultry can be recommended. In

  18. The impact of RNA binding motif protein 4-regulated splicing cascade on the progression and metabolism of colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yu-Chih; Lin, Wei-Cheng; Lin, Ying-Ju; Lin, Jung-Chun

    2015-11-10

    Dysregulated splicing of pre-messenger (m)RNA is considered a molecular occasion of carcinogenesis. However, the underlying mechanism is complex and remains to be investigated. Herein, we report that the upregulated miR-92a reduced the RNA-binding motif 4 (RBM4) protein expression, leading to the imbalanced expression of the neuronal polypyrimidine tract-binding (nPTB) protein through alternative splicing-coupled nonsense mediated decay (NMD) mechanism. Increase in nPTB protein enhances the relative level of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 IIIc (FGFR2) and pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) transcripts which contribute to the progression and metabolic signature of CRC cells. Expression profiles of RBM4 and downstream alternative splicing events are consistently observed in cancerous tissues compared to adjacent normal tissues. These results constitute a mechanistic understanding of RBM4 on repressing the carcinogenesis of colorectal cells.

  19. Radioimmunodetection of colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, E.E.; Deland, F.H.; Casper, S.; Corgan, R.L.; Primus, F.J.; Goldenberg, D.M.

    1980-03-15

    This study examines the accuracy of colorectal cancer radioimmunodetection. Twenty-seven patients with a history of histologically-confirmed colonic or rectal carcinoma received a high-titer, purified goat anti-CEA IgG labelled with /sup 131/I at a total dose of at least 1.0 ..mu..Ci. Various body views were scanned at 24 and 48 hours after administration of the radioantibody. Three additional cases were evaluated; one had a villous adenoma in the rectum and received the /sup 131/I-labeled anti-CEA IgG, while two colonic carcinoma patients received normal goat IgG labelled with /sup 131/I. All of the 7 cases with primary colorectal cancer showed true-positive tumor localization, while 20 of 25 sites of metastatic colorectal cancer detected by immune scintigraphy were corroborated by other detection measures. The sensitivity of the radioimmunodetection of colorectal cancers (primary and metastatic) was found to be 90% (true-positive rate), the putative specificity (true-negative rate) was 94%, and the apparent overall accuracy of the technique was 93%. Neither the case of a villous adenoma receiving the anti-CEA IgG nor the two cases of colonic cancer receiving normal goat IgG showed tumor radiolocalization. Very high circulating CEA titers did not appear to hinder successful tumor radiolocalization. These findings suggest that in colorectal cancers the method of CEA radioimmunodetection may be of value in preoperatively determining the location and extent of disease, in assessing possible recurrence or spread postoperatively, and in localizing the source of CEA production in patients with rising or elevated CEA titers. An ancilliary benefit could be a more tumor-specific detection test for confirming the findings of other, more conventional diagnostic measures.

  20. Continuation of bevacizumab after first progression in metastatic colorectal cancer (ML18147): a randomised phase 3 trial.

    PubMed

    Bennouna, Jaafar; Sastre, Javier; Arnold, Dirk; Österlund, Pia; Greil, Richard; Van Cutsem, Eric; von Moos, Roger; Viéitez, Jose Maria; Bouché, Olivier; Borg, Christophe; Steffens, Claus-Christoph; Alonso-Orduña, Vicente; Schlichting, Christoph; Reyes-Rivera, Irmarie; Bendahmane, Belguendouz; André, Thierry; Kubicka, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Bevacizumab plus fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy is standard treatment for first-line and bevacizumab-naive second-line metastatic colorectal cancer. We assessed continued use of bevacizumab plus standard second-line chemotherapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer progressing after standard first-line bevacizumab-based treatment. In an open-label, phase 3 study in 220 centres in Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Saudi Arabia, Spain, Sweden, and Switzerland, patients (aged ≥18 years) with unresectable, histologically confirmed metastatic colorectal cancer progressing up to 3 months after discontinuing first-line bevacizumab plus chemotherapy were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to second-line chemotherapy with or without bevacizumab 2·5 mg/kg per week equivalent (either 5 mg/kg every 2 weeks or 7·5 mg/kg every 3 weeks, intravenously). The choice between oxaliplatin-based or irinotecan-based second-line chemotherapy depended on the first-line regimen (switch of chemotherapy). A combination of a permuted block design and the Pocock and Simon minimisation algorithm was used for the randomisation. The primary endpoint was overall survival, analysed by intention to treat. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00700102. Between Feb 1, 2006, and June 9, 2010, 409 (50%) patients were assigned to bevacizumab plus chemotherapy and 411 (50%) to chemotherapy alone. Median follow-up was 11·1 months (IQR 6·4-15·6) in the bevacizumab plus chemotherapy group and 9·6 months (5·4-13·9) in the chemotherapy alone group. Median overall survival was 11·2 months (95% CI 10·4-12·2) for bevacizumab plus chemotherapy and 9·8 months (8·9-10·7) for chemotherapy alone (hazard ratio 0·81, 95% CI 0·69-0·94; unstratified log-rank test p=0·0062). Grade 3-5 bleeding or haemorrhage (eight [2%] vs one [<1%]), gastrointestinal perforation (seven [2%] vs three [<1

  1. Enrichment map profiling of the cancer invasion front suggests regulation of colorectal cancer progression by the bone morphogenetic protein antagonist, gremlin-1.

    PubMed

    Karagiannis, George S; Berk, Aaron; Dimitromanolakis, Apostolos; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2013-08-01

    The cancer invasion front (CIF), a spatially-recognized area due to the frequent presence of peritumoral desmoplastic reaction, represents a cancer site where many hallmarks of cancer metastasis occur. It is now strongly suggested that the desmoplastic microenvironment holds crucial information for determining tumor development and progression. Despite extensive research on tumor-host cell interactions at CIFs, the exact paracrine molecular network that is hardwired into the proteome of the stromal and cancer subpopulations remains partially understood. Here, we interrogated the signaling pathways and the molecular functional signatures across the proteome of a desmoplastic coculture model system of colorectal cancer progression. We discovered a group of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) antagonists that coordinates major biological programs in CIFs, including cell proliferation, invasion, migration and differentiation processes. Using a mathematical model of cancer cell progression, coupled to in vitro cell migration assays, we demonstrated that the prominent BMP antagonist gremlin-1 (GREM1) may trigger motility of cancer cell cohorts. Our data collectively demonstrate that the desmoplastic CIFs deploy a microenvironmental signature, based on BMP antagonism, in order to regulate the motogenic fates of cancer cell cohorts invading the adjacent stroma. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. All rights reserved.

  2. Overexpression of paxillin induced by miR-137 suppression promotes tumor progression and metastasis in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Rui-Hua

    2013-01-01

    The deregulation of paxillin (PXN) has been involved in the progression and metastasis of different malignancies including colorectal cancer (CRC). miR-137 is frequently suppressed in CRC. PXN is predicted to be a direct target of miR-137 in CRC cells. On this basis, we hypothesized that overexpression of PXN induced by suppression of miR-137 may promote tumor progression and metastasis and predicts poor prognosis. We detected the expression of PXN and miR-137 in clinical tumor tissues by immunohistochemical analysis and real-time PCR, positive PXN staining was observed in 198 of the 247 (80.1%) cases, whereas no or weak PXN staining was observed in the adjacent non-cancerous area. Higher level of PXN messenger RNA (mRNA) and lower level of miR-137 was observed in cancer tissues than adjacent non-cancerous tissues. High expression of PXN and low expression of miR-137 was associated with aggressive tumor phenotype and adverse prognosis. Moreover, the expression of PXN was negatively correlated with miR-137 expression. A dual-luciferase reporter gene assay validated that PXN was a direct target of miR-137. The use of miR-137 mimics or inhibitor could decrease or increase PXN mRNA and protein levels in CRC cell lines. Knockdown of PXN or ectopic expression of miR-137 could markedly inhibit cell proliferation, migration and invasion in vitro and repress tumor growth and metastasis in vivo. Taken together, these results demonstrated that overexpression of PXN induced by suppression of miR-137 promotes tumor progression and metastasis and could serve as an independent prognostic indicator in CRC patients. PMID:23275153

  3. miR-450b-5p induced by oncogenic KRAS is required for colorectal cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Dan-ling; Jiao, Hong-Li; Li, Ting-Ting; Wang, Shu-Yang; Wang, Yong-Xia; Xiao, Zhi-Yuan; Wei, Wen-ting; Chen, Yan-Ru; Qiu, Jun-Feng; Yang, Run-Wei; Lin, Jie; Liang, Li; Liao, Wen-Ting; Ding, Yan-Qing

    2016-01-01

    The development and progression of CRC are regarded as a complicated network and progressive event including genetic and/or epigenetic alterations. Recent researches revealed that MicroRNAs are biomarkers and regulators of CRC progression. Analyses of published microarray datasets revealed that miR-450b-5p was highly up-regulated in CRC tissues. In addition, high expression of miR-450b-5p was significantly associated with KRAS mutation. However, the role of miR-450b-5p in the progression of CRC remains unknown. Here, we sought to validate the expression of miR-450b-5p in CRC tissues and investigate the role and underlying mechanism of miR-450b-5p in the progression of CRC. The results revealed that miR-450b-5p was up-regulated in CRC tissues, high expression level of miR-450b-5p was positively associated with poor differentiation, advanced TNM classification and poor prognosis. Moreover, miR-450b-5p was especially high in KRAS-mutated cell lines and could be up-regulated by KRAS/AP-1 signaling. Functional validation revealed that overexpression of miR-450b-5p promoted cell proliferation and tumor growth while inhibited apoptosis of CRC cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that miR-450b-5p directly bound the 3′-UTRs of SFRP2 and SIAH1, and activated Wnt/β-Catenin signaling. In conclusion, miR-450b-5p induced by oncogenic KRAS is required for colorectal cancer progression. Collectively, our work helped to understand the precise role of miR-450b-5p in the progression of CRC, and might promote the development of new therapeutic strategies against CRC. PMID:27494869

  4. [Colorectal cancer screening].

    PubMed

    Castells, Antoni

    2015-09-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of malignancies showing the greatest benefit from preventive measures, especially screening or secondary prevention. Several screening strategies are available with demonstrated efficacy and efficiency. The most widely used are the faecal occult blood test in countries with population-based screening programmes, and colonoscopy in those conducting opportunistic screening. The present article reviews the most important presentations on colorectal cancer screening at the annual congress of the American Gastroenterological Association held in Washington in 2015, with special emphasis on the medium-term results of faecal occult blood testing strategies and determining factors and on strategies to reduce the development of interval cancer after colonoscopy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. CSN5 silencing inhibits invasion and arrests cell cycle progression in human colorectal cancer SW480 and LS174T cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Gang; Li, Huikai; Shan, Tao; Zhang, Nan

    2015-01-01

    CSN5 has been implicated as a candidate oncogene in human cancers by genetic linkage with activation of the poor-prognosis, wound response gene expression signature. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of silencing CSN5 on invasion and cell cycle progression of human colorectal cancer cells, and to determine the potential molecular mechanisms that are involved. The CSN5 specific small interfering RNA (shRNA) plasmid vector was constructed and then transfected into colorectal cancer cells. The expression of CSN5 mRNA and protein was detected by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis, respectively. Cell adhesion and invasion were analyzed using MTS and Transwell assays, respectively, and cell cycle progression was analyzed using flow cytometry. Adhesion, invasion, and cell cycle distribution were assessed following knockdown of CSN5 by RNA interference (RNAi). Furthermore, knockdown of CSN5 significantly inhibited cell adhesion and reduced the number of invasive cells, while increasing the percentage of cells in the G0/G1 phase (P < 0.05). Western blot and real-time PCR analysis were used to identify differentially expressed invasion and cell cycle associated proteins in cells with silenced CSN5. The expression levels of CSN5 in colorectal cancer cells transfected with siRNA were decreased, leading to a significant inhibition of colorectal cancer cell adhesion and invasion. Western blot analysis revealed that silencing of CSN5 may inhibit CD44, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 2 and MMP 9 protein expression, significantly promoted cell cycle-related genes P53 and P27 expression. In addition, CSN5 silencing may induce activation PI3K/AKT signal regulated cell invasion. Moreover, CSN5 silencing inhibited the secretion of TGF-β, IL-1β and IL-6 and the transcriptional activity of transcription factor NF-κB and Twist in human colorectal cancer cells. Taken together, down regulation of CSN5 may inhibit invasion and arrests cell

  6. CSN5 silencing inhibits invasion and arrests cell cycle progression in human colorectal cancer SW480 and LS174T cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Gang; Li, Huikai; Shan, Tao; Zhang, Nan

    2015-01-01

    CSN5 has been implicated as a candidate oncogene in human cancers by genetic linkage with activation of the poor-prognosis, wound response gene expression signature. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of silencing CSN5 on invasion and cell cycle progression of human colorectal cancer cells, and to determine the potential molecular mechanisms that are involved. The CSN5 specific small interfering RNA (shRNA) plasmid vector was constructed and then transfected into colorectal cancer cells. The expression of CSN5 mRNA and protein was detected by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis, respectively. Cell adhesion and invasion were analyzed using MTS and Transwell assays, respectively, and cell cycle progression was analyzed using flow cytometry. Adhesion, invasion, and cell cycle distribution were assessed following knockdown of CSN5 by RNA interference (RNAi). Furthermore, knockdown of CSN5 significantly inhibited cell adhesion and reduced the number of invasive cells, while increasing the percentage of cells in the G0/G1 phase (P<0.05). Western blot and real-time PCR analysis were used to identify differentially expressed invasion and cell cycle associated proteins in cells with silenced CSN5. The expression levels of CSN5 in colorectal cancer cells transfected with siRNA were decreased, leading to a significant inhibition of colorectal cancer cell adhesion and invasion. Western blot analysis revealed that silencing of CSN5 may inhibit CD44, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 2 and MMP 9 protein expression, significantly promoted cell cycle-related genes P53 and P27 expression. In addition, CSN5 silencing may induce activation PI3K/AKT signal regulated cell invasion. Moreover, CSN5 silencing inhibited the secretion of TGF-β, IL-1β and IL-6 and the transcriptional activity of transcription factor NF-κB and Twist in human colorectal cancer cells. Taken together, down regulation of CSN5 may inhibit invasion and arrests cell cycle

  7. UXT-AS1-induced alternative splicing of UXT is associated with tumor progression in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jun; Luo, Wei; Zeng, Xiang; Zeng, Lisi; Li, Zhiyang; Deng, Xiaofang; Tan, Xiaojun; Hu, Weimin

    2017-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) can act as crucial regulators of tumor progression. In the present study, UXT-AS1 was found to be significantly upregulated in colorectal cancer (CRC) and high expression levels of UXT-AS1 were significantly associated with poor prognosis in CRC patients. In addition, upregulation of UXT-AS1 resulted in inhibition of cell apoptosis and the promotion of cell proliferation. Moreover, by regulating the alternative splicing of UXT, upregulation of UXT-AS1 decreased the UXT1 transcript which promoted cell apoptosis and increased the UXT2 transcript which promoted cell proliferation. Thus, aberrant high expression of UXT-AS1 can promote CRC progression by changing the alternative splicing of UXT from the UXT1 transcript to the UXT2 transcript. In conclusion, our findings suggest that the regulation of CRC progression is by UXT-AS1-induced alternative splicing of UXT, and the expression level of UXT-AS1 may be a potential prognostic biomarker and therapy target in CRC patients.

  8. Integrated genomic analysis of colorectal cancer progression reveals activation of EGFR through demethylation of the EREG promoter

    PubMed Central

    Qu, X; Sandmann, T; Frierson, H; Fu, L; Fuentes, E; Walter, K; Okrah, K; Rumpel, C; Moskaluk, C; Lu, S; Wang, Y; Bourgon, R; Penuel, E; Pirzkall, A; Amler, L; Lackner, M R; Tabernero, J; Hampton, G M; Kabbarah, O

    2016-01-01

    Key molecular drivers that underlie transformation of colonic epithelium into colorectal adenocarcinoma (CRC) are well described. However, the mechanisms through which clinically targeted pathways are activated during CRC progression have yet to be elucidated. Here, we used an integrative genomics approach to examine CRC progression. We used laser capture microdissection to isolate colonic crypt cells, differentiated surface epithelium, adenomas, carcinomas and metastases, and used gene expression profiling to identify pathways that were differentially expressed between the different cell types. We identified a number of potentially important transcriptional changes in developmental and oncogenic pathways, and noted a marked upregulation of EREG in primary and metastatic cancer cells. We confirmed this pattern of gene expression by in situ hybridization and observed staining consistent with autocrine expression in the tumor cells. Upregulation of EREG during the adenoma–carcinoma transition was associated with demethylation of two key sites within its promoter, and this was accompanied by an increase in the levels of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) phosphorylation, as assessed by reverse-phase protein analysis. In CRC cell lines, we demonstrated that EREG demethylation led to its transcriptional upregulation, higher levels of EGFR phosphorylation, and sensitization to EGFR inhibitors. Low levels of EREG methylation in patients who received cetuximab as part of a phase II study were associated with high expression of the ligand and a favorable response to therapy. Conversely, high levels of promoter methylation and low levels of EREG expression were observed in tumors that progressed after treatment. We also noted an inverse correlation between EREG methylation and expression levels in several other cancers, including those of the head and neck, lung and bladder. Therefore, we propose that upregulation of EREG expression through promoter demethylation

  9. Cancer in Māori: lessons from prostate, colorectal and gastric cancer and progress in hereditary stomach cancer in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Blair, Vanessa; Kahokehr, Arman; Sammour, Tarik

    2013-01-01

    Persisting ethnic disparities in cancer incidence and outcomes exist between Māori and non-Māori in Aotearoa/New Zealand. It is difficult to disentangle the complex interplay of environmental and genetic factors that contribute to the variation in cancer statistics between these two groups. In Māori, the sites of highest cancer incidence are the prostate in men, breast in women and lung in both - the next most common cancers in Māori are colorectal and stomach cancer. This paper discusses colorectal, prostate and stomach cancer in Māori to illustrate selected issues that impact on cancer care. Colorectal cancer is discussed to illustrate the importance of accurate cancer statistics to focus management strategies. Prostate cancer in Māori is reviewed - an area where cultural factors impact on care delivery. Sporadic stomach cancer in New Zealand is used to show how sub-classification of different types of cancer can be important and illustrate the breadth of putative causal factors. Then follows an overview of developments in hereditary gastric cancer in New Zealand in the last 15 years, showing how successful clinical and research partnerships can improve patient outcomes. One example is the Kimi Hauora Clinic, which provides support to cancer patients, mutation carriers and their families, helping them navigate the interface with the many health-care professionals involved in the multidisciplinary care of cancer patients in the 21st century. © 2012 The Authors. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2012 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  10. XRCC2 Promotes Colorectal Cancer Cell Growth, Regulates Cell Cycle Progression, and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kaiwu; Song, Xinming; Chen, Zhihui; Qin, Changjiang; He, Yulong; Zhan, Wenhua

    2014-01-01

    Abstract X-ray repair complementing defective repair in Chinese hamster cells 2 (XRCC2) and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) both play important roles in homologous recombination DNA repair. According to the theory of synthetic lethality, XRCC2-deficient cells are more sensitive to PARP1 inhibitors compared to XRCC2-expressing cells. We investigated XRCC2 expression and function in colorectal cancer (CRC), and the characteristics of sensitivity to PARP1 inhibitor in CRC cells with different XRCC2 levels. We enrolled 153 patients with CRC who had undergone surgery in this study. XRCC2 expression was assessed using immunohistochemistry. Stable CRC SW480 cell lines with low or high XRCC2 expression were constructed. Following treatment with the PARP1 inhibitor olaparib, the viability of cells with different XRCC2 levels was determined; cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were analyzed using flow cytometry. B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) protein expression was measured by Western blotting. The positive rates of XRCC2 in primary CRC tissue were significantly higher than that in the matched adjacent noncancerous tissue, and XRCC2 expression status in primary CRC was related to tumor site, Dukes’ stage, and tumor-nodes-metastasis (TNM) stage. XRCC2 overexpression inhibited CRC cell apoptosis and promoted proliferation by enriching cells in the G0/G1 phase. Moreover, olaparib suppressed proliferation, and olaparib sensitivity in CRC cells with high XRCC2 expression was greater. High XRCC2 expression promotes CRC cell proliferation and enriches cells in the G0/G1 phase but inhibits apoptosis. High XRCC2 expression cells are more sensitive to olaparib, which inhibits their viability. PMID:25526472

  11. Colorectal cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Bessa Caserras, Xavier

    2016-09-01

    In the latest meeting of the American Gastroenterological Association, several clinical studies were presented that aimed to evaluate the various colorectal cancer screening strategies, although most assessed the various aspects of faecal immunochemical testing (FIT) and colonoscopy. Data were presented from consecutive FIT-based screening rounds, confirming the importance of adherence to consecutive screening rounds, achieving a similar or superior diagnostic yield to endoscopic studies. There was confirmation of the importance of not delaying endoscopic study after a positive result. Participants with a negative FIT (score of 0) had a low risk for colorectal cancer. Several studies seemed to confirm the importance of high-quality colonoscopy in colorectal cancer screening programmes. The implementation of high-quality colonoscopies has reduced mortality from proximal lesions and reduced interval cancers in various studies. Finally, participants with a normal colonoscopy result or with a small adenoma are at low risk for developing advanced neoplasms during follow-up. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. [Colorectal cancer screening with colonoscopy].

    PubMed

    Pereyra, Lisandro; Gómez, Estanislao J; Mella, José M; Cimmino, Daniel G; Boerr, Luis A

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death worldwide and also in Argentina. In the past few years colorectal cancer screening has become more popular and colonoscopy has been postulated as the gold standard. In this review we analyzed the evidence supporting this method in contrast with its complications and disadvantages.

  13. Colorectal cancer screening in Asia.

    PubMed

    Ng, Siew C; Wong, Sunny H

    2013-01-01

    The incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer are rapidly rising in several countries in Asia. However, screening guidelines are lacking. Review of literature and local data published in peer review journals. The incidence, anatomical distribution and mortality of colorectal cancer among Asian populations are comparable to those in Western countries. Flat and depressed colonic lesions are not uncommon. Male gender, smoking, obesity, metabolic syndrome and family history are risk factors for colorectal cancer. Certain ethnic groups in Asia have increased susceptibility to colorectal cancer. Faecal occult blood test, flexible sigmoidoscopy and colonoscopy are recommended options for colorectal cancer screening in Asia. Regular screening should start at the age of 50 years. The optimal screening method in Asia remains unclear. Faecal immunochemical test has been suggested as the first choice of screening test in countries with limited resources. The role of nurse endoscopists in performing endoscopic procedures for colorectal cancer screening in Asia has not been defined. There is low public awareness and little support by health authorities for screening and prevention of this emerging disease. Screening for colorectal cancer should be a national health priority in most Asian countries. Studies on barriers to screening, education of the public and engagement of family physicians are important strategies in promoting colorectal cancer screening. With more health-care support, increased public acceptance and better access to the general population, colorectal cancer screening in Asia can be rewarding.

  14. Aberrant Expression of MicroRNA-15a and MicroRNA-16 Synergistically Associates with Tumor Progression and Prognosis in Patients with Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Guangfa; Tang, Huihuan; Wei, Wei; Li, Jian; Ji, Liandong; Ge, Jie

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to reveal the associations of microRNA miR-15a and miR-16 dysregulation with clinicopathological characteristics and prognosis in patients with colorectal cancer. As a result, we found that miR-15a and miR-16 expression, detected by quantitative real time-PCR, were both significantly downregulated in colorectal cancer tissues compared with adjacent colorectal mucosa (both P < 0.001). Particularly, the expression levels of miR-15a in colorectal cancer tissues were positively correlated with those of miR-16 significantly (Spearman correlation coefficient r = 0.652, P < 0.001). In addition, miR-15a and/or miR-16 downregulation were all significantly associated with advanced TNM stage (all P < 0.05), poorly histological grade (all P < 0.05), and positive lymph node metastasis (all P < 0.05). Moreover, the survival analysis identified miR-15a expression, miR-16 expression, and miR-15a/miR-16 combination as independent predictors of both unfavorable overall survival and disease-free survival. Interestingly, the prognostic value of miR-15a/miR-16 combination was more significant than miR-15a or miR-16 expression alone. Collectively, the aberrant expression of miR-15a and miR-16 could be used to stratify patients with aggressive tumor progression of colorectal cancer. The combined pattern of miR-15a and miR-16 downregulation has a significant value for distinguishing patients with a worse prognosis of colorectal cancer after surgery. PMID:25435873

  15. Lower or Standard Dose Regorafenib in Treating Patients With Refractory Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-07-11

    Colon Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Adenocarcinoma; Stage III Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer; Stage IV Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer

  16. Chemoprevention of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    LANGMAN, M; BOYLE, P

    1998-01-01

    Department of Medicine, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham B15 2TH, UK P BOYLE Colorectal cancer is the fourth commonest form of cancer in men with 678 000 estimated new cases per year worldwide, representing 8.9% of all new cancers. The disease is most frequent in Occidental countries and particularly so in North America, Australia, New Zealand, and parts of Europe. Prospects for colorectal cancer control are bright and a number of possible approaches could prove fruitful. Among these, pharmaceutical measures seem to be valid and logical approaches to the prevention of colorectal cancer and diminishing its impact. Such approaches could concentrate in primary prevention in at-risk subjects or be applied in altering the course of precursor or established disease. Treatments used must fulfil basic requirements of biological plausibility and safety in continued use in large numbers of subjects. Those available include vitamins and minerals, and other drugs with potential as antioxidants, immune modulators or promoters of cell differentiation or apoptosis. Of the various regimens suggested, vitamin A supplementation may even predispose to adverse outcomes, and antioxidant vitamins in general have no coherent body of evidence to support their use. N-acetylcysteine and ursodeoxycholic acid have promising characteristics but there are as yet no clinical data to support the use of the former in gut epithelial cancer, and formal dose ranging studies must be carried out before the latter is submitted to large scale trial. Folate shows promising characteristics but non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and vitamin D seem the most promising agents. Both seem to reduce the incidence of disease, and to reduce growth rates and/or induce differentiation or apoptosis in gut epithelial cancer cells. Both are also well understood pharmacologically. They may be preferred to newer selective compounds in the same class until these newer compounds are confirmed as safe for widespread

  17. SDF-1/CXCR4 promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition and progression of colorectal cancer by activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ting-Hua; Yao, Yu; Yu, Shuo; Han, Li-Li; Wang, Wen-Juan; Guo, Hui; Tian, Tao; Ruan, Zhi-Pin; Kang, Xiao-Min; Wang, Jing; Wang, Shu-Hong; Nan, Ke-Jun

    2014-11-28

    Stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) and its receptor, CXCR4, play an important role in angiogenesis and are associated with tumor progression. This study aimed to investigate the role of SDF-1/CXCR4-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and the progression of colorectal cancer (CRC) as well as the underlying mechanisms. The data showed that expression of CXCR4 and β-catenin mRNA and protein was significantly higher in CRC tissues than in distant normal tissues. CXCR4 expression was associated with β-catenin expression in CRC tissues, whereas high CXCR4 expression was strongly associated with low E-cadherin, high N-cadherin, and high vimentin expression, suggesting a cross talk between the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in CRC. In vitro, SDF-1 induced CXCR4-positive colorectal cancer cell invasion and EMT by activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. In contrast, SDF-1/CXCR4 axis activation-induced colorectal cancer invasion and EMT was effectively inhibited by the Wnt signaling pathway inhibitor Dickkopf-1. In conclusion, CXCR4-promoted CRC progression and EMT were regulated by the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Thus, targeting of the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis could have clinical applications in suppressing CRC progression.

  18. Black Raspberries Enhance Natural Killer Cell Infiltration into the Colon and Suppress the Progression of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Pan; Kang, Siwen; Wang, Youwei; Liu, Ka; Oshima, Kiyoko; Huang, Yi-Wen; Zhang, Jianying; Yearsley, Martha; Yu, Jianhua; Wang, Li-Shu

    2017-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are an essential component of innate immunity against cancer development. Many studies have been conducted to evaluate immune-modulating effects using dietary compounds. Our laboratory has been investigating the chemopreventive potential of black raspberries (BRBs) and previously demonstrated their beneficial modulation of genetic and epigenetic biomarkers in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). The current study investigated their potential on modulating NK cells. To avoid the excessive inflammation caused by the dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) treatment that leads to colitis, we treated the mice with overnight DSS so that it would slightly irritate the colon but still promote colon carcinogenesis with 100% incidence in both the ApcMin/+ mice and azoxymethane (AOM)-treated mice. A significant decrease of tissue-infiltrating NK cells along the progression of microadenoma-to-adenoma and adenoma-to-adenocarcinoma was observed in the ApcMin/+/DSS and AOM/DSS mice, respectively. Depletion of NK cells significantly promoted the development of CRC, suggesting a critical role of NK cells in combating CRC progression. BRBs significantly suppressed the CRC progression and increased the number of tissue-infiltrating NK cells in both mouse models. Moreover, we further determined BRBs’ effects on NK cells in the human biopsy specimens collected from our previously completed clinical trial, in which CRC patients consumed BRBs for an average of 4 weeks during a presurgical window. We observed an increased number and an enhanced cytotoxicity of NK cells by BRB intervention. The current study provides evidence that BRBs have the potential to enhance the tumor immunesurveillance of NK cells that can be beneficial in the setting of CRC prevention and treatment. PMID:28861089

  19. Black Raspberries Enhance Natural Killer Cell Infiltration into the Colon and Suppress the Progression of Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Pan, Pan; Kang, Siwen; Wang, Youwei; Liu, Ka; Oshima, Kiyoko; Huang, Yi-Wen; Zhang, Jianying; Yearsley, Martha; Yu, Jianhua; Wang, Li-Shu

    2017-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are an essential component of innate immunity against cancer development. Many studies have been conducted to evaluate immune-modulating effects using dietary compounds. Our laboratory has been investigating the chemopreventive potential of black raspberries (BRBs) and previously demonstrated their beneficial modulation of genetic and epigenetic biomarkers in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). The current study investigated their potential on modulating NK cells. To avoid the excessive inflammation caused by the dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) treatment that leads to colitis, we treated the mice with overnight DSS so that it would slightly irritate the colon but still promote colon carcinogenesis with 100% incidence in both the Apc(Min/+) mice and azoxymethane (AOM)-treated mice. A significant decrease of tissue-infiltrating NK cells along the progression of microadenoma-to-adenoma and adenoma-to-adenocarcinoma was observed in the Apc(Min/+) /DSS and AOM/DSS mice, respectively. Depletion of NK cells significantly promoted the development of CRC, suggesting a critical role of NK cells in combating CRC progression. BRBs significantly suppressed the CRC progression and increased the number of tissue-infiltrating NK cells in both mouse models. Moreover, we further determined BRBs' effects on NK cells in the human biopsy specimens collected from our previously completed clinical trial, in which CRC patients consumed BRBs for an average of 4 weeks during a presurgical window. We observed an increased number and an enhanced cytotoxicity of NK cells by BRB intervention. The current study provides evidence that BRBs have the potential to enhance the tumor immunesurveillance of NK cells that can be beneficial in the setting of CRC prevention and treatment.

  20. High expression level and nuclear localization of Sam68 are associated with progression and poor prognosis in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Src-associated in mitosis (Sam68; 68 kDa) has been implicated in the oncogenesis and progression of several human cancers. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinicopathologic significance of Sam68 expression and its subcellular localization in colorectal cancer (CRC). Methods Sam68 expression was examined in CRC cell lines, nine matched CRC tissues and adjacent noncancerous tissues using reverse transcription (RT)-PCR, quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting. Sam68 protein expression and localization were determined in 224 paraffin-embedded archived CRC samples using immunohistochemistry. Statistical analyses were applied to evaluate the clinicopathologic significance. Results Sam68 was upregulated in CRC cell lines and CRC, as compared with normal tissues; high Sam68 expression was detected in 120/224 (53.6%) of the CRC tissues. High Sam68 expression correlated significantly with poor differentiation (P = 0.033), advanced T stage (P < 0.001), N stage (P = 0.023) and distant metastasis (P = 0.033). Sam68 nuclear localization correlated significantly with poor differentiation (P = 0.002) and T stage (P =0.021). Patients with high Sam68 expression or Sam68 nuclear localization had poorer overall survival than patients with low Sam68 expression or Sam68 cytoplasmic localization. Patients with high Sam68 expression had a higher risk of recurrence than those with low Sam68 expression. Conclusions Overexpression of Sam68 correlated highly with cancer progression and poor differentiation in CRC. High Sam68 expression and Sam68 nuclear localization were associated with poorer overall survival. PMID:23937454

  1. Screening for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Mandel, Jack S

    2008-03-01

    Although there are several methods available for colon cancer screening, none is optimal. This article reviews methods for screening, including fecal occult blood tests, flexible sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, CT colonography, capsule endoscopy, and double contrast barium enema. A simple, inexpensive, noninvasive, and relatively sensitive screening test is needed to identify people at risk for developing advanced adenomas or colorectal cancer who would benefit from colonoscopy. It is hoped that new markers will be identified that perform better. Until then we fortunately have a variety of screening strategies that do work.

  2. Practical genetics of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Henry T; Shaw, Trudy G

    2013-06-01

    Hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC) is highly heterogeneous, both genotypically and phenotypically. The most frequently occurring hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome is Lynch syndrome, accounting for approximately 3% of the total colorectal cancer burden. Polyposis syndromes, such as familial adenomatous polyposis, account for a lesser percentage. Familial colorectal cancer, defined by family history, occurs in an estimated 20% of all colorectal cancer cases. With a worldwide annual colorectal cancer incidence of over one million, and annual mortality of over 600,000, hereditary and familial forms of colorectal cancer are a major public health problem. Lynch syndrome is attributable to DNA mismatch repair germline mutations, with the MSH2, MLH1, MSH6, and PMS2 genes being implicated. The characteristics of Lynch syndrome-associated colorectal tumors, including early age of onset and predilection to the proximal colon, mandate surveillance by colonoscopy beginning by age 20 to 25 and repeated every other year through age 40 and annually thereafter. Besides colorectal cancer, Lynch syndrome also predisposes to a litany of extracolonic cancers, foremost of which is endometrial cancer, followed by cancer of the ovary, stomach, renal pelvis and ureter, small bowel, hepatobiliary tract, pancreas, glioblastoma multiforme in the Turcot's variant, and sebaceous skin tumors in the Muir-Torre variant and, more recently identified, cancers of the breast and prostate. The most common polyposis syndrome is familial adenomatous polyposis, caused by mutations in the APC gene. Affected individuals have multiple colonic adenomas and, without treatment invariably develop colorectal cancer. Colonic surveillance with polypectomy may be pursued until the appearance of multiple colonic adenomas, at which time prophylactic colectomy should be considered. Extra-intestinal manifestations include desmoid tumor, hepatoblastoma, thyroid carcinoma, and medulloblastoma. Other polyposis

  3. [Colorectal cancer screening].

    PubMed

    Castells, Antoni

    2013-10-01

    Colorectal cancer is the paradigm of tumoral growth that is susceptible to preventive measures, especially screening. Various screening strategies with demonstrated efficacy and efficiency are currently available, notable examples being the fecal occult blood test and endoscopic tests. In addition, new modalities have appeared in the last few years that could become viable alternatives in the near future. The present article reviews the most important presentations on colorectal screening at the annual congress of the American Gastroenterological Association held in Orlando in May 2013, with special emphasis on the medium- and long-term results of strategies using the fecal occult blood test and flexible sigmoidoscopy, as well as initial experiences with the use of new biomarkers.

  4. Relative telomere lengths in tumor and normal mucosa are related to disease progression and chromosome instability profiles in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jorissen, Robert N.; Hampson, Debbie; Ghosh, Anil; Sengupta, Neel; Thaha, Mohamed; Ahmed, Shafi; Kirwan, Michael; Aleva, Floor; Propper, David; Feakins, Roger M.; Vulliamy, Tom; Elwood, Ngaire J.; Tian, Pei; Ward, Robyn L.; Hawkins, Nicholas J.; Xu, Zheng-Zhou; Molloy, Peter L.; Jones, Ian T.; Croxford, Matthew; Gibbs, Peter; Silver, Andrew; Sieber, Oliver M.

    2016-01-01

    Telomeric dysfunction is linked to colorectal cancer (CRC) initiation. However, the relationship of normal tissue and tumor telomere lengths with CRC progression, molecular features and prognosis is unclear. Here, we measured relative telomere length (RTL) by real-time quantitative PCR in 90 adenomas (aRTL), 419 stage I-IV CRCs (cRTL) and adjacent normal mucosa (nRTL). Age-adjusted RTL was analyzed against germline variants in telomere biology genes, chromosome instability (CIN), microsatellite instability (MSI), CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP), TP53, KRAS, BRAF mutations and clinical outcomes. In 509 adenoma or CRC patients, nRTL decreased with advancing age. Female gender, proximal location and the TERT rs2736100 G allele were independently associated with longer age-adjusted nRTL. Adenomas and carcinomas exhibited telomere shortening in 79% and 67% and lengthening in 7% and 15% of cases. Age-adjusted nRTL and cRTL were independently associated with tumor stage, decreasing from adenoma to stage III and leveling out or increasing from stage III to IV, respectively. Cancer MSI, CIMP, TP53, KRAS and BRAF status were not related to nRTL or cRTL. Near-tetraploid CRCs exhibited significantly longer cRTLs than CIN- and aneuploidy CRCs, while cRTL was significantly shorter in CRCs with larger numbers of chromosome breaks. Age-adjusted nRTL, cRTL or cRTL:nRTL ratios were not associated with disease-free or overall survival in stage II/III CRC. Taken together, our data show that both normal mucosa and tumor RTL are independently associated with CRC progression, and highlight divergent associations of CRC telomere length with tumor CIN profiles. PMID:27167335

  5. ToP: a trend-of-disease-progression procedure works well for identifying cancer genes from multi-state cohort gene expression data for human colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Chung, Feng-Hsiang; Lee, Henry Hsin-Chung; Lee, Hoong-Chien

    2013-01-01

    Significantly expressed genes extracted from microarray gene expression data have proved very useful for identifying genetic biomarkers of diseases, including cancer. However, deriving a disease related inference from a list of differentially expressed genes has proven less than straightforward. In a systems disease such as cancer, how genes interact with each other should matter just as much as the level of gene expression. Here, in a novel approach, we used the network and disease progression properties of individual genes in state-specific gene-gene interaction networks (GGINs) to select cancer genes for human colorectal cancer (CRC) and obtain a much higher hit rate of known cancer genes when compared with methods not based on network theory. We constructed GGINs by integrating gene expression microarray data from multiple states--healthy control (Nor), adenoma (Ade), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and CRC--with protein-protein interaction database and Gene Ontology. We tracked changes in the network degrees and clustering coefficients of individual genes in the GGINs as the disease state changed from one to another. From these we inferred the state sequences Nor-Ade-CRC and Nor-IBD-CRC both exhibited a trend of (disease) progression (ToP) toward CRC, and devised a ToP procedure for selecting cancer genes for CRC. Of the 141 candidates selected using ToP, ∼50% had literature support as cancer genes, compared to hit rates of 20% to 30% for standard methods using only gene expression data. Among the 16 candidate cancer genes that encoded transcription factors, 13 were known to be tumorigenic and three were novel: CDK1, SNRPF, and ILF2. We identified 13 of the 141 predicted cancer genes as candidate markers for early detection of CRC, 11 and 2 at the Ade and IBD states, respectively.

  6. A long noncoding RNA, lncRNA-ATB, is involved in the progression and prognosis of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Iguchi, Tomohiro; Uchi, Ryutaro; Nambara, Sho; Saito, Tomoko; Komatsu, Hisateru; Hirata, Hidenari; Ueda, Masami; Sakimura, Shotaro; Takano, Yuki; Kurashige, Jyunji; Shinden, Yoshiaki; Eguchi, Hidetoshi; Sugimachi, Keishi; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Mimori, Koshi

    2015-03-01

    A long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) activated by transforming growth factor (TGF)-β (lncRNA-ATB) was recently described to promote the invasion-metastasis cascade in hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of the present study was to clarify the clinicopathological role and prognostic relevance of lncRNA-ATB in colorectal cancer (CRC). lncRNA-ATB expression was evaluated by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in 124 patients with CRC. Patients were divided into two groups based on the median lncRNA-ATB expression. High lncRNA-ATB expression was significantly associated with greater tumor size, depth of tumor invasion, lymphatic invasion, vascular invasion, and lymph node metastasis. Patients of the high-lncRNA-ATB expression group had significantly poorer outcomes than those of the low-expression group. Additionally, levels of lncRNA-ATB expression were significantly higher in patients with hematogenous metastases. lncRNA-ATB may be involved in the progression of CRC and be a novel indicator of poor prognosis in patients with CRC. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  7. What's New in Colorectal Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Research? Colorectal Cancer About Colorectal Cancer What’s New in Colorectal Cancer Research? Research is always going ... ways to find colorectal cancer early by studying new types of screening tests and improving the ones ...

  8. Epigenetics of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Goel, Ajay; Boland, C Richard

    2012-12-01

    In the early years of the molecular biology revolution, cancer research was mainly focused on genetic changes (ie, those that altered DNA sequences). Although this has been extremely useful as our understanding of the pathogenesis and biology of cancer has grown and matured, there is another realm in tumor development that does not involve changing the sequence of cellular DNA. This field is called "epigenetics" and broadly encompasses changes in the methylation of cytosines in DNA, changes in histone and chromatin structure, and alterations in the expression of microRNAs, which control the stability of many messenger RNAs and serve as "master regulators" of gene expression. This review focuses on the epigenetics of colorectal cancer and illustrates the impact epigenetics has had on this field.

  9. Tissue Specific Promoters in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rama, A. R.; Aguilera, A.; Melguizo, C.; Caba, O.; Prados, J.

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma is the third most prevalent cancer in the world. In the most advanced stages, the use of chemotherapy induces a poor response and is usually accompanied by other tissue damage. Significant progress based on suicide gene therapy has demonstrated that it may potentiate the classical cytotoxic effects in colorectal cancer. The inconvenience still rests with the targeting and the specificity efficiency. The main target of gene therapy is to achieve an effective vehicle to hand over therapeutic genes safely into specific cells. One possibility is the use of tumor-specific promoters overexpressed in cancers. They could induce a specific expression of therapeutic genes in a given tumor, increasing their localized activity. Several promoters have been assayed into direct suicide genes to cancer cells. This review discusses the current status of specific tumor-promoters and their great potential in colorectal carcinoma treatment. PMID:26648599

  10. [Genetics of colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Balaguer, Francesc

    2013-10-01

    Up to 5% of all cases of colorectal cancer (CRC) are due to a known hereditary syndrome. These hereditary forms often require a high degree of suspicion for their diagnosis and specific and specialized management. Moreover, a diagnosis of hereditary CRC has important consequences, not only for patients-for whom highly effective preventive measures are available-, but also for their relatives, who may be carriers of the same condition. The most significant advances in the field of hereditary CRC have been produced in the diagnosis and characterization of these syndromes and in the discovery of new causative genes.

  11. MFHAS1 promotes colorectal cancer progress by regulating polarization of tumor-associated macrophages via STAT6 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jing; Wang, Huihui; Weng, Meilin; Cheng, Qian; Wu, Qichao; Sun, Zhirong; Jiang, Hui; Zhu, Minmin; Ren, Yu; Xu, Pingbo; Chen, Jiawei; Miao, Changhong

    2016-01-01

    Malignant fibrous histiocytoma amplified sequence 1 (MFHAS1) is a predicted oncoprotein that demonstrates tumorigenic activity in vivo; however, the mechanisms involved are unknown. Macrophages are divided into the pro-inflammatory M1 and anti-inflammatory/protumoral M2 subtypes. Tumor cells can induce M2 polarization of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) to promote metastasis; but the underlying pathways require to be elucidated. In this study, we detected a positive association between MFHAS1 expression in TAMs and human colorectal cancer (CRC) TNM stage. Supernatant of CT26 murine CRC cells induced MFHAS1 expression in RAW264.7 murine macrophages. Additionally, CT26 supernatant induced the M2 marker CD206 and activated the pro-M2 STAT6 and KLF4 signaling in control but not MFHAS1-silenced RAW264.7 macrophages. Moreover, supernatant of control, but not MFHAS1-silenced macrophages promoted CT26 cell proliferation, migration and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Compared with control macrophages, MFHAS1-silenced macrophages showed significantly reduced protumoral effects in vivo. Together, these results suggested that CRC cells induce M2 polarization of TAMs through MFHAS1 induction and subsequent STAT6 and KLF4 activation to promote CRC progress. Finally, similar to CT26 supernatant stimulation, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) activation by rosiglitazone induced M2 polarization of RAW264.7 macrophages through MFHAS1-dependent pathway. Our results highlight the role of MFHAS1 as a regulator of macrophages polarization and CRC progress. PMID:27783989

  12. Bevacizumab exposure beyond first disease progression in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer: analyses of the ARIES observational cohort study.

    PubMed

    Grothey, Axel; Flick, E Dawn; Cohn, Allen L; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios S; Bendell, Johanna C; Kozloff, Mark; Roach, Nancy; Mun, Yong; Fish, Susan; Hurwitz, Herbert I

    2014-07-01

    This analysis from Avastin® Registries: Investigation of Effectiveness and Safety (ARIES) examined the association between exposure to bevacizumab after disease progression (PD) and postprogression survival (PPS) in bevacizumab-exposed metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) through the application of time-dependent and time-fixed analytical methods. Patients with mCRC who were treated with first-line bevacizumab and who survived first PD (PD1) were included. A time-dependent Cox regression model was fitted to assess the effect of cumulative bevacizumab exposure on PPS, while controlling for potential confounders. In addition to support findings from previous studies, a modified intent-to-treat (mITT) analysis compared PPS in patients who received bevacizumab beyond disease progression (BBP) with those who did not (No-BBP). Of 1550 patients, 1199 survived PD1 and had a median PPS of 13.4 months. Cumulative bevacizumab exposure was associated with improved PPS (p = 0.0040). After adjusting for confounders, the hazard ratios (HRs) for PPS decreased, on average, by 1.2% (range, 1.1-1.3%) with each additional dose of bevacizumab. In the mITT analysis, the median PPS for BBP (n = 438) was 14.4 months vs 10.6 months with for No-BBP (n = 667). BBP was found to be independently associated with longer PPS in a multivariable Cox regression analysis (HR, 0.84; 95% confidence interval, 0.73-0.97). Protocol-specified adverse events suspected to be associated with bevacizumab occurred in 13.0% of patients with BBP. This analysis supports the observation that bevacizumab exposure after PD1 is associated with longer PPS in mCRC. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. The pattern of epidermal growth factor receptor variation with disease progression and aggressiveness in colorectal cancer depends on tumor location

    PubMed Central

    PAPAGIORGIS, PETROS C.; ZIZI, ADAMANTIA E.; TSELENI, SOPHIA; OIKONOMAKIS, IOANNIS N.; NIKITEAS, NIKOLAOS I.

    2012-01-01

    The role of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in colorectal cancer (CRC) prognosis remains unclear despite the recent development of anti-EGFR treatments for metastatic disease. The heterogeneity of CRC may account for this discrepancy; proximal and distal CRC has been found to be genetically and clinicopathologically different. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of tumor location on the association of EGFR with the conventional prognostic indicators (stage and grade) in CRC. Immunohistochemical assessment of EGFR was retrospectively performed in 119 primary CRC specimens and data were correlated with tumor stage and grade in the proximal and distal tumor subset. The molecular combination of EGFR with p53 (previously assessed in this sample) was similarly analyzed. EGFR positivity was detected in 34, 30 and 35% of the entire cohort, proximal and distal tumors, respectively. The pattern of EGFR clinicopathological correlation was found to differ by site. A reduction in the frequency of EGFR(+) with progression of stage and/or worsening of grade was observed proximally, whereas an opposite trend was recorded distally. Proximal tumors with stage I or with indolent features (stage I, well-differentiated) exhibited a significantly higher proportion of EGFR positivity than other tumors of this location (p=0.023 and p=0.022, respectively) or corresponding distal tumors (p=0.018 and p=0.035, respectively). Moreover, the co-existence of EGFR and high p53 staining (accounting for 11% of cases) was found in a significantly higher proportion of stage IV tumors compared to other stages (p=0.004), although only for the distal subset. Proximal and distal tumors showed various patterns of EGFR variation with disease progression and aggressiveness. This disparity provides further support to the hypothesis that these particular subsets of CRC are distinct tumor entities. It may also be suggestive of a potentially different therapeutic approach according to

  14. Obesity and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Bardou, Marc; Barkun, Alan N; Martel, Myriam

    2013-06-01

    Excess body weight, as defined by the body mass index (BMI), has been associated with several diseases and includes subjects who are overweight (BMI ≥ 25-29.9 kg/m(2)) or obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)). Overweight and obesity constitute the fifth leading risk for overall mortality, accounting for at least 2.8 million adult deaths each year. In addition around 11% of colorectal cancer (CRC) cases have been attributed to overweight and obesity in Europe. Epidemiological data suggest that obesity is associated with a 30-70% increased risk of colon cancer in men, whereas the association is less consistent in women. Similar trends exist for colorectal adenoma, although the risk appears lower. Visceral fat, or abdominal obesity, seems to be of greater concern than subcutaneous fat obesity, and any 1 kg/m(2) increase in BMI confers additional risk (HR 1.03). Obesity might be associated with worse cancer outcomes, such as recurrence of the primary cancer or mortality. Several factors, including reduced sensitivity to antiangiogenic-therapeutic regimens, might explain these differences. Except for wound infection, obesity has no significant impact on surgical procedures. The underlying mechanisms linking obesity to CRC are still a matter of debate, but metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance and modifications in levels of adipocytokines seem to be of great importance. Other biological factors such as the gut microbiota or bile acids are emerging. Many questions still remain unanswered: should preventive strategies specifically target obese patients? Is the risk of cancer great enough to propose prophylactic bariatric surgery in certain patients with obesity?

  15. Primary Prevention of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Andrew T.; Giovannucci, Edward L.

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer has been strongly associated with a Western lifestyle. In the past several decades, much has been learned about the dietary, lifestyle, and medication risk factors for this malignancy. Although there is controversy about the role of specific nutritional factors, consideration of the dietary pattern as a whole appears useful for formulating recommendations. For example, several studies have shown that high intake of red and processed meats, highly refined grains and starches, and sugars is related to increased risk of colorectal cancer. Replacing these factors with poultry, fish, and plant sources as the primary source of protein; unsaturated fats as the primary source of fat; and unrefined grains, legumes and fruits as the primary source of carbohydrates is likely to lower risk of colorectal cancer. Although a role for supplements, including vitamin D, folate, and vitamin B6, remains uncertain, calcium supplementation is likely to be at least modestly beneficial. With respect to lifestyle, compelling evidence indicates that avoidance of smoking and heavy alcohol use, prevention of weight gain, and the maintenance of a reasonable level of physical activity are associated with markedly lower risks of colorectal cancer. Medications such as aspirin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and post-menopausal hormones for women are associated with significant reductions in colorectal cancer risk, though their utility is affected by associated risks. Taken together, modifications in diet and lifestyle should substantially reduce the risk of colorectal cancer and could complement screening in reducing colorectal cancer incidence. PMID:20420944

  16. Familial colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lung, M S; Trainer, A H; Campbell, I; Lipton, L

    2015-05-01

    Identifying individuals with a genetic predisposition to developing familial colorectal cancer (CRC) is crucial to the management of the affected individual and their family. In order to do so, the physician requires an understanding of the different gene mutations and clinical manifestations of familial CRC. This review summarises the genetics, clinical manifestations and management of the known familial CRC syndromes, specifically Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, MUTYH-associated neoplasia, juvenile polyposis syndrome and Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. An individual suspected of having a familial CRC with an underlying genetic predisposition should be referred to a familial cancer centre to enable pre-test counselling and appropriate follow up. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  17. [Hereditary and familial colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Balaguer, Francesc

    2014-09-01

    Up to 5% of all colorectal cancer cases are caused by a known hereditary syndrome. These hereditary types often need a higher degree of clinical suspicion to be diagnosed and require specific and specialized management. In addition, diagnosing hereditary colorectal cancer has significant consequences not only for the patient, for whom there are effective preventative measures, but also for their families, who could be carriers of the condition. The most significant advances in the field of colorectal cancer have come from the diagnosis and characterization of these syndromes.

