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Sample records for column displacement experiments

  1. Column displacement experiments to evaluate electrical conductivity effects on electromagnetic soil water sensing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bulk electrical conductivity (EC) in superactive soils has been shown to strongly influence electromagnetic sensing of permittivity. However, these effects are dependent on soil water content and temperature as well as the pore water conductivity. We carried out isothermal column displacement experi...

  2. A multi-flowpath model for the interpretation of immiscible displacement experiments in heterogeneous soil columns.

    PubMed

    Aggelopoulos, C A; Tsakiroglou, C D

    2009-04-01

    This work focuses on the phenomenon of the immiscible two-phase flow of water and oil in saturated heterogeneous soil columns. The goal is to develop a fast and reliable method for quantifying soil heterogeneities for incorporation into the relevant capillary pressure and relative permeability functions. Such data are commonly used as input data in simulators of contaminant transport in the subsurface. Rate-controlled drainage experiments are performed on undisturbed soil columns and the transient response of the axial distribution of water saturation is determined from electrical measurements. The transient responses of the axial distribution of water saturation and total pressure drop are fitted with the multi-flowpath model (MFPM) where the pore space is regarded as a system of parallel paths of different permeability. The MFPM enables us to quantify soil heterogeneity at two scales: the micro-scale parameters describe on average the effects of pore network heterogeneities on the two-phase flow pattern; the macro-scale parameters indicate the variability of permeability at the scale of interconnected pore networks. The capillary pressure curve is consistent with that measured with mercury intrusion porosimetry over the low pressure range. The oil relative permeability increases sharply at a very low oil saturation (<10(-3)) and tends to a high end value. The water relative permeability decreases abruptly at a low oil saturation (~0.1), whereas the irreducible wetting phase saturation is quite high. The foregoing characteristics of the two-phase flow properties are associated with critical (preferential) flowpaths that comprise a very small percentage of the total pore volume, control the overall hydraulic conductivity, and are consistent with the very broad range of pore-length scales usually probed in soil porous matrix.

  3. An Undergraduate Column Chromatography Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danot, M.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Background information, list of materials needed, and procedures used are provided for an experiment designed to introduce undergraduate students to the theoretical and technical aspects of column chromatography. The experiment can also be shortened to serve as a demonstration of the column chromatography technique. (JN)

  4. Preparative displacement electrophoresis (isotachophoresis) of proteins on cellulose columns.

    PubMed

    Johansson, G; Ofverstedt, L G; Hjertén, S

    1987-11-01

    This paper describes the separation of proteins by displacement electrophoresis on columns packed with cellulose powder as a stabilizing medium. Cellulose has virtually no molecular sieving properties and thus differs from dextran, polyacrylamide, and agarose in this respect. Therefore, without the risk of unstacking, columns packed with cellulose permit conventional elution of the protein zones and the use of a counter flow (to increase the effective length of the bed). For the same reason, electroosmotic flow is less disturbing. A continuous elution-migration technique adapted to suit the special requirements of displacement electrophoresis gave better separation than was obtainable by conventional elution. Normal human serum and a fresh hemolysate from human erythrocytes were used as samples. An expression for the volume velocity of the boundaries is derived. This parameter can be used to determine the maximum duration of a run and a suitable pump speed when continuous elution or a counter flow is employed. The special advantages of displacement electrophoresis in cellulose beds are discussed as well as general disadvantages of the displacement technique, including the risk that proteins precipitate during a run.

  5. NONEQUILIBRIUM SORPTION DURING DISPLACEMENT OF HYRDOPHOBIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS AND 45CA THROUGH SOIL COLUMNS WITH AQUEOUS AND MIXED SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A series of miscible displacement experiments was conducted to investigate the significance of intraorganic matter diffusion (IOMD) as the rate-limiting step in sorption of organic and inorganic solutes during steady water flow in soil columns. Displacement studies were performed...

  6. Bucky gel actuator displacement: experiment and model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghamsari, A. K.; Jin, Y.; Zegeye, E.; Woldesenbet, E.

    2013-02-01

    Bucky gel actuator (BGA) is a dry electroactive nanocomposite which is driven with a few volts. BGA’s remarkable features make this tri-layered actuator a potential candidate for morphing applications. However, most of these applications would require a better understanding of the effective parameters that influence the BGA displacement. In this study, various sets of experiments were designed to investigate the effect of several parameters on the maximum lateral displacement of BGA. Two input parameters, voltage and frequency, and three material/design parameters, carbon nanotube type, thickness, and weight fraction of constituents were selected. A new thickness ratio term was also introduced to study the role of individual layers on BGA displacement. A model was established to predict BGA maximum displacement based on the effect of these parameters. This model showed good agreement with reported results from the literature. In addition, an important factor in the design of BGA-based devices, lifetime, was investigated.

  7. Commander prepares glass columns for electrophoresis experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Commander Jack Lousma prepares on of the glass columns for the electrophoresis test in the middeck area of the Columbia. The experiment, deployed in an L-shaped mode in upper right corner, consists of the processing unit with glass columns in which the separation takes place; a camera (partially obscurred by Lousma's face) to document the process; and a cryogenic freezer to freeze and store the samples after separation.

  8. Experiments on chemically enhanced immiscible fluid displacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soori, Tejaswi; Ward, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    This talk focuses on experiments conducted by displacing a vegetable oil within a capillary tube (diameter < 1 mm) using an aqueous alkali solution. Estimates of the residual film were measured as a function of Reynolds (Re), viscous Atwood (At) and capillary (Ca) numbers. The pendant drop method was used to measure surface tension of the aqueous alkali solutions. We observed a decrease in surface tension for an increase in alkali concentration, which beyond a critical concentration forms a stable micro-emulsion. We estimate the shear viscosity of the emulsion as a function of alkali and aqueous/oil concentrations. Separately we attempt to measure the average bulk diffusion coefficient of the emulsion in both phases which is necessary to estimate the Péclet number (Pé) and subsequent mass transport phenomena. American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund.

  9. Seismic behavior and force-displacement characterization of neotype column-slab high piers.

    PubMed

    Zhou, YanQun; Zhang, YeZhi; Ye, MeiXin; Zhan, MengSi

    2014-01-01

    The seismic behavior and plasticity spreading of a neotype column-slab high pier are researched in this paper. Four scale model tests of a web slab with two boundary columns are carried out under cyclic inelastic lateral displacements simulating seismic response. The test results show that the neotype column-slab high pier has strong and stable bearing capacity, good ductility, and energy dissipation capacity. The experimental values pertaining to the spread of plasticity are derived. An approach for deriving the spread of plasticity analytically is deduced and applied to the four tests. This method accurately assesses a pier's spread of plasticity for most ductility levels. At nearly all ductility levels, the mean difference between analytical assessments of the spread of plasticity and results from 4 large-scale tests is 12% with a 9% coefficient of variation.

  10. Seismic Behavior and Force-Displacement Characterization of Neotype Column-Slab High Piers

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, YanQun; Zhang, YeZhi; Ye, MeiXin; Zhan, MengSi

    2014-01-01

    The seismic behavior and plasticity spreading of a neotype column-slab high pier are researched in this paper. Four scale model tests of a web slab with two boundary columns are carried out under cyclic inelastic lateral displacements simulating seismic response. The test results show that the neotype column-slab high pier has strong and stable bearing capacity, good ductility, and energy dissipation capacity. The experimental values pertaining to the spread of plasticity are derived. An approach for deriving the spread of plasticity analytically is deduced and applied to the four tests. This method accurately assesses a pier's spread of plasticity for most ductility levels. At nearly all ductility levels, the mean difference between analytical assessments of the spread of plasticity and results from 4 large-scale tests is 12% with a 9% coefficient of variation. PMID:24883420

  11. Displacement behaviour regulates the experience of stress in men.

    PubMed

    Mohiyeddini, Changiz; Semple, Stuart

    2013-03-01

    Behavioural coping strategies represent a key means by which people regulate their stress levels. Attention has recently focused on the potential role in coping of 'displacement behaviour' - activities such as scratching, lip biting and face touching. Increased levels of displacement behaviour are associated with feelings of anxiety and stress; however, the extent to which displacement behaviour, as a short-term behavioural response to emotionally challenging stimuli, influences the subsequent experience of stress remains poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential role of displacement behaviour in coping with stress. In a study population of 42 healthy adult men (mean age = 28.09 years, SD = 7.98), we quantified displacement behaviour during a Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), and used self-report questionnaires to assess trait and state anxiety before the TSST, and the experience of stress afterwards. We predicted displacement behaviour would diminish the negative impact of the stressful situation, and hence be associated with lower post-TSST stress levels. Furthermore, we predicted displacement behaviour would mediate the link between state and trait anxiety on the one hand and the experience of stress on the other. Results showed the rate of displacement behaviour was positively correlated with state anxiety but unrelated to trait anxiety, and negatively correlated with the self-reported experience of stress, in agreement with the idea that displacement behaviour has a crucial impact on regulation of stress. Moreover, serial mediation analyses using a bias-corrected bootstrapping approach indicated displacement behaviour mediated the relationship between state anxiety and the experience of stress, and that state anxiety and displacement behaviour - in combination, respectively - mediated the link between trait anxiety and experience of stress. These results shed important new light on the function of displacement behaviour, and

  12. COLUMN EXPERIMENTS AND ANOMALOUS CONDUCTIVITY IN HYDROCARBON-IMPACTED SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A laboratory experiment was designed to increase the understanding of the geoelectric effects of microbial " degradation of hydrocarbons. Eight large columns were were paired to provide a replicate of each of four experiments. These large-volume columns contained "sterilized" soi...

  13. Mini-columns for Conducting Breakthrough Experiments. Design and Construction

    SciTech Connect

    Dittrich, Timothy M.; Reimus, Paul William; Ware, Stuart Douglas

    2015-06-11

    Experiments with moderately and strongly sorbing radionuclides (i.e., U, Cs, Am) have shown that sorption between experimental solutions and traditional column materials must be accounted for to accurately determine stationary phase or porous media sorption properties (i.e., sorption site density, sorption site reaction rate coefficients, and partition coefficients or Kd values). This report details the materials and construction of mini-columns for use in breakthrough columns to allow for accurate measurement and modeling of sorption parameters. Material selection, construction techniques, wet packing of columns, tubing connections, and lessons learned are addressed.

  14. Fluid Dynamic Experiments on Mush Column Magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan-Brown, R. E.; Marsh, B. D.

    2001-05-01

    A vertically extensive stack of sills interconnected by pipe-like conduits extending from the mantle through the lithosphere and capped by a volcanic center is a magmatic mush column. At any instant at various locations it contains fractionated and primitive melts as pools of nearly crystal-free magma, pools of crystal-rich magma, thick beds of cumulates, open conduits, and conduits congested by cognate and wall debris. All boundaries of the system are sheathed by solidification fronts. With the wide range of local, characteristic length scales there is a commensurate range of solidification time scales. This creates a complicated series of resistances to magma flow and provides a variety of distinct local physical environments for the chemical modification of magma. The system is driven by over-pressure from the addition of new melt from below. The over-pressure propagates upward by moving magma which flushes conduits, disrupts cumulate beds, and pools or purges sills. A critical aspect of this process is the entrainment, transport, and deposition of crystals throughout the system. Picritic lavas charges with entrained (tramp) olivine of a wide compositional range erupted at many systems (e.g. Jan Mayen, Kilauea, Reunion, etc.) are the final expression of this process. That the size and abundance of these crystals is correlated with eruptive flux (Murata & Richter, AJS, 1966) suggests an important indicator of the overall dynamics of the mush column. A mush column of this basic nature is observed is observed in the McMurdo Dry Valleys region of Antarctica and is inferred beneath Hawaii and the ocean ridges. We have attempted to model this process by studying the entrainment, transport, and deposition of particles in a vertical stack of sills (Plexiglas tanks) connected by resistive conduits (check valves), over-pressured from the base, and open at the top. The system is about two meters in height with water and oil as fluids and particles with Reynolds numbers

  15. Dynamical approach to displacement jumps in nanoindentation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    K, Srikanth; Ananthakrishna, G.

    2017-01-01

    The load-controlled mode is routinely used in nanoindentation experiments. Yet there are no simulations or models that predict the generic features of force-displacement F -z curves, in particular, the existence of several displacement jumps of decreasing magnitude. Here, we show that the recently developed dislocation dynamical model predicts all the generic features when the model is appropriately coupled to an equation defining the load rate. Since jumps in the indentation depth result from the plastic deformation occurring inside the sample, we devise a method for calculating this contribution by setting up a system of coupled nonlinear time evolution equations for the mobile and forest dislocation densities. The equations are then coupled to the force rate equation. We include nucleation, multiplication, and propagation threshold mechanisms for the mobile dislocations apart from other well known dislocation transformation mechanisms between the mobile and forest dislocations. The commonly used Berkovitch indenter is considered. The ability of the approach is illustrated by adopting experimental parameters such as the indentation rate, the geometrical quantities defining the Berkovitch indenter including the nominal tip radius, and other parameters. We identify specific dislocation mechanisms contributing to different regions of the F -z curve as a first step for obtaining a good fit to a given experimental F -z curve. This is done by studying the influence of the parameters on the model F -z curves. In addition, the study demonstrates that the model predicts all the generic features of nanoindentation such as the existence of an initial elastic branch followed by several displacement jumps of decreasing magnitude, and residual plasticity after unloading for a range of model parameter values. Further, an optimized set of parameter values can be easily determined that gives a good fit to the experimental force-displacement curve for Al single crystals of (110

  16. Column experiments on organic micropollutants - applications and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banzhaf, Stefan; Hebig, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    As organic micropollutants become more and more ubiquitous in the aquatic environment, a sound understanding of their fate and transport behaviour is needed. This is to assure both safe and clean drinking water supply for mankind in the future and to protect the aquatic environment from pollution and negative consequences caused by manmade contamination. Apart from countless field studies, column experiments were and are frequently used to study transport of organic micropollutants. As the transport of (organic) solutes in groundwater is controlled by the chemical and physical properties of the compounds, the solvent (the groundwater including all solutes), and the substrate (the aquifer material), the adjustment and control of these boundary conditions allow to study a multitude of different experimental setups and to address specific research questions. The main purpose, however, remains to study the transport of a specific compound and its sorption and degradation behaviour in a specific sediment or substrate. Apart from the effective control of the individual boundary conditions, the main advantage of columns studies compared to other experimental setups (such as field studies, batch/microcosm studies), is that conservative and reactive solute breakthrough curves are obtained, which represent the sum of the transport processes. The analysis of these curves is well-developed and established. Additionally, limitations of this experimental method are presented here: the effects observed in column studies are often a result of dynamic, non-equilibrium processes. Time (or flow velocity) plays a major role in contrast to batch experiments, in which all processes will be observed until equilibrium is reached in the substrate-solution-system. Slightly modifying boundary conditions in different experiments have a strong influence on transport and degradation behaviour of organic micropollutants. This is a significant severe issue when it comes to general findings on the

  17. SOIL VAPOR EXTRACTION COLUMN EXPERIMENTS ON GASOLINE CONTAMINATED SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) is a technique that is used to remove volatile organic compounds from unsaturated soils. Air is pumped through and from the contaminated zone to remove vapor phase constituents. In the work, laboratory soil column experiments were conducted using a gas...

  18. Column Experiments to Interpret Weathering in Columbia Hills

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hausrath, E. M.; Morris, R.V.; Ming, D.W.; Golden, D.C.; Galindo, C.; Sutter, B.

    2009-01-01

    Phosphate mobility has been postulated as an indicator of early aqueous activity on Mars. In addition, rock surfaces analyzed by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit are consistent with the loss of a phosphate- containing mineral To interpret phosphate alteration behavior on Mars, we performed column dissolution experiments leaching the primary phases Durango fluorapatite, San Carlos olivine, and basalt glass (Stapafjell Volcano, courtesy of S. Gislason, University of Iceland) [3,4]) with acidic solutions. These phases were chosen to represent quickly dissolving phases likely present in Columbia Hills. Column dissolution experiments are closer to natural dissolution conditions than batch experiments, although they can be difficult to interpret. Acidic solutions were used because the leached layers on the surfaces of these rocks have been interpreted as resulting from acid solutions [5].

  19. Noninvasive Imaging of Tracer Experiments in a Soil Column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelinkova, V.; Pohlmeier, A.; van Dusschoten, D.; Vereecken, H.; Cislerova, M.

    2008-12-01

    A set of tracer-infiltration experiments on soil columns by means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed. Computed tomography (CT) was applied in order to map the spatial distribution of porous media, namely the local densities and porosities, and their variation within the soil sample under test. The CT visualisation was done in order to trace disturbances in the structure as a possible source of preferential flow. By means of MRI the flow paths during the infiltration experiment were visualized using a tracer pulse containing Ni(NO3)2 in a concentration of 0.05 mol/litre. The pulse was added under hydraulic steady state conditions. The tracer motion was monitored through its effect on the signal relaxation of 1H using a 7 Tesla vertical magnet system equipped with a 40 mm RF probe. The boundary condition at the top of the soil columns was maintained using a dripping system connected to a HPLC pump with flow rate set to 0.5 ml/min. Free outflow was used as the bottom boundary condition. The vertical component of the local velocity value was calculated after the experiment. Small disturbances in the tracer front observed during the break-through could be related to the preferential flow phenomena in combination with the air bubble entrapment. This research has been supported by research project SP/2e7/229/07 and DBU - Deutsche Bundesstiftung Umwelt.

  20. Investigations of infiltration processes from flooded areas by column experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohrlok, U.; Bethge, E.; Golalipour, A.

    2009-04-01

    In case of inundation of flood plains during flood events there is an increased risk of groundwater contamination due to infiltration of increasingly polluted river water. Specifically in densely populated regions, this groundwater may be used as source for drinking water supply. For the evaluation of this a detailed quantitative understanding of the infiltration processes under such conditions is required. In this context the infiltration related to a flood event can be described by three phases. The first phase is defined by the saturation of the unsaturated soils. Within the second phase infiltration takes place under almost saturated conditions determined by the hydraulic load of the flood water level. The drainage of the soils due to falling groundwater table is characterizing the third phase. Investigations by soil columns gave a detailed insight into the infiltration processes caused by flooding. Inflow at the soil top was established by a fixed water table fed by a Mariotte bottle. Free outflow and a groundwater table were used as lower boundary condition. Inflow and outflow volume were monitored. The evolution of the matrix pressure was observed by micro-tensiometers installed at several depths within the soil column. The flow processes during phase one and two were characterized by a tracer test. Some of the experiments were repeated in order to study the influence of preliminary events. Main results were a difference in infiltration due to the lower boundary condition with regard to inflow rate, outflow dynamics and matrix pressure evolution which is directly related to the water content evolution. Further, the influence of preliminary events was different for the different boundary conditions. A replacement of pre-event water could be observed which was confirmed by volume balances calculated for the infiltration experiments. Although these water balances were almost closed significant dynamics of the matrix pressure remained in soil column in the

  1. Missed Opportunities: Examining the Literacy Experiences of African American Students Displaced by Hurricane Katrina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollard, Tamica McClarty

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how five African American middle school students, who were displaced by Hurricane Katrina represent their literacy experiences before, during, and after their displacement. Specifically, the two research questions were: (a) What are the stories that these middle school students tell about their lives,…

  2. Long-term flow-through column experiments and their relevance to natural granitoid weathering rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Art F.; Schulz, Marjorie S.; Lawrence, Corey R.; Vivit, Davison V.; Stonestrom, David A.

    2017-04-01

    Four pairs of fresh and partly-weathered granitoids, obtained from well-characterized watersheds-Merced River, CA, USA; Panola, GA, USA; Loch Vale, CO, USA, and Rio Icacos, Puerto Rico-were reacted in columns under ambient laboratory conditions for 13.8 yrs, the longest running experimental weathering study to date. Low total column mass losses (<1 wt.%), correlated with the absence of pitting or surface roughening of primary silicate grains. BET surface area (SBET) increased, primarily due to Fe-oxyhydroxide precipitation. Surface areas returned to within factors of 2-3 of their original values after dithionite extraction. Miscible displacement experiments indicated homogeneous plug flow with negligible immobile water, commonly cited for column experiments. Fresh granitoid effluent solute concentrations initially declined rapidly, followed by much slower decreases over the next decade. Weathered granitoid effluent concentrations increased modestly over the same time period, indicating losses of natural Fe-oxide and/or clay coatings and the increased exposure of primary mineral surfaces. Corresponding (fresh and weathered) elemental effluent concentrations trended toward convergence during the last decade of reaction. NETPATH/PHREEQC code simulations indicated non-stoichiometric dissolution involving Ca release from disseminated calcite and excess K release from interlayer biotite. Effluent 87Sr/85Sr ratios reflected a progressive weathering sequence beginning and ending with 87Sr/85Sr values of plagioclase with an additional calcite input and a radiogenic biotite excursion proportional to the granitoid ages. Effluents became thermodynamically saturated with goethite and gibbsite, slightly under-saturated with kaolinite and strongly under-saturated with plagioclase, consistent with kinetically-limited weathering in which solutes such as Na varied with column flow rates. Effluent Na concentrations showed no clear trend with time during the last decade of reaction

  3. Long-term flow-through column experiments and their relevance to natural granitoid weathering rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, Arthur F.; Schulz, Marjorie S.; Lawrence, Corey R.; Vivit, Davison V.; Stonestrom, David A.

    2017-01-01

    Four pairs of fresh and partly-weathered granitoids, obtained from well-characterized watersheds—Merced River, CA, USA; Panola, GA, USA; Loch Vale, CO, USA, and Rio Icacos, Puerto Rico—were reacted in columns under ambient laboratory conditions for 13.8 yrs, the longest running experimental weathering study to date. Low total column mass losses (<1 wt. %), correlated with the absence of pitting or surface roughening of primary silicate grains. BET surface area (SBET) increased, primarily due to Fe-oxyhydroxide precipitation. Surface areas returned to within factors of 2 to 3 of their original values after dithionite extraction. Miscible displacement experiments indicated homogeneous plug flow with negligible immobile water, commonly cited for column experiments. Fresh granitoid effluent solute concentrations initially declined rapidly, followed by much slower decreases over the next decade. Weathered granitoid effluent concentrations increased modestly over the same time period, indicating losses of natural Fe-oxide and/or clay coatings and the increased exposure of primary mineral surfaces. Corresponding (fresh and weathered) elemental effluent concentrations trended toward convergence during the last decade of reaction. NETPATH/PHREEQC code simulations indicated non-stoichiometric dissolution involving Ca release from disseminated calcite and excess K release from interlayer biotite. Effluent 87Sr/85Sr ratios reflected a progressive weathering sequence beginning and ending with 87Sr/85Sr values of plagioclase with an additional calcite input and a radiogenic biotite excursion proportional to the granitoid ages.Effluents became thermodynamically saturated with goethite and gibbsite, slightly under-saturated with kaolinite and strongly under-saturated with plagioclase, consistent with kinetically-limited weathering in which solutes such as Na varied with column flow rates. Effluent Na concentrations showed no clear trend with time during the last decade of

  4. Public self-consciousness moderates the link between displacement behaviour and experience of stress in women.

    PubMed

    Mohiyeddini, Changiz; Bauer, Stephanie; Semple, Stuart

    2013-07-01

    When stressed, people typically show elevated rates of displacement behaviour--activities such as scratching and face touching that seem irrelevant to the ongoing situation. Growing evidence indicates that displacement behaviour may play a role in regulating stress levels, and thus may represent an important component of the coping response. Recently, we found evidence that this stress-regulating effect of displacement behaviour is found in men but not in women. This sex difference may result from women's higher levels of public self-consciousness, which could inhibit expression of displacement behaviour due to the fear of projecting an inappropriate image. Here, we explored the link between public self-consciousness, displacement behaviour and stress among 62 healthy women (mean age = 26.59 years; SD = 3.61). We first assessed participants' public self-consciousness, and then quantified displacement behaviour, heart rate and cognitive performance during a Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) and used self-report questionnaires to assess the experience of stress afterwards. Public self-consciousness was negatively correlated with rate of displacement behaviour, and positively correlated with both the subjective experience of stress post-TSST and the number of mistakes in the cognitive task. Moderation analyses revealed that for women high in public self-consciousness, high levels of displacement behaviour were associated with higher reported levels of stress and poorer cognitive performance. For women low in public self-consciousness, stress levels and cognitive performance were unrelated to displacement behaviour. Our findings indicate that public self-consciousness is associated with both the expression of displacement behaviour and how such behaviour mediates responses to social stress.

  5. Displacement chromatography of proteins using a retained pH front in a hydrophobic charge induction chromatography column.

    PubMed

    Pinto, N D S; Frey, Douglas D

    2015-03-27

    The chromatographic separation of two proteins into a displacement train of two adjoined rectangular bands was accomplished using a novel method for hydrophobic charge induction chromatography (HCIC) which employs a self-sharpening pH front as the displacer. This method exploits the fact that protein elution in HCIC is promoted by a pH change, but is relatively independent of salt effects, so that a retained pH front can be used in place of a traditional displacer in displacement chromatography. The retained pH front was produced using the two adsorbed buffering species tricine and acetic acid. The separation of lysozyme and α-chymotrypsinogen A into adjoined, rectangular bands was accomplished with overall recoveries based on the total mass injected greater than 90 and 70%, respectively. The addition of urea to the buffer system increased the sharpness of the pH front by 36% while the yields of lysozyme and α-chymotrypsinogen A based on the total mass eluted increased from 76% to 99% and from 37% to 85%, respectively, when the purities of both proteins in their product fractions were fixed at 85%. The results demonstrate that the method developed in this study is a useful variant of HCIC and is also a useful alternative to other displacement chromatography methods.

  6. Water-column cooling and sea surface salinity increase in the upwelling region off central-south Chile driven by a poleward displacement of the South Pacific High

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Wolfgang; Donoso, David; Garcés-Vargas, José; Escribano, Rubén

    2017-02-01

    Here we present results of direct observations of seawater temperature and salinity over the continental shelf off central-south Chile that shows an unprecedented cooling of the entire water column and an increase in upper layer salinity during 2002 to 2013. We provide evidence that this phenomenon is related to the intensification but mostly to a recent southward displacement of the South Pacific High over the same period, from 2007 on. This in turn has accelerated alongshore, equatorward, subtropical coastal upwelling favorable winds, particularly during winter, injecting colder water from below into the upper water column. Consequently, the environmental conditions on the shelf off central-south Chile shifted from a warmer (fresher) to a cooler (saltier) phase; water column temperature dropped from 11.7 °C (2003-2006) to 11.3 °C (2007-2012) and upper layer salinity rose by 0.25; water column stratification gradually decreased. The biological impacts of such abrupt cooling are apparently already happening in this coastal ecosystem, as recent evidence shows substantial changes in the plankton community and negative trends in zooplankton biomass over the same period.

  7. Field performance of the Walker Branch throughfall displacement experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, P.J.; Todd, D.E.; Edwards, N.T.; Huston, M.A.

    1994-10-06

    The authors are conducting a large-scale manipulative field experiments in an upland oak forest on the Walker Branch Watershed in eastern Tennessee USA to identify important ecosystem responses that might result from future precipitation changes. The manipulation of soil moisture is being implemented by a gravity-driven transfer of throughfall precipitation from one treatment plot to another. Throughfall is intercepted in {approx} 2,000 subcanopy troughs (0.3 x 5 m) suspended above the forest floor of the dry plots ({approx} 33% of the ground area is covered) and transferred by gravity flow across an ambient plot for subsequent distribution onto the wet treatment plot. Percent soil water is being monitored with time domain reflectometers at 310 sampling locations across the site. The experimental system is able to produce statistically significant differences in soil water content in years having both extremely dry and extremely wet conditions. Furthermore, comparisons of pre- and post-installation soil temperature measurements have documented the ability of the experimental design to produce these changes without changing the microclimate of the forest understory.

  8. Use of column experiments to investigate the fate of organic micropollutants - a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banzhaf, Stefan; Hebig, Klaus H.

    2016-09-01

    Although column experiments are frequently used to investigate the transport of organic micropollutants, little guidance is available on what they can be used for, how they should be set up, and how the experiments should be carried out. This review covers the use of column experiments to investigate the fate of organic micropollutants. Alternative setups are discussed together with their respective advantages and limitations. An overview is presented of published column experiments investigating the transport of organic micropollutants, and suggestions are offered on how to improve the comparability of future results from different experiments. The main purpose of column experiments is to investigate the transport and attenuation of a specific compound within a specific sediment or substrate. The transport of (organic) solutes in groundwater is influenced by the chemical and physical properties of the compounds, the solvent (i.e., the groundwater, including all solutes), and the substrate (the aquifer material). By adjusting these boundary conditions a multitude of different processes and related research questions can be investigated using a variety of experimental setups. Apart from the ability to effectively control the individual boundary conditions, the main advantage of column experiments compared to other experimental setups (such as those used in field experiments, or in batch microcosm experiments) is that conservative and reactive solute breakthrough curves can be derived, which represent the sum of the transport processes. There are well-established methods for analyzing these curves. The effects observed in column studies are often a result of dynamic, non-equilibrium processes. Time (or flow velocity) is an important factor, in contrast to batch experiments where all processes are observed until equilibrium is reached in the substrate-solution system. Slight variations in the boundary conditions of different experiments can have a marked influence on

  9. Experiment K307: Vertebral body strength of rat spinal columns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazarian, L. E.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of space flight on vertebral body bone strength excised were investigated. Comparative biomechanical investigations of vertebral body strength for flight, synchronous, and vivarium rats following spacecraft recovery (R+0), at R+6 and R+29 days post flight recovery are presented. Statistical analyses are presented for the mechanical properties of stiffness, ultimate load, displacement to ultimate load, and energy to ultimate load. At R+0 all of the above properties show that the vertebral body exhibits an increasing susceptibility to fracture. The reduction of bone strength is inhomogeneous and dependent on vertebral level. The R+6 recovery data was inconclusive since it varied above and below the R+0 data. At R+29 ultimate load values showed a statistically significant increase in bone strength approaching that of the vivarium or control group.

  10. Column experiments and full dissolution rate law of gibbsite

    SciTech Connect

    Mogollon, J.L.; Ganor, J.; Soler, J.M.; Lasaga, A.C.

    1996-12-31

    The dissolution of a gibbsitic bauxite in natural systems was simulated in the laboratory, at 25{degrees}C, using a column reactor, with input pHs ranging from 3.2 to 4.5 and fluid velocities ranging from 61 to 1085 m/y. As a result, the dissolution of gibbsite was measured under a wide range of saturation state conditions from equilibrium or near-equilibrium conditions to very far from equilibrium conditions. Far-from-equilibrium dissolution rates were measured under steady-state conditions. At slower flow rates, the variation of the rates with deviation from equilibrium was also extracted. The slowest flow rates yielded the equilibrium solubility of gibbsite. The solubility (K{sub sp}) of natural gibbsite and the column output solution saturation states (expressed as the Gibbs Free Energy of reaction, {Delta}G{sub {gamma}}) were determined with respect to the overall reaction: Al(OH){sub 3} + 3H{sup +} = Al{sup 3} + 3H{sub 2}O. Despite the impurities present in the natural sample material, the calculated log K{sub sp}, 7.83 {plus_minus} 0.12, is in excellent agreement with published K{sub sp} values for pure gibbsite. Far-from-equilibrium, {Delta}G{sub {gamma}} <{minus}0.7 kcal/mol, the dissolution rates attain a constant value of {minus}7.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}13} moles/m{sup 2}/sec at input pH values of 3.5. A reaction order of 0.33 with respect to a{sub H+} was found. The variation of the rates with deviation from equilibrium was found to be very similar to the results of Nagy and Lasaga (1992), even though our study used natural gibbsite, a column device, and different pH and temperature. Therefore, the comparison of the results of this study and Nagy and Lasaga (1992) validates the use of a general rate law and suggests that the same kind of {Delta}G{sub {gamma}} functionality is valid over a broad range of pH and temperature conditions. 45 refs., 11 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. Applicability of soil column incubation experiments to measure CO2 efflux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Linlin; Nishimura, Taku; Imoto, Hiromi; Sun, Zhigang

    2015-10-01

    Accurate measurements of CO2 efflux from soils are essential to understand dynamic changes in soil carbon storage. Column incubation experiments are commonly used to study soil water and solute transport; however, the use of column incubation experiments to study soil CO2 efflux has seldom been reported. In this study, a 150-day greenhouse experiment with two treatments (no-tillage and tillage soils) was conducted to evaluate the applicability of soil column incubation experiments to study CO2 efflux. Both the chamber measurement and the gradient method were used, and results from the two methods were consistent: tillage increased soil cumulative CO2 efflux during the incubation period. Compared with fieldwork, incubation experiments can create or precisely control experimental conditions and thus have advantages for investigating the influence of climate factors or human activities on CO2 efflux. They are superior to bottle incubation because soil column experiments maintain a soil structure that is almost the same as that in the field, and thus can facilitate analyses on CO2 behaviour in the soil profile and more accurate evaluations of CO2 efflux. Although some improvements are still required for column incubation experiments, wider application of this method to study soil CO2 behaviour is expected.

  12. Adequacy of transport parameters obtained in soil column experiments for selected chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymundo-Raymundo, E.; Nikolskii, Yu. N.; Guber, A. K.; Landeros-Sanchez, C.

    2012-07-01

    The transport parameters were determined for the 18O isotope (in the form of H2 18O), the Br- ion, and atrazine in intact columns of allophanic Andosol (Mexico State, Mexico). A one-dimensional model for the convective-dispersive transport of chemicals with account for the decomposition and equilibrium adsorption (HYDRUS-1D), which is widely applied for assessing the risk of the chemical and bacterial contamination of natural waters, was used. The model parameters were obtained by solving the inverse problem on the basis of laboratory experiments on the transport of the 18O isotope, the Br- ion, and atrazine in intact soil columns at a fixed filtration velocity. The hydrodynamic dispersion parameters determined for the 18O and Br- ions in one column were of the same order of magnitude, and those for atrazine were higher by 3-4 times. The obtained parameters were used to calculate the transport of these substances in another column with different values of the water content and filtration velocity. The transport process was adequately described only for the 18O isotope. In the case of the Br- ion, the model significantly underestimated the transport velocity; for atrazine, its peak concentration in the column was overestimated. The column study of the transport of the three chemical compounds showed that transport parameters could not be reliably predicted from the results of a single experiment, even when several compounds were used in this experiment.

  13. 241Am migration in a sandy aquifer studied by long-term column experiments.

    PubMed

    Artinger, Robert; Schuessler, Wolfram; Scherbaum, Franz; Schild, Dieter; Kim, Jae-Il

    2002-11-15

    The migration behavior of 241Am(III) in a sandy aquifer was studied under near-natural conditions by long-term column experiments of more than 1 year duration. Columns with 50 cm length and 5 cm in diameter were packed with aeolian quartz sand and equilibrated with two different groundwaters having an original dissolved organic carbon concentration (DOC) of 1.1 and 7.2 mg x dm(-3), respectively,from the Gorleben site (Lower Saxony, Germany). In each experiment, 1 cm3 of Am-spiked groundwater ([Am] = 0.2 to 2 micromol x dm(-3)) was injected into the column. The flow rate of the groundwater was adjusted to 0.28 m x d(-1). A small colloid-borne Am fraction was found to elute together with tritiated water. After 414 and 559 days, respectively, the experiments were terminated. Whereas the nonsorbing tracer of tritiated water would have covered a distance of about 350 m in that time period, the maximum of the Am activity was detected between 32 and 40 mm column length. Applying selective dissolution analysis to the sand surface, Am was found to be preferentially bound to iron hydroxide/oxide sites. From this Am distribution, a retardation factor R of about 10(4) was determined and compared to static batch experiments. The Am breakthrough was calculated forthe conditions of the column experiment

  14. Mobility of pharmaceuticals carbamazepine, diclofenac, ibuprofen, and propyphenazone in miscible-displacement experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheytt, Traugott J.; Mersmann, Petra; Heberer, Thomas

    2006-02-01

    Many pharmaceuticals pass the unsaturated zone before reaching an aquifer. Therefore, laboratory sand column transport experiments were conducted to study the transport behavior of carbamazepine, diclofenac, ibuprofen, and propyphenazone under unsaturated conditions. The test water was artificial sewage effluent to simulate the infiltration of reused wastewater. The test water was spiked with the pharmaceutically active compounds and the tracer LiCl. Afterwards it was passed through laboratory sand columns, one experiment for each pharmaceutical. The physical and chemical parameters were recorded and general ions measured. Pharmaceuticals were measured using solid phase extraction, derivatization, and detection with GC-MS. The column experiments indicate a significant elimination of ibuprofen (54%), propyphenazone (55%), and diclofenac (35%), whereas carbamazepine was not eliminated. Retardation factors varied between 1.84 for carbamazepine, 2.51 for propyphenazone, 3.00 for ibuprofen, and 4.80 for diclofenac. These results show that mobility and elimination of diclofenac, ibuprofen, and propyphenazone is about in the same range as for experiments under saturated conditions whereas carbamazepine had a significantly lower sorption and elimination under unsaturated conditions.

  15. Effect of pore velocity on biodegradation of cis-dichloroethene (DCE) in column experiments.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Sanchez, Itza; Autenrieth, Robin L; McDonald, Thomas J; Cunningham, Jeffrey A

    2010-06-01

    Column experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of pore velocity on the extent of biodegradation of cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) during transport in porous media. Columns were filled with homogeneous glass beads and inoculated with a culture capable of complete dechlorination of tetrachloroethene to ethene. A constant concentration of cis-DCE was maintained in the columns' influent. Three different pore velocities were tested in duplicate, subjecting each column to a constant velocity. At high flow velocity, degradation of cis-DCE to ethene was nearly complete within the residence time of the columns. However, at medium and low flow velocities, incomplete dechlorination was observed. After 7 weeks, DNA was harvested from the columns to determine differences in the microbial populations. Results suggest that Dehalococcoides sp. were present in higher quantities in the high-velocity columns, consistent with the observed dechlorination. These results suggest that, at contaminated groundwater sites, heterogeneity of groundwater velocity may be one factor that contributes to heterogeneous distribution of biological activity.

  16. Design and Operation of Cryogenic Distillation Research Column for Ultra-Low Background Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiller, Christopher; Alanson Chiller, Angela; Jasinski, Benjamin; Snyder, Nathan; Mei, Dongming

    2013-04-01

    Motivated by isotopically enriched germanium (76Ge and 73Ge) for monocrystalline crystal growth for neutrinoless double-beta decay and dark matter experiments, a cryogenic distillation research column was developed. Without market availability of distillation columns in the temperature range of interest with capabilities necessary for our purposes, we designed, fabricated, tested, refined and operated a two-meter research column for purifying and separating gases in the temperature range from 100-200K. Due to interest in defining stratification, purity and throughput optimization, capillary lines were integrated at four equidistant points along the length of the column such that real-time residual gas analysis could guide the investigation. Interior gas column temperatures were monitored and controlled within 0.1oK accuracy at the top and bottom. Pressures were monitored at the top of the column to four significant figures. Subsequent impurities were measured at partial pressures below 2E-8torr. We report the performance of the column in this paper.

  17. Three years of column flotation operating experience at Powell Mountain Coal Company

    SciTech Connect

    Groppo, J.G.; Parekh, B.K.; Peters, W.J.; Kennedy, D.L.

    1993-12-31

    A joint project was initiated in 1989 between the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) and the Powell Mountain Coal Company (PMCC) to evaluated the applicability of column flotation for recovery of fine coal from classifying cyclone refuse at PMCC`s Mayflower Preparation Plant. Laboratory and extensive pilot plant studies were conducted on each of the seams processed by the plant evaluating various column operating parameters. These results were used to design a larger 8-ft. diameter {times} 22-ft. tall column capable of recovering fine coal from the dilute classifying cyclone overflow with a feed capacity of 1,000 gpm. In order to effectively treat the entire plant classifying cyclone overflow stream, a total of four columns operating in parallel were installed in December 1989. This paper outlines three years of operating experience and results obtained with this fine coal recovery circuit.

  18. Comparison of monometal and multimetal adsorption in Mississippi River alluvial wetland sediment: batch and column experiments.

    PubMed

    Seo, Dong Cheol; Yu, Kewei; DeLaune, Ronald D

    2008-12-01

    Monometal and multimetal adsorption of selected heavy metals in a sediment from a coastal Louisiana forested swamp used for wastewater treatment was studied. Results from the batch experiments show that the maximum adsorption capacities of the metals by the sediment were in the order of Pb>Hg>Cr>CdCuZn>As based on monometal adsorption isotherm, and Hg>Cr>CuCd approximately Pb>As approximately Zn based on multimetal adsorption isotherm, respectively. Batch experimental data best fit the Langmuir model rather than the Freundlich isotherms. In the column experiments, the maximum adsorption capacities of the metals were in the order of Pb>Hg>Cr>Cd>Cu>Zn>As in monometal conditions, and Hg>Cr>Pb>CuZn approximately Cd>As in multimetal conditions. The metals became more mobile in multimetal than in monometal conditions. Results from both the batch and column experiments show that competitive adsorption among metals increases the mobility of these metals. Particularly, in this study, Pb in multimetal conditions lost it adsorption capacity most significantly. In both monometal and multimetal conditions, the maximum adsorption capacity of the metals in the column experiments was higher than that in the batch experiment indicating other metal retention mechanisms rather than adsorption may be involved. Therefore, both column and batch experiments are needed for estimating retention capacities and removal efficiencies of metals in sediments.

  19. Experiments on Methane Displacement by Carbon Dioxide in Large Coal Specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Weiguo; Zhao, Yangsheng; Wu, Di; Dusseault, Maurice B.

    2011-09-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is considered to be the most important greenhouse gas in terms of overall effect. CO2 geological storage in coal beds is of academic and industrial interest because of economic synergies between greenhouse gas sequestration and coal bed methane (CH4) recovery by displacement/adsorption. Previously, most work focused on either theoretical analyses and mathematical simulations or gas adsorption-desorption experiments using coal particles of millimeter size or smaller. Those studies provided basic understanding of CH4 recovery by CO2 displacement in coal fragments, but more relevant and realistic investigations are still rare. To study the processes more realistically, we conducted experimental CH4 displacement by CO2 and CO2 sequestration with intact 100 × 100 × 200 mm coal specimens. The coal specimen permeability was measured first, and results show that the permeability of the specimen is different for CH4 and CO2; the CO2 permeability was found to be at least two orders of magnitude greater than that for CH4. Simultaneously, a negative exponential relationship between the permeability and the applied mean stress on the specimen was found. Under the experimental stress conditions, 17.5-28.0 volumes CO2 can be stored in one volume of coal, and the displacement ratio CO2-CH4 is as much as 7.0-13.9. The process of injection, adsorption and desorption, displacement, and output of gases proceeds smoothly under an applied constant pressure differential, and the CH4 content in the output gas amounted to 20-50% at early stages, persisting to 10-16% during the last stage of the experiments. Production rate and CH4 fraction are governed by complex factors including initial CH4 content, the pore and fissure fabric of the coal, the changes in this fabric as the result of differential adsorption of CO2, the applied stress, and so on. During CO2 injection and CH4 displacement, the coal can swell from effects of gas adsorption and desorption, leading to

  20. An Optical Fiber Lateral Displacement Measurement Method and Experiments Based on Reflective Grating Panel

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuhe; Guan, Kaisen; Hu, Zhaohui; Chen, Yanxiang

    2016-01-01

    An optical fiber sensing method based on a reflective grating panel is demonstrated for lateral displacement measurement. The reflective panel is a homemade grating with a periodic variation of its refractive index, which is used to modulate the reflected light intensity. The system structure and operation principle are illustrated in detail. The intensity calculation and simulation of the optical path are carried out to theoretically analyze the measurement performance. A distinctive fiber optic grating ruler with a special fiber optic measuring probe and reflective grating panel is set up. Experiments with different grating pitches are conducted, and long-distance measurements are executed to accomplish the functions of counting optical signals, subdivision, and discerning direction. Experimental results show that the proposed measurement method can be used to detect lateral displacement, especially for applications in working environments with high temperatures. PMID:27271624

  1. An Optical Fiber Lateral Displacement Measurement Method and Experiments Based on Reflective Grating Panel.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuhe; Guan, Kaisen; Hu, Zhaohui; Chen, Yanxiang

    2016-06-02

    An optical fiber sensing method based on a reflective grating panel is demonstrated for lateral displacement measurement. The reflective panel is a homemade grating with a periodic variation of its refractive index, which is used to modulate the reflected light intensity. The system structure and operation principle are illustrated in detail. The intensity calculation and simulation of the optical path are carried out to theoretically analyze the measurement performance. A distinctive fiber optic grating ruler with a special fiber optic measuring probe and reflective grating panel is set up. Experiments with different grating pitches are conducted, and long-distance measurements are executed to accomplish the functions of counting optical signals, subdivision, and discerning direction. Experimental results show that the proposed measurement method can be used to detect lateral displacement, especially for applications in working environments with high temperatures.

  2. Predicted and measured temperatures, displacements and stresses from the Stripa heater experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, T.; Hood, M.; Witherspoon, P.A.

    1980-01-01

    A summary of the results of heater experiments conducted at the Stripa Mine in Sweden is given. These results for the induced temperature, displacement and stress fields, are compared with the original predictions for these parameters which were made using both analytical and finite-element calculations assuming that the material properties of the rock remained temperature independent. Discrepancies between the measured and the predicted results are discussed. Additional calculations, based on a limited amount of laboratory data for the temperature dependence of these material properties, are described. These new predictions are found to agree better with the measured field data.

  3. Effects of Humidity Swings on Adsorption Columns for Air Revitalization: Modeling and Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVan, M. Douglas; Finn, John E.

    1997-01-01

    Air purification systems are necessary to provide clean air in the closed environments aboard spacecraft. Trace contaminants are removed using adsorption. One major factor concerning the removal of trace contaminants is relative humidity. Water can reduce adsorption capacity and, due to constant fluctuations, its presence is difficult to incorporate into adsorption column designs. The purpose of the research was to allow for better design techniques in trace contaminant adsorption systems, especially for feeds with water present. Experiments and mathematical modeling research on effects of humidity swings on adsorption columns for air revitalization were carried out.

  4. Aerosol Effects on Radiation and Climate: Column Closure Experiments with Towers, Aircraft, and Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Philip B.

    1994-01-01

    Many theoretical studies have shown that anthropogenic aerosol particles can change the radiation balance in an atmospheric column and might thereby exert a significant effect on the Earth's climate. In particular, recent calculations have shown that sulfate particles from anthropogenic combustion may already exert a cooling influence on the Earth that partially offsets the warming caused by the greenhouse gases from the same combustion. Despite the potential climatic importance of anthropogenic aerosols, simultaneous measurements of anthropogenic aerosol properties and their effect on atmospheric radiation have been very rare. Successful comparisons of measured radiation fields with those calculated from aerosol measurements - now referred to as column closure comparisons - are required to improve the accuracy and credibility of climate predictions. This paper reviews the column closure experiment performed at the Mt. Sutro Tower in San Francisco in 1975, in which elevated radiometers measured the change in Earth-plus-atmosphere albedo caused by an aerosol layer, while a lidar, sunphotometer, nephelometer, and other radiometers measured properties of the responsible aerosol. The time-dependent albedo calculated from the measured aerosol properties agreed with that measured by the tower radiometers. Also presented are designs for future column closure studies using radiometers and aerosol instruments on the ground, aircraft, and satellites. These designs draw upon algorithms and experience developed in the Sutro Tower study, as well as more recent experience with current measurement and analysis capabilities.

  5. Closed-flow column experiments: A numerical sensitivity analysis of reactive transport and parameter uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritschel, Thomas; Totsche, Kai Uwe

    2016-08-01

    The identification of transport parameters by inverse modeling often suffers from equifinality or parameter correlation when models are fitted to measurements of the solute breakthrough in column outflow experiments. This parameter uncertainty can be approached by performing multiple experiments with different sets of boundary conditions, each provoking observations that are uniquely attributable to the respective transport processes. A promising approach to further increase the information potential of the experimental outcome is the closed-flow column design. It is characterized by the recirculation of the column effluent into the solution supply vessel that feeds the inflow, which results in a damped sinusoidal oscillation in the breakthrough curve. In order to reveal the potential application of closed-flow experiments, we present a comprehensive sensitivity analysis using common models for adsorption and degradation. We show that the sensitivity of inverse parameter determination with respect to the apparent dispersion can be controlled by the experimenter. For optimal settings, a decrease in parameter uncertainty as compared to classical experiments by an order of magnitude is achieved. In addition, we show a reduced equifinality between rate-limited interactions and apparent dispersion. Furthermore, we illustrate the expected breakthrough curve for equilibrium and nonequilibrium adsorption, the latter showing strong similarities to the behavior found for completely mixed batch reactor experiments. Finally, breakthrough data from a reactive tracer experiment is evaluated using the proposed framework with excellent agreement of model and experimental results.

  6. Single-experiment displacement assay for quantifying high-affinity binding by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Krainer, Georg; Keller, Sandro

    2015-04-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is the gold standard for dissecting the thermodynamics of a biomolecular binding process within a single experiment. However, reliable determination of the dissociation constant (KD) from a single titration is typically limited to the range 100 μM>KD>1 nM. Interactions characterized by a lower KD can be assessed indirectly by so-called competition or displacement assays, provided that a suitable competitive ligand is available whose KD falls within the directly accessible window. However, this protocol is limited by the fact that it necessitates at least two titrations to characterize one high-affinity inhibitor, resulting in considerable consumption of both sample material and time. Here, we introduce a fast and efficient ITC displacement assay that allows for the simultaneous characterization of both a high-affinity ligand and a moderate-affinity ligand competing for the same binding site on a receptor within a single experiment. The protocol is based on a titration of the high-affinity ligand into a solution containing the moderate-affinity ligand bound to the receptor present in excess. The resulting biphasic binding isotherm enables accurate and precise determination of KD values and binding enthalpies (ΔH) of both ligands. We discuss the theoretical background underlying the approach, demonstrate its practical application to metal ion chelation, explore its potential and limitations with the aid of simulations and statistical analyses, and elaborate on potential applications to protein-inhibitor interactions.

  7. Characterize Behaviour of Emerging Pollutants in Artificial Recharge: Column Experiments - Experiment Design and Results of Preliminary Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Carrera, J.; Ayora, C.; Licha, T.

    2012-04-01

    Emerging pollutants (EPs) have been detected in water resources as a result of human activities in recent years. They include pharmaceuticals, personal care products, dioxins, flame retardants, etc. They are a source of concern because many of them are resistant to conventional water treatment, and they are harmful to human health, even in low concentrations. Generally, this study aims to characterize the behaviour of emerging pollutants in reclaimed water in column experiments which simulates artificial recharge. One column set includes three parts: influent, reactive layer column (RLC) and aquifer column (AC). The main influent is decided to be Secondary Effluent (SE) of El Prat Wastewater Treatment Plant, Barcelona. The flow rate of the column experiment is 0.9-1.5 mL/min. the residence time of RLC is designed to be about 1 day and 30-40 days for AC. Both columns are made of stainless steel. Reactive layer column (DI 10cm * L55cm) is named after the filling material which is a mixture of organic substrate, clay and goethite. One purpose of the application of the mixture is to increase dissolve organic carbon (DOC). Leaching test in batchs and columns has been done to select proper organic substrate. As a result, compost was selected due to its long lasting of releasing organic matter (OM). The other purpose of the application of the mixture is to enhance adsorption of EPs. Partition coefficients (Kow) of EPs indicate the ability of adsorption to OM. EPs with logKow>2 could be adsorbed to OM, like Ibuprofen, Bezafibrate and Diclofenac. Moreover, some of EPs are charged in the solution with pH=7, according to its acid dissociation constant (Ka). Positively charged EPs, for example Atenolol, could adsorb to clay. In the opposite, negatively charged EPs, for example Gemfibrozil, could adsorb to goethite. Aquifer column (DI 35cm * L1.5m) is to simulate the processes taking place in aquifer in artificial recharge. The filling of AC has two parts: silica sand and

  8. The Impact of Organo-Mineral Complexation on Mineral Weathering in the Soil Zone: Column Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, F.; Dever, S.; Yoo, K.; Imhoff, P. T.; Michael, H. A.

    2015-12-01

    While it is well known that organo-mineral complexes can protect organic matter (OM) from degradation, its impact on soil mineral weathering is not clear. Strong evidence has shown that the adsorption of OM to mineral surface accelerates the dissolution of some minerals, but these observations are limited to bench-scale experiments that focus on specific OM and minerals. In this study, soil samples prepared from an undisturbed forest site were used to determine mineral weathering rates under differing OM sorption on minerals. Soil samples from two depths, 0-6cm and 84-100cm, were chosen to represent different soil OM content and soil mineralogy. Soil OM was removed stepwise by heating samples to 350℃ for different durations (0-6cm: 100% removed, ~50% removed, and no removal; 84-100cm: 100% removed and no removal). Pretreated soil samples were subjected to flow-through, saturated column experiments using 0.01M LiCl and 5%CO2/95%air gas saturated (pH = 4.5) influent solution. Each column treatment was run in duplicate under a constant flow rate (Darcy velocity ≈ 8cm/hr). All columns reached a steady state after 600~700 pore volumes at which effluent pH, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and element concentrations were constant. At the 95% significance level, the DOC from OM-present columns was significantly higher, as expected. Correspondingly, effluent pH was lower in higher OM content columns. The chemical denudation rates were calculated from the effluent concentrations of the elements of interest. For the soil columns from both depths, silicon (Si) leaching rate showed that dissolution of silicate minerals was 2-3 times higher in OM-removed columns, suggesting that organo-mineral complexes suppress mineral dissolution. The N2-BET specific surface area (SSA) measurement also showed that the removal of OM increased SSA, which supported the idea that OM adsorption had decreased mineral exposure and thus decreased mineral dissolution. The leaching rates of some

  9. Transient groundwater chemistry near a river: Effects on U(VI) transport in laboratory column experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Jun; Haggerty, Roy; Stoliker, Deborah L.; Kent, Douglas B.; Istok, Jonathan D.; Greskowiak, Janek; Zachara, John M.

    2011-04-05

    In the 300 Area of a U(VI)-contaminated aquifer at Hanford, Washington, USA, inorganic carbon and major cations, which have large impacts on U(VI) transport, change on an hourly and seasonal basis near the Columbia River. Batch and column experiments were conducted to investigate the factors controlling U(VI) adsorption/desorption by changing chemical conditions over time. Low alkalinity and low Ca concentrations (Columbia River water) enhanced adsorption and reduced aqueous concentrations. Conversely, high alkalinity and high Ca concentrations (Hanford groundwater) reduced adsorption and increased aqueous concentrations of U(VI). An equilibrium surface complexation model calibrated using laboratory batch experiments accounted for the decrease in U(VI) adsorption observed with increasing (bi)carbonate concentrations and other aqueous chemical conditions. In the column experiment, alternating pulses of river and groundwater caused swings in aqueous U(VI) concentration. A multispecies multirate surface complexation reactive transport model simulated most of the major U(VI) changes in two column experiments. The modeling results also indicated that U(VI) transport in the studied sediment could be simulated by using a single kinetic rate without loss of accuracy in the simulations. Moreover, the capability of the model to predict U(VI) transport in Hanford groundwater under transient chemical conditions depends significantly on the knowledge of real-time change of local groundwater chemistry.

  10. Transient groundwater chemistry near a river: Effects on U(VI) transport in laboratory column experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jun; Haggerty, Roy; Stoliker, Deborah L.; Kent, Douglas B.; Istok, Jonathan D.; Greskowiak, Janek; Zachara, John M.

    2011-04-01

    In the 300 Area of a U(VI)-contaminated aquifer at Hanford, Washington, USA, inorganic carbon and major cations, which have large impacts on U(VI) transport, change on an hourly and seasonal basis near the Columbia River. Batch and column experiments were conducted to investigate the factors controlling U(VI) adsorption/desorption by changing chemical conditions over time. Low alkalinity and low Ca concentrations (Columbia River water) enhanced adsorption and reduced aqueous concentrations. Conversely, high alkalinity and high Ca concentrations (Hanford groundwater) reduced adsorption and increased aqueous concentrations of U(VI). An equilibrium surface complexation model calibrated using laboratory batch experiments accounted for the decrease in U(VI) adsorption observed with increasing (bi)carbonate concentrations and other aqueous chemical conditions. In the column experiment, alternating pulses of river and groundwater caused swings in aqueous U(VI) concentration. A multispecies multirate surface complexation reactive transport model simulated most of the major U(VI) changes in two column experiments. The modeling results also indicated that U(VI) transport in the studied sediment could be simulated by using a single kinetic rate without loss of accuracy in the simulations. Moreover, the capability of the model to predict U(VI) transport in Hanford groundwater under transient chemical conditions depends significantly on the knowledge of real-time change of local groundwater chemistry.

  11. Transient groundwater chemistry near a river: Effects on U(VI) transport in laboratory column experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yin, Jun; Haggerty, Roy; Stoliker, Deborah L.; Kent, Douglas B.; Istok, Jonathan D.; Greskowiak, Janek; Zachara, John M.

    2011-01-01

    In the 300 Area of a U(VI)-contaminated aquifer at Hanford, Washington, USA, inorganic carbon and major cations, which have large impacts on U(VI) transport, change on an hourly and seasonal basis near the Columbia River. Batch and column experiments were conducted to investigate the factors controlling U(VI) adsorption/desorption by changing chemical conditions over time. Low alkalinity and low Ca concentrations (Columbia River water) enhanced adsorption and reduced aqueous concentrations. Conversely, high alkalinity and high Ca concentrations (Hanford groundwater) reduced adsorption and increased aqueous concentrations of U(VI). An equilibrium surface complexation model calibrated using laboratory batch experiments accounted for the decrease in U(VI) adsorption observed with increasing (bi)carbonate concentrations and other aqueous chemical conditions. In the column experiment, alternating pulses of river and groundwater caused swings in aqueous U(VI) concentration. A multispecies multirate surface complexation reactive transport model simulated most of the major U(VI) changes in two column experiments. The modeling results also indicated that U(VI) transport in the studied sediment could be simulated by using a single kinetic rate without loss of accuracy in the simulations. Moreover, the capability of the model to predict U(VI) transport in Hanford groundwater under transient chemical conditions depends significantly on the knowledge of real-time change of local groundwater chemistry.

  12. Transient groundwater chemistry near a river: Effects on U(VI) transport in laboratory column experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yin, J.; Haggerty, R.; Stoliker, D.L.; Kent, D.B.; Istok, J.D.; Greskowiak, J.; Zachara, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    In the 300 Area of a U(VI)-contaminated aquifer at Hanford, Washington, USA, inorganic carbon and major cations, which have large impacts on U(VI) transport, change on an hourly and seasonal basis near the Columbia River. Batch and column experiments were conducted to investigate the factors controlling U(VI) adsorption/desorption by changing chemical conditions over time. Low alkalinity and low Ca concentrations (Columbia River water) enhanced adsorption and reduced aqueous concentrations. Conversely, high alkalinity and high Ca concentrations (Hanford groundwater) reduced adsorption and increased aqueous concentrations of U(VI). An equilibrium surface complexation model calibrated using laboratory batch experiments accounted for the decrease in U(VI) adsorption observed with increasing (bi)carbonate concentrations and other aqueous chemical conditions. In the column experiment, alternating pulses of river and groundwater caused swings in aqueous U(VI) concentration. A multispecies multirate surface complexation reactive transport model simulated most of the major U(VI) changes in two column experiments. The modeling results also indicated that U(VI) transport in the studied sediment could be simulated by using a single kinetic rate without loss of accuracy in the simulations. Moreover, the capability of the model to predict U(VI) transport in Hanford groundwater under transient chemical conditions depends significantly on the knowledge of real-time change of local groundwater chemistry. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Preliminary results of column experiments simulating nutrients transport in artificial recharge by treated wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal, María; Meffe, Raffaella; Lillo, Javier

    2013-04-01

    Nutrients (phosphates, nitrates, nitrites and ammonium) are very often present in treated wastewater as consequence of the inefficient removal capability during wastewater treatments. Such compounds represent an environmental concern since they are responsible for contamination and/or eutrophication problems when reaching the water bodies (groundwater, river, streams…). Therefore, when wastewater reclamation activities such as artificial recharge are planned, special attention should be paid to these compounds to avoid groundwater deterioration. In this context, we proposed the installation of a Horizontal Permeable Reactive Barrier (H-PRB) made of different reactive materials, among them zeolite and palygorskite, to remove nutrients or at least to decrease their concentrations. The overall aim of this research is to evaluate if the application of a H-PRB could represent a feasible solution for the attenuation of nutrients when unconventional water resources (i.e. treated wastewater) are used for recharge activities. Specifically, this study is intended to identify the transport processes affecting nitrates, nitrites, ammonium and phosphates when treated wastewater is infiltrated through the reactive materials of the H-PRB. Column experiments are generally suitable to examine the interactions between reactive materials and treated wastewater that affect the transport behavior of nutrients. For example, processes such as adsorption can be identified and quantified. Thus, laboratory column experiments were carried out using zeolite or palygorskite as column infilling material and synthetic treated wastewater as column influent. The experiments are closely connected to an experimental field study in Carrión de los Céspedes (Seville-Spain) where a pilot H-PRB is currently under evaluation. The columns were operated under saturated conditions applying a constant flow rate of 1.2 mL/min equivalent to the infiltration rate estimated through infiltration experiments at

  14. MISCIBLE FLUID DISPLACEMENT STABILITY IN UNCONFINED POROUS MEDIA: TWO-DIMENSIONAL FLOW EXPERIMENTS AND SIMULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In situ flushing groundwater remediation technologies, such as cosolvent flushing, rely on the stability of the interface between the resident and displacing fluids for efficient removal of contaminants. Contrasts in density and viscosity between the resident and displacing flui...

  15. Relative permeability experiments of carbon dioxide displacing brine and their implications for carbon sequestration.

    PubMed

    Levine, Jonathan S; Goldberg, David S; Lackner, Klaus S; Matter, Juerg M; Supp, Michael G; Ramakrishnan, T S

    2014-01-01

    To mitigate anthropogenically induced climate change and ocean acidification, net carbon dioxide emissions to the atmosphere must be reduced. One proposed option is underground CO2 disposal. Large-scale injection of CO2 into the Earth's crust requires an understanding of the multiphase flow properties of high-pressure CO2 displacing brine. We present laboratory-scale core flooding experiments designed to measure CO2 endpoint relative permeability for CO2 displacing brine at in situ pressures, salinities, and temperatures. Endpoint drainage CO2 relative permeabilities for liquid and supercritical CO2 were found to be clustered around 0.4 for both the synthetic and natural media studied. These values indicate that relative to CO2, water may not be strongly wetting the solid surface. Based on these results, CO2 injectivity will be reduced and pressure-limited reservoirs will have reduced disposal capacity, though area-limited reservoirs may have increased capacity. Future reservoir-scale modeling efforts should incorporate sensitivity to relative permeability. Assuming applicability of the experimental results to other lithologies and that the majority of reservoirs are pressure limited, geologic carbon sequestration would require approximately twice the number of wells for the same injectivity.

  16. A clay permeable reactive barrier to remove Cs-137 from groundwater: Column experiments.

    PubMed

    De Pourcq, K; Ayora, C; García-Gutiérrez, M; Missana, T; Carrera, J

    2015-11-01

    Clay minerals are reputed sorbents for Cs-137 and can be used as a low-permeability material to prevent groundwater flow. Therefore, clay barriers are employed to seal Cs-137 polluted areas and nuclear waste repositories. This work is motivated by cases where groundwater flow cannot be impeded. A permeable and reactive barrier to retain Cs-137 was tested. The trapping mechanism is based on the sorption of cesium on illite-containing clay. The permeability of the reactive material is provided by mixing clay on a matrix of wood shavings. Column tests combined with reactive transport modeling were performed to check both reactivity and permeability. Hydraulic conductivity of the mixture (10(-4) m/s) was sufficient to ensure an adequate hydraulic performance of an eventual barrier excavated in most aquifers. A number of column experiments confirmed Cs retention under different flow rates and inflow solutions. A 1D reactive transport model based on a cation-exchange mechanism was built. It was calibrated with batch experiments for high concentrations of NH4+ and K+ (the main competitors of Cs in the exchange positions). The model predicted satisfactorily the results of the column experiments. Once validated, it was used to investigate the performance and duration of a 2 m thick barrier under different scenarios (flow, clay content, Cs-137 and K concentration).

