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Sample records for colorectal cancer survivors

  1. Survivorship Care Plan in Promoting Physical Activity in Breast or Colorectal Cancer Survivors in Wisconsin

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-19

    Cancer Survivor; Healthy Subject; Stage I Colorectal Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer

  2. Colorectal cancer survivors undergoing genetic testing for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer: motivational factors and psychosocial functioning.

    PubMed

    Esplen, M J; Madlensky, L; Aronson, M; Rothenmund, H; Gallinger, S; Butler, K; Toner, B; Wong, J; Manno, M; McLaughlin, J

    2007-11-01

    Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) represents about 1-3% of all cases of colorectal cancer (CRC). The objectives of the study were to examine motivational factors, expectations and psychosocial functioning in a sample of CRC survivors undergoing genetic testing for HNPCC. A cross-sectional survey of 314 colorectal cancer patients recruited through a population-based colon cancer family registry was conducted. Motivations for genetic testing for hereditary cancer were similar to those of clinic-based samples of CRC patients and included learning of the increased risk to offspring and finding out if additional screening was needed. While age at diagnosis and sex were associated with psychological functioning, significant predictors of post-counseling distress were perceived lower satisfaction with social support, an escape-avoidant coping style and the anticipation of becoming depressed if a mutation was present. Most cancer survivors anticipated disclosing test results to relatives and physicians. Cancer survivors reported several motivations for genetic testing for HNPCC that varied by sex. A subgroup of survivors with lower satisfaction with social support and an escape-avoidant coping style were worried about the potential impact of genetic test results and demonstrated more distress following counseling. Findings have implications for future research and potential support needs during the genetic counseling and testing process. PMID:17892499

  3. Adverse health behaviours among colorectal cancer survivors: a case study from Iran

    PubMed Central

    Aminisani, Nayyereh; Nikbakht, Hosseinali A.; Hosseinei, Seidreza R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cancer survivors are at greater risk of developing secondary tumours, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and osteoporosis. A part of this is because they share the similar lifestyle factors. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of adverse health behaviours and its determinants among colorectal survivors. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in Babol city located in North of Iran. The pathologic information and demographic characteristics were collected from the population based-cancer registry. Colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors between 2007–2013 were included in this study. A questionnaire includes socioeconomic status, lifestyle behaviours [smoking, physical activity (PA), fruit & vegetable consumption], and clinical factors were completed via home visit by trained interviewers. Results The majority of CRC survivors were male and were more than 50 years of age, more than half of them resided in urban areas. About 67% of survivors had at least one comorbid condition. In general, the majority of them were not meeting the recommendation for PA (89%), about 87% of them consumed less than 5 daily serving of fruit & vegetable and 14.6% of participants were smoke either cigarette or hookah. Female genders, illiteracy, comorbidities, and place of residency were the most important determinants of having adverse health behaviours. Conclusions The minority of people with CRC were not meeting the PA or 5-A-day recommendations. It is important to notify the health policy makers and to develop a comprehensive educational program to enhance the adherence to healthy lifestyle recommendation among CRC survivors. PMID:27284469

  4. Untreated peristomal skin complications among long-term colorectal cancer survivors with ostomies.

    PubMed

    McMullen, Carmit K; Wasserman, Joseph; Altschuler, Andrea; Grant, Marcia L; Hornbrook, Mark C; Liljestrand, Petra; Briggs, Catherine; Krouse, Robert S

    2011-12-01

    This ethnography of family caregiving explored why peristomal skin complications are common and undertreated among colorectal cancer survivors with intestinal ostomies. Data were collected through in-depth interviews with 31 cancer survivors and their family caregivers, fieldwork, structured assessments, and medical records review, and analyzed with qualitative theme and matrix analyses. Survivors who received help changing the skin barrier around their stoma had fewer obstacles to detection and treatment of peristomal skin complications. Half of the survivors received unpaid help with ostomy care, and all such help came from spouses. Married couples who collaborated in ostomy care reported that having assistance in placing the ostomy appliance helped with preventing leaks, detecting skin changes, and modifying ostomy care routines. In addition, survivors who struggled to manage ostomy care independently reported more obstacles to alleviating and seeking treatment for skin problems. Oncology nurses can improve treatment of peristomal skin problems by asking patients and caregivers about ostomy care and skin problems, examining the peristomal area, and facilitating routine checkups with a wound, ostomy, and continence nurse.

  5. Illness perceptions in relation to experiences of contemporary cancer care settings among colorectal cancer survivors and their partners

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Ann-Caroline; Axelsson, Malin; Berndtsson, Ina; Brink, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Illness is constituted by subjective experiences of symptoms and their psychosocial consequences. Illness perceptions concern people's lay beliefs about understandings and interpretation of a disease and expectations as to disease outcome. Our knowledge about illness perceptions and coping in relation to the cancer care context among persons with colorectal cancer (CRC) and their partners is incomplete. The aim of the present study was to explore illness perceptions in relation to contemporary cancer care settings among CRC survivors and partners. The present research focused on illness rather than disease, implying that personal experiences are central to the methodology. The grounded theory method used is that presented by Kathy Charmaz. The present results explore illness perceptions in the early recovery phase after being diagnosed and treated for cancer in a contemporary cancer care setting. The core category outlook on the cancer diagnosis when quickly informed, treated, and discharged illustrates the illness perceptions of survivors and partners as well as the environment in which they were found. The cancer care environment is presented in the conceptual category experiencing contemporary cancer care settings. Receiving treatment quickly and without waiting was a positive experience for both partners and survivors; however partners experienced the information as massive and as causing concern. The period after discharge was being marked by uncertainty and loneliness, and partners tended to experience non-continuity in care as more problematic than the survivor did. The results showed different illness perceptions and a mismatch between illness perceptions among survivors and partners, presented in the conceptual category outlook on the cancer diagnosis. One illness perception, here presented among partners, focused on seeing the cancer diagnosis as a permanent life-changing event. The other illness perception, here presented among survivors, concentrated on

  6. Long-term health outcomes in a British cohort of breast, colorectal and prostate cancer survivors: a database study

    PubMed Central

    Khan, N F; Mant, D; Carpenter, L; Forman, D; Rose, P W

    2011-01-01

    Background: The community-based incidence of cancer treatment-related long-term consequences is uncertain. We sought to establish the burden of health outcomes that have been associated with treatment among British long-term cancer survivors. Methods: We identified 26 213 adults from the General Practice Research Database who have survived 5 years or more following breast, colorectal or prostate cancer. Four age-, sex- and general practice-matched non-cancer controls were selected for each survivor. We considered the incidence of treatment-associated health outcomes using Cox proportional hazards models. Results: Breast cancer survivors had an elevated incidence of heart failure (hazards ratio (HR) 1.95, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.27–3.01), coronary artery disease (HR 1.27, 95% CI 1.11–1.44), hypothyroidism (HR 1.26, 95% CI 1.02–1.56) and osteoporosis (HR 1.26, 95% CI 1.13–1.40). Among colorectal cancer survivors, there was increased incidence of dementia (HR 1.68, 95% CI 1.20–2.35), diabetes (HR 1.39, 95% CI 1.12–1.72) and osteoporosis (HR 1.41, 95% CI 1.15–1.73). Prostate cancer survivors had the highest risk of osteoporosis (HR 2.49, 95% CI 1.93–3.22). Conclusions: The study confirms the occurrence of increased incidence of chronic illnesses in long-term cancer survivors attributable to underlying lifestyle and/or cancer treatments. Although the absolute risk of the majority of late effects in the cancer survivors cohort is low, identifying prior risk of osteoporosis by bone mineral density scanning for prostate survivors should be considered. There is an urgent need to improve primary care recording of cancer treatment. PMID:22048030

  7. GENDER DIFFERENCES IN QUALITY OF LIFE AMONG LONG-TERM COLORECTAL CANCER SURVIVORS WITH OSTOMIES

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Marcia; McMullen, Carmit K.; Altschuler, Andrea; Mohler, M. Jane; Hornbrook, Mark C.; Herrinton, Lisa J.; Wendel, Christopher S.; Baldwin, Carol M.; Krouse, Robert S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To describe how gender shapes the concerns and adaptations of long-term (> 5 years) colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors with ostomies. Design Qualitative study using content analysis of focus group content. Setting Member of Kaiser Permanente, residing in either Oregon, Southwest Washington State, or Northern California. Sample Four female and four male focus groups selected from quantitative survey participants with health-related quality of life (HRQOL) scores in the highest or lowest quartile. Methods Eight focus groups, discussed challenges of living with an ostomy. Content was recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using directive and summative content analysis. Main Research Variables HRQOL domains of physical, psychological, social and spiritual well being. Findings All groups reported avoiding foods that cause gas or rapid transit, and discussed how limiting the amount of food eaten controlled the output. All groups discussed physical activities, getting support from friends and family, and the importance of being resilient. Both genders identified challenges with sexuality/intimacy. Coping and adjustment difficulties were discussed by women with men only discussing these issues to a small extent. Difficulties with sleep were primarily identified by Low HRQOL women. Problems with body image and depression were discussed only by Low HRQOL women. Conclusions Common issues included diet management, physical activity, social support and sexuality. Women with low HRQOL discussed problems with depression, body image, and sleep. Implications for Nursing Application of these gender-based differences can inform educational interventions for CRC survivors with ostomies. PMID:21875846

  8. Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... rectum are part of the large intestine. Colorectal cancer occurs when tumors form in the lining of ... men and women. The risk of developing colorectal cancer rises after age 50. You're also more ...

  9. "It's up to you and God": understanding health behavior change in older African American survivors of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Harper, Felicity W K; Nevedal, Andrea; Eggly, Susan; Francis, Carie; Schwartz, Kendra; Albrecht, Terrance L

    2013-03-01

    This study investigated the beliefs and attitudes of older African American colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors that may influence health behavior changes after treatment. Drawing from existing theories of health behavior change and cultural beliefs about health, a semi-structured interview guide was developed to elicit survivors' perspectives. Qualitative focus groups and interviews were conducted with 17 survivors identified through the Detroit Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results registry. Using verbatim transcripts from the sessions and NVivo software, thematic analysis was conducted to analyze patterns of responses. Transcripts were coded for seven categories (health behaviors, who/what motivates change, self-efficacy, fatalism, religion/spirituality, beliefs about cancer, race/ethnicity). Five themes emerged from the data (personal responsibility, resilience, desire for information, intentions to change, beliefs in divine control). Findings support the relevance of existing theories of health behavior change to older African American CRC survivors. Cultural considerations are suggested to improve interventions seeking to maximize changes in diet and exercise among this group of survivors. PMID:23646096

  10. Cancer in atomic bomb survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Shigematsu, I.; Kagan, A.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: sampling of atomic bomb survivors and method of cancer detection in Hiroshima and Nagasaki; atomic bomb dosimetry for epidemiological studies of survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki; tumor and tissue registries in Hiroshima and Nagasaki; the cancer registry in Nagasaki, with atomic bomb survivor data, 1973-1977; cancer mortality; methods for study of delayed health effects of a-bomb radiation; experimental radiation carcinogenesis in rodents; leukemia, multiple myeloma, and malignant lymphoma; cancer of the thyroid and salivary glands; malignant tumors in atomic bomb survivors with special reference to the pathology of stomach and lung cancer; colorectal cancer among atomic bomb survivors; breast cancer in atomic bomb survivors; and ovarian neoplasms in atomic bomb survirors.

  11. A population-based study comparing HRQoL among breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer survivors to propensity score matched controls, by cancer type, and gender

    PubMed Central

    LeMasters, Traci; Madhavan, Suresh; Sambamoorthi, Usha; Kurian, Sobha

    2016-01-01

    Background Objectives were to compare health-related quality of life (HRQoL) between breast cancer survivors, prostate cancer survivors (PCS), and colorectal cancer survivors (CCS) to matched controls, stratified by short and long-term survivors, by cancer type, and gender. Methods By using the 2009 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, propensity scores matched three controls to adult survivors >1 year past diagnosis (N = 11,964) on age, gender, race/ethnicity, income, insurance status, and region of the USA Chi-square tests and logistic regression models compared HRQoL outcomes (life satisfaction, activity limitations, sleep quality, emotional support, general, physical, and mental health). Results Although all cancer survivors reported worse general health (p < 0.000) and more activity limitations (p < 0.004) than controls, these disparities decreased among long-term survivors. Short-term PCS and male CCS were more likely to report worse outcomes across additional domains of HRQoL than controls, but PCS were 0.61, 0.63, and 0.70 times less likely to report activity limitations, fair/poor general health, and 1–15 bad physical health days in the past month than male CCS. Breast cancer survivors and female CCS were 2.12 and 3.17, 1.58 and 1.86, and 1.49 and 153, respectively, times more likely to report rarely/never receiving needed emotional support, 1–15 bad mental health days in the past month, and not receiving enough sleep 1–15 days in the past month than PCS and male CCS. Conclusions Cancer survivors experience worse HRQoL than similar individuals without a history of cancer and the severity of affected HRQoL domains differ by time since diagnosis, cancer type, and gender. PMID:23606210

  12. Reach Out to Enhance Wellness in Older Cancer Survivors (RENEW): Design, Methods and Recruitment Challenges of a Home-based Exercise and Diet Intervention to Improve Physical Function among Long-term Survivors of Breast, Prostate, and Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Denise Clutter; Morey, Miriam C.; Sloane, Richard; Stull, Valeda; Cohen, Harvey Jay; Peterson, Bercedis; Pieper, Carl; Hartman, Terryl J.; Miller, Paige E.; Mitchell, Diane C.; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy

    2009-01-01

    Objective Cure rates for cancer are increasing, especially for breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer. Despite positive trends in survivorship, a cancer diagnosis can trigger accelerated functional decline that can threaten independence, reduce quality-of-life and increase health care costs, especially among the elderly who comprise the majority of survivors. Lifestyle interventions may hold promise in reorienting functional decline in older cancer survivors, but few studies have been conducted. Method We describe the design and methods of a randomized controlled trial, RENEW (Reach out to ENhancE Wellness), that tests whether a home-based multi-behavior intervention focused on exercise, and including a low-saturated fat, plant-based diet, would improve physical functioning among 641 older, long-term (≥5 years post-diagnosis) survivors of breast, prostate, or colorectal cancer. Challenges to recruitment are examined. Results 20,015 cases were approached, and screened using a two-step screening process to assure eligibility. This population of long-term, elderly cancer survivors had lower rates of response (∼11%) and higher rates of ineligibility (∼70%) than our previous intervention studies conducted on adults with newly diagnosed cancer. Significantly higher response rates were noted among survivors who were white, younger, and more proximal to diagnosis and breast cancer survivors (p-values < 0.001). Conclusions Older cancer survivors represent a vulnerable population for whom lifestyle interventions may hold promise. RENEW may provide guidance in allocating limited resources in order to maximize recruitment efforts aimed at this needy, but hard-to-reach population. PMID:19117329

  13. Prospective relationships of physical activity with quality of life among colorectal cancer survivors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Physical activity can enhance quality of life for cancer survivors. However, few longitudinal studies have examined whether physical activity has a sustained effect on improvements in quality of life. The present study aims to examine the relationships between physical activity and quality of life o...

  14. CD14 and IL18 gene polymorphisms associated with colorectal cancer subsite risks among atomic bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yiqun; Yoshida, Kengo; Cologne, John B; Maki, Mayumi; Morishita, Yukari; Sasaki, Keiko; Hayashi, Ikue; Ohishi, Waka; Hida, Ayumi; Kyoizumi, Seishi; Kusunoki, Yoichiro; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Nakachi, Kei; Hayashi, Tomonori

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a common malignancy worldwide, and chronic inflammation is a risk factor for CRC. In this study, we carried out a cohort study among the Japanese atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivor population to investigate any association between immune- and inflammation-related gene polymorphisms and CRC. We examined the effects of six single-nucleotide polymorphisms of CD14 and IL18 on relative risks (RRs) of CRC. Results showed that RRs of CRC, overall and by anatomic subsite, significantly increased with increasing radiation dose. The CD14-911A/A genotype showed statistically significant higher risks for all CRC and distal CRC compared with the other two genotypes. In addition, the IL18-137 G/G genotype showed statistically significant higher risks for proximal colon cancer compared with the other two genotypes. In phenotype-genotype analyses, the CD14-911A/A genotype presented significantly higher levels of membrane and soluble CD14 compared with the other two genotypes, and the IL18-137 G/G genotype tended to be lower levels of plasma interleukin (IL)-18 compared with the other two genotypes. These results suggest the potential involvement of a CD14-mediated inflammatory response in the development of distal CRC and an IL18-mediated inflammatory response in the development of proximal colon cancer among A-bomb survivors.

  15. The Effect of Oncologists’ Exercise Recommendation on the Level of Exercise and Quality of Life in Breast and Colorectal Cancer Survivors: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji-Hye; Lee, Junga; Oh, Minsuk; Park, Hyuna; Chae, Jisuk; Kim, Dong-Il; Lee, Mikyoung; Yoon, Yong Jin; Lee, Chulwon; Kim, Nam Kyu; Jones, Lee W.; Kim, Seung Il; Park, Se Ho; Jeon, Justin Y.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of an oncologists’ exercise recommendation with and without exercise motivation package on the amount of exercise participation and quality of life (QOL) in breast and colon cancer survivors. Methods A total of 162 early stage breast and colorectal cancer survivors who completed primary and adjuvant treatments were recruited for this study. Participants were randomly assigned into one of three groups: 1) control (N=59), 2) Oncologists’ exercise recommendation (N=53), and 3) Oncologists’ exercise recommendation with exercise motivation package (N=50). At baseline and after 4 weeks, the level of exercise participation and QOL were assessed. Results A total of 130 (80.7%) participants completed the 4-week assessment. The result showed that participants who only received oncologists’ exercise recommendation did not increase their exercise participation level. But participants who received oncologist’s exercise recommendation with motivation package significantly increased the level of exercise participation [4.30±7.84 Metabolic Equivalent of Task (MET) hour per week, p<001] compared with that of the control group and significantly improved role functioning, pain and diarrhea. Conclusion Oncologists’ exercise recommendation may not be enough to increase exercise participation.. Exercise motivation package with oncologists’ exercise recommendation may be ideal to increase exercise participation to cancer survivor Implications of cancer survivors The providence of exercise motivation package in addition to oncologists’ exercise recommendation to increase the level of exercise among breast and colorectal cancer survivors should be considered. PMID:25965782

  16. A Longitudinal Study of Post-Traumatic Growth and Psychological Distress in Colorectal Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Occhipinti, Stefano; Chambers, Suzanne K; Lepore, Stephen; Aitken, Joanne; Dunn, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The stability of post-traumatic growth over time and the relationship between post-traumatic growth and traditional distress outcomes remains unclear. We tracked post-traumatic growth in a population-based sample of colorectal cancer patients from soon after diagnosis to five years subsequently to assess the heterogeneity of a post-traumatic growth response to cancer over time and describe the simultaneous and longitudinal relationships between post-traumatic growth and psychological distress. 1966 colorectal patients who were five months post diagnosis were assessed six times over a five year period. There was considerable heterogeneity associated with both psychological distress and benefit finding scores over time. However, both for benefit finding and psychological distress, the variation in individual scores suggested an underlying positive linear trend and both lagged and lagged change components. Specifically, benefit finding and psychological distress are mutual leading indicators of each other. First, benefit finding served as a leading indicator of distress, in that increases in reported benefit finding from year to year predicted higher future increases in psychological distress. As well, in an inverse relationship, psychological distress served as a leading indicator of benefit finding, such that increases in reported distress from year to year predicted lower future increases in benefit finding. Post-traumatic growth may reflect patients coping efforts to enhance perceptions of wellbeing in response to escalating cancer-related threats, acting as harbinger of increasing trajectories of psychological distress. This explanation is consistent with a cognitive dissonance response in which threats to the integrity of the self then lead to a tendency to accentuate positive aspects of the self. PMID:26418357

  17. A Longitudinal Study of Post-Traumatic Growth and Psychological Distress in Colorectal Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Occhipinti, Stefano; Chambers, Suzanne K.; Lepore, Stephen; Aitken, Joanne; Dunn, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The stability of post-traumatic growth over time and the relationship between post-traumatic growth and traditional distress outcomes remains unclear. We tracked post-traumatic growth in a population-based sample of colorectal cancer patients from soon after diagnosis to five years subsequently to assess the heterogeneity of a post-traumatic growth response to cancer over time and describe the simultaneous and longitudinal relationships between post-traumatic growth and psychological distress. 1966 colorectal patients who were five months post diagnosis were assessed six times over a five year period. There was considerable heterogeneity associated with both psychological distress and benefit finding scores over time. However, both for benefit finding and psychological distress, the variation in individual scores suggested an underlying positive linear trend and both lagged and lagged change components. Specifically, benefit finding and psychological distress are mutual leading indicators of each other. First, benefit finding served as a leading indicator of distress, in that increases in reported benefit finding from year to year predicted higher future increases in psychological distress. As well, in an inverse relationship, psychological distress served as a leading indicator of benefit finding, such that increases in reported distress from year to year predicted lower future increases in benefit finding. Post-traumatic growth may reflect patients coping efforts to enhance perceptions of wellbeing in response to escalating cancer–related threats, acting as harbinger of increasing trajectories of psychological distress. This explanation is consistent with a cognitive dissonance response in which threats to the integrity of the self then lead to a tendency to accentuate positive aspects of the self. PMID:26418357

  18. [A questionnaire survey on QOL and toxicity in colorectal cancer survivors who received adjuvant chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Hiroya; Narita, Yukiya; Komori, Koji; Kimura, Kenya; Kinoshita, Takashi; Komori, Azusa; Uegaki, Shiori; Nomura, Motoo; Nitta, Souhei; Yamaguchi, Kazuhisa; Kadowaki, Shigenori; Takahari, Daisuke; Ura, Takashi; Andoh, Masashi; Muro, Kei

    2015-04-01

    The relative risk of cancer recurrence with postoperative adjuvant FOLFOX/CapeOX therapy(Ox)for stage III colorectal cancer is reduced by approximately 20%when compared to that with fluorouracil plus Leucovorin. We performed a questionnaire survey to evaluate the quality of life(QOL)and extent of side effects in patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy. In order to evaluate the risks and benefits of oxaliplatin administration, we also examined the differences in awareness of oxaliplatin side effects between patients and medical staff. Responses were obtained from 147 patients, 54 doctors, and 84 nurses. Analysis of the patient responses showed higher current QOL scores regardless of the chemotherapy regimen, although patients in the Ox group had a high rate of residual sensory peripheral neuropathy. In the Ox group, 81% of patients responded that the side effects were moderate. In contrast, 40% of medical staff identified the side effects of oxaliplatin as severe, which differed from that reported by the patients. Considering that Ox adjuvant chemotherapy may reduce the risk of recurrence by approximately 20%, the risk/benefit balance is acceptable.

  19. Physician visits and preventive care among Asian American and Pacific Islander long-term survivors of colorectal cancer, USA, 1996–2006

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Julie S.; Tai, Eric; Thomas, Cheryll C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Published literature on receipt of preventive healthcare services among Asian American and Pacific Islander (API) cancer survivors is scarce. We describe patterns in receipt of preventive services among API long-term colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors. Methods Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry–Medicare data were used to identify 9,737 API and white patients who were diagnosed with CRC during 1996–2000 and who survived 5 or more years beyond their diagnoses. We examined receipt of vaccines, mammography (females), bone densitometry (females), and cholesterol screening among the survivors and how the physician specialties they visited for follow-up care correlated to services received. Results APIs were less likely than whites to receive mammography (52.0 vs. 69.3 %, respectively; P <0.0001) but more likely to receive influenza vaccine, cholesterol screening, and bone densitometry. These findings remained significant in our multivariable model, except for receipt of bone densitometry. APIs visited PCPs only and both PCPs and oncologists more frequently than whites (P <0.0001). Women who visited both PCPs and oncologists compared with PCPs only were more likely to receive mammography (odds ratio=1.40; 95 % confidence interval, 1.05–1.86). Conclusions Visits to both PCPs and oncologists were associated with increased use of mammography. Although API survivors visited these specialties more frequently than white survivors, API women may need culturally appropriate outreach to increase their use of this test. Implications for Cancer Survivors Long-term cancer survivors need to be aware of recommended preventive healthcare services, as well as who will manage their primary care and cancer surveillance follow-up. PMID:24190589

  20. Is referral of postsurgical colorectal cancer survivors to cardiac rehabilitation feasible and acceptable? A pragmatic pilot randomised controlled trial with embedded qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Gill; Adams, Richard; Campbell, Anna; Kidd, Lisa; Leslie, Stephen J; Munro, Julie; Watson, Angus

    2016-01-01

    Objectives (1) Assess whether cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is a feasible and acceptable model of rehabilitation for postsurgical colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors, (2) evaluate trial procedures. This article reports the results of the first objective. Design and setting A pragmatic pilot randomised controlled trial with embedded qualitative study was conducted in 3 UK hospitals with CR facilities. Descriptive statistics were used to summarise trial parameters indicative of intervention feasibility and acceptability. Interviews and focus groups were conducted and data analysed thematically. Participants People with CRC were considered for inclusion in the trial if they were ≥18 years old, diagnosed with primary CRC and in the recovery period postsurgery (they could still be receiving adjuvant therapy). 31% (n=41) of all eligible CRC survivors consented to participate in the trial. 22 of these CRC survivors, and 8 people with cardiovascular disease (CVD), 5 CRC nurses and 6 CR clinicians participated in the qualitative study. Intervention Referral of postsurgical CRC survivors to weekly CR exercise classes and information sessions. Classes included CRC survivors and people with CVD. CR nurses and physiotherapists were given training about cancer and exercise. Results Barriers to CR were protracted recoveries from surgery, ongoing treatments and poor mobility. No adverse events were reported during the trial, suggesting that CR is safe. 62% of participants completed the intervention as per protocol and had high levels of attendance. 20 health professionals attended the cancer and exercise training course, rating it as excellent. Participants perceived that CR increased CRC survivors’ confidence and motivation to exercise, and offered peer support. CR professionals were concerned about CR capacity to accommodate cancer survivors and their ability to provide psychosocial support to this group of patients. Conclusions CR is feasible and acceptable for postsurgical

  1. 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... colon cancer. Photo: AP Photo/Ron Edmonds Colorectal Cancer Cancer of the colon (large intestine) or rectum ( ...

  2. Pain in cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Brown, Matthew Rd; Ramirez, Juan D; Farquhar-Smith, Paul

    2014-11-01

    Cancer and its treatment exert a heavy psychological and physical toll. Of the myriad symptoms which result, pain is common, encountered in between 30% and 60% of cancer survivors. Pain in cancer survivors is a major and growing problem, impeding the recovery and rehabilitation of patients who have beaten cancer and negatively impacting on cancer patients' quality of life, work prospects and mental health. Persistent pain in cancer survivors remains challenging to treat successfully. Pain can arise both due to the underlying disease and the various treatments the patient has been subjected to. Chemotherapy causes painful chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN), radiotherapy can produce late effect radiation toxicity and surgery may lead to the development of persistent post-surgical pain syndromes. This review explores a selection of the common causes of persistent pain in cancer survivors, detailing our current understanding of the pathophysiology and outlining both the clinical manifestations of individual pain states and the treatment options available. PMID:26516548

  3. Perceived Barriers and Facilitators for Return to Work Among Colorectal Cancer Survivors: Malaysian Healthcare Professionals Experience- A Qualitative Inquiry.

    PubMed

    Chow, Sze Loon; Loh, Siew Yim; Su, Tin Tin

    2015-06-01

    Return to work (RTW) can be a challenging occupational health (OH) issue among previously-employed colorectal cancer survivors. This study aimed to explore the various perceived barriers and facilitators encountered during the RTW process in cancer survivorship, from the perception of healthcare professionals (HCP). Face to face, semistructured interviews were carried out on twelve HCP (government and private sectors) from various disciplines. Data collected were transcribed verbatim and data management was aided by NVivo software 8.0. A new theory from contextual data was generated using open coding, axial coding and selective coding. The HCP shared numerous barriers and facilitators associated with RTW, under four categories. The key barriers were disturbing side effects, psychological barriers (personal factor), compensation (financial factor), poor ability to multitask (work-related factor), long paid medical leaves policy, employer's lackadaisical attitude, lack of knowledge and awareness of RTW (environmental factor). Key facilitators identified were desire to resume working life and to contribute to society (personal factor), financial pressure, maintain organizational health insurance (financial factor), less physically demanding job (work-related factor), supportive workplace and strict organizational policy on medical leaves (environmental factor). While not all HCP were trained in RTW, they all agreed that RTW is important for survivors and workplace. Occupational health doctors have a direct role in helping survivors RTW. Early Intervention on RTW during survivorship should involve occupational health doctors and employers, targeting the modifiable factors (environmental and work-related) to improve RTW after cancer. PMID:26073502

  4. Pain in Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Glare, Paul A.; Davies, Pamela S.; Finlay, Esmé; Gulati, Amitabh; Lemanne, Dawn; Moryl, Natalie; Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Paice, Judith A.; Stubblefield, Michael D.; Syrjala, Karen L.

    2014-01-01

    Pain is a common problem in cancer survivors, especially in the first few years after treatment. In the longer term, approximately 5% to 10% of survivors have chronic severe pain that interferes with functioning. The prevalence is much higher in certain subpopulations, such as breast cancer survivors. All cancer treatment modalities have the potential to cause pain. Currently, the approach to managing pain in cancer survivors is similar to that for chronic cancer-related pain, pharmacotherapy being the principal treatment modality. Although it may be appropriate to continue strong opioids in survivors with moderate to severe pain, most pain problems in cancer survivors will not require them. Moreover, because more than 40% of cancer survivors now live longer than 10 years, there is growing concern about the long-term adverse effects of opioids and the risks of misuse, abuse, and overdose in the nonpatient population. As with chronic nonmalignant pain, multimodal interventions that incorporate nonpharmacologic therapies should be part of the treatment strategy for pain in cancer survivors, prescribed with the aim of restoring functionality, not just providing comfort. For patients with complex pain issues, multidisciplinary programs should be used, if available. New or worsening pain in a cancer survivor must be evaluated to determine whether the cause is recurrent disease or a second malignancy. This article focuses on patients with a history of cancer who are beyond the acute diagnosis and treatment phase and on common treatment-related pain etiologies. The benefits and harms of the various pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic options for pain management in this setting are reviewed. PMID:24799477

  5. Colorectal Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics of Colorectal Cancer Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer in the ... professional versions have detailed information written in technical language. The patient versions are written in easy-to- ...

  6. Associations of sedentary time and patterns of sedentary time accumulation with health-related quality of life in colorectal cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    van Roekel, Eline H; Winkler, Elisabeth A H; Bours, Martijn J L; Lynch, Brigid M; Willems, Paul J B; Meijer, Kenneth; Kant, Ijmert; Beets, Geerard L; Sanduleanu, Silvia; Healy, Genevieve N; Weijenberg, Matty P

    2016-12-01

    Sedentary behavior (sitting/lying at low energy expenditure while awake) is emerging as an important risk factor that may compromise the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors. We examined associations of sedentary time with HRQoL in CRC survivors, 2-10 years post-diagnosis. In a cross-sectional study, stage I-III CRC survivors (n = 145) diagnosed (2002-2010) at Maastricht University Medical Center+, the Netherlands, wore the thigh-mounted MOX activity monitor 24 h/day for seven consecutive days. HRQoL outcomes were assessed by validated questionnaires (EORTC QLQ-C30, WHODAS II, Checklist Individual Strength, and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale). Confounder-adjusted linear regression models were used to estimate associations with HRQoL outcomes of MOX-derived total and prolonged sedentary time (in prolonged sedentary bouts ≥ 30 min), and usual sedentary bout duration, corrected for waking wear time. On average, participants spent 10.2 h/day sedentary (SD, 1.6), and 4.5 h/day in prolonged sedentary time (2.3). Mean usual sedentary bout duration was 27.3 min (SD, 16.8). Greater total and prolonged sedentary time, and longer usual sedentary bout duration were associated with significantly (P < 0.05) lower physical functioning, and higher disability and fatigue scores. Greater prolonged sedentary time and longer usual sedentary bout duration also showed significant associations with lower global quality of life and role functioning. Associations with distress and social functioning were non-significant. Sedentary time was cross-sectionally associated with poorer HRQoL outcomes in CRC survivors. Prospective studies are needed to investigate whether sedentary time reduction is a potential target for lifestyle interventions aiming to improve the HRQoL of CRC survivors. PMID:27419042

  7. Five Myths about Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACS » Your Local Offices Close + - Text Size Five Myths About Colorectal Cancer In many cases, colorectal cancer ... screening tests you need, when you need them. Myth: Colorectal cancer is a man’s disease. Truth: Colorectal ...

  8. Diet and Exercise Intervention Adherence and Health-Related Outcomes among Older Long-Term Breast, Prostate, and Colorectal Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Winger, Joseph G.; Mosher, Catherine E.; Rand, Kevin L.; Morey, Miriam C.; Snyder, Denise C.; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    Background Diet and exercise interventions for cancer survivors result in health benefits; however, few studies have examined health outcomes in relation to adherence. Purpose We examined associations between adherence to components of a diet–exercise intervention and survivors’ physical and mental health. Methods A randomized controlled trial tested a telephone and mailed print intervention among 641 older, overweight, long-term survivors of breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer. Dietary and exercise behaviors were assessed at 14 time points throughout the year-long intervention; health outcomes were examined postintervention. Results Telephone session attendance had significant indirect relationships with health outcomes through intervention-period exercise and dietary behavior. Attendance showed positive indirect relationships with physical function (β= 0.11, p<0.05), basic and advanced lower extremity function (β=0.10, p<0.05/β=0.09, p<0.05), and mental health (β= 0.05, p<0.05), and a negative indirect relationship with body mass index (β=−0.06, p<0.05). Conclusions Session attendance is vital in facilitating improvement in health behaviors and attendant outcomes (Clinicaltrials.gov number NCT00303875). PMID:24648018

  9. Dietary changes and dietary supplement use, and underlying motives for these habits reported by colorectal cancer survivors of the Patient Reported Outcomes Following Initial Treatment and Long-Term Evaluation of Survivorship (PROFILES) registry.

    PubMed

    Bours, Martijn J; Beijer, Sandra; Winkels, Renate M; van Duijnhoven, Fränzel J; Mols, Floortje; Breedveld-Peters, José J; Kampman, Ellen; Weijenberg, Matty P; van de Poll-Franse, Lonneke V

    2015-07-01

    In the present study, we aimed to describe dietary changes made post-diagnosis and current dietary supplement use by survivors of colorectal cancer (CRC), and explore the underlying motives for these lifestyle habits. Cross-sectional analyses were performed for 1458 stage I-IV CRC survivors of the Patient Reported Outcomes Following Initial Treatment and Long-Term Evaluation of Survivorship (PROFILES) registry, diagnosed between 2000 and 2009. Lifestyle, sociodemographic and clinical information was collected. Prevalence of and motivations for dietary changes and supplement use were assessed. Associations between lifestyle, sociodemographic and clinical variables were analysed by multivariable logistic regression. CRC survivors (57% male) were on average 70 (SD 9) years of age and diagnosed 7 (SD 3) years ago. Dietary changes post-diagnosis were reported by 36% of the survivors and current supplement use by 32%. Motivations for dietary changes were mostly cancer-related (44% reported 'prevention of cancer recurrence' as the main reason), while motivations for supplement use were less frequently related to the cancer experience (38% reported 'to improve health and prevent disease in general' as the main reason). Dietary changes were significantly associated with dietary supplement use (OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.1, 2.1). Survivors who had received dietary advice, were non-smokers, under 65 years of age, and had no stoma were more likely to have changed their diet. Survivors who were female, had multiple co-morbidities, and no overweight or obesity were more likely to use supplements. In conclusion, many CRC survivors alter their diet post-diagnosis and use dietary supplements, in part for different reasons. Insights into motivations behind these lifestyle habits and characteristics of CRC survivors adopting these habits can improve the tailoring of lifestyle counselling strategies.

  10. Synchronous trifocal colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Charalampoudis, Petros; Kykalos, Stylianos; Stamopoulos, Paraskevas; Kouraklis, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Synchronous colorectal cancers (SCRCs) have been increasingly diagnosed due to emerging diagnostic modalities. The presence of three or more synchronous colorectal cancers has, however, only rarely been reported. A 76-year-old white man presented for management of two concurrent colorectal adenocarcinomas in the left colon evidenced on total colonoscopy. Preoperative abdominal ultrasonography and thoracoabdominal computed tomography were negative for metastatic disease. The patient underwent an elective left hemicolectomy. The pathology report ultimately showed the presence of three moderately differentiated, distinct colorectal cancers. The patient experienced an uneventful recovery. PMID:27695171

  11. Synchronous trifocal colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Charalampoudis, Petros; Kykalos, Stylianos; Stamopoulos, Paraskevas; Kouraklis, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Synchronous colorectal cancers (SCRCs) have been increasingly diagnosed due to emerging diagnostic modalities. The presence of three or more synchronous colorectal cancers has, however, only rarely been reported. A 76-year-old white man presented for management of two concurrent colorectal adenocarcinomas in the left colon evidenced on total colonoscopy. Preoperative abdominal ultrasonography and thoracoabdominal computed tomography were negative for metastatic disease. The patient underwent an elective left hemicolectomy. The pathology report ultimately showed the presence of three moderately differentiated, distinct colorectal cancers. The patient experienced an uneventful recovery.

  12. Inherited Colorectal Cancer Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Kastrinos, Fay; Syngal, Sapna

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the most common gastrointestinal malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer death in both men and women in the United States. Most colorectal cancer cases diagnosed annually are due to sporadic events but up to 5% are attributed to known monogenic disorders including Lynch syndrome, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis, MYH-associated polyposis, and the rare hamartomatous polyposis syndromes. These inherited colorectal cancer syndromes confer a markedly increased risk for the development of multiple cancers and predictive genetic testing is available to identify mutation carriers and at-risk family members. Through personalized strategies for diagnosis and management, a substantial reduction in morbidity and mortality has been appreciated among patients at highest risk for the development of colorectal cancer. PMID:22157284

  13. Chemoprevention of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lang, Michaela; Gasche, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer has become one of the most prevalent malignant diseases for both men and women. Patients with inflammatory bowel diseases or certain inherited cancer syndromes are at high risk of developing colorectal cancer and have naturally the highest need for cancer prevention. In familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and Lynch syndrome, most of the underlying germline mutations can be detected by DNA sequencing, and medical counselling of affected individuals involves both surveillance tests and chemopreventive measures. However, as the mechanisms leading to colorectal cancer differ in these high-risk groups, the molecular action of chemopreventive drugs needs to be adjusted to the certain pathway of carcinogenesis. In the last decades, a number of drugs have been tested, including sulindac, aspirin, celecoxib, and mesalazine, but some of them are still controversially discussed. This review summarizes the advances and current standards of colorectal cancer prevention in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, FAP and Lynch syndrome. PMID:25531498

  14. Study protocol for “Moving Bright, Eating Smart”– A phase 2 clinical trial on the acceptability and feasibility of a diet and physical activity intervention to prevent recurrence in colorectal cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer is the second most common cancer and cancer-killer in Hong Kong with an alarming increasing incidence in recent years. The latest World Cancer Research Fund report concluded that foods low in fibre, and high in red and processed meat cause colorectal cancer whereas physical activity protects against colon cancer. Yet, the influence of these lifestyle factors on cancer outcome is largely unknown even though cancer survivors are eager for lifestyle modifications. Observational studies suggested that low intake of a Western-pattern diet and high physical activity level reduced colorectal cancer mortality. The Theory of Planned Behaviour and the Health Action Process Approach have guided the design of intervention models targeting a wide range of health-related behaviours. Methods/design We aim to demonstrate the feasibility of two behavioural interventions intended to improve colorectal cancer outcome and which are designed to increase physical activity level and reduce consumption of a Western-pattern diet. This three year study will be a multicentre, randomised controlled trial in a 2x2 factorial design comparing the “Moving Bright, Eating Smart” (physical activity and diet) programme against usual care. Subjects will be recruited over a 12-month period, undertake intervention for 12 months and followed up for a further 12 months. Baseline, interim and three post-intervention assessments will be conducted. Two hundred and twenty-two colorectal cancer patients who completed curative treatment without evidence of recurrence will be recruited into the study. Primary outcome measure will be whether physical activity and dietary targets are met at the end of the 12-month intervention. Secondary outcome measures include the magnitude and mechanism of behavioural change, the degree and determinants of compliance, and the additional health benefits and side effects of the intervention. Discussion The results of this study will establish

  15. Epidemiology of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Marley, Andrew R; Nan, Hongmei

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is currently the third deadliest cancer in the United States and will claim an estimated 49,190 U.S. lives in 2016. The purpose of this review is to summarize our current understanding of this disease, based on nationally published statistics and information presented in peer-reviewed journal articles. Specifically, this review will cover the following topics: descriptive epidemiology (including time and disease trends both in the United States and abroad), risk factors (environmental, genetic, and gene-environment interactions), screening, prevention and control, and treatment. Landmark discoveries in colorectal cancer risk factor research will also be presented. Based on the information reviewed for this report, we suggest that future U.S. public health efforts aim to increase colorectal cancer screening among African American communities, and that future worldwide colorectal cancer epidemiology studies should focus on researching nutrient-gene interactions towards the goal of improving personalized treatment and prevention strategies. PMID:27766137

  16. Risks of Colorectal Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics of Colorectal Cancer Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer in the ... professional versions have detailed information written in technical language. The patient versions are written in easy-to- ...

  17. Tests for Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... to look for colorectal cancer Imaging tests use sound waves, x-rays, magnetic fields, or radioactive substances to ... has spread to the liver. Ultrasound Ultrasound uses sound waves and their echoes to create images of the ...

  18. Role of physical activity and diet after colorectal cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Van Blarigan, Erin L; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A

    2015-06-01

    This review summarizes the evidence regarding physical activity and diet after colorectal cancer diagnosis in relation to quality of life, disease recurrence, and survival. There have been extensive reports on adiposity, inactivity, and certain diets, particularly those high in red and processed meats, and increased risk of colorectal cancer. Only in the past decade have data emerged on how such lifestyle factors are associated with outcomes in colorectal cancer survivors. Prospective observational studies have consistently reported that physical activity after colorectal cancer diagnosis reduces mortality. A meta-analysis estimated that each 15 metabolic equivalent task-hour per week increase in physical activity after colorectal cancer diagnosis was associated with a 38% lower risk of mortality. No randomized controlled trials have been completed to confirm that physical activity lowers risk of mortality among colorectal cancer survivors; however, trials have shown that physical activity, including structured exercise, is safe for colorectal cancer survivors (localized to metastatic stage, during and after treatment) and improves cardiorespiratory fitness and physical function. In addition, prospective observational studies have suggested that a Western dietary pattern, high carbohydrate intake, and consuming sugar-sweetened beverages after diagnosis may increase risk of colorectal cancer recurrence and mortality, but these data are limited to single analyses from one of two US cohorts. Additional data from prospective studies and randomized controlled trials are needed. Nonetheless, on the basis of the available evidence, it is reasonable to counsel colorectal cancer survivors to engage in regular physical activity and limit consumption of refined carbohydrates, red and processed meats, and sugar-sweetened beverages.

  19. Role of Physical Activity and Diet After Colorectal Cancer Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Van Blarigan, Erin L.; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    This review summarizes the evidence regarding physical activity and diet after colorectal cancer diagnosis in relation to quality of life, disease recurrence, and survival. There have been extensive reports on adiposity, inactivity, and certain diets, particularly those high in red and processed meats, and increased risk of colorectal cancer. Only in the past decade have data emerged on how such lifestyle factors are associated with outcomes in colorectal cancer survivors. Prospective observational studies have consistently reported that physical activity after colorectal cancer diagnosis reduces mortality. A meta-analysis estimated that each 15 metabolic equivalent task-hour per week increase in physical activity after colorectal cancer diagnosis was associated with a 38% lower risk of mortality. No randomized controlled trials have been completed to confirm that physical activity lowers risk of mortality among colorectal cancer survivors; however, trials have shown that physical activity, including structured exercise, is safe for colorectal cancer survivors (localized to metastatic stage, during and after treatment) and improves cardiorespiratory fitness and physical function. In addition, prospective observational studies have suggested that a Western dietary pattern, high carbohydrate intake, and consuming sugar-sweetened beverages after diagnosis may increase risk of colorectal cancer recurrence and mortality, but these data are limited to single analyses from one of two US cohorts. Additional data from prospective studies and randomized controlled trials are needed. Nonetheless, on the basis of the available evidence, it is reasonable to counsel colorectal cancer survivors to engage in regular physical activity and limit consumption of refined carbohydrates, red and processed meats, and sugar-sweetened beverages. PMID:25918293

  20. Frailty in childhood cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Ness, Kirsten K; Armstrong, Gregory T; Kundu, Mondira; Wilson, Carmen L; Tchkonia, Tamara; Kirkland, James L

    2015-05-15

    Young adult childhood cancer survivors are at an increased risk of frailty, a physiologic phenotype typically found among older adults. This phenotype is associated with new-onset chronic health conditions and mortality among both older adults and childhood cancer survivors. Mounting evidence suggests that poor fitness, muscular weakness, and cognitive decline are common among adults treated for childhood malignancies, and that risk factors for these outcomes are not limited to those treated with cranial radiation. Although the pathobiology of this phenotype is not known, early cellular senescence, sterile inflammation, and mitochondrial dysfunction in response to initial cancer or treatment-related insults are hypothesized to play a role. To the authors' knowledge, interventions to prevent or remediate frailty among childhood cancer survivors have not been tested to date. Pharmaceutical, nutraceutical, and lifestyle interventions have demonstrated some promise.

  1. [Nutrition and colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Ströhle, Alexander; Maike, Wolters; Hahn, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Diet plays an important role in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. Current prospective cohort studies and metaanalysis enable a reevaluation of how food or nutrients such as fiber and fat influence cancer risk. Based on the evidence criteria of the WHO/FAD, risk reduction by a high intake of fruit is assessed as possible, while a lowered risk by a high vegetable intake is probable. Especially raw vegetables and fruits seem to exert anticancer properties. The evidence of a risk reducing effect of whole grain relating to colorectal cancer is assessed as probable whereas the evidence of an increased risk by high consumption of refined white flour products and sweets is (still) insufficient despite some evidences. There is a probable risk reducing effect of milk and dairy products. e available data on eggs and red meat indicate a possible risk increasing influence. Stronger clues for a risk increasing effect have been shown for meat products leading to an evidence assessed as probable. Owing to varied interpretations of the data on fiber, the evidence of a risk reducing effect relating to colorectal cancer is assessed as possible or insufficient. The available data on alcohol consumption indicate a possible risk increasing effect. In contrast to former evaluations, diets rich in fat seem to increase colorectal cancer risk only indirectly as part of a hypercaloric diet by advancing the obesity risk. Thus, the evidence of obesity, especially visceral obesity, as a risk of colorectal cancer is judged as convincing today. Prospective cohort studies suggest that people who get higher than average amounts of folic acid from multivitamin supplements have lower risks of colorectal cancer. The evidence for a risk reducing effect of calcium, selenium, vitamin D and vitamin E on colorectal cancer is insufficient. As primary prevention, a diet rich in vegetables, fruits, whole grain products, and legumes added by low-fat dairy products, fish, and poultry can be recommended. In

  2. Radioimmunodetection of colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, E.E.; Deland, F.H.; Casper, S.; Corgan, R.L.; Primus, F.J.; Goldenberg, D.M.

    1980-03-15

    This study examines the accuracy of colorectal cancer radioimmunodetection. Twenty-seven patients with a history of histologically-confirmed colonic or rectal carcinoma received a high-titer, purified goat anti-CEA IgG labelled with /sup 131/I at a total dose of at least 1.0 ..mu..Ci. Various body views were scanned at 24 and 48 hours after administration of the radioantibody. Three additional cases were evaluated; one had a villous adenoma in the rectum and received the /sup 131/I-labeled anti-CEA IgG, while two colonic carcinoma patients received normal goat IgG labelled with /sup 131/I. All of the 7 cases with primary colorectal cancer showed true-positive tumor localization, while 20 of 25 sites of metastatic colorectal cancer detected by immune scintigraphy were corroborated by other detection measures. The sensitivity of the radioimmunodetection of colorectal cancers (primary and metastatic) was found to be 90% (true-positive rate), the putative specificity (true-negative rate) was 94%, and the apparent overall accuracy of the technique was 93%. Neither the case of a villous adenoma receiving the anti-CEA IgG nor the two cases of colonic cancer receiving normal goat IgG showed tumor radiolocalization. Very high circulating CEA titers did not appear to hinder successful tumor radiolocalization. These findings suggest that in colorectal cancers the method of CEA radioimmunodetection may be of value in preoperatively determining the location and extent of disease, in assessing possible recurrence or spread postoperatively, and in localizing the source of CEA production in patients with rising or elevated CEA titers. An ancilliary benefit could be a more tumor-specific detection test for confirming the findings of other, more conventional diagnostic measures.

  3. Radioimmunodetection of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, E E; Deland, F H; Casper, S; Corgan, R L; Primus, F J; Goldenberg, D M

    1980-03-15

    This study examines the accuracy of colorectal cancer radioimmunodetection. Twenty-seven patients with a history of histologically-confirmed colonic or rectal carcinoma received a high-titer, purified goat anti-CEA IgG labelled with 131-I at a total dose of at least 1.0 muCi. Various body views were scanned at 24 and 48 hours after administration of the radioantibody. Three additional cases were evaluated; one had a villous adenoma in the rectum and received the 131-I-labelled anti-CEA IgG, while two colonic carcinoma patients received normal goat IgG labelled with 131-I. All of the 7 cases with primary colorectal cancer showed true-positive tumor localization, while 20 of 25 sites of metastatic colorectal cancer detected by immune scintigraphy were corroborated by other detection measures. The sensitivity of the radioimmunodetection of colorectal cancers (primary and metastatic) was found to be 90% (true-positive rate), the putative specificity (true-negative rate) was 94%, and the appraent overall accuracy of the technique was 93%. Neither the case of a villous adenoma receiving the anti-CEA IgG nor the two cases of colonic cancer receiving normal goat IgG showed tumor radiolocalization. Very high circulating CEA titers did not appear to hinder successful tumor radiolocalization. These findings suggest that in colorectal cancers the method of CEA radioimmunodetection may be of value in preoperatively determining the location and extent of disease, in assessing possible recurrence or spread postoperatively, and in localizing the source of CEA production in patients with rising or elevated CEA titers. An ancilliary benefit could be a more tumor-specific detection test for confirming the findings of other, more conventional diagnostic measures.

  4. Internet Use and Breast Cancer Survivors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muhamad, Mazanah; Afshari, Mojgan; Mohamed, Nor Aini

    2011-01-01

    A survey was administered to 400 breast cancer survivors at hospitals and support group meetings in Peninsular Malaysia to explore their level of Internet use and factors related to the Internet use by breast cancer survivors. Findings of this study indicated that about 22.5% of breast cancer survivors used Internet to get information about breast…

  5. Understanding topics and sentiment in an online cancer survivor community.

    PubMed

    Portier, Kenneth; Greer, Greta E; Rokach, Lior; Ofek, Nir; Wang, Yafei; Biyani, Prakhar; Yu, Mo; Banerjee, Siddhartha; Zhao, Kang; Mitra, Prasenjit; Yen, John

    2013-12-01

    Online cancer communities help members support one another, provide new perspectives about living with cancer, normalize experiences, and reduce isolation. The American Cancer Society's 166000-member Cancer Survivors Network (CSN) is the largest online peer support community for cancer patients, survivors, and caregivers. Sentiment analysis and topic modeling were applied to CSN breast and colorectal cancer discussion posts from 2005 to 2010 to examine how sentiment change of thread initiators, a measure of social support, varies by discussion topic. The support provided in CSN is highest for medical, lifestyle, and treatment issues. Threads related to 1) treatments and side effects, surgery, mastectomy and reconstruction, and decision making for breast cancer, 2) lung scans, and 3) treatment drugs in colon cancer initiate with high negative sentiment and produce high average sentiment change. Using text mining tools to assess sentiment, sentiment change, and thread topics provides new insights that community managers can use to facilitate member interactions and enhance support outcomes.

  6. Breast Cancer Survivorship Care: Targeting a Colorectal Cancer Education Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Homan, Sherri G.; Yun, Shumei; Stewart, Bob R.; Armer, Jane M.

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer survivors are at risk of developing a second primary cancer. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading second primary cancers, and it is often preventable. We developed a multi-component educational tool to inform and encourage women breast cancer survivors to engage in CRC screening. To assess the strengths and weakness of the tool and to improve the relevancy to the target audience, we convened four focus groups of women breast cancer survivors in Missouri. We also assessed the potential impact of the tool on the knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs regarding CRC and collected information on the barriers to CRC screening through pre- and post-focus groups’ questionnaires. A total of 43 women breast cancer survivors participated and provided very valuable suggestions on design and content to update the tool. Through the process and comparing pre- and post-focus group assessments, a significantly higher proportion of breast cancer survivors strongly agreed or agreed that CRC is preventable (78.6% vs. 96.9%, p = 0.02) and became aware that they were at a slightly increased risk for CRC (18.6% vs. 51.7%, p = 0.003). The most cited barrier was the complexity of preparation for colonoscopy. PMID:26258794

  7. American Cancer Society Colorectal Cancer Survivorship Care Guidelines.

    PubMed

    El-Shami, Khaled; Oeffinger, Kevin C; Erb, Nicole L; Willis, Anne; Bretsch, Jennifer K; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Cannady, Rachel S; Wong, Sandra L; Rose, Johnie; Barbour, April L; Stein, Kevin D; Sharpe, Katherine B; Brooks, Durado D; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer and third leading cause of cancer death in both men and women and second leading cause of cancer death when men and women are combined in the United States (US). Almost two-thirds of CRC survivors are living 5 years after diagnosis. Considering the recent decline in both incidence and mortality, the prevalence of CRC survivors is likely to increase dramatically over the coming decades with the increase in rates of CRC screening, further advances in early detection and treatment and the aging and growth of the US population. Survivors are at risk for a CRC recurrence, a new primary CRC, other cancers, as well as both short-term and long-term adverse effects of the CRC and the modalities used to treat it. CRC survivors may also have psychological, reproductive, genetic, social, and employment concerns after treatment. Communication and coordination of care between the treating oncologist and the primary care clinician is critical to effectively and efficiently manage the long-term care of CRC survivors. The guidelines in this article are intended to assist primary care clinicians in delivering risk-based health care for CRC survivors who have completed active therapy. PMID:26348643

  8. American Cancer Society Colorectal Cancer Survivorship Care Guidelines.

    PubMed

    El-Shami, Khaled; Oeffinger, Kevin C; Erb, Nicole L; Willis, Anne; Bretsch, Jennifer K; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Cannady, Rachel S; Wong, Sandra L; Rose, Johnie; Barbour, April L; Stein, Kevin D; Sharpe, Katherine B; Brooks, Durado D; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer and third leading cause of cancer death in both men and women and second leading cause of cancer death when men and women are combined in the United States (US). Almost two-thirds of CRC survivors are living 5 years after diagnosis. Considering the recent decline in both incidence and mortality, the prevalence of CRC survivors is likely to increase dramatically over the coming decades with the increase in rates of CRC screening, further advances in early detection and treatment and the aging and growth of the US population. Survivors are at risk for a CRC recurrence, a new primary CRC, other cancers, as well as both short-term and long-term adverse effects of the CRC and the modalities used to treat it. CRC survivors may also have psychological, reproductive, genetic, social, and employment concerns after treatment. Communication and coordination of care between the treating oncologist and the primary care clinician is critical to effectively and efficiently manage the long-term care of CRC survivors. The guidelines in this article are intended to assist primary care clinicians in delivering risk-based health care for CRC survivors who have completed active therapy.

  9. Biology of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Arvelo, Francisco; Sojo, Felipe; Cotte, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a serious health problem, a challenge for research, and a model for studying the molecular mechanisms involved in its development. According to its incidence, this pathology manifests itself in three forms: family, hereditary, and most commonly sporadic, apparently not associated with any hereditary or familial factor. For the types having inheritance patterns and a family predisposition, the tumours develop through defined stages ranging from adenomatous lesions to the manifestation of a malignant tumour. It has been established that environmental and hereditary factors contribute to the development of colorectal cancer, as indicated by the accumulation of mutations in oncogenes, genes which suppress and repair DNA, signaling the existence of various pathways through which the appearance of tumours may occur. In the case of the suppressive and mutating tracks, these are characterised by genetic disorders related to the phenotypical changes of the morphological progression sequence in the adenoma/carcinoma. Moreover, alternate pathways through mutation in BRAF and KRAS genes are associated with the progression of polyps to cancer. This review surveys the research done at the cellular and molecular level aimed at finding specific alternative therapeutic targets for fighting colorectal cancer. PMID:25932044

  10. Living as a Breast Cancer Survivor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emotional aspects of breast cancer Living as a breast cancer survivor For many women with breast cancer, treatment ... making some new choices. Follow-up care after breast cancer treatment Even after you have completed breast cancer ...

  11. Health Behaviors of Childhood Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Jennifer S.; Barnett, Marie; Werk, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    There has been a dramatic increase in the number of childhood cancer survivors living to an old age due to improved cancer treatments. However, these survivors are at risk of numerous late effects as a result of their cancer therapy. Engaging in protective health behaviors and limiting health damaging behaviors are vitally important for these survivors given their increased risks. We reviewed the literature on childhood cancer survivors’ health behaviors by searching for published data and conference proceedings. We examine the prevalence of a variety of health behaviors among childhood cancer survivors, identify significant risk factors, and describe health behavior interventions for survivors. PMID:27417484

  12. Chemoprevention of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    LANGMAN, M; BOYLE, P

    1998-01-01

    Department of Medicine, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham B15 2TH, UK P BOYLE Colorectal cancer is the fourth commonest form of cancer in men with 678 000 estimated new cases per year worldwide, representing 8.9% of all new cancers. The disease is most frequent in Occidental countries and particularly so in North America, Australia, New Zealand, and parts of Europe. Prospects for colorectal cancer control are bright and a number of possible approaches could prove fruitful. Among these, pharmaceutical measures seem to be valid and logical approaches to the prevention of colorectal cancer and diminishing its impact. Such approaches could concentrate in primary prevention in at-risk subjects or be applied in altering the course of precursor or established disease. Treatments used must fulfil basic requirements of biological plausibility and safety in continued use in large numbers of subjects. Those available include vitamins and minerals, and other drugs with potential as antioxidants, immune modulators or promoters of cell differentiation or apoptosis. Of the various regimens suggested, vitamin A supplementation may even predispose to adverse outcomes, and antioxidant vitamins in general have no coherent body of evidence to support their use. N-acetylcysteine and ursodeoxycholic acid have promising characteristics but there are as yet no clinical data to support the use of the former in gut epithelial cancer, and formal dose ranging studies must be carried out before the latter is submitted to large scale trial. Folate shows promising characteristics but non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and vitamin D seem the most promising agents. Both seem to reduce the incidence of disease, and to reduce growth rates and/or induce differentiation or apoptosis in gut epithelial cancer cells. Both are also well understood pharmacologically. They may be preferred to newer selective compounds in the same class until these newer compounds are confirmed as safe for widespread

  13. Adherence to Survivorship Care Guidelines in Health Care Providers for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and Colorectal Cancer Survivor Care

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Colon Cancer; Stage I Rectal Cancer; Stage IA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  14. Dietary changes among cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Maskarinec, G; Murphy, S; Shumay, D M; Kakai, H

    2001-03-01

    Given the limited scientific knowledge about dietary factors that affect cancer recurrence, dietary guidelines for cancer survivors are similar to general recommendations on healthy eating. This study explored the patterns of and motivation for, dietary changes among cancer patients. We conducted in-person interviews with 143 cancer survivors who were chosen from a mail survey on complementary and alternative medicine among cancer patients. We applied qualitative analysis using the software package NUD*IST to sort and code the transcribed interviews. The majority of dietary changes reported by 69 cancer patients agreed with current nutritional recommendations, such as decreasing meat and fat intake and increasing the consumption of vegetables and fruits. However, many diet changers also reported the intake of herbal and vitamin supplements, many with unproven effects. The major themes for changing diet were hopes that nutrition would increase well-being, maintain health and prevent cancer recurrence and beliefs that foods that cause or prevent cancer should be avoided and increased, respectively. Many cancer patients use non-scientific reasons when deciding on dietary changes and supplement use. Increasing communication with health care providers may prevent the use of extreme diets, unproven and possibly harmful supplements and reduce exaggerated hopes related to the benefits of a particular dietary regimen. PMID:11827263

  15. Immunotherapy for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Koido, Shigeo; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Homma, Sadamu; Namiki, Yoshihisa; Takakura, Kazuki; Saito, Keisuke; Ito, Zensho; Kobayashi, Hiroko; Kajihara, Mikio; Uchiyama, Kan; Arihiro, Seiji; Arakawa, Hiroshi; Okamoto, Masato; Gong, Jianlin; Tajiri, Hisao

    2013-12-14

    The incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) is on the rise, and the prognosis for patients with recurrent or metastatic disease is extremely poor. Although chemotherapy and radiation therapy can improve survival rates, it is imperative to integrate alternative strategies such as immunotherapy to improve outcomes for patients with advanced CRC. In this review, we will discuss the effect of immunotherapy for inducing cytotoxic T lymphocytes and the major immunotherapeutic approaches for CRC that are currently in clinical trials, including peptide vaccines, dendritic cell-based cancer vaccines, whole tumor cell vaccines, viral vector-based cancer vaccines, adoptive cell transfer therapy, antibody-based cancer immunotherapy, and cytokine therapy. The possibility of combination therapies will also be discussed along with the challenges presented by tumor escape mechanisms. PMID:24379570

  16. [Genetics of colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Balaguer, Francesc

    2012-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most frequent neoplasms in developed countries and up to 5% of all cases occur in the context of a hereditary syndrome. These hereditary forms often require a high index of suspicion for their diagnosis and specific and specialized management. Moreover, a diagnosis of hereditary CRC has major consequences not only for the patient--for whom there are highly effective preventive measures--but also for the patient's relatives, who may carry the same condition. The most significant advances in the field of hereditary CRC have been produced in the diagnosis and characterization of Lynch's syndrome and serrated polyposis syndrome.

  17. [Genetics of colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Balaguer, Francesc

    2013-10-01

    Up to 5% of all cases of colorectal cancer (CRC) are due to a known hereditary syndrome. These hereditary forms often require a high degree of suspicion for their diagnosis and specific and specialized management. Moreover, a diagnosis of hereditary CRC has important consequences, not only for patients-for whom highly effective preventive measures are available-, but also for their relatives, who may be carriers of the same condition. The most significant advances in the field of hereditary CRC have been produced in the diagnosis and characterization of these syndromes and in the discovery of new causative genes.

  18. Primary Prevention of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Andrew T.; Giovannucci, Edward L.

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer has been strongly associated with a Western lifestyle. In the past several decades, much has been learned about the dietary, lifestyle, and medication risk factors for this malignancy. Although there is controversy about the role of specific nutritional factors, consideration of the dietary pattern as a whole appears useful for formulating recommendations. For example, several studies have shown that high intake of red and processed meats, highly refined grains and starches, and sugars is related to increased risk of colorectal cancer. Replacing these factors with poultry, fish, and plant sources as the primary source of protein; unsaturated fats as the primary source of fat; and unrefined grains, legumes and fruits as the primary source of carbohydrates is likely to lower risk of colorectal cancer. Although a role for supplements, including vitamin D, folate, and vitamin B6, remains uncertain, calcium supplementation is likely to be at least modestly beneficial. With respect to lifestyle, compelling evidence indicates that avoidance of smoking and heavy alcohol use, prevention of weight gain, and the maintenance of a reasonable level of physical activity are associated with markedly lower risks of colorectal cancer. Medications such as aspirin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and post-menopausal hormones for women are associated with significant reductions in colorectal cancer risk, though their utility is affected by associated risks. Taken together, modifications in diet and lifestyle should substantially reduce the risk of colorectal cancer and could complement screening in reducing colorectal cancer incidence. PMID:20420944

  19. Colorectal cancer in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Carlos Gouveia; Paquete, Ana Teresa; Pissarra, Irene

    2010-01-01

    Increasing diagnosis and deaths caused by colorectal cancer (CRC) warrant closer examination of affected patients and focus on management of CRC in Portugal. In order to assess the extent and quality of the information available in Portugal, we first analyse Portuguese cancer registries and then the management of CRC by discussing the diagnostic process and medical care provided, especially pharmaceuticals. Other cancer indications are mentioned in order to illustrate current approaches of cancer in Portugal. Current national data on cancer patients are scarce and there are divergencies in methods of data collection and treatment amongst regional cancer registries. However, the available data is sufficient enough to understand the dimension of CRC, with age-standardised incidence of 37 per 100,000 and mortality of 31 per 100,000 annually. An ongoing project is restructuring health services to improve efficiency and quality, however, some problems exist. The regional inequity of access to health care facilities and long waiting times for diagnostic examinations and surgery are major examples. Despite the non-availability of clinical guidelines, a pilot screening programme started at the beginning of 2009 in the Centre Region of the country. It is hoped that this overview will provide the basis for discussion on improvements in CRC management in Portugal and lead to better outcomes.

  20. [Hereditary and familial colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Balaguer, Francesc

    2014-09-01

    Up to 5% of all colorectal cancer cases are caused by a known hereditary syndrome. These hereditary types often need a higher degree of clinical suspicion to be diagnosed and require specific and specialized management. In addition, diagnosing hereditary colorectal cancer has significant consequences not only for the patient, for whom there are effective preventative measures, but also for their families, who could be carriers of the condition. The most significant advances in the field of colorectal cancer have come from the diagnosis and characterization of these syndromes.