  18. Microsatellite Instability in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Boland, C. Richard; Goel, Ajay

    2011-01-01

    Microsatellite instability (MSI) is a hypermutable phenotype caused by the loss of DNA mismatch repair activity. MSI is detected in about 15% of all colorectal cancers; 3% are of these are associated with Lynch syndrome and the other 12% are caused by sporadic, acquired hypermethylation of the promoter of the MLH1 gene, which occurs in tumors with the CpG island methylator phenotype. Colorectal tumors with MSI have distinctive features, including a tendency to arise in the proximal colon, lymphocytic infiltrate, and a poorly differentiated, mucinous or signet ring appearance. They have a slightly better prognosis than colorectal tumors without MSI and do not have the same response to chemotherapeutics. Discovery of MSI in colorectal tumors has increased awareness of the diversity of colorectal cancers and implications for specialized management of patients. PMID:20420947

  19. Animal Models of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Robert L.; Fleet, James C.

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a heterogeneous disease that afflicts a large number of people in the United States. The use of animal models has the potential to increase our understanding of carcinogenesis, tumor biology, and the impact of specific molecular events on colon biology. In addition, animal models with features of specific human colorectal cancers can be used to test strategies for cancer prevention and treatment. In this review we provide an overview of the mechanisms driving human cancer, we discuss the approaches one can take to model colon cancer in animals, and we describe a number of specific animal models that have been developed for the study of colon cancer. We believe that there are many valuable animal models to study various aspects of human colorectal cancer. However, opportunities for improving upon these models exist. PMID:23076650

  20. Biomarkers for Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Takuji; Tanaka, Mayu; Tanaka, Takahiro; Ishigamori, Rikako

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common epithelial malignancy in the world. Since CRC develops slowly from removable precancerous lesions, detection of the lesion at an early stage by regular health examinations can reduce the incidence and mortality of this malignancy. Colonoscopy significantly improves the detection rate of CRC, but the examination is expensive and inconvenient. Therefore, we need novel biomarkers that are non-invasive to enable us to detect CRC quite early. A number of validation studies have been conducted to evaluate genetic, epigenetic or protein markers for identification in the stool and/or serum. Currently, the fecal occult blood test is the most widely used method of screening for CRC. However, advances in genomics and proteomics will lead to the discovery of novel non-invasive biomarkers. PMID:20957089

  1. Hereditary forms of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Castells, Antoni

    2016-09-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most frequent neoplasms in western countries; it is the third most common cancer in men after prostate and lung cancer and the second most common in women after breast cancer. Colorectal cancer is usually sporadic but in a small proportion is hereditary. The genetic cause is well established, allowing pre-symptomatic diagnosis in at-risk relatives. The present article reviews the most novel findings presented at the latest meeting of the American Gastroenterological Association on hereditary forms of colorectal cancer, especially Lynch syndrome and MUTYH-associated polyposis, as well as diverse organisational aspects that can favour the correct management of these patients and their relatives.

  2. [Surgery in complicated colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Kreisler, Esther; Biondo, Sebastiano; Martí-Ragué, Joan

    2006-07-01

    Colorectal cancer continues to have a serious social impact. A large proportion of patients are diagnosed at an advanced stage of the disease. Approximately one-third of patients with colorectal cancer will undergo emergency surgery for a complicated tumor, with a high risk of mortality and poorer long-term prognosis. The most frequent complications are obstruction and perforation, while massive hemorrhage is rare. The curative potential of surgery, whether urgent or elective, depends on how radical the resection is, among other factors. In the literature on the management of urgent colorectal disease, there are few references to the oncological criteria for resection. Uncertainly about the optimal treatment has led to wide variability in the treatment of this entity. The present article aims to provide a critical appraisal of the controversies surrounding the role of surgery and its impact on complicated colorectal cancer.

  3. Survivorship Care Plan in Promoting Physical Activity in Breast or Colorectal Cancer Survivors in Wisconsin

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-01

    Cancer Survivor; Healthy Subject; Stage I Colorectal Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer

  4. Selumetinib and Cyclosporine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Advanced or Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-28

    Recurrent Colorectal Carcinoma; Solid Neoplasm; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7

  5. Applications of genomic tools to colorectal cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Auman, J Todd; McLeod, Howard L

    2008-12-01

    Clinically and histopathologically similar colorectal cancers exhibit considerable variability in their responses to chemotherapeutics. The advent of genomic technologies has enabled the unbiased determination of changes in DNA and RNA, alterations that may be responsible for, or predictive of the variability in response to chemotherapy. This review highlights several advances made in applying genomic tools toward colorectal cancer therapeutics. Progress has been made using gene expression profiling to identify which colorectal cancer patients would benefit most from adjuvant chemotherapy. In addition, advances have been made in colorectal cancer pharmacogenomics by identifying gene expression patterns associated with sensitivity to specific chemotherapeutic agents. Lastly, the use of genome-wide mutation screening of individual tumor samples to identify the profiles of mutated genes is explored. Future research toward integrating genomic information with clinical and histopathological data is expected to lead to improved therapeutic management of colorectal cancer.

  6. Crohn's disease and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Gillen, C D; Andrews, H A; Prior, P; Allan, R N

    1994-01-01

    The colorectal cancer risk in Crohn's disease eliminating all known biases was assessed in a cohort of 281 patients with Crohn's disease who resided in the West Midlands at the time of diagnosis, and were first seen within five years of onset of symptoms between 1945-1975. All patients were 15 years of age or more at onset and were followed up from 12-35 years (total 5213 person years at risk (PYR)). The colorectal cancer risk in the series compared with the risk in the general population was computed by applying sex and age specific PYRs to the date of death or end of the study period 31 December 1991. There were six colonic and two rectal cancers. Six of the eight colorectal cancers were diagnosed 20 or more years after the onset of Crohn's disease. The relative risk (RR) of colorectal cancer for the series as a whole was 3.4 (p < 0.001), with a fivefold excess in the colon, but no significant excess in the rectum. Patients with extensive colitis showed an 18-fold increase in risk (RR = 18.2, p < 0.001), which decreased with increasing age at onset. This study shows that there is a statistical excess risk of developing colorectal cancer in patients who develop their Crohn's disease at a young age of onset (less than 30 years of age). PMID:8200559

  7. Pemetrexed in advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Louvet, Christophe; de Gramont, Aimery

    2004-11-01

    Pemetrexed (Alimta) shows single-agent activity in advanced colorectal cancer. In two phase II studies in which patients received pemetrexed at 600 mg/m2 or 500 mg/m2 as first-line treatment for metastatic disease, objective response rates were 15.4% and 17.2%. These trials were conducted prior to supplementation with folic acid and vitamin B12, which markedly decreased the frequency of hematologic toxicities of pemetrexed; routine supplementation is now included in all clinical trials of the agent. The marked improvement in toxicity and tolerance with vitamin supplementation suggests the need to reexamine optimal dosing in pemetrexed combination schedules. In a National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project phase II trial in 54 patients with previously untreated advanced colorectal cancer, pemetrexed at 500 mg/m2 plus oxaliplatin (Eloxatin) at 120 mg/m2 every 21 days with folic acid/vitamin B12 supplementation resulted in an objective response of 23%. Three additionalpatients (5.6%) had unconfirmed partial response (partial response at one visit), and 27 patients (50%) had stable disease. Median progression-free survival was 5.3 months and median duration of response was 5.7 months; median overall survival was approximately 11.05 months. Grade 3/4 neutropenia was observed in only 17% of patients and treatment was well tolerated. A phase I/II study is under way to identify and assess the optimal combination of pemetrexed/irinotecan in second-line treatment of advanced colorectal cancer. Planned studies include a phase I study examining the combination of pemetrexed and oxaliplatin given every 2 weeks as first-line treatment, and a phase I/II trial to identify the optimal pemetrexed/ oxaliplatin dose in a 21-day schedule and to compare pemetrexed/ oxaliplatin with FOLFOX4 in first-line treatment of metastatic disease. All of these trials include vitamin supplementation. A phase III trial comparing the every-3-week pemetrexed/oxaliplatin regimen with FOLFOX4 as

  8. Colorectal cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Bretthauer, M

    2011-08-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cause of cancer death worldwide and a major health problem. In this review, the different approaches for CRC screening will be outlined with emphasis on evidence-based medicine. Evidence from randomized trials on the effectiveness of CRC screening is summarized. Several screening tools for CRC are available. They can be categorized according to their mode of action: early detection tools such as the faecal occult blood test (FOBT) and cancer prevention tools such as flexible sigmoidoscopy and colonoscopy. Meta-analyses of randomized trials show that FOBT screening reduces CRC mortality by 16% (risk ratio 0.84; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.78-0.9) compared with 30% (risk ratio 0.7; 95% CI 0.6-0.81) for flexible sigmoidoscopy screening. FOBT screening is cheap and noninvasive, but results in large numbers of false-positive tests and needs to be repeated frequently. Flexible sigmoidoscopy is more invasive, but is effective for once-only screening. Although colonoscopy screening is used in some countries, no randomized trials have been conducted to estimate its benefit, and therefore, it should not be recommended at the present time. Faecal occult blood test and flexible sigmoidoscopy are the two CRC screening tools that can be recommended as they have been proven to reduce CRC mortality. Colonoscopy has the potential to be superior to FOBT and flexible sigmoidoscopy, but needs to be evaluated in randomized trials before any recommendation can be provided. © 2011 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  9. TP53 mutation at early stage of colorectal cancer progression from two types of laterally spreading tumors.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Eiji; Fukuyo, Masaki; Matsusaka, Keisuke; Ohata, Ken; Doi, Noriteru; Takane, Kiyoko; Matsuhashi, Nobuyuki; Fukushima, Junichi; Nakajima, Atsushi; Kaneda, Atsushi

    2016-06-01

    Although most sporadic colorectal cancers (CRC) are thought to develop from protruded adenomas through the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, some CRC develop through flat lesions, so-called laterally spreading tumors (LST). We previously analyzed epigenetic aberrations in LST and found that LST are clearly classified into two molecular subtypes: intermediate-methylation with KRAS mutation and low-methylation with absence of oncogene mutation. Intermediate-methylation LST were mostly granular type LST (LST-G) and low-methylation LST were mostly non-granular LST (LST-NG). In the present study, we conducted a targeted exon sequencing study including 38 candidate CRC driver genes to gain insight into how these genes modulate the development of LST. We identified a mean of 11.5 suspected nonpolymorphic variants per sample, including indels and non-synonymous mutations, although there was no significant difference in the frequency of total mutations between LST-G and LST-NG. Genes associated with RTK/RAS signaling pathway were mutated more frequently in LST-G than LST-NG (P = 0.004), especially KRAS mutation occurring at 70% (30/43) of LST-G but 26% (13/50) of LST-NG (P < 0.0001). Both LST showed high frequency of APC mutation, even at adenoma stage, suggesting its involvement in the initiation stage of LST, as it is involved at early stage of colorectal carcinogenesis via adenoma-carcinoma sequence. TP53 mutation was never observed in adenomas, but was specifically detected in cancer samples. TP53 mutation occurred during development of intramucosal cancer in LST-NG, but during development of cancer with submucosal invasion in LST-G. It is suggested that TP53 mutation occurs in the early stages of cancer development from adenoma in both LST-G and LST-NG, but is involved at an earlier stage in LST-NG.

  10. Colorectal Cancer: The Importance of Early Detection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alliance : www.ccalliance.org Read More "Colorectal Cancer" Articles Colorectal Cancer: A Personal Journey / The Importance of Early Detection / Developments in Colorectal Cancer Screening Summer 2016 Issue: Volume 11 Number 2 Page ... Us | Viewers & Players Friends of the National Library of Medicine (FNLM)

  11. High FOXRED1 expression predicted good prognosis of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Weiqiang; Liu, Shuiping; Hu, Xiaotong

    2016-01-01

    The human FAD-dependent oxidoreductase domain containing 1 (FOXRED1) protein is reported as an assembly factor which promotes the correct assembly and stability of mitochondrial Complex I (CI). Alterations of mitochondrial CI might cause tumorigenesis and metastasis, but it’s molecular mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we selected 145 cases of colorectal cancer for immunohistochemistry to explore the role of FOXRED1 played in the tumor progression of colorectal cancer. The relationship between FOXRED1 expression and clinicopathological features of colorectal cancers was evaluated. FOXRED1 mainly localized in the cytoplasm in the colorectal cancer tissues, and had significant association with histopathological grading, depth of invasion, lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis and TNM stage (P<0.05 for each). However, age, gender and tumor location was not found to be associated with FOXRED1 expression. Colorectal cancer patients with higher expression of FOXRED1 had the higher 3 year survival rate (P=0.003). Moreover, FOXRED1 had potentiality to be an independent prognostic factor for survival in colorectal cancer (P=0.04). Low FOXRED1 expression correlated with poor prognosis of colorectal cancer and targeting this molecular will be a potential treatment strategy for colorectal cancer. PMID:27904784

  12. Urinary nucleosides as biological markers for patients with colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yu-Fang; Yang, Jun; Zhao, Xin-Jie; Feng, Bo; Kong, Hong-Wei; Chen, Ying-Jie; Lv, Shen; Zheng, Min-Hua; Xu, Guo-Wang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Fourteen urinary nucleosides, primary degradation products of tRNA, were evaluated to know the potential as biological markers for patients with colorectal cancer. METHODS: The concentrations of 14 kinds of urinary nucleosides from 52 patients with colorectal cancer, 10 patients with intestinal villous adenoma and 60 healthy adults were determined by column switching high performance liquid chromatography method. RESULTS: The mean levels of 12 kinds of urinary nucleosides (except uridine and guanosine) in the patients with colorectal cancer were significantly higher than those in patients with intestinal villous adenoma or the healthy adults. Using the levels of 14 kinds of urinary nucleosides as the data vectors for principal component analysis, 71% (37/52) patients with colorectal cancer were correctly classified from healthy adults, in which the identification rate was much higher than that of CEA method (29%). Only 10% (1/10) of patients with intestinal villous adenoma were indistinguishable from patients with colorectal cancer. The levels of m1G, Pseu and m1A were positively related with tumor size and Duke’s stages of colorectal cancer. When monitoring the changes in urinary nucleoside concentrations of patients with colorectal cancer associated with surgery, it was found that the overall correlations with clinical assessment were 84% (27/32) and 91% (10/11) in response group and progressive group, respectively. CONCLUSION: These findings indicate that urinary nucleosides determined by column switching high performance liquid chromatography method may be useful as biological markers for colorectal cancer. PMID:15991285

  13. Colorectal Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing colorectal cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  14. High endothelial venules are rare in colorectal cancers but accumulate in extra-tumoral areas with disease progression.

    PubMed

    Bento, Diana Costa; Jones, Emma; Junaid, Syed; Tull, Justyna; Williams, Geraint T; Godkin, Andrew; Ager, Ann; Gallimore, Awen

    2015-03-01

    Prolonged patient survival after surgical resection, is associated with a higher cytotoxic and memory T cell density within colorectal cancers (CRC). High endothelial venules (HEVs) are specialized blood vessels present in secondary lymphoid organs (SLO) that allow ingress of naïve and central memory T cells from the blood. It has been proposed that HEVs in tumors might serve as a similar route of entry for lymphocytes into the tumor and result in an improved prognosis. The present study aimed to characterize HEVs and their microenvironment in resected tumors from colorectal cancer patients (n = 62). We observed HEVs in association with lymphoid aggregates in 49 out of 62 patients. However, these HEV(+) lymphoid aggregates were largely at the invasive margin of the tumor and although there was an association with lymphocytes and HEVs at the invasive margin (p = 0.002) there was only a very weak association with tumor infiltrating lymphocytes. Indeed, lymphoid aggregates were associated with more advanced disease (Dukes' stage C) and did not indicate a favorable prognosis.

  15. Apoptotic pathways as a therapeutic target for colorectal cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Abraha, Aman M; Ketema, Ezra B

    2016-08-15

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer among adults. The disease begins as a benign adenomatous polyp, which develops into an advanced adenoma with high-grade dysplasia and then progresses to an invasive cancer. Appropriate apoptotic signaling is fundamentally important to preserve a healthy balance between cell death and cell survival and in maintaining genome integrity. Evasion of apoptotic pathway has been established as a prominent hallmark of several cancers. During colorectal cancer development, the balance between the rates of cell growth and apoptosis that maintains intestinal epithelial cell homeostasis gets progressively disturbed. Evidences are increasingly available to support the hypothesis that failure of apoptosis may be an important factor in the evolution of colorectal cancer and its poor response to chemotherapy and radiation. The other reason for targeting apoptotic pathway in the treatment of cancer is based on the observation that this process is deregulated in cancer cells but not in normal cells. As a result, colorectal cancer therapies designed to stimulate apoptosis in target cells would play a critical role in controlling its development and progression. A better understanding of the apoptotic signaling pathways, and the mechanisms by which cancer cells evade apoptotic death might lead to effective therapeutic strategies to inhibit cancer cell proliferation with minimal toxicity and high responses to chemotherapy. In this review, we analyzed the current understanding and future promises of apoptotic pathways as a therapeutic target in colorectal cancer treatment.

  16. Prostaglandins induce early growth response 1 transcription factor mediated microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase up-regulation for colorectal cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Stamatakis, Konstantinos; Jimenez-Martinez, Marta; Jimenez-Segovia, Alba; Chico-Calero, Isabel; Conde, Elisa; Galán-Martínez, Javier; Ruiz, Julia; Pascual, Alejandro; Barrocal, Beatriz; López-Pérez, Ricardo; García-Bermejo, María Laura; Fresno, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase2 (COX2) has been associated with cell growth, invasiveness, tumor progression and metastasis of colorectal carcinomas. However, the downstream prostaglandin (PG)-PG receptor pathway involved in these effects is poorly characterized. We studied the PG-pathway in gene expression databases and we found that PTGS2 (prostaglandin G/H synthase and cyclooxygenase) and PTGES (prostaglandin E synthase) are co-expressed in human colorectal tumors. Moreover, we detected that COX2 and microsomal Prostaglandin E2 synthase 1 (mPGES1) proteins are both up-regulated in colorectal human tumor biopsies. Using colon carcinoma cell cultures we found that COX2 overexpression significantly increased mPGES1 mRNA and protein. This up-regulation was due to an increase in early growth response 1 (EGR1) levels and its transcriptional activity. EGR1 was induced by COX2-generated PGF2α. A PGF2α receptor antagonist, or EGR1 silencing, inhibited the mPGES1 induction by COX2 overexpression. Moreover, using immunodeficient mice, we also demonstrated that both COX2- and mPGES1-overexpressing carcinoma cells were more efficient forming tumors. Our results describe for the first time the molecular pathway correlating PTGS2 and PTGES in colon cancer progression. We demonstrated that in this pathway mPGES1 is induced by COX2 overexpression, via autocrine PGs release, likely PGF2α, through an EGR1-dependent mechanism. This signaling provides a molecular explanation to PTGS2 and PTGES association and contribute to colon cancer advance, pointing out novel potential therapeutic targets in this oncological context. PMID:26498686

  17. Tucatinib (ONT-380) and Trastuzumab for Patients With HER2-positive Metastatic Colorectal Cancer (MOUNTAINEER)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-13

    Colorectal Cancer; Colorectal Carcinoma; Colorectal Tumors; Neoplasms, Colorectal; HER-2 Gene Amplification; Metastatic Cancer; Metastatic Colon Cancer; Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum

  18. Colorectal cancers and chlorinated water.

    PubMed

    El-Tawil, Ahmed Mahmoud

    2016-04-15

    Published reports have revealed increased risk of colorectal cancers in people exposed to chlorinated drinking water or chemical derivatives of chlorination. Oestrogen plays a dual positive functions for diminishing the possibilities of such risk by reducing the entrance, and increasing the excretion, of these chemicals. In addition, there are supplementary measures that could be employed in order to reduce this risk further, such as boiling the drinking water, revising the standard concentrations of calcium, magnesium and iron in the public drinking water and prescribing oestrogen in susceptible individuals. Hypo-methylation of genomic DNA could be used as a biological marker for screening for the potential development of colorectal cancers.

  19. Colorectal cancers and chlorinated water

    PubMed Central

    El-Tawil, Ahmed Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Published reports have revealed increased risk of colorectal cancers in people exposed to chlorinated drinking water or chemical derivatives of chlorination. Oestrogen plays a dual positive functions for diminishing the possibilities of such risk by reducing the entrance, and increasing the excretion, of these chemicals. In addition, there are supplementary measures that could be employed in order to reduce this risk further, such as boiling the drinking water, revising the standard concentrations of calcium, magnesium and iron in the public drinking water and prescribing oestrogen in susceptible individuals. Hypo-methylation of genomic DNA could be used as a biological marker for screening for the potential development of colorectal cancers. PMID:27096035

  20. Stathmin, a new target of PRL-3 identified by proteomic methods, plays a key role in progression and metastasis of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ping; Liu, Yong-Xia; Chen, Lin; Liu, Xun-Hua; Xiao, Zheng-Quan; Zhao, Liang; Li, Guang-Qiu; Zhou, Jun; Ding, Yan-Qing; Li, Jian-Ming

    2010-10-01

    To better understand the role of PRL-3 in progression and metastasis of colorectal cancer (CRC), we searched for PRL-3 associated proteins using proteomic methods. We identified 39 PRL-3 associated proteins based on proteomic strategy. Stathmin, a key oncoprotein, was proved to be a new PRL-3 associated protein. Notably, co-immunoprecipitation assays in both endogenous CRC cell lines and CRC tissues indicated that PRL-3 could interact with stathmin. And, both stathmin and PRL-3 contributed to microtubule (MT) destabilization of CRC cells. Moreover, gain-of-function and loss-of-function analyses revealed that stathmin promoted proliferation, cell adhesion, and migration of human CRC cells. Immunohistochemical analysis of 149 colorectal tumor samples showed that overexpression of stathmin was strongly correlated with tumor differentiation (P = 0.035), tumor invasion (P = 0.024), lymph node status (P < 0.001), Dukes classification (P < 0.001), and TNM staging (P < 0.001) of CRC patients. Univariate and multivariate survival analyses further supported that overexpression of stathmin protein was a potential independent poor prognostic factor for CRC. Our results reveal many PRL-3 associated proteins for the first time. The oncoprotein stathmin plays a key role in CRC as a new target of PRL-3. Interaction between PRL-3 and stathmin leads to MT destabilization of CRC cells, which contributes to progression and metastasis of CRC.

  1. Nutrients, foods, and colorectal cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Song, Mingyang; Garrett, Wendy S; Chan, Andrew T

    2015-05-01

    Diet has an important role in the development of colorectal cancer. In the past few decades, findings from extensive epidemiologic and experimental investigations have linked consumption of several foods and nutrients to the risk of colorectal neoplasia. Calcium, fiber, milk, and whole grains have been associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer, and red meat and processed meat have been associated with an increased risk. There is substantial evidence for the potential chemopreventive effects of vitamin D, folate, fruits, and vegetables. Nutrients and foods also may interact, as a dietary pattern, to influence colorectal cancer risk. Diet likely influences colorectal carcinogenesis through several interacting mechanisms. These include the direct effects on immune responsiveness and inflammation, and the indirect effects of overnutrition and obesity-risk factors for colorectal cancer. Emerging evidence also implicates the gut microbiota as an important effector in the relationship between diet and cancer. Dietary modification therefore has the promise of reducing colorectal cancer incidence.

  2. Nutrients, Foods, and Colorectal Cancer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Song, Mingyang; Garrett, Wendy S.; Chan, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    Diet has an important role in the development of colorectal cancer. In the past few decades, findings from extensive epidemiologic and experimental investigation have linked consumption of several foods and nutrients to the risk of colorectal neoplasia. Calcium, fiber, milk, and whole grain have been associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer, and red meat and processed meat with an increased risk. There is substantial evidence for the potential chemopreventive effects of vitamin D, folate, fruits and vegetables. Nutrients and foods may also interact, as a dietary pattern, to influence colorectal cancer risk. Diet likely influences colorectal carcinogenesis through several interacting mechanisms. These include the direct effects on immune responsiveness and inflammation, and the indirect effects of over-nutrition and obesity—risk factors for colorectal cancer. Emerging evidence also implicates the gut microbiota as an important effector in the relationship between diet and cancer. Dietary modification therefore has the promise of reducing colorectal cancer incidence. PMID:25575572

  3. Five Myths about Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... and processed meat you eat. If you drink alcohol, limit the amount to 1 drink per day for women, 2 per day for men. Don’t use tobacco in any form. Myth: African Americans are not at risk for colorectal cancer. Truth: African-American men and women are diagnosed ...

  4. General Aspects of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Centelles, Josep J.

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the main causes of death. Cancer is initiated by several DNA damages, affecting proto-oncogenes, tumour suppressor genes, and DNA repairing genes. The molecular origins of CRC are chromosome instability (CIN), microsatellite instability (MSI), and CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP). A brief description of types of CRC cancer is presented, including sporadic CRC, hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) or Lynch syndromes, familiar adenomatous polyposis (FAP), MYH-associated polyposis (MAP), Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS), and juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS). Some signalling systems for CRC are also described, including Wnt-β-catenin pathway, tyrosine kinase receptors pathway, TGF-β pathway, and Hedgehog pathway. Finally, this paper describes also some CRC treatments. PMID:23209942

  5. General aspects of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Centelles, Josep J

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the main causes of death. Cancer is initiated by several DNA damages, affecting proto-oncogenes, tumour suppressor genes, and DNA repairing genes. The molecular origins of CRC are chromosome instability (CIN), microsatellite instability (MSI), and CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP). A brief description of types of CRC cancer is presented, including sporadic CRC, hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) or Lynch syndromes, familiar adenomatous polyposis (FAP), MYH-associated polyposis (MAP), Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS), and juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS). Some signalling systems for CRC are also described, including Wnt-β-catenin pathway, tyrosine kinase receptors pathway, TGF-β pathway, and Hedgehog pathway. Finally, this paper describes also some CRC treatments.

  6. Telomere function in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Frías, Cristina; Morán, Alberto; de Juan, Carmen; Ortega, Paloma; Fernández-Marcelo, Tamara; Sánchez-Pernaute, Andrés; Torres, Antonio José; Díaz-Rubio, Eduardo; Benito, Manuel; Iniesta, Pilar

    2009-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common form of cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in the western world. Tumour cells acquire the hallmarks of cancer during the carcinogenic selection process. Cell immortality is one of the principal features acquired during this process which involves the stabilization of telomere length. It is achieved mainly, by telomerase activation. Thus, the discovery of telomeres and telomerase allowed an understanding of the mechanisms by which cells can become immortalized. Different studies have shown that tumour cells have shorter telomeres than nontumour cells and have detected telomerase activity in the majority of tumours. Survival studies have determined that telomere maintenance and telomerase activity are associated with poor prognosis. Taking into account all the results achieved by different groups, quantification and evaluation of telomerase activity and measurement of telomere length may be useful methods for additional biologic and prognostic staging of colorectal carcinoma. PMID:21160767

  7. The expression pattern of long non-coding RNA PVT1 in tumor tissues and in extracellular vesicles of colorectal cancer correlates with cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Guo, Kai; Yao, Jie; Yu, Qiang; Li, Zijian; Huang, Hu; Cheng, Jianguo; Wang, Zhigang; Zhu, Yunfeng

    2017-04-01

    The plasmacytoma variant translocation 1 gene (PVT1) is a large non-coding locus at adjacent of c-Myc, and long non-coding RNA PVT1 is now recognized as a cancerous gene co-amplified with c-Myc in various cancers. But the expression and functional role of PVT1 in colorectal cancer are still unelucidated. In addition, all the reported long non-coding RNAs so far are discovered in either cells or tissues, but no research about long non-coding RNAs detection in extracellular vesicles has been reported yet. In the present study, we firstly investigated the expression of PVT1 in colorectal cancer specimens and its correlation with the expression of c-Myc and other related genes by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Then, we isolated the extracellular vesicles from colorectal cancer cells culturing medium by differential centrifugation and detected the PVT1 expression in extracellular vesicles by using real-time polymerase chain reaction. The PVT1 targeting siRNA was transfected into SW480 and SW620 cells, and 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium assay and flow cytometry were used to evaluate the cell proliferation and apoptosis. The results showed that the PVT1 expression in tumor tissues was higher than that in normal tissues, which was significantly correlated with the expression of c-Myc and three c-Myc regulating genes FUBP1, EZH2, and NPM1 and also correlated with the expression of two other PVT1-associated transcript factors nuclear factor-κB and myocyte-specific enhancer factor 2A. Here, we reported for the first time that PVT1 as a long non-coding RNA was successfully detected in extracellular vesicles excluded from SW620 and SW480 cells, and the expression level of PVT1 was higher in extracellular vesicles from the more aggressive cell SW620 than from SW480. The results also showed that by down-regulating the PVT1 expression, the c-Myc expression was suppressed, the cell proliferation was inhibited, and

  8. Iron, microbiota and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ng, Oliver

    2016-10-01

    Iron deficiency and anaemia are common in colorectal cancer. Replacement with oral or intravenous iron effectively treats this deficiency. However, mechanistic and population studies suggest that excess iron promotes colorectal carcinogenesis. Growing research into gut microbiota and dysbiosis suggests one explanation for this association. Iron is growth limiting for many pathogenic bacteria and may promote a shift in the ratio of pathogenic to protective bacteria. This may increase the toxic bacterial metabolites, promoting inflammation and carcinogenesis. This has important implications as we seek to correct anaemia in our patients.

  9. Novel role of STRAP in progression and metastasis of colorectal cancer through Wnt/β-catenin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Guandou; Zhang, Bixiang; Yang, Shanzhong; Jin, Lin; Datta, Arunima; Bae, Sejong; Chen, Xiaoping; Datta, Pran K

    2016-01-01

    Serine-Threonine Kinase Receptor-Associated Protein (STRAP) interacts with a variety of proteins and influences a wide range of cellular processes. Aberrant activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling has been implicated in the development of colorectal cancer (CRC). Here, we show the molecular mechanism by which STRAP induces CRC metastasis by promoting β-catenin signaling through its stabilization. We have genetically engineered a series of murine and human CRC and lung cancer cell lines to investigate the effects of STRAP on cell migration and invasion in vitro, and on tumorigenicity and metastasis in vivo. Downregulation of STRAP inhibits invasion, tumorigenicity, and metastasis of CRC cells. Mechanistically, STRAP binds with GSK-3β and reduces the phosphorylation, ubiquitylation, and degradation of β-catenin through preventing its binding to the destruction complex. This leads to an inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling and reduction in the expression of downstream targets, such as Cyclin D1, matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9, and ß-TrCP. In human CRC specimens, higher STRAP expression correlates significantly with β-catenin expression with increased nuclear levels (R =0.696, p < .0001, n =128). Together, these results suggest that STRAP increases invasion and metastasis of CRC partly through inhibiting ubiquitin-dependent degradation of β-catenin and promoting Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:26910283

  10. Genetic Architecture of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Ulrike; Bien, Stephanie; Zubair, Niha

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a complex disease that develops as a consequence of both genetic and environmental risk factors. A small proportion (3–5%) of cases arises from hereditary syndromes predisposing to early onset CRC as a result of mutations in over a dozen well-defined genes. In contrast, CRC is predominantly a late-onset “sporadic” disease, developing in individuals with no obvious hereditary syndrome. In recent years genome-wide association studies have discovered over 40 genetic regions to be associated with weak effects on sporadic CRC and it has been estimated that increasingly large genome-wide scans will identify many additional novel genetic regions. Subsequent experimental validations have identified the causally related variant(s) in a limited number of these genetic regions. Further biological insight could be obtained through ethnically diverse study populations, larger genetic sequencing studies, and development of higher-throughput functional experiments. Along with inherited variation, integration of the tumour genome may shed light on the carcinogenic processes in CRC. In addition to summarizing the genetic architecture of CRC, this review discusses genetic factors that modify environmental predictors of CRC, as well as examples of how genetic insight has improved clinical surveillance, prevention, and treatment strategies. In summary, substantial progress has been made in uncovering the genetic architecture of CRC and continued research efforts are expected to identify additional genetic risk factors that further our biological understanding of this disease. PMID:26187503

  11. Danish Colorectal Cancer Group Database.

    PubMed

    Ingeholm, Peter; Gögenur, Ismail; Iversen, Lene H

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the database, which has existed for registration of all patients with colorectal cancer in Denmark since 2001, is to improve the prognosis for this patient group. All Danish patients with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer who are either diagnosed or treated in a surgical department of a public Danish hospital. The database comprises an array of surgical, radiological, oncological, and pathological variables. The surgeons record data such as diagnostics performed, including type and results of radiological examinations, lifestyle factors, comorbidity and performance, treatment including the surgical procedure, urgency of surgery, and intra- and postoperative complications within 30 days after surgery. The pathologists record data such as tumor type, number of lymph nodes and metastatic lymph nodes, surgical margin status, and other pathological risk factors. The database has had >95% completeness in including patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma with >54,000 patients registered so far with approximately one-third rectal cancers and two-third colon cancers and an overrepresentation of men among rectal cancer patients. The stage distribution has been more or less constant until 2014 with a tendency toward a lower rate of stage IV and higher rate of stage I after introduction of the national screening program in 2014. The 30-day mortality rate after elective surgery has been reduced from >7% in 2001-2003 to <2% since 2013. The database is a national population-based clinical database with high patient and data completeness for the perioperative period. The resolution of data is high for description of the patient at the time of diagnosis, including comorbidities, and for characterizing diagnosis, surgical interventions, and short-term outcomes. The database does not have high-resolution oncological data and does not register recurrences after primary surgery. The Danish Colorectal Cancer Group provides high-quality data and has been documenting an

  12. Gankyrin sustains PI3K/GSK-3β/β-catenin signal activation and promotes colorectal cancer aggressiveness and progression

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qianlong; Zhang, Tong; Wang, Chengxing; Wei, Jianchang; Chen, Zhuanpeng; Hu, He; Li, Wanglin; Cao, Jie

    2016-01-01

    High levels of angiogenesis, metastasis and chemoresistance are major clinical features of colorectal cancer (CRC), a lethal disease with a high incidence worldwide. Aberrant activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway contributes to CRC progression. However, little is known about regulatory mechanisms of the β-catenin activity in cancer progression. Here we report that Gankyrin was markedly upregulated in primary tumor tissues from CRC patients and was associated with poor survival. Moreover, we demonstrated that overexpressing Gankyrin promoted, while knockdown of Gankyrin impaired, the aggressive phenotype of proliferation, angiogenesis, chemoresistance and metastasis of CRC cells both in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, we found a unique molecular mechanism of Gankyrin in CRC cells signaling transduction, that regulated the cross-talk between PI3K/Akt and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways, sustaining PI3K/GSK-3β/β-catenin signal activation in CRC. Therefore, these findings not only reveal a mechanism that promotes aggressiveness and progression in CRC, but also provide insight into novel molecular targets for antitumor therapy in CRCs. PMID:27835604

  13. miR-124 and miR-506 inhibit colorectal cancer progression by targeting DNMT3B and DNMT1.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiheng; Liu, Shaojun; Tian, Li; Wu, Minghao; Ai, Feiyan; Tang, Wuliang; Zhao, Lian; Ding, Juan; Zhang, Liyang; Tang, Anliu

    2015-11-10

    miR-124 and miR-506 are reportedly down-regulated and associated with tumor progression in many cancers, but little is known about their intrinsic regulatory mechanisms in colorectal cancer (CRC). In this study, we found that the miR-124 and miR-506 levels were significantly lower in human CRC tissues than in controls, as indicated by qRT-PCR and in situ hybridization histochemistry. We also found that the overexpression of miR-124 or miR-506 inhibited tumor cell progression and increased sensitivity to chemotherapy in vitro. Increased miR-124 or miR-506 expression also inhibited tumor cell proliferation and invasion in vivo. Luciferase reporter assays and western blotting were used to determine the association between miR-124, miR-506 and their target genes, DNMTs. We further identified that miR-124 and miR-506 directly targeted DNMT3B and indirectly targeted DNMT1. The overexpression of miR-124 and miR-506 reduced global DNA methylation and restored the expression of E-cadherin, MGMT and P16. In conclusion, our data showed that miR-124 and miR-506 inhibit progression and increase sensitivity to chemotherapy by targeting DNMT3B and DNMT1 in CRC. These findings may provide novel avenues for the development of targeted therapies.

  14. Loss of ZG16 is regulated by miR-196a and contributes to stemness and progression of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yingchao; Xia, Hongping

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common malignant tumour and the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Clarification of the mechanism that underlies CRC tumorigenesis and progression therefore is urgently needed ffor developing novel therapies. Through analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) dataset, we identified an interesting gene, ZG16, which is significantly decreased in CRC samples compared to adjacent non-tumor tissues and associated with prognosis of patients. We found that the expression of ZG16 correlated with CRC related genes which were regulated by APC/CTNNB1 pathway. Interestingly, the expression of ZG16 was negatively correlated with CRC stem cell marker, LGR5. Overexpression of ZG16 significantly inhibits growth and sphere formation of stem-like CRC cells. Moreover, we also identified an upstream regulator of ZG16, miR-196a, which was significantly overexpressed in CRC and promotes cell growth and stemness. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that loss of ZG16 is regulated by miR-196a and contributes to stemness and progression of CRC, which may provide a promising therapeutic strategy for advanced CRCs. PMID:27880730

  15. Colorectal (Colon) Cancer: What Are the Risk Factors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Colorectal Cancer” Infographic Screening for Colorectal Cancer: Optimizing Quality (CME) Partners Related Links Glossary Stay Informed Cancer Home What Are the Risk Factors for Colorectal Cancer? Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend ...

  16. Perspectives of Colorectal Cancer Risk and Screening among Dominicans and Puerto Ricans: Stigma and Misperceptions

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Roberta E.; Diaz, Joseph A.; Kim, Ivone

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second most common cancer among Latinos, but a lower percentage of Latinos are screened than Whites and Blacks. Along with recognized economic barriers, differences in knowledge and perceptions might impede colorectal screening among Latinos. We conducted 147 individual, qualitative interviews with Dominicans and Puerto Ricans in the northeastern United States to explore their explanatory models for colorectal cancer and screening barriers. Many participants had not previously heard of colorectal cancer. The most commonly mentioned cause of colorectal cancer was anal sex. Also considered risks were “bad food,” digestion leading to constipation, and strained bowel movements. Screening barriers included stigma, misperceptions, embarrassment, and machismo. Progress toward increasing colorectal cancer screening requires normalization of this screening among Latinos. Higher patient familiarity, along with improved physician counseling and referral, might contribute to reducing stigma and other barriers, and to enhancing knowledge and Latino community support of colorectal cancer screening. PMID:19776255

  17. Perspectives of colorectal cancer risk and screening among Dominicans and Puerto Ricans: stigma and misperceptions.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Roberta E; Diaz, Joseph A; Kim, Ivone

    2009-11-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second most common cancer among Latinos, but a lower percentage of Latinos are screened than Whites and Blacks. Along with recognized economic barriers, differences in knowledge and perceptions might impede colorectal screening among Latinos. We conducted 147 individual, qualitative interviews with Dominicans and Puerto Ricans in the northeastern United States to explore their explanatory models for colorectal cancer and screening barriers. Many participants had not previously heard of colorectal cancer. The most commonly mentioned cause of colorectal cancer was anal sex. Also considered risks were "bad food," digestion leading to constipation, and strained bowel movements. Screening barriers included stigma, misperceptions, embarrassment, and machismo. Progress toward increasing colorectal cancer screening requires normalization of this screening among Latinos. Higher patient familiarity, along with improved physician counseling and referral, might contribute to reducing stigma and other barriers, and to enhancing knowledge and Latino community support of colorectal cancer screening.

  18. Time course of safety and efficacy of aflibercept in combination with FOLFIRI in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who progressed on previous oxaliplatin-based therapy.

    PubMed

    Ruff, Paul; Ferry, David R; Lakomỳ, Radek; Prausová, Jana; Van Hazel, Guy A; Hoff, Paulo M; Cunningham, David; Arnold, Dirk; Schmoll, Hans J; Moiseyenko, Vladimir M; McKendrick, Joseph J; Ten Tije, Albert J; Vishwanath, Raghu L; Bhargava, Pankaj; Chevalier, Soazig; Macarulla, Teresa; Van Cutsem, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) previously-treated with oxaliplatin benefit significantly from the addition of aflibercept to FOLFIRI in relation to overall survival, progression-free survival and response rate. The results for efficacy and safety over the time course of the VEGF Trap (aflibercept) with irinotecan in colorectal cancer after failure of oxaliplatin regimen trial were analysed based on data from 1226 patients randomised to receive FOLFIRI plus either aflibercept (n=612) or placebo (n=614). Hazard ratios (HR) by 6-month time period were estimated using a piecewise Cox proportional hazard model. Severity of adverse events (AEs) was graded using National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria, version 3.0. The estimated probabilities of survival were 38.5% versus 30.9% at 18 months, 28.0% versus 18.7% at 24 months and 22.3% versus 12.0% at 30 months, for the aflibercept- and placebo-treated arms, respectively. The proportional improvement in the HR over time was consistent with the survival probability results; survival at 24 months was improved by 50% and almost doubled at 30 months. The majority of worst-grade AEs occurred within the first four cycles of treatment and in a small percent of treatment cycles and were mostly reversible. Common chemotherapy- and anti-vascular epithelial growth factor (VEGF)-associated AEs occurred rarely and in a small proportion of cycles with the majority being of single occurrence. The addition of aflibercept to FOLFIRI showed a continued and persistent improvement in overall survival over time in patients with mCRC. Although grade 3-4 AEs were more frequent in the aflibercept arm, they occurred in early treatment cycles and decreased sharply following initial presentation. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Primary prevention of colorectal cancer: lifestyle, nutrition, exercise.

    PubMed

    Martínez, María Elena

    2005-01-01

    The past two decades have provided a vast amount of literature related to the primary prevention of colorectal cancer. Large international variation in colorectal cancer incidence and mortality rates and the prominent increases in the incidence of colorectal cancer in groups that migrated from low- to high-incidence areas provided important evidence that lifestyle factors influence the development of this malignancy. Moreover, there is convincing evidence from epidemiological and experimental studies that dietary intake is an important etiological factor in colorectal neoplasia. Although the precise mechanisms have not been clarified, several lifestyle factors are likely to have a major impact on colorectal cancer development. Physical inactivity and to a lesser extent, excess body weight, are consistent risk factors for colon cancer. Exposure to tobacco products early in life is associated with a higher risk of developing colorectal neoplasia. Diet and nutritional factors are also clearly important. Diets high in red and processed meat increase risk. Excess alcohol consumption, probably in combination with a diet low in some micronutrients such as folate and methionine, appear to increase risk. There is also recent evidence supporting a protective effect of calcium and vitamin D in the etiology of colorectal neoplasia. The relationship between intake of dietary fiber and risk of colon cancer has been studied for three decades but the results are still inconclusive. However, some micronutrients or phytochemicals in fiber-rich foods may be important; folic acid is one such micronutrient that has been shown to protect against the development of colorectal neoplasia and is currently being studied in intervention trials of adenoma recurrence. The overwhelming evidence indicates that primary prevention of colon cancer is feasible. Continued focus on primary prevention of colorectal cancer, in combination with efforts aimed at screening and surveillance, will be vital in

  20. Improving colorectal cancer screening: fact and fantasy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dam, Jacques

    2008-02-01

    procedure. Efforts to improve the practice of colonoscopy will be described. Another limitation of the current practice is the inability to detect polypoid neoplasia that is hidden from view under white light imaging by the natural folds that occur within the colon. A device to overcome this limitation will also be described. Efforts to improve colorectal cancer screening (and thereby decrease the death rate of this second leading cause of cancer death in the United States) are progressing in many arenas. The researcher, basic or clinical, should maintain an up to date overview of the field and how each new technological advance is likely to have a role in the screening and early detection of colorectal cancer.

  1. Colorectal cancer in Jordan: prevention and care.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Muayyad M; Dardas, Latefa; Dardas, Lubna; Ahmad, Huthaifa

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the knowledge, attitudes, and practices toward colorectal cancer prevention and care in Jordan. A survey was designed to produce reliable estimates for the population's knowledge, attitudes, and practices in all 12 governorates of Jordan by using stratified random sampling. A representative sample of the adult population in Jordan completed a comprehensive tool which explored participants' knowledge about the risk factors associated with colorectal cancer, cancer prevention through lifestyle changes, and early cancer diagnosis and screening. According to the participants (n = 3196), colorectal cancer had the second highest percentage of screening recommendation (12.6%) after breast cancer (57.3%). Only 340 individuals (11%) reported ever screening for cancer. About 20% of the participants had heard of one of the screening tests for colorectal cancer. In fact, only 290 (9.1%) participants had performed the colorectal cancer screening tests. This study provides data that will help colorectal cancer prevention and treatment programs and may enhance the efficiency of colorectal cancer-controlling programs. The findings confirm the necessity of starting colorectal screening intervention that targets the most vulnerable individuals.

  2. RET is a potential tumor suppressor gene in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yanxin; Tsuchiya, Karen D.; Park, Dong Il; Fausel, Rebecca; Kanngurn, Samornmas; Welcsh, Piri; Dzieciatkowski, Slavomir; Wang, Jianping; Grady, William M.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer arises as the consequence of mutations and epigenetic alterations that activate oncogenes and inactivate tumor suppressor genes. Through a genome-wide screen for methylated genes in colon neoplasms, we identified aberrantly methylated RET in colorectal cancer. RET, a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase and a receptor for the GDNF-family ligands, was one of the first oncogenes to be identified and has been shown to be an oncogene in thyroid cancer and pheochromocytoma. However, unexpectedly, we found RET is methylated in 27% of colon adenomas and in 63% of colorectal cancers, and now provide evidence that RET has tumor suppressor activity in colon cancer. The aberrant methylation of RET correlates with decreased RET expression, whereas the restoration of RET in colorectal cancer cell lines results in apoptosis. Furthermore, in support of a tumor suppressor function of RET, mutant RET has also been found in primary colorectal cancer. We now show that these mutations inactivate RET, which is consistent with RET being a tumor suppressor gene in the colon. These findings suggest that the aberrant methylation of RET and the mutational inactivation of RET promote colorectal cancer formation and that RET can serve as a tumor suppressor gene in the colon. Moreover, the increased frequency of methylated RET in colon cancers compared to adenomas suggests RET inactivation is involved in the progression of colon adenomas to cancer. PMID:22751117

  3. Is Liver Transplantation an Option in Colorectal Cancer Patients with Nonresectable Liver Metastases and Progression on All Lines of Standard Chemotherapy?

    PubMed

    Dueland, Svein; Hagness, Morten; Line, Pål-Dag; Guren, Tormod Kyrre; Tveit, Kjell Magne; Foss, Aksel

    2015-07-01

    About 50 % of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) will develop metastatic disease with liver as primary metastatic site. The majority of CRC patients has nonresectable disease and receives palliative chemotherapy. Overall survival (OS) from time of progression on last line of chemotherapy in metastatic CRC is about 5 months. CLM have been considered a contraindication for liver transplantation. However, we have previously reported 5-year OS of 60 % after liver transplantation for nonresectable CLM. There were six patients who had progressive disease (PD) on last line of standard chemotherapy at the time of liver transplantation; here we report the outcome for these six patients. Patients with nonresectable liver-only CLM received liver transplantation in the SECA study, a subgroup of six patients whose disease had progressed on all standard lines of chemotherapy. These patients with nonresectable disease and PD on the last line of standard chemotherapy at time of liver transplantation had 8-35 metastatic lesions in the liver with the largest diameter at 2.8-13.0 cm. All patients had a relapse within 2.1-12.4 months after liver transplantation. Some patients received treatment with curative intent at the time of relapse, and median OS after transplantation was 41 months with a Kaplan-Meier calculated 5-year OS of 44 %. Liver transplantation in nonresectable CLM patients with extensive tumor load and PD on the last line of chemotherapy had extended OS compared with any other treatment option reported in the literature.

  4. Tropism between hepatic and pulmonary metastases in colorectal cancers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Hyun; Choi, So-Jung; Park, Joon Suk; Lee, Jinseon; Cho, Yong Beom; Kang, Min-Woong; Lee, Woo Yong; Choi, Yong Soo; Kim, Hong Kwan; Han, Joungho; Chun, Ho-Kyung; Kim, Jhingook

    2012-08-01

    In metastatic colorectal cancers, tumor cells are disseminated prior to surgical resection of the primary tumor but remain dormant until proper colonization mechanisms are activated. To identify the colonization mechanisms of the metastatic tumors, we conducted a pairwise comparison between primary colorectal cancers and metastatic tumors (n=12 pairs), including six hepatic pairs and six pulmonary pairs. The mRNA levels of 224 genes previously reported to be associated with metastasis, cytokines and angiogenesis were quantitatively determined by PCR arrays. Among them, 27 genes were duplicated or triplicated to show consistent expression. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of the Ct values of metastasis-related genes revealed that liver metastases were indistinguishable from primary colorectal cancers (n=5/6), whereas lung metastases were highly diversified from one another and from the primary tumors (n=6/6). Cytokines and receptor gene expression array data also confirmed the divergence of pulmonary metastases from primary colorectal cancers (n=6/6). Heat map analyses of ΔCt values of the metastasis-related genes identified a 17-gene tropism signature that was sufficient not only to distinguish liver and the lung metastases, but also reconstituted the clustering of primary tumors with the hepatic metastases (n=17/18). In this pilot experiment, pulmonary metastases were significantly diverged from hepatic metastases that were indistinguishable from primary colorectal cancers. Further genomic and clinical studies are in progress to evaluate the potential of the tropism signature as a therapeutic target to inhibit the colonization of metastatic colorectal cancers.

  5. Red Meat and Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Aykan, Nuri Faruk

    2015-02-10

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in men and the second in women worldwide. More than half of cases occur in more developed countries. The consumption of red meat (beef, pork, lamb, veal, mutton) is high in developed countries and accumulated evidence until today demonstrated a convincing association between the intake of red meat and especially processed meat and CRC risk. In this review, meta-analyses of prospective epidemiological studies addressed to this association, observed link of some subtypes of red meat with CRC risk, potential carcinogenic compounds, their mechanisms and actual recommendations of international guidelines are presented.

  6. Red Meat and Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in men and the second in women worldwide. More than half of cases occur in more developed countries. The consumption of red meat (beef, pork, lamb, veal, mutton) is high in developed countries and accumulated evidence until today demonstrated a convincing association between the intake of red meat and especially processed meat and CRC risk. In this review, meta-analyses of prospective epidemiological studies addressed to this association, observed link of some subtypes of red meat with CRC risk, potential carcinogenic compounds, their mechanisms and actual recommendations of international guidelines are presented. PMID:26779313

  7. Familial aggregation of colorectal cancer in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Soliman, A S; Bondy, M L; Levin, B; El-Badawy, S; Khaled, H; Hablas, A; Ismail, S; Adly, M; Mahgoub, K G; McPherson, R S; Beasley, R P

    1998-09-11

    We have investigated the familial aggregation of colorectal cancer and hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) in Egypt because of the high incidence of colorectal cancer in Egyptian children and young adults and the prevalence of consanguinity there. In a pilot study, we conducted detailed interviews with 111 Egyptian colorectal cancer patients and 111 healthy Egyptian controls about their family histories of colorectal cancer, and other cancers, consanguinity, age at diagnosis, symptoms and recurrence. Eight patients (7.2%) had one or more first- or second-degree relatives under age 40 with colorectal cancer, suggestive of HNPCC by the Amsterdam criteria. One of these families had a typical history of HNPCC, with 4 relatives having colorectal cancer in 3 generations; 3 of these relatives were younger than age 45 at colon cancer diagnosis, and other relatives had extracolonic tumors. Another 14 patients (12.6%) had a first- or second-degree relative with a family history of other neoplasms such as endometrial, urinary and hepatobiliary cancers that could also be related to HNPCC. Four patients with early-onset colon cancer and a family history of other HNPCC-related cancers reported that their parents were first-degree cousins.