  17. Implementation of the GFS physical package in the GRAPES regional model: single column experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Baode; Huang, Wei; Bao, Jian-wen

    2015-04-01

    There is a growing concern about coupling among physical components in NWP models. The Physics package of the NCEP Global Forecast System (GFS) has been considerably turned and connection among various components is well considered. Thus, the full GFS physical package was implemented into the GRAPES-MESO and its single column version as well. Using the data collected at ARM Southern Great Plain site during the summer 1997 Intensive Observing Period, several experiments of single-column model (SCM) were conducted to test performance of a set of original physical processes of GRAPES(CTL experiment) and the GFS physics package implemented(GFS experiment). Temperature, moisture, radiation, surface heat flux, surface air temperature and precipitation are evaluated. It is found that potential temperature and vapor mixing ratio simulated by GFS experiment is more accurate than that of CTL experiment. Errors of surface downward solar and long-wave radiation simulated by GFS experiment are less than that of CTL experiment and upward latent and sensible heat flux are also better agreeing with observation. The maximum and minimum 2-m air temperatures of the GFS experiment are close to observation compared with that of CTL experiment. Analysis of precipitation simulated shows that both sets of physical processes well reproduce heavy rainfall events. Failure and delay of moderate rainfall events and over predictions of drizzle events are commonly found for two sets of experiments. For the case of three rainfall events, the errors of potential temperature and vapor mixing ratio simulated by GFS experiment were smaller than that of CTL experiment. It is shown that the late occurrences of rainfall are resulted from a more stable temperature profile and lower moisture simulated in boundary layer than those from the observation prior to rainfall. When the simulated rainfall occurs, the simulated temperature and moisture become more favorable to the precipitation than observation.

  18. Redox-sensitivity and mobility of selected pharmaceutical compounds in a laboratory column experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banzhaf, S.; Nödler, K.; Licha, T.; Krein, A.; Scheytt, T.

    2012-04-01

    Laboratory column experiments are suitable to investigate the sediment water interaction and to study the transport behaviour of solutes. Processes like retardation and degradation can be identified and quantified. The conducted experiment, which is closely connected to a field study in Luxembourg, investigated the transport behaviour of selected pharmaceutical compounds and their redox-dependent metabolism under water saturated conditions. Fine-grained natural sediment with a low hydraulic conductivity from a study site in Luxembourg was filled into the column. The water for the experiment was taken from a small stream at the same fieldsite. It was spiked with four pharmaceutical compounds (carbamazepine, diclofenac, ibuprofen, sulfamethoxazole) with concentrations between 170 and 300 ng/L for the different substances. The chosen pharmaceuticals were also detected in groundwater and surface water samples at the study site and used to qualify exchange/mixing of surface water and groundwater (BANZHAF et al., 2011). As some of the substances are known to exhibit redox-sensitive degradation, the redox-conditions were systematically varied throughout the experiment. This was realised by adding nitrate at the inflow of the column. During the experiment, which lasted for 2.5 months, four different nitrate concentrations (20-130 mg/L) were applied, beginning with the highest concentration. During the experiment water from the reservoir tank was sampled daily in order to detect a potential degradation of the pharmaceutical compounds before they enter the column. The effluent water was sampled every three hours to guarantee a maximum resolution for the analysis of the pharmaceuticals where necessary. In addition, major ions were analysed in the influent and effluent samples. Throughout the experiment physicochemical parameters (oxidation reduction potential (ORP), dissolved oxygen, electrical conductivity, and pH-value) were measured and logged at the outflow of the column

  19. Lattice thermal expansion and anisotropic displacements in -sulfur from diffraction experiments and first-principles theory.

    PubMed

    George, Janine; Deringer, Volker L; Wang, Ai; Müller, Paul; Englert, Ulli; Dronskowski, Richard

    2016-12-21

    Thermal properties of solid-state materials are a fundamental topic of study with important practical implications. For example, anisotropic displacement parameters (ADPs) are routinely used in physics, chemistry, and crystallography to quantify the thermal motion of atoms in crystals. ADPs are commonly derived from diffraction experiments, but recent developments have also enabled their first-principles prediction using periodic density-functional theory (DFT). Here, we combine experiments and dispersion-corrected DFT to quantify lattice thermal expansion and ADPs in crystalline α-sulfur (S8), a prototypical elemental solid that is controlled by the interplay of covalent and van der Waals interactions. We begin by reporting on single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction measurements that provide new and improved reference data from 10 K up to room temperature. We then use several popular dispersion-corrected DFT methods to predict vibrational and thermal properties of α-sulfur, including the anisotropic lattice thermal expansion. Hereafter, ADPs are derived in the commonly used harmonic approximation (in the computed zero-Kelvin structure) and also in the quasi-harmonic approximation (QHA) which takes the predicted lattice thermal expansion into account. At the PPBE+D3(BJ) level, the QHA leads to excellent agreement with experiments. Finally, more general implications of this study for theory and experiment are discussed.

  20. Walker Branch Throughfall Displacement Experiment Data Report: Site Characterization, System Performance, Weather, Species Composition, and Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, P.J.

    2001-09-04

    This numeric data package provides data sets, and accompanying documentation, on site characterization, system performance, weather, species composition, and growth for the Throughfall Displacement Experiment, which was established in the Walker Branch Watershed of East Tennessee to provide data on the responses of forests to altered precipitation regimes. The specific data sets include soil water content and potential, coarse fraction of the soil profile, litter layer temperature, soil temperature, monthly weather, daily weather, hourly weather, species composition of trees and saplings, mature tree and sapling annual growth, and relative leaf area index. Fortran and SAS{trademark} access codes are provided to read the ASCII data files. The data files and this documentation are available without charge on a variety of media and via the Internet from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC).

  1. Column experiment to study isotope fractionation of volatile organic contaminants in porous media under unsaturated conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeannottat, Simon; Hunkeler, Daniel; Breider, Florian

    2010-05-01

    Pollution by organic contaminants such as petroleum hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents is common in industrialized countries. The use of stable isotope analysis is increasingly recognized as a powerful technique for investigating the behaviour of organic or inorganic contaminants. Recently, compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) has proven to be an effective tool to confirm and quantify in-situ biodegradation by indigenous microbial populations in groundwater.In contrast, only few studies have investigated the use of CSIA in the unsaturated zone. In the unsaturated zone, the main potential applications of CSIA include the assessment of biodegradation and the fingerprinting of different sources of petroleum hydrocarbon or chlorinated solvents vapours. However, it has to be taken into account that isotope ratios in the unsaturated zone can vary due to diffusion and volatilization in addition to biodegradation. For application of isotope methods in the unsaturated zone, it is crucial to quantify isotopic fractionation resulting from physico-chemical and transport processes. The study is focused on laboratory experiments that investigate the effect of vaporization and diffusion on isotope ratios. The effect of diffusion is carried out using a column experiment setup that can be considered to represent VOC transport from a floating NAPL towards the atmosphere. Furthermore, additional column and batch experiments will be conducted to better understand the effect of biodegradation. Volatilization is studied with an other experimental setup. In addition, a mathematical framework was developed to simulate the isotope evolution in the column study. Since the initial experiments aimed at investigating the effect of vaporization and diffusion only, the column is filled with dry quartz sand in order to avoid perturbations of concentration profiles by humidity or adsorption on organic matter. An activated sand will later be used for the biodegradation experiments. A

  2. Particle image velocimetry for the surface tension driven convection experiment using a particle displacement tracking technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.; Pline, Alexander D.

    1991-01-01

    The Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment (STDCE) is a Space Transportation System flight experiment to study both transient and steady thermocapillary fluid flows aboard the USML-1 Spacelab mission planned for 1992. One of the components of data collected during the experiment is a video record of the flow field. This qualitative data is then quantified using an all electronic, two-dimensional particle image velocimetry technique called particle displacement tracking (PDT) which uses a simple space domain particle tracking algorithm. The PDT system is successful in producing velocity vector fields from the raw video data. Application of the PDT technique to a sample data set yielded 1606 vectors in 30 seconds of processing time. A bottom viewing optical arrangement is used to image the illuminated plane, which causes keystone distortion in the final recorded image. A coordinate transformation was incorporated into the system software to correct this viewing angle distortion. PDT processing produced 1.8 percent false identifications, due to random particle locations. A highly successful routine for removing the false identifications was also incorporated, reducing the number of false identifications to 0.2 percent.

  3. Numerical simulations of the flow with the prescribed displacement of the airfoil and comparison with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Řidký, V.; Šidlof, P.; Vlček, V.

    2013-04-01

    The work is devoted to comparing measured data with the results of numerical simulations. As mathematical model was used mathematical model whitout turbulence for incompressible flow In the experiment was observed the behavior of designed NACA0015 airfoil in airflow. For the numerical solution was used OpenFOAM computational package, this is open-source software based on finite volume method. In the numerical solution is prescribed displacement of the airfoil, which corresponds to the experiment. The velocity at a point close to the airfoil surface is compared with the experimental data obtained from interferographic measurements of the velocity field. Numerical solution is computed on a 3D mesh composed of about 1 million ortogonal hexahedron elements. The time step is limited by the Courant number. Parallel computations are run on supercomputers of the CIV at Technical University in Prague (HAL and FOX) and on a computer cluster of the Faculty of Mechatronics of Liberec (HYDRA). Run time is fixed at five periods, the results from the fifth periods and average value for all periods are then be compared with experiment.

  4. Particle image velocimetry for the Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment using a particle displacement tracking technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.; Pline, Alexander D.

    1991-01-01

    The Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment (STDCE) is a Space Transportation System flight experiment to study both transient and steady thermocapillary fluid flows aboard the USML-1 Spacelab mission planned for 1992. One of the components of data collected during the experiment is a video record of the flow field. This qualitative data is then quantified using an all electronic, two-dimensional particle image velocimetry technique called particle displacement tracking (PDT) which uses a simple space domain particle tracking algorithm. The PDT system is successful in producing velocity vector fields from the raw video data. Application of the PDT technique to a sample data set yielded 1606 vectors in 30 seconds of processing time. A bottom viewing optical arrangement is used to image the illuminated plane, which causes keystone distortion in the final recorded image. A coordinate transformation was incorporated into the system software to correct this viewing angle distortion. PDT processing produced 1.8 percent false identifications, due to random particle locations. A highly successful routine for removing the false identifications was also incorporated, reducing the number of false identifications to 0.2 percent.

  5. Soil vapor-extraction column experiments on gasoline-contaminated soil. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.E.; Pedersen, T.A.; Kaslick, C.A.; Hoag, G.E.; Fan, C.Y.

    1992-09-01

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) is a technique that is used to remove volatile organic compounds from unsaturated soils. Air is pumped through and from the contaminated zone to remove vapor phase constituents. In the work, laboratory soil column experiments were conducted using a gasoline residually saturated sandy soil to evaluate the performance of SVE under controlled conditions. Both vapor extraction and aqueous leaching of the soil columns were conducted. The progress of the vapor extraction event was continuously monitored by an in-line total hydrocarbon analyzer. Performance of vapor extraction was evaluated by a series of soil chemical analyses including total petroleum hydrocarbons, headspace measurements, and extraction techniques with quantification by GC/FID and GC/MS.

  6. The effectiveness of using computer simulated experiments on junior high students' understanding of the volume displacement concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Byung-Soon; Gennaro, Eugene

    Several researchers have suggested that the computer holds much promise as a tool for science teachers for use in their classrooms (Bork, 1979, Lunetta & Hofstein, 1981). It also has been said that there needs to be more research in determining the effectiveness of computer software (Tinker, 1983).This study compared the effectiveness of microcomputer simulated experiences with that of parallel instruction involving hands-on laboratory experiences for teaching the concept of volume displacement to junior high school students. This study also assessed the differential effect on students' understanding of the volume displacement concept using sex of the students as another independent variable. In addition, it compared the degree of retention, after 45 days, of both treatment groups.It was found that computer simulated experiences were as effective as hands-on laboratory experiences, and that males, having had hands-on laboratory experiences, performed better on the posttest than females having had the hands-on laboratory experiences. There were no significant differences in performance when comparing males with females using the computer simulation in the learning of the displacement concept. This study also showed that there were no significant differences in the retention levels when the retention scores of the computer simulation groups were compared to those that had the hands-on laboratory experiences. However, an ANOVA of the retention test scores revealed that males in both treatment conditions retained knowledge of volume displacement better than females.

  7. Experiments and analysis of drainage displacement processes relevant to carbon dioxide injection.

    PubMed

    Aryana, Saman A; Kovscek, Anthony R

    2012-12-01

    The motivation for this work is a dramatically improved understanding of the fluid mechanics of drainage processes with applications such as CO_{2} storage in saline aquifers and water-alternating-gas injection as an enhanced oil recovery method. In this paper we present in situ distributions of wetting and nonwetting fluids obtained during core-scale two-phase immiscible drainage experiments. The ratio of the viscosity of the resident fluid to that of the invading fluid varies across a range of 0.43 to 150. Saturation distributions observed during dynamic displacement experiments are surprisingly smooth and do not display only one or a few dominant fingers, contrary to the indications of the current literature. The analysis of the saturation distribution using the fractal dimensions of the dynamic three-dimensional saturation distributions suggests that the constitutive relationships for porous media, namely, the relative permeability functions, are history dependent. Accordingly, it is suggested that the nonlinear, unstable flow regime is the regime where efforts to improve physical understanding must be focused.

  8. SURFACTANT ENHANCED REMEDIATION OF SOIL COLUMNS CONTAMINATED BY RESIDUAL TETRACHLOROETHYLENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability of aqueous surfactant solutions to recover tetrachloroethylene (PCE) entrapped in Ottawa sand was evaluated in four column experiments. Residual PCE was emplaced by injecting 14C-labeled PCE into water-saturated soil columns and displacing the free product ...

  9. Building the GPM-GV Column from the GPM Cold season Precipitation Experiment (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesbitt, S. W.; Duffy, G. A.; Gleicher, K.; McFarquhar, G. M.; Kulie, M.; Williams, C. R.; Petersen, W. A.; Munchak, S. J.; Tokay, A.; Skofronick Jackson, G.; Chandrasekar, C. V.; Kollias, P.; Hudak, D. R.; Tanelli, S.

    2013-12-01

    Within the context of the Drop Size Distribution Working Group (DSDWG) of the Global Precipitation Mission-Ground Validation (GPM-GV) program, a major science and satellite precipitation algorithm validation focus is on quantitatively determining the variability of microphysical properties of precipitation in the vertical column, as well as the radiative properties of those particles at GPM-relevant microwave frequencies. The GPM Cold season Precipitation Experiment, or GCPEx, was conducted to address both of these objectives in mid-latitude winter precipitation. Radar observations at C, X, Ku, Ka, and W band from ground based scanning radars, profiling radars, and aircraft, as well as an aircraft passive microwave imager from GCPEx, conducted in early 2012 near Barrie, Ontario, Canada, can be used to constrain the observed reflectivites and brightness temperatures in snow as well as construct radar dual frequency ratios (DFRs) that can be used to identify regimes of microwave radiative properties in observed hydrometeor columns. These data can be directly matched with aircraft and ground based in situ microphysical probes, such as 2-D and bulk aircraft probes and surface disdrometers, to place the microphysical and microwave scattering and emission properties of the snow in context throughout the column of hydrometeors. In this presentation, particle scattering regimes will be identified in GCPEx hydrometeor columns storm events using a clustering technique in a multi-frequency DFR-near Rayleigh radar reflectivity phase space using matched ground-based and aircraft-based radar and passive microwave data. These data will be interpreted using matched in situ disdrometer and aircraft probe microphysical data (particle size distributions, habit identification, fall speed, mass-diameter relationships) derived during the events analyzed. This database is geared towards evaluating scattering simulations and the choice of integral particle size distributions for snow

  10. Psychosocial effects of war experiences among displaced children in southern Darfur.

    PubMed

    Morgos, Dorothy; Worden, J William; Gupta, Leila

    This study focused on assessing the psychosocial effects of the long standing, high intensity, and guerrilla-style of warfare among displaced children in Southern Darfur. The goal was to better understand the etiology, prognosis, and treatment implications for traumatic reactions, depression, and grief symptoms in this population. Three hundred thirty-one children aged 6-17 from three IDP Camps were selected using a quota sampling approach and were administered a Demographic Questionnaire, Child Post Traumatic Stress Reaction Index, Child Depression Inventory, and the Expanded Grief Inventory. Forty-three percent were girls and 57% were boys. The mean age of the children was 12 years. Results found that children were exposed to a very large number of war experiences with no significant differences between genders for types of exposure, including rape, but with older children (13-17 years) facing a larger number of exposures than younger children (6-12 years). Out of the 16 possible war experiences, the mean number was 8.94 (SD = 3.27). Seventy-five percent of the children met the DSM-IV criteria for PTSD, and 38% exhibited clinical symptoms of depression. The percentage of children endorsing significant levels of grief symptoms was 20%. Increased exposure to war experiences led to higher levels of: (1) traumatic reactions; (2) depression; and (3) grief symptoms. Of the 16 war experiences, abduction, hiding to protect oneself, being raped, and being forced to kill or hurt family members were most predictive of traumatic reactions. Being raped, seeing others raped, the death of a parent/s, being forced to fight, and having to hide to protect oneself were the strongest predictors of depressive symptoms. War experiences such as abduction, death of one's parent/s, being forced to fight, and having to hide to protect oneself were the most associated with the child's experience of grief. In addition to Total Grief, Traumatic Grief, Existential Grief, and Continuing Bonds

  11. Estimation of mechanical dispersion and dispersivity in a soil-gas system by column experiments and the dusty gas model.

    PubMed

    Hibi, Yoshihiko; Kanou, Yuki; Ohira, Yuki

    2012-04-01

    In a previous study, column experiments were carried out with Toyoura sand (permeability 2.05×10(-11)m(2)) and Toyoura sand mixed with bentonite (permeability 9.96×10(-13)m(2)) to obtain the molecular diffusion coefficient, the Knudsen diffusion coefficient, the tortuosity for the molecular diffusion coefficient, and the mechanical dispersion coefficient of soil-gas systems. In this study, we conducted column experiments with field soil (permeability 2.0×10(-13)m(2)) and showed that the above parameters can be obtained for both less-permeable and more-permeable soils by using the proposed method for obtaining the parameters and performing column experiments. We then estimated dispersivity from the mechanical dispersion coefficients obtained by the column experiments. We found that the dispersivity depended on the mole fraction of the tracer gas and could be represented by a quadratic equation.

  12. Past On-Site Experience, Crowding Perceptions, and Use Displacement of Visitor Groups to a Peri-Urban National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnberger, Arne; Brandenburg, Christiane

    2007-07-01

    Past on-site experience was linked to the crowding perceptions and use displacement of 383 on-site visitors to the peri-urban Danube Floodplains National Park, Austria. Three visitor groups were determined according to their area experience: local residents from Vienna and rural communities, having the highest level of experience; regional visitors from the city and eastern Austria; and tourists from Austria and abroad with the lowest degree of experience. Crowding perceptions were significantly different across the user groups. More than 50% of local residents perceived the national park as crowded, whereas only 27% of regional visitors and 19% of tourists reported such an evaluation. Even among local residents and regional visitors, respondents with more on-site experience expressed a greater impression of a crowded park. Differences in crowding evaluations between local rural and urban residents and between regional rural and urban visitors were not found. For 27% of local residents and 15% of regional visitors, use levels were so unacceptable that they displaced temporally and spatially, whereas use displacement was relatively irrelevant for tourists. The use displacement strategies involved differ among the three user groups. Management implications were discussed, taking the specific situation of the small national park on the urban-rural fringe into consideration.

  13. Investigating geochemical aspects of managed aquifer recharge by column experiments with alternating desalinated water and groundwater.

    PubMed

    Ronen-Eliraz, Gefen; Russak, Amos; Nitzan, Ido; Guttman, Joseph; Kurtzman, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Managed aquifer recharge (MAR) events are occasionally carried out with surplus desalinated seawater that has been post-treated with CaCO3 in infiltration ponds overlying the northern part of the Israeli Coastal Aquifer. This water's chemical characteristics differ from those of any other water recharged to the aquifer and of the natural groundwater. As the MAR events are short (hours to weeks), the sediment under the infiltration ponds will intermittently host desalinated and natural groundwater. As part of comprehensive research on the influence of those events, column experiments were designed to simulate the alternation of the two water types: post-treated desalinated seawater (PTDES) and natural groundwater (GW). Each experiment included three stages: (i) saturation with GW; (ii) inflow of PTDES; (iii) inflow of GW. Three runs were conducted, each with different sediments extracted from the field and representing a different layer below the infiltration pond: (i) sand (<1% CaCO3), (ii) sand containing 7% CaCO3, and (iii) crushed calcareous sandstone (35% CaCO3). The results from all columns showed enrichment of K(+) and Mg(2+) (up to 0.4meq/L for 20 pore volumes) when PTDES replaced GW, whereas an opposite trend of Ca(2+) depletion (up to 0.5meq/L) was observed only in the columns that contained a high percentage of CaCO3. When GW replaced PTDES, depletion of Mg(2+) and K(+) was noted. The results indicated that adsorption/desorption of cations are the main processes causing the observed enrichment/depletion. It was concluded that the high concentration of Ca(2+) (relative to the total concentration of cations) and the low concentration of Mg(2+) in the PTDES relative to natural GW are the factors controlling the main sediment-water interaction. The enrichment of PTDES with Mg(2+) may be viewed as an additional post-treatment.

  14. Flow-through column experiments to determine the geochemical behavior of common hydrological tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moola, P. S. N.; Sigfússon, B.; Stefansson, A.

    2015-12-01

    Tracer testing is one of the most effective methods used to study groundwater flow, reservoir characteristics and subsurface properties in geohydrology. Hydrological tracer tests were conducted with the basic assumption that the tracer is chemically inert and non-reactive. However, not all tracers behave non-reactive at different pH conditions, the particular tracer may interact with mineral surfaces in the reservoir. In order to study the geochemical behavior of some common hydrological tracers flow-through column experiments were conducted at 25°C. Six common hydrological tracers were investigated, amino G acid, fluorescein, napthionic acid, pyranine, rhodamine B and rhodamine G in porous rocks consisting of basaltic glass, quartz or rhyolite at pH 3, 6.5 and 9. Homogenous porous material of fixed grain size 45-125μm were dry packed in the column to conduct flow through column experiments. Tracers were pumped at fixed flow rates for 20 minutes and switched back to experimental blank solution and the tracer concentration monitored at the outlet. The measured break-through tracer curves were compared to theoretical 1-D reactive transport simulations calculated using the PHREEQC program (Parkhurst and Appelo, 1999). The data obtained from the breakthrough curves suggest that the tracers may be reactive, non-reactive and partially reactive depending on the rock type and solution pH. The tracers that were observed to be reactive showed the influence of adsorption and desorption. The results suggest that some tracers commonly used in ground water hydrology are not suitable under all conditions as they may react with the rocks of the groundwater system.

  15. Removal of cadmium, copper, nickel, cobalt and mercury from water by Apatite II™: column experiments.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Josep; De Pablo, Joan; Cortina, José-Luis; Cama, Jordi; Ayora, Carlos

    2011-10-30

    Apatite II™, a biogenic hydroxyapatite, was evaluated as a reactive material for heavy metal (Cd, Cu, Co, Ni and Hg) removal in passive treatments. Apatite II™ reacts with acid water by releasing phosphates that increase the pH up to 6.5-7.5, complexing and inducing metals to precipitate as metal phosphates. The evolution of the solution concentration of calcium, phosphate and metals together with SEM-EDS and XRD examinations were used to identify the retention mechanisms. SEM observation shows low-crystalline precipitate layers composed of P, O and M. Only in the case of Hg and Co were small amounts of crystalline phases detected. Solubility data values were used to predict the measured column experiment values and to support the removal process based on the dissolution of hydroxyapatite, the formation of metal-phosphate species in solution and the precipitation of metal phosphate. Cd(5)(PO(4))(3)OH(s), Cu(2)(PO(4))OH(s), Ni(3)(PO(4))(2)(s), Co(3)(PO(4))(2)8H(2)O(s) and Hg(3)(PO(4))(2)(s) are proposed as the possible mineral phases responsible for the removal processes. The results of the column experiments show that Apatite II™ is a suitable filling for permeable reactive barriers.

  16. Beyond the Factory Floor: The Experiences of Displaced Manufacturing Workers as They Retrain in Community College Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Entz, Mary J.

    2010-01-01

    This study describes and examines the experiences of displaced manufacturing workers as they lose jobs and retrain in community college settings. The analysis included perceptions of community college services and programming designed to help the workers transition into retraining programs, along with those factors that they identified as…

  17. Fiber-optic displacement sensors on the Hunters Trophy UGT impulse gauge experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Green, R.E.L.; Poutiatine, A.I.

    1995-03-01

    As part of a program to develop gauges for measurement of various mechanical properties in hostile environments, the authors fielded purely optical displacement sensors at the ends of long fiber-optic cables as supplements to the regular displacement sensors of four impulse gauges fielded as part of a materials study on the Hunters Trophy underground effects test at the Nevada Test Site. These fiber-optic sensor systems and their performance on the Hunters Trophy test are described in this report.

  18. Investigating Attachment Behaviors of Cryptosporidium Parvum Oocysts Using Collision Efficiency in Laboratory Column Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Y.; Hou, L.; Atwill, R.; Packman, A. I.; Harter, T.

    2009-12-01

    Cryptosporidium is one of the most common enteric parasites of humans and domestic animals, and a number of outbreaks of Cryprosporidiosis, a diarrheal disease caused by Cryptosporidium have been reported worldwide. Natural porous media has been demonstrated to be an effective filter for removing Cryptosporidium parvum from contaminated water and the amount of Cryptosporidium filtered is known to be highly dependent on physical and chemical conditions of the porous media and the water. Cryptosporidium deposition in saturated porous media involves two main steps: approach and attachment. In contrast to the approach mechanisms, attachment processes have not been systematically described to predict a priori because theories that represent attachment behavior (colloid stability) such as DLVO are insufficient to explain experimental data. For this reason, attachment efficiency is calculated based on empirical data, typically experimental breakthrough curves in laboratory columns or field experiments. In this study, collision (attachment) efficiencies (α) of C. parvum oocyst were calculated to test the effect of chemical property changes on the association of oocysts with sand grains. The breakthrough curve data obtained from twelve column experiments and three models were employed to calculate single collector efficiency (η) and α. The first ten experiments were conducted by changing ionic strength and pH, and mixing with natural sediments under the same physical properties (same η). Our experiment results show that iron coating or clay/suspended solids mixture drastically enhanced oocyst deposition. The experiments also showed that increase in ionic strength and decrease in pH enhanced the attachment efficiency. However, the experiment with 100mM NaCl resulted in low attachment efficiency and the experiment with pH 8.5 showed similar attachment efficiency to the one at pH 7. Based on the results from two additional experiments with different flow velocities, it

  19. Non-isothermal infiltration and tracer transport experiments on large soil columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobotkova, Martina; Snehota, Michal; Cejkova, Eva; Tesar, Miroslav

    2016-04-01

    Isothermal and non-isothermal infiltration experiments were carried out in the laboratory on large undisturbed soil columns (19 cm in diameter, 25 cm high) taken at the experimental catchments Roklan (Sumava Mountains, Czech Republic) and Uhlirska (Jizera Mountains, Czech republic). The aim of the study was twofold. The first goal was to obtain water flow and heat transport data for indirect parameter estimation of thermal and hydraulic properties of soils from two sites by inverse modelling. The second aim was to investigate the extent of impact of the temperature on saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) and dispersity of solute transport. The temperature of infiltrating water in isothermal experiment (20 °C) was equal to the initial temperature of the sample. For non-isothermal experiment water temperature was 5°C, while the initial temperature of the sample was 20°C as in previous case. The experiment was started by flooding the sample surface. Then water level was maintained at constant level throughout the infiltration run using the optical sensor and peristaltic pump. Concentration pulse of deuterium was applied at the top of the soil sample, during the steady state flow. Initial pressure head in the sample was close to field capacity. Two tensiometers and two temperature sensors were inserted in the soil sample in two depths (9 and 15 cm below the top of the sample). Two additional temperature sensors monitored the temperature entering and leaving the samples. Water drained freely through the perforated plate at the bottom of sample by gravity. Inflow and outflow water flux densities, water pressure heads and soil temperatures were monitored continuously during experiments. Effluent was sampled in regular time intervals and samples were analysed for deuterium concentrations by laser spectroscopy to develop breakthrough curves. The outcome of experiments are the series of measured water fluxes, pressure heads and temperatures ready for inverse modelling

  20. Importance of Reversible Attachment in Predicting E. Coli Transport in Saturated Aquifers From Column Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Knappett, P. S. K.; Du, J.; Liu, P.; Horvath, V.; Mailloux, B. J.; Feighery, J.; van Geen, A.; Culligan, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    Drinking water wells indiscriminatingly placed adjacent to fecal contaminated surface water represents a significant but difficult to quantify health risk. Here we seek to understand mechanisms that limit the contamination extent by scaling up bacterial transport results from the laboratory to the field in a well constrained setting. Three pulses of E. coli originating during the early monsoon from a freshly excavated pond receiving latrine effluent in Bangladesh were monitored in 6 wells and modeled with a two-dimensional (2-D) flow and transport model conditioned with measured hydraulic heads. The modeling was performed assuming three different modes of interaction of E. coli with aquifer sands: 1) irreversible attachment only (best-fit ki=7.6 day-1); 2) reversible attachment only (ka=10.5 and kd=0.2 day-1); and 3) a combination of reversible and irreversible modes of attachment (ka=60, kd=7.6, ki=5.2 day-1). Only the third approach adequately reproduced the observed temporal and spatial distribution of E. coli, including a 4-log10 lateral removal distance of ∼9 m. In saturated column experiments, carried out using aquifer sand from the field site, a combination of reversible and irreversible attachment was also required to reproduce the observed breakthrough curves and E. coli retention profiles within the laboratory columns. Applying the laboratory-measured kinetic parameters to the 2-D calibrated flow model of the field site underestimates the observed 4-log10 lateral removal distance by less than a factor of two. This is promising for predicting field scale transport from laboratory experiments. PMID:24821993

  1. Grossular activity-composition relationships in ternary garnets determined by reversed displaced-equilibrium experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koziol, Andrea M.; Newton, Robert C.

    1989-12-01

    Activity-composition relationships of Ca3Al2Si3O12 (grs) in ternary Ca-Mg-Fe garnets of various compositions have been determined by reversed displaced equilibrium experiments at 1000° C and 900° C and pressures of 8 to 17 kbar. The mixing of grs in garnet is nearly ideal at 30 mol% grs, with positive deviations from ideality at lower grs contents. Models of garnet mixing currently in the literature do not predict this trend. Analysis of the present reversals, in conjunction with a garnet mixing model based solely on calorimetry measurements on the binary joins, indicates that a ternary interaction constant for a ternary asymmetric Margules model (Wohl 1953) cannot be constrained. Apparently, some aspects of the garnet binary joins are still not well-known. An alternative asymmetric empirical model, based on analysis of pseudobinary joins of constant Mg/Mg + Fe(Mg #), reproduces the data well and is able to predict grs activity coefficients for garnets with grs contents between 3 and 40 mol% and Mg numbers between 0 and 0.60. The grossular activity coefficient, γ grs, is given by: 410_2005_Article_BF01041750_TeX2GIFE1.gif RTln γ _{grs} = (1 - X_{grs} )^2 [W_{Ca} + 2X_{grs} (W_{FM} - W_{Ca} )] where: 410_2005_Article_BF01041750_TeX2GIFE2.gif begin{gathered} W_{Ca} (J) = - 2060 + 3.57 × 10^4 (Mg# ) - 4.95 × 10^4 (Mg# )^2 \\ W_{FM} (J) = 3390 - 3.71 × 10^4 (Mg# ) + 6.49 × 10^4 (Mg# )^2 \\ These expressions are valid only over the composition range investigated. The formulation cannot be used to extract Fe and Mg activity coefficients. There appears to be no temperature or pressure dependence of the W-parameters over the P-T range investigated. The improved definition of the grossular activity coefficient which results from the present work contributes to an improved formulation of the garnet-Al2SiO5-quartz-plagioclase (GASP) geobarometer and other phase equilibria relevant to metamorphic petrology.

  2. The Use of Narratives to Contextualize the Experiences and Needs of Unemployed, Underemployed, and Displaced Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Jessica C.

    2011-01-01

    The author examined the role of narratives used by unemployed, underemployed, and displaced workers seeking job training assistance through a government-funded One-Stop Career Center. Interviews with employees of a One-Stop Career Center provided insight on client rate of disclosure of personal narratives and how client narratives are used to…

  3. Lyapunov stable displacement-mode haptic manipulation of hydraulic actuators: theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarei-nia, Kurosh; Sepehri, Nariman

    2012-09-01

    In this article, a stable control scheme is designed and experimentally evaluated for haptic-enabled teleoperated control of hydraulic actuators. At the actuator (slave) side, the controller allows the hydraulic actuator to have a stable position tracking. At the master side, the haptic device provides a kind of 'feel' of telepresence to the operator by creating a force that acts like a virtual spring, coupling the displacement of the haptic device to the displacement of the hydraulic actuator. In free motion, this virtual spring restricts the operator's hand to move fast when the slave manipulator is behind/ahead in terms of tracking the master manipulator's displacement. On the other hand, when interacting with the environment, the constrained force imposed on the hydraulic actuator is indirectly reflected through this virtual spring force. Extension of Lyapunov's stability theory to non-smooth systems is first employed to prove the stability of the resulting control system. Effectiveness of the controller is then validated via experimental studies. It is shown that the control scheme performs well in terms of both positioning the hydraulic actuator and providing a haptic feel to the operator. The control scheme is easy to implement since very little knowledge about system parameters is needed and the required on-line measurements are actuator's supply and line pressures and displacement.

  4. Applied the Column Experiment to study on the Physical Clogging Features of Groundwater Artificial Recharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, T.; Tian, Y.; Xing, G.; Shao, J.

    2015-12-01

    Abstract: With the completion of South-to-North Water Diversion Project in China. Except used as the industrial and domestic water, the rest of the water will be injected into the aquifers for recovering of groundwater level. Where the water can be injected and will the blockage happen during the injection time would be the key problems. Thus, a clogging test is designed for testing the reinjection property of different mediums. The clogging process of artificial recharge with sand was experimentally studied in laboratory using sand columns. The clogging degree was determined according to the changes of hydraulic conductivity and flow rate. In this experiment, two kinds of the medium are used, which are round gravel from Xihuang Village and the sands from Yongding riverbed. For simulation different injection conditions, two kinds of suspension are used as the reinjection water, which are 0.5g/l and 1g/l. The test device consists of sand column, water supply system, piezometer system and flow measuring system. By recording the piezometric head and flow in different designed time, the variation of permeability in different depth can be caculated. The permeability can be treat as an important indicator of blockage. The experimental results show that: the physical clogging speed is as twice as fast,when the medium is the sands from Yongding river and the concentration of suspended solids doubled. But there is little differences in physical clogging speed, when the medium is the round gravel from Xihuan village and the concentration of suspension doubled. Generally, the blockage would finish within 20 hours. When it finished, the permeability commonly drops 10%. And the blockage influnce range is about 10cm. Thus, water quantity, water quality and cost effectiveness should be considered to select the recharge place where the recharge speed and the clogging speed are optimized.

  5. Flow-through Column Experiments and Modeling of Microbially Mediated Cr(VI) Reduction at Hanford 100H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, L.; Molins, S.; Beller, H. R.; Brodie, E. L.; Steefel, C.; Nico, P. S.; Han, R.

    2010-12-01

    Microbially mediated Cr(VI) reduction at the Hanford 100H area was investigated by flow-through column experiments. Three separate experiments were conducted to promote microbial activities associated with denitrification, iron and sulfate reduction, respectively. Replicate columns packed with natural sediments from the site under anaerobic environment were injected with 5mM Lactate as the electron donor and 5 μM Cr(VI) in all experiments. Sulfate and nitrate solutions were added to act as the main electron acceptors in the respective experiments, while iron columns relied on the indigenous sediment iron (and manganese) oxides as electron acceptors. Column effluent solutions were analyzed by IC and ICP-MS to monitor the microbial consumption/conversion of lactate and the associated Cr(VI) reduction. Biogeochemical reactive transport modeling was performed to gain further insights into the reaction mechanisms and Cr(VI) bioreduction rates. All experimental columns showed a reduction of the injected Cr(VI). Columns under denitrifying conditions showed the least Cr(VI) reduction at early stages (<60 days) compared to columns run under other experimental conditions, but became more active over time, and ultimately showed the most consistent Cr(VI) reduction. A strong correlation between denitrification and Cr(VI) reduction processes was observed and was in agreement with the results obtained in batch experiments with a denitrifying bacterium isolated from the Hanford site. The accumulation of nitrite does not appear to have an adverse effect on Cr(VI) reduction rates. Reactive transport simulations indicated that biomass growth completely depleted influent ammonium, and called for an additional source of N to account for the measured reduction rates. Iron columns were the least active with undetectable consumption of the injected lactate, slowest cell growth, and the smallest change in Cr(VI) concentrations during the course of the experiment. In contrast, columns

  6. Response of Atmospheric-Methane Oxidation to Methane-Flux Manipulation in a Laboratory Soil-Column Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroth, M. H.; Mignola, I.; Henneberger, R.

    2015-12-01

    Upland soils are an important sink for atmospheric methane (CH4). Uptake of atmospheric CH4 in soils is generally diffusion limited, and is mediated by aerobic CH4 oxidizing bacteria (MOB) that possess a high-affinity form of a key enzyme, allowing CH4 consumption at near-atmospheric concentrations (≤ 1.9 µL/L). As cultivation attempts for these high-affinity MOB have shown little success, there remains much speculation regarding their functioning in different environments. For example, it is frequently assumed that they are highly sensitive to physical disturbance, but their response in activity and abundance to changes in substrate availability remains largely unknown. We present results of a laboratory column experiment conducted to investigate the response in activity and abundance of high-affinity MOB to an increase in CH4 flux. Intact soil cores, collected at a field site where atmospheric CH4 oxidation activity is frequently quantified, were transferred into two 1-m-long, 12-cm-dia. columns. The columns were operated at constant temperature in the dark, their headspace being continuously flushed with air. Diffusive gas-transport conditions were maintained in the reference column, whereas CH4 flux was increased in several steps in the treatment column by inducing advective gas flow using a diaphragm pump. Soil-gas samples periodically collected from ports installed along the length of the columns were analyzed for CH4 content. Together with measurements of soil-water content, atmospheric CH4 oxidation was quantified using the soil-profile method. First results indicate that atmospheric CH4 oxidation activity comparable with the field was maintained in the reference column throughout the experiment. Moreover, high-affinity MOB quickly adjusted to an increase in CH4 flux in the treatment column, efficiently consuming CH4. Quantification of MOB abundance is currently ongoing. Our data provide new insights into controls on atmospheric CH4 oxidation in soils.

  7. Bridging the gap between batch and column experiments: A case study of Cs adsorption on granite.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tsing-Hai; Li, Ming-Hsu; Teng, Shi-Ping

    2009-01-15

    Both batch and column methods are conventionally utilized to determine some critical parameters for assessing the transport of contaminants of concern. The validity of using these parameters is somewhat confusing, however, since outputs such as distribution coefficient (Kd) from these two approaches are often discrepant. To bridge this gap, all possible factors that might contribute to this discrepancy were thoroughly investigated in this report by a case study of Cs sorption to crushed granite under various conditions. Our results confirm an important finding that solid/liquid (S/L) ratio is the dominant factor responsible for this discrepancy. As long as the S/L ratio exceeds 0.25, a consistent Kd value can be reached by the two methods. Under these conditions (S/L ratios>0.25), the sorption capacity of the solid is about an order of magnitude less than that in low S/L ratios (<0.25). Although low sorption capacity is observed in the cases of high S/L ratios, the sorption usually takes place preferentially on the most favorable (thermodynamically stable) sorption sites to form a stronger binding. This is verified by our desorption experiments in which a linear isotherm feature is shown either in deionized water or in 1M of ammonium acetate solutions. It may be concluded that batch experiment with an S/L ratio exceeding 0.25 is crucial to obtain convincing Kd values for safety assessment of radioactive waste repository.

  8. Experiments on front roughness and averaged saturation for immiscible displacement in heterogeneous porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiss, V.; Neuweiler, I.; Faerber, A.

    2009-04-01

    For mass transfer during two-phase two-component flow processes in heterogeneous porous media, the fluid-fluid interface of the two-phases have a strong influence. To predict mass transfer it is therefore important to determine the interface properties. An important characterization criterion for displacement of one fluid by another, immiscible one in porous media, is the morphology of the fluid-fluid interface. The interface morphology is investigated intensely since a long time. It is determined by the interplay between capillary, gravity and viscous forces and by the structure of the pore space. The interface morphology influences the modeling of a displacement process on the Darcy scale, where the pore scale is no longer resolved. However, the interface criteria on the pore scale cannot necessarily be transferred to the larger scale. This is in particular true in heterogeneous media, where the structure of material interfaces on the large scale may determine the flow process. Immiscible displacement fronts on a Darcy scale are often sharp and may show instabilities on the larger scale. Pore scale instabilities, on the other hand, may appear as stabilized on the large scale due to large scale structures. We will present observations of displacement fronts in Darcy scale heterogeneous media, where fluid content was measured using optical methods. The front properties were analyzed for different flow regimes and structures. The growth rate of the front roughness shows a different behavior than the spatially averaged fluid content. While the front is in most cases stable after some time, the width of the distribution of the averaged fluid content continues to grow due to pore-scale and macroscopic trapping events.

  9. Crossover from Fingering to Fracturing in Fluid-fluid Displacement in Deformable Granular Media: Theory and Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holtzman, R.; Szulczewski, M.; Darby, J.; Juanes, R.

    2011-12-01

    Predicting and, possibly, controlling the morphology of gas invasion in porous media is critical in many natural and engineered processes like enhanced oil recovery, hydraulic fracturing, methane venting from organic-rich sediments, and filter design. Here, we study fluid-fluid displacement in a deformable granular medium by means of laboratory experiments, computer simulations and scaling analysis. Experimentally, we inject air into a water-saturated glass beads packed in a slender cylindrical container, and record the evolution of the invasion pattern. We have three control variables: the injection rate, the bead size, and the confining stress. Under large confinement, when the granular pack behaves as a rigid medium, the invasion pattern experiences a transition from viscous to capillary fingering by decreasing the injection rate, in agreement with classical results [1]. We show, however, that for a fixed injection rate the system exhibits a crossover from fingering to "fracturing" as the bead size is decreased or the level of confinement is reduced. Thus, fracture opening is the dominant gas invasion mechanism in fine, soft sediments. Our mechanistic model and scaling analysis allow us to rationalize the different regimes of fluid displacement as a function of the properties of the fluids (interfacial tension and viscosity) and solid particles (particle size and stiffness), pore-scale disorder, injection rate and external confinement. We identify two dimensionless groups that describe the interplay between capillarity, viscosity and elasticity, and control the mode of fluid displacement [2].

  10. Column Experiments of Smouldering Combustion as a Remediation Technology for NAPL Source Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pironi, P.; Switzer, C.; Rein, G.; Torero, J. L.; Gerhard, J. I.

    2008-12-01

    Smouldering combustion is an innovative approach that has significant potential for the remediation of industrial sites contaminated by non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). Many common liquid contaminants, including coal tar, solvents, oils and petrochemicals are combustible and release significant amounts of heat when burned. Smouldering combustion is the flameless burning of a condensed fuel that derives heat from surface oxidation reactions. Gerhard et al., 2006 (Eos Trans., 87(52), Fall Meeting Suppl. H24A) presented proof-of-concept experiments demonstrating that NAPLs embedded in a porous medium may be effectively destroyed via smouldering. Based upon that work, it was hypothesized that the process can be self- sustaining, such that, a short duration energy input (i.e., ignition) at a single location is sufficient to generate a reaction that propagates itself through the NAPL source zone until the NAPL is eliminated, provided that enough air is injected into the soil. In this work, this hypothesis is proven via column experiments at the intermediate bench scale (~ 30 cm) utilizing coal tar-contaminated quartz sands. Over 30 such experiments examine the sensitivity of NAPL smouldering to a series of fluid-media system variables and engineering control parameters, including contaminant type, NAPL saturation, water saturation, porous media type and air injection rate. Diagnostic techniques employed to characterize the results include temperature mapping, off-gas analysis (via FTIR), heat front mapping via digital imaging, and pre- and post-treatment soil analysis. The derived relationships between the manipulated system variables and experimental results are providing understanding of the mechanisms controlling the ignition and propagation of liquid smouldering. Such insight is necessary for the ongoing design of both ex situ and in situ pilot applications.

  11. Column experiments to investigate transport of colloidal humic acid through porous media during managed aquifer recharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dan; Zhou, Jingjing; Zhang, Wenjing; Huan, Ying; Yu, Xipeng; Li, Fulin; Chen, Xuequn

    2016-09-01

    Colloids act as vectors for pollutants in groundwater, thereby creating a series of environmental problems. While managed aquifer recharge plays an important role in protecting groundwater resources and controlling land subsidence, it has a significant effect on the transport of colloids. In this study, particle size and zeta potential of colloidal humic acid (HA) have been measured to determine the effects of different hydrochemistry conditions. Column experiments were conducted to examine the effects on the transport of colloidal HA under varying conditions of pH (5, 7, 9), ionic strength (<0.0005, 0.02, 0.05 M), cation valence (Na+, Ca2+) and flow rate (0.1, 0.2, 0.4 ml/min) through collectors (glass beads) to model the properties and quality of artificial recharge water and changes in the hydrodynamic field. Breakthrough curves showed that the behavior of colloidal HA being transported varied depending on the conditions. Colloid transport was strongly influenced by hydrochemical and hydrodynamic conditions. With decreasing pH or increasing ionic strength, a decrease in the peak effluent concentration of colloidal HA and increase in deposition could be clearly seen. Comparison of different cation valence tests indicated that changes in transport and deposition were more pronounced with divalent Ca2+ than with monovalent Na+. Changes in hydrodynamic field (flow rate) also had an impact on transportation of colloidal HA. The results of this study highlight the need for further research in this area.

  12. A Single Column Model Ensemble Approach Applied to the TWP-ICE Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, Laura; Jakob, Christian; Cheung, K.; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Hill, Adrian; Hume, Timothy; Keane, R. J.; Komori, T.; Larson, Vincent E.; Lin, Yanluan; Liu, Xiaohong; Nielsen, Brandon J.; Petch, Jon C.; Plant, R. S.; Singh, M. S.; Shi, Xiangjun; Song, X.; Wang, Weiguo; Whitall, M. A.; Wolf, A.; Xie, Shaocheng; Zhang, Guang J.

    2013-06-27

    Single column models (SCM) are useful testbeds for investigating the parameterisation schemes of numerical weather prediction and climate models. The usefulness of SCM simulations are limited, however, by the accuracy of the best-estimate large-scale data prescribed. One method to address this uncertainty is to perform ensemble simulations of the SCM. This study first derives an ensemble of large-scale data for the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) based on an estimate of a possible source of error in the best-estimate product. This data is then used to carry out simulations with 11 SCM and 2 cloud-resolving models (CRM). Best-estimate simulations are also performed. All models show that moisture related variables are close to observations and there are limited differences between the best-estimate and ensemble mean values. The models, however, show different sensitivities to changes in the forcing particularly when weakly forced. The ensemble simulations highlight important differences in the moisture budget between the SCM and CRM. Systematic differences are also apparent in the ensemble mean vertical structure of cloud variables. The ensemble is further used to investigate relations between cloud variables and precipitation identifying large differences between CRM and SCM. This study highlights that additional information can be gained by performing ensemble simulations enhancing the information derived from models using the more traditional single best-estimate simulation.

  13. Advanced landfill leachate treatment using iron-carbon microelectrolysis- Fenton process: Process optimization and column experiments.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liqun; Yang, Qi; Wang, Dongbo; Li, Xiaoming; Zeng, Guangming; Li, Zhijun; Deng, Yongchao; Liu, Jun; Yi, Kaixin

    2016-11-15

    A novel hydrogen peroxide-enhanced iron-carbon (Fe-C) microelectrolysis reactor was proposed for the pretreatment of mature landfill leachate. This reactor, combining microelectrolysis with Fenton process, revealed high treatment efficiency. The operating variables, including Fe-C dosage, H2O2 concentration and initial pH, were optimized by the response surface methodology (RSM), regarding the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency and biochemical oxygen demand: chemical oxygen demand (BOD5/COD) as the responses. The highest COD removal (74.59%) and BOD5/COD (0.50) was obtained at optimal conditions of Fe-C dosage 55.72g/L, H2O2 concentration 12.32mL/L and initial pH 3.12. Three-dimensional excitation and emission matrix (3D-EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular weight (MW) distribution demonstrated that high molecular weight fractions such as refractory fulvic-like substances in leachate were effectively destroyed during the combined processes, which should be attributed to the combination oxidative effect of microelectrolysis and Fenton. The fixed-bed column experiments were performed and the breakthrough curves at different flow rates were evaluated to determine the practical applicability of the combined process. All these results show that the hydrogen peroxide-enhanced iron-carbon (Fe-C) microelectrolysis reactor is a promising and efficient technology for the treatment of mature landfill leachate.

  14. Rise characteristics of gas bubbles in a 2D rectangular column: VOF simulations vs experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna, R.; Baten, J.M. van

    1999-10-01

    About five centuries ago, Leonardo da Vinci described the sinuous motion of gas bubbles rising in water. The authors have attempted to simulate the rise trajectories of bubbles of 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 12, and 20 mm in diameter rising in a 2D rectangular column filled with water. The simulations were carried out using the volume-of-fluid (VOF) technique developed by Hirt and Nichols (J. Computational Physics, 39, 201--225 (1981)). To solve the Navier-Stokes equations of motion the authors used a commercial solver, CFX 4.1c of AEA Technology, UK. They developed their own bubble-tracking algorithm to capture sinuous bubble motions. The 4 and 5 mm bubbles show large lateral motions observed by Da Vinci. The 7, 8 and 9 mm bubble behave like jellyfish. The 12 mm bubble flaps its wings like a bird. The extent of lateral motion of the bubbles decreases with increasing bubble size. Bubbles larger than 20 mm in size assume a spherical cap form and simulations of the rise characteristics match experiments exactly. VOF simulations are powerful tools for a priori determination of the morphology and rise characteristics of bubbles rising in a liquid. Bubble-bubble interactions are also properly modeled by the VOF technique.

  15. Competitive adsorption and selectivity sequence of heavy metals by chicken bone-derived biochar: Batch and column experiment.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Hwan; Cho, Ju-Sik; Ok, Yong Sik; Kim, Seong-Heon; Kang, Se-Won; Choi, Ik-Won; Heo, Jong-Soo; DeLaune, Ronald D; Seo, Dong-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate adsorption of heavy metals in single- and ternary-metal forms onto chicken bone biochar (CBB). Competitive sorption of heavy metals by CBB has never been reported previously. The maximum adsorption capacities of metals by CBB were in the order of Cu (130 mg g(-1)) > Cd (109 mg g(-1)) > Zn (93 mg g(-1)) in the single-metal adsorption isotherm and Cu (108 mg g(-1)) > Cd (54 mg g(-1)) ≥ Zn (44 mg g(-1)) in the ternary-metal adsorption isotherm. Cu was the most retained cation, whereas Zn could be easily exchanged and substituted by Cu. Batch experimental data best fit the Langmuir model rather than the Freundlich isotherms. In the column experiments, the total adsorbed amounts of the metals were in the following order of Cu (210 mg g(-1)) > Cd (192 mg g(-1)) > Zn (178) in single-metal conditions, and Cu (156) > Cd (123) > Zn (92) in ternary-metal conditions. Results from both the batch and column experiments indicate that competitive adsorption among metals increases the mobility of these metals. Especially, Zn in single-metal conditions lost it adsorption capacity most significantly. Based on the 3D simulation graphs of heavy metals, adsorption patterns under single adsorption condition were different than under competitive adsorption condition. Results from both the batch and column experiments show that competitive adsorption among metals increases the mobility of these metals. The maximum metal adsorption capacity of the metals in the column experiments was higher than that in the batch experiment indicating other metal retention mechanisms rather than adsorption may be involved. Therefore, both column and batch experiments are needed for estimating retention capacities and removal efficiencies of metals in CBB.

  16. Using Artificial Soil and Dry-Column Flash Chromatography to Simulate Organic Substance Leaching Process: A Colorful Environmental Chemistry Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Avellar, Isa G. J.; Cotta, Tais A. P. G.; Neder, Amarilis de V. Finageiv

    2012-01-01

    Soil is an important and complex environmental compartment and soil contamination contributes to the pollution of aquifers and other water basins. A simple and low-cost experiment is described in which the mobility of three organic compounds in an artificial soil is examined using dry-column flash chromatography. The compounds were applied on top…

  17. Natural attenuation of pharmaceuticals and an illicit drug in a laboratory column experiment.

    PubMed

    Greenhagen, Andrew M; Lenczewski, Melissa E; Carroll, Monica

    2014-11-01

    Trace amounts of pharmaceutical compounds have been detected in waters across the United States. Many compounds are released as the result of human ingestion and subsequent excretion of over-the-counter and prescription medications, and illicit drugs. This research utilized columns (30×30cm) of sand and undisturbed fine-grained sediments to simulate injection of wastewater containing pharmaceuticals and an illicit drug, such as would be found in a septic system, leaky sewer, or landfill. The columns were placed in a temperature-controlled laboratory and each was injected with natural groundwater containing known concentrations of caffeine, methamphetamine, and acetaminophen. Natural attenuation of each chemical was observed in all columns. The highest amount removed (approximately 90%) occurred in the undisturbed column injected with methamphetamine, compared with little reduction in the sand column. When the suite of drugs was injected, loss of methamphetamine was less than when methamphetamine was injected alone. The subsurface sediments exhibit the ability to remove a substantial amount of the injected pharmaceuticals and illicit drug; however, complete removal was not achieved. There was little attenuation of injected pharmaceuticals in the sand column which demonstrates a concern for water quality in the environment if pharmaceuticals were to contaminate a sandy aquifer. Understanding the transport of pharmaceuticals in the subsurface environment is an important component of protecting drinking water supplies from contamination.

  18. A Single-column Model Ensemble Approach Applied to the TWP-ICE Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, L.; Jakob, C.; Cheung, K.; DelGenio, A.; Hill, A.; Hume, T.; Keane, R. J.; Komori, T.; Larson, V. E.; Lin, Y.; Liu, X.; Nielsen, B. J.; Petch, J.; Plant, R. S.; Singh, M. S.; Shi, X.; Song, X.; Wang, W.; Whithall, M. A.; Wolf, A.; Xie, S.; Zhang, G.

    2013-01-01

    Single-column models (SCM) are useful test beds for investigating the parameterization schemes of numerical weather prediction and climate models. The usefulness of SCM simulations are limited, however, by the accuracy of the best estimate large-scale observations prescribed. Errors estimating the observations will result in uncertainty in modeled simulations. One method to address the modeled uncertainty is to simulate an ensemble where the ensemble members span observational uncertainty. This study first derives an ensemble of large-scale data for the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) based on an estimate of a possible source of error in the best estimate product. These data are then used to carry out simulations with 11 SCM and two cloud-resolving models (CRM). Best estimate simulations are also performed. All models show that moisture-related variables are close to observations and there are limited differences between the best estimate and ensemble mean values. The models, however, show different sensitivities to changes in the forcing particularly when weakly forced. The ensemble simulations highlight important differences in the surface evaporation term of the moisture budget between the SCM and CRM. Differences are also apparent between the models in the ensemble mean vertical structure of cloud variables, while for each model, cloud properties are relatively insensitive to forcing. The ensemble is further used to investigate cloud variables and precipitation and identifies differences between CRM and SCM particularly for relationships involving ice. This study highlights the additional analysis that can be performed using ensemble simulations and hence enables a more complete model investigation compared to using the more traditional single best estimate simulation only.

  19. A single-column model ensemble approach applied to the TWP-ICE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, L.; Jakob, C.; Cheung, K.; Genio, A. Del; Hill, A.; Hume, T.; Keane, R. J.; Komori, T.; Larson, V. E.; Lin, Y.; Liu, X.; Nielsen, B. J.; Petch, J.; Plant, R. S.; Singh, M. S.; Shi, X.; Song, X.; Wang, W.; Whitall, M. A.; Wolf, A.; Xie, S.; Zhang, G.

    2013-06-01

    Single-column models (SCM) are useful test beds for investigating the parameterization schemes of numerical weather prediction and climate models. The usefulness of SCM simulations are limited, however, by the accuracy of the best estimate large-scale observations prescribed. Errors estimating the observations will result in uncertainty in modeled simulations. One method to address the modeled uncertainty is to simulate an ensemble where the ensemble members span observational uncertainty. This study first derives an ensemble of large-scale data for the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) based on an estimate of a possible source of error in the best estimate product. These data are then used to carry out simulations with 11 SCM and two cloud-resolving models (CRM). Best estimate simulations are also performed. All models show that moisture-related variables are close to observations and there are limited differences between the best estimate and ensemble mean values. The models, however, show different sensitivities to changes in the forcing particularly when weakly forced. The ensemble simulations highlight important differences in the surface evaporation term of the moisture budget between the SCM and CRM. Differences are also apparent between the models in the ensemble mean vertical structure of cloud variables, while for each model, cloud properties are relatively insensitive to forcing. The ensemble is further used to investigate cloud variables and precipitation and identifies differences between CRM and SCM particularly for relationships involving ice. This study highlights the additional analysis that can be performed using ensemble simulations and hence enables a more complete model investigation compared to using the more traditional single best estimate simulation only.

  20. GRAVI-2 space experiment: investigating statoliths displacement and location effects on early stages of gravity perception pathways in lentil roots.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizet, François; Eche, Brigitte; Pereda Loth, Veronica; Badel, Eric; Legue, Valerie; Brunel, Nicole; Label, Philippe; Gérard, Joëlle

    2016-07-01

    The plants ability to orient their growth with respect to external stimuli such as gravity is a key factor for survival and acclimation to their environment. Belowground, plant roots modulate their growth towards gravity, allowing soil exploration and uptake of water and nutrients. In roots, gravity sensing cells called statocytes are located in the center of the root cap. Statocytes contain starch-filled plastids denser than the cytoplasm, which sedimentation along the direction of gravity is widely accepted as being involved into early stages of gravity perception (the starch-statolith hypothesis; Sack, 1991). Root gravitropism following statoliths displacement is based on auxin redistribution in the root apex, inducing differential growth between the root upward and downward sides. However at the cell scale, the chain of transduction starting from statoliths displacement and leading to auxin redistribution remains poorly documented. Signaling molecules such as calcium, reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide and inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate are serious candidates previously shown to be involved within minutes before modification of the expression of auxin-related genes (Morita, 2010; Sato et al., 2015). Here, we observe and quantify statoliths displacements and locations at various levels of gravity to investigate two hypothesis: (i) Are contacts between statoliths and the endoplasmic reticulum necessary to induce gravitropism? (ii) Are very low displacements of statoliths sufficient to initiate transduction pathways such as the calcium's one? These questionings have led to an experiment called GRAVI-2 which took place aboard the ISS in 2014. During the experiment, lentil roots were grown in the European modular cultivation system for several hours in microgravity and were then submitted to short high gravity stimulus (5 and 15 minutes at 2 g) before the return to Earth for analyses. Ongoing cytological measurements will reveal the effects of statoliths

  1. Transport and attenuation of metal(loid)s in mine tailings amended with organic carbon: Column experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, Matthew B. J.; Blowes, David W.; Ptacek, Carol J.; Condon, Peter D.

    2011-07-01

    A laboratory-scale column experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of organic carbon amendments on the mobility of As, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Tl and Zn in mine tailings. Three columns were packed with sulfide- and carbonate-rich tailings, which were amended with a 1:1 (vol.) mixture of peat and spent brewing grain at proportions of 0, 2 and 5 vol. %. A simulated input solution characterized by circumneutral pH and elevated concentrations of SO 4 and S 2O 3 was passed through the columns for 540 days. The input solution contained low concentrations of metal(loid)s during the initial 300 days and elevated concentrations thereafter. Decreases in mass transport of S 2O 3 were observed in all columns; with increased attenuation observed at 5 vol. % organic carbon content. Removal of Mn, Ni, Cu, Sb and Mo was observed in all columns during the initial 300 days. However, during this time, mobilization of Fe, As, Zn and Pb was observed, with the greatest increases in concentration observed at the higher organic carbon content. During the final 240 days, S 2O 3 removal was enhanced in columns containing organic carbon, and Fe, Mn, Ni, Tl, As and Sb removal also was observed. This study demonstrates the influence of organic carbon amendments on metal(loid) mobility in mine tailings. Decreases in mass discharge of metal(loid)s may be achieved using this technique; however, site-specific geochemical conditions must be considered before field-scale implementation.

  2. Influences of nanoscale zero valent iron loadings and bicarbonate and calcium concentrations on hydrogen evolution in anaerobic column experiments.

    PubMed

    Paar, Hendrik; Ruhl, Aki Sebastian; Jekel, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The estimation of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) reactivity after its injection into the subsurface is essential for its application in groundwater remediation. In the present study H₂ generation of commercially available nZVI and novel milled nZVI flakes were investigated in column experiments with varying nZVI loads (ranging from 8 to 43 g nZVI per kg sand). H₂ evolution rates were determined for column experiments without and with hydrogen carbonate and/or calcium. On average 0.29 mmol H₂/L per g Fe⁰ evolved within the first 30 days in column experiments with spherical, commercial nZVI particles. The H₂ evolution developed almost independently of the water matrices applied. The application of nZVI flakes resulted in lower H₂ generation rates. In general corrosion rates accelerated linearly with increasing initial amounts of iron. This was evident in experiments with both particle types. Concentration profiles of carbonate and calcium in influent and effluent were used to estimate corrosion products and precipitates. Despite the presence of high concentrations of inorganic carbon, Fe²⁺ reacted preferably with hydroxide ions to form ferrous hydroxide which is the precursor of magnetite. As a result only minor passivation of the reactive nZVI was observed.

  3. Computational experience with a dense column feature for interior-point methods

    SciTech Connect

    Wenzel, M.; Czyzyk, J.; Wright, S.

    1997-08-01

    Most software that implements interior-point methods for linear programming formulates the linear algebra at each iteration as a system of normal equations. This approach can be extremely inefficient when the constraint matrix has dense columns, because the density of the normal equations matrix is much greater than the constraint matrix and the system is expensive to solve. In this report the authors describe a more efficient approach for this case, that involves handling the dense columns by using a Schur-complement method and conjugate gradient interaction. The authors report numerical results with the code PCx, into which the technique now has been incorporated.

  4. Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program. Operating experience with pulsed-column holdup estimators

    SciTech Connect

    Ehinger, M.H.

    1986-01-01

    Methods for estimating pulsed-column holdup are being investigated as part of the Safeguards Assessment task of the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The CFRP was a major sponsor of test runs at the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel plant (BNFP) in 1980 and 1981. During these tests, considerable measurement data were collected for pulsed columns in the plutonium purification portion of the plant. These data have been used to evaluate and compare three available methods of holdup estimation.

  5. Effect of gravity on colloid transport through water-saturated columns packed with glass beads: modeling and experiments.

    PubMed

    Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V; Syngouna, Vasiliki I

    2014-06-17

    The role of gravitational force on colloid transport in water-saturated columns packed with glass beads was investigated. Transport experiments were performed with colloids (clays: kaolinite KGa-1b, montmorillonite STx-1b). The packed columns were placed in various orientations (horizontal, vertical, and diagonal) and a steady flow rate of Q = 1.5 mL/min was applied in both up-flow and down-flow modes. All experiments were conducted under electrostatically unfavorable conditions. The experimental data were fitted with a newly developed, analytical, one-dimensional, colloid transport model. The effect of gravity is incorporated in the mathematical model by combining the interstitial velocity (advection) with the settling velocity (gravity effect). The results revealed that flow direction influences colloid transport in porous media. The rate of particle deposition was shown to be greater for up-flow than for down-flow direction, suggesting that gravity was a significant driving force for colloid deposition.

  6. An adult-like pattern of ocular dominance columns in striate cortex of newborn monkeys prior to visual experience.

    PubMed

    Horton, J C; Hocking, D R

    1996-03-01

    In macaque monkeys, the geniculocortical afferents serving each eye segregate in layer IVc of striate cortex during early life into a pattern of alternating inputs called ocular dominance columns. It has been disputed whether visual experience is necessary for the formation of ocular dominance columns. To settle this issue, fetal monkeys were delivered prematurely by Caesarean section at embryonic day 157 (E157), 8 d before the end of normal gestation. To avoid light exposure, the Caesarean section and all subsequent feedings and procedures were done in absolute darkness, using infrared night-vision goggles. Tritiated proline was injected into the right eye 1 d after delivery (E158). One week later at postnatal age 0 (P0), the equivalent of a full-term pregnancy (E165/P0), alternate sections of unfolded and flattened visual cortex were prepared for autoradiography or cytochrome oxidase (CO). All three newborns studied at E165/P0 had well segregated ocular dominance columns organized into the characteristic mosaic present in adults. In the upper layers, a mature pattern of CO patches (also known as blobs or puffs) was visible, aligned with the ocular dominance columns in layer IVc. Every other row of patches in layers II, III was labeled by [3H]proline. In V2, a distinct system of alternating thick-pale-thin-pale CO stripes was present. These findings indicate that stimulation of the retina by light is not necessary for the development of columnar systems in the visual cortex. Ocular dominance columns, patches, and V2 stripes all are well formed before visual experience. Even the thalamic input to the patches in the upper layers of striate cortex is segregated by eye in newborns.