  1. Population screening for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    2006-09-01

    Each year in the UK, around 16,000 people die from colorectal cancer. At disease presentation, around 55% of people have advanced cancer that has spread to lymph nodes, metastasised to other organs or is so locally advanced that surgery is unlikely to be curative (Dukes' stage C or D). Overall 5-year survival for colorectal cancer in the UK is around 47-51% (compared to 64% in the USA), but only 7% at most in those presenting with metastatic disease. These facts underlie the current introduction of national bowel screening programmes in the UK. Here we assess the role of screening of the general population in reducing mortality from colorectal cancer. We do not consider the screening arrangements needed for high-risk populations, including those with inflammatory bowel disease or a strong family history of colorectal cancer. PMID:17009566

  2. Animal Models of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Robert L.; Fleet, James C.

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a heterogeneous disease that afflicts a large number of people in the United States. The use of animal models has the potential to increase our understanding of carcinogenesis, tumor biology, and the impact of specific molecular events on colon biology. In addition, animal models with features of specific human colorectal cancers can be used to test strategies for cancer prevention and treatment. In this review we provide an overview of the mechanisms driving human cancer, we discuss the approaches one can take to model colon cancer in animals, and we describe a number of specific animal models that have been developed for the study of colon cancer. We believe that there are many valuable animal models to study various aspects of human colorectal cancer. However, opportunities for improving upon these models exist. PMID:23076650

  3. Animal models of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Robert L; Fleet, James C

    2013-06-01

    Colorectal cancer is a heterogeneous disease that afflicts a large number of people in the USA. The use of animal models has the potential to increase our understanding of carcinogenesis, tumor biology, and the impact of specific molecular events on colon biology. In addition, animal models with features of specific human colorectal cancers can be used to test strategies for cancer prevention and treatment. In this review, we provide an overview of the mechanisms driving human cancer, we discuss the approaches one can take to model colon cancer in animals, and we describe a number of specific animal models that have been developed for the study of colon cancer. We believe that there are many valuable animal models to study various aspects of human colorectal cancer. However, opportunities for improving upon these models exist.

  4. Childhood Cancer Survivor Study: An Overview

    Cancer.gov

    Health problems that develop years later as a result of a cancer treatment are known as late effects. The Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS) was started in 1994 to better understand these late effects.

  5. Marriage and divorce among childhood cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Koch, Susanne Vinkel; Kejs, Anne Mette Tranberg; Engholm, Gerda; Møller, Henrik; Johansen, Christoffer; Schmiegelow, Kjeld

    2011-10-01

    Many childhood cancer survivors have psychosocial late effects. We studied the risks for cohabitation and subsequent separation. Through the Danish Cancer Register, we identified a nationwide, population-based cohort of all 1877 childhood cancer survivors born from 1965 to 1980, and in whom cancer was diagnosed between 1965 and 1996 before they were 20 years of age. A sex-matched and age-matched population-based control cohort was used for comparison (n=45,449). Demographic and socioeconomic data were obtained from national registers and explored by discrete-time Cox regression analyses. Childhood cancer survivors had a reduced rate of cohabitation [rate ratio (RR) 0.78; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.73-0.83], owing to lower rates among survivors of both noncentral nervous system (CNS) tumors (RR 0.88; 95% CI: 0.83-0.95) and CNS tumors (RR 0.52; 95% CI: 0.45-0.59). Male CNS tumor survivors had a nonsignificantly lower rate (RR 0.47; 95% CI: 0.38-0.58) than females (RR 0.56; 95% CI: 0.47-0.68). The rates of separation were almost identical to those of controls. In conclusion, the rate of cohabitation was lower for all childhood cancer survivors than for the population-based controls, with the most pronounced reduction among survivors of CNS tumors. Mental deficits after cranial irradiation are likely to be the major risk factor.

  6. Colorectal Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing colorectal cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  7. Immunotherapy of Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Dirk; Halama, Niels; Zörnig, Inka; Klug, Paula; Krauss, Jürgen; Haag, Georg-Martin

    2016-01-01

    It is known that the immune response, reflected by high T cell infiltrates in primary tumors and metastases, influences the clinical course of colorectal cancer (CRC). Therefore, immunotherapy concepts have been adapted from other tumor entities, which typically rely on the activation of T cells in the tumor microenvironment (e.g. blockade of the immune checkpoint molecules PD-1 and CTLA-4). However, most of the strategies using the approved checkpoint inhibitors and/or combination strategies have more or less failed to produce impressive results in early phase trials in CRC. Therefore, a number of novel targets for checkpoint inhibition are currently in early phase clinical testing (TIM-3, Lag-3, OX40, GITR, 4-1BB, CD40, CD70). A simple activation of infiltrating T cells will not, however, lead to a meaningful anti-tumor response without modulating the environmental factors in CRC. Thus, it is absolutely necessary to improve our understanding of the complex regulation of the tumor microenvironment in CRC to design individual combination treatments leading to effective immune control. PMID:27259331

  8. Subclinical Hypothyroidism in Childhood Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun Joo; Hahn, Seung Min; Jin, Song Lee; Shin, Yoon Jung; Kim, Sun Hee; Lee, Yoon Sun; Kim, Hyo Sun; Lyu, Chuhl Joo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In childhood cancer survivors, the most common late effect is thyroid dysfunction, most notably subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH). Our study evaluated the risk factors for persistent SCH in survivors. Materials and Methods Survivors (n=423) were defined as patients who survived at least 2 years after cancer treatment completion. Thyroid function was assessed at this time and several years thereafter. Two groups of survivors with SCH were compared: those who regained normal thyroid function during the follow-up period (normalized group) and those who did not (persistent group). Results Overall, 104 of the 423 survivors had SCH. SCH was observed in 26% of brain or nasopharyngeal cancer survivors (11 of 43) and 21.6% of leukemia survivors (35 of 162). Sixty-two survivors regained normal thyroid function, 30 remained as persistent SCH, and 12 were lost to follow-up. The follow-up duration was 4.03 (2.15–5.78) years. Brain or nasopharyngeal cancer and Hodgkin disease were more common in the persistent group than in the normalized group (p=0.002). More patients in the persistent group received radiation (p=0.008). Radiation to the head region was higher in this group (2394±2469 cGy) than in the normalized group (894±1591 cGy; p=0.003). On multivariable analysis, lymphoma (p=0.011), brain or nasopharyngeal cancer (p=0.039), and head radiation dose ≥1800 cGy (p=0.039) were significant risk factors for persistent SCH. Conclusion SCH was common in childhood cancer survivors. Brain or nasopharyngeal cancer, lymphoma, and head radiation ≥1800 cGy were significant risk factors for persistent SCH. PMID:27189285

  9. Utilizing Data from Cancer Patient & Survivor Studies

    Cancer.gov

    Utilizing Data from Cancer Patient & Survivor Studies and Understanding the Current State of Knowledge and Developing Future Research Priorities, a 2011 workshop sponsored by the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program.

  10. Sam Donaldson: Tips From a Cancer Survivor

    MedlinePlus

    ... up on my own specialty of the "Cancer Club, Melanoma Division." Although I am not an oncologist, ... people several things when talking about the survivors club and what we can do. First, we all ...

  11. Why Breast Cancer Survivors Should Exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... Moderate physical activity can ease stress that impairs memory, study suggests To use the sharing features on ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Excessive stress can lead to memory problems among breast cancer survivors, but exercise can ...

  12. Colorectal cancers and chlorinated water

    PubMed Central

    El-Tawil, Ahmed Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Published reports have revealed increased risk of colorectal cancers in people exposed to chlorinated drinking water or chemical derivatives of chlorination. Oestrogen plays a dual positive functions for diminishing the possibilities of such risk by reducing the entrance, and increasing the excretion, of these chemicals. In addition, there are supplementary measures that could be employed in order to reduce this risk further, such as boiling the drinking water, revising the standard concentrations of calcium, magnesium and iron in the public drinking water and prescribing oestrogen in susceptible individuals. Hypo-methylation of genomic DNA could be used as a biological marker for screening for the potential development of colorectal cancers. PMID:27096035

  13. Colorectal Cancer Coalition

    MedlinePlus

    ... Reports Press Room Contact Us Sign Up We fight for Moms Dads Uncles Aunts Friends Brothers Sisters ... on Congress. Take Action Your Guide in the Fight Free resource for stage III & stage IV colorectal ...

  14. Income in Adult Survivors of Childhood Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wengenroth, Laura; Sommer, Grit; Schindler, Matthias; Spycher, Ben D.; von der Weid, Nicolas X.; Stutz-Grunder, Eveline; Michel, Gisela; Kuehni, Claudia E.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Little is known about the impact of childhood cancer on the personal income of survivors. We compared income between survivors and siblings, and determined factors associated with income. Methods As part of the Swiss Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (SCCSS), a questionnaire was sent to survivors, aged ≥18 years, registered in the Swiss Childhood Cancer Registry (SCCR), diagnosed at age <21 years, who had survived ≥5 years after diagnosis of the primary tumor. Siblings were used as a comparison group. We asked questions about education, profession and income and retrieved clinical data from the SCCR. We used multivariable logistic regression to identify characteristics associated with income. Results We analyzed data from 1’506 survivors and 598 siblings. Survivors were less likely than siblings to have a high monthly income (>4’500 CHF), even after we adjusted for socio-demographic and educational factors (OR = 0.46, p<0.001). Older age, male sex, personal and parental education, and number of working hours were associated with high income. Survivors of leukemia (OR = 0.40, p<0.001), lymphoma (OR = 0.63, p = 0.040), CNS tumors (OR = 0.22, p<0.001), bone tumors (OR = 0.24, p = 0.003) had a lower income than siblings. Survivors who had cranial irradiation, had a lower income than survivors who had no cranial irradiation (OR = 0.48, p = 0.006). Discussion Even after adjusting for socio-demographic characteristics, education and working hours, survivors of various diagnostic groups have lower incomes than siblings. Further research needs to identify the underlying causes. PMID:27213682

  15. Health Behaviors of Minority Childhood Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Stolley, Melinda R.; Sharp, Lisa K.; Tangney, Christy; Schiffer, Linda; Arroyo, Claudia; Kim, Yoonsang; Campbell, Richard; Schmidt, Mary Lou; Breen, Kathleen; Kinahan, Karen E.; Dilley, Kim; Henderson, Tara; Korenblit, Allen D.; Seligman, Katya

    2015-01-01

    Background Available data suggest that childhood cancer survivors (CCSs) are comparable to the general population on many lifestyle parameters. However, little is known about minority CCSs. This cross-sectional study describes and compares the body mass index (BMI) and health behaviors of African-American, Hispanic and White survivors to each other and to non-cancer controls. Methods Participants included 452 adult CCS (150 African-American, 152 Hispanic, 150 white) recruited through four childhood cancer treating institutions and 375 ethnically-matched non-cancer controls (125 in each racial/ethnic group) recruited via targeted digit dial. All participants completed a 2-hour in-person interview. Results Survivors and non-cancer controls reported similar health behaviors. Within survivors, smoking and physical activity were similar across racial/ethnic groups. African-American and Hispanic survivors reported lower daily alcohol use than whites, but consumed unhealthy diets and were more likely to be obese. Conclusions This unique study highlights that many minority CCSs exhibit lifestyle profiles that contribute to increased risk for chronic diseases and late effects. Recommendations for behavior changes must consider the social and cultural context in which minority survivors may live. PMID:25564774

  16. General aspects of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Centelles, Josep J

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the main causes of death. Cancer is initiated by several DNA damages, affecting proto-oncogenes, tumour suppressor genes, and DNA repairing genes. The molecular origins of CRC are chromosome instability (CIN), microsatellite instability (MSI), and CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP). A brief description of types of CRC cancer is presented, including sporadic CRC, hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) or Lynch syndromes, familiar adenomatous polyposis (FAP), MYH-associated polyposis (MAP), Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS), and juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS). Some signalling systems for CRC are also described, including Wnt-β-catenin pathway, tyrosine kinase receptors pathway, TGF-β pathway, and Hedgehog pathway. Finally, this paper describes also some CRC treatments.

  17. Reproductive outcomes for survivors of childhood cancer.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Melissa M

    2010-11-01

    Because of remarkable progress in therapy, long-term survival is expected for 80% of children and adolescents diagnosed with cancer. Infertility remains one of the most common and life-altering complications experienced by adults treated for cancer during childhood. Surgery, radiation, or chemotherapy that negatively affects any component of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis may compromise reproductive outcomes in childhood cancer survivors. The risk of infertility is generally related to the tissues or organs involved in cancer and the specific type, dose, and combination of cytotoxic therapy. In addition to anticancer therapy, age at treatment, sex, and likely genetic factors influence the risk of permanent infertility. When possible, contemporary protocols limit cumulative doses of cytotoxic therapy in an effort to optimize reproductive potential. If sterilizing therapy is required for cancer control, then fertility preservation measures should be explored before initiation of therapy. For childhood cancer survivors who maintain fertility, health risks to offspring resulting from their cancer treatment are major concerns. Radiation affecting ovarian and uterine function has been linked to pregnancy complications, including spontaneous abortion, preterm labor, fetal malposition, and low birth weight. The risk of congenital malformations, genetic disorders, and cancer appears to be low, with the exception of cancer risk in offspring born to survivors with germline cancer-predisposing mutations. This review summarizes research about cancer treatment factors affecting fertility and pregnancy outcomes of childhood cancer survivors. The data presented should facilitate the delivery of preventive counseling and age- and sex-appropriate interventions to optimize reproductive outcomes in childhood cancer survivors.

  18. Childhood cancer survivor cohorts in Europe.

    PubMed

    Winther, Jeanette F; Kenborg, Line; Byrne, Julianne; Hjorth, Lars; Kaatsch, Peter; Kremer, Leontien C M; Kuehni, Claudia E; Auquier, Pascal; Michel, Gérard; de Vathaire, Florent; Haupt, Riccardo; Skinner, Roderick; Madanat-Harjuoja, Laura M; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Wesenberg, Finn; Reulen, Raoul C; Grabow, Desiree; Ronckers, Cecile M; van Dulmen-den Broeder, Eline; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M; Schindler, Matthias; Berbis, Julie; Holmqvist, Anna S; Gudmundsdottir, Thorgerdur; de Fine Licht, Sofie; Bonnesen, Trine G; Asdahl, Peter H; Bautz, Andrea; Kristoffersen, Anja K; Himmerslev, Liselotte; Hasle, Henrik; Olsen, Jørgen H; Hawkins, Mike M

    2015-05-01

    With the advent of multimodality therapy, the overall five-year survival rate from childhood cancer has improved considerably now exceeding 80% in developed European countries. This growing cohort of survivors, with many years of life ahead of them, has raised the necessity for knowledge concerning the risks of adverse long-term sequelae of the life-saving treatments in order to provide optimal screening and care and to identify and provide adequate interventions. Childhood cancer survivor cohorts in Europe. Considerable advantages exist to study late effects in individuals treated for childhood cancer in a European context, including the complementary advantages of large population-based cancer registries and the unrivalled opportunities to study lifetime risks, together with rich and detailed hospital-based cohorts which fill many of the gaps left by the large-scale population-based studies, such as sparse treatment information. Several large national cohorts have been established within Europe to study late effects in individuals treated for childhood cancer including the Nordic Adult Life after Childhood Cancer in Scandinavia study (ALiCCS), the British Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (BCCSS), the Dutch Childhood Oncology Group (DCOG) LATER study, and the Swiss Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (SCCSS). Furthermore, there are other large cohorts, which may eventually become national in scope including the French Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (FCCSS), the French Childhood Cancer Survivor Study for Leukaemia (LEA), and the Italian Study on off-therapy Childhood Cancer Survivors (OTR). In recent years significant steps have been taken to extend these national studies into a larger pan-European context through the establishment of two large consortia - PanCareSurFup and PanCareLIFE. The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the current large, national and pan-European studies of late effects after childhood cancer. This overview will highlight the

  19. Systemic Treatment of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wolpin, Brian M.; Mayer, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the fourth most common non-cutaneous malignancy in the United States and the second most frequent cause of cancer-related death. Over the past 12 years, significant progress has been made in the systemic treatment of this malignant condition. Six new chemotherapeutic agents have been introduced, increasing median overall survival for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer from less than 9 months with no treatment to approximately 24 months. For patients with stage III (lymph node positive) colon cancer, an overall survival benefit for fluorouracil-based chemotherapy has been firmly established, and recent data have shown further efficacy for the inclusion of oxaliplatin in such adjuvant treatment programs. For patients with stage II colon cancer, the use of adjuvant chemotherapy remains controversial, but may be appropriate in a subset of individuals at higher risk for disease recurrence. Ongoing randomized clinical trials are evaluating how best to combine currently available therapies, while smaller studies are evaluating new agents, with the goal of continued progress in prolonging life among patients with metastatic colorectal cancer and increasing cure rates among those with resectable disease. PMID:18471507

  20. Exercise, inflammation, and fatigue in cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    LaVoy, Emily C.P.; Fagundes, Christopher P.; Dantzer, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Cancer-related fatigue significantly disrupts normal functioning and quality of life for a substantial portion of cancer survivors, and may persist for years following cancer treatment. While the causes of persistent fatigue among cancer survivors are not yet fully understood, accumulating evidence suggests that several pathways, including chronic inflammation, autonomic imbalance, HPA-axis dysfunction, and/or mitochondrial damage, could contribute towards the disruption of normal neuronal function and result in the symptom of cancer-related fatigue. Exercise training interventions have been shown to be some of the more successful treatment options to address cancer-related fatigue. In this review, we discuss the literature regarding the causes of persistent fatigue in cancer survivors and the mechanisms by which exercise may relieve this symptom. There is still much work to be done until the prescription of exercise becomes standard practice for cancer survivors. With improvements in the quality of studies, evidenced-based exercise interventions will allow exercise scientists and oncologists to work together to treat cancer-related fatigue. PMID:26853557

  1. The Mendelian colorectal cancer syndromes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A small minority of colorectal cancers (CRCs) (≤5%) are caused by a single, inherited faulty gene. These diseases, the Mendelian colorectal cancer (CRC) syndromes, have been central to our understanding of colorectal carcinogenesis in general. Most of the approximately 13 high-penetrance genes that predispose to CRC primarily predispose to colorectal polyps, and each gene is associated with a specific type of polyp, whether conventional adenomas (APC, MUTYH, POLE, POLD1, NTHL1), juvenile polyps (SMAD4, BMPR1A), Peutz-Jeghers hamartomas (LKB1/STK11) and mixed polyps of serrated and juvenile types (GREM1). Lynch syndrome (MSH2, MLH1, MSH6, PMS2), by contrast, is associated primarily with cancer risk. Major functional pathways are consistently inactivated in the Mendelian CRC syndromes: certain types of DNA repair (proofreading of DNA replication errors, mismatch repair and base excision repair) and signalling (bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), Wnt signalling and mTOR). The inheritance of the CRC syndromes also varies: most are dominant but some of the DNA repair deficiencies are recessive. Some of the Mendelian CRC genes are especially important because they play a role through somatic inactivation in sporadic CRC (APC, MLH1, SMAD4, POLE). Additional Mendelian CRC genes may remain to be discovered and searches for these genes are ongoing, especially in patients with multiple adenomas and hyperplastic polyps. PMID:26169059

  2. What's New in Colorectal Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Additional resources for colorectal cancer What’s new in colorectal cancer research? Research is always going ... ways to find colorectal cancer early by studying new types of screening tests and improving the ones ...

  3. Percentage of Adults Who Receive Colorectal Cancer Screening as Appropriate

    MedlinePlus

    ... Appropriate Percentage of Adults Who Receive Colorectal Cancer Screening as Appropriate Colorectal cancer is the second leading ... Percentage of Adults Who Receive Recommended Colorectal Cancer Screening by Age Group 78pm-ubty Download these data » ...

  4. Primary Care of the Prostate Cancer Survivor.

    PubMed

    Noonan, Erika M; Farrell, Timothy W

    2016-05-01

    This summary of the American Cancer Society Prostate Cancer Survivorship Care Guidelines targets primary care physicians who coordinate care of prostate cancer survivors with subspecialists. Prostate cancer survivors should undergo prostate-specific antigen screening every six to 12 months and digital rectal examination annually. Surveillance of patients who choose watchful waiting for their prostate cancer should be conducted by a subspecialist. Any hematuria or rectal bleeding must be thoroughly evaluated. Prostate cancer survivors should be screened regularly for urinary incontinence and sexual dysfunction. Patients with predominant urge incontinence symptoms, which can occur after surgical and radiation treatments, may benefit from an anticholinergic agent. If there is difficulty with bladder emptying, a trial of an alpha blocker may be considered. A phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor can effectively treat sexual dysfunction following treatment for prostate cancer. Osteoporosis screening should occur before initiation of androgen deprivation therapy, and patients treated with androgen deprivation therapy should be monitored for anemia, metabolic syndrome, and vasomotor symptoms. Healthy lifestyle choices should be encouraged, including weight management, regular physical activity, proper nutrition, and smoking cessation. Primary care physicians should be vigilant for psychosocial distress, including depression, among prostate cancer survivors, as well as the potential impact of this distress on patients' family members and partners. PMID:27175954

  5. The diagnostics of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Swiderska, Magdalena; Choromańska, Barbara; Dąbrowska, Ewelina; Konarzewska-Duchnowska, Emilia; Choromańska, Katarzyna; Szczurko, Grzegorz; Myśliwiec, Piotr; Dadan, Jacek; Ladny, Jerzy Robert; Zwierz, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most frequent human malignant neoplasms. CRC has an estimated incidence of more than 1,000,000 new cases annually worldwide. Approximately one out of three people who develop CRC dies from the disease. Furthermore, CRC often affects inhabitants of industrialized countries in comparison to less developed countries. Several markers of colon cancer, including CEA, CA-19-9, TPS, TAG-72 and lysosomal hydrolases, have been identified and are now being adopted in routine clinical practice. Increased values of these markers are often the first signal of recurrence or metastases, which is useful in prediction and prognosis of clinical outcome of patients with CRC. Determination of the activity of lysosomal exoglycosidases in body fluids may bring some hope of improving diagnosis of colorectal cancer. However, it has to be remembered that currently the most effective diagnostic method of CRC is endoscopy. PMID:24876814

  6. Cancer survivors in Switzerland: a rapidly growing population to care for

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cancer survivors are a heterogeneous group with complex health problems. Data concerning its total number and growing dynamics for Switzerland are scarce and outdated. Methods Population and mortality data were retrieved from the Swiss Federal Statistical Office (FSO). Incidence and relative survival for invasive cancers were computed using data from the cancer registries Geneva (1970–2009), St. Gallen - Appenzell (1980–2010), Grisons & Glarus (1989–2010), and Valais (1989–2010). We estimated prevalence for 1990–2010 using the Prevalence, Incidence Approach MODel (PIAMOD) method. We calculated trends in prevalence estimates by Joinpoint analysis. Projections were extrapolated using the above models and based on time trends of the period 2007–2010. Results The estimated number of cancer survivors increased from 139′717 in 1990 (2.08% of the population) to 289′797 persons in 2010 (3.70%). The growth rate shows an exponential shape and was 3.3% per year in the period 2008 to 2010. Almost half of the survivors have a history of breast, prostate or colorectal cancer. Among cancer survivors, 55% are women but the increases have been more marked in men (p < 0.01, 3.9% annual increase in men vs. 2.7% in women since 2008). By the end of 2020 372′000 cancer survivors are expected to live in Switzerland. Conclusions There is a rapidly growing population of cancer survivors in Switzerland whose needs and concerns are largely unknown. PMID:23764068

  7. Cancer Survivors More Prone to Obesity, Study Finds

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_160399.html Cancer Survivors More Prone to Obesity, Study Finds Risk appears to be particularly high ... 12, 2016 FRIDAY, Aug. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Obesity is more common among cancer survivors in the ...

  8. Fertility treatment in male cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Kirsten Louise Tryde; Carlsen, Elisabeth; Andersen, Anders Nyboe

    2007-08-01

    The present study reviews the use of assisted reproductive technology in male cancer survivors and their partners. As antineoplastic treatment with chemotherapy or radiation therapy, has the potential of inducing impairment of spermatogenesis through damage of the germinal epithelium, many male cancer survivors experience difficulties in impregnating their partners after treatment. The impairment can be temporary or permanent. While many cancer survivors regain spermatogenesis months to years after treatment, some become infertile with a-, oligo- or azoospermia. An option to secure the fertility potential of young cancer patients is to cryopreserve semen before cancer treatment for later use. A desired pregnancy may be obtained in couples where the husband has a history of cancer, using assisted reproductive technology with either fresh or cryopreserved/thawed semen. Successful outcomes have been obtained with intrauterine insemination (IUI) as well as in vitro fertilization (IVF) with or without the use of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). In conclusion, male cancer survivors and their partners who have failed to obtain a pregnancy naturally within a reasonable time frame after end of treatment should be referred to a fertility clinic. PMID:17573855

  9. Inflammatory networks underlying colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lasry, Audrey; Zinger, Adar; Ben-Neriah, Yinon

    2016-03-01

    Inflammation is emerging as one of the hallmarks of cancer, yet its role in most tumors remains unclear. Whereas a minority of solid tumors are associated with overt inflammation, long-term treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is remarkably effective in reducing cancer rate and death. This indicates that inflammation might have many as-yet-unrecognized facets, among which an indolent course might be far more prevalent than previously appreciated. In this Review, we explore the various inflammatory processes underlying the development and progression of colorectal cancer and discuss anti-inflammatory means for its prevention and treatment.

  10. Current concepts in colorectal cancer prevention

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Patricia A; Gerner, Eugene W

    2009-01-01

    Colorectal cancer chemoprevention, or chemoprophylaxis, is a drug-based approach to prevent colorectal cancer. Preventing colorectal adenomas with currently available agents demonstrates the promise of pharmacologic strategies directed at critical regulatory pathways. However, agent toxicity, lesion breakthrough and competing efficacy from endoscopy procedures challenge population-based implementation. This article reviews the role of colorectal cancer chemoprevention in the context of existing screening and surveillance guidelines and practice. Emphasis is placed on the role of the colorectal adenoma as a cancer precursor and its surrogacy in assessing individual risk and for evaluating chemoprevention efficacy. We discuss the importance of risk stratification for identifying subjects at moderate-to-high risk for colorectal cancer who are most likely to benefit from chemoprevention at an acceptable level of risk. PMID:19673624

  11. Colorectal cancer in Jordan: prevention and care.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Muayyad M; Dardas, Latefa; Dardas, Lubna; Ahmad, Huthaifa

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the knowledge, attitudes, and practices toward colorectal cancer prevention and care in Jordan. A survey was designed to produce reliable estimates for the population's knowledge, attitudes, and practices in all 12 governorates of Jordan by using stratified random sampling. A representative sample of the adult population in Jordan completed a comprehensive tool which explored participants' knowledge about the risk factors associated with colorectal cancer, cancer prevention through lifestyle changes, and early cancer diagnosis and screening. According to the participants (n = 3196), colorectal cancer had the second highest percentage of screening recommendation (12.6%) after breast cancer (57.3%). Only 340 individuals (11%) reported ever screening for cancer. About 20% of the participants had heard of one of the screening tests for colorectal cancer. In fact, only 290 (9.1%) participants had performed the colorectal cancer screening tests. This study provides data that will help colorectal cancer prevention and treatment programs and may enhance the efficiency of colorectal cancer-controlling programs. The findings confirm the necessity of starting colorectal screening intervention that targets the most vulnerable individuals.

  12. Estrogen therapy in gynecological cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Guidozzi, F

    2013-12-01

    Treatment of gynecological cancer has significant impact on a woman's quality of life because it commonly includes removal of the uterus and ovaries, both being the core of a woman's femininity, whilst irradiation and chemotherapy, be they as primary therapy or when indicated as postoperative adjuvant therapy, will lead to ablation of ovarian function if the ovaries had not been removed. This will lead to an acute onset of menopausal symptoms, which may be more debilitating than those occurring as a result of natural aging, and of which hot flushes, night sweats, insomnia, mood swings, vaginal dryness, decreased libido, malaise and a general feeling of apathy are the most common. About 25% of gynecological cancers will occur in pre- and perimenopausal women, a large percentage of whom will become menopausal as a result of their treatment. There are also the gynecological cancer survivors who are not rendered menopausal as a result of the treatment strategy but who will become menopausal because of natural aging. Concern among the medical attendants of these women is whether use of estrogen therapy or estrogen and progestogens for their menopausal symptoms will reactivate tumor deposits and therefore increase the rate of recurrence and, as a result, decrease overall survival among these women. Yet the data that are available do not support this concern. There are eight retrospective studies and only one randomized study that have analyzed outcome in endometrial cancer survivors who used hormone therapy after their surgery, whilst, among ovarian cancer survivors, there are four retrospective studies and one randomized study. The studies do suffer from small numbers and, although the studies pertaining to endometrial cancer analyze mostly women with early-stage disease, a number of the studies in both the endometrial and ovarian cancer survivors do have a sizeable follow-up. These studies seem to support that estrogen therapy after the treatment for gynecological

  13. Genetic counseling of the cancer survivor

    SciTech Connect

    Mulvihill, J.J.; Byrne, J.

    1989-02-01

    Each year, tens of thousands of persons are diagnosed with cancer, are treated, and become survivors while still in their reproductive years. Their concerns about possible germ-cell damage as a result of life-saving radiation, chemotherapy, or both are plausible, based on evidence from animal models and from somatic cell mutations in human beings. A 40-year follow-up of survivors of the atomic bomb blasts in Japan showed no detectable genetic damage and suggested that the human gonad is more resistant to radiogenic mutation than the laboratory mouse. The pooled results of studying 12 series of offspring of cancer patients showed a 4% rate of major birth defects (similar to that of the general population) and an excess of fetal loss and low birth weight in offspring of women who received abdominal radiotherapy. According to preliminary evaluation of a new National Cancer Institute collaboration with five cancer registries, offspring of survivors of childhood cancers had no more birth defects than expected and, beyond an increase in probably familial cancers in children younger than 5, no overall increase in childhood cancer. Ideally, genetic and reproductive counseling should take place as soon as cancer is diagnosed (before therapy starts) and again when pregnancy is contemplated. 28 references.

  14. Physicians' Decision-making Style and Psychosocial Outcomes Among Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Neeraj K.; Weaver, Kathryn E.; Clayman, Marla L.; Oakley-Girvan, Ingrid; Potosky, Arnold L.

    2009-01-01

    Objective We evaluated pathways linking physicians' decision-making style with cancer survivors' health-related quality of life (HRQOL) Methods We analyzed survey data from 623 survivors diagnosed with leukemia, colorectal, or bladder cancer in Northern California, 2–5 years prior to the study. Of these, 395 reported making a medical decision in the past 12 months and were asked about their physician's decision-making style. We evaluated the association of physician style with proximal communication outcomes (trust, participation self-efficacy), intermediate cognitive outcomes (perceived control, uncertainty), and distal health outcomes (physical and mental HRQOL). Results Overall, 54% of survivors reported a sub-optimal decision-making style for their physician. With the exception of physical health, physician style was associated with all proximal, intermediate, and distal outcomes (p≤0.01). We identified two significant pathways by which a participatory physician style may be associated with survivors' mental health: 1) by increasing survivors' participation self-efficacy and thereby enhancing their perceptions of personal control (p<0.01); 2) by enhancing survivors' level of trust and thereby reducing their perceptions of uncertainty (p<0.05). Conclusion A participatory physician style may improve survivors' mental health by a complex two step mechanism of improving survivors' proximal communication and intermediate cognitive outcomes. Practice Implications Physicians who adopt a participatory decision-making style are likely to facilitate patient empowerment and enhance patients' HRQOL. PMID:19892508

  15. Red Meat and Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in men and the second in women worldwide. More than half of cases occur in more developed countries. The consumption of red meat (beef, pork, lamb, veal, mutton) is high in developed countries and accumulated evidence until today demonstrated a convincing association between the intake of red meat and especially processed meat and CRC risk. In this review, meta-analyses of prospective epidemiological studies addressed to this association, observed link of some subtypes of red meat with CRC risk, potential carcinogenic compounds, their mechanisms and actual recommendations of international guidelines are presented. PMID:26779313

  16. Molecular Diagnostic Applications in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huth, Laura; Jäkel, Jörg; Dahl, Edgar

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer, a clinically diverse disease, is a leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Application of novel molecular diagnostic tests, which are summarized in this article, may lead to an improved survival of colorectal cancer patients. Distinction of these applications is based on the different molecular principles found in colorectal cancer (CRC). Strategies for molecular analysis of single genes (as KRAS or TP53) as well as microarray based techniques are discussed. Moreover, in addition to the fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) and colonoscopy some novel assays offer approaches for early detection of colorectal cancer like the multitarget stool DNA test or the blood-based Septin 9 DNA methylation test. Liquid biopsy analysis may also exhibit great diagnostic potential in CRC for monitoring developing resistance to treatment. These new diagnostic tools and the definition of molecular biomarkers in CRC will improve early detection and targeted therapy of colorectal cancer.

  17. Cancer survivor identity shared in a social media intervention.

    PubMed

    Song, Hayeon; Nam, Yujung; Gould, Jessica; Sanders, W Scott; McLaughlin, Margaret; Fulk, Janet; Meeske, Kathleen A; Ruccione, Kathleen S

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates how cancer survivors construct their identities and the impact on their psychological health, as measured by depression and survivor self-efficacy. Fourteen young adult survivors of pediatric cancer participated in a customized social networking and video blog intervention program, the LIFECommunity, over a 6-month period. Survivors were asked to share their stories on various topics by posting video messages. Those video blog postings, along with survey data collected from participants, were analyzed to see how cancer survivors expressed their identities, and how these identities are associated with survivors' psychosocial outcomes. In survivors who held negative stereotypes about cancer survivors, there was a positive relationship with depression while positive stereotypes had a marginal association with cancer survivor efficacy. Findings indicate that although pediatric cancer survivors often do not publicly discuss a "cancer survivor identity," they do internalize both positive and negative stereotypes about cancer survivorship. It is important for practitioners to be aware of the long-term implications of cancer survivor identity and stereotypes.

  18. Tailored Telephone Counseling Increases Colorectal Cancer Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawl, Susan M.; Christy, Shannon M.; Monahan, Patrick O.; Ding, Yan; Krier, Connie; Champion, Victoria L.; Rex, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of two interventions to promote colorectal cancer screening participation and forward stage movement of colorectal cancer screening adoption among first-degree relatives of individuals diagnosed with adenomatous polyps. One hundred fifty-eight first-degree relatives of individuals diagnosed with adenomatous polyps were…

  19. Cancer Survivors in the United States: A Review of the Literature and a Call to Action

    PubMed Central

    Valdivieso, Manuel; Kujawa, Ann M.; Jones, Tisha; Baker, Laurence H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The number of cancer survivors in the U.S. has increased from 3 million in 1971, when the National Cancer Act was enacted, to over 12 million today. Over 70% of children affected by cancer survive more than 10 years, and most are cured. Most cancer survivors are adults, with two-thirds of them 65 years of age or older and two-thirds alive at five years. The most common cancer diagnoses among survivors include breast, prostate and colorectal cancers. This review was conducted to better appreciate the challenges associated with cancer survivors and the opportunities healthcare providers have in making a difference for these patients. Methods: Comprehensive review of literature based on PubMed searches on topics related to cancer survivorship, and associated physical, cognitive, socio-economic, sexual/behavioral and legal issues. Results: At least 50% of cancer survivors suffer from late treatment-related side effects, often including physical, psychosocial, cognitive and sexual abnormalities, as well as concerns regarding recurrence and/or the development of new malignancies. Many are chronic in nature and some are severe and even life-threatening. Survivors also face issues involving lack of appropriate health maintenance counseling, increased unemployment rate and workplace discrimination. Conclusions: Advances in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer will lead to more survivors and better quality of life. However, tools to recognize potentially serious long-lasting side effects of cancer therapy earlier in order to treat and/or prevent them must be developed. It is incumbent upon our health care delivery systems to make meeting these patients' needs a priority. PMID:22275855

  20. Reduced male fertility in childhood cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun Hee; Shin, Choong Ho

    2013-12-01

    With advances in cancer treatment, more pediatric cancer patients have increased their life expectancy. Because cancer-related therapy causes various physical and psychological problems, many male survivors experience later problems with thyroid and sexual functions, and with growth. As outcomes have improved, more survivors need to maintain their reproductive function to maximize their long-term quality of life. Cancer and cancer-related treatment can impair fertility by damage to the testes, to the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, or to the genitourinary organs. Prior radiation therapy to the testes, the use of alkylating agents, and central hypogonadism further impair fertility in male survivors of childhood cancer. Following any course of chemotherapy, peripubertal maturation, any testicular volume changes, and symptoms of androgen deficiency should be monitored systematically. If patients request fertility testing, spermatogenesis status can be evaluated either directly by semen analysis or indirectly by determination of the levels of testosterone/gonadotropins and by monitoring any changes in testicular volume. According to the patient's condition, semen cryopreservation, hormonal therapy, or assisted reproduction technologies should be provided.

  1. Evolving management of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    van Zijp, Jochem van der Voort; Hoekstra, Harald J; Basson, Marc D

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews recent advances in surgical techniques and adjuvant therapies for colorectal cancer, including total mesorectal excision, the resection of liver and lung metastasis and advances in chemoradiation and foreshadows some interventions that may lie just beyond the frontier. In particular, little is known about the intracellular and extracellular cascades that may influence colorectal cancer cell adhesion and metastasis. Although the phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinases and focal adhesion associated proteins in response to integrin-mediated cell matrix binding (”outside in integrin signaling”) is well described, the stimulation of cell adhesion by intracellular signals activated by pressure prior to adhesion represents a different signal paradigm. However, several studies have suggested that increased pressure and shear stress activate cancer cell adhesion. Further studies of the pathways that regulate integrin-driven cancer cell adhesion may identify ways to disrupt these signals or block integrin-mediated adhesion so that adhesion and eventual metastasis can be prevented in the future. PMID:18609678

  2. New registry: National Cancer Patient Registry--Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wendy, L; Radzi, M

    2008-09-01

    Colorectal cancer is emerging as one of the commonest cancers in Malaysia. Data on colorectal cancer from the National Cancer Registry is very limited. Comprehensive information on all aspects of colorectal cancer, including demographic details, pathology and treatment outcome are needed as the management of colorectal cancer has evolved rapidly over the years involving several disciplines including gastroenterology, surgery, radiology, pathology and oncology. This registry will be an important source of information that can help the development of guidelines to improve colorectal cancer care relevant to this country. The database will initially recruit all colorectal cancer cases from eight hospitals. The data will be stored on a customized web-based case report form. The database has begun collecting data from 1 October 2007 and will report on its first year findings at the end of 2008. PMID:19230248

  3. New registry: National Cancer Patient Registry--Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wendy, L; Radzi, M

    2008-09-01

    Colorectal cancer is emerging as one of the commonest cancers in Malaysia. Data on colorectal cancer from the National Cancer Registry is very limited. Comprehensive information on all aspects of colorectal cancer, including demographic details, pathology and treatment outcome are needed as the management of colorectal cancer has evolved rapidly over the years involving several disciplines including gastroenterology, surgery, radiology, pathology and oncology. This registry will be an important source of information that can help the development of guidelines to improve colorectal cancer care relevant to this country. The database will initially recruit all colorectal cancer cases from eight hospitals. The data will be stored on a customized web-based case report form. The database has begun collecting data from 1 October 2007 and will report on its first year findings at the end of 2008.

  4. What Breast Cancer Survivors Need to Know about Osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... browser. Home Osteoporosis Osteoporosis and Other Conditions What Breast Cancer Survivors Need to Know About Osteoporosis Publication available ... Print-Friendly Page April 2016 The Impact of Breast Cancer Other than skin cancer, breast cancer is the ...

  5. Update on Hereditary Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    DA Silva, Felipe Carneiro; Wernhoff, Patrik; Dominguez-Barrera, Constantino; Dominguez-Valentin, Mev

    2016-09-01

    In the past two decades, significant advances have been made in our understanding of colorectal (CRC) tumors with DNA mismatch (MMR) repair deficiency. The knowledge from molecular and genetic alterations in a variety of clinical conditions has refined the disease terminology and classification. Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) encompasses a spectrum of conditions that have significant phenotypic overlapping that makes clinical diagnosis a challenging task. Distinguishing among the HNPCC disorders is clinically important, as the approach to surveillance for patients and their at-risk family members differs according to risks for colonic and extracolonic cancer associated with each syndrome. Prospective and next-generation studies will provide valuable clinical information regarding the natural history of disease that will help differentiate the Lynch syndrome mimics and guide diagnosis and management for heterogeneous conditions currently grouped under the category of familial CRC. The review is intended to present and discuss the molecular nature of various conditions related to MMR deficiency and discusses the tools and strategies that have been used in detecting these conditions. PMID:27630275

  6. Genetic architecture of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Peters, Ulrike; Bien, Stephanie; Zubair, Niha

    2015-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a complex disease that develops as a consequence of both genetic and environmental risk factors. A small proportion (3-5%) of cases arise from hereditary syndromes predisposing to early onset CRC as a result of mutations in over a dozen well defined genes. In contrast, CRC is predominantly a late onset 'sporadic' disease, developing in individuals with no obvious hereditary syndrome. In recent years, genome wide association studies have discovered that over 40 genetic regions are associated with weak effects on sporadic CRC, and it has been estimated that increasingly large genome wide scans will identify many additional novel genetic regions. Subsequent experimental validations have identified the causally related variant(s) in a limited number of these genetic regions. Further biological insight could be obtained through ethnically diverse study populations, larger genetic sequencing studies and development of higher throughput functional experiments. Along with inherited variation, integration of the tumour genome may shed light on the carcinogenic processes in CRC. In addition to summarising the genetic architecture of CRC, this review discusses genetic factors that modify environmental predictors of CRC, as well as examples of how genetic insight has improved clinical surveillance, prevention and treatment strategies. In summary, substantial progress has been made in uncovering the genetic architecture of CRC, and continued research efforts are expected to identify additional genetic risk factors that further our biological understanding of this disease. Subsequently these new insights will lead to improved treatment and prevention of colorectal cancer. PMID:26187503

  7. Survivor Centrality Among Breast Cancer Survivors: Implications for Well-Being

    PubMed Central

    Helgeson, Vicki S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective The goal of this research was to examine the extent to which 10-year breast cancer survivors integrated cancer into their self-concept (i.e., survivor centrality), identify predictors of survivor centrality, and determine the relation of survivor centrality to well-being. Methods Breast cancer survivors (n = 240) were interviewed 10 years following the initial diagnosis. They completed measures of survivor centrality, illness valence (i.e., positive or negative views of illness), and well-being (positive and negative affect, mental and physical functioning, psychological distress, benefit-finding). Results There were few predictors of the kinds of women who were more likely to integrate breast cancer into their self-concepts, but survivor centrality was related to engaging in behaviors that suggested survivorship was relevant to women’s daily lives, such as becoming involved in breast cancer activities. Survivor centrality was related to three markers of negative psychological well-being: more negative affect, poorer mental functioning, and greater psychological distress. However, in the case of negative affect and psychological distress, this relation was moderated by illness valence, such that survivor centrality was only related to negative psychological well-being when the illness was viewed in less positive terms. Conclusions Women vary in the extent to which they define themselves in terms of the breast cancer experience. Survivor centrality in and of itself is not always indicative of adjustment to disease. When women have a more negative view of being a breast cancer survivor, survivor centrality is more likely to signify potential problems. PMID:20878844

  8. Targeted nanoparticles for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Cisterna, Bruno A; Kamaly, Nazila; Choi, Won Il; Tavakkoli, Ali; Farokhzad, Omid C; Vilos, Cristian

    2016-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is highly prevalent worldwide, and despite notable progress in treatment still leads to significant morbidity and mortality. The use of nanoparticles as a drug delivery system has become one of the most promising strategies for cancer therapy. Targeted nanoparticles could take advantage of differentially expressed molecules on the surface of tumor cells, providing effective release of cytotoxic drugs. Several efforts have recently reported the use of diverse molecules as ligands on the surface of nanoparticles to interact with the tumor cells, enabling the effective delivery of antitumor agents. Here, we present recent advances in targeted nanoparticles against CRC and discuss the promising use of ligands and cellular targets in potential strategies for the treatment of CRCs. PMID:27529192

  9. One-Year Experience Managing a Cancer Survivorship Clinic Using a Shared-Care Model for Gastric Cancer Survivors in Korea

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Given the rapid growth of the population of cancer survivors, increased attention has been paid to their health problems. Although gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers, empirical evidence of survivorship care is limited. The objectives of this study were to describe the health care status of gastric cancer survivors and to report the experience of using the shared-care model during a one-year experience at the cancer survivorship clinic in Seoul National University Hospital. This is a descriptive, single-center study of 250 long-term gastric cancer survivors who were referred to the survivorship clinic. The status of their health behaviors, comorbid conditions, secondary cancer screenings, and survivorship care status were investigated through questionnaires and examining the medical records. Among the survivors, 7.2% were current smokers, 8.8% were at-risk drinkers, and 32.4% were physically inactive. Among the patients who did not know their bone density status, the majority were in the osteopenic (37.1%) or osteoporotic range (24.1%). Screening among the eligible population within the recommended time intervals were 76.3% for colorectal cancer, but only 13.6% for lung cancer. All of the survivors were provided with counseling and medical management at the survivorship clinic, as appropriate. In conclusion, Long-term gastric cancer survivors have various unmet needs. Shared-care through survivorship clinics can be an effective solution for providing comprehensive care to cancer survivors. PMID:27247493

  10. One-Year Experience Managing a Cancer Survivorship Clinic Using a Shared-Care Model for Gastric Cancer Survivors in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Eun; Shin, Dong Wook; Lee, Hyejin; Son, Ki Young; Kim, Warrick Junsuk; Suh, Yun-Suhk; Kong, Seong-Ho; Lee, Hyuk Joon; Cho, Belong; Yang, Han-Kwang

    2016-06-01

    Given the rapid growth of the population of cancer survivors, increased attention has been paid to their health problems. Although gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers, empirical evidence of survivorship care is limited. The objectives of this study were to describe the health care status of gastric cancer survivors and to report the experience of using the shared-care model during a one-year experience at the cancer survivorship clinic in Seoul National University Hospital. This is a descriptive, single-center study of 250 long-term gastric cancer survivors who were referred to the survivorship clinic. The status of their health behaviors, comorbid conditions, secondary cancer screenings, and survivorship care status were investigated through questionnaires and examining the medical records. Among the survivors, 7.2% were current smokers, 8.8% were at-risk drinkers, and 32.4% were physically inactive. Among the patients who did not know their bone density status, the majority were in the osteopenic (37.1%) or osteoporotic range (24.1%). Screening among the eligible population within the recommended time intervals were 76.3% for colorectal cancer, but only 13.6% for lung cancer. All of the survivors were provided with counseling and medical management at the survivorship clinic, as appropriate. In conclusion, Long-term gastric cancer survivors have various unmet needs. Shared-care through survivorship clinics can be an effective solution for providing comprehensive care to cancer survivors.

  11. Bone density in survivors of childhood cancer.

    PubMed

    Mulder, Jean E; Bilezikian, John P

    2004-01-01

    Advances in combination chemotherapy, radiation therapy, surgery, and bone marrow transplantation have resulted in markedly improved survival rates for many children with cancer. Advancements in therapy, however, have led to new concerns, namely long-term consequences of effective treatments. Young adult and adult survivors of childhood cancer are at risk for a number of disorders related to therapy. Specifically, the young adult who has survived cancer, attendant treatments, and their complications is at risk for factors that can lead to suboptimal acquisition of peak bone mass. These factors include chronic illness, nutritional deficiencies, limited physical activity, and treatment with glucocorticoids, multiagent chemotherapy, and radiation. The long-term adverse effects of these therapies on endocrine systems, especially sex steroid and growth hormone deficiencies, are additional risk factors for some patients. After a brief review of the processes associated with acquisition of peak bone mass in the young adult, this article examines the impact of cancer and cancer therapy on bone mineral density in survivors of childhood cancer.

  12. Dependence receptors and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Mehlen, Patrick; Tauszig-Delamasure, Servane

    2014-11-01

    The research on colorectal cancer (CRC) biology has been leading the oncology field since the early 1990s. The search for genetic alterations has allowed the identification of the main tumour suppressors or oncogenes. Recent work obtained in CRC has unexpectedly proposed the existence of novel category of tumour suppressors, the so-called 'dependence receptors'. These transmembrane receptors behave as Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde with two opposite sides: they induce a positive signalling (survival, proliferation, differentiation) in presence of their ligand, but are not inactive in the absence of their ligand and rather trigger apoptosis when unbound. This trait confers them a conditional tumour suppressor activity: they eliminate cells that grow abnormally in an environment offering a limited quantity of ligand. This review will describe how receptors such as deleted in colorectal carcinoma (DCC), uncoordinated 5 (UNC5), rearranged during transfection (RET) or TrkC constrain CRC progression and how this dependence receptor paradigm may open up therapeutical perspectives. PMID:25163468

  13. Sexual and reproductive health in cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Goldfarb, Shari; Mulhall, John; Nelson, Christian; Kelvin, Joanne; Dickler, Maura; Carter, Jeanne

    2013-12-01

    As patients live longer after cancer diagnosis and treatment, attention to symptoms and quality of life (QoL) are of increasing importance both during treatment and throughout survivorship. Two complications of multi-modal cancer treatment that can profoundly affect both men and women are sexual dysfunction and infertility. Survivors at highest risk for treatment-related sexual dysfunction are those with tumors that involve the sexual or pelvic organs and those whose treatment affects the hormonal systems mediating sexual function. Sexual dysfunction may not abate without appropriate intervention. Therefore, early identification and treatment strategies are essential. Likewise, multiple factors contribute to the risk of infertility from cancer treatment and many cancer patients of reproductive age would prefer to maintain their fertility, if possible. Fortunately, advances in reproductive technology have created options for young newly diagnosed patients to preserve their ability to have a biologic child. This paper will focus on the sexual and reproductive problems encountered by cancer survivors and discuss some treatment options.

  14. Tests to Detect Colorectal Cancer and Polyps

    MedlinePlus

    ... be acceptable screening tests for colorectal cancer: High-sensitivity fecal occult blood tests (FOBT). Both polyps and ... higher than that of gFOBT or FIT. Test sensitivity for adenomas is low. False-positive test results ...

  15. TAS-102 for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of results from an international phase III trial that compared TAS-102 with placebo in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer whose disease progressed following prior treatments or who had health conditions that prevented the re-administrati

  16. Diet, microbiota, and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Akin, Hakan; Tözün, Nurdan

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in the world causing nearly 500,000 deaths every year. In addition to genetic background, environmental factors including diet and lifestyle are accepted as major contributors to adenoma and CRC development. Lifestyle factors include high BMI, obesity, and reduced physical activity. Growing interest and accumulating data on human microbiota implicate that host-microbe interplay has an important role in the development of metabolic, neoplastic, and inflammatory diseases. Findings from recent studies suggest that colon cancer risk is determined by the interaction between diet and gut microbiota. Dietary changes affect gut microbiota and conversely microbiota mediates the generation of dietary factors triggering colon cancer. Identification of the microbial communities associated with carcinogenesis is of crucial importance. Nowadays, with the evolvement of culture-independent molecular techniques, it has become possible to identify main bacterial species in healthy individuals, inflammatory conditions, and CRC. Some recent studies have shown the differences in intestinal microbiota between colon cancer patients and healthy individuals. Animal studies have provided a better understanding of interaction between pathobionts and symbionts in the development of colon cancer. There is no single causative organism identified in CRC; however, there is strong evidence that reduction of protective bacteria, increase in some bacteria (ie, fusobacterium members; Bacteroides/Prevotella), and age-related changes in microbiota have an impact on adenoma or cancer development. Future studies will enable us to understand procarcinogenic and anticarcinogenic mechanisms and give insights to rational manipulation of the microbiota with prebiotics, probiotics, or dietary modifications. PMID:25291132

  17. The stability of colorectal cancer mathematical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khairudin, Nur Izzati; Abdullah, Farah Aini

    2013-04-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common types of cancer. To better understand about the kinetics of cancer growth, mathematical models are used to provide insight into the progression of this natural process which enables physicians and oncologists to determine optimal radiation and chemotherapy schedules and develop a prognosis, both of which are indispensable for treating cancer. This thesis investigates the stability of colorectal cancer mathematical models. We found that continuous saturating feedback is the best available model of colorectal cancer growth. We also performed stability analysis. The result shows that cancer progress in sequence of genetic mutations or epigenetic which lead to a very large number of cells population until become unbounded. The cell population growth initiate and its saturating feedback is overcome when mutation changes causing the net per-capita growth rate of stem or transit cells exceed critical threshold.

  18. Abdominal metastases from colorectal cancer: intraperitoneal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Guend, Hamza; Patel, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    Patients with peritoneal metastasis from colorectal cancer represent a distinct subset with regional disease rather than systemic disease. They often have poorer survival outcomes with systemic chemotherapy. Optimal cytoreductive surgery and intraperitoneal chemotherapy (IPC) offers such patients a more directed therapy with improved survival. In this review, we discuss the diagnosis, evaluation and classification, as well as rational for treatment of peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC) secondary to colorectal cancer. PMID:26697203

  19. Older breast cancer survivors' views and preferences for physical activity.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Sarah; Lavelle, Katrina

    2009-07-01

    Evidence suggests that physical activity improves quality of life and physical functioning among breast cancer patients and survivors. However, previous studies have tended to focus on younger patients, despite higher incidence and lower survival among older breast cancer survivors. In this study we explored physical activity preferences of older breast cancer survivors to inform the development of future targeted interventions. Twenty-nine female breast cancer survivors (1 to 5 years postdiagnosis) aged 59 to 86 (mean 66.54, SD 6.50) took part in either a semistructured interview or a focus group exploring physical activity patterns, motivators, facilitators, barriers, and preferences. The main factors influencing physical activity were body image, weight issues, vitality, mood, and the desire to carry on as normal. Preference was expressed for activities that were gentle, tailored to age and cancer-related abilities, holistic, involving other older breast cancer survivors, and with an instructor who was knowledgeable about both breast cancer and aging.

  20. Industrial risk factors for colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lashner, B.A.; Epstein, S.S. )

    1990-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second most common malignancy in the United States, and its incidence rates have sharply increased recently, especially in males. Industrial exposures, both occupational and environmental, are important colorectal cancer risk factors that are generally unrecognized by clinicians. Migration studies have documented that colorectal cancer is strongly associated with environmental risk factors. The causal role of occupational exposures is evidenced by a substantial literature associating specific work practices with increased colorectal cancer risks. Industrially related environmental exposures, including polluted drinking water and ionizing radiation, have also been associated with excess risks. Currently, there is a tendency to attribute colorectal cancer, largely or exclusively, to dietary and other lifestyle factors, thus neglecting these industrially related effects. Concerted efforts are needed to recognize the causal role of industrial risk factors and to encourage government and industry to reduce carcinogenic exposures. Furthermore, cost-effective screening programs for high-risk population groups are critically needed to further reduce deaths from colorectal cancer. 143 references.

  1. Second Neoplasms in Survivors of Childhood Cancer: Findings From the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Meadows, Anna T.; Friedman, Debra L.; Neglia, Joseph P.; Mertens, Ann C.; Donaldson, Sarah S.; Stovall, Marilyn; Hammond, Sue; Yasui, Yutaka; Inskip, Peter D.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To review the reports of subsequent neoplasms (SNs) in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS) cohort that were made through January 1, 2006, and published before July 31, 2008, and to discuss the host-, disease-, and therapy-related risk factors associated with SNs. Patients and Methods SNs were ascertained by survivor self-reports and subsequently confirmed by pathology findings or medical record review. Cumulative incidence of SNs and standardized incidence ratios for second malignant neoplasms (SMNs) were calculated. The impact of host-, disease-, and therapy-related risk factors was evaluated by Poisson regression. Results Among 14,358 cohort members, 730 reported 802 SMNs (excluding nonmelanoma skin cancers). This represents a 2.3-fold increase in the number of SMNs over that reported in the first comprehensive analysis of SMNs in the CCSS cohort, which was done 7 years ago. In addition, 66 cases of meningioma and 1,007 cases of nonmelanoma skin cancer were diagnosed. The 30-year cumulative incidence of SMNs was 9.3% and that of nonmelanoma skin cancer was 6.9%. Risk of SNs remains elevated for more than 20 years of follow-up for all primary childhood cancer diagnoses. In multivariate analyses, risks differ by SN subtype, but include radiotherapy, age at diagnosis, sex, family history of cancer, and primary childhood cancer diagnosis. Female survivors whose primary childhood cancer diagnosis was Hodgkin's lymphoma or sarcoma and who received radiotherapy are at particularly increased risk. Analyses of risk associated with radiotherapy demonstrated different dose-response curves for specific SNs. Conclusion Childhood cancer survivors are at a substantial and increasing risk for SNs, including nonmelanoma skin cancer and meningiomas. Health care professionals should understand the magnitude of these risks to provide individuals with appropriate counseling and follow-up. PMID:19255307

  2. Precancerous Lesions in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sandouk, Fayez; Al Jerf, Feras; Al-Halabi, M. H. D. Bassel

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cause of cancer death in the world. The incidence rate (ASR) and age distribution of this disease differ between most of African-Middle-Eastern (AMAGE) and North America and Europe for many reasons. However, in all areas, “CRC” is considered as one of the most preventable cancers, because it might develop from variant processes like polyps and IBD in addition to the genetic pathogenesis which became very well known in this disease. We tried in this paper to review all the possible reasons of the differences in incidence and age between the west and AMAGE. Also we reviewed all the mutations that lead to the hereditary and familiar clustering of this disease with the correlations with the surrounding food and environment of different areas. Then, we focused on the precancerous pathology of this disease with special focusing on early detection depending on new endoscopy technology and most important genetic studies. We lastly reviewed the evidence of some of the surveillance and put suggestions about future surveillance programs and how important those programs are on the psychological aspect of the patients and their families. PMID:23737765

  3. Nutritional status assessment in colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Joana Pedro; de Castro Cardoso Pereira, Paula Manuela; dos Reis Baltazar Vicente, Ana Filipa; Bernardo, Alexandra; de Mesquita, María Fernanda

    2013-01-01

    The present study intended to evaluate the nutritional status of Portuguese colorectal patients and associated it with surgery type as well as quality of life outcomes. Malnutrition can affect up to 85% of cancer patients and specifically 30-60% in colorectal cancer and can significantly influence health outcomes. A sample of 50 colorectal cancer patients was evaluated in what refers to several anthropometric measures, food intake, clinical history, complications rate before and after surgery procedure. The sample was divided between convention and fast-track procedures. Most of the individuals were overweight or obese but had lost weight on the past six months. Despite mild, there were signs of malnutrition in this sample with high losses of fat free mass, weight and also fat mass during the hospitalization period. These results reinforce the importance of malnutrition assessment in colorectal patients as well as consider weight loss on the past months and body composition in order to complement nutritional status evaluation.

  4. Genetics of Colorectal Cancer (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the genetics of colorectal cancer, including information about specific genes and family cancer syndromes. The summary also contains information about screening for colorectal cancer and research aimed at prevention of this disease. Psychosocial issues associated with genetic testing and counseling of individuals who may have hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome are also discussed.

  5. Depression in older breast cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among U.S. women .The 5-year survival rate for this tumour is nowadays 85%, and the 61% of these women are still alive at 15 years. When depression symptoms are present as a consequence of breast cancer treatments, they may interfere negatively with patients’ quality of life. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of breast cancer treatment on the quality of life and the impact of depression on the health-related life. Methods We enrolled 173 women aged 65-75 years with early stage breast cancer diagnosed over the last 10 years, initially recruited to participate in a study examining heath-related quality of life in the first 5 years after breast cancer diagnosis. Participants were divided into four groups: 1) 46 breast cancer survivors (aged 65-70); 2) 62 women diagnosed with breast cancer (aged 65-69); 3) 32 women with recurrent breast cancer after 10 years (aged 66-75); 4) 30 women in good health status (aged 60-70). The Geriatric Depression Scale was used as a routine part of a comprehensive geriatric assessment. Collection of data for the application of instruments, such as sociodemographic variables (age, educational level, social state) and clinical date (stage and time of the disease and treatment), was carried out by trained researcher assistants. Results Our results demonstrated the correlation between depression and previous cancer experiences. In fact, in patients with cancer experience, the grade of depression was significantly higher compared to healthy subjects. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the patients with recurrent breast cancer were severely depressed compared to other groups. Conclusions A high percentage of participants were identified as having emotional and/or well being problems. Further investigations on the cause of depression problems cancer-related are needed. PMID:23173836

  6. Fear of cancer recurrence in prostate cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    van de Wal, Marieke; van Oort, Inge; Schouten, Joost; Thewes, Belinda; Gielissen, Marieke; Prins, Judith

    2016-07-01

    Background High fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) is an understudied topic in prostate cancer (PCa) survivors. This study aimed to detect the prevalence, consequences and characteristics associated with high FCR in PCa survivors. Material and methods This cross-sectional study included patients diagnosed with localized PCa and treated with curative radical prostatectomy between 1992 and 2012. We administered the Cancer Worry Scale (CWS) to assess FCR severity (primary outcome measure). Secondary outcomes included distress, quality of life (QOL), post-traumatic symptoms, and multidimensional aspects of FCR. χ(2)-tests, t-tests and Pearson's correlations examined the relationship between FCR and medical/demographic characteristics. MANOVA analyses and χ2-tests identified differences between PCa survivors with high and low FCR. Results Two hundred eighty-three PCa survivors (median age of 70.0 years) completed the questionnaires a median time of 7.1 years after surgery. About a third (36%) of all PCa survivors experienced high FCR. High FCR was associated with lower QOL, more physical problems, higher distress and more post-traumatic stress symptoms. PCa survivors with high FCR reported disease-related triggers (especially medical examinations), felt helpless and experienced problems in social relationships. High FCR was associated with a younger age and having received adjuvant radiotherapy. Conclusions Results illustrate that FCR is a significant problem in PCa survivors. Younger men and those treated with adjuvant radiotherapy are especially at risk. Those with high FCR experience worse QOL and higher symptom burden. Health care providers should pay specific attention to this problem and provide appropriate psychosocial care when needed. PMID:26935517

  7. Impact of Preoperative Radiotherapy on General and Disease-Specific Health Status of Rectal Cancer Survivors: A Population-Based Study

    SciTech Connect

    Thong, Melissa S.Y.; Mols, Floortje; Lemmens, Valery E.P.P.; Rutten, Harm J.T.; Roukema, Jan A.; Martijn, Hendrik; Poll-Franse, Lonneke V. van de

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To date, few studies have evaluated the impact of preoperative radiotherapy (pRT) on long-term health status of rectal cancer survivors. Using a population-based sample, we assessed the impact of pRT on general and disease-specific health status of rectal cancer survivors up to 10 years postdiagnosis. The health status of older ({>=}75 years old at diagnosis) pRT survivors was also compared with that of younger survivors. Methods and Materials: Survivors identified from the Eindhoven Cancer Registry treated with surgery only (SU) or with pRT between 1998 and 2007 were included. Survivors completed the Short Form-36 (SF-36) health survey questionnaire and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Colorectal 38 (EORTC QLQ-CR38) questionnaire. The SF-36 and EORTC QLQ-CR38 (sexuality subscale) scores of the survivors were compared to an age- and sex-matched Dutch normal population. Results: A total of 340 survivors (response, 85%; pRT survivors, 71%) were analyzed. Overall, survivors had similar general health status. Both short-term (<5 years) and long-term ({>=}5 years) pRT survivors had significantly poorer body image and more problems with gastrointestinal function, male sexual dysfunction, and defecation than SU survivors. Survivors had comparable general health status but greater sexual dysfunction than the normal population. Older pRT survivors had general and disease-specific health status comparable to that of younger pRT survivors. Conclusions: For better survivorship care, rectal cancer survivors could benefit from increased clinical and psychological focus on the possible long-term morbidity of treatment and its effects on health status.

  8. Cancer incidence in Holocaust male survivors-An Israeli cohort study.

    PubMed

    Keinan-Boker, Lital; Goldbourt, Uri

    2016-12-01

    Previous studies, often using proxy exposure assessment and not controlling for individual risk factors, suggested higher cancer risk in Holocaust survivors. We have used individual-level data from a male cohort of Israeli civil servants recruited in 1963 to investigate cancer incidence in Holocaust survivors, controlling for potential confounders. The analysis included 4,669 Europe-born subjects; 689 exposed = E (immigrated to Israel after 1939 and reported of being in Nazi camps during World War II); 2,307 potentially exposed = PE (immigrated to Israel after 1939 and reported of not being in Nazi camps); and 1,673 non-exposed = NE (immigrated to Israel prior to 1939). Vital status and cancer incidence in the cohort were determined based on national registries. Socioeconomic level, health behaviors and cancer incidence were compared between the groups and Cox proportional hazards regression models adjusting for potential confounders assessed hazard risk ratios for cancer by exposure status. All-cause mortality was studied as a competing risk. In total, 241, 682, and 522 cancer cases were diagnosed in the E, PE, and NE, respectively. Compared with the NE, all-site cancer incidence was higher in the E (HR = 1.13, 95%CI 0.97-1.32) but not in the PE. All-cause mortality competed with all-site invasive cancer incidence in the E group (HR = 1.18, 95%CI 1.02-1.38). Colorectal and lung cancer seemed to be positively though non-significantly associated with the exposure while prostate cancer was not. Male Holocaust survivors may be at a weakly increased risk for all-site, colorectal and lung cancer. The role of age at exposure and residual confounding should be further investigated. PMID:27509441

  9. Intestinal Obstruction in Survivors of Childhood Cancer: A Report From the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

    PubMed Central

    Madenci, Arin L.; Fisher, Stacey; Diller, Lisa R.; Goldsby, Robert E.; Leisenring, Wendy M.; Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Robison, Leslie L.; Sklar, Charles A.; Stovall, Marilyn; Weathers, Rita E.; Armstrong, Gregory T.; Yasui, Yutaka; Weldon, Christopher B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose For adult survivors of childhood cancer, knowledge about the long-term risk of intestinal obstruction from surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy is limited. Methods Intestinal obstruction requiring surgery (IOS) occurring 5 or more years after cancer diagnosis was evaluated in 12,316 5-year survivors in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (2,002 with and 10,314 without abdominopelvic tumors) and 4,023 sibling participants. Cumulative incidence of IOS was calculated with second malignant neoplasm, late recurrence, and death as competing risks. Using piecewise exponential models, we assessed the associations of clinical and demographic factors with rate of IOS. Results Late IOS was reported by 165 survivors (median age at IOS, 19 years; range, 5 to 50 years; median time from diagnosis to IOS, 13 years) and 14 siblings. The cumulative incidence of late IOS at 35 years was 5.8% (95% CI, 4.4% to 7.3%) among survivors with abdominopelvic tumors, 1.0% (95% CI, 0.7% to 1.4%) among those without abdominopelvic tumors, and 0.3% (95% CI, 0.1% to 0.5%) among siblings. Among survivors, abdominopelvic tumor (adjusted rate ratio [ARR], 3.6; 95% CI, 1.9 to 6.8; P < .001) and abdominal/pelvic radiotherapy within 5 years of cancer diagnosis (ARR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.6 to 3.7; P < .001) increased the rate of late IOS, adjusting for diagnosis year; sex; race/ethnicity; age at diagnosis; age during follow-up (as natural cubic spline); cancer type; and chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and surgery within 5 years of cancer diagnosis. Developing late IOS increased subsequent mortality among survivors (ARR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.1 to 2.9; P = .016), adjusting for the same factors. Conclusion The long-term risk of IOS and its association with subsequent mortality underscore the need to promote awareness of this complication among patients and providers. PMID:26261256

  10. US cancer survivors grows to nearly 12 million

    Cancer.gov

    The number of cancer survivors in the United States increased to 11.7 million in 2007, according to a report released by NCI and CDC. There were 3 million cancer survivors in 1971 and 9.8 million in 2001.