  8. Gut microbiota, inflammation and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jun; Kato, Ikuko

    2016-01-01

    Although genes contribute to colorectal cancer, the gut microbiota are an important player. Accumulating evidence suggests that chronic infection and the ensuing inflammation contributes to tumor initiation and tumor progression. A variety of bacterial species and tumor-promoting virulence mechanisms have been investigated. Significant advances have been made in understanding the composition and functional capabilities of the gut microbiota and its roles in cancer. In the current review, we discuss the novel roles of microbiota in the progression of colon cancer. Although microbiota technically include organisms other than bacteria e.g., viruses and fungi, this review will primarily focus on bacteria. We summarize epidemiological studies of human microbiome and colon cancer. We discuss the progress in the scientific understanding of the interplay between the gut microbiota, barrier function, and host responses in experimental models. Further, we discuss the potential application in prevention, diagnosis, and therapy of colon cancer by targeting microbiota. We discuss the challenges lie ahead and the future direction in studying gut microbiome in colon cancer to close the gap between the basic sciences and clinical application. PMID:28078319

  9. Danish Colorectal Cancer Group Database

    PubMed Central

    Ingeholm, Peter; Gögenur, Ismail; Iversen, Lene H

    2016-01-01

    Aim of database The aim of the database, which has existed for registration of all patients with colorectal cancer in Denmark since 2001, is to improve the prognosis for this patient group. Study population All Danish patients with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer who are either diagnosed or treated in a surgical department of a public Danish hospital. Main variables The database comprises an array of surgical, radiological, oncological, and pathological variables. The surgeons record data such as diagnostics performed, including type and results of radiological examinations, lifestyle factors, comorbidity and performance, treatment including the surgical procedure, urgency of surgery, and intra- and postoperative complications within 30 days after surgery. The pathologists record data such as tumor type, number of lymph nodes and metastatic lymph nodes, surgical margin status, and other pathological risk factors. Descriptive data The database has had >95% completeness in including patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma with >54,000 patients registered so far with approximately one-third rectal cancers and two-third colon cancers and an overrepresentation of men among rectal cancer patients. The stage distribution has been more or less constant until 2014 with a tendency toward a lower rate of stage IV and higher rate of stage I after introduction of the national screening program in 2014. The 30-day mortality rate after elective surgery has been reduced from >7% in 2001–2003 to <2% since 2013. Conclusion The database is a national population-based clinical database with high patient and data completeness for the perioperative period. The resolution of data is high for description of the patient at the time of diagnosis, including comorbidities, and for characterizing diagnosis, surgical interventions, and short-term outcomes. The database does not have high-resolution oncological data and does not register recurrences after primary surgery. The Danish

  10. Economic burden of colorectal cancer in Korea.

    PubMed

    Byun, Ju-Young; Yoon, Seok-Jun; Oh, In-Hwan; Kim, Young Ae; Seo, Hye-Young; Lee, Yo-Han

    2014-03-01

    The incidence and survival rate of colorectal cancer in Korea are increasing because of improved screening, treatment technologies, and lifestyle changes. In this aging population, increases in economic cost result. This study was conducted to estimate the economic burden of colorectal cancer utilizing claims data from the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service. Economic burdens of colorectal cancer were estimated using prevalence data and patients were defined as those who received ambulatory treatment from medical institutions or who had been hospitalized due to colorectal cancer under the International Classification of Disease 10th revision codes from C18-C21. The economic burdens of colorectal cancer were calculated as direct costs and indirect costs. The prevalence rate (per 100 000 people) of those who were treated for colorectal cancer during 2010 was 165.48. The economic burdens of colorectal cancer in 2010 were 3 trillion and 100 billion Korean won (KRW), respectively. Direct costs included 1 trillion and 960 billion KRW (62.85%), respectively and indirect costs were 1 trillion and 160 billion (37.15%), respectively. Colorectal cancer has a large economic burden. Efforts should be made to reduce the economic burden of the disease through primary and secondary prevention.

  11. Tailored Telephone Counseling Increases Colorectal Cancer Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawl, Susan M.; Christy, Shannon M.; Monahan, Patrick O.; Ding, Yan; Krier, Connie; Champion, Victoria L.; Rex, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of two interventions to promote colorectal cancer screening participation and forward stage movement of colorectal cancer screening adoption among first-degree relatives of individuals diagnosed with adenomatous polyps. One hundred fifty-eight first-degree relatives of individuals diagnosed with adenomatous polyps were…

  12. Best practice in colorectal cancer care.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Claire

    Nurses need up-to-date knowledge of colorectal cancer. This article provides an overview of the aetiology and risk factors for this disease, diagnostic and staging investigations, treatment options and future care. Managing colorectal cancer is complex. Patients can have a range of healthcare needs. Nurses play an increasingly important role in informing, supporting and coordinating care to improve patients' quality of life.

  13. Tailored Telephone Counseling Increases Colorectal Cancer Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawl, Susan M.; Christy, Shannon M.; Monahan, Patrick O.; Ding, Yan; Krier, Connie; Champion, Victoria L.; Rex, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of two interventions to promote colorectal cancer screening participation and forward stage movement of colorectal cancer screening adoption among first-degree relatives of individuals diagnosed with adenomatous polyps. One hundred fifty-eight first-degree relatives of individuals diagnosed with adenomatous polyps were…

  14. Knowledge of colorectal cancer among older persons.

    PubMed

    Weinrich, S P; Weinrich, M C; Boyd, M D; Johnson, E; Frank-Stromborg, M

    1992-10-01

    Cancer screening is a national health priority, especially for colorectal cancer, the second leading cause of death due to cancer in the United States. The researchers measured colorectal cancer knowledge among 211 older Americans. A quasiexperimental pretest-posttest two-by-two factorial design was used to test the effect of knowledge on participation in fecal occult blood screening. The American Cancer Society's colorectal cancer educational slide-tape presentation served as the basis for all of the educational programs. Hemoccult II kits were distributed at no cost to the participants. Descriptive statistics, chi 2, and logistic regressions were used to analyze data. One-half of the participants had incomes below the poverty level. Almost one-half the subjects in the study sample stated that they had not received any information about colorectal cancer within the past year. Caucasians had more knowledge of colorectal cancer than African Americans [F(1, 78) = 7.92, p < 0.01] and persons with higher income had more knowledge than persons with less income [F(2, 76) = 3.01, p = 0.05]. Subjects showed significant increases in colorectal cancer knowledge 6 days after the colorectal cancer education program [t(79) = 2.59, p = 0.01] and this increased knowledge was a predictor of participation in free fecal occult blood screening [chi 2(1, n = 164) = 5.34, p = 0.02].

  15. What Is Colorectal Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

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  16. Menopause and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Franceschi, S; Gallus, S; Talamini, R; Tavani, A; Negri, E; Vecchia, C La

    2000-01-01

    Post-menopausal women who have never used hormone replacement therapy have a higher risk of colon, but not rectal, cancer than do premenopausal women of the same age, socio-cultural class and dietary habits. Such risk increase seems to last about 10 years and to be restricted to lean women, a group who have lower levels of oestradiol after ovarian function ceases after menopause. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10839302

  17. Long non-coding RNA AK027294 involves in the process of proliferation, migration, and apoptosis of colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Niu, Hui; Hu, Zhaoyang; Liu, Hui; Hu, Guoliang; Yang, Bo; Wu, Shixiu; Li, Fang

    2016-08-01

    This study is aimed to investigate the differentially expressed long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in colorectal cancer and its potential biological function. Colorectal adenoma is the precancerous lesions of colorectal cancer, so in this study, we used colorectal adenoma as negative control. The global lncRNA expression profile in colorectal cancer and adenoma was evaluated by bioinformatics. The biological functions and potential mechanism of AK027294 were investigated in HCT116, HCT8, and SW480 colorectal cancer cells. A total of 135 lncRNAs were found to be differentially expressed in colorectal cancer and adenoma tissues. Among them, 71 lncRNAs were up-regulated and 64 lncRNAs were down-regulated. Especially, AK027294 was found to be highly expressed in colorectal cancer tissues compared with colorectal adenoma tissues (fold change is 184.5). Our results indicated that AK027294 down-regulation significantly inhibited colorectal cancer cells proliferation and migration, but promoted cell apoptosis (P < 0.05). The potential mechanism of AK027294 might be associated with the regulation of caspase-3, caspase-8, Bcl-2, MMP12, MMP9, and TWIST. The lncRNA expression profile in colorectal cancer suggests lncRNAs may play important roles in the occurrence and progression of colorectal cancer. AK027294 is highly expressed in colorectal cancer and closely correlates with colorectal cells proliferation, migration, and apoptosis.

  18. Peritumoral eosinophils predict recurrence in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Harbaum, Lars; Pollheimer, Marion J; Kornprat, Peter; Lindtner, Richard A; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Langner, Cord

    2015-03-01

    In colorectal cancer, the presence and extent of eosinophil granulocyte infiltration may render important prognostic information. However, it remains unclear whether an increasing number of eosinophils might simply be linked to the overall inflammatory cell reaction or represent a self-contained, antitumoral mechanism that needs to be documented and promoted therapeutically. Peri- and intratumoral eosinophil counts were retrospectively assessed in 381 primary colorectal cancers from randomly selected patients. Tumors were diagnosed in American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC)/Union Internationale Contre le Cancer (UICC) stage I in 21%, stage II in 32%, stage III in 33%, and stage IV in 14%. Presence and extent of eosinophils was related to various histopathological parameters as well as patients' outcome. Overall, peri- and intratumoral eosinophils were observed in 86 and 75% cancer specimens. The peritumoral eosinophil count correlated strongly with the intratumoral eosinophil count (R=0.69; P<0.001) and with the intensity of the overall inflammatory cell reaction (R=0.318; P<0.001). Both increasing peri- and intratumoral eosinophil counts were significantly associated with lower T and N classification, better tumor differentiation, absence of vascular invasion, as well as improved progression-free and cancer-specific survival. However, only peritumoral eosinophils, but not intratumoral, were an independent prognosticator of favorable progression-free (hazard ratio 0.75; 95% confidence interval 0.58-0.98; P=0.04) and cancer-specific survival (hazard ratio 0.7; 95% confidence interval 0.52-0.93; P=0.01)-independent of the intensity of overall inflammatory cell reaction. This was also found for patients with AJCC/UICC stage II disease, wherein the presence of peritumoral eosinophils was significantly associated with favorable outcome. In conclusion, the number of peritumoral eosinophils had a significant favorable impact on prognosis of colorectal cancer patients

  19. Estrogen and colorectal cancer incidence and mortality.

    PubMed

    Lavasani, Sayeh; Chlebowski, Rowan T; Prentice, Ross L; Kato, Ikuko; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Johnson, Karen C; Young, Alicia; Rodabough, Rebecca; Hubbell, F Allan; Mahinbakht, Ali; Simon, Michael S

    2015-09-15

    The preponderance of observational studies describe an association between the use of estrogen alone and a lower incidence of colorectal cancer. In contrast, no difference in the incidence of colorectal cancer was seen in the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) randomized, placebo-controlled trial with estrogen alone after a mean intervention of 7.1 years and cumulative follow-up of 13.2 years. This study extends these findings by providing detailed analyses of the effects of estrogen alone on the histology, grade, and stage of colorectal cancer, relevant subgroups, and deaths from and after colorectal cancer. The WHI study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial involving 10,739 postmenopausal women with prior hysterectomy. Participants were assigned to conjugated equine estrogen at 0.625 mg/d (n = 5279) or a matching placebo (n = 5409). Rates of colorectal cancer diagnoses and deaths from and after colorectal cancer were assessed throughout the study. Colorectal cancer rates in the estrogen-alone and placebo groups were comparable: 0.14% and 0.12% per year, respectively (hazard ratio [HR], 1.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.83-1.58; P = .43). Bowel screening examinations were comparable between the 2 groups throughout the study. The grade, stage, and location of colorectal cancer did not differ between the randomization groups. There were more colorectal cancer deaths in the estrogen-alone group (34 [0.05%] vs 24 [0.03%]; HR, 1.46, 95% CI, 0.86-2.46; P = .16), but the difference was not statistically significant. The colorectal cancer incidence was higher for participants with a history of colon polyp removal in the estrogen-alone group (0.23% vs 0.02%; HR, 13.47; nominal 95% CI, 1.76-103.0; P < .001). The use of estrogen alone in postmenopausal women with prior hysterectomy does not influence the incidence of colorectal cancer or deaths from or after colorectal cancer. A possibly higher risk of colorectal cancer in women with

  20. Immunotherapy in colorectal cancer: What have we learned so far?

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Castañón, María; Er, Tze-Kiong; Bujanda, Luis; Herreros-Villanueva, Marta

    2016-09-01

    After decades of progress based on chemotherapy and targeted agents, patients with metastatic colorectal cancer still have low long-term survival, with more than 500,000 deaths occurring worldwide every year. Recent results showing clinical evidence of efficacy using immunotherapy in other types of tumors, such as melanoma and lung cancer, have also made this a viable therapy for evaluation in colorectal cancer in clinical trials. The development of cancer immunotherapies is progressing quickly, with a variety of technological approaches. This review summarizes the current status of clinical trials testing immunotherapy in colorectal cancer and discusses what has been learned based on previous results. Immunotherapy strategies, such as various models of vaccines, effector-cell therapy and checkpoint inhibitor antibodies, provide protection against progression for a limited subset of patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer. A better understanding of particular immune cell types and pathways in each patient is still needed. These findings will enable the development of novel biomarkers to select the appropriate subset of patients to be treated with a particular immunotherapy, and the tendencies determined from recent results can guide clinical practice for oncologists in this new therapeutic area and in the design of the next round of clinical trials.

  1. The potential of statins for individualized colorectal cancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Rutger J; Kodach, Liudmila L; Hardwick, James C H

    2011-12-01

    Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of death by cancer in the western world. Despite major progress, even new chemotherapeutic regimens have had relatively little impact on long term survival in the approximately 50% of patients with advanced disease at presentation meaning that prevention is the only realistic way to reduce the burden of this disease. Many countries have implemented population-based screening methods to prevent colorectal cancer by the physical removal of its precursor lesion the adenoma, or to detect cancer at an earlier stage when it is amenable to surgical cure. However these programs have only been shown to reduce colorectal cancer deaths by 30% in those screened and therefore new or complimentary approaches are needed. One such approach is chemoprevention. A number of compounds have shown potential in reducing the incidence of colorectal cancer. Most widely known are NSAIDs but recently inhibitors of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, also known as statins, commonly prescribed medications that lower serum cholesterol, have been shown to reduce colorectal cancer incidence. A critical issue in chemoprevention is the weighing of benefits against risks. In chemoprevention this balance is likely to be unfavourable when used in a wide unselected population even for the safest of compounds. Therapy should therefore be tailored to the individual patient. The balance will be more favourable in high risk groups such as individuals especially susceptible to neoplasia because of environmental risk factors, patients with inflammatory bowel disease, those with a hereditary predisposition and patients with a previous history of colorectal cancer or polyps. Furthermore colorectal cancer is not one disease but a heterogeneous group of diseases with different underlying molecular mechanisms. It is likely that both prevention and therapy will need to be tailored to the molecular subtype of the cancer in question. This may explain

  2. Colorectal Cancer: Genetics is Changing Everything.

    PubMed

    Obuch, Joshua C; Ahnen, Dennis J

    2016-09-01

    Cancer is fundamentally a genetic disease caused by mutational or epigenetic alterations in DNA. There has been a remarkable expansion of the molecular understanding of colonic carcinogenesis in the last 30 years and that understanding is changing many aspects of colorectal cancer care. It is becoming increasingly clear that there are genetic subsets of colorectal cancer that have different risk factors, prognosis, and response to treatment. This article provides a general update on colorectal cancer and highlights the ways that genetics is changing clinical care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Management of colorectal cancer and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Caroline; Nash, Guy F; Hickish, Tamas

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is associated with diabetes mellitus and both of these common conditions are often managed together by a surgeon. The surgical focus is usually upon cancer treatment rather than diabetes management. The relationship between colorectal cancer and diabetes is a complex one and can raise problems in both diagnosis and the management of patients with both conditions. This literature review explores the relationship between diabetes, diabetic treatment and colorectal cancer and addresses the issues that arise in diagnosing and treating this patient group. By highlighting these difficulties, this review aims to improve understanding and to provide clearer insight into both surgical and non-surgical management. PMID:24334910

  4. Colorectal cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Salama, Paul; Platell, Cameron

    2009-10-01

    Somatic stem cells reside at the base of the crypts throughout the colonic mucosa. These cells are essential for the normal regeneration of the colonic epithelium. The stem cells reside within a special 'niche' comprised of intestinal sub-epithelial myofibroblasts that tightly control their function. It has been postulated that mutations within these adult colonic stem cells may induce neoplastic changes. Such cells can then dissociate from the epithelium and travel into the mesenchyme and thus form invasive cancers. This theory is based on the observation that within a colon cancer, less than 1% of the neoplastic cells have the ability to regenerate the tumour. It is this group of cells that exhibits characteristics of colonic stem cells. Although anti-neoplastic agents can induce remissions by inhibiting cell division, the stem cells appear to be remarkably resistant to both standard chemotherapy and radiotherapy. These stem cells may therefore persist after treatment and form the nucleus for cancer recurrence. Hence, future treatment modalities should focus specifically on controlling the cancer stem cells. In this review, we discuss the biology of normal and malignant colonic stem cells.

  5. Bevacizumab plus chemotherapy continued beyond first progression in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer previously treated with bevacizumab plus chemotherapy: ML18147 study KRAS subgroup findings.

    PubMed

    Kubicka, S; Greil, R; André, T; Bennouna, J; Sastre, J; Van Cutsem, E; von Moos, R; Osterlund, P; Reyes-Rivera, I; Müller, T; Makrutzki, M; Arnold, D

    2013-09-01

    ML18147 evaluated continued bevacizumab with second-line chemotherapy for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) progressing after the standard first-line bevacizumab-containing therapy. Evaluating outcomes according to tumor Kirsten rat sarcoma virus oncogene (KRAS) status was an exploratory analysis. KRAS data were collected from local laboratories (using their established methods) and/or from a central laboratory (mutation-specific Scorpion amplification-refractory mutation system). No adjustment was made for multiplicity; analyses were not powered to detect statistically significant differences. Of 820 patients, 616 (75%) had unambiguous KRAS data; 316 (51%) had KRAS wild-type tumors and 300 (49%) had mutant KRAS tumors. The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 6.4 months for bevacizumab plus chemotherapy and 4.5 months for chemotherapy [P < 0.0001; HR = 0.61; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.49-0.77] for wild-type KRAS and 5.5 and 4.1 months, respectively (P = 0.0027; HR = 0.70; 95% CI: 0.56-0.89) for mutant KRAS. The median overall survival (OS) was 15.4 and 11.1 months, respectively (P = 0.0052; HR = 0.69; 95% CI: 0.53-0.90) for wild-type KRAS and 10.4 versus 10.0 months, respectively (P = 0.4969; HR = 0.92; 95% CI: 0.71-1.18) for mutant KRAS. In both analyses, no treatment interaction by KRAS status was observed (PFS, P = 0.4436; OS, P = 0.1266). Bevacizumab beyond first progression represents an option for patients with mCRC treated with bevacizumab plus standard first-line chemotherapy, independent of KRAS status.

  6. Hereditary Colorectal Cancer: Genetics and Screening

    PubMed Central

    Offerhaus, G. Johan A.

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer and the third leading cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. Each year more than 140,000 new patients are diagnosed. About 30% of patients with CRC report a family history of CRC. However, only 5% of colorectal cancers arise in the setting of a well-established Mendelian inherited disorder such as Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, MUTYH-associated polyposis, juvenile polyposis, hereditary mixed polyposis, or Peutz-Jeghers. In addition, serrated polyposis is a clinically defined syndrome with multiple serrated polyps in the colorectum and an increased CRC risk for which the genetics are unknown. The majority of familial colorectal cancers arise as so called non-syndromic familial colorectal cancer and likely have a more complex multigenetic cause. This review focuses on genetic and clinical aspects of Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis and MUTYH-associated polyposis. PMID:26315524

  7. Tailored telephone counseling increases colorectal cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Rawl, Susan M.; Christy, Shannon M.; Monahan, Patrick O.; Ding, Yan; Krier, Connie; Champion, Victoria L.; Rex, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of two interventions to promote colorectal cancer screening participation and forward stage movement of colorectal cancer screening adoption among first-degree relatives of individuals diagnosed with adenomatous polyps. One hundred fifty-eight first-degree relatives of individuals diagnosed with adenomatous polyps were randomly assigned to receive one of two interventions to promote colorectal cancer screening. Participants received either a tailored telephone counseling plus brochures intervention or a non-tailored print brochures intervention. Data were collected at baseline and 3 months post-baseline. Group differences and the effect of the interventions on adherence and stage movement for colorectal cancer screening were examined using t-tests, chi-square tests, and logistic regression. Individuals in the tailored telephone counseling plus brochures group were significantly more likely to complete colorectal cancer screening and to move forward on stage of change for fecal occult blood test, any colorectal cancer test stage and stage of the risk-appropriate test compared with individuals in the non-tailored brochure group at 3 months post-baseline. A tailored telephone counseling plus brochures intervention successfully promoted forward stage movement and colorectal cancer screening adherence among first-degree relatives of individuals diagnosed with adenomatous polyps. PMID:26025212

  8. Epigenetic Alterations in Colorectal Cancer: Emerging Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Grady, William M.; Goel, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. One of the fundamental processes driving the initiation and progression of CRC is the accumulation of a variety of genetic and epigenetic changes in colon epithelial cells. Over the past decade, major advances have been made in our understanding of cancer epigenetics, particularly regarding aberrant DNA methylation, microRNA (miRNA) and noncoding RNA deregulation, and alterations in histone modification states. Assessment of the colon cancer “epigenome” has revealed that virtually all CRCs have aberrantly methylated genes and altered miRNA expression. The average CRC methylome has hundreds to thousands of abnormally methylated genes and dozens of altered miRNAs. As with gene mutations in the cancer genome, a subset of these epigenetic alterations, called driver events, is presumed to have a functional role in CRC. In addition, the advances in our understanding of epigenetic alterations in CRC have led to these alterations being developed as clinical biomarkers for diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic applications. Progress in this field suggests that these epigenetic alterations will be commonly used in the near future to direct the prevention and treatment of CRC. PMID:26216839

  9. [Colonoscopies for colorectal cancer screening].

    PubMed

    Bessa Caserras, Xavier

    2014-09-01

    Colonoscopies play a vital role in population screening programs, either for initial examinations or as a test carried out after a positive result from a fecal occult blood test or sigmoidoscopy. Colonoscopies, and ancillary techniques such as polipectomies, must comply with basic quality criteria that must be reflected in the quality standards of screening programs. A quality colonoscopy is absolutely vital to avoid the occurrence of interval cancers. It is extremely important to detect any proximal lesions during a colonoscopy, especially those which are serrated, because they are difficult to identify and due to the increased risk of colorectal cancer. Regarding follow-up programs for resected colorectal polyps, current evidence of the relationship between the risk of neoplasia and certain variables (age, sex, smoker, BMI, diabetes, etc.) must allow for individualized risk and algorithms for screening and follow-up frequency to be developed for these patients. However, initial endoscopic exploration in a screening colonoscopy is essential to establishing the optimum interval and ensuring follow-up. Despite poor adherence to follow-up programs, mostly due to their overuse, follow-up colonoscopies 3 years after resection of all polypoid lesions detect clinically significant lesions as effectively as colonoscopies at one year.

  10. The UVB1 Vitamin D analogue inhibits colorectal carcinoma progression.

    PubMed

    Ferronato, María Julia; Alonso, Eliana Noelia; Gandini, Norberto Ariel; Fermento, María Eugenia; Villegas, María Emilia; Quevedo, Mario Alfredo; Arévalo, Julián; López Romero, Alejandro; Rivadulla, Marcos Lois; Gómez, Generosa; Fall, Yagamare; Facchinetti, María Marta; Curino, Alejandro Carlos

    2016-10-01

    Vitamin D has been shown to display a wide variety of antitumour effects, but their therapeutic use is limited by its severe side effects. We have designed and synthesized a Gemini vitamin D analogue of calcitriol (UVB1) which has shown to display antineoplastic effects on different cancer cell lines without causing hypercalcemia. The aim of this work has been to investigate, by employing in silico, in vitro, and in vivo assays, whether UVB1 inhibits human colorectal carcinoma progression. We demonstrated that UVB1 induces apoptotic cell death and retards cellular migration and invasion of HCT116 colorectal carcinoma cells. Moreover, the analogue reduced the tumour volume in vivo, and modulated the expression of Bax, E-cadherin and nuclear β-catenin in tumour animal tissues without producing toxic effects. In silico analysis showed that UVB1 exhibits greater affinity for the ligand binding domain of vitamin D receptor than calcitriol, and that several characteristics in the three-dimensional conformation of VDR may influence the biological effects. These results demonstrate that the Gemini vitamin D analogue affects the growth of the colorectal cancer and suggest that UVB1 is a potential chemotherapeutic agent for treatment of this disease.

  11. Colorectal Cancer Metastasis to the Thymus Gland: Rare Presentation of Colorectal Cancer as Anterior Mediastinal Mass.

    PubMed

    Peters, H Charles; Liu, Xiuli; Iqbal, Atif; Cunningham, Lisa A; Tan, Sanda A

    2017-01-01

    Despite improved screening modalities, 15-25% of newly diagnosed colorectal cancers are metastatic at the time of diagnosis. The vast majority of these cases present as hepatic metastasis; however, 22% present with concomitant extrahepatic disease. The thymus gland is an uncommon site of metastasis for any primary malignancy, particularly, colorectal cancer given its vascular and lymphatic drainage. This case report details our experience with a rare case of colorectal cancer metastasis to the thymus gland presenting as a symptomatic mediastinal mass.

  12. Probability model for estimating colorectal polyp progression rates.

    PubMed

    Gopalappa, Chaitra; Aydogan-Cremaschi, Selen; Das, Tapas K; Orcun, Seza

    2011-03-01

    According to the American Cancer Society, colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cause of cancer related deaths in the United States. Experts estimate that about 85% of CRCs begin as precancerous polyps, early detection and treatment of which can significantly reduce the risk of CRC. Hence, it is imperative to develop population-wide intervention strategies for early detection of polyps. Development of such strategies requires precise values of population-specific rates of incidence of polyp and its progression to cancerous stage. There has been a considerable amount of research in recent years on developing screening based CRC intervention strategies. However, these are not supported by population-specific mathematical estimates of progression rates. This paper addresses this need by developing a probability model that estimates polyp progression rates considering race and family history of CRC; note that, it is ethically infeasible to obtain polyp progression rates through clinical trials. We use the estimated rates to simulate the progression of polyps in the population of the State of Indiana, and also the population of a clinical trial conducted in the State of Minnesota, which was obtained from literature. The results from the simulations are used to validate the probability model.

  13. Calcium remodeling in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Carlos; Sobradillo, Diego; Hernández-Morales, Miriam; Núñez, Lucía

    2017-06-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most frequent form of cancer and the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. Basic and clinical data indicate that aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may prevent colon cancer but mechanisms remain unknown. Aspirin metabolite salicylate and other NSAIDs may inhibit tumor cell growth acting on store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE), suggesting an important role for this pathway in CRC. Consistently, SOCE is emerging as a novel player in different forms of cancer, including CRC. SOCE and store-operated currents (SOCs) are dramatically enhanced in CRC while Ca(2+) stores are partially empty in CRC cells. These features may contribute to CRC hallmarks including enhanced cell proliferation, migration, invasion and survival. At the molecular level, enhanced SOCE and depleted stores are mediated by overexpression of Orai1, Stromal interaction protein 1 (STIM1) and Transient receptor protein channel 1 (TRPC1) and downregulation of STIM2. In normal colonic cells, SOCE is mediated by Ca(2+)-release activated Ca(2+) channels made of STIM1, STIM2 and Orai1. In CRC cells, SOCE is mediated by different store-operated currents (SOCs) driven by STIM1, Orai1 and TRPC1. Loss of STIM2 contributes to depletion of Ca(2+) stores and enhanced resistance to cell death in CRC cells. Thus, SOCE is a novel key player in CRC and inhibition by salicylate and other NSAIDs may contribute to explain chemoprevention activity. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most frequent form of cancer worldwide. Recent evidence suggests that intracellular Ca(2+) remodeling may contribute to cancer hallmarks. In addition, aspirin and other NSAIDs might prevent CRC acting on remodeled Ca(2+) entry pathways. In this review, we will briefly describe 1) the players involved in intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis with a particular emphasis on the mechanisms involved in SOCE activation and inactivation, 2) the evidence that aspirin

  14. [Inflammation and cancer - colorectal carcinoma as an example].

    PubMed

    Väyrynen, Juha; Böhm, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Immune system contributes to the pathogenesis of cancer. Immunoediting describes a process in which the immune system can recognize transformed cancer cells and establish an anti-tumor response, potentially leading to the selection of less immunogenic tumor cells. Additionally, inflammation may contribute to cancer progression by activating angiogenesis and oncogenic signaling pathways. In colorectal cancer, dense inflammatory infiltrate in tumor samples is generally associated with improved prognosis but this association is dependent on the type of immune cells and their location. In future, increased knowledge on cancer immunology is expected to benefit the diagnostics, prognostication, follow-up and treatment of cancer.

  15. Impact of age and comorbidity on survival in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    van Eeghen, Elmer E.; Bakker, Sandra D.; van Bochove, Aart

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with colorectal cancer are often excluded from clinical trials based on age or a poor performance score. However, 70% of colorectal cancer is diagnosed in patients over 65. Evaluation on the influence of age and comorbidity on survival and cause of death in a non-selected population. Methods Included were 621 consecutive patients with colorectal cancer. An extensive chart review was performed for 392 patients with colon cancer and 143 patients with rectal cancer. Analyses were performed separately for both groups. Results Median survival of colon cancer patients was 5.13 years, 131 patients (34.3%) died from tumour progression. Age and comorbidity were significant predictors for overall survival (P<0.001). Age was also a significant predictor of cause of death (P=0.001). In rectal cancer patients median survival was 4.67 years, 51 (35.7%) of patients died from tumour progression. Neither age nor comorbidity was significant predictors of survival. Age was a significant predictor of cause of death (P<0.001). Conclusions In colon cancer patient age and comorbidity predict survival. This represents possible bias or a reduced survival benefit of treatment, and is an indication that colon cancer is not the prognosis defining illness in the majority of patients. In rectal cancer patients neither age or comorbidity significantly impacted survival. PMID:26697191

  16. Circadian clock circuitry in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Papa, Gennaro; Piepoli, Ada

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the most prevalent among digestive system cancers. Carcinogenesis relies on disrupted control of cellular processes, such as metabolism, proliferation, DNA damage recognition and repair, and apoptosis. Cell, tissue, organ and body physiology is characterized by periodic fluctuations driven by biological clocks operating through the clock gene machinery. Dysfunction of molecular clockworks and cellular oscillators is involved in tumorigenesis, and altered expression of clock genes has been found in cancer patients. Epidemiological studies have shown that circadian disruption, that is, alteration of bodily temporal organization, is a cancer risk factor, and an increased incidence of colorectal neoplastic disease is reported in shift workers. In this review we describe the involvement of the circadian clock circuitry in colorectal carcinogenesis and the therapeutic strategies addressing temporal deregulation in colorectal cancer. PMID:24764658

  17. Circadian clock circuitry in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Papa, Gennaro; Piepoli, Ada

    2014-04-21

    Colorectal cancer is the most prevalent among digestive system cancers. Carcinogenesis relies on disrupted control of cellular processes, such as metabolism, proliferation, DNA damage recognition and repair, and apoptosis. Cell, tissue, organ and body physiology is characterized by periodic fluctuations driven by biological clocks operating through the clock gene machinery. Dysfunction of molecular clockworks and cellular oscillators is involved in tumorigenesis, and altered expression of clock genes has been found in cancer patients. Epidemiological studies have shown that circadian disruption, that is, alteration of bodily temporal organization, is a cancer risk factor, and an increased incidence of colorectal neoplastic disease is reported in shift workers. In this review we describe the involvement of the circadian clock circuitry in colorectal carcinogenesis and the therapeutic strategies addressing temporal deregulation in colorectal cancer.

  18. Colorectal (Colon) Cancer: Questions to Ask Your Doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Home Questions to Ask Your Doctor About Colorectal Cancer Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... adults age 50 to 75 be screened for colorectal cancer. The decision to be screened after age 75 ...

  19. Minnesota Colorectal Cancer Initiative: successful development and implementation of a community-based colorectal cancer registry.

    PubMed

    Rothenberger, David A; Dalberg, Deanna L; Leininger, Anna

    2004-10-01

    The aim of the Minnesota Colorectal Cancer Initiative is to implement risk-specific interventions to decrease colorectal cancer morbidity and mortality by 1) assisting clinicians to identify and educate individuals and families at high and increased risk for colorectal cancer; 2) providing professional and community education; 3) maintaining a database to evaluate the effectiveness of preventive intervention strategies; and 4) facilitating colorectal cancer research. Two physician groups and the University Cancer Center founded the Minnesota Colorectal Cancer Initiative as a not-for-profit organization. Health care organizations, pharmaceutical companies, a consulting firm, and other practice groups provide continuing financial and other support. A database registry, risk-assessment survey, and consent document were developed and then were approved by an institutional review board. A trial enrollment was conducted. Minnesota Colorectal Cancer Initiative services are available to the public. Participants are actively recruited through member organizations. Minnesota Colorectal Cancer Initiative assesses hereditary risk and will document family history in the medical record on request. A personally targeted reply letter reviews risk factors and recommends specific screening and surveillance strategies for participants and their family members, and when appropriate, provides information regarding genetic counseling and testing services. Minnesota Colorectal Cancer Initiative services are free to participants. Since 1999, Minnesota Colorectal Cancer Initiative has sent individually tailored reply letters providing risk-specific information about colorectal cancer to 717 participants and more than 3200 of their first-degree and second-degree relatives. More than 200 families, previously unidentified as having histories suggestive of hereditary colorectal cancer (attenuated familial polyposis and hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer), have been identified; genetic

  20. Update on Anti-Angiogenesis Therapy in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ciombor, Kristen K.; Goldberg, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a complex biologic process critical to growth and proliferation of colorectal cancer. The safety and efficacy of various anti-angiogenic agents have been investigated in many treatment settings. Bevacizumab, an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor agent, has efficacy in both the first-line setting and beyond progression in metastatic colorectal cancer. The decoy vascular endothelial growth factor receptor aflibercept has been approved in combination with 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin and irinotecan-based chemotherapy in metastatic colorectal cancer patients whose disease has progressed on a prior oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy regimen. The multikinase inhibitor regorafenib is modestly effective in the refractory colorectal cancer setting but confers significant toxicity. Ramucirumab, an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 molecule, has efficacy in combination with 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin and irinotecan after disease progression on a first-line bevacizumab-, oxaliplatin- and fluoropyrimidine-containing regimen. Questions regarding optimal treatment setting, predictive biomarkers of response, and cost effectiveness of these anti-angiogenic agents and others are as yet unanswered. PMID:27551256

  1. 5-FU Based Maintenance Therapy in RAS Wild Type Metastatic Colorectal Cancer After Induction With FOLFOX Plus Panitumumab

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-28

    Colorectal Adenocarcinoma; RAS Wild Type; Stage III Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IV Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7

  2. Gastrins, iron and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Graham S

    2009-09-01

    This minireview explores the connections between circulating gastrins, iron status and colorectal cancer. The peptide hormone gastrin is a major regulator of acid secretion and a potent mitogen for normal and malignant gastrointestinal cells. Gastrins bind two ferric ions with μM affinity and, in the case of non-amidated forms of the hormone, iron binding is essential for biological activity. The ferric ion ligands have been identified as glutamates 7, 8 and 9 in the 18 amino acid peptide glycine-extended gastrin. An interaction between gastrin and transferrin was first demonstrated by covalent crosslinking techniques, and has been recently confirmed by surface plasmon resonance. We have therefore proposed that gastrins act as catalysts in the loading of transferrin with iron. Several recent lines of evidence, including the facts that the concentrations of circulating gastrins are increased in mice and humans with the iron overload disease haemochromatosis, and that transferrin saturation positively correlates with circulating gastrin concentrations, suggest that gastrins may be involved in iron homeostasis. In addition the recognition that ferric ions may play an unexpected role in the biological activity of non-amidated gastrins may assist in the development of new therapies for colorectal carcinoma.

  3. Genetic Testing for Hereditary Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... genetic condition called Lynch syndrome, also known as hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer or HNPCC. About 3% (1 ... early if you get it. Lynch syndrome is hereditary, meaning that it is caused by an inherited ...

  4. Diagnostic Approach to Hereditary Colorectal Cancer Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Kalady, Matthew F.; Heald, Brandie

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 5 to 10% of colorectal cancers develop within a known hereditary syndrome. Specific underlying genetic mutations drive the clinical phenotype and it is imperative to determine the genetic etiology to provide meaningful surveillance and intervention. Recognizing potential patients and families with a hereditary predisposition is the first step in management. Syndromes can be categorized according to polyp burden as polyposis or nonpolyposis. Clinical assessment should start with a personal and family medical history, physical examination, and evaluation for the presence and type of colorectal polyps or cancers. Key information is gained from these simple steps and should guide the specific genetic analysis for diagnosis. Genetic counseling is a critical component to any hereditary colorectal cancer program and should be conducted before genetic testing to provide education about the implications of test results. This review focuses on the thought process that drives initial clinical evaluation and guides genetic testing for patients with suspected hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes. PMID:26664327

  5. Diagnostic Approach to Hereditary Colorectal Cancer Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Kalady, Matthew F; Heald, Brandie

    2015-12-01

    Approximately 5 to 10% of colorectal cancers develop within a known hereditary syndrome. Specific underlying genetic mutations drive the clinical phenotype and it is imperative to determine the genetic etiology to provide meaningful surveillance and intervention. Recognizing potential patients and families with a hereditary predisposition is the first step in management. Syndromes can be categorized according to polyp burden as polyposis or nonpolyposis. Clinical assessment should start with a personal and family medical history, physical examination, and evaluation for the presence and type of colorectal polyps or cancers. Key information is gained from these simple steps and should guide the specific genetic analysis for diagnosis. Genetic counseling is a critical component to any hereditary colorectal cancer program and should be conducted before genetic testing to provide education about the implications of test results. This review focuses on the thought process that drives initial clinical evaluation and guides genetic testing for patients with suspected hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes.

  6. CpG island methylator phenotype in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Toyota, Minoru; Ahuja, Nita; Ohe-Toyota, Mutsumi; Herman, James G.; Baylin, Stephen B.; Issa, Jean-Pierre J.

    1999-01-01

    Aberrant methylation of promoter region CpG islands is associated with transcriptional inactivation of tumor-suppressor genes in neoplasia. To understand global patterns of CpG island methylation in colorectal cancer, we have used a recently developed technique called methylated CpG island amplification to examine 30 newly cloned differentially methylated DNA sequences. Of these 30 clones, 19 (63%) were progressively methylated in an age-dependent manner in normal colon, 7 (23%) were methylated in a cancer-specific manner, and 4 (13%) were methylated only in cell lines. Thus, a majority of CpG islands methylated in colon cancer are also methylated in a subset of normal colonic cells during the process of aging. In contrast, methylation of the cancer-specific clones was found exclusively in a subset of colorectal cancers, which appear to display a CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP). CIMP+ tumors also have a high incidence of p16 and THBS1 methylation, and they include the majority of sporadic colorectal cancers with microsatellite instability related to hMLH1 methylation. We thus define a pathway in colorectal cancer that appears to be responsible for the majority of sporadic tumors with mismatch repair deficiency. PMID:10411935

  7. Abdominal metastases from colorectal cancer: intraperitoneal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Guend, Hamza; Patel, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    Patients with peritoneal metastasis from colorectal cancer represent a distinct subset with regional disease rather than systemic disease. They often have poorer survival outcomes with systemic chemotherapy. Optimal cytoreductive surgery and intraperitoneal chemotherapy (IPC) offers such patients a more directed therapy with improved survival. In this review, we discuss the diagnosis, evaluation and classification, as well as rational for treatment of peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC) secondary to colorectal cancer. PMID:26697203

  8. [Gut microbial influence and probiotics on colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Myung, Dae Seong; Joo, Young Eun

    2012-11-01

    The human intestinal microbiota is a community of 10(13)-10(14) microorganisms that harbor in the intestine and normally participate in a symbiotic relationship with human. Technical and conceptual advances have enabled rapid progress in characterizing the taxonomic composition, metabolic capacity and immunomodulatory activity of the human intestinal microbiota. Their collective genome, defined as microbiome, is estimated to contain ≥150 times as many genes as 2.85 billion base pair human genome. The intestinal microbiota and its microbiome form a diverse and complex ecological community that profoundly impact intestinal homeostasis and disease states. It is becoming increasingly evident that the large and complex bacterial population of the large intestine plays an important role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Numerous studies show that gut immunity and inflammation have impact on the development of colorectal cancer. Additionally, bacteria have been linked to colorectal cancer by the production of toxic and genotoxic bacterial metabolite. In this review, we discuss the multifactorial role of intestinal microbiota in colorectal cancer and role for probiotics in the prevention of colorectal cancer.

  9. Dietary chemoprevention of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Forte, Angelo; De Sanctis, Rita; Leonetti, Giovanni; Manfredelli, Simone; Urbano, Vincenzo; Bezzi, Marcello

    2008-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second cause of morbidity and death in Italy. Genetic and environmental factors, i.e. inappropriate nutrition, are strongly involved in the aetiology of colon cancer. In the present review the authors analyze the possible mechanisms by which certain nutritive factors may interfere with the complex process of carcinogenesis. The authors identify studies by a literature search of Medline from January 1, 1970, through December 31, 2006. The mechanism of every protective compound is detailed, in particular the impact of antioxidant vitamins and minerals on tumor development. At present, the data suggest that vegetables are associated with lower risk and that their fbre content alone does not account for this association. Further, meat consumption is associated with an increased risk but this, too, is not explained solely by its fat content. Several microconstituents of the diet may be associated with reduced risk, including folate, methionine, calcium and vitamin D. Short chain fatty acids also contribute to colonic health. Nevertheless agricultural products contain several dangerous pesticides. Mutagenic compounds, particularly heterocyclic amines, produced when protein is cooked, plausibly explain the meat association. Healthy nutrition is a necessary but not sufficient condition for colon cancer prevention: accepted the feasibility of an accurate control on every patient's diet, fequently the difficulty encountered in nutritional chemoprevention is to establish individual metabolic profiles.

  10. Precancerous Lesions in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sandouk, Fayez; Al Jerf, Feras; Al-Halabi, M. H. D. Bassel

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cause of cancer death in the world. The incidence rate (ASR) and age distribution of this disease differ between most of African-Middle-Eastern (AMAGE) and North America and Europe for many reasons. However, in all areas, “CRC” is considered as one of the most preventable cancers, because it might develop from variant processes like polyps and IBD in addition to the genetic pathogenesis which became very well known in this disease. We tried in this paper to review all the possible reasons of the differences in incidence and age between the west and AMAGE. Also we reviewed all the mutations that lead to the hereditary and familiar clustering of this disease with the correlations with the surrounding food and environment of different areas. Then, we focused on the precancerous pathology of this disease with special focusing on early detection depending on new endoscopy technology and most important genetic studies. We lastly reviewed the evidence of some of the surveillance and put suggestions about future surveillance programs and how important those programs are on the psychological aspect of the patients and their families. PMID:23737765

  11. Nutritional status assessment in colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Joana Pedro; de Castro Cardoso Pereira, Paula Manuela; dos Reis Baltazar Vicente, Ana Filipa; Bernardo, Alexandra; de Mesquita, María Fernanda

    2013-01-01

    The present study intended to evaluate the nutritional status of Portuguese colorectal patients and associated it with surgery type as well as quality of life outcomes. Malnutrition can affect up to 85% of cancer patients and specifically 30-60% in colorectal cancer and can significantly influence health outcomes. A sample of 50 colorectal cancer patients was evaluated in what refers to several anthropometric measures, food intake, clinical history, complications rate before and after surgery procedure. The sample was divided between convention and fast-track procedures. Most of the individuals were overweight or obese but had lost weight on the past six months. Despite mild, there were signs of malnutrition in this sample with high losses of fat free mass, weight and also fat mass during the hospitalization period. These results reinforce the importance of malnutrition assessment in colorectal patients as well as consider weight loss on the past months and body composition in order to complement nutritional status evaluation.

  12. Genetics of Colorectal Cancer (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the genetics of colorectal cancer, including information about specific genes and family cancer syndromes. The summary also contains information about screening for colorectal cancer and research aimed at prevention of this disease. Psychosocial issues associated with genetic testing and counseling of individuals who may have hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome are also discussed.

  13. Genetics of Colorectal Cancer (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the genetics of colorectal cancer, including information about specific genes and family cancer syndromes. The summary also contains information about screening for colorectal cancer and research aimed at prevention of this disease. Psychosocial issues associated with genetic testing and counseling of individuals who may have hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome are also discussed.

  14. Cetuximab Plus Oxaliplatin May Not Be Effective Primary Treatment for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In a randomized phase III trial, the addition of the targeted therapy cetuximab to oxaliplatin and fluoropyrimidine chemotherapy did not prolong survival or time to disease progression of patients with advanced colorectal cancer.

  15. Microsatellite instability in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Iacopetta, Barry; Grieu, Fabienne; Amanuel, Benhur

    2010-12-01

    Approximately 20 percent of right-sided colon cancers and 5 percent of left-sided colon and rectal cancers have a deficient DNA mismatch repair system. This results in the widespread accumulation of mutations to nucleotide repeats, some of which occur within the coding regions of cancer-related genes such as TGFβRII and BAX. A standardized definition for microsatellite instability (MSI) based on the presence of deletions to mononucleotide repeats is gaining widespread acceptance in both research and the clinic. Colorectal cancer (CRC) with MSI are characterized histologically by an abundance of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, poor differentiation and a signet ring or mucinous phenotype. In younger patients these tumors usually develop along the chromosomal instability pathway, in which case the mismatch repair genes are inactivated by germline mutation, somatic mutation and loss of heterozygosity. In older patients MSI CRC usually develops against a background of widespread hypermethylation that includes methylation-induced silencing of the mismatch repair gene MLH1. The overall biological and clinical phenotype of MSI CRC that arise in these two pathways is likely to be different and may account for some of the discordant results reported in the literature relating to the clinical properties of these tumors. The available evidence indicates that MSI is unlikely to be a clinically useful marker for the prognostic stratification of early-stage CRC. The predictive value of MSI for response to 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy remains controversial, while for other agents the predictive value is difficult to assess because they are used in combination regimens. The MSI phenotype is being actively investigated for novel therapeutic approaches based on the principle of synthetic lethality. Finally, the MSI status of CRC is an extremely useful marker for population-based screening programs that aim to identify individuals and families with the hereditary cancer

  16. Potential roles of microRNAs and ROS in colorectal cancer: diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jingmei; Chuang, Chia-Chen; Zuo, Li

    2017-01-01

    As one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers worldwide, colorectal adenocarcinoma often occurs sporadically in individuals aged 50 or above and there is an increase among younger patients under 50. Routine screenings are recommended for this age group to improve early detection. The multifactorial etiology of colorectal cancer consists of both genetic and epigenetic factors. Recently, studies have shown that the development and progression of colorectal cancer can be attributed to aberrant expression of microRNA. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) that play a key role in cancer cell survival, can also lead to carcinogenesis and cancer exacerbations. Given the rapid accumulating knowledge in the field, an updated review regarding microRNA and ROS in colorectal cancer is necessary. An extensive literature search has been conducted in PubMed/Medline databases to review the roles of microRNAs and ROS in colorectal cancer. Unique microRNA expression in tumor tissue, peripheral blood, and fecal samples from patients with colorectal cancer is outlined. Therapeutic approaches focusing on microRNA and ROS in colorectal cancer treatment is also delineated. This review aims to summarize the newest knowledge on the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer in the hopes of discovering novel diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic techniques. PMID:28061475

  17. LAP+CD4+ T cells are suppressors accumulated in the tumor sites and associated with the progression of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Mahalingam, Jayashri; Lin, Yung-Chang; Chiang, Jy-Ming; Su, Po-Jung; Fang, Jian-He; Chu, Yu-Yi; Huang, Ching-Tai; Chiu, Cheng-Tang; Lin, Chun-Yen

    2012-10-01

    Suppressor T cells are one of the determinants of colorectal cancer (CRC) clinical outcome. LAP(+)CD4(+) T cell is a recently identified subset of suppressor T cells. This study was designed to investigate their clinical relevance in patients with CRC. Sixty patients with CRC and 24 healthy donors (HD) were enrolled in this study. The percentages of LAP(+)CD4(+) T cells in peripheral blood and tumor tissue were measured. The phenotype and functional relevance of LAP(+)CD4(+) T cells were analyzed subsequently. The percentages of LAP(+)CD4(+) T cells in peripheral blood of patients with CRC were significantly higher than HD (HD vs. CRC: 3.1% ± 0.78% vs. 8.8% ± 5.8%, P < 0.0001) and in tumor tissue when compared with nontumor tissue (nontumor vs. tumor: 3.2% ± 1.1% vs. 9.5% ± 5.5%, P = 0.0002). In addition, LAP(+)CD4(+) T cells with effector memory (EM) phenotype were more likely to accumulate in the tumor sites than in peripheral blood. These LAP(+)CD4(+) T cells produced significantly higher levels of IFN-γ, IL-17 and comparatively lower IL-2 and very few IL-10. LAP(+)CD4(+) T cells could suppress the proliferation of LAP(-)CD4(+) T cells that were partially mediated by TGF-β. Furthermore, these LAP(+)CD4(+) T cells accumulated in tumor site and increased further in the peripheral blood in patients with metastasis. LAP(+)CD4(+) T cells as a suppressor subset could accumulate in the tumor microenvironment and circulated more in the peripheral blood with tumor progression in patients with CRC.

  18. Korean Guidelines for Colorectal Cancer Screening and Polyp Detection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bo-In; Hong, Sung Pil; Kim, Seong-Eun; Kim, Se Hyung; Hong, Sung Noh; Yang, Dong-Hoon; Shin, Sung Jae; Lee, Suck-Ho; Park, Dong Il; Kim, Young-Ho; Kim, Hyun Jung; Yang, Suk-Kyun; Kim, Hyo Jong; Jeon, Hae Jeong

    2012-01-01

    Now colorectal cancer is the second most common cancer in males and the fourth most common cancer in females in Korea. Since most of colorectal cancers occur after the prolonged transformation of adenomas into carcinomas, early detection and removal of colorectal adenomas are one of the most effective methods to prevent colorectal cancer. Considering the increasing incidence of colorectal cancer and polyps in Korea, it is very important to establish Korean guideline for colorectal cancer screening and polyp detection. The guideline was developed by the Korean Multi-Society Take Force and we tried to establish the guideline by evidence-based methods. Parts of the statements were draw by systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Herein we discussed epidemiology of colorectal cancers and adenomas in Korea and optimal methods for screening of colorectal cancer and detection of adenomas including fecal occult blood tests, radiologic tests, and endoscopic examinations. PMID:22741131

  19. Characterisation and protein expression profiling of annexins in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Duncan, R; Carpenter, B; Main, L C; Telfer, C; Murray, G I

    2008-01-29

    The annexins are family of calcium-regulated phospholipid-binding proteins with diverse roles in cell biology. Individual annexins have been implicated in tumour development and progression, and in this investigation a range of annexins have been studied in colorectal cancer. Annexins A1, A2, A4 and A11 were identified by comparative proteomic analysis to be overexpressed in colorectal cancer. Annexins A1, A2, A4 and A11 were further studied by immunohistochemistry with a colorectal cancer tissue microarray containing primary and metastatic colorectal cancer and also normal colon. There was significant increase in expression in annexins A1 (P=0.01), A2 (P<0.001), A4 (P<0.001) and A11 (P<0.001) in primary tumours compared with normal colon. There was increasing expression of annexins A2 (P=0.001), A4 (P=0.03) and A11 (P=0.006) with increasing tumour stage. An annexin expression profile was identified by k-means cluster analysis, and the annexin profile was associated with tumour stage (P=0.01) and also patient survival. Patients in annexin cluster group 1 (low annexin expression) had a better survival (log rank=5.33, P=0.02) than patients in cluster group 2 (high annexins A4 and A11 expression). In conclusion, this study has shown that individual annexins are present in colorectal cancer, specific annexins are overexpressed in colorectal cancer and the annexin expression profile is associated with survival.

  20. Differential Expression of IL-17, 22 and 23 in the Progression of Colorectal Cancer in Patients with K-ras Mutation: Ras Signal Inhibition and Crosstalk with GM-CSF and IFN-γ

    PubMed Central

    Petanidis, Savvas; Anestakis, Doxakis; Argyraki, Maria; Hadzopoulou-Cladaras, Margarita; Salifoglou, Athanasios

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that aberrant K-ras signaling is responsible for triggering immunological responses and inflammation-driven tumorigenesis. Interleukins IL-17, IL-22, and IL-23 have been reported in various types of malignancies, but the exact mechanistic role of these molecules remains to be elucidated. Given the role of K-ras and the involvement of interleukins in colorectal tumorigenesis, research efforts are reported for the first time, showing that differentially expressed interleukin IL-17, IL-22, and IL-23 levels are associated with K-ras in a stage-specific fashion along colorectal cancer progression. Specifically, a) the effect of K-ras signaling was investigated in the overall expression of interleukins in patients with colorectal cancer and healthy controls, and b) an association was established between mutant K-ras and cytokines GM-CSF and IFN-γ. The results indicate that specific interleukins are differentially expressed in K-ras positive patients and the use of K-ras inhibitor Manumycin A decreases both interleukin levels and apoptosis in Caco-2 cells by inhibiting cell viability. Finally, inflammation-driven GM-CSF and IFN-γ levels are modulated through interleukin expression in tumor patients, with interleukin expression in the intestinal lumen and cancerous tissue mediated by aberrant K-ras signaling. Collectively, the findings a) indicate that interleukin expression is influenced by ras signaling and specific interleukins play an oncogenic promoter role in colorectal cancer, highlighting the molecular link between inflammation and tumorigenesis, and b) accentuate the interwoven molecular correlations as leads to new therapeutic approaches in the future. PMID:24040001

  1. Prevalence of local recurrence of colorectal cancer at the Iranian Cancer Institute.

    PubMed

    Omranipour, Ramesh; Mahmoodzadeh, Habibollah; Safavi, Farinaz

    2014-01-01

    Although a great deal of progress has been made in the management of colorectal cancer in terms of neoadjuvant modalities, surgical techniques and adjuvant therapies, the recurrence of tumors remains an enigmatic complication in patients. A better understanding of colorectal cancer and of factors that lead to recurrence of disease can provide helpful information for designing more effective screening and surveillance methods. To investigate the factors that may lead to local recurrence of colorectal cancers. The current retrospective case study evaluated 617 patients admitted to the Iranian Cancer Institute (the largest referral cancer center in the country) from 1995 to 2009 with confirmed colorectal cancer. Patients with distant metastasis, or with pathology other than adenocarcinoma and no follow-up, were excluded (175 patients). The remainder (442) included 294 (66.5%) with rectal cancer and 148 (33.5%) with colon cancer. The median duration of follow-up was 26 months. The total rate of recurrence was 17.4%, comprising 19.6% and 16.3% recurrence rates in colon and rectal cancer, respectively. Recurrence of colorectal cancer was significantly correlated to tumor grade (p<0.008).