  7. Investigation of reactive transport with closed-flow column experiments and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) of fluorescence data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritschel, Thomas; Totsche, Kai Uwe

    2013-04-01

    The sorption of solutes and colloids to immobile sorbents results in the phenomenon of retardation. Besides the interactions at the sorbent-solution-interface, the sorption rate depends also on the spatial structure of the pore network (size distribution, connectivity, topology). Column experiments allow for the consideration of the structure and thus for a quantification of possible rate limitations. We focus on column experiments run in closed-flow mode. There, a typical oscillation in the "breakthrough" of solute concentration, which conveys additional information about the flow regime (dispersivity, water content, immobile water) as well as the effective interaction kinetics, can be observed. Another major feature of the closed flow design is the conservation of tracer mass inside the column setup. Therefore, the investigation of sorption characteristics can be simplified by using mass balances. Our objective is to study the interaction between different solutes (conservative tracers, e.g., NaCl or LiBr and reactive tracers, e.g., acetate, oxalate and phenanthrene) and artificial porous media (composed of quartz, illite, goethite and charcoal in a well defined grain size distribution). The concentration-time profile of solutes is measured with non-consuming techniques (fluorescence spectroscopy or electrical conductivity measurements). PARAFAC analysis of fluorescence data is used for the quantification of aromatic compounds in complex background solutions. Interaction parameters obtained from breakthrough data are then used to quantify the availability of reactive mineral surfaces and effective rates of physical and chemical non-equilibrium processes. After the column experiments, the effect on the microtopology and mineral surfaces is investigated by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Recent multi-step tracer experiments allowed for the reconstruction of adsorption isotherms of oxalate and acetate on goethite.

  8. Being Careful with PASCO's Kinetic Friction Experiment: Uncovering Pre-Sliding Displacement?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawlor, T. M.

    2008-01-01

    The widely used PASCO laboratory equipment is an excellent way to introduce students to many topics in physics. In one case, PASCO's equipment may be too good! Various experiments exist for calculating the kinetic coefficient of friction by measuring the acceleration of a sliding object under some constant force. With ever more accurate equipment,…

  9. Education and/or Displacement? A Pedagogical Inquiry into Foucault's "Limit-Experience"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Christiane

    2010-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the educational-philosophical implications of Michel Foucault's work: It poses the question whether Michel Foucault's remarks surrounding "limit-experience" can be placed in an educational context and provide an alternative view regarding the relationship that we maintain to ourselves. As a first step, the significance…

  10. Lattice thermal expansion and anisotropic displacements in 𝜶-sulfur from diffraction experiments and first-principles theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Janine; Deringer, Volker L.; Wang, Ai; Müller, Paul; Englert, Ulli; Dronskowski, Richard

    2016-12-01

    Thermal properties of solid-state materials are a fundamental topic of study with important practical implications. For example, anisotropic displacement parameters (ADPs) are routinely used in physics, chemistry, and crystallography to quantify the thermal motion of atoms in crystals. ADPs are commonly derived from diffraction experiments, but recent developments have also enabled their first-principles prediction using periodic density-functional theory (DFT). Here, we combine experiments and dispersion-corrected DFT to quantify lattice thermal expansion and ADPs in crystalline α-sulfur (S8), a prototypical elemental solid that is controlled by the interplay of covalent and van der Waals interactions. We begin by reporting on single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction measurements that provide new and improved reference data from 10 K up to room temperature. We then use several popular dispersion-corrected DFT methods to predict vibrational and thermal properties of α-sulfur, including the anisotropic lattice thermal expansion. Hereafter, ADPs are derived in the commonly used harmonic approximation (in the computed zero-Kelvin structure) and also in the quasi-harmonic approximation (QHA) which takes the predicted lattice thermal expansion into account. At the PPBE+D3(BJ) level, the QHA leads to excellent agreement with experiments. Finally, more general implications of this study for theory and experiment are discussed.

  11. The use of spin desalting columns in DMSO-quenched H/D-exchange NMR experiments.

    PubMed

    Chandak, Mahesh S; Nakamura, Takashi; Takenaka, Toshio; Chaudhuri, Tapan K; Yagi-Utsumi, Maho; Chen, Jin; Kato, Koichi; Kuwajima, Kunihiro

    2013-04-01

    Dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO)-quenched hydrogen/deuterium (H/D)-exchange is a powerful method to characterize the H/D-exchange behaviors of proteins and protein assemblies, and it is potentially useful for investigating non-protected fast-exchanging amide protons in the unfolded state. However, the method has not been used for studies on fully unfolded proteins in a concentrated denaturant or protein solutions at high salt concentrations. In all of the current DMSO-quenched H/D-exchange studies of proteins so far reported, lyophilization was used to remove D2 O from the protein solution, and the lyophilized protein was dissolved in the DMSO solution to quench the H/D exchange reactions and to measure the amide proton signals by two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) spectra. The denaturants or salts remaining after lyophilization thus prevent the measurement of good NMR spectra. In this article, we report that the use of spin desalting columns is a very effective alternative to lyophilization for the medium exchange from the D2 O buffer to the DMSO solution. We show that the medium exchange by a spin desalting column takes only about 10 min in contrast to an overnight length of time required for lyophilization, and that the use of spin desalting columns has made it possible to monitor the H/D-exchange behavior of a fully unfolded protein in a concentrated denaturant. We report the results of unfolded ubiquitin in 6.0M guanidinium chloride.

  12. Nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium and magnesium release from two compressed fertilizers: column experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Sanjurjo, M. J.; Alvarez-Rodríguez, E.; Núñez-Delgado, A.; Fernández-Marcos, M. L.; Romar-Gasalla, A.

    2014-07-01

    We used soil columns to study nutrients release from two compressed NPK fertilizers. The columns were filled with soil material from the surface horizon of a granitic soil. Tablets of two slow-release NPK fertilizers (11-18-11 or 8-8-16) were placed into the soil, and then water was percolated through the columns in a saturated regime. Percolates were analyzed for N, P, K, Ca and Mg. These nutrients were also determined in soil and fertilizer tablets at the end of the trials. Nutrient concentrations were high in the first percolates, reaching a steady state when 1426 mm water have percolated, which is equivalent to approximately 1.5 years of rainfall in the geographic area. In the whole trial, both tablets lost more than 80% of their initial N, P and K contents. However, K, Ca and Mg were the most leached, whereas N and P were lost in leachates to a lesser extent. Nutrient release was slower from the tablet with composition 8-8-16 than from the 11-18-11 fertilizer. In view of that, the 8-8-16 tablet can be considered more adequate for crops with a nutrient demand sustained over time. At the end of the trial, the effects of these fertilizers on soil chemical parameters were still evident.

  13. Mobility, Deposition and Remobilization of pre-Synthesis Stabilized Nano-scale Zero Valent Iron in Long Column Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, C. V.; O'Carroll, D. M.; Sleep, B.

    2014-12-01

    Reactive zero-valent iron is currently being used for remediation of contaminated groundwater. Permeable reactive barriers are the current state-of-the-practice method for using zero-valent iron. Instead of an excavated trench filled with granular zero-valent iron, a relatively new and promising method is the injection of a nano-scale zero-valent iron colloid suspension (nZVI) into the subsurface using injection wells. One goal of nZVI injection can be to deposit zero valent iron in the aquifer and form a reactive permeable zone which is no longer bound to limited depths and plume treatment, but can also be used directly at the source. It is very important to have a good understanding of the transport behavior of nZVI during injection as well as the fate of nZVI after injection due to changes in the flow regime or water chemistry changes. So far transport was mainly tested using commercially available nZVI, however these studies suggest that further work is required as commercial nZVI was prone to aggregation, resulting in low physical stability of the suspension and very short travel distances in the subsurface. In the presented work, nZVI is stabilized during synthesis to significantly increase the physical suspension stability. To improve our understanding of nZVI transport, the feasibility for injection into various porous media materials and controlled deposition, a suite of column experiments are conducted. The column experiments are performed using a long 1.5m column and a novel nZVI measuring technique. The measuring technique was developed to non-destructively determine the concentration of nano-scale iron during the injection. It records the magnetic susceptibility, which makes it possible to get transient nZVI retention profiles along the column. These transient nZVI retention profiles of long columns provide unique insights in the transport behavior of nZVI which cannot be obtained using short columns or effluent breakthrough curves.

  14. Soil column experiments used as a means to assess transport, sorption, and biodegradation of pesticides in groundwater.

    PubMed

    Magga, Zoi; Tzovolou, Dimitra N; Theodoropoulou, Maria A; Dalkarani, Theodora; Pikios, Konstantinos; Tsakiroglou, Christos D

    2008-11-01

    Soil column experiments are used to investigate the fate of three pesticides of high, intermediate, and low solubility in groundwater: N- phosphonomethyl glycine (glyphosate); O,O-diethyl-S-[(ethylthio)methyl]phosphorodithioate (phorate); (2,4-dichlorophenoxy)acetic acid (2,4-D). Feed solutions are prepared by adding each pesticide (100 mg/L glyphosate, 50 micro g/L phorate, 50 mg/L 2,4-D) along with conservative tracer, KBr, in synthetic groundwater. The concentration of the pesticides in effluents is detected by ion chromatography (glyphosate, 2,4-D) and GC-FID (phorate). The Br(-) breakthrough curves are employed to estimate the dispersion coefficient and mean pore velocity in each column. Solute transport and reactive models accounting for equilibrium/non-equilibrium sorption and biodegradation are coupled with inverse modeling numerical codes to estimate the kinetic parameters for all pesticides.

  15. Cr(VI) removal from aqueous systems using pyrite as the reducing agent: batch, spectroscopic and column experiments.

    PubMed

    Kantar, Cetin; Ari, Cihan; Keskin, Selda; Dogaroglu, Zeynep Gorkem; Karadeniz, Aykut; Alten, Akin

    2015-03-01

    Laboratory batch and column experiments, in conjunction with geochemical calculations and spectroscopic analysis, were performed to better understand reaction mechanisms and kinetics associated with Cr(VI) removal from aqueous systems using pyrite as the reactive material under both static and dynamic flow conditions similar to those observed in in situ permeable reactive barriers (PRBs). The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and geochemical calculations suggest that the Cr(VI) removal by pyrite occurred due to the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III), coupled with the oxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III) and S2(2-) to SO4(2-) at the pyrite surface. Zeta potential measurements indicate that although the pyrite surface was negatively charged under a wide pH range in the absence of Cr(VI), it behaved more like a "metal oxide" surface with the surface potential shifting from positive to negative values at pH values >pH 6 in the presence of Cr(VI). Batch experiments show that increasing solution pH led to a significant decrease in Cr(VI) removal. The decrease in Cr(VI) removal at high Cr(VI) concentrations and pH values can be explained through the precipitation of sparingly soluble Cr(OH)(3(s)), Fe(OH)(3(s)) and Fe(III)-Cr(III) (oxy) hydroxides onto pyrite surface which may, then, lead to surface passivation for further Cr(VI) reduction. Batch results also suggest that the reaction kinetics follow a first order model with rate constants decreasing with increasing solution pH, indicating proton consumption during Cr(VI) reduction by pyrite. Column experiments indicate that nearly 100% of total Fe in the column effluent was in the form of Fe(II) species with a [SO4(2-)]/[Fe(2+)] stoichiometric ratio of 2.04, indicating that the reduction of Cr(VI) by pyrite produced about 2 mol of sulfate per mole of Fe (II) release under excess surface sites relative to Cr(VI) concentration. Column experiments provide further evidence on the accumulation of oxidation products which

  16. Biodegradation of the surfactant linear alkylbenzenesulfonate in sewage- contaminated groundwater: A comparison of column experiments and field tracer tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krueger, C.J.; Radakovich, K.M.; Sawyer, T.E.; Barber, L.B.; Smith, R.L.; Field, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    Transport and biodegradation of linear alkylbenzenesulfonate (LAS) in sewage-contaminated groundwater were investigated for a range of dissolved oxygen concentrations. Both laboratory column and an 80-day continuous injection tracer test field experiments were conducted. The rates of LAS biodegradation increased with increasing dissolved oxygen concentrations and indicated the preferential biodegradation of the longer alkyl chain LAS homologues (i.e., C12 and C13) and external isomers (i.e., 2-and 3- phenyl). However, for similar dissolved oxygen concentrations, mass removal rates for LAS generally were 2-3 times greater in laboratory column experiments than in the field tracer test. Under low oxygen conditions (<1 mg/L) only a fraction of the LAS mixture biodegraded in both laboratory and field experiments. Biodegradation rate constants for the continuous injection field test (0.002-0.08 day-1) were comparable to those estimated for a 3-h injection (pulsed) tracer test conducted under similar biogeochemical conditions, indicating that increasing the exposure time of aquifer sediments to LAS did not increase biodegradation rates.Transport and biodegradation of linear alkylbenzenesulfonate (LAS) in sewage-contaminated groundwater were investigated for a range of dissolved oxygen concentrations. Both laboratory column and an 80-day continuous injection tracer test field experiments were conducted. The rates of LAS biodegradation increased with increasing dissolved oxygen concentrations and indicated the preferential biodegradation of the longer alkyl chain LAS homologues (i.e., C12 and C13) and external isomers (i.e., 2- and 3-phenyl). However, for similar dissolved oxygen concentrations, mass removal rates for LAS generally were 2-3 times greater in laboratory column experiments than in the field tracer test. Under low oxygen conditions (<1 mg/L) only a fraction of the LAS mixture biodegraded in both laboratory and field experiments. Biodegradation rate constants

  17. Description and field performance of the Walker Branch throughfall displacement experiment: 1993--1996

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, P.J.; Todd, D.E.; Huston, M.A.; Joslin, J.D.; Croker, J.L.; Auge, R.M.

    1998-04-01

    The authors are conducting a large-scale manipulative field experiment in an upland oak forest on the Walker Branch Watershed in eastern Tennessee to identify important ecosystem responses that might result from future precipitation changes. The manipulation of soil water content is being implemented by a gravity-driven transfer of throughfall from one 6400-m{sup 2} treatment plot to another. Throughfall is intercepted in {approx}1850 subcanopy troughs suspended above the forest floor of the dry plot and transferred by gravity flow across an ambient plot for subsequent distribution onto the wet treatment plot. Soil water content is being monitored at two depths with time domain reflectometers at 310 sampling locations across the site. The experimental system is able to produce statistically significant differences in soil water content in years having both dry and wet conditions. Maximum soil water content differentials between wet and dry plots in the 0- to 0.35-m horizon were 8 to 10% during summers with abundant precipitation and 3 to 5% during drought periods. Treatment impacts on soil water potential were restricted to the surface soil layer. Comparisons of pre- and post-installation soil and litter temperature measurements showed the ability of the experimental design to produce changes in soil water content and water potential without creating large artifacts in the forest understory environment.

  18. Column CO2 Measurements with Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave Lidar System During the ASCENDS 2014 Summer Field Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meadows, B.; Nehrir, A. R.; Lin, B.; Harrison, F. W.; Dobler, J. T.; Kooi, S. A.; Campbell, J. F.; Obland, M. D.; Browell, E. V.; Yang, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents an overview of the ASCENDS 2014 flight campaign results of an intensity-modulated continuous-wave (IM-CW) lidar system operating at 1.57 µm for measurements of column CO2 over a wide variety of geographic regions. The 2007 National Research Council's Decadal Survey of Earth Science and Applications from Space recommended Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) as a mid-term, Tier II, space mission to address global sources, sinks, and transport of atmospheric CO2. As part of the development of a capability for the NASA ASCENDS mission, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) and Exelis, Inc. have been collaborating to develop, demonstrate and mature the IM-CW lidar approach for measuring atmospheric column CO2 mixing ratios from a space platform using the integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar technique with preferential weighting of the CO2 measurements to the mid to lower troposphere. The Multi-Functional Fiber Laser Lidar (MFLL), a system developed as a technology demonstrator for the ASCENDS mission, has been used to demonstrate high precision column CO2 retrievals from various aircraft platforms. The MFLL operates using a novel IM-CW IPDA approach to make simultaneous CO2 and O2 column measurements in the 1.57-micron and 1.26-micron spectral regions, respectively, to derive the column-average CO2 dry-air mixing ratios. Measurements from the 2014 summer field experiment focused on advancing CO2 & O2 measurement technologies under day and night conditions in realistic environments, assessing CO2 emissions over large metropolitan areas, observing and evaluating CO2 drawdown and diurnal trends over large agricultural regions, obtaining reflectance data and CO2 & O2 measurements over rough ocean surfaces with high surface wind speeds (~10 m/s), and carrying out CO2 & O2 intercomparisons with OCO-2 and GOSAT over the western United States. Initial results from MFLL for the aforementioned flight campaign

  19. Do lab-derived distribution coefficient values of pesticides match distribution coefficient values determined from column and field-scale experiments? A critical analysis of relevant literature.

    PubMed

    Vereecken, H; Vanderborght, J; Kasteel, R; Spiteller, M; Schäffer, A; Close, M

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed sorption parameters for pesticides that were derived from batch and column or batch and field experiments. The batch experiments analyzed in this study were run with the same pesticide and soil as in the column and field experiments. We analyzed the relationship between the pore water velocity of the column and field experiments, solute residence times, and sorption parameters, such as the organic carbon normalized distribution coefficient ( ) and the mass exchange coefficient in kinetic models, as well as the predictability of sorption parameters from basic soil properties. The batch/column analysis included 38 studies with a total of 139 observations. The batch/field analysis included five studies, resulting in a dataset of 24 observations. For the batch/column data, power law relationships between pore water velocity, residence time, and sorption constants were derived. The unexplained variability in these equations was reduced, taking into account the saturation status and the packing status (disturbed-undisturbed) of the soil sample. A new regression equation was derived that allows estimating the values derived from column experiments using organic matter and bulk density with an value of 0.56. Regression analysis of the batch/column data showed that the relationship between batch- and column-derived values depends on the saturation status and packing of the soil column. Analysis of the batch/field data showed that as the batch-derived value becomes larger, field-derived values tend to be lower than the corresponding batch-derived values, and vice versa. The present dataset also showed that the variability in the ratio of batch- to column-derived value increases with increasing pore water velocity, with a maximum value approaching 3.5.

  20. Chromium Isotopic Fractionation During Biogeochemical Cr (IV) Reduction in Hanford Sediment Column Experiments with Native Aquifer Microbial Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, L.; Christensen, J. N.; Brown, S. T.; Yang, L.; Conrad, M. E.; Sonnenthal, E. L.; Beller, H. R.

    2010-12-01

    Hexavalent Chromium contamination in groundwater within the DOE complex, including the Hanford 100D and 100H sites has been a long-standing issue. It has been established that certain bacteria (including denitrifying and sulfate-reducing bacteria) harbor enzymes that catalyze Cr(VI) reduction to relatively nontoxic Cr(III). Microbial reduction of Cr(VI) also occurs indirectly by products of microbial respiration, such as sulfide and Fe(II). Chromium isotopes can be fractionated during Cr(VI) reduction and provides a potential basis for characterizing and discriminating between different microbial metabolic and geochemical pathways associated with Cr(VI) reductive immobilization. Addition of electron donor to contaminated groundwater systems to create conditions favorable for reductive metal immobilization has become a widely utilized remediation practice. We conducted a series of small-scale column experiments with homogenized material from the Hanford 100H aquifer to examine the effects of differing electron acceptors on local microbial communities. All columns have a continuous inflow of solutions with constant concentrations of Cr(VI), lactate (electron donor), and the appropriate electron acceptor (e.g. nitrate or sulfate). The Cr isotopic composition in the effluent was measured using a 50-54 double-spike technique and a Triton TIMS. Cr concentration measurements showed that the greatest Cr(VI) reduction occurred in the sulfate columns. Our preliminary Cr isotopic data show that under these conditions the delta 53Cr value increased from close to 0 to 4 per mil while the Cr concentration decreased from 260 ppb to 30 ppb in the effluent. This yields an apparent fractionation factor of 0.9979 (2.1 per mil). A decrease in Cr concentration from 260 ppb to 190 ppb in a nitrate-reducing column was accompanied by an increase of 1 per mil in delta 53Cr. Further Cr isotopic data will be presented and the effects of differing flow rates and electron acceptors will be

  1. Coal fly ash interaction with environmental fluids: Geochemical and strontium isotope results from combined column and batch leaching experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Brubaker, Tonya M; Stewart, Brian W; Capo, Rosemary C; Schroeder, Karl T; Chapman, Elizabeth C; Spivak-Birndorf, Lev J; Vesper, Dorothy J; Cardone, Carol R; Rohar, Paul C

    2013-05-01

    The major element and Sr isotope systematics and geochemistry of coal fly ash and its interactions with environmental waters were investigated using laboratory flow-through column leaching experiments (sodium carbonate, acetic acid, nitric acid) and sequential batch leaching experiments (water, acetic acid, hydrochloric acid). Column leaching of Class F fly ash samples shows rapid release of most major elements early in the leaching procedure, suggesting an association of these elements with soluble and surface bound phases. Delayed release of certain elements (e.g., Al, Fe, Si) signals gradual dissolution of more resistant silicate or glass phases as leaching continues. Strontium isotope results from both column and batch leaching experiments show a marked increase in {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio with continued leaching, yielding a total range of values from 0.7107 to 0.7138. For comparison, the isotopic composition of fluid output from a fly ash impoundment in West Virginia falls in a narrow range around 0.7124. The experimental data suggest the presence of a more resistant, highly radiogenic silicate phase that survives the combustion process and is leached after the more soluble minerals are removed. Strontium isotopic homogenization of minerals in coal does not always occur during the combustion process, despite the high temperatures encountered in the boiler. Early-released Sr tends to be isotopically uniform; thus the Sr isotopic composition of fly ash could be distinguishable from other sources and is a useful tool for quantifying the possible contribution of fly ash leaching to the total dissolved load in natural surface and ground waters.

  2. Phosphorus vertical migration in aquic brown soil and light chernozem under different phosphorous application rate: a soil column leaching experiment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Muqiu; Chen, Xin; Shi, Yi; Zhou, Quanlai; Lu, Caiyan

    2009-01-01

    A soil column leaching experiment was conducted to study the vertical migration of phosphorus in aquic brown soil and light chernozem under different phosphorus fertilization rates. The results showed that total dissolved phosphorus concentration in the leachates from the two soils was nearly the same, but dissolved inorganic phosphorus concentration was obviously different. In all fertilization treatments, aquic brown soil had a higher content of phosphorus in calcium chloride extracts compared with light chernozem. But Olsen phosphorus content was higher at the soil depth beneath 0-20 cm, and increased with increasing phosphorus application rate.

  3. Nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium and magnesium release from two compressed fertilizers: column experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Sanjurjo, M. J.; Alvarez-Rodríguez, E.; Núñez-Delgado, A.; Fernández-Marcos, M. L.; Romar-Gasalla, A.

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this work was to study nutrients release from two compressed nitrogen-potassium-phosphorous (NPK) fertilizers. In the Lourizán Forest Center, tablet-type controlled-release fertilizers (CRF) were prepared by compressing various mixtures of fertilizers without covers or binders. We used soil columns (50 cm long and 7.3 cm inner diameter) that were filled with soil from the surface layer (0-20 cm) of an A horizon corresponding to a Cambic Umbrisol. Tablets of two slow-release NPK fertilizers (11-18-11 or 8-8-16) were placed into the soil (within the first 3 cm), and then water was percolated through the columns in a saturated regime for 80 days. Percolates were analyzed for N, P, K+, Ca2+ and Mg2+. These elements were also determined in soil and fertilizer tablets at the end of the trials. Nutrient concentrations were high in the first leachates and reached a steady state when 1426 mm of water had been percolated, which is equivalent to approximately 1.5 years of rainfall in this geographic area. In the whole trial, both tablets lost more than 80% of their initial N, P and K contents. However, K+, Ca2+ and Mg2+ were the most leached, whereas N and P were lost in leachates to a lesser extent. Nutrient release was slower from the tablet with a composition of 8-8-16 than from the 11-18-11 fertilizer. In view of that, the 8-8-16 tablet can be considered more adequate for crops with a nutrient demand sustained over time. At the end of the trial, the effects of these fertilizers on soil chemical parameters were still evident, with a significant increase of pH, available Ca2+, Mg2+, K+, P and effective cation exchange capacity (eCEC) in the fertilized columns, as well as a significant decrease in exchangeable Al3+, reaching values < 0.08 cmol (+) kg-1.

  4. Capillary filling rules and displacement mechanisms for spontaneous imbibition of CO2 for carbon storage and EOR using micro-model experiments and pore scale simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, E.; Yang, J.; Crawshaw, J.; Boek, E. S.

    2012-04-01

    In the 1980s, Lenormand et al. carried out their pioneering work on displacement mechanisms of fluids in etched networks [1]. Here we further examine displacement mechanisms in relation to capillary filling rules for spontaneous imbibition. Understanding the role of spontaneous imbibition in fluid displacement is essential for refining pore network models. Generally, pore network models use simple capillary filling rules and here we examine the validity of these rules for spontaneous imbibition. Improvement of pore network models is vital for the process of 'up-scaling' to the field scale for both enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and carbon sequestration. In this work, we present our experimental microfluidic research into the displacement of both supercritical CO2/deionised water (DI) systems and analogous n-decane/air - where supercritical CO2 and n-decane are the respective wetting fluids - controlled by imbibition at the pore scale. We conducted our experiments in etched PMMA and silicon/glass micro-fluidic hydrophobic chips. We first investigate displacement in single etched pore junctions, followed by displacement in complex network designs representing actual rock thin sections, i.e. Berea sandstone and Sucrosic dolomite. The n-decane/air experiments were conducted under ambient conditions, whereas the supercritical CO2/DI water experiments were conducted under high temperature and pressure in order to replicate reservoir conditions. Fluid displacement in all experiments was captured via a high speed video microscope. The direction and type of displacement the imbibing fluid takes when it enters a junction is dependent on the number of possible channels in which the wetting fluid can imbibe, i.e. I1, I2 and I3 [1]. Depending on the experiment conducted, the micro-models were initially filled with either DI water or air before the wetting fluid was injected. We found that the imbibition of the wetting fluid through a single pore is primarily controlled by the

  5. Burdach's column.

    PubMed

    Pearce, J M S

    2006-01-01

    After the Greek physicians Herophilus and Galen, the major anatomical advances in the anatomy of the spinal cord were made possible by the microtome devised by Benedikt Stilling in January 1842. This enabled him to cut the frozen, thin sections and examine them, unstained,with the microscope. The technique founded future investigation of the cord's anatomy. Brown-Séquard, Türck, Clarke, Lissauer, Goll, and Flechsig all contributed. An important result of these progressing anatomical experiments was the identification of the posterior columns. In 1826, the German physiologist Karl Friedrich Burdach (1776-1847) described, from macroscopic study, the fasciculus cuneatus, known as the tract of Burdach: the lateral portion of the posterior columns of the cord that terminate in the nucleus cuneatus of the medulla.

  6. Modeling long term Enhanced in situ Biodenitrification and induced heterogeneity in column experiments under different feeding strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Escales, Paula; Folch, Albert; van Breukelen, Boris M.; Vidal-Gavilan, Georgina; Sanchez-Vila, Xavier

    2016-07-01

    Enhanced In situ Biodenitrification (EIB) is a capable technology for nitrate removal in subsurface water resources. Optimizing the performance of EIB implies devising an appropriate feeding strategy involving two design parameters: carbon injection frequency and C:N ratio of the organic substrate nitrate mixture. Here we model data on the spatial and temporal evolution of nitrate (up to 1.2 mM), organic carbon (ethanol), and biomass measured during a 342 day-long laboratory column experiment (published in Vidal-Gavilan et al., 2014). Effective porosity was 3% lower and dispersivity had a sevenfold increase at the end of the experiment as compared to those at the beginning. These changes in transport parameters were attributed to the development of a biofilm. A reactive transport model explored the EIB performance in response to daily and weekly feeding strategies. The latter resulted in significant temporal variation in nitrate and ethanol concentrations at the outlet of the column. On the contrary, a daily feeding strategy resulted in quite stable and low concentrations at the outlet and complete denitrification. At intermediate times (six months of experiment), it was possible to reduce the carbon load and consequently the C:N ratio (from 2.5 to 1), partly because biomass decay acted as endogenous carbon to respiration, keeping the denitrification rates, and partly due to the induced dispersivity caused by the well-developed biofilm, resulting in enhancement of mixing between the ethanol and nitrate and the corresponding improvement of denitrification rates. The inclusion of a dual-domain model improved the fit at the last days of the experiment as well as in the tracer test performed at day 342, demonstrating a potential transition to anomalous transport that may be caused by the development of biofilm. This modeling work is a step forward to devising optimal injection conditions and substrate rates to enhance EIB performance by minimizing the overall supply of

  7. Microbially induced carbonate precipitation (MICP) by denitrification as ground improvement method - Process control in sand column experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Vinh; van Paassen, Leon; Nakano, Akiko; Kanayama, Motohei; Heimovaara, Timo

    2013-04-01

    Calcite precipitation induced by microbes has been proven to be efficient in stabilizing granular soils, especially with urea hydrolysis, as it has been successfully demonstrated in a pilot application 2010. However, as a byproduct highly concentrated ammonium chloride (NH4Cl) solution is produced, which has to be removed and disposed and forms a significant disadvantage of the technique that makes an alternative process like denitrification preferred. The proof of principle of microbially induced calcite precipitation (MICP) by denitrification has been demonstrated by Van Paassen et al (2010) who suggested that instead of producing waste as a byproduct, different pre-treated waste streams could be used as substrates for in situ growth of denitrifying bacteria and simultaneous cementation without producing waste to be removed. In this study sand column experiments are performed in which calcium carbonate was successfully precipitated by indigenous denitrifying micro-organisms, which were supplied weekly with a pulse of a substrate solution containing calcium acetate and calcium nitrate. Besides the production of calcite and the growth of bacteria in biofilms, the reduction of nitrate resulted in the production of (nitrogen) gas. It was observed that this gas partly fills up the pore space and consequently contributed to a reduction of the permeability of the treated sand. The presence of gas in the pore space affected the flow of the injected substrates and influenced to the distribution of calcium carbonate. The effect of the mean particle size (D50) on the flow and transport of solutes and gas in the porous media has been evaluated by treating several columns with varying grain size distribution and comparing the change in permeability after each incubation period and analyzing the distribution of the gas throughout the columns using X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanning. The present results show that there is a considerable decrease of permeability - a

  8. An Inorganic Microsphere Composite for the Selective Removal of 137 Cesium from Acidic Nuclear Waste Solutions 2: Bench-Scale Column Experiments, Modeling, and Preliminary Process Design

    SciTech Connect

    Troy J. Tranter; T. A. Vereschagina; V. Utgikar

    2009-03-01

    A new inorganic ion exchange composite for removing radioactive cesium from acidic waste streams has been developed. The new material consists of ammonium molybdophosphate, (NH4)3P(Mo3O10)4?3H2O (AMP), synthesized within hollow aluminosilicate microspheres (AMP-C), which are produced as a by-product from coal combustion. The selective cesium exchange capacity of this inorganic composite was evaluated in bench-scale column tests using simulated sodium bearing waste solution as a surrogate for the acidic tank waste currently stored at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Total cesium loading on the columns at saturation agreed very well with equilibrium values predicted from isotherm experiments performed previously. A numerical algorithm for solving the governing partial differential equations (PDE) for cesium uptake was developed using the intraparticle mass transfer coefficient obtained from previous batch kinetic experiments. Solutions to the governing equations were generated to obtain the cesium concentration at the column effluent as a function of throughput volume using the same conditions as those used for the actual column experiments. The numerical solutions of the PDE fit the column break through data quite well for all the experimental conditions in the study. The model should therefore provide a reliable prediction of column performance at larger scales.

  9. subsection{Fate of the cyanobacterial toxin Microcystin-LR during bank filtration - column experiments and modelling}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerstenberg, Karen; Nützmann, Gunnar

    2010-05-01

    Over the past several years there has been an increasing interest in microcystins and other cyanobacterial toxins in surface waters and oxic groundwater. Since these compounds are strong hepatotoxic agents their presence in surface water is undesirable and can especially cause health problems if the contaminated surface water is used for drinking water abstraction by bank filtration. During the subsurface sediment passage microcystins are biodegraded by adapted microorganisms in a co-metabolic way together with other compounds - a process which causes depletion of oxygen in the sediment and production of anoxic zones in the underground. Presence or absence of oxygen as electron acceptor for microbial energetic metabolism is a crucial factor for degradation. Up to now most studies focused on the fate of microcystin under oxic conditions. But if during bank filtration anoxic zones occur, these approaches cannot be used for description and prediction of transport and degradation processes of microcystin in bank filtration sites. For a better understanding of anoxic degradation of microcystins during subsurface sediment passage laboratory column experiments were designed to simulate the transport and degradation conditions in the aquifer. In small columns of about 20 cm length different cyanobacterial concentrations and potential electron acceptors are adjusted. The outflowing water was analyzed with respect to Microcystin-LR and the main ion concentrations. Transport and sorption parameters were investigated by flow experiments, and quantification of the main parameters was done by inverse modelling using a MATLAB inverse transport model. Flow and sorption experiments reconfirmed that Microcystin-LR does not tend to sorb to the sandy material. Considering the anoxic degradation behaviour of the toxin the redox state of the system was assumed to be the most important factor and therefore varied during the experiments by adding supplemental nitrate or nitrite. The

  10. Effects of Humidity Swings on Adsorption Columns for Air Revitalization: Modeling and Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVan, M. Douglas; Finn, John E.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of this research was to develop a dynamic model which can predict the effect of humidity swings on activated carbon adsorption beds used to remove trace contaminants from the atmosphere in spacecraft. Specifically, the model was to be incorporated into a computer simulation to predict contaminant concentrations exiting the bed as a function of time after a humidity swing occurs. Predicted breakthrough curves were to be compared to experimentally measured results. In all respects the research was successful. The two major aspects of this research were the mathematical model and the experiments. Experiments were conducted by Mr. Appel using a fixed-bed apparatus at NASA-Ames Research Center during the summers of 1994 and 1995 and during the first 8 months of 1996. Mr. Appel conducted most of his mathematical modeling work at the University of Virginia. The simulation code was used to predict breakthrough curves using adsorption equilibrium correlations developed previously by M. D. LeVan's research group at the University of Virginia. These predictions were compared with the experimental measurements, and this led to improvements in both the simulation code and the apparatus.

  11. Column Experiments Investigating Wetting and Drying of Soil and Consumption of Organic Contaminants for Managed Aquifer Recharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, M.; Schueth, C.; Wefer-Roehl, A.; Kuebeck, C.

    2014-12-01

    The EU FP7 project MARSOL seeks to address water scarcity challenges in arid regions. Within this framework, we conduct a series of experiments to evaluate the potential for water quality improvement and changes in hydraulic conductivity when managed aquifer recharge (MAR) is performed by infiltrating treated wastewater in soils that do not have high potential for sorption. For example, in the Attica (Athens and vicinity) region of Greece, the bedrock is mostly marble, resulting in calcite-rich soils that present little potential for sorption of contaminants to mineral surfaces. This leaves consumption of organic contaminants by microbes as the critical mechanism for water quality improvement, when treated wastewater is infiltrated through such soils. In order to enhance the potential for contaminant consumption by aerobic bacteria in a way that would be realistic to later perform in an infiltration basin, we conduct experiments using a series of wetting and drying cycles. The experimental setup consists of 90-cm long soil columns, fitted with oxygen sensors, time-domain reflectometry sensors (to measure moisture content), sampling ports, oxidation-reduction probes, and head observation tubes. We use the data collected from these sensors and features of the experimental setup to answer the following questions: 1. Does hydraulic conductivity change, from formation of a biofilm or dissolution of calcite (or both)? 2. Are organic contaminants consumed? 3. What effect do wetting and drying cycles have on consumption of organic contaminants? 4. How long can infiltration of treated wastewater last, before oxygen is consumed and conditions become reducing? These questions are investigated by observing the hydraulic head and outflow, performing tracer tests, taking samples from the sampling ports and outflow for chemical analyses, and measuring moisture content and oxygen concentration, in the course of performing multiple wetting and drying cycles. These column

  12. Biogeochemistry of Two Types of Permeable Reafctive Barriers, Organic Carbon and Iron-bearing Organic Carbon for Mine Drainage treatment: Column experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Q.; Blowes, D

    2009-01-01

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) are an alternative technology to treat mine drainage containing sulfate and heavy metals. Two column experiments were conducted to assess the suitability of an organic carbon (OC) based reactive mixture and an Fe{sup 0}-bearing organic carbon (FeOC) based reactive mixture, under controlled groundwater flow conditions. The organic carbon mixture contains about 30% (volume) organic carbon (composted leaf mulch) and 70% (volume) sand and gravel. The Fe{sup 0}-bearing organic carbon mixture contains 10% (volume) zero-valent iron, 20% (volume) organic carbon, 10% (volume) limestone, and 60% (volume) sand and gravel. Simulated groundwater containing 380 ppm sulfate, 5 ppm As, and 0.5 ppm Sb was passed through the columns at flow rates of 64 (the OC column) and 62 (the FeOC column) ml d{sup -1}, which are equivalent to 0.79 (the OC column) and 0.78 (the FeOC column) pore volumes (PVs) per week or 0.046 m d{sup -1} for both columns. The OC column showed an initial sulfate reduction rate of 0.4 {mu}mol g (OC){sup -1} d{sup -1} and exhausted its capacity to promote sulfate reduction after 30 PVs, or 9 months of flow. The FeOC column sustained a relatively constant sulfate reduction rate of 0.9 {mu}mol g (OC){sup -1} d{sup -1} for at least 65 PVs (17 months). In the FeOC column, the {delta}34S values increase with the decreasing sulfate concentration. The {delta}34S fractionation follows a Rayleigh fractionation model with an enrichment factor of 21.6%. The performance decline of the OC column was caused by the depletion of substrate or electron donor. The cathodic production of H{sub 2} by anaerobic corrosion of Fe probably sustained a higher level of SRB activity in the FeOC column. These results suggest that zero-valent iron can be used to provide an electron donor in sulfate reducing PRBs. A sharp increase in the {delta}13C value of the dissolved inorganic carbon and a decrease in the concentration of HCO{sub 3}{sup -} indicate that

  13. Interpretation of column experiments of transport of solutes undergoing an irreversible bimolecular reaction using a continuum approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Vila, Xavier; Fernã Ndez-Garcia, Daniel; Guadagnini, Alberto

    2010-12-01

    We provide a quantitative interpretation of the column experiment reported by Gramling et al. (2002). The experiment involves advection-dominated transport in porous media of three dissolved species, i.e., two reactants undergoing a fast irreversible reaction and the resulting product. The authors found that their observations could not be properly fitted with a model based on an advection-dispersion-reaction equation (ADRE) assuming the reaction was instantaneous, the actual measured total reaction product being lower than predictions for all times. The data have been recently well reproduced by Edery et al. (2009, 2010) by means of a particle tracking approach in a continuous time random walk framework. These and other authors have questioned the use of partial differential equation (PDE)-based approaches to quantify reactive transport because of the difficulty in capturing local-scale mixing and reaction. We take precisely this approach and interpret the experiments mentioned by means of a continuum-scale model based on the ADRE. Our approach differs from previous modeling attempts in that we imbue effects of incomplete mixing at the pore scale in a time-dependent kinetic reaction term and show that this model allows quantitative interpretation of the experiments in terms of both reaction product profiles and time-dependent global production rate. The time dependence of the kinetic term presented accounts for the progressive effects of incomplete mixing due to pore-scale rate-limited mass transfer, and follows a power law, which is consistent with the compilation of existing experiments reported by Haggerty et al. (2004). Our interpretation can form the basis for further research to assess the potential use of PDE approaches for the interpretation of reactive transport problems in moderately heterogeneous media.

  14. Modelling of a viscoplastic granular column collapse and comparison with experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Nathan; Ionescu, Ioan; Mangeney, Anne; Bouchut, François; Roche, Olivier; Farin, Maxime

    2015-04-01

    Landslides and, more generally, large scale granular flows, represent a wide variety of geophysical flows also including mud or debris flow and snow avalanches. In a continuum mechanics context, the accurate simulation of these flows strongly depends on the modelling of their rheology and their boundary conditions, namely the sliding law and processes of erosion. In particular the description of the static and of the flowing states of granular media is still an open issue. We focus here on the quantitative reproduction of laboratory experiments using a mechanical and numerical model of dry granular flows with the so-called μ(I) rheology associated to a Drucker-Prager plasticity criterion and a shear rate and pressure dependent viscosity η(||D||,p). A Coulomb type friction law is considered at the base of the flow. The modelling is achieved in a finite-element context using the software FreeFem++. The simulations are bidimensionnal and well reproduce quantitatively both the dynamical and final shapes of the deposit. The effects of the sidewalls of the experimental channel, neglected in 2D simulations, are investigated by introducing an extra term in the equations varying with the inverse of the width of the channel, providing an enhanced agreement with the experiments. The numerical results show that the flow is essentially located in a surface layer behind the front, while the whole granular material is flowing near the front where basal sliding occurs. The static/flowing interface changes as a function of space and time, in good agreement with experimental observations. The resulting dynamic viscosity varies from very small values near the free surface and near the front to 1.5Pa.s within the quasi-static zone. The results show a rather small yet computationnaly expensive difference between a constant viscosity model and a μ(I) rheology in the case of a rigid bed. This has important implication for application to real geophysical flows. The role of an erodible

  15. Dynamics of deposited fly-ash and fine grained magnetite in sandy material of different porosity (column experiments)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapicka, Ales; Kodesova, Radka; Petrovsky, Eduard; Grison, Hana

    2010-05-01

    Several studies confirm that soil magnetometry can serve as proxy of industrial immisions as well as heavy-metal contamination. The important assumption for magnetic mapping of contaminated soils is that atmospherically deposited particulate matter, including the ferrimagnetic phase, accumulates in the top soil horizons and remains there over long period. Only if this is true, large areas can be reliably mapped using soil magnetometry, and, moreover, this method can be used also for long-term monitoring. However, in soil types such as sandy soils with different porosity or soils with substantial variability of water regime, translocation of the deposited anthropogenic particles may result in biased (underestimated) values of the measured topsoil magnetic susceptibility. From the physical point of view, this process may be considered as colloid transport through porous medium. In our column experiments in laboratory we used three technical sands with different particle sizes (0,63 - 1.25mm, 0,315-0,80mm, 0,10-0,63mm). Sands in cylinders were contaminated on the surface by fly-ashes from coal-burning power plant (mean grain size 10μm) and fine grained Fe3O4 (grain size < 20 μm). Soil moisture sensors were used to monitor water regime within the sand columns after controlled rain simulation and temperature distribution in sand column was measured as well. Vertical migration of ferrimagnetic particles-tracers presented in the fly-ash was measured by SM 400 Kappameter. By means of magnetic susceptibility distribution we studied two parameters: gradual shift of peak concentration of contaminants (relative to surface layer) and maximum penetration depth. Results indicated that after rain simulation (pulls infiltration of defined water volume) the positions of peak values moved downwards compared to the initial state and gradual decrease of susceptibility peak values were detected in all studied sand formations. Fly-ash migrated more or less freely in coarse sand

  16. Development of a simple, accurate SPME-based method for assay of VOCs in column breakthrough experiments.

    PubMed

    Salaices Avila, Manuel Alejandro; Breiter, Roman; Mott, Henry

    2007-01-01

    Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) with gas chromatography is to be used for assay of effluent liquid samples from soil column experiments associated with VOC fate/transport studies. One goal of the fate/transport studies is to develop accurate, highly reproducible column breakthrough curves for 1,2-cis-dichloroethylene (cis-DCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE) to better understand interactions with selected natural solid phases. For SPME, the influences of the sample equilibration time, extraction temperature and the ratio of volume of sample bottle to that of the liquid sample (V(T)/V(w)) are the critical factors that could influence accuracy and precision of the measured results. Equilibrium between the gas phase and liquid phase was attained after 200 min of equilibration time. The temperature must be carefully controlled due to variation of both the Henry's constant (K(h)) and the fibre/gas phase distribution coefficient (K(fg)). K(h) decreases with decreasing temperature while K(fg) increases. Low V(T)/V(w) yields better sensitivity but results in analyte losses and negative bias of the resultant assay. High V(T)/V(w) ratio yields reduced sensitivity but analyte losses were found to be minimal, leading to better accuracy and reproducibility. A fast SPME method was achieved, 5 min for SPME extraction and 3.10 min for GC analysis. A linear calibration function in the gas phase was developed to analyse the breakthrough curve data, linear between a range of 0.9-236 microgl(-1), and a detection limit lower than 5 microgl(-1).

  17. Size- and concentration-dependent deposition of fluorescent silica colloids in saturated sand columns: transport experiments and modeling.

    PubMed

    Vitorge, Elsa; Szenknect, Stéphanie; Martins, Jean M F; Gaudet, Jean-Paul

    2013-08-01

    This study investigates the size and concentration effects on the transport of silica colloids in columns of sandy aquifer material. Colloid transport experiments were performed with specifically developed fluorescent labeled silica colloids in columns of a repacked natural porous medium under hydro-geochemical conditions representative of sandy aquifers. Breakthrough curves and vertical deposition profiles of colloids were measured for various colloid concentrations and sizes. The results showed that for a given colloid concentration injected, deposition increased when increasing the size of the colloids. For a given colloid size, retention was also shown to be highly concentration-dependent with a non-monotonous pattern presenting low and high concentration specificities. Deposition increases when increasing both size and injected concentration, until a threshold concentration is reached, above which retention decreases, thus increasing colloid mobility. Results observed above the threshold concentration agree with a classical blocking mechanism typical of a high concentration regime. Results observed at lower colloid concentrations were not modeled with a classical blocking model and a depth- and time-dependent model with a second order kinetic law was necessary to correctly fit the experimental data in the entire range of colloid concentrations with a single set of parameters for each colloidal size. The colloid deposition mechanisms occuring at low concentrations were investigated through a pore structure analysis carried out with Mercury Intrusion Porosimetry and image analysis. The determined pore size distribution permitted estimation of the maximal retention capacity of the natural sand as well as some low flow zones. Altogether, these results stress the key role of the pore space geometry of the sand in controlling silica colloids deposition under hydro-geochemical conditions typical of sandy aquifers. Our results also showed originally that colloid

  18. Student Displacement in Louisiana after the Hurricanes of 2005: Experiences of Public Schools and Their Students. Technical Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pane, John F.; McCaffrey, Daniel F.; Tharp-Taylor, Shannah; Asmus, Gary J.; Stokes, Billy R.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this technical report is to provide timely documentation of many of the short-term effects of the movements of students that occurred as part of the displacement of storm victims. The report will help guide educators and policymakers in their ongoing responses to this disaster and preparations for future events. Focusing on the…

  19. Comparison of batch, stirred flow chamber, and column experiments to study adsorption, desorption and transport of carbofuran within two acidic soils.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez-Couso, Alipio; Fernández-Calviño, David; Rodríguez-Salgado, Isabel; Nóvoa-Muñoz, Juan Carlos; Arias-Estévez, Manuel

    2012-06-01

    Different methods (batch, column and stirred flow chamber experiments) used for adsorption and desorption of carbofuran studies were compared. All tested methods showed that the carbofuran adsorption was higher in the soil with the higher organic matter content, whereas the opposite behaviour was observed for the percentage of carbofuran desorbed. However, different methods have revealed some discrepancies in carbofuran adsorption/desorption kinetics. Although batch method showed interesting data on equilibrium experiments, such as a low heterogeneity for the carbofuran adsorption sites independent of soil organic matter content, it had some disadvantages for carbofuran adsorption/desorption kinetic studies. The disadvantages were related with the excessive limitations of this method on kinetics, i.e., no difference could be detected between different soils. However, with column and stirred flow chamber methods the carbofuran adsorption/desorption kinetics of different soils could be compared. Moreover, the absolute values of carbofuran adsorption/desorption and its rate were higher in the stirred flow chamber than in the batch and column experiments. Using stirred flow chamber experiments the carbofuran desorption was significantly faster than its adsorption, whereas carbofuran using column experiments they were similar. These discrepancies should be considered when the results obtained only with one method is discussed.

  20. Column flotation '88

    SciTech Connect

    Sastry, K.V.S.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 34 selections. Some of the titles are: Column flotation of ultrafine coal: experience at BHP-Utah Coal Limited's Riverside mine; Measurement of rate data in flotation columns; Factors influencing the structure of a 3-phase coal flotation froth; and Microbubble flotation of fine coal.

  1. Investigation of pharmaceutical transport in saturated sandy aquifers using column experiments: the effect of pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Börnick, Hilmar; Boxberger, Norman; Licha, Tobias; Worch, Eckhard

    2010-05-01

    Due to the development of advanced analytical techniques it is increasingly known that a high number of polar organic trace compounds, particularly residues of pharmaceuticals, occur in the aquatic environment. In contrast to the sources and pathways of such compounds, their impact on ecosystems and their fate in different environmental compartments are comparatively less investigated. Because of the spatial extension and time available, the zone between water and natural solids (e.g. sediments or soil in groundwater zones, bank filtration sites and for soil aquifer treatment) plays an important role in the elimination of anthropogenic trace compounds from water phase. Here, degradation and sorption processes mainly influence the content of trace compounds. Correlations, specific for compound groups, between n-octanol-water distribution coefficients, available from experiment or calculations, and sorption coefficients (e.g. KOC) often allow a suitable prognosis of the transport behavior of organic pollutants in an underground passage. In case of polar, ionizable organic compounds such prediction is problematic and often not possible. Here, besides relatively weak non-polar van der Waals attraction, other interaction mechanisms, such as covalent bonding, complex formation, or ion exchange, can dominate. The latter is closely connected with the type of basic and/or acid groups in a molecule. The degree of protonation could be changed in dependence of type and concentration of other ions and of the acidity constants (pKa) and therefore from pH. Laboratory column studies at different pH value (range from 4 to 8) were carried out using natural sandy sediments from aquifers and model water containing selected pharmaceuticals to investigate the influence of degree of protonation on sorption. Eight different pharmaceuticals were chosen for laboratory column experiments. Their selection was based on the presence of basic/acid functional groups, pKa, high production and

  2. Cation Uptake and Allocation by Red Pine Seedlings under Cation-Nutrient Stress in a Column Growth Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Zhenqing; Balogh-Brunstad, Zsuzsanna; Grant, Michael R.; Harsh, James B.; Gill, Richard; Thomashow, Linda; Dohnalkova, Alice; Stacks, Daryl; Letourneau, Melissa; Keller, Chester K.

    2014-01-10

    Background and Aims Plant nutrient uptake is affected by environmental stress, but how plants respond to cation-nutrient stress is poorly understood. We assessed the impact of varying degrees of cation-nutrient limitation on cation uptake in an experimental plant-mineral system. Methods Column experiments, with red pine (Pinus resinosa Ait.) seedlings growing in sand/mineral mixtures, were conducted for up to nine months under a range of Ca- and K-limited conditions. The Ca and K were supplied from both minerals and nutrient solutions with varying Ca and K concentrations. Results Cation nutrient stress had little impact on carbon allocation after nine months of plant growth and K was the limiting nutrient for biomass production. The Ca/Sr and K/Rb ratio results allowed independent estimation of dissolution incongruency and discrimination against Sr and Rb during cation uptake processes. The fraction of K in biomass from biotite increased with decreasing K supply from nutrient solutions. The mineral anorthite was consistently the major source of Ca, regardless of nutrient treatment. Conclusions Red pine seedlings exploited more mineral K in response to more severe K deficiency. This did not occur for Ca. Plant discrimination factors must be carefully considered to accurately identify nutrient sources using cation tracers.

  3. Reactive transport modeling of thermal column experiments to investigate the impacts of aquifer thermal energy storage on groundwater quality.

    PubMed

    Bonte, Matthijs; Stuyfzand, Pieter J; Breukelen, Boris M van

    2014-10-21

    Aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) systems are increasingly being used to acclimatize buildings and are often constructed in aquifers used for drinking water supply. This raises the question of potential groundwater quality impact. Here, we use laboratory column experiments to develop and calibrate a reactive transport model (PHREEQC) simulating the thermally induced (5-60 °C) water quality changes in anoxic sandy sediments. Temperature-dependent surface complexation, cation-exchange, and kinetic dissolution of K-feldspar were included in the model. Optimization results combined with an extensive literature survey showed surface complexation of (oxy)anions (As, B, and PO4) is consistently exothermic, whereas surface complexation of cations (Ca and Mg) and cationic heavy metals (Cd, Pb, and Zn) is endothermic. The calibrated model was applied to simulate arsenic mobility in an ATES system using a simple yet powerful mirrored axi-symmetrical grid. Results showed that ATES mobilizes arsenic toward the fringe of the warm water bubble and the center of the cold water bubble. This transient redistribution of arsenic causes its aqueous concentrations in the cold and warm groundwater bubbles to become similar through multiple heating cycles, with a final concentration depending on the average injection temperature of the warm and cold ATES wells.

  4. Sorption behavior of 20 wastewater originated micropollutants in groundwater--column experiments with pharmaceutical residues and industrial agents.

    PubMed

    Burke, Victoria; Treumann, Svantje; Duennbier, Uwe; Greskowiak, Janek; Massmann, Gudrun

    2013-11-01

    Since sorption is an essential process with regard to attenuation of organic pollutants during subsurface flow, information on the sorption properties of each pollutant are essential for assessing their environmental fate and transport behavior. In the present study, the sorption behavior of 20 wastewater originated organic micropollutants was assessed by means of sediment column experiments, since experimentally determined data for these compounds are not or sparsely represented in the literature. Compounds investigated include various psychoactive drugs, phenazone-type pharmaceuticals and β-blockers, as well as phenacetine, N-methylphenacetine, tolyltriazole and para-toluenesulfonamide. While for most of the compounds no or only a low sorption affinity was observed, an elevated tendency to sorb onto aquifer sand was obtained for the β-blockers atenolol, propranolol and metoprolol. A comparison between experimental data and data estimated based on the octanol/water partition coefficient following the QSAR approach demonstrated the limitations of the latter to predict the adsorption behavior in natural systems for the studied compounds.

  5. Sorption behavior of 20 wastewater originated micropollutants in groundwater — Column experiments with pharmaceutical residues and industrial agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Victoria; Treumann, Svantje; Duennbier, Uwe; Greskowiak, Janek; Massmann, Gudrun

    2013-11-01

    Since sorption is an essential process with regard to attenuation of organic pollutants during subsurface flow, information on the sorption properties of each pollutant are essential for assessing their environmental fate and transport behavior. In the present study, the sorption behavior of 20 wastewater originated organic micropollutants was assessed by means of sediment column experiments, since experimentally determined data for these compounds are not or sparsely represented in the literature. Compounds investigated include various psychoactive drugs, phenazone-type pharmaceuticals and β-blockers, as well as phenacetine, N-methylphenacetine, tolyltriazole and para-toluenesulfonamide. While for most of the compounds no or only a low sorption affinity was observed, an elevated tendency to sorb onto aquifer sand was obtained for the β-blockers atenolol, propranolol and metoprolol. A comparison between experimental data and data estimated based on the octanol/water partition coefficient following the QSAR approach demonstrated the limitations of the latter to predict the adsorption behavior in natural systems for the studied compounds.

  6. Evolution of the Microbial Community Structure and Iron Reduction Rate in a Column Biostimulation Experiment During the Transition From Iron to Sulfate Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, P. R.; Elbishlawi, H.; Hettich, R. L.; Kerkhof, L.; Komlos, J.; Kukkadapu, R. P.; Lipton, M. S.; Long, P. E.; McGuinness, L.; Moon, H.; Peacock, A. D.; Verberkmoes, N. C.; Williams, K. H.

    2007-12-01

    During the biostimulation of iron reducers for the purpose of concurrent biological reduction of U(VI), it has been postulated that iron reduction proceeds while bioavailable iron is present, after which the system switches to sulfate reduction if sulfate is present. Field experiments from the Rifle Integrated Field Challenge (IFC) site in Colorado showing that the onset of sulfate reduction has been associated with decreased removal of U(VI) from groundwater support this hypothesis. However, column experiments using sediments from the Rifle site and synthetic groundwater with comparable (7 mM) sulfate levels as in the field, showed that the onset of sulfate reduction occurred within a month with no negative effect on U(VI) reduction. Separate column experiments using low (9 uM) sulfate concentrations showed that iron reduction can be maintained for over 200 days with no indication of iron limitations. To address the discrepancy between field and column experiments, an experiment is being conducted to determine the activity of iron reducers before and after the onset of sulfate reduction. Since Fe(II) buildup is difficult to quantify in the presence of sulfate reduction, the sediments were augmented with Fe- 57 goethite. Minute changes in the Fe-57 goethite can be detected via Mössbauer spectroscopy. Ten columns (2.5 cm internal diameter and 15 cm in length), loaded with sediment from the Rifle site, have been set up and are being operated at 17 °C. Groundwater from the Rifle site, amended with 3mM acetate and 20 μM U(VI), is pumped through the columns at a rate of 0.035 ml/min. Column effluent concentrations are being monitored for acetate, Fe(II), U(VI), and sulfate. Columns are sacrificed at 10 day intervals and the sediment samples are analyzed for Fe(II), U(IV), and acid volatile sulfides using standard analytical procedures. Changes in Fe-57 goethite measured using Mössbauer spectroscopy during biostimulation of the native microorganisms at 10-day

  7. Numerical modeling of humic colloid borne americium (III) migration in column experiments using the transport/speciation code K1D and the KICAM model.

    PubMed

    Schüssler, W; Artinger, R; Kim, J I; Bryan, N D; Griffin, D

    2001-02-01

    The humic colloid borne Am(III) transport was investigated in column experiments for Gorleben groundwater/sand systems. It was found that the interaction of Am with humic colloids is kinetically controlled, which strongly influences the migration behavior of Am(III). These kinetic effects have to be taken into account for transport/speciation modeling. The kinetically controlled availability model (KICAM) was developed to describe actinide sorption and transport in laboratory batch and column experiments. Application of the KICAM requires a chemical transport/speciation code, which simultaneously models both kinetically controlled processes and equilibrium reactions. Therefore, the code K1D was developed as a flexible research code that allows the inclusion of kinetic data in addition to transport features and chemical equilibrium. This paper presents the verification of K1D and its application to model column experiments investigating unimpeded humic colloid borne Am migration. Parmeters for reactive transport simulations were determined for a Gorleben groundwater system of high humic colloid concentration (GoHy 2227). A single set of parameters was used to model a series of column experiments. Model results correspond well to experimental data for the unretarded humic borne Am breakthrough.

  8. Numerical modeling of humic colloid borne Americium (III) migration in column experiments using the transport/speciation code K1D and the KICAM model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüßler, W.; Artinger, R.; Kim, J. I.; Bryan, N. D.; Griffin, D.

    2001-02-01

    The humic colloid borne Am(III) transport was investigated in column experiments for Gorleben groundwater/sand systems. It was found that the interaction of Am with humic colloids is kinetically controlled, which strongly influences the migration behavior of Am(III). These kinetic effects have to be taken into account for transport/speciation modeling. The kinetically controlled availability model (KICAM) was developed to describe actinide sorption and transport in laboratory batch and column experiments. Application of the KICAM requires a chemical transport/speciation code, which simultaneously models both kinetically controlled processes and equilibrium reactions. Therefore, the code K1D was developed as a flexible research code that allows the inclusion of kinetic data in addition to transport features and chemical equilibrium. This paper presents the verification of K1D and its application to model column experiments investigating unimpeded humic colloid borne Am migration. Parameters for reactive transport simulations were determined for a Gorleben groundwater system of high humic colloid concentration (GoHy 2227). A single set of parameters was used to model a series of column experiments. Model results correspond well to experimental data for the unretarded humic borne Am breakthrough.

  9. Adsorption and transformation of ammonium ion in a loose-pore geothermal reservoir: Batch and column experiments.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li; Li, Yanli; Wang, Shidong; Wang, Xinyi; Meng, Hongqi; Luo, Shaohe

    2016-09-01

    Adsorption kinetics and transformation process of ammonium ion (NH4(+)) were investigated to advance the understanding of N cycle in a low-temperature loose-pore geothermal reservoir. Firstly, batch experiments were performed in order to determine the sorption capacity and the kinetic mechanism of NH4(+) onto a loose-pore geothermal reservoir matrix. Then column experiments were carried out at temperatures from 20°C to 60°C in order to determine the transport parameters and transformation mechanism of NH4(+) in the studied matrix. The results showed that the adsorption process of NH4(+) onto the porous media well followed the pseudo-second-order model. No obvious variation of hydrodynamic dispersion coefficient (D) and retardation factor (R) was observed at different transport distances at a Darcy's flux of 2.27cm/h, at which nitrification could be neglected. The simulated D obtained by the CDE model in CXTFIT2.1 increased with temperature while R decreased with temperature, indicating that the adsorption capacity of NH4(+) onto the matrix decreased with the increasing of temperature. When the Darcy's flux was decreased to 0.014cm/h, only a little part of NH4(+) could be transformed to nitrate, suggesting that low density of nitrifiers existed in the simulated loose-pore geothermal reservoir. Although nitrification rate increased with temperature in the range of 20°C to 60°C, it was extremely low and no accumulation of nitrite was observed under the simulated low-temperature geothermal conditions without addition of biomass and oxygen.

  10. Adsorption and transformation of ammonium ion in a loose-pore geothermal reservoir: Batch and column experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Li; Li, Yanli; Wang, Shidong; Wang, Xinyi; Meng, Hongqi; Luo, Shaohe

    2016-09-01

    Adsorption kinetics and transformation process of ammonium ion (NH4+) were investigated to advance the understanding of N cycle in a low-temperature loose-pore geothermal reservoir. Firstly, batch experiments were performed in order to determine the sorption capacity and the kinetic mechanism of NH4+ onto a loose-pore geothermal reservoir matrix. Then column experiments were carried out at temperatures from 20 °C to 60 °C in order to determine the transport parameters and transformation mechanism of NH4+ in the studied matrix. The results showed that the adsorption process of NH4+ onto the porous media well followed the pseudo-second-order model. No obvious variation of hydrodynamic dispersion coefficient (D) and retardation factor (R) was observed at different transport distances at a Darcy's flux of 2.27 cm/h, at which nitrification could be neglected. The simulated D obtained by the CDE model in CXTFIT2.1 increased with temperature while R decreased with temperature, indicating that the adsorption capacity of NH4+ onto the matrix decreased with the increasing of temperature. When the Darcy's flux was decreased to 0.014 cm/h, only a little part of NH4+ could be transformed to nitrate, suggesting that low density of nitrifiers existed in the simulated loose-pore geothermal reservoir. Although nitrification rate increased with temperature in the range of 20 °C to 60 °C, it was extremely low and no accumulation of nitrite was observed under the simulated low-temperature geothermal conditions without addition of biomass and oxygen.

  11. Loading and unloading resin from MPPF rapid ion-exchange columns

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, W.C.

    1981-10-01

    A process was developed which permits changing the resin in the Multipurpose Processing Facility Rapid Ion Exchange columns, without replacing the entire column assembly. The columns remain on the rack during the resin removal and replacement. The resin displacement process consists of a resin unloading and a resin loading step. During resin removal, the spent resin is hydraulically displaced from the columns to a resin collection tank, and then transferred to the evaporator for dissolution. Fresh resin is loaded into the empty column by hydraulic displacement or a combination of vacuum loading followed by hydraulic displacement. In the hydraulic displacement loading process, the amount of fresh resin needed to load the columns is transferred to a resin displacement tank where the resin is hydraulically displaced to the appropriate column. In the vacuum loading process, part of the resin feed is loaded directly into the column by applying a negative pressure to the column.

  12. Utilization of fly ash to improve the quality of the acid mine drainage generated by oxidation of a sulphide-rich mining waste: column experiments.

    PubMed

    Pérez-López, Rafael; Nieto, José Miguel; de Almodóvar, Gabriel Ruiz

    2007-04-01

    The production of Acid Mine Drainage (AMD) as a result of the oxidative dissolution of sulphides is one of the main pollution problems affecting natural watercourses in mining environments with sulphide-rich residues. In this work, the generation of AMD was prevented by means of the addition of fly ash to sulphide-rich residues in non-saturated column experiments. A column experiment filled with a pyrite-rich sludge with artificial irrigation leached acid drainages (pH approx. 2) containing high concentrations of sulphate, iron and other metals. However, non-saturated column experiments filled with pyritic-rich sludge and fly ash drained leachates characterized by alkaline pH (pH up to 10), low sulphate concentration, and lack of iron and other metals in solution. The pyrite oxidative dissolution at high pH, as a consequence of the leaching of fly ash, favours the metal precipitation inside the column (mainly iron), the coating of pyrite grains, and the attenuation of the oxidation process, resulting in a great improvement in the quality of the leachates.