  11. Epigenetics and Colorectal Cancer Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bardhan, Kankana; Liu, Kebin

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) develops through a multistage process that results from the progressive accumulation of genetic mutations, and frequently as a result of mutations in the Wnt signaling pathway. However, it has become evident over the past two decades that epigenetic alterations of the chromatin, particularly the chromatin components in the promoter regions of tumor suppressors and oncogenes, play key roles in CRC pathogenesis. Epigenetic regulation is organized at multiple levels, involving primarily DNA methylation and selective histone modifications in cancer cells. Assessment of the CRC epigenome has revealed that virtually all CRCs have aberrantly methylated genes and that the average CRC methylome has thousands of abnormally methylated genes. Although relatively less is known about the patterns of specific histone modifications in CRC, selective histone modifications and resultant chromatin conformation have been shown to act, in concert with DNA methylation, to regulate gene expression to mediate CRC pathogenesis. Moreover, it is now clear that not only DNA methylation but also histone modifications are reversible processes. The increased understanding of epigenetic regulation of gene expression in the context of CRC pathogenesis has led to development of epigenetic biomarkers for CRC diagnosis and epigenetic drugs for CRC therapy. PMID:24216997

  12. The Right Balance: Helping Cancer Survivors Achieve a Healthy Weight

    Cancer.gov

    An article about interventions that aim to help survivors maintain a healthy weight to reduce the risk of cancer recurrence and death and decrease the likelihood of chronic and late effects of cancer treatment.

  13. Caring for breast cancer survivors in primary care.

    PubMed

    Trotter, Kathryn; Stouder, April

    2016-10-01

    Women with a history of breast cancer compose the largest group of cancer survivors. Physician assistants and nurse practitioners can play a key role in caring for cancer survivors in primary care settings. This article provides a brief overview and synthesis of current breast cancer guidelines, other resources, and clinical observations that may help primary care providers to translate plans developed by oncology specialists into primary care delivery. PMID:27623290

  14. [Colorectal cancer (CCR): genetic and molecular alterations].

    PubMed

    Juárez-Vázquez, Clara Ibet; Rosales-Reynoso, Mónica Alejandra

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to present a genetic and molecular overview of colorectal carcinogenesis (sporadic and hereditary origin) as a multistage process, where there are a number of molecular mechanisms associated with the development of colorectal cancer and genomic instability that allows the accumulation of mutations in proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, chromosomal instability, and methylation and microsatellite instability, and the involvement of altered expression of microRNAs' prognosis factors.

  15. Tissue Specific Promoters in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rama, A. R.; Aguilera, A.; Melguizo, C.; Caba, O.; Prados, J.

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma is the third most prevalent cancer in the world. In the most advanced stages, the use of chemotherapy induces a poor response and is usually accompanied by other tissue damage. Significant progress based on suicide gene therapy has demonstrated that it may potentiate the classical cytotoxic effects in colorectal cancer. The inconvenience still rests with the targeting and the specificity efficiency. The main target of gene therapy is to achieve an effective vehicle to hand over therapeutic genes safely into specific cells. One possibility is the use of tumor-specific promoters overexpressed in cancers. They could induce a specific expression of therapeutic genes in a given tumor, increasing their localized activity. Several promoters have been assayed into direct suicide genes to cancer cells. This review discusses the current status of specific tumor-promoters and their great potential in colorectal carcinoma treatment. PMID:26648599

  16. Survivorship care plans for people with colorectal cancer: do they reflect the research evidence?

    PubMed Central

    D’Souza, V.; Daudt, H.; Kazanjian, A.

    2016-01-01

    Aim In the present study, we synthesized the published literature about the psychosocial aspects of colorectal cancer (crc) survivorship to support an update of the evidentiary base of the survivorship care plans (scps) created in our jurisdiction. Methods The psychosocial topics identified in the crc scps created by two different initiatives in our province were used as search criteria: quality of life (qol), sexual function, fatigue, and lifestyle behaviors. An umbrella review was conducted to retrieve the best possible evidence. Only reviews that investigated the intended outcomes in crc survivors and those with moderate-to-high methodologic quality scores were included. Results Of 462 retrieved reports, eight reviews met the inclusion criteria for the synthesis. Of those eight, six investigated the challenges of crc survivors and two investigated the effect of physical activity on survivor well-being. Our results indicate that emotional and physical challenges are common in crc survivors and that physical activity is associated with clinically important benefits for the fatigue and physical functioning of crc survivors. Conclusions Our study findings update the evidence and indicate that existing scps in our province concerning the physical and emotional challenges of crc survivors reflect the evidence at the time of their issue. However, the literature concerning cancer risks specific to crc survivors is lacking. Although systematic reviews are considered to be the “gold standard” in knowledge synthesis, our findings suggest that much remains to be done in the area of synthesis research to better guide practice in cancer survivorship. PMID:27803610

  17. Gut microbiota imbalance and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gagnière, Johan; Raisch, Jennifer; Veziant, Julie; Barnich, Nicolas; Bonnet, Richard; Buc, Emmanuel; Bringer, Marie-Agnès; Pezet, Denis; Bonnet, Mathilde

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota acts as a real organ. The symbiotic interactions between resident micro-organisms and the digestive tract highly contribute to maintain the gut homeostasis. However, alterations to the microbiome caused by environmental changes (e.g., infection, diet and/or lifestyle) can disturb this symbiotic relationship and promote disease, such as inflammatory bowel diseases and cancer. Colorectal cancer is a complex association of tumoral cells, non-neoplastic cells and a large amount of micro-organisms, and the involvement of the microbiota in colorectal carcinogenesis is becoming increasingly clear. Indeed, many changes in the bacterial composition of the gut microbiota have been reported in colorectal cancer, suggesting a major role of dysbiosis in colorectal carcinogenesis. Some bacterial species have been identified and suspected to play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis, such as Streptococcus bovis, Helicobacter pylori, Bacteroides fragilis, Enterococcus faecalis, Clostridium septicum, Fusobacterium spp. and Escherichia coli. The potential pro-carcinogenic effects of these bacteria are now better understood. In this review, we discuss the possible links between the bacterial microbiota and colorectal carcinogenesis, focusing on dysbiosis and the potential pro-carcinogenic properties of bacteria, such as genotoxicity and other virulence factors, inflammation, host defenses modulation, bacterial-derived metabolism, oxidative stress and anti-oxidative defenses modulation. We lastly describe how bacterial microbiota modifications could represent novel prognosis markers and/or targets for innovative therapeutic strategies. PMID:26811603

  18. Colorectal Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity

    MedlinePlus

    ... getting colorectal cancer, followed by white, Hispanic, Asian/Pacific Islander (A/PI), and American Indian/Alaska Native ( ... white, Hispanic, American Indian/Alaska Native, and Asian/Pacific Islander women. Sources: CDC’s National Program of Cancer ...

  19. Diagnostics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kolligs, Frank T

    2016-06-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related morbidity and mortality. Main risk factors include advanced age, family history, male sex, and lifestyle factors. Screening can reduce incidence and death from colorectal cancer. Therefore, prevention and early detection are crucial in order to detect and remove pre-neoplastic adenomas and to detect cancers at early stages. Colonoscopy, flexible sigmoidoscopy, and fecal occult blood tests are established tools for screening. Newer fecal immunochemical tests reveal higher sensitivities for advanced adenoma and cancer than guaiac-based hemoccult tests. Molecular stool and blood tests as well as virtual colonoscopy and colon capsule endoscopy are promising new developments so far not established as routine instruments for the prevention and early detection of colorectal cancer. Colonoscopy is the method of choice for the diagnosis of colorectal cancer and for adenoma removal. Prognosis is essentially dependent on the tumor stage at the time of the initial diagnosis. Proper staging based on imaging prior to therapy is a prerequisite. In rectal cancer, local staging is an essential requirement for the identification of appropriate candidates for neoadjuvant therapy. PMID:27493942

  20. Menopausal hormone therapy in cancer survivors: A narrative review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kuhle, Carol L; Kapoor, Ekta; Sood, Richa; Thielen, Jacqueline M; Jatoi, Aminah; Faubion, Stephanie S

    2016-10-01

    Decision making regarding the use of menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) for the treatment of bothersome menopausal symptoms in a cancer survivor can be complex, and includes assessment of its impact on disease-free or overall survival. Estrogen receptors are present in several cancer types, but this does not always result in estrogen-mediated tumor proliferation and adverse cancer-related outcomes. Estrogen may even be protective against certain cancers. Menopausal hormone therapy is associated with an increased risk of recurrence and mortality after diagnosis of some cancer types, but not others. We provide a narrative review of the medical literature regarding the risk of cancer recurrence and associated mortality with initiation of MHT after the diagnosis of breast, gynecologic, lung, colorectal, hematologic cancers, and melanoma. Menopausal hormone therapy may be considered for management of bothersome menopausal symptoms in women with some cancer types (e.g., colorectal and hematologic cancer, localized melanoma, and most cervical, vulvar and vaginal cancers), while nonhormonal treatment options may be preferred for others (e.g., breast cancer). In women with other cancer types, recommendations are less straightforward, and the use of MHT must be individualized. PMID:27621244

  1. Penile Rehabilitation Strategies Among Prostate Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Aoun, Fouad; Peltier, Alexandre; van Velthoven, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in technical and surgical approaches, erectile dysfunction (ED) remains the most common complication among prostate cancer survivors, adversely impacting quality of life. This article analyzes the concept and rationale of ED rehabilitation programs in prostate cancer patients. Emphasis is placed on the pathophysiology of ED after diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer to understand the efficacy of rehabilitation programs in clinical practice. Available evidence shows that ED is a transient complication following prostate biopsy and cancer diagnosis, with no evidence to support rehabilitation programs in these patients. A small increase in ED and in the use of phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors was reported in patients under active surveillance. Patients should be advised that active surveillance is unlikely to severely affect erectile function, but clinically significant changes in sexual function are possible. Focal therapy could be an intermediate option for patients demanding treatment/refusing active surveillance and invested in maintaining sexual activity. Unlike radical prostatectomy, there is no support for PDE5 inhibitor use to prevent ED after highly conformal external radiotherapy or low-dose rate brachytherapy. Despite progress in the understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms responsible for ED in prostate cancer patients, the success rates of rehabilitation programs remain low in clinical practice. Alternative strategies to prevent ED appear warranted, with attention toward neuromodulation, nerve grafting, nerve preservation, stem cell therapy, investigation of neuroprotective interventions, and further refinements of radiotherapy dosing and delivery methods. PMID:27222641

  2. Penile Rehabilitation Strategies Among Prostate Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Aoun, Fouad; Peltier, Alexandre; van Velthoven, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in technical and surgical approaches, erectile dysfunction (ED) remains the most common complication among prostate cancer survivors, adversely impacting quality of life. This article analyzes the concept and rationale of ED rehabilitation programs in prostate cancer patients. Emphasis is placed on the pathophysiology of ED after diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer to understand the efficacy of rehabilitation programs in clinical practice. Available evidence shows that ED is a transient complication following prostate biopsy and cancer diagnosis, with no evidence to support rehabilitation programs in these patients. A small increase in ED and in the use of phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors was reported in patients under active surveillance. Patients should be advised that active surveillance is unlikely to severely affect erectile function, but clinically significant changes in sexual function are possible. Focal therapy could be an intermediate option for patients demanding treatment/refusing active surveillance and invested in maintaining sexual activity. Unlike radical prostatectomy, there is no support for PDE5 inhibitor use to prevent ED after highly conformal external radiotherapy or low-dose rate brachytherapy. Despite progress in the understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms responsible for ED in prostate cancer patients, the success rates of rehabilitation programs remain low in clinical practice. Alternative strategies to prevent ED appear warranted, with attention toward neuromodulation, nerve grafting, nerve preservation, stem cell therapy, investigation of neuroprotective interventions, and further refinements of radiotherapy dosing and delivery methods. PMID:27222641

  3. Surveillance and Care of the Gynecologic Cancer Survivor

    PubMed Central

    MacLaughlin, Kathy L.; Long, Margaret E.; Pruthi, Sandhya; Casey, Petra M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Care of the gynecologic cancer survivor extends beyond cancer treatment to encompass promotion of sexual, cardiovascular, bone, and brain health; management of fertility, contraception, and vasomotor symptoms; and genetic counseling. Methods: This is a narrative review of the data and guidelines regarding care and surveillance of the gynecologic cancer survivor. We searched databases including PubMed, Cochrane, and Scopus using the search terms gynecologic cancer, cancer surveillance, and cancer survivor and reached a consensus for articles chosen for inclusion in the review based on availability in the English language and publication since 2001, as well as key older articles, consensus statements, and practice guidelines from professional societies. However, we did not undertake an extensive systematic search of the literature to identify all potentially relevant studies, nor did we utilize statistical methods to summarize data. We offer clinical recommendations for the management of gynecologic cancer survivors based on review of evidence and our collective clinical experience. Results: Key messages include the limitations of laboratory studies, including CA-125, and imaging in the setting of gynecologic cancer surveillance, hormonal and non-hormonal management of treatment-related vasomotor symptoms and genitourinary syndrome of menopause, as well as recommendations for general health screening, fertility preservation, and contraception. Conclusions: A holistic approach to care extending beyond cancer treatment alone benefits gynecologic cancer survivors. In addition to surveillance for cancer recurrence and late treatment side effects, survivors benefit from guidance on hormonal, contraceptive, and fertility management and promotion of cardiovascular, bone, brain, and sexual health. PMID:26208166

  4. Skin Cancer Surveillance Behaviors Among Childhood Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, Jerod L; Tatum, Kristina L; Devine, Katie A; Stephens, Sue; Masterson, Margaret; Baig, Amna; Hudson, Shawna V; Coups, Elliot J

    2016-03-01

    The risk of developing skin cancer is elevated among childhood cancer survivors (CCS), particularly among those treated with radiation. This survey study examined the skin cancer surveillance behaviors of 94 CCS. Approximately 48% of CCS had ever conducted skin self-examination (SSE) and 31% had ever received a physician skin examination. Rates of physician skin examination were 2.5 times higher among CCS treated with radiation compared to those without radiation. However, rates of SSEs did not differ based on treatment history. These findings highlight the need to promote skin cancer surveillance as an important aspect of CCS survivorship care.

  5. An international review of the patterns and determinants of health service utilisation by adult cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There is a need to review factors related to health service utilisation by the increasing number of cancer survivors in order to inform care planning and the organisation and delivery of services. Methods Studies were identified via systematic searches of Medline, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Social Science Citation Index and the SEER-MEDICARE library. Methodological quality was assessed using STROBE; and the Andersen Behavioural Model was used as a framework to structure, organise and analyse the results of the review. Results Younger, white cancer survivors were most likely to receive follow-up screening, preventive care, visit their physician, utilise professional mental health services and least likely to be hospitalised. Utilisation rates of other health professionals such as physiotherapists were low. Only studies of health service use conducted in the USA investigated the role of type of health insurance and ethnicity. There appeared to be disparate service use among US samples in terms of ethnicity and socio-demographic status, regardless of type of health insurance provision s- this may be explained by underlying differences in health-seeking behaviours. Overall, use of follow-up care appeared to be lower than expected and barriers existed for particular groups of cancer survivors. Conclusions Studies focussed on the use of a specific type of service rather than adopting a whole-system approach and future health services research should address this shortcoming. Overall, there is a need to improve access to care for all cancer survivors. Studies were predominantly US-based focussing mainly on breast or colorectal cancer. Thus, the generalisability of findings to other health-care systems and cancer sites is unclear. The Andersen Behavioural Model provided an appropriate framework for studying and understanding health service use among cancer survivors. The active involvement of physicians and use of personalised care plans are required in order to ensure

  6. Relationship between intestinal microbiota and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cipe, Gokhan; Idiz, Ufuk Oguz; Firat, Deniz; Bektasoglu, Huseyin

    2015-01-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract hosts a complex and vast microbial community with up to 1011-1012 microorganisms colonizing the colon. The gut microbiota has a serious effect on homeostasis and pathogenesis through a number of mechanisms. In recent years, the relationship between the intestinal microbiota and sporadic colorectal cancer has attracted much scientific interest. Mechanisms underlying colonic carcinogenesis include the conversion of procarcinogenic diet-related factors to carcinogens and the stimulation of procarcinogenic signaling pathways in luminal epithelial cells. Understanding each of these mechanisms will facilitate future studies, leading to the development of novel strategies for the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of colorectal cancer. In this review, we discuss the relationship between colorectal cancer and the intestinal microbiota. PMID:26483877

  7. Media Use and the Cancer Communication Strategies of Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Heesoo; Sohn, Minsung; Jung, Minsoo

    2016-01-01

    Communication related to health not only substantially affects perceptions and behaviors related to health but is also positively associated with the extent of health-information seeking and the practice of preventive behavior. Despite the fact that the number of cancer survivors has increased dramatically, there are few studies of the lack of health information, factors which act as barriers, and the difficulties in follow-up care experienced by cancer survivors. Therefore, we reviewed media utilization and the types of media used by cancer survivors with regard to risk communication and suggested appropriate strategies for cancer communication. According to the results, health communication contributed to health promotion by providing health-related information, consolidating social support factors such as social solidarity and trust, and reducing anxiety. In particular, participatory health communication may establish preventive programs which reflect the needs of communities, expand accessibility to better quality healthcare, and intensify healthy living by reducing health inequalities. Therefore, when people do not have an intention to obtain cancer screening, we need to intervene to change their behavior, norms, and degrees of self-efficacy. The findings of this study may help those involved in building partnerships by assisting in their efforts to understand and communicate with the public. PMID:27722138

  8. Breast cancer survivors' decisions to join a dragon boating team.

    PubMed

    Weisenbach, Beth B; McDonough, Meghan H

    2014-12-01

    Physical activity is associated with psychosocial and physical health benefits for breast cancer survivors. Little is known, however, about survivors' decision-making processes when considering joining group physical activity programs designed for survivors. Guided by interpretive description methodology (Thorne, 2008), N = 15 breast cancer survivors who were considering or had made the decision to join a dragon boating team were interviewed about their decisions to participate. Four patterns of decision making were identified: searching for a way to care for physical and social needs, taking advantage of opportunities created by breast cancer, dove in with little contemplation, and hesitant to connect with other survivors. Results have implications for understanding decisions to participate in physical activity groups in this population and overcoming challenges to participation.

  9. Preventing Second Cancers in Colon Cancer Survivors

    Cancer.gov

    In this phase III trial, people who have had curative surgery for colon cancer will be randomly assigned to take sulindac and a placebo, eflornithine and a placebo, both sulindac and eflornithine, or two placebo pills for 36 months.

  10. Advanced endoscopic technologies for colorectal cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Obstein, Keith L; Valdastri, Pietro

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in men and the second most common cancer in women worldwide. Diagnosing colorectal has been increasingly successful due to advances in technology. Flexible endoscopy is considered to be an effective method for early diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal cancer, making it a popular choice for screening programs. However, millions of people who may benefit from endoscopic colorectal cancer screening fail to have the procedure performed. Main reasons include psychological barriers due to the indignity of the procedure, fear of procedure related pain, bowel preparation discomfort, and potential need for sedation. Therefore, an urgent need for new technologies addressing these issues clearly exists. In this review, we discuss a set of advanced endoscopic technologies for colorectal cancer screening that are either already available or close to clinical trial. In particular, we focus on visual-inspection-only advanced flexible colonoscopes, interventional colonoscopes with alternative propulsion mechanisms, wireless capsule colonoscopy, and technologies for intraprocedural bowel cleansing. Many of these devices have the potential to reduce exam related patient discomfort, obviate the need for sedation, increase diagnostic yield, reduce learning curves, improve access to screening, and possibly avert the need for a bowel preparation. PMID:23382621

  11. Local inflammatory response in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Łaskowski, P; Klim, B; Ostrowski, K; Szkudlarek, M; Litwiejko-Pietryńczak, E; Kitlas, K; Nienartowicz, S; Dzięcioł, J

    2016-06-01

    Type and intensity of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in close proximity to the primary tumor are prognostically significant in postoperative patients. High intensity of TILs is considered to be a prognostically beneficial factor. The research included 66 postoperative colorectal cancer patients. The control group comprised 20 colon segments. Monoclonal antibodies LCA, CD3, CD4, CD5, CD8, CD20, CD23 and CD138 were used to differentiate between T and B lymphocytes. Types of cells in the infiltrate were defined. We found greater numbers of T and B lymphocytes located in close proximity to the cancerous tissue when compared to the control group. T lymphocyte intensity in the inflammatory infiltrations was directly correlated with the size of resected tumors, presence of regional lymphatic node metastases and histological grade of malignancy. Lymphocytic infiltrations of greater intensity located in close proximity to the primary tumor were found in subjects with less advanced colorectal cancer. The research presented here proves direct dependence between the immune system and colorectal cancer. The presence of lymphocytes in the inflammatory infiltrations located in close proximity to the cancerous tissue has been proved to be prognostically beneficial. The obtained results support the application of immunotherapy in colorectal cancer treatment. PMID:27543872

  12. [New advances in hereditary colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Moreira, Leticia

    2015-09-01

    Colorectal cancer is the most frequent malignancy in both sexes in Spain. Between 20% and 25% of affected individuals have a family history of the disease, and 5% to 6% have a germ mutation, i.e. the disease develops in the context of a hereditary syndrome. The importance of identifying patients with hereditary syndromes predisposing them to colorectal cancer lies in the possibility of applying preventive measures, screening, and more appropriate management of both patients and their families. The present article outlines the most important studies presented at the congress of the American Gastroenterological Association.

  13. Surgical quality in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Plummer, Joseph M.; Williams, Nadia; Leake, Pierre-Anthony; Ferron-Boothe, Doreen; Meeks-Aitken, Nicola; Mitchell, Derek I.; McFarlane, Michael E.; East, Jeffery

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the quality of surgical management offered to patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) as measured by adequacy of nodal resections and compare variations across the major hospitals in Jamaica. Method Data was obtained from the CRC Registry of patients diagnosed and treated surgically for CRC during the 3-year period commencing January 1, 2011. Variables analyzed included tumor site, stage and number of lymph nodes resected across hospitals. Results During the period under review 60% (349) of 586 patients had resections and formed the basis of this study. Of these 49% were treated at the UHWI, 27% from the KPH and STH, 15% from CRH and MRH and 8% from a private laboratory (DPS). Patient distribution was similar at UHWI compared to the others with mean age (61 vs 62) and with slightly more women having surgery (53% Vs 54%) (UHWI vs Others). For tumor grade, margin status, lymphovascular and depth of invasion (majority T3) there was no difference between UHWI and the other sites, although a smaller percentage of tumors treated at UHWI had Crohn's like reaction (p = 0.01). There was a larger proportion of sigmoid cancer at UHWI while the reverse trend was seen in cancers of the rectum (p = 0.027). The tumors treated at UHWI have a larger median number of regional nodes when compared to the other facilities (14 vs 10; p < 0.001) and also more likely to have positive nodes, as were women and younger patients. Comparison across facilities revealed that the proportion of tumors classed as well differentiated, circumferential margin involvement, and having lymphovascular invasion were higher for specimens processed at the private facility (p = 0.021, 0.035, 0.01 respectively). Histopathology reports of tumors treated at UHWI and DPS had median 14 and 18 nodes respectively while at NPH laboratory and CRH they were 9 and 10 respectively (p < 0.001), whilst those of the ascending, descending, sigmoid colon and rectum had median 15, 11, 13, 11

  14. Get Tested for Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of fiber . Talk with your doctor about taking aspirin every day. Taking aspirin every day can lower your risk of colorectal ... 50 to 59, ask your doctor if daily aspirin is right for you . Previous section Get Tested ...

  15. Cancer risk-reduction behaviors of breast cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, Ada M; Waltman, Nancy; Gross, Gloria; Ott, Carol D; Twiss, Jan

    2004-12-01

    Using secondary data analysis, the aim was to determine if postmenopausal women, who have survived breast cancer, have adopted healthy nutritional and physical activity behaviors recommended in the American Cancer Society guidelines as cancer risk-reduction strategies, and in guidelines for prevention of other chronic diseases or for improving general health. From their personal health history, women who have survived breast cancer would be likely candidates to adopt healthy behaviors recommended as cancer risk-reduction strategies or for prevention of other chronic diseases. A secondary aim was to determine the perceived general health and affective state of these women. These breast cancer survivors had a high perception of their general health, a positive affective state, and have adopted some healthy lifestyle behaviors, but they are not fully adhering to the ACS nutrition and physical activity guidelines or other health related guidelines for cancer risk reduction or prevention of other chronic diseases. PMID:15539533

  16. Cancer risk-reduction behaviors of breast cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, Ada M; Waltman, Nancy; Gross, Gloria; Ott, Carol D; Twiss, Jan

    2004-12-01

    Using secondary data analysis, the aim was to determine if postmenopausal women, who have survived breast cancer, have adopted healthy nutritional and physical activity behaviors recommended in the American Cancer Society guidelines as cancer risk-reduction strategies, and in guidelines for prevention of other chronic diseases or for improving general health. From their personal health history, women who have survived breast cancer would be likely candidates to adopt healthy behaviors recommended as cancer risk-reduction strategies or for prevention of other chronic diseases. A secondary aim was to determine the perceived general health and affective state of these women. These breast cancer survivors had a high perception of their general health, a positive affective state, and have adopted some healthy lifestyle behaviors, but they are not fully adhering to the ACS nutrition and physical activity guidelines or other health related guidelines for cancer risk reduction or prevention of other chronic diseases.

  17. Adherence to Guidelines for Cancer Survivors and Health-Related Quality of Life among Korean Breast Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Song, Sihan; Hwang, Eunkyung; Moon, Hyeong-Gon; Noh, Dong-Young; Lee, Jung Eun

    2015-12-01

    There is limited evidence on the association between adherence to guidelines for cancer survivors and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). In a cross-sectional study of Korean breast cancer survivors, we examined whether adherence to the guidelines of the American Cancer Society (ACS) and World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) for cancer survivors was related to levels of HRQoL, assessed by the Korean version of Core 30 (C30) and Breast cancer module 23 (BR23) of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer-Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC-QLQ). We included a total of 160 women aged 21 to 79 years who had been diagnosed with breast cancer according to American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stages I to III and had breast cancer surgery at least six months before the interview. Increasing adherence to ACS guidelines was associated with higher scores of social functioning (p for trend = 0.05), whereas increasing adherence to WCRF/AICR recommendations was associated with higher scores of arm symptoms (p for trend = 0.01). These associations were limited to those with stage II or III cancer. Diet may be an important factor in relation to quality of life among Korean breast cancer survivors, however our findings warrant further prospective studies to evaluate whether healthy diet improves survivors' quality of life.

  18. Computerized Cognitive Retraining in Improving Cognitive Function in Breast Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-26

    Cancer Survivor; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  19. Gut Microbiota, Inflammation, and Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Caitlin A; Garrett, Wendy S

    2016-09-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States and fourth-leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. While cancer is largely considered to be a disease of genetic and environmental factors, increasing evidence has demonstrated a role for the microbiota (the microorganisms associated with the human body) in shaping inflammatory environments and promoting tumor growth and spread. Herein, we discuss both human data from meta'omics analyses and data from mechanistic studies in cell culture and animal models that support specific bacterial agents as potentiators of tumorigenesis-including Fusobacterium nucleatum, enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis, and colibactin-producing Escherichia coli. Further, we consider how microbes can be used in diagnosing colorectal cancer and manipulating the tumor environment to encourage better patient outcomes in response to immunotherapy treatments. PMID:27607555

  20. Colorectal Cancer and Basement Membranes: Clinicopathological Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Mylonas, Charalampos C.; Lazaris, Andreas C.

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer in males and the second in females. In 2008, an estimated 1.2 million people were diagnosed with and 608,700 people died of CRC. Besides diagnosis and treatment, prognosis is an important matter for cancer patients. Today, clinicopathological correlations have many applications in cancer prognostication. Examples include the prediction of the medium patient survival and the screening for patients suitable for specific therapeutic approaches. Apart from traditional prognostic factors, such as tumor stage and grade, new markers may be useful in clinical practice. Possible markers may result from the study of basement membranes (BMs). BM seems to play a role in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer, so BM alterations may have prognostic significance as well. The purpose of this review is to briefly describe BMs and their relationship with CRC, in the aspect of clinicopathological correlations. PMID:25614736

  1. Survivorship Care in Reducing Symptoms in Young Adult Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-04

    Breast Carcinoma; Cancer Survivor; Depression; Fatigue; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Malignant Bone Neoplasm; Malignant Digestive System Neoplasm; Malignant Female Reproductive System Neoplasm; Malignant Male Reproductive System Neoplasm; Pain; Sleep Disorder; Soft Tissue Sarcoma

  2. Hyperplastic polyposis: association with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Leggett, B A; Devereaux, B; Biden, K; Searle, J; Young, J; Jass, J

    2001-02-01

    Hyperplastic polyposis is a loosely defined syndrome initially thought not to confer a clinically important predisposition to colorectal cancer. The aim of the current study was to examine the clinical, histologic, and molecular features of a prospective series of cases meeting a strict definition of the condition. Twelve patients were identified, seven of whom had developed colorectal cancer. Most polyps were hyperplastic, but 11 patients also had polyps containing dysplasia as either serrated adenomas. mixed polyps, or traditional adenomas. The mean percentage of dysplastic polyps in patients with cancer was 35%, and in patients without cancer, 11% (p < 0.05). Microsatellite instability (MSI) was present in 3 of 47 hyperplastic polyps and two of eight serrated adenomas. Kras was mutated in 8 of 47 hyperplastic polyps and two of eight serrated adenomas. No polyps showed loss of heterozygosity of chromosomes 5q, 1p, or 18q. Two of seven cancers showed a high level of MSI. It is concluded that hyperplastic polyposis is associated with a high risk of colorectal cancer. Hyperplastic polyps are the dominant type of polyp, but most cases have some dysplastic epithelium. A higher proportion of dysplastic polyps is associated with increased cancer risk. Clonal genetic changes are observed in some hyperplastic polyps and serrated adenomas.

  3. Obesity in Childhood Cancer Survivors: Call for Early Weight Management.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang Fang; Parsons, Susan K

    2015-09-01

    A high prevalence of obesity and cardiometabolic conditions has been increasingly recognized in childhood cancer survivors. In particular, survivors of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia have been found to be at risk of becoming overweight or obese early in treatment, with increases in weight maintained throughout treatment and beyond. Nutrition plays an important role in the etiology of obesity and cardiometabolic conditions and is among the few modifiable factors that can prevent or delay the early onset of these chronic conditions. However, nutritional intake in childhood cancer survivors has not been adequately examined and the evidence is built on data from small cohorts of survivors. In addition, the long-term impact of cancer diagnosis and treatment on survivors' nutritional intake as well as how survivors' nutritional intake is associated with chronic health conditions have not been well quantified in large-scale studies. Promoting family-based healthy lifestyles, preferably at a sensitive window of unhealthy weight gain, is a priority for preventing the early onset of obesity and cardiometabolic conditions in childhood cancer survivors.

  4. Biomarkers for colitis-associated colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ru; Lai, Lisa A; Brentnall, Teresa A; Pan, Sheng

    2016-09-21

    Patients with extensive ulcerative colitis (UC) of more than eight years duration have an increased risk of colorectal cancer. Molecular biomarkers for dysplasia and cancer could have a great clinical value in managing cancer risk in these UC patients. Using a wide range of molecular techniques - including cutting-edge OMICS technologies - recent studies have identified clinically relevant biomarker candidates from a variety of biosamples, including colonic biopsies, blood, stool, and urine. While the challenge remains to validate these candidate biomarkers in multi-center studies and with larger patient cohorts, it is certain that accurate biomarkers of colitis-associated neoplasia would improve clinical management of neoplastic risk in UC patients. This review highlights the ongoing avenues of research in biomarker development for colitis-associated colorectal cancer. PMID:27672285

  5. Biomarkers for colitis-associated colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ru; Lai, Lisa A; Brentnall, Teresa A; Pan, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Patients with extensive ulcerative colitis (UC) of more than eight years duration have an increased risk of colorectal cancer. Molecular biomarkers for dysplasia and cancer could have a great clinical value in managing cancer risk in these UC patients. Using a wide range of molecular techniques - including cutting-edge OMICS technologies - recent studies have identified clinically relevant biomarker candidates from a variety of biosamples, including colonic biopsies, blood, stool, and urine. While the challenge remains to validate these candidate biomarkers in multi-center studies and with larger patient cohorts, it is certain that accurate biomarkers of colitis-associated neoplasia would improve clinical management of neoplastic risk in UC patients. This review highlights the ongoing avenues of research in biomarker development for colitis-associated colorectal cancer. PMID:27672285

  6. Biomarkers for colitis-associated colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ru; Lai, Lisa A; Brentnall, Teresa A; Pan, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Patients with extensive ulcerative colitis (UC) of more than eight years duration have an increased risk of colorectal cancer. Molecular biomarkers for dysplasia and cancer could have a great clinical value in managing cancer risk in these UC patients. Using a wide range of molecular techniques - including cutting-edge OMICS technologies - recent studies have identified clinically relevant biomarker candidates from a variety of biosamples, including colonic biopsies, blood, stool, and urine. While the challenge remains to validate these candidate biomarkers in multi-center studies and with larger patient cohorts, it is certain that accurate biomarkers of colitis-associated neoplasia would improve clinical management of neoplastic risk in UC patients. This review highlights the ongoing avenues of research in biomarker development for colitis-associated colorectal cancer.

  7. Access to Cancer Services for Rural Colorectal Cancer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Laura-Mae; Cai, Yong; Larson, Eric H.; Dobie, Sharon A.; Wright, George E.; Goodman, David C.; Matthews, Barbara; Hart, L. Gary

    2008-01-01

    Context: Cancer care requires specialty surgical and medical resources that are less likely to be found in rural areas. Purpose: To examine the travel patterns and distances of rural and urban colorectal cancer (CRC) patients to 3 types of specialty cancer care services--surgery, medical oncology consultation, and radiation oncology consultation.…

  8. Physical performance limitations in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study cohort.

    PubMed

    Ness, Kirsten K; Hudson, Melissa M; Ginsberg, Jill P; Nagarajan, Rajaram; Kaste, Sue C; Marina, Neyssa; Whitton, John; Robison, Leslie L; Gurney, James G

    2009-05-10

    Physical performance limitations are one of the potential long-term consequences following diagnosis and treatment for childhood cancer. The purpose of this review is to describe the risk factors for and the participation restrictions that result from physical performance limitations among childhood cancer survivors who participated in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS). Articles previously published from the CCSS cohort related to physical performance limitations were reviewed and the results summarized. Our review showed that physical performance limitations are prevalent among childhood cancer survivors and may increase as they age. Host-based risk factors for physical disability include an original diagnosis of bone tumor, brain tumor, or Hodgkin's disease; female sex; and an income less than $20,000 per year. Treatment-based risk factors include radiation and treatment with a combination of alkylating agents and anthracyclines. Musculoskeletal, neurologic, cardiac, pulmonary, sensory, and endocrine organ system dysfunction also increase the risk of developing a physical performance limitation. In summary, monitoring of physical performance limitations in an aging cohort of childhood cancer survivors is important and will help determine the impact of physical performance limitations on morbidity, mortality, and caregiver burden. In addition, in developing restorative and preventive interventions for childhood cancer survivors, we must take into account the special needs of survivors with physical disability to optimize their health and enhance participation in daily living activities. PMID:19332713

  9. Factors Associated with Fatigue in Korean Gastric Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Park, Wan; Lee, Jung-Kwon; Kim, Cho-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Background Gastric cancer is the second most common cancer in Korea. Fatigue is a common symptom among cancer survivors. The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with fatigue in gastric cancer survivors. Methods Data were analyzed from 199 gastric cancer survivors who visited a cancer survivor outpatient clinic from July 2013 to June 2014. Patients were surveyed using a questionnaire containing a fatigue severity scale (FSS) and questions regarding associated symptoms. Participants were divided into fatigue (FSS) and non-fatigue groups based on FSS scores (≥4 and <4, respectively). Age, sex, weight, body mass index, cancer stage, pathology, surgery type, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, comorbid disease, family history of cancer, smoking, alcohol consumption, exercise, and laboratory results were investigated. Results The fatigue and non-fatigue groups contained 42 and 157 survivors, respectively. Their mean age was 58 years, and the mean post-operative period was 6.58 years. Arthralgia (odds ratio [OR], 12.95; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.21-52.34), dyspnea (OR, 10.54; 95% CI, 2.94-37.80), dyspepsia (OR, 8.26; 95% CI, 2.63-25.96), changed bowel habits (OR, 4.56; 95% CI, 1.09-19.11), anemia (OR, 3.18; 95% CI, 1.26-8.05), and regular exercise (OR, 0.31; 95% CI, 0.12-0.77) were significantly associated with fatigue in gastric cancer survivors, while weight, treatment, and depressive mood were not. Conclusion Arthralgia, dyspnea, dyspepsia, bowel habit change, anemia, and regular exercise are associated with fatigue in gastric cancer survivors. PMID:26634101

  10. Late effects of cancer treatment in breast cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Sushma

    2014-04-01

    Postoperative radiation therapy (RT) and chemotherapy,both reduces the risk of local recurrence and extends overall survival in patients with breast cancer (BC). Concerns have, however, been raised about the risk of acute and chronic side effects in breast cancer survivors as the number of treated individuals is large and their expected survival is long compared to most patients with other malignant diseases. Cardiac toxicity, reproductive dysfunction, pneumonitis (RP),arm lymph edema, neuropathy, skin changes are examples of the wide range of complications that has been associated with adjuvant treatment.

  11. Contraceptive Practices Among Female Cancer Survivors of Reproductive Age

    PubMed Central

    Dominick, Sally A.; McLean, Mamie R.; Whitcomb, Brian W.; Gorman, Jessica R.; Mersereau, Jennifer E.; Bouknight, Janet M.; Su, H. Irene

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare rates of contraception between reproductive-aged cancer survivors and women in the general U.S. population. Among survivors, the study examined factors associated with use of contraception and emergency contraception. Methods This study analyzed enrollment data from an ongoing national prospective cohort study on reproductive health after cancer entitled the Fertility Information Research Study. We compared current contraceptive use in survivors with that of the general population ascertained by the 2006–2010 National Survey for Family Growth. Log-binomial regression models estimated relative risks for characteristics associated with use of contraception, World Health Organization tiers I–II (sterilization and hormonal) contraceptive methods, and emergency contraception in survivors. Results Data from 295 survivors (mean age 31.6 ± 5.7 years, range 20–44 years) enrolled in this prospective study (85% response rate) were examined. Age-adjusted rates of using tiers I–II contraceptive methods were lower in survivors than the general population (34% [28.8–40.0] compared with 53% [51.5–54.5], P<.01). Only 56% of survivors reported receiving family planning services (counseling, prescription or procedure related to birth control) since cancer diagnosis. In adjusted analysis, receipt of family planning services was associated with both increased use of tiers I–II contraceptive methods (relative risk 1.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1–1.5) and accessing emergency contraception (relative risk 5.0, 95% CI 1.6–16.3) in survivors. Conclusion Lower rates of using Tiers I–II contraceptive methods were found in reproductive-aged cancer survivors compared to the general population of U.S. women. Exposure to family planning services across the cancer care continuum may improve contraception utilization among these women. Clinical Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov, www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01843140. PMID:26181090

  12. Health-related quality of life among colorectal cancer patients in Malaysia: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer is a major public health problem in Malaysia. However, it is also one of the most treatable cancers, resulting in significant numbers of survivors. Therefore, the impact of surviving treatment for colorectal cancer on health related quality of life is important for the patients, clinicians and policy makers, and may differ in different cultures and populations. The aim of this study was to validate the Malaysian versions of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer quality of life instruments among colorectal cancers patients. Methods/design This is a cross sectional multi centre study. Three hospitals were included, the University of Malaya Medical Centre, the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre and Hospital Tuanku Jaafar Seremban. Malaysian citizens and permanent residence were studied and demographic and clinical information obtained from hospital records. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of life Core 30, colorectal cancer CR29, and the colorectal cancer liver metastasis LMC 21 were used and an observer assessment of performance obtained with the Karnofsky Performance Scale. Questionnaires were translated into three most commonly spoken languages in Malaysia (Bahasa Malaysia, Chinese and Tamil), then administered, scored and analyzed following the developers’ guidelines. Ethical approval was obtained from the participating centres. Tests of reliability and validity were performed to examine the validity of these instruments. Conclusion The result of pilot testing shows that the use of the Malaysian versions of EORTC QLQ C30, CR29 instruments is feasible in our sample of colorectal cancer patients. Instructions for completion as well as questions were well understood except the questions on the overall quality of life, overall health status and sexual activity. Thus we anticipate obtaining good psychometric properties for the instruments at the end of the study

  13. Virtual Weight Loss Program in Maintaining Weight in African American Breast Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-01

    Cancer Survivor; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  14. Comprehensive cancer control programs and coalitions: partnering to launch successful colorectal cancer screening initiatives.

    PubMed

    Seeff, Laura C; Major, Anne; Townsend, Julie S; Provost, Ellen; Redwood, Diana; Espey, David; Dwyer, Diane; Villanueva, Robert; Larsen, Leslie; Rowley, Kathryn; Leonard, Banning

    2010-12-01

    Colorectal cancer control has long been a focus area for Comprehensive Cancer Control programs and their coalitions, given the high burden of disease and the availability of effective screening interventions. Colorectal cancer control has been a growing priority at the national, state, territorial, tribal, and local level. This paper summarizes several national initiatives and features several Comprehensive Cancer Control Program colorectal cancer control successes.

  15. Expressions of Generativity and Posttraumatic Growth in Adult Cancer Survivors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellizzi, Keith M.

    2004-01-01

    Much of the psycho-oncology research that has been conducted to date has focused on understanding the negative psychological and psychosocial sequelae of cancer. However, a growing body of evidence suggests that many cancer survivors report psychological growth following a diagnosis of cancer. Further, there are few studies that examine the…

  16. N-glycosylation of Colorectal Cancer Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Balog, Crina I. A.; Stavenhagen, Kathrin; Fung, Wesley L. J.; Koeleman, Carolien A.; McDonnell, Liam A.; Verhoeven, Aswin; Mesker, Wilma E.; Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.; Deelder, André M.; Wuhrer, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer worldwide with an annual incidence of ∼1 million cases and an annual mortality rate of ∼655,000 individuals. There is an urgent need for identifying novel targets to develop more sensitive, reliable, and specific tests for early stage detection of colon cancer. Post-translational modifications are known to play an important role in cancer progression and immune surveillance of tumors. In the present study, we compared the N-glycan profiles from 13 colorectal cancer tumor tissues and corresponding control colon tissues. The N-glycans were enzymatically released, purified, and labeled with 2-aminobenzoic acid. Aliquots were profiled by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC-HPLC) with fluorescence detection and by negative mode MALDI-TOF-MS. Using partial least squares discriminant analysis to investigate the N-glycosylation changes in colorectal cancer, an excellent separation and prediction ability were observed for both HILIC-HPLC and MALDI-TOF-MS data. For structure elucidation, information from positive mode ESI-ion trap-MS/MS and negative mode MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS was combined. Among the features with a high separation power, structures containing a bisecting GlcNAc were found to be decreased in the tumor, whereas sulfated glycans, paucimannosidic glycans, and glycans containing a sialylated Lewis type epitope were shown to be increased in tumor tissues. In addition, core-fucosylated high mannose N-glycans were detected in tumor samples. In conclusion, the combination of HILIC and MALDI-TOF-MS profiling of N-glycans with multivariate statistical analysis demonstrated its potential for identifying N-glycosylation changes in colorectal cancer tissues and provided new leads that might be used as candidate biomarkers. PMID:22573871

  17. Perceptions of Support Among Older African American Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Jill B.; Moore, Charles E.; Powe, Barbara D.; Agarwal, Mansi; Martin, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To explore the perceived social support needs among older adult African American cancer survivors. Research Approach Qualitative design using grounded theory techniques. Setting Outpatient oncology clinics in the southeastern United States. Participants Focus groups with 22 older adult African American cancer survivors. Methodologic Approach Purposeful sampling technique was used to identify focus group participants. In-depth interviews were conducted and participants were interviewed until informational redundancy was achieved. Main Research Variables Social support needs of older adult African American patients with cancer. Findings Social support was influenced by (a) symptoms and treatment side effects, (b) perceptions of stigma and fears expressed by family and friends, (c) cultural beliefs about cancer, and (d) desires to lessen any burden or disruption to the lives of family and friends. Survivors navigated within and outside of their networks to get their social support needs met. In some instances, survivors socially withdrew from traditional sources of support for fear of being ostracized. Survivors also described feeling hurt, alone, and socially isolated when completely abandoned by friends. Conclusions The support from family, friends, and fellow church members is important to positive outcomes among older African American cancer survivors. However, misconceptions, fears, and negative cultural beliefs persist within the African American community and negatively influence the social support available to this population. Interpretations Early identification of the factors that influence social support can facilitate strategies to improve outcomes and decrease health disparities among this population. PMID:20591808

  18. BRAF mutation in multiple primary cancer with colorectal cancer and stomach cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Hyun; Ahn, Byung-Kwon; Baek, Sung-Uhn; Chang, Hee-Kyung

    2013-01-01

    Aims: Recently, BRAF mutation testing has been introduced as a marker in differentiating Lynch syndrome from sporadic colorectal cancers or in predicting colorectal cancers with worse prognosis. Individuals with hereditary predisposition to cancer development are at an increased risk of developing multiple primary cancers. The purpose of this study is to identify mutation in the BRAF gene in multiple primary cancers with colorectal cancer and stomach cancer. Methods: BRAF mutation was analysed in 45 patients with colorectal cancer and stomach cancer, synchronously or metachronously. Results: Mean age was 64.07 years (range: 47–83 years). For the colorectal cancer, tumors were located at the sigmoid colon in eight patients (17.8%) and at the rectum in 22 patients (48.9%). Twenty-three patients (51.1%) had synchronous cancer. Four patients (8.9%) had family members with cancer. BRAF mutation was identified in three patients (6.7%). All three of these patients had metachronous cancers. The colorectal cancers were located in the sigmoid colon (1 patient) and the rectum (2 patients). Conclusions: BRAF mutation rate was low in the multiple primary cancer with colorectal cancer and stomach cancer. With only BRAF gene study, it was not possible to identify any correlation with family history of colorectal cancer. Further study means considering other genes – MSI, MSH2, MLH1, MSH6. PMID:24759670

  19. BRAF Mutation in Colorectal Cancer: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Barras, David

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is still one of the deadliest cancer-related diseases. About 10% of CRC patients are characterized by a mutation in the B-Raf proto-oncogene serine/threonine kinase (BRAF) gene resulting in a valine-to-glutamate change at the residue 600 (V600E). This mutation is also present in more than 60% of melanoma patients. BRAF inhibitors were developed and found to improve patient survival; however, most patients at the end of the track ultimately develop resistance to these inhibitors. Melanoma patients benefit from the combination of BRAF inhibitors with mitogen/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK) inhibitors, among others. Unfortunately, colorectal patients do not respond much efficiently, which suggests different resistance mechanisms between the two cancer types. This review aims at shedding light on recent discoveries that improve our understanding of the BRAF mutation biology in CRC. PMID:26396549

  20. Therapeutic strategy in unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tournigand, Christophe; André, Thierry; de Gramont, Aimery

    2012-01-01

    While surgery is the cornerstone treatment for early-stage colorectal cancer, chemotherapy is the first treatment option for metastatic disease when tumor lesions are frequently not fully resectable at presentation. Mortality from colon cancer has decreased over the past 30 years, but there is still a huge heterogeneity in survival rates that can be mainly explained by patient and tumor characteristics, host response factors, and treatment modalities. The management of unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer is a global treatment strategy, which applies several lines of therapy, salvage surgery, maintenance, and treatment-free intervals. The individualization of cancer treatment is based on the evaluation of prognostic factors for survival (serum lactate dehydrogenase level, performance status), and predictive factors for treatment efficacy [Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) mutation status]. The available treatment modalities for metastatic colorectal cancer are chemotherapy (fluoropyrimidine, oxaliplatin, irinotecan), anti-angiogenic agents (e.g. bevacizumab), and anti-epidermal growth factor agents (cetuximab, panitumumab). The increasing number of active compounds dictates the strategy of trials evaluating these treatments either in combination or sequentially. Alternative outcomes that can be measured earlier than overall survival are needed to shorten the duration and reduce the size and cost of clinical trials. PMID:22423266

  1. Screening for Vitamin D Insufficiency in Pediatric Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Esbenshade, Adam J.; Sopfe, Jenna; Zhao, Zhiguo; Li, Zeda; Campbell, Kristin; Simmons, Jill H.; Friedman, Debra L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Corticosteroids increase risk for decreased bone mineral density, which can be worsened by vitamin D insufficiency (VDI) or deficiency (VDD). Procedure In the Vanderbilt cancer survivorship clinic, we obtained screening total 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels (VDL) in 171 cancer survivors <23 years old who were treated with prolonged corticosteroids for their cancer, and compared this group to a control group of 97 healthy pediatric patients. Results VDD was diagnosed in 15.8% and VDI in 34.5% of cancer survivors and VDD/VDI combined was associated with body mass index (BMI) >85th percentile (Odds ratio (OR) = 5.4; p<0.001), older age (OR = 2.2; p=0.012), non-Caucasian or Hispanic race (OR = 4.5 p = 0.008) and summer versus winter season (OR= 0.12, p<0.001). In multivariable analysis, VDI/VDD prevalence did not differ from the control group (VDI/VDD (43.3%). In the combined survivor/control group multivariable analysis, cancer diagnosis did not increase VDI/VDD risk, but significant associations persisted with elevated BMI (p <0.001), age (p=0.004), non-Caucasian or Hispanic race (p<0.001), and seasonality (p<0.001). Conclusion VDD/VDI is equally common in pediatric cancer survivors treated with corticosteroids and healthy children. The impact of VDD/VDI in cancer survivors may be greater due to risk for impaired bone health superimposed on that conferred from corticosteroid exposure. Thus, screening VDLs should be obtained in pediatric cancer survivors treated with corticosteroids, particularly in those with elevated BMI, older age, or non-Caucasian race. Prospective studies evaluating the impact of interventions to minimize VDD/VDI on long-term bone health in survivors are required. PMID:24194420

  2. A review of breast cancer survivorship issues from survivors' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jihyoung; Jung, So-Youn; Lee, Jung Eun; Shim, Eun-Jung; Kim, Nam Hyoung; Kim, Zisun; Sohn, Guiyun; Youn, Hyun Jo; Kim, Ku Sang; Kim, Hanna; Lee, Jong Won; Lee, Min Hyuk

    2014-09-01

    Despite the fact that more breast cancer survivors are currently enjoying longer lifespans, there remains limited knowledge about the factors and issues that are of greatest significance for these survivors, particularly from their perspectives. This review was based on the concept that the topics addressed should focus on the perspectives of current survivors and should be extended to future modalities, which physicians will be able to use to gain a better understanding of the hidden needs of these patients. We intended to choose and review dimensions other than the pathology and the disease process that could have been overlooked during treatment. The eight topics upon which we focused included: delay of treatment and survival outcome; sexual well-being; concerns about childbearing; tailored follow-up; presence of a family history of breast cancer; diet and physical activity for survivors and their families; qualitative approach toward understanding of breast cancer survivorship, and; mobile health care for breast cancer survivors. Through this review, we aimed to examine the present clinical basis of the central issues noted from the survivors' perspectives and suggest a direction for future survivorship-related research.

  3. A review of breast cancer survivorship issues from survivors' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jihyoung; Jung, So-Youn; Lee, Jung Eun; Shim, Eun-Jung; Kim, Nam Hyoung; Kim, Zisun; Sohn, Guiyun; Youn, Hyun Jo; Kim, Ku Sang; Kim, Hanna; Lee, Jong Won; Lee, Min Hyuk

    2014-09-01

    Despite the fact that more breast cancer survivors are currently enjoying longer lifespans, there remains limited knowledge about the factors and issues that are of greatest significance for these survivors, particularly from their perspectives. This review was based on the concept that the topics addressed should focus on the perspectives of current survivors and should be extended to future modalities, which physicians will be able to use to gain a better understanding of the hidden needs of these patients. We intended to choose and review dimensions other than the pathology and the disease process that could have been overlooked during treatment. The eight topics upon which we focused included: delay of treatment and survival outcome; sexual well-being; concerns about childbearing; tailored follow-up; presence of a family history of breast cancer; diet and physical activity for survivors and their families; qualitative approach toward understanding of breast cancer survivorship, and; mobile health care for breast cancer survivors. Through this review, we aimed to examine the present clinical basis of the central issues noted from the survivors' perspectives and suggest a direction for future survivorship-related research. PMID:25320616

  4. Circulating Non-coding RNA as Biomarkers in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferracin, Manuela; Lupini, Laura; Mangolini, Alessandra; Negrini, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggested that colorectal cancer influences the types and quantity of nucleic acids - especially microRNAs - detected in the bloodstream. Concentration of circulating (cell-free) microRNAs, and possibly of other non-coding RNAs, could therefore serve as valuable colorectal cancer biomarker and could deliver insight into the disease process. This chapter addresses the recent discoveries on circulating microRNA and long non-coding RNA as diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers in colorectal cancer. PMID:27573900

  5. Hereditary Colorectal Cancer: Genetics and Screening.

    PubMed

    Brosens, Lodewijk A A; Offerhaus, G Johan A; Giardiello, Francis M

    2015-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer and the third leading cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. About 30% of patients with CRC report a family history of CRC. However, only 5% of CRCs arise in the setting of a well-established mendelian inherited disorder. In addition, serrated polyposis is a clinically defined syndrome with multiple serrated polyps in the colorectum and an increased CRC risk for which the genetics are unknown. This article focuses on genetic and clinical aspects of Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, and MUTYH-associated polyposis.

  6. Colorectal cancer risk in hamartomatous polyposis syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Fábio Guilherme; Figueiredo, Marleny Novaes; Martinez, Carlos Augusto Real

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality around the world, and approximately 5% of them develop in a context of inherited mutations leading to some form of familial colon cancer syndromes. Recognition and characterization of these patients have contributed to elucidate the genetic basis of CRC. Polyposis Syndromes may be categorized by the predominant histological structure found within the polyps. The aim of the present paper is to review the most important clinical features of the Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes, a rare group of genetic disorders formed by the peutz-Jeghers syndrome, juvenil polyposis syndrome and PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndrome (Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalacaba and Cowden Syndromes). A literature search was performed in order to retrieve the most recent and important papers (articles, reviews, clinical cases and clinical guidelines) regarding the studied subject. We searched for terms such as “hamartomatous polyposis syndromes”, “Peutz-Jeghers syndrome”, “juvenile polyposis syndrome”, “juvenile polyp”, and “PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome” (Cowden syndrome, Bananyan-Riley-Ruvalcaba). The present article reports the wide spectrum of disease severity and extraintestinal manifestations, with a special focus on their potential to develop colorectal and other neoplasia. In the literature, the reported colorectal cancer risk for Juvenile Polyposis, Peutz-Jeghers and PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndromes are 39%-68%, 39%-57% and 18%, respectively. A review regarding cancer surveillance recommendations is also presented. PMID:25848489

  7. Colorectal cancer risk in hamartomatous polyposis syndromes.

    PubMed

    Campos, Fábio Guilherme; Figueiredo, Marleny Novaes; Martinez, Carlos Augusto Real

    2015-03-27

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality around the world, and approximately 5% of them develop in a context of inherited mutations leading to some form of familial colon cancer syndromes. Recognition and characterization of these patients have contributed to elucidate the genetic basis of CRC. Polyposis Syndromes may be categorized by the predominant histological structure found within the polyps. The aim of the present paper is to review the most important clinical features of the Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes, a rare group of genetic disorders formed by the peutz-Jeghers syndrome, juvenil polyposis syndrome and PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndrome (Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalacaba and Cowden Syndromes). A literature search was performed in order to retrieve the most recent and important papers (articles, reviews, clinical cases and clinical guidelines) regarding the studied subject. We searched for terms such as "hamartomatous polyposis syndromes", "Peutz-Jeghers syndrome", "juvenile polyposis syndrome", "juvenile polyp", and "PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome" (Cowden syndrome, Bananyan-Riley-Ruvalcaba). The present article reports the wide spectrum of disease severity and extraintestinal manifestations, with a special focus on their potential to develop colorectal and other neoplasia. In the literature, the reported colorectal cancer risk for Juvenile Polyposis, Peutz-Jeghers and PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndromes are 39%-68%, 39%-57% and 18%, respectively. A review regarding cancer surveillance recommendations is also presented.

  8. Treatment of colorectal cancer in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Millan, Monica; Merino, Sandra; Caro, Aleidis; Feliu, Francesc; Escuder, Jordi; Francesch, Tani

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer has a high incidence, and approximately 60% of colorectal cancer patients are older than 70, with this incidence likely increasing in the near future. Elderly patients (> 70-75 years of age) are a very heterogeneous group, ranging from the very fit to the very frail. Traditionally, these patients have often been under-treated and recruited less frequently to clinical trials than younger patients, and thus are under-represented in publications about cancer treatment. Recent studies suggest that fit elderly patients can be treated in the same way as their younger counterparts, but the treatment of frail patients with comorbidities is still a matter of controversy. Many factors should be taken into account, including fitness for treatment, the wishes of the patient and family, and quality of life. This review will focus on the existing evidence for surgical, oncologic, and palliative treatment in patients over 70 years old with colorectal cancer. Careful patient assessment is necessary in order to individualize treatment approach, and this should rely on a multidisciplinary process. More well-designed controlled trials are needed in this patient population. PMID:26483875

  9. Patient Satisfaction With Breast and Colorectal Cancer Survivorship Care Plans

    PubMed Central

    Sprague, Brian L.; Dittus, Kim L.; Pace, Claire M.; Dulko, Dorothy; Pollack, Lori A.; Hawkins, Nikki A.; Geller, Berta M.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer survivors face several challenges following the completion of active treatment, including uncertainty about late effects of treatment and confusion about coordination of follow-up care. The authors evaluated patient satisfaction with personalized survivorship care plans designed to clarify those issues. The authors enrolled 48 patients with breast cancer and 10 patients with colorectal cancer who had completed treatment in the previous two months from an urban academic medical center and a rural community hospital. Patient satisfaction with the care plan was assessed by telephone interview. Overall, about 80% of patients were very or completely satisfied with the care plan, and 90% or more agreed that it was useful, it was easy to understand, and the length was appropriate. Most patients reported that the care plan was very or critically important to understanding an array of survivorship issues. However, only about half felt that it helped them better understand the roles of primary care providers and oncologists in survivorship care. The results provide evidence that patients with cancer find high value in personalized survivorship care plans, but the plans do not eliminate confusion regarding the coordination of follow-up care. Future efforts to improve care plans should focus on better descriptions of how survivorship care will be coordinated. PMID:23722604

  10. Diet and supplements and their impact on colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pericleous, Marinos; Mandair, Dalvinder

    2013-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer is the third commonest cancer and the third leading cause of cancer death among men and women. It has been proposed that dietary factors are responsible for 70-90% of colorectal cancer and diet optimization may prevent most cases. Aim To evaluate the role of dietary components and supplements in colorectal cancer. Methods Bibliographical searches were performed in Pubmed for the terms “diet and colorectal cancer”, “diet and colon cancer”, “diet and rectal cancer”, “nutrition and colorectal cancer”, “probiotics and colorectal cancer”, “prebiotics and colorectal cancer”, “alcohol and cancer” and “colorectal cancer epidemiology”. Results Consumption of processed or red meat, especially when cooked at high temperatures may be associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer. The evidence for dietary fibre is unclear but foods that contain high amounts of fibre are usually rich in polyphenols which have been shown to alter molecular processes that can encourage colorectal carcinogenesis. Meta-analyses provide evidence on the benefits of circulating, diet-derived and supplemented, vitamin D and Calcium. We also found that diets rich in Folate may prevent colorectal carcinoma. The evidence on dietary micronutrients such as Zinc and Selenium in association with colorectal cancer is not conclusive. It has been suggested that there may be a direct association between alcohol intake and colorectal cancer. In vitro and in vivo studies have highlighted a possible protective role of prebiotics and probiotics. Conclusions The lack of randomized trials and the presence of confounding factors including smoking, physical activity, obesity and diabetes may often yield inconclusive results. Carefully designed randomized trials are recommended. PMID:24294513

  11. Aspects of mental health dysfunction among survivors of childhood cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fidler, Miranda M; Ziff, Oliver J; Wang, Sarra; Cave, Joshua; Janardhanan, Pradeep; Winter, David L; Kelly, Julie; Mehta, Susan; Jenkinson, Helen; Frobisher, Clare; Reulen, Raoul C; Hawkins, Michael M

    2015-01-01

    Background: Some previous studies have reported that survivors of childhood cancer are at an increased risk of developing long-term mental health morbidity, whilst others have reported that this is not the case. Therefore, we analysed 5-year survivors of childhood cancer using the British Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (BCCSS) to determine the risks of aspects of long-term mental health dysfunction. Procedure: Within the BCCSS, 10 488 survivors completed a questionnaire that ascertained mental health-related information via 10 questions from the Short Form-36 survey. Internal analyses were conducted using multivariable logistic regression to determine risk factors for mental health dysfunction. External analyses were undertaken using direct standardisation to compare mental health dysfunction in survivors with UK norms. Results: This study has shown that overall, childhood cancer survivors had a significantly higher prevalence of mental health dysfunction for 6/10 questions analysed compared to UK norms. Central nervous system (CNS) and bone sarcoma survivors reported the greatest dysfunction, compared to expected, with significant excess dysfunction in 10 and 6 questions, respectively; the excess ranged from 4.4–22.3% in CNS survivors and 6.9–15.9% in bone sarcoma survivors. Compared to expected, excess mental health dysfunction increased with attained age; this increase was greatest for reporting ‘limitations in social activities due to health', where the excess rose from 4.5% to 12.8% in those aged 16–24 and 45+, respectively. Within the internal analyses, higher levels of educational attainment and socio-economic classification were protective against mental health dysfunction. Conclusions: Based upon the findings of this large population-based study, childhood cancer survivors report significantly higher levels of mental health dysfunction than those in the general population, where deficits were observed particularly among CNS and bone sarcoma

  12. What's new in hereditary colorectal cancer?

    PubMed

    Jass, Jeremy R

    2005-11-01

    Precancerous polyposes other than classic familial adenomatous polyposis and the condition hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, or Lynch syndrome, continue to present major diagnostic challenges for the anatomic pathologist. This editorial highlights the practical significance of novel insights and clinical guidelines in the recent literature, as well as in 4 contributions to this edition of the Archives of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine. The first section will address attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis and a newly recognized type of autosomal-recessive adenomatous polyposis associated with the DNA repair gene MYH. The remainder of the editorial discusses the role of the revised Bethesda guidelines in the diagnosis of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer and concludes with the recently identified serrated pathway syndrome.

  13. Endocrine complications in long-term survivors of childhood cancers.

    PubMed

    Chemaitilly, Wassim; Sklar, Charles A

    2010-09-01

    Endocrine disturbances are among the most frequently reported complications in childhood cancer survivors, affecting between 20 and 50% of individuals who survive into adulthood. Most endocrine complications are the result of prior cancer treatments, especially radiotherapy. The objective of the present review is to discuss the main endocrine complications observed in this population, including disorders of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, disorders of pubertal development, thyroid dysfunction, gonadal dysfunction, decreased bone mineral density, obesity, and alterations in glucose metabolism with a special focus on recent findings reported from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.