  2. Worldwide burden of colorectal cancer: a review.

    PubMed

    Favoriti, Pasqualino; Carbone, Gabriele; Greco, Marco; Pirozzi, Felice; Pirozzi, Raffaele Emmanuele Maria; Corcione, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    Colorectal cancer is a major public health problem, being the third most commonly diagnosed cancer and the fourth cause of cancer death worldwide. There is wide variation over time among the different geographic areas due to variable exposure to risk factors, introduction and uptake of screening as well as access to appropriate treatment services. Indeed, a large proportion of the disparities may be attributed to socioeconomic status. Although colorectal cancer continues to be a disease of the developed world, incidence rates have been rising in developing countries. Moreover, the global burden is expected to further increase due to the growth and aging of the population and because of the adoption of westernized behaviors and lifestyle. Colorectal cancer screening has been proven to greatly reduce mortality rates that have declined in many longstanding as well as newly economically developed countries. Statistics on colorectal cancer occurrence are essential to develop targeted strategies that could alleviate the burden of the disease. The aim of this paper is to provide a review of incidence, mortality and survival rates for colorectal cancer as well as their geographic variations and temporal trends.

  3. CRCHD Launches National Colorectal Cancer Outreach and Screening Initiative

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI CRCHD launches National Screen to Save Colorectal Cancer Outreach and Screening Initiative which aims to increase colorectal cancer screening rates among racially and ethnically diverse and rural communities.

  4. [Colorectal cancer in twins. Report of two cases].

    PubMed

    Białek, Andrzej; Homa, Katarzyna; Marlicz, Krzysztof

    2003-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common neoplasms that often occurs in several members of family. In this communication we present the case of synchronous colorectal cancers with similar localization and similar clinical course in monozygotic twins.

  5. Cell-based Immunotherapy for Colorectal Cancer with Cytokine-induced Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Sung; Kim, Yong Guk; Park, Eun Jae; Kim, Boyeong; Lee, Hong Kyung; Hong, Jin Tae; Kim, Youngsoo

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third leading cancer worldwide. Although incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer are gradually decreasing in the US, patients with metastatic colorectal cancer have poor prognosis with an estimated 5-year survival rate of less than 10%. Over the past decade, advances in combination chemotherapy regimens for colorectal cancer have led to significant improvement in progression-free and overall survival. However, patients with metastatic disease gain little clinical benefit from conventional therapy, which is associated with grade 3~4 toxicity with negative effects on quality of life. In previous clinical studies, cell-based immunotherapy using dendritic cell vaccines and sentinel lymph node T cell therapy showed promising therapeutic results for metastatic colorectal cancer. In our preclinical and previous clinical studies, cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells treatment for colorectal cancer showed favorable responses without toxicities. Here, we review current treatment options for colorectal cancer and summarize available clinical studies utilizing cell-based immunotherapy. Based on these studies, we recommend the use CIK cell therapy as a promising therapeutic strategy for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. PMID:27162526

  6. Aberrant methylation patterns in colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Durso, Danielle Fernandes; Bacalini, Maria Giulia; do Valle, Ítalo Faria; Pirazzini, Chiara; Bonafé, Massimiliano; Castellani, Gastone; Faria, Ana Maria Caetano; Franceschi, Claudio; Garagnani, Paolo; Nardini, Christine

    2017-02-21

    Colorectal cancer is among the leading causes of cancer death worldwide. Despite numerous molecular characterizations of the phenomenon, the exact dynamics of its onset and progression remain elusive. Colorectal cancer onset has been characterized by changes in DNA methylation profiles, that, owing to the stability of their patterns, are promising candidates to shed light on the molecular events laying at the base of this phenomenon.To exploit this stability and reinforce it, we conducted a meta-analysis on publicly available DNA methylation datasets generated on: normal colorectal, adenoma (ADE) and adenocarcinoma (CRC) samples using the Illumina 450k array, in the systems medicine frame, searching for tumor gene episignatures, to produce a carefully selected list of potential drivers, markers and targets of the disease. The analysis proceeds from a differential meta-analysis of the methylation profiles using an analytical pipeline recently developed by our group [1], through network reconstruction, topological and functional analyses, to finally highlight relevant epigenomic features. Our results show that genes already highlighted for their genetic or transcriptional alteration in colorectal cancer are also differentially methylated, reinforcing -regardless of the level of cellular control- their role in the complex of alterations involved in tumorigenesis.These findings were finally validated in an independent cohort from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA).

  7. CYB5R1 links epithelial-mesenchymal transition and poor prognosis in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lamprecht, Sebastian; Engel, Jutta; Hermeking, Heiko; Kirchner, Thomas; Horst, David

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancers show significant tumor cell heterogeneity within the same core genetic background. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an important functional aspect of this heterogeneity and hallmark of colorectal cancer progression. Here, we identify CYB5R1, an enzyme involved in oxidative stress protection and drug metabolism, as an indicator of EMT in colon cancer. We demonstrate high CYB5R1 expression in colorectal cancer cells undergoing EMT at the infiltrative tumor edge and reveal an extraordinarily strong association of CYB5R1 expression with two core EMT gene expression signatures in a large independent colon cancer data set from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Furthermore, we demonstrate that CYB5R1 is required for an infiltrative tumor cell phenotype, and robustly linked with poor prognosis in colorectal cancer. Our findings have important implications for colon cancer cells undergoing EMT and may be exploited for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. PMID:27120783

  8. Accumulation of arachidonic acid-containing phosphatidylinositol at the outer edge of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hiraide, Takanori; Ikegami, Koji; Sakaguchi, Takanori; Morita, Yoshifumi; Hayasaka, Takahiro; Masaki, Noritaka; Waki, Michihiko; Sugiyama, Eiji; Shinriki, Satoru; Takeda, Makoto; Shibasaki, Yasushi; Miyazaki, Shinichiro; Kikuchi, Hirotoshi; Okuyama, Hiroaki; Inoue, Masahiro; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Konno, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that cancer cells show specific alterations in phospholipid metabolism that contribute to tumour progression in several types of cancer, including colorectal cancer. Questions still remain as to what lipids characterize the outer edge of cancer tissues and whether those cancer outer edge-specific lipid compositions emerge autonomously in cancer cells. Cancer tissue-originated spheroids (CTOSs) that are composed of pure primary cancer cells have been developed. In this study, we aimed to seek out the cancer cell-autonomous acquisition of cancer outer edge-characterizing lipids in colorectal cancer by analysing phospholipids in CTOSs derived from colorectal cancer patients with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). A signal at m/z 885.5 in negative ion mode was detected specifically at the surface regions. The signal was identified as an arachidonic acid (AA)-containing phosphatidylinositol (PI), PI(18:0/20:4), by tandem mass spectrometry analysis. Quantitative analysis revealed that the amount of PI(18:0/20:4) in the surface region of CTOSs was two-fold higher than that in the medial region. Finally, PI(18:0/20:4) was enriched at the cancer cells/stromal interface in colorectal cancer patients. These data imply a possible importance of AA-containing PI for colorectal cancer progression, and suggest cells expressing AA-containing PI as potential targets for anti-cancer therapy. PMID:27435310

  9. Identification of a biomarker panel for colorectal cancer diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Malignancies arising in the large bowel cause the second largest number of deaths from cancer in the Western World. Despite progresses made during the last decades, colorectal cancer remains one of the most frequent and deadly neoplasias in the western countries. Methods A genomic study of human colorectal cancer has been carried out on a total of 31 tumoral samples, corresponding to different stages of the disease, and 33 non-tumoral samples. The study was carried out by hybridisation of the tumour samples against a reference pool of non-tumoral samples using Agilent Human 1A 60-mer oligo microarrays. The results obtained were validated by qRT-PCR. In the subsequent bioinformatics analysis, gene networks by means of Bayesian classifiers, variable selection and bootstrap resampling were built. The consensus among all the induced models produced a hierarchy of dependences and, thus, of variables. Results After an exhaustive process of pre-processing to ensure data quality--lost values imputation, probes quality, data smoothing and intraclass variability filtering--the final dataset comprised a total of 8, 104 probes. Next, a supervised classification approach and data analysis was carried out to obtain the most relevant genes. Two of them are directly involved in cancer progression and in particular in colorectal cancer. Finally, a supervised classifier was induced to classify new unseen samples. Conclusions We have developed a tentative model for the diagnosis of colorectal cancer based on a biomarker panel. Our results indicate that the gene profile described herein can discriminate between non-cancerous and cancerous samples with 94.45% accuracy using different supervised classifiers (AUC values in the range of 0.997 and 0.955). PMID:22280244

  10. Investigation of the roles of exosomes in colorectal cancer liver metastasis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xia; Ding, Xiaoling; Nan, Lijuan; Wang, Yiting; Wang, Jing; Yan, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Wei; Sun, Jihong; Zhu, Wei; Ni, Bing; Dong, Suzhen; Yu, Lei

    2015-05-01

    The leading cause of death among cancer patients is tumor metastasis. Tumor-derived exosomes are emerging as mediators of metastasis. In the present study, we demonstrated that exosomes play a pivotal role in the metastatic progression of colorectal cancer. First, a nude mouse model of colorectal cancer liver metastasis was established and characterized. Then, we demonstrated that exosomes from a highly liver metastatic colorectal cancer cell line (HT-29) could significantly increase the metastatic tumor burden and distribution in the mouse liver of Caco-2 colorectal cancer cells, which ordinarily exhibit poor liver metastatic potential. We further investigated the mechanisms by which HT-29-derived-exosomes influence the liver metastasis of colorectal cancer and found that mice treated with HT-29-derived exosomes had a relatively higher level of CXCR4 in the metastatic microenvironment, indicating that exosomes may promote colorectal cancer metastasis by recruiting CXCR4-expressing stromal cells to develop a permissive metastatic microenvironment. Finally, the migration of Caco-2 cells was significantly increased following treatment with HT-29-derived exosomes in vitro, further supporting a role for exosomes in modulating colorectal tumor-derived liver metastasis. The data from the present study may facilitate further translational medicine research into the prevention and treatment of colorectal cancer liver metastasis.

  11. Gut microbiota imbalance and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gagnière, Johan; Raisch, Jennifer; Veziant, Julie; Barnich, Nicolas; Bonnet, Richard; Buc, Emmanuel; Bringer, Marie-Agnès; Pezet, Denis; Bonnet, Mathilde

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota acts as a real organ. The symbiotic interactions between resident micro-organisms and the digestive tract highly contribute to maintain the gut homeostasis. However, alterations to the microbiome caused by environmental changes (e.g., infection, diet and/or lifestyle) can disturb this symbiotic relationship and promote disease, such as inflammatory bowel diseases and cancer. Colorectal cancer is a complex association of tumoral cells, non-neoplastic cells and a large amount of micro-organisms, and the involvement of the microbiota in colorectal carcinogenesis is becoming increasingly clear. Indeed, many changes in the bacterial composition of the gut microbiota have been reported in colorectal cancer, suggesting a major role of dysbiosis in colorectal carcinogenesis. Some bacterial species have been identified and suspected to play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis, such as Streptococcus bovis, Helicobacter pylori, Bacteroides fragilis, Enterococcus faecalis, Clostridium septicum, Fusobacterium spp. and Escherichia coli. The potential pro-carcinogenic effects of these bacteria are now better understood. In this review, we discuss the possible links between the bacterial microbiota and colorectal carcinogenesis, focusing on dysbiosis and the potential pro-carcinogenic properties of bacteria, such as genotoxicity and other virulence factors, inflammation, host defenses modulation, bacterial-derived metabolism, oxidative stress and anti-oxidative defenses modulation. We lastly describe how bacterial microbiota modifications could represent novel prognosis markers and/or targets for innovative therapeutic strategies. PMID:26811603

  12. Gut microbiota imbalance and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Gagnière, Johan; Raisch, Jennifer; Veziant, Julie; Barnich, Nicolas; Bonnet, Richard; Buc, Emmanuel; Bringer, Marie-Agnès; Pezet, Denis; Bonnet, Mathilde

    2016-01-14

    The gut microbiota acts as a real organ. The symbiotic interactions between resident micro-organisms and the digestive tract highly contribute to maintain the gut homeostasis. However, alterations to the microbiome caused by environmental changes (e.g., infection, diet and/or lifestyle) can disturb this symbiotic relationship and promote disease, such as inflammatory bowel diseases and cancer. Colorectal cancer is a complex association of tumoral cells, non-neoplastic cells and a large amount of micro-organisms, and the involvement of the microbiota in colorectal carcinogenesis is becoming increasingly clear. Indeed, many changes in the bacterial composition of the gut microbiota have been reported in colorectal cancer, suggesting a major role of dysbiosis in colorectal carcinogenesis. Some bacterial species have been identified and suspected to play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis, such as Streptococcus bovis, Helicobacter pylori, Bacteroides fragilis, Enterococcus faecalis, Clostridium septicum, Fusobacterium spp. and Escherichia coli. The potential pro-carcinogenic effects of these bacteria are now better understood. In this review, we discuss the possible links between the bacterial microbiota and colorectal carcinogenesis, focusing on dysbiosis and the potential pro-carcinogenic properties of bacteria, such as genotoxicity and other virulence factors, inflammation, host defenses modulation, bacterial-derived metabolism, oxidative stress and anti-oxidative defenses modulation. We lastly describe how bacterial microbiota modifications could represent novel prognosis markers and/or targets for innovative therapeutic strategies.

  13. Oral bisphosphonates and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Vogtmann, Emily; Corley, Douglas A; Almers, Lucy M; Cardwell, Chris R; Murray, Liam J; Abnet, Christian C

    2017-03-10

    Use of oral bisphosphonates has been associated with a decreased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), but the association may be related to residual confounding by healthy lifestyle or body mass index (BMI). Therefore, we conducted a prospective nested case-control study within the Kaiser Permanente, Northern California health system cohort. In total, 12,505 CRC cases were individually matched to 599,534 controls. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using conditional logistic regression models with adjustment for important covariates extracted from the database. Participants who had ever used oral bisphosphonates were less likely than non-users to be diagnosed with CRC (OR 0.82; 95% CI: 0.74, 0.89). Colon and rectum site-specific associations were similar to the overall association. A stronger inverse association for ever use of bisphosphonates was observed for men (OR 0.63; 95% CI: 0.47, 0.85), however when stratified by previous lower endoscopy, the association was only observed in the participants who did not have a previous lower endoscopy (OR 0.73 (0.64, 0.83)). In conclusion, we found that oral bisphosphonate use was associated with a decreased odds of CRC, however this association may be due to residual confounding by BMI or another confounder.

  14. Evidence for colorectal cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Bretthauer, Michael

    2010-08-01

    The incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) has been increasing during the past decades, and the lifetime risk for CRC in industrialised countries is about 5%. CRC is a good candidate for screening, because it is a disease with high prevalence, has recognised precursors, and early treatment is beneficial. This paper outlines the evidence for efficacy from randomised trials for the most commonly used CRC screening tests to reduce CRC incidence and mortality in the average-risk population. Four randomised trials have investigated the effect of guaiac-based fecal occult blood screening on CRC mortality, with a combined CRC mortality risk reduction of 15-17% in an intention-to-screen analysis, and 25% for those people who attended screening. Flexible sigmoidoscopy screening has been evaluated in three randomised trials. The observed reduction in CRC incidence varied between 23 and 80%, and between 27 and 67% for CRC mortality, respectively (intention-to-screen analyses) in the trials with long follow-up time. No randomised trials exist in other CRC screening tools, included colonoscopy screening. FOBT and flexible sigmoidoscopy are the two CRC screening methods which have been tested in randomised trials and shown to reduce CRC mortality. These tests can be recommended for CRC screening. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Oral bisphosphonates and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vogtmann, Emily; Corley, Douglas A.; Almers, Lucy M.; Cardwell, Chris R.; Murray, Liam J.; Abnet, Christian C.

    2017-01-01

    Use of oral bisphosphonates has been associated with a decreased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), but the association may be related to residual confounding by healthy lifestyle or body mass index (BMI). Therefore, we conducted a prospective nested case-control study within the Kaiser Permanente, Northern California health system cohort. In total, 12,505 CRC cases were individually matched to 599,534 controls. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using conditional logistic regression models with adjustment for important covariates extracted from the database. Participants who had ever used oral bisphosphonates were less likely than non-users to be diagnosed with CRC (OR 0.82; 95% CI: 0.74, 0.89). Colon and rectum site-specific associations were similar to the overall association. A stronger inverse association for ever use of bisphosphonates was observed for men (OR 0.63; 95% CI: 0.47, 0.85), however when stratified by previous lower endoscopy, the association was only observed in the participants who did not have a previous lower endoscopy (OR 0.73 (0.64, 0.83)). In conclusion, we found that oral bisphosphonate use was associated with a decreased odds of CRC, however this association may be due to residual confounding by BMI or another confounder. PMID:28281559

  16. RHOA inactivation enhances Wnt signaling and promotes colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Paulo; Macaya, Irati; Bazzocco, Sarah; Mazzolini, Rocco; Andretta, Elena; Dopeso, Higinio; Mateo-Lozano, Silvia; Bilić, Josipa; Cartón-García, Fernando; Nieto, Rocio; Suárez-López, Lucia; Afonso, Elsa; Landolfi, Stefania; Hernandez-Losa, Javier; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Cajal, Santiago Ramón y; Tabernero, Josep; Tebbutt, Niall C.; Mariadason, John M.; Schwartz, Simo; Arango, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the small GTPase RHOA has strong oncogenic effects in many tumor types, although its role in colorectal cancer remains unclear. Here we show that RHOA inactivation contributes to colorectal cancer progression/metastasis, largely through the activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. RhoA inactivation in the murine intestine accelerates the tumorigenic process and in human colon cancer cells leads to the redistribution of β-catenin from the membrane to the nucleus and enhanced Wnt/β-catenin signaling, resulting in increased proliferation, invasion and de-differentiation. In mice, RHOA inactivation contributes to colon cancer metastasis and reduced RHOA levels were observed at metastatic sites compared to primary human colon tumors. Therefore, we have identified a new mechanism of activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling and characterized the role of RHOA as a novel tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer. These results constitute a shift from the current paradigm and demonstrate that RHO GTPases can suppress tumor progression and metastasis. PMID:25413277

  17. ACR Appropriateness Criteria colorectal cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Yee, Judy; Kim, David H; Rosen, Max P; Lalani, Tasneem; Carucci, Laura R; Cash, Brooks D; Feig, Barry W; Fowler, Kathryn J; Katz, Douglas S; Smith, Martin P; Yaghmai, Vahid

    2014-06-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. Most colorectal cancers can be prevented by detecting and removing the precursor adenomatous polyp. Individual risk factors for the development of colorectal cancer will influence the particular choice of screening tool. CT colonography (CTC) is the primary imaging test for colorectal cancer screening in average-risk individuals, whereas the double-contrast barium enema (DCBE) is now considered to be a test that may be appropriate, particularly in settings where CTC is unavailable. Single-contrast barium enema has a lower performance profile and is indicated for screening only when CTC and DCBE are not available. CTC is also the preferred test for colon evaluation following an incomplete colonoscopy. Imaging tests including CTC and DCBE are not indicated for colorectal cancer screening in high-risk patients with polyposis syndromes or inflammatory bowel disease. This paper presents the updated colorectal cancer imaging test ratings and is the result of evidence-based consensus by the ACR Appropriateness Criteria Expert Panel on Gastrointestinal Imaging. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 2 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances where evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment.

  18. Safety and efficacy of palliative systemic chemotherapy combined with colorectal self-expandable metallic stents in advanced colorectal cancer: A multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Cézé, Nicolas; Charachon, Antoine; Locher, Christophe; Aparicio, Thomas; Mitry, Emmanuel; Barbieux, Jean-Pierre; Landi, Bruno; Dorval, Etienne; Moussata, Driffa; Lecomte, Thierry

    2016-04-01

    Self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS) placement is an accepted palliative therapy for management of acute malignant bowel obstruction in advanced colorectal cancer. Nevertheless, data are lacking on the effects of systemic chemotherapy combined with colorectal SEMS. The aim of this study was to investigate the safety and efficacy of palliative chemotherapy for advanced colorectal cancer combined with colorectal SEMS placement. This multicentre retrospective study included all consecutive advanced colorectal cancer patients who received first-line palliative chemotherapy combined with endoscopic stenting for colorectal cancer with obstruction. We analyzed the number of cycles and the type of combination used. The primary endpoint was overall survival. Secondary endpoints included progression-free survival, response rate, grade 3-4 toxicity and the outcomes of SEMS for malignant colorectal obstruction. A total of 38 patients were included. Among them, 25 patients received oxaliplatin and 5-fluorouracil combination chemotherapy. Objective response and stabilization occurred in 38 and 24% of patients, respectively. The median overall survival and progression-free survival from the start of chemotherapy were 18 and 5months, respectively. The objective response rate and overall disease control rate were 38 and 62%, respectively. Toxicity was generally acceptable. Major complications related to stenting included perforation (8%), stent migration (5%), and reobstruction secondary to tumor ingrowths (13%). Chemotherapy combined with colonic stenting as a first-line treatment seems to be a valid option in advanced colorectal cancer patients with malignant colorectal obstruction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Colorectal Cancer Metastasis to the Thymus Gland: Rare Presentation of Colorectal Cancer as Anterior Mediastinal Mass

    PubMed Central

    Peters, H. Charles; Liu, Xiuli; Iqbal, Atif; Cunningham, Lisa A.

    2017-01-01

    Despite improved screening modalities, 15–25% of newly diagnosed colorectal cancers are metastatic at the time of diagnosis. The vast majority of these cases present as hepatic metastasis; however, 22% present with concomitant extrahepatic disease. The thymus gland is an uncommon site of metastasis for any primary malignancy, particularly, colorectal cancer given its vascular and lymphatic drainage. This case report details our experience with a rare case of colorectal cancer metastasis to the thymus gland presenting as a symptomatic mediastinal mass. PMID:28116210

  20. Overexpression of LAMC2 predicts poor prognosis in colorectal cancer patients and promotes cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion.

    PubMed

    Huang, Dandan; Du, Changzheng; Ji, Dengbo; Xi, Jianzhong; Gu, Jin

    2017-06-01

    Laminin γ2 (LAMC2) has been reported to be involved in the development and progression of a variety of tumors. However, its function in human colorectal cancer is unclear. Our study aimed to investigate the role of laminin γ2 in colorectal cancer. We first performed the multiple Kaplan-Meier survival analysis of laminin γ2 in a cohort of Gene Expression Omnibus datasets and evaluated its relationship with clinical outcomes of colorectal cancer patients. Then, we established stable colorectal cancer cell lines with laminin γ2 overexpression and examined the functional assays in vitro. Finally the expression pattern of laminin γ2 in colorectal cancer clinical samples was analyzed by immunohistochemistry and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. We found that laminin γ2 was significantly correlated with poor clinical outcomes such as disease-specific, recurrence-free, disease-free, and overall survival in colorectal cancer. Moreover, stably overexpressing laminin γ2 promoted proliferation, migration, and invasion of colorectal cancer cells. In addition, overexpressed laminin γ2 was identified in tumor tissues compared with paired adjacent normal tissues and was related to tumor-node-metastasis stage (p = 0.001) and lymph node metastasis (p < 0.001). In summary, our results strongly suggest that laminin γ2 may be a potential prognostic biomarker and therapeutic target in colorectal cancer.

  1. The Association Between Molecular Markers in Colorectal Sessile Serrated Polyps and Colorectal Cancer Risk

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0273 TITLE: The Association between Molecular Markers in Colorectal Sessile Serrated Polyps and Colorectal Cancer...ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE August 2016 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 1 Aug 2015 - 31 July 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Association Between...molecular markers associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer in patients with sessile serrated colorectal polyps (SSPs). The project’s

  2. Progress in colorectal cancer survival in Europe from the late 1980s to the early 21st century: the EUROCARE study.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Hermann; Bouvier, Anne Marie; Foschi, Roberto; Hackl, Monika; Larsen, Inger Kristin; Lemmens, Valery; Mangone, Lucia; Francisci, Silvia

    2012-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cause of death due to cancer causing death in Europe, accounting for more than 200,000 deaths per year. Prognosis strongly depends on stage at diagnosis, and the disease can be cured in most cases if diagnosed at an early stage. We aimed to assess trends and recent developments in 5-year relative survival in European countries, with a special focus on age, stage at diagnosis and anatomical cancer subsite. Data from 25 population-based cancer registries from 16 European countries collected in the context of the EUROCARE-4 project were analyzed. Using period analysis, age-adjusted and age-specific 5-year relative survival was calculated by country, European region, stage and cancer subsite for time periods from 1988-1990 to 2000-2002. Survival substantially increased over time in all European regions. In general, increases were more pronounced in younger than in older patients, for earlier than for more advanced cancer stages and for rectum than for colon cancer. Substantial variation of CRC survival between European countries and between age groups persisted and even tentatively increased over time. There is a huge potential for reducing the burden of CRC in Europe by more widespread and equal delivery of existing options of effective early detection and curative treatment to the European population. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  3. Sugars, sucrose and colorectal cancer risk: the Fukuoka colorectal cancer study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenjie; Uchida, Kazuhiro; Ohnaka, Keizo; Morita, Makiko; Toyomura, Kengo; Kono, Suminori; Ueki, Takashi; Tanaka, Masao; Kakeji, Yoshihiro; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Okamura, Takeshi; Ikejiri, Koji; Futami, Kitaroh; Maekawa, Takafumi; Yasunami, Yohichi; Takenaka, Kenji; Ichimiya, Hitoshi; Terasaka, Reiji

    2014-05-01

    A diet high in sugars may promote colorectal carcinogenesis, but it remains uncertain whether high intake of sugars or sucrose confers increased risk of colorectal cancer. The authors investigated the associations of sugars and sucrose intake with colorectal cancer risk in a community-based case-control study in Japan. The study subjects comprised 816 incident cases of colorectal cancer and 815 community controls. Consumption frequencies and portion sizes of 148 food and beverage items were ascertained by a computer-assisted interview. The authors used the consumption of 29 food items to estimate sugars and sucrose intake. The odds ratios of colorectal cancer risk according to intake categories were obtained using a logistic regression model with adjustment for potential confounding variables. Overall, intakes of sugars and sucrose were not related to colorectal cancer risk either in men or women. The association between sugars intake and colorectal cancer risk differed by smoking status and alcohol use in men, but not in women. In men, sugars intake tended to be associated with colorectal cancer risk inversely among never-smokers and positively among male ever-smokers (interaction p=0.01). Sugars intake was associated with an increased risk among men with no alcohol consumption, but was unrelated to the risk among male alcohol drinkers (interaction p=0.02). Body mass index did not modify the association with sugars intake in either men or women. Sugars intake was associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer among smokers and non-alcohol drinkers in men selectively.

  4. Molecular alterations and biomarkers in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Grady, William M.; Pritchard, Colin C.

    2013-01-01

    The promise of precision medicine is now a clinical reality. Advances in our understanding of the molecular genetics of colorectal cancer genetics is leading to the development of a variety of biomarkers that are being used as early detection markers, prognostic markers, and markers for predicting treatment responses. This is no more evident than in the recent advances in testing colorectal cancers for specific molecular alterations in order to guide treatment with the monoclonal antibody therapies cetuximab and panitumumab, which target the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In this review, we update a prior review published in 2010 and describe our current understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of colorectal cancer and how these alterations relate to emerging biomarkers for early detection and risk stratification (diagnostic markers), prognosis (prognostic markers), and the prediction of treatment responses (predictive markers). PMID:24178577

  5. Colorectal cancer atlas: An integrative resource for genomic and proteomic annotations from colorectal cancer cell lines and tissues.

    PubMed

    Chisanga, David; Keerthikumar, Shivakumar; Pathan, Mohashin; Ariyaratne, Dinuka; Kalra, Hina; Boukouris, Stephanie; Mathew, Nidhi Abraham; Al Saffar, Haidar; Gangoda, Lahiru; Ang, Ching-Seng; Sieber, Oliver M; Mariadason, John M; Dasgupta, Ramanuj; Chilamkurti, Naveen; Mathivanan, Suresh

    2016-01-04

    In order to advance our understanding of colorectal cancer (CRC) development and progression, biomedical researchers have generated large amounts of OMICS data from CRC patient samples and representative cell lines. However, these data are deposited in various repositories or in supplementary tables. A database which integrates data from heterogeneous resources and enables analysis of the multidimensional data sets, specifically pertaining to CRC is currently lacking. Here, we have developed Colorectal Cancer Atlas (http://www.colonatlas.org), an integrated web-based resource that catalogues the genomic and proteomic annotations identified in CRC tissues and cell lines. The data catalogued to-date include sequence variations as well as quantitative and non-quantitative protein expression data. The database enables the analysis of these data in the context of signaling pathways, protein-protein interactions, Gene Ontology terms, protein domains and post-translational modifications. Currently, Colorectal Cancer Atlas contains data for >13 711 CRC tissues, >165 CRC cell lines, 62 251 protein identifications, >8.3 million MS/MS spectra, >18 410 genes with sequence variations (404 278 entries) and 351 pathways with sequence variants. Overall, Colorectal Cancer Atlas has been designed to serve as a central resource to facilitate research in CRC. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. The gut microbiota, bacterial metabolites and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Louis, Petra; Hold, Georgina L; Flint, Harry J

    2014-10-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that the human intestinal microbiota contributes to the aetiology of colorectal cancer (CRC), not only via the pro-carcinogenic activities of specific pathogens but also via the influence of the wider microbial community, particularly its metabolome. Recent data have shown that the short-chain fatty acids acetate, propionate and butyrate function in the suppression of inflammation and cancer, whereas other microbial metabolites, such as secondary bile acids, promote carcinogenesis. In this Review, we discuss the relationship between diet, microbial metabolism and CRC and argue that the cumulative effects of microbial metabolites should be considered in order to better predict and prevent cancer progression.

  7. Serrated Polyposis: An Enigmatic Model of Colorectal Cancer Predisposition

    PubMed Central

    Rosty, Christophe; Parry, Susan; Young, Joanne P.

    2011-01-01

    Serrated polyposis has only recently been accepted as a condition which carries an increased personal and familial risk of colorectal cancer. Described over four decades ago, it remains one of the most underrecognized and poorly understood of all the intestinal polyposes. With a variety of phenotypic presentations, it is likely that serrated polyposis represents a group of diseases rather than a single entity. Further, neoplastic progression in serrated polyposis may be associated with premature aging in the normal mucosa, typified by widespread gene promoter hypermethylation. From this epigenetically altered field, arise diverse polyps and cancers which show a range of molecular features. Despite a high serrated polyp count, only one-third of colorectal cancers demonstrate a BRAF V600E mutation, the molecular hallmark of the canonical serrated pathway, suggesting that though multiple serrated polyps act as a marker of an abnormal mucosa, the majority of CRC in these patients arise within lesions other than BRAF-mutated serrated polyps. PMID:21660283

  8. Advanced endoscopic technologies for colorectal cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Obstein, Keith L; Valdastri, Pietro

    2013-01-28

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in men and the second most common cancer in women worldwide. Diagnosing colorectal has been increasingly successful due to advances in technology. Flexible endoscopy is considered to be an effective method for early diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal cancer, making it a popular choice for screening programs. However, millions of people who may benefit from endoscopic colorectal cancer screening fail to have the procedure performed. Main reasons include psychological barriers due to the indignity of the procedure, fear of procedure related pain, bowel preparation discomfort, and potential need for sedation. Therefore, an urgent need for new technologies addressing these issues clearly exists. In this review, we discuss a set of advanced endoscopic technologies for colorectal cancer screening that are either already available or close to clinical trial. In particular, we focus on visual-inspection-only advanced flexible colonoscopes, interventional colonoscopes with alternative propulsion mechanisms, wireless capsule colonoscopy, and technologies for intraprocedural bowel cleansing. Many of these devices have the potential to reduce exam related patient discomfort, obviate the need for sedation, increase diagnostic yield, reduce learning curves, improve access to screening, and possibly avert the need for a bowel preparation.

  9. Advanced endoscopic technologies for colorectal cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Obstein, Keith L; Valdastri, Pietro

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in men and the second most common cancer in women worldwide. Diagnosing colorectal has been increasingly successful due to advances in technology. Flexible endoscopy is considered to be an effective method for early diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal cancer, making it a popular choice for screening programs. However, millions of people who may benefit from endoscopic colorectal cancer screening fail to have the procedure performed. Main reasons include psychological barriers due to the indignity of the procedure, fear of procedure related pain, bowel preparation discomfort, and potential need for sedation. Therefore, an urgent need for new technologies addressing these issues clearly exists. In this review, we discuss a set of advanced endoscopic technologies for colorectal cancer screening that are either already available or close to clinical trial. In particular, we focus on visual-inspection-only advanced flexible colonoscopes, interventional colonoscopes with alternative propulsion mechanisms, wireless capsule colonoscopy, and technologies for intraprocedural bowel cleansing. Many of these devices have the potential to reduce exam related patient discomfort, obviate the need for sedation, increase diagnostic yield, reduce learning curves, improve access to screening, and possibly avert the need for a bowel preparation. PMID:23382621

  10. [New advances in hereditary colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Moreira, Leticia

    2015-09-01

    Colorectal cancer is the most frequent malignancy in both sexes in Spain. Between 20% and 25% of affected individuals have a family history of the disease, and 5% to 6% have a germ mutation, i.e. the disease develops in the context of a hereditary syndrome. The importance of identifying patients with hereditary syndromes predisposing them to colorectal cancer lies in the possibility of applying preventive measures, screening, and more appropriate management of both patients and their families. The present article outlines the most important studies presented at the congress of the American Gastroenterological Association. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Get Tested for Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of fiber . Talk with your doctor about taking aspirin every day. Taking aspirin every day can lower your risk of colorectal ... 50 to 59, ask your doctor if daily aspirin is right for you . Previous section Get Tested ...

  12. Cell Surface Markers in Colorectal Cancer Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Belov, Larissa; Zhou, Jerry; Christopherson, Richard I.

    2011-01-01

    The classification of colorectal cancers (CRC) is currently based largely on histologically determined tumour characteristics, such as differentiation status and tumour stage, i.e., depth of tumour invasion, involvement of regional lymph nodes and the occurrence of metastatic spread to other organs. These are the conventional prognostic factors for patient survival and often determine the requirement for adjuvant therapy after surgical resection of the primary tumour. However, patients with the same CRC stage can have very different disease-related outcomes. For some, surgical removal of early-stage tumours leads to full recovery, while for others, disease recurrence and metastasis may occur regardless of adjuvant therapy. It is therefore important to understand the molecular processes that lead to disease progression and metastasis and to find more reliable prognostic markers and novel targets for therapy. This review focuses on cell surface proteins that correlate with tumour progression, metastasis and patient outcome, and discusses some of the challenges in finding prognostic protein markers in CRC. PMID:21339979

  13. Genomic landscape of metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Haan, Josien C; Labots, Mariette; Rausch, Christian; Koopman, Miriam; Tol, Jolien; Mekenkamp, Leonie J M; van de Wiel, Mark A; Israeli, Danielle; van Essen, Hendrik F; van Grieken, Nicole C T; Voorham, Quirinus J M; Bosch, Linda J W; Qu, Xueping; Kabbarah, Omar; Verheul, Henk M W; Nagtegaal, Iris D; Punt, Cornelis J A; Ylstra, Bauke; Meijer, Gerrit A

    2014-11-14

    Response to drug therapy in individual colorectal cancer (CRC) patients is associated with tumour biology. Here we describe the genomic landscape of tumour samples of a homogeneous well-annotated series of patients with metastatic CRC (mCRC) of two phase III clinical trials, CAIRO and CAIRO2. DNA copy number aberrations of 349 patients are determined. Within three treatment arms, 194 chromosomal subregions are associated with progression-free survival (PFS; uncorrected single-test P-values <0.005). These subregions are filtered for effect on messenger RNA expression, using an independent data set from The Cancer Genome Atlas which returned 171 genes. Three chromosomal regions are associated with a significant difference in PFS between treatment arms with or without irinotecan. One of these regions, 6q16.1-q21, correlates in vitro with sensitivity to SN-38, the active metabolite of irinotecan. This genomic landscape of mCRC reveals a number of DNA copy number aberrations associated with response to drug therapy.

  14. Genomic landscape of metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Haan, Josien C.; Labots, Mariette; Rausch, Christian; Koopman, Miriam; Tol, Jolien; Mekenkamp, Leonie J. M.; van de Wiel, Mark A.; Israeli, Danielle; van Essen, Hendrik F.; van Grieken, Nicole C. T.; Voorham, Quirinus J. M.; Bosch, Linda J. W.; Qu, Xueping; Kabbarah, Omar; Verheul, Henk M. W.; Nagtegaal, Iris D.; Punt, Cornelis J. A.; Ylstra, Bauke; Meijer, Gerrit A.

    2014-01-01

    Response to drug therapy in individual colorectal cancer (CRC) patients is associated with tumour biology. Here we describe the genomic landscape of tumour samples of a homogeneous well-annotated series of patients with metastatic CRC (mCRC) of two phase III clinical trials, CAIRO and CAIRO2. DNA copy number aberrations of 349 patients are determined. Within three treatment arms, 194 chromosomal subregions are associated with progression-free survival (PFS; uncorrected single-test P-values <0.005). These subregions are filtered for effect on messenger RNA expression, using an independent data set from The Cancer Genome Atlas which returned 171 genes. Three chromosomal regions are associated with a significant difference in PFS between treatment arms with or without irinotecan. One of these regions, 6q16.1–q21, correlates in vitro with sensitivity to SN-38, the active metabolite of irinotecan. This genomic landscape of mCRC reveals a number of DNA copy number aberrations associated with response to drug therapy. PMID:25394515

  15. Multiple roles of angiotensin in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kuniyasu, Hiroki

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) cells express renin and chymase through which they can activate angiotensin. Renin expression is induced by hyperglycemic conditions. As angiotensinogen is produced in the liver, CRC cells that can activate angiotensin have an enhanced ability to metastasize to this organ. In human CRC cases, patients with diabetes have higher activities of rennin and angiotensin-II in primary tumors, and on average, have a more progressed disease stage, especially with respect to liver metastasis. These patients exhibit a stronger association with Hemoglobin A1c levels and metastasis compared to patients without diabetes. In a combined diabetes/CRC liver metastasis mouse model, concurrent treatment with anti-angiotensin and hypoglycemic agents shows a synergic effect in terms of reduced liver metastasis and improved survival. The effect of anti-angiotensin treatment and blood sugar control as a baseline management for colon cancer patients with diabetes needs to be examined in clinical trials to establish whether it can prevent liver metastasis. PMID:23293754

  16. Association between phytosterol intake and colorectal cancer risk: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jing; Xu, Ming; Fang, Yu-Jing; Lu, Min-Shan; Pan, Zhi-Zhong; Huang, Wu-Qing; Chen, Yu-Ming; Zhang, Cai-Xia

    2017-04-06

    A study in rodent models showed that phytosterols protected against colon carcinogenesis, probably by inhibiting dysregulated cell cycle progression and inducing cellular apoptosis. However, epidemiological studies on the relationship between phytosterols and colorectal cancer risk are quite limited. The aim of this study was to investigate dietary phytosterol intake in relation to colorectal cancer risk in the Chinese population. A case-control study was conducted from July 2010 to June 2016, recruiting 1802 eligible colorectal cancer cases plus 1813 age (5-year interval) and sex frequency-matched controls. Dietary information was collected by using a validated FFQ. The OR and 95 % CI of colorectal cancer risk were assessed by multivariable logistic regression models. A higher total intake of phytosterols was found to be associated with a 50 % reduction in colorectal cancer risk. After adjusting for various confounders, the OR of the highest quartile intake compared with the lowest quartile intake was 0·50 (95 % CI 0·41, 0·61, P trend<0·01) for total phytosterols. An inverse association was also found between the consumption of β-sitosterol, campesterol, campestanol and colorectal cancer risk. However, stigmasterol intake was related to an increased risk of colorectal cancer. No statistically significant association was found between β-sitostanol and colorectal cancer risk. Stratified analysis by sex showed that the positive association of stigmasterol intake with colorectal cancer risk was found only in women. These data indicated that the consumption of total phytosterols, β-sitosterol, campesterol and campestanol is inversely associated with colorectal cancer risk in a Chinese population.

  17. Colorectal cancer: From prevention to personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Binefa, Gemma; Rodríguez-Moranta, Francisco; Teule, Àlex; Medina-Hayas, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a very heterogeneous disease that is caused by the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. CRC develops through a gradual accumulation of genetic and epigenetic changes, leading to the transformation of normal colonic mucosa into invasive cancer. CRC is one of the most prevalent and incident cancers worldwide, as well as one of the most deadly. Approximately 1235108 people are diagnosed annually with CRC, and 609051 die from CRC annually. The World Health Organization estimates an increase of 77% in the number of newly diagnosed cases of CRC and an increase of 80% in deaths from CRC by 2030. The incidence of CRC can benefit from different strategies depending on its stage: health promotion through health education campaigns (when the disease is not yet present), the implementation of screening programs (for detection of the disease in its early stages), and the development of nearly personalized treatments according to both patient characteristics (age, sex) and the cancer itself (gene expression). Although there are different strategies for screening and although the number of such strategies is increasing due to the potential of emerging technologies in molecular marker application, not all strategies meet the criteria required for screening tests in population programs; the three most accepted tests are the fecal occult blood test (FOBT), colonoscopy and sigmoidoscopy. FOBT is the most used method for CRC screening worldwide and is also the primary choice in most population-based screening programs in Europe. Due to its non-invasive nature and low cost, it is one of the most accepted techniques by population. CRC is a very heterogeneous disease, and with a few exceptions (APC, p53, KRAS), most of the genes involved in CRC are observed in a small percentage of cases. The design of genetic and epigenetic marker panels that are able to provide maximum coverage in the diagnosis of colorectal neoplasia seems a reasonable strategy

  18. Promoting Colorectal Cancer Screening Discussion

    PubMed Central

    Christy, Shannon M.; Perkins, Susan M.; Tong, Yan; Krier, Connie; Champion, Victoria L.; Skinner, Celette Sugg; Springston, Jeffrey K.; Imperiale, Thomas F.; Rawl, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Provider recommendation is a predictor of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. Purpose To compare the effects of two clinic-based interventions on patient–provider discussions about CRC screening. Design Two-group RCT with data collected at baseline and 1 week post-intervention. Participants/setting African-American patients that were non-adherent to CRC screening recommendations (n=693) with a primary care visit between 2008 and 2010 in one of 11 urban primary care clinics. Intervention Participants received either a computer-delivered tailored CRC screening intervention or a nontailored informational brochure about CRC screening immediately prior to their primary care visit. Main outcome measures Between-group differences in odds of having had a CRC screening discussion about a colon test, with and without adjusting for demographic, clinic, health literacy, health belief, and social support variables, were examined as predictors of a CRC screening discussion using logistic regression. Intervention effects on CRC screening test order by PCPs were examined using logistic regression. Analyses were conducted in 2011 and 2012. Results Compared to the brochure group, a greater proportions of those in the computer-delivered tailored intervention group reported having had a discussion with their provider about CRC screening (63% vs 48%, OR=1.81, p<0.001). Predictors of a discussion about CRC screening included computer group participation, younger age, reason for visit, being unmarried, colonoscopy self-efficacy, and family member/friend recommendation (all p-values <0.05). Conclusions The computer-delivered tailored intervention was more effective than a nontailored brochure at stimulating patient–provider discussions about CRC screening. Those who received the computer-delivered intervention also were more likely to have a CRC screening test (fecal occult blood test or colonoscopy) ordered by their PCP. Trial registration This study is registered at www

  19. Mass screening for colorectal cancer in Hungary.

    PubMed Central

    Preisich, P; Siba, S; Szakátsy, E

    1987-01-01

    Haemoccult screening for colorectal tumours was carried out in Hungary in small cities and villages around Budapest. Haemoccult slides were supplied to 17,662 individuals over 40 years of age, and 15,431 (87%) were returned. Of these, 346 (2.2%) were positive and 18 colorectal carcinomas were detected. Additionally, 24 patients with one or more polyps greater than 1 cm diameter were found. Of the screened cases of cancer 39% were in Dukes' stage A and B, a rate twice as good as when screening was not done. The cost per tumour detected amounted to about three times more than one monthly income, indicating that the costs of screening for colorectal cancer are relatively much higher in Hungary than in Western countries. All expenses were met from state funds. PMID:3625689

  20. N-glycoprotein analysis discovers new up-regulated glycoproteins in colorectal cancer tissue.

    PubMed

    Nicastri, Annalisa; Gaspari, Marco; Sacco, Rosario; Elia, Laura; Gabriele, Caterina; Romano, Roberto; Rizzuto, Antonia; Cuda, Giovanni

    2014-11-07

    Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of death due to cancer worldwide. Therefore, the identification of high-specificity and -sensitivity biomarkers for the early detection of colorectal cancer is urgently needed. Post-translational modifications, such as glycosylation, are known to play an important role in cancer progression. In the present work, we used a quantitative proteomic technique based on (18)O stable isotope labeling to identify differentially expressed N-linked glycoproteins in colorectal cancer tissue samples compared with healthy colorectal tissue from 19 patients undergoing colorectal cancer surgery. We identified 54 up-regulated glycoproteins in colorectal cancer samples, therefore potentially involved in the biological processes of tumorigenesis. In particular, nine of these (PLOD2, DPEP1, SE1L1, CD82, PAR1, PLOD3, S12A2, LAMP3, OLFM4) were found to be up-regulated in the great majority of the cohort, and, interestingly, the association with colorectal cancer of four (PLOD2, S12A2, PLOD3, CD82) has not been hitherto described.

  1. Emerging role of vitamin D in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kang, Wonmo; Lee, Sujin; Jeon, Eunyi; Yun, Ye-Rang; Kim, Kook-Hyun; Jang, Jun-Hyeog

    2011-08-15

    Colorectal cancer is a common cancer and the fourth leading cause of death in Korea. The incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer varies according to risk factors, such as age, family history, genetic history, food habits, and physical activities. Some studies have focused on the association between vitamin D and colorectal cancer. Today, there is growing evidence that high vitamin D intake and a plasma level of 25(OH)D(3) reduce the incidence of colorectal cancer by modifying cancer angiogenesis, cell apoptosis, differentiation, and proliferation. Taken together, these results suggest that vitamin D supplementation alone, or in combination with anti-cancer agents, might reduce the incidence of colorectal cancer. In this review, we discuss the function and mechanism of vitamin D including the effect of vitamin D on colorectal cancer.

  2. Targeting of the MUC1-C Oncoprotein in Colitis-Associated Colorectal Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    the focus area is “inflammatory response in the development of colorectal cancer”. Inflammatory bowel disease ( IBD ) is associated with the development...of colorectal cancer; however, little is known about the mechanisms responsible for the progression of IBD to malignancy. The purpose of the work...the growth and survival of human colon cancer cells growing in vitro and as tumor xenografts in nude mice and to develop a MUC1+/ IL -10-/- model of

  3. Natural history of colorectal cancer in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (Lynch syndromes I and II).

    PubMed

    Lynch, H T; Watson, P; Lanspa, S J; Marcus, J; Smyrk, T; Fitzgibbons, R J; Kriegler, M; Lynch, J F

    1988-06-01

    Approximately 5 to 6 percent of the total colorectal cancer burden is accounted for by hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). Because clinical premonitory signs such as those seen in familial polyposis coli (FPC) are lacking, the clinician must recognize clinical findings and family history typical of HNPCC. The authors have described colorectal cancer expression from a survey of ten HNPCC kindreds. Kindred members with colorectal cancer differed significantly (P less than .05) from patients with sporadic colorectal cancer: 1) mean age of initial colon cancer diagnosis was 44.6 years; 2) 72.3 percent of first colon cancers were located in the right colon, and only 25 percent were in the sigmoid colon and rectum; 3) 18.1 percent had synchronous colon cancers; and 4) 24.2 percent developed metachronous colon cancer, with a risk for metachronous lesions in ten years of 40 percent. Affecteds and their first-degree relatives should undergo early intensive education and surveillance. In families with an early age of onset, colonoscopy should begin at age 25, and biannually thereafter, with fecal occult blood testing of the stool semiannually. Third-party carriers must become more responsive to the costly surveillance measures required for these otherwise healthy patients.

  4. Prognostic factors for tumour response, progression-free survival and toxicity in metastatic colorectal cancer patients given irinotecan (CPT-11) as second-line chemotherapy after 5FU failure

    PubMed Central

    Freyer, G; Rougier, P; Bugat, R; Droz, J-P; Marty, M; Bleiberg, H; Mignard, D; Awad, L; Herait, P; Culine, S; Trillet-Lenoir, V

    2000-01-01

    Our purpose was to determine, in patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma treated with irinotecan single-agent after 5-FU failure, the most significant predictive parameters for tumour response, progression-free survival and toxicity. Between October 1992 and April 1995, 455 patients with 5-FU resistant metastatic colorectal carcinoma entered four consecutive phase II trials. The first two studies assessed tumour response, the other two were randomized studies which assessed the efficacy of racecadotril to prevent irinotecan-induced diarrhoea. Due to homogeneous main eligibility criterias, data from those studies could be pooled for statistical analysis. Potential clinical and biological predictive factors (PF) for toxicity, tumour growth control, e.g. response or stabilization and progression-free survival (PFS), were studied in multivariate analysis. 363 patients were evaluable for response, 432 were evaluable for PFS, 368 for neutropenia and 416 for delayed diarrhoea, respectively. Normal baseline haemoglobin level (Hb), time since diagnosis of colorectal carcinoma, grade 3 or 4 neutropenia or diarrhoea at first cycle and a low number of organs involved were the most PF for tumour growth control (P< 0.05). Significant prognostic variables for PFS were WHO Performance Status, liver and lymph-node involvement, time since diagnosis, age and CEA value (P≤ 0.02). Six groups of patients based on the number of unfavourable prognostic factors are presented. Baseline bilirubin, haemoglobin level, number of organs involved and time from diagnosis were PF for neutropenia; PS, serum creatinine, leukocyte count, time from 5-FU progression and prior abdominopelvic irradiation were PF for delayed diarrhoea (P≤ 0.05). These PF should help clinicians to anticipate for a given patient the probability to observe a response/stabilization or a toxicity. These results should also be prospectively confirmed in ongoing or future trials using irinotecan, both as a single agent

  5. Individual Patient Data Analysis of Progression-Free Survival Versus Overall Survival As a First-Line End Point for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer in Modern Randomized Trials: Findings From the Analysis and Research in Cancers of the Digestive System Database

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Qian; de Gramont, Aimery; Grothey, Axel; Zalcberg, John; Chibaudel, Benoist; Schmoll, Hans-Joachim; Seymour, Matthew T.; Adams, Richard; Saltz, Leonard; Goldberg, Richard M.; Punt, Cornelis J.A.; Douillard, Jean-Yves; Hoff, Paulo M.; Hecht, Joel Randolph; Hurwitz, Herbert; Díaz-Rubio, Eduardo; Porschen, Rainer; Tebbutt, Niall C.; Fuchs, Charles; Souglakos, John; Falcone, Alfredo; Tournigand, Christophe; Kabbinavar, Fairooz F.; Heinemann, Volker; Van Cutsem, Eric; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Buyse, Marc; Sargent, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Progression-free survival (PFS) has previously been established as a surrogate for overall survival (OS) for first-line metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Because mCRC treatment has advanced in the last decade with extended OS, this surrogacy requires re-examination. Methods Individual patient data from 16,762 patients were available from 22 first-line mCRC studies conducted from 1997 to 2006; 12 of those studies tested antiangiogenic and/or anti–epidermal growth factor receptor agents. The relationship between PFS (first event of progression or death) and OS was evaluated by using R2 statistics (the closer the value is to 1, the stronger the correlation) from weighted least squares regression of trial-specific hazard ratios estimated by using Cox and Copula models. Results Forty-four percent of patients received a regimen that included biologic agents. Median first-line PFS was 8.3 months, and median OS was 18.2 months. The correlation between PFS and OS was modest (R2, 0.45 to 0.69). Analyses limited to trials that tested treatments with biologic agents, nonstrategy trials, or superiority trials did not improve surrogacy. Conclusion In modern mCRC trials, in which survival after the first progression exceeds time to first progression, a positive but modest correlation was observed between OS and PFS at both the patient and trial levels. This finding demonstrates the substantial variability in OS introduced by the number of lines of therapy and types of effective subsequent treatments and the associated challenge to the use of OS as an end point to assess the benefit attributable to a single line of therapy. PFS remains an appropriate primary end point for first-line mCRC trials to detect the direct treatment effect of new agents. PMID:25385741

  6. Individual patient data analysis of progression-free survival versus overall survival as a first-line end point for metastatic colorectal cancer in modern randomized trials: findings from the analysis and research in cancers of the digestive system database.