  13. Apparent Dependence of Rate- and State-Dependent Friction Parameters on Loading Velocity and Cumulative Displacement Inferred from Large-Scale Biaxial Friction Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urata, Yumi; Yamashita, Futoshi; Fukuyama, Eiichi; Noda, Hiroyuki; Mizoguchi, Kazuo

    2016-11-01

    We investigated the constitutive parameters in the rate- and state-dependent friction (RSF) law by conducting numerical simulations, using the friction data from large-scale biaxial rock friction experiments for Indian metagabbro. The sliding surface area was 1.5 m long and 0.5 m wide, slid for 400 s under a normal stress of 1.33 MPa at a loading velocity of either 0.1 or 1.0 mm/s. During the experiments, many stick-slips were observed and those features were as follows. (1) The friction drop and recurrence time of the stick-slip events increased with cumulative slip displacement in an experiment before which the gouges on the surface were removed, but they became almost constant throughout an experiment conducted after several experiments without gouge removal. (2) The friction drop was larger and the recurrence time was shorter in the experiments with faster loading velocity. We applied a one-degree-of-freedom spring-slider model with mass to estimate the RSF parameters by fitting the stick-slip intervals and slip-weakening curves measured based on spring force and acceleration of the specimens. We developed an efficient algorithm for the numerical time integration, and we conducted forward modeling for evolution parameters (b) and the state-evolution distances (L_{c} ), keeping the direct effect parameter (a) constant. We then identified the confident range of b and L_{c} values. Comparison between the results of the experiments and our simulations suggests that both b and L_{c} increase as the cumulative slip displacement increases, and b increases and L_{c} decreases as the loading velocity increases. Conventional RSF laws could not explain the large-scale friction data, and more complex state evolution laws are needed.

  14. Will the Displacement of Zebra Mussels by Quagga Mussels Increase Water Clarity in Shallow Lakes during Summer? Results from a Mesocosm Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Kassam, Sinan-Saleh; Rudstam, Lars G.

    2016-01-01

    Zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) are known to increase water clarity and affect ecosystem processes in invaded lakes. During the last decade, the conspecific quagga mussels (D. rostriformis bugensis) have displaced zebra mussels in many ecosystems including shallow lakes such as Oneida Lake, New York. In this study, an eight-week mesocosm experiment was conducted to test the hypothesis that the displacement of zebra mussels by quagga mussels leads to further decreases in phytoplankton and increases in water clarity resulting in increases in benthic algae. We found that the presence of zebra mussels alone (ZM), quagga mussels alone (QM), or an equal number of both species (ZQ) reduced total phosphorus (TP) and phytoplankton Chl a. Total suspended solids (TSS) was reduced in ZM and ZQ treatments. Light intensity at the sediment surface was higher in all three mussel treatments than in the no-mussel controls but there was no difference among the mussel treatments. There was no increase in benthic algae biomass in the mussel treatments compared with the no-mussel controls. Importantly, there was no significant difference in nutrient (TP, soluble reactive phosphorus and NO3-) levels, TSS, phytoplankton Chl a, benthic algal Chl a, or light intensity on the sediment surface between ZM, QM and ZQ treatments. These results confirm the strong effect of both mussel species on water clarity and indicate that the displacement of zebra mussel by an equivalent biomass of quagga mussel is not likely to lead to further increases in water clarity, at least for the limnological conditions, including summer temperature, tested in this experiment. PMID:28005940

  15. Effects of Low-Molecular-Weight Organic Acids on the Dissolution of Hydroxyapatite Nanoparticles in Batch and Column Experiments: A Perspective from Phosphate Oxygen Isotope Fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D.; Jaisi, D. P.; Jin, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (HANPs) are increasingly being advocated as an efficient and environment-friendly "green" phosphorus nanofertilizer attributed to their nanoscale dimension, large reactive surface area, and low leaching potential. However, knowledge of how naturally occurring low-molecular-weight organic acids (LMWOAs) that are secreted by plant roots mediate the dissolution of HANPs (releasing PO43- ion for plant growth) is nonexistent. Here three most commonly encountered LMWOAs (acetic acid, oxalic acid, and citric acid) at environmentally relevant concentration (1 mM) were evaluated for their effects on HANPs' dissolution in static batch and dynamic column systems. Particularly, phosphate oxygen isotope fractionation of HANPs during dissolution was examined to disentangle mechanisms controlling the evolution of O-isotopic composition of dissolved PO43- ion. Our results reveal that in batch experiments the dissolution of HANPs was fast but the overall dissolution efficiency of HANPs was limited (≤30%). In contrast, ~100% HANPs were dissolved in columns where LMWOAs were continuously injected. The limited dissolution of HANPs in static batch systems was due primarily to pH buffer effect (pH increased sharply when LMWOA was added in HANPs suspension), whereas in dynamic column systems the HANPs were continuously dissolved by low pH LMWOAs and leached away. Regardless of LMWOA type and experimental system, the isotopically light phosphate (P16O4) was preferentially released during dissolution and the O-isotopic composition of dissolved PO43- ion increased gradually with increasing dissolution due to equilibrium isotope effect between dissolved PO43- ion and HANPs. However, the overall magnitude of O-isotopic fractionation of dissolved PO43- ion was less in batch than in column systems, due to less mass transfer between dissolved PO43- ions and HANPs in batch relative to column experiments. Our findings provide new insights into bioavailability

  16. Transport of carboxyl-functionalized carbon black nanoparticles in saturated porous media: Column experiments and model analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jin-Kyu; Yi, In-Geol; Park, Jeong-Ann; Kim, Song-Bae; Kim, Hyunjung; Han, Yosep; Kim, Pil-Je; Eom, Ig-Chun; Jo, Eunhye

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the transport behavior of carboxyl-functionalized carbon black nanoparticles (CBNPs) in porous media including quartz sand, iron oxide-coated sand (IOCS), and aluminum oxide-coated sand (AOCS). Two sets of column experiments were performed under saturated flow conditions for potassium chloride (KCl), a conservative tracer, and CBNPs. Breakthrough curves were analyzed to obtain mass recovery and one-dimensional transport model parameters. The first set of experiments was conducted to examine the effects of metal (Fe, Al) oxides and flow rate (0.25 and 0.5 mL min- 1) on the transport of CBNPs suspended in deionized water. The results showed that the mass recovery of CBNPs in quartz sand (flow rate = 0.5 mL min- 1) was 83.1%, whereas no breakthrough of CBNPs (mass recovery = 0%) was observed in IOCS and AOCS at the same flow rate, indicating that metal (Fe, Al) oxides can play a significant role in the attachment of CBNPs to porous media. In addition, the mass recovery of CBNPs in quartz sand decreased to 76.1% as the flow rate decreased to 0.25 mL min- 1. Interaction energy profiles for CBNP-porous media were calculated using DLVO theory for sphere-plate geometry, demonstrating that the interaction energy for CBNP-quartz sand was repulsive, whereas the interaction energies for CBNP-IOCS and CBNP-AOCS were attractive with no energy barriers. The second set of experiments was conducted in quartz sand to observe the effect of ionic strength (NaCl = 0.1 and 1.0 mM; CaCl2 = 0.01 and 0.1 mM) and pH (pH = 4.5 and 5.4) on the transport of CBNPs suspended in electrolyte. The results showed that the mass recoveries of CBNPs in NaCl = 0.1 and 1.0 mM were 65.3 and 6.4%, respectively. The mass recoveries of CBNPs in CaCl2 = 0.01 and 0.1 mM were 81.6 and 6.3%, respectively. These results demonstrated that CBNP attachment to quartz sand can be enhanced by increasing the electrolyte concentration. Interaction energy profiles demonstrated that

  17. Physico-chemical modeling of the First Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE 1) Lagrangian B: 1. A moving column approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhre, Karsten; Mari, CéLine; Bates, Timothy S.; Johnson, James E.; Rosset, Robert; Wang, Qing; Bandy, Alan R.; Blake, Donald R.; Businger, Steven; Eisele, Fred L.; Huebert, Barry J.; Kok, Gregory L.; Lee Mauldin, R.; PréVôT, André S. H.; Schillawski, Richard D.; Tanner, David J.; Thornton, Donald C.

    1998-01-01

    During Lagrangian experiment B (LB in the following) of the First Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE 1), a clean maritime air mass was followed over a period of 28 hours. During that time span, the vertical distribution of aerosols and their gas phase precursors were characterized by a total of nine aircraft soundings which were performed during three research flights that followed the trajectory of a set of marked tetroons. The objective of this paper is to study the time evolution of gas phase photochemistry in this Lagrangian framework. A box model approach to the wind shear driven and vertically stratified boundary layer is questionable, since its basic assumption of instantaneous turbulent mixing of the entire air column is not satisfied here. To overcome this obstacle, a one-dimensional Lagrangian boundary layer meteorological model with coupled gas phase photochemistry is used. To our knowledge, this is the first time that such a model is applied to a Lagrangian experiment and that enough measurements are available to fully constrain the simulations. A major part of this paper is devoted to the question of to what degree our model is able to reproduce the time evolution and the vertical distribution of the observed species. Comparison with observations of O3, OH, H2O2, CH3OOH, DMS, and CH3I, made on the nine Lagrangian aircraft soundings shows that this is in general the case, although the dynamical simulation started to deviate from the observations on the last Lagrangian flight. In agreement with experimental findings reported by Q. Wang et al. (unpublished manuscript, 1998b), generation of turbulence in the model appears to be most sensitive to the imposed sea surface temperature. Concerning the different modeled and observed chemical species, a number of conclusions are drawn: (1) Ozone, having a relatively long photochemical lifetime in the clean marine boundary layer, is found to be controlled by vertical transport processes, in particular

  18. Cation uptake and allocation by red pine seedlings under cation-nutrient stress in a column growth experiment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background and aims: Plant nutrient uptake is affected by environmental stress, but how plants respond to cation nutrient stress is poorly understood. We assessed the impact of varying degrees of cation-nutrient stress on cation uptake in an experimental plant-mineral system. Methods: Column experim...

  19. Americium, Cesium, and Plutonium Colloid-Facilitated Transport in a Groundwater/Bentonite/Fracture Fill Material System: Column Experiments and Model Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittrich, T. M.; Boukhalfa, H.; Reimus, P. W.

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate and quantify the effects of desorption kinetics and colloid transport on radionuclides with different sorption affinities. We focused on quantifying transport mechanisms important for upscaling in time and distance. This will help determine the long-term fate and transport of radionuclides to aid in risk assessments. We selected a fractured/weathered granodiorite at the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) in Switzerland as a model crystalline rock repository system because the system has been thoroughly studied and field experiments involving radionuclides have already been conducted. Working on this system provides a unique opportunity to compare lab experiments with field-scale observations. Weathered fracture fill material (FFM) and bentonite used as backfill at the GTS were characterized (e.g., BET, SEM/EDS, QXRD), and batch and breakthrough column experiments were conducted. Solutions were prepared in synthetic groundwaters that matched the natural water chemistry. FFM samples were crushed, rinsed, sieved (150-355 μm), and equilibrated with synthetic groundwater. Bentonite was crushed, sodium-saturated, equilibrated with synthetic groundwater, and settled to yield a stable suspension. Suspensions were equilibrated with Am, Cs, or Pu. All experiments were conducted with Teflon®materials to limit sorption to system components. After radionuclide/colloid injections reached stability, radionuclide-free solutions were injected to observe the desorption and release behavior. Aliquots of effluent were measured for pH, colloid concentration, and total and dissolved radionuclides. Unanalyzed effluent from the first column was then injected through a second column of fresh material. The process was repeated for a third column and the results of all three breakthrough curves were modeled with a multi-site/multi-rate MATLAB code to elucidate the sorption rate coefficients and binding site densities of the bentonite colloids and

  20. Influence of a compost layer on the attenuation of 28 selected organic micropollutants under realistic soil aquifer treatment conditions: insights from a large scale column experiment.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Mario; Kröger, Kerrin Franziska; Nödler, Karsten; Ayora, Carlos; Carrera, Jesús; Hernández, Marta; Licha, Tobias

    2015-05-01

    Soil aquifer treatment is widely applied to improve the quality of treated wastewater in its reuse as alternative source of water. To gain a deeper understanding of the fate of thereby introduced organic micropollutants, the attenuation of 28 compounds was investigated in column experiments using two large scale column systems in duplicate. The influence of increasing proportions of solid organic matter (0.04% vs. 0.17%) and decreasing redox potentials (denitrification vs. iron reduction) was studied by introducing a layer of compost. Secondary effluent from a wastewater treatment plant was used as water matrix for simulating soil aquifer treatment. For neutral and anionic compounds, sorption generally increases with the compound hydrophobicity and the solid organic matter in the column system. Organic cations showed the highest attenuation. Among them, breakthroughs were only registered for the cationic beta-blockers atenolol and metoprolol. An enhanced degradation in the columns with organic infiltration layer was observed for the majority of the compounds, suggesting an improved degradation for higher levels of biodegradable dissolved organic carbon. Solely the degradation of sulfamethoxazole could clearly be attributed to redox effects (when reaching iron reducing conditions). The study provides valuable insights into the attenuation potential for a wide spectrum of organic micropollutants under realistic soil aquifer treatment conditions. Furthermore, the introduction of the compost layer generally showed positive effects on the removal of compounds preferentially degraded under reducing conditions and also increases the residence times in the soil aquifer treatment system via sorption.

  1. Dynamic behavior of binary component ion-exchange displacement chromatography of proteins visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Shi, Qing-Hong; Shi, Zhi-Cong; Sun, Yan

    2012-09-28

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) was introduced to visualize particle-scale binary component protein displacement behavior in Q Sepharose HP column. To this end, displacement chromatography of two intrinsic fluorescent proteins, enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and red fluorescent protein (RFP), were developed using sodium saccharin (NaSac) as a displacer. The results indicated that RFP as well as eGFP could be effectively displaced in the single-component experiments by 50 mmol/L NaSac at 120 and 140 mmol/L NaCl whereas a fully developed displacement train with eGFP and RFP was only observed at 120 mmol/L NaCl in binary component displacement. At 140 mmol/L NaCl, there was a serious overlapping of the zones of the two proteins, indicating the importance of induced-salt effect on the formation of an isotachic displacement train. CLSM provided particle-scale evidence that induced-salt effect occurred likewise in the interior of an adsorbent and was synchronous to the introduction of the displacer. CLSM results at 140 mmol/L NaCl also demonstrated that both the proteins had the same fading rate at 50 mmol/L NaSac in the initial stage, suggesting the same displacement ability of NaSac to both the proteins. In the final stage, the fading rate of RFP in the adsorbent became slow, particularly at lower displacer concentrations. In the binary component displacement, the two proteins exhibited distinct fading rates as compared to the single component displacement and the remarkable lagging of the fading rate was observed in protein displacements. It suggested that the co-adsorbed proteins had significant influence on the formation of an isotachic train and the displacement chromatography of the proteins. Therefore, this research provided particle-scale insight into the dynamic behavior and complexity in the displacement of proteins.

  2. Measuring vulnerability to disaster displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brink, Susan A.; Khazai, Bijan; Power, Christopher; Wenzel, Friedemann

    2015-04-01

    aggregate these ideas into a framework of disaster displacement vulnerability that distinguishes between three main aspects of disaster displacement. Disaster displacement can be considered in terms of the number of displaced people and the length of that displacement. However, the literature emphasizes that the severity of disaster displacement can not be measured completely in quantitative terms. Thus, we include a measure representing people who are trapped and unable to leave their homes due to mobility, resources or for other reasons. Finally the third main aspect considers the difficulties that are associated with displacement and reflects the difference between the experiences of those who are displaced into safe and supportive environments as compared to those whose only alternate shelter is dangerous and inadequate for their needs. Finally, we apply the framework to demonstrate a methodology to estimate vulnerability to disaster displacement. Using data from the Global Earthquake Model (GEM) Social and Economic Vulnerability sub-National Database, we generate an index to measure the vulnerability of Japanese prefectures to the dimensions of displacement included in the framework. References Yonitani, M. (2014). Global Estimates 2014: People displaced by disasters. http://www.internal-displacement.org/publications/2014/global-estimates-2014-people-displaced-by-disasters/

  3. RTV 21 Displacements

    SciTech Connect

    Kurita, C.H.; /Fermilab

    1987-02-04

    A seal is needed for the cover of the Nitrogen Test Vessel in order to prevent leakage of the N{sub 2} gas. This seal is to be molded out of RTV 21. In this experiment, the Modulus of Elasticity of the RTV was sought after, and the displacements of the RTV due to various stresses were measured to see if they were large enough to provide a tight seal between the vessel and its cover.

  4. [60]Fullerene Displacement from (Dihapto-Buckminster-Fullerene) Pentacarbonyl Tungsten(0): An Experiment for the Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortes-Figueroa, Jose E.; Moore-Russo, Deborah A.

    2006-01-01

    The kinetics experiments on the ligand-C[subscript 60] exchange reactions on (dihapto-[60]fullerene) pentacarbonyl tungsten(0), ([eta][superscript 2]-C[subscript 60])W(CO)[subscript 5], form an educational activity for the inorganic chemistry laboratory that promotes graphical thinking as well as the understanding of kinetics, mechanisms, and the…

  5. Development of a novel multi-column airlift photobioreactor with easy scalability by means of computational fluid dynamics simulations and experiments.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianke; Ying, Jiangguo; Fan, Fei; Yang, Qijian; Wang, Jun; Li, Yuanguang

    2016-12-01

    Aiming to culture algae with high efficiency, a novel vertical multi-column airlift photobioreactor (VMAPBR) has been developed. It was constructed with a series of vertically arranged parallel columns with easy scalability. The hydrodynamic, irradiation and shear stress characteristics of the photobioreactor were studied by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Accordingly, the optimal aeration manner and aeration rate were determined. When the novel airlift PBR was alternately aerated with aeration rate of 0.2vvm, the biomass concentration of Chlorella pyrenoidosa under outdoor condition reached 1.30gL(-1) within the prototype PBR and was further increased to 1.56gL(-1) within the optimized PBR. The result of cultivation experiment had good agreement with that of CFD prediction.

  6. Distillation Column Flooding Predictor

    SciTech Connect

    George E. Dzyacky

    2010-11-23

    /vapor traffic that produce increased contact area and lead to substantial increases in separation efficiency – which translates to a 10% increase in energy efficiency on a BTU/bbl basis. The Flooding Predictor™ operates on the principle that between five to sixty minutes in advance of a flooding event, certain column variables experience an oscillation, a pre-flood pattern. The pattern recognition system of the Flooding Predictor™ utilizes the mathematical first derivative of certain column variables to identify the column’s pre-flood pattern(s). This pattern is a very brief, highly repeatable, simultaneous movement among the derivative values of certain column variables. While all column variables experience negligible random noise generated from the natural frequency of the process, subtle pre-flood patterns are revealed among sub-sets of the derivative values of column variables as the column approaches its hydraulic limit. The sub-set of column variables that comprise the pre-flood pattern is identified empirically through in a two-step process. First, 2ndpoint’s proprietary off-line analysis tool is used to mine historical data for pre-flood patterns. Second, the column is flood-tested to fine-tune the pattern recognition for commissioning. Then the Flooding Predictor™ is implemented as closed-loop advanced control strategy on the plant’s distributed control system (DCS), thus automating control of the column at its hydraulic limit.

  7. Displacement Damage Effects in Solar Cells: Mining Damage From the Microelectronics and Photonics Test Bed Space Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardage, Donna (Technical Monitor); Walters, R. J.; Morton, T. L.; Messenger, S. R.

    2004-01-01

    The objective is to develop an improved space solar cell radiation response analysis capability and to produce a computer modeling tool which implements the analysis. This was accomplished through analysis of solar cell flight data taken on the Microelectronics and Photonics Test Bed experiment. This effort specifically addresses issues related to rapid technological change in the area of solar cells for space applications in order to enhance system performance, decrease risk, and reduce cost for future missions.

  8. Lateral displacement and rotational displacement sensor

    DOEpatents

    Duden, Thomas

    2014-04-22

    A position measuring sensor formed from opposing sets of capacitor plates measures both rotational displacement and lateral displacement from the changes in capacitances as overlapping areas of capacitors change. Capacitances are measured by a measuring circuit. The measured capacitances are provided to a calculating circuit that performs calculations to obtain angular and lateral displacement from the capacitances measured by the measuring circuit.

  9. Laboratory-Scale Column Testing Using IONSIV IE-911 for Removing Cesium from Acidic Tank Waste Simulant. 2: Determination of Cesium Exchange Capacity and Effective Mass Transfer Coefficient from a 500-cm3 Column Experiement

    SciTech Connect

    T.J. Tranter; R.D. Tillotson; T.A. Todd

    2005-04-01

    A semi-scale column test was performed using a commercial form of crystalline silicotitanate (CST) for removing radio-cesium from a surrogate acidic tank solution, which represents liquid waste stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The engineered form of CST ion exchanger, known as IONSIVtmIE-911 (UOP, Mt. Laurel,NJ, USA), was tested in a 500-cm3 column to obtain a cesium breakthrough curve. The cesium exchange capacity of this column matched that obtained from previous testing with a 15-mc3 column. A numerical algorithm using implicit finite difference approximations was developed to solve the governing mass transport equations for the CST columns. An effective mass transfer coefficient was derived from solving these equations for previously reported 15 cm3 tests. The effective mass transfer coefficient was then used to predict the cesium breakthrough curve for the 500-cm3 column and compared to the experimental data reported in this paper. The calculated breakthrough curve showed excellent agreement with the data from the 500-cm3 column even though the interstitial velocity was a factor of two greater. Thus, this approach should provide a reasonable method for scale up to larger columns for treating actual tank waste.

  10. Effects of humic substances on the 241Am migration in a sandy aquifer: column experiments with Gorleben groundwater/sediment systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artinger, R.; Kienzler, B.; Schüßler, W.; Kim, J. I.

    1998-12-01

    Migration experiments were performed to study the influence of aquatic humic substances on the transport behavior of 241Am(III). Four groundwaters with different humic substance concentrations (DOC: 1 to 80 mg/l) were sampled together with Pleistocene aeolian quartz sand from the Gorleben site. Sand, groundwaters and humic substances were characterized by different analytical methods (e.g., ICP-MS, X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence analysis, ultrafiltration). The sand was equilibrated with each groundwater under inert gas atmosphere with 1% CO 2 for a period of at least 3 months. As confirmed by ultrafiltration, the size distribution of humic colloids remained unchanged during equilibration. The hydraulic properties of sand columns were characterized with tritiated water as an inert tracer. Column and batch experiments were carried out with each groundwater as a function of the reaction period and flow velocity. In addition, the influence of the equilibration period of Am with groundwater was investigated prior to the injection into a column. The results revealed that increasing humic substance concentration reduced the Am sorption onto sand and enhanced the transport as colloid-borne Am species. The migration of colloid-borne Am was slightly faster than the groundwater flow velocity. Furthermore, the migration behavior of Am was found to depend on kinetically controlled interaction of humic colloid-bound Am with the sand surface. The application of the laboratory data to natural conditions was examined. The results were found applicable for the assessment of humic colloid facilitated radionuclide migration in natural aquifers.

  11. Biogeochemical impacts of aquifer thermal energy storage at 5, 12, 25 and 60°C investigated with anoxic column experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonte, M.; van Breukelen, B. M.; Van Der Wielen, P. W. J. J.; Stuyfzand, P. J.

    2012-04-01

    Aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) uses groundwater to store energy for heating or cooling purposes in the built environment. ATES systems are often located in the same aquifers used for public drinking water supply, leading to urgent questions on its environmental impacts. This contribution presents the results of research on the biogeochemical impacts of ATES in anoxic column experiments at 5, 12, 25, and 60° C. In- and effluents are analyzed for major ions, trace elements, heavy metals, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and UV extinction. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) of 16S rRNA genes and analysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) were used to detect changes in the microbiological population and activity. Results from the column experiments at 5, 25, and 60° C compared to the reference column at 12° C showed a number of changes in biogeochemical conditions: At 5° C, only changes were observed in alkalinity and calcium concentrations, resulting from calcite dissolution. The 25° C and 60° C column effluents from a sediment containing Fe-(hydr)oxides showed an increase in arsenic concentrations, well above the drinking water limit. This is due to either (reductive) dissolution of, or desorption from, iron(hydro)xides containing arsenic. In addition, at these two temperatures sulfate reduction occurred while this was undetectable at 5 and 12° C within the given timeframe (25 days) and analytical accuracy. The carbon source for sulfate reduction is inferred to be sedimentary organic carbon. Increasing DOC with residence time in the 60° C effluent suggests that at 60° C the terminal sulfate reduction step is rate limiting, while at 25° C the enzymatic hydrolization step in sulfate reducing bacteria is overall rate limiting. Specific ultraviolet absorption (SUVA, the ratio of UV extinction and DOC) however shows a clear decrease in reactivity of the humic acid fraction in DOC. This means that the DOC accumulation at 60° C could

  12. Interaction of (3)H(+) (as HTO) and (36)Cl(-) (as Na(36)Cl) with crushed granite and corresponding fracture infill material investigated in column experiments.

    PubMed

    Štamberg, K; Palágyi, Š; Videnská, K; Havlová, V

    The transport of (3)H(+) (as HTO) and (36)Cl(-) (as Na(36)Cl) was investigated in the dynamic system, i.e., in the columns filled with crushed pure granite and fracture infill of various grain sizes. The aim of column experiments was to determine important transport parameter, such as the retardation, respectively distribution coefficients, Peclet numbers and hydrodynamic dispersion coefficients. Furthermore, the research was focused to quantification of the effect of grain size on migration of studied radionuclides. The experimental breakthrough curves were fitted by a model based on the erfc-function, assuming a linear reversible equilibrium sorption/desorption isotherm, and the above mentioned transport parameters were determined. The results showed that influence of grain size on sorption of (3)H(+) and (36)Cl(-) was negligible. Retardation and distribution coefficients of both tracers converged to one and zero, respectively, in case of all fractions of crushed granite and infill material. Generally, the presumed ion exclusion of (36)Cl in anionic form was proved under given conditions, only very weak one seems to exist in a case of infill material. In principal, both radionuclides behaved as non-sorbing, conservative tracers. On the other hand, the influence of grain size on Peclet numbers value and on dispersion coefficient was observed for both crystalline materials, namely in agreement with theoretical suppositions that the values of Peclet numbers decrease with increasing grain size and values of dispersion coefficient increase.

  13. Experiments of high-amplitude and shock-free oscillations of air column in a tube with array of Helmholtz resonators.

    PubMed

    Masuda, M; Sugimoto, N

    2005-07-01

    This experimental study is made to verify the weakly nonlinear theory for high-amplitude and shock-free oscillations of an air column developed in the previous paper [Sugimoto et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 114, 1772-1784 (2003)]. The experiments use a new tube and resonators designed so as to not only avoid higher harmonic resonances and evanescences but also reduce the values of the coefficient of Q in the amplitude equation, and a rubber diaphragm sandwiched by circular plates to drive the air column. The steady-state pressure field in the tube and in the cavities of the resonators is measured, from which Fourier coefficients are obtained. In spite of nonlinearity, higher harmonics are suppressed significantly as designed, and the frequency response measured shows quantitatively good agreement with the one predicted up to about 170 dB (SPL). The first harmonics and the nonoscillatory component in the pressure field are well predicted, though the second harmonics show a quantitative discrepancy with the theory. In view of the good agreement of the frequency response, it is concluded that the theory is valid and useful enough to provide guidelines in designing the tube with the array of resonators.

  14. Batch and column studies of adsorption of Li, Ni and Br by a reference sand for contaminant transport experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Seigel, M.D.; Ward, D.B.; Bryan, C.R.

    1995-09-01

    A processed quartz sand (Wedron 510), mined from the St. Peter sandstone, has been characterized by a variety of chemical and physical methods for use as a reference porous media in transport model validation experiments. Wedron 510 sand was used in an intermediate-scale experiment involving migration of Ni, Li and Br through a 6-m high x 3-m diameter caisson. Ni and Li adsorption/desorption, and Li/Ni site-competition experiments yielded information on the importance of the trace mineral phases to adsorption of Li and Ni by the sand. The presence of an iron hydroxide coating similar to goethite on the sand grains is suggested by visual observation and leaching experiments. Kaolinite was identified by SEM and XRD as a significant trace mineral phase in the sand and occurs as small particles coating the sand grains. Quartz, the predominant constituent of the sand by weight, does not appear to contribute significantly to the adsorption properties of the sand. Qualitatively, the adsorption properties of the sand can be adequately modeled as a two-mineral system (goethite and kaolinite). The studies described in this report should provide a basis for understanding transport of Ni, Li and Br through porous media similar to the reference sand. Techniques were developed for obtaining parameter values for surface complexation and kinetic adsorption models for the sand and its mineral components. These constants can be used directly in coupled hydrogeochemical transport codes. The techniques should be useful for characterization of other natural materials and elements in high-level nuclear waste in support of coupled hydrogeochemical transport calculations for Yucca Mountain.

  15. Laboratory column experiments and transport modeling to evaluate retardation of uranium in an aquifer downgradient of a uranium in-situ recovery site

    DOE PAGES

    Dangelmayr, Martin A.; Reimus, Paul W.; Wasserman, Naomi L.; ...

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the attenuation potential and retardation of uranium in sediments taken from boreholes at the Smith-Ranch Highland in-situ recovery (ISR) site. Five column experiments with four different sediments were conducted to study the effects of variable mineralogy and alkalinity on uranium breakthrough. Uranium transport was modeled with PHREEQC using a generalized composite surface complexation model (GC SCM) with one, two, and, three generic surfaces, respectively. Reactive surface areas were approximated with PEST using BET derived surface areas to constrain fitting parameters. Uranium breakthrough was delayed by a factor of 1.68, 1.69 and 1.47more » relative to the non-reactive tracer for three of the 5 experiments at an alkalinity of 540 mg/l. A sediment containing smectite and kaolinite retained uranium by a factor of 2.80 despite a lower measured BET surface area. Decreasing alkalinity to 360 mg/l from 540 mg/l increased retardation by a factor of 4.26. Model fits correlated well to overall BET surface area in the three columns where clay content was less than 1%. For the sediment with clay, models consistently understated uranium retardation when reactive surface sites were restricted by BET results. Calcite saturation was shown to be a controlling factor for uranium desorption as the pH of the system changes. A pH of 6 during a secondary background water flush remobilized previously sorbed uranium resulting in a secondary uranium peak at twice the influent concentrations. Furthermore, this study demonstrates the potential of GC SCM models to predict uranium transport in sediments with homogenous mineral composition, but highlights the need for further research to understand the role of sediment clay composition and calcite saturation in uranium transport.« less

  16. Effects of initial iron corrosion rate on long-term performance of iron permeable reactive barriers: column experiments and numerical simulation.

    PubMed

    suk O, Jin; Jeen, Sung-Wook; Gillham, Robert W; Gui, Lai

    2009-01-26

    Column experiments and numerical simulation were conducted to test the hypothesis that iron material having a high corrosion rate is not beneficial for the long-term performance of iron permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) because of faster passivation of iron and greater porosity loss close to the influent face of the PRBs. Four iron materials (Connelly, Gotthart-Maier, Peerless, and ISPAT) were used for the column experiments, and the changes in reactivity toward cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) degradation in the presence of dissolved CaCO3 were evaluated. The experimental results showed that the difference in distribution of the accumulated precipitates, resulting from differences in iron corrosion rate, caused a difference in the migration rate of the cis-DCE profiles and a significant difference in the pattern of passivation, indicating a faster passivation in the region close to the influent end for the material having a higher corrosion rate. For the numerical simulation, the accumulation of secondary minerals and reactivity loss of iron were coupled using an empirically-derived relationship that was incorporated into a multi-component reactive transport model. The simulation results provided a reasonable representation of the evolution of iron reactivity toward cis-DCE treatment and the changes in geochemical conditions for each material, consistent with the observed data. The simulations for long-term performance were also conducted to further test the hypothesis and predict the differences in performance over a period of 40 years under typical groundwater conditions. The predictions showed that the cases of higher iron corrosion rates had earlier cis-DCE breakthrough and more reduction in porosity starting from near the influent face, due to more accumulation of carbonate minerals in that region. Therefore, both the experimental and simulation results appear to support the hypothesis and suggest that reactivity changes of iron materials resulting from

  17. A Laboratory Experiment To Measure Henry's Law Constants of Volatile Organic Compounds with a Bubble Column and a Gas Chromatography Flame Ionization Detector (GC-FID)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Shan-Hu; Mukherjee, Souptik; Brewer, Brittany; Ryan, Raphael; Yu, Huan; Gangoda, Mahinda

    2013-01-01

    An undergraduate laboratory experiment is described to measure Henry's law constants of organic compounds using a bubble column and gas chromatography flame ionization detector (GC-FID). This experiment is designed for upper-division undergraduate laboratory courses and can be implemented in conjunction with physical chemistry, analytical…

  18. Micron-Size Zero-Valent Iron Emplacement in Porous Media Using Polymer Additives: Column and Flow Cell Ex-periments

    SciTech Connect

    Oostrom, Mart; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Covert, Matthew A.; Vermeul, Vince R.

    2006-03-20

    At the Hanford Site, an extensive In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) permeable reactive barrier was installed to prevent chromate from reaching the Columbia River. However, chromium has been detected in several wells, indicating a premature loss of the reductive capacity in the aquifer. Laboratory experiments have been conducted to investigate whether barrier reductive capacity can be enhanced by adding micron-scale zero-valent iron to the high-permeability zones within the aquifer using shear-thinning fluids containing polymers. Porous media were packed in a wedge-shaped flow cell to create either a heterogeneous layered system with a high-permeability zone between two low-permeability zones or a high-permeability channel sur-rounded by low-permeability materials. The injection flow rate, polymer type, polymer concentration, and injected pore volumes were determined based on preliminary short- and long-column experiments. The flow cell experiments indicated that iron concentration enhancements of at least 0.6% (w/w) could be obtained using moderate flow rates and injection of 30 pore volumes. The 0.6% amended Fe0 concentration would provide approximately 20 times the average reductive capacity that is provided by the dithionite-reduced iron in the ISRM barrier. Calculations show that a 1-m-long Fe0 amended zone with an average concentration of 0.6% w/w iron subject to a groundwater velocity of 1 m/day will have an estimated longevity of 7.2 years.

  19. Enhanced removal of organic matter and ammoniacal-nitrogen in a column experiment of tidal flow constructed wetland system.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guangzhi; Zhao, Yaqian; Allen, Stephen

    2005-01-26

    A tidal flow constructed wetland system was investigated for the removal of organic matter and ammoniacal-nitrogen from diluted piggery wastewater. The results demonstrated that the operation of tidal flow enhanced the transfer of oxygen into wetland matrices. The supply of oxygen by the operation (473 gO2/m2d) matched the demand for wastewater treatment. The overall oxygen consumption rate in the system was considerably higher than the typical rate obtainable in conventional wetlands; most oxygen being used for the decomposition of organic matter. Compared with conventional systems, the tidal flow system demonstrated greater efficiency in the removal of organic matter. Significant nitrification did not take place, although 27-48% ammonia was removed from the wastewater. Immobilization by microbial cells and adsorption were the likely routes to remove ammonia under the specific experiment conditions. Percentage removals of BOD5, NH4-N and SS increased after effluent recirculation at a ratio of 1:1 was employed.

  20. Retraining Displaced Workers. Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaLonde, Robert; Sullivan, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Robert LaLonde of the University of Chicago and Daniel Sullivan of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago suggest that retraining through our nation's community colleges is a way to reduce the skills gaps of at least some of these displaced workers and increase their reemployment earnings. Although workers may still experience significant earnings…

  1. Spectral Signature of Column Solar Radiation Absorption During the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE). Revision

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hirok, William; Gautier, Catherine; Ricchiazzi, Paul

    1999-11-01

    Spectral and broadband shortwave radiative flux data obtained from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE) are compared with 3-D radiative transfer computations for the cloud field of October 30, 1995. Because the absorption of broadband solar radiation in the cloudy atmosphere deduced from observations and modeled differ by 135 Wm{sup -2}, we performed a consistency analysis using spectral observations and the model to integrate for wavelengths between the spectral observations. To match spectral measurements, aerosols need a reduction in both single scattering albedo (from 0.938 to 0.82) and asymmetry factor (from 0.67 to 0.61), and cloud droplets require a three-fold increase in co-albedo. Even after modifying the model inputs and microphysics the difference in total broadband absorption is still of the order of 75Wm{sup -2}. Finally, an unexplained absorber centered around 1.06 {micro}m appears in the comparison that is much too large to be explained by dimers.

  2. Developing large-scale forcing data for single-column and cloud-resolving models from the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Shaocheng; Klein, Stephen A.; Zhang, Minghua; Yio, John J.; Cederwall, Richard T.; McCoy, Renata

    2006-10-05

    [1] This study represents an effort to develop Single-Column Model (SCM) and Cloud-Resolving Model large-scale forcing data from a sounding array in the high latitudes. An objective variational analysis approach is used to process data collected from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), which was conducted over the North Slope of Alaska in October 2004. In this method the observed surface and top of atmosphere measurements are used as constraints to adjust the sounding data from M-PACE in order to conserve column-integrated mass, heat, moisture, and momentum. Several important technical and scientific issues related to the data analysis are discussed. It is shown that the analyzed data reasonably describe the dynamic and thermodynamic features of the Arctic cloud systems observed during M-PACE. Uncertainties in the analyzed forcing fields are roughly estimated by examining the sensitivity of those fields to uncertainties in the upper-air data and surface constraints that are used in the analysis. Impacts of the uncertainties in the analyzed forcing data on SCM simulations are discussed. Results from the SCM tests indicate that the bulk features of the observed Arctic cloud systems can be captured qualitatively well using the forcing data derived in this study, and major model errors can be detected despite the uncertainties that exist in the forcing data as illustrated by the sensitivity tests. Lastly, the possibility of using the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts analysis data to derive the large-scale forcing over the Arctic region is explored.

  3. Developing large-scale forcing data for single-column and cloud-resolving models from the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Xie, Shaocheng; Klein, Stephen A.; Zhang, Minghua; ...

    2006-10-05

    [1] This study represents an effort to develop Single-Column Model (SCM) and Cloud-Resolving Model large-scale forcing data from a sounding array in the high latitudes. An objective variational analysis approach is used to process data collected from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), which was conducted over the North Slope of Alaska in October 2004. In this method the observed surface and top of atmosphere measurements are used as constraints to adjust the sounding data from M-PACE in order to conserve column-integrated mass, heat, moisture, and momentum. Several important technical and scientific issues related tomore » the data analysis are discussed. It is shown that the analyzed data reasonably describe the dynamic and thermodynamic features of the Arctic cloud systems observed during M-PACE. Uncertainties in the analyzed forcing fields are roughly estimated by examining the sensitivity of those fields to uncertainties in the upper-air data and surface constraints that are used in the analysis. Impacts of the uncertainties in the analyzed forcing data on SCM simulations are discussed. Results from the SCM tests indicate that the bulk features of the observed Arctic cloud systems can be captured qualitatively well using the forcing data derived in this study, and major model errors can be detected despite the uncertainties that exist in the forcing data as illustrated by the sensitivity tests. Lastly, the possibility of using the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts analysis data to derive the large-scale forcing over the Arctic region is explored.« less

  4. Degradation of toluene by a mixed population of archetypal aerobes, microaerophiles, and denitrifiers: laboratory sand column experiment and multispecies biofilm model formulation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Su; Jaffé, Peter R

    2008-02-01

    An experiment was conducted in a saturated sand column with three bacterial strains that have different growth characteristics on toluene, Pseudomonas putida F1 which degrades toluene only under aerobic conditions, Thauera aromatica T1 which degrades toluene only under denitrifying conditions, and Ralstonia pickettii PKO1 has a facultative nature and can perform nitrate-enhanced biodegradation of toluene under hypoxic conditions (DO <2 mg/L). Steady-state concentration profiles showed that oxygen and nitrate appeared to be utilized simultaneously, regardless of the dissolved oxygen concentration and the results from fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) indicated that PKO1 maintained stable cells numbers throughout the column, even when the pore water oxygen concentration was high. Since PKO1's growth rate under aerobic condition is much lower than that of F1, except under hypoxic conditions, these observations were not anticipated. Therefore these observations require a mechanistic explanation that can account for localized low oxygen concentrations under aerobic conditions. To simulate the observed dynamics, a multispecies biofilm model was implemented. This model formulation assumes the formation of a thin biofilm that is composed of the three bacterial strains. The individual strains grow in response to the substrate and electron acceptor flux from bulk fluid into the biofilm. The model was implemented such that internal changes in bacterial composition and substrate concentration can be simulated over time and space. The model simulations from oxic to denitrifying conditions compared well to the experimental profiles of the chemical species and the bacterial strains, indicating the importance of accounting for the biological activity of individual strains in biofilms that span different redox conditions.

  5. Heavy metal displacement in chelate-irrigated soil during phytoremediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madrid, F.; Liphadzi, M. S.; Kirkham, M. B.

    2003-03-01

    Heavy metals in wastewater sewage sludge (biosolids), applied to land, contaminate soils. Phytoremediation, the use of plants to clean up toxic heavy metals, might remove them. Chelating agents are added to soil to solubilize the metals for enhanced phytoextraction. Yet no studies follow the displacement and leaching of heavy metals in soil with and without roots following solubilization with chelates. The objective of this work was to determine the mobility of heavy metals in biosolids applied to the surface of soil columns (76 cm long; 17 cm diam.) with or without plants (barley; Hordeum vulgare L.). Three weeks after barley was planted, all columns were irrigated with the disodium salt of the chelating agent, EDTA (ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid) (0.5 g/kg soil). Drainage water, soil, and plants were analyzed for heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn). Total concentrations of the heavy metals in all columns at the end of the experiment generally were lower in the top 30 cm of soil with EDTA than without EDTA. The chelate increased concentrations of heavy metals in shoots. With or without plants, the EDTA mobilized Cd, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn, which leached to drainage water. Drainage water from columns without EDTA had concentrations of these heavy metals below detection limits. Only Cu did not leach in the presence of EDTA. Even though roots retarded the movement of Cd, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn through the EDTA-treated soil from 1 d (Cd) to 5 d (Fe), the drainage water from columns with EDTA had concentrations of Cd, Fe, Mn, and Pb that exceeded drinking water standards by 1.3, 500, 620, and 8.6 times, respectively. Because the chelate rendered Cd, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn mobile, it is suggested that the theory for leaching of soluble salts, put forward by Nielsen and associates in 1965, could be applied to control movement of the heavy metals for maximum uptake during chelate-assisted phytoremediation.

  6. 49 CFR 571.204 - Standard No. 204; Steering control rearward displacement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... barrier, the upper end of the steering column and shaft in the vehicle shall not be displaced more than 5... barrier, the upper end of the steering column and shaft in the vehicle shall not be displaced more than....6The parking brake is disengaged and the transmission is in neutral. S5.7Tires are inflated to...

  7. Investigation of the behavior of a magnetic fluid in displacement and force transducers

    SciTech Connect

    Bashtovoi, V.G.; Mikhalev, V.P.; Reks, A.G.

    1988-01-01

    The behavior of a drop of magnetic fluid in a capillary tube was investigated with reference to displacement and force transducers. The design of the sensing element of a magnetic fluid transducer was examined to investigate the shape of the meniscus of the column of magnetic fluid in a glass capillary tube under a longitudinal uniform magnetic field stress, the effect of magnetization of the fluid on drop elongation in the tube, the dependence of magnetic field strength and gradient on the current of the electromagnet for various points of the magnetic system gap, and the relation between the displacement of the magnetic fluid and the measurable force of the field stress. Experiments showed that the shape of the cylindrical column of magnetic fluid in the capillary tube depended substantially not only on the longitudinal uniform magnetic field stress but also on orientation of the column relative to the field. Fluid MMT-52 was used (magnetic phase-magnetite, stabilizer-oleic acid). One of the conditions necessary for its reliable operation was a convex shape of the magnetic fluid meniscus. It was found that transducer magnetic systems with a transverse field with respect to the sensing element were preferable since the magnetic fluid in the column retains its shape.

  8. Experimenting with a Visible Copper-Aluminum Displacement Reaction in Agar Gel and Observing Copper Crystal Growth Patterns to Engage Student Interest and Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Xinhua; Wu, Meifen; Wang, Xiaogang; Yang, Yangyiwei; Shi, Xiang; Wang, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    The reaction process of copper-aluminum displacement in agar gel was observed at the microscopic level with a stereomicroscope; pine-like branches of copper crystals growing from aluminum surface into gel at a constant rate were observed. Students were asked to make hypotheses on the pattern formation and design new research approaches to prove…

  9. Is Maxwell's Displacement Current a Current?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, A. P.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses in detail the claim that certain well-known physics experiments demonstrate the magnetic field produced by Maxwell's displacement current. Addresses the question of whether the displacement current acts as a source of magnetic field in the same way as a current in a wire would. (Contains 12 references.) (WRM)

  10. Cervicitis associated with lateral cervical displacement.

    PubMed

    Gjoni, Indira; Muneyyirci-Delale, Ozgul

    2012-01-01

    Lateral cervical displacement has been recognized as a sign of endometriosis; however, other causes of the finding have not been explored. In our experience, patients without endometriosis are presenting with lateral cervical displacement, mainly towards the left of midline. The common finding in these cases is the presence of cervicitis leading us to hypothesize the role of cervicitis in causing lateral displacement of the cervix. Future research into this area will provide us with a stronger understanding of the role that lateral cervical displacement plays in the development of pelvic pathology and the development of cervical cancer.

  11. Displacement of Propagating Squeezed Microwave States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, Kirill G.; Zhong, L.; Pogorzalek, S.; Eder, P.; Fischer, M.; Goetz, J.; Xie, E.; Wulschner, F.; Inomata, K.; Yamamoto, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Di Candia, R.; Las Heras, U.; Sanz, M.; Solano, E.; Menzel, E. P.; Deppe, F.; Marx, A.; Gross, R.

    2016-07-01

    Displacement of propagating quantum states of light is a fundamental operation for quantum communication. It enables fundamental studies on macroscopic quantum coherence and plays an important role in quantum teleportation protocols with continuous variables. In our experiments, we have successfully implemented this operation for propagating squeezed microwave states. We demonstrate that, even for strong displacement amplitudes, there is no degradation of the squeezing level in the reconstructed quantum states. Furthermore, we confirm that path entanglement generated by using displaced squeezed states remains constant over a wide range of the displacement power.

  12. Precision displacement reference system

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F.; Dubois, Robert R.; Strother, Jerry D.

    2000-02-22

    A precision displacement reference system is described, which enables real time accountability over the applied displacement feedback system to precision machine tools, positioning mechanisms, motion devices, and related operations. As independent measurements of tool location is taken by a displacement feedback system, a rotating reference disk compares feedback counts with performed motion. These measurements are compared to characterize and analyze real time mechanical and control performance during operation.

  13. Job Displacement, Reemployment, and Earnings Loss: Evidence from the January 1984 Displaced Worker Survey. Research Report Series RR-86-18.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Podgursky, Michael; Swaim, Paul

    Job displacement represents a serious labor market problem affecting a broad spectrum of the labor force. A study used data from the January 1984 Displaced Worker Survey, a supplement to the Current Population Survey, which analyzed patterns of job displacement, the post-displacement reemployment, and earnings experience of displaced workers. The…

  14. Fate and transport of carbamazepine in a soil aquifer treatment (SAT) system: evaluation of a monitoring study and soil column experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arye, G.; Dror, I.; Berkowitz, B.

    2009-12-01

    Carbamazepine (CBZ), an anticonvulsant and mood stabilizing drug, is found to be highly persistent in wastewater treatment plants and when subsequently released to the environment. Because of its physicochemical properties, CBZ is only weakly sorbed to mineral soils and is resistant to biodegradation. As a consequence, CBZ has been suggested as an appropriate anthropogenic marker to track the fate of wastewater in aquatic systems. We study the fate and transport of CBZ in the Dan Region Reclamation Project (Shafdan) in Israel, where about one quarter of the country’s wastewater undergoes purification. The secondary treatment of raw wastewater consists of mechanical and biological treatment by activated sludge, with an additional step of nitrification-denitrification, and subsequent recharge of treated effluent to groundwater via infiltration basins, as a complementary tertiary treatment known as soil aquifer treatment (SAT). Water produced from the SAT system is pumped from a depth of 100-200 m by means of approximately 100 recovery wells, located 300-1,500 m from the recharge basins. This water is then delivered through a single 87 km long pipeline to the southern part of the country, where it is used for irrigation. We examine the fate of CBZ before and after treatment with the SAT system. To date, our monitoring has detected up to 1300 ng/L of CBZ in the recharged effluent before SAT, and up to 700 ng/L after treatment, prior to use for irrigation. The latter may considered as an aggregate value from all recovery wells. Additional information on CBZ transport characteristics has been gained from a series of soil column experiments using soil samples taken from the SAT infiltration basin to a depth of 170 cm. For each soil layer examined, the soil column was first leached of CBZ and subsequently loaded with secondary treated wastewater containing CBZ. The CBZ breakthrough curves resemble transport of a conservative tracer in most of the soil samples. We

  15. Tactile suppression of displacement.

    PubMed

    Ziat, Mounia; Hayward, Vincent; Chapman, C Elaine; Ernst, Marc O; Lenay, Charles

    2010-10-01

    In vision, the discovery of the phenomenon of saccadic suppression of displacement has made important contributions to the understanding of the stable world problem. Here, we report a similar phenomenon in the tactile modality. When scanning a single Braille dot with two fingers of the same hand, participants were asked to decide whether the dot was stationary or whether it was displaced from one location to another. The stimulus was produced by refreshable Braille devices that have dots that can be swiftly raised and recessed. In some conditions, the dot was stationary. In others, a displacement was created by monitoring the participant's finger position and by switching the dot activation when it was not touched by either finger. The dot displacement was of either 2.5 mm or 5 mm. We found that in certain cases, displaced dots were felt to be stationary. If the displacement was orthogonal to the finger movements, tactile suppression occurred effectively when it was of 2.5 mm, but when the displacement was of 5 mm, the participants easily detected it. If the displacement was medial-lateral, the suppression effect occurred as well, but less often when the apparent movement of the dot opposed the movement of the finger. In such cases, the stimulus appeared sooner than when the brain could predict it from finger movement, supporting a predictive rather than a postdictive differential processing hypothesis.

  16. Displacement data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenthal, W. Steven; Venkataramani, Shankar; Mariano, Arthur J.; Restrepo, Juan M.

    2017-02-01

    We show that modifying a Bayesian data assimilation scheme by incorporating kinematically-consistent displacement corrections produces a scheme that is demonstrably better at estimating partially observed state vectors in a setting where feature information is important. While the displacement transformation is generic, here we implement it within an ensemble Kalman Filter framework and demonstrate its effectiveness in tracking stochastically perturbed vortices.

  17. Internal displacement in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Shultz, James M; Ceballos, Ángela Milena Gómez; Espinel, Zelde; Oliveros, Sofia Rios; Fonseca, Maria Fernanda; Florez, Luis Jorge Hernandez

    2014-01-01

    This commentary aims to delineate the distinguishing features of conflict-induced internal displacement in the nation of Colombia, South America. Even as Colombia is currently implementing a spectrum of legal, social, economic, and health programs for “victims of armed conflict,” with particular focus on internally displaced persons (IDPs), the dynamics of forced migration on a mass scale within this country are little known beyond national borders.   The authors of this commentary are embarking on a global mental health research program in Bogota, Colombia to define best practices for reaching the displaced population and implementing sustainable, evidence-based screening and intervention for common mental disorders. Presenting the defining characteristics of internal displacement in Colombia provides the context for our work and, more importantly, conveys the compelling and complex nature of this humanitarian crisis. We attempt to demonstrate Colombia’s unique position within the global patterning of internal displacement. PMID:28228997

  18. Applying reactive models to column experiments to assess the hydrogeochemistry of seawater intrusion: Optimising ACUAINTRUSION and selecting cation exchange coefficients with PHREEQC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boluda-Botella, N.; Valdes-Abellan, J.; Pedraza, R.

    2014-03-01

    Three sets of laboratory column experimental results concerning the hydrogeochemistry of seawater intrusion have been modelled using two codes: ACUAINTRUSION (Chemical Engineering Department, University of Alicante) and PHREEQC (U.S.G.S.). These reactive models utilise the hydrodynamic parameters determined using the ACUAINTRUSION TRANSPORT software and fit the chloride breakthrough curves perfectly. The ACUAINTRUSION code was improved, and the instabilities were studied relative to the discretisation. The relative square errors were obtained using different combinations of the spatial and temporal steps: the global error for the total experimental data and the partial error for each element. Good simulations for the three experiments were obtained using the ACUAINTRUSION software with slight variations in the selectivity coefficients for both sediments determined in batch experiments with fresh water. The cation exchange parameters included in ACUAINTRUSION are those reported by the Gapon convention with modified exponents for the Ca/Mg exchange. PHREEQC simulations performed using the Gains-Thomas convention were unsatisfactory, with the exchange coefficients from the database of PHREEQC (or range), but those determined with fresh water - natural sediment allowed only an approximation to be obtained. For the treated sediment, the adjusted exchange coefficients were determined to improve the simulation and are vastly different from those from the database of PHREEQC or batch experiment values; however, these values fall in an order similar to the others determined under dynamic conditions. Different cation concentrations were simulated using two different software packages; this disparity could be attributed to the defined selectivity coefficients that affect the gypsum equilibrium. Consequently, different calculated sulphate concentrations are obtained using each type of software; a smaller mismatch was predicted using ACUAINTRUSION. In general, the presented

  19. Microbial Consortia Development and Microcosm and Column Experiments for Enhanced Bioremediation of Chlorinated Volatile Organic Compounds, West Branch Canal Creek Wetland Area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lorah, Michelle M.; Majcher, Emily H.; Jones, Elizabeth J.; Voytek, Mary A.

    2008-01-01

    Chlorinated solvents, including 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, tetrachloroethene, trichloroethene, carbon tetrachloride, and chloroform, are reaching land surface in localized areas of focused ground-water discharge (seeps) in a wetland and tidal creek in the West Branch Canal Creek area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. In cooperation with the U.S. Army Garrison, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, the U.S. Geological Survey is developing enhanced bioremediation methods that simulate the natural anaerobic degradation that occurs without intervention in non-seep areas of the wetland. A combination of natural attenuation and enhanced bioremediation could provide a remedy for the discharging ground-water plumes that would minimize disturbance to the sensitive wetland ecosystem. Biostimulation (addition of organic substrate or nutrients) and bioaugmentation (addition of microbial consortium), applied either by direct injection at depth in the wetland sediments or by construction of a permeable reactive mat at the seep surface, were tested as possible methods to enhance anaerobic degradation in the seep areas. For the first phase of developing enhanced bioremediation methods for the contaminant mixtures in the seeps, laboratory studies were conducted to develop a microbial consortium to degrade 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane and its chlorinated daughter products under anaerobic conditions, and to test biostimulation and bioaugmentation of wetland sediment and reactive mat matrices in microcosms. The individual components required for the direct injection and reactive mat methods were then combined in column experiments to test them under groundwater- flow rates and contaminant concentrations observed in the field. Results showed that both direct injection and the reactive mat are promising remediation methods, although the success of direct injection likely would depend on adequately distributing and maintaining organic substrate throughout the wetland sediment in the seep

  20. A large column analog experiment of stable isotope variations during reactive transport: II. Carbon mass balance, microbial community structure and predation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druhan, Jennifer L.; Bill, Markus; Lim, HsiaoChien; Wu, Cindy; Conrad, Mark E.; Williams, Kenneth H.; DePaolo, Donald J.; Brodie, Eoin L.

    2014-01-01

    Here we report a combined analysis of carbon mass balance based on isotopic labeling and microbiological characterization during organic carbon stimulated bioreduction of a subsurface sediment in a large laboratory column experimental system. This combination of approaches allows quantification of both the cycling of carbon through multiple redox pathways and the associated spatial and temporal evolution of bacterial communities in response to this nutrient source. Carbon isotope mass balance facilitated by the use of 13C-labeled acetate as the electron donor showed evidence for a net loss of sediment organic carbon over the course of the amendment experiment. Furthermore, these data clearly demonstrated a source of isotopically labeled inorganic carbon that was not attributable to primary metabolism by acetate-oxidizing microorganisms. Fluid samples collected weekly over the duration of the 43-day amendment at <20 cm intervals along the flow path were analyzed for microbial composition by pyrosequencing of ribosomal RNA genes. The microbial community composition was transient, with distinct occurrences of Azoarcus, Geobacter and multiple sulfate reducing species over the course of the experiment. In combination with DNA sequencing data, the anomalous carbon cycling process is shown to occur exclusively during the period of predominant Geobacter species growth. Pyrosequencing indicated, and targeted cloning and sequencing confirmed the presence of several bacteriovorous protozoa, including species of the Breviata, Planococcus and Euplotes genera. Cloning and qPCR analysis demonstrated that Euplotes species were most abundant and displayed a growth trajectory that closely followed that of the Geobacter population. These results suggest a previously undocumented secondary turnover of biomass carbon related to protozoan grazing that was not sufficiently prevalent to be observed in bulk concentrations of carbon species in the system, but was clearly identified in the

  1. Autoclave treatment of pig manure does not reduce the risk of transmission and transfer of tetracycline resistance genes in soil: successive determinations with soil column experiments.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yijun; Gu, Xian; Hao, Yangyang; Hu, Jian

    2016-03-01

    The increasing use of antibiotics, especially tetracycline, in livestock feed adversely affects animal health and ecological integrity. Therefore, approaches to decrease this risk are urgently needed. High temperatures facilitate antibiotic degradation; whether this reduces transmission risk and transfer of tetracycline-resistant bacteria (TRBs) and tetracycline resistance genes (TRGs) in soil remains unknown. Successive experiments with soil columns evaluated the effects of autoclaving pig manure (APM) on soil TRB populations and TRGs over time at different soil depths. The data showed sharp increases in TRB populations and TRGs in each subsoil layer of PM (non-APM) and APM treatments within 30 days, indicating that TRBs and TRGs transferred rapidly. The level of TRBs in the upper soil layers was approximately 15-fold higher than in subsoils. TRBs were not dependent on PM and APM levels, especially in the late phase. Nevertheless, higher levels of APM led to rapid expansion of TRBs as compared to PM. Moreover, temporal changes in TRB frequencies in total culturable bacteria (TCBs) were similar to TRBs, indicating that the impact of PM or APM on TRBs was more obvious than for TCBs. TRBs were hypothesized to depend on the numbers of TRGs and indigenous recipient bacteria. In the plough layer, five TRGs (tetB, tetG, tetM, tetW, and tetB/P) existed in each treatment within 150 days. Selective pressure of TC may not be a necessary condition for the transfer and persistence of TRGs in soil. High temperatures might reduce TRBs in PM, which had minimal impact on the transmission and transfer of TRGs in soil. Identifying alternatives to decrease TRG transmission remains a major challenge.

  2. Influence of collector surface composition and water chemistry on the deposition of cerium dioxide nanoparticles: QCM-D and column experiment approaches.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuyang; Chen, Gexin; Su, Chunming

    2012-06-19

    The deposition behavior of cerium dioxide (CeO(2)) nanoparticles (NPs) in dilute NaCl solutions was investigated as a function of collector surface composition, pH, ionic strength, and organic matter (OM). Sensors coated separately with silica, iron oxide, and alumina were applied in quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) to examine the effect of these mineral phases on CeO(2) deposition in NaCl solution (1-200 mM). Frequency and dissipation shift followed the order: silica > iron oxide > alumina in 10 mM NaCl at pH 4.0. No significant deposition was observed at pH 6.0 and 8.5 on any of the tested sensors. However, ≥ 94.3% of CeO(2) NPs deposited onto Ottawa sand in columns in 10 mM NaCl at pH 6.0 and 8.5. The inconsistency in the different experimental approaches can be mainly attributed to NP aggregation, surface heterogeneity of Ottawa sand, and flow geometry. In QCM-D experiments, the deposition kinetics was found to be qualitatively consistent with the predictions based on the classical colloidal stability theory. The presence of low levels (1-6 mg/L) of Suwannee River humic acid, fulvic acid, alginate, citric acid, and carboxymethyl cellulose greatly enhanced the stability and mobility of CeO(2) NPs in 1 mM NaCl at pH 6.5. The poor correlation between the transport behavior and electrophoretic mobility of CeO(2) NPs implies that the electrosteric effect of OM was involved.

  3. Computer simulation of displacement cation exchange chromatography: separation of trivalent actinides and lanthanides

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1980-05-01

    A first-generation mathematical model of displacement cation exchange chromatography (CES) was constructed. The model incorporated the following phenomena: diffusion of cations up and down the column, diffusion of cations from the bulk liquid to the resin surface, and equilibrium of cations between liquid and solid resin beads. A limited number of experiments with rare earths using DTPA as the separation agent were undertaken to increase the current understanding of the processes involved in cation exchange chromatography. The numerical computer program based on the mathematical model was written in FORTRAN IV for use on the IBM 360 series of computers.

  4. Autonomous dynamic displacement estimation from data fusion of acceleration and intermittent displacement measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Junhee; Kim, Kiyoung; Sohn, Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Addressing the importance of displacement measurement of structural responses in the field of structural health monitoring, this paper presents an autonomous algorithm for dynamic displacement estimation from acceleration integration fused with displacement data intermittently measured. The presented acceleration integration algorithm of multi-rate Kalman filtering distinguishes itself from the past study in the literature by explicitly considering acceleration measurement bias. Furthermore, the algorithm is formulated by unique state definition of integration errors and error dynamics system modeling. To showcase performance of the algorithm, a series of laboratory dynamic experiments for measuring structural responses of acceleration and displacement are conducted. Improved results are demonstrated through comparison between the proposed and past study.

  5. Implications of Research on Displaced Workers. ERIC Digest No. 80.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naylor, Michele

    Worker displacement is more closely related to structural features associated with firms than to the characteristics of the individuals who lost their jobs. Despite economic growth, large numbers of displaced workers continue to experience difficulty in making labor market adjustments. Programs to retrain and reemploy displaced workers exist at…

  6. Advanced Triangulation Displacement Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poteet, Wade M.; Cauthen, Harold K.

    1996-01-01

    Advanced optoelectronic triangulation displacement sensors undergoing development. Highly miniaturized, more stable, more accurate, and relatively easy to use. Incorporate wideband electronic circuits suitable for real-time monitoring and control of displacements. Measurements expected to be accurate to within nanometers. In principle, sensors mass-produced at relatively low unit cost. Potential applications numerous. Possible industrial application in measuring runout of rotating shaft or other moving part during fabrication in "zero-defect" manufacturing system, in which measured runout automatically corrected.

  7. Atomic displacements in quantum crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusseault, Marisa; Boninsegni, Massimo

    2017-03-01

    Displacements of atoms and molecules away from lattice sites in helium and parahydrogen solids at low temperature have been studied by means of quantum Monte Carlo simulations. In the bcc phases of 3He and 4He, atomic displacements are largely quantum-mechanical in character, even at melting. The computed Lindemann ratio at melting is found to be in good agreement with experimental results for 4He. Unlike the case of helium, in solid parahydrogen there exists near melting a significant thermal contribution to molecular vibrations, accounting for roughly half of the total effect. Although the Lindemann ratio at melting is in quantitative agreement with experiment, computed molecular mean square fluctuations feature a clear temperature dependence, in disagreement with recent experimental observations.

  8. Internal displacement in Burma.

    PubMed

    Lanjouw, S; Mortimer, G; Bamforth, V

    2000-09-01

    The internal displacement of populations in Burma is not a new phenomenon. Displacement is caused by numerous factors. Not all of it is due to outright violence, but much is a consequence of misguided social and economic development initiatives. Efforts to consolidate the state by assimilating populations in government-controlled areas by military authorities on the one hand, while brokering cease-fires with non-state actors on the other, has uprooted civilian populations throughout the country. Very few areas in which internally displaced persons (IDPs) are found are not facing social turmoil within a climate of impunity. Humanitarian access to IDP populations remains extremely problematic. While relatively little information has been collected, assistance has been focused on targeting accessible groups. International concern within Burma has couched the problems of displacement within general development modalities, while international attention along its borders has sought to contain displacement. With the exception of several recent initiatives, few approaches have gone beyond assistance and engaged in the prevention or protection of the displaced.

  9. Interplay between interstitial displacement and displacive lattice transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xie; Hickel, Tilmann; Rogal, Jutta; Neugebauer, Jörg

    2016-09-01

    Diffusionless displacive lattice rearrangements, which include martensitic transformations, are in real materials often accompanied by a displacive drag of interstitials. The interplay of both processes leads to a particular atomistic arrangement of the interstitials in the product phase, which is decisive for its performance. An archetype example is the martensitic transformation in Fe-C alloys. One of the puzzles for this system is that the deviation from the cubic symmetry (i.e., the tetragonality) in the martensite resulting from this interplay is lower than what thermodynamics dictates. In our ab initio approach, the relative motion of C in the transforming lattice is studied with the nudged elastic band method. We prove that an atomic shearlike shuffle mechanism of adjacent (11 2 ¯) Fe layers along the ±[111] bcc directions is essential to achieve a redistribution of C atoms during the fcc → bcc transition, which fully explains the abnormal behavior. Furthermore, the good agreement with experiment validates our method to treat a diffusionless redistribution of interstitials and a displacive rearrangement of the host lattice simultaneously.