  14. Improving colorectal cancer screening: fact and fantasy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dam, Jacques

    2008-02-01

    Premalignant diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, such as Barrett's esophagus, long-standing ulcerative colitis, and adenomatous polyps, have a significantly increased risk for development of adenocarcinoma, most often through an intermediate stage of dysplasia. Adenocarcinoma of the colon is the second most common cancer in the United States. Because patients with colorectal cancer often present with advanced disease, the outcomes are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Effective methods of early detection are essential. As non-polypoid dysplasia is not visible using conventional endoscopy, surveillance of patients with Barrett's esophagus and ulcerative colitis is performed via a system in which multiple random biopsies are obtained at prescribed intervals. Sampling error and missed diagnoses occur frequently and render current screening methods inadequate. Also, the examination of a tissue biopsy is time consuming and costly, and significant intra- and inter-observer variation may occur. The newer methods discussed herein demonstrate the potential to solve these problems by early detection of disease with high sensitivity and specificity. Conventional endoscopy is based on the observation of white light reflected off the tissue surface. Subtle changes in color and shadow reveal structural changes. New developments in optical imaging go beyond white light, exploiting other properties of light. Several promising methods will be discussed at this meeting and shall be briefly discussed below. However, few such imaging modalities have arrived at our clinical practice. Some much more practical methods to improve colorectal cancer screening are currently being evaluated for their clinical impact. These methods seek to overcome limitations other than those of detecting dysplasia not visible under white light endoscopy. The current standard practice of colorectal cancer screening utilizes colonoscopy, an uncomfortable, sometimes difficult medical

  15. Endoluminal Therapy in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Katherine A; Tsikitis, V Liana

    2016-09-01

    Appropriate endoscopic resection for colorectal polyps can present a challenge to endoscopists, as these lesions may harbor malignancy. With recent advances in endoscopy, however, we are now entering an exciting frontier of endoscopic therapy for gastrointestinal lesions. These techniques include endoluminal mucosal resection and endoscopic submucosal dissection, which may be utilized on several colonic lesions. This article will discuss these principle endoscopic techniques, their outcomes, and briefly highlight their influence on endoscopic interventions, including transanal endoscopic microsurgery and natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery. PMID:27582646

  16. Colorectal Cancer with Uncommon Metastatic Spread

    PubMed Central

    Dellavedova, Luca; Calcagno, Anna; Roncoroni, Lucia; Maffioli, Lorenzo Stefano

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of bone metastases from colorectal cancer (CRC) is quite low and the presence of isolated osseous metastases at the time of diagnosis or the onset of bone metastases without other organ involvement during follow-up is even lower. Here, we present an interesting case of diffuse skeletal metastases from CRC in which both the atypical presentation of the metastatic spread and the presence of infective comorbidities created some troubles in getting the final diagnosis. PMID:26420997

  17. Cigarette smoking disparities among sexual minority cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    Kamen, Charles; Blosnich, John R.; Lytle, Megan; Janelsins, Michelle C.; Peppone, Luke J.; Mustian, Karen M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Sexual minority (i.e., lesbian, gay, and bisexual) adults smoke cigarettes at higher rates than heterosexual adults. Smoking after receiving a cancer diagnosis is a major health concern, yet risk of continued smoking among sexual minority cancer survivors is as yet unknown. The current study examines current smoking among sexual minority vs. heterosexual adult cancer survivors. Method Data drawn from the 2010 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey in five states (Alaska, California, Massachusetts, New Mexico, and Wisconsin) included items about sexual orientation, cancer diagnosis, and tobacco use. The analytic sample included 124 sexual minority and 248 propensity score matched heterosexual adult cancer survivors. Results Bivariate analysis showed that sexual minority cancer survivors had twice the odds of current smoking as their heterosexual counterparts (OR = 2.03, 95%CI:1.09–3.80). In exploratory analyses stratified by sex, sexual minority disparities in prevalence of smoking post-cancer showed a trend toward significance among females, not males. Conclusion The current study offers preliminary evidence that sexual minority status is one variable among many that must be taken into account when assessing health behaviors post-cancer diagnosis. Future research should identify mechanisms leading from sexual minority status to increased rates of smoking and develop tailored smoking cessation interventions. PMID:25984441

  18. Assessing quality of life in adult cancer survivors (QLACS).

    PubMed

    Avis, Nancy E; Smith, Kevin W; McGraw, Sarah; Smith, Roselyn G; Petronis, Vida M; Carver, Charles S

    2005-05-01

    This article describes development of a quality of life measure designed to assess issues relevant to long-term cancer survivors. In-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with 58 long-term cancer survivors to identify domains most relevant to long-term survivors (> or = 5 years post-diagnosis). Self-report items were developed from these interviews and administered to a second sample of 242 long-term survivors. Domains and items were selected from the item pool by a combination of factor analysis and criterion-based item selection. Five cancer-specific domains were identified (appearance concerns, financial problems, distress over recurrence, family-related distress, and benefits of cancer) along with seven generic QOL domains (negative feelings, positive feelings, cognitive problems, sexual problems, physical pain, fatigue, and social avoidance). Cronbach's alpha was 0.72 or greater for each domain. Correlations between domain scores and criterion measures were 0.72 or higher in all but one generic domain (social avoidance), but somewhat lower on cancer-specific domains. The new multidimensional measure has good internal consistency and validity and is appropriate for comparisons between cancer and non-cancer populations, as well as long-term follow-up of cancer patients.

  19. Developmental Status and Intimacy in Adult Survivors of Childhood Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zevon, Michael A.; Corn, Barbara; Lowrie, Geoffrey; Green, Daniel M.

    Whereas aggressive multimodal therapies are responsible for improved survival rates of children and adolescents diagnosed with cancer, concern has grown regarding the potential for adverse and delayed developmental effects resulting from these treatments. In light of this concern, this study assessed 207 adult survivors of childhood cancer in…

  20. Stem cells, colorectal cancer and cancer stem cell markers correlations.

    PubMed

    Cherciu, Irina; Bărbălan, A; Pirici, D; Mărgăritescu, C; Săftoiu, A

    2014-01-01

    : The idea of stem cells as being progenitors of cancer was initially controversial, but later supported by research in the field of leukemia and solid tumors. Afterwards, it was established that genetic abnormalities can affect the stem and progenitor cells, leading to uncontrolled replication and deregulated differentiation. These alterations will cause the changeover to cancerous stem cells (CSC) having two main characteristics: tumor initiation and maintenance. This review will focus on the colorectal cancer stem cell (CR-CSCs) theory which provides a better understanding of different tumor processes: initiation, aggressive growth, recurrence, treatment resistance and metastasis. A search in PubMed/Medline was performed using the following keywords: colorectal cancer stem cells (CR-CSCs), colorectal neoplasms stem cells, colorectal cancer stem cell (CR-CSCs) markers, etc. Electronic searches were supplemented by hand searching reference lists, abstracts and proceedings from meetings. Isolation of CR-CSCs can be achieved by targeting and selecting subpopulation of tumor cells based on expression of one or multiple cell surface markers associated with cancer self-renewal, markers as: CD133, CD166, CD44, CD24, beta1 integrin-CD29, Lgr5, EpCAM (ESA), ALDH-1, Msi-1, DCAMLK1 or EphB receptors. The identification and localization of CR-CSCs through different markers will hopefully lead to a better stratification of prognosis and treatment response, as well as the development of new effective strategies for cancer management.

  1. Circulating tumor cells in colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Torino, Francesco; Bonmassar, Enzo; Bonmassar, Laura; De Vecchis, Liana; Barnabei, Agnese; Zuppi, Cecilia; Capoluongo, Ettore; Aquino, Angelo

    2013-11-01

    The availability of sensitive methods has allowed the detailed study of circulating tumor cells only recently. Evolving evidence support the prognostic and predictive role of these cells in patients affected by several solid tumors, including colorectal cancer. Ongoing studies are aimed at confirming that the molecular characterization of circulating tumor cells in peripheral blood and in bone marrow of patients is a powerful tool to improve the patient risk-stratification, to monitor activity of the drugs, to develop more appropriate targeted therapies and tailored treatments. In parallel, results from these correlative studies promise to gain a better biological understanding of the metastatic process. The clinical utility of the detection of circulating tumor cells in patients affected by colorectal cancer is still hampered by a number of specific hurdles. Improvement in sensitivity and specificity of the available methods of detection, standardization of these methods and functional characterization of circulating tumor cells in well designed and statistically well powered studies are the key steps to reach these ambitious objectives in colorectal cancer patients as well.

  2. Cancer Support Needs for African American Breast Cancer Survivors and Caregivers.

    PubMed

    Haynes-Maslow, Lindsey; Allicock, Marlyn; Johnson, La-Shell

    2016-03-01

    Improved cancer screening and treatment advances have led to higher cancer survival rates in the United States. However, racial disparities in breast cancer survival persist for African American women who experience lower survival rates than white women. These disparities suggest that unmet needs related to survivorship still exist. This study focuses on the challenges that both African American cancer survivors and caregivers face across the cancer continuum. Five African American focus groups examined cancer survivor and caregiver support needs. Focus groups were recorded, transcribed, and uploaded into Atlas.ti. Thematic content analysis was applied to the text during the coding process. Themes were identified and emphasized based on the research team's integrated and unified final codes. Forty-one African Americans participated in five focus groups: 22 cancer survivors and 19 caregivers. Participants discussed five themes: (1) a culture that discourages the discussion of cancer; (2) lack of support services for African American cancer survivors; (3) lack of support services for cancer caregivers; (4) need for culturally appropriate cancer resources, including resources targeted at African American women; and (5) aspects that were helpful to cancer survivors and caregivers, including connecting with other survivors and caregivers, and having strong social support networks. We gained new insight into the unmet support needs for survivors and caregivers, especially when coping with the cancer experience continuum. While some cancer and caregiver support services exist, our study reveals a great need for services that incorporate the cultural differences that exist across races. PMID:25869580

  3. Cancer Support Needs for African American Breast Cancer Survivors and Caregivers.

    PubMed

    Haynes-Maslow, Lindsey; Allicock, Marlyn; Johnson, La-Shell

    2016-03-01

    Improved cancer screening and treatment advances have led to higher cancer survival rates in the United States. However, racial disparities in breast cancer survival persist for African American women who experience lower survival rates than white women. These disparities suggest that unmet needs related to survivorship still exist. This study focuses on the challenges that both African American cancer survivors and caregivers face across the cancer continuum. Five African American focus groups examined cancer survivor and caregiver support needs. Focus groups were recorded, transcribed, and uploaded into Atlas.ti. Thematic content analysis was applied to the text during the coding process. Themes were identified and emphasized based on the research team's integrated and unified final codes. Forty-one African Americans participated in five focus groups: 22 cancer survivors and 19 caregivers. Participants discussed five themes: (1) a culture that discourages the discussion of cancer; (2) lack of support services for African American cancer survivors; (3) lack of support services for cancer caregivers; (4) need for culturally appropriate cancer resources, including resources targeted at African American women; and (5) aspects that were helpful to cancer survivors and caregivers, including connecting with other survivors and caregivers, and having strong social support networks. We gained new insight into the unmet support needs for survivors and caregivers, especially when coping with the cancer experience continuum. While some cancer and caregiver support services exist, our study reveals a great need for services that incorporate the cultural differences that exist across races.

  4. Aflibercept in the Treatment of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tzu-Fei; Lockhart, Albert Craig

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in the US. In recent decades, an improved understanding of the role of the angiogenesis pathway in colorectal cancer has led to advancements in treatment. Bevacizumab has been shown to improve the progression-free survival and overall survival when combined with cytotoxic chemotherapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, and at present is the only antiangiogenesis agent approved for the treatment of this cancer. Aflibercept is a novel angiogenesis-targeting agent, and has demonstrated efficacy in treating metastatic colorectal cancer in a recent randomized Phase III trial. Here we review the role of angiogenesis in the tumorigenesis of colorectal cancer, strategies for targeting angiogenesis, and the clinical development of aflibercept. PMID:22253552

  5. [Cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitors and colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Bernardeau-Mozer, Marianne; Chaussade, Stanislas

    2004-05-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox2) is an inductible isoenzyme of cyclooxygenase undetectable in normal colonic mucosa and overexpressed in 80% colonic tumor. Several works in vitro and in vivo showed that Cox2 plays a key role in the multistep process of colorectal tumorigenesis such apoptosis inhibition of cellular proliferation and angiogenesis induction. So that Cox2 represent a potential molecular target in colorectal management and specific Cox2 inhibitors may be useful as chemopreventive as well as therapeutic agent in humans. In animals study Cox2 inhibitors was shown to be effective and in humans Cox2 inhibitors are approved by the Food and Drug Administration as an adjunct to endoscopic surveillance and surgery in patients with Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP). The purpose of this article is to review the relationship between Cox2/Cox2 inhibitors and differents signaling pathways of colorectal carcinogenesis and to precise their possible molecular mechanisms of action. This work although review clinicals data of their efficacy as chemopreventive agent as well as therapeutic in the differents group at risk for colorectal cancer. PMID:15239336

  6. Childhood Cancer Survivor Study: An Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  7. Colorectal Cancer Risk Assessment Tool

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rectal Cancer Home Page Colon and Rectal Cancer: Prevention, Genetics, Causes Tests to ... corresponding to answers “medications that do not contain aspirin unknown" (page 4 of 7). Things to know ...

  8. Variation in the association between colorectal cancer susceptibility loci and colorectal polyps by polyp type.

    PubMed

    Burnett-Hartman, Andrea N; Newcomb, Polly A; Hutter, Carolyn M; Peters, Ulrike; Passarelli, Michael N; Schwartz, Malaika R; Upton, Melissa P; Zhu, Lee-Ching; Potter, John D; Makar, Karen W

    2014-07-15

    We conducted a case-control study of the association between subsets of colorectal polyps, including adenomas and serrated polyps, and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) related to colorectal cancer through prior genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Participants were enrollees in the Group Health Cooperative (Seattle, Washington) aged 24-79 years who received a colonoscopy from 1998 to 2007, donated a buccal or blood sample, and completed a structured questionnaire. We performed genotyping of 13 colorectal cancer susceptibility SNPs. Polytomous logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for associations between polyps and the colorectal cancer risk allele for each SNP under a log-additive model. Analyses included 781 controls, 489 cases with adenoma, 401 cases with serrated polyps, and 188 cases with both polyp types. The following SNPs were associated with advanced adenomas: rs10936599, rs10795668, rs16892766, and rs9929218 (P < 0.05). For nonadvanced adenomas and for serrated polyps overall, only rs961253 was statistically significant (P < 0.05). These associations were in the same directions as those in prior colorectal cancer GWAS. No SNP was significantly associated with hyperplastic polyps, and only rs6983267 was significantly associated with sessile serrated polyps, but this association was opposite of that found in colorectal cancer GWAS. Our results suggest that the association between colorectal cancer susceptibility SNPs and colorectal polyps varies by polyp type.

  9. [A childhood and adolescence cancer survivors' association: Les Aguerris].

    PubMed

    Ly, Kai Yan; Vélius, Élodie; Pitot, Maxime; Rivieri, Lionel; Dupont, Morvan

    2015-01-01

    In France, we can estimate that 50,000 adults are childhood or adolescence cancer survivors. Not all of them will experience late effects but they should be informed about their previous disease and should get a detailed summary of treatment information including a personal plan for late effects screening. They also should have access to appropriate follow-up care including detection and treatment of late effects and provision of support and advice. From a follow-up clinic experience, the need of a survivor association has emerged and "Les Aguerris" has been created with several objectives: to improve the quality of life of survivors providing them information about the possible physical, social and psychological consequences of childhood cancer, to raise awareness of public authorities and other actors on questions regarding the need of long-term follow-up of the patients in dedicated clinics, to support researches about late effects of cancer and treatments and to create a network of adult survivors of childhood cancer in relation with other European survivors or parents associations. This paper describes the activities of the association to fulfill its objectives and the annual national meetings they are organizing. PMID:25934653

  10. Motivations associated with physical activity in young breast cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Voege, Patricia; Bower, Julienne E; Stanton, Annette L; Ganz, Patricia A

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity is associated with positive health outcomes in breast cancer survivors. However, factors that promote or discourage physical activity in this population are not fully understood. This cross-sectional study was designed to examine approach and avoidance motivations, barriers for exercise, and their association with physical activity in breast cancer survivors younger than 50 years old at time of diagnosis. Current physical activity levels, approach and avoidance motivations, and barriers to exercise were assessed through self-report questionnaires in young breast cancer survivors (N = 156). Results indicated that barriers to exercise were negatively associated with physical activity (p < .01) while approach motivations were positively associated with physical activity (p < .01) and were most relevant in the context of low perceived barriers (p < .05). Avoidance motivations were not associated with physical activity (p = .91).

  11. Immune cell interplay in colorectal cancer prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Norton, Samuel E; Ward-Hartstonge, Kirsten A; Taylor, Edward S; Kemp, Roslyn A

    2015-01-01

    The immune response to colorectal cancer has proven to be a reliable measure of patient outcome in several studies. However, the complexity of the immune response in this disease is not well understood, particularly the interactions between tumour-associated cells and cells of the innate and adaptive immune system. This review will discuss the relationship between cancer associated fibroblasts and macrophages, as well as between macrophages and T cells, and demonstrate how each population may support or prevent tumour growth in a different immune environment. PMID:26483876

  12. Childhood cancer survivor care: development of the Passport for Care.

    PubMed

    Poplack, David G; Fordis, Michael; Landier, Wendy; Bhatia, Smita; Hudson, Melissa M; Horowitz, Marc E

    2014-12-01

    Survivors of childhood cancer are at risk of long-term adverse effects and late effects of the disease and/or its treatment. In response to national recommendations to improve evidence-based follow-up care, a web-based support system for clinical decision making, the Passport for Care (PFC), was developed for use at the point of care to produce screening recommendations individualized to the survivor. To date, the PFC has been implemented in over half of the nearly 200 clinics affiliated with the Children's Oncology Group across the USA. Most clinician users report that the PFC has been integrated into clinic workflows, and that it fosters improved conversations with survivors about the potential late effects a survivor might experience and about the screening and/or behavioural interventions recommended to improve health status. Furthermore, clinicians using the PFC have indicated that they adhered more closely to follow-up care guidelines. Perspectives on the challenges encountered and lessons learned during the development and deployment of the PFC are reviewed and contrasted with other nationwide approaches to the provision of guidance on survivor follow-up care; furthermore, the implications for the care of childhood cancer survivors are discussed.

  13. Aspirin Metabolomics in Colorectal Cancer Chemoprevention | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Substantial evidence supports the effectiveness of aspirin for cancer chemoprevention in addition to its well-established role in cardiovascular protection. In recent meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials in humans, daily aspirin use reduced incidence, metastasis and mortality from several common types of cancer, especially colorectal cancer. The mechanism(s) by which aspirin exerts an anticancer benefit is uncertain;numerous effects have been described involving both cyclooxygenase-dependent and -independent pathways. |

  14. Perceived religiousness is protective for colorectal cancer: data from the Melbourne Colorectal Cancer Study.

    PubMed Central

    Kune, G A; Kune, S; Watson, L F

    1993-01-01

    The perceived or self-reported degree of 'religiousness' was obtained by interview from 715 colorectal cancer patients and 727 age/sex matched community controls, as part of a large, comprehensive population-based study of colorectal cancer incidence, aetiology and survival (The Melbourne Colorectal Cancer Study) conducted in Melbourne, Australia. Self-reported or perceived 'religiousness', as defined in the study, was a statistically significant protective factor [relative risk (RR) = 0.70, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.6-0.9, P = 0.002]. This statistically significant protection remained after the previously determined major risk factors found in the study, namely a family history of colorectal cancer, dietary risk factors, beer consumption, number of children and age at birth of the first child, were statistically corrected for (P = 0.004). There was no association between Dukes' staging of the cancer and perceived degree of 'religiousness' (P = 0.42). Although self-reported or perceived 'religiousness' was associated with a median survival time of 62 months compared with 52 months in those self-reporting as being 'non-religious', this difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.64). PMID:8258800

  15. TNIK inhibition abrogates colorectal cancer stemness

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Mari; Uno, Yuko; Ohbayashi, Naomi; Ohata, Hirokazu; Mimata, Ayako; Kukimoto-Niino, Mutsuko; Moriyama, Hideki; Kashimoto, Shigeki; Inoue, Tomoko; Goto, Naoko; Okamoto, Koji; Shirouzu, Mikako; Sawa, Masaaki; Yamada, Tesshi

    2016-01-01

    Canonical Wnt/β-catenin signalling is essential for maintaining intestinal stem cells, and its constitutive activation has been implicated in colorectal carcinogenesis. We and others have previously identified Traf2- and Nck-interacting kinase (TNIK) as an essential regulatory component of the T-cell factor-4 and β-catenin transcriptional complex. Consistent with this, Tnik-deficient mice are resistant to azoxymethane-induced colon tumorigenesis, and Tnik−/−/Apcmin/+ mutant mice develop significantly fewer intestinal tumours. Here we report the first orally available small-molecule TNIK inhibitor, NCB-0846, having anti-Wnt activity. X-ray co-crystal structure analysis reveals that NCB-0846 binds to TNIK in an inactive conformation, and this binding mode seems to be essential for Wnt inhibition. NCB-0846 suppresses Wnt-driven intestinal tumorigenesis in Apcmin/+ mice and the sphere- and tumour-forming activities of colorectal cancer cells. TNIK is required for the tumour-initiating function of colorectal cancer stem cells. Its inhibition is a promising therapeutic approach. PMID:27562646

  16. TNIK inhibition abrogates colorectal cancer stemness.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Mari; Uno, Yuko; Ohbayashi, Naomi; Ohata, Hirokazu; Mimata, Ayako; Kukimoto-Niino, Mutsuko; Moriyama, Hideki; Kashimoto, Shigeki; Inoue, Tomoko; Goto, Naoko; Okamoto, Koji; Shirouzu, Mikako; Sawa, Masaaki; Yamada, Tesshi

    2016-01-01

    Canonical Wnt/β-catenin signalling is essential for maintaining intestinal stem cells, and its constitutive activation has been implicated in colorectal carcinogenesis. We and others have previously identified Traf2- and Nck-interacting kinase (TNIK) as an essential regulatory component of the T-cell factor-4 and β-catenin transcriptional complex. Consistent with this, Tnik-deficient mice are resistant to azoxymethane-induced colon tumorigenesis, and Tnik(-/-)/Apc(min/+) mutant mice develop significantly fewer intestinal tumours. Here we report the first orally available small-molecule TNIK inhibitor, NCB-0846, having anti-Wnt activity. X-ray co-crystal structure analysis reveals that NCB-0846 binds to TNIK in an inactive conformation, and this binding mode seems to be essential for Wnt inhibition. NCB-0846 suppresses Wnt-driven intestinal tumorigenesis in Apc(min/+) mice and the sphere- and tumour-forming activities of colorectal cancer cells. TNIK is required for the tumour-initiating function of colorectal cancer stem cells. Its inhibition is a promising therapeutic approach. PMID:27562646

  17. Social outcomes in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study cohort.

    PubMed

    Gurney, James G; Krull, Kevin R; Kadan-Lottick, Nina; Nicholson, H Stacy; Nathan, Paul C; Zebrack, Brad; Tersak, Jean M; Ness, Kirsten K

    2009-05-10

    Difficulties with negotiating and achieving desired social outcomes in life may be exacerbated by the experience of childhood cancer, including adverse effects from therapies used to achieve a cure. This review of previous publications from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS) and other relevant literature provides insight into the prevalence of, and risk factors for, poor educational attainment, less than optimal employment status, and interpersonal relationship issues among long-term survivors of childhood cancer. The impacts of emotional health and physical disability on social outcomes are also examined. Study results suggest that childhood cancer survivors generally have similar high school graduation rates, but are more likely to require special education services than sibling comparison groups. Survivors are slightly less likely than expected to attend college, and are more likely to be unemployed and not married as young adults. Cancers and treatments that result in impairment to the CNS, particularly brain tumors, or that impact sensory functioning, such as hearing loss, are associated with greater risk for undesirable social outcomes, as are emotional health problems and physical disability. This review of relevant data from CCSS and other studies provides information on risk factors for social problems into adulthood. A greater understanding of the long-term social impacts from the diagnosis and treatment of childhood cancer is critically important for developing targeted interventions to prevent or ameliorate adverse psychosocial effects. PMID:19224833

  18. Exercise Preference Patterns, Resources, and Environment among Rural Breast Cancer Survivors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Laura Q.; Markwell, Stephen J.; Courneya, Kerry S.; McAuley, Edward; Verhulst, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Context: Rural breast cancer survivors may be at increased risk for inadequate exercise participation. Purpose: To determine for rural breast cancer survivors: (1) exercise preference "patterns," (2) exercise resources and associated factors, and (3) exercise environment. Methods: A mail survey was sent to rural breast cancer survivors identified…

  19. Evaluation of the Quality of Life in Adult Cancer Survivors (QLACS) scale for early post-treatment breast cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    Sohl, Stephanie J.; Levine, Beverly

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The end of primary treatment for cancer patients is increasingly recognized as an important time of adjustment that may impact quality of life (QoL). A psychometrically sound QoL instrument that assesses the mix of acute and longer-term concerns present during this unique time has not yet been identified. This article evaluates the Quality of Life in Adult Cancer Survivors (QLACS) scale, originally developed for long-term (≥5 years) cancer survivors, as an appropriate QoL measure for this transition period. Methods Psychometric properties of the QLACS were evaluated in a sample of post-treatment breast cancer survivors 18–24 months post-diagnosis. This observational study consisted of women (n = 552) aged 25 years and older (mean = 55.4 years) who were diagnosed with stage I, II, or III breast cancer. The 47 items of the QLACS comprise 12 domains: seven domains are generic, and five are cancer specific. Results The QLACS demonstrated adequate internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha for the 12 domains ranged from 0.79 to 0.91) and good convergent and divergent validity (assessed by comparison with the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy and other measures). Conclusions The QLACS appears to be consistent with other widely accepted measures in capturing QoL, while also allowing for more inclusive measurement of specific issues relevant to post-treatment cancer survivors. These data, in addition to previous data supporting use of the QLACS across different cancer sites, suggest that the QLACS is a promising comprehensive QoL measure appropriate for breast cancer survivors transitioning off active treatment. PMID:24996392

  20. Colorectal cancer screening: The role of the noninvasive options.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Lisa; Varcak, Susan Combs

    2016-09-01

    Recommended screening options for colorectal cancer are divided into noninvasive stool-based options, and invasive procedure-based options. Because multiple screening strategies are effective, efforts to reduce deaths from colorectal cancer should focus on maximizing the number of patients who are screened. This article reviews noninvasive stool-based screening options. PMID:27575898

  1. NIH study finds sigmoidoscopy reduces colorectal cancer rates

    Cancer.gov

    Study finds that flexible sigmoidoscopy is effective in reducing the rates of new cases and deaths due to colorectal cancer. Researchers found that overall colorectal cancer mortality was reduced by 26 percent and incidence was reduced by 21 percent as a

  2. Radiation, Atherosclerotic Risk Factors, and Stroke Risk in Survivors of Pediatric Cancer: A Report From the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Sabine; Fullerton, Heather J.; Stratton, Kayla; Leisenring, Wendy; Weathers, Rita E.; Stovall, Marilyn; Armstrong, Gregory T.; Goldsby, Robert E.; Packer, Roger J.; Sklar, Charles A.; Bowers, Daniel C.; Robison, Leslie L.; Krull, Kevin R.

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To test the hypotheses that (1) the increased risk of stroke conferred by childhood cranial radiation therapy (CRT) persists into adulthood; and (2) atherosclerotic risk factors further increase the stroke risk in cancer survivors. Methods and Materials: The Childhood Cancer Survivor Study is a multi-institutional retrospective cohort study of 14,358 5-year survivors of childhood cancer and 4023 randomly selected sibling controls with longitudinal follow-up. Age-adjusted incidence rates of self-reported late-occurring (≥5 years after diagnosis) first stroke were calculated. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used to identify independent stroke predictors. Results: During a mean follow-up of 23.3 years, 292 survivors reported a late-occurring stroke. The age-adjusted stroke rate per 100,000 person-years was 77 (95% confidence interval [CI] 62-96), compared with 9.3 (95% CI 4-23) for siblings. Treatment with CRT increased stroke risk in a dose-dependent manner: hazard ratio 5.9 (95% CI 3.5-9.9) for 30-49 Gy CRT and 11.0 (7.4-17.0) for 50+ Gy CRT. The cumulative stroke incidence in survivors treated with 50+ Gy CRT was 1.1% (95% CI 0.4-1.8%) at 10 years after diagnosis and 12% (95% CI 8.9-15.0%) at 30 years. Hypertension increased stroke hazard by 4-fold (95% CI 2.8-5.5) and in black survivors by 16-fold (95% CI 6.9-36.6). Conclusion: Young adult pediatric cancer survivors have an increased stroke risk that is associated with CRT in a dose-dependent manner. Atherosclerotic risk factors enhanced this risk and should be treated aggressively.

  3. Occupation-related risks for colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Spiegelman, D.; Wegman, D.H.

    1985-11-01

    Several population data bases were used to generate hypotheses about associations between colorectal cancer and workplace exposures. The Third National Cancer Survey interview sample was used to select 343 male and 208 female cases and 626 male and 1,235 female cancer controls. Potential work exposures were assigned with the use of data from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health National Occupational Hazard Survey. Dietary factors were modeled from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data. Work-related stress was considered with the use of a model based on the U.S. Department of Labor's Quality of Employment Survey. Other risk factors included age, race, ponderosity, and menopausal status. Logistic analysis yielded hypotheses for colon cancer risk in males with potentially high exposure to solvents, abrasives, and fuel oil and in those in jobs with high demand and low control (high stress). Hypotheses emerged for females with potentially high exposure to dyes, solvents, and grinding wheel dust.

  4. Genetic pathways in colorectal and other cancers.

    PubMed

    Ilyas, M; Straub, J; Tomlinson, I P; Bodmer, W F

    1999-12-01

    Cells from cancers show aberrant behaviour such as unrestrained growth, invasion into adjacent tissue and metastasis. All these features of cancer cell behaviour can be explained in terms of genetic changes and the functional impact of these changes. In this review, colorectal cancer (CRC) is examined as a classical example of multistep carcinogenesis. First there is an overview which shows that cancers develop by a process of somatic evolution. This gives rise to preferred genetic pathways of tumorigenesis. The factors which may influence the development and ultimate choice of genetic pathways are then examined. Next, CRC is studied as a specific disease and the putative genetic pathways are described. The mutations that comprise these pathways and the possible functional sequelae of these are explored. The review concludes with a look at those avenues which may further elucidate the natural history of CRC and lead to improved therapy.

  5. Genetic pathways in colorectal and other cancers.

    PubMed

    Ilyas, M; Straub, J; Tomlinson, I P; Bodmer, W F

    1999-03-01

    Cells from cancers show aberrant behaviour such as unrestrained growth, invasion into adjacent tissue and metastasis. All these features of cancer cell behaviour can be explained in terms of genetic changes and the functional impact of these changes. In this review, colorectal cancer (CRC) is examined as a classical example of multistep carcinogenesis. First there is an overview which shows that cancers develop by a process of somatic evolution. This gives rise to preferred genetic pathways of tumorigenesis. The factors which may influence the development and ultimate choice of genetic pathways are then examined. Next, CRC is studied as a specific disease and the putative genetic pathways are described. The mutations that comprise these pathways and the possible functional sequelae of these are explored. The review concludes with a look at those avenues which may further elucidate the natural history of CRC and lead to improved therapy.

  6. Survivorship education for Latina breast cancer survivors: Empowering Survivors through education

    PubMed Central

    Juarez, Gloria; Mayorga, Lina; Hurria, Arti; Ferrell, Betty

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Nueva Luz is an English and Spanish quality of life (QOL) intervention developed to address the educational needs of Latina breast cancer survivors and provide strategies to assist in their transition into survivorship. Methods A qualitative approach was used to evaluate the English and Spanish educational intervention (Nueva Luz). A purposive sample of eight Latina breast cancer survivors was selected from the group who received the intervention to participate in a digitally recorded interview. Data was analyzed using thematic analysis. Results Findings provide evidence that the one-on-one tailored approach is a feasible and acceptable method of providing a bilingual psychosocial intervention. The provision of printed bilingual information along with the verbal instruction from a bilingual and culturally competent health care provider can be effective in helping Latina breast cancer survivor’s transition successfully into survivorship, improve QOL and contribute to better patient outcomes Conclusions The study informs our understanding of the cultural context in patient education content and delivery of psychosocial interventions. The findings may also have relevance for other ethnic minority cancer survivors. PMID:24416043

  7. Virtual colonoscopy in stenosing colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Coccetta, Marco; Migliaccio, Carla; La Mura, Francesco; Farinella, Eriberto; Galanou, Ioanna; Delmonaco, Pamela; Spizzirri, Alessandro; Napolitano, Vincenzo; Cattorini, Lorenzo; Milani, Diego; Cirocchi, Roberto; Sciannameo, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    Background Between 5 and 10% of the patients undergoing a colonoscopy cannot have a complete procedure mainly due to stenosing neoplastic lesion of rectum or distal colon. Nevertheless the elective surgical treatment concerning the stenosis is to be performed after the pre-operative assessment of the colonic segments upstream the cancer. The aim of this study is to illustrate our experience with the Computed Tomographic Colonography (CTC) for the pre-operative assessment of the entire colon in the patients with stenosing colorectal cancers. Methods From January 2005 till March 2009, we observed and treated surgically 43 patients with stenosing colorectal neoplastic lesions. All patients did not tolerate the pre-operative colonoscopy. For this reason they underwent a pre-operative CTC in order to have a complete assessment of the entire colon. All patients underwent a follow-up colonoscopy 3 months after the surgical treatment. The CTC results were compared with both macroscopic examination of the specimen and the follow-up coloscopy. Results The pre-operative CTC showed four synchronous lesions in four patients (9.3% of the cases). The macroscopic examination of the specimen revealed three small sessile polyps (3 - 4 mm in diameter) missed in the pre-operative assessment near the stenosing colorectal cancer. The follow-up colonoscopy showed four additional sessile polyps with a diameter between 3 - 11 mm in three patients. Our experience shows that CTC has a sensitivity of 83,7%. Conclusion In patients with stenosing colonic lesions, CTC allows to assess the entire colon pre-operatively avoiding the need of an intraoperative colonoscopy. More synchronous lesions are detected and treated at the time of the elective surgery for the stenosing cancer avoiding further surgery later on. PMID:19900286

  8. Perceived Positive Impact of Cancer Among Long-term Survivors of Childhood Cancer: a report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

    PubMed Central

    Zebrack, Brad J.; Stuber, Margaret L.; Meeske, Kathleen A.; Phipps, Sean; Krull, Kevin R.; Liu, Qi; Parry, Carla; Hamilton, Rachel; Robison, Leslie L.; Zeltzer, Lonnie K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Investigations examining psychosocial adjustment among childhood cancer survivors have focused primarily on negative effects and psychopathology. Emergent literature suggests the existence of positive impact or adjustment experienced after cancer, as well. The purpose of this study is to examine the distribution of Perceived Positive Impact (PPI) and its correlates in young adult survivors of childhood cancer. Methods 6,425 survivors and 360 siblings completed a comprehensive health survey, inclusive of a modified version of the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory (PTGI) as a measure of PPI. Linear regression models were used to examine demographic, disease and treatment characteristics associated with PPI. Results Survivors were significantly more likely than siblings to report PPI. Endorsement of PPI was significantly greater among female and non-white survivors, and among survivors exposed to at least one intense therapy, a second malignancy or cancer recurrence. Survivors diagnosed at older ages and fewer years since diagnosis were more likely to report PPI. Income, education and marital/relationship status appeared to have varied relationships to PPI depending upon the subscale being evaluated. Conclusions The existence and variability of PPI in survivors in this study suggest that individual characteristics, inclusive of race, gender, cancer type, intensity of treatment, age at diagnosis and time since diagnosis, have unique and specific associations with different aspects of perceived positive outcomes of childhood cancer. PMID:21425388

  9. Neuroepidemiology of cancer and treatment-related neurocognitive dysfunction in adult-onset cancer patients and survivors.

    PubMed

    Jean-Pierre, P; McDonald, B C

    2016-01-01

    Cancer and treatment-related neurocognitive dysfunction (CRND) - impairments in aspects of cognition commonly including attention and memory, information-processing speed, and executive functioning - can negatively affect patients' and survivors' participation in routine activities of daily living and overall quality of life. CRND can be enduring, and varies in severity level. The epidemiology of CRND is not yet clearly established; reported incidence has ranged from 17% to 75% among patients and survivors of noncentral nervous system malignancies, including breast, prostate, cervical, and colorectal cancers. Progress in the development of strategies for assessing and treating CRND has been delayed by limitations in the knowledge of the precise etiology of this adverse condition, as well as the lack of sufficiently sensitive and reliable methods to determine its presence and quantify its severity. In this chapter, we present a brief description of the concept of CRND and its clinical presentation, and discuss the descriptive epidemiology, pathophysiology, risk factors, and availability of treatment interventions. This neuroepidemiologic perspective provides a framework for characterizing CRND, determining its etiology, and understanding its negative effects on routine activities of daily living, to help support the development and testing of reliable interventions to treat this deleterious condition for patients and survivors. PMID:27637965

  10. Radiation and cancer risk in atomic-bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Kodama, K; Ozasa, K; Okubo, T

    2012-03-01

    With the aim of accurately assessing the effects of radiation exposure in the Japanese atomic-bomb survivors, the Radiation Effects Research Foundation has, over several decades, conducted studies of the Life Span Study (LSS) cohort, comprising 93 000 atomic-bomb survivors and 27 000 controls. Solid cancer: the recent report on solid cancer incidence found that at age 70 years following exposure at age 30 years, solid cancer rates increase by about 35%  Gy(-1) for men and 58% Gy(-1) for women. Age-at-exposure is an important risk modifier. In the case of lung cancer, cigarette smoking has been found to be an important risk modifier. Radiation has similar effects on first-primary and second-primary cancer risks. Finally, radiation-associated increases in cancer rates appear to persist throughout life. Leukaemia: the recent report on leukaemia mortality suggests that radiation effects on leukaemia mortality persisted for more than 50 years. Moreover, significant dose-response for myelodysplastic syndrome was observed in Nagasaki LSS members even 40-60 years after radiation exposure. Future perspective: given the continuing solid cancer increase in the survivor population, the LSS will likely continue to provide important new information on radiation exposure and solid cancer risks for another 15-20 years, especially for those exposed at a young age.

  11. Radiation and cancer risk in atomic-bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Kodama, K; Ozasa, K; Okubo, T

    2012-03-01

    With the aim of accurately assessing the effects of radiation exposure in the Japanese atomic-bomb survivors, the Radiation Effects Research Foundation has, over several decades, conducted studies of the Life Span Study (LSS) cohort, comprising 93 000 atomic-bomb survivors and 27 000 controls. Solid cancer: the recent report on solid cancer incidence found that at age 70 years following exposure at age 30 years, solid cancer rates increase by about 35%  Gy(-1) for men and 58% Gy(-1) for women. Age-at-exposure is an important risk modifier. In the case of lung cancer, cigarette smoking has been found to be an important risk modifier. Radiation has similar effects on first-primary and second-primary cancer risks. Finally, radiation-associated increases in cancer rates appear to persist throughout life. Leukaemia: the recent report on leukaemia mortality suggests that radiation effects on leukaemia mortality persisted for more than 50 years. Moreover, significant dose-response for myelodysplastic syndrome was observed in Nagasaki LSS members even 40-60 years after radiation exposure. Future perspective: given the continuing solid cancer increase in the survivor population, the LSS will likely continue to provide important new information on radiation exposure and solid cancer risks for another 15-20 years, especially for those exposed at a young age. PMID:22394591

  12. Worse quality of life in young and recently diagnosed breast cancer survivors compared with female survivors of other cancers: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingmei; Humphreys, Keith; Eriksson, Mikael; Dar, Huma; Brandberg, Yvonne; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila

    2016-12-01

    Literature focusing on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) by cancer site among women only is scarce. This study examines HRQoL of breast cancer (BC) survivors compared with female survivors of other cancers, and to understand which subgroups of BC survivors were particularly at risk of reduced HRQoL. We placed emphasis on young (<50 years) and recently diagnosed (≤5 years) survivors, where the deficits in HRQoL were most pronounced. The cross-sectional study consisted of 2,224 BC survivors, 8,504 non-cancer controls and 2,205 other cancer survivors in the Karma study. We examined HRQoL differences using linear regression analyses in the whole cohort and in a subset of young and recently diagnosed BC survivors (n = 242) and female survivors of other cancers (n = 140) with comparable ages at diagnosis (43.6 vs 43.6, p = 0.917) and time since diagnosis (2.3 vs 2.8 years, p < 0.001). HRQoL was assessed using the EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaire. While only cognitive functioning was significantly compromised in BC survivors compared with survivors of other cancers when women of all ages were included, young BC survivors reported significantly lower HRQoL on multiple functional scales (global quality of life, emotional, role, social and cognitive functioning) and experienced more fatigue and insomnia. BC survivors with any prior medical history of mental disorders reported poorer HRQoL than those without such a history. We also observed a close-knit relationship between tumor and treatment characteristics. BC survivors perform poorly in HRQoL in comparison with female survivors of other cancers. Our results emphasize the importance of age- and gender-appropriate comparison groups. PMID:27486698

  13. Colorectal cancer screening with virtual colonoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Yaorong; Vining, David J.; Ahn, David K.; Stelts, David R.

    1999-05-01

    Early detection and removal of colorectal polyps have been proven to reduce mortality from colorectal carcinoma (CRC), the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. Unfortunately, traditional techniques for CRC examination (i.e., barium enema, sigmoidoscopy, and colonoscopy) are unsuitable for mass screening because of either low accuracy or poor public acceptance, costs, and risks. Virtual colonoscopy (VC) is a minimally invasive alternative that is based on tomographic scanning of the colon. After a patient's bowel is optimally cleansed and distended with gas, a fast tomographic scan, typically helical computed tomography (CT), of the abdomen is performed during a single breath-hold acquisition. Two-dimensional (2D) slices and three-dimensional (3D) rendered views of the colon lumen generated from the tomographic data are then examined for colorectal polyps. Recent clinical studies conducted at several institutions including ours have shown great potential for this technology to be an effective CRC screening tool. In this paper, we describe new methods to improve bowel preparation, colon lumen visualization, colon segmentation, and polyp detection. Our initial results show that VC with the new bowel preparation and imaging protocol is capable of achieving accuracy comparable to conventional colonoscopy and our new algorithms for image analysis contribute to increased accuracy and efficiency in VC examinations.

  14. MTDH genetic variants in colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Gnosa, Sebastian; Ticha, Ivana; Haapaniemi, Staffan; Sun, Xiao-Feng

    2016-01-01

    The colorectal carcinogenesis is a complex process encompassing genetic alterations. The oncoprotein AEG-1, encoded by the MTDH gene, was shown previously to be involved in colorectal cancer (CRC). The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and the spectrum of MTDH variants in tumor tissue, and their relationship to clinicopathological variables in CRC patients. The study included tumors from 356 unselected CRC patients. Mutation analysis of the MTDH gene, including coding region and adjacent intronic sequences, was performed by direct DNA sequencing. The corresponding normal colorectal tissue was analyzed in the carriers of exonic variant to confirm germline or somatic origin. We detected 42 intronic variants, where 25 were novel. Furthermore, we found 8 exonic variants of which four, one missense (c.977C > G-germline) and three frameshift mutations (c.533delA-somatic, c.1340dupA-unknown origin, c.1731delA-unknown origin), were novel. In silico prediction analyses suggested four deleterious variants (c.232G > T, c.533delA, c.1340dupA, and c.1731delA). There were no correlations between the MTDH variants and tumor stage, differentiation or patient survival. We described several novel exonic and intronic variants of the MTDH gene. The detection of likely pathogenic truncating mutations and alterations in functional protein domains indicate their clinical significance, although none of the variants had prognostic potential. PMID:26983693

  15. Polysomnographic Study of Sleep in Survivors of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Reinsel, Ruth A.; Starr, Tatiana D.; O'Sullivan, Barbara; Passik, Steven D.; Kavey, Neil B.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objective: Insomnia is a frequent complaint in breast cancer patients during and after treatment. Breast cancer survivors, 1–10 years posttreatment, underwent in-lab polysomnography (PSG) to objectively define the insomnia in those patients with such a complaint. Methods: Twenty-six breast cancer survivors (aged 39–80, mean 54.0 months posttreatment) spent 2 nights in the sleep laboratory. Sleep on Night 2 was scored for sleep stages, sleep onset latency, REM sleep onset latency, wake time, apneas and hypopneas, periodic limb movements and arousals. Subjects were allocated into 2 groups by their scores on the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI): no/ mild sleep disturbance (PSQI score ≤ 9, n = 15) or moderate/ severe sleep disturbance (PSQI ≥ 10, n = 11). Results: Standard PSG/EEG parameters failed to differentiate insomniacs from non-insomniacs. The single variable that distinguished the insomnia group was periodic limb movements in sleep (PLMS). PLMS were significantly correlated (r ≅ 0.7, p < 0.02) with subjective report of insomnia on PSQI and insomnia severity index. Log[Number of PLMS] was higher in the moderate/severe insomnia group (p = 0.008). Five of 11 patients in the moderate/severe insomnia group had a PLMS index ≥ 15, compared to only one of 15 patients in the none/mild insomnia group (p = 0.02). Menopausal symptoms and use of caffeine, hypnotics, and antidepressants were unrelated to insomnia severity or PLMS. Conclusions: PLMS was the sole PSG variable that separated breast cancer survivors with moderate/severe insomnia from those with no/mild sleep disturbance. Further study of the incidence and significance of PLMS in breast cancer survivors with the complaint of insomnia is merited. Citation: Reinsel RA, Starr TD, O'Sullivan B, Passik SD, Kavey NB. Polysomnographic study of sleep in survivors of breast cancer. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(12):1361–1370. PMID:26194735

  16. Exercise for Breast Cancer Survivors: Research Evidence and Clinical Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courneya, Kerry S.; Mackey, John R.; McKenzie, Donald C.

    2002-01-01

    Exercise can significantly benefit breast cancer survivors during and after treatment. Moderate intensity aerobic exercise as well as resistance training are important. Psychological health is optimized by enjoyable exercise that develops new skills, incorporates social interaction, and occurs in a stimulating environment. Several conditions…

  17. Experiences of Parents of Childhood Cancer Survivors: A Qualitative Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Dongen-Melman, J. E. W. M.; van Zuuren, F. J.; Verhulst, F. C.

    1998-01-01

    Interviews with parents of child-cancer survivors about the late consequences of the disease were utilized in a qualitative research study. Results indicate that parents experienced changes of a definite and long-lasting nature as a result of the child's survival; feelings of loss and preservation of problems prevailed. (Author/MKA)

  18. The Effect of Cancer on Suicide among Elderly Holocaust Survivors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakash, Ora; Liphshitz, Irena; Keinan-Boker, Lital; Levav, Itzhak

    2013-01-01

    Jewish-Israelis of European origin with cancer have higher suicide rates relative to their counterparts in the general population. We investigated whether this effect results from the high proportion of Holocaust survivors among them, due to vulnerabilities arising from the earlier traumas they sustained. The study was based on all Jewish-European…

  19. Searching for maintenance in exercise interventions for cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    Ory, Marcia G.; Friedman, Daniela B.; Dwyer, Andrea; Birken, Sarah A.; Risendal, Betsy

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Translating evidence-based exercise interventions into practice is important for expanding the capacity to support cancer survivors. Using the reach, efficacy/effectiveness, adoption, implementation, and maintenance (RE-AIM) framework and scoping study methodology, we addressed the research question, “What is known about the maintenance of exercise interventions for cancer survivors that would inform translation from research to practice and community settings?” Maintenance was investigated at the individual and setting level. Methods Literature searches were performed in the PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), and Sport Discus databases for articles published from January 2009 to June 2012. Abstracts were judged using a priori criteria for the survivor population, exercise intervention, and maintenance on the individual or setting level. We included completed and planned randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and other study designs. Publications meeting the criteria were reviewed and coded. Results Of the 211 abstracts meeting patient and exercise criteria, 24 (19 RCTs) met the maintenance criteria. Nine of the 12 completed RCTs demonstrated maintenance of intervention outcomes after 3 to 14 months of follow-up. The planned RCTs described interventions lasting 2 to 4.5 months and maintenance intervals lasting 3 to 12 months following the active intervention. Maintenance at the setting level was reported in one publication. Conclusions On the individual level, intervention outcomes were maintained in most studies, in a variety of settings and survivor subpopulations. Maintenance on the setting level was scarcely addressed. This scoping study suggests several strategies that could be taken by agencies, clinicians, and researchers to develop more effective and sustainable exercise programs for cancer survivors. Implications for Cancer Survivors Many benefits of exercise training are maintained for months after cancer

  20. Colorectal cancer development and advances in screening

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Most colon tumors develop via a multistep process involving a series of histological, morphological, and genetic changes that accumulate over time. This has allowed for screening and detection of early-stage precancerous polyps before they become cancerous in individuals at average risk for colorectal cancer (CRC), which may lead to substantial decreases in the incidence of CRC. Despite the known benefits of early screening, CRC remains the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Hence, it is important for health care providers to have an understanding of the risk factors for CRC and various stages of disease development in order to recommend appropriate screening strategies. This article provides an overview of the histological/molecular changes that characterize the development of CRC. It describes the available CRC screening methods and their advantages and limitations and highlights the stages of CRC development in which each screening method is most effective. PMID:27486317

  1. Biomechanical investigation of colorectal cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmieri, Valentina; Lucchetti, Donatella; Maiorana, Alessandro; Papi, Massimiliano; Maulucci, Giuseppe; Ciasca, Gabriele; Svelto, Maria; De Spirito, Marco; Sgambato, Alessandro

    2014-09-01

    The nanomechanical properties of SW480 colon cancer cells were investigated using Atomic Force Microscopy. SW480 cells are composed of two sub-populations with different shape and invasiveness. These two cells populations showed similar adhesion properties while appeared significantly different in term of cells stiffness. Since cell stiffness is related to invasiveness and growth, we suggest elasticity as a useful parameter to distinguish invasive cells inside the colorectal tumor bulk and the high-resolution mechanical mapping as a promising diagnostic tool for the identification of malignant cells.

  2. Management of Colorectal Cancer in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Joleen M

    2016-02-01

    Treatment for colorectal cancer should not be based on age alone. Pooled analyses from clinical trials show that fit older adults are able to tolerate treatment well with similar efficacy as younger adults. When an older adult is considered for treatment, the clinical encounter must evaluate for deficits in physical and cognitive function, and assess comorbidities, medications, and the degree of social support, all which have may affect tolerance of treatment. Based on the degree of fitness of the patient, multiple alternatives to aggressive treatment regimens and strategies exist to minimize toxicity and preserve quality of life during treatment.

  3. Modelling multiscale aspects of colorectal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen, Ingeborg M. M.; Byrne, Helen M.; Johnston, Matthew D.; Edwards, Carina M.; Chapman, S. Jonathan; Bodmer, Walter F.; Maini, Philip K.

    2008-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is responsible for nearly half a million deaths annually world-wide [11]. We present a series of mathematical models describing the dynamics of the intestinal epithelium and the kinetics of the molecular pathway most commonly mutated in CRC, the Wnt signalling network. We also discuss how we are coupling such models to build a multiscale model of normal and aberrant guts. This will enable us to combine disparate experimental and clinical data, to investigate interactions between phenomena taking place at different levels of organisation and, eventually, to test the efficacy of new drugs on the system as a whole.

  4. Dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kajihara, Mikio; Takakura, Kazuki; Kanai, Tomoya; Ito, Zensho; Saito, Keisuke; Takami, Shinichiro; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Okamoto, Masato; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers and a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Although systemic therapy is the standard care for patients with recurrent or metastatic CRC, the prognosis is extremely poor. The optimal sequence of therapy remains unknown. Therefore, alternative strategies, such as immunotherapy, are needed for patients with advanced CRC. This review summarizes evidence from dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy strategies that are currently in clinical trials. In addition, we discuss the possibility of antitumor immune responses through immunoinhibitory PD-1/PD-L1 pathway blockade in CRC patients. PMID:27158196

  5. Dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kajihara, Mikio; Takakura, Kazuki; Kanai, Tomoya; Ito, Zensho; Saito, Keisuke; Takami, Shinichiro; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Okamoto, Masato; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers and a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Although systemic therapy is the standard care for patients with recurrent or metastatic CRC, the prognosis is extremely poor. The optimal sequence of therapy remains unknown. Therefore, alternative strategies, such as immunotherapy, are needed for patients with advanced CRC. This review summarizes evidence from dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy strategies that are currently in clinical trials. In addition, we discuss the possibility of antitumor immune responses through immunoinhibitory PD-1/PD-L1 pathway blockade in CRC patients.

  6. Dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kajihara, Mikio; Takakura, Kazuki; Kanai, Tomoya; Ito, Zensho; Saito, Keisuke; Takami, Shinichiro; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Okamoto, Masato; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers and a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Although systemic therapy is the standard care for patients with recurrent or metastatic CRC, the prognosis is extremely poor. The optimal sequence of therapy remains unknown. Therefore, alternative strategies, such as immunotherapy, are needed for patients with advanced CRC. This review summarizes evidence from dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy strategies that are currently in clinical trials. In addition, we discuss the possibility of antitumor immune responses through immunoinhibitory PD-1/PD-L1 pathway blockade in CRC patients. PMID:27158196

  7. RNF43 is frequently mutated in colorectal and endometrial cancers

    PubMed Central

    Giannakis, Marios; Hodis, Eran; Mu, Xinmeng Jasmine; Yamauchi, Mai; Rosenbluh, Joseph; Cibulskis, Kristian; Saksena, Gordon; Lawrence, Michael S.; Qian, ZhiRong; Nishihara, Reiko; Van Allen, Eliezer M.; Hahn, William C.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Lander, Eric S.; Getz, Gad; Ogino, Shuji; Fuchs, Charles S.; Garraway, Levi A.

    2014-01-01

    We report somatic mutations of RNF43 in over 18% of colorectal adenocarcinomas and endometrial carcinomas. RNF43 encodes an E3 ubiquitin ligase that negatively regulates Wnt signaling. Truncating mutations of RNF43 are more prevalent in microsatellite-unstable tumors and show mutual exclusivity with inactivating APC mutations in colorectal adenocarcinomas. These results indicate that RNF43 is one of the most commonly mutated genes in colorectal and endometrial cancers. PMID:25344691

  8. Low levels of energy expenditure in childhood cancer survivors: Implications for obesity prevention

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Childhood cancer survivors are at an increased risk of obesity but causes for this elevated risk are uncertain. We evaluated total energy expenditure in childhood cancer survivors using the doubly labeled water method in a cross-sectional study of 17 survivors of pediatric leukemia or lymphoma (medi...

  9. Factors influencing quality of life in breast cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Vacek, Pamela M; Winstead-Fry, Patricia; Secker-Walker, Roger H; Hooper, Gloria J; Plante, Dennis A

    2003-08-01

    Longitudinal data from 195 breast cancer survivors were used to identify factors affecting the level and rate of change in quality of life after completion of treatment. Women were interviewed up to four times at approximately yearly intervals using Kaplan and Bush's Quality of Well Being instrument (QWB). Random coefficient regression analysis was used to model QWB as a function of time since diagnosis and personal characteristics. QWB scores decreased over time and the rate of decline increased with age (p = 0.032). This was similar to declines in women with benign breast biopsies, but overall QWB levels were lower in women with breast cancer. Having a spouse tended to slow the rate of decline in breast cancer survivors (p = 0.004). The presence of comorbidity was associated with significantly lower QWB levels (p = 0.037) but did not affect the rate of change over time. Education, family history of breast cancer, cancer stage and treatment modalities were not significantly related to QWB levels or rates of change. Breast cancer survivors experience a reduction in quality of life that persists for years after treatment and is similar in magnitude to that associated with other health problems.

  10. Food groups and colorectal cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Levi, F; Pasche, C; La Vecchia, C; Lucchini, F; Franceschi, S

    1999-01-01

    Most studies of diet and colorectal cancer have considered nutrients and micronutrients, but the role of foods or food groups remains open to debate. To elucidate the issue, we examined data from a case–control study conducted between 1992 and 1997 in the Swiss canton of Vaud. Cases were 223 patients (142 men, 81 women) with incident, histologically confirmed colon (n = 119) or rectal (n = 104) cancer (median age 63 years), linked with the Cancer Registry of the Swiss Canton of Vaud, and controls were 491 subjects (211 men, 280 women, median age 58 years) admitted to the same university hospital for a wide spectrum of acute non-neoplastic conditions unrelated to long-term modifications of diet. Odds ratios (OR) were obtained after allowance for age, sex, education, smoking, alcohol, body mass index, physical activity and total energy intake. Significant associations were observed for refined grain (OR = 1.32 for an increase of one serving per day), and red meat (OR = 1.54), pork and processed meat (OR = 1.27), alcohol (OR = 1.28), and significant protections for whole grain (OR = 0.85), raw (OR = 0.85) and cooked vegetables (OR = 0.69), citrus (OR = 0.86) and other fruits (OR = 0.85), and for coffee (OR = 0.73). Garlic was also protective (OR = 0.32 for the highest tertile of intake). These findings in a central European population support the hypothesis that a diet rich in refined grains and red meat increases the risk of colorectal cancer; they, therefore, support the recommendation to substitute whole grains for refined grain, to limit meat intake, and to increase fruit and vegetable consumption. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10098773

  11. Colonoscopy in Colorectal Cancer Screening: Current Aspects.

    PubMed

    Triantafillidis, John K; Vagianos, Constantine; Malgarinos, George

    2015-09-01

    Colonoscopy represents a very important diagnostic modality for screening for colorectal cancer, because it has the ability to both detect and effectively remove pro-malignant and malignant lesions. It is recommended by almost all international and national gastroenterology and cancer societies, as an initial screening modality or, following a positive fecal occult blood test, to be performed every 10 years in individuals of average risk starting from the age of 50. However, a significant problem is the so-called post-screening (interval) polyps and cancers found some years after the index colonoscopy. In order to reduce the rate of interval cancers it is extremely necessary to optimize the quality and effectiveness of colonoscopy. Bowel preparation is of paramount importance for both accurate diagnosis and subsequent treatment of lesions found on colonoscopy. The quality of bowel preparation could be significantly improved by splitting the dose regimens, a strategy that has been shown to be superior to single-dose regimen. A good endoscopic technique and optimal withdrawal time offering adequate time for inspection, would further optimize the rate of cecal intubation and the number of lesions detected. During the last years, sophisticated devices have been introduced that would further facilitate cecal intubation. The percentage of total colonoscopies is now super-passing the level of 95 % allowing the adenoma detection rate to be greater than the suggestive level of 25 % in men and 15 % in women. This review aims to provide the reader with the current knowledge concerning indications, usefulness, limitations and future perspectives of this probably most important screening technique for colorectal cancer available today. PMID:27217671

  12. Sexual Health Concerns Among Cancer Survivors: Testing a Novel Information-Need Measure Among Breast and Prostate Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Sheila A; Foley, Sallie M; Wittmann, Daniela; Jagielski, Christina H; Dunn, Rodney L; Clark, Patricia M; Griggs, Jennifer J; Peterson, Catherine; Leonard, Marcia; An, Lawrence C; Wei, John T; Montie, James E; Janz, Nancy K

    2016-09-01

    While it is recognized that cancer treatment can contribute to problems in sexual function, much less is currently known about the specific sexual health concerns and information needs of cancer survivors. This study tested a new instrument to measure cancer survivors' sexual health concerns and needs for sexual information after cancer treatment. The Information on Sexual Health: Your Needs after Cancer (InSYNC), developed by a multidisciplinary team of experts, is a novel 12-item questionnaire to measure sexual health concerns and information needs of cancer survivors. We tested the measure with a sample of breast and prostate cancer survivors. A convenience sample of 114 cancer survivors (58 breast, 56 prostate) was enrolled. Results of the InSYNC questionnaire showed high levels of sexual concern among cancer survivors. Areas of concern differed by cancer type. Prostate cancer survivors were most concerned about being able to satisfy their partners (57 %) while breast cancer survivors were most concerned with changes in how their bodies worked sexually (46 %). Approximately 35 % of all cancer survivors wanted more information about sexual health. Sexual health concerns and unmet information needs are common among breast and prostate cancer survivors, varying in some aspects by type of cancer. Routine screening for sexual health concerns should be included in comprehensive cancer survivorship care to appropriately address health care needs. The InSYNC questionnaire is one tool that may help clinicians identify concerns facing their patients.

  13. Dietary flavonoid intake and risk of stomach and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Woo, Hae Dong; Kim, Jeongseon

    2013-02-21

    Stomach and colorectal cancers are common cancers and leading causes of cancer deaths. Because the alimentary tract can interact directly with dietary components, stomach and colorectal cancer may be closely related to dietary intake. We systematically searched published literature written in English via PubMed by searching for terms related to stomach and colorectal cancer risk and dietary flavonoids up to June 30, 2012. Twenty-three studies out of 209 identified articles were finally selected for the analysis. Log point effect estimates and the corresponding standard errors were calculated using covariate-adjusted point effect estimates and 95%CIs from the selected studies. Total dietary flavonoid intake was not associated with a reduced risk of colorectal or stomach cancer [odds ratio (OR) (95%CI) = 1.00 (0.90-1.11) and 1.07 (0.70-1.61), respectively]. Among flavonoid subclasses, the intake of flavonols, flavan-3-ols, anthocyanidins, and proanthocyanidins showed a significant inverse association with colorectal cancer risk [OR (95%CI) = 0.71 (0.63-0.81), 0.88 (0.79-0.97), 0.68 (0.56-0.82), and 0.72 (0.61-0.85), respectively]. A significant association was found only between flavonols and stomach cancer risk based on a limited number of selected studies [OR (95%CI) = 0.68 (0.46-0.99)]. In the summary estimates from case-control studies, all flavonoid subclasses except flavones and flavanones were inversely associated with colorectal cancer risk, whereas neither total flavonoids nor any subclasses of flavonoids were associated with colorectal cancer risk in the summary estimates based on the cohort studies. The significant association between flavonoid subclasses and cancer risk might be closely related to bias derived from the case-control design. There was no clear evidence that dietary flavonoids are associated with reduced risk of stomach and colorectal cancer.

  14. Colorectal cancer prognosis twenty years later

    PubMed Central

    Bujanda, Luis; Sarasqueta, Cristina; Hijona, Elisabeth; Hijona, Lander; Cosme, Angel; Gil, Ines; Elorza, Jose Luis; Asensio, Jose I; Larburu, Santiago; Enríquez-Navascués, José M; Jover, Rodrigo; Balaguer, Francesc; Llor, Xavier; Bessa, Xavier; Andreu, Montserrat; Paya, Artemio; Castells, Antoni; Association, Gastrointestinal Oncology Group of the Spanish Gastroenterological

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate changes in colorectal cancer (CRC) survival over the last 20 years. METHODS: We compared two groups of consecutive CRC patients that were prospectively recruited: Group I included 1990 patients diagnosed between 1980 and 1994. Group II included 871 patients diagnosed in 2001. RESULTS: The average follow up time was 21 mo (1-229) for Group I and 50 mo (1-73.4) for Group II. Overall median survival was significantly longer in Group II than in Group I (73 mo vs 25 mo, P < 0.001) and the difference was significant for all tumor stages. Post surgical mortality was 8% for Group Iand 2% for Group II (P < 0.001). Only 17% of GroupI patients received chemotherapy compared with 50% of Group II patients (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Survival in colorectal cancer patients has doubled over the past 20 years. This increase seems to be partly due to the generalization in the administration of chemotherapy and to the decrease of post surgical mortality. PMID:20143465

  15. Appropriateness of cardiovascular care in elderly adult cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Winson Y; Levin, Raisa; Setoguchi, Soko

    2013-01-01

    Research suggests that the quality of non-cancer-related care among cancer survivors (CS) is suboptimal. Secondary disease prevention is an important component of survivorship care that has not been previously evaluated. Our aims were (1) to assess the utilization of and adherence to medications and treatments for the secondary prevention of myocardial infarction (MI) in CS versus non-cancer patients (NCP) and (2) to compare temporal trends in cardiovascular care between these two patient cohorts. Linking data from Medicare, pharmacy assistance programs, and cancer registries, we calculated the percentage of individuals receiving preventive medications (statins, β-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors) and revascularization interventions (angioplasty, stent, bypass surgery) within 90 days after acute MI in CS and propensity score-matched NCP. We assessed trends over time and determined predictors of appropriate preventive care using modified Poisson regression. We identified 1,119 CS and 7,886 NCP. Compared to NCP, more survivors received statins (38 vs. 31 %) and β-blockers (67 vs. 59 %), but fewer underwent bypass surgery (1.5 vs. 2.8 %) after MI. From 1997 to 2004, both survivors and NCP were increasingly prescribed medications to prevent future coronary events. Over the same time period, receipt of bypass surgery was significantly lower among survivors. Co-morbidities, such as depression and lung disease, and demographic factors, such as advanced age and female, were associated with underuse of preventive care among survivors when compared to NCP. Use of preventive medications and procedures has generally improved, but uptake of bypass surgery among CS still lags behind NCP.

  16. Long-Term Pulmonary Function in Survivors of Childhood Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Armenian, Saro H.; Landier, Wendy; Francisco, Liton; Herrera, Claudia; Mills, George; Siyahian, Aida; Supab, Natt; Wilson, Karla; Wolfson, Julie A.; Horak, David; Bhatia, Smita

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study was undertaken to determine the magnitude of pulmonary dysfunction in childhood cancer survivors when compared with healthy controls and the extent (and predictors) of decline over time. Patients and Methods Survivors underwent baseline (t1) pulmonary function tests, followed by a second comprehensive evaluation (t2) after a median of 5 years (range, 1.0 to 10.3 years). Survivors were also compared with age- and sex-matched healthy controls at t2. Results Median age at cancer diagnosis was 16.5 years (range, 0.2 to 21.9 years), and time from diagnosis to t2 was 17.1 years (range, 6.3 to 40.1 years). Compared with odds for healthy controls, the odds of restrictive defects were increased 6.5-fold (odds ratio [OR], 6.5; 95% CI, 1.5 to 28.4; P < .01), and the odds of diffusion abnormalities were increased 5.2-fold (OR, 5.2; 95% CI, 1.8 to 15.5; P < .01). Among survivors, age younger than 16 years at diagnosis (OR, 3.0; 95% CI, 1.2 to 7.8; P = .02) and exposure to more than 20 Gy chest radiation (OR, 5.6; 95% CI, 1.5 to 21.0; P = .02, referent, no chest radiation) were associated with restrictive defects. Female sex (OR, 3.9; 95% CI, 1.7 to 9.5; P < .01) and chest radiation dose (referent: no chest radiation; ≤ 20 Gy: OR, 6.4; 95% CI, 1.7 to 24.4; P < .01; > 20 Gy: OR, 11.3; 95% CI, 2.6 to 49.5; P < .01) were associated with diffusion abnormalities. Among survivors with normal pulmonary function tests at t1, females and survivors treated with more than 20 Gy chest radiation demonstrated decline in diffusion function over time. Conclusion Childhood cancer survivors exposed to pulmonary-toxic therapy are significantly more likely to have restrictive and diffusion defects when compared with healthy controls. Diffusion capacity declines with time after exposure to pulmonary-toxic therapy, particularly among females and survivors treated with high-dose chest radiation. These individuals could benefit from subsequent monitoring. PMID:25847925

  17. Role of phytochemicals in colorectal cancer prevention

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu-Hua; Niu, Yin-Bo; Sun, Yang; Zhang, Feng; Liu, Chang-Xu; Fan, Lei; Mei, Qi-Bing

    2015-01-01

    Although the incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) has been declining in recent decades, it remains a major public health issue as a leading cause of cancer mortality and morbidity worldwide. Prevention is one milestone for this disease. Extensive study has demonstrated that a diet containing fruits, vegetables, and spices has the potential to prevent CRC. The specific constituents in the dietary foods which are responsible for preventing CRC and the possible mechanisms have also been investigated extensively. Various phytochemicals have been identified in fruits, vegetables, and spices which exhibit chemopreventive potential. In this review article, chemopreventive effects of phytochemicals including curcumin, polysaccharides (apple polysaccharides and mushroom glucans), saponins (Paris saponins, ginsenosides and soy saponins), resveratrol, and quercetin on CRC and the mechanisms are discussed. This review proposes the need for more clinical evidence for the effects of phytochemicals against CRC in large trials. The conclusion of the review is that these phytochemicals might be therapeutic candidates in the campaign against CRC. PMID:26309353

  18. Probiotics, prebiotics and colorectal cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Ambalam, Padma; Raman, Maya; Purama, Ravi Kiran; Doble, Mukesh

    2016-02-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC), the third major cause of mortality among various cancer types in United States, has been increasing in developing countries due to varying diet and dietary habits and occupational hazards. Recent evidences showed that composition of gut microbiota could be associated with the development of CRC and other gut dysbiosis. Modulation of gut microbiota by probiotics and prebiotics, either alone or in combination could positively influence the cross-talk between immune system and microbiota, would be beneficial in preventing inflammation and CRC. In this review, role of probiotics and prebiotics in the prevention of CRC has been discussed. Various epidemiological and experimental studies, specifically gut microbiome research has effectively improved the understanding about the role of probiotics and microbial treatment as anticarcinogenic agents. A few human studies support the beneficial effect of probiotics and prebiotics; hence, comprehensive understanding is urgent to realize the clinical applications of probiotics and prebiotics in CRC prevention.