    PubMed

    Shi, Qian; de Gramont, Aimery; Grothey, Axel; Zalcberg, John; Chibaudel, Benoist; Schmoll, Hans-Joachim; Seymour, Matthew T; Adams, Richard; Saltz, Leonard; Goldberg, Richard M; Punt, Cornelis J A; Douillard, Jean-Yves; Hoff, Paulo M; Hecht, Joel Randolph; Hurwitz, Herbert; Díaz-Rubio, Eduardo; Porschen, Rainer; Tebbutt, Niall C; Fuchs, Charles; Souglakos, John; Falcone, Alfredo; Tournigand, Christophe; Kabbinavar, Fairooz F; Heinemann, Volker; Van Cutsem, Eric; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Buyse, Marc; Sargent, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Progression-free survival (PFS) has previously been established as a surrogate for overall survival (OS) for first-line metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Because mCRC treatment has advanced in the last decade with extended OS, this surrogacy requires re-examination. Individual patient data from 16,762 patients were available from 22 first-line mCRC studies conducted from 1997 to 2006; 12 of those studies tested antiangiogenic and/or anti-epidermal growth factor receptor agents. The relationship between PFS (first event of progression or death) and OS was evaluated by using R(2) statistics (the closer the value is to 1, the stronger the correlation) from weighted least squares regression of trial-specific hazard ratios estimated by using Cox and Copula models. Forty-four percent of patients received a regimen that included biologic agents. Median first-line PFS was 8.3 months, and median OS was 18.2 months. The correlation between PFS and OS was modest (R(2), 0.45 to 0.69). Analyses limited to trials that tested treatments with biologic agents, nonstrategy trials, or superiority trials did not improve surrogacy. In modern mCRC trials, in which survival after the first progression exceeds time to first progression, a positive but modest correlation was observed between OS and PFS at both the patient and trial levels. This finding demonstrates the substantial variability in OS introduced by the number of lines of therapy and types of effective subsequent treatments and the associated challenge to the use of OS as an end point to assess the benefit attributable to a single line of therapy. PFS remains an appropriate primary end point for first-line mCRC trials to detect the direct treatment effect of new agents. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  7. Reciprocal interactions between tumor-associated macrophages and CD44-positive cancer cells via osteopontin/CD44 promote tumorigenicity in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Rao, Guanhua; Wang, Hongyi; Li, Baowei; Huang, Li; Xue, Danfeng; Wang, Xiaohui; Jin, Haijing; Wang, Jun; Zhu, Yushan; Lu, Youyong; Du, Lei; Chen, Quan

    2013-02-15

    CD44 is of functional importance for tumor initiation and progression in colorectal cancer, but how this molecule benefits cancer cells from the tumor microenvironment, especially tumor-associated macrophages (TAM), remains poorly defined. In vivo tumorigenic assays were conducted to assess the role of murine TAMs in the tumorigenesis of human colorectal cancer cells. Both in vitro and in vivo osteopontin (OPN) expression levels in TAMs were examined by immunohistochemistry, quantitative PCR, and Western blotting. Soft agar colony formation assays were used to estimate the clonogenicity of colorectal cancer cells that had received different treatments. The relationships between the expression levels of OPN, CD44v6, and CD68 and clinical prognosis were evaluated by tissue microarray analysis. We found that macrophages, when coinjected or cocultured with CD44-positive colorectal cancer cells, were able to produce higher levels of OPN, which in turn facilitated the tumorigenicity and clonogenicity of the colorectal cancer cells. The knockdown of CD44 or treatment with blocking antibodies to CD44 attenuated OPN secretion. OPN, through binding to its receptor CD44, activated c-jun-NH(2)-kinase signaling and promoted the clonogenicity of colorectal cancer cells. Moreover, tissue microarray data have shown that OPN expression, in combination with CD44v6, has a negative correlation with colorectal cancer patient survival. These results suggest that the OPN-CD44 interaction is important for colorectal cancer progression and could serve as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of colorectal cancer. ©2012 AACR.

  8. Colorectal Cancer Presenting with Constipation During Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Povlow, Michael R

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a rare occurrence during pregnancy and can present with symptoms that are common during pregnancy such as constipation.This can make the diagnosis of colorectal cancer during pregnancy difficult. Management of colorectal cancer during pregnancy is similar to the treatment of non-pregnant patients, but with fetal safety in mind. This case report describes a 33-year-old female gravida two para one (G2P1) at 29 weeks gestation who presented with a complete bowel obstruction. Colonoscopy, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and later resection showed an obstructing malignancy which was then resected through an exploratory laparotomy with left hemicolectomy. Postoperatively, there was a concern for sepsis, so labor was induced and the baby was delivered vaginally. The patient then continued with chemotherapy with hematology-oncology. High clinical suspicion is needed to diagnose colorectal cancer during pregnancy. Once diagnosed, surgery can be considered if resectable, taking into account gestational age. Fetal safety is a major consideration during treatment. PMID:28553568

  9. Hereditary Colorectal Cancer (CRC) Program in Latvia

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study is to evaluate the incidence and phenotype - genotype characteristics of hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes in Latvia in order to develop the basis of clinical management for patients and their relatives affected by these syndromes. Materials and methods From 02/1999-09/2002 in several hospitals in Latvia cancer family histories were collected from 865 patients with CRC. In families suspected of having a history consistent with a hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome, DNA testing for MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 genes was performed. In addition immunohistochemical (IH) examination of the normal and cancer tissue from large bowel tumors for MSH2 and MSH6 protein expression was performed prior to DNA analysis. Results From the 865 CRC cases only 3 (0.35%) pedigrees fulfilled the Amsterdam II criteria of Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC) and 15 cases (1.73%) were suspected of HNPCC. In 69 cases (8%) with a cancer family aggregation (CFA) were identified. Thus far 27 IH analyses have been performed and in 3 cancers homogenous lack of MSH2 or MSH6 protein expression was found. In one of these cases a mutation in MSH6 was identified. In 18 patients suspected of HNPCC or of matching the Amsterdam II criteria, denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) followed by DNA sequencing of any heteroduplexes of the 35 exons comprising both MLH1 and MSH2 was performed revealing 3 mutations. For all of kindreds diagnosed definitively or with a high probability of being an HNPCC family appropriate recommendations concerning prophylactic measures, surveillance and treatment were provided in written form. Conclusions Existing pedigree/clinical data suggest that in Latvia the frequency of HNPCC is around 2% of consecutive colorectal cancer patients. It is crucial that genetic counseling is an integral part of cancer family syndrome management.

  10. Control of the human osteopontin promoter by ERRα in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Boudjadi, Salah; Bernatchez, Gérald; Beaulieu, Jean-François; Carrier, Julie C

    2013-07-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer. Osteopontin (OPN) is a component of tumor extracellular matrix identified as a key marker of cancer progression. The estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα) has been implicated in endocrine-related cancer development and progression, possibly through modulation of cellular energy metabolism. Previous reports that ERRα regulates OPN expression in bone prompted us to investigate whether ERRα controls OPN expression in human colorectal cancer. Using a tissue microarray containing 83 tumor-normal tissue pairs of colorectal cancer samples, we found that tumor epithelial cells displayed higher staining for ERRα than normal mucosa, in correlation with elevated OPN expression. In addition, knocking down endogenous ERRα led to reduced OPN expression in HT29 colon cancer cells. Promoter analysis, inhibition of ERRα activity, and expression and mutation of potential ERRα response elements in the proximal promoter of human OPN showed that ERRα and its obligate co-activator, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ co-activator-1 α, positively control human OPN promoter activity. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed in vivo occupancy of the OPN promoter by ERRα in HT29 cells, suggesting that OPN is a direct target of ERRα in colorectal cancer. These findings suggest an additional mechanism by which ERRα participates in the development and progression of colorectal cancer, further supporting the relevance of targeting ERRα with antagonists as anticancer agents.

  11. A novel antimetabolite: TAS-102 for metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yuji; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Baba, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    TAS-102 is a new oral anti-tumor drug, composed of a thymidine-based nucleoside analog (trifluridine: FTD) and a thymidine phosphorylase inhibitor (tipiracil hydrochloride: TPI). TAS-102 has been shown to significantly improve overall survival and progression-free survival in patients with refractory metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) in placebo-controlled randomized phase II and III trials. The current review summarizes mechanisms of action, pharmacokinetics/dynamics and preclinical and clinical data of TAS-102 in colorectal cancer. TAS-102 is a new salvage-line treatment option for patients with mCRC. TAS-102 is well tolerated and has great potential in future clinical drug combination therapies.

  12. Mouse models of colorectal cancer as preclinical models

    PubMed Central

    Buczacki, Simon J.A.; Arends, Mark J.; Adams, David J.

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we discuss the application of mouse models to the identification and pre‐clinical validation of novel therapeutic targets in colorectal cancer, and to the search for early disease biomarkers. Large‐scale genomic, transcriptomic and epigenomic profiling of colorectal carcinomas has led to the identification of many candidate genes whose direct contribution to tumourigenesis is yet to be defined; we discuss the utility of cross‐species comparative ‘omics‐based approaches to this problem. We highlight recent progress in modelling late‐stage disease using mice, and discuss ways in which mouse models could better recapitulate the complexity of human cancers to tackle the problem of therapeutic resistance and recurrence after surgical resection. PMID:26115037

  13. Choroidal and skin metastases from colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Joo Young; Oh, Edward Hynseung; Jung, Moon Ki; Park, Song Ee; Kim, Ji Tak; Hwang, In Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Choroidal and skin metastasis of colon cancer is rare. In women, the frequency of cutaneous metastasis from colon cancer as the primary lesion in is 9% and skin metastasis occurs in 0.81% of all colorectal cancers. We report a patient with colonic adenocarcinoma who presented with visual disorder in her right eye and scalp pain as her initial symptoms. Contrast-enhance orbital magnetic resonance imaging with fat suppression revealed an infrabulbar mass, and skin biopsy of the posterior parietal scalp confirmed adenocarcinoma. These symptoms were diagnosed as being caused by choroidal and skin metastases of colonic adenocarcinoma. We started palliative chemotherapy with oral capecitabine (1000 mg/m2, twice a day, on days 1-14) every 3 wk, which was effective at shrinking the brain masses and improving the visual disorder. This is the first report that capecitabine is effective at reducing a choroidal and cutaneous metastatic lesion from right-sided colorectal cancer. PMID:27920486

  14. Choroidal and skin metastases from colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ha, Joo Young; Oh, Edward Hynseung; Jung, Moon Ki; Park, Song Ee; Kim, Ji Tak; Hwang, In Gyu

    2016-11-21

    Choroidal and skin metastasis of colon cancer is rare. In women, the frequency of cutaneous metastasis from colon cancer as the primary lesion in is 9% and skin metastasis occurs in 0.81% of all colorectal cancers. We report a patient with colonic adenocarcinoma who presented with visual disorder in her right eye and scalp pain as her initial symptoms. Contrast-enhance orbital magnetic resonance imaging with fat suppression revealed an infrabulbar mass, and skin biopsy of the posterior parietal scalp confirmed adenocarcinoma. These symptoms were diagnosed as being caused by choroidal and skin metastases of colonic adenocarcinoma. We started palliative chemotherapy with oral capecitabine (1000 mg/m(2), twice a day, on days 1-14) every 3 wk, which was effective at shrinking the brain masses and improving the visual disorder. This is the first report that capecitabine is effective at reducing a choroidal and cutaneous metastatic lesion from right-sided colorectal cancer.

  15. Culture-independent analysis of the gut microbiota in colorectal cancer and polyposis.

    PubMed

    Scanlan, Pauline D; Shanahan, Fergus; Clune, Yvonne; Collins, John K; O'Sullivan, Gerald C; O'Riordan, Micheal; Holmes, Elaine; Wang, Yulan; Marchesi, Julian R

    2008-03-01

    A role for the intestinal microbiota is routinely cited as a potential aetiological factor in colorectal cancer initiation and progression. As the majority of bacteria in the gut are refractory to culture we investigated this ecosystem in subjects with colorectal cancer and with adenomatous polyposis who are at high risk of developing colorectal cancer, using culture-independent methods. Twenty colorectal cancer and 20 polypectomized volunteers were chosen for this analysis. An exploration of the diversity and temporal stability of the dominant bacteria and several bacterial subgroups was undertaken using 16S rRNA gene denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (RISA). Metabonomic analysis of the distal gut microbiota's environment was also undertaken. A significantly reduced temporal stability and increased diversity for the microbiota of subjects with colorectal cancer and polyposis was evident. A significantly increased diversity of the Clostridium leptum and C. coccoides subgroups was also noted for both disease groups. A clear division in the metabonome was observed for the colorectal cancer and polypectomized subjects compared with control volunteers. The intestinal microbiota and their metabolites are significantly altered in both colorectal cancer and polypectomized subjects compared with controls.

  16. Access to Cancer Services for Rural Colorectal Cancer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Laura-Mae; Cai, Yong; Larson, Eric H.; Dobie, Sharon A.; Wright, George E.; Goodman, David C.; Matthews, Barbara; Hart, L. Gary

    2008-01-01

    Context: Cancer care requires specialty surgical and medical resources that are less likely to be found in rural areas. Purpose: To examine the travel patterns and distances of rural and urban colorectal cancer (CRC) patients to 3 types of specialty cancer care services--surgery, medical oncology consultation, and radiation oncology consultation.…

  17. Access to Cancer Services for Rural Colorectal Cancer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Laura-Mae; Cai, Yong; Larson, Eric H.; Dobie, Sharon A.; Wright, George E.; Goodman, David C.; Matthews, Barbara; Hart, L. Gary

    2008-01-01

    Context: Cancer care requires specialty surgical and medical resources that are less likely to be found in rural areas. Purpose: To examine the travel patterns and distances of rural and urban colorectal cancer (CRC) patients to 3 types of specialty cancer care services--surgery, medical oncology consultation, and radiation oncology consultation.…

  18. Non-coding landscapes of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ragusa, Marco; Barbagallo, Cristina; Statello, Luisa; Condorelli, Angelo Giuseppe; Battaglia, Rosalia; Tamburello, Lucia; Barbagallo, Davide; Di Pietro, Cinzia; Purrello, Michele

    2015-01-01

    For two decades Vogelstein’s model has been the paradigm for describing the sequence of molecular changes within protein-coding genes that would lead to overt colorectal cancer (CRC). This model is now too simplistic in the light of recent studies, which have shown that our genome is pervasively transcribed in RNAs other than mRNAs, denominated non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). The discovery that mutations in genes encoding these RNAs [i.e., microRNAs (miRNAs), long non-coding RNAs, and circular RNAs] are causally involved in cancer phenotypes has profoundly modified our vision of tumour molecular genetics and pathobiology. By exploiting a wide range of different mechanisms, ncRNAs control fundamental cellular processes, such as proliferation, differentiation, migration, angiogenesis and apoptosis: these data have also confirmed their role as oncogenes or tumor suppressors in cancer development and progression. The existence of a sophisticated RNA-based regulatory system, which dictates the correct functioning of protein-coding networks, has relevant biological and biomedical consequences. Different miRNAs involved in neoplastic and degenerative diseases exhibit potential predictive and prognostic properties. Furthermore, the key roles of ncRNAs make them very attractive targets for innovative therapeutic approaches. Several recent reports have shown that ncRNAs can be secreted by cells into the extracellular environment (i.e., blood and other body fluids): this suggests the existence of extracellular signalling mechanisms, which may be exploited by cells in physiology and pathology. In this review, we will summarize the most relevant issues on the involvement of cellular and extracellular ncRNAs in disease. We will then specifically describe their involvement in CRC pathobiology and their translational applications to CRC diagnosis, prognosis and therapy. PMID:26556998

  19. Epigenetics in diagnosis of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Sameer, Aga Syed; Nissar, Saniya

    2016-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a third most common epithelial carcinoma. CRC is known to develop from the early precancerous lesion to full blown malignancy via definite phases due to cumulative mutations and aberrant methylation of number of genes. The use of serum biomarkers that is non-invasive to discriminate cancer patients from healthy persons will prove to be an important tool to improve the early diagnosis of CRC. This will serve as the boon to the clinical management of the disease.

  20. Early diagnosis for colorectal cancer in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ya-Li; Zhang, Zhen-Su; Wu, Ba-Ping; Zhou, Dian-Yuan

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To review the present studies on early diagnosis of colorectal cancer. METHODS: The detective rate for early cancer is 1.7%-26.1% based on various statistical data, with much higher detective rate in endoscopy. Since early cancer means invasion involved in the mucosa or submucosa, the diagnosis can only be made when the invasive depth is identified. Pathological tissue materials from both surgical operation or endoscopic resection are suitable for early cancer evaluation. RESULTS: Incidence of polyp malignancy is 1.4%-20.4%. The various constitutive proportion of polyps may explain the different rates. Malignant incidence is higher in adenomatous polyps, that for villous polyps can reach 21.3%-58.3%. Type II early stage of colorectal carcinoma is rarely reported in China. It is shownd that majority of them were not malignant, most of type IIa being adenoma or hyperplasia, and IIb being inflammatory and IIc might be the isolated ulcers. The occurrence of malignancy of type II is far lower than that of polypoid lesion. In China, the qualitative diagnosis and classification of neoplasm generally adopted the WHO standard, including surgical excision or biopsies. There is impersonal evaluation between colorectal pre-malignancy and cancer. The former emphasizes the dysplasia of nuclei and gland, while the latter is marked with cancer invasion. Diagnosis of early stage colorectal cancer in endoscopy is made with too much caution which made the detective rate much lower. Mass screening for asymptomatic subjects and follow-up for high risk population are mainly used to find the early stage colorectal cancer in China. Fecal occult blood test is also widely made as primary screening test, galactose oxygenase test of rectal mucus (T antigen), fecal occult albumin test are also used. The detective rate of colorectal cancer is 24-36.5 per 105 mass population. CONCLUSION: Although carcinoma associated antigen in blood or stool, microsatellite DNA instability for high risk

  1. New intracellular and molecular aspects in pathophysiology of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ziapour, Payman; Shadifar, Mohammad; Vaillancourt, Cathy; Ahmadi, Ali; Jafari-Sabet, Majid; Ataee, Amin

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common malignancy in the world and the second cancer-related death, many molecular and genetic aspects of this disease have been cleared as chromosomal instability and the role of some key proteins as WNT/β catenin, trypsin and others. Also recently the role of folate turnover and some neurotransmitters as serotonin were also considered. The scope of this review is to describe some details about new molecular pathways suggested for occurrence or progress of this disease. PMID:24834156

  2. Advances in glucose metabolism research in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Sitian; Fang, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells uptake glucose at a higher rate and produce lactic acid rather than metabolizing pyruvate through the tricarboxylic acid cycle. This adaptive metabolic shift is termed the Warburg effect. Recently progress had been made regarding the mechanistic understanding of glucose metabolism and associated diagnostic and therapeutic methods, which have been investigated in colorectal cancer. The majority of novel mechanisms involve important glucose metabolism associated genes and miRNA regulation. The present review discusses the contribution of these research results to facilitate with the development of novel diagnosis and anticancer treatment options. PMID:27602209

  3. Microbiota regulation of inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhanju; Cao, Anthony T.; Cong, Yingzi

    2013-01-01

    The host and microbiota have evolved mechanisms for coexistence over millions of years. Accumulating evidence indicates that a dynamic mutualism between the host and the commensal microbiota has important implications for health, and microbial colonization contributes to the maintenance of intestinal immune homeostasis. However, alterations in communication between the mucosal immune system and gut microbial communities have been implicated as the core defect that leads to chronic intestinal inflammation and cancer development. We will discuss the recent progress on how gut microbiota regulates intestinal homeostasis and the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer. PMID:24071482

  4. Selective internal radiation therapy for liver metastases from colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Amanda R; Chong, Li Chia; Karapetis, Christos; Price, Timothy J

    2016-11-01

    Liver metastases are often the dominant site of metastatic disease in colorectal cancer. Selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) involves embolising radiolabeled spheres (SIR-Spheres) into the arterial supply of the liver. This review assesses the effectiveness and toxicity of SIRT in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer liver metastasis when given alone or with systemic or regional hepatic artery chemotherapy. We reviewed only randomised controlled trials comparing SIRT and chemotherapy (systemic and/or regional) with chemotherapy alone, or comparing SIRT alone with best supportive care. Only four randomized trials were identified. Due to heterogeneity of the patients and treatments received it was not possible to perform a formal meta-analysis, therefore this is a descriptive analysis only. All studies included patients with either liver only or liver dominant metastatic colorectal cancer. Two trials compared SIRT alone and SIRT with chemotherapy first line. The first with only 21 patients revealed a significant improvement in PFS and median survival with SIRT. The larger second study SIRFLOX of 530 patients comparing SIRT and current standard first line FOLFOX chemotherapy (+/- bevacizumab) with standard FOLFOX+/-bevacizumab alone. There was no improvement in overall PFS with addition of SIRT. In chemotherapy refractory patients SIRT and systemic chemotherapy (fluorouracil) improved progression free survival but not overall survival. A final study (63 patients) compared SIRT and regional chemotherapy (floxuridine) with regional chemotherapy alone in first line showed no significant difference in progression free survival and median survival. There remains a lack of evidence that SIRT improves survival or quality of life in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. The overall survival results from SIRFLOX combined with FOXFIRE and FOXFIRE Global are awaited. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Screening for colorectal cancer and prostate cancer: challenges for New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Ann K; Potter, John D

    2014-06-06

    Prostate cancer and colorectal cancer are the most commonly registered cancers in New Zealanders and among the five most commonly registered cancers worldwide, but the balance of benefits and harms, and therefore appropriate screening policies, for these cancers differ. We aimed to compare the potential benefits and harms of screening for prostate cancer and colorectal cancer to aid prioritisation in New Zealand. Relevant reports from randomised controlled trials and systematic reviews of prostate cancer and colorectal cancer screening were reviewed to obtain estimates of the potential benefits and harms of screening for prostate cancer and colorectal cancer. The balance of potential benefits and harms of screening is better for colorectal cancer screening than for prostate cancer screening. For colorectal cancer, the balance of benefits and harms is better for flexible sigmoidoscopy screening than for faecal occult blood screening. In New Zealand, colorectal cancer screening should be a priority. Challenges include colonoscopy capacity, and decisions about the most appropriate screening modality.

  6. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors in colorectal cancer prevention: point.

    PubMed

    Arber, Nadir

    2008-08-01

    The limited success of current treatments for most advanced common malignancies highlights the importance of cancer prevention. Clinical trials on cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor drugs showed the potential of chemoprevention as a strategy for reducing cancer incidence, although not without associated side effects. The attractiveness of these drugs partly stems from an ability to engage multiple mechanisms of action by their potential to influence multiple components of the carcinogenesis pathway, from initiation to progression. There are two isoforms of the COX enzymes. COX-1 is constitutively expressed in normal tissues and serves as a "housekeeper" of mucosal integrity, whereas COX-2 is an immediate early response gene that is highly inducible by neoplastic and inflammatory stimuli. COX-2 is significantly overexpressed in colorectal neoplasms, making it an attractive therapeutic target. The drug market has been revolutionized by the development of preparations targeted selectively against COX-2, and a proof of concept has been achieved. Chemoprevention of colorectal cancer is already possible with celecoxib, but it is still not the ultimate drug of choice especially because of the cardiovascular risk associated with COX-2 inhibitors. Better patient selection and more effective and safer drugs are needed. Celecoxib is probably best used in a subset of individuals at moderate to high colorectal cancer risk and low risk of cardiovascular disease.

  7. Colorectal Cancer Prognosis Following Obesity Surgery in a Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Tao, Wenjing; Konings, Peter; Hull, Mark A; Adami, Hans-Olov; Mattsson, Fredrik; Lagergren, Jesper

    2017-05-01

    Obesity surgery involves mechanical and physiological changes of the gastrointestinal tract that might promote colorectal cancer progression. Thus, we hypothesised that obesity surgery is associated with poorer prognosis in patients with colorectal cancer. This nationwide population-based cohort study included all patients with an obesity diagnosis who subsequently developed colorectal cancer in Sweden from 1980 to 2012. The exposure was obesity surgery, and the main and secondary outcomes were disease-specific mortality and all-cause mortality, respectively. Cox proportional hazard survival models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), adjusted for sex, age, calendar year and education level. The exposed and unexposed cohort included 131 obesity surgery and 1332 non-obesity surgery patients with colorectal cancer. There was a statistically significant increased rate of colorectal cancer deaths following obesity surgery (disease-specific HR 1.50, 95% CI 1.00-2.19). When analysed separately, the mortality rate was more than threefold increased in rectal cancer patients with prior obesity surgery (disease-specific HR 3.70, 95% CI 2.00-6.90), while no increased mortality rate was found in colon cancer patients (disease-specific HR 1.10, 85% CI 0.67-1.70). This population-based study among obese individuals found a poorer prognosis in colorectal cancer following obesity surgery, which was primarily driven by the higher mortality rate in rectal cancer.

  8. Folate-related nutrients, genetic polymorphisms, and colorectal cancer risk: the fukuoka colorectal cancer study.

    PubMed

    Morita, Makiko; Yin, Guang; Yoshimitsu, Shin-ichiro; Ohnaka, Keizo; Toyomura, Kengo; Kono, Suminori; Ueki, Takashi; Tanaka, Masao; Kakeji, Yoshihiro; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Okamura, Takeshi; Ikejiri, Koji; Futami, Kitaroh; Maekawa, Takafumi; Yasunami, Yohichi; Takenaka, Kenji; Ichimiya, Hitoshi; Terasaka, Reiji

    2013-01-01

    One-carbon metabolism plays an important role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Meta-analyses have suggested protective associations of folate and vitamin B6 intakes with colorectal cancer primarily based on studies in Caucasians, and genetic polymorphisms pertaining to the folate metabolism have been a matter of interest. Less investigated are the roles of methionine synthase (MTR) and thymidylate synthetase (TS) polymorphisms in colorectal carcinogenesis. In a study of 816 cases and 815 community controls in Japan, we investigated associations of dietary intakes of folate, methionine, vitamin B2, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12 with colorectal cancer risk. The associations with MTR 2756A>G, MTRR 66A>G, and TSER repeat polymorphism were examined in 685 cases and 778 controls. Methionine and vitamin B12 intakes were inversely associated with colorectal cancer risk, but the associations were totally confounded by dietary calcium and n-3 fatty acids. The other nutrients showed no association with the risk even without adjustment for calcium and n-3 fatty acids. The TSER 2R allele was dose-dependently associated with an increased risk. The MTR and MTRR polymorphisms were unrelated to colorectal cancer risk. There was no measurable gene-gene or gene-nutrient interaction, but increased risk associated with the TSER 2R allele seemed to be confined to individuals with high folate status. This study does not support protective associations for folate and vitamin B6. The TSER 2R allele may confer an increased risk of colorectal cancer. The role of the TSER polymorphism in colorectal carcinogenesis may differ by ethnicity.

  9. Colorectal cancer screening using fecal occult blood test and subsequent risk of colorectal cancer: a prospective cohort study in Japan.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Jae; Inoue, Manami; Otani, Tetsuya; Iwasaki, Motoki; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2007-01-01

    To investigate prospectively the association between colorectal cancer screening and subsequent risk of colorectal cancer death in a large-scale population-based cohort study (the JPHC study) with a 13-year follow-up period in Japan. We analyzed data from a population-based cohort of 42,150 (20,326 men and 21,824 women) subjects. Subjects who had undergone fecal occult blood test (FOBT) screening during the preceding 12 months were defined as the screened group. A total of 132 colorectal cancer deaths and 597 cases of newly diagnosed colorectal cancer were identified during the follow-up period. We observed a nearly 70% decrease in colorectal cancer mortality in screened versus unscreened subjects (RR=0.28, 95% CI=0.13-0.61). Screening participation was associated with a 30% reduced risk of death from all causes other than colorectal cancer (RR=0.70, 95% CI=0.61-0.79). However, the extent of mortality reduction was greater for colorectal cancer than other causes. A significant decrease in the incidence of advanced colorectal cancer was seen in screened subjects (RR=0.41, 95% CI=0.27-0.63), although the overall incidence rate did not differ significantly between the screened and unscreened groups. Although self-selection bias could not be fully controlled, these findings suggest that colorectal cancer screening may be associated with a reduction in mortality from colorectal cancer in the Japanese population.

  10. BRAF Mutation in Colorectal Cancer: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Barras, David

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is still one of the deadliest cancer-related diseases. About 10% of CRC patients are characterized by a mutation in the B-Raf proto-oncogene serine/threonine kinase (BRAF) gene resulting in a valine-to-glutamate change at the residue 600 (V600E). This mutation is also present in more than 60% of melanoma patients. BRAF inhibitors were developed and found to improve patient survival; however, most patients at the end of the track ultimately develop resistance to these inhibitors. Melanoma patients benefit from the combination of BRAF inhibitors with mitogen/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK) inhibitors, among others. Unfortunately, colorectal patients do not respond much efficiently, which suggests different resistance mechanisms between the two cancer types. This review aims at shedding light on recent discoveries that improve our understanding of the BRAF mutation biology in CRC. PMID:26396549

  11. [Molecular genetics of colorectal cancer and carcinogenesis].

    PubMed

    Panduro Cerda, A; Lima González, G; Villalobos, J J

    1993-01-01

    Genetic and environmental aspects play an important role in the development of colorectal cancer. However, the common molecular alteration in both hereditary and sporadic colon cancer is localized in the APC gene. the APC gene maps in the long arm of chromosome 5 and was discovered in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). The search for the APC gene led to the identification of restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) in FAP patients. Using these RFLPs in relatives of FAP patients it is possible to make the presymptomatic and prenatal diagnosis. The FAP syndrome is an interesting model of carcinogenesis in vivo. Thus the different stages involved in the FAP syndrome which include hyperproliferative epithelium, adenoma, adenocarcinoma and metastases, have allowed the analysis of molecular alterations in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. The APC gene alteration if not inherited, occurs as the earliest molecular alteration in the development of colorectal cancer whereas structural alterations of the genes myc, ras, p53, MCC and DCC are considered to be late events. All these investigations have lead to 1) a better understanding of the ethiology of cancer and 2) early diagnosis of colorectal cancer in both the hereditary and sporadic forms of the disease.

  12. Superoxide-hydrogen peroxide imbalance interferes with colorectal cancer cells viability, proliferation and oxaliplatin response.

    PubMed

    Azzolin, Verônica Farina; Cadoná, Francine Carla; Machado, Alencar Kolinski; Berto, Maiquidieli Dal; Barbisan, Fernanda; Dornelles, Eduardo Bortoluzzi; Glanzner, Werner Giehl; Gonçalves, Paulo Bayard; Bica, Claudia Giugliano; da Cruz, Ivana Beatrice Mânica

    2016-04-01

    The role of superoxide dismutase manganese dependent enzyme (SOD2) in colorectal cancer is presently insufficiently understood. Some studies suggest that high SOD2 levels found in cancer tissues are associated with cancer progression. However, thus far, the role of colorectal cancer superoxide-hydrogen peroxide imbalance has not yet been studied. Thus, in order to address this gap in extant literature, we performed an in vitro analysis using HT-29 colorectal cell line exposed to paraquat, which generates high superoxide levels, and porphyrin, a SOD2 mimic molecule. The effect of these drugs on colorectal cancer cell response to oxaliplatin was evaluated. At 0.1 μM concentration, both drugs exhibited cytotoxic and antiproliferative effect on colorectal cancer cells. However, this effect was more pronounced in cells exposed to paraquat. Paraquat also augmented the oxaliplatin cytotoxic and antiproliferative effects by increasing the number of apoptosis events, thus causing the cell cycle arrest in the S and M/G2 phases. The treatments were also able to differentially modulate genes related to apoptosis, cell proliferation and antioxidant enzyme system. However, the effects were highly variable and the results obtained were inconclusive. Nonetheless, our findings support the hypothesis that imbalance caused by increased hydrogen peroxide levels could be beneficial to cancer cell biology. Therefore, the use of therapeutic strategies to decrease hydrogen peroxide levels mainly during oxaliplatin chemotherapy could be clinically important to the outcomes of colorectal cancer treatment.

  13. TUG1 mediates methotrexate resistance in colorectal cancer via miR-186/CPEB2 axis.

    PubMed

    Li, Changfeng; Gao, Yongjian; Li, Yongchao; Ding, Dayong

    2017-09-16

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a common malignancy, most of which remain unresponsive to chemotherapy. Methotrexate (MTX) is one of the earliest cytotoxic drugs and serves as an anti-metabolite and anti-folate chemotherapy for various types of cancer. However, MTX resistance prevents its clinical application in cancer therapy. Thereby, overcoming the drug resistance is an alternative strategy to maximize the efficacy of MTX therapies in clinics. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have gained widespread attention in recent years. More and more evidences have shown that lncRNAs play regulatory roles in various biological activities and disease progression including drug resistance in cancer cells. Here, we observed lncRNA TUG1 was associated to the MTX resistant in colorectal cancer cells. Firstly, quantitative analysis indicated that TUG1 was significantly increased in tumors which were resistant to MTX treatment. TUG1 knockdown re-sensitized the MTX resistance in colorectal cancer cells, which were MTX-resistant colorectal cell line. Furthermore, bioinformatics analysis showed that miR-186 could directly bind to TUG1, suggesting TUG1 might worked as a ceRNA to sponge miR-186. Extensively, our study also showed that CPEB2 was the direct target of miR-186 in colorectal cancer cells. Taken together, our study suggests that lncRNA TUG1 mediates MTX resistance in colorectal cancer via miR-186/CPEB2 axis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Sulindac and Celecoxib regulate cell cycle progression by p53/p21 up regulation to induce apoptosis during initial stages of experimental colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Vaish, Vivek; Rana, Chandan; Piplani, Honit; Vaiphei, Kim; Sanyal, Sankar Nath

    2014-03-01

    In the present study we have elaborated the putative mechanisms could be followed by the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) viz. Sulindac and Celecoxib in the regulation of cell cycle checkpoints along with tumor suppressor proteins to achieve their chemopreventive effects in the initial stages of experimental colorectal cancer. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered with 1,2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH) to produce early stages of colorectal carcinogenesis. The mRNA expression profiles of various target genes were analyzed by RT-PCR and validated by quantitative real-time PCR, whereas protein expression was analyzed by Western blotting. Nuclear localization of transcription factors or other nuclear proteins was analyzed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and immunofluorescence. Flowcytometry was performed to analyze the differential apoptotic events and cell cycle regulation. Molecular docking studies with different target proteins were also performed to deduce the various putative mechanisms of action followed by Sulindac and Celecoxib. We observed that DMH administration has abruptly increased the proliferation of colonic cells which is macroscopically visible in the form of multiple plaque lesions and co-relates with the disturbed molecular mechanisms of cell cycle regulation. However, co-administration of NSAIDs has shown regulatory effects on cell cycle checkpoints via induction of various tumor suppressor proteins. We may conclude that Sulindac and Celecoxib could possibly follow p53/p21 mediated regulation of cell proliferation, where down regulation of NF-κB signaling and activation of PPARγ might serve as important additional events in vivo.

  15. Prediagnostic Plasma Adiponectin and Survival among Patients with Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chong, Dawn Q; Mehta, Raaj S; Song, Mingyang; Kedrin, Dmitriy; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A; Ng, Kimmie; Wu, Kana; Fuchs, Charles S; Giovannucci, Edward L; Ogino, Shuji; Chan, Andrew T

    2015-12-01

    Circulating adiponectin is inversely related to the risk of colorectal cancer. However, its influence on colorectal cancer survival is unclear. We conducted a prospective study to evaluate the association between prediagnostic plasma levels of adiponectin and mortality in patients with colorectal cancer. We identified 621 incident colorectal cancer cases who provided blood specimens prior to diagnosis within the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) and Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS). Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CI). After a median follow-up of 9 years, there were 269 (43%) total deaths, of which 181 (67%) were due to colorectal cancer. Compared with participants in the lowest quartile of adiponectin, those in the highest quartile had multivariate HRs of 1.89 (95% CI, 1.21-2.97; P(trend) = 0.01) for colorectal cancer-specific mortality and 1.66 (95% CI, 1.15-2.39; P(trend) = 0.009) for overall mortality. The apparent increased risk in colorectal cancer-specific mortality was more pronounced in patients with metastatic disease (HR, 3.02: 95% CI, 1.50-6.08). Among patients with colorectal cancer, prediagnostic plasma adiponectin is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer-specific and overall mortality and is more apparent in patients with metastatic disease. Adiponectin may be a marker for cancers which develop through specific pathways that may be associated with worsened prognosis. Further studies are needed to validate these findings.

  16. miR-330 regulates the proliferation of colorectal cancer cells by targeting Cdc42

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuefeng; Zhu, Xiaolan; Xu, Wenlin; Wang, Dongqing; Yan, Jinchuan

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► miR-330 was inversely correlated with Cdc42 in colorectal cancer cells. ► Elevated miR-330 suppressed cell proliferation in vivo and in vitro. ► Elevated miR-330 mimicked the effect of Cdc42 knockdown. ► Restoration of Cdc42 could partially attenuate the effects of miR-330. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNA molecules that play important roles in the multistep process of colorectal carcinoma (CRC) development. However, the miRNA–mRNA regulatory network is far from being fully understood. The objective of this study was to investigate the expression and the biological roles of miR-330 in colorectal cancer cells. Cdc42, one of the best characterized members of the Rho GTPase family, was found to be up-regulated in several types of human tumors including CRC and has been implicated in cancer initiation and progression. In the present study, we identified miR-330, as a potential regulator of Cdc42, was found to be inversely correlated with Cdc42 expression in colorectal cancer cell lines. Ectopic expression of miR-330 down-regulated Cdc42 expression at both protein and mRNA level, mimicked the effect of Cdc42 knockdown in inhibiting proliferation, inducing G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of the colorectal cancer cells, whereas restoration of Cdc42 could partially attenuate the effects of miR-330. In addition, elevated expression of miR-330 could suppress the immediate downstream effectors of Cdc42 and inhibit the growth of colorectal cancer cells in vivo. To sum up, our results establish a role of miR-330 in negatively regulating Cdc42 expression and colorectal cancer cell proliferation. They suggest that manipulating the expression level of Cdc42 by miR-330 has the potential to influence colorectal cancer progression.

  17. The non-coding variant rs1800734 enhances DCLK3 expression through long-range interaction and promotes colorectal cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ning Qing; ter Huurne, Menno; Nguyen, Luan N.; Peng, Tianran; Wang, Shuang-Yin; Studd, James B.; Joshi, Onkar; Ongen, Halit; Bramsen, Jesper B; Yan, Jian; Andersen, Claus L.; Taipale, Jussi; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Houlston, Richard S.; Hubner, Nina C.; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G.

    2017-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified a great number of non-coding risk variants for colorectal cancer (CRC). To date, the majority of these variants have not been functionally studied. Identification of allele-specific transcription factor (TF) binding is of great importance to understand regulatory consequences of such variants. A recently developed proteome-wide analysis of disease-associated SNPs (PWAS) enables identification of TF-DNA interactions in an unbiased manner. Here we perform a large-scale PWAS study to comprehensively characterize TF-binding landscape that is associated with CRC, which identifies 731 allele-specific TF binding at 116 CRC risk loci. This screen identifies the A-allele of rs1800734 within the promoter region of MLH1 as perturbing the binding of TFAP4 and consequently increasing DCLK3 expression through a long-range interaction, which promotes cancer malignancy through enhancing expression of the genes related to epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. PMID:28195176

  18. Screening for colorectal cancer: possible improvements by risk assessment evaluation?

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Hans J; Jakobsen, Karen V; Christensen, Ib J; Brünner, Nils

    2011-11-01

    Emerging results indicate that screening improves survival of patients with colorectal cancer. Therefore, screening programs are already implemented or are being considered for implementation in Asia, Europe and North America. At present, a great variety of screening methods are available including colono- and sigmoidoscopy, CT- and MR-colonography, capsule endoscopy, DNA and occult blood in feces, and so on. The pros and cons of the various tests, including economic issues, are debated. Although a plethora of evaluated and validated tests even with high specificities and reasonable sensitivities are available, an international consensus on screening procedures is still not established. The rather limited compliance in present screening procedures is a significant drawback. Furthermore, some of the procedures are costly and, therefore, selection methods for these procedures are needed. Current research into improvements of screening for colorectal cancer includes blood-based biological markers, such as proteins, DNA and RNA in combination with various demographically and clinically parameters into a "risk assessment evaluation" (RAE) test. It is assumed that such a test may lead to higher acceptance among the screening populations, and thereby improve the compliances. Furthermore, the involvement of the media, including social media, may add even more individuals to the screening programs. Implementation of validated RAE and progressively improved screening methods may reform the cost/benefit of screening procedures for colorectal cancer. Therefore, results of present research, validating RAE tests, are awaited with interest.

  19. The Heterocellular Emergence of Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tape, Christopher J

    2017-02-01

    Tissues contain multiple different cell types and can be considered to be heterocellular systems. Signaling between different cells allows tissues to achieve phenotypes that no cell type can achieve in isolation. Such emergent tissue-level phenotypes can be said to 'supervene upon' heterocellular signaling. It is proposed here that cancer is also an emergent phenotype that supervenes upon heterocellular signaling. Using colorectal cancer (CRC) as an example, I review how heterotypic cells differentially communicate to support emergent malignancy. Studying tumors as integrated heterocellular systems - rather than as solitary expansions of mutated cells - may reveal novel ways to treat cancer.

  20. Hereditary Colorectal Cancer: Genetics and Screening.

    PubMed

    Brosens, Lodewijk A A; Offerhaus, G Johan A; Giardiello, Francis M

    2015-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer and the third leading cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. About 30% of patients with CRC report a family history of CRC. However, only 5% of CRCs arise in the setting of a well-established mendelian inherited disorder. In addition, serrated polyposis is a clinically defined syndrome with multiple serrated polyps in the colorectum and an increased CRC risk for which the genetics are unknown. This article focuses on genetic and clinical aspects of Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, and MUTYH-associated polyposis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Treatment of colorectal cancer in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Millan, Monica; Merino, Sandra; Caro, Aleidis; Feliu, Francesc; Escuder, Jordi; Francesch, Tani

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer has a high incidence, and approximately 60% of colorectal cancer patients are older than 70, with this incidence likely increasing in the near future. Elderly patients (> 70-75 years of age) are a very heterogeneous group, ranging from the very fit to the very frail. Traditionally, these patients have often been under-treated and recruited less frequently to clinical trials than younger patients, and thus are under-represented in publications about cancer treatment. Recent studies suggest that fit elderly patients can be treated in the same way as their younger counterparts, but the treatment of frail patients with comorbidities is still a matter of controversy. Many factors should be taken into account, including fitness for treatment, the wishes of the patient and family, and quality of life. This review will focus on the existing evidence for surgical, oncologic, and palliative treatment in patients over 70 years old with colorectal cancer. Careful patient assessment is necessary in order to individualize treatment approach, and this should rely on a multidisciplinary process. More well-designed controlled trials are needed in this patient population. PMID:26483875

  2. Body image concerns after colorectal cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Claire

    Body image is understood to be a person's perception of his or her own physical appearance although, as this article highlights, it embraces a greater range of bodily attributes than is often appreciated. It can be significantly affected by a diagnosis of colorectal cancer and subsequent treatment, which may modify the way the body looks, feels and functions. One of the major aesthetic and functional consequences of colorectal cancer surgery is the possibility of stoma formation, which is of particular concern to many. However, the range of other bodily effects following surgery should not be overlooked, not least because of they may result in distress. While concerns about changes in body image generally decrease over time, people recovering from cancer treatment often feel their relationship with their body has been permanently altered. Specialist support is often required when adjusting to any changes in bodily appearance and function. Care outcomes can be improved by having a sound understanding of the body image concerns likely to arise following treatment, as well as the skills to identify and support patients at risk of altered body image. This article provides guidance to nurses caring for individuals who may be experiencing distress over how their body is now perceived by themselves and others following colorectal cancer surgery.

  3. Colorectal cancer risk in hamartomatous polyposis syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Fábio Guilherme; Figueiredo, Marleny Novaes; Martinez, Carlos Augusto Real

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality around the world, and approximately 5% of them develop in a context of inherited mutations leading to some form of familial colon cancer syndromes. Recognition and characterization of these patients have contributed to elucidate the genetic basis of CRC. Polyposis Syndromes may be categorized by the predominant histological structure found within the polyps. The aim of the present paper is to review the most important clinical features of the Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes, a rare group of genetic disorders formed by the peutz-Jeghers syndrome, juvenil polyposis syndrome and PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndrome (Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalacaba and Cowden Syndromes). A literature search was performed in order to retrieve the most recent and important papers (articles, reviews, clinical cases and clinical guidelines) regarding the studied subject. We searched for terms such as “hamartomatous polyposis syndromes”, “Peutz-Jeghers syndrome”, “juvenile polyposis syndrome”, “juvenile polyp”, and “PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome” (Cowden syndrome, Bananyan-Riley-Ruvalcaba). The present article reports the wide spectrum of disease severity and extraintestinal manifestations, with a special focus on their potential to develop colorectal and other neoplasia. In the literature, the reported colorectal cancer risk for Juvenile Polyposis, Peutz-Jeghers and PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndromes are 39%-68%, 39%-57% and 18%, respectively. A review regarding cancer surveillance recommendations is also presented. PMID:25848489

  4. Colorectal cancer risk in hamartomatous polyposis syndromes.

    PubMed

    Campos, Fábio Guilherme; Figueiredo, Marleny Novaes; Martinez, Carlos Augusto Real

    2015-03-27

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality around the world, and approximately 5% of them develop in a context of inherited mutations leading to some form of familial colon cancer syndromes. Recognition and characterization of these patients have contributed to elucidate the genetic basis of CRC. Polyposis Syndromes may be categorized by the predominant histological structure found within the polyps. The aim of the present paper is to review the most important clinical features of the Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes, a rare group of genetic disorders formed by the peutz-Jeghers syndrome, juvenil polyposis syndrome and PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndrome (Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalacaba and Cowden Syndromes). A literature search was performed in order to retrieve the most recent and important papers (articles, reviews, clinical cases and clinical guidelines) regarding the studied subject. We searched for terms such as "hamartomatous polyposis syndromes", "Peutz-Jeghers syndrome", "juvenile polyposis syndrome", "juvenile polyp", and "PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome" (Cowden syndrome, Bananyan-Riley-Ruvalcaba). The present article reports the wide spectrum of disease severity and extraintestinal manifestations, with a special focus on their potential to develop colorectal and other neoplasia. In the literature, the reported colorectal cancer risk for Juvenile Polyposis, Peutz-Jeghers and PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndromes are 39%-68%, 39%-57% and 18%, respectively. A review regarding cancer surveillance recommendations is also presented.

  5. MicroRNAs: Clinical Relevance in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Joe; Ohtsuka, Masahisa; Pichler, Martin; Ling, Hui

    2015-11-25

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancer diagnoses and causes of mortality worldwide. MicroRNAs are a class of small, non-coding regulatory RNAs that have shown strong associations with colorectal cancer. Through the repression of target messenger RNAs, microRNAs modulate many cellular pathways, such as those involved in cell proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation. The utilization of microRNAs has shown significant promise in the diagnosis and prognosis of colorectal cancer, owing to their unique expression profile associations with cancer types and malignancies. Moreover, microRNA therapeutics with mimics or antagonists show great promise in preclinical studies, which encourages further development of their clinical use for colorectal cancer patients. The unique ability of microRNAs to affect multiple downstream pathways represents a novel approach for cancer therapy. Although still early in its development, we believe that microRNAs can be used in the near future as biomarkers and therapeutic targets for colorectal cancer.

  6. Dietary polyphenols and colorectal cancer risk: The Fukuoka colorectal cancer study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen-Jie; Ohnaka, Keizo; Morita, Makiko; Toyomura, Kengo; Kono, Suminori; Ueki, Takashi; Tanaka, Masao; Kakeji, Yoshihiro; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Okamura, Takeshi; Ikejiri, Koji; Futami, Kitaroh; Maekawa, Takafumi; Yasunami, Yohichi; Takenaka, Kenji; Ichimiya, Hitoshi; Terasaka, Reiji

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the associations between dietary intake of polyphenols and colorectal cancer. METHODS: The study subjects were derived from the Fukuoka colorectal cancer study, a community-based case-control study. The study subjects were 816 cases of colorectal cancer and 815 community-based controls. The consumption of 148 food items was assessed by a computer-assisted interview. We used the consumption of 97 food items to estimate dietary intakes of total, tea and coffee polyphenols. The Phenol-Explorer database was used for 92 food items. Of the 5 foods which were not listed in the Phenol-Explorer Database, polyphenol contents of 3 foods (sweet potatoes, satoimo and daikon) were based on a Japanese study and 2 foods (soybeans and fried potatoes) were estimated by ORAC-based polyphenol contents in the United States Department of Agriculture Database. Odds ratios (OR) and 95%CI of colorectal cancer risk according to quintile categories of intake were obtained by using logistic regression models with adjustment for age, sex, residential area, parental history of colorectal cancer, smoking, alcohol consumption, body mass index 10 years before, type of job, leisure-time physical activity and dietary intakes of calcium and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. RESULTS: There was no measurable difference in total or tea polyphenol intake between cases and controls, but intake of coffee polyphenols was lower in cases than in controls. The multivariate-adjusted OR of colorectal cancer according to quintile categories of coffee polyphenols (from the first to top quintile) were 1.00 (referent), 0.81 (95%CI: 0.60-1.10), 0.65 (95%CI: 0.47-0.89), 0.65 (95%CI: 0.46-0.89) and 0.82 (95%CI: 0.60-1.10), respectively (Ptrend = 0.07). Similar, but less pronounced, decreases in the OR were also noted for the third and fourth quintiles of total polyphenol intake. Tea polyphenols and non-coffee polyphenols showed no association with colorectal cancer risk. The site-specific analysis

  7. Diet and supplements and their impact on colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pericleous, Marinos; Mandair, Dalvinder

    2013-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer is the third commonest cancer and the third leading cause of cancer death among men and women. It has been proposed that dietary factors are responsible for 70-90% of colorectal cancer and diet optimization may prevent most cases. Aim To evaluate the role of dietary components and supplements in colorectal cancer. Methods Bibliographical searches were performed in Pubmed for the terms “diet and colorectal cancer”, “diet and colon cancer”, “diet and rectal cancer”, “nutrition and colorectal cancer”, “probiotics and colorectal cancer”, “prebiotics and colorectal cancer”, “alcohol and cancer” and “colorectal cancer epidemiology”. Results Consumption of processed or red meat, especially when cooked at high temperatures may be associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer. The evidence for dietary fibre is unclear but foods that contain high amounts of fibre are usually rich in polyphenols which have been shown to alter molecular processes that can encourage colorectal carcinogenesis. Meta-analyses provide evidence on the benefits of circulating, diet-derived and supplemented, vitamin D and Calcium. We also found that diets rich in Folate may prevent colorectal carcinoma. The evidence on dietary micronutrients such as Zinc and Selenium in association with colorectal cancer is not conclusive. It has been suggested that there may be a direct association between alcohol intake and colorectal cancer. In vitro and in vivo studies have highlighted a possible protective role of prebiotics and probiotics. Conclusions The lack of randomized trials and the presence of confounding factors including smoking, physical activity, obesity and diabetes may often yield inconclusive results. Carefully designed randomized trials are recommended. PMID:24294513

  8. Dietary fatty acids, luminal modifiers, and risk of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Ikuko; Majumdar, Adhip P.; Land, Susan J.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.; Severson, Richard K.