  10. Effects of kaolinite colloids on Cd²⁺ transport through saturated sand under varying ionic strength conditions: Column experiments and modeling approaches.

    PubMed

    Wikiniyadhanee, Rakkreat; Chotpantarat, Srilert; Ong, Say Kee

    2015-11-01

    Column experiments were performed under various ionic strengths (0.0-0.9 mM) using 10 mg L(-1) of Cd(2+) without kaolinite colloids and 10 mg L(-1) Cd(2+) mixed with 100 mg L(-1) kaolinite colloids. The nonequilibrium two-site model (TSM) described the behavior of both Cd(2+) transport and Cd(2+) co-transported with kaolinite colloids better than the equilibrium model (CD(eq)) (R(2)=0.978-0.996). The results showed that an increase in ionic strength negatively impacted the retardation factors (R) of both Cd(2+) and Cd(2+) mixed with kaolinite colloids. The presence of kaolinite colloids increased the retardation factors of Cd(2+) from 7.23 to 7.89, 6.76 to 6.61 and 3.79 to 6.99 for ionic strengths of 0.225, 0.45 and 0.9 mM, respectively. On the other hand, the presence of kaolinite colloids decreased the retardation factor of Cd(2+) from 8.13 to 7.83 for ionic strength of 0.0 mM. The fraction of instantaneous sorption sites (f) parameters, kinetic constant for sorption sites (α) and Freundlich constant (K(f)) were estimated from HYDRUS-1D of TSM for Cd(2+) transport. The fraction of instantaneous sorption sites was found to increase for an increase in ionic strength. K(f) values of Cd(2+) transport without kaolinite colloids for 0.0, 0.225 and 0.45 mM were found to be higher than those of Cd(2+) transport with kaolinite colloids, except for ionic strength of 0.9 mM. Hence, the presence of kaolinite colloids probably retarded the mobility of Cd(2+) in porous media for higher ionic strengths. Furthermore, retardation factors and K(f) values of both Cd(2+) transport and Cd(2+) co-transport were shown to decrease when ionic strength increased. Interestingly, according to TSM, the fraction of instantaneous sorption sites tends to increase for an increase in ionic strength, which imply that the mechanism of Cd(2+) sorption onto quartz sand can be better described using equilibrium sorption rather than nonequilibrium sorption for an increase in ionic strength.

  11. Programmable selectivity for GC with series-coupled columns using pulsed heating of the second column.

    PubMed

    Whiting, Joshua; Sacks, Richard

    2003-05-15

    A series-coupled ensemble of a nonpolar dimethyl polysiloxane column and a polar trifluoropropylmethyl polysiloxane column with independent at-column heating is used to obtain pulsed heating of the second column. For mixture component bands that are separated by the first column but coelute from the column ensemble, a temperature pulse is initiated after the first of the two components has crossed the column junction point and is in the second column, while the other component is still in the first column. This accelerates the band for the first component. If the second column cools sufficiently prior to the second component band crossing the junction, the second band experiences less acceleration, and increased separation is observed for the corresponding peaks in the ensemble chromatogram. High-speed at-column heating is obtained by wrapping the fused-silica capillary column with resistance heater wire and sensor wire. Rapid heating for a temperature pulse is obtained with a short-duration linear heating ramp of 1000 degrees C/min. During a pulse, the second-column temperature increases by 20-100 degrees C in a few seconds. Using a cold gas environment, cooling to a quiescent temperature of 30 degrees C can be obtained in approximately 25 s. The effects of temperature pulse initiation time and amplitude on ensemble peak separation and resolution are described. A series of appropriately timed temperature pulses is used to separate three coeluting pairs of components in a 13-component mixture.

  12. Column Liquid Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majors, Ronald E.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Reviews literature covering developments of column liquid chromatography during 1982-83. Areas considered include: books and reviews; general theory; columns; instrumentation; detectors; automation and data handling; multidimensional chromatographic and column switching techniques; liquid-solid chromatography; normal bonded-phase, reversed-phase,…

  13. Water displacement mercury pump

    DOEpatents

    Nielsen, M.G.

    1984-04-20

    A water displacement mercury pump has a fluid inlet conduit and diffuser, a valve, a pressure cannister, and a fluid outlet conduit. The valve has a valve head which seats in an opening in the cannister. The entire assembly is readily insertable into a process vessel which produces mercury as a product. As the mercury settles, it flows into the opening in the cannister displacing lighter material. When the valve is in a closed position, the pressure cannister is sealed except for the fluid inlet conduit and the fluid outlet conduit. Introduction of a lighter fluid into the cannister will act to displace a heavier fluid from the cannister via the fluid outlet conduit. The entire pump assembly penetrates only a top wall of the process vessel, and not the sides or the bottom wall of the process vessel. This insures a leak-proof environment and is especially suitable for processing of hazardous materials.

  14. Water displacement mercury pump

    DOEpatents

    Nielsen, Marshall G.

    1985-01-01

    A water displacement mercury pump has a fluid inlet conduit and diffuser, a valve, a pressure cannister, and a fluid outlet conduit. The valve has a valve head which seats in an opening in the cannister. The entire assembly is readily insertable into a process vessel which produces mercury as a product. As the mercury settles, it flows into the opening in the cannister displacing lighter material. When the valve is in a closed position, the pressure cannister is sealed except for the fluid inlet conduit and the fluid outlet conduit. Introduction of a lighter fluid into the cannister will act to displace a heavier fluid from the cannister via the fluid outlet conduit. The entire pump assembly penetrates only a top wall of the process vessel, and not the sides or the bottom wall of the process vessel. This insures a leak-proof environment and is especially suitable for processing of hazardous materials.

  15. Optical displacement sensor

    DOEpatents

    Carr, Dustin W.

    2008-04-08

    An optical displacement sensor is disclosed which uses a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) coupled to an optical cavity formed by a moveable membrane and an output mirror of the VCSEL. This arrangement renders the lasing characteristics of the VCSEL sensitive to any movement of the membrane produced by sound, vibrations, pressure changes, acceleration, etc. Some embodiments of the optical displacement sensor can further include a light-reflective diffractive lens located on the membrane or adjacent to the VCSEL to control the amount of lasing light coupled back into the VCSEL. A photodetector detects a portion of the lasing light from the VCSEL to provide an electrical output signal for the optical displacement sensor which varies with the movement of the membrane.

  16. Multiplexed detection of DNA sequences using a competitive displacement assay in a microfluidic SERRS-based device.

    PubMed

    Yazdi, Soroush H; Giles, Kristen L; White, Ian M

    2013-11-05

    We demonstrate sensitive and multiplexed detection of DNA sequences through a surface enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS)-based competitive displacement assay in an integrated microsystem. The use of the competitive displacement scheme, in which the target DNA sequence displaces a Raman-labeled reporter sequence that has lower affinity for the immobilized probe, enables detection of unlabeled target DNA sequences with a simple single-step procedure. In our implementation, the displacement reaction occurs in a microporous packed column of silica beads prefunctionalized with probe-reporter pairs. The use of a functionalized packed-bead column in a microfluidic channel provides two major advantages: (i) immobilization surface chemistry can be performed as a batch process instead of on a chip-by-chip basis, and (ii) the microporous network eliminates the diffusion limitations of a typical biological assay, which increases the sensitivity. Packed silica beads are also leveraged to improve the SERRS detection of the Raman-labeled reporter. Following displacement, the reporter adsorbs onto aggregated silver nanoparticles in a microfluidic mixer; the nanoparticle-reporter conjugates are then trapped and concentrated in the silica bead matrix, which leads to a significant increase in plasmonic nanoparticles and adsorbed Raman reporters within the detection volume as compared to an open microfluidic channel. The experimental results reported here demonstrate detection down to 100 pM of the target DNA sequence, and the experiments are shown to be specific, repeatable, and quantitative. Furthermore, we illustrate the advantage of using SERRS by demonstrating multiplexed detection. The sensitivity of the assay, combined with the advantages of multiplexed detection and single-step operation with unlabeled target sequences makes this method attractive for practical applications. Importantly, while we illustrate DNA sequence detection, the SERRS-based competitive

  17. Displacement of location in illusory line motion.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Timothy L; Ruppel, Susan E

    2013-05-01

    Six experiments examined displacement in memory for the location of the line in illusory line motion (ILM; appearance or disappearance of a stationary cue is followed by appearance of a stationary line that is presented all at once, but the stationary line is perceived to "unfold" or "be drawn" from the end closest to the cue to the end most distant from the cue). If ILM was induced by having a single cue appear, then memory for the location of the line was displaced toward the cue, and displacement was larger if the line was closer to the cue. If ILM was induced by having one of two previously visible cues vanish, then memory for the location of the line was displaced away from the cue that vanished. In general, the magnitude of displacement increased and then decreased as retention interval increased from 50 to 250 ms and from 250 to 450 ms, respectively. Displacement of the line (a) is consistent with a combination of a spatial averaging of the locations of the cue and the line with a relatively weaker dynamic in the direction of illusory motion, (b) might be implemented in a spreading activation network similar to networks previously suggested to implement displacement resulting from implied or apparent motion, and (c) provides constraints and challenges for theories of ILM.

  18. The jet flotation column control system

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Zhiqiang; Ming Shangzhi; Liu Lijian; Huangfu Jinghua; Huo Sen; Zhang Rongzeng; Yang Hongjun

    1998-12-31

    Compared with the conventional mechanical flotation column, the jet flotation column has the advantages of high selectivity of separation, low investment and production cost, low floor space requirement, low dosage of reagent, easy control; it is more suitable to process fine particles. Recently, many new types of flotation columns have been developed with new methods. Mineral Processing Dept., China University of Mining and Technology (Beijing) designed an aerated, double-jet flotation column in the lab and the industrial trial will be put into operation. One of the significant characteristics of the new type of flotation column is high selectivity of separation, fast bubble mineralization speed. As it is sensitive to various factors, a control system for flotation column has been developed to stabilize the working condition, and this set of control system has been operated in the lab experiment.

  19. Heavy metal displacement in salt-water-irrigated soil during phytoremediation.

    PubMed

    Wahla, Intkhab Hazoor; Kirkham, M B

    2008-09-01

    In regions where phytoremediation is carried out, brackish water must often be used. However, no information exists concerning the consequences of saline-water irrigation on the mobility of heavy metals in sludge applied to soil during phytoremediation. The purpose of this experiment was to determine the effect of NaCl irrigation on displacement of seven heavy metals in sludge (Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn) applied to the surface of soil columns containing barley plants. Half the columns received NaCl irrigation (10,000 mg L(-1)) and half the columns received tap-water irrigation. Half the columns were treated with the chelating agent EDTA. With no EDTA, irrigation with the NaCl solution increased the concentrations of Cd, Fe, Mn, and Pb in the drainage water above drinking-water standards. Irrigation of sludge farms with brackish water is not recommended, because saline water increased the mobility of the heavy metals and they polluted the drainage water.

  20. Geophysical surveys combined with laboratory soil column experiments to identify and explore risk areas for soil and water pollution in feedlots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espejo-Pérez, Antonio Jesus; Sainato, Claudia Mabel; Jairo Márquez-Molina, John; Giráldez, Juan Vicente; Vanderlinden, Karl

    2014-05-01

    Changes of land use without a correct planning may produce its deterioration with their social, economical and environmental irreversible consequences over short to medium time range. In Argentina, the expansion of soybean fields induced a reduction of the area of pastures dedicated to stockbreeding. As cattle activity is being progressively concentrated on small pens, at feedlots farms, problems of soil and water pollution, mainly by nitrate, have been detected. The characterization of the spatial and temporal variability of soil water content is very important because the mostly advective transport of solutes. To avoid intensive soil samplings, very expensive, one has to recur to geophysical exploration methods. The objective of this work was to identify risk areas within a feedlot of the NW zone of Buenos Aires Province, in Argentina through geophysical methods. The surveys were carried out with an electromagnetic induction profiler EMI-400 (GSSI) and a Time domain Reflectometry (TDR) survey of depth 0-0.10 m with soil sampling and measurement of moisture content with gravimetric method (0-1.0 m). Several trenches were dug inside the pens and also at a test site, where texture, apparent density, saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks), electrical conductivity of the saturation paste extract and organic matter content (OM) were measured. The water retention curves for these soils were also determined. At one of the pens undisturbed soil columns were extracted at 3 locations. Laboratory analysis for 0-1.0 m indicated that soil texture was classified as sandy loam, average organic matter content (OM) was greater than 2.3% with low values of apparent density in the first 10 cm. The range of spatial dependence of data suggested that the number of soil samples could be reduced. Soil apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) and soil moisture were well correlated and indicated a clear spatial pattern in the corrals. TDR performance was acceptable to identify the spatial

  1. Displaced Homemakers: Unresolved Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zawada, Mary Ann

    1980-01-01

    Problems of today's displaced homemakers overlap with those of women in the 1960s. Problems of women seeking employment are similar to those of minority groups, older workers and welfare recipients. Recent legislation has expanded to fulfill some of the needs of women returning to the labor force. (Author/BEF)

  2. Inelastic column behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duberg, John E; Wilder, Thomas W , III

    1952-01-01

    The significant findings of a theoretical study of column behavior in the plastic stress range are presented. When the behavior of a straight column is regarded as the limiting behavior of an imperfect column as the initial imperfection (lack of straightness) approaches zero, the departure from the straight configuration occurs at the tangent-modulus load. Without such a concept of the behavior of a straight column, one is led to the unrealistic conclusion that lateral deflection of the column can begin at any load between the tangent-modulus value and the Euler load, based on the original elastic modulus. A family of curves showing load against lateral deflection is presented for idealized h-section columns of various lengths and of various materials that have a systematic variation of their stress-strain curves.

  3. Mini-Column Ion-Exchange Separation and Atomic Absorption Quantitation of Nickel, Cobalt, and Iron: An Undergraduate Quantitative Analysis Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, James L.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Presents an undergraduate quantitative analysis experiment, describing an atomic absorption quantitation scheme that is fast, sensitive and comparatively simple relative to other titration experiments. (CS)

  4. Distillation Column Modeling Tools

    SciTech Connect

    2001-09-01

    Advanced Computational and Experimental Techniques will Optimize Distillation Column Operation. Distillation is a low thermal efficiency unit operation that currently consumes 4.8 quadrillion BTUs of energy...

  5. The photoelectric displacement converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragoner, Valeriu V.

    2005-02-01

    In the article are examined questions of constructing photoelectric displacement converter satisfying demands that are stated above. Converter has channels of approximate and precise readings. The approximate reading may be accomplished either by the method of reading from a code mask or by the method of the consecutive calculation of optical scale gaps number. Phase interpolator of mouar strips" gaps is determined as a precise measuring. It is shown mathematical model of converter that allow evaluating errors and operating speed of conversion.

  6. Tunable beam displacer

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar-Serrano, Luis José; Valencia, Alejandra; Torres, Juan P.

    2015-03-15

    We report the implementation of a tunable beam displacer, composed of a polarizing beam splitter (PBS) and two mirrors, that divides an initially polarized beam into two parallel beams whose separation can be continuously tuned. The two output beams are linearly polarized with either vertical or horizontal polarization and no optical path difference is introduced between them. The wavelength dependence of the device as well as the maximum separation between the beams achievable is limited mainly by the PBS characteristics.

  7. Variable displacement vane pump

    SciTech Connect

    Tschantz, J.S.; Bisson, B.J.

    1997-12-31

    What has been developed under this program is a pumping system which can vary the amount of fuel delivered according to engine needs, thereby reducing the temperature rise of the fuel to very low levels. This permits the elimination of the air/oil coolers and conserves the vital airflow through the fan. The variable displacement vane pump (VDVP) also permits a substantial simplification of the control system with the elimination of complex metering valves, offering a significant reduction in fuel system cost. This program was initiated to develop a technology that embodied the ruggedness of the gear pump with the efficiency and metering versatility of the variable displacement vane pump. Thick metal vanes emulate the teeth on pumping gears while the simple, elegant swing cam feature provides the variable displacement capability without the unwieldy multiple cam segments found in other concepts. The result is a pumping architecture which is rugged, light in weight and extremely versatile, having demonstrated superb heat management and controllability in extensive bench and engine testing. This paper will report the results that the pumps have achieved to date both in terms of durability and efficiency.

  8. Buoyant miscible displacement flows in vertical pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiri, A.; Larachi, F.; Taghavi, S. M.

    2016-10-01

    The displacement flow of two miscible Newtonian fluids is investigated experimentally in a vertical pipe of long aspect ratio (δ-1 ≈ 210). The fluids have a small density difference and they have the same viscosity. The heavy displacing fluid is initially placed above the light displaced fluid. The displacement flow is downwards. The experiments cover a wide range of the two dimensionless parameters that largely describe the flow: the modified Reynolds number (0 ≤ Ret⪅800) and the densimetric Froude number (0 ≤ Fr ≤ 24). We report on the stabilizing effect of the imposed flow and uncover the existence of two main flow regimes at long times: a stable displacement flow and an unstable displacement flow. The transition between the two regimes occurs at a critical modified Reynolds number " separators=" R et | Critical , as a function of Fr. We study in depth the stable flow regime: First, a lubrication model combined with a simple initial acceleration formulation delivers a reasonable prediction to the time-dependent penetrating displacing front velocity. Second, we find two sub-regimes for stable displacements, namely, sustained-back-flows and no-sustained-back-flows. The transition between the two sub-regimes is a marginal stationary interface flow state, which is also well predicted by the lubrication model. The unstable regime is associated to instabilities and diffusive features of the flow. In addition, particular patterns such as front detachment phenomenon appear in the unstable flow regime, for which we quantify the regions of existence versus the dimensionless groups.

  9. Inflatable Column Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    Lightweight structural member easy to store. Billowing between circumferential loops of fiber inflated column becomes series of cells. Each fiber subjected to same tension along entire length (though tension is different in different fibers). Member is called "isotensoid" column. Serves as jack for automobiles or structures during repairs. Also used as support for temporary bleachers or swimming pools.

  10. Modeling of column flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Luttrell, G.H.; Adel, G.T.; Yoon, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    Many investigators believe that column flotation cells offer significant advantages over standard mechanical machines for the flotation of fine particles. However, because of their unique design and operation, conventional techniques for flotation cell scale-up and design cannot be applied to columns. In an attempt to help alleviate this problem, a population balance model based on first principles has been developed for fine particle flotation in a column. Two different terms have been considered in the model, i.e., transport and rate. Transport terms, incorporating fluid flow and buoyancy, are used to describe the movement of air bubbles, unattached particles and bubble-particle aggregates along the length of the column. Rate terms, which describe the bubble-particle attachment process, have been derived from first principle considerations. Because the model is based on first principles, it can be useful for the design, control, optimization and scale-up of column flotation cells. 9 refs., 12 figs.

  11. Glass-silicon column

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad M.

    2003-12-30

    A glass-silicon column that can operate in temperature variations between room temperature and about 450.degree. C. The glass-silicon column includes large area glass, such as a thin Corning 7740 boron-silicate glass bonded to a silicon wafer, with an electrode embedded in or mounted on glass of the column, and with a self alignment silicon post/glass hole structure. The glass/silicon components are bonded, for example be anodic bonding. In one embodiment, the column includes two outer layers of silicon each bonded to an inner layer of glass, with an electrode imbedded between the layers of glass, and with at least one self alignment hole and post arrangement. The electrode functions as a column heater, and one glass/silicon component is provided with a number of flow channels adjacent the bonded surfaces.

  12. JCE Feature Columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Jon L.

    1999-05-01

    The Features area of JCE Online is now readily accessible through a single click from our home page. In the Features area each column is linked to its own home page. These column home pages also have links to them from the online Journal Table of Contents pages or from any article published as part of that feature column. Using these links you can easily find abstracts of additional articles that are related by topic. Of course, JCE Online+ subscribers are then just one click away from the entire article. Finding related articles is easy because each feature column "site" contains links to the online abstracts of all the articles that have appeared in the column. In addition, you can find the mission statement for the column and the email link to the column editor that I mentioned above. At the discretion of its editor, a feature column site may contain additional resources. As an example, the Chemical Information Instructor column edited by Arleen Somerville will have a periodically updated bibliography of resources for teaching and using chemical information. Due to the increase in the number of these resources available on the WWW, it only makes sense to publish this information online so that you can get to these resources with a simple click of the mouse. We expect that there will soon be additional information and resources at several other feature column sites. Following in the footsteps of the Chemical Information Instructor, up-to-date bibliographies and links to related online resources can be made available. We hope to extend the online component of our feature columns with moderated online discussion forums. If you have a suggestion for an online resource you would like to see included, let the feature editor or JCE Online (jceonline@chem.wisc.edu) know about it. JCE Internet Features JCE Internet also has several feature columns: Chemical Education Resource Shelf, Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems, Equipment Buyers Guide, Hal's Picks, Mathcad

  13. An electromechanical displacement transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villiers, Marius; Mahboob, Imran; Nishiguchi, Katsuhiko; Hatanaka, Daiki; Fujiwara, Akira; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    Two modes of an electromechanical resonator are coupled through the strain inside the structure with a cooperativity as high as 107, a state-of-the-art value for purely mechanical systems, which enables the observation of normal-mode splitting. This coupling is exploited to transduce the resonator’s fundamental mode into the bandwidth of the second flexural mode, which is 1.4 MHz higher in frequency. Thus, an all-mechanical heterodyne detection scheme is implemented that can be developed into a high-precision displacement sensor.

  14. Synthesis of finite displacements and displacements in continental margins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speed, R. C.; Elison, M. W.; Heck, F. R.; Russo, R. M.

    1988-01-01

    The scope of the project is the analysis of displacement-rate fields in the transitional regions between cratonal and oceanic lithospheres over Phanerozoic time (last 700 ma). Associated goals are an improved understanding of range of widths of major displacement zones; the partition of displacement gradients and rotations with position and depth in such zones; the temporal characteristics of such zones-the steadiness, episodicity, and duration of uniform versus nonunifrom fields; and the mechanisms and controls of the establishment and kinematics of displacement zones. The objective is to provide a context of time-averaged kinematics of displacement zones. The initial phase is divided topically among the methodology of measurement and reduction of displacements in the lithosphere and the preliminary analysis from geologic and other data of actual displacement histories from the Cordillera, Appalachians, and southern North America.

  15. Transport and degradation of metalaxyl and isoproturon in biopurification columns inoculated with pesticide-primed material.

    PubMed

    De Wilde, Tineke; Spanoghe, Pieter; Sniegowksi, Kristel; Ryckeboer, Jaak; Jaeken, Peter; Springael, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    Laboratory column displacement experiments were performed to examine whether addition of pesticide-primed material to the matrix of an on-farm biopurification system (BPS), intended to remove pesticides from agricultural waste water, positively affects the degradation of mobile pesticides in the system. Percolated column microcosms with varying types and amounts of metalaxyl and/or isoproturon-primed material or non-primed material were irrigated with water artificially contaminated with isoproturon and/or metalaxyl. Transport of isoproturon was well described using the convection dispersion equation and no dissipation was observed, even in columns inoculated with isoproturon-primed material. On the other hand, delayed dissipation of metalaxyl, i.e., after an initial lag phase, was encountered in all columns receiving metalaxyl. In all systems, dissipation could be described using the Monod model indicating that a metalaxyl degrading population grew in the systems. There was a clear correlation between the lag phase and the amount of metalaxyl-primed material added to the system, i.e., increasing amounts of added material resulted into shorter lag phases and hence more rapid initiation of growth-associated metalaxyl degradation in the system. Our observations suggest that indeed pesticide-primed material can reduce the start-up phase of degradation of mobile pesticides in a BPS and as such can increase its efficiency. However, the primed material should be chosen carefully and preferentially beforehand tested for its capacity to degrade the pesticide.

  16. Nuclear reactor control column

    DOEpatents

    Bachovchin, Dennis M.

    1982-01-01

    The nuclear reactor control column comprises a column disposed within the nuclear reactor core having a variable cross-section hollow channel and containing balls whose vertical location is determined by the flow of the reactor coolant through the column. The control column is divided into three basic sections wherein each of the sections has a different cross-sectional area. The uppermost section of the control column has the greatest cross-sectional area, the intermediate section of the control column has the smallest cross-sectional area, and the lowermost section of the control column has the intermediate cross-sectional area. In this manner, the area of the uppermost section can be established such that when the reactor coolant is flowing under normal conditions therethrough, the absorber balls will be lifted and suspended in a fluidized bed manner in the upper section. However, when the reactor coolant flow falls below a predetermined value, the absorber balls will fall through the intermediate section and into the lowermost section, thereby reducing the reactivity of the reactor core and shutting down the reactor.

  17. Column continuous transition functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yangrong

    2007-04-01

    A column continuous transition function is by definition a standard transition function P(t) whose every column is continuous for t[greater-or-equal, slanted]0 in the norm topology of bounded sequence space l[infinity]. We will prove that it has a stable q-matrix and that there exists a one-to-one relationship between column continuous transition functions and increasing integrated semigroups on l[infinity]. Using the theory of integrated semigroups, we give some necessary and sufficient conditions under which the minimal q-function is column continuous, in terms of its generator (of the Markov semigroup) as well as its q-matrix. Furthermore, we will construct all column continuous Q-functions for a conservative, single-exit and column bounded q-matrix Q. As applications, we find that many interesting continuous-time Markov chains (CTMCs), say Feller-Reuter-Riley processes, monotone processes, birth-death processes and branching processes, etc., have column continuity.

  18. Angular displacement measuring device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seegmiller, H. Lee B. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A system for measuring the angular displacement of a point of interest on a structure, such as aircraft model within a wind tunnel, includes a source of polarized light located at the point of interest. A remote detector arrangement detects the orientation of the plane of the polarized light received from the source and compares this orientation with the initial orientation to determine the amount or rate of angular displacement of the point of interest. The detector arrangement comprises a rotating polarizing filter and a dual filter and light detector unit. The latter unit comprises an inner aligned filter and photodetector assembly which is disposed relative to the periphery of the polarizer so as to receive polarized light passing the polarizing filter and an outer aligned filter and photodetector assembly which receives the polarized light directly, i.e., without passing through the polarizing filter. The purpose of the unit is to compensate for the effects of dust, fog and the like. A polarization preserving optical fiber conducts polarized light from a remote laser source to the point of interest.

  19. Angular displacement measuring device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seegmiller, H. Lee B.

    1992-08-01

    A system for measuring the angular displacement of a point of interest on a structure, such as aircraft model within a wind tunnel, includes a source of polarized light located at the point of interest. A remote detector arrangement detects the orientation of the plane of the polarized light received from the source and compares this orientation with the initial orientation to determine the amount or rate of angular displacement of the point of interest. The detector arrangement comprises a rotating polarizing filter and a dual filter and light detector unit. The latter unit comprises an inner aligned filter and photodetector assembly which is disposed relative to the periphery of the polarizer so as to receive polarized light passing the polarizing filter and an outer aligned filter and photodetector assembly which receives the polarized light directly, i.e., without passing through the polarizing filter. The purpose of the unit is to compensate for the effects of dust, fog and the like. A polarization preserving optical fiber conducts polarized light from a remote laser source to the point of interest.

  20. Competitive adsorption, displacement, and transport of organic matter on iron oxide: II. Displacement and transport

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, B; Mehlhorn, T.L.; Liang, Liyuan

    1996-08-01

    The competitive interactions between organic matter compounds and mineral surfaces are poorly understood, yet these interactions may play a significant role in the stability and co-transport of mineral colloids and/or environmental contaminants. In this study, the processes of competitive adsorption, displacement, and transport of Suwannee River natural organic matter (SR-NOM) are investigated with several model organic compounds in packed beds of iron oxide-coated quartz columns. Results demonstrated that strongly-binding organic compounds are competitively adsorbed and displace those weakly-bound organic compounds along the flow path. Among the four organic compounds studied, polyacrylic acid (PAA) appeared to be the most competitive, whereas SR-NOM was more competitive than phthalic and salicylic acids. A diffuse adsorption and sharp desorption front (giving an appearance of irreversible adsorption) of the SR-NOM breakthrough curves are explained as being a result of the competitive time-dependent adsorption and displacement processes between different organic components within the SR-NOM. The stability and transport of iron oxide colloids varied as one organic component competitively displaces another. Relatively large quantities of iron oxide colloids are transported when the more strongly-binding PAA competitively displaces the weakly-binding SR-NOM or when SR-NOM competitively displaces phthalic and salicylic acids. Results of this study suggest that the chemical composition and hence the functional behavior of NOM (e.g., in stabilizing mineral colloids and in complexing contaminants) can change along its flow path as a result of the dynamic competitive interactions between heterogeneous NOM subcomponents. Further studies are needed to better define and quantify these NOM components as well as their roles in contaminant partitioning and transport. 37 refs., 10 figs.

  1. Gas Chromatograph Method Optimization Trade Study for RESOLVE: 20-meter Column v. 8-meter Column

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huz, Kateryna

    2014-01-01

    RESOLVE is the payload on a Class D mission, Resource Prospector, which will prospect for water and other volatile resources at a lunar pole. The RESOLVE payload's primary scientific purpose includes determining the presence of water on the moon in the lunar regolith. In order to detect the water, a gas chromatograph (GC) will be used in conjunction with a mass spectrometer (MS). The goal of the experiment was to compare two GC column lengths and recommend which would be best for RESOLVE's purposes. Throughout the experiment, an Inficon Fusion GC and an Inficon Micro GC 3000 were used. The Fusion had a 20m long column with 0.25mm internal diameter (Id). The Micro GC 3000 had an 8m long column with a 0.32mm Id. By varying the column temperature and column pressure while holding all other parameters constant, the ideal conditions for testing with each column length in their individual instrument configurations were determined. The criteria used for determining the optimal method parameters included (in no particular order) (1) quickest run time, (2) peak sharpness, and (3) peak separation. After testing numerous combinations of temperature and pressure, the parameters for each column length that resulted in the most optimal data given my three criteria were selected. The ideal temperature and pressure for the 20m column were 95 C and 50psig. At this temperature and pressure, the peaks were separated and the retention times were shorter compared to other combinations. The Inficon Micro GC 3000 operated better at lower temperature mainly due to the shorter 8m column. The optimal column temperature and pressure were 70 C and 30psig. The Inficon Micro GC 3000 8m column had worse separation than the Inficon Fusion 20m column, but was able to separate water within a shorter run time. Therefore, the most significant tradeoff between the two column lengths was peak separation of the sample versus run time. After performing several tests, it was concluded that better

  2. Development of fine-resolution analyses and expanded large-scale forcing properties. Part II: Scale-awareness and application to single-column model experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Sha; Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Li, Zhijin; Liu, Yangang; Lin, Wuyin; Zhang, Minghua; Toto, Tami; Endo, Satoshi

    2015-01-20

    Fine-resolution three-dimensional fields have been produced using the Community Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) data assimilation system for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Southern Great Plains region. The GSI system is implemented in a multi-scale data assimilation framework using the Weather Research and Forecasting model at a cloud-resolving resolution of 2 km. From the fine-resolution three-dimensional fields, large-scale forcing is derived explicitly at grid-scale resolution; a subgrid-scale dynamic component is derived separately, representing subgrid-scale horizontal dynamic processes. Analyses show that the subgrid-scale dynamic component is often a major component over the large-scale forcing for grid scales larger than 200 km. The single-column model (SCM) of the Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5) is used to examine the impact of the grid-scale and subgrid-scale dynamic components on simulated precipitation and cloud fields associated with a mesoscale convective system. It is found that grid-scale size impacts simulated precipitation, resulting in an overestimation for grid scales of about 200 km but an underestimation for smaller grids. The subgrid-scale dynamic component has an appreciable impact on the simulations, suggesting that grid-scale and subgrid-scale dynamic components should be considered in the interpretation of SCM simulations.

  3. Development of fine-resolution analyses and expanded large-scale forcing properties: 2. Scale awareness and application to single-column model experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Sha; Li, Zhijin; Liu, Yangang; Lin, Wuyin; Zhang, Minghua; Toto, Tami; Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Endo, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    three-dimensional fields have been produced using the Community Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) data assimilation system for the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Southern Great Plains region. The GSI system is implemented in a multiscale data assimilation framework using the Weather Research and Forecasting model at a cloud-resolving resolution of 2 km. From the fine-resolution three-dimensional fields, large-scale forcing is derived explicitly at grid-scale resolution; a subgrid-scale dynamic component is derived separately, representing subgrid-scale horizontal dynamic processes. Analyses show that the subgrid-scale dynamic component is often a major component over the large-scale forcing for grid scales larger than 200 km. The single-column model (SCM) of the Community Atmospheric Model version 5 is used to examine the impact of the grid-scale and subgrid-scale dynamic components on simulated precipitation and cloud fields associated with a mesoscale convective system. It is found that grid-scale size impacts simulated precipitation, resulting in an overestimation for grid scales of about 200 km but an underestimation for smaller grids. The subgrid-scale dynamic component has an appreciable impact on the simulations, suggesting that grid-scale and subgrid-scale dynamic components should be considered in the interpretation of SCM simulations.

  4. Efficacy of reactive mineral-based sorbents for phosphate, bacteria, nitrogen and TOC removal--column experiment in recirculation batch mode.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Charlotte; Lakshmanan, Ramnath; Renman, Gunno; Rajarao, Gunaratna Kuttuva

    2013-09-15

    Two mineral-based materials (Polonite and Sorbulite) intended for filter wells in on-site wastewater treatment were compared in terms of removal of phosphate (PO4-P), total inorganic nitrogen (TIN), total organic carbon (TOC) and faecal indicator bacteria (Escherichia coli and Enterococci). Using an innovative, recirculating system, septic tank effluent was pumped at a hydraulic loading rate of 3000 L m(2) d(-1) into triplicate bench-scale columns of each material over a 90-day period. The results showed that Polonite performed better with respect to removal of PO4-P, retaining on average 80% compared with 75% in Sorbulite. This difference was attributed to higher CaO content in Polonite and its faster dissolution. Polonite also performed better in terms of removal of bacteria because of its higher pH value. The total average reduction in E. coli was 60% in Polonite and 45% in Sorbulite, while for Enterococci the corresponding value was 56% in Polonite and 34% in Sorbulite. Sorbulite removed TIN more effectively, with a removal rate of 23%, while Polonite removed 11% of TIN, as well as TOC. Organic matter (measured as TOC) was accumulated in the filter materials but was also released periodically. The results showed that Sorbulite could meet the demand in removing phosphate and nitrogen with reduced microbial release from the wastewater treatment process.

  5. Development of fine-resolution analyses and expanded large-scale forcing properties. Part II: Scale-awareness and application to single-column model experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Feng, Sha; Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Li, Zhijin; ...

    2015-01-20

    Fine-resolution three-dimensional fields have been produced using the Community Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) data assimilation system for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Southern Great Plains region. The GSI system is implemented in a multi-scale data assimilation framework using the Weather Research and Forecasting model at a cloud-resolving resolution of 2 km. From the fine-resolution three-dimensional fields, large-scale forcing is derived explicitly at grid-scale resolution; a subgrid-scale dynamic component is derived separately, representing subgrid-scale horizontal dynamic processes. Analyses show that the subgrid-scale dynamic component is often a major component over the large-scale forcing for grid scalesmore » larger than 200 km. The single-column model (SCM) of the Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5) is used to examine the impact of the grid-scale and subgrid-scale dynamic components on simulated precipitation and cloud fields associated with a mesoscale convective system. It is found that grid-scale size impacts simulated precipitation, resulting in an overestimation for grid scales of about 200 km but an underestimation for smaller grids. The subgrid-scale dynamic component has an appreciable impact on the simulations, suggesting that grid-scale and subgrid-scale dynamic components should be considered in the interpretation of SCM simulations.« less

  6. Fingering phenomena during grain-grain displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mello, Nathália M. P.; Paiva, Humberto A.; Combe, G.; Atman, A. P. F.

    2017-04-01

    Spontaneous formation of fingered patterns during the displacement of dense granular assemblies was experimentally reported few years ago, in a radial Hele-Shaw cell. Here, by means of discrete element simulations, we have recovered the experimental findings and extended the original study to explore the control parameters space. In particular, using assemblies of grains with different geometries (monodisperse, bidisperse, or polydisperse), we measured the macroscopic stress tensor in the samples in order to confirm some conjectures proposed in analogy with Saffman-Taylor viscous fingering phenomena for immiscible fluids. Considering an axial setup which allows to control the discharge of grains and to follow the trajectory and the pressure gradient along the displacing interface, we have applied the Darcy law for laminar flow in fluids in order to measure an "effective viscosity" for each assembly combination, in an attempt to mimic variation of the viscosity ratio between the injected/displaced fluids in the Saffman-Taylor experiment. The results corroborate the analogy with the viscous fluids displacement, with the bidisperse assembly corresponding to the less viscous geometry. But, differently to fluid case, granular fingers only develop for a specific combination of displaced/injected geometries, and we have demonstrated that it is always related with the formation of a force chain network along the finger direction.

  7. Variable displacement blower

    DOEpatents

    Bookout, Charles C.; Stotts, Robert E.; Waring, Douglass R.; Folsom, Lawrence R.

    1986-01-01

    A blower having a stationary casing for rotatably supporting a rotor assembly having a series of open ended chambers arranged to close against the surrounding walls of the casing. Pistons are slidably mounted within each chamber with the center of rotation of the pistons being offset in regard to the center of rotation of the rotor assembly whereby the pistons reciprocate in the chambers as the rotor assembly turns. As inlet port communicates with the rotor assembly to deliver a working substance into the chamber as the pistons approach a top dead center position in the chamber while an outlet port also communicates with the rotor to exhaust the working substance as the pistons approach a bottom dead center position. The displacement of the blower is varied by adjusting the amount of eccentricity between the center of rotation of the pistons and the center of rotation of the rotor assembly.

  8. Impact of sludge stabilization processes and sludge origin (urban or hospital) on the mobility of pharmaceutical compounds following sludge landspreading in laboratory soil-column experiments.

    PubMed

    Lachassagne, Delphine; Soubrand, Marilyne; Casellas, Magali; Gonzalez-Ospina, Adriana; Dagot, Christophe

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to determine the effect of sludge stabilization treatments (liming and anaerobic digestion) on the mobility of different pharmaceutical compounds in soil amended by landspreading of treated sludge from different sources (urban and hospital). The sorption and desorption potential of the following pharmaceutical compounds: carbamazepine (CBZ), ciprofloxacin (CIP), sulfamethoxazole (SMX), salicylic acid (SAL), ibuprofen (IBU), paracetamol (PAR), diclofenac (DIC), ketoprofen (KTP), econazole (ECZ), atenolol (ATN), and their solid-liquid distribution during sludge treatment (from thickening to stabilization) were investigated in the course of batch testing. The different sludge samples were then landspread at laboratory scale and leached with an artificial rain simulating 1 year of precipitation adapted to the surface area of the soil column used. The quality of the resulting leachate was investigated. Results showed that ibuprofen had the highest desorption potential for limed and digested urban and hospital sludge. Ibuprofen, salicylic acid, diclofenac, and paracetamol were the only compounds found in amended soil leachates. Moreover, the leaching potential of these compounds and therefore the risk of groundwater contamination depend mainly on the origin of the sludge because ibuprofen and diclofenac were present in the leachates of soils amended with urban sludge, whereas paracetamol and salicylic acid were found only in the leachates of soils amended with hospital sludge. Although carbamazepine, ciprofloxacin, sulfamethoxazole, ketoprofen, econazole, and atenolol were detected in some sludge, they were not present in any leachate. This reflects either an accumulation and/or (bio)degradation of these compounds (CBZ, CIP, SMX, KTP, ECZ, and ATN ), thus resulting in very low mobility in soil. Ecotoxicological risk assessment, evaluated by calculating the risk quotients for each studied pharmaceutical compound, revealed no high risk due to the

  9. Displacement parameter inversion for a novel electromagnetic underground displacement sensor.

    PubMed

    Shentu, Nanying; Li, Qing; Li, Xiong; Tong, Renyuan; Shentu, Nankai; Jiang, Guoqing; Qiu, Guohua

    2014-05-22

    Underground displacement monitoring is an effective method to explore deep into rock and soil masses for execution of subsurface displacement measurements. It is not only an important means of geological hazards prediction and forecasting, but also a forefront, hot and sophisticated subject in current geological disaster monitoring. In previous research, the authors had designed a novel electromagnetic underground horizontal displacement sensor (called the H-type sensor) by combining basic electromagnetic induction principles with modern sensing techniques and established a mutual voltage measurement theoretical model called the Equation-based Equivalent Loop Approach (EELA). Based on that work, this paper presents an underground displacement inversion approach named "EELA forward modeling-approximate inversion method". Combining the EELA forward simulation approach with the approximate optimization inversion theory, it can deduce the underground horizontal displacement through parameter inversion of the H-type sensor. Comprehensive and comparative studies have been conducted between the experimentally measured and theoretically inversed values of horizontal displacement under counterpart conditions. The results show when the measured horizontal displacements are in the 0-100 mm range, the horizontal displacement inversion discrepancy is generally tested to be less than 3 mm under varied tilt angles and initial axial distances conditions, which indicates that our proposed parameter inversion method can predict underground horizontal displacement measurements effectively and robustly for the H-type sensor and the technique is applicable for practical geo-engineering applications.

  10. Eruption column physics

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, G.A.

    1997-03-01

    In this paper the author focuses on the fluid dynamics of large-scale eruption columns. The dynamics of these columns are rooted in multiphase flow phenomena, so a major part of the paper sets up a foundation on that topic that allows one to quickly assess the inherent assumptions made in various theoretical and experimental approaches. The first part is centered on a set of complex differential equations that describe eruption columns, but the focus is on a general understanding of important physical processes rather than on the mathematics. The author discusses briefly the relative merits and weaknesses of different approaches, emphasizing that the largest advances in understanding are made by combining them. He then focuses on dynamics of steady eruption columns and then on transient phenomena. Finally he briefly reviews the effects of varying behavior of the ambient medium through which an eruption column moves. These final sections will emphasize concepts and a qualitative understanding of eruption dynamics. This paper relies on principles of continuum mechanics and transport processes but does not go into detail on the development of those principles. 36 refs., 36 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. The development of mitochondrial membrane affinity chromatography columns for the study of mitochondrial transmembrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Habicht, K-L.; Singh, N.S.; Indig, F.E.; Wainer, I.W.; Moaddel, R.; Shimmo, R.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial membrane fragments from U-87 MG (U87MG) and HEK-293 cells were successfully immobilized on to Immobilized Artificial Membrane (IAM) chromatographic support and surface of activated open tubular (OT) silica capillary resulting in mitochondrial membrane affinity chromatography (MMAC) columns. Translocator protein (TSPO), located in mitochondrial outer membrane as well as sulfonylurea and mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) receptors, localized to the inner membrane, were characterized. Frontal displacement experiments with multiple concentrations of dipyridamole (DIPY) and PK-11195 were run on MMAC-(U87MG) column and the binding affinities (Kd) determined were 1.08 ± 1.49 and 0.0086 ± 0.0006 μM respectively, which was consistent with previously reported values. Further, binding affinities (Ki) for DIPY binding site were determined for TSPO ligands, PK-11195, mesoporphyrin IX, protoporphyrin IX and rotenone. Additionally, the relative ranking of these TSPO ligands based on single displacement studies using DIPY as marker on MMAC-(U87MG) was consistent with the obtained Ki values. The immobilization of mitochondrial membrane fragments was also confirmed by confocal microscopy. PMID:26049098

  12. Isothermal Multiple Displacement Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Medeiros, L. Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    Isothermal multiple strand displacement amplification (IMDA) of the whole human genome is a promising method for procuring abundant DNA from valuable and often limited clinical specimens. However, whether DNA generated by this method is of high quality and a faithful replication of the DNA in the original specimen, allowing for subsequent molecular diagnostic testing, requires verification. In this study, we evaluated the suitability of IMDA-generated DNA (IMDA-DNA) for detecting antigen receptor gene rearrangements, chromosomal translocations, and gene mutations using Southern blot analysis, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods, or sequencing methods in 28 lymphoma and leukemia clinical specimens. Molecular testing before and after whole genome amplification of these specimens using the IMDA technique showed concordance in 27 of 28 (96%) specimens. Analysis of IMDA-DNA by Southern blot analysis detected restriction fragments >12 kilobases long. No amplification bias was observed at all loci tested demonstrating that this method can be useful in generating large amounts of unbiased, high molecular weight DNA from limited clinical specimens. PMID:15269301

  13. Laser optical displacement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starritt, Larry W.; Matthews, Larryl K.

    1995-04-01

    The current quality of our nations bridges is on a decline. There are roughly half a million highway bridges in the United States and out of the half a million more than 200,000 are deficient. With catastrophic failure of bridges causing the loss of life and property, the need for bridge inspection and maintenance is evident. When the Silver Bridge that crossed the Ohio River collapsed in December 1967, 46 people were killed. The failure to prevent the disaster was attributed to the poor inspection techniques used by the bridge inspectors. Current inspection techniques depend on humans being able to recognize structural imperfections without the aid of instrumentation. The Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1968 mandated both national bridge inspection standards and training for bridge inspectors. This act has encouraged the development of instruments that would allow inspectors to perform more complete inspections of bridges. To improve the quality of inspection and data, there is a great need for proven methods and instruments used to acquire data. The Laser Optical Displacement System (L.O.D.S.) developed at New Mexico State University by the Optical and Materials Science Lab is such a device. The L.O.D.S. has been tested and proven in both laboratory situations and in the field. This paper describes some of the methods that are now being used to measure deflections in bridges. Then, a description of the development and application of the L.O.D.S. unit is given.

  14. Displacement, Substitution, Sublimation: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedrini, D. T.; Pedrini, Bonnie C.

    Sigmund Freund worked with the mechanisms of displacement, substitution, and sublimation. These mechanisms have many similarities and have been studied diagnostically and therapeutically. Displacement and substitution seem to fit in well with phobias, hysterias, somatiyations, prejudices, and scapegoating. Phobias, prejudices, and scapegoating…

  15. Laboratory studies of water column separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autrique, R.; Rodal, E.

    2013-12-01

    Results of experimental studies of water column separation following an upstream valve closure are presented. Different geometrical arrangements with transparent PVC pipes are installed immediately downstream of the closing valve, namely, horizontal pipes, vertical pipes flowing down, and humpback profile pipes, the last two being used in order to obtain full pipe section vapor cavities. Maximum over pressures at water column rejoining, and maximum cavity lengths and duration, are compared with theoretical values and with previous experiments with horizontal pipes. Good agreement is found between theory and experiments, and interesting visual material is obtained.

  16. Columns in Clay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leenhouts, Robin

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a clay project for students studying Greece and Rome. It provides a wonderful way to learn slab construction techniques by making small clay column capitols. With this lesson, students learn architectural vocabulary and history, understand the importance of classical architectural forms and their influence on today's…

  17. Mineral displacement and -dissolution processes and their relevance to rock porosity and permeability in Rotliegend sandstones of the Altmark natural gas field (central Germany) - results from CO2 laboratory batch experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudlo, Dieter; Enzmann, Frieder; Heister, Katja; Werner, Lars; Ganzer, Leonhard; Reitenbach, Viktor; Henkel, Steven; Albrecht, Daniel; Gaupp, Reinhard

    2014-05-01

    supported by µ-CT investigations. Here, the achieved 3D modelling data indicate an increase in reactive surface areas exposed to the pore space (which is in accord to the BET observations), as well as an enhancement in rock porosity and permeability after the runs. Moreover, these simulations showed that a remarkable mass (mineral) transfer was induced by the experiments, which led to a displacement of the porosity and permeability distribution in the sandstones and therefore a change in the fluid flow characteristics within the rocks - a parameter most important for every fluid-rock process. These observations are quite astonishing because they suggest that not only fluid velocity (e.g. during fluid flow experiments) might detach and transport grain rimming (clay) minerals, but also that physico-chemical reactions may enforce the release of such solids, even during almost static p-/T-/Xfluid conditions, as used in our experiments.

  18. METHOD TO TEST ISOTOPIC SEPARATION EFFICIENCY OF PALLADIUM PACKED COLUMNS

    SciTech Connect

    Heung, L; Gregory Staack, G; James Klein, J; William Jacobs, W

    2007-06-27

    The isotopic effect of palladium has been applied in different ways to separate hydrogen isotopes for many years. At Savannah River Site palladium deposited on kieselguhr (Pd/k) is used in a thermal cycling absorption process (TCAP) to purify tritium for over ten years. The need to design columns for different throughputs and the desire to advance the performance of TCAP created the need to evaluate different column designs and packing materials for their separation efficiency. In this work, columns with variations in length, diameter and metal foam use, were tested using an isotope displacement method. A simple computer model was also developed to calculate the number of theoretical separation stages using the test results. The effects of column diameter, metal foam and gas flow rate were identified.

  19. Effects of Boundary Conditions and Flow on the Kink Instability in a Cylindrical Plasma Column

    SciTech Connect

    Furno, I; Intrator, T P; Lapenta, G; Dorf, L; Ryutov, D D

    2007-02-06

    An experimental investigation of the kink instability is presented in a linear plasma column where one end is line-tied to the plasma source, and the other end is not line-tied and therefore free to slide over the surface of the end-plate. This latter boundary condition is a result of plasma sheath resistance that insulates, at least partially, the plasma from the end-plate. The helical m = 1 kink mode is observed to grow when the plasma current exceeds a threshold and, close to the criticality, is characterized by an axial mode structure with maximum displacement at the free axial boundary. Azimuthal rotation of the mode is observed such that the helically kinked column always screws into the free axial boundary. The kink mode structure, rotation frequency and instability threshold are accurately reproduced by a recent kink theory [D. D. Ryutov, et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 032105 (2006)], which includes axial plasma flow and one end of the plasma column that is free to move due to a perfect non-line-tying boundary condition which is experimentally verified. A brief review of the kink theory and its predictions for the boundary conditions relevant in the present experiments are presented.

  20. Regenerative rotary displacer Stirling engine

    SciTech Connect

    Isshiki, Naotsugu; Watanabe, Hiroichi; Raggi, L.; Isshiki, Seita; Hirata, Koichi

    1996-12-31

    A few rotary displacer Stirling engines in which the displacer has one gas pocket space at one side and rotates in a main enclosed cylinder, which is heated from one side and cooled from opposite side without any regenerator, have been studied for some time by the authors. The authors tried to improve this engine by equipping it with a regenerator, because without a regenerator, pressure oscillation and efficiency are too small. Here, several types of regenerative rotary displacer piston Stirling engines are proposed. One is the contra-rotating tandem two disc type displacer engine using axial heat conduction through side walls or by heat pipes and another is a single disc type with circulating fluid regenerator or heat pipes. Stirling engines of this new rotary displacer type are thought to attain high speed. Here, experimental results of the original rotary displacer Stirling engine without a regenerator, and one contra-rotating tandem displacer engine with side wall regenerator by axial heat conduction are reported accompanied with a discussion of the results.

  1. Column flotation: Processes, designs and practices. Process engineering for the chemical, metals and minerals industry, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, J.B. . Flotation Equipment and Process Engineering Dept.)

    1994-01-01

    Practically all mined ores of non-ferrous and rare metals and an increasing share of industrial minerals and coal are processed through flotation. This book presents the analysis of a wide range of problems in the process theory of flotation columns, including the first published analysis of models of flotation froths. The experience of pilot tests and commercial applications of column flotation for mineral processing and in waste water treatment circuits are also considered. This is the first book to consider column flotation design and operation experience and to present data on column parameters. Topics include: design of flotation columns; aerators in flotation columns; experimental methods of column aerohydrodynamics investigation; aerohydrodynamic characteristics of flotation columns; experimental investigation of the flotation process in columns; kinetics aspects of column flotation; scaling-up methods for flotation columns; structure and mass transfer in flotation froths; column flotation practice; and column flotation control.

  2. Research on Joint Parameter Inversion for an Integrated Underground Displacement 3D Measuring Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Shentu, Nanying; Qiu, Guohua; Li, Qing; Tong, Renyuan; Shentu, Nankai; Wang, Yanjie

    2015-01-01

    Underground displacement monitoring is a key means to monitor and evaluate geological disasters and geotechnical projects. There exist few practical instruments able to monitor subsurface horizontal and vertical displacements simultaneously due to monitoring invisibility and complexity. A novel underground displacement 3D measuring sensor had been proposed in our previous studies, and great efforts have been taken in the basic theoretical research of underground displacement sensing and measuring characteristics by virtue of modeling, simulation and experiments. This paper presents an innovative underground displacement joint inversion method by mixing a specific forward modeling approach with an approximate optimization inversion procedure. It can realize a joint inversion of underground horizontal displacement and vertical displacement for the proposed 3D sensor. Comparative studies have been conducted between the measured and inversed parameters of underground horizontal and vertical displacements under a variety of experimental and inverse conditions. The results showed that when experimentally measured horizontal displacements and vertical displacements are both varied within 0 ~ 30 mm, horizontal displacement and vertical displacement inversion discrepancies are generally less than 3 mm and 1 mm, respectively, under three kinds of simulated underground displacement monitoring circumstances. This implies that our proposed underground displacement joint inversion method is robust and efficient to predict the measuring values of underground horizontal and vertical displacements for the proposed sensor. PMID:25871714

  3. Apes Communicate about Absent and Displaced Objects: Methodology Matters

    PubMed Central

    Lyn, Heidi; Russell, Jamie L.; Leavens, David A.; Bard, Kim A.; Boysen, Sarah T.; Schaeffer, Jennifer A.; Hopkins, William D.

    2013-01-01

    Displaced reference is the ability to refer to an item that has been moved (displaced) in space and/or time, and has been called one of the true hallmarks of referential communication. Several studies suggest that nonhuman primates have this capability, but a recent experiment concluded that in a specific situation (absent entities) human infants display displaced reference but chimpanzees do not. Here we show that chimpanzees and bonobos of diverse rearing histories are capable of displaced reference to absent and displaced objects. It is likely that some of the conflicting findings from animal cognition studies are due to relatively minor methodological differences, but are compounded by interpretation errors. Comparative studies are of great importance in elucidating the evolution of human cognition, however, greater care must be taken with methodology and interpretation for these studies to accurately reflect species differences. PMID:23681052

  4. The displacement estimation error back-propagation (DEEP) method for a multiple structural displacement monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, H.; Shin, J. U.; Myung, H.

    2013-04-01

    Visually servoed paired structured light system (ViSP) has been found to be useful in estimating 6-DOF relative displacement. The system is composed of two screens facing each other, each with one or two lasers, a 2-DOF manipulator and a camera. The displacement between two sides is estimated by observing positions of the projected laser beams and rotation angles of the manipulators. To apply the system to massive structures, the whole area should be partitioned and each ViSP module is placed in each partition in a cascaded manner. The estimated displacement between adjoining ViSPs is combined with the next partition so that the entire movement of the structure can be estimated. The multiple ViSPs, however, have a major problem that the error is propagated through the partitions. Therefore, a displacement estimation error back-propagation (DEEP) method which uses Newton-Raphson or gradient descent formulation inspired by the error back-propagation algorithm is proposed. In this method, the estimated displacement from the ViSP is updated using the error back-propagated from a fixed position. To validate the performance of the proposed method, various simulations and experiments have been performed. The results show that the proposed method significantly reduces the propagation error throughout the multiple modules.

  5. Slurry bubble column hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rados, Novica

    Slurry bubble column reactors are presently used for a wide range of reactions in both chemical and biochemical industry. The successful design and scale up of slurry bubble column reactors require a complete understanding of multiphase fluid dynamics, i.e. phase mixing, heat and mass transport characteristics. The primary objective of this thesis is to improve presently limited understanding of the gas-liquid-solid slurry bubble column hydrodynamics. The effect of superficial gas velocity (8 to 45 cm/s), pressure (0.1 to 1.0 MPa) and solids loading (20 and 35 wt.%) on the time-averaged solids velocity and turbulent parameter profiles has been studied using Computer Automated Radioactive Particle Tracking (CARPT). To accomplish this, CARPT technique has been significantly improved for the measurements in highly attenuating systems, such as high pressure, high solids loading stainless steel slurry bubble column. At a similar set of operational conditions time-averaged gas and solids holdup profiles have been evaluated using the developed Computed Tomography (CT)/Overall gas holdup procedure. This procedure is based on the combination of the CT scans and the overall gas holdup measurements. The procedure assumes constant solids loading in the radial direction and axially invariant cross-sectionally averaged gas holdup. The obtained experimental holdup, velocity and turbulent parameters data are correlated and compared with the existing low superficial gas velocities and atmospheric pressure CARPT/CT gas-liquid and gas-liquid-solid slurry data. The obtained solids axial velocity radial profiles are compared with the predictions of the one dimensional (1-D) liquid/slurry recirculation phenomenological model. The obtained solids loading axial profiles are compared with the predictions of the Sedimentation and Dispersion Model (SDM). The overall gas holdup values, gas holdup radial profiles, solids loading axial profiles, solids axial velocity radial profiles and solids

  6. Competitive displacement of DNA during surface hybridization.

    PubMed

    Bishop, J; Wilson, C; Chagovetz, A M; Blair, S

    2007-01-01

    Using real-time dual-color fluorescence detection, we have experimentally tracked individual target species during competitive DNA surface hybridization in a two-component sample. Our experimental results demonstrate displacement of the lower affinity species by the higher affinity species and corroborate recent theoretical models describing competitive DNA surface hybridization. Competition at probe sites complementary to one of the two DNA species was monitored in separate experiments for two different target pairs. Each pair differs in sequence by a single nucleotide polymorphism, and one pair includes a folding target. We propose a mechanistic interpretation of the differences between hybridization curves of targets in multi-component and single-component experiments.

  7. Displacement sensing system and method

    DOEpatents

    VunKannon, Jr., Robert S

    2006-08-08

    A displacement sensing system and method addresses demanding requirements for high precision sensing of displacement of a shaft, for use typically in a linear electro-dynamic machine, having low failure rates over multi-year unattended operation in hostile environments. Applications include outer space travel by spacecraft having high-temperature, sealed environments without opportunity for servicing over many years of operation. The displacement sensing system uses a three coil sensor configuration, including a reference and sense coils, to provide a pair of ratio-metric signals, which are inputted into a synchronous comparison circuit, which is synchronously processed for a resultant displacement determination. The pair of ratio-metric signals are similarly affected by environmental conditions so that the comparison circuit is able to subtract or nullify environmental conditions that would otherwise cause changes in accuracy to occur.

  8. Evaluation of simultaneous reduction and transport of selenium in saturated soil columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Lei; Frankenberger, William T.; Jury, William A.

    1999-03-01

    Speciation plays an important role in determining the overall leachability of selenium in soil. In this study we present a mathematical model and results of miscible displacement experiments that were conducted to evaluate simultaneous reduction and transport of selenate in saturated soil columns. The experiments were carried out in organic amended (compost manure or gluten) or unamended soil, with O2-sparged or nonsparged influent solution. In all columns, reduction of selenate was fast enough to produce selenite flux in the effluent and elemental Se in the soil profile during a mean residence time of ˜30 hours. Reduction was accelerated in the presence of organic amendments and under low O2 concentrations, resulting in an increased retardation of selenium transport as a whole. The results of our experiments show that although selenate does not sorb to solid surfaces during transport, it reduces rapidly to forms that are strongly retarded. On the basis of simulation with the consecutive reaction and transport model using parameters derived from this study, selenium is expected to be retained near the soil surface, even under extreme leaching conditions.

  9. Lucky interferometry for displacement measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioniţă, Bogdan; Logofătu, Petre Cătălin; Apostol, Dan

    2009-11-01

    We extrapolated the lucky imaging technique, mostly used in astronomy, to the field of interferometry for displacement measurement. From the batch of interferograms generated by a Twyman-Green-type interferometer and acquired by a CCD camera, those with high overall contrast were selected and fitted to a sinusoidal function. The high-contrast interferograms showed a significantly lower dispersion and, consequently, a lower uncertainty of the measured displacement.

  10. Axisymmetric collapses of granular columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lube, Gert; Huppert, Herbert E.; Sparks, R. Stephen J.; Hallworth, Mark A.

    2004-06-01

    Experimental observations of the collapse of initially vertical columns of small grains are presented. The experiments were performed mainly with dry grains of salt or sand, with some additional experiments using couscous, sugar or rice. Some of the experimental flows were analysed using high-speed video. There are three different flow regimes, dependent on the value of the aspect ratio a {=} h_i/r_i, where h_i and r_i are the initial height and radius of the granular column respectively. The differing forms of flow behaviour are described for each regime. In all cases a central, conically sided region of angle approximately 59(°) , corresponding to an aspect ratio of 1.7, remains undisturbed throughout the motion. The main experimental results for the final extent of the deposit and the time for emplacement are systematically collapsed in a quantitative way independent of any friction coefficients. Along with the kinematic data for the rate of spread of the front of the collapsing column, this is interpreted as indicating that frictional effects between individual grains in the bulk of the moving flow only play a role in the last instant of the flow, as it comes to an abrupt halt. For a {<} 1.7, the measured final runout radius, r_infty, is related to the initial radius by r_infty {=} r_i(1 {+} 1.24a); while for 1.7 {<} a the corresponding relationship is r_infty {=} r_i(1 {+} 1.6a(1/2) ). The time, t_infty, taken for the grains to reach r_infty is given by t_infty {=} 3(h_i/g)(1/2} {=} 3(r_i/g)({1/2}a^{1/2)) , where g is the gravitational acceleration. The insights and conclusions gained from these experiments can be applied to a wide range of industrial and natural flows of concentrated particles. For example, the observation of the rapid deposition of the grains can help explain details of the emplacement of pyroclastic flows resulting from the explosive eruption of volcanoes.

  11. Biological processes in the water column of the South Atlantic Bight: Zooplankton responses: A progress report, June 1986 to June 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Paffenhoefer, G.A.

    1986-12-19

    During April of 1984 and 1985 we studied the effects of wind forcing on water flow on the inner and middle shelf off Georgia and South Carolina. We present in this Progress Report selected data from our SPREX cruise (Spring Runoff Experiment) in April 1985 and compare the date with results from our Pre-SPREX cruise in April 1984. River runoff in April 1985 was about 50% lower than the previous average. The overall water flow at midshelf off Charleston was alongshore at the surface and onshore near bottom. The water column was well mixed and started to show signs of stratification by the end of April 1985. The water flow data indicate that nearshore zooplankton would hardly be displaced towards offshore, whereas offshore zooplankton would be transported towards shore. A comparison of results from April 1984 with those from April 1985 shows major differences: Fairly high runoff and pronounced displacement of nearshore water towards offshore with northeastward wind stress resulted in strong offshore displacement of estuarine zooplankton in surface waters (April 1984). Low runoff and weak alongshore displacement of surface water with weak windstress resulted in no offshore displacement of estuarine zooplankton which were at abnormally low concentrations in their habitat (April 1985).

  12. Surfactant-induced flow compromises determination of air-water interfacial areas by surfactant miscible-displacement.

    PubMed

    Costanza-Robinson, Molly S; Henry, Eric J

    2017-03-01

    Surfactant miscible-displacement (SMD) column experiments are used to measure air-water interfacial area (AI) in unsaturated porous media, a property that influences solute transport and phase-partitioning. The conventional SMD experiment results in surface tension gradients that can cause water redistribution and/or net drainage of water from the system ("surfactant-induced flow"), violating theoretical foundations of the method. Nevertheless, the SMD technique is still used, and some suggest that experimental observations of surfactant-induced flow represent an artifact of improper control of boundary conditions. In this work, we used numerical modeling, for which boundary conditions can be perfectly controlled, to evaluate this suggestion. We also examined the magnitude of surfactant-induced flow and its impact on AI measurement during multiple SMD flow scenarios. Simulations of the conventional SMD experiment showed substantial surfactant-induced flow and consequent drainage of water from the column (e.g., from 75% to 55% SW) and increases in actual AI of up to 43%. Neither horizontal column orientation nor alternative boundary conditions resolved surfactant-induced flow issues. Even for simulated flow scenarios that avoided surfactant-induced drainage of the column, substantial surfactant-induced internal water redistribution occurred and was sufficient to alter surfactant transport, resulting in up to 23% overestimation of AI. Depending on the specific simulated flow scenario and data analysis assumptions used, estimated AI varied by nearly 40% and deviated up to 36% from the system's initial AI. We recommend methods for AI determination that avoid generation of surface-tension gradients and urge caution when relying on absolute AI values measured via SMD.