  19. Pharmacogenomics and -genetics in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Alexandra; Lurje, Georg; Manegold, Philipp C; Lenz, Heinz-Josef

    2009-05-20

    Despite recent progress in our knowledge about the development and therapy of colorectal cancer (CRC), it still remains one of the major cancer related deaths throughout the world. With the introduction of new cytotoxic and targeting agents a significant improvement in progression-free and overall survival has been achieved. However, a significant percentage (40-50%) of patients do not experience beneficial effects and suffer from severe toxicities. It will be critical to identify molecular markers, which may help to assess therapeutic response and outcome in CRC. Validation of predictive and prognostic molecular markers will enable oncologists to tailor patient specific treatment strategies for the individual patient according to the molecular profile of both the patient and their tumor. Individualized therapy will help to improve therapeutic efficacy and to minimize toxicities and therapeutic expenses.

  20. Colorectal cancer carcinogenesis: a review of mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Tariq, Kanwal; Ghias, Kulsoom

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cancer in women and the third most common in men globally. CRC arises from one or a combination of chromosomal instability, CpG island methylator phenotype, and microsatellite instability. Genetic instability is usually caused by aneuploidy and loss of heterozygosity. Mutations in the tumor suppressor or cell cycle genes may also lead to cellular transformation. Similarly, epigenetic and/or genetic alterations resulting in impaired cellular pathways, such as DNA repair mechanism, may lead to microsatellite instability and mutator phenotype. Non-coding RNAs, more importantly microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs have also been implicated at various CRC stages. Understanding the specific mechanisms of tumorigenesis and the underlying genetic and epigenetic traits is critical in comprehending the disease phenotype. This paper reviews these mechanisms along with the roles of various non-coding RNAs in CRCs. PMID:27144067

  1. The gastrointestinal microbiota and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dulal, Santosh; Deveaux, April; Jovov, Biljana; Han, Xuesong

    2014-01-01

    The human gut is home to a complex and diverse microbiota that contributes to the overall homeostasis of the host. Increasingly, the intestinal microbiota is recognized as an important player in human illness such as colorectal cancer (CRC), inflammatory bowel diseases, and obesity. CRC in itself is one of the major causes of cancer mortality in the Western world. The mechanisms by which bacteria contribute to CRC are complex and not fully understood, but increasing evidence suggests a link between the intestinal microbiota and CRC as well as diet and inflammation, which are believed to play a role in carcinogenesis. It is thought that the gut microbiota interact with dietary factors to promote chronic inflammation and CRC through direct influence on host cell physiology, cellular homeostasis, energy regulation, and/or metabolism of xenobiotics. This review provides an overview on the role of commensal gut microbiota in the development of human CRC and explores its association with diet and inflammation. PMID:25540232

  2. MicroRNA Methylation in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Sippy; Lotsari-Salomaa, Johanna E; Seppänen-Kaijansinkko, Riitta; Peltomäki, Päivi

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic alterations such as DNA methylation, histone modifications and non-coding RNA (including microRNA) associated gene silencing have been identified as a major characteristic in human cancers. These alterations may occur more frequently than genetic mutations and play a key role in silencing tumor suppressor genes or activating oncogenes, thereby affecting multiple cellular processes. In recent years, studies have shown that microRNAs, that act as posttranscriptional regulators of gene expression are frequently deregulated in colorectal cancer (CRC), via aberrant DNA methylation. Over the past decade, technological advances have revolutionized the field of epigenetics and have led to the identification of numerous epigenetically dysregulated miRNAs in CRC, which are regulated by CpG island hypermethylation and DNA hypomethylation. In addition, aberrant DNA methylation of miRNA genes holds a great promise in several clinical applications such as biomarkers for early screening, prognosis, and therapeutic applications in CRC. PMID:27573897

  3. Gut microbiota and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Mayuko; Matsumoto, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    The mucosal immune system is unique to the gastrointestinal mucosa, in which a large number of immune cells are located and exert multiple functions. Meanwhile, ~100 trillion microorganisms are thought to co-inhabit in the gastrointestinal tract. Furthermore, immune cells and gut microbiota have a mutual influence and the maintenance of this symbiotic relationship results in gut homeostasis. A recent study suggested that a disturbance of gut microbiota-so called "dysbiosis"-is related to various diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and colitis-associated cancer (CAC). In this review, we discuss the relationship between gut microbiota and the mucosal immune system with regard to the development of IBD and CAC. In addition, we elucidate the possibility of probiotics in treatment against these diseases. PMID:27350830

  4. Empowerment of Cancer Survivors Through Information Technology: An Integrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Groen, Wim G; Kuijpers, Wilma; Oldenburg, Hester SA; Wouters, Michel WJM; Aaronson, Neil K

    2015-01-01

    Background Patient empowerment may be an effective approach to strengthen the role of cancer survivors and to reduce the burden on health care. However, it is not well conceptualized, notably in oncology. Furthermore, it is unclear to what extent information technology (IT) services can contribute to empowerment of cancer survivors. Objective We aim to define the conceptual components of patient empowerment of chronic disease patients, especially cancer survivors, and to explore the contribution of existing and new IT services to promote empowerment. Methods Electronic databases were searched to identify theoretical and empirical articles regarding empowerment. We extracted and synthesized conceptual components of patient empowerment (ie, attributes, antecedents, and consequences) according to the integrated review methodology. We identified recent IT services for cancer survivors by examining systematic reviews and a proposed inventory of new services, and we related their features and effects to the identified components of empowerment. Results Based on 26 articles, we identified five main attributes of patient empowerment: (1) being autonomous and respected, (2) having knowledge, (3) having psychosocial and behavioral skills, (4) perceiving support from community, family, and friends, and (5) perceiving oneself to be useful. The latter two were specific for the cancer setting. Systematic reviews of IT services and our additional inventory helped us identify five main categories: (1) educational services, including electronic survivorship care plan services, (2) patient-to-patient services, (3) electronic patient-reported outcome (ePRO) services, (4) multicomponent services, and (5) portal services. Potential impact on empowerment included knowledge enhancement and, to a lesser extent, enhancing autonomy and skills. Newly developed services offer promising and exciting opportunities to empower cancer survivors, for instance, by providing tailored advice for

  5. Pregnancy After Cancer: Results from a Prospective Cohort Study of Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Katherine E.; Sammel, Mary D.; Ginsberg, Jill P.; Lechtenberg, Lara; Prewitt, Maureen; Gracia, Clarisa R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Future fertility is an important concern for many cancer survivors. Cancer therapies have been shown to adversely impact reproductive function. However, it is difficult to predict the extent to which reproductive dysfunction will occur. The purpose of this study was to compare measures of ovarian reserve (MOR) and pregnancy rates in young female cancer survivors and similar-aged controls. Procedures A prospective cohort study was conducted in a university-hospital setting. Participants were followed annually for a mean 25 months to assess reproductive history, the incidence of pregnancy, and MOR (serum follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, estradiol, inhibin B, anti-mullerian hormone (AMH), antral follicle counts and mean ovarian volume). Results Eighty-four female survivors (average age 26, and 14 years post-treatment) and 98 similar-aged controls that were sexually active with men were included. At baseline, 27/84 survivors and 42/98 controls reported a prior pregnancy. Adjusted models showed that anti-mullerian hormone (AMH) and antral follicle count (AFC) were impaired in survivors with a prior pregnancy compared to controls with a prior pregnancy (p<0.01, p=0.03). During follow-up in 56 survivors and 74 controls, 19 pregnancies occurred in survivors and 18 in controls. Comparison of MOR between survivors who became pregnant and controls who became pregnant revealed that AMH and AFC were impaired in survivors (p<0.05). Compared to survivors who did not become pregnant, survivors who did were older (p<0.01) and more likely to be cohabitating (p<0.01), but had similar MOR and exposure to alkylators (p=0.34). Conclusions Survivors achieved pregnancy at a rate similar to controls despite impaired MOR. PMID:24038829

  6. Coping strategies of long-term cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Halstead, M T; Fernsler, J I

    1994-04-01

    Cancer survival is a stressful experience requiring coping for the maintenance of equilibrium. Lazarus' Theory of Stress and Coping was the framework for this descriptive study of the use and effectiveness of coping strategies as assessed by long-term survivors of cancer. The Jalowiec Coping Scale (JCS) and a subject information sheet (SIS) were mailed to 128 potential subjects, identified by the snowball technique, who survived cancer for > 5 years, were not currently receiving therapy, and were not in a terminal stage of disease. Fifty-nine subjects with a mean survival of 13.03 years correctly completed and returned the questionnaire and were included in data analysis. Respondents were predominantly white (88.1%), female (83.7%), married (72.8%), employed as professionals (57.8%), 41-65 years of age (59.3%), and diagnosed with breast cancer (50.8%). Subjects rated optimistic, supportive, and confrontive strategies as most often used and effective. Length of survival did not result in different choices of strategies. Statistically significant differences were found in coping styles between elderly and middle-aged survivors. Results of this study increase nurses' awareness of effective coping strategies and the importance of assessment of coping in long-term survivors of cancer. The importance of social support, spirituality, and helping others is emphasized.

  7. Primary prevention of colorectal cancer: lifestyle, nutrition, exercise.

    PubMed

    Martínez, María Elena

    2005-01-01

    The past two decades have provided a vast amount of literature related to the primary prevention of colorectal cancer. Large international variation in colorectal cancer incidence and mortality rates and the prominent increases in the incidence of colorectal cancer in groups that migrated from low- to high-incidence areas provided important evidence that lifestyle factors influence the development of this malignancy. Moreover, there is convincing evidence from epidemiological and experimental studies that dietary intake is an important etiological factor in colorectal neoplasia. Although the precise mechanisms have not been clarified, several lifestyle factors are likely to have a major impact on colorectal cancer development. Physical inactivity and to a lesser extent, excess body weight, are consistent risk factors for colon cancer. Exposure to tobacco products early in life is associated with a higher risk of developing colorectal neoplasia. Diet and nutritional factors are also clearly important. Diets high in red and processed meat increase risk. Excess alcohol consumption, probably in combination with a diet low in some micronutrients such as folate and methionine, appear to increase risk. There is also recent evidence supporting a protective effect of calcium and vitamin D in the etiology of colorectal neoplasia. The relationship between intake of dietary fiber and risk of colon cancer has been studied for three decades but the results are still inconclusive. However, some micronutrients or phytochemicals in fiber-rich foods may be important; folic acid is one such micronutrient that has been shown to protect against the development of colorectal neoplasia and is currently being studied in intervention trials of adenoma recurrence. The overwhelming evidence indicates that primary prevention of colon cancer is feasible. Continued focus on primary prevention of colorectal cancer, in combination with efforts aimed at screening and surveillance, will be vital in

  8. Apoptotic pathways as a therapeutic target for colorectal cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Abraha, Aman M; Ketema, Ezra B

    2016-08-15

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer among adults. The disease begins as a benign adenomatous polyp, which develops into an advanced adenoma with high-grade dysplasia and then progresses to an invasive cancer. Appropriate apoptotic signaling is fundamentally important to preserve a healthy balance between cell death and cell survival and in maintaining genome integrity. Evasion of apoptotic pathway has been established as a prominent hallmark of several cancers. During colorectal cancer development, the balance between the rates of cell growth and apoptosis that maintains intestinal epithelial cell homeostasis gets progressively disturbed. Evidences are increasingly available to support the hypothesis that failure of apoptosis may be an important factor in the evolution of colorectal cancer and its poor response to chemotherapy and radiation. The other reason for targeting apoptotic pathway in the treatment of cancer is based on the observation that this process is deregulated in cancer cells but not in normal cells. As a result, colorectal cancer therapies designed to stimulate apoptosis in target cells would play a critical role in controlling its development and progression. A better understanding of the apoptotic signaling pathways, and the mechanisms by which cancer cells evade apoptotic death might lead to effective therapeutic strategies to inhibit cancer cell proliferation with minimal toxicity and high responses to chemotherapy. In this review, we analyzed the current understanding and future promises of apoptotic pathways as a therapeutic target in colorectal cancer treatment. PMID:27574550

  9. Apoptotic pathways as a therapeutic target for colorectal cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Abraha, Aman M; Ketema, Ezra B

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer among adults. The disease begins as a benign adenomatous polyp, which develops into an advanced adenoma with high-grade dysplasia and then progresses to an invasive cancer. Appropriate apoptotic signaling is fundamentally important to preserve a healthy balance between cell death and cell survival and in maintaining genome integrity. Evasion of apoptotic pathway has been established as a prominent hallmark of several cancers. During colorectal cancer development, the balance between the rates of cell growth and apoptosis that maintains intestinal epithelial cell homeostasis gets progressively disturbed. Evidences are increasingly available to support the hypothesis that failure of apoptosis may be an important factor in the evolution of colorectal cancer and its poor response to chemotherapy and radiation. The other reason for targeting apoptotic pathway in the treatment of cancer is based on the observation that this process is deregulated in cancer cells but not in normal cells. As a result, colorectal cancer therapies designed to stimulate apoptosis in target cells would play a critical role in controlling its development and progression. A better understanding of the apoptotic signaling pathways, and the mechanisms by which cancer cells evade apoptotic death might lead to effective therapeutic strategies to inhibit cancer cell proliferation with minimal toxicity and high responses to chemotherapy. In this review, we analyzed the current understanding and future promises of apoptotic pathways as a therapeutic target in colorectal cancer treatment. PMID:27574550

  10. Survivorship Care Planning in Improving Quality of Life in Survivors of Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-19

    Cancer Survivor; Stage IA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  11. Primary and Secondary Prevention of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tárraga López, Pedro J; Albero, Juan Solera; Rodríguez-Montes, José Antonio

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Cancer is a worldwide problem as it will affect one in three men and one in four women during their lifetime. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most frequent cancer in men, after lung and prostate cancer, and is the second most frequent cancer in women after breast cancer. It is also the third cause of death in men and women separately, and is the second most frequent cause of death by cancer if both genders are considered together. CRC represents approximately 10% of deaths by cancer. Modifiable risk factors of CRC include smoking, physical inactivity, being overweight and obesity, eating processed meat, and drinking alcohol excessively. CRC screening programs are possible only in economically developed countries. However, attention should be paid in the future to geographical areas with ageing populations and a western lifestyle.19,20 Sigmoidoscopy screening done with people aged 55–64 years has been demonstrated to reduce the incidence of CRC by 33% and mortality by CRC by 43%. OBJECTIVE To assess the effect on the incidence and mortality of CRC diet and lifestyle and to determine the effect of secondary prevention through early diagnosis of CRC. METHODOLOGY: A comprehensive search of Medline and Pubmed articles related to primary and secondary prevention of CRC and subsequently, a meta-analysis of the same blocks are performed. RESULTS 225 articles related to primary or secondary prevention of CRC were retrieved. Of these 145 were considered valid on meta-analysis: 12 on epidemiology, 56 on diet and lifestyle, and over 77 different screenings for early detection of CRC. Cancer is a worldwide problem as it will affect one in three men and one in four women during their lifetime. There is no doubt whatsoever which environmental factors, probably diet, may account for these cancer rates. Excessive alcohol consumption and cholesterol-rich diet are associated with a high risk of colon cancer. A diet poor in folic acid and vitamin B6 is also

  12. Eicosanoid pathway in colorectal cancer: Recent updates

    PubMed Central

    Tuncer, Sinem; Banerjee, Sreeparna

    2015-01-01

    Enzymatic metabolism of the 20C polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) arachidonic acid (AA) occurs via the cyclooxygenase (COX) and lipoxygenase (LOX) pathways, and leads to the production of various bioactive lipids termed eicosanoids. These eicosanoids have a variety of functions, including stimulation of homeostatic responses in the cardiovascular system, induction and resolution of inflammation, and modulation of immune responses against diseases associated with chronic inflammation, such as cancer. Because chronic inflammation is essential for the development of colorectal cancer (CRC), it is not surprising that many eicosanoids are implicated in CRC. Oftentimes, these autacoids work in an antagonistic and highly temporal manner in inflammation; therefore, inhibition of the pro-inflammatory COX-2 or 5-LOX enzymes may subsequently inhibit the formation of their essential products, or shunt substrates from one pathway to another, leading to undesirable side-effects. A better understanding of these different enzymes and their products is essential not only for understanding the importance of eicosanoids, but also for designing more effective drugs that solely target the inflammatory molecules found in both chronic inflammation and cancer. In this review, we have evaluated the cancer promoting and anti-cancer roles of different eicosanoids in CRC, and highlighted the most recent literature which describes how those molecules affect not only tumor tissue, but also the tumor microenvironment. Additionally, we have attempted to delineate the roles that eicosanoids with opposing functions play in neoplastic transformation in CRC through their effects on proliferation, apoptosis, motility, metastasis, and angiogenesis. PMID:26557000

  13. Colorectal cancer, diabetes and survival: epidemiological insights.

    PubMed

    Zanders, M M J; Vissers, P A J; Haak, H R; van de Poll-Franse, L V

    2014-04-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) patients with pre-existing diabetes have significantly lower rates of overall survival compared with patients without diabetes. Against this backdrop, the American Diabetes Association and American Cancer Society in 2010 reviewed the scientific literature concerning diabetes and cancer. One of the key issues identified for further investigation was the need for a better understanding of whether diabetes influences cancer prognosis above and beyond the prognosis conferred by each disease state independently. Whether the worsened survival of CRC patients with diabetes could be explained by less favourable patient-, tumour- and treatment-related characteristics has also been evaluated in numerous recent studies. However, as most studies did not account for all the various potential confounders, such as cancer stage, comorbidities and body mass index (BMI) in their analyses, the current evidence for the association between diabetes and survival in CRC patients remains inconclusive. Nevertheless, based on multiple examples in the literature, the present review demonstrates that diabetes affects the presentation of CRC as well as its treatment and outcome, which may then result in lower overall rates of survival in patients with, compared to those without, diabetes. PMID:24507584

  14. Epigenetic Alterations in Colorectal Cancer: Emerging Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Grady, William M.; Goel, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. One of the fundamental processes driving the initiation and progression of CRC is the accumulation of a variety of genetic and epigenetic changes in colon epithelial cells. Over the past decade, major advances have been made in our understanding of cancer epigenetics, particularly regarding aberrant DNA methylation, microRNA (miRNA) and noncoding RNA deregulation, and alterations in histone modification states. Assessment of the colon cancer “epigenome” has revealed that virtually all CRCs have aberrantly methylated genes and altered miRNA expression. The average CRC methylome has hundreds to thousands of abnormally methylated genes and dozens of altered miRNAs. As with gene mutations in the cancer genome, a subset of these epigenetic alterations, called driver events, is presumed to have a functional role in CRC. In addition, the advances in our understanding of epigenetic alterations in CRC have led to these alterations being developed as clinical biomarkers for diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic applications. Progress in this field suggests that these epigenetic alterations will be commonly used in the near future to direct the prevention and treatment of CRC. PMID:26216839

  15. Long-term adverse outcomes in survivors of childhood bone sarcoma: the British Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

    PubMed Central

    Fidler, M M; Frobisher, C; Guha, J; Wong, K; Kelly, J; Winter, D L; Sugden, E; Duncan, R; Whelan, J; Reulen, R C; Hawkins, M M

    2015-01-01

    Background: With improved survival, more bone sarcoma survivors are approaching middle age making it crucial to investigate the late effects of their cancer and its treatment. We investigated the long-term risks of adverse outcomes among 5-year bone sarcoma survivors within the British Childhood Cancer Survivor Study. Methods: Cause-specific mortality and risk of subsequent primary neoplasms (SPNs) were investigated for 664 bone sarcoma survivors. Use of health services, health and marital status, alcohol and smoking habits, and educational qualifications were investigated for survivors who completed a questionnaire. Results: Survivors were seven times more likely to experience all-cause mortality than expected, and there were substantial differences in risk depending on tumour type. Beyond 25 years follow-up the risk of dying from all-causes was comparable to the general population. This is in contrast to dying before 25 years where the risk was 12.7-fold that expected. Survivors were also four times more likely to develop a SPN than expected, where the excess was restricted to 5–24 years post diagnosis. Increased health-care usage and poor health status were also found. Nonetheless, for some psychosocial outcomes survivors were better off than expected. Conclusions: Up to 25 years after 5-year survival, bone sarcoma survivors are at substantial risk of death and SPNs, but this is greatly reduced thereafter. As 95% of all excess deaths before 25 years follow-up were due to recurrences and SPNs, increased monitoring of survivors could prevent mortality. Furthermore, bone and breast SPNs should be a particular concern. Since there are variations in the magnitude of excess risk depending on the specific adverse outcome under investigation and whether the survivors were initially diagnosed with osteosarcoma or Ewing sarcoma, risks need to be assessed in relation to these factors. These findings should provide useful evidence for risk stratification and updating

  16. Endometrial metastasis of colorectal cancer with coincident endometrial adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Colling, Richard; Lopes, Tito; Das, Nagiindra; Mathew, Joe

    2010-01-01

    Metastasis to the uterine corpus is uncommon and secondary colorectal tumours of the endometrium are rare. We describe a uterine tumour with components of both primary endometrial and metastatic colorectal carcinomata. In this case, a 72-year-old obese woman presented with a 2-week history of postmenopausal bleeding per vaginum and weight loss. She had an abdominoperineal resection 3 years previously for a Dukes stage B rectal carcinoma. A transvaginal ultrasonography showed a thickened endometrium. Histology immunophenotyping showed a CK7+, CK20+, CA125− and CEA+ colorectal metastasis (a profile consistent with her previous cancer) associated with a primary CK7+, CK20−, CA125+ and CEA− endometroid endometrial adenocarcinoma. We conclude this represents endometrial metastasis of colorectal carcinoma with coincident primary endometrial adenocarcinoma. We speculate as to whether the endometrial carcinoma arose de novo or was induced by the colorectal metastasis, or whether the primary endometrial tumour provided a fertile site for the colorectal metastasis. PMID:22791861

  17. Biomarkers, Bundled Payments, and Colorectal Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Patrick; Raju, Gottumukkala; Rodriguez, Alma; Burke, Thomas; Hafemeister, Lisa; Hawk, Ernest; Wu, Xifeng; DuBois, Raymond N.

    2012-01-01

    Changes in the management of cancers such as colorectal cancer (CRC) are urgently needed, as such cancers continue to be one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers; CRC accounts for 21% of all cancers and is responsible for mortalities second only to lung cancer in the United States. A comprehensive science-driven approach towards markedly improved early detection/screening to efficacious targeted therapeutics with clear diagnostic and prognostic markers is essential. In addition, further changes addressing rising costs, stemming from recent health care reform measures, will be brought about in part by changes in how care is reimbursed. For oncology, the advances in genomics and biomarkers have the potential to define subsets of patients who have a prognosis or response to a particular type of therapy that differs from the mean. Better definition of a cancer’s behavior will facilitate developing care plans tailored to the patient. One method under study is episode-based payment or bundling, where one payment is made to a provider organization to cover all expenses associated with a discrete illness episode. Payments will be based on the average cost of care, with providers taking on a risk for overutilization and outliers. For providers to thrive in this environment, they will need to know what care a patient will require and the costs of that care. A science-driven “personalized approach” to cancer care has the potential to produce better outcomes with reductions in the use of ineffectual therapies and costs. This promising scenario is still in the future, but progress is being made, and the shape of things to come for cancer care in the age of genomics is becoming clearer. PMID:22893787

  18. Primary and recurrent colorectal cancer masquerading as gynaecological malignancy.

    PubMed

    Brand, A; Scurry, J; Planner, R; Leung, S

    1996-05-01

    To make clinicians more aware of the phenomenon of primary and recurrent colorectal and anal carcinoma masquerading as primary gynaecological malignancy, we reviewed the records of 8 women referred to our gynaecological oncology unit with primary colorectal cancer (1), recurrent colorectal cancer (6) and primary anal cancer (1). Seven of these patients presented with abnormal vaginal bleeding or discharge. All patients had Papanicolaou smears performed; 7 were abnormal and 1 unsuitable for cytological assessment. None of the 6 patients with recurrent carcinoma had been previously treated with more than standard anterior or abdominoperineal resection; no radiotherapy had been given, and only 1 patient had received chemotherapy. These patients were treated in our gynaecological oncology unit for their recurrence by surgery and/or chemotherapy and/or irradiation. All 6 had further recurrences in the pelvis despite this aggressive therapy. Follow-up of colorectal cancer in women should involve gynaecological history, pelvirectal examination and Pap smear at each visit. Correct diagnosis of the colorectal origin of a genital tract tumour is made on careful history, examination and biopsy. An abnormal Pap smear may be the first indication of recurrent colorectal cancer in the cervix and vagina, although most patients ultimately present with abnormal vaginal bleeding. The presence of a tumour invading both cervix and posterior vaginal wall is suggestive of spread from a colorectal tumour compared to the more common lateral spread of a cervical primary.

  19. Atrophic Vaginitis in Breast Cancer Survivors: A Difficult Survivorship Issue

    PubMed Central

    Lester, Joanne; Pahouja, Gaurav; Andersen, Barbara; Lustberg, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Management of breast cancer includes systematic therapies including chemotherapy and endocrine therapy can lead to a variety of symptoms that can impair the quality of life of many breast cancer survivors. Atrophic vaginitis, caused by decreased levels of circulating estrogen to urinary and vaginal receptors, is commonly experienced by this group. Chemotherapy induced ovarian failure and endocrine therapies including aromatase inhibitors and selective estrogen receptor modulators can trigger the onset of atrophic vaginitis or exacerbate existing symptoms. Symptoms of atrophic vaginitis include vaginal dryness, dyspareunia, and irritation of genital skin, pruritus, burning, vaginal discharge, and soreness. The diagnosis of atrophic vaginitis is confirmed through patient-reported symptoms and gynecological examination of external structures, introitus, and vaginal mucosa. Lifestyle modifications can be helpful but are usually insufficient to significantly improve symptoms. Non-hormonal vaginal therapies may provide additional relief by increasing vaginal moisture and fluid. Systemic estrogen therapy is contraindicated in breast cancer survivors. Continued investigations of various treatments for atrophic vaginitis are necessary. Local estrogen-based therapies, DHEA, testosterone, and pH-balanced gels continue to be evaluated in ongoing studies. Definitive results are needed pertaining to the safety of topical estrogens in breast cancer survivors. PMID:25815692

  20. Salivary Alpha-Amylase Reactivity in Breast Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Cynthia; Couture-Lalande, Marie-Ève; Narain, Tasha A.; Lebel, Sophie; Bielajew, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    The two main components of the stress system are the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) and sympathetic-adrenal-medullary (SAM) axes. While cortisol has been commonly used as a biomarker of HPA functioning, much less attention has been paid to the role of the SAM in this context. Studies have shown that long-term breast cancer survivors display abnormal reactive cortisol patterns, suggesting a dysregulation of their HPA axis. To fully understand the integrity of the stress response in this population, this paper explored the diurnal and acute alpha-amylase profiles of 22 breast cancer survivors and 26 women with no history of cancer. Results revealed that breast cancer survivors displayed identical but elevated patterns of alpha-amylase concentrations in both diurnal and acute profiles relative to that of healthy women, F (1, 39) = 17.95, p < 0.001 and F (1, 37) = 7.29, p = 0.010, respectively. The average area under the curve for the diurnal and reactive profiles was 631.54 ± 66.94 SEM and 1238.78 ± 111.84 SEM, respectively. This is in sharp contrast to their cortisol results, which showed normal diurnal and blunted acute patterns. The complexity of the stress system necessitates further investigation to understand the synergistic relationship of the HPA and SAM axes. PMID:27023572

  1. Molecular Taxonomy and Tumourigenesis of Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Biswas, S; Holyoake, D; Maughan, T S

    2016-02-01

    Over the last 5 years there has been a surge in interest in the molecular classification of colorectal cancer. The effect of molecular subtyping on current treatment decisions is limited to avoidance of adjuvant 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy in stage II microsatellite unstable-high disease and avoidance of epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted antibodies in extended RAS mutant tumours. The emergence of specific novel combination therapy for the BRAF-mutant cohort and of the microsatellite unstable-high cohort as a responsive group to immune checkpoint inhibition shows the growing importance of a clinically relevant molecular taxonomy. Clinical trials such as the Medical Research Council FOCUS4 trial using biomarkers to select patients for specific therapies are currently open and testing such approaches. The integration of mutation, gene expression and pathological analyses is refining our understanding of the biological subtypes within colorectal cancer. Sharing of data sets of parallel sequencing and gene expression of thousands of cancers among independent groups has allowed the description of disease subsets and the need for a validated consensus classification has become apparent. This biological understanding of the disease is a key step forward in developing a stratified approach to patient management. The discovery of stratifiers that predict a response to existing and emerging therapies will enable better use of these treatments. Improved scientific understanding of the biological characteristics of poorly responsive subgroups will facilitate the design of novel biologically rational combinations. Novel treatment regimens, including the combination of new drugs with radiation, and the discovery and validation of their associated predictive biomarkers will gradually lead to improved outcomes from therapy.

  2. Nomograms for colorectal cancer: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Kazushige; Sunami, Eiji; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Ishihara, Soichiro; Kazama, Shinsuke; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Hata, Keisuke; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Tanaka, Junichiro; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Kitayama, Joji; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assist in the selection of suitable nomograms for obtaining desired predictions in daily clinical practice. METHODS: We conducted electronic searches for journal articles on colorectal cancer (CRC)-associated nomograms using the search terms colon/rectal/colorectal/nomogram. Of 174 articles initially found, we retrieved 28 studies in which a nomogram for CRC was developed. RESULTS: We discuss the currently available CRC-associated nomograms, including those that predict the oncological prognosis, the short-term outcome of treatments, such as surgery or neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy, and the future development of CRC. Developing nomograms always presents a dilemma. On the one hand, the desire to cover as wide a patient range as possible tends to produce nomograms that are too complex and yet have C-indexes that are not sufficiently high. Conversely, confining the target patients might impair the clinical applicability of constructed nomograms. CONCLUSION: The information provided in this review should be of use in selecting a nomogram suitable for obtaining desired predictions in daily clinical practice. PMID:26557011

  3. Radiotherapy and brachytherapy for recurrent colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nag, S. )

    1991-05-01

    Radical surgical excision of locoregional recurrence of colorectal carcinoma usually produces the best survival and should be attempted whenever possible. However, recurrences are often unresectable; hence palliative local therapy may be indicated. There are several options for the radiation therapy of local, unresectable, recurrent, or metastatic colorectal cancer. Whole pelvis irradiation of 4,000-5,000 cGy followed by a coned-down boost of 1,000-1,500 cGy generally provides good symptomatic palliation in 80-90% of patients, but long-term control or cure is rarely achieved. External beam irradiation of 2,000-3,000 cGy to the whole liver with or without concurrent chemotherapy may be used for palliation of metastatic disease to the liver. A combination of intraoperative radiation therapy applied directly to the tumor bed and external beam irradiation may improve local control and survival rates. Multiple options are available for the intraoperative use of brachytherapy which can deliver high radiation doses to the residual tumor, or tumor bed, sparing normal tissue.

  4. Health behaviors, quality of life, and psychosocial health among survivors of adolescent and young adult cancers

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Gina E.; Zhang, Yingying; McFadden, Molly; Wright, Jennifer; Spraker-Perlman, Holly; Kinney, Anita Y.; Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Kirchhoff, Anne C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Survivors of adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer may engage in unhealthy lifestyles (e.g., smoking), potentially heightening their risk for long-term health problems. We assessed health behaviors and constructs including quality of life (QOL) and psychosocial well-being among survivors of AYA cancer compared to the general population. Methods We used 2009 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data to evaluate health behaviors for survivors of AYA cancer compared to AYAs without cancer. Multivariable regressions assessed health behaviors (smoking, binge drinking, physical inactivity, and low fruit/vegetable intake) by sex and age between AYA survivors and controls, and among survivors to determine the effects of demographic, QOL, psychosocial, and cancer factors on behaviors. Results A greater proportion of female survivors of AYA cancer smoked than controls (currently aged 20–39: 27 vs. 14.3%, respectively; currently aged 40–64: 29.3 vs. 18.4%, respectively). Generally, survivors and controls were non-adherent to national health behavior guidelines. Uninsured survivors were at greater risk of smoking vs. insured (females, Relative Risk (RR)=1.64, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.43–1.90; males, RR=2.62, 95 % CI 1.71–4.02). Poor social/emotional support was associated with smoking (RR= 1.26, 95 % CI 1.07–1.48) among female survivors and was associated with low fruit/vegetable intake among male (RR= 1.12, 95 % CI 1.01–1.23) and female (RR=1.12, 95 % CI 1.05–1.19) survivors. Female survivors >10 years from diagnosis had higher risk of smoking (RR=1.26–1.91, all p<0.01) than survivors 5–10 years from diagnosis. Conclusions Unhealthy lifestyle behaviors are common in survivors of AYA cancer. Implications for Cancer Survivors AYA survivors require health behavior support. PMID:26248766

  5. Cardiac complications in childhood cancer survivors treated with anthracyclines.

    PubMed

    Franco, Vivian I; Lipshultz, Steven E

    2015-08-01

    Cardiovascular complications are among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality among survivors of childhood cancer, after cancer relapse and secondary malignancies. Although advances in cancer treatment have improved the 5-year survival rates, the same treatments, such as anthracyclines, that cure cancer also increase the risk for adverse cardiovascular effects. Anthracycline-related cardiotoxicity in survivors of childhood cancer is progressive and can take years to develop, initially presenting as sub-clinical cardiac abnormalities that, if left undetected or untreated, can lead to heart failure, myocardial infarction, or other clinical cardiac dysfunction. A higher cumulative dose of anthracycline is associated with cardiotoxicity in children; however, sub-clinical cardiac abnormalities are evident at lower doses with longer follow-up, suggesting that there is no "safe" dose of anthracycline. Other risk factors include female sex, younger age at diagnosis, black race, trisomy 21, longer time since treatment, and the presence of pre-existing cardiovascular disease and co-morbidities. Cardioprotective strategies during treatment are limited in children. Enalapril provides only temporary cardioprotection, whereas continuous anthracycline infusion extends none. On the other hand, dexrazoxane successfully prevents or reduces anthracycline-related cardiotoxicity in children with cancer, without increased risks for recurrence of primary or second malignancies or reductions in anti-tumour efficacy. With more childhood cancer survivors now reaching adulthood, it is vital to understand the adverse effects of cancer treatment on the cardiovascular system and their long-term consequences to identify and establish optimal prevention and management strategies that balance oncologic efficacy with long-term safety.

  6. Risk factors for subsequent endocrine-related cancer in childhood cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Wijnen, M; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M M; Medici, M; Peeters, R P; van der Lely, A J; Neggers, S J C M M

    2016-06-01

    Long-term adverse health conditions, including secondary malignant neoplasms, are common in childhood cancer survivors. Although mortality attributable to secondary malignancies declined over the past decades, the risk for developing a solid secondary malignant neoplasm did not. Endocrine-related malignancies are among the most common secondary malignant neoplasms observed in childhood cancer survivors. In this systematic review, we describe risk factors for secondary malignant neoplasms of the breast and thyroid, since these are the most common secondary endocrine-related malignancies in childhood cancer survivors. Radiotherapy is the most important risk factor for secondary breast and thyroid cancer in childhood cancer survivors. Breast cancer risk is especially increased in survivors of Hodgkin lymphoma who received moderate- to high-dosed mantle field irradiation. Recent studies also demonstrated an increased risk after lower-dose irradiation in other radiation fields for other childhood cancer subtypes. Premature ovarian insufficiency may protect against radiation-induced breast cancer. Although evidence is weak, estrogen-progestin replacement therapy does not seem to be associated with an increased breast cancer risk in premature ovarian-insufficient childhood cancer survivors. Radiotherapy involving the thyroid gland increases the risk for secondary differentiated thyroid carcinoma, as well as benign thyroid nodules. Currently available studies on secondary malignant neoplasms in childhood cancer survivors are limited by short follow-up durations and assessed before treatment regimens. In addition, studies on risk-modifying effects of environmental and lifestyle factors are lacking. Risk-modifying effects of premature ovarian insufficiency and estrogen-progestin replacement therapy on radiation-induced breast cancer require further study. PMID:27229933

  7. Immune reaction and colorectal cancer: Friends or foes?

    PubMed Central

    Formica, Vincenzo; Cereda, Vittore; Nardecchia, Antonella; Tesauro, Manfredi; Roselli, Mario

    2014-01-01

    The potential clinical impact of enhancing antitumor immunity is increasingly recognized in oncology therapeutics for solid tumors. Colorectal cancer is one of the most studied neoplasms for the tumor-host immunity relationship. Although immune cell populations involved in such a relationship and their prognostic role in colorectal cancer development have clearly been identified, still no approved therapies based on host immunity intensification have so far been introduced in clinical practice. Moreover, a recognized risk in enhancing immune reaction for colitis-associated colorectal cancer development has limited the emphasis of this approach. The aim of the present review is to discuss immune components involved in the host immune reaction against colorectal cancer and analyze the fine balance between pro-tumoral and anti-tumoral effect of immunity in this model of disease. PMID:25253941

  8. Racial and Ethnic Differences in Health Behaviors and Preventive Health Services Among Prostate Cancer Survivors in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Trevor D.; Richards, Thomas B.; Steele, C. Brooke

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Little is known about how health behaviors and receipt of preventive health care differ by race and ethnicity among prostate cancer survivors. The purpose of this study was to identify differences in the prevalence of 7 modifiable factors related to prostate cancer: smoking, alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, weight, colorectal cancer screening, influenza vaccination, and pneumococcal vaccination. Methods We used data from the 2010 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System to calculate the racial/ethnic prevalence of sociodemographic and health-related characteristics, health behaviors, and preventive health care among prostate cancer survivors. Adjusted prevalence estimates were calculated by using multivariable logistic regression. Results We identified 8,016 men with a history of prostate cancer. Multivariable analyses indicated that more black men reported being obese (29.9%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 24.5%–35.9%) than white men (22.8%; 95% CI, 21.1%–24.6%). More white men (3.6%; 95% CI, 2.9%–4.5%) reported consuming more than 2 alcoholic drinks per day than black men (0.9%; 95% CI, 0.4%–2.0%). More white men aged 65 or older reported receiving pneumococcal vaccine (74.2%; 95% CI, 72.2%–76.1%) than black men of the same age (63.2%; 95% CI, 54.8%–70.8%).We did not observe any differences in the prevalence of health behaviors and preventive health care between white men and men in Hispanic or other race categories. Conclusion Differences in alcohol consumption, obesity, and receipt of pneumococcal vaccination existed only between black and white prostate cancer survivors. These differences underscore the need to develop culturally appropriate, evidence-based interventions to reduce excessive alcohol consumption, maintain a healthy weight, and promote pneumococcal vaccination among prostate cancer survivors. PMID:27442995

  9. SATB1 and 2 in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Brocato, Jason; Costa, Max

    2015-02-01

    The special AT-rich sequence-binding proteins 1 and 2 (SATB1/2) are nuclear matrix associated proteins that are transcription factors involved in chromatin remodeling and gene regulation. Expression of the SATB2 gene is tissue-specific, and the only epithelial cells expressing SATB2 are the glandular cells of the lower gastrointestinal tract where its expression is regulated by microRNA-31 (miR-31) and miR-182. SATB2, along with its homolog SATB1, are thought to be involved in various cancers with their roles in this disease being specific to the type of cancer. Colorectal cancer (CRC) provides the largest association of SATB2 with cancer and the roles of SATB2 are better defined and more studied in CRC than in any other cancer type. SATB1 displays a negative association with SATB2 in CRC. The various studies that have investigated the involvement of SATB1 and 2 in CRC have produced consistent findings. Here, we form four major conclusions regarding the role of these proteins in CRC and their potential clinical value: (i) SATB2 is a sensitive marker to distinguish CRC from other cancer types, (ii) Reduced expression of SATB2 in CRC is associated with poor prognosis, (iii) High levels of SATB1 expression facilitate CRC and are associated with poor prognosis and (iv) Overexpression of miR-31 and -182 in CRC leads to more aggressive cancer. This review will describe several of the key investigations that established these conclusions and highlight results that offer opportunities for future research in the treatment and diagnosis of CRC. PMID:25543122

  10. Recruiting young adult cancer survivors for behavioral research.

    PubMed

    Rabin, Carolyn; Horowitz, Santina; Marcus, Bess

    2013-03-01

    Young adults have been dramatically underrepresented in cancer survivorship research. One contributing factor is the difficulty recruiting this population. To identify effective recruitment strategies, the current study assessed the yield of strategies used to recruit young survivors for an exercise intervention including: clinic-based recruitment, recruitment at cancer-related events, mailings, telephone-based recruitment, advertising on the internet, radio, television and social networking media, distributing brochures and word-of-mouth referrals. When taking into account the strategies for which we could track the number of survivors approached, recruitment at an oncology clinic was the most productive: 38 % of those approached were screened and 8 % enrolled. When evaluating which strategy yielded the greatest percentage of the sample, however, mailings were the most productive. Given widespread use of the internet and social networking by young adults, investigators should also consider these low-cost recruitment strategies.

  11. Recruiting Young Adult Cancer Survivors for Behavioral Research

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Santina; Marcus, Bess

    2012-01-01

    Young adults have been dramatically underrepresented in cancer survivorship research. One contributing factor is the difficulty recruiting this population. To identify effective recruitment strategies, the current study assessed the yield of strategies used to recruit young survivors for an exercise intervention including: clinic-based recruitment, recruitment at cancer-related events, mailings, telephone-based recruitment, advertising on the internet, radio, television and social networking media, distributing brochures and word-of-mouth referrals. When taking into account the strategies for which we could track the number of survivors approached, recruitment at an oncology clinic was the most productive: 38 % of those approached were screened and 8 % enrolled. When evaluating which strategy yielded the greatest percentage of the sample, however, mailings were the most productive. Given widespread use of the internet and social networking by young adults, investigators should also consider these low-cost recruitment strategies. PMID:22810954

  12. Recruiting young adult cancer survivors for behavioral research.

    PubMed

    Rabin, Carolyn; Horowitz, Santina; Marcus, Bess

    2013-03-01

    Young adults have been dramatically underrepresented in cancer survivorship research. One contributing factor is the difficulty recruiting this population. To identify effective recruitment strategies, the current study assessed the yield of strategies used to recruit young survivors for an exercise intervention including: clinic-based recruitment, recruitment at cancer-related events, mailings, telephone-based recruitment, advertising on the internet, radio, television and social networking media, distributing brochures and word-of-mouth referrals. When taking into account the strategies for which we could track the number of survivors approached, recruitment at an oncology clinic was the most productive: 38 % of those approached were screened and 8 % enrolled. When evaluating which strategy yielded the greatest percentage of the sample, however, mailings were the most productive. Given widespread use of the internet and social networking by young adults, investigators should also consider these low-cost recruitment strategies. PMID:22810954

  13. Characteristics of Long-Term Survivors of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cress, Rosemary D.; Chen, Yingjia S.; Morris, Cyllene R.; Petersen, Megan; Leiserowitz, Gary S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify characteristics associated with long-term survival forepithelial ovarian cancer patients using the California Cancer Registry. Methods A descriptive analysis of survival of all California residents diagnosed with epithelial ovarian cancer between 1994 and 2001 was conducted using patients identified through the cancer registry with follow up through 2011. Characteristics of the patients who survived more than 10 years (long-term survivors) were compared to three other cohorts: patients who survived less than 2 years, those who survived at least 2 but no more than 5 years, and those who survived at least 5 but no more than 10 years. Results A total of 3,582 out of 11,541 (31% CI=30.2%, 31.8%) of the patients survived more than 10 years. Younger age, early stage, low-grade, and non-serous histology were significant predictors of long-term survival, but long-term survivors also included women with high-risk cancer. Conclusion Long-term survival is not unusual in patients with epithelial ovarian cancer, even in those with high-risk disease. Many of the prognostic factors are well known, but it remains to be determined why some patients with advanced stage high-grade cancers survive longer than others with the same histology. These findings are important for patient counseling. PMID:26244529

  14. Internet Recruitment of Asian American Breast Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Im, Eun-Ok; Lee, Yaelim; Ji, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Jingwen; Kim, Sangmi; Chee, Eunice; Chee, Wonshik; Tsai, Hsiu-Min; Nishigaki, Masakazu; Yeo, Seon Ae; Shapira, Marilyn M; Mao, Jun James

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to identify practical issues in Internet recruitment of racial/ethnic minorities by analyzing an Internet intervention study conducted with Asian American breast cancer survivors, and to propose directions for recruitment of racial/ethnic minorities for future Internet research. Six practical issues were identified: (a) a relatively fewer number of Internet communities/groups; (b) hindrances in establishing authenticity; PMID:27490884

  15. International collaboration for the prevention of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Winawer, S. J.

    1990-01-01

    This brief paper describes the involvement of the World Health Organization in promoting international collaboration for the prevention of colorectal cancer, more than half a million cases of which are diagnosed every year. A WHO Collaborating Centre was designated in 1985 in the USA and the activities of this Centre have included the preparation of a series of six articles for publication in the Bulletin of the World Health Organization. These articles deal with primary prevention, risk and screening of average-risk individuals, as well as risk and surveillance of individuals with chronic ulcerative colitis, colorectal polyps, and heritable factors for colorectal cancer. PMID:2393985

  16. [Streamlined treatment pathway for a colorectal cancer patient].

    PubMed

    Rantala, Arto; Ristamäki, Raija; Keränen, Ulla

    2016-01-01

    The organization of colorectal cancer patient treatment, the pathway, is an important component of the quality of care of a large patient group as nearly 3000 colorectal cancer patients are diagnosed and treated annually in Finland. By designing and describing the whole pathway, the more streamlined approach can be made and thus improve patient care. Multidisciplinary team work between colorectal surgeons, oncologists, pathologists and radiologists is flexible team work, having been proven to improve overall treatment results. This method of working together is also a good tool for the development of the pathway to a better organized treatment. PMID:27483633

  17. [Overview of current modalities of colorectal cancer screening].

    PubMed

    Kajzrlíková, Ivana Mikoviny; Vítek, Petr

    2016-04-01

    There are one-step and two-steps programs for colorectal cancer screening. The aim of all screening examinations is to detect early stage of the disease in asymptomatic patient. The aim of this article is actual review of current screening modalities such as fecal occult blood test, flexible sigmoideoscopy, colonoscopy, CT colonography, capsule endoscopy, blood-based tests and stool DNA tests. Colonoscopy still remains the gold standard for detection of colorectal neoplasias. In majority of countries worldwide programs for colorectal cancer screening are based on immunochemical fecal occult blood test followed by colonoscopy when positive.

  18. Familial Colorectal Cancer: Understanding the Alphabet Soup.

    PubMed

    Giglia, Matthew D; Chu, Daniel I

    2016-09-01

    While most colorectal cancers (CRCs) originate from nonhereditary spontaneous mutations, one-third of cases are familial or hereditary. Hereditary CRCs, which account for < 5% of all CRCs, have identifiable germline mutations and phenotypes, such as Lynch syndrome and familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Familial CRCs, which account for up to 30% of CRCs, have no identifiable germline mutation or specific pattern of inheritance, but higher-than-expected incidence within a family. Since the discovery that certain genotypes can lead to development of CRC, thousands of mutations have now been implicated in CRC. These new findings have enhanced our ability to identify at-risk patients, initiate better surveillance, and take preventative measures. Given the large number of genes now associated with hereditary and familial CRCs, clinicians should be familiar with the alphabet soup of genes to provide the highest quality of care for patients and families. PMID:27582643

  19. Screening for colorectal cancer: what fits best?

    PubMed

    Lee, Chun Seng; Ronan, Leen; O'Morain, Colm; McNamara, Deirdre

    2012-06-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening has been shown to be effective in reducing CRC incidence and mortality. There are currently a number of screening modalities available for implementation into a population-based CRC screening program. Each screening method offers different strengths but also possesses its own limitations as a population-based screening strategy. We review the current evidence base for accepted CRC screening tools and evaluate their merits alongside their challenges in fulfilling their role in the detection of CRC. We also aim to provide an outlook on the demands of a low-risk population-based CRC screening program with a view to providing insight as to which modality would best suit current and future needs.

  20. The consensus molecular subtypes of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Guinney, Justin; Dienstmann, Rodrigo; Wang, Xin; de Reyniès, Aurélien; Schlicker, Andreas; Soneson, Charlotte; Marisa, Laetitia; Roepman, Paul; Nyamundanda, Gift; Angelino, Paolo; Bot, Brian M; Morris, Jeffrey S; Simon, Iris M; Gerster, Sarah; Fessler, Evelyn; De Sousa E Melo, Felipe; Missiaglia, Edoardo; Ramay, Hena; Barras, David; Homicsko, Krisztian; Maru, Dipen; Manyam, Ganiraju C; Broom, Bradley; Boige, Valerie; Perez-Villamil, Beatriz; Laderas, Ted; Salazar, Ramon; Gray, Joe W; Hanahan, Douglas; Tabernero, Josep; Bernards, Rene; Friend, Stephen H; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Medema, Jan Paul; Sadanandam, Anguraj; Wessels, Lodewyk; Delorenzi, Mauro; Kopetz, Scott; Vermeulen, Louis; Tejpar, Sabine

    2015-11-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a frequently lethal disease with heterogeneous outcomes and drug responses. To resolve inconsistencies among the reported gene expression-based CRC classifications and facilitate clinical translation, we formed an international consortium dedicated to large-scale data sharing and analytics across expert groups. We show marked interconnectivity between six independent classification systems coalescing into four consensus molecular subtypes (CMSs) with distinguishing features: CMS1 (microsatellite instability immune, 14%), hypermutated, microsatellite unstable and strong immune activation; CMS2 (canonical, 37%), epithelial, marked WNT and MYC signaling activation; CMS3 (metabolic, 13%), epithelial and evident metabolic dysregulation; and CMS4 (mesenchymal, 23%), prominent transforming growth factor-β activation, stromal invasion and angiogenesis. Samples with mixed features (13%) possibly represent a transition phenotype or intratumoral heterogeneity. We consider the CMS groups the most robust classification system currently available for CRC-with clear biological interpretability-and the basis for future clinical stratification and subtype-based targeted interventions.

  1. Pharmacologic resistance in colorectal cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, William A.; Swaika, Abhisek; Mody, Kabir

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) persists as one of the most prevalent and deadly tumor types in both men and women worldwide. This is in spite of widespread, effective measures of preventive screening, and also major advances in treatment options. Despite advances in cytotoxic and targeted therapy, resistance to chemotherapy remains one of the greatest challenges in long-term management of incurable metastatic disease and eventually contributes to death as tumors accumulate means of evading treatment. We performed a comprehensive literature search on the data available through PubMed, Medline, Scopus, and the ASCO Annual Symposium abstracts through June 2015 for the purpose of this review. We discuss the current state of knowledge of clinically relevant mechanisms of resistance to cytotoxic and targeted therapies now in use for the treatment of CRC. PMID:26753006

  2. [Gastrointestinal oncology: the genetics of colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Balaguer Prunés, Francesc

    2011-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common malignancies in developed countries, and up to 5% of all cases occur in the context of a hereditary syndrome. These hereditary forms often require a high degree of suspicion for diagnosis, as well as specific and specialized management. In addition, a diagnosis of hereditary CRC has major consequences not only for the patient, for whom there are highly effective prevention measures, but also for relatives, who may be carriers of the same condition. The most significant advances in the field of hereditary CRC have occurred in the characterization of serrated polyposis syndrome and in the diagnosis and management of patients with Lynch syndrome and familial adenomatous polyposis.

  3. Estimating the heritability of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Shuo; Peters, Ulrike; Berndt, Sonja; Brenner, Hermann; Butterbach, Katja; Caan, Bette J.; Carlson, Christopher S.; Chan, Andrew T.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen; Curtis, Keith R.; Duggan, David; Gong, Jian; Harrison, Tabitha A.; Hayes, Richard B.; Henderson, Brian E.; Hoffmeister, Michael; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Marchand, Loic Le; Potter, John D.; Rudolph, Anja; Schoen, Robert E.; Seminara, Daniela; Slattery, Martha L.; White, Emily; Hsu, Li

    2014-01-01

    A sizable fraction of colorectal cancer (CRC) is expected to be explained by heritable factors, with heritability estimates ranging from 12 to 35% twin and family studies. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have successfully identified a number of common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with CRC risk. Although it has been shown that these CRC susceptibility SNPs only explain a small proportion of the genetic risk, it is not clear how much of the heritability these SNPs explain and how much is left to be detected by other, yet to be identified, common SNPs. Therefore, we estimated the heritability of CRC under different scenarios using Genome-Wide Complex Trait Analysis in the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium including 8025 cases and 10 814 controls. We estimated that the heritability explained by known common CRC SNPs identified in GWAS was 0.65% (95% CI:0.3–1%; P = 1.11 × 10−16), whereas the heritability explained by all common SNPs was at least 7.42% (95% CI: 4.71–10.12%; P = 8.13 × 10−8), suggesting that many common variants associated with CRC risk remain to be detected. Comparing the heritability explained by the common variants with that from twin and family studies, a fraction of the heritability may be explained by other genetic variants, such as rare variants. In addition, our analysis showed that the gene × smoking interaction explained a significant proportion of the CRC variance (P = 1.26 × 10−2). In summary, our results suggest that known CRC SNPs only explain a small proportion of the heritability and more common SNPs have yet to be identified. PMID:24562164

  4. Can the prognosis of colorectal cancer be improved by surgery?

    PubMed

    Takii, Yasumasa; Maruyama, Satoshi; Nogami, Hitoshi

    2016-08-27

    Surgical resection is the only curative treatment modality for colorectal cancer limited locally. Evidence for the kind of resection procedure that is effective for improving prognosis is insufficient. Prognosis improvement is expected with the no-touch isolation technique (NTIT), making it the most important resection procedure. We are conducting a multicenter randomized controlled trial (RCT) to confirm the efficacy of NTIT in patients with colorectal cancer. The present review serves as a preface to our trial, as it focuses on basic and clinical studies that support the efficacy of NTIT. The detection ratios of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) of peripheral blood indicate the progress and prognosis of colorectal cancer. In a rabbit liver tumor model, metastases increased after surgical manipulation. Also, CTCs increased during the radical excision of colorectal cancer. However, NTIT decreased the detection of CTCs of intraoperative portal vein blood in patients with colorectal cancer. Although these aforementioned results support the use of NTIT, a previous controlled prospective trial was not able to confirm the clinical benefit of NTIT, as it had an insufficient sample size and many patients were lost to follow-up. Therefore, we initiated a large-scale high-quality RCT to confirm the efficacy of NTIT for colorectal cancer. PMID:27648161

  5. Can the prognosis of colorectal cancer be improved by surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Takii, Yasumasa; Maruyama, Satoshi; Nogami, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Surgical resection is the only curative treatment modality for colorectal cancer limited locally. Evidence for the kind of resection procedure that is effective for improving prognosis is insufficient. Prognosis improvement is expected with the no-touch isolation technique (NTIT), making it the most important resection procedure. We are conducting a multicenter randomized controlled trial (RCT) to confirm the efficacy of NTIT in patients with colorectal cancer. The present review serves as a preface to our trial, as it focuses on basic and clinical studies that support the efficacy of NTIT. The detection ratios of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) of peripheral blood indicate the progress and prognosis of colorectal cancer. In a rabbit liver tumor model, metastases increased after surgical manipulation. Also, CTCs increased during the radical excision of colorectal cancer. However, NTIT decreased the detection of CTCs of intraoperative portal vein blood in patients with colorectal cancer. Although these aforementioned results support the use of NTIT, a previous controlled prospective trial was not able to confirm the clinical benefit of NTIT, as it had an insufficient sample size and many patients were lost to follow-up. Therefore, we initiated a large-scale high-quality RCT to confirm the efficacy of NTIT for colorectal cancer.

  6. Detection of colorectal cancer using time-resolved autofluorescence spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Sheng; Kwek, Leong-Chuan; Chia, Teck-Chee; Lim, Chu-Sing; Tang, Choong-Leong; Ang, Wuan-Suan; Zhou, Miao-Chang; Loke, Po-Ling

    2006-04-01

    As we know Quantum mechanics is a mathematical theory that can describe the behavior of objects that are at microscopic level. Time-resolved autofluorescence spectrometer monitors events that occur during the lifetime of the excited state. This time ranges from a few picoseconds to hundreds of nanoseconds. That is an extremely important advance as it allows environmental parameters to be monitored in a spatially defined manner in the specimen under study. This technique is based on the application of Quantum Mechanics. This principle is applied in our project as we are trying to use different fluorescence spectra to detect biological molecules commonly found in cancerous colorectal tissue and thereby differentiate the cancerous and non-cancerous colorectal polyps more accurately and specifically. In this paper, we use Fluorescence Lifetime Spectrometer (Edinburgh Instruments FL920) to measure decay time of autofluorescence of colorectal cancerous and normal tissue sample. All specimens are from Department of Colorectal Surgery, Singapore General Hospital. The tissues are placed in the time-resolved autofluorescence instrument, which records and calculates the decay time of the autofluorescence in the tissue sample at the excitation and emission wavelengths pre-determined from a conventional spectrometer. By studying the decay time,τ, etc. for cancerous and normal tissue, we aim to present time-resolved autofluorescence as a feasible technique for earlier detection of malignant colorectal tissues. By using this concept, we try to contribute an algorithm even an application tool for real time early diagnosis of colorectal cancer for clinical services.

  7. Coffee Consumption and the Incidence of Colorectal Cancer in Women.

    PubMed

    Groessl, Erik J; Allison, Matthew A; Larson, Joseph C; Ho, Samuel B; Snetslaar, Linda G; Lane, Dorothy S; Tharp, Katie M; Stefanick, Marcia L

    2016-01-01

    Background. Higher coffee consumption has been associated with decreased incidence of colorectal cancer. Our objective was to examine the relationship of coffee intake to colorectal cancer incidence in a large observational cohort of postmenopausal US women. Methods. Data were collected for the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study providing a follow-up period of 12.9 years. The mean age of our sample (N = 83,778 women) was 63.5 years. Daily coffee intake was grouped into 3 categories: None, moderate (>0-<4 cups), and high (4+ cups). Proportional hazards modeling was used to evaluate the relationship between coffee intake and colorectal cancer. Results. There were 1,282 (1.53%) new cases of colorectal cancer during follow-up. Compared to nondrinkers, moderate and high coffee drinkers had an increased incidence of colorectal cancer in multivariate analysis (HR 1.15, 1.02-1.29; HR 1.14, 0.93-1.38). Moderate drip brew coffee intake (HR 1.20, 1.05-1.36) and high nondrip brew coffee intake (HR 1.43, 1.01-2.02) were associated with increased odds. Conclusion. Our results suggesting increased incidence of colorectal cancer associated with higher coffee consumption contradict recent meta-analyses but agree with a number of other studies showing that coffee increases risk or has no effect. Brew method results are novel and warrant further research. PMID:27239197

  8. Preoperative thrombocytosis predicts prognosis in stage II colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong Sun; Suh, Kwang Wook

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Thrombocytosis is known to be a poor prognostic factor in several types of solid tumors. The prognostic role of preoperative thrombocytosis in colorectal cancer remains limited. The aim of this study is to investigate the prognostic role of preoperative thrombocytosis in stage II colorectal cancer. Methods Two hundred eighty-four patients with stage II colorectal cancer who underwent surgical resection between December 2003 and December 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. Thrombocytosis was defined as platelet > 450 × 109/L. We compared patients with thrombocytosis and those without thrombocytosis in terms of survival. Results The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rates were lower in patients with thrombocytosis compared to those without thrombocytosis in stage II colorectal cancer (73.3% vs. 89.6%, P = 0.021). Cox multivariate analysis demonstrated that thrombocytosis (hazard ratio, 2.945; 95% confidence interval, 1.127–7.697; P = 0.028) was independently associated with DFS in patients with stage II colorectal cancer. Conclusion This study showed that thrombocytosis is a prognostic factor predicting DFS in stage II colorectal cancer patients. PMID:27274508

  9. Can the prognosis of colorectal cancer be improved by surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Takii, Yasumasa; Maruyama, Satoshi; Nogami, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Surgical resection is the only curative treatment modality for colorectal cancer limited locally. Evidence for the kind of resection procedure that is effective for improving prognosis is insufficient. Prognosis improvement is expected with the no-touch isolation technique (NTIT), making it the most important resection procedure. We are conducting a multicenter randomized controlled trial (RCT) to confirm the efficacy of NTIT in patients with colorectal cancer. The present review serves as a preface to our trial, as it focuses on basic and clinical studies that support the efficacy of NTIT. The detection ratios of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) of peripheral blood indicate the progress and prognosis of colorectal cancer. In a rabbit liver tumor model, metastases increased after surgical manipulation. Also, CTCs increased during the radical excision of colorectal cancer. However, NTIT decreased the detection of CTCs of intraoperative portal vein blood in patients with colorectal cancer. Although these aforementioned results support the use of NTIT, a previous controlled prospective trial was not able to confirm the clinical benefit of NTIT, as it had an insufficient sample size and many patients were lost to follow-up. Therefore, we initiated a large-scale high-quality RCT to confirm the efficacy of NTIT for colorectal cancer. PMID:27648161

  10. Coffee Consumption and the Incidence of Colorectal Cancer in Women

    PubMed Central

    Groessl, Erik J.; Allison, Matthew A.; Larson, Joseph C.; Ho, Samuel B.; Snetslaar, Linda G.; Lane, Dorothy S.; Tharp, Katie M.; Stefanick, Marcia L.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Higher coffee consumption has been associated with decreased incidence of colorectal cancer. Our objective was to examine the relationship of coffee intake to colorectal cancer incidence in a large observational cohort of postmenopausal US women. Methods. Data were collected for the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study providing a follow-up period of 12.9 years. The mean age of our sample (N = 83,778 women) was 63.5 years. Daily coffee intake was grouped into 3 categories: None, moderate (>0–<4 cups), and high (4+ cups). Proportional hazards modeling was used to evaluate the relationship between coffee intake and colorectal cancer. Results. There were 1,282 (1.53%) new cases of colorectal cancer during follow-up. Compared to nondrinkers, moderate and high coffee drinkers had an increased incidence of colorectal cancer in multivariate analysis (HR 1.15, 1.02–1.29; HR 1.14, 0.93–1.38). Moderate drip brew coffee intake (HR 1.20, 1.05–1.36) and high nondrip brew coffee intake (HR 1.43, 1.01–2.02) were associated with increased odds. Conclusion. Our results suggesting increased incidence of colorectal cancer associated with higher coffee consumption contradict recent meta-analyses but agree with a number of other studies showing that coffee increases risk or has no effect. Brew method results are novel and warrant further research. PMID:27239197

  11. Predicting Fear of Breast Cancer Recurrence and Self-Efficacy in Survivors by Age at Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Ziner, Kim Wagler; Sledge, George W.; Bell, Cynthia J.; Johns, Shelley; Miller, Kathy D.; Champion, Victoria L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To determine the effect that age at diagnosis has on fear of breast cancer recurrence and to identify the predictors of fear of recurrence using self-efficacy as a mediator. Design Cross-sectional survey. Setting Two university cancer centers and one cooperative group in the midwestern United States. Sample 1,128 long-term survivors. Methods Survivors were eligible if they were aged 18–45 years (younger group) or 55–70 years (older group) at cancer diagnosis, had received chemotherapy, and were three to eight years postdiagnosis. Fear of recurrence was compared between younger and older groups. Multiple regression analyses were used to test variables’ prediction of fear of recurrence and breast cancer survivor self-efficacy, as well as breast cancer survivor self-efficacy mediation effects. Main Research Variables Fear of recurrence, breast cancer survivor self-efficacy, and age at diagnosis. Findings Survivors diagnosed at a younger age had significantly higher fear of recurrence, as well as health, role, womanhood, death, and parenting worries. Perceived risk of recurrence, trait anxiety, and breast cancer reminders explained significant variance in fear of recurrence and breast cancer survivor self-efficacy. Breast cancer survivor self-efficacy partially mediated the effects of variables on fear of recurrence. Conclusions The findings suggest that breast cancer survivor self-efficacy may have a protective effect for survivors who are younger at diagnosis and have higher perceived risk of recurrence, higher trait anxiety, and more breast cancer reminders. Oncology nurses already use the skills required to support self-efficacy. Additional research is needed to define and test breast cancer survivor self-efficacy interventions. Implications for Nursing Oncology nurses are in a key role to assess fear of recurrence and provide self-efficacy interventions to reduce it in breast cancer survivors. Strategies to efficiently address fear of

  12. Exercise Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease in Breast Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Kirkham, Amy A.; Davis, Margot K.

    2015-01-01

    Thanks to increasingly effective treatment, breast cancer mortality rates have significantly declined over the past few decades. Following the increase in life expectancy of women diagnosed with breast cancer, it has been recognized that these women are at an elevated risk for cardiovascular disease due in part to the cardiotoxic side effects of treatment. This paper reviews evidence for the role of exercise in prevention of cardiovascular toxicity associated with chemotherapy used in breast cancer, and in modifying cardiovascular risk factors in breast cancer survivors. There is growing evidence indicating that the primary mechanism for this protective effect appears to be improved antioxidant capacity in the heart and vasculature and subsequent reduction of treatment-related oxidative stress in these structures. Further clinical research is needed to determine whether exercise is a feasible and effective nonpharmacological treatment to reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in breast cancer survivors, to identify the cancer therapies for which it is effective, and to determine the optimal exercise dose. Safe and noninvasive measures that are sensitive to changes in cardiovascular function are required to answer these questions in patient populations. Cardiac strain, endothelial function, and cardiac biomarkers are suggested outcome measures for clinical research in this field. PMID:26339243

  13. Are we missing an opportunity for cancer prevention? Human papillomavirus vaccination for survivors of pediatric and young adult cancers.