    2009-01-01

    Inconsistent observations in epidemiologic studies on the association between total fat intake and colorectal cancer may be ascribed to opposing effects of individual fatty acids and the presence of other dietary constituents that modify luminal or systemic lipid exposure. We analyzed the data from a population-based case-control study that included 1163 cases and 1501 controls to examine the effects of individual fatty acid groups on colorectal cancer risk as well as their interactions with calcium and fiber intake. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated by unconditional logistic regression model according to quartile levels of energy-adjusted fatty acid intake. In the bivariable analyses, the risk of colorectal cancer increased with trans fatty acid (TFA) intake (OR for top vs bottom quartile =1.46, 95% CI 1.17-1.59, p-value for a trend <0.001 ), but the associations was substantially attenuated in multivariable analyses (p-value for a trend =0.176). However, a significant linear trend in the multivariable OR (p=0.029) for TFA was present for subjects with lower calcium intake. Furthermore, multivariable ORs progressively decreased with increasing both omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid intake (P-values for linear trend: 0.033 and 0.011, respectively) for subjects with lower dietary fiber intake. These interactions were also significant or marginally significant (P = 0.085 for TFA, 0.029 for omega-3 and 0.068 for omega-6). Our results suggest that populations with lower intake of luminal modifiers, i.e., calcium and fiber, may have differential risks of colorectal cancer associated with dietary fatty acid intake. PMID:19998336

  9. miR-433 reduces cell viability and promotes cell apoptosis by regulating MACC1 in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiaxin; Mao, Xuping; Wang, Xing; Miao, Ganggang; Li, Jiaxin

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are reported to have important roles in regulating the progression of numerous human cancers, although little is known regarding the role of miRNAs in colorectal cancer. The present study aimed to investigate the role of microRNA-433 (miR-433) in colorectal cancer. The expression levels of miR-433 and its target gene metastasis associated in colon cancer-1 (MACC1) in colorectal cancer tissues were evaluated using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. Furthermore, flow cytometry and MTT assays were used to examine the apoptosis, cell cycle distribution and viability of human colorectal cancer cells, and luciferase reporter and western blot assays were performed to verify the regulatory mechanism of miR-433 on MACC1. In addition, caspase-3 and caspase-9 expression were examined using western blotting. It was demonstrated that miR-433 expression was downregulated in colorectal cancer tissues and cell lines. Artificial upregulation of miR-433 in colorectal cancer cell lines using miR-433 mimics revealed that upregulation of miR-433 was able to reduce the viability and promote the apoptosis of colorectal cancer cells by downregulating MACC1. Taken together, these results suggested that miR-433 may have an important role in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. PMID:28123526

  10. Genetics, Cytogenetics, and Epigenetics of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Migliore, Lucia; Migheli, Francesca; Spisni, Roberto; Coppedè, Fabio

    2011-01-01

    Most of the colorectal cancer (CRC) cases are sporadic, only 25% of the patients have a family history of the disease, and major genes causing syndromes predisposing to CRC only account for 5-6% of the total cases. The following subtypes can be recognized: MIN (microsatellite instability), CIN (chromosomal instability), and CIMP (CpG island methylator phenotype). CIN occurs in 80–85% of CRC. Chromosomal instability proceeds through two major mechanisms, missegregation that results in aneuploidy through the gain or loss of whole chromosomes, and unbalanced structural rearrangements that lead to the loss and/or gain of chromosomal regions. The loss of heterozygosity that occur in the first phases of the CRC cancerogenesis (in particular for the genes on 18q) as well as the alteration of methylation pattern of multiple key genes can drive the development of colorectal cancer by facilitating the acquisition of multiple tumor-associated mutations and the instability phenotype. PMID:21490705

  11. COGENT (COlorectal cancer GENeTics) revisited

    PubMed Central

    Houlston, Richard S.

    2012-01-01

    Many colorectal cancers (CRCs) develop in genetically susceptible individuals most of whom are not carriers of germ line mismatch repair or APC gene mutations and much of the heritable risk of CRC appears to be attributable to the co-inheritance of multiple low-risk variants. The accumulated experience to date in identifying this class of susceptibility allele has highlighted the need to conduct statistically and methodologically rigorous studies and the need for the multi-centre collaboration. This has been the motivation for establishing the COGENT (COlorectal cancer GENeTics) consortium which now includes over 20 research groups in Europe, Australia, the Americas, China and Japan actively working on CRC genetics. Here, we review the rationale for identifying low-penetrance variants for CRC and the current and future challenges for COGENT. PMID:22294761

  12. Genetics, diagnosis and management of colorectal cancer (Review)

    PubMed Central

    DE ROSA, MARINA; PACE, UGO; REGA, DANIELA; COSTABILE, VALERIA; DURATURO, FRANCESCA; IZZO, PAOLA; DELRIO, PAOLO

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common type of cancer worldwide and a leading cause of cancer death. Surgery represents the mainstay of treatment in early cases but often patients are primarily diagnosed in an advanced stage of disease and sometimes also distant metastases are present. Neoadjuvant therapy is therefore needed but drug resistance may influence response and concur to recurrent disease. At molecular level, it is a very heterogeneous group of diseases with about 30% of hereditary or familial cases. During colorectal adenocarcinomas development, epithelial cells from gastrointestinal trait acquire sequential genetic and epigenetic mutations in specific oncogenes and/or tumour suppressor genes, causing CRC onset, progression and metastasis. Molecular characterization of cancer associated mutations gives valuable information about disease prognosis and response to the therapy. Very early diagnosis and personalized care, as well as a better knowledge of molecular basis of its onset and progression, are therefore crucial to obtain a cure of CRC. In this review, we describe updated genetics, current diagnosis and management of CRC pointing out the extreme need for a multidisciplinary approach to achieve the best results in patient outcomes. PMID:26151224

  13. Clinical guideline seom: hereditary colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Guillén-Ponce, C; Serrano, R; Sánchez-Heras, A B; Teulé, A; Chirivella, I; Martín, T; Martínez, E; Morales, R; Robles, L

    2015-12-01

    Genetic mutations have been identified as the cause of inherited cancer risk in some colon cancer; these mutations are estimated to account for only 5-6 % of colorectal cancer (CRC) cases overall. Up to 25-30 % of patients have a family history of CRC that suggests a hereditary component, common exposures among family members, or a combination of both. Cancers in people with a hereditary predisposition typically occur at an earlier age than in sporadic cases. A predisposition to CRC may include a predisposition to other cancers, such as endometrial cancer. We describe genetics, current diagnosis and management of CRC hereditary syndromes pointing to a multidisciplinary approach to achieve the best results in patients and family outcomes.

  14. Advances in treatment of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    McCafferty, Michael H

    2005-10-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide the practicing surgeon with an outline of several significant developments in colorectal cancer treatment that have affected the care of patients. This review is not intended to report on every important publication of the past few years nor is it intended to be encyclopedic. The author simply hopes to provide a useful reference for surgeons in their daily practice.

  15. TEAD1 enhances proliferation via activating SP1 in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Min-Hao; Zhang, Wei

    2016-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the most common type of gastrointestinal cancer. However, up to date, the specific mechanism for CRC proliferation remains unclear. Transcriptional enhancer activator domain 1 (TEAD1) is a transcription factor belongs to the TEAD family, which plays an important role in cancers progression. Here, we investigated the role of TEAD1 in CRC, and found that overexpression of TEAD1 was proved to increase colorectal cancer cells proliferation, whereas, knockdown of TEAD1 reduces the growth of cancer cells by BrdU assay, cell cycle analysis and MTT assay. Furthermore, we performed luciferase assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay to investigate the underlying mechanism of TEAD1 in CRC system, and observed that TEAD1 could enhance the expression levels of SP1, by directly binding to its promoter. In summary, we provided evidence for a novel mechanism regulating growth and proliferation in colorectal cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Genetic factors and colorectal cancer in Ashkenazi Jews.

    PubMed

    Locker, Gershon Y; Lynch, Henry T

    2004-01-01

    The observed increased incidence of colorectal cancer in Ashkenazi Jews compared to other populations is unexplained but likely has a genetic component. The I1307K APC polymorphism/mutation is carried by 6-8% of Ashkenazim and increases the risk of colorectal cancer 1.5-2 fold. There are few differences between the phenotype of colorectal cancer in I1307K carriers and sporadic cases. It is estimated that the mutation accounts for 6% of cases of colorectal cancer in Jews of Eastern European heritage. It should not be the subject of mass screening in Ashkenazi Jews, although it may be important in cases of familial colorectal cancer. Even rarer is the 1906G-->C MSH2 mutation carried by less than 1% of Ashkenazim, but as with other HNPCC mutations likely associated with a high risk of malignancy. Mutations at 15q13-14 are associated with the colorectal adenoma and carcinoma syndrome (CRAC) described in Ashkenazi families. The prevalence of the mutation is not known, nor its significance as a cause of colorectal cancer. Despite the paucity of genetic explanations for the high risk of colorectal cancer in Ashkenazim, that risk warrants aggressive colorectal cancer screening and particular attention to family history of malignancy in all Jews of Ashkenazi descent.

  17. Circulating tumor cells in colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Torino, Francesco; Bonmassar, Enzo; Bonmassar, Laura; De Vecchis, Liana; Barnabei, Agnese; Zuppi, Cecilia; Capoluongo, Ettore; Aquino, Angelo

    2013-11-01

    The availability of sensitive methods has allowed the detailed study of circulating tumor cells only recently. Evolving evidence support the prognostic and predictive role of these cells in patients affected by several solid tumors, including colorectal cancer. Ongoing studies are aimed at confirming that the molecular characterization of circulating tumor cells in peripheral blood and in bone marrow of patients is a powerful tool to improve the patient risk-stratification, to monitor activity of the drugs, to develop more appropriate targeted therapies and tailored treatments. In parallel, results from these correlative studies promise to gain a better biological understanding of the metastatic process. The clinical utility of the detection of circulating tumor cells in patients affected by colorectal cancer is still hampered by a number of specific hurdles. Improvement in sensitivity and specificity of the available methods of detection, standardization of these methods and functional characterization of circulating tumor cells in well designed and statistically well powered studies are the key steps to reach these ambitious objectives in colorectal cancer patients as well. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Polymorphisms within inflammatory genes and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Landi, Stefano; Gemignani, Federica; Bottari, Fabio; Gioia-Patricola, Lydie; Guino, Elisabet; Cambray, María; Biondo, Sebastiano; Capella, Gabriel; Boldrini, Laura; Canzian, Federico; Moreno, Victor

    2006-01-01

    Background Chronic inflammation is a risk factor for colorectal cancer and polymorphisms in the inflammatory genes could modulate the levels of inflammation. We have investigated ten single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the following inflammation-related genes: TLR4 (Asp299Gly), CD14 (-260 T>C), MCP1 (-2518 A>G), IL12A (+7506 A>T, +8707 A>G, +9177 T>A, +9508 G>A), NOS2A (+524T>C), TNF (-857C>T), and PTGS1 (V444I) in 377 colorectal (CRC) cancer cases and 326 controls from Barcelona (Spain). Results There was no statistically significant association between the SNPs investigated and colorectal cancer risk. Conclusion The lack of association may show that the inflammatory genes selected for this study are not involved in the carcinogenic process of colorectum. Alternatively, the negative results may derive from no particular biological effect of the analysed polymorphisms in relation to CRC. Otherwise, the eventual biological effect is so little to go undetected, unless analysing a much larger sample size. PMID:17062130

  19. KISS1 expression in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kostakis, Ioannis D; Agrogiannis, George; Vaiopoulos, Aristeidis G; Mylona, Eleni; Patsouris, Efstratios; Kouraklis, Gregory; Koutsilieris, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Kisspeptins, the products of the KISS1 gene, are involved in cancer invasion, migration, metastasis and angiogenesis, while they induce apoptosis in various cancers. Herein, we studied KISS1 expression in colorectal cancer. We analyzed KISS1 expression using immunohistochemistry and image analysis in normal and malignant tissue samples from 60 patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma. The results correlated with various clinicopathological parameters. The expression of KISS1 was much higher in normal than in malignant colonic mucosa. However, among malignant tissues, KISS1 expression was higher in larger tumors (>4 cm) than in smaller ones (≤4 cm) and in stages III and IV than in stages I and II. In addition, it was higher in patients with lymph node metastases. Moreover, KISS1 levels in the normal mucosa and their difference from those in the malignant mucosa were higher in the right part of the large intestine than in the left one. KISS1 expression is reduced during the malignant transformation of the colonic mucosa and there is a difference in the expression pattern between the right and the left part of the large intestine. However, larger and advanced colorectal tumors express higher KISS1 levels than smaller and localized ones.

  20. Differential prognosis of metastatic colorectal cancer patients post-progression to first-line triplet chemotherapy plus bevacizumab, FIr-B/FOx, according to second-line treatment and KRAS genotype

    PubMed Central

    BRUERA, GEMMA; CANNITA, KATIA; GIORDANO, ALDO VICTOR; VICENTINI, ROBERTO; FICORELLA, CORRADO; RICEVUTO, ENRICO

    2014-01-01

    Clinical outcome post-progression to first-line triplet chemotherapy (CT) plus bevacizumab (FIr-B/FOx) was evaluated in metastatic colorectal cancer (MCRC) patients (pts). Second-line treatment was selected according to fitness, KRAS genotype, previous efficacy and safety. Efficacy was evaluated and compared according to treatment or KRAS genotype, using log-rank analysis. Among 54 pts, median overall survival (OS) post-progression was 12 months, significantly better in 40 (74.1%) treated compared to 14 (25.9%) who died without further treatment. Second-line surgical treatment, 4 pts (7.4%), medical treatment, 36 pts (66.7%): triplet CT plus targeted agent, 10 (18.5%); triplet regimens, 19 (35.2%); doublet/monotherapy, 7 (13%). At follow-up of 14 months, objective response rate (ORR) was 38%, metastasectomies 12.5%, progression-free survival (PFS) 10 months, OS 14 months. According to treatment, ORR, metastasectomies, PFS and OS were significantly favourable in triplet CT plus targeted agent compared to triplet, respectively: 80%, 40%, 13 months, not reached; 28%, 6%, 8 months, 11 months. PFS and OS were significantly worse in c.35 G>A mutant compared to wild-type and/or other mutant patients. Prognosis after progression to first-line FIr-B/FOx may be significantly favourable in MCRC pts re-challenged with intensive regimens, and unfavourable in c.35 G>A KRAS mutant patients. PMID:24247407

  1. Soy food and isoflavone intake and colorectal cancer risk: the Fukuoka Colorectal Cancer Study.

    PubMed

    Budhathoki, Sanjeev; Joshi, Amit Man; Ohnaka, Keizo; Yin, Guang; Toyomura, Kengo; Kono, Suminori; Mibu, Ryuichi; Tanaka, Masao; Kakeji, Yoshihiro; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Okamura, Takeshi; Ikejiri, Koji; Futami, Kitaroh; Maekawa, Takafumi; Yasunami, Yohichi; Takenaka, Kenji; Ichimiya, Hitoshi; Terasaka, Reiji

    2011-02-01

    It has been suggested that soy food and isoflavone intake may be protective against the risk of colorectal cancer. However, epidemiologic evidence remains sparse and inconsistent. We addressed this issue in the Fukuoka Colorectal Cancer Study. The study subjects were the 816 incident cases of histologically confirmed colorectal cancer and 815 community controls. Intakes of soy foods and isoflavones were assessed by in-person interview using a computer-assisted dietary method. Logistic regression analysis was applied to estimate odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of colorectal cancer with adjustment for dietary intakes of calcium and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids as well as for body mass index, physical activity, alcohol use, and other lifestyle factors. Energy-adjusted intakes of soy foods (dry weight) and isoflavones were inversely associated with colorectal cancer risk in men and postmenopausal women, but not in premenopausal women. The multivariate-adjusted OR for the highest versus lowest quintile was 0.65 (95% CI 0.41-1.03, p for trend = 0.03) for soy foods and 0.68 (95% CI 0.42-1.10, p for trend = 0.051) for isoflavones in men. The corresponding values for postmenopausal women were 0.60 (95% CI 0.29-1.25, p for trend = 0.053) and 0.68 (95% CI 0.33-1.40, p for trend = 0.049). The site-specific analysis showed inverse associations of soy foods (p for trend = 0.007) and isoflavones (p for trend = 0.02) with rectal cancer in men. The findings add to epidemiologic evidence for protective effects of soy foods and isoflavones in colorectal carcinogenesis.

  2. Cancer stem cells in colorectal cancer from pathogenesis to therapy: controversies and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Fanali, Caterina; Lucchetti, Donatella; Farina, Marisa; Corbi, Maddalena; Cufino, Valerio; Cittadini, Achille; Sgambato, Alessandro

    2014-01-28

    Colorectal cancer remains one of the most common and lethal malignancies worldwide despite the use of various therapeutic strategies. A better understanding of the mechanisms responsible for tumor initiation and progression is essential for the development of novel, more powerful therapies. The traditional, so-called "stochastic model" of tumor development, which assumes that each cancer cell is tumorigenic, has been deeply challenged during the past decade by the identification of cancer stem cells (CSCs), a biologically distinct subset of cells within the bulk of tumor mass. This discovery led to the development of the hierarchical model of tumorigenesis which assumes that only CSCs have the ability to initiate tumor growth, both at primary and metastatic sites. This model implies that the elimination of all CSCs is fundamental to eradicate tumors and that failure to do so might be responsible for the occurrence of relapses and/or metastases frequently observed in the clinical management of colorectal cancer patients. Identification and isolation of CSCs is essential for a better understanding of their role in the tumorigenetic process and for the development of CSC-specific therapies. Several methods have been used for this purpose and many efforts have been focused on the identification of specific CSC-surface markers. This review provides an overview of the proposed roles of CSC in human colorectal tumorigenesis focusing on the most important molecules identified as CSC-specific markers in colorectal cancer and on the potential strategies for the development of CSC-targeted therapy.

  3. Immunotherapy and immunoescape in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mazzolini, Guillermo; Murillo, Oihana; Atorrasagasti, Catalina; Dubrot, Juan; Tirapu, Iñigo; Rizzo, Miguel; Arina, Ainhoa; Alfaro, Carlos; Azpilicueta, Arantza; Berasain, Carmen; Perez-Gracia, José L; Gonzalez, Alvaro; Melero, Ignacio

    2007-01-01

    Immunotherapy encompasses a variety of interventions and techniques with the common goal of eliciting tumor cell destructive immune responses. Colorectal carcinoma often presents as metastatic disease that impedes curative surgery. Novel strategies such as active immunization with dendritic cells (DCs), gene transfer of cytokines into tumor cells or administration of immunostimulatory monoclonal antibodies (such as anti-CD137 or anti-CTLA-4) have been assessed in preclinical studies and are at an early clinical development stage. Importantly, there is accumulating evidence that chemotherapy and immunotherapy can be combined in the treatment of some cases with colorectal cancer, with synergistic potentiation as a result of antigens cross-presented by dendritic cells and/or elimination of competitor or suppressive T lymphocyte populations (regulatory T-cells). However, genetic and epigenetic unstable carcinoma cells frequently evolve mechanisms of immunoevasion that are the result of either loss of antigen presentation, or an active expression of immunosuppressive substances. Some of these actively immunosuppressive mechanisms are inducible by cytokines that signify the arrival of an effector immune response. For example, induction of 2, 3 indoleamine dioxygenase (IDO) by IFNγ in colorectal carcinoma cells. Combinational and balanced strategies fostering antigen presentation, T-cell costimulation and interference with immune regulatory mechanisms will probably take the stage in translational research in the treatment of colorectal carcinoma. PMID:17990348

  4. CD44v6 expression in patients with stage II or stage III sporadic colorectal cancer is superior to CD44 expression for predicting progression

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, LH; Lin, QL; Wei, J; Huai, YL; Wang, KJ; Yan, HY

    2015-01-01

    Background: Currently, it is difficult to predict the prognosis of patients exhibiting stage II or stage III colorectal cancer (CRC) and to identify those patients most likely to benefit from aggressive treatment. The current study was performed to examine the clinicopathological significance of CD44 and CD44v6 protein expression in these patients. Study design: We retrospectively investigated 187 consecutive patients who underwent surgery with curative intent for stage II to III CRC from 2007 to 2013 in the Beijing Civil Aviation Hospital. CD44 and CD44v6 protein expression levels were determined using immunohistochemistry and compared to the clinicopathological data. Results: Using immunohistochemical detection, CD44 expression was observed in 108 (57.75%) of the CRC patients; and its detection was significantly associated with greater invasion depth, lymph node metastasis, angiolymphatic invasion, and a more advanced pathological tumor-lymph node-metastasis (TNM) stage. CD44v6 expression was observed in 135 (72.19%) of the CRC patients; and its expression was significantly associated with a poorly differentiated histology, greater invasion depth, lymph node metastasis, angiolymphatic invasion, and a more advanced pathological TNM stage. Expression of CD44v6 was higher than that of CD44 in stage II and stage III sporadic CRC. Conclusion: CD44v6 is a more useful marker for predicting a poor prognosis in stage II and stage III sporadic CRC as compared to CD44. PMID:25755763

  5. [Colorectal cancer screening: situation and prospect].

    PubMed

    Guo, Chunguang; Liu, Qian; Dai, Min

    2015-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the fourth most common cause of cancer death in China and the incidence has been increasing during the decades. It is reported to take decades for adenoma to transform to carcinoma, which is known as the main CRC pre-cancer lesion. It is important to carry out mass screening in the average risk populations to find the pre-cancer lesion and early cancer, which was the key approach to improve CRC survival. Fecal occult blood test and flexible sigmoidoscopy are the two CRC screening methods, which have been shown to reduce CRC mortality. It still needs to be confirmed in random clinical trials that the value of colonoscopy in CRC screening. In China, the most CRC screening experience was drawn from the works in Zhejiang province in 1970s. Consequently, the Chinese CRC treatment and guideline was founded to provide standard for the CRC screening project.

  6. MiR-26a downregulates retinoblastoma in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    López-Urrutia, Eduardo; Coronel-Hernández, Jossimar; García-Castillo, Verónica; Contreras-Romero, Carlos; Martínez-Gutierrez, Antonio; Estrada-Galicia, Diana; Terrazas, Luis Ignacio; López-Camarillo, César; Maldonado-Martínez, Hector; Jacobo-Herrera, Nadia; Pérez-Plasencia, Carlos

    2017-04-01

    MicroRNAs are non-coding short RNAs that target the 3' untranslated region of messenger RNAs (mRNAs) and lead to their degradation or to translational repression. Several microRNAs have been designated as oncomirs, owing to their regulating tumor suppressor genes. Interestingly, a few of them have been found to target multiple genes whose simultaneous suppression contributes to the development of a tumoral phenotype. Here, we have showed that miR-26a is overexpressed in colorectal cancer data obtained from TCGA Research Network and in human colon cancer pathological specimens; moreover, an orthotopic in vivo model of colon cancer showed overexpression of miR-26a, while Rb1 expression inversely correlated to miR-26a in TCGA Research Network data, pathological samples, and the in vivo model. Then, by means of luciferase assay, we demonstrated that miR-26a targets the 3' untranslated region of Rb1 mRNA directly. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of miR-26a targeting Rb1 in colon cancer. The results of this study suggested that miR-26a could serve as a progression biomarker in colorectal cancer. Further validation studies are still needed to confirm our findings.

  7. Musashi2 as a novel predictive biomarker for liver metastasis and poor prognosis in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zong, Zhen; Zhou, Taicheng; Rao, Liangjun; Jiang, Zhipeng; Li, Yingru; Hou, Zehui; Yang, Bin; Han, Fanghai; Chen, Shuang

    2016-04-01

    Aberrant expression of musashi2 (MSI-2) has been detected in several malignancies. However, its role in the progression of colorectal cancer (CRC) remains unknown. Our study was designed to investigate the expression and prognostic significance of MSI-2 protein in patients with colorectal cancer. The expression of MSI-2 was detected in 164 patients' colorectal cancer and control specimens by the tissue microarray technique and immunohistochemical staining. The correlations between MSI-2 expression and clinicopathological variables including overall survival were analyzed. The prognostic value of liver metastasis is evaluated by logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. MSI-2 was highly expressed in 32.9% (54/164) of the colorectal cancer. Overexpression of MSI-2 was associated with depth of invasion, lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis, liver metastasis, Tumor Node Metastasis (TNM) clinical stage, and Carcinoembryonicantigen (CEA) level (P = 0.040, 0.014, <0.001, <0.001, 0.003, and 0.002, respectively). In the Cox multivariate test, MSI-2 overexpression, lymph node metastasis, and distant metastasis were found to be the independent prognostic factors (P = 0.027, 0.010, and 0.001, respectively). Further logistic regression suggested that TNM stage and MSI-2 high expression were related to liver metastasis in colorectal cancer patients. Conclusively, our study indicates that MSI-2 overexpression is associated with an unfavorable prognosis and may be a potential biomarker for liver metastasis in colorectal cancer patients.

  8. Epigenetics in diagnosis of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sameer, Aga Syed; Nissar, Saniya

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a third most common epithelial carcinoma. CRC is known to develop from the early precancerous lesion to full blown malignancy via definite phases due to cumulative mutations and aberrant methylation of number of genes. The use of serum biomarkers that is non-invasive to discriminate cancer patients from healthy persons will prove to be an important tool to improve the early diagnosis of CRC. This will serve as the boon to the clinical management of the disease. PMID:27844020

  9. Genetic Basis for Colorectal Cancer Disparities

    PubMed Central

    Nayani, Rahul; Ashktorab, Hassan; Brim, Hassan; Laiyemo, Adeyinka O.

    2015-01-01

    African Americans suffer the highest burden from colorectal cancer (CRC) in the USA. Studies have suggested that healthcare access and poorer utilization of preventive services may be playing more of a role in this disparity. However, African Americans also tend to develop CRC at younger ages and are more likely to have proximal cancers. This raises the possibility of higher genetic predisposition to CRC among African Americans and this has not been well studied. In this article, we reviewed possible genetic basis underpinning biological differences in CRC burden in the USA. PMID:26997937

  10. Immune cell interplay in colorectal cancer prognosis.

    PubMed

    Norton, Samuel E; Ward-Hartstonge, Kirsten A; Taylor, Edward S; Kemp, Roslyn A

    2015-10-15

    The immune response to colorectal cancer has proven to be a reliable measure of patient outcome in several studies. However, the complexity of the immune response in this disease is not well understood, particularly the interactions between tumour-associated cells and cells of the innate and adaptive immune system. This review will discuss the relationship between cancer associated fibroblasts and macrophages, as well as between macrophages and T cells, and demonstrate how each population may support or prevent tumour growth in a different immune environment.

  11. Genomics of Colorectal Cancer in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Brim, Hassan; Ashktorab, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide studies are increasingly becoming a must, especially for complex diseases such as cancer where multiple genes and diverse molecular mechanisms are known to be involved in genes’ function alteration. In this review, we report our latest genomic and epigenomic findings in African-American colorectal cancer patients. This population suffers a higher burden of the disease and most investigators in this field are looking for the underlying genetic and epigenetic targets that might be responsible for this disparity. We here report genome-wide copy number variations, single nucleotide mutations and DNA methylation findings that might be specific to this population. PMID:27917406

  12. Aspirin Metabolomics in Colorectal Cancer Chemoprevention | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Substantial evidence supports the effectiveness of aspirin for cancer chemoprevention in addition to its well-established role in cardiovascular protection. In recent meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials in humans, daily aspirin use reduced incidence, metastasis and mortality from several common types of cancer, especially colorectal cancer. The mechanism(s) by which aspirin exerts an anticancer benefit is uncertain;numerous effects have been described involving both cyclooxygenase-dependent and -independent pathways. |

  13. SLC25A22 Promotes Proliferation and Survival of Colorectal Cancer Cells With KRAS Mutations and Xenograft Tumor Progression in Mice via Intracellular Synthesis of Aspartate.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chi Chun; Qian, Yun; Li, Xiaona; Xu, Jiaying; Kang, Wei; Tong, Joanna H; To, Ka-Fai; Jin, Ye; Li, Weilin; Chen, Huarong; Go, Minnie Y Y; Wu, Jian-Lin; Cheng, Ka Wing; Ng, Simon S M; Sung, Joseph J Y; Cai, Zongwei; Yu, Jun

    2016-11-01

    Many colorectal cancer (CRC) cells contain mutations in KRAS. Analyses of CRC cells with mutations in APC or CTNNB1 and KRAS identified SLC25A22, which encodes mitochondrial glutamate transporter, as a synthetic lethal gene. We investigated the functions of SLC25A22 in CRC cells with mutations in KRAS. We measured levels of SLC25A22 messenger RNA and protein in paired tumor and nontumor colon tissues collected from 130 patients in Hong Kong and 17 patients in China and compared protein levels with patient survival times. Expression of SLC25A22 was knocked down in KRAS mutant CRC cell lines (DLD1, HCT116, LOVO, SW480, SW620, and SW1116) and CRC cell lines without mutations in KRAS (CACO-2, COLO205, HT29, and SW48); cells were analyzed for colony formation, proliferation, glutaminolysis and aspartate synthesis, and apoptosis in Matrigel and polymerase chain reaction array analyses. DLD1 and HCT116 cells with SLC25A22 knockdown were grown as xenograft tumors in nude mice; tumor growth and metastasis were measured. SLC25A22 was expressed ectopically in HCT116 cells, which were analyzed in vitro and grown as xenograft tumors in nude mice. Levels of SLC25A22 messenger RNA and protein were increased in colorectal tumor tissues compared with matched nontumor colon tissues; increased protein levels were associated with shorter survival times of patients (P = .01). Knockdown of SLC25A22 in KRAS mutant CRC cells reduced their proliferation, migration, and invasion in vitro, and tumor formation and metastasis in mice, compared with cells without SLC25A22 knockdown. Knockdown of SLC25A22 reduced aspartate biosynthesis, leading to apoptosis, decreased cell proliferation in KRAS mutant CRC cells. Incubation of KRAS mutant CRC cells with knockdown of SLC25A22 with aspartate increased proliferation and reduced apoptosis, which required GOT1, indicating that oxaloacetate is required for cell survival. Decreased levels of oxaloacetate in cells with knockdown of SLC25A22 reduced

  14. [Colorectal cancer screening: evidence and implementation].

    PubMed

    Brenner, H; Hoffmeister, M

    2014-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cancer among both men and women in Germany. Owing to its relatively slow growth, perspectives for effective early detection are much better than for other forms of cancer. To summarize the evidence on effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of CRC screening, and to provide an overview on the current state and perspectives for effective CRC screening. Summary and critical review of evidence from randomized trials and observational epidemiological studies. A reduction in CRC mortality by offering annual fecal occult blood tests or once-only flexible sigmoidoscopy has been demonstrated in randomized trials. Novel fecal immunochemical tests for hemoglobin in stool have been shown to be more sensitive than traditional fecal occult blood tests and could substantially improve noninvasive CRC screening. Epidemiological studies suggest that the majority of CRC cases and deaths could be prevented by colonoscopy and removal of colorectal adenomas. However, adherence to screening offered outside organized screening programs is low. The National Cancer Plan recommends an organized CRC screening program in Germany. The law on the early detection of cancer from April 2013 has paved the way for its implementation. The great potential for CRC prevention by early detection has so far only been realized to a very limited extent in Germany. Introduction of an organized screening program and the offer of enhanced noninvasive screening tests could strongly enhance the utilization and effectiveness of CRC screening in Germany. The political frame has been set, and timely quality-assured implementation is required.

  15. Accomplishments in 2007 in the Management of Curable Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Amit; Alberts, Steven

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Overview of the Disease IncidencePrognosisCurrent Therapy Standards Colorectal Liver Metastases (CRLM) Resectable TumorsStrategies To Convert Nonresectable Liver Metastases to Resectable StatusSynchronous Colorectal Liver MetastasesPredictors of Survival After Resection of CRLMPeritoneal Carcinomatosis (PC) From Colorectal CancerColorectal Pulmonary Metastases (CRPM)Colorectal Liver Metastases With Extrahepatic DiseaseAccomplishments (or Lack of Accomplishments) During the Year Therapy New Staging SystemPreventive Measures for CRLMSystemic ChemotherapySelective Internal Radiation Therapy (SIRT)Proposed Definition of Cure From CRLMBasic ScienceWhat Needs To Be Done? Optimizing Patient CareControversies and DisagreementsFuture Directions Comments on ResearchObstacles to Progress PMID:19352462

  16. RPS7 inhibits colorectal cancer growth via decreasing HIF-1α-mediated glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen; Tong, Duo; Liu, Fei; Li, Dawei; Li, Jiajia; Cheng, Xi; Wang, Ziliang

    2016-02-02

    Ribosomal protein S7 (RPS7) acts as a tumor suppressor in primary tumorigenesis but its role in cancer metabolism remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that RPS7 inhibits the colorectal cancer (CRC) cell glycolysis by suppressing the expression of hypoxia-inducible transcription factor-1α (HIF-1α) and the metabolic promoting proteins glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) and lactate dehydrogenase B (LDHB). Further study found that the enhanced expression of HIF-1α abrogates the overexpression effects of RPS7 on CRC. In vivo assays also demonstrate that RPS7 suppresses colorectal cancer tumorigenesis and glycolysis. Clinically, the tissue microarray (TMA) analysis discloses the negative regulatory association between RPS7 and HIF-1α in colorectal cancer. Meanwhile, overexpression of RPS7 in colorectal cancer tissues predicts good overall survival and progression-free survival, but high expression level of HIF-1α indicates poor overall survival and progression-free survival. Overall, we reveal that RPS7 inhibits colorectal cancer glycolysis through HIF-1α-associated signaling and may be a promising biomarker for prognosis prediction and a potential target for therapeutic treatment.

  17. RPS7 inhibits colorectal cancer growth via decreasing HIF-1α-mediated glycolysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dawei; Li, Jiajia; Cheng, Xi; Wang, Ziliang

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal protein S7 (RPS7) acts as a tumor suppressor in primary tumorigenesis but its role in cancer metabolism remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that RPS7 inhibits the colorectal cancer (CRC) cell glycolysis by suppressing the expression of hypoxia-inducible transcription factor-1α (HIF-1α) and the metabolic promoting proteins glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) and lactate dehydrogenase B (LDHB). Further study found that the enhanced expression of HIF-1α abrogates the overexpression effects of RPS7 on CRC. In vivo assays also demonstrate that RPS7 suppresses colorectal cancer tumorigenesis and glycolysis. Clinically, the tissue microarray (TMA) analysis discloses the negative regulatory association between RPS7 and HIF-1α in colorectal cancer. Meanwhile, overexpression of RPS7 in colorectal cancer tissues predicts good overall survival and progression-free survival, but high expression level of HIF-1α indicates poor overall survival and progression-free survival. Overall, we reveal that RPS7 inhibits colorectal cancer glycolysis through HIF-1α-associated signaling and may be a promising biomarker for prognosis prediction and a potential target for therapeutic treatment. PMID:26735579

  18. Designing effective vaccines for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sandip P; Osada, Takuya; Lyerly, H Kim; Morse, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Achieving long-term control of colorectal cancers with therapeutic vaccines that generate potent anti-tumor T cell and antibody responses has been a goal for more than two decades. To date, clinical trials of these vaccines have demonstrated induction of immune responses, but clinical benefit has been limited. Improved vector delivery systems with enhanced immunostimulatory properties, decreased immunogenicity against vector and improved antigen presentation are some of the key features of modern tumor vaccines. Furthermore, an improved understanding of the various immunosuppressive factors in the tumor microenvironment and regional lymph nodes, coupled with a burgeoning ability to impair inhibitory immune synapses, highlights a growing opportunity to induce beneficial antigen-specific responses against tumor. The combination of improved antigenic delivery systems, coupled with therapeutic immune activation, represents state-of-the-art colorectal vaccine design concepts with the goal of augmenting immune responses against tumor and improving clinical outcomes.

  19. Toward the Elimination of Colorectal Cancer Disparities Among African Americans.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, Steven S; Blumenthal, Daniel S; Seay, Shirley Jordan; Smith, Selina A

    2016-12-01

    In the USA, race and socioeconomic status are well-known factors associated with colorectal cancer incidence and mortality rates. These are higher among blacks than whites and other racial/ethnic groups. In this article, we review opportunities to address disparities in colorectal cancer incidence, mortality, and survivorship among African Americans. First, we summarize the primary prevention of colorectal cancer and recent advances in the early detection of the disease and disparities in screening. Then, we consider black-white disparities in colorectal cancer treatment and survival including factors that may contribute to such disparities and the important roles played by cultural competency, patient trust in one's physician, and health literacy in addressing colorectal cancer disparities, including the need for studies involving the use of colorectal cancer patient navigators who are culturally competent. To reduce these disparities, intervention efforts should focus on providing high-quality screening and treatment for colorectal cancer and on educating African Americans about the value of diet, weight control, screening, and treatment. Organized approaches for delivering colorectal cancer screening should be accompanied by programs and policies that provide access to diagnostic follow-up and treatment for underserved populations.

  20. Toward the Elimination of Colorectal Cancer Disparities Among African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Blumenthal, Daniel S.; Seay, Shirley Jordan; Smith, Selina A.

    2015-01-01

    Background In the USA, race and socioeconomic status are well-known factors associated with colorectal cancer incidence and mortality rates. These are higher among blacks than whites and other racial/ethnic groups. Methods In this article, we review opportunities to address disparities in colorectal cancer incidence, mortality, and survivorship among African Americans. Results First, we summarize the primary prevention of colorectal cancer and recent advances in the early detection of the disease and disparities in screening. Then, we consider black-white disparities in colorectal cancer treatment and survival including factors that may contribute to such disparities and the important roles played by cultural competency, patient trust in one’s physician, and health literacy in addressing colorectal cancer disparities, including the need for studies involving the use of colorectal cancer patient navigators who are culturally competent. Conclusion To reduce these disparities, intervention efforts should focus on providing high-quality screening and treatment for colorectal cancer and on educating African Americans about the value of diet, weight control, screening, and treatment. Organized approaches for delivering colorectal cancer screening should be accompanied by programs and policies that provide access to diagnostic follow-up and treatment for underserved populations. PMID:27294749

  1. From dinosaurs to DNA: a history of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Mulcahy, Hugh E; Hyland, John; O'Donoghue, Diarmuid P

    2003-05-01

    The roots of colorectal cancer date back to antiquity. In this short history of colorectal cancer we trace its clinical and research origins from ancient times through the dark ages, middle ages, to the scientific and medical advances of the seventeenth to twentieth centuries and into the twenty-first century.

  2. Colorectal cancer and consumption of beef and fat.

    PubMed Central

    Enstrom, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    Secular, socioeconomic and urban-rural gradients and geographical differences in beef and fat consumption within the United States of America are compared with corresponding data on colorectal cancer incidence and mortality rates. These results, together with the results of most previous epidemiological studies, appear to contradict the hypothesis that beef and fat consumption are involved in the aetiology of colorectal cancer. PMID:1212410

  3. NIH study finds sigmoidoscopy reduces colorectal cancer rates

    Cancer.gov

    Study finds that flexible sigmoidoscopy is effective in reducing the rates of new cases and deaths due to colorectal cancer. Researchers found that overall colorectal cancer mortality was reduced by 26 percent and incidence was reduced by 21 percent as a

  4. Combination Therapy of Lactobacillus plantarum Supernatant and 5-Fluouracil Increases Chemosensitivity in Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    An, JaeJin; Ha, Eun-Mi

    2016-08-28

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in the world. Although 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is the representative chemotherapy drug for colorectal cancer, it has therapeutic limits due to its chemoresistant characteristics. Colorectal cancer cells can develop into cancer stem cells (CSCs) with self-renewal potential, thereby causing malignant tumors. The human gastrointestinal tract contains a complex gut microbiota that is essential for the host's homeostasis. Recently, many studies have reported correlations between gut flora and the onset, progression, and treatment of CRC. The present study confirms that the most representative symbiotic bacteria in humans, Lactobacillus plantarum (LP) supernatant (SN), selectively inhibit the characteristics of 5-FU-resistant colorectal cancer cells (HT-29 and HCT- 116). LP SN inhibited the expression of the specific markers CD44, 133, 166, and ALDH1 of CSCs. The combination therapy of LP SN and 5-FU inhibited the survival of CRCs and led to cell death by inducing caspase-3 activity. The combination therapy of LP SN and 5-FU induced an anticancer mechanism by inactivating the Wnt/β-catenin signaling of chemoresistant CRC cells, and reducing the formation and size of colonospheres. In conclusion, our results show that LP SN can enhance the therapeutic effect of 5-FU for colon cancer, and reduce colorectal cancer stem-like cells by reversing the development of resistance to anticancer drugs. This implies that probiotic substances may be useful therapeutic alternatives as biotherapeutics for chemoresistant CRC.

  5. The Notch pathway in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Vinson, Kaitlyn E; George, Dennis C; Fender, Alexander W; Bertrand, Fred E; Sigounas, George

    2016-04-15

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third leading cause of cancer death worldwide. It is also the third most common cancer diagnosis among men, and the second most common cancer diagnosis among women. Globally, CRC can account for nearly 694,000 annual deaths. It is widely appreciated that CRC is the result of dysregulated cellular pathways that promote an inappropriate stem-cell-like phenotype, apoptotic resistance, unchecked proliferation and metastatic spread. While no single pathway is responsible for all of these attributes, an array of recent studies suggests a pivotal role for abnormal Notch-1 signaling in CRC, in part due to interconnectivity of Notch with other pathways. This review will summarize recent evidence for a role of Notch signaling in CRC, will consider interconnectivity between Notch and other pathways involved in CRC and will discuss the possible utility of targeting Notch as a CRC therapeutic.

  6. Occupation-related risks for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Spiegelman, D; Wegman, D H

    1985-11-01

    Several population data bases were used to generate hypotheses about associations between colorectal cancer and workplace exposures. The Third National Cancer Survey interview sample was used to select 343 male and 208 female cases and 626 male and 1,235 female cancer controls. Potential work exposures were assigned with the use of data from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health National Occupational Hazard Survey. Dietary factors were modeled from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data. Work-related stress was considered with the use of a model based on the U.S. Department of Labor's Quality of Employment Survey. Other risk factors included age, race, ponderosity, and menopausal status. Logistic analysis yielded hypotheses for colon cancer risk in males with potentially high exposure to solvents, abrasives, and fuel oil and in those in jobs with high demand and low control (high "stress"). Hypotheses emerged for females with potentially high exposure to dyes, solvents, and grinding wheel dust.

  7. Current controversies in the management of metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Vera, Ruth; Alonso, Vicente; Gállego, Javier; González, Encarnación; Guillén-Ponce, Carmen; Pericay, Carles; Rivera, Fernando; Safont, M José; Valladares-Ayerbes, Manuel

    2015-10-01

    The factors affecting the decisions for the treatment for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) are related to the patient, the tumor, and the treatment itself. Both cetuximab and panitumumab are anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody options for patients with RAS wild-type tumors. Several trials comparing these agents with bevacizumab are analyzed in this paper. The liver is the most common site of metastases in patients with CRC, and perioperative chemotherapy has been shown to yield benefits in this setting. In the second-line treatment for mCRC, maintenance with bevacizumab after progression following first-line treatment is convenient in some groups of patients with mCRC. Also, aflibercept has demonstrated benefits in response rate, progression-free survival, and overall survival in second-line treatment, whereas regorafenib provides benefits to patients progressing on all standard therapies. Several novel therapeutic options for patients with mCRC are under development, and these are discussed.

  8. Colorectal cancer tumour markers and biomarkers: Recent therapeutic advances.

    PubMed

    Lech, Gustaw; Słotwiński, Robert; Słodkowski, Maciej; Krasnodębski, Ireneusz Wojciech

    2016-02-07

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer among females and third among males worldwide. It also contributes significantly to cancer-related deaths, despite the continuous progress in diagnostic and therapeutic methods. Biomarkers currently play an important role in the detection and treatment of patients with colorectal cancer. Risk stratification for screening might be augmented by finding new biomarkers which alone or as a complement of existing tests might recognize either the predisposition or early stage of the disease. Biomarkers have also the potential to change diagnostic and treatment algorithms by selecting the proper chemotherapeutic drugs across a broad spectrum of patients. There are attempts to personalise chemotherapy based on presence or absence of specific biomarkers. In this review, we update review published last year and describe our understanding of tumour markers and biomarkers role in CRC screening, diagnosis, treatment and follow-up. Goal of future research is to identify those biomarkers that could allow a non-invasive and cost-effective diagnosis, as well as to recognise the best prognostic panel and define the predictive biomarkers for available treatments.

  9. PolyA Deletions in Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Salovaara, Reijo; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Järvinen, Heikki J.; Aaltonen, Lauri A.; Shibata, Darryl

    2002-01-01

    Microsatellite instability (MSI) secondary to loss of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) is present in adenomas and colorectal carcinomas from individuals with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). To better characterize when MMR loss occurs during HNPCC progression, the extent of deletions in noncoding polyA sequences were compared between 6 adenomas (all ≤1.0 cm in size) and 10 cancers. Numbers of deleted bases reflect time since loss of MMR because polyA deletions are stepwise. Adenoma deletions were nearly the same (85%) as the cancers with sum total deletions at four different polyA loci of −32.7 bases in adenomas and −38.4 bases in cancers. Intervals between negative clinical examinations and tumor removal (average of 2.1 years) were known for six tumors. There were no significant differences in the extent of deletions in tumors removed under clinical surveillance (−34.8 bases) versus tumors removed without prior negative examinations (−36.5 bases). These findings illustrate that MSI is extensive in both small adenomas, and tumors which appear after negative clinical examinations, consistent with an early loss of MMR in HNPCC, even before a gatekeeper mutation. PMID:11943734

  10. Self-renewal molecular mechanisms of colorectal cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Tianhui; Xu, Jinghong; Zhu, Yongliang

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer stem cells (CCSCs) represent a small fraction of the colorectal cancer cell population that possess self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation potential and drive tumorigenicity. Self-renewal is essential for the malignant biological behaviors of colorectal cancer stem cells. While the self-renewal molecular mechanisms of colorectal cancer stem cells are not yet fully understood, the aberrant activation of signaling pathways, such as Wnt, Notch, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)/bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and Hedgehog-Gli (HH-GLI), specific roles mediated by cell surface markers and micro-environmental factors are involved in the regulation of self-renewal. The elucidation of the molecular mechanisms behind self-renewal may lead to the development of novel targeted interventions for the treatment of colorectal cancer. PMID:27909729

  11. [Colorectal cancer mass screening: present and future].

    PubMed

    Bretagne, Jean-François; Manfredi, Sylvain; Heresbach, Denis

    2007-01-01

    Hemoccult II is the only method of screening for colorectal cancer whose effectiveness in reducing specific mortality has been proved by randomized controlled trials. The first experience of French districts based on this strategy reproduced on a population scale the results of the experimental studies. Expanding screening in France to the general public is a public health priority. Large-scale media campaigns, which currently do not exist, could then be launched, and prevention opportunities seized. Immunological tests identifying the presence of blood in the stool have better sensitivity than the guaiac smear tests, especially for the diagnosis of adenomas and to a lesser extent, for that of cancers as a whole. These tests may constitute an alternative to guaiac tests, but are more expensive. Total colonoscopy, proposed every 10 years from the age of 50 years or once in a lifetime around the age of 60 years, is not a realistic method because of its cost and its risks. Sigmoidoscopies are under evaluation in several countries in randomized controlled trials but do not seem appropriate to either the epidemiologic trends of colorectal cancer or to the practice of endoscopy in France. Virtual colonoscopy is an attractive alternative to searching for blood in stool. The evaluation now underway should not interfere with the broad expansion of methods of proven efficacy. Virtual colonoscopy may face competition from numerous emerging techniques of endoscopic exploration of the colon, including the video-capsule. To obtain widespread participation in colorectal cancer screening, policy-makers must take the opinions of healthcare professionals and of the public into account. The medicoeconomic data will be a decisive factor in the choice between these new strategies.

  12. TRP genes family expression in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Sozucan, Y; Kalender, M E; Sari, I; Suner, A; Oztuzcu, S; Arman, K; Yumrutas, O; Bozgeyik, I; Cengiz, B; Igci, Y Z; Balakan, O; Camci, C

    2015-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the most common cancer of the gastrointestinal tract. Different factors are responsible for the development of CRC. Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) which is an important component of calcium channel is associated with several pathological conditions like cancer, neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. Thirty members of the family of TRP ion channel in mammals have been determined till now. The aim of this study is to investigate TRPM, TRPV and TRPC gene expression levels in tumor tissues of CRC patients and to analyze the relationship of expression in tumor tissue of CRC with other known prognostic factors. In this study, 93 CRC patients were included. The level of TRP gene expression in paraffin blocks of normal and cancerous colorectal tissue samples were studied at the level of mRNA with Real-time PCR. The mRNA expression level of TRPV3, TRPV4, TRPV5, TRPM4 and TRPC6 genes in 37 female and 56 male patients diagnosed with CRC was revealed lower in tumor tissue as compared to normal tissue (p < 0.05). No statistically significant differences of mRNA expression levels of other TRP genes were found. TRP gene family like TRPV3, TRPV4, TRPV5, TRPM4 and TRPC6 may be thought as potential genes contributing to tumorigenesis as their expression decreases in CRC as compared to normal tissues.

  13. Eight-week, multimodal exercise counteracts a progress of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy and improves balance and strength in metastasized colorectal cancer patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Philipp; Trebing, Sina; Timmers-Trebing, Ursula; Schenk, Alexander; Paust, Rainer; Bloch, Wilhelm; Rudolph, Roland; Streckmann, Fiona; Baumann, Freerk T

    2017-09-30

    Physical activity is supposed to decrease mortality of colorectal cancer (CRC) and is suggested to reduce side-effects of the disease and its treatment. However, the knowledge about the influence of exercise interventions on patients suffering from CRC and metastasized CRC (mCRC) is still sparse. One frequently observed side effect in mCRC is chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN). This randomized controlled trial investigated the influence of a supervised exercise program on CIPN in mCRC. Thirty patients (stage IV) undergoing outpatient palliative treatment including a median of 23.5 chemotherapy cycles of various regimens were randomly assigned to an intervention or control group (IG, n = 17; CG, n = 13). The IG participated in an eight-week supervised exercise program, including endurance, resistance and balance training (2×/week for 60 min) whereas the CG received written standard recommendations to obtain physical fitness. CIPN was assessed using the FACT/GOG-NTX questionnaire. Moreover, endurance capacity (6MWT), strength (h1RM) and balance (GGT-Reha) were evaluated before (t 0) and after (t 1) the intervention as well as after 4 weeks follow-up (t2). Neuropathic symptoms remained stable in the IG over time, while CIPN significantly worsened in the CG from t 0 to t 1 and t 0 to t 2. In contrast to the CG, the IG significantly improved in strength and balance function. Changes in CIPN correlated with changes in balance. This is the first investigation showing positive effects of a multimodal exercise program on CIPN, balance and strength on mCRC patients in a palliative setting, thereby consequently increasing patients` quality of life. The results support earlier findings stating a positive influence of balance exercise on CIPN.