  13. Biodegradation of Jet Fuel in Vented Columns of Water-Unsaturated Sandy Soil

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    construction, a wrap-around column template was used to position the sampling, tensiometer and venting ports on all three columns. The single column used...during the preliminary phase of this experiment was constructed with nine 0.5-inch diameter soil sampling ports and six 0.375-inch diameter tensiometer ...ports. The two columns used during the biodegradation testing had no soil sampling ports and only three water tensiometer ports. Each column had air

  14. Oscillating water column structural model

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, Guild; Bull, Diana L; Jepsen, Richard Alan; Gordon, Margaret Ellen

    2014-09-01

    An oscillating water column (OWC) wave energy converter is a structure with an opening to the ocean below the free surface, i.e. a structure with a moonpool. Two structural models for a non-axisymmetric terminator design OWC, the Backward Bent Duct Buoy (BBDB) are discussed in this report. The results of this structural model design study are intended to inform experiments and modeling underway in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated Reference Model Project (RMP). A detailed design developed by Re Vision Consulting used stiffeners and girders to stabilize the structure against the hydrostatic loads experienced by a BBDB device. Additional support plates were added to this structure to account for loads arising from the mooring line attachment points. A simplified structure was designed in a modular fashion. This simplified design allows easy alterations to the buoyancy chambers and uncomplicated analysis of resulting changes in buoyancy.

  15. Nonlinear and tangent stiffness of imperfect beam columns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, M. S.

    1982-01-01

    A curved member under axial load is analyzed using beam column theory to determine nonlinear response and the tangent stiffness associated with small displacements from the nonlinear state. Such a result is suitable for incorporation into a general nonlinear analysis using a corotational coordinate system to describe the rigid body type motion of individual members. The method is applied to buckling problems. Several examples are given to show the accuracy of the method.

  16. Maximization of organic acids production by Aspergillus niger in a bubble column bioreactor for V and Ni recovery enhancement from power plant residual ash in spent-medium bioleaching experiments.

    PubMed

    Rasoulnia, P; Mousavi, S M

    2016-09-01

    Spent-medium bioleaching of V and Ni from a power plant residual ash (PPR ash) was conducted using organic acids produced by Aspergillus niger. The production of organic acids in a bubble column bioreactor was optimized through selecting three most influencing factors. Under optimum condition of aeration rate of 762.5(ml/min), sucrose concentration of 101.9(g/l) and inoculum size of 40(ml/l), respectively 17,185, 4539, 1042 and 502(ppm) of oxalic, gluconic, citric and malic acids were produced. Leaching experiments were carried out using biogenic produced organic acids under leaching environment temperature of 60°C and rotary shaking speed of 135rpm, with various pulp densities of 1, 2, 3, 5, 7 and 9(%w/v). The results showed that biogenic produced organic acids leached V much more efficiently than Ni so that even at high pulp density of 9(%w/v), 83% of V was recovered while Ni recovery yield was 30%.

  17. Job Displacement Among Single Mothers:

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Jennie E.; Thomas, Juli Simon

    2015-01-01

    Given the recent era of economic upheaval, studying the effects of job displacement has seldom been so timely and consequential. Despite a large literature associating displacement with worker well-being, relatively few studies focus on the effects of parental displacement on child well-being, and fewer still focus on implications for children of single parent households. Moreover, notwithstanding a large literature on the relationship between single motherhood and children’s outcomes, research on intergenerational effects of involuntary employment separations among single mothers is limited. Using 30 years of nationally representative panel data and propensity score matching methods, we find significant negative effects of job displacement among single mothers on children’s educational attainment and social-psychological well-being in young adulthood. Effects are concentrated among older children and children whose mothers had a low likelihood of displacement, suggesting an important role for social stigma and relative deprivation in the effects of socioeconomic shocks on child well-being. PMID:25032267

  18. Modeling of rotating disc contactor (RDC) column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Wan Nurul Aiffah; Zakaria, Siti Aisyah; Noor, Nor Fashihah Mohd; Sulong, Ibrahim; Arshad, Khairil Anuar

    2014-12-01

    Liquid-liquid extraction is one of the most important separation processes. Different kinds of liquid-liquid extractor such as Rotating Disc Contactor (RDC) Column being used in industries. The study of liquid-liquid extraction in an RDC column has become a very important subject to be discussed not just among chemical engineers but mathematician as well. In this research, the modeling of small diameter RDC column using the chemical system involving cumene/isobutryric asid/water are analyzed by the method of Artificial Neural Network (ANN). In the previous research, we begin the process of analyzed the data using methods of design of the experiments (DOE) to identify which factor and their interaction factor are significant and to determine the percentage of contribution of the variance for each factor. From the result obtained, we continue the research by discussed the development and validation of an artificial neural network model in estimating the concentration of continuous and concentration of dispersed outlet for an RDC column. It is expected that an efficient and reliable model will be formed to predict RDC column performance as an alternative to speed up the simulation process.

  19. The lateral column lengthening and medial column stabilization procedures.

    PubMed

    Chi, T D; Toolan, B C; Sangeorzan, B J; Hansen, S T

    1999-08-01

    The results of medial column stabilization, lateral column lengthening, and combined medial and lateral procedures were reviewed in the treatment of adult acquired flatfoot secondary to posterior tibialis tendon insufficiency. All bony procedures were accompanied by transfer of the flexor digitorum longus tendon to the medial cuneiform or stump of the posterior tibialis tendon and tendoachilles lengthening or gastrocnemius recession. Medial column fusion was performed for naviculocuneiform and cuneiform first metatarsal sag; lateral column lengthening was performed for calcaneovalgus deformity with a flat pitch angle; and combined procedures were performed for complex combined deformities. At 1 to 4 year followup of 65 feet, 88% of the feet that had lateral column lengthening, 80% that had medial column stabilization, and 88% of the feet that had medial and lateral procedures had a decrease in pain or were pain free. The lateral talar first metatarsal angle improved by 16 degrees in the patients in the lateral column lengthening group, 20 degrees in the patients in the medial column stabilization group, and 24 degrees in the patients in the combined medial and lateral procedures group. The anteroposterior talonavicular coverage angle improved by 14 degrees in the patients in the lateral column lengthening group, 10 degrees in the patients in the medial column stabilization group, and 14 degrees in the patients in the combined medial and lateral procedures group. These techniques effectively correct deformity without disrupting the essential joints of the hindfoot and midfoot.

  20. Comparing Teaching Approaches About Maxwell's Displacement Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karam, Ricardo; Coimbra, Debora; Pietrocola, Maurício

    2014-08-01

    Due to its fundamental role for the consolidation of Maxwell's equations, the displacement current is one of the most important topics of any introductory course on electromagnetism. Moreover, this episode is widely used by historians and philosophers of science as a case study to investigate several issues (e.g. the theory-experiment relationship). Despite the consensus among physics educators concerning the relevance of the topic, there are many possible ways to interpret and justify the need for the displacement current term. With the goal of understanding the didactical transposition of this topic more deeply, we investigate three of its domains: (1) The historical development of Maxwell's reasoning; (2) Different approaches to justify the term insertion in physics textbooks; and (3) Four lectures devoted to introduce the topic in undergraduate level given by four different professors. By reflecting on the differences between these three domains, significant evidence for the knowledge transformation caused by the didactization of this episode is provided. The main purpose of this comparative analysis is to assist physics educators in developing an epistemological surveillance regarding the teaching and learning of the displacement current.

  1. Gender-based violence in conflict and displacement: qualitative findings from displaced women in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Gender-based violence (GBV) is prevalent among, though not specific to, conflict affected populations and related to multifarious levels of vulnerability of conflict and displacement. Colombia has been marked with decades of conflict, with an estimated 5.2 million internally displaced persons (IDPs) and ongoing violence. We conducted qualitative research to understand the contexts of conflict, displacement and dynamics with GBV. This as part of a multi-phase, mixed method study, in collaboration with UNHCR, to develop a screening tool to confidentially identify cases of GBV for referral among IDP women who were survivors of GBV. Methods Qualitative research was used to identify the range of GBV, perpetrators, contexts in conflict and displacement, barriers to reporting and service uptake, as well as to understand experiences of service providers. Thirty-five female IDPs, aged 18 years and older, who self-identified as survivors of GBV were enrolled for in-depth interviews in San Jose de Guaviare and Quibdo, Colombia in June 2012. Thirty-one service providers participated in six focus group discussions and four interviews across these sites. Results Survivors described a range of GBV across conflict and displacement settings. Armed actors in conflict settings perpetrated threats of violence and harm to family members, child recruitment, and, to a lesser degree, rape and forced abortion. Opportunistic violence, including abduction, rape, and few accounts of trafficking were more commonly reported to occur in the displacement setting, often perpetrated by unknown individuals. Intrafamilial violence, intimate partner violence, including physical and sexual violence and reproductive control were salient across settings and may be exacerbated by conflict and displacement. Barriers to reporting and services seeking were reported by survivors and providers alike. Conclusions Findings highlight the need for early identification of GBV cases, with emphasis on

  2. Perceived displacement explains wolfpack effect

    PubMed Central

    Šimkovic, Matúš; Träuble, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the influence of perceived displacement of moving agent-like stimuli on the performance in dynamic interactive tasks. In order to reliably measure perceived displacement we utilize multiple tasks with different task demands. The perceived center of an agent's body is displaced in the direction in which the agent is facing and this perceived displacement is larger than the theoretical position of the center of mass would predict. Furthermore, the displacement in the explicit judgment is dissociated from the displacement obtained by the implicit measures. By manipulating the location of the pivot point, we show that it is not necessary to postulate orientation as an additional cue utilized by perception, as has been suggested by earlier studies. These studies showed that the agent's orientation influences the detection of chasing motion and the detection-related performance in interactive tasks. This influence has been labeled wolfpack effect. In one of the demonstrations of the wolfpack effect participants control a green circle on a display with a computer mouse. It has been shown that participants avoid display areas with agents pointing toward the green circle. Participants do so in favor of areas where the agents point in the direction perpendicular to the circle. We show that this avoidance behavior arises because the agent's pivot point selected by the earlier studies is different from where people locate the center of agent's body. As a consequence, the nominal rotation confounds rotation and translation. We show that the avoidance behavior disappears once the pivot point is set to the center of agent's body. PMID:25566114

  3. Particle displacement tracking for PIV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.

    1990-01-01

    A new Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) data acquisition and analysis system, which is an order of magnitude faster than any previously proposed system has been constructed and tested. The new Particle Displacement Tracing (PDT) system is an all electronic technique employing a video camera and a large memory buffer frame-grabber board. Using a simple encoding scheme, a time sequence of single exposure images are time coded into a single image and then processed to track particle displacements and determine velocity vectors. Application of the PDT technique to a counter-rotating vortex flow produced over 1100 velocity vectors in 110 seconds when processed on an 80386 PC.

  4. Rotor component displacement measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Mercer, Gary D.; Li, Ming C.; Baum, Charles R.

    2003-05-27

    A measuring system for measuring axial displacement of a tube relative to an axially stationary component in a rotating rotor assembly includes at least one displacement sensor adapted to be located normal to a longitudinal axis of the tube; an insulated cable system adapted for passage through the rotor assembly; a rotatable proximitor module located axially beyond the rotor assembly to which the cables are connected; and a telemetry system operatively connected to the proximitor module for sampling signals from the proximitor module and forwarding data to a ground station.

  5. Measurement of chest wall displacement based on terahertz wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Lv, Hao; Jiao, Teng; Lu, Guohua; Li, Sheng; Li, Zhao; Liu, Miao; Jing, Xijing; Wang, Jianqi

    2015-02-01

    Measurement of chest wall displacement is an important approach for measuring mechanics of chest wall, which has considerable significance for assessing respiratory system and diagnosing pulmonary diseases. However, existing optical methods for measuring chest wall displacement are inconvenient for some specific patients such as the female patients and the patients with bandaged chest. In this letter, we proposed a method for measuring chest wall displacement based on terahertz wave and established corresponding mathematic model and set up a terahertz measurement system. The main advantages of this method are that it can measure the chest wall displacement of the subjects without taking off clothes or arranging any markers. To validate this method and assess the performance of the terahertz system, in vitro, the displacement of a water module driven by a linear guide rail was measured by the terahertz system and compared with the actual displacement of the water module. The results showed that the waveforms measured with two methods have a good agreement, and the relative error is less than 5% and sufficiently good for measurement demands. In vivo, the synchronous experiment was performed on five human volunteers with the terahertz system and a respiratory belt transducer. The results demonstrate that this method has good performance and promising prospects for measuring chest wall displacement.

  6. Why Hexagonal Basalt Columns?

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Martin; Anderssohn, Robert; Bahr, Hans-Achim; Weiß, Hans-Jürgen; Nellesen, Jens

    2015-10-09

    Basalt columns with their preferably hexagonal cross sections are a fascinating example of pattern formation by crack propagation. Junctions of three propagating crack faces rearrange such that the initial right angles between them tend to approach 120°, which enables the cracks to form a pattern of regular hexagons. To promote understanding of the path on which the ideal configuration can be reached, two periodically repeatable models are presented here involving linear elastic fracture mechanics and applying the principle of maximum energy release rate. They describe the evolution of the crack pattern as a transition from rectangular start configuration to the hexagonal pattern. This is done analytically and by means of three-dimensional finite element simulation. The latter technique reproduces the curved crack path involved in this transition.

  7. Can Monkeys (Macaca mulatta) Represent Invisible Displacement?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filion, Christine M.; Washburn, David A.; Gulledge, Jonathan P.

    1996-01-01

    Four experiments were conducted to assess whether or not rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) could represent the unperceived movements of a stimulus. Subjects were tested on 2 computerized tasks, HOLE (monkeys) and LASER (humans and monkeys), in which subjects needed to chase or shoot at, respectively, a moving target that either remained visible or became invisible for a portion of its path of movement. Response patterns were analyzed and compared between target-visible and target-invisible conditions. Results of Experiments 1, 2, and 3 demonstrated that the monkeys are capable of extrapolating movement. That this extrapolation involved internal representation of the target's invisible movement was suggested but not confirmed. Experiment 4, however, demonstrated that the monkeys are capable of representing the invisible displacements of a stimulus.

  8. Polybenzimidazoles Via Aromatic Nucleophilic Displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W.; Hergenrother, Paul M.; Smith, Joseph G.

    1994-01-01

    Soluble polybenzimidazoles (PBI's) synthesized by nucleophilic displacement reaction of di(hydroxyphenyl)-benzimidazole monomers with activated aromatic difluoride compounds in presence of anhydrous potassium carbonate. These polymers exhibit good thermal, thermo-oxidative, and chemical stability, and high mechanical properties. Using benzimidazole monomers, more economical, and new PBI's processed more easily than commercial PBI, without loss of desirable physical properties.

  9. Buckling of a holey column.

    PubMed

    Pihler-Puzović, D; Hazel, A L; Mullin, T

    2016-09-14

    We report the results from a combined experimental and numerical investigation of buckling in a novel variant of an elastic column under axial load. We find that including a regular line of centred holes in the column can prevent conventional, global, lateral buckling. Instead, the local microstructure introduced by the holes allows the column to buckle in an entirely different, internal, mode in which the holes are compressed in alternate directions, but the column maintains the lateral reflection symmetry about its centreline. The internal buckling mode can be accommodated within a smaller external space than the global one; and it is the preferred buckling mode over an intermediate range of column lengths for sufficiently large holes. For very short or sufficiently long columns a modification of the classical, global, lateral buckling is dominant.

  10. Wettability controls slow immiscible displacement through local interfacial instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Michael; Brinkmann, Martin; Seemann, Ralf; Hiller, Thomas; Sanchez de La Lama, Marta; Herminghaus, Stephan

    2016-11-01

    Immiscible fluid displacement with average front velocities in the capillary-dominated regime is studied in a transparent Hele-Shaw cell with cylindrical posts. Employing various combinations of fluids and wall materials allows us to cover a range of advancing contact angles 46∘≤θa≤180∘ of the invading fluid in our experiments. In parallel, we study the displacement process in particle-based simulations that account for wall wettability. Considering the same arrangement of posts in experiments and simulation, we find a consistent crossover between stable interfacial displacement at θa≲80∘ and capillary fingering at high contact angles θa≳120∘ . The position of the crossover is quantified through the evolution of the interface length and the final saturation of the displaced fluid. A statistical analysis of the local displacement processes demonstrates that the shape evolution of the fluid front is governed by local instabilities as proposed by Cieplak and Robbins for a quasistatic interfacial displacement [Cieplak and Robbins, Phys. Rev. Lett. 60, 2042 (1988), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.60.2042]. The regime of stable front advances coincides with a corresponding region of contact angles where cooperative interfacial instabilities prevail. Capillary fingering, however, is observed only for large θa, where noncooperative instabilities dominate the invasion process.

  11. Displacement measurements with resolution in the 15 pm range

    SciTech Connect

    Puppin, Ezio

    2005-10-15

    An approach to the measurement of mechanical displacements in the picometer range is proposed. The basic idea is to intercept a focused laser beam with a blade whose displacements induce a variation in the intensity of the transmitted light. The smallest detectable displacement depends on the beam diameter and on the resolution of the electronic chain. In our preliminary experiment the beam has been focused with a microscope objective down to a size of 3 {mu}m. Two different methods have been used for reducing noise in the electronic chain. In one case the output signal has been normalized to the laser intensity. In the other case the blade position has been modulated at low frequency. In both cases the smallest detectable displacement is in the order of 15 pm.

  12. Desulfurization of coal by microbial column flotation.

    PubMed

    Ohmura, N; Saiki, H

    1994-06-05

    Twenty-three strains capable of oxidizing iron were isolated from coal and ore storage sites as well as coal and ore mines, volcanic areas, and hot spring. Four strains were found to have high iron-oxidizing activity. One strain (T-4) was selected for this experiment since the strain showed the fastest leaching rate of iron and sulfate from pyrite among the four strains. The T-4 strain was assigned for Thiobacillus ferrooxidans from its cultural and morphological characteristics.Bacterial treatment was applied to column flotation. An increase of cell density in the microbial column flotation resulted in the increase of pyrite removal from a coal-pyrite mixture (high sulfur imitated coal) with corresponding decrease of coal recovery. The addition of kerosene into the microbial column flotation increased the recovery of the imitated coal from 55% (without kerosene) to 81% (with 50 microL/L kerosene) with the reduction of pyrite sulfur content from 11% (feed coal) to 3.9% (product coal). The kerosene addition could reduce the pyritic sulfur content by collecting the coal in the recovery. However, the addition could not enhance separation of pyrite from the coal-pyrite mixture, since pyrite rejection was not affected by the increase of the kerosene addition. An excellent separation was obtained by the microbial flotation using a long column which had a length-diameter (L/D) ratio of 12.7. The long column flotation reduced the pyritic sulfur content from 11% (feed coal) to 1.8% (product coal) when 80% of the feed coal was recovered without the kerosene addition. The long column flotation not only attained an excellent separation but also reduced the amount of cells for desulfurization to as little as one-tenth of the reported amount.

  13. Compact electron beam focusing column

    SciTech Connect

    Persaud, Arun; Leung, Ka-Ngo; Reijonen, Jani

    2001-07-13

    A novel design for an electron beam focusing column has been developed at LBNL. The design is based on a low-energy spread multicusp plasma source which is used as a cathode for electron beam production. The focusing column is 10 mm in length. The electron beam is focused by means of electrostatic fields. The column is designed for a maximum voltage of 50 kV. Simulations of the electron trajectories have been performed by using the 2-D simulation code IGUN and EGUN. The electron temperature has also been incorporated into the simulations. The electron beam simulations, column design and fabrication will be discussed in this presentation.

  14. Centrifuge Techniques and Apparatus for Transport Experiments in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Earl D. Mattson; Carl D. Paler; Robert W. Smith; Markus Flury

    2010-06-01

    This paper describes experimental approaches and apparatus that we have developed to study solute and colloid transport in porous media using Idaho National Laboratory's 2-m radius centrifuge. The ex-perimental techniques include water flux scaling with applied acceleration at the top of the column and sub-atmospheric pressure control at the column base, automation of data collection, and remote experimental con-trol over the internet. These apparatus include a constant displacement piston pump, a custom designed liquid fraction collector based on switching valve technology, and modified moisture monitoring equipment. Suc-cessful development of these experimental techniques and equipment is illustrated through application to transport of a conservative tracer through unsaturated sand column, with centrifugal acceleration up to 40 gs. Development of such experimental equipment that can withstand high accelerations enhances the centrifuge technique to conduct highly controlled unsaturated solute/colloid transport experiments and allows in-flight liquid sample collection of the effluent.

  15. Laser heterodyne interferometer for simultaneous measuring displacement and angle based on the Faraday effect.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Enzheng; Hao, Qun; Chen, Benyong; Yan, Liping; Liu, Yanna

    2014-10-20

    A laser heterodyne interferometer for simultaneous measuring displacement and angle based on the Faraday effect is proposed. The optical configuration of the proposed interferometer is designed and the mathematic model for measuring displacement and angle is established. The influences of the translational, lateral and rotational movements of the measuring reflector on displacement and angle measurement are analyzed in detail. The experimental setup based on the proposed interferometer was constructed and a series of experiments of angle comparison and simultaneous measuring displacement and angle were performed to verify the feasibility of the proposed interferometer for precision displacement and angle measurement.

  16. Free displacer and Ringbom displacer for a Malone refrigerator

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, G.W.; Brown, A.O.

    1994-05-01

    Malone refrigeration uses a liquid near its critical point (instead of the customary gas) as the working fluid in a Stirling, Brayton, or similar regenerative or recuperative cycle. Thus far, we have focused on the Stirling cycle, to avoid the difficult construction of the high-pressure-difference counterflow recuperator required for a Brayton machine. Our first Malone refrigerator used liquid propylene (C{sub 3}H{sub 6}) in a double-acting 4-cylinder Stirling configuration. First measurements with a free displacer used in a liquid working fluid are presented. The displacer was operated both in harmonic mode and in Ringbom mode, in liquid carbon dioxide. The results are in reasonable agreement with expectations.

  17. Spatial and Temporal Variability of Ground and Satellite Column Measurements of NO2 and O3 over the Atlantic Ocean During the Deposition of Atmospheric Nitrogen to Coastal Ecosystems Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martins, Douglas K.; Najjar, Raymond G.; Tzortziou, Maria; Abuhassan, Nader; Thompson, Anne M.; Kollonige, Debra E.

    2016-01-01

    In situ measurements of O3 and nitrogen oxides (NO + NO2=NOx) and remote sensing measurements of total column NO2 and O3 were collected on a ship in the North Atlantic Ocean as part of the Deposition of Atmospheric Nitrogen to Coastal Ecosystems (DANCE) campaign in July August 2014,100 km east of the mid-Atlantic United States. Relatively clean conditions for both surface in situ mixing ratio and total column O3 and NO2 measurements were observed throughout the campaign. Increased surface and column NO2 and O3 amounts were observed when a terrestrial air mass was advected over the study region. Relative to ship-based total column measurements using a Pandora over the entire study, satellite measurements overestimated total column NO2 under these relatively clean atmospheric conditions over offshore waters by an average of 16. Differences are most likely due to proximity, or lack thereof, to surface emissions; spatial averaging due to the field of view of the satellite instrument; and the lack of sensitivity of satellite measurements to the surface concentrations of pollutants. Total column O3 measurements from the shipboard Pandora showed good correlation with the satellite measurements(r 0.96), but satellite measurements were 3 systematically higher than the ship measurements, in agreement with previous studies. Derived values of boundary layer height using the surface in situ and total column measurements of NO2 are much lower than modeled and satellite-retrieved boundary layer heights, which highlight the differences in the vertical distribution between terrestrial and marine environments.

  18. Spatial and temporal variability of ground and satellite column measurements of NO2 and O3 over the Atlantic Ocean during the Deposition of Atmospheric Nitrogen to Coastal Ecosystems Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Douglas K.; Najjar, Raymond G.; Tzortziou, Maria; Abuhassan, Nader; Thompson, Anne M.; Kollonige, Debra E.

    2016-12-01

    In situ measurements of O3 and nitrogen oxides (NO + NO2 ≡ NOx) and remote sensing measurements of total column NO2 and O3 were collected on a ship in the North Atlantic Ocean as part of the Deposition of Atmospheric Nitrogen to Coastal Ecosystems (DANCE) campaign in July-August 2014, 100 km east of the mid-Atlantic United States. Relatively clean conditions for both surface in situ mixing ratio and total column O3 and NO2 measurements were observed throughout the campaign. Increased surface and column NO2 and O3 amounts were observed when a terrestrial air mass was advected over the study region. Relative to ship-based total column measurements using a Pandora over the entire study, satellite measurements overestimated total column NO2 under these relatively clean atmospheric conditions over offshore waters by an average of 16%. Differences are most likely due to proximity, or lack thereof, to surface emissions; spatial averaging due to the field of view of the satellite instrument; and the lack of sensitivity of satellite measurements to the surface concentrations of pollutants. Total column O3 measurements from the shipboard Pandora showed good correlation with the satellite measurements (r = 0.96), but satellite measurements were 3% systematically higher than the ship measurements, in agreement with previous studies. Derived values of boundary layer height using the surface in situ and total column measurements of NO2 are much lower than modeled and satellite-retrieved boundary layer heights, which highlight the differences in the vertical distribution between terrestrial and marine environments.

  19. Post-disruptive plasma loss in the Princeton Beta Experiment (PBX)

    SciTech Connect

    Jardin, S.C.; DeLucia, J.; Okabayashi, M.; Pomphrey, N.; Reusch, M.; Kaye, S.; Takahashi, H.

    1986-07-01

    The free-boundary, axisymmetric tokamak simulation code TSC is used to model the transport time scale evolution and positional stability of PBX. A disruptive thermal quench will cause the plasma column to move inward in major radius. It is shown that the plasma can then lose axisymmetric stability, causing it to displace exponentially off the midplane, terminating the discharge. We verify the accuracy of the code by modeling several controlled experiments shots in PBX.

  20. Dorsal column stimulator applications

    PubMed Central

    Yampolsky, Claudio; Hem, Santiago; Bendersky, Damián

    2012-01-01

    Background: Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has been used to treat neuropathic pain since 1967. Following that, technological progress, among other advances, helped SCS become an effective tool to reduce pain. Methods: This article is a non-systematic review of the mechanism of action, indications, results, programming parameters, complications, and cost-effectiveness of SCS. Results: In spite of the existence of several studies that try to prove the mechanism of action of SCS, it still remains unknown. The mechanism of action of SCS would be based on the antidromic activation of the dorsal column fibers, which activate the inhibitory interneurons within the dorsal horn. At present, the indications of SCS are being revised constantly, while new applications are being proposed and researched worldwide. Failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS) is the most common indication for SCS, whereas, the complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is the second one. Also, this technique is useful in patients with refractory angina and critical limb ischemia, in whom surgical or endovascular treatment cannot be performed. Further indications may be phantom limb pain, chronic intractable pain located in the head, face, neck, or upper extremities, spinal lumbar stenosis in patients who are not surgical candidates, and others. Conclusion: Spinal cord stimulation is a useful tool for neuromodulation, if an accurate patient selection is carried out prior, which should include a trial period. Undoubtedly, this proper selection and a better knowledge of its underlying mechanisms of action, will allow this cutting edge technique to be more acceptable among pain physicians. PMID:23230533

  1. A novel approach to modeling unstable EOR displacements

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, E.J.

    1991-01-01

    This research is aimed at developing a methodology for predicting the performance of unstable displacements in heterogeneous porous media. A performance prediction approach that integrates numerical modeling with laboratory experiments will be developed. Flow visualization experiments will be performed on laboratory corefloods using X-ray computed tomography (CT) and other imaging technologies to map the in situ fluid saturations in time and space. A systematic procedure will be developed to replicate the experimental image data with high-resolution numerical models of the displacements. 2 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Laboratory imaging of stimulation fluid displacement from hydraulic fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Tidwell, V.; Parker, M.

    1996-11-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to physically investigate the processes governing stimulation fluid displacement from hydraulic fractures. Experiments were performed on two scales: meter-scale in a 1500 cm{sup 2} sand pack and core-scale in a 65 cm{sup 2} API linear conductivity cell. High-resolution light transmission imaging was employed at the meter-scale to visualize and quantify processes governing fluid displacement. For comparison, complimentary tests were performed using an API conductivity cell under ambient test conditions and at elevated closure stress. In these experiments viscous fingering and gravity drainage were identified as the dominant processes governing fluid displacement. Fluid viscosity was found to dictate the relative importance of the competing displacement processes and ultimately determine the residual liquid saturation of the sand pack. The process by which fluid displacement occurs was seen to effect the shape of both the gas and liquid phase relative permeability functions. Knowledge of such viscosity/relative permeability relationships may prove useful in bounding predictions of post-stimulation recovery of gels from the fracture pack.

  3. Desulfurization of coal by microbial column flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Ohmura, Naoya; Saiki, Hiroshi . Dept. of Biotechnology)

    1994-06-05

    Twenty-three strains capable of oxidizing iron were isolated from coal and ore storage sites as well as coal and ore mines, volcanic areas, and hot spring. Four strains were found to have high iron-oxidizing activity. One strain (T-4) was selected for this experiment since the strain showed the fastest leaching rate of iron and sulfate from pyrite among the four strains. The T-4 strain was assigned for Thiobacillus ferrooxidans from its cultural and morphological characteristics. Bacterial treatment was applied to column flotation. An increase of cell density in the microbial column flotation resulted in the increase of pyrite removal from a coal-pyrite mixture with corresponding decrease of coal recovery. The addition of kerosene into the microbial column flotation increased the recovery of the imitated coal from 55% (without kerosene) to 81% (with 50 [mu]L/L kerosene) with the reduction of pyrite sulfur content from11% (feed coal) to 3.9% (product coal). An excellent separation was obtained by the microbial flotation using a long column which had a length-diameter (L/D) ratio of 12.7.

  4. Automatic connector joins structural columns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacquemin, G. G.

    1980-01-01

    Connector snap-locks over toothed bolthead mounted on column end, forming rigid joint that will not bend or twist. Connector is used in conventional construction to install temporary structures or as mechanical coupler. Up to nine receptacles can be clustered in one node to join up to nine converging columns.

  5. Polybenzimidazole via aromatic nucleophilic displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Di(hydroxyphenyl)benzimidazole monomers were prepared from phenyl-4-hydroxybenzoate and aromatic bis(o-diamine)s. These monomers were used in the synthesis of soluble polybenzimidazoles. The reaction involved the aromatic nucleophilic displacement of various di(hydroxyphenyl)benzimidazole monomers with activated aromatic dihalides or activated aromatic dinitro compounds in the presence of an alkali metal base. These polymers exhibited lower glass transition temperatures, improved solubility, and better compression moldability over their commercial counterparts.

  6. Polyphenylquinoxalines via aromatic nucleophilic displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    Polyphenylquinoxalines are prepared by the nucleophilic displacement reaction of di(hydroxyphenyl)quinoxaline monomers with activated aromatic dihalides or dinitro compounds. The reactions are carried out in polar aprotic solvents using alkali metal bases at elevated temperatures under nitrogen. The di(hydroxyphenyl)quinoxaline monomers are prepared either by reacting stoichiometric quantities of aromatic bis(o-diamines) with a hydroxybenzil or by reacting o-phenylenediamine with a dihydroxybenzil or bis(hydroxyphenylglyoxylyl)benzene.

  7. Polyphenylquinoxalines via aromatic nucleophilic displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Polyphenylquinoxalines are prepared by the nucleophilic displacement reaction of di(hydroxyphenyl)quinoxaline monomers with activated aromatic dihalides or dinitro compounds. The reactions are carried out in polar aprotic solvents during alkali metal bases at elevated temperatures under nitrogen. The di(hydroxyphenyl)quinoxaline monomers are prepared either by reacting stoichiometric quantities of aromatic bis(o-diamines) with a hydroxybenzil or by reacting o-phenylenediamine with a dihydroxybenzil or bis(hydroxyphenylglyoxylyl)benzene.

  8. Single-mode displacement sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duivenvoorden, Kasper; Terhal, Barbara M.; Weigand, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    We show that one can determine both parameters of a displacement acting on an oscillator with an accuracy which scales inversely with the square root of the number of photons in the oscillator. Our results are obtained by using a grid state as a sensor state for detecting small translations in phase space (displacements). Grid states were first proposed [D. Gottesman et al., Phys. Rev. A 64, 012310 (2001), 10.1103/PhysRevA.64.012310] for encoding a qubit into an oscillator: an efficient preparation protocol of such states, using a coupling to a qubit, was later developed [B. M. Terhal and D. Weigand, Phys. Rev. A 93, 012315 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevA.93.012315]. We compare the performance of the grid state with the quantum compass or cat code state and place our results in the context of the two-parameter quantum Cramér-Rao lower bound on the variances of the displacement parameters. We show that the accessible information about the displacement for a grid state increases with the number of photons in the state when we measure and prepare the state using a phase estimation protocol. This is in contrast with the accessible information in the quantum compass state which we show is always upper bounded by a constant, independent of the number of photons. We present numerical simulations of a phase estimation based preparation protocol of a grid state in the presence of photon loss, nonlinearities, and qubit measurement, using no post-selection, showing how the two effective squeezing parameters which characterize the grid state change during the preparation. The idea behind the phase estimation protocol is a simple maximal-information gain strategy.

  9. Comparison of column flotation cells

    SciTech Connect

    Honaker, R.Q.; Mohanty, M.K.; Ho, K.

    1995-08-01

    Six commercial column flotation technologies, i.e., Canadian, Flotaire, Jameson, Microcel, Packed-Column, and Turbo-air, were tested for the treatment of Illinois Basin fine coal and the results from each column compared based on separation performance and throughout capacity. The separation performance achieved by each cell approached and, in some cases, exceeded the ultimate performance predicted by release analysis. A comparison of the test results indicates differences in the selectivity obtained by each flotation column on the basis of both ash and sulfur rejection. This finding may be due to variations in cell hydrodynamics and the ability to support a deep froth phase among the different column cells. In addition, throughput capacity of each cell was found to differ, apparently due to the differences in the bubble-particle attachment environment, bubble size, and bubble population. Variations in the operating characteristics, such as reagent additions, aeration rate and wash water rate, were also noted and summarized in this publication.

  10. Sorption, desorption and displacement of ibuprofen, estrone, and 17β estradiol in wastewater irrigated and rainfed agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Durán-Álvarez, Juan C; Prado, Blanca; Ferroud, Anouck; Juayerk, Narcedalia; Jiménez-Cisneros, Blanca

    2014-03-01

    Sorption and leaching potential of ibuprofen, estrone and 17β estradiol were tested in two agricultural soils: one irrigated using municipal wastewater and the other used in rainfed agriculture. Batch sorption-desorption experiments and undisturbed soil column assays were carried out using both soils to which were added a mixture of the target compounds. The three compounds were sorbed to a different extent by both soils: estrone>17β estradiol>ibuprofen. Higher sorption was observed in the irrigated soil, which was attributed to the accumulation of organic matter caused by wastewater irrigation. Desorption of hormones was hysteretic in the irrigated soil, while ibuprofen showed low hysteresis in both soils. Retardation of the compounds' displacement was consistent with the sorption pattern observed in the batch tests. Retardation factor (RF) was similar for the three compounds in the two tested soils, indicating that the target compounds are much more mobile in the soil columns than would be predicted based on their equilibrium sorption parameters. The results obtained in the experiments clarify the role of wastewater irrigated soils as a filter and degradation media for the target micropollutants.

  11. Mush Column Magma Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, B. D.

    2002-12-01

    Magma chambers are a necessary concept in understanding the chemical and physical evolution of magma. The concept may well be similar to a transfer function in circuit or time series analysis. It does what needs to be done to transform source magma into eruptible magma. In gravity and geodetic interpretations the causative body is (usually of necessity) geometrically simple and of limited vertical extent; it is clearly difficult to `see' through the uppermost manifestation of the concentrated magma. The presence of plutons in the upper crust has reinforced the view that magma chambers are large pots of magma, but as in the physical representation of a transfer function, actual magma chambers are clearly distinct from virtual magma chambers. Two key features to understanding magmatic systems are that they are vertically integrated over large distances (e.g., 30-100 km), and that all local magmatic processes are controlled by solidification fronts. Heat transfer considerations show that any viable volcanic system must be supported by a vertically extensive plumbing system. Field and geophysical studies point to a common theme of an interconnected stack of sill-like structures extending to great depth. This is a magmatic Mush Column. The large-scale (10s of km) structure resembles the vertical structure inferred at large volcanic centers like Hawaii (e.g., Ryan et al.), and the fine scale (10s to 100s of m) structure is exemplified by ophiolites and deeply eroded sill complexes like the Ferrar dolerites of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. The local length scales of the sill reservoirs and interconnecting conduits produce a rich spectrum of crystallization environments with distinct solidification time scales. Extensive horizontal and vertical mushy walls provide conditions conducive to specific processes of differentiation from solidification front instability to sidewall porous flow and wall rock slumping. The size, strength, and time series of eruptive behavior

  12. Exogenous factors contributing to column bed heterogeneity: Part 1: Consequences of 'air' injections in liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Samuelsson, Jörgen; Fornstedt, Torgny; Shalliker, Andrew

    2015-08-07

    It has been shown that not only the packing homogeneity, but also factors external to the column bed, such as, frits and distributors can have important effects on the column performance. This current communication is the first in a series focusing on the impact of exogenous factors on the column bed heterogeneity. This study is based on several observations by us and others that chromatographic runs often, for technical reasons, include more or less portions of air in the injections. It is therefore extremely important to find out the impact of air on the column performance, the reliability of the results derived from analyses where air was injected, and the effect on the column homogeneity. We used a photographic approach for visualising the air transport phenomena, and found that the air transport through the column is comprised of many different types of transport phenomena, such as laminal flow, viscous fingering like flows, channels and bulbs, and pulsations. More particularly, the air clouds within the column definitely interact in the adsorption, i.e. mobile phase adsorbed to the column surface is displaced. In addition, irrespective of the type of air transport phenomena, the air does not penetrate the column homogeneously. This process is strongly flow dependent. In this work we study air transport both in an analytical scale and a semi-prep column.

  13. Hysteretic behavior of special shaped columns composed of steel and reinforced concrete (SRC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zongping; Xu, Jinjun; Xue, Jianyang

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes a series of experimental investigations on seventeen specimens of steel reinforced concrete special shaped (SRCSS) columns under low cyclic reversed loading using parallel crosshead equipment. Nine T-shaped SRC columns, four L-shaped SRC columns and four +-shaped SRC columns were tested to examine the effects of shape steel configuration, loading angle, axial compressive ratio and shear-span ratio on the behavior (strength, stiffness, energy dissipation, ductility, etc.) of SRCSS column specimens. The failure modes and hysteretic performance of all the specimens were obtained in the tests. Test results demonstrate that the shear-span ratio is the main parameter affecting the failure modes of SRCSS columns. The specimens with small shear-span ratio are prone to shear failure, and the primary failure planes in SRCSS columns are parallel to the loading direction. As a result, there is a symmetry between positive and negative loading directions in the hysteretic curves of the SRCSS columns. The majority of displacement ductility coefficients for all the specimens are over 3.0, so that the SRCSS columns demonstrate a better deformation capacity. In addition, the equivalent viscous damping coefficients of all the specimens are greater than 0.2, indicating that the seismic behavior of SRCSS columns is adequate. Finally, the superposition theory was used to calculate the limits of axial compressive ratio for the specimens, and it is found that the test axial compressive ratio is close to or smaller than the calculated axial compressive ratio limit.

  14. Experimental investigations of /sup 238/Pu behavior in soil columns

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, G.B.; Herrera, B.; Stalnaker, N.D.; Coffelt, K.P.; Patterson, J.H.; Heaton, R.C.; Matlack, G.M.

    1984-05-01

    Two series of experiments were conducted to study the transport of plutonium through soils. The first series involved deposition of small quantities (2.0 to 3.5 mg) of particulate /sup 238/Pu oxide on soil columns containing silt loam soil. When deionized water was allowed to percolate through the columns, plutonium was released into the drainage at the rate of 8 to 15 pg/day. During the 6.8-y experiment, the total amount of plutonium released into the soil drainage amounted to less than 0.01% of the original source. Analysis of the soil as a function of depth at the end of the experiment revealed that more than 99% of the deposited source remained in the uppermost fraction (2.8 cm) of the column. The second series of experiments was performed by pumping water containing plutonium through columns of soil and comparing the amount of plutonium in the column effluents to that in the feed. For a loamy sand soil, the plutonium content of the effluent reached a steady state of 5% of the feed after 500 days. Analysis of the soil at the end of the experiment (1200 days) showed the columns to be approximately 50% saturated. Saturation of the soil with plutonium would require 13 ..mu..g/g and 6.6 y at the feed rate used (averaged of 1.2 ..mu..g/g into 300 g of soil).

  15. A novel approach to modeling unstable EOR displacements. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, E.J.

    1994-04-01

    Most enhanced oil recovery schemes involve the displacement of a more dense and more viscous oil by a less dense and less viscous fluid in a heterogeneous porous medium. The interaction of heterogeneity with the several competing forces, namely, viscous, capillary, gravitational, and dispersive forces, can conspire to make the displacements unstable and difficult to model and to predict. The objective of this research was to develop a systematic methodology for modeling unstable fluid displacements in heterogeneous media. Flow visualization experiments were conducted using X-ray computed tomography imaging and a video imaging workstation to gain insights into the dynamics of unstable displacements, acquire detailed quantitative experimental image data for calibrating numerical models of unstable displacements, and image and characterize heterogeneities in laboratory cores geostatistically. High-resolution numerical models modified for use on vector-architecture supercomputers were used to replicate the image data. Geostatistical models of reservoir heterogeneity were incorporated in order to study the interaction of hydrodynamic instability and heterogeneity in reservoir displacements. Finally, a systematic methodology for matching the experimental data with the numerical models and scaling the laboratory results to other systems were developed. The result is a new method for predicting the performance of unstable EOR displacements in the field based on small-scale displacements in the laboratory. The methodology is general and can be applied to forecast the performance of most processes that involve fluid flow and transport in porous media. Therefore, this research should be of interest to those involved in forecasting the performance of enhanced oil recovery processes and the spreading of contaminants in heterogeneous aquifers.

  16. A differential Michelson interferometer with orthogonal single frequency laser for nanometer displacement measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Liping; Chen, Benyong; Wang, Bin

    2017-04-01

    A novel differential Michelson laser interferometer is proposed to eliminate the influence of environmental fluctuations for nanometer displacement measurement. This differential interferometer consists of two homodyne interferometers in which two orthogonal single frequency beams share common reference arm and partial measurement arm. By modulating the displacement of the common reference arm with a piezoelectric transducer, the common-mode displacement drift resulting from the environmental disturbances can be well suppressed and the measured displacement as differential-mode displacement signal is achieved. In addition, a phase difference compensation method is proposed for accurately determining the phase difference between interference signals by correcting the time interval according to the average speed in one cycle of interference signal. The nanometer displacement measurement experiments were performed to demonstrate the effectiveness and feasibility of the proposed interferometer and show that precision displacement measurement with standard deviation less than 1 nm has been achieved.

  17. Surface drift in the upper centimetres of the water column in short fetches and the behaviour of the diffusive sub-layer from experiments in a wind wave flume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocampo-Torres, Francisco J.; Branger, Hubert; Osuna, Pedro; Robles, Lucia

    2015-04-01

    Ocean surface drift is of great relevance to properly model exchange processes between the ocean and the atmosphere. It is also important to better understand the early stages of surface waves development and their implications in the momentum transfer across the sea surface. In this work we study the the onset of surface drift induced by wind and waves through detailed laboratory measurements in a large wind-wave flume. Momentum transfer through the water surface, waves and surface drift were being measured in the 40m long wind-wave tank at IRPHE, Marseille. In a station in the middle of the tank momentum fluxes were estimated directly through the eddy correlation method to provide reference information for the corresponding surface drift onset recorded at very short fetch. During each experimental run very low wind was set on (about 1m/s) for a certain period and suddenly it was constantly accelerated to reach about 13 m/s (as well as 8 and 5 m/s during different runs) in about 15 sec to as long as 600 sec. The wind was kept constant at that high speed for 2 to 10 min, and then suddenly and constantly decelerate to 0 at the end of each experiment. The 3-d velocity vertical profile is measured with an acoustic sensor (Nortek Vectrino Profiler), with a vertical resolution of 0.1 cm and sampling rate of 100 Hz, over a column of 3.5 cm in length. Under the highest wind conditions a very distinctive shear was detected in the upper 1.5 cm while the strongest surface drift was recorded as about 0.5 cm/s. A rather linear variation of surface drift was observed with depth under cases of low to moderate wind speed. Evolution of the surface drift velocity is analysed and onset behaviour is addressed with particular emphasis in accelerated winds. A strong surface drift is expected to play a major role in the early stages of surface wave spectrum development, which is to be addressed in terms of frequency spectra estimated from a capacitance gauge deployed in the vicinity of

  18. Stiffening of short small-size circular composite steel–concrete columns with shear connectors

    PubMed Central

    Younes, Sherif M.; Ramadan, Hazem M.; Mourad, Sherif A.

    2015-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to investigate the effect of shear connectors’ distribution and method of load application on load–displacement relationship and behavior of thin-walled short concrete-filled steel tube (CFT) columns when subjected to axial load. The study focused on the compressive strength of the CFT columns and the efficiency of the shear stud in distribution of the load between the concrete core and steel tube. The study showed that the use of shear connectors enhanced slightly the axial capacity of CFT columns. It is also shown that shear connectors have a great effect on load distribution between the concrete and steel tubes. PMID:27222757

  19. Fiber-Optic Differential Displacement Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Ping

    1996-01-01

    Dual fiber-optic sensor measures small relative displacements of two proximate objects along common surface. Dual sensor comprises two fiber-optic sensors in differential configuration increasing sensitivity to displacement while decreasing sensitivity to thermal expansion and contraction.

  20. Seismic behavior of lightweight concrete columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabbat, B. G.; Daniel, J. I.; Weinmann, T. L.; Hanson, N. W.

    1982-09-01

    Sixteen full-scale, column-beam assemblies, which represented a portion of a frame subjected to simulated seismic loading, were tested. Controlled test parameters included concrete type, column size, amount of main column steel, size and spacing of column confining hoops, and magnitude of column axial load. The columns were subjected to constant axial load and slow moment reversals at increasing inelastic deformations. Test data showed that properly designed lightweight concrete columns maintained ductility and strength when subjected to large inelastic deformations from load reversals. Confinement requirements for normal weight concrete columns were shown to be applicable to lightweight concrete columns up to thirty percent of the design strength.

  1. Performance optimization of lateral displacement estimation with spatial angular compounding.

    PubMed

    He, Qiong; Tong, Ling; Huang, Lingyun; Liu, Jing; Chen, Yinran; Luo, Jianwen

    2017-01-01

    Elastography provides tissue mechanical information to differentiate normal and disease states. Nowadays, axial displacement and strain are usually estimated in clinical practice whereas lateral estimation is rarely used given that its accuracy is typically one order of magnitude worse than that of axial estimation. To improve the performance of lateral estimation, spatial angular compounding of multiple axial displacements along ultrasound beams transmitting in different steering angles was previously proposed. However, few studies have been conducted to evaluate the influence of key factors such as grating lobe noise (GLN), the number of steering angles (NSA) and maximum steering angle (MSA) in terms of performance optimization. The aim of this study was thus to investigate the effects of these factors through both computer simulations and phantom experiments. Only lateral rigid motion was considered in this study to separate its effects from those of axial and lateral strains on lateral displacement estimation. The performance as indicated by the root mean square error (RMSE) and standard deviation (SD) of the estimated lateral displacements validates the capability of spatial angular compounding in improving the performance of lateral estimation. It is necessary to filter the GLN for better estimation, and better performance is associated with a larger NSA and bigger MSA in both simulations and experiments, which is in agreement with the theoretical analysis. As indicated by the RMSE and SD, two steering angles with a larger steering angle are recommended. These results could provide insights into the performance optimization of lateral displacement estimation with spatial angular compounding.

  2. Key parameters for precise lateral displacement estimation in ultrasound elastography.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jianwen; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2009-01-01

    Complementary to axial, lateral and elevational displacement and strain can provide important information on the mechanical properties of biological soft tissues. In this paper, the effects of key parameters on the lateral displacement estimation were investigated in simulations and validated in phantom experiments. The performance of the lateral estimator was evaluated by measuring its associated bias, and jitter (i.e., standard deviation). Simulation results showed that the bias and jitter undergo periodic variations depending on the lateral displacement, with a period equal to the pitch (i.e., adjacent element distance). The performance of the lateral estimation was improved, when a smaller pitch, or a larger beamwidth, was used. The effects of the pitch were found to be greater than those of the beamwidth. The results of the phantom experiments were shown in good agreement with the simulation findings, including the periodic variation of the performance with lateral displacement, effects of pitch and beamwidth. In conclusion, smaller pitches and wider beamwidths were found to be key in reducing the jitter error in the lateral displacement estimation. The same results also hold for tracking in the elevational direction.

  3. Tilt displacement range testing for a piezoelectric deformable mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dongdong; Hao, Qun; Song, Yong; Cheng, Xuemin; Fan, Fan; Li, Heng

    2016-10-01

    In our previous works, we presented a zoom system and image stabilization design based on deformable mirrors (DMs). According to the high bandwidth and free edge characteristics of the piezoelectric deformable mirror (PDM), we tested the system's image-stable capability. We found the PDM could realize some tilt displacements while keeping a certain stable surface shape, it could obtain higher image stabilizing precision when integrated with the traditional mechanical image stabilization systems. In the design of the image stabilization system, the PDM's tilt displacement range is a key factor for consideration. So in this paper, we carried out a tilt displacement range testing experiment by using the OKO's 37-channel PDM. We measured and analyzed the variation of the tilt displacements in optical image stabilization process, and calculated the maximum tilt angle as the PDM surface shape was stabilized. We built an experimental platform consisting of a fixed target, an imaging system based on PDM, and a CCD camera. We used the ZYGO interferometer as an evaluation instrument to measure the surface shape stability. When the PDM surface had a tilt displacement, the image point of the fixed target on the camera sensor shifted correspondingly. The tilt angle of the PDM could be obtained by calculating this shift. The results showed that the maximum tilt angle of the PDM was 0.2mrad. The paper also analyzed the experiment errors when concerning about the off-axis error of the PDM deflection center.

  4. The case for character displacement in plants

    PubMed Central

    Beans, Carolyn M

    2014-01-01

    The evidence for character displacement as a widespread response to competition is now building. This progress is largely the result of the establishment of rigorous criteria for demonstrating character displacement in the animal literature. There are, however, relatively few well-supported examples of character displacement in plants. This review explores the potential for character displacement in plants by addressing the following questions: (1) Why aren't examples of character displacement in plants more common? (2) What are the requirements for character displacement to occur and how do plant populations meet those requirements? (3) What are the criteria for testing the pattern and process of character displacement and what methods can and have been used to address these criteria in the plant literature? (4) What are some additional approaches for studying character displacement in plants? While more research is needed, the few plant systems in which character displacement hypotheses have been rigorously tested suggest that character displacement may play a role in shaping plant communities. Plants are especially amenable to character displacement studies because of the experimental ease with which they can be used in common gardens, selection analyses, and breeding designs. A deeper investigation of character displacement in plants is critical for a more complete understanding of the ecological and evolutionary processes that permit the coexistence of plant species. PMID:24683467

  5. The case for character displacement in plants.

    PubMed

    Beans, Carolyn M

    2014-03-01

    The evidence for character displacement as a widespread response to competition is now building. This progress is largely the result of the establishment of rigorous criteria for demonstrating character displacement in the animal literature. There are, however, relatively few well-supported examples of character displacement in plants. This review explores the potential for character displacement in plants by addressing the following questions: (1) Why aren't examples of character displacement in plants more common? (2) What are the requirements for character displacement to occur and how do plant populations meet those requirements? (3) What are the criteria for testing the pattern and process of character displacement and what methods can and have been used to address these criteria in the plant literature? (4) What are some additional approaches for studying character displacement in plants? While more research is needed, the few plant systems in which character displacement hypotheses have been rigorously tested suggest that character displacement may play a role in shaping plant communities. Plants are especially amenable to character displacement studies because of the experimental ease with which they can be used in common gardens, selection analyses, and breeding designs. A deeper investigation of character displacement in plants is critical for a more complete understanding of the ecological and evolutionary processes that permit the coexistence of plant species.

  6. 40 CFR 205.153 - Engine displacement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine displacement. 205.153 Section... TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Motorcycles § 205.153 Engine displacement. (a) Engine displacement must be calculated using nominal engine values and rounded to the nearest whole cubic...

  7. 40 CFR 205.153 - Engine displacement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Engine displacement. 205.153 Section... TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Motorcycles § 205.153 Engine displacement. (a) Engine displacement must be calculated using nominal engine values and rounded to the nearest whole cubic...

  8. Displacement Compensation of Temperature Probe Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Christopher S.; Hubert, James A.; Barber, Patrick G.

    1996-01-01

    Analysis of temperature data from a probe in a vertical Bridgman furnace growing germanium crystals revealed a displacement of the temperature profile due to conduction error. A theoretical analysis shows that the displacement compensation is independent of local temperature gradient. A displacement compensation value should become a standard characteristic of temperature probes used for temperature profile measurements.

  9. 25 CFR 700.59 - Displaced person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Displaced person. 700.59 Section 700.59 Indians THE OFFICE OF NAVAJO AND HOPI INDIAN RELOCATION COMMISSION OPERATIONS AND RELOCATION PROCEDURES General Policies and Instructions Definitions § 700.59 Displaced person. Displaced person means a member of...

  10. Polyphenylquinoxalines via Aromatic Nucleophilic Displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, Paul M.; Connell, John W.

    1988-01-01

    Polyphenylquinoxalines are produced by an aromatic nucleophilic displacement reaction involving an activated aromatic dihalide with an appropriate quinoxaline monomer. Polyphenylquinoxalines are high temperature thermoplastics used as adhesives, coatings, films and composite matrices. The novelty of this invention is threefold: (1) some of the quinoxaline monomers are new compositions of matter; (2) the phenylquinoxaline polymers which are the end products of the invention are new compositions of matter; and (3) the method of forming the polymers is novel, replacing a more costly prior art process, which is also limited in the kinds of products prepared therefrom.

  11. Displacement Current and Surface Flashover

    SciTech Connect

    harris, J R; Caporaso, G J; Blackfield, D; Chen, Y J

    2007-07-17

    High-voltage vacuum insulator failure is generally due to surface flashover rather than insulator bulk breakdown. Vacuum surface flashover is widely believed to be initiated by a secondary electron emission avalanche along the vacuum-insulator interface. This process requires a physical mechanism to cause secondary electrons emitted from the insulator surface to return to that surface. Here, we show that when an insulator is subjected to a fast high-voltage pulse, the magnetic field due to displacement current through the insulator can provide this mechanism. This indicates the importance of the voltage pulse shape, especially the rise time, in the flashover initiation process.

  12. Sources of Variability in the Stratospheric Column of Nitrogen Dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglass, Anne; Gleason, James; Chin, Mian; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Instruments such as the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME, on the European Remote Sensing Satellite (ERS-2), launched 1995), the Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY, on ENVISAT, to be launched July 2001) and the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI on EOS Aura, to be launched 2003) make measurements of the total column of NO2. There is interest in separating the stratospheric and tropospheric contributions to the column, as the tropospheric column provides a measure of pollution. We are using a 3D chemistry and transport model driven by winds from the Goddard Space Flight Center Data Assimilation System to examine variability in the stratospheric NO2 column. Model results for NOx = NO + NO2 + 2N2O5 will be shown to compare well with sunset observations from the Halogen Occultation Experiment on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite, and to exhibit similar temporal and spatial dependence. Partitioning between NO, NO2, and N2O5 is also shown to compare well with observations. This good agreement supports the use of simulated fields in the stratosphere to derive the tropospheric column from the total column. Preliminary comparisons of the tropospheric column with model simulations for the troposphere will also be shown.

  13. Isotope shifts and coulomb displacement energies in calcium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caurier, E.; Poves, A.; Zuker, A.

    1980-10-01

    Isotope shifts, neutron-proton radii differences and Coulomb displacement energies are calculated for calcium isotopes A = 41 to 48. A simple parametrization of the core polarization terms of the effective force in the framework of the Isospin Projected Hartree-Fock (IPHF) method leads to good agreement between theory and experiment.

  14. Mining Induced Displacement and Mental Health: A Call for Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goessling, Kristen P.

    2010-01-01

    India is a country of unparalleled diversity within both the cultural and ecological spheres of life. This paper examines the author's experience exploring and inquiring into the mental health implications of mining and mining induced displacement within several Adivasi (tribal) communities in Andhra Pradesh, India. Through collaboration with…

  15. Armed conflict, homonegativity, and forced internal displacement: Implications for HIV among Colombian gay, bisexual, and transgender individuals

    PubMed Central

    Reisen, Carol A.; Bianchi, Fernanda T.; Gonzales, Felisa A.; Betancourt, Fabián; Aguilar, Marcela; Poppen, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Colombia has endured six decades of civil unrest, population displacement, and violence. We examined the relationships of contextual conditions, displacement, and HIV among gay, bisexual, and transgender individuals in Bogotá, Colombia. Nineteen key informants provided information about internal displacement of sexual minorities. Life history interviews were conducted with 42 participants aged 18 to 48 years, and included questions about displacement experiences, sexual behaviour, life prior to displacement, and participants’ economic and social situation in Bogotá. The interplay of a variety of factors—including internal conflict and violence, homonegativity and “social cleansing,” gender and sexual identity, and poverty—strongly shaped the varied experiences of displacement. Migration, sexual violence, exchange sex, and low rates of HIV testing were risk factors that increased vulnerability for HIV in this displaced sample. Although displacement and HIV in Colombia are major problems, both are understudied. PMID:23586420

  16. Armed conflict, homonegativity and forced internal displacement: implications for HIV among Colombian gay, bisexual and transgender individuals.

    PubMed

    Zea, Maria Cecilia; Reisen, Carol A; Bianchi, Fernanda T; Gonzales, Felisa A; Betancourt, Fabián; Aguilar, Marcela; Poppen, Paul J

    2013-01-01

    Colombia has endured six decades of civil unrest, population displacement and violence. We examined the relationships between contextual conditions, displacement and HIV among gay, bisexual and transgender individuals in Bogotá, Colombia. A total of 19 key informants provided information about internal displacement of sexual minorities. Life-history interviews were conducted with 42 participants aged 18 to 48 years and included questions about displacement experiences, sexual behaviour, life prior to displacement and participants' economic and social situation in Bogotá. The interplay of a variety of factors - including internal conflict and violence, homonegativity and 'social cleansing', gender and sexual identity and poverty - strongly shaped the varied experiences of displacement. Migration, sexual violence, exchange sex and low rates of HIV testing were risk factors that increased vulnerability for HIV in this displaced sample. Although displacement and HIV in Colombia are major problems, both are understudied.

  17. Direct conversion of silver complexes to nanoscale hexagonal columns on a copper alloy for plasmonic applications.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yuko S; Hasegawa, Katsuyuki; Hasegawa, Yuuki; Takahashi, Naoshi; Kitahama, Yasutaka; Fukuoka, Satoshi; Murase, Norio; Baba, Yoshinobu; Ozaki, Yukihiro; Itoh, Tamitake

    2013-09-21

    We introduced a novel method for the rapid synthesis of silver nanohexagonal thin columns from an aqueous mixture of sodium thiosulfate (Na2S2O3) and silver chloride (AgCl) simply added to a phosphor bronze substrate. The reaction is based on galvanic displacement and the products are potentially useful for plasmonic applications.

  18. Self-regenerating column chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Park, W.K.

    1995-05-30

    The present invention provides a process for treating both cations and anions by using a self-regenerating, multi-ionic exchange resin column system which requires no separate regeneration steps. The process involves alternating ion-exchange chromatography for cations and anions in a multi-ionic exchange column packed with a mixture of cation and anion exchange resins. The multi-ionic mixed-charge resin column works as a multi-function column, capable of independently processing either cationic or anionic exchange, or simultaneously processing both cationic and anionic exchanges. The major advantage offered by the alternating multi-function ion exchange process is the self-regeneration of the resins.

  19. Telescoping columns. [parabolic antenna support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazur, J. T. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An extendable column is described which consists of several axially elongated rigid structural sections nested within one another. Each section includes a number of rotatably attached screws running along its length. The next inner section includes threaded lugs oriented to threadingly engage the screws. The column is extended or retracted upon rotation of the screws. The screws of each section are selectively rotated by a motor and an engagement mechanism.

  20. Superconducting inductive displacement detection of a microcantilever

    SciTech Connect

    Vinante, A.

    2014-07-21

    We demonstrate a superconducting inductive technique to measure the displacement of a micromechanical resonator. In our scheme, a type I superconducting microsphere is attached to the free end of a microcantilever and approached to the loop of a dc Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) microsusceptometer. A local magnetic field as low as 100 μT, generated by a field coil concentric to the SQUID, enables detection of the cantilever thermomechanical noise at 4.2 K. The magnetomechanical coupling and the magnetic spring are in good agreement with image method calculations assuming pure Meissner effect. These measurements are relevant to recent proposals of quantum magnetomechanics experiments based on levitating superconducting microparticles.

  1. Interferometric fiber optic displacement sensor

    DOEpatents

    Farah, John

    1999-01-01

    A method is presented to produce a change in the optical path length in the gap between two single mode optical fibers proportional to the lateral displacement of either fiber end normal to its axis. This is done with the use of refraction or diffraction at the interface between a guiding and non-guiding media to change the direction of propagation of the light in the gap. A method is also presented for laying a waveguide on a cantilever so that the displacement of the tip of the cantilever produces a proportional path length change in the gap by distancing the waveguide from the neutral axis of the cantilever. The fiber is supported as a cantilever or a waveguide is deposited on a micromachined cantilever and incorporated in an interferometer which is made totally on a silicon substrate with the use of integrated-optic technology. A resonant element in the form of a micro-bridge is incorporated in the ridge waveguide and produces a frequency output which is readily digitizeable and immune to laser frequency noise. Finally, monolithic mechanical means for phase modulation are provided on the same sensor substrate. This is done by vibrating the cantilever or micro-bridge either electrically or optically.

  2. Interferometric fiber optic displacement sensor

    DOEpatents

    Farah, J.

    1999-04-06

    A method is presented to produce a change in the optical path length in the gap between two single mode optical fibers proportional to the lateral displacement of either fiber end normal to its axis. This is done with the use of refraction or diffraction at the interface between a guiding and non-guiding media to change the direction of propagation of the light in the gap. A method is also presented for laying a waveguide on a cantilever so that the displacement of the tip of the cantilever produces a proportional path length change in the gap by distancing the waveguide from the neutral axis of the cantilever. The fiber is supported as a cantilever or a waveguide is deposited on a micromachined cantilever and incorporated in an interferometer which is made totally on a silicon substrate with the use of integrated-optic technology. A resonant element in the form of a micro-bridge is incorporated in the ridge waveguide and produces a frequency output which is readily digitizeable and immune to laser frequency noise. Finally, monolithic mechanical means for phase modulation are provided on the same sensor substrate. This is done by vibrating the cantilever or micro-bridge either electrically or optically. 23 figs.

  3. Interferometric fiber optic displacement sensor

    DOEpatents

    Farah, John

    1995-01-01

    A method is presented to produce a change in the optical path length in the gap between two single mode optical fibers proportional to the lateral displacement of either fiber end normal to its axis. This is done with the use of refraction or diffraction at the interface between a guiding and non-guiding media to change the direction of propagation of the light in the gap. A method is also presented for laying a waveguide on a cantilever so that the displacement of the tip of the cantilever produces a proportional path length change in the gap by distancing the waveguide from the neutral axis of the cantilever. The fiber is supported as a cantilever or a waveguide is deposited on a micromachined cantilever and incorporated in an interferometer which is made totally on a silicon substrate with the use of integrated-optic technology. A resonant element in the form of a micro-bridge is incorporated in the ridge waveguide and produces a frequency output which is readily digitizeable and immune to laser frequency noise. Finally, monolithic mechanical means for phase modulation are provided on the same sensor substrate. This is done by vibrating the cantilever or micro-bridge either electrically or optically.

  4. Interferometric fiber optic displacement sensor

    DOEpatents

    Farah, J.

    1995-05-30

    A method is presented to produce a change in the optical path length in the gap between two single mode optical fibers proportional to the lateral displacement of either fiber end normal to its axis. This is done with the use of refraction or diffraction at the interface between a guiding and non-guiding media to change the direction of propagation of the light in the gap. A method is also presented for laying a waveguide on a cantilever so that the displacement of the tip of the cantilever produces a proportional path length change in the gap by distancing the waveguide from the neutral axis of the cantilever. The fiber is supported as a cantilever or a waveguide is deposited on a micromachined cantilever and incorporated in an interferometer which is made totally on a silicon substrate with the use of integrated-optic technology. A resonant element in the form of a micro-bridge is incorporated in the ridge waveguide and produces a frequency output which is readily digitizeable and immune to laser frequency noise. Finally, monolithic mechanical means for phase modulation are provided on the same sensor substrate. This is done by vibrating the cantilever or micro-bridge either electrically or optically. 29 figs.

  5. LIQUID-LIQUID EXTRACTION COLUMNS

    DOEpatents

    Thornton, J.D.