    PubMed

    Temkin, Sarah M; Seibel, Nita L

    2015-10-01

    Survivors of pediatric and young adult cancers remain at risk for subsequent diseases, including those related to human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Prevention of HPV acquisition through vaccination has become possible over the last decade. HPV vaccines have been shown to be safe and effective, yet rates of vaccination among childhood cancer survivors have remained low. Multiple factors, including stronger advocacy for this intervention from providers, could potentially increase vaccination and lead to lower HPV disease burdens for childhood cancer survivors. Health care providers for survivors of pediatric and adolescent cancers should prioritize counseling for HPV vaccination at follow-up visits. Cancer 2015;121:3435-43. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  14. Living as an Endometrial Cancer Survivor

    MedlinePlus

    ... your chances of the cancer coming back Keeping health insurance and copies of your medical records Even after treatment, it’s very important to keep health insurance . Tests and doctor visits cost a lot, and ...

  15. Coffee, colon function and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Vitaglione, Paola; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Pellegrini, Nicoletta

    2012-09-01

    For several years the physiological effects of coffee have been focused on its caffeine content, disregarding the hundreds of bioactive coffee components, such as polyphenols, melanoidins, carbohydrates, diterpenes, etc. These compounds may exert their protection against colorectal cancer (CRC), the third most common cancer worldwide. However, the amount and type of compounds ingested with the beverage may be highly different depending on the variety of coffee used, the roasting degree, the type of brewing method as well as the serving size. In this frame, this paper reviews the mechanisms by which coffee may influence the risk of CRC development focusing on espresso and filtered coffee, as well as on the components that totally or partially reach the colon i.e. polyphenols and dietary fiber, including melanoidins. In particular the effects of coffee on some colon conditions whose deregulation may lead to cancer, namely microbiota composition and lumen reducing environment, were considered. Taken together the discussed studies indicated that, due to their in vivo metabolism and composition, both coffee chlorogenic acids and dietary fiber, including melanoidins, may reduce CRC risk, increasing colon motility and antioxidant status. Further studies should finally assess whether the coffee benefits for colon are driven through a prebiotic effect.

  16. Cytokine-Induced Modulation of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mager, Lukas F.; Wasmer, Marie-Hélène; Rau, Tilman T.; Krebs, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of novel immunomodulatory cancer therapies over the last decade, above all immune checkpoint blockade, has significantly advanced tumor treatment. For colorectal cancer (CRC), a novel scoring system based on the immune cell infiltration in tumors has greatly improved disease prognostic evaluation and guidance to more specific therapy. These findings underline the relevance of tumor immunology in the future handling and therapeutic approach of malignant disease. Inflammation can either promote or suppress CRC pathogenesis and inflammatory mediators, mainly cytokines, critically determine the pro- or anti-tumorigenic signals within the tumor environment. Here, we review the current knowledge on the cytokines known to be critically involved in CRC development and illustrate their mechanisms of action. We also highlight similarities and differences between CRC patients and murine models of CRC and point out cytokines with an ambivalent role for intestinal cancer. We also identify some of the future challenges in the field that should be addressed for the development of more effective immunomodulatory therapies. PMID:27148488

  17. Aspirin, cyclooxygenase inhibition and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sostres, Carlos; Gargallo, Carla Jerusalen; Lanas, Angel

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common type of cancer worldwide. Screening measures are far from adequate and not widely available in resource-poor settings. Primary prevention strategies therefore remain necessary to reduce the risk of developing CRC. Increasing evidence from epidemiological studies, randomized clinical trials and basic science supports the effectiveness of aspirin, as well as other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, for chemoprevention of several types of cancer, including CRC. This includes the prevention of adenoma recurrence and reduction of CRC incidence and mortality. The detectable benefit of daily low-dose aspirin (at least 75 mg), as used to prevent cardiovascular disease events, strongly suggests that its antiplatelet action is central to explaining its antitumor efficacy. Daily low-dose aspirin achieves complete and persistent inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 in platelets (in pre-systemic circulation) while causing a limited and rapidly reversible inhibitory effect on COX-2 and/or COX-1 expressed in nucleated cells. Aspirin has a short half-life in human circulation (about 20 minutes); nucleated cells have the ability to resynthesize acetylated COX isozymes within a few hours, while platelets do not. COX-independent mechanisms of aspirin have been suggested to explain its chemopreventive effects but this concept remains to be demonstrated in vivo at clinical doses. PMID:24605250

  18. Aspirin, cyclooxygenase inhibition and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Sostres, Carlos; Gargallo, Carla Jerusalen; Lanas, Angel

    2014-02-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common type of cancer worldwide. Screening measures are far from adequate and not widely available in resource-poor settings. Primary prevention strategies therefore remain necessary to reduce the risk of developing CRC. Increasing evidence from epidemiological studies, randomized clinical trials and basic science supports the effectiveness of aspirin, as well as other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, for chemoprevention of several types of cancer, including CRC. This includes the prevention of adenoma recurrence and reduction of CRC incidence and mortality. The detectable benefit of daily low-dose aspirin (at least 75 mg), as used to prevent cardiovascular disease events, strongly suggests that its antiplatelet action is central to explaining its antitumor efficacy. Daily low-dose aspirin achieves complete and persistent inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 in platelets (in pre-systemic circulation) while causing a limited and rapidly reversible inhibitory effect on COX-2 and/or COX-1 expressed in nucleated cells. Aspirin has a short half-life in human circulation (about 20 minutes); nucleated cells have the ability to resynthesize acetylated COX isozymes within a few hours, while platelets do not. COX-independent mechanisms of aspirin have been suggested to explain its chemopreventive effects but this concept remains to be demonstrated in vivo at clinical doses.

  19. Cytokine-Induced Modulation of Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Mager, Lukas F; Wasmer, Marie-Hélène; Rau, Tilman T; Krebs, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of novel immunomodulatory cancer therapies over the last decade, above all immune checkpoint blockade, has significantly advanced tumor treatment. For colorectal cancer (CRC), a novel scoring system based on the immune cell infiltration in tumors has greatly improved disease prognostic evaluation and guidance to more specific therapy. These findings underline the relevance of tumor immunology in the future handling and therapeutic approach of malignant disease. Inflammation can either promote or suppress CRC pathogenesis and inflammatory mediators, mainly cytokines, critically determine the pro- or anti-tumorigenic signals within the tumor environment. Here, we review the current knowledge on the cytokines known to be critically involved in CRC development and illustrate their mechanisms of action. We also highlight similarities and differences between CRC patients and murine models of CRC and point out cytokines with an ambivalent role for intestinal cancer. We also identify some of the future challenges in the field that should be addressed for the development of more effective immunomodulatory therapies.

  20. Colorectal (Colon) Cancer: What Are the Risk Factors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Are the Risk Factors for Colorectal Cancer? Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... Cancer Institute) Learning About Colon Cancer Stay Informed Language: English Español (Spanish) File Formats Help: How do I ...

  1. Risk Factors Associated With Secondary Sarcomas in Childhood Cancer Survivors: A Report From the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Tara O.; Rajaraman, Preetha; Stovall, Marilyn; Constine, Louis S.; Olive, Aliza; Smith, Susan A.; Mertens, Ann; Meadows, Anna; Neglia, Joseph P.; Hammond, Sue; Whitton, John; Inskip, Peter D.; Robison, Leslie L.; Diller, Lisa

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Childhood cancer survivors have an increased risk of secondary sarcomas. To better identify those at risk, the relationship between therapeutic dose of chemotherapy and radiation and secondary sarcoma should be quantified. Methods and Materials: We conducted a nested case-control study of secondary sarcomas (105 cases, 422 matched controls) in a cohort of 14,372 childhood cancer survivors. Radiation dose at the second malignant neoplasm (SMN) site and use of chemotherapy were estimated from detailed review of medical records. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by conditional logistic regression. Excess odds ratio (EOR) was modeled as a function of radiation dose, chemotherapy, and host factors. Results: Sarcomas occurred a median of 11.8 years (range, 5.3-31.3 years) from original diagnosis. Any exposure to radiation was associated with increased risk of secondary sarcoma (OR = 4.1, 95% CI = 1.8-9.5). A dose-response relation was observed, with elevated risks at doses between 10 and 29.9 Gy (OR = 15.6, 95% CI = 4.5-53.9), 30-49.9 Gy (OR = 16.0, 95% CI 3.8-67.8) and >50 Gy (OR = 114.1, 95% CI 13.5-964.8). Anthracycline exposure was associated with sarcoma risk (OR = 3.5, 95% CI = 1.6-7.7) adjusting for radiation dose, other chemotherapy, and primary cancer. Adjusting for treatment, survivors with a first diagnosis of Hodgkin lymphoma (OR = 10.7, 95% CI = 3.1-37.4) or primary sarcoma (OR = 8.4, 95% CI = 3.2-22.3) were more likely to develop a sarcoma. Conclusions: Of the risk factors evaluated, radiation exposure was the most important for secondary sarcoma development in childhood cancer survivors; anthracycline chemotherapy exposure was also associated with increased risk.

  2. Cancer incidence among Japanese atomic-bomb survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Mabuchi, Kiyohiko; Preston, D.L.; Ron, E.

    1997-03-01

    The long-term follow-up of the Life Span Study (LSS) cohort of atomic bomb survivors is a major source of epidemiological data for risk assessment used in radiological protection. Previous analyses of cancer risk have primarily focused on mortality data for this cohort. Recently, it has also become possible to use cancer incidence data from the tumor registries in Hiroshima and Nagasaki for a subset of the LSS cohort, and a series of reports from the first comprehensive analyses of the LSS cancer incidence data have been published. The availability of cancer incidence data has also prompted a series of in-depth studies of specific cancers. This paper describes how the incidence and mortality data differ and discusses how the incidence data will add a new dimension to the radiation risk assessment.

  3. MicroRNAs: Clinical Relevance in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Joe; Ohtsuka, Masahisa; Pichler, Martin; Ling, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancer diagnoses and causes of mortality worldwide. MicroRNAs are a class of small, non-coding regulatory RNAs that have shown strong associations with colorectal cancer. Through the repression of target messenger RNAs, microRNAs modulate many cellular pathways, such as those involved in cell proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation. The utilization of microRNAs has shown significant promise in the diagnosis and prognosis of colorectal cancer, owing to their unique expression profile associations with cancer types and malignancies. Moreover, microRNA therapeutics with mimics or antagonists show great promise in preclinical studies, which encourages further development of their clinical use for colorectal cancer patients. The unique ability of microRNAs to affect multiple downstream pathways represents a novel approach for cancer therapy. Although still early in its development, we believe that microRNAs can be used in the near future as biomarkers and therapeutic targets for colorectal cancer. PMID:26602923

  4. Colorectal cancer: from prevention to personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Binefa, Gemma; Rodríguez-Moranta, Francisco; Teule, Alex; Medina-Hayas, Manuel

    2014-06-14

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a very heterogeneous disease that is caused by the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. CRC develops through a gradual accumulation of genetic and epigenetic changes, leading to the transformation of normal colonic mucosa into invasive cancer. CRC is one of the most prevalent and incident cancers worldwide, as well as one of the most deadly. Approximately 1235108 people are diagnosed annually with CRC, and 609051 die from CRC annually. The World Health Organization estimates an increase of 77% in the number of newly diagnosed cases of CRC and an increase of 80% in deaths from CRC by 2030. The incidence of CRC can benefit from different strategies depending on its stage: health promotion through health education campaigns (when the disease is not yet present), the implementation of screening programs (for detection of the disease in its early stages), and the development of nearly personalized treatments according to both patient characteristics (age, sex) and the cancer itself (gene expression). Although there are different strategies for screening and although the number of such strategies is increasing due to the potential of emerging technologies in molecular marker application, not all strategies meet the criteria required for screening tests in population programs; the three most accepted tests are the fecal occult blood test (FOBT), colonoscopy and sigmoidoscopy. FOBT is the most used method for CRC screening worldwide and is also the primary choice in most population-based screening programs in Europe. Due to its non-invasive nature and low cost, it is one of the most accepted techniques by population. CRC is a very heterogeneous disease, and with a few exceptions (APC, p53, KRAS), most of the genes involved in CRC are observed in a small percentage of cases. The design of genetic and epigenetic marker panels that are able to provide maximum coverage in the diagnosis of colorectal neoplasia seems a reasonable strategy

  5. Colorectal cancer: From prevention to personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Binefa, Gemma; Rodríguez-Moranta, Francisco; Teule, Àlex; Medina-Hayas, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a very heterogeneous disease that is caused by the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. CRC develops through a gradual accumulation of genetic and epigenetic changes, leading to the transformation of normal colonic mucosa into invasive cancer. CRC is one of the most prevalent and incident cancers worldwide, as well as one of the most deadly. Approximately 1235108 people are diagnosed annually with CRC, and 609051 die from CRC annually. The World Health Organization estimates an increase of 77% in the number of newly diagnosed cases of CRC and an increase of 80% in deaths from CRC by 2030. The incidence of CRC can benefit from different strategies depending on its stage: health promotion through health education campaigns (when the disease is not yet present), the implementation of screening programs (for detection of the disease in its early stages), and the development of nearly personalized treatments according to both patient characteristics (age, sex) and the cancer itself (gene expression). Although there are different strategies for screening and although the number of such strategies is increasing due to the potential of emerging technologies in molecular marker application, not all strategies meet the criteria required for screening tests in population programs; the three most accepted tests are the fecal occult blood test (FOBT), colonoscopy and sigmoidoscopy. FOBT is the most used method for CRC screening worldwide and is also the primary choice in most population-based screening programs in Europe. Due to its non-invasive nature and low cost, it is one of the most accepted techniques by population. CRC is a very heterogeneous disease, and with a few exceptions (APC, p53, KRAS), most of the genes involved in CRC are observed in a small percentage of cases. The design of genetic and epigenetic marker panels that are able to provide maximum coverage in the diagnosis of colorectal neoplasia seems a reasonable strategy

  6. Pharmacological and dietary prevention for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer morbidity and mortality. People at higher risk are those individuals with a family history of CRC and familial adenomatous polyposis. Prevention and screening are two milestones for this disease. The aim of this study is to evaluate the chemopreventive role of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including aspirin and cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitors, some micronutrients (folic acid, calcium, selenium, antioxidants) and probiotics. Discussion The studies on aspiring reported promising results, but it is debatable whether aspirin should be used as chemoprevention, because of its side effects and because of poor efficacy evident in subjects at high risk. Similar results were reported for other non-aspirin NSAIDs, such as sulindac and celecoxib, which the potential adverse effects limit their use. Selenium role in prevention of various types of cancer as well as in colon adenomas are often inconclusive or controversial. Several studies suggested that calcium may have a possible chemopreventive effect on colon adenomas and CRC, although contrasting results are reported for the latter. A recent meta-analysis including 13 randomized trial suggested that folic acid supplementation had not a chemiopreventive action on CRC. Several studies investigated the association between antioxidants, administered alone or in combination, and CRC risk, both among general and at risk population, but only few of them supported statistically significant results. Conclusion The results of this literature review showed an unclear role in CRC prevention of both pharmacological and dietary intervention. Despite several options are available to prevent colon cancer, it is challenging to identify a correct strategy to prevent CRC through pharmacological and dietary intervention due to the long latency of cancer promotion and development. Since some of the drugs investigated may have uncertain individual effects, it can be

  7. Psychological outcomes and health beliefs in adolescent and young adult survivors of childhood cancer and controls.

    PubMed

    Kazak, Anne E; Derosa, Branlyn Werba; Schwartz, Lisa A; Hobbie, Wendy; Carlson, Claire; Ittenbach, Richard F; Mao, Jun J; Ginsberg, Jill P

    2010-04-20

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to compare adolescent and young adult (AYA) pediatric cancer survivors and peers without a history of serious illness on psychological distress, health-related quality of life (HRQOL), health beliefs; examine age at diagnosis and cancer treatment intensity on these outcomes; and examine relationships between number of health problems and the outcomes. PATIENTS AND METHODS AYA cancer survivors (n = 167) and controls (n = 170), recruited during visits to a cancer survivorship clinic and primary care, completed self-report questionnaires of distress, health problems, and health beliefs. For survivors, providers rated treatment intensity and health problems. Results There were no statistically significant differences between survivors and controls in psychological distress or HRQOL. Cancer survivors had less positive health beliefs. Survivors diagnosed as adolescents had significantly greater psychological distress and fewer positive health beliefs than those diagnosed earlier. Survivors with the highest level of treatment intensity had greater anxiety and fewer positive health beliefs than those with less intense treatments. Provider report of current health problems related to survivors' beliefs and mental HRQOL only, whereas patient report of health problems correlated significantly with most psychosocial outcomes and beliefs. CONCLUSION AYA cancer survivors did not differ from peers in psychological adjustment but did endorse less adaptive health beliefs. Survivors diagnosed during adolescence and who had more intensive cancer treatments evidenced poorer psychosocial outcomes. Beliefs about health may be identified and targeted for intervention to improve quality of life, particularly when patient perceptions of current health problems are considered.

  8. Interrelated Processes toward Quality of Life in Survivors of Childhood Cancer: A Grounded Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsonis, Miranda; McDougall, Janette; Mandich, Angela; Irwin, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Past research has not adequately addressed the quality of life (QOL) of survivors of childhood cancer. The purpose of this study was to understand how QOL is experienced for individuals who have survived childhood cancer. Specific research questions included: (a) How do childhood cancer survivors define the concept of QOL and (b) What processes do…

  9. Endocrine sequelae in survivors of childhood cancer.

    PubMed

    Oberfield, Sharon E; Sklar, Charles A

    2002-02-01

    Long-term survival after treatment for childhood cancers has dramatically improved in the past 25 years. Overall 5-year survival rates for childhood cancer are greater than 70%. Residual endocrine disorders are as high as 40% in this population, with the most serious disturbances noted in growth and thyroid function. Dysfunction also is observed in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, and recent evidence cites alterations in bone and mineral metabolism, body composition, and lipid disorders. These abnormalities are most likely related directly to prior cancer treatment. This chapter focuses on a description of such disorders and offers suggestions for long-term endocrine management and follow-up evaluation.

  10. Risk of Salivary Gland Cancer After Childhood Cancer: A Report From the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

    SciTech Connect

    Boukheris, Houda; Stovall, Marilyn; Gilbert, Ethel S.; Stratton, Kayla L.; Smith, Susan A.; Weathers, Rita; Hammond, Sue; Mertens, Ann C.; Donaldson, Sarah S.; Armstrong, Gregory T.; Robison, Leslie L.; Neglia, Joseph P.; Inskip, Peter D.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate effects of radiation therapy, chemotherapy, cigarette smoking, and alcohol consumption on the risk of second primary salivary gland cancer (SGC) in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS). Methods and Materials: Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) and excess absolute risks (EAR) of SGC in the CCSS were calculated using incidence rates from Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results population-based cancer registries. Radiation dose to the salivary glands was estimated based on medical records. Poisson regression was used to assess risks with respect to radiation dose, chemotherapy, smoking, and alcohol consumption. Results: During the time period of the study, 23 cases of SGC were diagnosed among 14,135 childhood cancer survivors. The mean age at diagnosis of the first primary cancer was 8.3 years, and the mean age at SGC diagnosis was 24.8 years. The incidence of SGC was 39-fold higher in the cohort than in the general population (SIR = 39.4; 95% CI = 25.4-57.8). The EAR was 9.8 per 100,000 person-years. Risk increased linearly with radiation dose (excess relative risk = 0.36/Gy; 95% CI = 0.06-2.5) and remained elevated after 20 years. There was no significant trend of increasing risk with increasing dose of chemotherapeutic agents, pack-years of cigarette smoking, or alcohol intake. Conclusion: Although the cumulative incidence of SGC was low, childhood cancer survivors treated with radiation experienced significantly increased risk for at least 2 decades after exposure, and risk was positively associated with radiation dose. Results underscore the importance of long-term follow up of childhood cancer survivors for the development of new malignancies.

  11. crcTRP: A Translational Research Platform for Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Ning; Zheng, Ling; Liu, Fang; Wang, Li; Duan, Huilong

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of cancer mortality in both developed and developing countries. Transforming basic research results into clinical practice is one of the key tasks of translational research, which will greatly improve the diagnosis and treatments of colorectal cancer. In this paper, a translational research platform for colorectal cancer, named crcTRP, is introduced. crcTRP serves the colorectal cancer translational research by providing various types of biomedical information related with colorectal cancer to the community. The information, including clinical data, epidemiology data, individual omics data, and public omics data, was collected through a multisource biomedical information collection solution and then integrated in a clinic-omics database, which was constructed with EAV-ER model for flexibility and efficiency. A preliminary exploration of conducting translational research on crcTRP was implemented and worked out a set of clinic-genomic relations, linking clinical data with genomic data. These relations have also been applied to crcTRP to make it more conductive for cancer translational research. PMID:23431356

  12. Motivational Interviewing and Colorectal Cancer Screening

    PubMed Central

    Wahab, Stéphanie; Menon, Usha; Szalacha, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Objective This article focuses on design, training, and delivery of MI in a longitudinal randomized controlled trial intended to assess the efficacy of two separate interventions designed to increase colorectal screening when compared to a usual care, control group. One intervention was a single-session, telephone-based motivational interview (MI), created to increase colorectal cancer screening within primary care populations. The other was tailored health counseling. We present the rationale, design, and process discussions of the one-time motivational interview telephone intervention. We discuss in this paper the training and supervision of study interventionists, in order to enhance practice and research knowledge concerned with fidelity issues in motivational interview interventions. Methods To improve motivational interview proficiency and effectiveness, we developed a prescribed training program adapting MI to a telephone counseling session. Results The four interventionists trained in MI demonstrate some MI proficiency assessed by the Motivational Interviewing Treatment Integrity Scale. In the post-intervention interview, 20.5% of the MI participants reported having had a CRC screening test, and another 19.75% (n = 16) had scheduled a screening test. Almost half of the participants (43%) indicated that the phone conversation helped them to overcome the reasons why they had not had a screening test. Conclusions Ongoing supervision and training (post MI workshop) are crucial to supporting MI fidelity. The trajectory of learning MI demonstrated by the interventionists is consistent with the eight stages of learning MI. The MI roadmap created for the interventionists has shown to be more of a distraction than a facilitator in the delivery of the telephone intervention. MI can, however, be considered a useful tool for health education and warrants further study. Practice Implications MI training should include consistent training and process evaluation. MI can

  13. Ionizing radiation and kidney cancer among Japanese atomic bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Richardson, David B; Hamra, Ghassan

    2010-06-01

    Understanding of the role of radiation as a cause of kidney cancer remains limited. The most common types of kidney cancer are renal cell carcinoma and renal pelvis carcinoma. It has been posited that these entities differ in their degree of radiogenicity. Recent analyses of cancer incidence and mortality in the Life Span Study (LSS) of Japanese atomic bomb survivors have examined associations between ionizing radiation and renal cell carcinoma, but these analyses have not reported results for cancer of the renal pelvis and ureters. This paper reports the results of analyses of kidney cancer incidence during the period 1958-1998 among 105,427 atomic bomb survivors. Poisson regression methods were used to derive estimates of associations between radiation dose (in sievert, Sv) and cancer of the renal parenchyma (n = 167), and cancer of the renal pelvis and ureter (n = 80). Heterogeneity by cancer site was tested by joint modeling of cancer risks. Radiation dose was positively associated with cancers of the renal pelvis and ureter [excess relative rate (ERR)/Sv = 1.65; 90% confidence interval (CI): 0.37, 3.78]. The magnitude of this association was larger than the estimated association between radiation dose and cancer of the renal parenchyma (ERR/Sv = 0.27; 90% CI = -0.19, 0.98). While the association between radiation and cancer of the renal parenchyma was of greater magnitude at ages <55 years (ERR/Sv = 2.82; 90% CI = 0.45, 8.89) than at older attained ages (ERR/Sv = -0.11; 90% CI = nd, 0.53), the association between radiation and cancers of the renal pelvis and ureter varied minimally across these categories of attained age. A test of heterogeneity of type-specific risks provides modest support for the conclusion that risks vary by kidney cancer site (LRT = 2.34, 1 d.f., P = 0.13). Since some studies of radiation-exposed populations examine these sites in aggregate, results were also derived for the combined category of cancer of the renal parenchyma, renal

  14. Ionizing radiation and kidney cancer among Japanese atomic bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Richardson, David B; Hamra, Ghassan

    2010-06-01

    Understanding of the role of radiation as a cause of kidney cancer remains limited. The most common types of kidney cancer are renal cell carcinoma and renal pelvis carcinoma. It has been posited that these entities differ in their degree of radiogenicity. Recent analyses of cancer incidence and mortality in the Life Span Study (LSS) of Japanese atomic bomb survivors have examined associations between ionizing radiation and renal cell carcinoma, but these analyses have not reported results for cancer of the renal pelvis and ureters. This paper reports the results of analyses of kidney cancer incidence during the period 1958-1998 among 105,427 atomic bomb survivors. Poisson regression methods were used to derive estimates of associations between radiation dose (in sievert, Sv) and cancer of the renal parenchyma (n = 167), and cancer of the renal pelvis and ureter (n = 80). Heterogeneity by cancer site was tested by joint modeling of cancer risks. Radiation dose was positively associated with cancers of the renal pelvis and ureter [excess relative rate (ERR)/Sv = 1.65; 90% confidence interval (CI): 0.37, 3.78]. The magnitude of this association was larger than the estimated association between radiation dose and cancer of the renal parenchyma (ERR/Sv = 0.27; 90% CI = -0.19, 0.98). While the association between radiation and cancer of the renal parenchyma was of greater magnitude at ages <55 years (ERR/Sv = 2.82; 90% CI = 0.45, 8.89) than at older attained ages (ERR/Sv = -0.11; 90% CI = nd, 0.53), the association between radiation and cancers of the renal pelvis and ureter varied minimally across these categories of attained age. A test of heterogeneity of type-specific risks provides modest support for the conclusion that risks vary by kidney cancer site (LRT = 2.34, 1 d.f., P = 0.13). Since some studies of radiation-exposed populations examine these sites in aggregate, results were also derived for the combined category of cancer of the renal parenchyma, renal

  15. Minimally Invasive Colorectal Cancer Surgery in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Babaei, Masoud; Balavarca, Yesilda; Jansen, Lina; Gondos, Adam; Lemmens, Valery; Sjövall, Annika; B⊘rge Johannesen, Tom; Moreau, Michel; Gabriel, Liberale; Gonçalves, Ana Filipa; Bento, Maria José; van de Velde, Tony; Kempfer, Lana Raffaela; Becker, Nikolaus; Ulrich, Alexis; Ulrich, Cornelia M.; Schrotz-King, Petra; Brenner, Hermann

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) of colorectal cancer (CRC) was first introduced over 20 years ago and recently has gained increasing acceptance and usage beyond clinical trials. However, data on dissemination of the method across countries and on long-term outcomes are still sparse. In the context of a European collaborative study, a total of 112,023 CRC cases from 3 population-based (N = 109,695) and 4 institute-based clinical cancer registries (N = 2328) were studied and compared on the utilization of MIS versus open surgery. Cox regression models were applied to study associations between surgery type and survival of patients from the population-based registries. The study considered adjustment for potential confounders. The percentage of CRC patients undergoing MIS differed substantially between centers and generally increased over time. MIS was significantly less often used in stage II to IV colon cancer compared with stage I in most centers. MIS tended to be less often used in older (70+) than in younger colon cancer patients. MIS tended to be more often used in women than in men with rectal cancer. MIS was associated with significantly reduced mortality among colon cancer patients in the Netherlands (hazard ratio [HR] 0.66, 95% confidence interval [CI] (0.63–0.69), Sweden (HR 0.68, 95% CI 0.60–0.76), and Norway (HR 0.73, 95% CI 0.67–0.79). Likewise, MIS was associated with reduced mortality of rectal cancer patients in the Netherlands (HR 0.74, 95% CI 0.68–0.80) and Sweden (HR 0.77, 95% CI 0.66–0.90). Utilization of MIS in CRC resection is increasing, but large variation between European countries and clinical centers prevails. Our results support association of MIS with substantially enhanced survival among colon cancer patients. Further studies controlling for selection bias and residual confounding are needed to establish role of MIS in survival of patients. PMID:27258522

  16. Modeling and Control of Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Song, Li-Peng; Wang, Hao-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal Cancer (CRC) is becoming a major threat to people's life in China. Screening methods adopted by many other countries as effective counter-cancer methods have not been explicitly explored for people there. Thus, we present a Markov model with detailed precancerous adenoma states and then evaluate various screening strategies in this paper. Different from current researches, our model considers the population's heterogeneous risk of developing adenomas and observation-based screening strategies. Furthermore, we also give a new cost-effectiveness metric. After calibrating, the model is simulated using the Monte Carlo method. Numerical results show that there are threshold values of compliance rates below which strategy with every ten-year colonoscopy becomes the most cost-effective method; otherwise, an observation-based screening strategy is the most cost-effective. We also find that strategy with single colonoscopy for adenoma-free individuals and every three-year colonoscopy for those with adenoma is recommended when the observation-based strategy is not considered. Our findings give an explicit and complete instruction in CRC screening protocol in average-risk Chinese. PMID:27536786

  17. Modeling and Control of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Song, Li-Peng; Wang, Hao-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal Cancer (CRC) is becoming a major threat to people’s life in China. Screening methods adopted by many other countries as effective counter-cancer methods have not been explicitly explored for people there. Thus, we present a Markov model with detailed precancerous adenoma states and then evaluate various screening strategies in this paper. Different from current researches, our model considers the population’s heterogeneous risk of developing adenomas and observation-based screening strategies. Furthermore, we also give a new cost-effectiveness metric. After calibrating, the model is simulated using the Monte Carlo method. Numerical results show that there are threshold values of compliance rates below which strategy with every ten-year colonoscopy becomes the most cost-effective method; otherwise, an observation-based screening strategy is the most cost-effective. We also find that strategy with single colonoscopy for adenoma-free individuals and every three-year colonoscopy for those with adenoma is recommended when the observation-based strategy is not considered. Our findings give an explicit and complete instruction in CRC screening protocol in average-risk Chinese. PMID:27536786

  18. Novel RNA variants in colorectal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Alagaratnam, Sharmini; Zhao, Sen; Nome, Torfinn; Løvf, Marthe; Bakken, Anne C.; Hektoen, Merete; Sveen, Anita; Lothe, Ragnhild A.; Skotheim, Rolf I.

    2015-01-01

    With an annual estimated incidence of 1.4 million, and a five-year survival rate of 60%, colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major clinical burden. To identify novel RNA variants in CRC, we analyzed exon-level microarray expression data from a cohort of 202 CRCs. We nominated 25 genes with increased expression of their 3′ parts in at least one cancer sample each. To efficiently investigate underlying transcript structures, we developed an approach using rapid amplification of cDNA ends followed by high throughput sequencing (RACE-seq). RACE products from the targeted genes in 23 CRC samples were pooled together and sequenced. We identified VWA2-TCF7L2, DHX35-BPIFA2 and CASZ1-MASP2 as private fusion events, and novel transcript structures for 17 of the 23 other candidate genes. The high-throughput approach facilitated identification of CRC specific RNA variants. These include a recurrent read-through fusion transcript between KLK8 and KLK7, and a splice variant of S100A2. Both of these were overrepresented in CRC tissue and cell lines from external RNA-seq datasets. PMID:26474385

  19. Colorectal Cancer Screening: Tests, Strategies, and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Stracci, Fabrizio; Zorzi, Manuel; Grazzini, Grazia

    2014-01-01

    Screening has a central role in colorectal cancer (CRC) control. Different screening tests are effective in reducing CRC-specific mortality. Influence on cancer incidence depends on test sensitivity for pre-malignant lesions, ranging from almost no influence for guaiac-based fecal occult blood testing (gFOBT) to an estimated reduction of 66–90% for colonoscopy. Screening tests detect lesions indirectly in the stool [gFOBT, fecal immunochemical testing (FIT), and fecal DNA] or directly by colonic inspection [flexible sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, CT colonography (CTC), and capsule endoscopy]. CRC screening is cost-effective compared to no screening but no screening strategy is clearly better than the others. Stool tests are the most widely used in worldwide screening interventions. FIT will soon replace gFOBT. The use of colonoscopy as a screening test is increasing and this strategy has superseded all alternatives in the US and Germany. Despite its undisputed importance, CRC screening is under-used and participation rarely reaches 70% of target population. Strategies to increase participation include ensuring recommendation by physicians, introducing organized screening and developing new, more acceptable tests. Available evidence for DNA fecal testing, CTC, and capsule endoscopy is reviewed. PMID:25386553

  20. Lack of association between human papillomavirus infection and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Taherian, Hanieh; Fard, Zahra Tahmasebi; Abdirad, Afshin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide, with nearly one million new cases identified annually. Different factors might cause colorectal cancer, one of the most prevalent cancers among both men and women. Viral aetiology in cancerous malignancies is a very important issue and so far a number of viral strains have been identified as tumour oncogene viruses. Viral infections, such as human papillomavirus (HPV), have recently been suggested as a risk factor for colorectal cancer. However, the aetiology of the disease is still unknown. Aim To assessed the association between HPV infection and colorectal cancer. Material and methods In this study, 50 cancer tissue samples and 50 samples without colon cancer were studied in order to identify HPV through polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Of 42 adenocarcinomas, 10 were well differentiated, 30 moderated differentiated, and 2 were poorly differentiated. DNA extraction was verified by beta globin gene amplification; specific PCR was carried out based on HPV L1 consensus primers MY09/MY11. Results HPV DNA was not identified in any of the normal, adenocarcinoma, or adenoma samples. Conclusions In contrast with previous studies, the current research failed to establish a relationship between HPV infection and the incidence of colon cancer. Considering the existing inconsistencies, it is recommended that further studies be conducted with larger sample size. PMID:25396002

  1. Metabolites of tobacco smoking and colorectal cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Cross, Amanda J; Boca, Simina; Freedman, Neal D; Caporaso, Neil E; Huang, Wen-Yi; Sinha, Rashmi; Sampson, Joshua N; Moore, Steven C

    2014-07-01

    Colorectal cancer is not strictly considered a tobacco-related malignancy, but modest associations have emerged from large meta-analyses. Most studies, however, use self-reported data, which are subject to misclassification. Biomarkers of tobacco exposure may reduce misclassification and provide insight into metabolic variability that potentially influences carcinogenesis. Our aim was to identify metabolites that represent smoking habits and individual variation in tobacco metabolism, and investigate their association with colorectal cancer. In a nested case-control study of 255 colorectal cancers and 254 matched controls identified in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian cancer screening trial, baseline serum was used to identify metabolites by ultra-high-performance liquid-phase chromatography and mass spectrometry, as well as gas chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated by logistic regression. Self-reported current smoking was associated with serum cotinine, O-cresol sulfate and hydroxycotinine. Self-reported current smoking of any tobacco (OR = 1.90, 95% CI: 1.02-3.54) and current cigarette smoking (OR = 1.51, 95% CI: 0.75-3.04) were associated with elevated colorectal cancer risks, although the latter was not statistically significant. Individuals with detectable levels of hydroxycotinine had an increased colorectal cancer risk compared with those with undetectable levels (OR = 2.68, 95% CI: 1.33-5.40). Although those with detectable levels of cotinine had a suggestive elevated risk of this malignancy (OR = 1.81, 95% CI: 0.98-3.33), those with detectable levels of O-cresol sulfate did not (OR = 1.16, 95% CI: 0.57-2.37). Biomarkers capturing smoking behavior and metabolic variation exhibit stronger associations with colorectal cancer than self-report, providing additional evidence for a role for tobacco in this malignancy.

  2. Metabolites of tobacco smoking and colorectal cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Cross, Amanda J; Boca, Simina; Freedman, Neal D; Caporaso, Neil E; Huang, Wen-Yi; Sinha, Rashmi; Sampson, Joshua N; Moore, Steven C

    2014-07-01

    Colorectal cancer is not strictly considered a tobacco-related malignancy, but modest associations have emerged from large meta-analyses. Most studies, however, use self-reported data, which are subject to misclassification. Biomarkers of tobacco exposure may reduce misclassification and provide insight into metabolic variability that potentially influences carcinogenesis. Our aim was to identify metabolites that represent smoking habits and individual variation in tobacco metabolism, and investigate their association with colorectal cancer. In a nested case-control study of 255 colorectal cancers and 254 matched controls identified in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian cancer screening trial, baseline serum was used to identify metabolites by ultra-high-performance liquid-phase chromatography and mass spectrometry, as well as gas chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated by logistic regression. Self-reported current smoking was associated with serum cotinine, O-cresol sulfate and hydroxycotinine. Self-reported current smoking of any tobacco (OR = 1.90, 95% CI: 1.02-3.54) and current cigarette smoking (OR = 1.51, 95% CI: 0.75-3.04) were associated with elevated colorectal cancer risks, although the latter was not statistically significant. Individuals with detectable levels of hydroxycotinine had an increased colorectal cancer risk compared with those with undetectable levels (OR = 2.68, 95% CI: 1.33-5.40). Although those with detectable levels of cotinine had a suggestive elevated risk of this malignancy (OR = 1.81, 95% CI: 0.98-3.33), those with detectable levels of O-cresol sulfate did not (OR = 1.16, 95% CI: 0.57-2.37). Biomarkers capturing smoking behavior and metabolic variation exhibit stronger associations with colorectal cancer than self-report, providing additional evidence for a role for tobacco in this malignancy. PMID:24648381

  3. Television Watching and Colorectal Cancer Survival in Men

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yin; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A.; Chan, Andrew T.; Wu, Kana; Fuchs, Charles S.; Giovannucci, Edward L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess the association between pre- and postdiagnostic time spent sitting watching TV as well as other sedentary behaviors (other sitting at home and at work/driving) and mortality from colorectal cancer or other causes, and overall mortality. Methods We followed stage I-III colorectal cancer patients from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (1986–2010). Cox models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results 926 and 714 patients were included in the analysis of pre- and postdiagnostic TV watching respectively, and 471 and 325 died during follow-up. Prolonged prediagnostic TV viewing was associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer-specific mortality independent of leisure-time physical activity. The HRs (95% CIs) for 0–6, 7–13,14–20 and ≥21 h/wk were 1.00 (referent), 0.84 (0.56–1.25), 1.15 (0.75–1.78), 2.13 (1.31–3.45) (Ptrend=0.01). The association was observed primarily among overweight and obese individuals. Prediagnostic TV watching was also associated with overall mortality within 5 years of diagnosis, largely due to the association with colorectal cancer mortality. Other prediagnostic sitting at home or at work/driving was not associated with mortality. Postdiagnostic TV viewing was associated with non-significant increased risk of colorectal cancer-specific mortality (HR for ≥21 vs 0–6 h/wk=1.45; 95% CI 0.73–2.87) adjusting for TV viewing before diagnosis. Conclusion Prolonged prediagnostic TV watching is associated with higher colorectal cancer-specific mortality independent of leisure-time physical activity among colorectal cancer patients. PMID:26293240

  4. Health Care of Young Adult Survivors of Childhood Cancer: A Report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

    PubMed Central

    Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Mertens, Ann C.; Hudson, Melissa M.; Gurney, James G.; Casillas, Jacqueline; Chen, Hegang; Whitton, John; Yeazel, Mark; Yasui, Yutaka; Robison, Leslie L.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND We wanted to determine the type of outpatient medical care reported by young adult survivors of childhood cancer and to examine factors associated with limited medical care. METHODS We analyzed data from 9,434 adult childhood cancer survivors enrolled in a retrospective cohort study who completed a baseline questionnaire. They had a mean age of 26.8 years (range 18 to 48 years), 47% were female, 12% were minorities, and 16% were uninsured. Four self-reported outcome measures were used to determine outpatient medical care in a 2-year period: general contact with the health care system, general physical examination, cancer-related medical visit, and medical visit at a cancer center. RESULTS Eighty-seven percent reported general medical contact, 71.4% a general physical examination, 41.9% a cancer-related visit, and 19.2%, a visit at a cancer center. Factors associated with not reporting a general physical examination, a cancer-related visit, or a cancer center visit included no health insurance (odds ratio [OR] = 2.34; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.97–2.77), male sex (OR = 1.65; 95% CI, 1.44–1.88), lack of concern for future health (OR = 1.57; 95% CI, 1.36–1.82), and age 30 years or older in comparison with those 18 to 29 years (OR = 1.56; 95% CI, 1.35–1.81). The likelihood of reporting a cancer-related visit or a general physical examination decreased significantly as the survivor aged or the time from cancer diagnosis increased. This trend was also significant for those treated with therapies associated with substantial risk for cardiovascular disease or breast cancer. CONCLUSIONS Primary care physicians provide health care for most of this growing high-risk population. To optimize risk-based care, it is critical that cancer centers and primary care physicians develop methods to communicate effectively and longitudinally. PMID:15053285

  5. Social Support for Chamorro Breast Cancer Survivors on Guam

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Lilli Ann; Natividad, Lisalinda; Chung, William; Haddock, Robert L.; Wenzel, Lari; Hubbell, F. Allan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess the types of social support used by Chamorro (indigenous) breast cancer survivors on Guam. Methods We assessed social support use among 25 self-reported Chamorro women with a diagnosis of breast cancer through interviews and construction of genograms and ecomaps -pictorial displays of the women's family relationships, medical history, and their social networks. Results The mean age of the participants was 54.5 years. The average number of years since the diagnosis of breast cancer was 7.8 years. Respondents indicated that the nuclear family was the most important form of social support (34.2%). Indeed, nuclear family and other types of informal systems were the most common type of social support used by the women (60.2%). Formal support services, clubs, and organizations were reported by 17.9% of participants while spiritual and/or religious resources were reported by 21.9% of them. Conclusion These Chamorro breast cancer survivors depended largely on family for social support. Support from family, although informal, should be recognized as a pivotal factor in recovery and survivorship. Future directions could incorporate formal and informal mechanisms to utilize this natural support resource. PMID:25866489

  6. A brief intervention for fatigue management in breast cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Fillion, Lise; Gagnon, Pierre; Leblond, Francine; Gélinas, Céline; Savard, Josée; Dupuis, Réjeanne; Duval, Karine; Larochelle, Marie

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this randomized control trial was to verify the effectiveness of a brief group intervention that combines stress management psycho-education and physical activity (ie, independent variable) intervention in reducing fatigue and improving energy level, quality of life (mental and physical), fitness (VO 2submax), and emotional distress (ie, dependent variables) in breast cancer survivors. This study applied Lazarus and Folkman stress-coping theoretical framework, as well as Salmon's unifying theory of physical activity. Eighty-seven French-speaking women who had completed their treatments for nonmetastatic breast cancer at a university hospital in Quebec City, Canada, were randomly assigned to either the group intervention (experimental) or the usual-care (control) condition. Data were collected at baseline, postintervention, and at 3-month follow-up. The 4-week group intervention was cofacilitated by 2 nurses. Results showed that participants in the intervention group showed greater improvement in fatigue, energy level, and emotional distress at 3-month follow-up, and physical quality of life at postintervention, compared with the participants in the control group. These results suggest that a brief psycho-educational group intervention focusing on active coping strategies and physical activity is beneficial to cancer survivors after breast cancer treatments.

  7. Map syndrome (MYH Associated Polyposis) colorectal cancer, etiopathological connections

    PubMed Central

    Ion, D; Stoian, RV; Serban, MB

    2011-01-01

    The case presented raised our scientific curiosity and it is worthy of being brought in front of the medical audience because of several reasons presented below. Presently, there are 3 hereditary syndromes that have a demonstrated etiological relationship with the colorectal cancer: Familiar Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP syndrome), HNPCC syndrome (Hereditary Nonpoliposis Colorectal Cancer) and MAP syndrome. Discovered only in 2002, the MAP syndrome (MYH associated polyposis) is the first hereditary syndrome that has autosomal recessive transmission. The APC gene can be mutated in several ways during the colonic oncogenesis: congenital in the FAP syndrome, somatic in sporadic colorectal cancers and secondary to the MYH gene inactivation in MAP syndrome. MAP phenotype is similar to the FAP phenotype because of the somatic mutations to the APC gene. Colonic polyposis is lower than FAP syndrome and appeared later, in the 40's and 50's. Colorectal cancers are frequent and discovered in the same moment as the colonic polyposis. Patients are diagnosed mostly in cancer stages. Colonoscopy shows polyps disseminated around the entire colic frame. Treatment in these cases is total rectocolectomy with ileoanal anastomosis. When working in a general emergency surgery clinic, physicians are often faced with colorectal cancers in different evolutive stages, and mostly they are faced with their complications. PMID:21505584

  8. Strong correlation between diet and development of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Cappellani, Alessandro; Zanghì, Antonio; Di Vita, Maria; Cavallaro, Andrea; Piccolo, Gaetano; Veroux, Pierfrancesco; Lo Menzo, Emanuele; Cavallaro, Vincenzo; de Paoli, Paolo; Veroux, Massimiliano; Berretta, Massimiliano

    2013-01-01

    Multiple factors have been described among the causes of non-hereditary colorectal cancer. In Western countries, the most common risk factors include upper-middle socioeconomic status and dietary regimens rich in proteins and animal fats. High consumption of red meats, smoked foods, cold cuts, or canned foods is believed to contribute to carcinogenesis as they directly affect epithlial turnover and cause metabolism of biliary acids. Dietary fibers have protective effects in that they capture the fats and biliary acids, thereby inhibiting their activity. Tobacco smoking acts both locally and systemically on the colorectal mucosa through the production of carcinogenic agents. Finally, the action of alcohol, in association with nicotine addiction, also increases the risk of developing colorectal tumors. Knowledge of dietary and environmental factors is of paramount importance in implementing preventive strategies for colorectal cancer. PMID:23276917

  9. Cytoreductive Surgery plus HIPEC for Peritoneal Metastases from Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Aditi; Goéré, Diane

    2016-06-01

    Occurring either synchronously or metachronously to the primary tumor, peritoneal metastases (PM) are diagnosed in 8 to 20 % of the patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). Prognosis of these patients appears to be worse than those with other sites of metastases. While systemic therapy has shown significant prolongation of survival in patients with stage IV colorectal cancer, the outcomes in the subset of patients with PM has been much inferior. Over the last 2 decades, cytoreductive surgery (CRS) followed by hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) have been effective in substantially prolonging survival in patients with colorectal PM and have the potential to cure certain patients as well. This article reviews the current evidence for CRS and HIPEC to treat colorectal PM as well as future research going on in this form of locoregional treatment. PMID:27065708

  10. Quality of life in female cancer survivors: Is it related to ovarian reserve?

    PubMed Central

    Kondapalli, Laxmi A.; Dillon, Katherine E.; Sammel, Mary D.; Ray, Anushree; Prewitt, Maureen; Ginsberg, Jill P.; Gracia, Clarisa R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To assess quality of life scores and possible association with measures of ovarian reserve in female cancer survivors compared to healthy controls of similar age. Methods In this prospective cohort study, fifty-nine cancer survivors aged 16–39 years and 66 healthy, similarly aged unexposed women were recruited at the University of Pennsylvania. The primary outcome measures are the generic and cancer-specific domain scores on the Quality of Life in Adult Cancer Survivors (QLACS) instruments, early follicular phase serum hormones (follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), estradiol (E2), inhibin B (INH), anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH) and ovarian ultrasound measurements (ovarian volume and antral follicle count [AFC]) Results Cancer survivors had significantly higher total and cancer-specific domain scores compared to unexposed participants. Serum AMH, INH, ovarian volume and AFC were lower while serum FSH was higher in cancer survivors. Although survivors exhibited diminished ovarian reserve, these markers were not independently associated with total QLACS score. Cancer survivors with irregular menstrual function were found to have lower QOL scores than those with regular cycles. Conclusions We found that QOL appears to be significantly impaired in cancer survivors compared to controls, even when remote from initial cancer diagnosis. In addition, our study suggests that reproductive aging contributes to QOL in the setting of irregular menses and likely profound impairment of ovarian function. PMID:23881516

  11. Non-coding landscapes of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ragusa, Marco; Barbagallo, Cristina; Statello, Luisa; Condorelli, Angelo Giuseppe; Battaglia, Rosalia; Tamburello, Lucia; Barbagallo, Davide; Di Pietro, Cinzia; Purrello, Michele

    2015-01-01

    For two decades Vogelstein’s model has been the paradigm for describing the sequence of molecular changes within protein-coding genes that would lead to overt colorectal cancer (CRC). This model is now too simplistic in the light of recent studies, which have shown that our genome is pervasively transcribed in RNAs other than mRNAs, denominated non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). The discovery that mutations in genes encoding these RNAs [i.e., microRNAs (miRNAs), long non-coding RNAs, and circular RNAs] are causally involved in cancer phenotypes has profoundly modified our vision of tumour molecular genetics and pathobiology. By exploiting a wide range of different mechanisms, ncRNAs control fundamental cellular processes, such as proliferation, differentiation, migration, angiogenesis and apoptosis: these data have also confirmed their role as oncogenes or tumor suppressors in cancer development and progression. The existence of a sophisticated RNA-based regulatory system, which dictates the correct functioning of protein-coding networks, has relevant biological and biomedical consequences. Different miRNAs involved in neoplastic and degenerative diseases exhibit potential predictive and prognostic properties. Furthermore, the key roles of ncRNAs make them very attractive targets for innovative therapeutic approaches. Several recent reports have shown that ncRNAs can be secreted by cells into the extracellular environment (i.e., blood and other body fluids): this suggests the existence of extracellular signalling mechanisms, which may be exploited by cells in physiology and pathology. In this review, we will summarize the most relevant issues on the involvement of cellular and extracellular ncRNAs in disease. We will then specifically describe their involvement in CRC pathobiology and their translational applications to CRC diagnosis, prognosis and therapy. PMID:26556998

  12. Survivors of childhood sexual abuse diagnosed with cancer: managing the impact of early trauma on cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Gallo-Silver, Les; Weiner, Michael O

    2006-01-01

    The incidence of survivors of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) diagnosed with cancer is unknown. It is estimated that one in three women and one in six men in the United States are survivors of CSA. Survivors of CSA diagnosed with cancer are presented with multiple and potentially accumulating traumas. The re-traumatizing nature of a cancer diagnosis and treatment affects all elements of the CSA survivor's care and may impede her/his treatment. To date, the impact of CSA on the medical treatment of people with cancer has been unexplored with the existing studies on female survivors of CSA with cancer focusing on the post-treatment experience and their higher incidence of sexual dysfunction. This article describes the impact of CSA on the cancer treatment of 18 survivors of CSA and the clinical interventions used to address the unique psychosocial needs of this population. Anecdotal information suggests that the survivors of CSA may find aspects of the cancer experience reminiscent of their history of abuse. All 18 survivors of CSA experienced distressing memories of their abuse during their cancer treatment. Fifteen CSA survivors presented traumatic memories that were inaccessible to conscious thought processes prior to their cancer diagnosis. Psychodynamic interventions address issues of disruption in the cancer treatment, non-adherence, and difficulties in relationships with the health care team. Containment of intense affect and distressing thoughts rather than exploration improved CSA survivors' adherence with cancer treatments. The acquisition of self-comforting skills helped CSA survivors feel less re-victimized by their cancer experience. The establishment of an environment of internal and external safety improved communication with the health care team. Health care/psychosocial clinicians' awareness and use of appropriate interventions can minimize the affects of re-traumatization and enhance the CSA survivor's treatment experience.

  13. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for patients with liver metastases from colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Mandalà, Mario; Mosconi, Stefania; Quadri, Antonello; Milesi, Laura; Labianca, Roberto

    2007-06-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second most common type of cancer in industrialized countries. Despite improved resection procedures and optimized adjuvant chemotherapy, local or distant recurrences occur in 22-25% of patients with stage II/III colon cancer. Approximately 30% of patients have advanced disease at presentation. The liver is the most common site of colorectal metastases and, interestingly, 20-30% of patients with colorectal cancer have liver-only metastases. The combined modality of chemotherapy and surgery increases overall survival and the chance of cure for metastatic patients, even if there is no agreement in terms of the best schedule and how long the treatment must last. In this paper, we review the role and the rationale of neoadjuvant chemotherapy within a multimodal approach, and discuss remaining questions and future directions.

  14. Tea, Coffee, and Milk Consumption and Colorectal Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Green, Chadwick John; de Dauwe, Palina; Boyle, Terry; Tabatabaei, Seyed Mehdi; Fritschi, Lin; Heyworth, Jane Shirley

    2014-01-01

    Background Data regarding the effects of tea, coffee, and milk on the risk of colorectal cancer are inconsistent. We investigated associations of tea, coffee, and milk consumption with colorectal cancer risk and attempted to determine if these exposures were differentially associated with the risks of proximal colon, distal colon, and rectal cancers. Methods Data from 854 incident cases and 948 controls were analyzed in a case-control study of colorectal cancer in Western Australia during 2005–07. Multivariable logistic regression was used to analyze the associations of black tea (with and without milk), green tea, herbal tea, hot coffee, iced coffee, and milk with colorectal cancer. Results Consumption of 1 or more cups of herbal tea per week was associated with a significantly decreased risk of distal colon cancer (adjusted odds ratio, 0.37; 95% CI, 0.16–0.82; PTrend = 0.044), and consumption of 1 or more cups of iced coffee per week was associated with increased risk of rectal cancer (adjusted odds ratio, 1.52; 95% CI, 0.91–2.54; PTrend = 0.004). Neither herbal tea nor iced coffee was associated with the risk of proximal colon cancer. Hot coffee was associated with a possible increased risk of distal colon cancer. Black tea (with or without milk), green tea, decaffeinated coffee, and milk were not significantly associated with colorectal cancer risk. Conclusions Consumption of herbal tea was associated with reduced risk of distal colon cancer, and consumption of iced coffee was associated with increased rectal cancer risk. PMID:24531002

  15. 77 FR 11123 - Scientific Information Request on Local Therapies for Unresectable Colorectal Cancer Metastases...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-24

    ... Therapies for Unresectable Colorectal Cancer Metastases to the Liver AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research... unresectable colorectal cancer metastases to the liver. The EHC Program is dedicated to identifying as many... manufacturers of unresectable colorectal cancer medical devices. Scientific information is being solicited...

  16. 42 CFR 410.37 - Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for...) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.37 Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and...) Colorectal cancer screening tests means any of the following procedures furnished to an individual for...

  17. 42 CFR 410.37 - Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for...) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.37 Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and...) Colorectal cancer screening tests means any of the following procedures furnished to an individual for...

  18. 42 CFR 410.37 - Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for...) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.37 Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and...) Colorectal cancer screening tests means any of the following procedures furnished to an individual for...

  19. 42 CFR 410.37 - Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for...) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.37 Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and...) Colorectal cancer screening tests means any of the following procedures furnished to an individual for...

  20. 42 CFR 410.37 - Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for...) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.37 Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and...) Colorectal cancer screening tests means any of the following procedures furnished to an individual for...

  1. Development and evaluation of a support program for prostate cancer survivors in Alaska

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Stacy; DeCourtney, Christine; Thorsness, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer survivors in Alaska and elsewhere have unmet support needs. The Men's Prostate Cancer Survivorship Retreat, or “men's retreat,” was developed targeting Alaska Native and non-Native men who were survivors of prostate cancer. The program brought together survivors in a supportive environment to discuss and share their experiences. Objective Despite the proven effectiveness of support groups for improving quality of life for cancer patients, men typically do not participate in formal support groups. This descriptive study was conducted to explore the needs of Alaska Native and non-Native prostate cancer survivors and assess satisfaction and acceptability of a men's cancer survivorship retreat in Alaska. Methods Prostate cancer survivors (N=80) who attended men's retreats during 2009–2013 were asked to complete a retreat application and post-retreat evaluation. Comments regarding social support, helpful and valuable aspects of the retreat including overall satisfaction were reported. Results A men's retreat with activities that engage men can be successful for prostate cancer survivors. Many men returned for successive retreats. After the retreat, 97% of the participants said they would continue with support activities. Conclusion The men's retreat provides a valued opportunity for men to interact with other survivors and access information from health professionals. The results from this study highlight a successful model for social support and resources specific to male prostate cancer survivors. PMID:26612829

  2. Factors Associated with Depression Assessed by the Patient Health Questionnaire-2 in Long-Term Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Goo, Ae-Jin; Shin, Jinyoung; Ko, Hyeonyoung

    2016-01-01

    Background This cross-sectional study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of depressive disorders and factors associated in long-term cancer survivors. Methods A total of 702 long-term cancer survivors over 5-years in remission were recruited in a university-affiliated tertiary hospital in Korea. Self-report using the Patient Health Questionnaire-2 and the Fatigue Severity Scale assessed depression and fatigue, respectively. Demographic characteristics, cancer-related clinical characteristics, comorbidity, health behaviors, and physical symptoms were assessed through the review of medical records or a structured self-administered questionnaire. Results We identified 26.1% of patients who had a depressed mood or displayed a loss of interest. The most prevalent primary site of cancer was the stomach (65.2%), followed by lung, breast, colorectal, and thyroid cancer. We also found that 5.7% of subjects experienced double or triple primary cancers. Larger proportion among depressive group (89.1%) complained at least one physical problem than among non-depressive group (53.2%). Physical symptoms including sleep problems, dry mouth, indigestion, pain, decreased appetite, and febrile sense were more frequent in the depressive group than in the non-depressive group. The Fatigue Severity Scale scores were higher in the depressive group than in the non-depressive group (P<0.001). Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that the highest tertile level of fatigue (odds ratio, 7.31; 95% confidence interval, 3.81–14.02) was associated with the increased risk of depression. Conclusion These findings suggest that careful concern about depression is necessary in long-term cancer survivors. Fatigue may be a surrogate sign for depression, and warrants further evaluation. PMID:27468341

  3. A Dyadic Exercise Intervention to Reduce Psychological Distress Among Lesbian, Gay, and Heterosexual Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Heckler, Charles; Janelsins, Michelle C.; Peppone, Luke J.; McMahon, James M.; Morrow, Gary R.; Bowen, Deborah; Mustian, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Studies have found disparities in psychological distress between lesbian and gay cancer survivors and their heterosexual counterparts. Exercise and partner support are shown to reduce distress. However, exercise interventions haven't been delivered to lesbian and gay survivors with support by caregivers included. Methods: In this pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT), ten lesbian and gay and twelve heterosexual survivors and their caregivers were randomized as dyads to: Arm 1, a survivor-only, 6-week, home-based, aerobic and resistance training program (EXCAP©®); or Arm 2, a dyadic version of the same exercise program involving both the survivor and caregiver. Psychological distress, partner support, and exercise adherence, were measured at baseline and post-intervention (6 weeks later). We used t-tests to examine group differences between lesbian/gay and heterosexual survivors and between those randomized to survivor-only or dyadic exercise. Results: Twenty of the twenty-two recruited survivors were retained post-intervention. At baseline, lesbian and gay survivors reported significantly higher depressive symptoms (P = .03) and fewer average steps walked (P = .01) than heterosexual survivors. Post-intervention, these disparities were reduced and we detected no significant differences between lesbian/gay and heterosexual survivors. Participation in dyadic exercise resulted in a significantly greater reduction in depressive symptoms than participation in survivor-only exercise for all survivors (P = .03). No statistically significant differences emerged when looking across arm (survivor-only vs. dyadic) by subgroup (lesbian/gay vs. heterosexual). Conclusion: Exercise may be efficacious in ameliorating disparities in psychological distress among lesbian and gay cancer survivors, and dyadic exercise may be efficacious for survivors of diverse sexual orientations. Larger trials are needed to replicate these findings. PMID:26652029

  4. Higher cardiorespiratory fitness levels are associated with greater hippocampal volume in breast cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    Chaddock-Heyman, Laura; Mackenzie, Michael J.; Zuniga, Krystle; Cooke, Gillian E.; Awick, Elizabeth; Roberts, Sarah; Erickson, Kirk I.; McAuley, Edward; Kramer, Arthur F.

    2015-01-01

    As breast cancer treatment is associated with declines in brain and cognitive health, it is important to identify strategies to enhance the cognitive vitality of cancer survivors. In particular, the hippocampus is known to play an important role in brain and memory declines following cancer treatment. The hippocampus is also known for its plasticity and positive association with cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF). The present study explores whether CRF may hold promise for lessening declines in brain and cognitive health of a sample of breast cancer survivors within 3 years of completion of primary cancer treatment. We explored the role of cardiovascular fitness in hippocampal structure in breast cancer survivors and non-cancer female controls, as well as performed a median split to compare differences in hippocampal volume in relatively higher fit and lower fit cancer survivors and non-cancer controls. Indeed, CRF and total hippocampal volume were positively correlated in the cancer survivors. In particular, higher fit breast cancer survivors had comparable hippocampal volumes to non-cancer control participants (Cohen’s d = 0.13; p > 0.3), whereas lower fit breast cancer survivors showed significantly smaller hippocampal volumes compared to both lower fit and higher fit control participants (Cohen’s d = 0.87, p < 0.05). These results are the first to identify that CRF may protect the brain health of breast cancer survivors within 3 years of treatment. The present study uniquely contributes to the field of cancer and cognition and emphasizes the importance of investigating how individual differences in CRF play a role in brain changes of breast cancer survivors. PMID:26379528

  5. Infertility, infertility treatment, and achievement of pregnancy in female survivors of childhood cancer: a report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study cohort

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Sara E.; Najita, Julie S.; Ginsburg, Elizabeth S.; Leisenring, Wendy M.; Stovall, Marilyn; Weathers, Rita E.; Sklar, Charles A.; Robison, Leslie L.; Diller, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Background Prior studies have documented decreased pregnancy rates and early menopause in female cancer survivors; however, infertility rates and reproductive interventions have not been studied. This study investigates infertility and time to pregnancy among female childhood cancer survivors, and analyzes treatment characteristics associated with infertility and subsequent pregnancy. Methods The Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS) is a cohort study including five-year cancer survivors from 26 institutions who were <21 years old at the time of diagnosis between January 1, 1970, and December 31, 1986, and a sibling control group. CCSS females ages 18–39 years reporting they had ever been sexually active (3,531 survivors and 1,366 female controls) were studied. Self-reported infertility, medical treatment for infertility, the time to first pregnancy in survivors and siblings, and the risk of infertility in survivors by demographic, disease, and treatment variables were analyzed. Findings Survivors had an increased risk of clinical infertility (>1 year of attempts at conception without success) compared to siblings which was most pronounced at early reproductive ages (≤24 years Relative Risk (RR)=2·92, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1·18–7·20; 25–29 years RR=1·61, 95% CI 1·05–2·48; 30–39 years RR=1·37, 95% CI 1·11–1·69). Despite being equally likely to seek treatment for infertility, survivors were less likely to be prescribed medication for treatment of infertility (RR=0·57, 95% CI 0·46–0·70). Increasing doses of uterine radiation and alkylating agent chemotherapy were most strongly associated with infertility. Although survivors had an increased time to pregnancy interval (p=0·032), 64·2% (292/455) with infertility achieved a pregnancy. Interpretation A more comprehensive understanding of infertility after cancer is critical for counseling and decision-making regarding future attempts at conception as well as fertility preservation

  6. Body fat and risk of colorectal cancer among postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Kabat, Geoffrey C; Heo, Moonseong; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Messina, Catherine; Thomson, Cynthia A; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Rohan, Thomas E

    2013-06-01

    Studies of the relationship between anthropometric indices of obesity and colorectal cancer risk in women have shown only weak and inconsistent associations. Given the limitations of such indices, we used dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA)-derived measures of body fat obtained in the Women's Health Initiative to examine the association between body fat and risk of incident colorectal cancer. We compared these risk estimates with those obtained using conventional anthropometric measurements (body mass index and waist circumference). After exclusions, the study population consisted of 11,124 postmenopausal women with DXA measurements at baseline and no history of colorectal cancer. After a median follow-up period of 12.9 years, 169 incident colorectal cancer cases were ascertained. Cox's proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios and 95 % confidence intervals for the exposures of interest. Neither DXA-derived body fat measures nor anthropometric measures showed significant associations with risk. In view of the limited number of cases, we cannot rule out the existence of weak associations of these measures with risk of colorectal cancer. PMID:23546610

  7. Iranian Dietary Patterns and Risk of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Azizi, Hosein; Asadollahi, Khairollah; Davtalab Esmaeili, Elham; Mirzapoor, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Role of diet on colorectal cancer (CRC) has been considered in terms of single foods and nutrients, but less frequently in terms of dietary patterns in Iran. The objective of this study was to determine the association between Iranian dietary patterns and CRC. Methods: This case–control study was conducted in four hospitals in Tabriz City of Iran including 414 participants aged 35–75 years:207 cases with CRC confirmed by pathology and colonoscopy findings were selected and 207 controls free of neoplastic conditions and diet-related chronic diseases (from the same hospital at the same period for the cases). Dietary data were assessed using a 123-item semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Two dietary patterns were found by using of Principal Component Analysis (PCA) method;“Healthy pattern”and “Iranian pattern”. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (OR) for relationship between dietary patterns and colorectal cancer. Results: After adjusting for confounding factors, the Iranian dietary pattern was significantly associated with an increased odds of colorectal cancer (OR= 1.46; 95% Confidenec Interval (CI)=1.05–2.19) while a reduced odds of colorectal cancer was observed with the Healthy dietary pattern (OR=0.18; 95% CI= 0.091-0.47). Conclusion: Iranian dietary pattern (IDP) seems to increase the odds of colorectal cancer and protective effect of Healthy dietary pattern. PMID:26000248

  8. Screening for colorectal cancer: using data to set prevention priorities

    PubMed Central

    McGowan, Lucy D’Agostino; James, Aimee S.; Bohlke, Kari; Goodman, Melody S.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Adherence to colorectal cancer screening recommendations is known to vary by state, but less information is available about within-state variability. In the current study, we assess county-level screening rates for Missouri, with the goal of better targeting public health efforts to increase screening. Methods Prevalence of colorectal cancer screening among Missouri adults between the ages of 50 and 74 was obtained from 2008 and 2010 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data. We used multilevel logistic regression to generate county-specific estimates. After excluding 77 counties with fewer than 30 respondents, information was available about 3,739 individuals in 37 counties, representing 78.5 % of the state population. Results Across counties, the prevalence of being up-to-date with recommended colorectal cancer screening ranged from 25 to 70 %. Conclusion State-level information about colorectal cancer screening masks substantial within-state variability. Assessing and monitoring county-level disparities in screening can guide public health efforts to increase screening and reduce colorectal cancer mortality. More complete population survey data will make such analysis possible. PMID:24146228

  9. Evaluating the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer with monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Popa, C; Ionescu, S; Mihăilă, D; Gal, I; Potecă, T; Simion, S

    2012-01-01

    The ability to tailor biologic therapy based on the status of tumor biomarkers and monoclonal antibodies has become very important in the last years. The role of tumor biomarkers in treating colorectal cancer, specifically the K-RAS gene, was identified. K-RAS had a higher interest after Lievre and colleagues reported at the 2008 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting, their analysis of K-RAS mutations in tumors from patients who did not appear to benefit from cetuximab therapy, providing additional data involving K-RAS mutant tumors and their lack of response to cetuximab, as part of first-line therapy for metastatic colorectal cancer. Furthermore, other trials evaluated the K-RAS status and the first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer, the treatment of refractory metastatic cancer and dual-antibody therapy in the first-line treatment of colorectal cancer. Patients with mutant K-RAS colorectal tumors have no benefit from cetuximab, no matter the type of chemotherapy regimen. PMID:22802884

  10. Lifestyle modification: A primary prevention approach to colorectal cancer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Early detection of cancer through screening is an important step in decreasing both morbidity and mortality. Likewise, specific modifiable lifestyle behaviors are associated with reduced risk of colorectal cancer. Lifestyle practices have also been shown to maximize health after the primary treatmen...