  14. ADNP Is a Therapeutically Inducible Repressor of WNT Signaling in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Blaj, Cristina; Bringmann, Agnes; Schmidt, Eva Marina; Urbischek, Manuela; Lamprecht, Sebastian; Fröhlich, Thomas; Arnold, Georg J; Krebs, Stefan; Blum, Helmut; Hermeking, Heiko; Jung, Andreas; Kirchner, Thomas; Horst, David

    2017-06-01

    Purpose: Constitutively active WNT signaling is a hallmark of colorectal cancers and a driver of malignant tumor progression. Therapeutic targeting of WNT signaling is difficult due to high pathway complexity and its role in tissue homeostasis. Here, we identify the transcription factor ADNP as a pharmacologically inducible repressor of WNT signaling in colon cancer.Experimental Design: We used transcriptomic, proteomic, and in situ analyses to identify ADNP expression in colorectal cancer and cell biology approaches to determine its function. We induced ADNP expression in colon cancer xenografts by low-dose ketamine in vivo Clinical associations were determined in a cohort of 221 human colorectal cancer cases.Results: ADNP was overexpressed in colon cancer cells with high WNT activity, where it acted as a WNT repressor. Silencing ADNP expression increased migration, invasion, and proliferation of colon cancer cells and accelerated tumor growth in xenografts in vivo Treatment with subnarcotic doses of ketamine induced ADNP expression, significantly inhibited tumor growth, and prolonged survival of tumor-bearing animals. In human patients with colon cancer, high ADNP expression was linked to good prognosis.Conclusions: Our findings indicate that ADNP is a tumor suppressor and promising prognostic marker, and that ketamine treatment with ADNP induction is a potential therapeutic approach that may add benefit to current treatment protocols for patients with colorectal cancer. Clin Cancer Res; 23(11); 2769-80. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. Focusing the Spotlight on the Zebrafish Intestine to Illuminate Mechanisms of Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lobert, Viola H; Mouradov, Dmitri; Heath, Joan K

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer, encompassing colon and rectal cancer, arises from the epithelial lining of the large bowel. It is most prevalent in Westernised societies and is increasing in frequency as the world becomes more industrialised. Unfortunately, metastatic colorectal cancer is not cured by chemotherapy and the annual number of deaths caused by colorectal cancer, currently 700,000, is expected to rise. Our understanding of the contribution that genetic mutations make to colorectal cancer, although incomplete, is reasonably well advanced. However, it has only recently become widely appreciated that in addition to the ongoing accumulation of genetic mutations, chronic inflammation also plays a critical role in the initiation and progression of this disease. While a robust and tractable genetic model of colorectal cancer in zebrafish, suitable for pre-clinical studies, is not yet available, the identification of genes required for the rapid proliferation of zebrafish intestinal epithelial cells during development has highlighted a number of essential genes that could be targeted to disable colorectal cancer cells. Moreover, appreciation of the utility of zebrafish to study intestinal inflammation is on the rise. In particular, zebrafish provide unique opportunities to investigate the impact of genetic and environmental factors on the integrity of intestinal epithelial barrier function. With currently available tools, the interplay between epigenetic regulators, intestinal injury, microbiota composition and innate immune cell mobilisation can be analysed in exquisite detail. This provides excellent opportunities to define critical events that could potentially be targeted therapeutically. Further into the future, the use of zebrafish larvae as hosts for xenografts of human colorectal cancer tissue, while still in its infancy, holds great promise that zebrafish could one day provide a practical, preclinical personalized medicine platform for the rapid assessment of the

  16. Lifestyle factors associated with survival after colorectal cancer diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, T; Fritschi, L; Platell, C; Heyworth, J

    2013-01-01

    Background: Aside from tumour stage and treatment, little is known about potential factors that may influence survival in colorectal cancer patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between physical activity, obesity and smoking and disease-specific and overall mortality after a colorectal cancer diagnosis. Methods: A cohort of 879 colorectal cancer patients, diagnosed in Western Australia between 2005 and 2007, were followed up to 30 June 2012. Cox's regression models were used to estimate the hazard ratios (HR) for colorectal cancer-specific and overall mortality associated with self-reported pre-diagnosis physical activity, body mass index (BMI) and smoking. Results: Significantly lower overall and colorectal cancer-specific mortality was seen in females who reported any level of recent physical activity than in females reporting no activity. The colorectal cancer-specific mortality HR for increasing levels of physical activity in females were 0.34 (95% CI=0.15, 0.75), 0.37 (95% CI=0.17, 0.81) and 0.41 (95% CI=0.18, 0.90). Overweight and obese women had almost twice the risk of dying from any cause or colorectal cancer compared with women of normal weight. Females who were current smokers had worse overall and colorectal cancer-specific mortality than never smokers (overall HR=2.64, 95% CI=1.18, 5.93; colorectal cancer-specific HR=2.70, 95% CI=1.16, 6.29). No significant associations were found in males. Conclusion: Physical activity, BMI and smoking may influence survival after a diagnosis of colorectal cancer, with more pronounced results found for females than for males. PMID:23787918

  17. Hereditary Colorectal Cancer Syndromes in Hong Kong: a Registry's Perspective

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Established in 1995, the Hereditary Gastrointestinal Cancer Registry aimed at cancer prevention due to hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes in Hong Kong through early detection, timely treatment, education and ongoing research. This article details the history, structure and work of the Registry. A summary is also provided on the results of various research work conducted by the Registry which facilitates the clinical management of hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes in Hong Kong Chinese families. PMID:20223041

  18. Singapore Cancer Network (SCAN) Guidelines for Systemic Therapy of Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    2015-10-01

    The SCAN colorectal cancer systemic therapy workgroup aimed to develop Singapore Cancer Network (SCAN) clinical practice guidelines for systemic therapy for colorectal cancer in Singapore. The workgroup utilised a modified ADAPTE process to calibrate high quality international evidence-based clinical practice guidelines to our local setting. Five international guidelines were evaluated-those developed by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network for colon (2014) and rectal (2014) cancer, the European Society of Medical Oncology for advanced (2012) and early (2013) cancer and the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (2011). Recommendations on systemic therapy in colorectal cancer were produced. These adapted guidelines form the SCAN Guidelines 2015 for systemic therapy of colorectal cancer.

  19. Assessing global transitions in human development and colorectal cancer incidence.

    PubMed

    Fidler, Miranda M; Bray, Freddie; Vaccarella, Salvatore; Soerjomataram, Isabelle

    2017-06-15

    Colorectal cancer incidence has paralleled increases in human development across most countries. Yet, marked decreases in incidence are now observed in countries that have attained very high human development. Thus, in this study, we explored the relationship between human development and colorectal cancer incidence, and in particular assessed whether national transitions to very high human development are linked to temporal patterns in colorectal cancer incidence. For these analyses, we utilized the Human Development Index (HDI) and annual incidence data from regional and national cancer registries. Truncated (30-74 years) age-standardized incidence rates were calculated. Yearly incidence rate ratios and HDI ratios, before and after transitioning to very high human development, were also estimated. Among the 29 countries investigated, colorectal cancer incidence was observed to decrease after reaching the very high human development threshold for 12 countries; decreases were also observed in a further five countries, but the age-standardized incidence rates remained higher than that observed at the threshold. Such declines or stabilizations are likely due to colorectal cancer screening in some populations, as well as varying levels of exposure to protective factors. In summary, it appears that there is a threshold at which human development predicts a stabilization or decline in colorectal cancer incidence, though this pattern was not observed for all countries assessed. Future cancer planning must consider the increasing colorectal cancer burden expected in countries transitioning towards higher levels of human development, as well as possible declines in incidence among countries reaching the highest development level. © 2017 UICC.

  20. The Genome-Wide Analysis of Carcinoembryonic Antigen Signaling by Colorectal Cancer Cells Using RNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Gorbunova, Anna; Evsyukov, Igor; Rayko, Michael; Gapon, Svetlana; Bozhokina, Ekaterina; Shishkin, Alexander; O’Brien, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Сarcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, CEACAM5, CD66) is a promoter of metastasis in epithelial cancers that is widely used as a prognostic clinical marker of metastasis. The aim of this study is to identify the network of genes that are associated with CEA-induced colorectal cancer liver metastasis. We compared the genome-wide transcriptomic profiles of CEA positive (MIP101 clone 8) and CEA negative (MIP 101) colorectal cancer cell lines with different metastatic potential in vivo. The CEA-producing cells displayed quantitative changes in the level of expression for 100 genes (over-expressed or down-regulated). They were confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR. The KEGG pathway analysis identified 4 significantly enriched pathways: cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, MAPK signaling pathway, TGF-beta signaling pathway and pyrimidine metabolism. Our results suggest that CEA production by colorectal cancer cells triggers colorectal cancer progression by inducing the epithelial- mesenchymal transition, increasing tumor cell invasiveness into the surrounding tissues and suppressing stress and apoptotic signaling. The novel gene expression distinctions establish the relationships between the existing cancer markers and implicate new potential biomarkers for colorectal cancer hepatic metastasis. PMID:27583792

  1. The Clinical and Cost Effectiveness of Aflibercept in Combination with Irinotecan and Fluorouracil-Based Therapy (FOLFIRI) for the Treatment of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Which has Progressed Following Prior Oxaliplatin-Based Chemotherapy: a Critique of the Evidence.

    PubMed

    Wade, Ros; Duarte, Ana; Simmonds, Mark; Rodriguez-Lopez, Rocio; Duffy, Steven; Woolacott, Nerys; Spackman, Eldon

    2015-05-01

    The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) invited the manufacturer of aflibercept (Sanofi) to submit clinical and cost-effectiveness evidence for aflibercept in combination with irinotecan and fluorouracil-based therapy [irinotecan/5-fluorouracil/folinic acid (FOLFIRI)] for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer which has progressed following prior oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy, as part of the Institute's Single Technology Appraisal process. The Centre for Reviews and Dissemination and Centre for Health Economics at the University of York were commissioned to act as the independent Evidence Review Group (ERG). This article provides a description of the company submission, the ERG review and the resulting NICE guidance TA307 issued in March 2014. The ERG critically reviewed the evidence presented in the manufacturer's submission and identified areas requiring clarification, for which the manufacturer provided additional evidence. The clinical effectiveness data were derived from one good-quality double-blind randomised controlled trial (RCT), the VELOUR trial, which compared aflibercept plus FOLFIRI with placebo plus FOLFIRI. This RCT found a small but statistically significant increase in overall survival (OS); the difference in median OS was 1.44 months (13.5 months in the aflibercept group and 12.06 months in the placebo group). There was also a statistically significant increase in progression-free survival (PFS) with aflibercept; the difference in median PFS was 2.23 months (6.9 months in the aflibercept group and 4.67 months in the placebo group). However, grade 3-4 adverse events were more frequent in the aflibercept group than the placebo group: 83.5% compared with 62.5%. Treatment-emergent adverse events led to permanent discontinuation of treatment in 26.8% of patients in the aflibercept group and 12.1% of patients in the placebo group. The manufacturer's submission included an estimation of mean OS benefit based on extrapolation

  2. Colorectal cancer screening with virtual colonoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Yaorong; Vining, David J.; Ahn, David K.; Stelts, David R.

    1999-05-01

    Early detection and removal of colorectal polyps have been proven to reduce mortality from colorectal carcinoma (CRC), the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. Unfortunately, traditional techniques for CRC examination (i.e., barium enema, sigmoidoscopy, and colonoscopy) are unsuitable for mass screening because of either low accuracy or poor public acceptance, costs, and risks. Virtual colonoscopy (VC) is a minimally invasive alternative that is based on tomographic scanning of the colon. After a patient's bowel is optimally cleansed and distended with gas, a fast tomographic scan, typically helical computed tomography (CT), of the abdomen is performed during a single breath-hold acquisition. Two-dimensional (2D) slices and three-dimensional (3D) rendered views of the colon lumen generated from the tomographic data are then examined for colorectal polyps. Recent clinical studies conducted at several institutions including ours have shown great potential for this technology to be an effective CRC screening tool. In this paper, we describe new methods to improve bowel preparation, colon lumen visualization, colon segmentation, and polyp detection. Our initial results show that VC with the new bowel preparation and imaging protocol is capable of achieving accuracy comparable to conventional colonoscopy and our new algorithms for image analysis contribute to increased accuracy and efficiency in VC examinations.

  3. The roles of JK-1 (FAM134B) expressions in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kasem, Kais; Gopalan, Vinod; Salajegheh, Ali; Lu, Cu-Tai; Smith, Robert A; Lam, Alfred K-Y

    2014-08-01

    The aims of the present study are to investigate the clinicopathological correlations of JK-1(FAM134B) expression and its relationship to carcinogenesis in a colorectal adenoma-adenocarcinoma model. JK-1(FAM134B) protein expression was studied in a colon cancer cell line by Western blot and immunocytochemistry. JK-1(FAM134B) expression profiles at mRNA and protein levels were investigated in cancer tissues from 236 patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma and 32 patients with colorectal adenoma using real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. The findings were then correlated with the clinicopathological features of these tumours. JK-1(FAM134B) protein was demonstrated in the colon cancer cells by Western blot. The protein was located in the nuclei of the tumour cells at both cellular and tissue levels. In colorectal adenocarcinomas, lower levels of JK-1(FAM134B) protein expression were associated with younger age (p=0.032), larger tumour size (p=0.004), advanced cancer stages (p=0.016) and higher rates of cancer recurrence (p=0.04). Also, lower levels of JK-1(FAM134B) mRNA expression were associated with advanced cancer stages (p=0.02) and presence of lymphovascular invasion (p=0.014). Higher JK-1(FAM134B) mRNA and protein expression levels were identified in adenomas and non-neoplastic mucosae, compared to carcinomas (p=0.005). To conclude, JK-1(FAM134B) mRNA expression and JK1 (FAM134B) protein levels varied with the different stages of progression of colorectal tumours. The expression levels of the gene were associated with clinicopathological features in patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma suggesting that JK-1(FAM134B) gene has roles in controlling some steps in the development of the invasive phenotypes from colorectal adenoma to early staged as well as advanced staged colorectal adenocarcinomas.

  4. Association of hyperplastic polyposis syndrome, colorectal cancer and meningioma.

    PubMed

    Muzaffar, Mahvish; Irlam, John; Mohamed, Iman

    2011-01-01

    Recent research has provided compelling evidence that a subset of hyperplastic polyps may be associated with a risk of colorectal cancer. Colorectal cancer with extracolonic manifestation is usually seen in a hereditary syndrome setting, but some association with meningioma has been reported. The association of colorectal cancer with hyperplastic polyposis and meningioma is extremely rare. This report in a 57-year-old female with no family history of colon cancer or polyps, could be the first case of hyperplastic polyposis syndrome, colorectal cancer and meningioma. Hyperplastic polyposis syndrome was diagnosed as per WHO criteria at the time of colon cancer diagnosis. Within 4 months of colon cancer diagnosis she developed seizures. Imaging of the brain revealed meningioma of the left cerebellopontine angle. The patient underwent surgery followed by chemotherapy.

  5. Screening for colorectal cancer: the business case.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Robert H; Colditz, Graham A; Pawlson, L Greg; Richman, Howard; Rosenthal, David; Salber, Patricia R

    2002-06-01

    Colorectal cancer screening is advocated by expert groups based on strong evidence of effectiveness, yet only approximately 1 in 3 Americans are screened. For a screening program to be effective, it is necessary for providers to offer and patients to accept screening, insurers to pay for screening, and provider groups to have monitoring and reminder systems and the expertise and facilities to perform the tests well. Whether and when such screening programs become successful depends on the priorities of healthcare decision makers as much as on the efforts of individual physicians and patients. There are strong arguments for decision makers giving colorectal cancer screening programs high priority: it saves as many lives as other services now in common use; it is a good use of scarce resources, costing less than $20,000 per year of life saved; and members of insurance programs increasingly expect screening benefits and programs, and failure to offer them might lead to member dissatisfaction and malpractice claims. Screening is costly, however, taking into account the cost of screening, follow-up tests, and treatments, and the costs occur many years before the benefits. Programs that are promoted to members but not fully implemented could create disappointment and backlash. Also, this screening can cause medical complications. Nevertheless, successful programs have been developed, proving that they are feasible in today's cost-conscious environment. We believe that colorectal cancer screening programs are integral to any organization purporting to provide high-quality care. Organizations without such programs should give them high priority for implementation.

  6. Extended Cancer Education for Longer-Term Survivors in Primary Care for Patients With Stage I-II Breast or Prostate Cancer or Stage I-III Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-01

    Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage I Colorectal Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage I Prostate Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage II Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage II Prostate Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIA Prostate Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIB Prostate Cancer; Stage IIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage III Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7

  7. Serrated pathway: Alternative route to colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Patai, Árpád V; Molnár, Béla; Tulassay, Zsolt; Sipos, Ferenc

    2013-01-01

    Serrated polyps have been an area of intense focus for gastroenterologists over the past several years. Contrary to what was thought before, a growing body of literature indicates that these polyps can be precursors of colorectal cancer (CRC). Most of these lesions, particularly those in the proximal colon, have so far been under-recognized and missed during colonoscopy, qualifying these lesions to be the main cause of interval cancers. It is estimated that 10%-20% of CRCs evolve through this alternative, serrated pathway, with a distinct genetic and epigenetic profile. Aberrant DNA methylation plays a central role in the development of this CRC subtype. This characteristic molecular background is reflected in a unique pathological and clinical manifestation different from cancers arising via the traditional pathway. In this review we would like to highlight morphological, molecular and clinical features of this emerging pathway that are essential for gastroenterologists and may influence their everyday practice. PMID:23431044

  8. Genetic abnormalities and microsatellite instability in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Iniesta, P; de Juan, C; Caldés, T; Vega, F J; Massa, M J; Cerdán, F J; López, J A; Fernández, C; Sánchez, A; Torres, A J; Balibrea, J L; Benito, M

    1998-01-01

    Our purpose was to investigate different genetic abnormalities, such as K-ras mutations, p53 alterations, and c-myc RNA overexpression, as well as microsatellite instability in 63 colorectal tumors obtained from patients that had undergone surgery. K-ras point mutations were analyzed by PCR-RFLP technique, followed by sequencing; p53 protein accumulation by immunohistochemistry; p53 gene mutations in exons 5-9 were studied by the SSCP and sequencing techniques, and c-myc overexpression by Northern blot. Microsatellite instability was performed at chromosomes 2p, 3p, and 11p by a PCR-based technique. Our data indicate a trend toward a poorer prognosis in patients who had K-ras transversions; besides, we have obtained a prevalence of c-myc RNA overexpression and p53 exon 7 mutations in the latest stages of tumor progression. In conclusion, our findings suggest that the recognition of molecular abnormalities might be used in colorectal cancer as a prognostic indicator or to determine the metastatic potential of colorectal adenocarcinomas.

  9. Regulation of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Johnston, S J; Ridge, S A; Cassidy, J; McLeod, H L

    1999-09-01

    Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) is responsible for degradation of the pyrimidines uracil and thymine and the inactivation of the chemotherapeutic agent 5-fluorouracil. DPD activity is highly variable in cancer populations, and this variation may influence the antitumor efficacy of 5-fluorouracil. However, little is known about the regulation of DPD mRNA expression in any tissues. Using a reverse transcription competitive PCR assay, we quantified DPD mRNA levels in 10 matched colorectal tumors and adjacent normal mucosae and 7 colorectal liver metastases and adjacent normal livers. Lower levels of DPD mRNA expression were observed in colorectal tumor compared with adjacent normal colon mucosa (median, 0.01 versus 0.37 amole/microg total RNA, P = 0.02). DPD mRNA expression was also lower in metastases than adjacent normal liver tissue (median, 0.11 versus 1.17 amole/microg total RNA, P = 0.001). DPD mRNA expression was higher in normal liver than normal colonic mucosa (median, 1.17 versus 0.37 amole/microg total RNA, P = 0.02). A significant relationship was observed between DPD mRNA and catalytic activity (r(s) = 0.66, P<0.001). The tumor:normal ratio for DPD mRNA, protein, and activity was relatively stable in liver (0.25, 0.55, and 0.51, respectively) but varied considerably in colon (0.085, 0.9, and 1.25, respectively), consistent with enhanced translation of DPD transcript in primary colorectal tumor. This suggests that DPD can be regulated at the levels of both transcription and translation.

  10. Management of Colorectal Cancer in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Joleen M

    2016-02-01

    Treatment for colorectal cancer should not be based on age alone. Pooled analyses from clinical trials show that fit older adults are able to tolerate treatment well with similar efficacy as younger adults. When an older adult is considered for treatment, the clinical encounter must evaluate for deficits in physical and cognitive function, and assess comorbidities, medications, and the degree of social support, all which have may affect tolerance of treatment. Based on the degree of fitness of the patient, multiple alternatives to aggressive treatment regimens and strategies exist to minimize toxicity and preserve quality of life during treatment.

  11. Biomechanical investigation of colorectal cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmieri, Valentina; Lucchetti, Donatella; Maiorana, Alessandro; Papi, Massimiliano; Maulucci, Giuseppe; Ciasca, Gabriele; Svelto, Maria; De Spirito, Marco; Sgambato, Alessandro

    2014-09-01

    The nanomechanical properties of SW480 colon cancer cells were investigated using Atomic Force Microscopy. SW480 cells are composed of two sub-populations with different shape and invasiveness. These two cells populations showed similar adhesion properties while appeared significantly different in term of cells stiffness. Since cell stiffness is related to invasiveness and growth, we suggest elasticity as a useful parameter to distinguish invasive cells inside the colorectal tumor bulk and the high-resolution mechanical mapping as a promising diagnostic tool for the identification of malignant cells.

  12. Nut consumption and risk of colorectal cancer in women

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Meng; Hu, Frank B.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Stampfer, Meir J.; Willett, Walter C.; Fuchs, Charles S.; Wu, Kana; Bao, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives Increasing nut consumption has been associated with reduced risk of obesity and type II diabetes, which are risk factors for colorectal cancer. However, the association between nut consumption and colorectal cancer risk is unclear. We aimed to examine the association of long-term nut consumption with risk of colorectal cancer. Subjects/Methods We prospectively followed 75,680 women who were free of cancer at baseline in the Nurses’ Health Study, and examined the association between nut consumption and colorectal cancer risk. Nut consumption was assessed at baseline and updated every 2 to 4 years. Relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. Results During 2,103,037 person-years of follow-up, we identified 1,503 colorectal cancer cases. After adjustment for other known or suspected risk factors, women who consumed nuts 2 or more times per week (i.e., ≥56 grams per week) had a 13% lower risk of colorectal cancer compared to those who rarely consumed nuts, but the association was not statistically significant (RR: 0.87; 95% CI: 0.72, 1.05; P trend: 0.06). No association was observed for peanut butter. Conclusions In this large prospective cohort of women, frequent nut consumption was not significantly associated with colorectal cancer risk after adjusting for other risk factors. PMID:25944181

  13. Anticancer effects of fucoxanthin and fucoxanthinol on colorectal cancer cell lines and colorectal cancer tissues.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kazuto; Hosokawa, Masashi; Kasajima, Hiroyuki; Hatanaka, Kazuteru; Kudo, Kazuhiro; Shimoyama, Norihiko; Miyashita, Kazuo

    2015-09-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most malignant neoplasms worldwide. Fucoxanthin is a carotenoid present in the chloroplasts of brown seaweeds. In the present study, the anticancer effects of fucoxanthin and its metabolite, fucoxanthinol, on 6 colorectal cancer cell lines and 20 tissue samples from surgically resected clinical colorectal cancer specimens were examined using a collagen-gel droplet embedded culture drug sensitivity test (CD-DST). The in vitro sensitivity to fucoxanthin, fucoxanthinol and the anticancer drugs is expressed as T/C (%), where T is the absorbance of cells which stained by neutral red treated with carotenoids and C is the absorbance of non-staining cells. Fucoxanthin and fucoxanthinol decreased the T/C (%) of Caco-2, WiDr, HCT116, and DLD-1 cell lines at doses of 20 µM. Fucoxanthinol also decreased the T/C (%) of SW620 cells, while the T/C (%) of Colo205 cells was not reduced by treatment with either carotenoid. Specifically, the T/C (%) of Caco-2 and WiDr cells, which were incubated in carotenoid-free medium for 6 days following treatment with 20 µM fucoxanthinol for 24 h, was markedly decreased to 1.4±0.2 and 12.0±0.3%, respectively. Furthermore, fucoxanthin and fucoxanthinol decreased the T/C (%) in colorectal cancer tissue samples. Notably, 20 µM fucoxanthinol treatment resulted in a higher proportion of colorectal cancer samples with a T/C (%) of <50% (13/20, 65%) compared with samples treated with 20 µM fucoxanthin (2/20, 10%). The median T/C (%) value of 35.1% for the 20 cancers specimens treated with 20 µM fucoxanthinol was lower than the median T/C (%) values of 86.3% and 75.8% for those treated with fluorouracil and paclitaxel, respectively. These results suggested that fucoxanthin and fucoxanthinol may be of use as chemotherapeutic agents in colorectal cancer.

  14. Food groups and colorectal cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Levi, F; Pasche, C; La Vecchia, C; Lucchini, F; Franceschi, S

    1999-01-01

    Most studies of diet and colorectal cancer have considered nutrients and micronutrients, but the role of foods or food groups remains open to debate. To elucidate the issue, we examined data from a case–control study conducted between 1992 and 1997 in the Swiss canton of Vaud. Cases were 223 patients (142 men, 81 women) with incident, histologically confirmed colon (n = 119) or rectal (n = 104) cancer (median age 63 years), linked with the Cancer Registry of the Swiss Canton of Vaud, and controls were 491 subjects (211 men, 280 women, median age 58 years) admitted to the same university hospital for a wide spectrum of acute non-neoplastic conditions unrelated to long-term modifications of diet. Odds ratios (OR) were obtained after allowance for age, sex, education, smoking, alcohol, body mass index, physical activity and total energy intake. Significant associations were observed for refined grain (OR = 1.32 for an increase of one serving per day), and red meat (OR = 1.54), pork and processed meat (OR = 1.27), alcohol (OR = 1.28), and significant protections for whole grain (OR = 0.85), raw (OR = 0.85) and cooked vegetables (OR = 0.69), citrus (OR = 0.86) and other fruits (OR = 0.85), and for coffee (OR = 0.73). Garlic was also protective (OR = 0.32 for the highest tertile of intake). These findings in a central European population support the hypothesis that a diet rich in refined grains and red meat increases the risk of colorectal cancer; they, therefore, support the recommendation to substitute whole grains for refined grain, to limit meat intake, and to increase fruit and vegetable consumption. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10098773

  15. Adipokines linking obesity with colorectal cancer risk in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Ho, Gloria Y F; Wang, Tao; Gunter, Marc J; Strickler, Howard D; Cushman, Mary; Kaplan, Robert C; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Xue, Xiaonan; Rajpathak, Swapnil N; Chlebowski, Rowan T; Vitolins, Mara Z; Scherer, Philipp E; Rohan, Thomas E

    2012-06-15

    Mechanistic associations between obesity and colorectal cancer remain unclear. In this study, we investigated whether adipokines are risk factors for colorectal cancer and whether they may mediate its association with obesity. In a case-cohort study nested within the Women's Health Initiative cohort of postmenopausal women, baseline plasma samples from 457 colorectal cancer cases and 841 subcohort subjects were assayed for seven adipokines-adiponectin, leptin, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), resistin, hepatocyte growth factor, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and TNF-α. Serum insulin and estradiol values measured previously were also available for data analysis. After adjusting for age, race, smoking, colonoscopy history, and estrogen level, a low level of anti-inflammatory adiponectin and high levels of proinflammatory leptin, PAI-1, and IL-6 were associated with increased colorectal cancer risk, though only leptin remained significant after further adjustment for insulin [HRs comparing extreme quartiles (HR(Q4-Q1)), 1.84; 95% CI, 1.17-2.90]. Mediation analyses showed that leptin and insulin partially explained the association between waist circumference and colorectal cancer and attenuated it by 25% and 37%, respectively, with insulin being a significant mediator (P = 0.041). Our findings support the conclusion that adipokines involved in inflammation are associated with colorectal cancer risk, but that their effects may be mediated mostly by insulin, with leptin exerting an independent effect. Hyperinsulinemia and hyperleptinemia may therefore partially explain the adiposity association with colorectal cancer in postmenopausal women.

  16. Fusobacterium nucleatum Promotes Chemoresistance to Colorectal Cancer by Modulating Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Yu, TaChung; Guo, Fangfang; Yu, Yanan; Sun, Tiantian; Ma, Dan; Han, Jixuan; Qian, Yun; Kryczek, Ilona; Sun, Danfeng; Nagarsheth, Nisha; Chen, Yingxuan; Chen, Haoyan; Hong, Jie; Zou, Weiping; Fang, Jing-Yuan

    2017-07-27

    Gut microbiota are linked to chronic inflammation and carcinogenesis. Chemotherapy failure is the major cause of recurrence and poor prognosis in colorectal cancer patients. Here, we investigated the contribution of gut microbiota to chemoresistance in patients with colorectal cancer. We found that Fusobacterium (F.) nucleatum was abundant in colorectal cancer tissues in patients with recurrence post chemotherapy, and was associated with patient clinicopathological characterisitcs. Furthermore, our bioinformatic and functional studies demonstrated that F. nucleatum promoted colorectal cancer resistance to chemotherapy. Mechanistically, F. nucleatum targeted TLR4 and MYD88 innate immune signaling and specific microRNAs to activate the autophagy pathway and alter colorectal cancer chemotherapeutic response. Thus, F. nucleatum orchestrates a molecular network of the Toll-like receptor, microRNAs, and autophagy to clinically, biologically, and mechanistically control colorectal cancer chemoresistance. Measuring and targeting F. nucleatum and its associated pathway will yield valuable insight into clinical management and may ameliorate colorectal cancer patient outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Adipokines Linking Obesity with Colorectal Cancer Risk in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Gloria Y.F.; Wang, Tao; Gunter, Marc J.; Strickler, Howard D.; Cushman, Mary; Kaplan, Robert C.; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Xue, Xiaonan; Rajpathak, Swapnil N.; Chlebowski, Rowan T.; Vitolins, Mara Z.; Scherer, Philipp E.; Rohan, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanistic associations between obesity and colorectal cancer remain unclear. In this study, we investigated whether adipokines are risk factors for colorectal cancer and whether they may mediate its association with obesity. In a case–cohort study nested within the Women’s Health Initiative cohort of postmenopausal women, baseline plasma samples from 457 colorectal cancer cases and 841 subcohort subjects were assayed for seven adipokines—adiponectin, leptin, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), resistin, hepatocyte growth factor, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and TNF-α. Serum insulin and estradiol values measured previously were also available for data analysis. After adjusting for age, race, smoking, colonoscopy history, and estrogen level, a low level of antiinflammatory adiponectin and high levels of proinflammatory leptin, PAI-1, and IL-6 were associated with increased colorectal cancer risk, though only leptin remained significant after further adjustment for insulin [HRs comparing extreme quartiles (HRQ4–Q1), 1.84; 95% CI, 1.17–2.90]. Mediation analyses showed that leptin and insulin partially explained the association between waist circumference and colorectal cancer and attenuated it by 25% and 37%, respectively, with insulin being a significant mediator (P = 0.041). Our findings support the conclusion that adipokines involved in inflammation are associated with colorectal cancer risk, but that their effects may be mediated mostly by insulin, with leptin exerting an independent effect. Hyperinsulinemia and hyperleptinemia may therefore partially explain the adiposity association with colorectal cancer in postmenopausal women. PMID:22511581

  18. The association between serum ferritin with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhe; Chen, Ji-Wei; Feng, Jian-Hua; Shen, Fei; Cai, Wen-Song; Cao, Jie; Xu, Bo

    2015-01-01

    There are conflicting reports on the correlation between serum levels of ferritin with colorectal cancer. The purpose of the present study is to clarify the association between serum ferritin with colorectal cancer using a meta-analysis approach. We searched articles indexed in Pubmed published as of July 2015 that met our predefined criteria. Six eligible articles involving 927 subjects were identified. Overall, pooled analysis indicated that subjects with colorectal cancer had lower serum level of ferritin than the healthy controls (SMD=-1.569, 95% CI=[-2.718, -0.420], P= 0.007). Further subgroup analysis found lower serum level of ferritin among patients with colorectal cancer in eastern country (SMD=-1.956, 95% CI=[-3.750, -0.162], P=0.033), but not in western country (SMD=-1.285, 95% CI=[-2.778, 0.207], P=0.091). In conclusion, this meta-analysis supports a significant association between serum ferritin with colorectal cancer. However, the subgroup analysis found that there was significant effect modification of ferritin level by ethnic. Thus this finding needs further confirmation by trans-regional multicenter, long-term observation in a cohort design to obtain better understanding of causal relationships between serum ferrintin levels and colorectal cancer, through measuring ferritin at baseline to investigate whether the highest ferritin category versus lowest is associated with colorectal cancer risk.

  19. Field cancerisation in colorectal cancer: a new frontier or pastures past?

    PubMed

    Patel, Abhilasha; Tripathi, Gyanendra; Gopalakrishnan, Kishore; Williams, Nigel; Arasaradnam, Ramesh P

    2015-04-07

    Despite considerable advances in our understanding of cancer biology, early diagnosis of colorectal cancer remains elusive. Based on the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, cancer develops through the progressive accumulation of mutations in key genes that regulate cell growth. However, recent mathematical modelling suggests that some of these genetic events occur prior to the development of any discernible histological abnormality. Cells acquire pro-tumourigenic mutations that are not able to produce morphological change but predispose to cancer formation. These cells can grow to form large patches of mucosa from which a cancer arises. This process has been termed "field cancerisation". It has received little attention in the scientific literature until recently. Several studies have now demonstrated cellular, genetic and epigenetic alterations in the macroscopically normal mucosa of colorectal cancer patients. In some reports, these changes were effectively utilised to identify patients with a neoplastic lesion suggesting potential application in the clinical setting. In this article, we present the scientific evidence to support field cancerisation in colorectal cancer and discuss important limitations that require further investigation. Characterisation of the field defect is necessary to enable early diagnosis of colorectal cancer and identify molecular targets for chemoprevention. Field cancerisation offers a promising prospect for experimental cancer research and has potential to improve patient outcomes in the clinical setting.

  20. Epigenetic Alterations in Colorectal Cancer: Emerging Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Grady, William M; Goel, Ajay

    2015-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. One of the fundamental processes driving the initiation and progression of CRC is the accumulation of a variety of genetic and epigenetic changes in colonic epithelial cells. Over the past decade, major advances have been made in our understanding of cancer epigenetics, particularly regarding aberrant DNA methylation, microRNA (miRNA) and noncoding RNA deregulation, and alterations in histone modification states. Assessment of the colon cancer "epigenome" has revealed that virtually all CRCs have aberrantly methylated genes and altered miRNA expression. The average CRC methylome has hundreds to thousands of abnormally methylated genes and dozens of altered miRNAs. As with gene mutations in the cancer genome, a subset of these epigenetic alterations, called driver events, are presumed to have a functional role in CRC. In addition, the advances in our understanding of epigenetic alterations in CRC have led to these alterations being developed as clinical biomarkers for diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic applications. Progress in this field suggests that these epigenetic alterations will be commonly used in the near future to direct the prevention and treatment of CRC.

  1. Dietary flavonoid intake and risk of stomach and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Hae Dong; Kim, Jeongseon

    2013-01-01

    Stomach and colorectal cancers are common cancers and leading causes of cancer deaths. Because the alimentary tract can interact directly with dietary components, stomach and colorectal cancer may be closely related to dietary intake. We systematically searched published literature written in English via PubMed by searching for terms related to stomach and colorectal cancer risk and dietary flavonoids up to June 30, 2012. Twenty-three studies out of 209 identified articles were finally selected for the analysis. Log point effect estimates and the corresponding standard errors were calculated using covariate-adjusted point effect estimates and 95%CIs from the selected studies. Total dietary flavonoid intake was not associated with a reduced risk of colorectal or stomach cancer [odds ratio (OR) (95%CI) = 1.00 (0.90-1.11) and 1.07 (0.70-1.61), respectively]. Among flavonoid subclasses, the intake of flavonols, flavan-3-ols, anthocyanidins, and proanthocyanidins showed a significant inverse association with colorectal cancer risk [OR (95%CI) = 0.71 (0.63-0.81), 0.88 (0.79-0.97), 0.68 (0.56-0.82), and 0.72 (0.61-0.85), respectively]. A significant association was found only between flavonols and stomach cancer risk based on a limited number of selected studies [OR (95%CI) = 0.68 (0.46-0.99)]. In the summary estimates from case-control studies, all flavonoid subclasses except flavones and flavanones were inversely associated with colorectal cancer risk, whereas neither total flavonoids nor any subclasses of flavonoids were associated with colorectal cancer risk in the summary estimates based on the cohort studies. The significant association between flavonoid subclasses and cancer risk might be closely related to bias derived from the case-control design. There was no clear evidence that dietary flavonoids are associated with reduced risk of stomach and colorectal cancer. PMID:23467443

  2. Dietary flavonoid intake and risk of stomach and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Woo, Hae Dong; Kim, Jeongseon

    2013-02-21

    Stomach and colorectal cancers are common cancers and leading causes of cancer deaths. Because the alimentary tract can interact directly with dietary components, stomach and colorectal cancer may be closely related to dietary intake. We systematically searched published literature written in English via PubMed by searching for terms related to stomach and colorectal cancer risk and dietary flavonoids up to June 30, 2012. Twenty-three studies out of 209 identified articles were finally selected for the analysis. Log point effect estimates and the corresponding standard errors were calculated using covariate-adjusted point effect estimates and 95%CIs from the selected studies. Total dietary flavonoid intake was not associated with a reduced risk of colorectal or stomach cancer [odds ratio (OR) (95%CI) = 1.00 (0.90-1.11) and 1.07 (0.70-1.61), respectively]. Among flavonoid subclasses, the intake of flavonols, flavan-3-ols, anthocyanidins, and proanthocyanidins showed a significant inverse association with colorectal cancer risk [OR (95%CI) = 0.71 (0.63-0.81), 0.88 (0.79-0.97), 0.68 (0.56-0.82), and 0.72 (0.61-0.85), respectively]. A significant association was found only between flavonols and stomach cancer risk based on a limited number of selected studies [OR (95%CI) = 0.68 (0.46-0.99)]. In the summary estimates from case-control studies, all flavonoid subclasses except flavones and flavanones were inversely associated with colorectal cancer risk, whereas neither total flavonoids nor any subclasses of flavonoids were associated with colorectal cancer risk in the summary estimates based on the cohort studies. The significant association between flavonoid subclasses and cancer risk might be closely related to bias derived from the case-control design. There was no clear evidence that dietary flavonoids are associated with reduced risk of stomach and colorectal cancer.

  3. Microbiota impact on the epigenetic regulation of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tao; Owen, Jennifer L.; Lightfooot, Yaíma L.; Kladde, Michael P.; Mohamadzadeh, Mansour

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms of colorectal cancer (CRC) development can be roughly divided into three categories: genetic, epigenetic, and aberrant immunologic signaling pathways, all of which may be triggered by an imbalanced intestinal microbiota. Aberrant gut microbial composition, termed “dysbiosis”, has been reported in inflammatory bowel disease patients who are at increased risk for CRC development. Recent studies indicate that it is feasible to rescue experimental models of colonic cancer by oral treatment with genetically engineered beneficial bacteria and/or their immune-regulating gene products. Here, we review the mechanisms of epigenetic modulation implicated in the development and progression of CRC, which may be the result of dysbiosis, and therefore, may be amenable to therapeutic intervention. PMID:24051204

  4. Dietary factors, genetic and epigenetic influences in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    PELLEGRINI, M.L.; ARGIBAY, P.; GOMEZ, D.E.

    2010-01-01

    Genetic influences, together with epigenetic components and dietary factors, play a fundamental role in the initiation and progression of cancer by causing a number of deregulations. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a disease influenced by dietary factors, for which established genetic and epigenetic alterations have been identified. Within CRC, there are hereditary syndromes that present mutations in the germ-line hMLH1, and also alterations in the methylation of the promoters. Epigenetics has also been established as a pathway of carcinogenesis. In the present review, we analyzed studies conducted to discern the different pathways leading to established CRC, stressing the importance of identifying factors that may predict CRC at an early stage, since it is mostly a silent disease observed at the clinical level in advanced stages. PMID:22993535

  5. Colorectal cancer prognosis twenty years later

    PubMed Central

    Bujanda, Luis; Sarasqueta, Cristina; Hijona, Elisabeth; Hijona, Lander; Cosme, Angel; Gil, Ines; Elorza, Jose Luis; Asensio, Jose I; Larburu, Santiago; Enríquez-Navascués, José M; Jover, Rodrigo; Balaguer, Francesc; Llor, Xavier; Bessa, Xavier; Andreu, Montserrat; Paya, Artemio; Castells, Antoni; Association, Gastrointestinal Oncology Group of the Spanish Gastroenterological

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate changes in colorectal cancer (CRC) survival over the last 20 years. METHODS: We compared two groups of consecutive CRC patients that were prospectively recruited: Group I included 1990 patients diagnosed between 1980 and 1994. Group II included 871 patients diagnosed in 2001. RESULTS: The average follow up time was 21 mo (1-229) for Group I and 50 mo (1-73.4) for Group II. Overall median survival was significantly longer in Group II than in Group I (73 mo vs 25 mo, P < 0.001) and the difference was significant for all tumor stages. Post surgical mortality was 8% for Group Iand 2% for Group II (P < 0.001). Only 17% of GroupI patients received chemotherapy compared with 50% of Group II patients (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Survival in colorectal cancer patients has doubled over the past 20 years. This increase seems to be partly due to the generalization in the administration of chemotherapy and to the decrease of post surgical mortality. PMID:20143465

  6. Role of Physical Activity and Diet After Colorectal Cancer Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Van Blarigan, Erin L.; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    This review summarizes the evidence regarding physical activity and diet after colorectal cancer diagnosis in relation to quality of life, disease recurrence, and survival. There have been extensive reports on adiposity, inactivity, and certain diets, particularly those high in red and processed meats, and increased risk of colorectal cancer. Only in the past decade have data emerged on how such lifestyle factors are associated with outcomes in colorectal cancer survivors. Prospective observational studies have consistently reported that physical activity after colorectal cancer diagnosis reduces mortality. A meta-analysis estimated that each 15 metabolic equivalent task-hour per week increase in physical activity after colorectal cancer diagnosis was associated with a 38% lower risk of mortality. No randomized controlled trials have been completed to confirm that physical activity lowers risk of mortality among colorectal cancer survivors; however, trials have shown that physical activity, including structured exercise, is safe for colorectal cancer survivors (localized to metastatic stage, during and after treatment) and improves cardiorespiratory fitness and physical function. In addition, prospective observational studies have suggested that a Western dietary pattern, high carbohydrate intake, and consuming sugar-sweetened beverages after diagnosis may increase risk of colorectal cancer recurrence and mortality, but these data are limited to single analyses from one of two US cohorts. Additional data from prospective studies and randomized controlled trials are needed. Nonetheless, on the basis of the available evidence, it is reasonable to counsel colorectal cancer survivors to engage in regular physical activity and limit consumption of refined carbohydrates, red and processed meats, and sugar-sweetened beverages. PMID:25918293

  7. Role of physical activity and diet after colorectal cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Van Blarigan, Erin L; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A

    2015-06-01

    This review summarizes the evidence regarding physical activity and diet after colorectal cancer diagnosis in relation to quality of life, disease recurrence, and survival. There have been extensive reports on adiposity, inactivity, and certain diets, particularly those high in red and processed meats, and increased risk of colorectal cancer. Only in the past decade have data emerged on how such lifestyle factors are associated with outcomes in colorectal cancer survivors. Prospective observational studies have consistently reported that physical activity after colorectal cancer diagnosis reduces mortality. A meta-analysis estimated that each 15 metabolic equivalent task-hour per week increase in physical activity after colorectal cancer diagnosis was associated with a 38% lower risk of mortality. No randomized controlled trials have been completed to confirm that physical activity lowers risk of mortality among colorectal cancer survivors; however, trials have shown that physical activity, including structured exercise, is safe for colorectal cancer survivors (localized to metastatic stage, during and after treatment) and improves cardiorespiratory fitness and physical function. In addition, prospective observational studies have suggested that a Western dietary pattern, high carbohydrate intake, and consuming sugar-sweetened beverages after diagnosis may increase risk of colorectal cancer recurrence and mortality, but these data are limited to single analyses from one of two US cohorts. Additional data from prospective studies and randomized controlled trials are needed. Nonetheless, on the basis of the available evidence, it is reasonable to counsel colorectal cancer survivors to engage in regular physical activity and limit consumption of refined carbohydrates, red and processed meats, and sugar-sweetened beverages. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  8. Colorectal cancer in Iran: Epidemiology and morphology trends

    PubMed Central

    Rafiemanesh, Hosein; Pakzad, Reza; Abedi, Mehdi; Kor, Yones; Moludi, Jalal; Towhidi, Farhad; Reza Makhsosi, Behnam; Salehiniya, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers in different countries, including Iran. No comprehensive study has been done in the country for colorectal cancer, but information on the incidence and trends is essential to planning. This study aimed to evaluate the occurrence and morphology of colorectal cancer and its trend in Iran. This study was conducted using data from the national cancer registry system in Iran from 2003-2008. We used joinpoint regression analysis for assessing incidence time trends and morphology change percentage. Of all cases of colorectal cancer, 61.83 % were colon cancer, 27.54 % rectal cancer, 7.46 % rectosigmoid cancer, and 3.10 anal cancer. The most common histological types with the frequencies of 80.85 % was related to adenocarcinoma, NOS. The Annual percentage changes (APC) in ASIR for colorectal cancer significantly increased in both men and women. APC in ASIR was 13.7 (CI: 10.5-17.1) in women and 16.4 (CI: 12.4-20.5) in men. APC of adenocarcinoma in villous adenoma showed significant declining trend (p<0.05), while APC of adenocarcinoma, NOS had a constant trend. The incidence of the cancer in recent years has increased in Iran because of changes in lifestyle and diet. Therefore, further studies are necessary to detect the cause of this cancer and perform preventive measures. PMID:28337105

  9. Sporadic colorectal cancer: microbial contributors to disease prevention, development and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Drewes, Julia L; Housseau, Franck; Sears, Cynthia L

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota has been hailed as an accessory organ, with functions critical to the host including dietary metabolic activities and assistance in the development of a proper functioning immune system. However, an aberrant microbiota (dysbiosis) may influence disease processes such as colorectal cancer. In this review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of the contributions of the microbiota to prevention, initiation/progression, and treatment of colorectal cancer, with a major focus on biofilms and the antimicrobial and antitumoural immune response. PMID:27380134

  10. DNA Mismatch Repair Status Predicts Need for Future Colorectal Surgery for Metachronous Neoplasms in Young Individuals Undergoing Colorectal Cancer Resection.

    PubMed

    Aronson, Melyssa; Holter, Spring; Semotiuk, Kara; Winter, Laura; Pollett, Aaron; Gallinger, Steven; Cohen, Zane; Gryfe, Robert

    2015-07-01

    The treatment of colorectal cancer in young patients involves both management of the incident cancer and consideration of the possibility of Lynch syndrome and the development of metachronous colorectal cancers. This study aims to assess the prognostic role of DNA mismatch repair deficiency and extended colorectal resection for metachronous colorectal neoplasia risk in young patients with colorectal cancer. This is a retrospective review of 285 patients identified in our GI cancer registry with colorectal cancer diagnosed at 35 years or younger in the absence of polyposis. Using univariate and multivariate analysis, we assessed the prognostic role of mismatch repair deficiency and standard clinicopathologic characteristics, including the extent of resection, on the rate of developing metachronous colorectal neoplasia requiring resection. Mismatch repair deficiency was identified in biospecimens from 44% of patients and was significantly associated with an increased risk for metachronous colorectal neoplasia requiring resection (10-year cumulative risk, 13.5% ± 4.2%) compared with 56% of patients with mismatch repair-intact colorectal cancer (10-year cumulative risk, 5.8% ± 3.3%; p = 0.011). In multivariate analysis, mismatch repair deficiency was associated with a HR of 3.65 (95% CI, 1.44-9.21; p = 0.006) for metachronous colorectal neoplasia, whereas extended resection with ileorectal or ileosigmoid anastomosis significantly decreased the risk of metachronous colorectal neoplasia (HR, 0.21; 95% CI, 0.05-0.90; p = 0.036). This study had a retrospective design, and, therefore, recommendations for colorectal cancer surgery and screening were not fully standardized. Quality of life after colorectal cancer surgery was not assessed. Young patients with colorectal cancer with molecular hallmarks of Lynch syndrome were at significantly higher risk for the development of subsequent colorectal neoplasia. This risk was significantly reduced in those who underwent extended

  11. Probiotics, prebiotics and colorectal cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Ambalam, Padma; Raman, Maya; Purama, Ravi Kiran; Doble, Mukesh

    2016-02-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC), the third major cause of mortality among various cancer types in United States, has been increasing in developing countries due to varying diet and dietary habits and occupational hazards. Recent evidences showed that composition of gut microbiota could be associated with the development of CRC and other gut dysbiosis. Modulation of gut microbiota by probiotics and prebiotics, either alone or in combination could positively influence the cross-talk between immune system and microbiota, would be beneficial in preventing inflammation and CRC. In this review, role of probiotics and prebiotics in the prevention of CRC has been discussed. Various epidemiological and experimental studies, specifically gut microbiome research has effectively improved the understanding about the role of probiotics and microbial treatment as anticarcinogenic agents. A few human studies support the beneficial effect of probiotics and prebiotics; hence, comprehensive understanding is urgent to realize the clinical applications of probiotics and prebiotics in CRC prevention.

  12. The gastrointestinal microbiota and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dulal, Santosh; Deveaux, April; Jovov, Biljana; Han, Xuesong

    2014-01-01

    The human gut is home to a complex and diverse microbiota that contributes to the overall homeostasis of the host. Increasingly, the intestinal microbiota is recognized as an important player in human illness such as colorectal cancer (CRC), inflammatory bowel diseases, and obesity. CRC in itself is one of the major causes of cancer mortality in the Western world. The mechanisms by which bacteria contribute to CRC are complex and not fully understood, but increasing evidence suggests a link between the intestinal microbiota and CRC as well as diet and inflammation, which are believed to play a role in carcinogenesis. It is thought that the gut microbiota interact with dietary factors to promote chronic inflammation and CRC through direct influence on host cell physiology, cellular homeostasis, energy regulation, and/or metabolism of xenobiotics. This review provides an overview on the role of commensal gut microbiota in the development of human CRC and explores its association with diet and inflammation. PMID:25540232

  13. The gastrointestinal microbiota and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Keku, Temitope O; Dulal, Santosh; Deveaux, April; Jovov, Biljana; Han, Xuesong

    2015-03-01

    The human gut is home to a complex and diverse microbiota that contributes to the overall homeostasis of the host. Increasingly, the intestinal microbiota is recognized as an important player in human illness such as colorectal cancer (CRC), inflammatory bowel diseases, and obesity. CRC in itself is one of the major causes of cancer mortality in the Western world. The mechanisms by which bacteria contribute to CRC are complex and not fully understood, but increasing evidence suggests a link between the intestinal microbiota and CRC as well as diet and inflammation, which are believed to play a role in carcinogenesis. It is thought that the gut microbiota interact with dietary factors to promote chronic inflammation and CRC through direct influence on host cell physiology, cellular homeostasis, energy regulation, and/or metabolism of xenobiotics. This review provides an overview on the role of commensal gut microbiota in the development of human CRC and explores its association with diet and inflammation.

  14. Role of phytochemicals in colorectal cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Hua; Niu, Yin-Bo; Sun, Yang; Zhang, Feng; Liu, Chang-Xu; Fan, Lei; Mei, Qi-Bing

    2015-08-21

    Although the incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) has been declining in recent decades, it remains a major public health issue as a leading cause of cancer mortality and morbidity worldwide. Prevention is one milestone for this disease. Extensive study has demonstrated that a diet containing fruits, vegetables, and spices has the potential to prevent CRC. The specific constituents in the dietary foods which are responsible for preventing CRC and the possible mechanisms have also been investigated extensively. Various phytochemicals have been identified in fruits, vegetables, and spices which exhibit chemopreventive potential. In this review article, chemopreventive effects of phytochemicals including curcumin, polysaccharides (apple polysaccharides and mushroom glucans), saponins (Paris saponins, ginsenosides and soy saponins), resveratrol, and quercetin on CRC and the mechanisms are discussed. This review proposes the need for more clinical evidence for the effects of phytochemicals against CRC in large trials. The conclusion of the review is that these phytochemicals might be therapeutic candidates in the campaign against CRC.

  15. The current thinking on colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Spreadborough, P; Doran, C

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the fourth most common cancer in the UK and the incidence has increased over recent decades. Although only 1.5% of cases are diagnosed in those aged under 40 years, it remains an important condition to be aware of in the military population. Patients who are genetically predisposed can have a lifetime risk of 80-100% of developing CRC and are likely to develop symptoms during their service. 20% of patients will present with metastatic disease. While surgical and oncological treatments have improved outcomes, early diagnosis of CRC is essential to reducing mortality. This paper provides an overview of the aetiology, investigations and treatment options for CRC. Explanation of primary surgical options and the principles of adjuvant therapies are included to aid informed discussions with patients.

  16. Colorectal cancer carcinogenesis: a review of mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Kanwal; Ghias, Kulsoom

    2016-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cancer in women and the third most common in men globally. CRC arises from one or a combination of chromosomal instability, CpG island methylator phenotype, and microsatellite instability. Genetic instability is usually caused by aneuploidy and loss of heterozygosity. Mutations in the tumor suppressor or cell cycle genes may also lead to cellular transformation. Similarly, epigenetic and/or genetic alterations resulting in impaired cellular pathways, such as DNA repair mechanism, may lead to microsatellite instability and mutator phenotype. Non-coding RNAs, more importantly microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs have also been implicated at various CRC stages. Understanding the specific mechanisms of tumorigenesis and the underlying genetic and epigenetic traits is critical in comprehending the disease phenotype. This paper reviews these mechanisms along with the roles of various non-coding RNAs in CRCs.

  17. Colorectal Cancer Chemoprevention: Is This the Future of Colorectal Cancer Prevention?

    PubMed Central

    Manzano, A.; Pérez-Segura, P.

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is presently one of the most common causes of cancer-related death in our setting and affects a great number of people each year. Screening strategies are commonly used but they do not seem enough to avoid CRC development or prevent completely its mortality. Because of this fact other prevention strategies have gained interest in recent years. Chemoprevention seems to be an attractive option in this setting and several drugs have been studied in this field. This review is focused on salicylates, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and cycloxygenase-2 inhibitors (COXIBs), whose mechanism of action could be directly related to colon cancer chemoprevention. PMID:22649288

  18. Colorectal Cancer Molecular Biology Moves Into Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, Colin C.; Grady, William M.

    2010-01-01

    The promise of personalized medicine is now a clinical reality, with colorectal cancer genetics at the forefront of this next major advance in clinical medicine. This is no more evident than in the recent advances in testing of colorectal cancers for specific molecular alterations in order to guide treatment with the monoclonal antibody therapies cetuximab and panitumumab, which target the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In this review, we examine genetic mechanisms of colorectal cancer and how these alterations relate to emerging biomarkers for early detection and risk stratification (diagnostic markers), prognosis (prognostic markers), and the prediction of treatment responses (predictive markers). PMID:20921207

  19. Tea, coffee, and milk consumption and colorectal cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Green, Chadwick John; de Dauwe, Palina; Boyle, Terry; Tabatabaei, Seyed Mehdi; Fritschi, Lin; Heyworth, Jane Shirley

    2014-01-01

    Data regarding the effects of tea, coffee, and milk on the risk of colorectal cancer are inconsistent. We investigated associations of tea, coffee, and milk consumption with colorectal cancer risk and attempted to determine if these exposures were differentially associated with the risks of proximal colon, distal colon, and rectal cancers. Data from 854 incident cases and 948 controls were analyzed in a case-control study of colorectal cancer in Western Australia during 2005-07. Multivariable logistic regression was used to analyze the associations of black tea (with and without milk), green tea, herbal tea, hot coffee, iced coffee, and milk with colorectal cancer. Consumption of 1 or more cups of herbal tea per week was associated with a significantly decreased risk of distal colon cancer (adjusted odds ratio, 0.37; 95% CI, 0.16-0.82; PTrend = 0.044), and consumption of 1 or more cups of iced coffee per week was associated with increased risk of rectal cancer (adjusted odds ratio, 1.52; 95% CI, 0.91-2.54; PTrend = 0.004). Neither herbal tea nor iced coffee was associated with the risk of proximal colon cancer. Hot coffee was associated with a possible increased risk of distal colon cancer. Black tea (with or without milk), green tea, decaffeinated coffee, and milk were not significantly associated with colorectal cancer risk. Consumption of herbal tea was associated with reduced risk of distal colon cancer, and consumption of iced coffee was associated with increased rectal cancer risk.