    1957-12-31

    This patent relates to liquid-liquid extraction columns having a means for pulsing the liquid in the column to give it an oscillatory up and down movement, and consists of a packed column, an inlet pipe for the dispersed liquid phase and an outlet pipe for the continuous liquid phase located in the direct communication with the liquid in the lower part of said column, an inlet pipe for the continuous liquid phase and an outlet pipe for the dispersed liquid phase located in direct communication with the liquid in the upper part of said column, a tube having one end communicating with liquid in the lower part of said column and having its upper end located above the level of said outlet pipe for the dispersed phase, and a piston and cylinder connected to the upper end of said tube for applying a pulsating pneumatic pressure to the surface of the liquid in said tube so that said surface rises and falls in said tube.

  6. Effect of Coulombic friction on spatial displacement statistics.

    PubMed

    Menzel, Andreas M; Goldenfeld, Nigel

    2011-07-01

    The phenomenon of Coulombic friction enters the stochastic description of dry friction between two solids and the statistic characterization of vibrating granular media. Here we analyze the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation including both velocity and spatial components, exhibiting a formal connection to a quantum mechanical harmonic oscillator in the presence of a delta potential. Numerical solutions for the resulting spatial displacement statistics show a crossover from exponential to Gaussian displacement statistics. We identify a transient intermediate regime that exhibits multiscaling properties arising from the contribution of Coulombic friction. The possible role of these effects during observations in diffusion experiments is briefly discussed.

  7. Fiber optic displacement measurement model based on finite reflective surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuhe; Guan, Kaisen; Hu, Zhaohui

    2016-10-01

    We present a fiber optic displacement measurement model based on finite reflective plate. The theoretical model was derived, and simulation analysis of light intensity distribution, reflective plate width, and the distance between fiber probe and reflective plate were conducted in details. The three dimensional received light intensity distribution and the characteristic curve of light intensity were studied as functions of displacement of finite reflective plate. Experiments were carried out to verify the established model. The physical fundamentals and the effect of operating parameters on measuring system performance were revealed in the end.

  8. Application of miscible displacement for Field MTX low permeability formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuntsevich, V.; Slivkin, S.; Belozerov, V.

    2015-02-01

    Miscible displacement is a very effective method of recovery efficiency improvement. It is widely used in the world, but this technology is not widely used in Russia. For this reason, it is necessary to study global experience and physical aspects of this EOR method. The most important factors and limitations of miscible displacement application from the geological point of view (heterogeneity) and from the physical point of view (properties of injected fluids and reservoir fluids) should be determined. The results of this analysis should be tested on the low permeability reservoir of field MTX with analytical, proxy calculation and simulation methods.

  9. Avoiding condylar displacement after intraoral vertical ramus osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Ritto, Fabio; Parente, Eduardo; da Silveira, Henrique Martins; Medeiros, Paulo José; de Moraes, Márcio

    2010-05-01

    The intraoral vertical osteotomy is a versatile and simple technique usually applied to correct mandibular prognathism. Its greatest advantages include ease of performance and minimum neurosensory disturbances, whereas maxillomandibular fixation is pointed as its major disadvantage. Another important concern about this technique is condylar displacement, which may lead to temporomandibular dysfunction. Technical notes to avoid condylar luxation are discussed after 15 years of experience using this osteotomy as the technique of choice to correct mandibular prognathism. Three similar cases are presented, where 1 condyle was displaced from the glenoid fossa, resulting in mandibular deviation during function in patients requiring small mandibular setback.

  10. Spatially variant regularization of lateral displacement measurement using variance.

    PubMed

    Sumi, Chikayoshi; Itoh, Toshiki

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of this work is to confirm the effectiveness of our proposed spatially variant displacement component-dependent regularization for our previously developed ultrasonic two-dimensional (2D) displacement vector measurement methods, i.e., 2D cross-spectrum phase gradient method (CSPGM), 2D autocorrelation method (AM), and 2D Doppler method (DM). Generally, the measurement accuracy of lateral displacement spatially varies and the accuracy is lower than that of axial displacement that is accurate enough. This inaccurate measurement causes an instability in a 2D shear modulus reconstruction. Thus, the spatially variant lateral displacement regularization using the lateral displacement variance will be effective in obtaining an accurate lateral strain measurement and a stable shear modulus reconstruction than a conventional spatially uniform regularization. The effectiveness is verified through agar phantom experiments. The agar phantom [60mm (height) x 100 mm (lateral width) x 40 mm (elevational width)] that has, at a depth of 10mm, a circular cylindrical inclusion (dia.=10mm) of a higher shear modulus (2.95 and 1.43 x 10(6)N/m(2), i.e., relative shear modulus, 2.06) is compressed in the axial direction from the upper surface of the phantom using a commercial linear array type transducer that has a nominal frequency of 7.5-MHz. Because a contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) expresses the detectability of the inhomogeneous region in the lateral strain image and further has almost the same sense as that of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for strain measurement, the obtained results show that the proposed spatially variant lateral displacement regularization yields a more accurate lateral strain measurement as well as a higher detectability in the lateral strain image (e.g., CNRs and SNRs for 2D CSPGM, 2.36 vs 2.27 and 1.74 vs 1.71, respectively). Furthermore, the spatially variant lateral displacement regularization yields a more stable and more accurate 2D shear modulus

  11. Displacement of squeezed propagating microwave states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, Kirill G.; Zhong, Ling; Pogorzalek, Stefan; Eder, Peter; Fischer, Michael; Goetz, Jan; Wulschner, Friedrich; Xie, Edwar; Menzel, Edwin; Deppe, Frank; Marx, Achim; Gross, Rudolf

    Displacement of propagating squeezed states is a fundamental operation for quantum communications. It can be applied to fundamental studies of macroscopic quantum coherence and has an important role in quantum teleportation protocols with propagating microwaves. We generate propagating squeezed states using a Josephson parametric amplifier and implement displacement using a cryogenic directional coupler. We study single- and two-mode displacement regimes. For the single-mode displacement we find that the squeezing level of the displaced squeezed state does not depend on the displacement amplitude. Also, we observe that quantum entanglement between two spatially separated channels stays constant across 4 orders of displacement power. We acknowledge support by the German Research Foundation through SFB 631 and FE 1564/1-1, the EU project PROMISCE, and Elite Network of Bavaria through the program ExQM.

  12. A theoretical model to predict both horizontal displacement and vertical displacement for electromagnetic induction-based deep displacement sensors.

    PubMed

    Shentu, Nanying; Zhang, Hongjian; Li, Qing; Zhou, Hongliang; Tong, Renyuan; Li, Xiong

    2012-01-01

    Deep displacement observation is one basic means of landslide dynamic study and early warning monitoring and a key part of engineering geological investigation. In our previous work, we proposed a novel electromagnetic induction-based deep displacement sensor (I-type) to predict deep horizontal displacement and a theoretical model called equation-based equivalent loop approach (EELA) to describe its sensing characters. However in many landslide and related geological engineering cases, both horizontal displacement and vertical displacement vary apparently and dynamically so both may require monitoring. In this study, a II-type deep displacement sensor is designed by revising our I-type sensor to simultaneously monitor the deep horizontal displacement and vertical displacement variations at different depths within a sliding mass. Meanwhile, a new theoretical modeling called the numerical integration-based equivalent loop approach (NIELA) has been proposed to quantitatively depict II-type sensors' mutual inductance properties with respect to predicted horizontal displacements and vertical displacements. After detailed examinations and comparative studies between measured mutual inductance voltage, NIELA-based mutual inductance and EELA-based mutual inductance, NIELA has verified to be an effective and quite accurate analytic model for characterization of II-type sensors. The NIELA model is widely applicable for II-type sensors' monitoring on all kinds of landslides and other related geohazards with satisfactory estimation accuracy and calculation efficiency.

  13. A Theoretical Model to Predict Both Horizontal Displacement and Vertical Displacement for Electromagnetic Induction-Based Deep Displacement Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Shentu, Nanying; Zhang, Hongjian; Li, Qing; Zhou, Hongliang; Tong, Renyuan; Li, Xiong

    2012-01-01

    Deep displacement observation is one basic means of landslide dynamic study and early warning monitoring and a key part of engineering geological investigation. In our previous work, we proposed a novel electromagnetic induction-based deep displacement sensor (I-type) to predict deep horizontal displacement and a theoretical model called equation-based equivalent loop approach (EELA) to describe its sensing characters. However in many landslide and related geological engineering cases, both horizontal displacement and vertical displacement vary apparently and dynamically so both may require monitoring. In this study, a II-type deep displacement sensor is designed by revising our I-type sensor to simultaneously monitor the deep horizontal displacement and vertical displacement variations at different depths within a sliding mass. Meanwhile, a new theoretical modeling called the numerical integration-based equivalent loop approach (NIELA) has been proposed to quantitatively depict II-type sensors’ mutual inductance properties with respect to predicted horizontal displacements and vertical displacements. After detailed examinations and comparative studies between measured mutual inductance voltage, NIELA-based mutual inductance and EELA-based mutual inductance, NIELA has verified to be an effective and quite accurate analytic model for characterization of II-type sensors. The NIELA model is widely applicable for II-type sensors’ monitoring on all kinds of landslides and other related geohazards with satisfactory estimation accuracy and calculation efficiency. PMID:22368467

  14. Deformation Monitoring of Retrofitted Short Concrete Columns with Laser Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avsar, E. Ö.; Celik, M. F.; Binbir, E.; Arslan, A. E.; Çokkeçeci, D.; Seker, D. Z.; Pala, S.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents one of the applications of monitoring mechanical tests carried out in Construction Materials Laboratory of Istanbul Technical University. In Turkey, as in many countries, large amount of existing buildings exposed to seismic hazard, therefore various analytical and experimental studies are being conducted to contribute to the solution of the problem. One of the new generation retrofitting techniques is to strength the structural members by using Fiber Reinforcing Polymer (FRP). This study summarize the results of monitoring of deformations short concrete column samples under the incremental compression load. In this study, result of two rectangular short columns are given. One of them was tested as a reference sample, the other sample were tested after strengthening by PET reinforced polymer composite materials. Besides conventional displacement and strain measurement systems, laser scanning method was used to get three dimensional deformed shape of sample at each selected steps.

  15. An Optical Fiber Displacement Sensor Using RF Interrogation Technique.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeon-Ho; Choi, Sang-Jin; Jeon, Keum Soo; Pan, Jae-Kyung

    2016-02-24

    We propose a novel non-contact optical fiber displacement sensor. It uses a radio frequency (RF) interrogation technique which is based on bidirectional modulation of a Mach-Zehnder electro-optical modulator (MZ-EOM). The displacement is measured from the free spectral range (FSR) which is determined by the dip frequencies of the modulated MZ-EOM transfer function. In experiments, the proposed sensor showed a sensitivity of 456 kHz/mm or 1.043 kHz/V in a measurement range of 7 mm. The displacement resolution of the proposed sensor depends on the linewidth and the power of the optical source. Resolution better than 0.05 μm would be achieved if an optical source which has a linewidth narrower than 1.5 nm and a received power larger than -36 dBm is used. Also, the multiplexing characteristic of the proposed sensor was experimentally validated.

  16. An Optical Fiber Displacement Sensor Using RF Interrogation Technique

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeon-Ho; Choi, Sang-Jin; Jeon, Keum Soo; Pan, Jae-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel non-contact optical fiber displacement sensor. It uses a radio frequency (RF) interrogation technique which is based on bidirectional modulation of a Mach-Zehnder electro-optical modulator (MZ-EOM). The displacement is measured from the free spectral range (FSR) which is determined by the dip frequencies of the modulated MZ-EOM transfer function. In experiments, the proposed sensor showed a sensitivity of 456 kHz/mm or 1.043 kHz/V in a measurement range of 7 mm. The displacement resolution of the proposed sensor depends on the linewidth and the power of the optical source. Resolution better than 0.05 μm would be achieved if an optical source which has a linewidth narrower than 1.5 nm and a received power larger than −36 dBm is used. Also, the multiplexing characteristic of the proposed sensor was experimentally validated. PMID:26927098

  17. Polymeric nanospheres as a displacement fluid in enhanced oil recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendraningrat, Luky; Zhang, Julien

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents the investigation of using nanoscale polyacrylamide-based spheres (nanospheres) as a displacement fluid in enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Coreflood experiments were conducted to evaluate the impact of nanospheres and its concentration dispersed in model formation water on oil recovery during a tertiary oil recovery process. The coreflood results showed that nanospheres can enhance residual oil recovery in the sandstone rock samples and its concentration showed a significant impact into incremental oil. By evaluating the contact angle, it was observed that wettability alteration also might be involved in the possible oil displacement mechanism in this process together with fluid behavior and permeability to water that might divert injected fluid into unswept oil areas and enhance the residual oil recovery. These investigations promote nanospheres aqueous disperse solution as a potential displacement fluid in EOR.

  18. Water column methanotrophy controlled by a rapid oceanographic switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinle, Lea; Graves, Carolyn A.; Treude, Tina; Ferré, Bénédicte; Biastoch, Arne; Bussmann, Ingeborg; Berndt, Christian; Krastel, Sebastian; James, Rachael H.; Behrens, Erik; Böning, Claus W.; Greinert, Jens; Sapart, Célia-Julia; Scheinert, Markus; Sommer, Stefan; Lehmann, Moritz F.; Niemann, Helge

    2015-05-01

    Large amounts of the greenhouse gas methane are released from the seabed to the water column, where it may be consumed by aerobic methanotrophic bacteria. The size and activity of methanotrophic communities, which determine the amount of methane consumed in the water column, are thought to be mainly controlled by nutrient and redox dynamics. Here, we report repeated measurements of methanotrophic activity and community size at methane seeps west of Svalbard, and relate them to physical water mass properties and modelled ocean currents. We show that cold bottom water, which contained a large number of aerobic methanotrophs, was displaced by warmer water with a considerably smaller methanotrophic community within days. Ocean current simulations using a global ocean/sea-ice model suggest that this water mass exchange is consistent with short-term variations in the meandering West Spitsbergen Current. We conclude that the shift from an offshore to a nearshore position of the current can rapidly and severely reduce methanotrophic activity in the water column. Strong fluctuating currents are common at many methane seep systems globally, and we suggest that they affect methane oxidation in the water column at other sites, too.

  19. Secondary tasks impair adaptation to step and gradual visual displacements

    PubMed Central

    Galea, J.M.; Sami, S.; Albert, N.B.; Miall, R.C.

    2016-01-01

    Performing two competing tasks can result in dividing cognitive resources between the tasks and impaired motor adaptation. In previous work we have reported impaired learning when participants had to switch from one visual displacement adaptation task to another. Here we examined whether or not a secondary task had a similar effect on adaptation to a visual displacement . The resource dividing task involved simultaneously adapting to a step visual displacement whilst vocally shadowing an auditory stimulus . The switching task required participants to adapt to opposing visual displacements in an alternating manner with the left and right hands. We found that both manipulations had a detrimental effect on adaptation rate. We then integrated these tasks and found the combination caused a greater decrease in adaptation rate than either manipulation in isolation. Experiment 2 showed that adaptation to a gradually imposed visual displacement was influenced in a similar manner to step adaptation. Therefore although gradual adaptation involves minimal awareness it still can be disrupted by a cognitively demanding secondary task. We propose that awareness and cognitive resource can be regarded as qualitatively different but that awareness may be a marker of the amount of resource required. For example, large errors are both noticed and require substantial cognitive resource to connect. However a lack of awareness does not mean an adaptation task will be resistant to interference from a resource consuming secondary task. PMID:20101396

  20. Multisegment Kinematics of the Spinal Column: Soft Tissue Artifacts Assessment.

    PubMed

    Mahallati, Sara; Rouhani, Hossein; Preuss, Richard; Masani, Kei; Popovic, Milos R

    2016-07-01

    A major challenge in the assessment of intersegmental spinal column angles during trunk motion is the inherent error in recording the movement of bony anatomical landmarks caused by soft tissue artifacts (STAs). This study aims to perform an uncertainty analysis and estimate the typical errors induced by STA into the intersegmental angles of a multisegment spinal column model during trunk bending in different directions by modeling the relative displacement between skin-mounted markers and actual bony landmarks during trunk bending. First, we modeled the maximum displacement of markers relative to the bony landmarks with a multivariate Gaussian distribution. In order to estimate the distribution parameters, we measured these relative displacements on five subjects at maximum trunk bending posture. Then, in order to model the error depending on trunk bending angle, we assumed that the error grows linearly as a function of the bending angle. Second, we applied our error model to the trunk motion measurement of 11 subjects to estimate the corrected trajectories of the bony landmarks and investigate the errors induced into the intersegmental angles of a multisegment spinal column model. For this purpose, the trunk was modeled as a seven-segment rigid-body system described using 23 reflective markers placed on various bony landmarks of the spinal column. Eleven seated subjects performed trunk bending in five directions and the three-dimensional (3D) intersegmental angles during trunk bending were calculated before and after error correction. While STA minimally affected the intersegmental angles in the sagittal plane (<16%), it considerably corrupted the intersegmental angles in the coronal (error ranged from 59% to 551%) and transverse (up to 161%) planes. Therefore, we recommend using the proposed error suppression technique for STA-induced error compensation as a tool to achieve more accurate spinal column kinematics measurements. Particularly, for intersegmental

  1. Polyimidazoles via aromatic nucleophilic displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Polyimidazoles (Pl) are prepared by the aromatic nucleophilic displacement reaction of di(hydroxyphenyl)imidazole monomers with activated aromatic dihalides or activated aromatic dinitro compounds. The reactions are carried out in polar aprotic solvents such as N,N-dimethylacetamide, sulfolane, N-methylpyrroldinone, dimethylsulfoxide, or diphenylsulfone using alkali metal bases such as potassium carbonate at elevated temperature under nitrogen. The di(hydroxyphenyl)imidazole monomers are prepared by reacting an aromatic aldehyde with a dimethoxybenzil or by reacting an aromatic dialdehyde with a methoxybenzil in the presence of ammonium acetate. The di(methoxyphenyl)imidazole is subsequently treated with aqueous hydrobromic acid to give the di(hydroxyphenyl)imidazole monomer. This synthetic route has provided high molecular weight Pl of new chemical structure, is economically and synthetically more favorable than other routes, and allows for facile chemical structure variation due to the availability of a large variety of activated aromatic dihalides and dinitro compounds.

  2. Polyimidazoles via aromatic nucleophilic displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Polyimidazoles (PI) are prepared by the aromatic nucleophilic displacement reaction of di(hydroxyphenyl) imidazole monomers with activated aromatic dihalides or activated aromatic dinitro compounds. The reactions are carried out in polar aprotic solvents such as N,N-dimethyl acetamide, sulfolane, N-methylpyrrolidinone, dimethylsulfoxide, or diphenylsulfone using alkali metal bases such as potassium carbonate at elevated temperatures under nitrogen. The di(hydroxyphenyl) imidazole monomers are prepared by reacting an aromatic aldehyde with a dimethoxybenzil or by reacting an aromatic dialdehyde with a methoxybenzil in the presence of ammonium acetate. The di(methoxyphenyl) imidazole is subsequently treated with aqueous hydrobromic acid to give the di(hydroxphenyl) imidazole monomer. This synthetic route has provided high molecular weight PI of new chemical structure, is economically and synthetically more favorable than other routes, and allows for facile chemical structure variation due to the availability of a large variety of activated aromatic dihalides and dinitro compounds.

  3. Polybenzimidazoles via aromatic nucleophilic displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Novel molecular weight controlled and endcapped polybenzimidazoles (PBI) are prepared by the aromatic nucleophilic displacement reaction of di(hydroxyphenyl benzimidazole) monomers with activated aromatic dihalides or activated aromatic dinitro compounds. The PBI are endcapped with mono(hydroxyphenyl) benzimidazoles. The polymerizations are carried out in polar aprotic solvents such as N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone or N,N-dimethylacetamide using alkali metal bases such as potassium carbonate at elevated temperatures under nitrogen. Mono(hydroxyphenyl) benzimidazoles are synthesizedby reacting phenyl-4-hydroxybenzoate with aromatic (o-diamine)s in diphenylsulfone. Molecular weight controlled and endcapped PBI of new chemical structures are prepared that exhibit a favorable combination of physical and mechanical properties.

  4. Polybenzimidazoles Via Aromatic Nucleophilic Displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Hergerrother, Paul M. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Novel molecular weight controlled and endcapped polybenzimidazoles (PBI) are prepared by the aromatic nucleophilic displacement reaction of di(hydroxyphenylbenzimidazole) monomers with activated aromatic dihalides or activated aromatic dinitro compounds. The PBI are endcapped with mono(hydroxyphenyl)benzimidazoles. The polymerizations are carried out in polar aprotic solvents such as N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone or N,N-dimethylacetamide using alkali metal bases such as potassium carbonate at elevated temperatures under nitrogen. Mono(hydroxyphenyl)benzimidazoles are synthesized by reacting phenyl-4-hydroxybenzoate with aromatic (o-diamine)s in diphenylsulfone. Molecular weight controlled and endcapped PBI of new chemical structures are prepared that exhibit a favorable combination of physical and mechanical properties.

  5. Variable delivery, fixed displacement pump

    SciTech Connect

    Sommars, Mark F.

    2001-01-01

    A variable delivery, fixed displacement pump comprises a plurality of pistons reciprocated within corresponding cylinders in a cylinder block. The pistons are reciprocated by rotation of a fixed angle swash plate connected to the pistons. The pistons and cylinders cooperate to define a plurality of fluid compression chambers each have a delivery outlet. A vent port is provided from each fluid compression chamber to vent fluid therefrom during at least a portion of the reciprocal stroke of the piston. Each piston and cylinder combination cooperates to close the associated vent port during another portion of the reciprocal stroke so that fluid is then pumped through the associated delivery outlet. The delivery rate of the pump is varied by adjusting the axial position of the swash plate relative to the cylinder block, which varies the duration of the piston stroke during which the vent port is closed.

  6. Limb displacement and brightness seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emilio, Marcelo; Cunnyngham, Ian; Kuhn, Jeff; Mehret, Leandro; Bush, Rock; Scholl, Isabelle

    2015-08-01

    The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) abord the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) has been used to obtain the most sensitive spectrally resolved observation of individual p-modes at the extreme solar limb. Such oscillation observations of the limb displacement and brightness for some spatial and temporal regimes are even competitive in signal-to-noise to full-disk doppler measurements of the p-mode spectrum. Limb measurements of 5-min p-modes, while having many similarities to full-disk doppler observations, have significantly different sensitivities to the solar rotation and the 5-min mode solar atmospheric structure. These may provide information about the solar structure which is complementary to full-disk measurements. In this work we present results from Individual spherical harmonic p-modes that were detected around solar limb with amplitudes at the micro-arcsecond level.

  7. Displaced electrode process for welding

    DOEpatents

    Heichel, L.J.

    1975-08-26

    A method is described for the butt-welding of a relatively heavy mass to a relatively small mass such as a thin-wall tube. In butt-welding heat is normally applied at the joint between the two pieces which are butt-welded together. The application of heat at the joint results in overheating the tube which causes thinning of the tube walls and porosity in the tube material. This is eliminated by displacing the welding electrode away from the seam toward the heavier mass so that heat is applied to the heavy mass and not at the butt seam. Examples of the parameters used in welding fuel rods are given. The cladding and end plugs were made of Zircalloy. The electrode used was of 2 percent thoriated tungsten. (auth)

  8. Displaceable Gear Torque Controlled Driver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Joseph S., Jr. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are provided for a torque driver including a displaceable gear to limit torque transfer to a fastener at a precisely controlled torque limit. A biasing assembly biases a first gear into engagement with a second gear for torque transfer between the first and second gear. The biasing assembly includes a pressurized cylinder controlled at a constant pressure that corresponds to a torque limit. A calibrated gage and valve is used to set the desired torque limit. One or more coiled output linkages connect the first gear with the fastener adaptor which may be a socket for a nut. A gear tooth profile provides a separation force that overcomes the bias to limit torque at the desired torque limit. Multiple fasteners may be rotated simultaneously to a desired torque limit if additional output spur gears are provided. The torque limit is adjustable and may be different for fasteners within the same fastener configuration.

  9. DISPLACEMENT BASED SEISMIC DESIGN CRITERIA

    SciTech Connect

    HOFMAYER,C.H.

    1999-03-29

    The USNRC has initiated a project to determine if any of the likely revisions to traditional earthquake engineering practice are relevant to seismic design of the specialized structures, systems and components of nuclear power plants and of such significance to suggest that a change in design practice might be warranted. As part of the initial phase of this study, a literature survey was conducted on the recent changes in seismic design codes/standards, on-going activities of code-writing organizations/communities, and published documents on displacement-based design methods. This paper provides a summary of recent changes in building codes and on-going activities for future codes. It also discusses some technical issues for further consideration.

  10. Fiber optic multimode displacement sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Karl A.; Jarzynski, Jacek

    1996-04-01

    An underwater Optical Motion Sensor (OMS) based on a design first presented by W. B. Spillman, Schlieren multimode fiber-optic hydrophone, Applied Physics Letters 37(2), 15 July 1980, p. 145-146 is described. The displacement sensor uses the same acoustooptical intensity modulation mechanism as Spillman, however the sensing mechanism is isolated from the ambient fluid environment by a small cylindrical aluminum enclosure (1″ OD×3/4″). The enclosure contains an inertial mass and the fiber collimators. The inertial mass is suspended in the center of the enclosure by three small wires rigidly mounted to the walls. The mass and wires act as a cantilever beam system with a mechanical resonance near 100 Hz. The transduction mechanism consists of two opposed optical gratings aligned and positioned between the fiber collimators. One grating is mounted on the inertial mass while the other is mounted on the lower end cap of the enclosure. Relative motion between the gratings causes a modulation of the light transmitted through the gratings. The modulated beam is focused onto a photodetector and converted to electric current. The frequency response is flat from 200 Hz-9 kHz with a minimum detectable displacement of 0.002 A and the dynamic range is 136 dB. The small size and light weight give the sensor an effective density of 1.08 g/cm3 making it almost neutrally buoyant in water. This in conjunction with the performance characteristics make this sensor suitable for use in acoustical sensing applications.

  11. Interpreting satellite column observations of formaldehyde over tropical South America.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Paul I; Barkley, Michael P; Kurosu, Thomas P; Lewis, Alastair C; Saxton, Julie E; Chance, Kelly; Gatti, Luciana V

    2007-07-15

    Space-borne column measurements of formaldehyde (HCHO), a high-yield oxidation product of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), represent important constraints for quantifying net regional fluxes of VOCs. Here, we interpret observed distributions of HCHO columns from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) over tropical South America during 1997-2001. We present the first comparison of year-long in situ isoprene concentrations and fire-free GOME HCHO columns over a tropical ecosystem. GOME HCHO columns and in situ isoprene concentrations are elevated in the wet and dry seasons, with the highest values in the dry season. Previous analysis of the in situ data highlighted the possible role of drought in determining the elevated concentrations during the dry season, inferring the potential of HCHO columns to provide regional-scale constraints for estimating the role of drought on isoprene emissions. The agreement between the observed annual cycles of GOME HCHO columns and Along-Track Scanning Radiometer firecount data over the Amazon basin (correlations typically greater than 0.75 for a particular year) illustrates the potential of HCHO column to provide quantitative information about biomass burning emissions.

  12. Internally displaced peoples in Bosnia-Herzegovina: impacts of long-term displacement on health and well-being.

    PubMed

    Kett, Maria E

    2005-01-01

    Several hundred thousand people remain internally displaced in Bosnia-Herzegovina living in camps and settlements. The public gaze of the media has long since moved on elsewhere and donors have shifted their resources. Displaced peoples have specific burdens over belonging, housing, occupation, welfare, security and loss of communities. The decision whether to return to their homes is complex, with local and international political pressures adding to their uncertainties and insecurities. In addition there is the impact of the war, the experiences of violence, the remembering and issues of reconciliation, and a variety of mostly unevaluated psychosocial programmes aimed at helping with these. All this has a profound impact on their health and well-being. Understanding these processes and the views of chronically displaced people themselves should guide policies of post-conflict management to plan for the longer-term and to be more focussed on the human factors rather than simply rules and properties.

  13. Youths' Displaced Aggression against in- and Out-Group Peers: An Experimental Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reijntjes, Albert; Thomaes, Sander; Kamphuis, Jan H.; Bushman, Brad J.; Reitz, Ellen; Telch, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    People often displace their anger and aggression against innocent targets, sometimes called scapegoats. Tragic historic events suggest that members of ethnic minority out-groups may be especially likely to be innocent targets. The current experiment examined displaced aggression of Dutch youths against Dutch in-group peers versus Moroccan…

  14. Vocational Education Single Parent/Displaced Homemaker Program Annual Report. July 1, 1989-June 30, 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Women's and Family Programs Corp., Louisville, KY.

    The Owensboro (Kentucky) Displaced Homemaker Program assists single parents/displaced homemakers in sustaining themselves and their families by enabling them to enter the workforce. Barriers of age, sex, lack of work experience, low self-esteem, low educational attainment, and little knowledge of the work environment affect their ability to enter…

  15. The mental health of civilians displaced by armed conflict: an ecological model of refugee distress.

    PubMed

    Miller, K E; Rasmussen, A

    2016-04-04

    Early research on the mental health of civilians displaced by armed conflict focused primarily on the direct effects of exposure to war-related violence and loss. Largely overlooked in this war exposure model were the powerful effects of ongoing stressors related to the experience of displacement itself. An ecological model of refugee distress is proposed, drawing on research demonstrating that mental health among refugees and asylum seekers stems not only from prior war exposure, but also from a host of ongoing stressors in their social ecology, or displacement-related stressors. Implications of this model for addressing the mental health and psychosocial needs of refugees and other displaced populations are considered.

  16. Seismic fragility analysis of lap-spliced reinforced concrete columns retrofitted by SMA wire jackets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Eunsoo; Park, Sun-Hee; Chung, Young-Soo; Kim, Hee Sun

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study is to provide seismic fragility curves of reinforced concrete columns retrofitted by shape memory alloy wire jackets and thus assess the seismic performance of the columns against earthquakes, comparing them with reinforced concrete columns with lap-spliced and continuous reinforcement. For that purpose, this study first developed analytical models of the experimental results of the three types of columns, (1) lap-spliced reinforcement, (2) continuous reinforcement and (3) lap-spliced reinforcement and retrofitted by SMA wire jackets, using the OpenSEES program, which is oriented to nonlinear dynamic analysis. Then, a suite of ten recorded ground motions was used to conduct dynamic analyses of the analytical models with scaling of the peak ground acceleration from 0.1g to 1.0g in steps of 0.1g. From the static experimental tests, the column retrofitted with SMA wire jackets had a larger displacement ductility by a factor of 2.3 times that of the lap-spliced column, which was 6% larger compared with the ductility of the continuous reinforcement column. From the fragility analyses, the SMA wire jacketed column had median values of 0.162g and 0.567g for yield and collapse, respectively. For the yield damage state, the SMA wire jacketed column had a median value similar to the continuous reinforcement column. However, for the complete damage state, the SMA wire jacketed column showed a 1.33 times larger median value than the continuously reinforcement column.

  17. A Noncontact FMCW Radar Sensor for Displacement Measurement in Structural Health Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cunlong; Chen, Weimin; Liu, Gang; Yan, Rong; Xu, Hengyi; Qi, Yi

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the Frequency Modulation Continuous Wave (FMCW) radar sensor for multi-target displacement measurement in Structural Health Monitoring (SHM). The principle of three-dimensional (3-D) displacement measurement of civil infrastructures is analyzed. The requirements of high-accuracy displacement and multi-target identification for the measuring sensors are discussed. The fundamental measuring principle of FMCW radar is presented with rigorous mathematical formulas, and further the multiple-target displacement measurement is analyzed and simulated. In addition, a FMCW radar prototype is designed and fabricated based on an off-the-shelf radar frontend and data acquisition (DAQ) card, and the displacement error induced by phase asynchronism is analyzed. The conducted outdoor experiments verify the feasibility of this sensing method applied to multi-target displacement measurement, and experimental results show that three targets located at different distances can be distinguished simultaneously with millimeter level accuracy. PMID:25822139

  18. A noncontact FMCW radar sensor for displacement measurement in structural health monitoring.

    PubMed

    Li, Cunlong; Chen, Weimin; Liu, Gang; Yan, Rong; Xu, Hengyi; Qi, Yi

    2015-03-26

    This paper investigates the Frequency Modulation Continuous Wave (FMCW) radar sensor for multi-target displacement measurement in Structural Health Monitoring (SHM). The principle of three-dimensional (3-D) displacement measurement of civil infrastructures is analyzed. The requirements of high-accuracy displacement and multi-target identification for the measuring sensors are discussed. The fundamental measuring principle of FMCW radar is presented with rigorous mathematical formulas, and further the multiple-target displacement measurement is analyzed and simulated. In addition, a FMCW radar prototype is designed and fabricated based on an off-the-shelf radar frontend and data acquisition (DAQ) card, and the displacement error induced by phase asynchronism is analyzed. The conducted outdoor experiments verify the feasibility of this sensing method applied to multi-target displacement measurement, and experimental results show that three targets located at different distances can be distinguished simultaneously with millimeter level accuracy.

  19. Column transport studies of 3-nitro-1,2,4-triazol-5-one (NTO) in soils.

    PubMed

    Mark, Noah; Arthur, Jennifer; Dontsova, Katerina; Brusseau, Mark; Taylor, Susan; Šimůnek, Jiří

    2017-03-01

    Development of the new, insensitive, energetic compound, NTO (3-nitro-1,2,4-triazol-5-one), creates need for the data on NTO's fate and transport to predict its behavior in the environment and potential for groundwater contamination. To measure the transport of NTO in soils, we conducted miscible-displacement experiments under steady state and interrupted flow conditions using eight soils having varying physical and geochemical properties. The breakthrough curve (BTC) data were analyzed using temporal moment analysis and simulated using HYDRUS-1D to determine transport parameters and better understand the mechanisms of sorption and transformation. Parameters determined from the miscible-displacement study were compared to results obtained from batch experiments conducted for the same soils, and examined in relation to soil properties. Column NTO linear adsorption coefficients (Kd) were low and correlated well (P = 0.000049) with measurements from the batch studies. NTO transformation rate constants increased and NTO recovery decreased with increase in soil organic carbon (OC) content. Autoclaved soils had slower transformation rates and greater NTO recoveries indicating that microorganisms play a role in NTO transformation. In addition, the transformation rate increased with time in soils with higher OC. Monod-type kinetics was implemented in HYDRUS-1D to simulate the observed increase in transformation rate with time. We think this phenomenon is due to bacterial growth. Results indicate very low adsorption of NTO in a range of soils, but natural attenuation through transformation that, depending on soil OC content and hydraulic residence time, could result in complete removal of NTO.

  20. Experimental study of permanent displacement estimate method based on strong-motion earthquake accelerograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Tao; Hu, Guorui

    2016-04-01

    In the engineering seismology studies, the seismic permanent displacement of the near-fault site is often obtained by the process of the ground motion accelerogram recorded by the instrument on the station. Because of the selection differences of the estimate methods and the algorithm parameters, the strongly different results of the permanent displacement is gotten often. And the reliability of the methods has not only been proved in fact, but also the selection of the algorithm parameters has to be carefully considered. In order to solve this problem, the experimental study on the permanent displacement according to the accelerogram was carried out with the experiment program of using the large shaking table and the sliding mechanism in the earthquake engineering laboratory. In the experiments,the large shaking table genarated the dynamincs excitation without the permanent displacement,the sliding mechanism fixed on the shaking table genarated the permanent displacement, and the accelerogram including the permant information had been recorded by the instrument on the sliding mechanism.Then the permanent displacement value had been obtained according to the accelerogram, and been compared with the displacement value gotten by the displacement meter and the digital close range photogrammetry. The experimental study showed that the reliable permanent displacement could be obtained by the existing processing method under the simple laboratory conditions with the preconditions of the algorithm parameters selection carefully.

  1. Has multivessel angioplasty displaced surgical revascularization?

    PubMed

    King, S B; Ivanhoe, R J

    1990-01-01

    Over the years, PTCA has been proved a safe and effective therapy for single-vessel CAD. Given the record of favorable results for single-vessel angioplasty, the extension of angioplasty to multivessel CAD soon followed. The successful application of PTCA to multivessel disease has been facilitated by developments in balloon, guidewire, and guide catheter technology. Success rates have been satisfactory, and complications have remained acceptable. Furthermore, as an outgrowth of an understanding of the mechanism and effect of PTCA, guidelines have been developed to aid case selection. As emphasized earlier, these guidelines should weigh heavily in deciding whether to select PTCA as a treatment modality. Presently, in our opinion, PTCA has not yet completely displaced surgery for multivessel CAD. Surgical standby is required for safe PTCA, because emergency surgery can be lifesaving and limit myocardial infarction after failed angioplasty. It is doubtful that surgery will ever relinquish its position as the treatment of choice for left main coronary artery disease. Nor will elective surgery find wide application in single-vessel disease. Whether one mode of revascularization will emerge as the most efficacious for multivessel disease related to long-term survival, limitation of cardiac events, and cost will be addressed in the analysis of the ongoing randomized trials of surgery versus angioplasty. Andreas Gruentzig established that it was possible to work within the coronary artery in an alert and comfortable patient. Interventional cardiology has experienced rapid technologic growth. Many patients formerly treated with bypass surgery can be managed effectively with angioplasty. If effective bail-out methods for acute closure are proven effective and restenosis is limited to a small percentage of patients, angioplasty in some form will further displace CABG. Until those ultimate goals are achieved, the value of angioplasty compared with bypass surgery must rest

  2. Modelling Toehold-Mediated RNA Strand Displacement

    PubMed Central

    Šulc, Petr; Ouldridge, Thomas E.; Romano, Flavio; Doye, Jonathan P.K.; Louis, Ard A.

    2015-01-01

    We study the thermodynamics and kinetics of an RNA toehold-mediated strand displacement reaction with a recently developed coarse-grained model of RNA. Strand displacement, during which a single strand displaces a different strand previously bound to a complementary substrate strand, is an essential mechanism in active nucleic acid nanotechnology and has also been hypothesized to occur in vivo. We study the rate of displacement reactions as a function of the length of the toehold and temperature and make two experimentally testable predictions: that the displacement is faster if the toehold is placed at the 5′ end of the substrate; and that the displacement slows down with increasing temperature for longer toeholds. PMID:25762335

  3. Modelling toehold-mediated RNA strand displacement.

    PubMed

    Šulc, Petr; Ouldridge, Thomas E; Romano, Flavio; Doye, Jonathan P K; Louis, Ard A

    2015-03-10

    We study the thermodynamics and kinetics of an RNA toehold-mediated strand displacement reaction with a recently developed coarse-grained model of RNA. Strand displacement, during which a single strand displaces a different strand previously bound to a complementary substrate strand, is an essential mechanism in active nucleic acid nanotechnology and has also been hypothesized to occur in vivo. We study the rate of displacement reactions as a function of the length of the toehold and temperature and make two experimentally testable predictions: that the displacement is faster if the toehold is placed at the 5' end of the substrate; and that the displacement slows down with increasing temperature for longer toeholds.

  4. Batch soil adsorption and column transport studies of 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN) in soils.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Jennifer D; Mark, Noah W; Taylor, Susan; Šimunek, J; Brusseau, M L; Dontsova, Katerina M

    2017-04-01

    The explosive 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) is currently a main ingredient in munitions; however the compound has failed to meet the new sensitivity requirements. The replacement compound being tested is 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN). DNAN is less sensitive to shock, high temperatures, and has good detonation characteristics. However, DNAN is more soluble than TNT, which can influence transport and fate behavior and thus bioavailability and human exposure potential. The objective of this study was to investigate the environmental fate and transport of DNAN in soil, with specific focus on sorption processes. Batch and column experiments were conducted using soils collected from military installations located across the United States. The soils were characterized for pH, electrical conductivity, specific surface area, cation exchange capacity, and organic carbon content. In the batch rate studies, change in DNAN concentration with time was evaluated using the first order equation, while adsorption isotherms were fitted using linear and Freundlich equations. Solution mass-loss rate coefficients ranged between 0.0002h(-1) and 0.0068h(-1). DNAN was strongly adsorbed by soils with linear adsorption coefficients ranging between 0.6 and 6.3Lg(-1), and Freundlich coefficients between 1.3 and 34mg(1)(-)(n)L(n)kg(-1). Both linear and Freundlich adsorption coefficients were positively correlated with the amount of organic carbon and cation exchange capacity of the soil, indicating that similar to TNT, organic matter and clay minerals may influence adsorption of DNAN. The results of the miscible-displacement column experiments confirmed the impact of sorption on retardation of DNAN during transport. It was also shown that under flow conditions DNAN transforms readily with formation of amino transformation products, 2-ANAN and 4-ANAN. The magnitudes of retardation and transformation observed in this study result in significant attenuation potential for DNAN, which would be anticipated

  5. Batch soil adsorption and column transport studies of 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN) in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthur, Jennifer D.; Mark, Noah W.; Taylor, Susan; Šimunek, J.; Brusseau, M. L.; Dontsova, Katerina M.

    2017-04-01

    The explosive 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) is currently a main ingredient in munitions; however the compound has failed to meet the new sensitivity requirements. The replacement compound being tested is 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN). DNAN is less sensitive to shock, high temperatures, and has good detonation characteristics. However, DNAN is more soluble than TNT, which can influence transport and fate behavior and thus bioavailability and human exposure potential. The objective of this study was to investigate the environmental fate and transport of DNAN in soil, with specific focus on sorption processes. Batch and column experiments were conducted using soils collected from military installations located across the United States. The soils were characterized for pH, electrical conductivity, specific surface area, cation exchange capacity, and organic carbon content. In the batch rate studies, change in DNAN concentration with time was evaluated using the first order equation, while adsorption isotherms were fitted using linear and Freundlich equations. Solution mass-loss rate coefficients ranged between 0.0002 h- 1 and 0.0068 h- 1. DNAN was strongly adsorbed by soils with linear adsorption coefficients ranging between 0.6 and 6.3 L g- 1, and Freundlich coefficients between 1.3 and 34 mg1 - n Ln kg- 1. Both linear and Freundlich adsorption coefficients were positively correlated with the amount of organic carbon and cation exchange capacity of the soil, indicating that similar to TNT, organic matter and clay minerals may influence adsorption of DNAN. The results of the miscible-displacement column experiments confirmed the impact of sorption on retardation of DNAN during transport. It was also shown that under flow conditions DNAN transforms readily with formation of amino transformation products, 2-ANAN and 4-ANAN. The magnitudes of retardation and transformation observed in this study result in significant attenuation potential for DNAN, which would be anticipated to

  6. FRACTIONATING COLUMN PRODUCT COLLECTOR CONTROL

    DOEpatents

    Paxson, G.D. Jr.

    1964-03-10

    Means for detecting minute fluid products from a chemical separation column and for advancing a collector tube rack in order to automatically separate and collect successive fractionated products are described. A charge is imposed on the forming drops at the column orifice to create an electric field as the drop falls in the vicinity of a sensing plate. The field is detected by an electrometer tube coupled to the plate causing an output signal to actuate rotation of a collector turntable rack, thereby positioning new collectors under the orifice. The invention provides reliable automatic collection independent of drop size, rate of fall, or chemical composition. (AEC)

  7. Precise displacement measurement for a local surface.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Sheng Lih; Lin, Shyh Tsong; Chang, Yu Hsin

    2009-11-01

    An optical measurement method to get the in-plane and out-of-plane displacements of a local surface using a laser is proposed. The proposed method simultaneously derives the in-plane and out-of-plane displacements by measuring the shift of interference fringes formed by scattered beams. The average errors of the in-plane and out-of-plane displacement measurements are significantly smaller than 10 nm. Moreover, the proposed method uses only low-cost optical elements.

  8. Displacement speeds in turbulent premixed flame simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Day, Marcus S.; Shepherd, Ian G.; Bell, J.; Grcar, Joseph F.; Lijewski, Michael J.

    2007-07-01

    The theory of turbulent premixed flames is based on acharacterization of the flame as a discontinuous surface propagatingthrough the fluid. The displacement speed, defined as the local speed ofthe flame front normal to itself, relative to the unburned fluid,provides one characterization of the burning velocity. In this paper, weintroduce a geometric approach to computing displacement speed anddiscuss the efficacy of the displacement speed for characterizing aturbulent flame.

  9. Isolation of Three Components from Spearmint Oil: An Exercise in Column and Thin-Layer Chromatography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Don R.; Johnson, Todd M.

    2007-01-01

    A simple experiment for undergraduate organic chemistry students to separate a colorless mixture using column chromatography and then monitor the outcome of the separation using thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and infrared spectroscopy(IR) is described. The experiment teaches students the principle and techniques of column and thin-layer…

  10. Polybenzoxazole via aromatic nucleophilic displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Polybenzoxazoles (PBO) are heterocyclic macromolecules which were first synthesized in a two-step process by the initial formation of aromatic diacid chlorides with bis(o-aminophenol)s through solution condensation of aromatic diacid chlorides with bis(o-aminophenol)s followed by thermal cyclodehydration. Since then several methods were utilized in their synthesis. The most common synthetic method for PBO involves a polycondensation of bis(o-aminophenol)s with aromatic diacid diphenyl esters. Another preparative route involves the solution polycondensation of the hydrochloride salts of bis(o-amino phenol)s with aromatic diacids in polyphosphoric acid. Another synthetic method involves the initial formation of poly(o-hydroxy amide)s from silylated bis(o-aminophenol)s with aromatic diacid chlorides followed by thermal cyclodehydration to PBO. A recent preparative route involves the reaction of aromatic bisphenols with bis(fluorophenyl) benzoxazoles by the displacement reaction to form PBO. The novelty of the present invention is that high molecular weight PBO of new chemical structures are prepared that exhibit a favorable combination of physical and mechanical properties.

  11. Chromatographic properties PLOT multicapillary columns.

    PubMed

    Nikolaeva, O A; Patrushev, Y V; Sidelnikov, V N

    2017-03-10

    Multicapillary columns (MCCs) for gas chromatography make it possible to perform high-speed analysis of the mixtures of gaseous and volatile substances at a relatively large amount of the loaded sample. The study was performed using PLOT MCCs for gas-solid chromatography (GSC) with different stationary phases (SP) based on alumina, silica and poly-(1-trimethylsilyl-1-propyne) (PTMSP) polymer as well as porous polymers divinylbenzene-styrene (DVB-St), divinylbenzene-vinylimidazole (DVB-VIm) and divinylbenzene-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (DVB-EGD). These MCCs have the efficiency of 4000-10000 theoretical plates per meter (TP/m) and at a column length of 25-30cm can separate within 10-20s multicomponent mixtures of substances belonging to different classes of chemical compounds. The sample amount not overloading the column is 0.03-1μg and depends on the features of a porous layer. Examples of separations on some of the studied columns are considered.

  12. Effects of Fault Displacement on Emplacement Drifts

    SciTech Connect

    F. Duan

    2000-04-25

    The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate potential effects of fault displacement on emplacement drifts, including drip shields and waste packages emplaced in emplacement drifts. The output from this analysis not only provides data for the evaluation of long-term drift stability but also supports the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) process model report (PMR) and Disruptive Events Report currently under development. The primary scope of this analysis includes (1) examining fault displacement effects in terms of induced stresses and displacements in the rock mass surrounding an emplacement drift and (2 ) predicting fault displacement effects on the drip shield and waste package. The magnitude of the fault displacement analyzed in this analysis bounds the mean fault displacement corresponding to an annual frequency of exceedance of 10{sup -5} adopted for the preclosure period of the repository and also supports the postclosure performance assessment. This analysis is performed following the development plan prepared for analyzing effects of fault displacement on emplacement drifts (CRWMS M&O 2000). The analysis will begin with the identification and preparation of requirements, criteria, and inputs. A literature survey on accommodating fault displacements encountered in underground structures such as buried oil and gas pipelines will be conducted. For a given fault displacement, the least favorable scenario in term of the spatial relation of a fault to an emplacement drift is chosen, and the analysis is then performed analytically. Based on the analysis results, conclusions are made regarding the effects and consequences of fault displacement on emplacement drifts. Specifically, the analysis will discuss loads which can be induced by fault displacement on emplacement drifts, drip shield and/or waste packages during the time period of postclosure.

  13. Study of the transport of cadusafos in two tropical undisturbed soil columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dionisio Fernandez-Bayo, Jesus; Crevoisier, David; Saison, Carine; Geniez, Chantal; Huttel, Olivier; Samouelian, Anatja; Voltz, Marc

    2013-04-01

    The use of pesticides to control agriculture pests is a common practice on most tropical plantations whose vulnerability to pesticide pollution is very important due to the frequent heavy rains that wash pesticides from target areas. Tropical volcanic soils have been scarcely investigated in this sense and monitoring the dynamic of pesticide at column scale is of great interest for a better understanding at catchment scale and risk modelling. The objective was to study and model the transport of cadusafos (CDS) in two undisturbed soil columns from a nitisol and an andosol, representative of the major soils in agricultural areas of the FWI. Undisturbed soil columns from andosol (sandy-loam soil) and nitisol (clay soil) from Guadeloupe Island were spiked with 14C-CDS along with 10 g of granulate Rugby®. To each soil column, 10 rain events of different intensities (20 and 40 mm/h during 4 and 2 hours, respectively) were applied with 4-7 days delay between two subsequent rain events. For the nitisol columns, the cumulated rain was halved (by decreasing duration of each rain event) since these soils occur in drier areas of Guadeloupe and because the imposed rain intensities led to the accumulation of water at the surface of the column. At the end of the leaching experiment the extractable and non-extractable remaining pesticide residues were determined along the soil profile. The andosol presented a very high permeability attributed to the preferential flow expected in this type of soil with high macroporosity due to the allophane materials. The maximum concentration of CDS was attained during the first rainfall event while the cumulated infiltrated volume of water was much less than the pore volume of the column soil. The peak concentration levels of CDS were almost constant during the first 5 rain events and they decreased during the subsequent rain events, probably due to degradation and/or ageing processes of CDS. The nitisol showed lower permeability reflected in

  14. 40 CFR 205.153 - Engine displacement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Engine displacement. 205.153 Section 205.153 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Motorcycles § 205.153 Engine displacement. (a)...

  15. 40 CFR 205.153 - Engine displacement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Engine displacement. 205.153 Section 205.153 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Motorcycles § 205.153 Engine displacement. (a)...

  16. 40 CFR 205.153 - Engine displacement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Engine displacement. 205.153 Section 205.153 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Motorcycles § 205.153 Engine displacement. (a)...

  17. Worker Displacement in a Strong Labor Market.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helwig, Ryan T.

    2001-01-01

    As economic growth continued in 1997 and 1998, job losses declined and the displacement rate was the lowest of the 1990s. Many displaced workers were able to find new jobs with little or no change in weekly earnings. (Author/JOW)

  18. Video Games, Adolescents, and the Displacement Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Carla Christine

    2012-01-01

    The displacement effect (the idea that time spent in one activity displaces time spent in other activities) was examined within the lens of adolescents' video game use and their time spent reading, doing homework, in physically active sports and activities, in creative play, and with parents and friends. Data were drawn from the Panel Study…

  19. Displaced Homemakers: Vo-Tech Workshop Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peltier, Wanda Jo

    Written for displaced homemaker programs in vocational-technical schools, this curriculum contains material designed so that instructors can prepare student manuals appropriate to almost any educational support situation for displaced homemakers. An overview provides information on special needs groups, curriculum use, and resources and sample…

  20. Column

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education in Chemistry, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Articles are included concerning industry and schools, science and mathematics award scheme, teaching and research, safety, inservice training, Ugandan chemistry, plastics, and 19th century Nuffield. (DF)

  1. Antibodies Targeting Closely Adjacent or Minimally Overlapping Epitopes Can Displace One Another

    PubMed Central

    Abdiche, Yasmina Noubia; Yeung, Andy Yik; Ni, Irene; Stone, Donna; Miles, Adam; Morishige, Winse; Rossi, Andrea; Strop, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Here we describe how real-time label-free biosensors can be used to identify antibodies that compete for closely adjacent or minimally overlapping epitopes on their specific antigen via a mechanism of antibody displacement. By kinetically perturbing one another’s binding towards their antigen via the formation of a transient trimolecular complex, antibodies can displace one another in a fully reversible and dose-dependent manner. Displacements can be readily identified when epitope binning assays are performed in a classical sandwich assay format whereby a solution antibody (analyte) is tested for binding to its antigen that is first captured via an immobilized antibody (ligand) because an inverted sandwiching response is observed when an analyte displaces a ligand, signifying the antigen’s unusually rapid dissociation from its ligand. In addition to classifying antibodies within a panel in terms of their ability to block or sandwich pair with one another, displacement provides a hybrid mechanism of competition. Using high-throughput epitope binning studies we demonstrate that displacements can be observed on any target, if the antibody panel contains appropriate epitope diversity. Unidirectional displacements occurring between disparate-affinity antibodies can generate apparent asymmetries in a cross-blocking experiment, confounding their interpretation. However, examining competition across a wide enough concentration range will often reveal that these displacements are reversible. Displacement provides a gentle and efficient way of eluting antigen from an otherwise high affinity binding partner which can be leveraged in designing reagents or therapeutic antibodies with unique properties. PMID:28060885

  2. Cation exchange displacement batch chromatography of proteins guided by screening of protein purification parameters.

    PubMed

    Kotasińska, Marta; Richter, Verena; Thiemann, Joachim; Schlüter, Hartmut

    2012-11-01

    Displacement chromatography has been shown to be an effective alternative for protein purification. We investigated in this study sample displacement chromatography, which does not require a displacer molecule. Furthermore, we performed a screening for determination of parameters for an optimal sample displacement chromatography. We screened the affinities of cytochrome C, lysozyme, myoglobin, and ribonuclease A toward a cation exchange material as a function of different pH values and to presence of different concentrations of sodium chloride in the sample application buffer. Sample displacement chromatography in batch chromatography mode for the separation of the protein mixture was studied with a sample application buffer with a pH of 5 and 7. As predicted by the screening experiments, sample displacement chromatography was most effective at pH 7 since this pH guaranteed the largest differences of the affinities of the four proteins toward the stationary phase. In summary, we describe here sample displacement chromatography in the batch chromatography mode for the separation of proteins, which is a simple and fast alternative to conventional displacement chromatography. Systematic screening of chromatographic parameters prior to sample displacement chromatography promises a successful separation of a target protein.

  3. Internal displacement in Colombia: Fifteen distinguishing features.

    PubMed

    Shultz, James M; Ceballos, Ángela Milena Gómez; Espinel, Zelde; Oliveros, Sofia Rios; Fonseca, Maria Fernanda; Florez, Luis Jorge Hernandez

    2014-01-01

    This commentary aims to delineate the distinguishing features of conflict-induced internal displacement in the nation of Colombia, South America. Even as Colombia is currently implementing a spectrum of legal, social, economic, and health programs for "victims of armed conflict," with particular focus on internally displaced persons (IDPs), the dynamics of forced migration on a mass scale within this country are little known beyond national borders.   The authors of this commentary are embarking on a global mental health research program in Bogota, Colombia to define best practices for reaching the displaced population and implementing sustainable, evidence-based screening and intervention for common mental disorders. Presenting the defining characteristics of internal displacement in Colombia provides the context for our work and, more importantly, conveys the compelling and complex nature of this humanitarian crisis. We attempt to demonstrate Colombia's unique position within the global patterning of internal displacement.

  4. New aspects in the theory and practice of column flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, J.; Badenicov, V.

    1995-12-31

    The high efficiency of column flotation allows a reduction in process time, a decrease in the number of cleaner stages and in the volume of the circulating load in the flotation circuit, and, as a result of this, an increase in consistency and reliability of operations. Unique multisectional column flotation apparatuses were developed. To attain that aim particular hydrodynamics and aeration regime is established in each section of the column, operational variables being adjusted according to the floatability of the material. Therefore in multisectional column machines, the material-apparatus feedback can be established, and process variables optimized depending on the characteristics of the floated materials. Successful operation was reported of the new generation of columns with cell volumes of 10 to 80 m{sup 3} and the height of 4--6 m in copper, molybdenum, antimony, tungsten and nickel ores and coal slurry processing at different plants. Operational experience of these cells showed their considerable design and operational advantages and verified the proposed options and relationships. The new apparatus is provided with a pneumohydraulic aerator allowing to control bubble size distribution, the service life of the aerator is not less than two years. A multilevel flotation model was developed and used to work out a technique of column design and process parameters calculation. A method of the apparatus design parameters calculation based on laboratory test results (scaling up) was worked out.

  5. Effects of system densities on distillation column performance

    SciTech Connect

    Fasesan, S.O.; Sanni, S.A.; Taiwo, E.A.

    1998-06-01

    Distillation experiments were carried out on three binary systems (ethanol-butanol, ethanol-propan-2-ol, and propan-2-ol-butanol) in a 0.1-m internal diameter glass column packed with 8 mm diameter Raschig rings. The experiments were performed under total reflux conditions and at atmospheric pressure. The data collected on column performance showed that performance declined with increasing average bulk liquid density. The results also lend credence to earlier reports on the behavior of column performance with respect to component concentration in the feed mixtures. The system densities of the three binary systems were measured at four different temperatures, 30, 40, 50, and 60 C. The data were compared with the predicted data of Yen-Woods and Multifluid models. The accuracy of the predictions of the Yen-Woods model was rather poor while that of the Multifluid model was very encouraging.

  6. Policies to Reduce High-Tenured Displaced Workers' Earnings Losses through Retraining. Discussion Paper 2011-11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Louis S.; LaLonde, Robert J.; Sullivan, Daniel G.

    2011-01-01

    High-tenured displaced workers often experience significant earnings losses that persist for the rest of their working lives. A well-targeted training initiative has the potential to substantially reduce permanent earnings losses for those displaced workers who have the academic preparation, work experience, and interest to complete high-return…

  7. Strand displacement synthesis by yeast DNA polymerase ε

    PubMed Central

    Ganai, Rais A.; Zhang, Xiao-Ping; Heyer, Wolf-Dietrich; Johansson, Erik

    2016-01-01

    DNA polymerase ε (Pol ε) is a replicative DNA polymerase with an associated 3′–5′ exonuclease activity. Here, we explored the capacity of Pol ε to perform strand displacement synthesis, a process that influences many DNA transactions in vivo. We found that Pol ε is unable to carry out extended strand displacement synthesis unless its 3′–5′ exonuclease activity is removed. However, the wild-type Pol ε holoenzyme efficiently displaced one nucleotide when encountering double-stranded DNA after filling a gap or nicked DNA. A flap, mimicking a D-loop or a hairpin structure, on the 5′ end of the blocking primer inhibited Pol ε from synthesizing DNA up to the fork junction. This inhibition was observed for Pol ε but not with Pol δ, RB69 gp43 or Pol η. Neither was Pol ε able to extend a D-loop in reconstitution experiments. Finally, we show that the observed strand displacement synthesis by exonuclease-deficient Pol ε is distributive. Our results suggest that Pol ε is unable to extend the invading strand in D-loops during homologous recombination or to add more than two nucleotides during long-patch base excision repair. Our results support the hypothesis that Pol ε participates in short-patch base excision repair and ribonucleotide excision repair. PMID:27325747

  8. Reconstructing asymmetrical reproductive character displacement in a periodical cicada contact zone.

    PubMed

    Cooley, John R; Marshall, David C; Hill, Kathy B R; Simon, Chris

    2006-05-01

    Selection against costly reproductive interactions can lead to reproductive character displacement (RCD). We use information from patterns of displacement and inferences about predisplacement character states to investigate causes of RCD in periodical cicadas. The 13-year periodical cicada Magicicada neotredecim exhibits RCD and strong reproductive isolation in sympatry with a closely related 13-year species, Magicicada tredecim. Displacement is asymmetrical, because no corresponding pattern of character displacement exists within M. tredecim. Results from playback and hybridization experiments strongly suggest that sexual interactions between members of these species were possible at initial contact. Given these patterns, we evaluate potential sources of selection for displacement. One possible source is 'acoustical interference', or mate-location inefficiencies caused by the presence of heterospecifics. Acoustical interference combined with the species-specificity of song pitch and preference appears to predict the observed asymmetrical pattern of RCD in Magicicada. However, acoustical interference does not appear to be a complete explanation for displacement in Magicicada, because our experiments suggest a significant potential for direct sexual interactions between these species before displacement. Another possible source of selection for displacement is hybrid failure. We evaluate the attractiveness of inferred hybrid mating signals, and we examine the viability of hybrid eggs. Neither of these shows strong evidence of hybrid inferiority. We conclude by presenting a model of hybrid failure related to life cycle differences in Magicicada.

  9. Preparation and Characterization of a Polymeric Monolithic Column for Use in High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bindis, Michael P.; Bretz, Stacey Lowery; Danielson, Neil D.

    2011-01-01

    The high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) experiment, most often done in the undergraduate analytical instrumentation laboratory course, generally illustrates reversed-phase chromatography using a commercial C[subscript]18 silica column. To avoid the expense of periodic column replacement and introduce a choice of columns with different…

  10. Beam Studies with Electron Columns

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; Valishev, A.; Kuznetsov, G.; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Romanov, A.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2009-04-01

    We report preliminary results of experimental studies of 'electron columns' in the Tevatron and in a specialized test setup. In the Tevatron, a beam of 150 GeV protons ionizes residual gas and ionization electrons are stored in an electrostatic trap immersed into strong longitudinal magnetic field. Shifts of proton betatron frequencies are observed. In the test setup, we observe effects pointing to accumulation and escape of ionization electrons.

  11. Stability of elastically supported columns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niles, Alfred S; Viscovich, Steven J

    1942-01-01

    A criterion is developed for the stiffness required of elastic lateral supports at the ends of a compression member to provide stability. A method based on this criterion is then developed for checking the stability of a continuous beam-column. A related method is also developed for checking the stability of a member of a pin-jointed truss against rotation in the plane of the truss.

  12. Cyclic performance and simplified pushover analyses of precast segmental concrete bridge columns with circular section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Zhanyu; Guo, Jian; Zheng, Rongyue; Song, Jianwei; Lee, George C.

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, precast segmental concrete bridge columns became prevalent because of the benefits of accelerated construction, low environmental impact, high quality and low life cycle costs. The lack of a detailed configuration and appropriate design procedure to ensure a comparable performance with monolithic construction has impeded this structural system from being widely used in areas of high seismicity. In this study, precast segmental bridge column cyclic loading tests were conducted to investigate the performance of unbonded post-tensioned segmental bridge columns. One monolithic and two precast segmental columns were tested. The precast segmental column exhibited minor damage and small residual displacement after the maximum 7% cyclic drift; energy dissipation (ED) can be enhanced byadding ED bars. The experimental results were modeled by a simplified pushover method (SPOM), as well as a fiber model (FIBM) finite element method. Forty-five cases of columns with different aspect ratios, axial load ratios and ED bar ratios were analyzed with the SPOM and FIBM, respectively. Using these parametric results, a simplified design method was suggested by regressive analysis. Satisfactory correlation was found between the experimental results and the simplified design method for precast segmental columns with different design parameters.

  13. Moment-rotation characteristics of semi-rigid steel beam-column connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altman, W. G., Jr.; Azizinamini, A.; Bradburn, J. H.; Radziminski, J. B.

    1982-06-01

    The potential of semi-rigid beam-to-column connections in contributing to the integrity of steel frame building structures in an earthquake was evaluated. Experimental studies were conducted of bolted connections comprised of top and seat beam flange angles and double web angles to determine moment-rotation behavior under static loading and to measure energy absorption capability under cyclic loading. The cyclic tests consisted of subjecting the beam-column connections to several stages of full reversal, controlled amplitude displacements of progressively increasing magnitude.

  14. Continuous and Batch Distillation in an Oldershaw Tray Column

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, Carlos M.; Vaz, Raquel V.; Santiago, Ana S.; Lito, Patricia F.

    2011-01-01

    The importance of distillation in the separation field prompts the inclusion of distillation experiments in the chemical engineering curricula. This work describes the performance of an Oldershaw column in the rectification of a cyclohexane/n-heptane mixture. Total reflux distillation, continuous rectification under partial reflux, and batch…

  15. Herbicide Leaching Column for a Weed Science Teaching Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahrens, W. H.

    1986-01-01

    Presents an experiment which enables weed science students to observe first-hand the process of herbicide leaching in soils. Features of this technique which demonstrate the movement of herbicide within a column of soil are outlined. Diagrams are provided of the apparatus employed in the exercise. (ML)

  16. Comparison of neptunium sorption results using batch and column techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Triay, I.R.; Furlano, A.C.; Weaver, S.C.; Chipera, S.J.; Bish, D.L.