  11. Social Support, Nutrition Intake, and Physical Activity in Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Shanice; Berg, Carla J.; Thompson, Nancy J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To examine depressive symptoms, hope, social support, and quality of life in relation to fruit and vegetable (FV) intake and physical activity (PA) among cancer survivors diagnosed within the past 4 years. Methods In 2010, participants were recruited from a southeastern US cancer center and completed a mail-based survey (response rate 22.7%) assessing these psychosocial factors, FV intake, and PA. Results Among 128 participants, 72% consumed ≥5 FV/ day; 77.8% walked for exercise ≥4 times/ week. Controlling for sociodemographics, consuming ≥5 FV/day was associated with greater significant other social support (p = .004); walking for exercise ≥4 times/week was associated with greater friend support (p = .003). Conclusions These findings can inform tertiary cancer prevention interventions. PMID:24636037

  12. The effect of cancer on suicide among elderly Holocaust survivors.

    PubMed

    Nakash, Ora; Liphshitz, Irena; Keinan-Boker, Lital; Levav, Itzhak

    2013-06-01

    Jewish-Israelis of European origin with cancer have higher suicide rates relative to their counterparts in the general population. We investigated whether this effect results from the high proportion of Holocaust survivors among them, due to vulnerabilities arising from the earlier traumas they sustained. The study was based on all Jewish-European persons with cancer, 60 years and over, diagnosed in Israel between 1999 and 2007. The standardized incidence ratios were not significantly different between the exposed and nonexposed groups (men: 0.90, 95% CI 0.60-1.19; women: 0.95, 95% CI 0.55-1.37). Past exposure to maximum adversity did not increase the suicide risk among persons with cancer.

  13. "I Am More than My Cancer": An Exploratory Examination of Adventure Programming and Cancer Survivors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugerman, Deborah

    2005-01-01

    Adventure programs have recently emerged that are specifically designed for individuals living with cancer, yet few research studies document the outcomes of such programs. The purpose of the current qualitative study was to examine the effects of an adventure program on individual adult cancer survivors. Three central themes emerged from the…

  14. Aetiology of colorectal cancer and relevance of monogenic inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Ponz de Leon, M; Benatti, P; Borghi, F; Pedroni, M; Scarselli, A; Di Gregorio, C; Losi, L; Viel, A; Genuardi, M; Abbati, G; Rossi, G; Menigatti, M; Lamberti, I; Ponti, G; Roncucci, L

    2004-01-01

    Background and aims: Although diet and lifestyle are associated with the development of colorectal malignancies, the only clearly identified aetiological factors in colorectal cancer are inheritance (hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) and familial polyposis), inflammatory bowel diseases, papillomavirus, and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Our aim was to determine what proportion of colorectal neoplasms could be attributed to these specific factors. Patients and methods: Data from a colorectal cancer registry were analysed over a 15 year period, during which nearly 2500 cases were recorded. In patients with suspected HNPCC, microsatellite instability and immunohistochemical expression of proteins encoded by the main DNA mismatch repair genes were assessed. In families with unstable neoplasms, constitutional mutations of the mismatch repair genes hMSH2, hMLH1, and hMSH6 were evaluated by single strand conformation polymorphism analysis and sequencing. Results: Inflammatory bowel diseases, familial polyposis, and AIDS were rare causes of colorectal cancer (three, three, and one case, respectively). Anal squamous carcinoma developed in 27 patients (1.0%) and could be attributed to papillomavirus infection. In 58 patients (from 34 families) a clinical diagnosis of HNPCC was established (2.4%). In total, cases with a known aetiology were 92 (3.7% of all patients). Microsatellite instability was detected in 15 cancers from HNPCC families, and germline mutations in six families (12 patients, 0.5% of the total). Families with unstable tumours, with or without mutations, were clinically similar, suggesting the involvement of the mismatch repair system even when mutations were not detected. Conclusions: The study suggests that the aetiology of colorectal malignancies remains elusive in the large majority of cases. Among specific causes, HNPCC represents the most frequent. However, with a population based approach, constitutional mutations of the

  15. Colorectal cancer detection in a rural community

    PubMed Central

    Cotterill, Mike; Gasparelli, Rudy; Kirby, Erle

    2005-01-01

    PROBLEM BEING ADDRESSED Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a substantial cause of death and morbidity in Canada. Endoscopy screening by colonoscopy has been recommended, but widespread implementation is impossible because it is difficult to obtain, especially in rural areas. OBJECTIVE OF PROGRAM To screen for CRC safely and effectively using colonoscopy performed by non-specialist endoscopists in rural areas. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Health providers and community organizations were informed about the screening program. Patients between the ages of 50 and 75 and those at high risk of CRC based on family history were screened. Measures of safety and effectiveness were monitored. In 2 years of screening, one of 152 patients was found to have CRC, and 23.7% had adenomatous polyps. There were no complications. Rates of CRC and adenoma detection and cecal intubation were similar to rates found in other screening studies. CONCLUSION It was not difficult to design and implement a CRC screening program in our small rural community. Colonoscopies performed by family physicians have been effective, and there have been no serious complications. PMID:16190175

  16. Colorectal cancer progression: lessons from Drosophila?

    PubMed

    Bell, Graham P; Thompson, Barry J

    2014-04-01

    Human colorectal cancers arise as benign adenomas, tumours that retain their epithelial character, and then progress to malignant adenocarcinomas and carcinomas in which the epithelium becomes disrupted. Carcinomas often exhibit transcriptional downregulation of E-cadherin and other epithelial genes in an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a mechanism first discovered in Drosophila to be mediated by the transcription factors Twist and Snail. In contrast, adenocarcinomas retain expression of E-cadherin and disruption of the epithelium occurs through formation of progressively smaller epithelial cysts with apical Crumbs/CRB3, Stardust/PALS1, and Bazooka/PAR3 localised to the inner lumen. Results from Drosophila show that morphologically similar cysts form upon induction of clonal heterogeneity in Wnt, Smad, or Ras signalling levels, which causes extrusion of epithelial cells at clonal boundaries. Thus, intratumour heterogeneity might also promote formation of adenocarcinomas in humans. Finally, epithelial cysts can collectively migrate, as in the case of Drosophila border cells, a potential model system for the invasive migration of adenocarcinoma cells.

  17. Colorectal cancer screening among Chinese American immigrants.

    PubMed

    Kim, Karen; Chapman, Christopher; Vallina, Helen

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the factors determining fecal occult blood test (FOBT) uptake in Chinese American immigrants. This study used a prospective, cross-sectional design with convenience sampling. An educational session on colorectal cancer screening (CRS) was provided to the participants during a health fair, and each participant was offered a no-cost FOBT kit. Data was collected over two consecutive years during three different health fairs. A questionnaire was used to collect demographic data. A total of 113 participants were recruited and 72% of them returned the FOBT kit. There was a significant association between having a primary-care physician (PCP) and having CRS in the past, even after controlling for age, gender and the length of time in the US (P = .009). Participants who visited a doctor for health maintenance were less likely to participate in the FOBT, compared to participants who never visited a doctor or who only visited a doctor when they were sick (P = .001). The length of time in the US had a significant effect on having a PCP (P = .002). However, having a PCP or having CRS in the past was not associated with participating in the screening and so was feeling at risk for CRC. In fact, 49% of Chinese women and 45% of Chinese men felt no risk of CRC. Future research and interventions that address knowledge deficits and focus on recent immigrants and their access to health care may have the potential to increase CRS among Chinese American immigrants.

  18. Colorectal Cancer in African Americans: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Renee; White, Pascale; Nieto, Jose; Vieira, Dorice; Francois, Fritz; Hamilton, Frank

    2016-01-01

    This review is an update to the American College of Gastroenterology (ACG) Committee on Minority Affairs and Cultural Diversity's paper on colorectal cancer (CRC) in African Americans published in 2005. Over the past 10 years, the incidence and mortality rates of CRC in the United States has steadily declined. However, reductions have been strikingly much slower among African Americans who continue to have the highest rate of mortality and lowest survival when compared with all other racial groups. The reasons for the health disparities are multifactorial and encompass physician and patient barriers. Patient factors that contribute to disparities include poor knowledge of benefits of CRC screening, limited access to health care, insurance status along with fear and anxiety. Physician factors include lack of knowledge of screening guidelines along with disparate recommendations for screening. Earlier screening has been recommended as an effective strategy to decrease observed disparities; currently the ACG and American Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopists recommend CRC screening in African Americans to begin at age 45. Despite the decline in CRC deaths in all racial and ethnic groups, there still exists a significant burden of CRC in African Americans, thus other strategies including educational outreach for health care providers and patients and the utilization of patient navigation systems emphasizing the importance of screening are necessary. These strategies have been piloted in both local communities and Statewide resulting in notable significant decreases in observed disparities. PMID:27467183

  19. Colorectal Cancer in African Americans: An Update.

    PubMed

    Williams, Renee; White, Pascale; Nieto, Jose; Vieira, Dorice; Francois, Fritz; Hamilton, Frank

    2016-01-01

    This review is an update to the American College of Gastroenterology (ACG) Committee on Minority Affairs and Cultural Diversity's paper on colorectal cancer (CRC) in African Americans published in 2005. Over the past 10 years, the incidence and mortality rates of CRC in the United States has steadily declined. However, reductions have been strikingly much slower among African Americans who continue to have the highest rate of mortality and lowest survival when compared with all other racial groups. The reasons for the health disparities are multifactorial and encompass physician and patient barriers. Patient factors that contribute to disparities include poor knowledge of benefits of CRC screening, limited access to health care, insurance status along with fear and anxiety. Physician factors include lack of knowledge of screening guidelines along with disparate recommendations for screening. Earlier screening has been recommended as an effective strategy to decrease observed disparities; currently the ACG and American Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopists recommend CRC screening in African Americans to begin at age 45. Despite the decline in CRC deaths in all racial and ethnic groups, there still exists a significant burden of CRC in African Americans, thus other strategies including educational outreach for health care providers and patients and the utilization of patient navigation systems emphasizing the importance of screening are necessary. These strategies have been piloted in both local communities and Statewide resulting in notable significant decreases in observed disparities. PMID:27467183

  20. Screening for colorectal cancer: spoiled for choice?

    PubMed

    Sarfati, Diana; Shaw, Caroline; McLeod, Melissa; Blakely, Tony; Bissett, Ian

    2016-01-01

    There are many different potential screening strategies for colorectal cancer (CRC) that vary both in the likely magnitude of their benefits on CRC mortality and their impact on health services. Many approaches to CRC screening are cost-effective, but there is substantial uncertainty about the optimal approach. Decision models using Markov or microsimulation modelling that compare the cost-effectiveness of different screening strategies are useful in this regard. We have reviewed recent decision models that compare the cost-effectiveness of one-off flexible sigmoidoscopy screening with immunochemical faecal occult blood (FIT) based screening. Models consistently show that any population-based screening is cost-effective compared with no screening, and that FIT-based screening is more effective than one-off sigmoidoscopy screening. The combination of one-off sigmoidoscopy with FIT is more effective in saving lives than either modality alone, but has the greatest impact on health service resources. The recent decision to proceed with biennial FIT-based screening is consistent with current evidence. PMID:27538046

  1. The psychological impact of modeling in a cancer survivors' fashion show.

    PubMed

    Kottke, T E; Trapp, M A; Spittal, P; Panser, L; Novotny, P

    1996-01-01

    Our objective was to assess whether cancer survivors can serve as models to promote cancer prevention and screening without suffering psychological discomfort themselves. The disease coping literature suggests that if women knew more about what cancer treatment and life after surviving cancer were like, they would be more likely to accept cancer screening tests. Because cancer survivors are living examples showing that people can survive and thrive after cancer, survivors have the potential to promote cancer screening by teaching others in their community. However, if cancer survivors are to be asked to accept this task, it is essential to demonstrate that this activity does not cause psychological suffering for them. Cancer survivors were invited (n = 31) or volunteered (n = 22) to model in a cancer survivors' fashion show. All were asked to complete a brief biographical sketch before the event and a convenience subsample was interviewed by a trained ethnographer. A brief questionnaire was mailed to the models after the event. Individuals who did not return the mailed questionnaire were contacted by telephone. Forty-two of the models completed the mailed questionnaire and 10 were contacted by telephone. The models tended to report that the experience was very positive for themselves (mean = 9.0, standard deviation [SD] = 1.3 on a scale of 0 to 10 where 0 is extremely negative and 10 is extremely positive) and for their family and friends who attended the fashion show (mean = 9.1, SD = 1.3 on the same scale). Under the proper conditions, modeling survivorship to others can be a rewarding experience for cancer survivors. While the models are easy to recruit, it remains to be demonstrated that cancer survivors are effective lay advocates for cancer prevention and screening. Medical Subject Headings (MeSH): mammography, recruitment, cancer survivors, psychological effects. PMID:8743876

  2. Risk Factors, Preventive Practices, and Health Care Among Breast Cancer Survivors, United States, 2010

    PubMed Central

    Kayani, Noaman; Yun, Shumei

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We compared behavioral risk factors and preventive measures among female breast cancer survivors, female survivors of other types of cancers, and women without a history of cancer. Survivorship health care indicators for the 2 groups of cancer survivors were compared. Methods Using data from the 2010 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, we calculated the proportion of women with risk factors and their engagement in preventive practices, stratified by cancer status (cancer survivors or women with no history of cancer), and compared the proportions after adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics. Results A significantly higher proportion of breast cancer survivors had mammography in the previous year (79.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 76.0%–83.0%) than did other cancer survivors (68.1%; 95% CI, 65.6%–70.7%) or women with no history of cancer (66.4%; 95% CI, 65.5%–67.3%). Breast cancer survivors were also more likely to have had a Papanicolaou (Pap) test within the previous 3 years than women with no history of cancer (89.4%; 95% CI, 85.9%–93.0 vs 85.1%; 95% CI, 84.4%–85.8%) and a colonoscopy within the previous 10 years (75.4%; 95% CI, 71.7%–79.0%) than women with no history of cancer (60.0%; 95% CI, 59.0%–61.0%). Current smoking was significantly lower among survivors of breast cancer (10.3%; 95% CI, 7.4%–13.2%) than other cancer survivors (20.8%; 95% CI, 18.4%–23.3%) and women with no history of cancer (18.3%; 95% CI, 17.5%–19.1%). After adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics, we found that breast cancer survivors were significantly more likely to have had mammography, a Pap test, and colonoscopy, and less likely to be current smokers. Conclusion Breast cancer survivors are more likely to engage in cancer screening and less likely to be current smokers than female survivors of other types of cancer or women with no history of cancer. PMID:26796517

  3. Leininger's Ethnonursing Research Methodology and Studies of Cancer Survivors: A Review.

    PubMed

    Farren, Arlene T

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to present the findings of a literature review regarding the use of Leininger's ethnonursing research methodology (ENRM) in studies addressing adult cancer survivors. It is important to learn about differences and similarities among cancer survivors' experiences so that patient-centered, culturally congruent care can be provided. A review of the literature was conducted using databases such as CINAHL and MEDLINE. Search terms included variations on ENRM and cancer survivors. The results were a small number of published studies that used the ENRM examining breast cancer survivors' perceptions and experiences. A review instrument was developed to estimate study quality based on established criteria. The studies are critiqued in relation to the theory-based methodology, evaluation criteria for qualitative research, and study findings are summarized. The author concludes that although there is a paucity of research using ENRM with adult cancer survivors, the preliminary findings of the included studies contribute to what is known about breast cancer survivors. Implications for research include recommendations to increase the use of ENRM to discover the universal and diverse experiences of care practices in adult cancer survivors and use the evidence to develop patient-centered, culturally congruent, quality care for cancer survivors.

  4. The Clinical and Research Infrastructure of a Childhood Cancer Survivor Program.

    PubMed

    Sadak, Karim Thomas; Bahr, Tori L; Moen, Catherine; Neglia, Joseph P; Jatoi, Aminah

    2015-09-01

    Increased knowledge and awareness of the long-term complications from childhood cancer has illuminated a clear need for healthcare delivery systems that address the specific needs of survivors. We report a descriptive framework of such a healthcare infrastructure within a single institution to provide education for other healthcare professionals developing a cancer survivorship program at their institution. This cross-sectional study described the structure and patient population of the Cancer Survivor Program (CSP) in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Minnesota (UM). It relied on the UM Cancer Survivorship Database maintained by the Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology. Demographic and relevant survivorship information is summarized for survivors seen from August 1, 2003 to May 1, 2013. The study population included 504 survivors of childhood cancer with a mean age of 21.4 years (range 3-59 years). Most were non-Hispanic white (455/504, 90 %) and the mean interval between prior cancer diagnosis and entry into the CSP was 13.7 years (range 1-56 years). The breakdown of cancer diagnoses among survivors is reflective of the incidence of childhood malignancies in the general population with the exception of an under-representation of survivors with brain tumors. Nearly 25 % of survivors received their oncology treatment at an outside institution. With the appropriate healthcare infrastructure, a pediatric cancer survivorship program can meet the needs of a large survivor population, many of whom are adults and are seeking care from outside institutions.

  5. Finding Your New Normal: Outcomes of a Wellness-Oriented Psychoeducational Support Group for Cancer Survivors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shannonhouse, Laura; Myers, Jane; Barden, Sejal; Clarke, Philip; Weimann, Rochelle; Forti, Allison; Moore-Painter, Terry; Knutson, Tami; Porter, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Group interventions have been useful for survivors to overcome the challenges of cancer. This study employed a pre/post, mixed-methods design to explore the influence of an 8-week support group on the holistic wellness of 14 breast cancer survivors. Pairing experiential activities with wellness-centered psychoeducation was viewed positively by…

  6. Development and Evaluation of a Theory-Based Physical Activity Guidebook for Breast Cancer Survivors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vallance, Jeffrey K.; Courneya, Kerry S.; Taylor, Lorian M.; Plotnikoff, Ronald C.; Mackey, John R.

    2008-01-01

    This study's objective was to develop and evaluate the suitability and appropriateness of a theory-based physical activity (PA) guidebook for breast cancer survivors. Guidebook content was constructed based on the theory of planned behavior (TPB) using salient exercise beliefs identified by breast cancer survivors in previous research. Expert…

  7. Optimising colorectal cancer screening acceptance: a review.

    PubMed

    Senore, Carlo; Inadomi, John; Segnan, Nereo; Bellisario, Cristina; Hassan, Cesare

    2015-07-01

    The study aims to review available evidence concerning effective interventions to increase colorectal cancer (CRC) screening acceptance. We performed a literature search of randomised trials designed to increase individuals' use of CRC screening on PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects. Small (≤ 100 subjects per arm) studies and those reporting results of interventions implemented before publication of the large faecal occult blood test trials were excluded. Interventions were categorised following the Continuum of Cancer Care and the PRECEDE-PROCEED models and studies were grouped by screening model (opportunistic vs organised). Multifactor interventions targeting multiple levels of care and considering factors outside the individual clinician control, represent the most effective strategy to enhance CRC screening acceptance. Removing financial barriers, implementing methods allowing a systematic contact of the whole target population, using personal invitation letters, preferably signed by the reference care provider, and reminders mailed to all non-attendees are highly effective in enhancing CRC screening acceptance. Physician reminders may support the diffusion of screening, but they can be effective only for individuals who have access to and make use of healthcare services. Educational interventions for patients and providers are effective, but the implementation of organisational measures may be necessary to favour their impact. Available evidence indicates that organised programmes allow to achieve an extensive coverage and to enhance equity of access, while maximising the health impact of screening. They provide at the same time an infrastructure allowing to achieve a more favourable cost-effectiveness profile of potentially effective strategies, which would not be sustainable in opportunistic settings. PMID:26059765

  8. Effects of Home-Based Diet and Exercise on Functional Outcomes Among Older, Overweight Long-Term Cancer Survivors: The RENEW: Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Morey, Miriam C.; Snyder, Denise C.; Sloane, Richard; Jay Cohen, Harvey; Peterson, Bercedis; Hartman, Terryl J; Miller, Paige; Mitchell, Diane C.; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy

    2009-01-01

    Context Five-year survival rates for early-stage colorectal, breast and prostate cancer currently exceed 90% and are increasing. Cancer survivors are at greater risk for second malignancies, other co-morbidities, and accelerated functional decline. Lifestyle interventions may provide benefit, but it is unknown whether long-term cancer survivors can modify their lifestyle behaviors sufficiently to improve functional status. Objective To determine whether a telephone counseling and mailed material-based diet-exercise intervention is effective in reorienting functional decline in older, overweight cancer survivors. Design Randomized controlled trial in which survivors were randomly assigned to intervention (Intervention, n=319) or delayed-intervention control arms (Control, n=322). Setting Home-based from Canada, United Kingdom and 21 United States Participants 641 overweight (body mass index [BMI] ≥ 25), long-term (≥ 5 years) survivors (ages 65–91) of colorectal, breast and prostate cancer recruited July 2005-May 2007. Intervention 12-month home-based tailored program of telephone counseling and mailed materials promoting exercise, improved diet quality, and modest weight loss. Control group wait-listed for 12 months. Main Outcome Measures Change in self-reported physical function (SF-36 physical function subscale: 0–100, high score indicates better function) from baseline to 12 months was the primary endpoint. Secondary outcomes included changes in basic and advanced lower extremity function (0–100), physical activity, BMI, and overall health quality-of-life. Results From an average baseline score of 75.7 to 12-month follow-up, SF-36 function scores declined less rapidly in Intervention [−2.15(95% CI-0.36,−3.93)] versus Control [−4.84(−3.04,−6.63)] arms (p=0.03). Likewise, changes in basic lower extremity function were +0.34(−0.84,1.52) versus −1.89(−0.70,−3.09) from an average baseline score of 78.2, p=0.005. Physical activity, dietary

  9. Characterizing metabolic changes in human colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Williams, Michael D; Zhang, Xing; Park, Jeong-Jin; Siems, William F; Gang, David R; Resar, Linda M S; Reeves, Raymond; Hill, Herbert H

    2015-06-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains a leading cause of cancer death worldwide, despite the fact that it is a curable disease when diagnosed early. The development of new screening methods to aid in early diagnosis or identify precursor lesions at risk for progressing to CRC will be vital to improving the survival rate of individuals predisposed to CRC. Metabolomics is an advancing area that has recently seen numerous applications to the field of cancer research. Altered metabolism has been studied for many years as a means to understand and characterize cancer. However, further work is required to establish standard procedures and improve our ability to identify distinct metabolomic profiles that can be used to diagnose CRC or predict disease progression. The present study demonstrates the use of direct infusion traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry to distinguish metabolic profiles from CRC samples and matched non-neoplastic epithelium as well as metastatic and primary tumors at different stages of disease (T1-T4). By directly infusing our samples, the analysis time was reduced significantly, thus increasing the speed and efficiency of this method compared to traditional metabolomics platforms. Partial least squares discriminant analysis was used to visualize differences between the metabolic profiles of sample types and to identify the specific m/z features that led to this differentiation. Identification of the distinct m/z features was made using the human metabolome database. We discovered alterations in fatty acid biosynthesis and oxidative, glycolytic, and polyamine pathways that distinguish tumors from non-malignant colonic epithelium as well as various stages of CRC. Although further studies are needed, our results indicate that colonic epithelial cells undergo metabolic reprogramming during their evolution to CRC, and the distinct metabolites could serve as diagnostic tools or potential targets in therapy or primary prevention. Graphical Abstract

  10. Characterizing metabolic changes in human colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Williams, Michael D; Zhang, Xing; Park, Jeong-Jin; Siems, William F; Gang, David R; Resar, Linda M S; Reeves, Raymond; Hill, Herbert H

    2015-06-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains a leading cause of cancer death worldwide, despite the fact that it is a curable disease when diagnosed early. The development of new screening methods to aid in early diagnosis or identify precursor lesions at risk for progressing to CRC will be vital to improving the survival rate of individuals predisposed to CRC. Metabolomics is an advancing area that has recently seen numerous applications to the field of cancer research. Altered metabolism has been studied for many years as a means to understand and characterize cancer. However, further work is required to establish standard procedures and improve our ability to identify distinct metabolomic profiles that can be used to diagnose CRC or predict disease progression. The present study demonstrates the use of direct infusion traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry to distinguish metabolic profiles from CRC samples and matched non-neoplastic epithelium as well as metastatic and primary tumors at different stages of disease (T1-T4). By directly infusing our samples, the analysis time was reduced significantly, thus increasing the speed and efficiency of this method compared to traditional metabolomics platforms. Partial least squares discriminant analysis was used to visualize differences between the metabolic profiles of sample types and to identify the specific m/z features that led to this differentiation. Identification of the distinct m/z features was made using the human metabolome database. We discovered alterations in fatty acid biosynthesis and oxidative, glycolytic, and polyamine pathways that distinguish tumors from non-malignant colonic epithelium as well as various stages of CRC. Although further studies are needed, our results indicate that colonic epithelial cells undergo metabolic reprogramming during their evolution to CRC, and the distinct metabolites could serve as diagnostic tools or potential targets in therapy or primary prevention. Graphical Abstract

  11. Assessment of colorectal cancer incidence among polypropylene pilot plant employees

    SciTech Connect

    Acquavella, J.F.; Owen, C.V. )

    1990-02-01

    Our recent study reported a colorectal cancer excess among workers involved in the manufacture of polypropylene. To follow up on this finding, we initiated a study of colorectal cancer incidence among polypropylene pilot plant workers within the same company. The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether colorectal cancer incidence was elevated among workers who may have had exposures similar to those experienced on the commercial production unit. The study population included 183 employees who worked at least 6 months on either of two pilot plants. Overall, there were three observed colorectal cases v. 3.3 expected (standardized incidence ratio = 0.9, 90% confidence interval 0.3 to 2.3). Analyses for the process, mechanic, and laboratory subgroup showed rates consistent with expected values (3 observed, 2.8 expected; standardized incidence ratio = 1.1, 90% confidence interval 0.3 to 2.8). Analyses by duration of employment and latency did not show patterns consistent with the colorectal cancer excess previously reported. The likelihood of lower or different exposures on the pilot plant than would be found on commercial production units is discussed along with the need for studies of workers in other polypropylene manufacturing environments.

  12. Expression and clinical significance of Sirt1 in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    YU, DENG-FENG; JIANG, SU-JUAN; PAN, ZHI-PENG; CHENG, WEI-DONG; ZHANG, WEN-JUN; YAO, XIAO-KUN; LI, YU-CHENG; LUN, YONG-ZHI

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to examine the expression of Silent information regulator 1 (Sirt1) in colorectal cancer and peritumoral normal mucosa tissue, and therefore analyze the role and molecular mechanism of Sirt1 in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. Colorectal cancer tissue specimens were employed as the experimental group, and adjacent normal mucosa tissues >5 cm from tumor lesions were used as the control group. The expression of Sirt1 was detected by the immunohistochemical streptavidin peroxidase detection method in paraffin-embedded sections, whilst Sirt1 protein expression was examined by western blot analysis in the fresh tissues. Sirt1 protein was primarily expressed in the nuclei of the tumor cells, and positive staining was brownish-yellow in color. The relative expression quantities of Sirt1 in the peritumoral normal rectal mucosa and rectal carcinoma were 1.15 and 2.62, and the differences between the two groups were statistically significant (P<0.05). The expression level of Sirt1 in colorectal carcinoma was significantly associated with the depth of tumor invasion, differentiation and tumor size (P<0.05). Sirt1 expression was also found to be associated with tumor tissue type, lymph node metastasis, Duke's stage and patient age. These characteristics combined may therefore be used as markers for the early diagnosis of colorectal cancer pathogenesis. PMID:26893713

  13. Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention for Worry, Uncertainty, and Insomnia for Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-22

    Anxiety Disorder; Worry; Uncertainty; Sleep Disorders; Insomnia; Fatigue; Pain; Depression; Cognitive-behavioral Therapy; Psychological Intervention; Esophageal Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Leukemia; Lung Cancer; Multiple Myeloma; Ovarian Neoplasm; Stage III or IV Cervical or Uterine Cancer; Stage IIIB, IIIC, or IV Breast Cancer; Glioblastoma Multiforme; Relapsed Lymphoma; Stage III or IV Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIC or IV Melanoma

  14. THBS2 is a Potential Prognostic Biomarker in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xue; Zhang, Lei; Li, Hui; Sun, WenJie; Zhang, Honghe; Lai, Maode

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common leading causes of death worldwide. Prognostic at an early stage is a useful way that decrease and avoid mortality. Although remarkable progress has been made to investigate the underlying mechanism, the understanding of the complicated carcinogenesis process was enormously hindered by large-scale tumor heterogeneity. Here we proposed that the prognosis-related gene THBS2, responsible for cooperativity disorientation, probably contain untapped prognostic resource of colorectal cancer. We originally established Spearman correlation transition, Kaplan–Meier survival analysis and meta-analysis that combine public dataset and clinical samples to quantify the prognostic value of THBS2. THBS2 could be considered as a novel prognostic marker in colorectal cancer. PMID:27632935

  15. THBS2 is a Potential Prognostic Biomarker in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue; Zhang, Lei; Li, Hui; Sun, WenJie; Zhang, Honghe; Lai, Maode

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common leading causes of death worldwide. Prognostic at an early stage is a useful way that decrease and avoid mortality. Although remarkable progress has been made to investigate the underlying mechanism, the understanding of the complicated carcinogenesis process was enormously hindered by large-scale tumor heterogeneity. Here we proposed that the prognosis-related gene THBS2, responsible for cooperativity disorientation, probably contain untapped prognostic resource of colorectal cancer. We originally established Spearman correlation transition, Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and meta-analysis that combine public dataset and clinical samples to quantify the prognostic value of THBS2. THBS2 could be considered as a novel prognostic marker in colorectal cancer. PMID:27632935

  16. Celebrity appeal: reaching women to promote colorectal cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Crystale Purvis; Gelb, Cynthia A; Lobb, Kathleen

    2015-03-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Screen for Life: National Colorectal Cancer Action Campaign works with the Entertainment Industry Foundation's National Colorectal Cancer Research Alliance to develop public service announcements (PSAs) featuring celebrities. Selection of Screen for Life celebrity spokespersons is based on a variety of factors, including their general appeal and personal connection to colorectal cancer. Screen for Life PSAs featuring celebrities have been disseminated exclusively through donated media placements and have been formatted for television, radio, print, and out-of-home displays such as dioramas in airports, other transit stations, and shopping malls. A 2012 national survey with women aged 50-75 years (n=772) investigated reported exposure to Screen for Life PSAs featuring actor Terrence Howard. In total, 8.3% of women recalled exposure to the PSAs. Celebrity spokespersons can attract the attention of both target audiences and media gatekeepers who decide which PSAs will receive donated placements.

  17. Targeting Angiogenesis in Colorectal Cancer: Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kircher, Sheetal Mehta; Nimeiri, Halla S; Benson, Al B

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is commonly diagnosed throughout the world, and treatment options have greatly expanded over the last 2 decades. Targeting angiogenesis has been a major focus of study in a variety of malignancy types. Targeting angiogenesis has been achieved by several mechanisms in colorectal cancer, including use of antiangiogenic small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). There have been many attempts and failures to prove efficacy of TKIs in the treatment of colorectal cancer including sorafenib, sunitinib, vatalanib, and tivozanib. Regorafenib was the first TKI to demonstrate efficacy and is an orally active inhibitor of angiogenic (including the vascular endothelial growth factor receptors 1, 2, and 3), stromal, and oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinases. There are ongoing investigations of both regorafenib and ninetanib; however, there remains a critical need to better understand novel combinations with TKIs that could prove more efficacious than available options. PMID:27341596

  18. Celebrity Appeal: Reaching Women to Promote Colorectal Cancer Screening

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Crystale Purvis; Gelb, Cynthia A.; Lobb, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Screen for Life: National Colorectal Cancer Action Campaign works with the Entertainment Industry Foundation’s National Colorectal Cancer Research Alliance to develop public service announcements (PSAs) featuring celebrities. Selection of Screen for Life celebrity spokespersons is based on a variety of factors, including their general appeal and personal connection to colorectal cancer. Screen for Life PSAs featuring celebrities have been disseminated exclusively through donated media placements and have been formatted for television, radio, print, and out-of-home displays such as dioramas in airports, other transit stations, and shopping malls. A 2012 national survey with women aged 50–75 years (n = 772) investigated reported exposure to Screen for Life PSAs featuring actor Terrence Howard. In total, 8.3% of women recalled exposure to the PSAs. Celebrity spokespersons can attract the attention of both target audiences and media gatekeepers who decide which PSAs will receive donated placements. PMID:25521047

  19. Physical activity and diet behaviour in colorectal cancer patients receiving chemotherapy: associations with quality of life

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The relationship between colorectal cancer (CRC) risk and physical activity and dietary habits has been well-established, but less is known about the relationship between these behaviours and quality of life (QOL) post-diagnosis. Moreover, it is unknown whether this relationship is consistent across cancer stage or treatment setting. Thus, the purpose of this study was to assess current diet and physical activity behaviour in CRC survivors receiving systemic chemotherapy, and to examine potential associations between these behaviours and quality of life. A secondary purpose was to examine the association between social support, diet, and physical activity behaviour in this population. Methods Using a cross-sectional survey, 67 CRC survivors currently receiving chemotherapy in Calgary, Alberta completed the survey package. Measures included demographic and medical data, physical activity levels, diet behaviour, QOL, and social support. Results In a largely metastatic sample (63%), approximately half were meeting national dietary guidelines (58%), less were meeting national physical activity guidelines (26%), and a small number were meeting both (17%). However, only 12.3% (n = 8) reported completely sedentary behaviour, and 7 of these 8 participants were receiving metastatic treatment. Neither behaviour was significantly associated with QOL or perceived social support. Furthermore, there were no significant QOL differences between those treated with palliative intent or adjuvant therapy. Important group differences emerged between those meeting and not meeting the guidelines, and associations between QOL, age, BMI, and provisions of social support. Conclusion These findings provide insight into lifestyle behaviours of CRC survivors currently receiving systemic chemotherapy, and the differences in perceived QOL as affected by severity of disease and treatment setting. Prospective studies in a larger sample of CRC survivors on chemotherapy are needed to

  20. Disparities in psychological distress impacting lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    Kamen, Charles; Mustian, Karen M.; Dozier, Ann; Bowen, Deborah J.; Li, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Objective Recent studies have highlighted disparities in cancer diagnosis between lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) and heterosexual adults. Studies have yet to examine disparities between LGBT and heterosexual cancer survivors in prevalence of psychological distress. Methods Data for the current study were drawn from the LIVESTRONG dataset, a US national survey that sampled 207 LGBT and 4899 heterosexual cancer survivors (all cancer types, 63.5% women, mean age 49) in 2010. Symptoms of psychological distress were assessed with dichotomous yes/no items in three symptom clusters (depression related to cancer, difficulties with social relationships post-cancer, fatigue/energy problems). We selected a sample of 621 heterosexual survivors matched by propensity score to the 207 LGBT survivors and assessed disparities in count of symptoms using Poisson regression. We also performed subgroup analyses by self-reported sex. Results Relative to heterosexuals, LGBT cancer survivors reported a higher number of depression and relationship difficulty symptoms. Exploratory analyses revealed that disparities in number of symptoms were visible between gay, bisexual, and transgender versus heterosexual men but not between lesbian, bisexual, and transgender versus heterosexual women. Conclusions This study highlights several disparities in psychological distress that exist between LGBT and heterosexual survivors. A need remains for interventions tailored to LGBT survivors and for studies examining disparities within subgroups of LGBT survivors. PMID:25630987

  1. Targeting mTOR network in colorectal cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Wen; Zhang, Yan-Jie

    2014-01-01

    The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) integrates growth factor signals with cellular nutrient and energy levels and coordinates cell growth, proliferation and survival. A regulatory network with multiple feedback loops has evolved to ensure the exquisite regulation of cell growth and division. Colorectal cancer is the most intensively studied cancer because of its high incidence and mortality rate. Multiple genetic alterations are involved in colorectal carcinogenesis, including oncogenic Ras activation, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway hyperactivation, p53 mutation, and dysregulation of wnt pathway. Many oncogenic pathways activate the mTOR pathway. mTOR has emerged as an effective target for colorectal cancer therapy. In vitro and preclinical studies targeting the mTOR pathway for colorectal cancer chemotherapy have provided promising perspectives. However, the overall objective response rates in major solid tumors achieved with single-agent rapalog therapy have been modest, especially in advanced metastatic colorectal cancer. Combination regimens of mTOR inhibitor with agents such as cytotoxic chemotherapy, inhibitors of vascular endothelial growth factor, epidermal growth factor receptor and Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitors are being intensively studied and appear to be promising. Further understanding of the molecular mechanism in mTOR signaling network is needed to develop optimized therapeutic regimens. In this paper, oncogenic gene alterations in colorectal cancer, as well as their interaction with the mTOR pathway, are systematically summarized. The most recent preclinical and clinical anticancer therapeutic endeavors are reviewed. New players in mTOR signaling pathway, such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug and metformin with therapeutic potentials are also discussed here. PMID:24764656

  2. The Risk of Cataract among Survivors of Childhood and Adolescent Cancer: A Report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.

    PubMed

    Chodick, Gabriel; Sigurdson, Alice J; Kleinerman, Ruth A; Sklar, Charles A; Leisenring, Wendy; Mertens, Ann C; Stovall, Marilyn; Smith, Susan A; Weathers, Rita E; Veiga, Lene H S; Robison, Leslie L; Inskip, Peter D

    2016-04-01

    With therapeutic successes and improved survival after a cancer diagnosis in childhood, increasing numbers of cancer survivors are at risk of subsequent treatment-related morbidities, including cataracts. While it is well known that the lens of the eye is one of the most radiosensitive tissues in the human body, the risks associated with radiation doses less than 2 Gy are less understood, as are the long- and short-term cataract risks from exposure to ionizing radiation at a young age. In this study, we followed 13,902 five-year survivors of childhood cancer in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study cohort an average of 21.4 years from the date of first cancer diagnosis. For patients receiving radiotherapy, lens dose (mean: 2.2 Gy; range: 0-66 Gy) was estimated based on radiotherapy records. We used unconditional multivariable logistic regression models to evaluate prevalence of self-reported cataract in relationship to cumulative radiation dose both at five years after the initial cancer diagnosis and at the end of follow-up. We modeled the radiation effect in terms of the excess odds ratio (EOR) per Gy. We also analyzed cataract incidence starting from five years after initial cancer diagnosis to the end of follow-up using Cox regression. A total of 483 (3.5%) cataract cases were identified, including 200 (1.4%) diagnosed during the first five years of follow-up. In a multivariable logistic regression model, cataract prevalence at the end of follow-up was positively associated with lens dose in a manner consistent with a linear dose-response relationship (EOR per Gy = 0.92; 95% CI: 0.65-1.20). The odds ratio for doses between 0.5 and 1.5 Gy was elevated significantly relative to doses <0.5 Gy (OR = 2.2; 95% CI: 1.3-3.7). The results from this study indicate a strong association between ocular exposure to ionizing radiation and long-term risk of pre-senile cataract. The risk of cataract increased with increasing exposure, beginning at lens doses as low as 0.5 Gy. Our

  3. Fatigue-Based Subgroups of Breast Cancer Survivors with Insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Dirksen, Shannon Ruff; Belyea, Michael J.; Epstein, Dana R.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if breast cancer survivors (BCS) with insomnia can be grouped according to their level of fatigue. A secondary data analysis was conducted on baseline data obtained from a randomized clinical trial that focused on a cognitive-behavioral intervention for insomnia in BCS. Participants were breast cancer survivors (n=86) with insomnia who were at least 3 months post completion of primary treatment without current evidence of disease. Three subgroups of women were identified with significant differences in fatigue, including: Exhausted (35%), Tired (41%), and Restored (24%). Results suggest a majority of women have moderate-to-severe fatigue many years post completion of treatment. Severe fatigue was associated with higher levels of other symptoms and poorer quality of life (Exhausted subgroup). Significant differences in insomnia severity, anxiety, depression, and quality of life were noted among the Exhausted, Tired and Restored subgroups. The existence of fatigue-based subgroups offers important information when providing care to BCS. By determining symptoms associated with fatigue, patient care will benefit through a shift in focus from treatment of a single symptom such as fatigue to the delivery of a tailored intervention that targets multiple symptoms. PMID:19661794

  4. Childhood cancer survivors' school (re)entry: Australian parents' perceptions.

    PubMed

    McLoone, J K; Wakefield, C E; Cohn, R J

    2013-07-01

    Starting or returning to school after intense medical treatment can be academically and socially challenging for childhood cancer survivors. This study aimed to evaluate the school (re)entry experience of children who had recently completed cancer treatment. Forty-two semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted to explore parents' perceptions of their child's (re)entry to school after completing treatment (23 mothers, 19 fathers, parent mean age 39.5 years; child mean age 7.76 years). Interviews were analysed using the framework of Miles and Huberman and emergent themes were organised using QSR NVivo8. Parents closely monitored their child's school (re)entry and fostered close relationships with their child's teacher to ensure swift communication of concerns should they arise. The most commonly reported difficulty related to aspects of peer socialisation; survivors either displayed a limited understanding of social rules such as turn taking, or related more to older children or teachers relative to their peers. Additionally, parents placed a strong emphasis on their child's overall personal development, above academic achievement alone. Improved parent, clinician and teacher awareness of the importance of continued peer socialisation during the treatment period is recommended in order to limit the ongoing ramifications this may have on school (re)entry post-treatment completion.

  5. A quantitative sensory analysis of peripheral neuropathy in colorectal cancer and its exacerbation by oxaliplatin chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho Barbosa, Mariana; Kosturakis, Alyssa K; Eng, Cathy; Wendelschafer-Crabb, Gwen; Kennedy, William R; Simone, Donald A; Wang, Xin S; Cleeland, Charles S; Dougherty, Patrick M

    2014-11-01

    Peripheral neuropathy caused by cytotoxic chemotherapy, especially platins and taxanes, is a widespread problem among cancer survivors that is likely to continue to expand in the future. However, little work to date has focused on understanding this challenge. The goal in this study was to determine the impact of colorectal cancer and cumulative chemotherapeutic dose on sensory function to gain mechanistic insight into the subtypes of primary afferent fibers damaged by chemotherapy. Patients with colorectal cancer underwent quantitative sensory testing before and then prior to each cycle of oxaliplatin. These data were compared with those from 47 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers. Patients showed significant subclinical deficits in sensory function before any therapy compared with healthy volunteers, and they became more pronounced in patients who received chemotherapy. Sensory modalities that involved large Aβ myelinated fibers and unmyelinated C fibers were most affected by chemotherapy, whereas sensory modalities conveyed by thinly myelinated Aδ fibers were less sensitive to chemotherapy. Patients with baseline sensory deficits went on to develop more symptom complaints during chemotherapy than those who had no baseline deficit. Patients who were tested again 6 to 12 months after chemotherapy presented with the most numbness and pain and also the most pronounced sensory deficits. Our results illuminate a mechanistic connection between the pattern of effects on sensory function and the nerve fiber types that appear to be most vulnerable to chemotherapy-induced toxicity, with implications for how to focus future work to ameloirate risks of peripheral neuropathy. PMID:25183707

  6. Cardiotoxicity in childhood cancer survivors: strategies for prevention and management.

    PubMed

    Harake, Danielle; Franco, Vivian I; Henkel, Jacqueline M; Miller, Tracie L; Lipshultz, Steven E

    2012-07-01

    Advances in cancer treatment have greatly improved survival rates of children with cancer. However, these same chemotherapeutic or radiologic treatments may result in long-term health consequences. Anthracyclines, chemotherapeutic drugs commonly used to treat children with cancer, are known to be cardiotoxic, but the mechanism by which they induce cardiac damage is still not fully understood. A higher cumulative anthracycline dose and a younger age of diagnosis are only a few of the many risk factors that identify the children at increased risk of developing cardiotoxicity. While cardiotoxicity can develop at anytime, starting from treatment initiation and well into adulthood, identifying the best cardioprotective measures to minimize the long-term damage caused by anthracyclines in children is imperative. Dexrazoxane is the only known agent to date, that is associated with less cardiac dysfunction, without reducing the oncologic efficacy of the anthracycline doxorubicin in children. Given the serious long-term health consequences of cancer treatments on survivors of childhood cancers, it is essential to investigate new approaches to improving the safety of cancer treatments. PMID:22871201

  7. Explorations of lung cancer stigma for female long term survivors

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Cati; Cataldo, Janine

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in women, accompanied by greater psychological distress than other cancers. There is minimal but increasing awareness of the impact of lung cancer stigma (LCS) on patient outcomes. LCS is associated with increased symptom burden and decreased quality of life. The purpose of this study was to explore the experience of female long term lung cancer survivors in the context of LCS and examine how participants discursively adhere to or reject stigmatizing beliefs. Findings situated within Cataldo et al.’s theoretical model include: 1) addiction and tobacco marketing as possible precursors for LCS, 2) the possible role of expert providers as LCS enhancers, 3) response of overlapping complicated identity shifts, 4) simultaneous rejection and assumption of LCS, and 5) information control via advocacy activities as a LCS mitigation response. These findings expand the current understanding of LCS, and call for future conceptual exploration and theoretical revision, particularly with respect to the possibility of interaction between relevant related stigma(s) and LCS. As the number of women living with lung cancer increases, with longer survival times, the effect of LCS and other experiences of discrimination on patient outcomes could be substantial. PMID:23414179

  8. Male breast cancer incidence among atomic bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Ron, Elaine; Ikeda, Takayoshi; Preston, Dale L; Tokuoka, Shoji

    2005-04-20

    To learn more about the role of ionizing radiation in the development of male breast cancer, we evaluated male breast cancer incidence among 45 880 male members of the Life Span Study cohort of Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Male breast cancers, diagnosed between January 1, 1958, and December 31, 1998, were identified through the Hiroshima and Nagasaki Tumor Registries. Nine male breast cancers were diagnosed among exposed Life Span Study members (crude rate = 1.8 per 100,000 person-years), and three were diagnosed among nonexposed cohort members (crude rate = 0.5 per 100,000 person-years). A statistically significant dose-response relation was observed (excess relative risk per sievert = 8, 95% confidence interval = 0.8 to 48; P = .01). Our finding of a statistically significant association between ionizing radiation and male breast cancer incidence adds to the very limited information that shows an association between radiation exposure and an increased risk of male breast cancer.

  9. Programmatic screening for colorectal cancer: the COLONPREV study.

    PubMed

    Castells, Antoni; Quintero, Enrique

    2015-03-01

    The COLONPREV study is an ongoing multicenter, nationwide, randomized controlled trial aimed at evaluating the efficacy of once-only colonoscopy and biennial fecal immunochemical testing with respect to the reduction of CRC-related mortality at 10 years in average-risk colorectal cancer screening population. Following a pragmatic approach, this study may contribute to establishing the most cost-effective strategy in a programmatic, population-based setting. In this review, we report the results obtained at the first screening round, as well as others achieved in nested evaluations using the COLONPREV dataset with the aim of clarifying some controversial issues on the different strategies of colorectal cancer screening.

  10. BRAF-Directed Therapy in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Korphaisarn, Krittiya; Kopetz, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Activating BRAF (V-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B) mutations occur in approximately 5% to 10% of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, mostly V600E mutation, and it is associated with distinct clinical and pathological features. To date, there are no approved treatments to target this mutation. BRAF inhibitor monotherapy has limited efficacy, in contrast to metastatic melanoma. Combination strategies that block not only BRAF mutated kinase but other alternative pathways are ongoing and have demonstrated improved activity. This review aims to provide data about new strategies to target to BRAF gene mutation in metastatic colorectal cancer. PMID:27341594

  11. Colorectal cancer implant in an external hemorrhoidal skin tag

    PubMed Central

    Liasis, Lampros

    2016-01-01

    External hemorrhoidal skin tags are generally benign. Colorectal cancer metastases to the squamous epithelium of perianal skin tags without other evidence of disseminated disease is a very rare finding. We present the case of a 61-year-old man with metastasis to an external hemorrhoidal skin tag from a midrectal primary adenocarcinoma. This case report highlights the importance of close examination of the anus during surgical planning for colorectal cancers. Abnormal findings of the perianal skin suggesting an implant or metastatic disease warrant biopsy, as distal spread and seeding can occur. In our patient, this finding appropriately changed surgical management. PMID:27034567

  12. [Diagnostic imaging techniques for hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Mollerup, Talie Khadem; Lorentzen, Torben; Møller, Jakob M; Nørgaard, Henrik; Achiam, Michael P

    2015-07-27

    Hepatic metastases (HM) are amongst the most important prognostic factors in patient survival from colorectal cancer. The diagnostic imaging techniques for accurate detection and characterization of colorectal metastases are therefore vital. In a review of the literature, MRI showed the highest sensitivity for detection of HM lesions < 1 cm, but the amount of MR scanners is insufficient. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound and computed tomography have similar sensitivity for detection of HM, but each method also have limitation such as operator dependency or enhanced risk of cancer due to ionizing radiation. PMID:26238008

  13. Mutator gene and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer

    DOEpatents

    de la Chapelle, Albert; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W.

    2008-02-05

    The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error.sup.+ (RER.sup.+) tumor cells.

  14. Sexual Health as a Survivorship Issue for Female Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Suzin, Daphne; McIlvenna, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    As more and more people are successfully treated for and live longer with cancer, greater attention is being directed toward the survivorship needs of this population. Women treated for cancer often experience issues related to sexual health and intimacy, which are frequently cited as areas of concern, even among long-term survivors. Unfortunately, data suggest that providers infrequently discuss these issues. We reviewed a contemporary understanding of sexual health of women and the impact of treatment on both sexual function and intimacy. We also provide a review of the diagnosis using the newest classification put forth by the American Psychiatric Association in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition, and potential treatments, including both endocrine and nonendocrine treatments that the general oncologist may be asked about when discussing sexual health with his or her patients. PMID:24396051

  15. Breast Cancer Cause Beliefs: Chinese, Korean, and Mexican American Breast Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Patricia; Lim, Jung-Won; Wang-Letzkus, Ming; Flores, Katrina F.; Allen, Kristi M.; Castañeda, Sheila F.; Talavera, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined causal attribution beliefs about breast cancer and the influence that these beliefs exert on health behavior change among breast cancer survivors (BCS). Focus groups with Chinese (n = 21), Korean (n = 11), and Mexican American (n = 9) BCS recruited through community- and hospital-based support groups were conducted. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and translated into English for thematic content analysis. Three themes concerning beliefs about breast cancer cause common to all three groups included (a) stress, (b) diet, and (c) fatalism. Causal beliefs corresponded to behavioral changes with women describing efforts to improve their diet and manage their stress. Ethnic minority BCS adhere to beliefs about what caused their cancer that influence their health behaviors. Providing quality health care to ethnically diverse cancer survivors requires cultural sensitivity to patients’ beliefs about the causes of their cancer and awareness of how beliefs influence patients’ health behaviors post diagnosis. PMID:25001237

  16. Patterns of Excess Cancer Risk among the Atomic Bomb Survivors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Donald A.

    1996-05-01

    I will indicate the major epidemiological findings regarding excess cancer among the atomic-bomb survivors, with some special attention to what can be said about low-dose risks. This will be based on 1950--90 mortality follow-up of about 87,000 survivors having individual radiation dose estimates. Of these about 50,000 had doses greater than 0.005 Sv, and the remainder serve largely as a comparison group. It is estimated that for this cohort there have been about 400 excess cancer deaths among a total of about 7800. Since there are about 37,000 subjects in the dose range .005--.20 Sv, there is substantial low-dose information in this study. The person-year-Seivert for the dose range under .20 Sv is greater than for any one of the 6 study cohorts of U.S., Canadian, and U.K. nuclear workers; and is equal to about 60% of the total for the combined cohorts. It is estimated, without linear extrapolation from higher doses, that for the RERF cohort there have been about 100 excess cancer deaths in the dose range under .20 Sv. Both the dose-response and age-time patterns of excess risk are very different for solid cancers and leukemia. One of the most important findings has been that the solid cancer (absolute) excess risk has steadily increased over the entire follow-up to date, similarly to the age-increase of the background risk. About 25% of the excess solid cancer deaths occurred in the last 5 years of the 1950--90 follow-up. On the contrary most of the excess leukemia risk occurred in the first few years following exposure. The observed dose response for solid cancers is very linear up to about 3 Sv, whereas for leukemia there is statistically significant upward curvature on that range. Very little has been proposed to explain this distinction. Although there is no hint of upward curvature or a threshold for solid cancers, the inherent difficulty of precisely estimating very small risks along with radiobiological observations that many radiation effects are nonlinear

  17. Natural Product Shows Effectiveness in Combating Colorectal Cancer | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    An herbal extract used for centuries to prevent heart disease has now been shown to be effective against colorectal cancer when tested in laboratory cell cultures. Scientists from NCI at Frederick found that the natural extract cryptotanshinone (CPT) stops the uncontrolled cell growth characteristic of cancer by interfering with a protein that has been implicated in several cancers, including those of the colon and rectum. The results appear in the journal Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry.

  18. Fundamental Causes of Colorectal Cancer Mortality: The Implications of Informational Diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Andrew; Clouston, Sean AP; Rubin, Marcie S; Colen, Cynthia G; Link, Bruce G

    2012-01-01

    Context Colorectal cancer is a major cause of mortality in the United States, with 52,857 deaths estimated in 2012. To explore further the social inequalities in colorectal cancer mortality, we used fundamental cause theory to consider the role of societal diffusion of information and socioeconomic status. Methods We used the number of deaths from colorectal cancer in U.S. counties between 1968 and 2008. Through geographical mapping, we examined disparities in colorectal cancer mortality as a function of socioeconomic status and the rate of diffusion of information. In addition to providing year-specific trends in colorectal cancer mortality rates, we analyzed these data using negative binomial regression. Findings The impact of socioeconomic status (SES) on colorectal cancer mortality is substantial, and its protective impact increases over time. Equally important is the impact of informational diffusion on colorectal cancer mortality over time. However, while the impact of SES remains significant when concurrently considering the role of diffusion of information, the propensity for faster diffusion moderates its effect on colorectal cancer mortality. Conclusions The faster diffusion of information reduces both colorectal cancer mortality and inequalities in colorectal cancer mortality, although it was not sufficient to eliminate SES inequalities. These findings have important long-term implications for policymakers looking to reduce social inequalities in colorectal cancer mortality and other, related, preventable diseases. PMID:22985282

  19. Sentinel and other mutational effects in offspring of cancer survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Mulvihill, J.J. )

    1990-01-01

    To date, no agent has been documented to cause germ cell mutation in human beings, with the possible exception of radiation causing abnormal meiotic chromosomes in testes. For studies in humans, mutation epidemiologists prefer the cohort approach, starting with an exposed population and looking for mutations that may be expressed in offspring as variants in health, chromosomes, proteins, or nucleic acids. Currently patients with cancer are the cohort exposed to the largest doses of potential mutagens, i.e., radiotherapy and drugs. In 12 large studies with over 825 patients and 1573 pregnancies, 46 (4%) of 1240 liveborns had a major birth defect, a rate comparable to that in the general population. One of these was a classic sentinel phenotype, i.e., a new sporadic case of a dominant mendelian syndrome. In collaboration with 5 U.S. cancer registries, we interviewed a retrospective cohort of 2383 patients diagnosed with cancer under age 20 years, from 1945 through 1975. Records were sought to verify major genetic disease, defined as a cytogenetic or single gene disorder or 1 of 15 isolated birth defects. In 2308 offspring of survivors, 5 had a chromosomal syndrome, 11 had a single gene disorder, and 62 had at least one major malformation. Among 4722 offspring of sibling controls, the respective numbers were 7, 12, and 127, nonsignificant differences. 7% of the parents of the offspring with possibly new mutations received potentially mutagenic therapy, compared with 12% of parents of normal children. Since pregnancy in or by cancer survivors is still a rare event, future efforts to document germ cell mutation may be best studied through international cooperation coupled with diverse laboratory measures of mutation.

  20. Risk of Cardiovascular Disease Using Framingham Risk Score in Korean Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    So, Ji-Hyun; Shin, Jin-Young; Park, Wan

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in cancer survivors. The aim of this study was to investigate the modifiable cardiovascular disease risk factors and 10-year probability of the disease based on the Framingham risk score in cancer survivors, compared with the general population. Methods A total of 1,225 cancer survivors and 5,196 non-cancer controls who participated in the 2007–2013 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys were enrolled. We assessed modifiable cardiovascular disease risk factors including smoking, body mass index, physical inactivity, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and elevated blood glucose level. The 10-year probability of cardiovascular disease was determined by applying the Framingham cardiovascular disease risk equation among cancer survivors and non-cancer controls, ranging from 30 to 74 years old who had no overt cardiovascular diseases. Results The proportion of subjects who had higher fasting glucose levels, hemoglobin A1c levels, systolic blood pressure, and low density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, and those who had lower high density lipoprotein cholesterol levels was significantly higher in the cancer survivors than in the non-cancer controls. The average 10-year probability of cardiovascular disease among the cancer survivors was higher than that in the non-cancer controls in both men and women. The average 10-year probability of cardiovascular disease in relation to the cancer type was significantly higher in patients with hepatic, colon, lung, breast, and gastric cancer. Conclusion Cancer survivors have a higher cardiovascular disease risk and 10-year probability of cardiovascular disease than non-cancer controls. Control of cardiovascular disease risk factors and implementation of a well-defined cardiovascular disease prevention program are needed for treating cancer survivors. PMID:27468342

  1. Perspectives of colorectal cancer risk and screening among Dominicans and Puerto Ricans: stigma and misperceptions.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Roberta E; Diaz, Joseph A; Kim, Ivone

    2009-11-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second most common cancer among Latinos, but a lower percentage of Latinos are screened than Whites and Blacks. Along with recognized economic barriers, differences in knowledge and perceptions might impede colorectal screening among Latinos. We conducted 147 individual, qualitative interviews with Dominicans and Puerto Ricans in the northeastern United States to explore their explanatory models for colorectal cancer and screening barriers. Many participants had not previously heard of colorectal cancer. The most commonly mentioned cause of colorectal cancer was anal sex. Also considered risks were "bad food," digestion leading to constipation, and strained bowel movements. Screening barriers included stigma, misperceptions, embarrassment, and machismo. Progress toward increasing colorectal cancer screening requires normalization of this screening among Latinos. Higher patient familiarity, along with improved physician counseling and referral, might contribute to reducing stigma and other barriers, and to enhancing knowledge and Latino community support of colorectal cancer screening.

  2. Determining the familial risk distribution of colorectal cancer: a data mining approach.

    PubMed

    Chau, Rowena; Jenkins, Mark A; Buchanan, Daniel D; Ait Ouakrim, Driss; Giles, Graham G; Casey, Graham; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W; Le Marchand, Loic; Newcomb, Polly A; Lindor, Noralane M; Hopper, John L; Win, Aung Ko

    2016-04-01

    This study was aimed to characterize the distribution of colorectal cancer risk using family history of cancers by data mining. Family histories for 10,066 colorectal cancer cases recruited to population cancer registries of the Colon Cancer Family Registry were analyzed using a data mining framework. A novel index was developed to quantify familial cancer aggregation. Artificial neural network was used to identify distinct categories of familial risk. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of colorectal cancer were calculated for each category. We identified five major, and 66 minor categories of familial risk for developing colorectal cancer. The distribution the major risk categories were: (1) 7% of families (SIR = 7.11; 95% CI 6.65-7.59) had a strong family history of colorectal cancer; (2) 13% of families (SIR = 2.94; 95% CI 2.78-3.10) had a moderate family history of colorectal cancer; (3) 11% of families (SIR = 1.23; 95% CI 1.12-1.36) had a strong family history of breast cancer and a weak family history of colorectal cancer; (4) 9 % of families (SIR = 1.06; 95 % CI 0.96-1.18) had strong family history of prostate cancer and weak family history of colorectal cancer; and (5) 60% of families (SIR = 0.61; 95% CI 0.57-0.65) had a weak family history of all cancers. There is a wide variation of colorectal cancer risk that can be categorized by family history of cancer, with a strong gradient of colorectal cancer risk between the highest and lowest risk categories. The risk of colorectal cancer for people with the highest risk category of family history (7% of the population) was 12-times that for people in the lowest risk category (60%) of the population. Data mining was proven an effective approach for gaining insight into the underlying cancer aggregation patterns and for categorizing familial risk of colorectal cancer.

  3. Assessing Dietary Intake in Childhood Cancer Survivors: Food Frequency Questionnaire Versus 24-Hour Diet Recalls.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang Fang; Roberts, Susan B; Must, Aviva; Wong, William W; Gilhooly, Cheryl H; Kelly, Michael J; Parsons, Susan K; Saltzman, Edward

    2015-10-01

    Cancer diagnosis and treatment may influence dietary intake. The validity of using self-reported methods to quantify dietary intake has not been evaluated in childhood cancer survivors. We validated total energy intake (EI) reported from Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) and repeated 24-hour diet recalls (24HRs) against total energy expenditure (TEE) measured using the doubly labeled water method in 16 childhood cancer survivors. Dietary underreporting, assessed by (EI-TEE)/TEE × 100%, was 22% for FFQ and 1% for repeated 24HRs. FFQ significantly underestimates dietary intake and should not be used to assess the absolute intake of foods and nutrients in childhood cancer survivors.

  4. Assessing Dietary Intake in Childhood Cancer Survivors: Food Frequency Questionnaire versus 24-Hour Diet Recalls

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fang Fang; Roberts, Susan B.; Must, Aviva; Wong, William W.; Gilhooly, Cheryl H.; Kelly, Michael J.; Parsons, lkSusan K.; Saltzman, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Cancer diagnosis and treatment may influence dietary intake. The validity of using self-reported methods to quantify dietary intake has not been evaluated in childhood cancer survivors. We validated total energy intake (EI) reported from food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and repeated 24-hour diet recalls (24HRs) against total energy expenditure (TEE) measured using the doubly labeled water method in 16 childhood cancer survivors. Dietary underreporting, assessed by (EI-TEE)/TEE ×100%, was 22% for FFQ and 1% for repeated 24HRs. FFQ significantly underestimates dietary intake and should not be used to assess the absolute intake of foods and nutrients in childhood cancer survivors. PMID:25883059

  5. Renal carcinoma after childhood cancer: a report from the childhood cancer survivor study.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Carmen L; Ness, Kirsten K; Neglia, Joseph P; Hammond, Sue; Shnorhavorian, Margarett; Leisenring, Wendy L; Stovall, Marilyn; Robison, Leslie L; Armstrong, Gregory T

    2013-04-01

    Adult survivors of childhood cancer are known to be at increased risk of subsequent malignancy, but only limited data exist describing the incidence and risk factors for secondary renal carcinoma. Among 14 358 5-year survivors diagnosed between 1970 and 1986, we estimated standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) for subsequent renal carcinoma and identified associations with primary cancer therapy using Poisson regression. Twenty-six survivors were diagnosed with renal carcinoma (median = 22.6 years from diagnosis; range = 6.3-35.7 years), reflecting a statistically significant excess (SIR = 8.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 5.2 to 11.7) compared with the general population. Highest risk was observed among neuroblastoma survivors (SIR = 85.8, 95% CI = 38.4 to 175.2) and, in multivariable analyses, with renal-directed radiotherapy of 5 Gy or greater (relative risk [RR] = 3.8, 95% CI = 1.6 to 9.3) and platinum-based chemotherapy (RR = 3.5, 95% CI = 1.0 to 11.2). To our knowledge, this is the first report of an association between cisplatin and subsequent renal carcinoma among survivors of childhood cancer.

  6. Psychosocial aspects of survivors of childhood cancer or leukemia.

    PubMed

    Massimo, L; Zarri, D; Caprino, D

    2005-12-01

    The majority of childhood cancer patients can expect nowadays to be cured and the percentage is now between 70% and 80%. The number of long-term survivors, off- threatment for at least 5 years, is rising rapidly and is becoming a new population, which needs a special care. It is becoming increasingly important to know how to prevent and treat the physical late effects as well as the psychosocial ones. The oldest among these patients are now in their 40's. How will their old age be like? Are they really cured? The aim of this study is to present a detailed survey of the literature on this topic as well as the authors' personal experience. Several techniques of psychological investigation for this population are highlighted. The semistructured interviews are mostly used for mono-institutional research, while the narrative dialogues are useful for small groups of patients. Questionnaires are usually conducted by epidemiologists for large groups of survivors. Tests are used for specific items such as defense mechanisms, self-esteem, relationships within the family, fear, and panic. The evaluation of the post-traumatic stress disorder is considered and the most important literature data are reported. It is also stressed the need of prevention of any type of psychosocial distress. In conclusion, most of the survivors appear to lead normal adult lives, to have obtained high school degrees, good jobs, and several have families and children. Nevertheless, a small percentage show some psychological or social problems, such as anxiety, depression, fear over the future or over relapse, a second primary, or sterility. The most vulnerable among them are females, people in poor financial conditions, the unemployed and those with poor educations.