  20. Primary and Secondary Prevention of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tárraga López, Pedro J; Albero, Juan Solera; Rodríguez-Montes, José Antonio

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Cancer is a worldwide problem as it will affect one in three men and one in four women during their lifetime. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most frequent cancer in men, after lung and prostate cancer, and is the second most frequent cancer in women after breast cancer. It is also the third cause of death in men and women separately, and is the second most frequent cause of death by cancer if both genders are considered together. CRC represents approximately 10% of deaths by cancer. Modifiable risk factors of CRC include smoking, physical inactivity, being overweight and obesity, eating processed meat, and drinking alcohol excessively. CRC screening programs are possible only in economically developed countries. However, attention should be paid in the future to geographical areas with ageing populations and a western lifestyle.19,20 Sigmoidoscopy screening done with people aged 55–64 years has been demonstrated to reduce the incidence of CRC by 33% and mortality by CRC by 43%. OBJECTIVE To assess the effect on the incidence and mortality of CRC diet and lifestyle and to determine the effect of secondary prevention through early diagnosis of CRC. METHODOLOGY: A comprehensive search of Medline and Pubmed articles related to primary and secondary prevention of CRC and subsequently, a meta-analysis of the same blocks are performed. RESULTS 225 articles related to primary or secondary prevention of CRC were retrieved. Of these 145 were considered valid on meta-analysis: 12 on epidemiology, 56 on diet and lifestyle, and over 77 different screenings for early detection of CRC. Cancer is a worldwide problem as it will affect one in three men and one in four women during their lifetime. There is no doubt whatsoever which environmental factors, probably diet, may account for these cancer rates. Excessive alcohol consumption and cholesterol-rich diet are associated with a high risk of colon cancer. A diet poor in folic acid and vitamin B6 is also

  1. [Genetic and epigenetic changes in colorectal cancer and genetic testing for personalized medicine].

    PubMed

    Suehiro, Yutaka; Hinoda, Yuji

    2012-10-01

    Recent studies have uncovered molecular pathways of colorectal cancer, including the chromosomal instability pathway and microsatellite pathway. In addition, according to genetic and epigenetic profiles, colorectal cancer can be subclassified into 3 distinct groups, named the CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) 1, CIMP2, and CIMP negative. CIMP1 is characterized by MSI and BRAF mutations and rare KRAS and p53 mutations. CIMP2 is associated with KRAS mutations and rare MSI, BRAF, or p53 mutations. CIMP negative cases have a high rate of p53 mutations and lower rates of MSI or mutations of BRAF or KRAS. Regarding genetic testing for personalized medicine for colorectal cancer, uridine disphosphate glucuronosyl transferase 1(UGT1) and KRAS tests are available. Irinotecan is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic agents in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. The prodrug irinotecan is biotransformed by carboxylesterase into its active metabolite SN-38, which is inactivated by UGT1 into the inactive compound SN-38G. Here we discuss UGT1A1 gene polymorphism as a predictor of toxicity. The epidermal growth factor (EGFR) plays an important role in the development and progression of colorectal cancer. KRAS serves as a mediator between extracellular ligand binding and intracellular transduction of signals from EGFR to the nucleus. Activating KRAS mutations has been identified as a predictor of resistance to EGFR-directed antibodies such as cetuximab. Here we discuss the current understanding of KRAS mutations and the therapeutic effect of cetuximab.

  2. Salinomycin Abolished STAT3 and STAT1 Interactions and Reduced Telomerase Activity in Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Chung, Seyung S; Adekoya, Debbie; Enenmoh, Ikechukwu; Clarke, Orette; Wang, Piwen; Sarkyssian, Marianna; Wu, Yong; Vadgama, Jaydutt V

    2017-02-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality in most developed countries. This mortality is mainly due to the metastatic progression to the liver with frequent recurrence. Colorectal cancer remains a therapeutic challenge and this has intensified the search for new drug targets. In an effort to establish a novel targeted-therapy, we studied the molecular mechanisms of cancer stem cell inhibitor salinomycin. Co-immunoprecipitation was performed to examine STAT3-STAT1 protein interactions. Telomerase activity was measured by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and ELISA assays. Apoptosis and cell stress arrays were analyzed to identify key proteins responding to salinomycin treatments. IL-6 and TNF-α induced STAT3 and STAT1 interactions, however the interactions were abolished by salinomycin challenge. Salinomycin reduced cancer stem cell phenotype and decreased telomerase activity of colorectal cancer cells. Our work uncovers a new mechanism through which salinomycin inhibits cancer stemness suggesting a novel targeted-therapy for metastatic colorectal cancer. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  3. Colorectal cancer screening beliefs. Focus groups with first-degree relatives.

    PubMed

    Rawl, S M; Menon, U; Champion, V L; Foster, J L; Skinner, C S

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the perceived benefits and barriers to colorectal cancer screening reported by first-degree relatives of colorectal cancer patients. In this study, the authors used focus groups to identify perceived benefits and barriers to colorectal cancer screening among parents and children of colorectal cancer patients. Four focus groups were conducted with relatives of colorectal cancer patients seen at two university medical centers in the Midwest. The groups ranged in size from five to eight members each and were stratified by gender. Four benefits of colorectal cancer screening were identified by participants: finding colorectal cancer early, decreasing the chances of dying from colorectal cancer, freedom from worry about colorectal cancer, and reassurance that one was cancer-free. Four main barriers were identified that applied to all four types of colorectal cancer screening or to colorectal cancer screening in general. These included inadequate public awareness of colorectal cancer, inconsistent recommendations from healthcare providers, concerns about the efficacy of screening tests, and embarrassment. Barriers unique to each screening test also were identified. Understanding individual beliefs about the benefits and barriers to colorectal cancer screening will allow clinicians and researchers to develop effective interventions to increase screening. Results from the focus groups have been used to develop an instrument to measure benefits and barriers to colorectal cancer screening, which now needs to be tested with more culturally and socioeconomically diverse groups.

  4. Chemoprevention, chemotherapy, and chemoresistance in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Marin, Jose J G; Sanchez de Medina, Fermin; Castaño, Beatriz; Bujanda, Luis; Romero, Marta R; Martinez-Augustin, Olga; Moral-Avila, Rosario Del; Briz, Oscar

    2012-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in industrialized countries. Chemoprevention is a promising approach, but studies demonstrating their usefulness in large populations are still needed. Among several compounds with chemopreventive ability, cyclooxygenase inhibitors have received particular attention. However, these agents are not without side effects, which must be weighed against their beneficial actions. Early diagnosis is critical in the management of CRC patients, because, in early stages, surgery is curative in >90% of cases. If diagnosis occurs at stages II and III, which is often the case, neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy before surgery are, in a few cases, recommended. Because of the high risk of recurrence in advanced cancers, chemotherapy is maintained after tumor resection. Chemotherapy is also indicated when the patient has metastases and in advanced cancer located in the rectum. In the last decade, the use of anticancer drugs in monotherapy or in combined regimens has markedly increased the survival of patients with CRC at stages III and IV. Although the rate of success is higher than in other gastrointestinal tumors, adverse effects and development of chemoresistance are important limitations to pharmacological therapy. Genetic profiling regarding mechanisms of chemoresistance are needed to carry out individualized prediction of the lack of effectiveness of pharmacological regimens. This would minimize side effects and prevent the selection of aggressive, cross-resistant clones, as well as avoiding undesirable delays in the use of the most efficient therapeutic approaches to treat these patients.

  5. Eicosanoid pathway in colorectal cancer: Recent updates

    PubMed Central

    Tuncer, Sinem; Banerjee, Sreeparna

    2015-01-01

    Enzymatic metabolism of the 20C polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) arachidonic acid (AA) occurs via the cyclooxygenase (COX) and lipoxygenase (LOX) pathways, and leads to the production of various bioactive lipids termed eicosanoids. These eicosanoids have a variety of functions, including stimulation of homeostatic responses in the cardiovascular system, induction and resolution of inflammation, and modulation of immune responses against diseases associated with chronic inflammation, such as cancer. Because chronic inflammation is essential for the development of colorectal cancer (CRC), it is not surprising that many eicosanoids are implicated in CRC. Oftentimes, these autacoids work in an antagonistic and highly temporal manner in inflammation; therefore, inhibition of the pro-inflammatory COX-2 or 5-LOX enzymes may subsequently inhibit the formation of their essential products, or shunt substrates from one pathway to another, leading to undesirable side-effects. A better understanding of these different enzymes and their products is essential not only for understanding the importance of eicosanoids, but also for designing more effective drugs that solely target the inflammatory molecules found in both chronic inflammation and cancer. In this review, we have evaluated the cancer promoting and anti-cancer roles of different eicosanoids in CRC, and highlighted the most recent literature which describes how those molecules affect not only tumor tissue, but also the tumor microenvironment. Additionally, we have attempted to delineate the roles that eicosanoids with opposing functions play in neoplastic transformation in CRC through their effects on proliferation, apoptosis, motility, metastasis, and angiogenesis. PMID:26557000

  6. Chemotherapy for colorectal cancer in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Han

    2015-05-07

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death in the elderly. However, elderly patients with CRC tend to be under-presented in clinical trials and undertreated in clinical practice. Advanced age alone should not be the only criteria to preclude effective therapy in elderly patients with CRC. The best guide about optimal cancer treatment can be provided by comprehensive geriatric assessment. Elderly patients with stage III colon cancer can enjoy the same benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin or capecitabine as younger patients, without a substantial increase in toxicity. With conflicting results of retrospective studies and a lack of data available from randomized studies, combined modality treatment should be used with great caution in elderly patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Combination chemotherapy can be considered for older patients with metastatic CRC. For elderly patients who are frail or vulnerable, however, monotherapy or a stop-and-go strategy may be desirable. The use of targeted therapies in older patients with metastatic CRC appears to be promising in view of their better efficacy and toxicity. Treatment should be individualized based on the nature of the disease, the physiologic or functional status, and the patient's preference.

  7. Microbiota disbiosis is associated with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhiguang; Guo, Bomin; Gao, Renyuan; Zhu, Qingchao; Qin, Huanlong

    2015-01-01

    The dysbiosis of the human intestinal microbiota is linked to sporadic colorectal carcinoma (CRC). The present study was designed to investigate the gut microbiota distribution features in CRC patients. We performed pyrosequencing based analysis of the 16S rRNA gene V3 region to investigate microbiota of the cancerous tissue and adjacent non-cancerous normal tissue in proximal and distal CRC samples. The results revealed that the microbial structures of the CRC patients and healthy individuals differed significantly. Firmicutes and Fusobacteria were over-represented whereas Proteobacteria was under-represented in CRC patients. In addition, Lactococcus and Fusobacterium exhibited a relatively higher abundance while Pseudomonas and Escherichia-Shigella was reduced in cancerous tissues compared to adjacent non-cancerous tissues. Meanwhile, the overall microbial structures of proximal and distal colon cancerous tissues were similar; but certain potential pro-oncogenic pathogens were different. These results suggested that the mucosa-associated microbiota is dynamically associated with CRC, which may provide evidences for microbiota-associated diagnostic, prognostic, preventive, and therapeutic strategies for CRC.

  8. Estrogen Plus Progestin and Colorectal Cancer Incidence and Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Michael S.; Chlebowski, Rowan T.; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Johnson, Karen C.; Muskovitz, Andrew; Kato, Ikuko; Young, Alicia; Hubbell, F. Allan; Prentice, Ross L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose During the intervention phase in the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) clinical trial, use of estrogen plus progestin reduced the colorectal cancer diagnosis rate, but the cancers were found at a substantially higher stage. To assess the clinical relevance of the findings, analyses of the influence of combined hormone therapy on colorectal cancer incidence and colorectal cancer mortality were conducted after extended follow-up. Patients and Methods The WHI study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial involving 16,608 postmenopausal women with an intact uterus who were randomly assigned to daily 0.625 mg conjugated equine estrogen plus 2.5 mg medroxyprogesterone acetate (n = 8,506) or matching placebo (n = 8,102). Colorectal cancer diagnosis rates and colorectal cancer mortality were assessed. Results After a mean of 5.6 years (standard deviation [SD], 1.03 years) of intervention and 11.6 years (SD, 3.1 years) of total follow-up, fewer colorectal cancers were diagnosed in the combined hormone therapy group compared with the placebo group (diagnoses/year, 0.12% v 0.16%; hazard ratio [HR], 0.72; 95% CI, 0.56 to 0.94; P = .014). Bowel screening examinations were comparable between groups throughout. Cancers in the combined hormone therapy group more commonly had positive lymph nodes (50.5% v 28.6%; P < .001) and were at higher stage (regional or distant, 68.8% v 51.4%; P = .003). Although not statistically significant, there was a higher number of colorectal cancer deaths in the combined hormone therapy group (37 v 27 deaths; 0.04% v 0.03%; HR, 1.29; 95% CI, 0.78 to 2.11; P = .320). Conclusion The findings, suggestive of diagnostic delay, do not support a clinically meaningful benefit for combined hormone therapy on colorectal cancer. PMID:23008295

  9. Is Month of Birth a Risk Factor for Colorectal Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, N. J.; Noble, E.; Cortina-Borja, M.; Salib, E.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. The developmental origins of health and disease hypothesis and season of birth have been linked to a wide variety of later life conditions including cancer. Whether any relationship between month and season of birth and colorectal cancer exists is unknown. Methods. A case-control study was performed with month of birth extracted from a dedicated colorectal cancer database. Age and gender matched patients were used as a control group. Generalised linear models were fitted with Poisson and negative binomial responses and logarithmic links. A forward stepwise approach was followed adding seasonal components with 6- and 12-month periods. Results. 1019 colorectal cancer patients and 1277 randomly selected age and gender matched controls were included. For both men and women there is an excess of colorectal cancer in those born in autumn and a corresponding reduction of risk among those born in spring (p = 0.026). For the identified September peak, the excess risk for colorectal cancer was 14.8% (95% CI 5.6–32.3%) larger than the spring trough. Conclusion. There is a seasonal effect in the monthly birth rates of people who are operated for colorectal cancer with a disproportionate excess of cancer in those born in September. Further large studies are required to validate these findings. PMID:28133478

  10. Is Month of Birth a Risk Factor for Colorectal Cancer?

    PubMed

    Francis, N K; Curtis, N J; Noble, E; Cortina-Borja, M; Salib, E

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. The developmental origins of health and disease hypothesis and season of birth have been linked to a wide variety of later life conditions including cancer. Whether any relationship between month and season of birth and colorectal cancer exists is unknown. Methods. A case-control study was performed with month of birth extracted from a dedicated colorectal cancer database. Age and gender matched patients were used as a control group. Generalised linear models were fitted with Poisson and negative binomial responses and logarithmic links. A forward stepwise approach was followed adding seasonal components with 6- and 12-month periods. Results. 1019 colorectal cancer patients and 1277 randomly selected age and gender matched controls were included. For both men and women there is an excess of colorectal cancer in those born in autumn and a corresponding reduction of risk among those born in spring (p = 0.026). For the identified September peak, the excess risk for colorectal cancer was 14.8% (95% CI 5.6-32.3%) larger than the spring trough. Conclusion. There is a seasonal effect in the monthly birth rates of people who are operated for colorectal cancer with a disproportionate excess of cancer in those born in September. Further large studies are required to validate these findings.

  11. Proteomics for discovery of candidate colorectal cancer biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-Chaver, Paula; Otero-Estévez, Olalla; Páez de la Cadena, María; Rodríguez-Berrocal, Francisco J; Martínez-Zorzano, Vicenta S

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cause of cancer-related deaths in Europe and other Western countries, mainly due to the lack of well-validated clinically useful biomarkers with enough sensitivity and specificity to detect this disease at early stages. Although it is well known that the pathogenesis of CRC is a progressive accumulation of mutations in multiple genes, much less is known at the proteome level. Therefore, in the last years many proteomic studies have been conducted to find new candidate protein biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis and as therapeutic targets for this malignancy, as well as to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of colorectal carcinogenesis. An important advantage of the proteomic approaches is the capacity to look for multiple differentially expressed proteins in a single study. This review provides an overview of the recent reports describing the different proteomic tools used for the discovery of new protein markers for CRC such as two-dimensional electrophoresis methods, quantitative mass spectrometry-based techniques or protein microarrays. Additionally, we will also focus on the diverse biological samples used for CRC biomarker discovery such as tissue, serum and faeces, besides cell lines and murine models, discussing their advantages and disadvantages, and summarize the most frequently identified candidate CRC markers. PMID:24744574

  12. Inflammation and colorectal cancer, when microbiota-host mutualism breaks.

    PubMed

    Candela, Marco; Turroni, Silvia; Biagi, Elena; Carbonero, Franck; Rampelli, Simone; Fiorentini, Carla; Brigidi, Patrizia

    2014-01-28

    Structural changes in the gut microbial community have been shown to accompany the progressive development of colorectal cancer. In this review we discuss recent hypotheses on the mechanisms involved in the bacteria-mediated carcinogenesis, as well as the triggering factors favoring the shift of the gut microbiota from a mutualistic to a pro-carcinogenic configuration. The possible role of inflammation, bacterial toxins and toxic microbiota metabolites in colorectal cancer onset is specifically discussed. On the other hand, the strategic role of inflammation as the keystone factor in driving microbiota to become carcinogenic is suggested. As a common outcome of different environmental and endogenous triggers, such as diet, aging, pathogen infection or genetic predisposition, inflammation can compromise the microbiota-host mutualism, forcing the increase of pathobionts at the expense of health-promoting groups, and allowing the microbiota to acquire an overall pro-inflammatory configuration. Consolidating inflammation in the gut, and favoring the bloom of toxigenic bacterial drivers, these changes in the gut microbial ecosystem have been suggested as pivotal in promoting carcinogenesis. In this context, it will become of primary importance to implement dietary or probiotics-based interventions aimed at preserving the microbiota-host mutualism along aging, counteracting deviations that favor a pro-carcinogenic microbiota asset.

  13. Prognostic Relevance and Function of MSX2 in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiancheng; An, Huaying; Yuan, Wei; Feng, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer patients with diabetes had the high risks of total mortality. High expression of MSX2 is related to development of diabetes. There are few reports about the clinical implications and function of MSX2 in colorectal cancer (CRC). The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between the expression of MSX2 and clinical relevance and discover the possible mechanism of MSX2 in the development of CRC. Compared with adjacent tissues, the expression of MSX2 was higher in tumor tissues in both mRNA and protein levels (P < 0.01). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that high mRNA expression of MSX2 was associated with short survival time (P = 0.013). Chi-squared test analysis indicated that MSX2 expression was related to tumor size (P = 0.04), tumor locus (P = 0.025), clinical stage (P < 0.001), tumor invasion (P = 0.003), lymphatic metastasis (P = 0.01), and distant metastasis (P = 0.033). In vitro experiments demonstrated that knockdown of MSX2 expression attenuated cell proliferation and invasion, promoted cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, and inactivated Akt phosphorylation. In conclusion, MSX2 played a crucial role in the progression of CRC and may be a potential novel prognostic factor and therapeutic target for CRC therapy. Our work may provide certain enlightenment for investigating the mechanism of MSX2 in the process of diabetes. PMID:28286778

  14. Inflammation and colorectal cancer, when microbiota-host mutualism breaks

    PubMed Central

    Candela, Marco; Turroni, Silvia; Biagi, Elena; Carbonero, Franck; Rampelli, Simone; Fiorentini, Carla; Brigidi, Patrizia

    2014-01-01

    Structural changes in the gut microbial community have been shown to accompany the progressive development of colorectal cancer. In this review we discuss recent hypotheses on the mechanisms involved in the bacteria-mediated carcinogenesis, as well as the triggering factors favoring the shift of the gut microbiota from a mutualistic to a pro-carcinogenic configuration. The possible role of inflammation, bacterial toxins and toxic microbiota metabolites in colorectal cancer onset is specifically discussed. On the other hand, the strategic role of inflammation as the keystone factor in driving microbiota to become carcinogenic is suggested. As a common outcome of different environmental and endogenous triggers, such as diet, aging, pathogen infection or genetic predisposition, inflammation can compromise the microbiota-host mutualism, forcing the increase of pathobionts at the expense of health-promoting groups, and allowing the microbiota to acquire an overall pro-inflammatory configuration. Consolidating inflammation in the gut, and favoring the bloom of toxigenic bacterial drivers, these changes in the gut microbial ecosystem have been suggested as pivotal in promoting carcinogenesis. In this context, it will become of primary importance to implement dietary or probiotics-based interventions aimed at preserving the microbiota-host mutualism along aging, counteracting deviations that favor a pro-carcinogenic microbiota asset. PMID:24574765

  15. Therapeutic options for peritoneal metastasis arising from colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Glockzin, Gabriel; Schlitt, Hans J; Piso, Pompiliu

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal metastasis is a common sign of advanced tumor stage, tumor progression or tumor recurrence in patients with colorectal cancer. Due to the improvement of systemic chemotherapy, the development of targeted therapy and the introduction of additive treatment options such as cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC), the therapeutic approach to peritoneal metastatic colorectal cancer (pmCRC) has changed over recent decades, and patient survival has improved. Moreover, in contrast to palliative systemic chemotherapy or best supportive care, the inclusion of CRS and HIPEC as inherent components of a multidisciplinary treatment regimen provides a therapeutic approach with curative intent. Although CRS and HIPEC are increasingly accepted as the standard of care for selected patients and have become part of numerous national and international guidelines, the individual role, optimal timing and ideal sequence of the different systemic, local and surgical treatment options remains a matter of debate. Ongoing and future randomized controlled clinical trials may help clarify the impact of the different components, allow for further improvement of patient selection and support the standardization of oncologic treatment regimens for pmCRC. The addition of further therapeutic options such as neoadjuvant intraperitoneal chemotherapy or pressurized intraperitoneal aerosol chemotherapy, should be investigated to optimize therapeutic regimens and further improve the oncological outcome. PMID:27602235

  16. Changing epidemiology of colorectal cancer makes screening sigmoidoscopy less useful for identifying carriers of colorectal neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Rozen, Paul; Liphshitz, Irena; Barchana, Micha

    2012-08-01

    There is renewed interest in flexible sigmoidoscopy (FS) colorectal cancer (CRC) screening following trials showing significantly reduced CRC incidence and mortality. To evaluate the potential usefulness of FS screening in our population. We examined rectosigmoid (RS) cancer epidemiology in our Jewish population using Israel National Cancer Registry data, computed by CRC site, age groups, and gender. We also reviewed endoscopy-screening publications for prevalence of RS and proximal advanced adenomas (AAP) and having both or either. During 1980-2008, there were 64,559 CRCs registered; 31.6 % were RS cancer which has now decreased to 29 % of men's and 26 % of women's CRC (both P < 0.01). In <50 year olds, RS cancer occurred in 42 % of males' and 35 % of females' CRC, and in the last 2 decades this ratio is unchanged. In 50-74 year olds, RS cancer decreased to stable levels of 32 % of males' and 29 % females' CRC (both P < 0.01). In ≥75 year olds, RS cancer progressively decreased to 24 % of males' and 22 % females' CRC (both P < 0.001). From endoscopy screening reports in 40-79 year olds, RS AAPs occurred in 2.0-5.8 %, being least in women, most in men, and not increased with aging. Some 50-57 % of screenees had both RS and proximal AAPs, least when aged 40-49 years at 25 %, women were 35 %, and with aging 40 %, but most in men at 70 %. With the changing CRC epidemiology, having fewer RS neoplasms but more proximal cancer, the effectiveness of FS screening for identifying significant neoplasms decreases with screenees' age and especially in females. These make FS screening less suitable for our aging and increasingly female population.

  17. Prospective Investigation of Body Mass Index, Colorectal Adenoma, and Colorectal Cancer in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kitahara, Cari M.; Berndt, Sonja I.; de González, Amy Berrington; Coleman, Helen G.; Schoen, Robert E.; Hayes, Richard B.; Huang, Wen-Yi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Obesity has consistently been linked to an increased risk of colorectal cancer, particularly among men. Whether body mass index (BMI) differentially influences the risk across the stages of colorectal cancer development remains unclear. We evaluated the associations of BMI with colorectal adenoma incidence, adenoma recurrence, and cancer in the context of a large screening trial, in which cases and controls had an equal chance for disease detection. Methods We prospectively evaluated the association between baseline BMI and the risk of incident distal adenoma (1,213 cases), recurrent adenoma (752 cases), and incident colorectal cancer (966 cases) among men and women, ages 55 to 74 years, randomly assigned to receive flexible sigmoidoscopy screening as part of the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CIs for adenoma incidence and recurrence, and hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs for colorectal cancer incidence, using multivariable-adjusted models. Results Compared with normal-weight men (18.5 to 24.9 kg/m2), obese men (≥ 30 kg/m2) had significantly higher risk of incident adenoma (OR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.65) and colorectal cancer (HR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.16 to 1.89) and a borderline increased risk of recurrent adenoma (OR, 1.50; 95% CI, 0.98 to 2.30). No associations were observed for either adenoma or cancer in women. Conclusion Data from this large prospective study suggest that obesity is important throughout the natural history of colorectal cancer, at least in men, and colorectal cancer prevention efforts should encourage the achievement and maintenance of a healthy body weight in addition to regular screenings. PMID:23715565

  18. Prospective investigation of body mass index, colorectal adenoma, and colorectal cancer in the prostate, lung, colorectal, and ovarian cancer screening trial.

    PubMed

    Kitahara, Cari M; Berndt, Sonja I; de González, Amy Berrington; Coleman, Helen G; Schoen, Robert E; Hayes, Richard B; Huang, Wen-Yi

    2013-07-01

    Obesity has consistently been linked to an increased risk of colorectal cancer, particularly among men. Whether body mass index (BMI) differentially influences the risk across the stages of colorectal cancer development remains unclear. We evaluated the associations of BMI with colorectal adenoma incidence, adenoma recurrence, and cancer in the context of a large screening trial, in which cases and controls had an equal chance for disease detection. We prospectively evaluated the association between baseline BMI and the risk of incident distal adenoma (1,213 cases), recurrent adenoma (752 cases), and incident colorectal cancer (966 cases) among men and women, ages 55 to 74 years, randomly assigned to receive flexible sigmoidoscopy screening as part of the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CIs for adenoma incidence and recurrence, and hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs for colorectal cancer incidence, using multivariable-adjusted models. Compared with normal-weight men (18.5 to 24.9 kg/m(2)), obese men (≥ 30 kg/m(2)) had significantly higher risk of incident adenoma (OR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.65) and colorectal cancer (HR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.16 to 1.89) and a borderline increased risk of recurrent adenoma (OR, 1.50; 95% CI, 0.98 to 2.30). No associations were observed for either adenoma or cancer in women. Data from this large prospective study suggest that obesity is important throughout the natural history of colorectal cancer, at least in men, and colorectal cancer prevention efforts should encourage the achievement and maintenance of a healthy body weight in addition to regular screenings.

  19. Immune escape mechanisms in colorectal cancer pathogenesis and liver metastasis.

    PubMed

    Pancione, Massimo; Giordano, Guido; Remo, Andrea; Febbraro, Antonio; Sabatino, Lina; Manfrin, Erminia; Ceccarelli, Michele; Colantuoni, Vittorio

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, growing evidence indicates that the tumor microenvironment (TME) contributes with genomic/epigenomic aberrations of malignant cells to enhance cancer cells survival, invasion, and dissemination. Many factors, produced or de novo synthesized by immune, stromal, or malignant cells, acting in a paracrine and autocrine fashion, remodel TME and the adaptive immune response culminating in metastasis. Taking into account the recent accomplishments in the field of immune oncology and using metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) as a model, we propose that the evasion of the immune surveillance and metastatic spread can be achieved through a number of mechanisms that include (a) intrinsic plasticity and adaptability of immune and malignant cells to paracrine and autocrine stimuli or genotoxic stresses; (b) alteration of positional schemes of myeloid-lineage cells, produced by factors controlling the balance between tumour-suppressing and tumour-promoting activities; (c) acquisition by cancer cells of aberrant immune-phenotypic traits (NT5E/CD73, CD68, and CD163) that enhance the interactions among TME components through the production of immune-suppressive mediators. These properties may represent the driving force of metastatic progression and thus clinically exploitable for cancer prevention and therapy. In this review we summarize results and suggest new hypotheses that favour the growing impact of tumor-infiltrating immune cells on tumour progression, metastasis, and therapy resistance.

  20. Immune Escape Mechanisms in Colorectal Cancer Pathogenesis and Liver Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Remo, Andrea; Febbraro, Antonio; Sabatino, Lina; Manfrin, Erminia; Ceccarelli, Michele; Colantuoni, Vittorio

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, growing evidence indicates that the tumor microenvironment (TME) contributes with genomic/epigenomic aberrations of malignant cells to enhance cancer cells survival, invasion, and dissemination. Many factors, produced or de novo synthesized by immune, stromal, or malignant cells, acting in a paracrine and autocrine fashion, remodel TME and the adaptive immune response culminating in metastasis. Taking into account the recent accomplishments in the field of immune oncology and using metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) as a model, we propose that the evasion of the immune surveillance and metastatic spread can be achieved through a number of mechanisms that include (a) intrinsic plasticity and adaptability of immune and malignant cells to paracrine and autocrine stimuli or genotoxic stresses; (b) alteration of positional schemes of myeloid-lineage cells, produced by factors controlling the balance between tumour-suppressing and tumour-promoting activities; (c) acquisition by cancer cells of aberrant immune-phenotypic traits (NT5E/CD73, CD68, and CD163) that enhance the interactions among TME components through the production of immune-suppressive mediators. These properties may represent the driving force of metastatic progression and thus clinically exploitable for cancer prevention and therapy. In this review we summarize results and suggest new hypotheses that favour the growing impact of tumor-infiltrating immune cells on tumour progression, metastasis, and therapy resistance. PMID:24741617

  1. Molecular Taxonomy and Tumourigenesis of Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Biswas, S; Holyoake, D; Maughan, T S

    2016-02-01

    Over the last 5 years there has been a surge in interest in the molecular classification of colorectal cancer. The effect of molecular subtyping on current treatment decisions is limited to avoidance of adjuvant 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy in stage II microsatellite unstable-high disease and avoidance of epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted antibodies in extended RAS mutant tumours. The emergence of specific novel combination therapy for the BRAF-mutant cohort and of the microsatellite unstable-high cohort as a responsive group to immune checkpoint inhibition shows the growing importance of a clinically relevant molecular taxonomy. Clinical trials such as the Medical Research Council FOCUS4 trial using biomarkers to select patients for specific therapies are currently open and testing such approaches. The integration of mutation, gene expression and pathological analyses is refining our understanding of the biological subtypes within colorectal cancer. Sharing of data sets of parallel sequencing and gene expression of thousands of cancers among independent groups has allowed the description of disease subsets and the need for a validated consensus classification has become apparent. This biological understanding of the disease is a key step forward in developing a stratified approach to patient management. The discovery of stratifiers that predict a response to existing and emerging therapies will enable better use of these treatments. Improved scientific understanding of the biological characteristics of poorly responsive subgroups will facilitate the design of novel biologically rational combinations. Novel treatment regimens, including the combination of new drugs with radiation, and the discovery and validation of their associated predictive biomarkers will gradually lead to improved outcomes from therapy. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Clinical and molecular analysis of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer in Chinese colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Luo, Mao-Hong; Zhang, Zuo-Xing; Zhang, Pei-Da; Jiang, Xi-Li; Ma, Dong-Wang; Suo, Rong-Zeng; Zhao, Li-Zhong; Qi, Qing-Hui

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the frequency of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) in Chinese colorectal cancer (CRC) patients, and to discuss the value of microsatellite instability (MSI) and/or immunohistochemistry (IHC) for MSH2/MLH1 protein analysis as pre-screening tests in China. METHODS: The Amsterdam criteriaIandII(clinical diagnosis) and/or germline hMLH1/hMSH2 mutations (genetic diagnosis) were used to classify HNPCC families. Genetic tests, including microsatellite instability, immunohistochemistry for MSH2/MLH1 proteins and hMSH2/hMLH1 genes, were performed in each proband. RESULTS: From July 2000 to June 2004, 1988 patients with colorectal cancer were analysed and 114 CRC patients (5.7%) from 48 families were categorized as having HNPCC, including 76 from 26 families diagnosed clinically and 38 from the other 22 families diagnosed genetically. The sensitivity and specificity of high MSI and IHC for predicting mutations were 100% and 54%, and 79% and 77%, respectively. CONCLUSION: The frequency of HNPCC is approximately 10% among all Chinese CRC cases. The MSI and IHC detections for hMSH2/hMLH1 proteins are reliable pre-screening tests for hMLH1/hMSH2 germline mutations in families suspected of having HNPCC. PMID:17461458

  3. The NRF2 transcription factor plays a dual role in colorectal cancer: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Molero, J.; Fernandez-Villa, T.; Vilorio-Marqués, L.; Molina, A. J.; Martín, V.

    2017-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide, and is influenced by the interplay of various factors, including a very strong genetic component. For instance, incorrect mitochondrial biogenesis is correlated with increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. Thus, it is important to understand the consequences of changes in both the expression and the correct function of the transcription factors that regulate mitochondrial biogenesis, namely NRF2. Objectives The main objective of this paper is to characterise the relationship between NRF2 and colorectal cancer by compiling data from an exhaustive literature search. Methods Information was obtained by defining specific search terms and searching in several databases. After a strict selection procedure, data were tabulated and the relationships between articles were assessed by measuring heterogeneity and by constructing conceptual maps. Results and discussion We found a general consensus in the literature that the presence of oxidizing agents as well as the inhibition of the NRF2 repressor Keap1 maintain NRF2 expression at basal levels. This predominantly exerts a cytoprotective effect on cells and decreases risk of colorectal cancer. However, if NRF2 is inhibited, protection against external agents disappears and risk of colorectal cancer increases. Interestingly, colorectal cancer risk is also increased when NRF2 becomes overexpressed. In this case, the increased risk arises from NRF2-induced inflammation and resistance to chemotherapy. Conclusion The proper basal function of NRF2 and Keap1 are essential for preventing oncogenic processes in the colon. Consequently, any disruption to the expression of these genes can promote the genesis and progression of colon cancer. PMID:28542357

  4. Gastrins, iron homeostasis and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kovac, Suzana; Anderson, Gregory J; Baldwin, Graham S

    2011-05-01

    The peptide hormone gastrin has been identified as a major regulator of acid secretion and a potent mitogen for normal and malignant gastrointestinal cells. The importance of gastric acid in the absorption of dietary iron first became evident 50 years ago when iron deficiency anemia was recognized as a long-term consequence of partial gastrectomy. This review summarizes the connections between circulating gastrins, iron status and colorectal cancer. Gastrins bind two ferric ions with micromolar affinity and, in the case of non-amidated forms of the hormone, iron binding is essential for biological activity in vitro and in vivo. The demonstration of an interaction between gastrin and transferrin by biochemical techniques led to the proposal that gastrins catalyze the loading of transferrin with iron. Several lines of evidence, including the facts that the concentrations of circulating gastrins are increased in mice and humans with the iron overload disease hemochromatosis and that transferrin saturation positively correlates with circulating gastrin concentration, suggest the potential involvement of gastrins in iron homeostasis. Conversely, recognition that ferric ions play an unexpected role in the biological activity of gastrins may assist in the development of useful therapies for colorectal carcinoma and other disorders of mucosal proliferation in the gastrointestinal tract. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 11th European Symposium on Calcium.

  5. Radiotherapy and brachytherapy for recurrent colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nag, S. )

    1991-05-01

    Radical surgical excision of locoregional recurrence of colorectal carcinoma usually produces the best survival and should be attempted whenever possible. However, recurrences are often unresectable; hence palliative local therapy may be indicated. There are several options for the radiation therapy of local, unresectable, recurrent, or metastatic colorectal cancer. Whole pelvis irradiation of 4,000-5,000 cGy followed by a coned-down boost of 1,000-1,500 cGy generally provides good symptomatic palliation in 80-90% of patients, but long-term control or cure is rarely achieved. External beam irradiation of 2,000-3,000 cGy to the whole liver with or without concurrent chemotherapy may be used for palliation of metastatic disease to the liver. A combination of intraoperative radiation therapy applied directly to the tumor bed and external beam irradiation may improve local control and survival rates. Multiple options are available for the intraoperative use of brachytherapy which can deliver high radiation doses to the residual tumor, or tumor bed, sparing normal tissue.

  6. Gastrins, Iron Homeostasis and Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kovac, Suzana; Anderson, Gregory J.; Baldwin, Graham S.

    2011-01-01

    The peptide hormone gastrin has been identified as a major regulator of acid secretion and a potent mitogen for normal and malignant gastrointestinal cells. The importance of gastric acid in the absorption of dietary iron first became evident 50 years ago when iron-deficiency anemia was recognised as a long-term consequence of partial gastrectomy. This review summarises the connections between circulating gastrins, iron status and colorectal cancer. Gastrins bind two ferric ions with micromolar affinity and, in the case of non-amidated forms of the hormone, iron-binding is essential for biological activity in vitro and in vivo. The demonstration of an interaction between gastrin and transferrin by biochemical techniques led to the proposal that gastrins catalyse the loading of transferrin with iron. Several lines of evidence, including the facts that the concentrations of circulating gastrins are increased in mice and humans with the iron-overload disease hemochromatosis and that transferrin saturation positively correlates with circulating gastrin concentration, suggest the potential involvement of gastrins in iron homeostasis. Conversely, recognition that ferric ions play an unexpected role in the biological activity of gastrins may assist in the development of useful therapies for colorectal carcinoma and other disorders of mucosal proliferation in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:21320535

  7. Colorectal Cancer Screening: Stool DNA and Other Noninvasive Modalities.

    PubMed

    Bailey, James R; Aggarwal, Ashish; Imperiale, Thomas F

    2016-03-01

    Colorectal cancer screening dates to the discovery of precancerous adenomatous tissue. Screening modalities and guidelines directed at prevention and early detection have evolved and resulted in a significant decrease in the prevalence and mortality of colorectal cancer via direct visualization or using specific markers. Despite continued efforts and an overall reduction in deaths attributed to colorectal cancer over the last 25 years, colorectal cancer remains one of the most common causes of malignancy-associated deaths. In attempt to further reduce the prevalence of colorectal cancer and associated deaths, continued improvement in screening quality and adherence remains key. Noninvasive screening modalities are actively being explored. Identification of specific genetic alterations in the adenoma-cancer sequence allow for the study and development of noninvasive screening modalities beyond guaiac-based fecal occult blood testing which target specific alterations or a panel of alterations. The stool DNA test is the first noninvasive screening tool that targets both human hemoglobin and specific genetic alterations. In this review we discuss stool DNA and other commercially available noninvasive colorectal cancer screening modalities in addition to other targets which previously have been or are currently under study.

  8. Colorectal Cancer Screening (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Cancer.gov

    There are five types of tests that are used to screen for colorectal cancer: fecal occult blood test, sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, virtual colonoscopy, and DNA stool test. Learn more about these and other tests in this expert-reviewed summary.

  9. Intra-operative peritoneal lavage for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Passot, Guillaume; Mohkam, Kayvan; Cotte, Eddy; Glehen, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Free cancer cells can be detected in peritoneal fluid at the time of colorectal surgery. Peritoneal lavage in colorectal surgery for cancer is not used in routine, and the prognostic significance of intraperitoneal free cancer cells (IPCC) remains unclear. Data concerning the technique of peritoneal lavage to detect IPCC and its timing regarding colorectal resection are scarce. However, positive IPCC might be the first step of peritoneal spread in colorectal cancers, which could lead to early specific treatments. Because of the important heterogeneity of IPCC determination in reported studies, no treatment have been proposed to patients with positive IPCC. Herein, we provide an overview of IPCC detection and its impact on recurrence and survival, and we suggest further multi-institutional studies to evaluate new treatment strategies. PMID:24616569

  10. Intra-operative peritoneal lavage for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Passot, Guillaume; Mohkam, Kayvan; Cotte, Eddy; Glehen, Olivier

    2014-02-28

    Free cancer cells can be detected in peritoneal fluid at the time of colorectal surgery. Peritoneal lavage in colorectal surgery for cancer is not used in routine, and the prognostic significance of intraperitoneal free cancer cells (IPCC) remains unclear. Data concerning the technique of peritoneal lavage to detect IPCC and its timing regarding colorectal resection are scarce. However, positive IPCC might be the first step of peritoneal spread in colorectal cancers, which could lead to early specific treatments. Because of the important heterogeneity of IPCC determination in reported studies, no treatment have been proposed to patients with positive IPCC. Herein, we provide an overview of IPCC detection and its impact on recurrence and survival, and we suggest further multi-institutional studies to evaluate new treatment strategies.

  11. Natural Product Shows Effectiveness in Combating Colorectal Cancer | FNLCR Staging

    Cancer.gov

    An herbal extract used for centuries to prevent heart disease has now been shown to be effective against colorectal cancer when tested in laboratory cell cultures. From left to right: Weidong Li, principal investigator, China Academy of Chinese Medic

  12. Immune reaction and colorectal cancer: Friends or foes?

    PubMed Central

    Formica, Vincenzo; Cereda, Vittore; Nardecchia, Antonella; Tesauro, Manfredi; Roselli, Mario

    2014-01-01

    The potential clinical impact of enhancing antitumor immunity is increasingly recognized in oncology therapeutics for solid tumors. Colorectal cancer is one of the most studied neoplasms for the tumor-host immunity relationship. Although immune cell populations involved in such a relationship and their prognostic role in colorectal cancer development have clearly been identified, still no approved therapies based on host immunity intensification have so far been introduced in clinical practice. Moreover, a recognized risk in enhancing immune reaction for colitis-associated colorectal cancer development has limited the emphasis of this approach. The aim of the present review is to discuss immune components involved in the host immune reaction against colorectal cancer and analyze the fine balance between pro-tumoral and anti-tumoral effect of immunity in this model of disease. PMID:25253941

  13. [How I treat colorectal cancer. I. Prevention and adjuvant treatment].

    PubMed

    Bours, V; Jerusalem, G; Fillet, G

    1998-04-01

    Colorectal adenocarcinoma is a major cause of cancer-related morbidity and mortality in Belgium and in other western countries. Prevention implies a modification of alimentation and maybe a chronic uptake of acetylsalicylic acid. Treatment of colorectal cancers is based on surgery and the prognosis is determined by the locoregional or metastatic tumor spread. Complete resection of any Astler Coller stage C colorectal malignant tumor has to be followed by a 5-fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy. In these protocols, 5-fluorouracil is administered together with folinic acid or levamisole. The administration of an adjuvant chemotherapy could also be considered for stage BII diseases. As rectal cancers are characterized by high local relapse rates, their treatment should associate radiotherapy, given either post-surgery or preferentially pre-surgery, with resection and chemotherapy. Appropriate treatment of colorectal cancers thus requires a concerted multidisciplinary approach.

  14. The cancer secretome, current status and opportunities in the lung, breast and colorectal cancer context.

    PubMed

    Schaaij-Visser, Tieneke B M; de Wit, Meike; Lam, Siu W; Jiménez, Connie R

    2013-11-01

    Despite major improvements on the knowledge and clinical management, cancer is still a deadly disease. Novel biomarkers for better cancer detection, diagnosis and treatment prediction are urgently needed. Proteins secreted, shed or leaking from the cancer cell, collectively termed the cancer secretome, are promising biomarkers since they might be detectable in blood or other biofluids. Furthermore, the cancer secretome in part represents the tumor microenvironment that plays a key role in tumor promoting processes such as angiogenesis and invasion. The cancer secretome, sampled as conditioned medium from cell lines, tumor/tissue interstitial fluid or tumor proximal body fluids, can be studied comprehensively by nanoLC-MS/MS-based approaches. Here, we outline the importance of current cancer secretome research and describe the mass spectrometry-based analysis of the secretome. Further, we provide an overview of cancer secretome research with a focus on the three most common cancer types: lung, breast and colorectal cancer. We conclude that the cancer secretome research field is a young, but rapidly evolving research field. Up to now, the focus has mainly been on the discovery of novel promising secreted cancer biomarker proteins. An interesting finding that merits attention is that in cancer unconventional secretion, e.g. via vesicles, seems increased. Refinement of current approaches and methods and progress in clinical validation of the current findings are vital in order to move towards applications in cancer management. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: An Updated Secretome.

  15. [Flow cytometry in datecting lymph node micrometastasis in colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Sun, Q; Ding, Y; Zhang, J

    2001-01-25

    To study the methodology and significance of flow cytometry in detecting lymph node micrometastasis of colorectal cancer. One hundred sixty-two cellular suspensions were prepared with lymph nodes which were resected radically on 25 patients with colorectal cancer and in which no cancer cells were found by HE staining. Different concentrations of cultured Lovo colorectal cancer cells were added into the celular suspension prepared from lymph node tissue of persons without colorectal cancer in order to prepare a control model. Dual staining with CK/FTTC and PI was made to the sedimetns from those 2 kinds of suspension. Flow cytometry was used to detect cancer cells. An ideal correlation was obtained between the detection value and the theoretical value of cancer cells in the specimen suspensions and control models (r = 0.097 6) with a sensitivity rate of 10/10(5). Cancer cells were detected from 7 out of the 25 patients and 30 of the 162 cellular suspensions. The detection rate was correlated with the size and infiltrating depth of the cancer. Flow cytometry is a reliable, rapid, and quantitative method for detecting lymph node micrometastasis in colorectal cancer.

  16. MicroRNA manipulation in colorectal cancer cells: from laboratory to clinical application.

    PubMed

    Aslam, Muhammad Imran; Patel, Maleene; Singh, Baljit; Jameson, John Stuart; Pringle, James Howard

    2012-06-20

    The development of Colorectal Cancer (CRC) follows a sequential progression from adenoma to the carcinoma. Therefore, opportunities exist to interfere with the natural course of disease development and progression. Dysregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) in cancer cells indirectly results in higher levels of messenger RNA (mRNA) specific to tumour promoter genes or tumour suppressor genes. This narrative review aims to provide a comprehensive review of the literature about the manipulation of oncogenic or tumour suppressor miRNAs in colorectal cancer cells for the purpose of development of anticancer therapies. A literature search identified studies describing manipulation of miRNAs in colorectal cancer cells in vivo and in vitro. Studies were also included to provide an update on the role of miRNAs in CRC development, progression and diagnosis. Strategy based on restoration of silenced miRNAs or inhibition of over expressed miRNAs has opened a new area of research in cancer therapy. In this review article different techniques for miRNA manipulation are reviewed and their utility for colorectal cancer therapy has been discussed in detail. Restoration of normal equilibrium for cancer related miRNAs can result in inhibition of tumour growth, apoptosis, blocking of invasion, angiogenesis and metastasis. Furthermore, drug resistant cancer cells can be turned into drug sensitive cells on alteration of specific miRNAs in cancer cells. MiRNA modulation in cancer cells holds great potential to replace current anticancer therapies. However, further work is needed on tissue specific delivery systems and strategies to avoid side effects.

  17. The Role of Bioactive Dietary Components in Modulating miRNA Expression in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gavrilas, Laura I.; Ionescu, Corina; Tudoran, Oana; Lisencu, Cosmin; Balacescu, Ovidiu; Miere, Doina

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in the world and considered to be one of the most diet-related types of cancer. Extensive research has been conducted but still the link between diet and colorectal cancer is complex. Recent studies have highlight microRNAs (miRNAs) as key players in cancer-related pathways in the context of dietary modulation. MicroRNAs are involved in most biological processes related to tumor development and progression; therefore, it is of great interest to understand the underlying mechanisms by which dietary patterns and components influence the expression of these powerful molecules in colorectal cancer. In this review, we discuss relevant dietary patterns in terms of miRNAs modulation in colorectal cancer, as well as bioactive dietary components able to modify gene expression through changes in miRNA expression. Furthermore, we emphasize on protective components such as resveratrol, curcumin, quercetin, α-mangostin, omega-3 fatty acids, vitamin D and dietary fiber, with a focus on the molecular mechanisms in the context of prevention and even treatment. In addition, several bioactive dietary components that have the ability to re-sensitize treatment resistant cells are described. PMID:27681738

  18. Stromal cell derived factor-1 and CXCR4 expression in colorectal cancer promote liver metastasis.

    PubMed

    Amara, Sameh; Chaar, Ines; Khiari, Meriem; Ounissi, Donia; Weslati, Marwa; Boughriba, Rahma; Hmida, Abdelmajid B; Bouraoui, Saadia

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that SDF-1 and CXCR4 are expressed in certain cancer cells, and malignant cells use this chemokine/receptor system to promote tumor progression and metastasis. However, the pathophysiological significance of their expression in colorectal cancer (CRC) tissue has not been fully elucidated. The purpose of this study was to assess SDF-1/CXCR4 expression and to explore its contribution to colorectal cancer. We examined SDF-1 and CXCR4 mRNA expression in 124 primary colorectal tumour and 35 liver metastases tissues and matched adjacent noncancerous tissues by reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR). Furthermore, their expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. The relationship between SDF-1/CXCR4 expression and clinicopathological features were analyzed by appropriate statistics. X2 test and Kaplan-Meier analysis were used to investigate the correlation between the ligand-receptor expression and prognosis of colorectal cancer patients. The relative mRNA expression of SDF-1 and CXCR4 was significantly elevated in colorectal cancer tissues as compared with adjacent noncancerous tissues (P < 0.001). The high expression of proteins expression in colorectal cancer tissues was significantly correlated with tumor grade (P = 0.0001), clinical stage (P < 0.05), and lymphatic invasion (P < 0.05). Furthermore, patients with CXCR4 nuclear-type expression showed more frequent lymph node metastasis (p = 0.021), advanced clinical stage (p = 0.001) and lymphatic invasion (p = 0.03) than those with cytoplasm staining-type. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed that high expression of the couple SDF-1/CXCR4 correlated with poor prognosis of colorectal cancer patients (P < 0.001). SDF-1 and CXCR4 may play an important role in the progression of colorectal cancer. The present data suggest that there is a significant association between SDF-1/CXCR4 to enhance the liver metastases causing poor prognosis. Those proteins may potentially be used as an independent

  19. Intrahepatic therapy for liver-dominant metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    De Groote, Kerlijne; Prenen, Hans

    2015-01-01

    In patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, the liver is the most common site of metastatic disease. In patients with liver-dominant disease, consideration needs to be given to locoregional treatments such as hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy, transarterial chemoembolisation and selective internal radiation therapy because hepatic metastases are a major cause of liver failure especially in chemorefractory disease. In this review we provide insights on the published literature for locoregional treatment of liver metastases in metastatic colorectal cancer. PMID:26380058

  20. A common genetic risk factor for colorectal and prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Haiman, Christopher A; Le Marchand, Loïc; Yamamato, Jennifer; Stram, Daniel O; Sheng, Xin; Kolonel, Laurence N; Wu, Anna H; Reich, David; Henderson, Brian E

    2008-01-01

    Variants on chromosome 8q24 contribute risk for prostate cancer; here, we tested whether they also modulate risk for colorectal cancer. We studied 1,807 affected individuals and 5,511 controls and found that one variant, rs6983267, is also significantly associated with colorectal cancer (odds ratio = 1.22; P = 4.4 × 10−6) and that the apportionment of risk among the variants differs significantly between the two cancers. Comprehensive testing in the region uncovered variants capturing significant additional risk. Our results show that variants at 8q24 have different effects on cancer development that depend on the tissue type. PMID:17618282

  1. EphB6 overexpression and Apc mutation together promote colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dan; Yuan, Liang; Liu, Xin; Li, Mingqi; Zhang, Fubin; Gu, Xin Yue; Zhang, Dongwei; Yang, Youlin; Cui, Binbin; Tong, Jinxue; Zhou, Jin; Yu, Zhiwei

    2016-05-24

    The erythropoietin-producing hepatocyte (Eph) family tyrosine kinases play important roles in tumorigenesis and cancer aggression. In this study, we investigated the role of EphB6 in oncogenic transformation of colorectal epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo. EphB6 is upregulated in human colorectal cancer (CRC) tissues as compared to normal tissues, and its overexpression promotes proliferation, migration and invasion by IMCE colorec