  7. Pharmacological cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors: Implications for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Archana; Vyas, Arpita; Deshpande, Kaivalya; Vyas, Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer accounts for a significant proportion of cancer deaths worldwide. The need to develop more chemotherapeutic agents to combat this disease is critical. Cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs), along with its binding partner cyclins, serve to control the growth of cells through the cell cycle. A new class of drugs, termed CDK inhibitors, has been studied in preclinical and now clinical trials. These inhibitors are believed to act as an anti-cancer drug by blocking CDKs to block the uncontrolled cellular proliferation that is hallmark of cancers like colorectal cancer. CDK article provides overview of the emerging drug class of CDK inhibitors and provides a list of ones that are currently in clinical trials. PMID:26900281

  8. Childhood Cancer Survivorship Research in Minority Populations: A Position Paper from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Smita; Gibson, Todd M; Ness, Kirsten K; Liu, Qi; Oeffinger, Kevin C; Krull, Kevin R; Nathan, Paul C; Neglia, Joseph P; Leisenring, Wendy; Yasui, Yutaka; Robison, Leslie L; Armstrong, Gregory T

    2016-01-01

    By the middle of this century, racial/ethnic minority populations will collectively constitute 50% of the US population. This temporal shift in the racial/ethnic make-up of the US population demands a close look at the race/ethnicity-specific burden of morbidity and premature mortality among childhood cancer survivors. To optimize targeted long-term follow-up care, it is essential to understand whether the burden of morbidity borne by survivors of childhood cancer differs by race/ethnicity. This is challenging because the number of minority participants is often limited in current childhood cancer survivorship research, resulting in a paucity of race/ethnicity-specific recommendations and/or interventions. We show that while the overall childhood cancer incidence increased between 1973 and 2003, the mortality rate declined; however these changes did not differ appreciably by race/ethnicity. We speculate that any racial/ethnic differences in outcome are likely to be multifactorial, and draw upon data from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study to illustrate the various contributors (socioeconomic characteristics, health behaviors and comorbidities) that could explain any observed differences in key treatment-related complications. Finally, we outline challenges in conducting race/ethnicity-specific childhood cancer survivorship research, showing that there are limited absolute numbers of children who are diagnosed and survive cancer in any one racial/ethnic minority population, precluding a rigorous evaluation of adverse events among specific primary cancer diagnoses and treatment exposure groups. PMID:27253866

  9. Excessive collagen turnover products are released during colorectal cancer progression and elevated in serum from metastatic colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kehlet, S N; Sanz-Pamplona, R; Brix, S; Leeming, D J; Karsdal, M A; Moreno, V

    2016-01-01

    During cancer progression, the homeostasis of the extracellular matrix becomes imbalanced with an excessive collagen remodeling by matrix metalloproteinases. As a consequence, small protein fragments of degraded collagens are released into the circulation. We have investigated the potential of protein fragments of collagen type I, III and IV as novel biomarkers for colorectal cancer. Specific fragments of degraded type I, III and IV collagen (C1M, C3M, C4M) and type III collagen formation (Pro-C3) were assessed in serum from colorectal cancer patients, subjects with adenomas and matched healthy controls using well-characterized and validated ELISAs. Serum levels of the biomarkers were significantly elevated in colorectal cancer patients compared to subjects with adenomas (C1M, Pro-C3, C3M) and controls (C1M, Pro-C3). When patients were stratified according to their tumour stage, all four biomarkers were able to differentiate stage IV metastatic patients from all other stages. Combination of all markers with age and gender in a logistic regression model discriminated between metastatic and non-metastatic patients with an AUROC of 0.80. The data suggest that the levels of these collagen remodeling biomarkers may be a measure of tumour activity and invasiveness and may provide new clinical tools for monitoring of patients with advanced stage colorectal cancer. PMID:27465284

  10. Excessive collagen turnover products are released during colorectal cancer progression and elevated in serum from metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Kehlet, S. N.; Sanz-Pamplona, R.; Brix, S.; Leeming, D. J.; Karsdal, M. A.; Moreno, V.

    2016-01-01

    During cancer progression, the homeostasis of the extracellular matrix becomes imbalanced with an excessive collagen remodeling by matrix metalloproteinases. As a consequence, small protein fragments of degraded collagens are released into the circulation. We have investigated the potential of protein fragments of collagen type I, III and IV as novel biomarkers for colorectal cancer. Specific fragments of degraded type I, III and IV collagen (C1M, C3M, C4M) and type III collagen formation (Pro-C3) were assessed in serum from colorectal cancer patients, subjects with adenomas and matched healthy controls using well-characterized and validated ELISAs. Serum levels of the biomarkers were significantly elevated in colorectal cancer patients compared to subjects with adenomas (C1M, Pro-C3, C3M) and controls (C1M, Pro-C3). When patients were stratified according to their tumour stage, all four biomarkers were able to differentiate stage IV metastatic patients from all other stages. Combination of all markers with age and gender in a logistic regression model discriminated between metastatic and non-metastatic patients with an AUROC of 0.80. The data suggest that the levels of these collagen remodeling biomarkers may be a measure of tumour activity and invasiveness and may provide new clinical tools for monitoring of patients with advanced stage colorectal cancer. PMID:27465284

  11. Whole grain intake and survival among Scandinavian colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Skeie, Guri; Braaten, Tonje; Olsen, Anja; Kyrø, Cecilie; Tjønneland, Anne; Nilsson, Lena Maria; Landberg, Rikard; Lund, Eiliv

    2014-01-01

    To our knowledge, no studies of associations between intake of whole grain (WHG) and survival of colorectal cancer have been published, despite evidence that dietary fiber, and to some extent WHG, are associated with lower risk of colorectal cancer. Scandinavia is an area where the WHG consumption traditionally is high. We performed a case-only (N = 1119) study in the Scandinavian HELGA cohort of pre-diagnosis WHG intake (total WHG, WHG wheat, WHG rye, and WHG oats) and survival of colorectal cancer. Cox regression analyses were used to study the associations, both in categorical and continuous models, stratified by location (proximal, distal, rectum) and country. No evidence of an association was found, neither for total WHG intake (hazard ratio = 1.32, 95% confidence interval: 0.88-1.97 lowest vs. highest tertile, adjusted for age at diagnosis, metastasis status, smoking, folate, margarine, and energy), nor for specific grains. Prediagnosis consumption of WHG does not seem to improve survival of colorectal cancer in subjects diagnosed within this prospective population-based Scandinavian cohort.

  12. Restaging of colorectal cancer and PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Çınar, Alev; Gençoğlu, Esra Arzu; Korkmaz, Meliha

    2013-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography/Computerized Tomography (PET/CT) is an important assessment method in restaging of oncology patients. Its ability to detect the metabolic/functional changes in patients with colorectal cancer during the early stages, in which morphological changes cannot be documented, is significantly superior to other imaging modalities. PMID:25931851

  13. Internet Use for Prediagnosis Symptom Appraisal by Colorectal Cancer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Maria D.; Siminoff, Laura A.; Longo, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: This study explored the characteristics of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients who accessed Internet-based health information as part of their symptom appraisal process prior to consulting a health care provider. Method: Newly diagnosed CRC patients who experienced symptoms prior to diagnosis were interviewed. Brief COPE was used to…

  14. Potential role of probiotics on colorectal cancer prevention

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer represents the most common malignancy of the gastrointestinal tract. Owing to differences in dietary habits and lifestyle, this neoplasm is more common in industrialized countries than in developing ones. Evidence from a wide range of sources supports the assumption that the link between diet and colorectal cancer may be due to an imbalance of the intestinal microflora. Discussion Probiotic bacteria are live microorganisms that, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a healthy benefit on the host, and they have been investigated for their protective anti-tumor effects. In vivo and molecular studies have displayed encouraging findings that support a role of probiotics in colorectal cancer prevention. Summary Several mechanisms could explain the preventive action of probiotics against colorectal cancer onset. They include: alteration of the intestinal microflora; inactivation of cancerogenic compounds; competition with putrefactive and pathogenic microbiota; improvement of the host’s immune response; anti-proliferative effects via regulation of apoptosis and cell differentiation; fermentation of undigested food; inhibition of tyrosine kinase signaling pathways. PMID:23173670

  15. BRAF inhibitors in colorectal cancer: Toward a differentiation therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Herr, Ricarda; Brummer, Tilman

    2015-01-01

    BRAF inhibitor monotherapy appears to be ineffective in BRAFV600E-positive colorectal cancer (CRC) as a result of inherent EGFR-mediated resistance mechanisms. This concept initiated combinatorial treatment approaches. Nevertheless, BRAF inhibition in isogenic CRC cell lines induced enhanced cell-cell adhesion and differentiation, underlining a potential benefit of BRAF inhibitors in CRC. PMID:27308494

  16. Neuropsychological sequelae of childhood cancer in long-term survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, D.R.; Fletcher, J.M.; Pfefferbaum-Levine, B.; Jaffe, N.; Ried, H.; Maor, M.

    1985-04-01

    In order to assess the effects of various cancer treatments on neuropsychological functioning, 74 long-term survivors of childhood cancer were examined. A comprehensive battery of tests was administered to two CNS treatment groups (irradiated and nonirradiated leukemia and lymphoma patients) and a control group (solid tumor and Hodgkin disease patients receiving no CNS treatment). The CNS-irradiated group obtained lower scores than the other two groups, with significant differences in visual-motor and fine motor skills, spatial memory, and arithmetic achievement resulting in significant differences in IQ scores (VIQ, PIQ, FSIQ). The results are discussed in relation to: (1) the effects of CNS irradiation on cognitive development; (2) the specificity of these effects; and (3) the relationship of age at diagnosis to treatment effects. It is concluded that although there is a general lowering of scores after CNS irradiation, the effect is most pronounced for nonlanguage skills. Age at diagnosis was less important than the type of treatment, with CNS irradiation reducing performance regardless of when cancer was diagnosed. There were indications that children with any type of cancer diagnosed before age 5 years are more likely to have some cognitive difficulties.

  17. Electronic Personal Health Records for Childhood Cancer Survivors: An Exploratory Study.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Lisa K; Carvalho, Priscilla; Southward, Matthew; Schmidt, Mary Lou; Jabine, Leslie N; Stolley, Melinda R; Gerber, Ben S

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Childhood cancer survivors have complex healthcare needs that may be effectively communicated using electronic personal health records. This study explores the knowledge, interest, and attitudes of a sample of survivors and some of their caregivers towards electronic personal health records (ePHRs). Methods: This descriptive study was conducted in a pediatric hematology-oncology clinic and associated survivorship clinic with a convenience sample of caregivers of survivors who were <14 years old and survivors ≥14 years old along with their caregivers when present. A semi-structured interview was conducted with survivors and some caregivers to understand their knowledge, interest, and attitudes towards adoption of ePHRs. Results: Interviews were completed with 11 caregivers of young survivors, four survivors alone, and five survivor-caregiver dyads. Survivors ranged in age at diagnosis from 1 to 17 years old. Among the ethnically diverse sample, approximately half of the nine survivors and 25% of 16 caregivers reported having some knowledge of ePHRs. Eighty-nine percent (8/9) of the survivors and 81% (13/16) of the caregivers reported that they were somewhat or very comfortable using the internet. All nine survivors and 75% of caregivers were interested in the adoption of ePHRs. Data security and privacy were the primary concerns expressed. Conclusions: Interest in adoption of ePHRs to manage cancer survivorship-related health information was high. Most felt that the privacy and security concerns would not prevent adoption. Additional research is needed on larger and more representative samples of survivors to understand what types of support and education are needed to effectively implement ePHRs.

  18. Pediatric Blood Cancer Survivors and Tobacco Use across Adolescence and Emerging Adulthood: A Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Masiero, Marianna; Riva, Silvia; Fioretti, Chiara; Pravettoni, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    Scholars underline the pivotal role of tobacco cigarette smoking in carcinogenesis process for blood tumors. A controversial debate is represented by the diffusion of tobacco use in young cancer survivors that had a previous diagnosis of blood tumor during the childhood. Compared with their peers, scientific evidence highlights that pediatric survivors have more difficult to give-up cigarette smoking. Furthermore, tobacco-smoking is frequently linked with others risk behaviors as drinking or substance abuse. In reviewing the main knowledge on this topic, authors affirm the need for increasing research on blood cancer survivors in order to depict psychological characteristics of pediatric blood cancer survivors. Improving health decision-making skills in young survivors could reduce the risk to adopt un-healthy behaviors and increase psychological wellbeing. Furthermore, authors propose tailored antismoking interventions based on the knowledge of the psychological and cognitive factors that support smoking during the transition toward emerging-adulthood. PMID:27047419

  19. Cancer recurrence worry, risk perception, and informational-coping styles among Appalachian cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Kimberly M; Shedlosky-Shoemaker, Randi; Porter, Kyle; Desimone, Philip; Andrykowski, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Despite a growing literature on the psychosocial impact of the threat of cancer recurrence, underserved populations, such as those from the Appalachian region, have been understudied. To examine worry and perceived risk in cancer survivors, Appalachian and non-Appalachian cancer patients at an ambulatory oncology clinic in a university hospital were surveyed. Appalachians had significantly higher worry than non-Appalachians. Cancer type and lower need for cognition were associated with greater worry. Those with missing perceived risk data were generally older, less educated, and lower in monitoring, blunting, and health literacy. Additional resources are needed to assist Appalachians and those with cancers with poor prognoses (e.g., liver cancer, pancreatic cancer) to cope with worry associated with developing cancer again. More attention for cancer prevention is critical to improve quality of life in underserved populations where risk of cancer is greater.

  20. A preventive registry for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Madlensky, L; Berk, T C; Bapat, B V; McLeod, R S; Couture, J; Baron, D; Hiruki, T; Redston, M; Cohen, Z; Gallinger, S

    1995-07-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is a genetic disorder characterized by a strong family history of colorectal and extracolonic cancers, usually at a young age. This article presents a new provincial service for families with HNPCC. The Steve Atanas Stavro Familial Gastrointestinal Cancer Registry at Mount Sinai Hospital is accruing patients that meet a set of criteria establishing a putative diagnosis of HNPCC. The objectives of the Registry are to develop and assess patient pedigrees, to coordinate screening procedures for at-risk persons, to maintain a prospective database of patient information, to provide education and support for families and to contribute to research. To date, surgeons and patients are the most common referral sources, while oncologists and geneticists are the least common. The ultimate goal of the HNPCC service is the secondary prevention of cancer and a corresponding decrease in mortality for HNPCC family members. PMID:8853507

  1. Meeting Physical Activity Guidelines in Rural Breast Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Erin A.; Mullen, Sean P.; Rogers, Laura Q.; Courneya, Kerry S.; Verhulst, Steven; McAuley, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine contribution of social cognitive constructs to meeting physical activity (PA) recommendations in rural breast cancer survivors (BCS). Methods Rural BCS (N = 483) completed a mail-based survey. PA, fatigue, barriers and exercise self-efficacy, environment, social support, and perceived barriers to PA were assessed. PA was dichotomized into either meeting guidelines (150+minutes/week) or not. Results Our model fit the data well with less fatigue, greater efficacy, and lower barriers being associated with PA (χ²=804.532(418), p < .001, CFI=.948, RMSEA=.044, SRMR=.046). Conclusions Fatigue, self-efficacy, and perceived barriers are key targets for future interventions designed to increase PA in rural BCS. Enhancing self-efficacy and overcoming barriers will require strategies unique and relevant to BCS living in rural settings. PMID:25341266

  2. Screening and management of adverse endocrine outcomes in adult survivors of childhood and adolescent cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tonorezos, Emily S; Hudson, Melissa M; Edgar, Angela B; Kremer, Leontien C; Sklar, Charles A; Wallace, W Hamish B; Oeffinger, Kevin C

    2015-01-01

    5 year survival for childhood and adolescent cancer in developed countries is now in excess of 80% and the number of survivors of cancer continues to increase worldwide. After completion of therapy, many of these survivors will face a lifelong risk of endocrine late effects. We summarise the available evidence related to the prevalence and risk factors for endocrine late effects among adult survivors of childhood and adolescent cancer. Present screening, surveillance, and treatment recommendations differ by country and region, so we also highlight the continued effort to harmonise the international guidelines for this population. PMID:25873569

  3. Colorectal cancer in a nuclear family. Familial or hereditary?

    PubMed

    Lynch, H T; Fitzgibbons, R; Marcus, J; McGill, J; Voorhees, G J; Lynch, J F

    1985-05-01

    Because of the high incidence of colorectal cancer, familial aggregations of this disease are common. Differentiation between etiologies contributing to familial clustering (which may have resulted either from common environmental exposure or from mere chance) and primary genetic factors may prove vexing to the physician. This report deals with the myriad problems encountered when attempting to make such etiologic distinctions in order to provide appropriate surveillance and management, based upon tumor spectrum and natural history, for patients at increased cancer risk.

  4. Identification of a biomarker panel for colorectal cancer diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Malignancies arising in the large bowel cause the second largest number of deaths from cancer in the Western World. Despite progresses made during the last decades, colorectal cancer remains one of the most frequent and deadly neoplasias in the western countries. Methods A genomic study of human colorectal cancer has been carried out on a total of 31 tumoral samples, corresponding to different stages of the disease, and 33 non-tumoral samples. The study was carried out by hybridisation of the tumour samples against a reference pool of non-tumoral samples using Agilent Human 1A 60-mer oligo microarrays. The results obtained were validated by qRT-PCR. In the subsequent bioinformatics analysis, gene networks by means of Bayesian classifiers, variable selection and bootstrap resampling were built. The consensus among all the induced models produced a hierarchy of dependences and, thus, of variables. Results After an exhaustive process of pre-processing to ensure data quality--lost values imputation, probes quality, data smoothing and intraclass variability filtering--the final dataset comprised a total of 8, 104 probes. Next, a supervised classification approach and data analysis was carried out to obtain the most relevant genes. Two of them are directly involved in cancer progression and in particular in colorectal cancer. Finally, a supervised classifier was induced to classify new unseen samples. Conclusions We have developed a tentative model for the diagnosis of colorectal cancer based on a biomarker panel. Our results indicate that the gene profile described herein can discriminate between non-cancerous and cancerous samples with 94.45% accuracy using different supervised classifiers (AUC values in the range of 0.997 and 0.955). PMID:22280244

  5. Bone mineral density deficits and fractures in survivors of childhood cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Carmen L.; Ness, Kirsten K.

    2014-01-01

    Although substantial increases in survival rates among children diagnosed with cancer have been observed in recent decades, survivors are at risk of developing therapy-related chronic health conditions. Among children and adolescents treated for cancer, acquisition of peak bone mass may be compromised by cancer therapies, nutritional deficiencies and reduced physical activity. Accordingly, failure to accrue optimal bone mass during childhood may place survivors at increased risk for deficits in bone density and fracture in later life. Current recommendations for the treatment of bone density decrements among cancer survivors include dietary counseling and supplementation to ensure adequate calcium and vitamin D intake. Few strategies exist to prevent or treat bone loss. Moving forward, studies characterizing the trajectory of changes in bone density over time will facilitate the development of interventions and novel therapies aimed at minimizing bone loss among survivors of childhood cancer. PMID:24043370

  6. Risk of Second Cancers According to Radiation Therapy Technique and Modality in Prostate Cancer Survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Berrington de Gonzalez, Amy; Wong, Jeannette; Kleinerman, Ruth; Kim, Clara; Morton, Lindsay; Bekelman, Justin E.

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy (RT) techniques for prostate cancer are evolving rapidly, but the impact of these changes on risk of second cancers, which are an uncommon but serious consequence of RT, are uncertain. We conducted a comprehensive assessment of risks of second cancer according to RT technique (>10 MV vs ≤10 MV and 3-dimensional [3D] vs 2D RT) and modality (external beam RT, brachytherapy, and combined modes) in a large cohort of prostate cancer patients. Methods and Materials: The cohort was constructed using the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results-Medicare database. We included cases of prostate cancer diagnosed in patients 66 to 84 years of age from 1992 to 2004 and followed through 2009. We used Poisson regression analysis to compare rates of second cancer across RT groups with adjustment for age, follow-up, chemotherapy, hormone therapy, and comorbidities. Analyses of second solid cancers were based on the number of 5-year survivors (n=38,733), and analyses of leukemia were based on number of 2-year survivors (n=52,515) to account for the minimum latency period for radiation-related cancer. Results: During an average of 4.4 years' follow-up among 5-year prostate cancer survivors (2DRT = 5.5 years; 3DRT = 3.9 years; and brachytherapy = 2.7 years), 2933 second solid cancers were diagnosed. There were no significant differences in second solid cancer rates overall between 3DRT and 2DRT patients (relative risk [RR] = 1.00, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.91-1.09), but second rectal cancer rates were significantly lower after 3DRT (RR = 0.59, 95% CI: 0.40-0.88). Rates of second solid cancers for higher- and lower-energy RT were similar overall (RR = 0.97, 95% CI: 0.89-1.06), as were rates for site-specific cancers. There were significant reductions in colon cancer and leukemia rates in the first decade after brachytherapy compared to those after external beam RT. Conclusions: Advanced treatment planning may have reduced rectal

  7. A week in the life of lung cancer survivors: Daily reports of stress, worry, mood, and symptoms.

    PubMed

    Aronson, Keith R; Wagstaff, David A; Farace, Elana; Muscat, Joshua; Belani, Chandra; Almokadem, Salah; Fossum, Thyra

    2016-10-01

    This study examined the day-to-day lives of early stage lung cancer survivors who were discharged from treatment between 2 and 24 months prior to the study. Lung cancer survivors were called on eight consecutive nights and completed an interview about their daily experiences. Repeated measures, multilevel analysis of the phone interview data was conducted. Survivors reported few daily stressor exposures or somatic symptoms. Daily moods were generally positive, and survivors reported living quite independently. Lung cancer survivors did not report experiencing health-related worry on a daily basis. The findings from this study create a much more positive picture of lung cancer survivorship relative to prior studies.

  8. Serrated colorectal cancer: Molecular classification, prognosis, and response to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Murcia, Oscar; Juárez, Miriam; Hernández-Illán, Eva; Egoavil, Cecilia; Giner-Calabuig, Mar; Rodríguez-Soler, María; Jover, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    Molecular advances support the existence of an alternative pathway of colorectal carcinogenesis that is based on the hypermethylation of specific DNA regions that silences tumor suppressor genes. This alternative pathway has been called the serrated pathway due to the serrated appearance of tumors in histological analysis. New classifications for colorectal cancer (CRC) were proposed recently based on genetic profiles that show four types of molecular alterations: BRAF gene mutations, KRAS gene mutations, microsatellite instability, and hypermethylation of CpG islands. This review summarizes what is known about the serrated pathway of CRC, including CRC molecular and clinical features, prognosis, and response to chemotherapy. PMID:27053844

  9. Serrated and non-serrated precursor lesions of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Langner, Cord

    2015-01-01

    Although often viewed as a single disease, colorectal cancer more accurately represents a family of diseases with different precursor lesions. Conventional (tubular, tubulovillous and villous) adenomas are the most common neoplastic lesions occurring in the large intestine. They have adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) mutations and arise from dysplastic aberrant crypt foci, initially as polyclonal lesions. In sporadic tumours, neoplastic progression follows the traditional pathway (chromosomal instability pathway), resulting in CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP)-negative, microsatellite-stable (MSS), BRAF and KRAS wild-type cancers. Germline mutations in the APC gene lead to familial adenomatous polyposis. Conventional adenomas are also the precursors of Lynch syndrome-associated microsatellite-instable (MSI-high) cancers. Sessile serrated adenoma/polyp (SSA/P) is the principal precursor lesion of the serrated pathway, in which BRAF mutation can lead to colorectal cancer with MSI-high CIMP-high or MSS CIMP-high phenotype. SSA/Ps have been associated with synchronous and metachronous invasive adenocarcinomas as well as so-called interval carcinomas. Serrated polyposis is rare but most likely underdiagnosed. Affected individuals bear an increased but unspecified risk for the development of colorectal cancer; close endoscopic surveillance is warranted. Traditional serrated adenomas (TSAs) are much less common than the other serrated lesions. Cancers originating from TSAs may show KRAS mutation with a CIMP-high MSS phenotype.

  10. [Genetics of Colorectal Tumorigenesis (Possibilities of Testing and Screening Prediction of Hereditary Form of Colorectal Cancer--Lynch Syndrome)].

    PubMed

    Mľkva, I

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is currently one of the most frequent cancers in developed countries. Understanding the molecular principles of its pathogenesis has recently come into focus of many oncogenetic studies. Colorectal cancer also represents an ideal model for the study of molecular basis of cancerogenesis owing to the wide availability of its precursor lesions and the existence of several notorious genetic predispositions such as familial adenomatous polyposis and Lynch syndrome. The classical model of colorectal tumorigenesis, described by Fearon and Vogelstein, suggested the idea of a conventional progression from adenoma to carcinoma. It was based on a careful analysis of mutations occurring within particular stages of carcinogenesis with regards to their stepwise accumulations leading to neoplastic transformation of the colonic epithelium. Recently, new evidence has pointed to an alternative model of colorectal tumorigenesis introducing the concept of serrated precursors. This alternative pathway, known as the serrated pathway, has provided a new perspective on colorectal cancer development. Nowadays, three molecular pathways leading to colorectal tumorigenesis are recognized: 1. the chromosomal instability pathway typified by familial adenomatous polyposis; 2. the mutator pathway characterized by inactivation of DNA mismatch repair genes such as in Lynch syndrome or a number of sporadic colorectal cancers; 3. the hypermethylation serrated neoplasia pathway characterized by excessive methylation of some CpG islands in the promoter region of certain genes (positive CpG islands methylator phenotype) (CIMP+).

  11. Colorectal Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts are Genotypically Distinct

    PubMed Central

    Mrazek, Amy A.; Carmical, Joseph R.; Wood, Thomas G.; Hellmich, Mark R.; Eltorky, Mahmoud; Bohanon, Frederick J.; Chao, Celia

    2014-01-01

    Cells in the stromal microenvironment facilitate colorectal cancer (CRC) progression and “co-evolve” with the epithelial cancer cells. Genetic and epigenetic differences between normal colorectal mucosa fibroblasts (NF) and carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAF) are not known. The aim of this study is to identify differentially expressed genes and promoter methylation between NF and CAF in human CRC. RNA and DNA were extracted from cultured NF and CAF from CRC resections. Genome-wide gene expression and methylation analyses were performed using the Illumina Human HT-12 v4.0 Expression and Illumina Human Methylation 27 BeadChips. Gene expression values between NF and CAF were compared and correlated with methylation patterns. Data was analyzed using Partek Genomics Suite using one-way ANOVA and p<0.05 as significant. Ingenuity iReport™ was performed to identify potential differences in biological functions and pathways between the NF and CAF. Paired methylation and gene expression analyses from 11 NF and 10 CAF colorectal samples are reported. Unsupervised analysis of differentially expressed genes using iReport™ identified “Top Diseases” as “Cancer” and “Colorectal Cancer”. Previous genome wide studies have focused on the cancer cells. We have identified differentially expressed genes and differentially methylated promoter regions that are CAF-specific in CRC. PMID:25530743

  12. Posttraumatic Growth in Women Survivors of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Barthakur, Michelle S; Sharma, Mahendra P; Chaturvedi, Santosh K; Manjunath, Suraj K

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the study was to understand the phenomenon of posttraumatic growth (PTG) in women survivors of breast cancer from an Indian perspective. Settings and Design: It was a mixed method, cross-sectional, and exploratory design wherein in-depth qualitative data covering a broader area of experiences were gathered from a sub-section of the larger quantitative sample (n = 50). The qualitative sample consisted of 15 Indian women from urban communities of Southern and Eastern India. Sampling method was purposive in nature. Subjects and Methods: Semi-structured interview schedule was developed by researchers based on a review of literature. In-depth interviews were audio recorded after their permissions were obtained and carried out at homes and offices of participants. All participants spoke English. Qualitative data were collected until no new phenomenological information emerged through the interviews. Data Management and Analysis: Descriptive phenomenological approach was utilized to analyze the interview data. It focuses on understanding one's life experience from the first person's point of view. Results: Consistent with other literature, PTG was evident in varying forms through positive changes in perspective toward life, better understanding of self, closer, and warmer relationships, and richer spiritual dimension of life. Conclusions: These findings have implications for promoting holistic cancer care and identifying ways to promote PTG through the initial stages of cancer care into survivorship trajectory. PMID:27162426

  13. Cardiovascular Disease in Adult Survivors of Childhood Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lipshultz, Steven E.; Franco, Vivian I.; Miller, Tracie L.; Colan, Steven D.; Sallan, Stephen E.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment advances have increased survival in children with cancer, but subclinical, progressive, irreversible, and sometimes fatal treatment-related cardiovascular effects may appear years later. Cardio-oncologists have identified promising preventive and treatment strategies. Dexrazoxane provides long-term cardioprotection from doxorubicin-associated cardiotoxicity without compromising the efficacy of anticancer treatment. Continuous infusion of doxorubicin is as effective as bolus administration in leukemia treatment, but no evidence has indicated that it provides long-term cardioprotection; continuous infusions should be eliminated from pediatric cancer treatment. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors can delay the progression of subclinical and clinical cardiotoxicity. All survivors, regardless of whether they were treated with anthracyclines or radiation, should be monitored for systemic inflammation and the risk of premature cardiovascular disease. Echocardiographic screening must be supplemented with screening for biomarkers of cardiotoxicity and perhaps by identification of genetic susceptibilities to cardiovascular diseases; optimal strategies need to be identified. The health burden related to cancer treatment will increase as this population expands and ages. PMID:25587648

  14. Impairments that Influence Physical Function among Survivors of Childhood Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Carmen L.; Gawade, Prasad L.; Ness, Kirsten K.

    2015-01-01

    Children treated for cancer are at increased risk of developing chronic health conditions, some of which may manifest during or soon after treatment while others emerge many years after therapy. These health problems may limit physical performance and functional capacity, interfering with participation in work, social, and recreational activities. In this review, we discuss treatment-induced impairments in the endocrine, musculoskeletal, neurological, and cardiopulmonary systems and their influence on mobility and physical function. We found that cranial radiation at a young age was associated with a broad range of chronic conditions including obesity, short stature, low bone mineral density and neuromotor impairments. Anthracyclines and chest radiation are associated with both short and long-term cardiotoxicity. Although numerous chronic conditions are documented among individuals treated for childhood cancer, the impact of these conditions on mobility and function are not well characterized, with most studies limited to survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia and brain tumors. Moving forward, further research assessing the impact of chronic conditions on participation in work and social activities is required. Moreover, interventions to prevent or ameliorate the loss of physical function among children treated for cancer are likely to become an important area of survivorship research. PMID:25692094

  15. Potential Protective Effects of Probiotics and Prebiotics Against Colorectal Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allsopp, Philip; Rowland, Ian

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the fourth most frequent cause of cancer related mortality in the world. Approximately 944,000 new cases were diagnosed globally in 2000 and this accounts for 9.2% of all new cancer cases (IARC, 2000). In Western societies namely Europe, North America and Australasia, it is the second most prevalent cancer after lung/breast (Boyle and Langman, 2000). About 363,000 new cases were reported in Europe in 2000 and it affects 6% of men and women by age 75, in almost equal proportion.

  16. Oncogene Mutations in Colorectal Polyps Identified in the Norwegian Colorectal Cancer Prevention (NORCCAP) Screening Study

    PubMed Central

    Lorentzen, Jon A.; Grzyb, Krzysztof; De Angelis, Paula M.; Hoff, Geir; Eide, Tor J.; Andresen, Per Arne

    2016-01-01

    Data are limited on oncogene mutation frequencies in polyps from principally asymptomatic participants of population-based colorectal cancer screening studies. In this study, DNA from 204 polyps, 5 mm or larger, were collected from 176 participants of the NORCCAP screening study and analyzed for mutations in KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA including the rarely studied KRAS exons 3 and 4 mutations. KRAS mutations were identified in 23.0% of the lesions and were significantly associated with tubulovillous adenomas and large size. A significantly higher frequency of KRAS mutations in females was associated with mutations in codon 12. The KRAS exon 3 and 4 mutations constituted 23.4% of the KRAS positive lesions, which is a larger proportion compared to previous observations in colorectal cancer. BRAF mutations were identified in 11.3% and were associated with serrated polyps. None of the individuals were diagnosed with de novo or recurrent colorectal cancer during the follow-up time (median 11.2 years). Revealing differences in mutation-spectra according to gender and stages in tumorigenesis might be important for optimal use of oncogenes as therapeutic targets and biomarkers. PMID:27656095

  17. Oncogene Mutations in Colorectal Polyps Identified in the Norwegian Colorectal Cancer Prevention (NORCCAP) Screening Study.

    PubMed

    Lorentzen, Jon A; Grzyb, Krzysztof; De Angelis, Paula M; Hoff, Geir; Eide, Tor J; Andresen, Per Arne

    2016-01-01

    Data are limited on oncogene mutation frequencies in polyps from principally asymptomatic participants of population-based colorectal cancer screening studies. In this study, DNA from 204 polyps, 5 mm or larger, were collected from 176 participants of the NORCCAP screening study and analyzed for mutations in KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA including the rarely studied KRAS exons 3 and 4 mutations. KRAS mutations were identified in 23.0% of the lesions and were significantly associated with tubulovillous adenomas and large size. A significantly higher frequency of KRAS mutations in females was associated with mutations in codon 12. The KRAS exon 3 and 4 mutations constituted 23.4% of the KRAS positive lesions, which is a larger proportion compared to previous observations in colorectal cancer. BRAF mutations were identified in 11.3% and were associated with serrated polyps. None of the individuals were diagnosed with de novo or recurrent colorectal cancer during the follow-up time (median 11.2 years). Revealing differences in mutation-spectra according to gender and stages in tumorigenesis might be important for optimal use of oncogenes as therapeutic targets and biomarkers. PMID:27656095

  18. Oncogene Mutations in Colorectal Polyps Identified in the Norwegian Colorectal Cancer Prevention (NORCCAP) Screening Study

    PubMed Central

    Lorentzen, Jon A.; Grzyb, Krzysztof; De Angelis, Paula M.; Hoff, Geir; Eide, Tor J.; Andresen, Per Arne

    2016-01-01

    Data are limited on oncogene mutation frequencies in polyps from principally asymptomatic participants of population-based colorectal cancer screening studies. In this study, DNA from 204 polyps, 5 mm or larger, were collected from 176 participants of the NORCCAP screening study and analyzed for mutations in KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA including the rarely studied KRAS exons 3 and 4 mutations. KRAS mutations were identified in 23.0% of the lesions and were significantly associated with tubulovillous adenomas and large size. A significantly higher frequency of KRAS mutations in females was associated with mutations in codon 12. The KRAS exon 3 and 4 mutations constituted 23.4% of the KRAS positive lesions, which is a larger proportion compared to previous observations in colorectal cancer. BRAF mutations were identified in 11.3% and were associated with serrated polyps. None of the individuals were diagnosed with de novo or recurrent colorectal cancer during the follow-up time (median 11.2 years). Revealing differences in mutation-spectra according to gender and stages in tumorigenesis might be important for optimal use of oncogenes as therapeutic targets and biomarkers.

  19. Six-Year Experience of a Nurse-Led Colorectal Cancer Follow-Up Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Al Chalabi, Hasan; O'Riordan, James M.; Richardson, Alex; Flannery, Delia; O'Connor, Katrina; Stuart, Charlotte; Larkin, John; McCormick, Paul; Mehigan, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Aims and Objectives. To review the experience of a nurse-led colorectal cancer follow-up clinic in a tertiary referral colorectal cancer centre. Methodology. Data from the nurse-led colorectal cancer follow-up clinic in our unit was prospectively maintained in a colorectal cancer database. Data was analysed from January 1, 2006 until the December 31, 2011. Results. 1125 patients were diagnosed with colorectal cancer, and referred to our unit as a tertiary centre for specialised colorectal cancer. Nine hundred and four patients had surgical resection of their colorectal cancer. Four hundred and seven patients were referred to the nurse-led colorectal cancer clinic for surveillance. The mean age of the patient cohort was 67 years (range 32–88) and 56% of patients were male. One hundred and seventeen patients were discharged to their general practitioner having been disease free after 5 years of followup. Fifty-four patients were diagnosed with either local or distant recurrence. Conclusion. A nurse-led colorectal cancer follow-up clinic is running according to strict follow-up protocols. This type of clinic significantly reduces the number of routine follow-up patients that have to be seen by the colorectal surgical consultant. PMID:25374950

  20. New Molecular Features of Colorectal Cancer Identified - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    Investigators from the National Cancer Institute's Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) who comprehensively analyzed 95 human colorectal tumor samples, have determined how gene alterations identified in previous analyses of the same samples

  1. Electronic Personal Health Records for Childhood Cancer Survivors: An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Priscilla; Southward, Matthew; Schmidt, Mary Lou; Jabine, Leslie N.; Stolley, Melinda R.; Gerber, Ben S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Childhood cancer survivors have complex healthcare needs that may be effectively communicated using electronic personal health records. This study explores the knowledge, interest, and attitudes of a sample of survivors and some of their caregivers towards electronic personal health records (ePHRs). Methods: This descriptive study was conducted in a pediatric hematology-oncology clinic and associated survivorship clinic with a convenience sample of caregivers of survivors who were <14 years old and survivors ≥14 years old along with their caregivers when present. A semi-structured interview was conducted with survivors and some caregivers to understand their knowledge, interest, and attitudes towards adoption of ePHRs. Results: Interviews were completed with 11 caregivers of young survivors, four survivors alone, and five survivor–caregiver dyads. Survivors ranged in age at diagnosis from 1 to 17 years old. Among the ethnically diverse sample, approximately half of the nine survivors and 25% of 16 caregivers reported having some knowledge of ePHRs. Eighty-nine percent (8/9) of the survivors and 81% (13/16) of the caregivers reported that they were somewhat or very comfortable using the internet. All nine survivors and 75% of caregivers were interested in the adoption of ePHRs. Data security and privacy were the primary concerns expressed. Conclusions: Interest in adoption of ePHRs to manage cancer survivorship-related health information was high. Most felt that the privacy and security concerns would not prevent adoption. Additional research is needed on larger and more representative samples of survivors to understand what types of support and education are needed to effectively implement ePHRs. PMID:25276495

  2. Matching the unmet needs of cancer survivors to resources using a shared care model.

    PubMed

    Bazzell, Judy L; Spurlock, Amy; McBride, Marilyn

    2015-06-01

    A substantial number of cancer survivors have unmet needs affecting quality of life. The purpose of this project was to match the unmet needs of cancer survivors in three rural counties to available evidence-based interventions and resources that improve survivor quality of life using a shared care model. The modified Survivors Unmet Needs Survey (SUNS) was used to explore the unmet needs of 52 survivors in three domains: emotional health, access and continuity of care, and information. A comprehensive search for evidence-based interventions or other services available to these survivors was conducted. Finally, efforts were made to determine whether the use of a shared care delivery model of survivorship care might improve opportunities for survivors to connect with resources. Twenty-five percent of the rural survivors reported high or very high emotional health or access and continuity of care unmet needs. ANOVA results provide evidence that there is a difference between survivor years since diagnosis and access and continuity of care unmet needs. ANOVA results also found that there is a difference between survivor age and emotional unmet needs. Access to interventions and survivorship resources were found to be limited in these rural areas. Interventions or resources found to exist require technology access or substantial travel. In many cases, they were found to be simply out of reach for most rural survivors without assistance from care providers. The unmet needs of survivors can be determined and matched with resources that improve quality of life if providers collaborate through use of a shared care model. PMID:25103849

  3. Quality of life among immigrant Latina breast cancer survivors: realities of culture and enhancing cancer care.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Class, Maria; Perret-Gentil, Monique; Kreling, Barbara; Caicedo, Larisa; Mandelblatt, Jeanne; Graves, Kristi D

    2011-12-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among Latinas. This study examined social, cultural, and health care system factors that impact the quality of life and survivorship experiences of Latina immigrant breast cancer survivors. We interviewed Latina breast cancer survivors (n = 19) and, based on the interview findings, conducted two focus groups (n = 9). Research staff translated transcripts from Spanish into English. Two trained raters reviewed the content and identified themes. Thematic content analysis was used to categorize and organize data. Participants were largely monolingual in Spanish, predominantly from Central and South America and most (68%) had lived in the U.S. for ten or more years. All women were diagnosed and treated in the U.S. and were an average of 3.1 years from diagnosis. Women's survivorship experiences appeared to be shaped by cultural beliefs and experiences as immigrants such as secrecy/shame about a breast cancer diagnosis, feelings of isolation, importance of family support (familism), challenges with developing social relationships in the U.S. (less personalismo), and, for some, their partner's difficulty with showing emotional support (machismo). Navigating the U.S. medical system and language barriers were additional challenges in the participants' health care interactions. Latina breast cancer survivors adhere to certain cultural values and face unique issues as immigrants, potentially influencing overall quality of life and doctor-patient communication. Efforts to improve Latina immigrant breast cancer survivors' quality of life could include increased assessment of psychosocial functioning and referral to social support services, culturally sensitive navigation programs, and consistent use of appropriately trained interpreters.

  4. The genomic landscapes of human breast and colorectal cancers.

    PubMed

    Wood, Laura D; Parsons, D Williams; Jones, Siân; Lin, Jimmy; Sjöblom, Tobias; Leary, Rebecca J; Shen, Dong; Boca, Simina M; Barber, Thomas; Ptak, Janine; Silliman, Natalie; Szabo, Steve; Dezso, Zoltan; Ustyanksky, Vadim; Nikolskaya, Tatiana; Nikolsky, Yuri; Karchin, Rachel; Wilson, Paul A; Kaminker, Joshua S; Zhang, Zemin; Croshaw, Randal; Willis, Joseph; Dawson, Dawn; Shipitsin, Michail; Willson, James K V; Sukumar, Saraswati; Polyak, Kornelia; Park, Ben Ho; Pethiyagoda, Charit L; Pant, P V Krishna; Ballinger, Dennis G; Sparks, Andrew B; Hartigan, James; Smith, Douglas R; Suh, Erick; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Buckhaults, Phillip; Markowitz, Sanford D; Parmigiani, Giovanni; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Velculescu, Victor E; Vogelstein, Bert

    2007-11-16

    Human cancer is caused by the accumulation of mutations in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. To catalog the genetic changes that occur during tumorigenesis, we isolated DNA from 11 breast and 11 colorectal tumors and determined the sequences of the genes in the Reference Sequence database in these samples. Based on analysis of exons representing 20,857 transcripts from 18,191 genes, we conclude that the genomic landscapes of breast and colorectal cancers are composed of a handful of commonly mutated gene "mountains" and a much larger number of gene "hills" that are mutated at low frequency. We describe statistical and bioinformatic tools that may help identify mutations with a role in tumorigenesis. These results have implications for understanding the nature and heterogeneity of human cancers and for using personal genomics for tumor diagnosis and therapy.

  5. The Multidisciplinary Management of Colorectal Cancer: Present and Future Paradigms.

    PubMed

    Sievers, Chelsie K; Kratz, Jeremy D; Zurbriggen, Luke D; LoConte, Noelle K; Lubner, Sam J; Uboha, Natalya; Mulkerin, Daniel; Matkowskyj, Kristina A; Deming, Dustin A

    2016-09-01

    As treatment strategies for patients with colorectal cancer advance, there has now become an ever-increasing need for multidisciplinary teams to care for these patients. Recent investigations into the timing and duration of perioperative therapy, as well as, the rise of molecular profiling have led to more systemic chemotherapeutic options. The most efficacious use, in terms of timing and patient selection, of these therapies in the setting of modern operative and radiotherapy techniques requires the generation of care teams discussing cases at multidisciplinary conferences. This review highlights the role of multidisciplinary team conferences, advances in perioperative chemotherapy, current clinical biomarkers, and emerging therapeutic agents for molecular subtypes of metastatic colon cancer. As our understanding of relevant molecular subtypes increases and as data becomes available on treatment response, the treatment of colorectal cancer will become more precise and effective. PMID:27582648

  6. Estimation of National Colorectal-Cancer Incidence Using Claims Databases

    PubMed Central

    Quantin, C.; Benzenine, E.; Hägi, M.; Auverlot, B.; Abrahamowicz, M.; Cottenet, J.; Fournier, E.; Binquet, C.; Compain, D.; Monnet, E.; Bouvier, A. M.; Danzon, A.

    2012-01-01

    Background. The aim of the study was to assess the accuracy of the colorectal-cancer incidence estimated from administrative data. Methods. We selected potential incident colorectal-cancer cases in 2004-2005 French administrative data, using two alternative algorithms. The first was based only on diagnostic and procedure codes, whereas the second considered the past history of the patient. Results of both methods were assessed against two corresponding local cancer registries, acting as “gold standards.” We then constructed a multivariable regression model to estimate the corrected total number of incident colorectal-cancer cases from the whole national administrative database. Results. The first algorithm provided an estimated local incidence very close to that given by the regional registries (646 versus 645 incident cases) and had good sensitivity and positive predictive values (about 75% for both). The second algorithm overestimated the incidence by about 50% and had a poor positive predictive value of about 60%. The estimation of national incidence obtained by the first algorithm differed from that observed in 14 registries by only 2.34%. Conclusion. This study shows the usefulness of administrative databases for countries with no national cancer registry and suggests a method for correcting the estimates provided by these data. PMID:22792103

  7. Advances and perspectives of colorectal cancer stem cell vaccine.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mei; Dou, Jun

    2015-12-01

    Colorectal cancer is essentially an environmental and genetic disease featured by uncontrolled cell growth and the capability to invade other parts of the body by forming metastases, which inconvertibly cause great damage to tissues and organs. It has become one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortality in the developed countries such as United States, and approximately 1.2 million new cases are yearly diagnosed worldwide, with the death rate of more than 600,000 annually and incidence rates are increasing in most developing countries. Apart from the generally accepted theory that pathogenesis of colorectal cancer consists of genetic mutation of a certain target cell and diversifications in tumor microenvironment, the colorectal cancer stem cells (CCSCs) theory makes a different explanation, stating that among millions of colon cancer cells there is a specific and scanty cellular population which possess the capability of self-renewal, differentiation and strong oncogenicity, and is tightly responsible for drug resistance and tumor metastasis. Based on these characteristics, CCSCs are becoming a novel target cells both in the clinical and the basic studies, especially the study of CCSCs vaccines due to induced efficient immune response against CCSCs. This review provides an overview of CCSCs and preparation technics and targeting factors related to CCSCs vaccines in detail.

  8. RHOA inactivation enhances Wnt signaling and promotes colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Paulo; Macaya, Irati; Bazzocco, Sarah; Mazzolini, Rocco; Andretta, Elena; Dopeso, Higinio; Mateo-Lozano, Silvia; Bilić, Josipa; Cartón-García, Fernando; Nieto, Rocio; Suárez-López, Lucia; Afonso, Elsa; Landolfi, Stefania; Hernandez-Losa, Javier; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Cajal, Santiago Ramón y; Tabernero, Josep; Tebbutt, Niall C.; Mariadason, John M.; Schwartz, Simo; Arango, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the small GTPase RHOA has strong oncogenic effects in many tumor types, although its role in colorectal cancer remains unclear. Here we show that RHOA inactivation contributes to colorectal cancer progression/metastasis, largely through the activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. RhoA inactivation in the murine intestine accelerates the tumorigenic process and in human colon cancer cells leads to the redistribution of β-catenin from the membrane to the nucleus and enhanced Wnt/β-catenin signaling, resulting in increased proliferation, invasion and de-differentiation. In mice, RHOA inactivation contributes to colon cancer metastasis and reduced RHOA levels were observed at metastatic sites compared to primary human colon tumors. Therefore, we have identified a new mechanism of activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling and characterized the role of RHOA as a novel tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer. These results constitute a shift from the current paradigm and demonstrate that RHO GTPases can suppress tumor progression and metastasis. PMID:25413277

  9. Temporal relationship between prostate brachytherapy and the diagnosis of colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Gutman, Sarah A.; Merrick, Gregory S. . E-mail: gmerrick@urologicresearchinstitute.org; Butler, Wayne M.; Wallner, Kent E.; Allen, Zachariah A.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Adamovich, Edward

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: To identify the location of pretreatment and posttreatment colorectal malignancies and posttreatment colorectal polyps in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer managed with brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: From April 1995 through July 2004, 1,351 consecutive patients underwent brachytherapy for clinical stage T1b-T3a (American Joint Committee on Cancer, 2002) prostate cancer. Supplemental external beam radiotherapy (XRT) was administered to 699 patients. The median follow-up was 4.6 years. Operative and pathology reports were reviewed for all patients with pretreatment and posttreatment colorectal cancer and posttreatment colorectal polyps. Multiple parameters were evaluated for the development of colorectal cancer or colorectal polyps. Results: Colorectal cancer was diagnosed in 23 and 25 patients before and after prostate brachytherapy, respectively. No differences were identified in the distribution of colorectal cancers either before or after treatment (3 and 4 rectal cancers in the pre- and postbrachytherapy cohorts). Thirty-five of the 48 colorectal cancers (73%) were diagnosed within 5 years of brachytherapy with a peak incidence 1 year after brachytherapy. One hundred ninety-two colorectal polyps were diagnosed after brachytherapy, 160 (83%) occurred within 4 years of brachytherapy, and only 27 (14%) were located in the rectum. In multivariate Cox regression analysis, prostate D{sub 9} (minimum percentage of the dose covering 90% of the target volume) predicted for posttreatment colorectal cancer. Rectal polyps were most closely related to patient age and percent positive biopsies, whereas sigmoid/colon polyps were best predicted by patient age, planning volume, and supplemental XRT. Conclusions: Colorectal cancer was diagnosed with equal frequency before and after brachytherapy with comparable geographic distributions. In addition, the vast majority of postbrachytherapy colorectal polyps were located beyond the confines of the

  10. Brain damage following prophylactic cranial irradiation in lung cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Simó, Marta; Vaquero, Lucía; Ripollés, Pablo; Jové, Josep; Fuentes, Rafael; Cardenal, Felipe; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni; Bruna, Jordi

    2016-03-01

    Long-term toxic effects of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) on cognition in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients have not yet been well-established. The aim of our study was to examine the cognitive toxic effects together with brain structural changes in a group of long-term SCLC survivors treated with PCI. Eleven SCLC patients, who underwent PCI ≥ 2 years before, were compared with an age and education matched healthy control group. Both groups were evaluated using a neuropsychological battery and multimodal structural magnetic resonance imaging. Voxel-based morphometry and Tract-based Spatial Statistics were used to study gray matter density (GMD) and white matter (WM) microstructural changes. Cognitive deterioration was correlated with GMD and Fractional Anisotropy (FA). Finally, we carried out a single-subject analysis in order to evaluate individual structural brain changes. Nearly half of the SCLC met criteria for cognitive impairment, all exhibiting a global worsening of cognitive functioning. Patients showed significant decreases of GMD in basal ganglia bilaterally (putamen and caudate), bilateral thalamus and right insula, together with WM microstructural changes of the entire corpus callosum. Cognitive deterioration scores correlated positively with mean FA values in the corpus callosum. Single-subject analysis revealed that GMD and WM changes were consistently observed in nearly all patients. This study showed neuropsychological deficits together with brain-specific structural differences in long-term SCLC survivors. Our results suggest that PCI therapy, possibly together with platinum-based chemotherapy, was associated to permanent long-term cognitive and structural brain effects in a SCLC population.

  11. 78 FR 25448 - Announcement of Requirements and Registration for “Crowds Care for Cancer: Supporting Survivors...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-01

    ...The number of cancer survivors in the United States is currently estimated at 14 million and is expected to increase significantly with the aging of the United States population. Cancer survivors may experience a host of long-term and late effects that require coordinated follow-up care after completion of primary treatment for cancer. Despite significant progress in cancer treatment, the......

  12. Primary and secondary prevention of colorectal cancer in the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Azeem, Kateřina; Ševčíková, Jarmila; Kyselý, Zdeněk; Horáková, Dagmar; Vlčková, Jana; Kollárová, Helena

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most frequent malignancies in the Czech Republic and worldwide. Also, a high prevalence of overweight and obesity, a high proportion of smokers in the population, and one of the highest per capita alcohol consumption rates are typical for the Czech population. The role of general practitioners in the prevention of colorectal cancer is crucial. In primary prevention, the doctor should emphasise the importance of a healthy lifestyle - a balanced diet rich in fruits and vegetables, maintaining a normal body weight, adequate physical activity, and non-smoking. In secondary prevention, patients should be informed about the possibilities of colorectal cancer screening and the benefits of early detection of the disease. Participation rates of the target population for colorectal cancer screening are low. Steps leading to increased participation in colorectal cancer screening (including postal invitations) play an important role in influencing the mortality of colorectal cancer.

  13. Primary and secondary prevention of colorectal cancer in the Czech Republic

    PubMed Central

    Azeem, Kateřina; Ševčíková, Jarmila; Kyselý, Zdeněk; Horáková, Dagmar; Vlčková, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most frequent malignancies in the Czech Republic and worldwide. Also, a high prevalence of overweight and obesity, a high proportion of smokers in the population, and one of the highest per capita alcohol consumption rates are typical for the Czech population. The role of general practitioners in the prevention of colorectal cancer is crucial. In primary prevention, the doctor should emphasise the importance of a healthy lifestyle – a balanced diet rich in fruits and vegetables, maintaining a normal body weight, adequate physical activity, and non-smoking. In secondary prevention, patients should be informed about the possibilities of colorectal cancer screening and the benefits of early detection of the disease. Participation rates of the target population for colorectal cancer screening are low. Steps leading to increased participation in colorectal cancer screening (including postal invitations) play an important role in influencing the mortality of colorectal cancer. PMID:27110303

  14. Childhood cancer survivorship research in minority populations: A position paper from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Smita; Gibson, Todd M; Ness, Kirsten K; Liu, Qi; Oeffinger, Kevin C; Krull, Kevin R; Nathan, Paul C; Neglia, Joseph P; Leisenring, Wendy; Yasui, Yutaka; Robison, Leslie L; Armstrong, Gregory T

    2016-08-01

    By the middle of this century, racial/ethnic minority populations will collectively constitute 50% of the US population. This temporal shift in the racial/ethnic composition of the US population demands a close look at the race/ethnicity-specific burden of morbidity and premature mortality among survivors of childhood cancer. To optimize targeted long-term follow-up care, it is essential to understand whether the burden of morbidity borne by survivors of childhood cancer differs by race/ethnicity. This is challenging because the number of minority participants is often limited in current childhood cancer survivorship research, resulting in a paucity of race/ethnicity-specific recommendations and/or interventions. Although the overall childhood cancer incidence increased between 1973 and 2003, the mortality rate declined; however, these changes did not differ appreciably by race/ethnicity. The authors speculated that any racial/ethnic differences in outcome are likely to be multifactorial, and drew on data from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study to illustrate the various contributors (socioeconomic characteristics, health behaviors, and comorbidities) that could explain any observed differences in key treatment-related complications. Finally, the authors outlined challenges in conducting race/ethnicity-specific childhood cancer survivorship research, demonstrating that there are limited absolute numbers of children who are diagnosed and survive cancer in any one racial/ethnic minority population, thereby precluding a rigorous evaluation of adverse events among specific primary cancer diagnoses and treatment exposure groups. Cancer 2016;122:2426-2439. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  15. Association between Body Mass Index and Physical Function among Endometrial Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Justin C.; Schmitz, Kathryn H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We sought to quantify the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and physical function among endometrial cancer survivors. Understanding this relationship would help healthcare providers target efforts to refer obese endometrial cancer survivors to weight loss and exercise interventions. Methods We conducted a survey of 213 endometrial cancer survivors who received cancer care at an academic l health system between 2006 and 2010. Physical function subscale was quantified using physical functional component score from the SF-12 questionnaire. We compared physical function of endometrial cancer survivors to population-based age-standardized normative values. Results Among the 213 patients, 16% were normal weight (BMI ≤25 kg/m2), and 52% were obese (≥30 kg/m2). Higher BMI categories were associated with lower physical function (Ptrend = 0.003), as a continuous variable each 5kg/m2 higher BMI, physical function score was lower by 0.15 points (β = -0.15; P = 0.045). Compared to population-based age-standardized normative values, patients <75yrs reported lower physical function, whereas patients ≥75yrs reported better physical function. BMI was the only covariate associated with differences in physical function between survivors and age-standardized normative values (P = 0.039). Conclusions Among endometrial cancer survivors, higher BMI is associated with lower physical function. Younger endometrial cancer survivors report lower physical function compared to age-standardized normative values. Healthcare providers should be aware that younger, obese endometrial cancer survivors may particularly benefit from interventions such as exercise and weight loss to increase or preserve physical function. PMID:27529546

  16. Knowledge of colorectal cancer screening among young Malaysians.

    PubMed

    Al-Naggar, Redhwan Ahmed; Bobryshev, Yuri V

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the knowledge and associated factors regarding colorectal cancer screening among university students in Malaysia. The questionnaire consisted of three parts: socio-demographic characteristics, lifestyle practice and knowledge of colorectal screening. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 300 students (21.3±1.4 years old). The majority of the participants were Malay with a monthly family income of less than 5,000 Ringgit Malaysia (equal to 1,700 USD) (67.0% and 76.0%, respectively). Regarding their lifestyle practices, the majority were non-smokers and had never consumed alcohol (83.7%, and 88.0%, respectively). The majority of the participants had no knowledge of digital rectal examination, colonoscopy, barium enema and fecal occult blood screening (63.3%, 60.7%, 74.0% and 62.3%, respectively). Univariate and multivariate analysis revealed that their age and the discipline which the students were studying significantly influenced their level of knowledge about colorectal screening. The present study results indicate that education campaigns about colorectal cancer should be promoted. PMID:23679301

  17. How do you feel about fertility and parenthood? The voices of young female cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    Gorman, Jessica R.; Bailey, Samantha; Pierce, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Young adult cancer survivors are often unaware of their fertility status and uninformed regarding their fertility and fertility preservation options. This qualitative research study explores the fertility and parenthood concerns of reproductive-age female cancer survivors and how they make parenthood decisions. Methods Population- and clinic-based recruitment methods were used to identify a diverse group of survivors between the ages of 18 and 34 years. Our final sample size included 22 participants who attended one of seven focus groups. We used cross-case, inductive analysis to identify themes. Results The following main themes were identified: (1) A hopeful but worried approach to fertility and parenthood, (2) Frustration with a lack of choice or control over fertility, (3) Young survivors want information about their fertility, (4) Young survivors want better continuity of care in survivorship, (5) Cancer diagnosis and related fertility problems introduce relationship challenges, and (6) Decisions about parenthood are complicated. Conclusions The diverse group of young cancer survivors in this study identified several common needs and concerns regarding fertility and parenthood. This study illustrates that young survivors could benefit from improved information regarding their fertility and parenthood options throughout survivorship, better coordination of medical care, and support navigating many emotional and practical issues that arise when considering their reproductive and parenthood options. PMID:22179785

  18. Low Levels of Energy Expenditure in Childhood Cancer Survivors: Implications for Obesity Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fang Fang; Roberts, Susan B.; Parsons, Susan K.; Must, Aviva; Kelly, Michael J.; Wong, William W.; Saltzman, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Childhood cancer survivors are at an increased risk of obesity but causes for this elevated risk are uncertain. We evaluated total energy expenditure (TEE) in childhood cancer survivors using the doubly labeled water method in a cross-sectional study of 17 survivors of pediatric leukemia or lymphoma (median age 11.5 years). Mean TEE was 2,073 kcal/day, which was nearly 500 kcal/day lower than estimated energy requirements with recommended levels of physical activity. This energy gap is likely to contribute to the risk of obesity in this population and future trials are needed to assess implications and potential treatment strategies. PMID:25197775

  19. Low Levels of Energy Expenditure in Childhood Cancer Survivors: Implications for Obesity Prevention.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang Fang; Roberts, Susan B; Parsons, Susan K; Must, Aviva; Kelly, Michael J; Wong, William W; Saltzman, Edward

    2015-04-01

    Childhood cancer survivors are at an increased risk of obesity but causes for this elevated risk are uncertain. We evaluated total energy expenditure in childhood cancer survivors using the doubly labeled water method in a cross-sectional study of 17 survivors of pediatric leukemia or lymphoma (median age, 11.5 y). Mean total energy expenditure was 2073 kcal/d, which was nearly 500 kcal/d lower than estimated energy requirements with recommended levels of physical activity. This energy gap is likely to contribute to the risk of obesity in this population and future trials are needed to assess implications and potential treatment strategies.

  20. The work life and career development of young breast cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Raque-Bogdan, Trisha L; Hoffman, Mary Ann; Ginter, Amanda C; Piontkowski, Sarah; Schexnayder, Kelci; White, Rachel

    2015-10-01

    Breast cancer survivors represent the largest proportion of cancer survivors, and the rate of young breast cancer survivors who are diagnosed before the age of 40 is increasing. Cancer survivorship scholarship has begun to address many aspects of survivors' quality of life, yet the role of work and career issues have been understudied, particularly for young survivors. To explore the work lives and career development of young breast cancer survivors, this study used consensual qualitative research methodology (Hill, Thompson, & Williams, 1997) to analyze data from qualitative interviews with 13 young women diagnosed with breast cancer before the age of 40. The 4 career-related domains that emerged from the data were (a) cancer-related work challenges, (b) coping with cancer-related work challenges, (c) reappraisal of career development after cancer, and (d) components of career and life satisfaction after cancer. Experiencing breast cancer at a young age was viewed by participants as contributing to an increased desire for work to provide a sense of meaning as well as financial security and insurance. Cancer was further viewed as contributing to lost control over career success and work choices, treatment side effects that interfere with work self-efficacy and capabilities, and interpersonal difficulties connecting within and outside of work. Women with more extensive cancer treatment and side effects reported greater work struggles. Despite this, participants' cancer narratives were characterized by a range of coping strategies, including reframing and seeking control, and by evidence of persistence, resilience, and hope. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

  1. Risky Sexual Behavior in Adolescent Survivors of Childhood Cancer: A Report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

    PubMed Central

    Klosky, James L.; Foster, Rebecca H.; Li, Zhenghong; Peasant, Courtney; Howell, Carrie; Mertens, Ann C.; Robison, Leslie L.; Ness, Kirsten K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify correlates of risky sexual behavior among adolescents surviving childhood cancer. Methods The Child Health and Illness Profile - Adolescent Edition (CHIP-AE) was completed by 307 survivors of childhood cancer aged 15–20 years (M age at diagnosis 1.53 years; range 0–3.76). Univariate analyses were performed using Chi-square and Fischer’s exact tests, and multivariable logistic regression models were used to calculate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals for risky sexual behaviors. Results Diagnosis of central nervous system cancer (OR =.13, 95% CI: .02–.96, p<.05), no history of beer/wine consumption (OR =.20, CI: .06–.68, p =.01), and fewer negative peer influences (OR =.28, CI: .09–.84, p =.02) associated with decreased likelihood of sexual intercourse. Good psychological health (scores ≥ −1.5 SD on the CHIP-AE Emotional Discomfort scale) associated with decreased risk of early intercourse (OR =.19, CI: .05–.77, p= .02), whereas high parental education (≥ college degree) associated with decreased risk of multiple lifetime sexual partners (OR =.25, CI: .09–.72, p =.01). Increased time from diagnosis (OR =.27, CI: .10–.78, p = .02) and psychological health (OR =.09, CI: .02–.36, p < .01) associated with decreased risk of unprotected sex at last intercourse, whereas high parent education associated with increased risk (OR = 4.27, CI: 1.46–12.52, p =.01). Conclusions Risky sexual behavior in adolescents surviving childhood cancer is associated with cancer type, time since diagnosis, psychological health, alcohol use, and peer influences. Consideration of these factors may provide direction for future interventions designed to reduce adolescent sexual risk-taking. PMID:24364376

  2. Clues to the pathogenesis of familial colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, L.A.; Peltomaeki, P.; Pylkkaenen, L.; Chappelle, A. de la ); Leach, F.S.; Powell, S.M.; Jen, J.; Hamilton, S.R.; Petersen, G.M.; Kinzler, K.W.; Vogelstein, B. Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD ); Sistonen, P. Finnish Red Cross Blood Transfusion Service, Helsinki ); Mecklin, J.P. ); Jaervinen, H. )

    1993-05-07

    A predisposition to colorectal cancer is shown to be linked to markers on chromosome 2 in some families. Molecular features of familial cancers were compared with those of sporadic colon cancers. Neither the familial nor sporadic cancers showed loss of heterozygosity for chromosome 2 markers, and the incidence of mutations in KRAS, P53, and APC was similar in the two groups of tumors. Most of the familial cancers, however, had widespread alterations in short repeated DNA sequences, suggesting that numerous replication errors had occurred during tumor development. Thirteen percent of sporadic cancers had identical abnormalities and these cancers shared biologic properties with the familial cases. These data suggest a mechanism for familial tumorigenesis different from that mediated by classic tumor suppressor genes. 22 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Development and preliminary testing of an instrument to measure healthiness of lifestyle among breast cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsiu-Ho; Chung, Ue-Lin; Tsay, Shiow-Luan; Hsieh, Pi-Ching; Su, Hui-Fang; Lin, Kuan-Chia

    2015-12-01

    Monitoring lifestyle to maintain health is an important issue for breast cancer survivors. No multidimensional instrument has previously been available specifically for assessing overall healthiness of lifestyle among breast cancer survivors. This study aims (i) to establish the Healthy Lifestyle Instrument for Breast Cancer Survivors (HLI-BCS) and (ii) to examine the reliability and validity of the established scale. A quantitative cross-sectional design was used. This project was conducted in four phases. In phase I, using the Health-Promoting Lifestyle Profile as the core concept, we created 50 preliminary measurement items. In phase II, we invited 10 breast cancer survivors and five professional experts to conduct a content validity assessment. In phases III and IV, a total of 220 breast cancer survivors were enrolled to assess the construct validity and the internal consistency and reliability. The final HLI-BCS contains 20 items across five domains: dietary habits, environment and physiology, health responsibility and stress management, social and interpersonal relations and spiritual growth. Through the information presented in the HLI-BCS, breast cancer survivors can assess their lifestyles on multiple dimensions and subsequently adjust their lifestyles to enhance their recovery and quality of life.

  4. Physical activity and biomarkers in breast cancer survivors: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Löf, Marie; Bergström, Katrin; Weiderpass, Elisabete

    2012-10-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. The number of breast cancer survivors has increased due to screening and improved treatment methods, which makes it important to increase knowledge on their health and well-being. Physical activity has been reported to improve quality of life, decrease fatigue and reduce all-cause and breast cancer-specific mortality in breast cancer survivors. The beneficial effects of physical activity may manifest themselves in circulating levels of insulin, insulin-growth factors (IGFs) I and II and their binding proteins (IGFB