    1996-08-01

    We used crushed-rock columns to study the sorption retardation of neptunium by zeolitic, devitrified, and vitric tuffs typical of those at the site of the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. We used two sodium bicarbonate waters (groundwater from Well J-13 at the site and water prepared to simulate groundwater from Well UE-25p No. 1) under oxidizing conditions. It was found that values of the sorption distribution coefficient, Kd, obtained from these column experiments under flowing conditions, regardless of the water or the water velocity used, agreed well with those obtained earlier from batch sorption experiments under static conditions. The batch sorption distribution coefficient can be used to predict the arrival time for neptunium eluted through the columns. On the other hand, the elution curves showed dispersivity, which implies that neptunium sorption in these tuffs may be nonlinear, irreversible, or noninstantaneous. As a result, use of a batch sorption distribution coefficient to calculate neptunium transport through Yucca Mountain tuffs would yield conservative values for neptunium release from the site. We also noted that neptunium (present as the anionic neptunyl carbonate complex) never eluted prior to tritiated water, which implies that charge exclusion does not appear to exclude neptunium from the tuff pores. The column experiments corroborated the trends observed in batch sorption experiments: neptunium sorption onto devitrified and vitric tuffs is minimal and sorption onto zeolitic tuffs decreases as the amount of sodium and bicarbonate/carbonate in the water increases.

  17. Repetitive Regeneration of Media #1 in a Dynamic Column Extraction using Brine #1

    SciTech Connect

    Gary Garland

    2015-10-14

    This data is from a regeneration study from a dynamic column extraction experiment where we ran a solution of REE's through a column of media #1 then stripped the REE's off the media using 2M HNO3 solution. We then re-equilibrated the media and repeated the process of running a REE solution through the column and stripping the REE's off the media and comparing the two runs.

  18. Microparticle column geometry in acoustic stationary fields.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Andrew; Insana, Michael F; Allen, John S

    2003-01-01

    Particles suspended in a fluid will experience forces from stationary acoustic fields. The magnitude of the force depends on the time-averaged energy density of the field and the material properties of the particles and fluid. Forces acting on known particles smaller than 20 microm were studied. Within a 500 kHz acoustic beam generated by a plane-piston circular source, observations were made of the geometry of the particle column that is formed. Varying the acoustic energy altered the column width in a manner predicted by equations for the primary acoustic radiation force from scattering of particles in the long-wavelength limit. The minimum pressures required to trap gas, solid, and liquid particles in a water medium at room temperature were also estimated to within 12%. These results highlight the ability of stationary acoustic fields from a plane-piston radiator to impose nano-Newton-scale forces onto fluid particles with properties similar to biological cells, and suggest that it is possible to accurately quantify these forces.

  19. Variable displacement alpha-type Stirling engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homutescu, V. M.; Bălănescu, D. T.; Panaite, C. E.; Atanasiu, M. V.

    2016-08-01

    The basic design and construction of an alpha-type Stirling engine with on load variable displacement is presented. The variable displacement is obtained through a planar quadrilateral linkage with one on load movable ground link. The physico-mathematical model used for analyzing the variable displacement alpha-type Stirling engine behavior is an isothermal model that takes into account the real movement of the pistons. Performances and power adjustment capabilities of such alpha-type Stirling engine are calculated and analyzed. An exemplification through the use of the numerical simulation was performed in this regard.

  20. Displacement sensor based on plasmonic slot metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei; Ren, Mengxin; Pi, Biao; Cai, Wei; Xu, Jingjun

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a plasmonic type displacement sensor based on slot metamaterials. The sensors are formed by arranging metamaterial arrays with different dimension parameters adjacently. Hence, the measured spectra would be modified as a result of moving the sensors across the detecting area of the spectrometer. From the spectral changes, the displacement amount could be retrieved. The sensor is demonstrated to be capable of recognizing a displacement of 200 nm, which is equal to the period of the metamaterial lattice, and the sensitivity is largely dependent on the shape and size of the acquisition area of the spectrometer used for spectra analysis.

  1. Method for packed column separations and purifications

    DOEpatents

    Holman, David A.; Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J.; Brockman, Fred J.; Chandler, Darrell P.

    2006-08-15

    The invention encompasses a method of packing and unpacking a column chamber. A mixture of a fluid and a matrix material are introduced through a column chamber inlet so that the matrix material is packed within a column chamber to form a packed column. The column chamber having the column chamber inlet or first port for receiving the mixture further has an outlet port and an actuator port. The outlet port is partially closed for capturing the matrix material and permitting the fluid to flow therepast by rotating relative one to the other of a rod placed in the actuator port. Further rotation relative one to the other of the rod and the column chamber opens the outlet and permits the matrix material and the fluid to flow therethrough thereby unpacking the matrix material from the column chamber.

  2. Displacement of oil by carbon dioxide. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, Jr., F. M.; Taber, J. J.

    1981-05-01

    Results of a comprehensive research program on factors influencing CO/sub 2/ flooding are reported. Equipment constructed for static equilibrium measurements of phase volumes, compositions, densities and viscosities is described. Design of an apparatus used for a variety of displacement tests is also reported. Apparatus and experimental procedures are described for a new experiment in which equilibrium phase compositions can be measured rapidly and continuously. Results of displacements of crude oil from slim tubes, cores and mixing cells are presented and interpreted in terms of detailed measurements of the phase behavior and fluid properties of the CO/sub 2/-crude oil mixtures. The complex phase behavior of low temperature CO/sub 2/-crude oil mixtures is described and compared with similar behavior for CO/sub 2/-alkane mixtures. A simple correlation is offered for the ranges of reservoir temperature and pressure at which liquid-liquid and liquid-liquid-vapor phase behavior should be expected to occur. Direct evidence is presented of the efficiency with which a CO/sub 2/-rich liquid phase can extract hydrocarbons from a crude oil. A simple one-dimensional process simulator for CO/sub 2/ flooding applications is described. Simulation results are compared with experimental data from slim tube displacements. Good agreement is reported between calculated and experimental results as long as the volume change of CO/sub 2/ on mixing with the oil is not too great.Sensitivity of calculated results to phase behavior and fluid properties is discussed. Comparison of displacement results, phase behavior measurements, and model calculations provides strong evidence that the high displacement efficiency which can be obtained when pressure is high enough and viscous fingering is controlled is the result of efficient extraction of a broad range of hydrocarbons by a dense CO/sub 2/-rich phase which is a liquid if the temperature is below about 50/sup 0/C (130/sup 0/F).

  3. PDT - PARTICLE DISPLACEMENT TRACKING SOFTWARE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, M. P.

    1994-01-01

    Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) is a quantitative velocity measurement technique for measuring instantaneous planar cross sections of a flow field. The technique offers very high precision (1%) directionally resolved velocity vector estimates, but its use has been limited by high equipment costs and complexity of operation. Particle Displacement Tracking (PDT) is an all-electronic PIV data acquisition and reduction procedure which is simple, fast, and easily implemented. The procedure uses a low power, continuous wave laser and a Charged Coupled Device (CCD) camera to electronically record the particle images. A frame grabber board in a PC is used for data acquisition and reduction processing. PDT eliminates the need for photographic processing, system costs are moderately low, and reduced data are available within seconds of acquisition. The technique results in velocity estimate accuracies on the order of 5%. The software is fully menu-driven from the acquisition to the reduction and analysis of the data. Options are available to acquire a single image or 5- or 25-field series of images separated in time by multiples of 1/60 second. The user may process each image, specifying its boundaries to remove unwanted glare from the periphery and adjusting its background level to clearly resolve the particle images. Data reduction routines determine the particle image centroids and create time history files. PDT then identifies the velocity vectors which describe the particle movement in the flow field. Graphical data analysis routines are included which allow the user to graph the time history files and display the velocity vector maps, interpolated velocity vector grids, iso-velocity vector contours, and flow streamlines. The PDT data processing software is written in FORTRAN 77 and the data acquisition routine is written in C-Language for 80386-based IBM PC compatibles running MS-DOS v3.0 or higher. Machine requirements include 4 MB RAM (3 MB Extended), a single or

  4. Bridge displacement monitoring method based on laser projection-sensing technology.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xuefeng; Liu, Hao; Yu, Yan; Xu, Xiaodong; Hu, Weitong; Li, Mingchu; Ou, Jingping

    2015-04-13

    Bridge displacement is the most basic evaluation index of the health status of a bridge structure. The existing measurement methods for bridge displacement basically fail to realize long-term and real-time dynamic monitoring of bridge structures, because of the low degree of automation and the insufficient precision, causing bottlenecks and restriction. To solve this problem, we proposed a bridge displacement monitoring system based on laser projection-sensing technology. First, the laser spot recognition method was studied. Second, the software for the displacement monitoring system was developed. Finally, a series of experiments using this system were conducted, and the results show that such a system has high measurement accuracy and speed. We aim to develop a low-cost, high-accuracy and long-term monitoring method for bridge displacement based on these preliminary efforts.

  5. Bridge Displacement Monitoring Method Based on Laser Projection-Sensing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xuefeng; Liu, Hao; Yu, Yan; Xu, Xiaodong; Hu, Weitong; Li, Mingchu; Ou, Jingping

    2015-01-01

    Bridge displacement is the most basic evaluation index of the health status of a bridge structure. The existing measurement methods for bridge displacement basically fail to realize long-term and real-time dynamic monitoring of bridge structures, because of the low degree of automation and the insufficient precision, causing bottlenecks and restriction. To solve this problem, we proposed a bridge displacement monitoring system based on laser projection-sensing technology. First, the laser spot recognition method was studied. Second, the software for the displacement monitoring system was developed. Finally, a series of experiments using this system were conducted, and the results show that such a system has high measurement accuracy and speed. We aim to develop a low-cost, high-accuracy and long-term monitoring method for bridge displacement based on these preliminary efforts. PMID:25871716

  6. Three-Dimensional Continuous Displacement Measurement with Temporal Speckle Pattern Interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Jie; Gao, Zhan; Wang, Xu; Yang, Shanwei

    2016-01-01

    A speckle interferometer which can measure whole field three-dimensional displacements continuously and dynamically has been built. Three different wavelength lasers are used to produce the speckle interferograms of the two in-plane displacements (displacements in the x- and y-direction) and one out-of-plane displacement (displacement in the z-direction), respectively. One color CCD camera is employed to collect these mixed speckle interferograms simultaneously. The mixed interferograms are separated by the Red, Green and Blue channels of the color CCD camera, and then are processed by the wavelet transform technique to extract the phase information of the measured object. The preliminary experiment is carried out to demonstrate the performance of this new device. PMID:27916858

  7. Temperature programmable microfabricated gas chromatography column

    DOEpatents

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.

    2003-12-23

    A temperature programmable microfabricated gas chromatography column enables more efficient chemical separation of chemical analytes in a gas mixture by the integration of a resistive heating element and temperature sensing on the microfabricated column. Additionally, means are provided to thermally isolate the heated column from their surroundings. The small heat capacity and thermal isolation of the microfabricated column improves the thermal time response and power consumption, both important factors for portable microanalytical systems.

  8. Scaling the final deposits of dry cohesive granular columns after collapse and quasi-static fall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mériaux, Catherine; Triantafillou, Trent

    2008-03-01

    This paper reports on laboratory experiments that were designed to investigate the collapse and quasi-static fall of dry cohesive granular columns. These experiments were compared with similar experiments that were performed with non-cohesive dry sand columns. A powder of gypsum (calcium sulphate dihydrate) was used to represent cohesive granular material. In all the experiments, the cohesive granular columns fractured and flowed in coherent blocks but, while faults remained steep in the quasi-static fall experiments, they flattened in the collapse experiments as the initial aspect ratio of the columns increased. Dilation was seen in the quasi-static fall experiments, while some air entrapment within the columns occurred in the collapse experiments. The final deposits of the cohesive granular columns were found to satisfy power law relationships as a function of the initial aspect ratio of the columns. Two asymptotes were found for the lower and higher range of initial aspect ratios, which varied between 0.5 and 8, respectively. When compared with the power law relationships found for dry noncohesive columns, the power dependence of the ratio of initial to final height and final runout to initial length with the aspect ratio of the columns was found to be similar. The prefactors of the power laws were found to slightly decrease with the increase of the cohesion or, equivalently, the decrease in grain size. Similar to the dry noncohesive case, the prefactors for the runout length were found to increase by a factor 2 with the increase of flow rate. When the collapse experiments were compared with the quasi-static fall experiments, a shift towards higher aspect ratios of the transition between the two asymptotic power laws was found.

  9. Stepping Aside: Correlates of Displacement in Pedestrians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Frank N., Jr.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Examines the effects of gender, age, race, group size, and other characteristics on spatial displacement in the general population. Considers the relative contributions of power, gallantry, and status in the determining of who yields to whom. (JMF)

  10. Displacement field measurement in the nanometer range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surrel, Yves; Fournier, Nicolas

    1996-09-01

    The grid method is a classical tool for displacement measurement, which provides field data. This method has benefited very much from the phase-shifting technique in recent years. Two examples of applications of this method in the nanometer range are presented. The first one concerns the materials science: it is shown that microgrids observed by SEM can provide displacement field data with an accuracy of a few nanometers. The second one concerns the measurement of a rigid-body displacement. In this case, displacement data can be averaged over the whole field, drastically increasing the sensitivity. It is shown that a sensitivity of 7 nm can be achieved by using a coarse grid with 8 lines per mm. This sensitivity corresponds to 1/18000 of the grid pitch.

  11. Effects of various parameters on lateral displacement estimation in ultrasound elastography.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jianwen; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2009-08-01

    Complementary to axial, lateral displacement and strain can provide important information on the biological soft tissues. In this paper, the effects of key parameters (i.e., lateral displacement, pitch, beamwidth, beam overlap and interpolation) on lateral displacement estimation were investigated, in simulations and homogeneous phantom experiments, using lateral rigid motion only to study its fundamentals separately from the effects of axial motion and 2-D deformation on lateral displacement estimation. The performance of the lateral motion estimator was evaluated by measuring its associated bias, jitter and correlation coefficient. Simulation results showed that the bias and jitter of the lateral displacement estimation and correlation coefficient of RF signals undergo periodic variations depending on the lateral displacement, with a period equal to the pitch. The performance of the lateral estimation was improved when a smaller pitch or a larger beamwidth, was used. The effect of the pitch on the lateral estimation on lateral displacement estimation was found to be greater than the beamwidth effect. Therefore, a smaller pitch is preferred when the beam overlap remains the same. The use of cubic spline, instead of linear interpolation, increases the correlation coefficient, and decreases the jitter, with the trade-off of increased bias. The results of the phantom experiments were shown in good agreement with the simulation findings, including the periodic variation of the performance with lateral displacement and effects of pitch, beamwidth and interpolation method on lateral displacement estimation. In conclusion, smaller pitch, wider beamwidth and spline interpolation were shown to be key in reducing the jitter error in the lateral displacement estimation.

  12. Monolithically integrated interferometer for optical displacement measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofstetter, Daniel; Zappe, Hans P.

    1996-01-01

    We discuss the fabrication of a monolithically integrated optical displacement sensors using III-V semiconductor technology. The device is configured as a Michelson interferometer and consists of a distributed Bragg reflector laser, a photodetector and waveguides forming a directional coupler. Using this interferometer, displacements in the 100 nm range could be measured at distances of up to 45 cm. We present fabrication, device results and characterization of the completed interferometer, problems, limitations and future applications will also be discussed.

  13. Transverse-displacement stabilizer for passive magnetic bearing systems

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F

    2017-03-07

    The invention provides a way re-center a rotor's central longitudinal rotational axis with a desired system longitudinal axis. A pair of planar semicircular permanent magnets are pieced together to form a circle. The flux from each magnet is pointed in in opposite directions that are both parallel with the rotational axis. A stationary shorted circular winding the plane of which is perpendicular to the system longitudinal axis and the center of curvature of the circular winding is positioned on the system longitudinal axis. Upon rotation of the rotor, when a transverse displacement of the rotational axis occurs relative to the system longitudinal axis, the winding will experience a time-varying magnetic flux such that an alternating current that is proportional to the displacement will flow in the winding. Such time-varying magnetic flux will provide a force that will bring the rotor back to its centered position about the desired axis.

  14. Displacement sensor for indoor machine calibrations.

    PubMed

    Mudassar, Asloob Ahmad; Butt, Saira

    2013-05-20

    This paper presents a simple displacement sensor for indoor machine calibrations. The sensor, which is placed in the path of a diverging laser beam, consists of two plane mirror pieces laterally displaced with the line joining their centers initially held perpendicular to the optical axis of the beam during the displacement of the sensor with one of the mirrors always traveling along the optical axis of the laser beam. The optical signals from the two mirrors are combined and a simple detector at the interference plane counts the fringes during the sensor displacement. The sensor could be mounted on the moving head of any mechanical machine, e.g., the lathe machine for displacement calibration. The device has been tested over a range of 10 cm beyond a distance of 150 cm from a diverging laser source giving an accuracy of 1.1015 μm. Theoretical modeling, simulation, and experimental results are presented which establish that the proposed sensor can be used as a promising displacement measuring device.

  15. Development and evolution of character displacement.

    PubMed

    Pfennig, David W; Pfennig, Karin S

    2012-05-01

    Character displacement occurs when competition for either resources or successful reproduction imposes divergent selection on interacting species, causing divergence in traits associated with resource use or reproduction. Here, we describe how character displacement can be mediated either by genetically canalized changes (i.e., changes that reflect allelic or genotype frequency changes) or by phenotypic plasticity. We also discuss how these two mechanisms influence the tempo of character displacement. Specifically, we suggest that, under some conditions, character displacement mediated by phenotypic plasticity might occur more rapidly than that mediated by genetically canalized changes. Finally, we describe how these two mechanisms may act together and determine character displacement's mode, such that it proceeds through an initial phase in which trait divergence is environmentally induced to a later phase in which divergence becomes genetically canalized. This plasticity-first hypothesis predicts that character displacement should be generally mediated by ancestral plasticity and that it will arise similarly in multiple, independently evolving populations. We conclude by highlighting future directions for research that would test these predictions.

  16. Dry-Column Flash Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shusterman, Alan J.; McDougal, Patrick G.; Glasfeld, Arthur

    1997-10-01

    Dry-column flash chromatography is a safe, powerful, yet easily learned preparative chromatography technique. It has proven useful in research, and an adaptation of the technique for use in large teaching laboratories (general chemistry, organic chemistry) is described here. The student version is similar to vacuum filtration, uses the same compact, readily available glassware, and inexpensive and safe solvents (ethyl acetate and hexane) and adsorbent (Merck grade 60 silica gel). The technique is sufficiently simple and powerful that a beginning student can successfully resolve diastereomers on sample scales ranging from 100 mg to >1 g.

  17. The evolution of fabric with displacement in natural brittle faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittempergher, S.; Di Toro, G.; Gratier, J.; Aretusini, S.; Boullier-Bertrand, A.

    2011-12-01

    In experiments performed at room temperature on gouges, a characteristic clast size distribution (CSD) is produced with increasing strain, and shear localization is documented to begin after few millimetres of sliding. But in natural faults active at depth in the crust, mechanical processes are associated with fluid-rock interactions, which might control the deformation and strength recovery. We aim to investigate the microstructural, geochemical and mineralogical evolution of low-displacement faults with increasing shear strain. The faults (cataclasite- and pseudotachylyte-bearing) are hosted in tonalite and were active at 9-11 km and 250-300°C. The samples were collected on a large glacier-polished outcrop, where major faults (accommodating up to 4300 mm of displacement) exploit pre-existing magmatic joints and are connected by a network of secondary fractures and faults (accommodating up to 500 mm of displacement) breaking intact tonalite. We performed optical and cathodoluminescence (CL) microscope, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS), Rietveld X-Ray Powder Diffraction and microprobe chemical analysis in deformation zones of secondary faults with various offsets in order to evaluate the transfer of chemical species between dissolution zones and protected zones. Image analysis techniques were applied on SEM-BSE and optical microscope images to compute the CSD in samples, which experienced an increasing amount of strain. The secondary fractures are up to 5 mm thick. Within the first 20 mm of displacement, shear localizes along Y and R1 surfaces and a cataclastic foliation develops. The CSD evolves from a fractal dimension D of 1.3 in fractures without visible displacement to values above 2 after the first 500 mm of displacement. Chemical maps and CL images indicate that the foliation in cataclasite results from the rotation and fragmentation of clasts, with dissolution of quartz and passive concentration of Ti oxides

  18. Selenium and trace element mobility affected by periodic displacement of stratification in the Great Salt Lake, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beisner, K.; Naftz, D.L.; Johnson, W.P.; Diaz, X.

    2009-01-01

    The Great Salt Lake (GSL) is a unique ecosystem in which trace element activity cannot be characterized by standard geochemical parameters due to the high salinity. Movement of selenium and other trace elements present in the lake bed sediments of GSL may occur due to periodic stratification displacement events or lake bed exposure. The water column of GSL is complicated by the presence of a chemocline persistent over annual to decadal time scales. The water below the chemocline is referred to as the deep brine layer (DBL), has a high salinity (16.5 to 22.9%) and is anoxic. The upper brine layer (UBL) resides above the chemocline, has lower salinity (12.6 to 14.7%) and is oxic. Displacement of the DBL may involve trace element movement within the water column due to changes in redox potential. Evidence of stratification displacement in the water column has been observed at two fixed stations on the lake by monitoring vertical water temperature profiles with horizontal and vertical velocity profiles. Stratification displacement events occur over periods of 12 to 24 h and are associated with strong wind events that can produce seiches within the water column. In addition to displacement events, the DBL shrinks and expands in response to changes in the lake surface area over a period of months. Laboratory tests simulating the observed sediment re-suspension were conducted over daily, weekly and monthly time scales to understand the effect of placing anoxic bottom sediments in contact with oxic water, and the associated effect of trace element desorption and (or) dissolution. Results from the laboratory simulations indicate that a small percentage (1%) of selenium associated with anoxic bottom sediments is periodically solubilized into the UBL where it potentially can be incorporated into the biota utilizing the oxic part of GSL.

  19. Application of the Stefan-Maxwell Equations to determine limitations of Fick's law when modeling organic vapor transport in sand columns

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baehr, Arthur L.; Bruell, Clifford J.

    1990-01-01

    The organic component of the vapor phase of a porous medium contaminated by an immiscible organic liquid can be significant enough to violate the condition of a dilute species diffusing in a bulk phase assumed by Fick's law. The Stefan-Maxwell equations provide a more comprehensive model for quantifying steady state transport for a vapor phase composed of arbitrary proportions of its constituents. The application of both types of models to the analysis of column experiments demonstrates that use of a Fickian-based transport model can lead to significant overestimates of soil tortuosity constants. Further, the physical displacement of naturally occurring gases (e.g., O2), predicted by the Stefan-Maxwell model but not by application of Fick's Law, can be attributed improperly to a sink term such as microbial degradation in a Fickian-based transport model.

  20. Hybrid first-principles/neural networks model for column flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, S.; Liu, P.H.; Svoronos, S.A.; Sharma, R.; Abdel-Khalek, N.A.; Cheng, Y.; El-Shall, H.

    1999-03-01

    A new model for phosphate column flotation is presented which for the first time relates the effects of operating variables such as frother concentration on column performance. This is a hybrid model that combines a first-principles model with artificial neural networks. The first-principles model is obtained from material balances on both phosphate particles and gangue (undesired material containing mostly silica). First-order rates of net attachment are assumed for both. Artificial neural networks relate the attachment rate constants to the operating variables. Experiments were conducted in a 6-in.-dia. (152-mm-dia.) laboratory column to provide data for neural network training and model validation. The model successfully predicts the effects of frother concentration, particle size, air flow rate and bubble diameter on grade and recovery.

  1. Hysteresis, memory and creep in a wealy vibrated granular column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umbanhowar, Paul; van Hecke, Martin

    2003-03-01

    We report experimental measurements of the apparent weight W of a column of granular material that is weakly and sinusoidally oscillated with peak acceleration Γ less than g, the acceleration due to gravity. Experiments are conducted in a rigid container with a piezo-electric force sensing element as the base and employ a time varying vertical acceleration to measure W. As in previous work, W increases monotonically and then saturates as the height of the grain column is increased. However, a "freshly" poured column previously driven at Γ < Γ1 exhibits bursts of rearrangements when Γ is slowly increased to a value larger than Γ_1. Above a minimum value of Γ, the apparent weight displays hysteretic behavior when Γ is ramped up and down. Finally, W appears to slowly decrease with time when Γ is kept constant. These results point to a highly non-trivial collective rearrangement of the force network which occurs in the absence of macroscopic grain motion.

  2. Performance analysis of rotating disc contactor (RDC) column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiffah, Wan Nurul; Aisyah, Siti; Fashihah, Nor; Anuar, Khairil

    2014-06-01

    Liquid-liquid extraction is one of the most important separation processes. Different kinds of liquid-liquid extrator such as Rotating Disc Contactor (RDC) Column being used in industries. The study of liquid-liquid extraction in an RDC column has be come a very important subject to be discussed not just amongst chemical engineers but mathematicans as well. In this study, the performance of small diameter column RDC using the chemical system involving cumene/isobutryric asid/water are analyzed by the method of design of the experiments (DOE). DOE are applied to estimated the effect of four independent variable; protor speed, flow rate, concentration of continuous inlet and dispersed inlet and their interaction factor to detemine the most significant factor that effect the concentration of continuous and dispersed outlet as output parameters.

  3. Leaching Behavior Of Mineral Processing Waste: Comparison Of Batch And Column Investigations

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, a comparison of laboratory batch and column experiments on metal release profile from a mineral processing waste (MPW) is presented. Batch (equilibrium) and column (dynamic) leaching tests were conducted on ground MPW at different liquid–solid ratios (LS) to determ...

  4. A straightforward methodology for designing continuous monoclonal antibody capture multi-column chromatography processes.

    PubMed

    Gjoka, Xhorxhi; Rogler, Karl; Martino, Richard Alexander; Gantier, Rene; Schofield, Mark

    2015-10-16

    A simple process development strategy for continuous capture multi-column chromatography (MCC) is described. The approach involves a few single column breakthrough experiments, based on several simplifying observations that enable users to rapidly convert batch processes into well-designed multi-column processes. The method was validated using a BioSMB(®) (Pall Life Sciences) lab scale multi-column system and a mAb capture process employing Protein A resin. The approach enables users to optimize MCC processes based on their internal preferences and constraints without requiring any mathematical modeling expertise.

  5. Retention Curve Measurement for Sands Using a TDR-based Long Column and Modified Tempe Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaki, T.; Illangasekare, T. H.

    2006-12-01

    Long column and Tempe cell are typical methods for measuring the water retention curves for soils. In the conventional long column method utilizing a stack of rings, water saturation profile is determined gravimetrically. X-ray or gamma ray attenuation are non-destructive methods but require complex and expensive devices and involve the use of photon sources. Time domain reflectometry (TDR) is an alternative to these radioactive methods for measuring water content profile along the column. Typical Tempe cells have a sample height of 3 to 6 cm. Suction is applied to the sample to induce drainage and monitored outflow is used to calculate the average water saturation of the sample, which potentially leads to obscuring the distinct displacement pressure value and results in a smoothed retention curve. In this study, we assumed that direct point-wise measurements provide retention curves that represent the physical behavior of the porous medium. We first determined retention curves for a number of well-sorted industrial silica sands using a long column that allows such point-wise measurements by TDR probes horizontally installed at eleven different elevations. Then, we modified a commercially available Tempe cell so that water saturation and capillary pressure head at a physical point in the cell, as well as the conventional height-averaged water saturation, can be measured simultaneously. Comparison of the conventional and point- measured retention curves that were obtained simultaneously for the identical sand samples revealed that 1) point-measured retention curves were identical to the ones measured in the long column, 2) the artifact of using height-averaged saturation values as pointed out by Dane et al. [1992] was experimentally confirmed. We further show that the displacement pressure head can possibly be underestimated especially for coarse soils when height-averaged water saturation is used. This is more significant for oil-water and DNAPL-water systems where

  6. Optimal displacement in apparent motion and quadrature models of motion sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B.

    1990-01-01

    A grating appears to move if it is displaced by some amount between two brief presentations, or between multiple successive presentations. A number of recent experiments have examined the influence of displacement size upon either the sensitivity to motion, or upon the induced motion aftereffect. Several recent motion models are based upon quadrature filters that respond in opposite quadrants in the spatiotemporal frequency plane. Predictions of the quadrature model are derived for both two-frame and multiframe displays. Quadrature models generally predict an optimal displacement of 1/4 cycle for two-frame displays, but in the multiframe case the prediction depends entirely on the frame rate.

  7. Monolithically integrated optical displacement sensor based on triangulation and optical beam deflection.

    PubMed

    Higurashi, E; Sawada, R; Ito, T

    1999-03-20

    A monolithically integrated optical displacement sensor based on triangulation and optical beam deflection is reported. This sensor is simple and consists of only a laser diode, a polyimide waveguide, and a split detector (a pair of photodiodes) upon a GaAs substrate. The resultant prototype device is extremely small (750 microm x 800 microm). Experiments have shown that this sensor can measure the displacement of a mirror with resolution of better than 4 nm. Additionally, we have experimentally demonstrated both axial and lateral displacement measurements when we used a cylindrical micromirror (diameter, 125 microm) as a movable external object.

  8. Elastic stability of non-uniform columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. Y.; Kuo, Y. H.

    1991-07-01

    A simple and efficient method is proposed to investigate the elastic stability of three different tapered columns subjected to uniformly distributed follower forces. The influences of the boundary conditions and taper ratio on critical buckling loads are investigated. The critical buckling loads of columns of rectangular cross section with constant depth and linearly varied width ( T1), constant width and linearly varied depth ( T2) and double taper ( T3) are investigated. Among the three different non-uniform columns considered, taper ratio has the greatest influence on the critical buckling load of column T3 and the lowest influence on that of column T1. The types of instability mechanisms for hinged-hinged and cantilever non-uniform columns are divergence and flutter respectively. However, for clamped-hinged and clamped-clamped non-uniform columns, the type of instability mechanism for column T1 is divergence, while that for columns T2 and T3 is divergence only when the taper ratio of the columns is greater than certain critical values and flutter for the rest value of taper ratio. When the type of instability mechanism changes from divergence to flutter, there is a finite jump for the critical buckling load. The influence of taper ratio on the elastic stability of cantilever column T3 is very sensitive for small values of the taper ratio and there also exist some discontinieties in the critical buckling loads of flutter instability. For a hinged-hinged non-uniform column ( T2 or T3) with a rotational spring at the left end of the column, when the taper ratio is less than the critical value the instability mechanism changes from divergence to flutter as the rotational spring constant is increased. For a clamped-elastically supported non-uniform column, when the taper ratio is greater than the critical value the instability mechanism changes from flutter to divergence as the translational spring constant is increased.

  9. Alternating prism exposure causes dual adaptation and generalization to a novel displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Robert B.; Bridgeman, Bruce; Anand, Sulekha; Browman, Kaitlin E.

    1993-01-01

    In two experiments, we examined the hypothesis that repeatedly adapting and readapting to two mutually conflicting sensory environments fosters the development of a separate adaptation to each situation (dual adaptation) as well as an increased ability to adapt to a novel displacement (adaptive generalization). In the preliminary study, subjects alternated between adapting their visuomotor coordination to 30-diopter prismatic displacement and readapting to normal vision. Dual adaptation was observed by the end of 10 alternation cycles. However, an unconfounded test of adaptive generalization was prevented by an unexpected prism-adaptive shift in preexposure baselines for the dual-adapted subjects. In the primary experiment, the subjects adapted and readapted to opposite 15-diopter displacements for a total of 12 cycles. Both dual adaptation and adaptive generalization to a 30-diopter displacement were obtained. These findings may be understood in terms of serial reversal learning and 'learning to learn'.

  10. Breakthrough performance of plasmid DNA on ion-exchange membrane columns.

    PubMed

    Montesinos-Cisneros, Rosa Ma; Olivas, Jonathan de la Vega; Ortega, Jaime; Guzmán, Roberto; Tejeda-Mansir, Armando

    2007-01-01

    Breakthrough performance of plasmid DNA adsorption on ion-exchange membrane columns was theoretically and experimentally investigated using batch and fixed-bed systems. System dispersion curves showed the absence of flow non-idealities in the experimental arrangement. Breakthrough curves (BTC) were significantly affected by inlet flow rate and solute concentration. In the theoretical analysis, a model was integrated by the serial coupling of the membrane transport model and the system dispersion model. A transport model that considers finite kinetic rate and column dispersed flow was used in the study. A simplex optimization routine, coupled to the solution of the partial differential model equations, was employed to estimate the maximum adsorption capacity constant, the equilibrium desorption constant, and the forward interaction rate constant, which are the parameters of the membrane transport model. The analysis shows that as inlet concentration or flow rate increases, the deviation of the model from the experimental behavior decreases. The BTCs displacement as inlet concentration increases was explained in terms of a greater degree of column saturation reached and more efficient operation accomplished. The degree of column saturation was not influenced by inlet flow rate. It was necessary to consider in the column model the slight variation in the BTC produced by the axial dispersion, in order to accomplish the experimental curve dispersion. Consequently, the design criteria that for Pe > 40 the column axial dispersion can be neglected should be taken with precaution.

  11. Three-dimensional displacement measurements ahead of a projectile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldrein, H. T.; Synnergren, P.; Proud, W. G.

    2000-04-01

    A new method has been developed for determining all three components of displacement at every point on a plane within a specimen deforming in an impact. By repeating the experiment, both the location of the plane and the time of the measurement can be varied, thus making it possible to visualise the entire 3-D flow throughout the experiment up to strains of many percent. The measurement technique involves 3-D digital speckle photography. The main experimental requirement is that the specimen is X-ray translucent, and can be fabricated with the measurement plane seeded with a random array of X-ray opaque particles, for example, lead filings. Experiments with epoxy resin and cement specimens being impacted by 9 mm ball bearings at ˜375 m s-1 are presented. Stereographic pairs of X-ray plates exposed before and during the impact experiment are then compared by a computer program developed from a system designed for optical photographs. The spatial resolution of the current system is approximately 1 mm, with a displacement sensitivity of approximately 0.1 mm, though this could be improved by reducing the X-ray spot size.

  12. Experimental Study on Mechanical Property of Steel Reinforced Concrete L-Shaped Short Columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhe; Qin, Hao; Dang, Hui; Li, Hui; Zhang, Jian-Shan

    The horizontal press performance of column is deteriorated because of its special-shaped section. Moreover, because the antiseismic performance of column is worse, special-shaped column is only used in regions where seismic intensity is lower. So the main problem is to enhance the ductility and shear capacity. This test study on mechanical performance has been carried out through 14 SRCLSSC and 2 RCLSSC. The study focuses on the impacts of test axial load ratio (nt), hooped reinforcement ratio (ρv), shear span ratio (λ) and steel ratio (ρss) on the shear strength and the antiseismic performance of SRCLSSC. It can be concluded that the shear strength of SRCLSSC is increasing with the increasing of nt and ρss, but the degree of increasing is small when nt is a certainty value, and that the shear strength of SRCLSSC is decreasing with increasing of λ The shear resistance formula of L-shaped column is derived through tests, the calculated results are in correspondence with those of the tests. It also can be concluded that the hysteretic loops of the SRCLSSC are full and the hysteretic behaviors are improved; the displacement ductility is increasing with increasing of ρv and ρss, but decreasing with the increasing of nt; the degree of variety in high axial load ratio is larger than that in low axial load ratio. If steel bars are added, the shear strength and displacement ductility of SRCLSSC are increased in a large degree.

  13. Ultra-Sensitive Magnetoresistive Displacement Sensing Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olivas, John D. (Inventor); Lairson, Bruce M. (Inventor); Ramesham, Rajeshuni (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An ultrasensitive displacement sensing device for use in accelerometers, pressure gauges, temperature transducers, and the like, comprises a sputter deposited, multilayer, magnetoresistive field sensor with a variable electrical resistance based on an imposed magnetic field. The device detects displacement by sensing changes in the local magnetic field about the magnetoresistive field sensor caused by the displacement of a hard magnetic film on a movable microstructure. The microstructure, which may be a cantilever, membrane, bridge, or other microelement, moves under the influence of an acceleration a known displacement predicted by the configuration and materials selected, and the resulting change in the electrical resistance of the MR sensor can be used to calculate the displacement. Using a micromachining approach, very thin silicon and silicon nitride membranes are fabricated in one preferred embodiment by means of anisotropic etching of silicon wafers. Other approaches include reactive ion etching of silicon on insulator (SOI), or Low Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition of silicon nitride films over silicon substrates. The device is found to be improved with the use of giant magnetoresistive elements to detect changes in the local magnetic field.

  14. Quantification of the vocal folds’ dynamic displacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Socorro Hernández-Montes, María; Muñoz, Silvino; De La Torre, Manuel; Flores, Mauricio; Pérez, Carlos; Mendoza-Santoyo, Fernando

    2016-05-01

    Fast dynamic data acquisition techniques are required to investigate the motional behavior of the vocal folds (VFs) when they are subjected to a steady air-flow through the trachea. High-speed digital holographic interferometry (DHI) is a non-invasive full-field-of-view technique that has proved its usefulness to study rapid and non-repetitive object movements. Hence it is an ideal technique used here to measure VF displacements and vibration patterns at 2000 fps. Analyses from a set of 200 displacement images showed that VFs’ vibration cycles are established along their width (y) and length (x). Furthermore, the maximum deformation for the right and left VFs’ area may be quantified from these images, which in itself represents an important result in the characterization of this structure. At a controlled air pressure, VF displacements fall within the range ~100-1740 nm, with a calculated precision and accuracy that yields a variation coefficient of 1.91%. High-speed acquisition of full-field images of VFs and their displacement quantification are on their own significant data in the study of their functional and physiological behavior since voice quality and production depend on how they vibrate, i.e. their displacement amplitude and frequency. Additionally, the use of high speed DHI avoids prolonged examinations and represents a significant scientific and technological alternative contribution in advancing the knowledge and working mechanisms of these tissues.

  15. Displacement behaviour is associated with reduced stress levels among men but not women.

    PubMed

    Mohiyeddini, Changiz; Bauer, Stephanie; Semple, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    Sex differences in the ability to cope with stress may contribute to the higher prevalence of stress-related disorders among women compared to men. We recently provided evidence that displacement behaviour--activities such as scratching and face touching--represents an important strategy for coping with stressful situations: in a healthy population of men, displacement behaviour during a social stress test attenuated the relationship between anxiety experienced prior to this test, and the subsequent self-reported experience of stress. Here, we extend this work to look at physiological and cognitive (in addition to self-reported) measures of stress, and study both men and women in order to investigate whether sex moderates the link between displacement behaviour and the response to stress. In a healthy study population, we quantified displacement behaviour, heart rate and cognitive performance during the Trier Social Stress Test, and used self-report questionnaires to assess the experience of stress afterwards. Men engaged in displacement behaviour about twice as often as women, and subsequently reported lower levels of stress. Bivariate correlations revealed that for men, higher rates of displacement behaviour were associated with decreased self-reported stress, fewer mistakes in the cognitive task and a trend towards lower heart rate; no relationships between displacement behaviour and stress measures were found for women. Moreover, moderation analyses revealed that high rates of displacement behaviour were associated with lower stress levels in men but not in women, and that high displacement behaviour rates were associated with poorer cognitive performance in women, but not men. These results point to an important sex difference in coping strategies, and highlight new avenues for research into sex biases in stress-related disorders.

  16. Displacement Behaviour Is Associated with Reduced Stress Levels among Men but Not Women

    PubMed Central

    Mohiyeddini, Changiz; Bauer, Stephanie; Semple, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    Sex differences in the ability to cope with stress may contribute to the higher prevalence of stress-related disorders among women compared to men. We recently provided evidence that displacement behaviour - activities such as scratching and face touching - represents an important strategy for coping with stressful situations: in a healthy population of men, displacement behaviour during a social stress test attenuated the relationship between anxiety experienced prior to this test, and the subsequent self-reported experience of stress. Here, we extend this work to look at physiological and cognitive (in addition to self-reported) measures of stress, and study both men and women in order to investigate whether sex moderates the link between displacement behaviour and the response to stress. In a healthy study population, we quantified displacement behaviour, heart rate and cognitive performance during the Trier Social Stress Test, and used self-report questionnaires to assess the experience of stress afterwards. Men engaged in displacement behaviour about twice as often as women, and subsequently reported lower levels of stress. Bivariate correlations revealed that for men, higher rates of displacement behaviour were associated with decreased self-reported stress, fewer mistakes in the cognitive task and a trend towards lower heart rate; no relationships between displacement behaviour and stress measures were found for women. Moreover, moderation analyses revealed that high rates of displacement behaviour were associated with lower stress levels in men but not in women, and that high displacement behaviour rates were associated with poorer cognitive performance in women, but not men. These results point to an important sex difference in coping strategies, and highlight new avenues for research into sex biases in stress-related disorders. PMID:23457555

  17. The synthesis and characterization of a nuclear membrane affinity chromatography column for the study of human breast cancer resistant protein (BCRP) using nuclear membranes obtained from the LN-229 cells.

    PubMed

    Habicht, K-L; Frazier, C; Singh, N; Shimmo, R; Wainer, I W; Moaddel, R

    2013-01-01

    BCRP expression has been reported in glioblastoma cell lines and clinical specimens and has been shown to be expressed both in purified nuclei and in the soluble cytoplasmic fraction. To date, the nuclear BCRP has not been characterized. Our laboratory has previously developed an online chromatographic approach for the study of binding interactions between ligands and protein, cellular membrane affinity chromatography. To this end, we have immobilized the nuclear membrane fragments onto an immobilized artificial membrane stationary phase (IAM), resulting in the nuclear membrane affinity chromatography (NMAC) column. Initial characterization was carried out on the radio flow detector, as well as the LC-MSD, using frontal displacement chromatography techniques. Etoposide, a substrate for BCRP, was initially tested, to determine the functional immobilization of BCRP. Frontal displacement experiments with multiple concentrations of etoposide were run and the binding affinity was determined to be 4.54 μM, which is in close agreement with literature. The BCRP was fully characterized on the NMAC column and this demonstrates that for the first time the nuclear membranes have been successfully immobilized.

  18. Linear oil displacement by the emulsion entrapment process. [Dissertation

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, D.P.

    1982-01-01

    Lack of mobility control is one of the major impediments to successful enhanced oil recovery, especially for high viscosity oils. This work presents experimental and theoretical results for linear secondary oil displacements using dilute, stable suspensions of oil drops. The major hypothesis is that emulsions provide mobility control through entrapment or local permeability reduction, not through viscosity ratio improvement. In order to describe the displacement process, previous emulsion filtration theory is extended to longer cores and to two-phase flow. Quantitative agreement between theory and experiment is satisfactory for continuous secondary oil displacement with various drop-size emulsions in unconsolidated sand packs of permeabilities ranging from 0.7 ..mu..m/sup 2/ to 3.3 ..mu..m/sup 2/. Linear emulsion floods are shown to be most effective when the mean drop-size to pore-size ratio is in the region between straining and interception at the emulsion shock. Floods are more effective when the emulsion concentration is high which minimizes retention lag. Additionally, a parallel flooding apparatus is utilized to determine qualitatively the macroscopic benefits of emulsion mobility control. Direct analogies are established between augmented oil recovery with dilute emulsions and with entrapping polymers.

  19. Experimental Evaluation of the Failure of a Seismic Design Category - B Precast Concrete Beam-Column Connection System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    ER D C TR -1 4 -1 2 Experimental Evaluation of the Failure of a Seismic Design Category – B Precast Concrete Beam-Column Connection...ERDC TR-14-12 December 2014 Experimental Evaluation of the Failure of a Seismic Design Category – B Precast Concrete Beam-Column Connection...experiment to test a precast concrete beam-column system to failure. This experiment was designed to evaluate the performance of precast frame

  20. Column Chromatography To Obtain Organic Cation Sorption Isotherms.

    PubMed

    Jolin, William C; Sullivan, James; Vasudevan, Dharni; MacKay, Allison A

    2016-08-02

    Column chromatography was evaluated as a method to obtain organic cation sorption isotherms for environmental solids while using the peak skewness to identify the linear range of the sorption isotherm. Custom packed HPLC columns and standard batch sorption techniques were used to intercompare sorption isotherms and solid-water sorption coefficients (Kd) for four organic cations (benzylamine, 2,4-dichlorobenzylamine, phenyltrimethylammonium, oxytetracycline) with two aluminosilicate clay minerals and one soil. A comparison of Freundlich isotherm parameters revealed isotherm linearity or nonlinearity was not significantly different between column chromatography and traditional batch experiments. Importantly, skewness (a metric of eluting peak symmetry) analysis of eluting peaks can establish isotherm linearity, thereby enabling a less labor intensive means to generate the extensive data sets of linear Kd values required for the development of predictive sorption models. Our findings clearly show that column chromatography can reproduce sorption measures from conventional batch experiments with the benefit of lower labor-intensity, faster analysis times, and allow for consistent sorption measures across laboratories with distinct chromatography instrumentation.

  1. Separation of the Carotenoid Bixin from Annatto Seeds Using Thin-Layer and Column Chromatography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCullagh, James V.; Ramos, Nicholas

    2008-01-01

    In this experiment the carotenoid bixin is isolated from annatto ("Bixa orellana") seeds using column chromatography. The experiment has several key advantages over previous pigment separation experiments. First, unlike other experiments significant quantities of the carotenoid (typically 20 to 25 mg) can be isolated from small quantities of plant…

  2. Adsorption characteristics of methylene blue onto agricultural wastes lotus leaf in bath and column modes.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiuli; Wang, Wei; Ma, Xiaojian

    2011-01-01

    The adsorption potential of lotus leaf to remove methylene blue (MB) from aqueous solution was investigated in batch and fixed-bed column experiments. Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Koble-Corrigan isotherm models were employed to discuss the adsorption behavior. The results of analysis indicated that the equilibrium data were perfectly represented by Temkin isotherm and the Langmuir saturation adsorption capacity of lotus leaf was found to be 239.6 mg g(-1) at 303 K. In fixed-bed column experiments, the effects of flow rate, influent concentration and bed height on the breakthrough characteristics of adsorption were discussed. The Thomas and the bed-depth/service time (BDST) models were applied to the column experimental data to determine the characteristic parameters of the column adsorption. The two models were found to be suitable to describe the dynamic behavior of MB adsorbed onto the lotus leaf powder column.

  3. Displacement Cascade Damage Production in Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Stoller, Roger E; Malerba, Lorenzo; Nordlund, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced changes in microstructure and mechanical properties in structural materials are the result of a complex set of physical processes initiated by the collision between an energetic particle (neutron or ion) and an atom in the lattice. This primary damage event is called an atomic displacement cascade. The simplest description of a displacement cascade is to view it as a series of many billiard-ball-like elastic collisions among the atoms in the material. This chapter describes the formation and evolution of this primary radiation damage mechanism to provide an overview of how stable defects are formed by displacement cascades, as well as the nature and morphology of the defects themselves. The impact of the relevant variables such as cascade energy and irradiation temperature is discussed, and defect formation in different materials is compared.

  4. Amorphization of Silicon Carbide by Carbon Displacement

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ram; Gao, Fei; Weber, William J.

    2004-05-10

    We have used molecular dynamics simulations to examine the possibility of amorphizing silicon carbide (SiC) by exclusively displacing C atoms. At a defect generation corresponding to 0.2 displacements per atom, the enthalpy surpasses the level of melt-quenched SiC, the density decreases by about 15%, and the radial distribution function shows a lack of long-range order. Prior to amorphization, the surviving defects are mainly C Frenkel pairs (67%), but Si Frenkel pairs (18%) and anti-site defects (15%) are also present. The results indicate that SiC can be amorphized by C sublattice displacements. Chemical short-range disorder, arising mainly from interstitial production, plays a significant role in the amorphization.

  5. Forced displacement and women's security in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Meertens, Donny

    2010-04-01

    In the protracted Colombian conflict, assistance to internally displaced persons has developed in the context of contradictory political processes. The Colombian government's launching of a transitional justice process in the midst of armed conflict has generated a complex situation displaying both conflict and post-conflict characteristics. The progressive Constitutional Court rulings on internal displacement, in particular the gender-sensitive Auto 092, constitute an attempt to bring together humanitarian interventions and transitional justice measures in a rights-based framework. However, the national government is reluctant to adopt them fully and local realities still hamper their integrated implementation. Displaced women, therefore, remain in an especially vulnerable position. This paper argues that gender-sensitive humanitarian interventions must take into account all of these complexities of scale and political process in order to make legal frameworks more effective at the local level. In these contexts, interventions should pay particular attention to strategies that contribute to transforming pre-existing gender regimes.

  6. Simple and sensitive strain gauge displacement transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramana, Y. V.; Sarma, L. P.

    1981-09-01

    We describe a simple and sensitive strain gauge displacement transducer. It is based on the linear movement of a shaft (with two cantilevers and four strain gauges) in a tapered chamber, resulting in a change in resistance proportional to the cantilever deformation. The transducer with its Wheatstone full bridge configuration is calibrated against a mechanical dial indicator of 0.002 mm accuracy for both ac and dc voltage excitations. Its output is linear for measurements of full range displacement up to 25 mm. It has a sensitivity of ±0.0082 mm for ac excitation with a strain indicator whose resolution is ±1 μɛ. It has a dc full range sensitivity of 1.5 mV/V for excitation levels up to 5 V. It can have varied field and laboratory applications wherever displacements are precisely read, recorded, or monitored.

  7. Miscible, porous media displacements with density stratification.

    PubMed

    Riaz, Amir; Meiburg, Eckart

    2004-11-01

    High accuracy, three-dimensional numerical simulations of miscible displacements with gravity override, in both homogeneous and heterogeneous porous media, are discussed for the quarter five-spot configuration. The influence of viscous and gravitational effects on the overall displacement dynamics is described in terms of the vorticity variable. Density differences influence the flow primarily by establishing a narrow gravity layer, in which the effective Peclet number is enhanced due to the higher flow rate. Although this effect plays a dominant role in homogeneous flows, it is suppressed to some extent in heterogeneous displacements. This is a result of coupling between the viscous and permeability vorticity fields. When the viscous wavelength is much larger than the permeability wavelength, gravity override becomes more effective because coupling between the viscous and permeability vorticity fields is less pronounced. Buoyancy forces of a certain magnitude can lead to a pinch-off of the gravity layer, thereby slowing it down.

  8. Theoretical and experimental study on regenerative rotary displacer Stirling engine

    SciTech Connect

    Raggi, L.; Katsuta, Masafumi; Isshiki, Naotsugu; Isshiki, Seita

    1997-12-31

    Recently a quite new type of hot air engine called rotary displacer engine, in which the displacer is a rotating disk enclosed in a cylinder, has been conceived and developed. The working gas, contained in a notch excavated in the disk, is heated and cooled alternately, on account of the heat transferred through the enclosing cylinder that is heated at one side and cooled at the opposite one. The gas temperature oscillations cause the pressure fluctuations that get out mechanical power acting on a power piston. In order to attempt to increase the performances for this kind of engine, the authors propose three different regeneration methods. The first one comprises two coaxial disks that, revolving in opposite ways, cause a temperature gradient on the cylinder wall and a regenerative axial heat conduction through fins shaped on the cylinder inner wall. The other two methods are based on the heat transferred by a proper closed circuit that in one case has a circulating liquid inside and in the other one is formed by several heat pipes working each one for different temperatures. An engine based on the first principle, the Regenerative Tandem Contra-Rotary Displacer Stirling Engine, has been realized and experimented. In this paper experimental results with and without regeneration are reported comparatively with a detailed description of the unity. A basic explanation of the working principle of this engine and a theoretical analysis investigating the main influential parameters for the regenerative effect are done. This new rotating displacer Stirling engines, for their simplicity, are expected to attain high rotational speed especially for applications as demonstration and hobby unities.

  9. Frictional behavior of large displacement experimental faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beeler, N.M.; Tullis, T.E.; Blanpied, M.L.; Weeks, J.D.

    1996-01-01

    The coefficient of friction and velocity dependence of friction of initially bare surfaces and 1-mm-thick simulated fault gouges (400 mm at 25??C and 25 MPa normal stress. Steady state negative friction velocity dependence and a steady state fault zone microstructure are achieved after ???18 mm displacement, and an approximately constant strength is reached after a few tens of millimeters of sliding on initially bare surfaces. Simulated fault gouges show a large but systematic variation of friction, velocity dependence of friction, dilatancy, and degree of localization with displacement. At short displacement (<10 mm), simulated gouge is strong, velocity strengthening and changes in sliding velocity are accompanied by relatively large changes in dilatancy rate. With continued displacement, simulated gouges become progressively weaker and less velocity strengthening, the velocity dependence of dilatancy rate decreases, and deformation becomes localized into a narrow basal shear which at its most localized is observed to be velocity weakening. With subsequent displacement, the fault restrengthens, returns to velocity strengthening, or to velocity neutral, the velocity dependence of dilatancy rate becomes larger, and deformation becomes distributed. Correlation of friction, velocity dependence of friction and of dilatancy rate, and degree of localization at all displacements in simulated gouge suggest that all quantities are interrelated. The observations do not distinguish the independent variables but suggest that the degree of localization is controlled by the fault strength, not by the friction velocity dependence. The friction velocity dependence and velocity dependence of dilatancy rate can be used as qualitative measures of the degree of localization in simulated gouge, in agreement with previous studies. Theory equating the friction velocity dependence of simulated gouge to the sum of the friction velocity dependence of bare surfaces and the velocity

  10. A force/displacement analysis of muscle testing.

    PubMed

    Caruso, W; Leisman, G

    2000-10-01

    Manual muscle testing procedures are the subject of a force and displacement analysis. Equipment was fabricated, tested, and employed to gather force, displacement, and time data for the purpose of examining muscle-test parameters as used by clinicians in applied kinesiology. Simple mathematical procedures are used to process the data to find potential patterns of force and displacement which would correspond to the testing of strong and weak muscles of healthy subjects. Particular attention is paid to the leading edge of the force pulses, as most clinicians report they derive most of their assessment from the initial thrust imparted on the patient's limb. An analysis of the simple linear regression of the slope (distance vs force) of the leading edge of a force pulse indicates that a significantly large slope is indicative of weak muscles (as perceived by the clinician), and a small slope is indicative of strong muscles. Threshold criteria for slopes are specified to create a model that may discriminate between strong and weak muscles. The model is accurate 98% of the time compared to judgments of clinicians with more than 5 years of experience but is considerably lower for clinicians with less than five years of experience (64%). this accuracy rate indicates that the model is reliable in predicting the clinician's perception of muscle strength, and it also indicates that the testing procedure for muscle strength used by experienced clinicians in applied kinesiology are reliable. The experiment lays the groundwork for studies of the objectivity of muscle-strength assessment in applied kinesiology.

  11. Atomistic Simulation of Displacement Cascades in Zircon

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ram; Weber, William J.; Corrales, Louis R.; BP McGrail and GA Cragnolino

    2002-05-06

    Low energy displacement cascades in zircon (ZrSiO4) initiated by a Zr primary knock-on atom have been investigated by molecular dynamics simulations using a Coulombic model for long-range interactions, Buckingham potential for short-range interactions and Ziegler-Biersack potentials for close pair interactions. Displacements were found to occur mainly in the O sublattice, and O replacements by a ring mechanism were predominant. Clusters containing Si interstitials bridged by O interstitials, vacancy clusters and anti-site defects were found to occur. This Si-O-Si bridging is considerable in quenched liquid ZrSiO4.

  12. Force based displacement measurement in micromechanical devices

    SciTech Connect

    O {close_quote}Shea, S. J.; Ng, C. K.; Tan, Y. Y.; Xu, Y.; Tay, E. H.; Chua, B. L.; Tien, N. C.; Tang, X. S.; Chen, W. T.

    2001-06-18

    We demonstrate how force detection methods based on atomic force microscopy can be used to measure displacement in micromechanical devices. We show the operation of a simple microfabricated accelerometer, the proof mass of which incorporates a tip which can be moved towards an opposing surface. Both noncontact operation using long range electrostatic forces and tapping mode operation are demonstrated. The displacement sensitivity of the present device using feedback to control the tip-surface separation is approximately 1 nm. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  13. Displacement sensors using soft magnetostrictive alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hristoforou, E.; Reilly, R. E.

    1994-09-01

    We report results on the response of a family of displacement sensors, which are based on the magentostrictive delay line (MDL) technique, using current conductors orthogonal to the MDL. Such sensing technique is based on the change of the magnetic circuit at the acoustic stress point of origin due to the displacement of a soft magnetic material above it. Integrated arrays of sensors can be obtained due to the acoustic delay line technique and they can be used as tactile arrays, digitizers or devices for medical applications (gait analysis etc.), while absence of hysteresis and low cost of manufacturing make them competent in this sector of sensor market.

  14. Computing Displacements And Strains From Video Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Samuel S.; Mcneill, Stephen R.; Lansing, Matthew D.

    1996-01-01

    Subpixel digital video image correlation (SDVIC) technique for measuring in-plane displacements on surfaces of objects under loads, without contact. Used for analyses of experimental research specimens or actual service structures of virtually any size or material. Only minimal preparation of test objects needed, and no need to isolate test objects from minor vibrations or fluctuating temperatures. Technique implemented by SDVIC software, producing color-graduated, full-field representations of in-plane displacements and partial derivatives with respect to position along both principal directions in each image plane. From representations, linear strains, shear strains, and rotation fields determined. Written in C language.

  15. REDISTRIBUTOR FOR LIQUID-LIQUID EXTRACTION COLUMNS

    DOEpatents

    Bradley, J.G.

    1957-10-29

    An improved baffle plate construction to intimately mix immiscible liquid solvents for solvent extraction processes in a liquid-liquid pulse column is described. To prevent the light and heavy liquids from forming separate continuous homogeneous vertical channels through sections of the column, a baffle having radially placed rectangular louvers with deflection plates opening upon alternate sides of the baffle is placed in the column, normal to the axis. This improvement substantially completely reduces strippiig losses due to poor mixing.

  16. The Computational Properties of a Simplified Cortical Column Model

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Ramakrishnan; Koch, Christof; Mihalas, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian neocortex has a repetitious, laminar structure and performs functions integral to higher cognitive processes, including sensory perception, memory, and coordinated motor output. What computations does this circuitry subserve that link these unique structural elements to their function? Potjans and Diesmann (2014) parameterized a four-layer, two cell type (i.e. excitatory and inhibitory) model of a cortical column with homogeneous populations and cell type dependent connection probabilities. We implement a version of their model using a displacement integro-partial differential equation (DiPDE) population density model. This approach, exact in the limit of large homogeneous populations, provides a fast numerical method to solve equations describing the full probability density distribution of neuronal membrane potentials. It lends itself to quickly analyzing the mean response properties of population-scale firing rate dynamics. We use this strategy to examine the input-output relationship of the Potjans and Diesmann cortical column model to understand its computational properties. When inputs are constrained to jointly and equally target excitatory and inhibitory neurons, we find a large linear regime where the effect of a multi-layer input signal can be reduced to a linear combination of component signals. One of these, a simple subtractive operation, can act as an error signal passed between hierarchical processing stages. PMID:27617444

  17. Influence of subcascade formation on displacement damage at high PKA energies

    SciTech Connect

    Stoller, R.E.; Greenwood, L.R.

    1997-08-01

    The design of first generation fusion reactors will have to be rely on radiation effects data obtained from experiments conducted in fission reactors. Two issues must be addressed to use this data with confidence. The first is differences in the neutron energy spectrum, and the second is differences in nuclear transmutation rates. Differences in the neutron energy spectra are reflected in the energy spectra of the primary knockon atoms (PKA). The issue of PKA energy effects has been addressed through the use of displacement cascade simulations using the method of molecular dynamics (MD). Although MD simulations can provide a detailed picture of the formation and evolution of displacement cascades, they impose a substantial computational burden. However, recent advances in computing equipment permit the simulation of high energy displacement events involving more than one-million atoms; the results presented here encompass MD cascade simulation energies from near the displacement threshold to as high as 40 keV. Two parameters have been extracted from the MD simulations: the number of point defects that remain after the displacement event is completed and the fraction of the surviving interstitials that are contained in clusters. The MD values have been normalized to the number of atomic displacements calculated with the secondary displacement model by Norgett, Robinson, and Torrens (NRT).

  18. Stirring a slightly magnetized column of plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Désangles, Victor; Bousselin, Guillaume; Poyé, Alexandre; Moulin, Marc; de Poucques, Ludovic; Plihon, Nicolas; Physique statistique, Hydrodynamique, Non-Linéarités Team; Département Chimie et Physique des Solides et des Surfaces Team

    2016-10-01

    The von-Kàrmàn plasma experiment (VKP) is a cylindrical, low pressure, high density plasma experiment which confines the plasma thanks to an axial magnetic field. Currents are radially driven between a hot emissive cathode and an anode which apply a Lorentz force on the plasma together with the magnetic field. We demonstrate that current driven radially sets the plasma into rotation. LIF technique at 668.43 nm as well as Mach probes measurements have been developed and used in different regimes in order to measure the velocity of plasma and relate it to the current driven between the electrodes. The LIF signal shows an important widening which corresponds to doppler shift effect due to the velocity of the ions. This widening can be related to the Mach probes signals. In the long term views, each end of the plasma column will be rotating in an opposite direction, such as to create a large shear-layer, resulting in a von-Kàrmàn-type flow.

  19. Soil column leaching of pesticides.

    PubMed

    Katagi, Toshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    In this review, I address the practical and theoretical aspects of pesticide soil mobility.I also address the methods used to measure mobility, and the factors that influence it, and I summarize the data that have been published on the column leaching of pesticides.Pesticides that enter the unsaturated soil profile are transported downwards by the water flux, and are adsorbed, desorbed, and/or degraded as they pass through the soil. The rate of passage of a pesticide through the soil depends on the properties of the pesticide, the properties of the soil and the prevailing environmental conditions.Because large amounts of many different pesticides are used around the world, they and their degradates may sometimes contaminate groundwater at unacceptable levels.It is for this reason that assessing the transport behavior and soil mobility of pesticides before they are sold into commerce is important and is one indispensable element that regulators use to assess probable pesticide safety. Both elementary soil column leaching and sophisticated outdoor lysimeter studies are performed to measure the leaching potential for pesticides; the latter approach more reliably reflects probable field behavior, but the former is useful to initially profile a pesticide for soil mobility potential.Soil is physically heterogeneous. The structure of soil varies both vertically and laterally, and this variability affects the complex flow of water through the soil profile, making it difficult to predict with accuracy. In addition, macropores exist in soils and further add to the complexity of how water flow occurs. The degree to which soil is tilled, the density of vegetation on the surface, and the type and amounts of organic soil amendments that are added to soil further affect the movement rate of water through soil, the character of soil adsorption sites and the microbial populations that exist in the soil. Parameters that most influence the rate of pesticide mobility in soil are

  20. A Workshop Guide for Post-Secondary Displaced Homemaker Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahlberg, Maurine

    Based on a survey of displaced homemakers and displaced homemaker advisory committee members in Texas and on a literature review, this guide was developed to help leaders of displaced homemaker programs conduct workshops for their clients. Following an introduction which explains the rationale for conducting workshops for displaced homemakers, the…

  1. 24 CFR 882.810 - Displacement, relocation, and acquisition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... section. (c) Relocation assistance for displaced persons. A “displaced person” (defined in paragraph (g... displaced person must be advised of his or her rights under the Fair Housing Act (42 U.S.C. 3601-19) and, if... qualifies as a displaced person, or the amount of relocation assistance for which the person is...

  2. 24 CFR 92.353 - Displacement, relocation, and acquisition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... assistance for displaced persons—(1) General. A displaced person (defined in paragraph (c)(2) of this section... U.S.C. 4201-4655) and 49 CFR part 24. A “displaced person” must be advised of his or her rights..., safe, and sanitary replacement dwellings not located in such areas. (2) Displaced Person. (i)...

  3. 24 CFR 941.207 - Displacement, relocation, and acquisition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... paragraph (b)(1) of this section. (c) Relocation assistance for displaced persons. A “displaced person... CFR part 24. A “displaced person” shall be advised of his/her rights under the Fair Housing Act (42 U... qualifies as a “displaced person,” or the amount of relocation assistance for which the person is...

  4. Adsorption, partition, ion exchange and chemical reaction in batch reactors or in columns — A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweich, D.; Sardin, M.

    The role of linear or non-linear adsorption, mass transfer kinetics, chemical reactions and ion exchange in column tracer experiments is qualitatively dealt with. The similarity of elution curves is emphasized even for very different phenomena. Some experimental procedures are proposed to point out the principal physico-chemical phenomenon which is responsible for the shape of the adsorption isotherm deduced from batch or column experiments.

  5. Water column methanotrophy controlled by a rapid oceanographic switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinle, Lea; Graves, Carolyn; Treude, Tina; Biastoch, Arne; Ferré, Bénédicte; Bussmann, Ingeborg; Berndt, Christian; Krastel, Sebastian; James, Rachael H.; Behrens, Erik; Böning, Claus W.; Greinert, Jens; Sapart, Célia-Julia; Sommer, Stefan; Lehmann, Moritz F.; Niemann, Helge

    2015-04-01

    Large amounts of the greenhouse gas methane are released from the seabed to the water column where it may be consumed by aerobic methanotrophic bacteria. This microbial filter is consequently the last marine sink for methane before its liberation into the atmosphere. The size and activity of methanotrophic communities, which determine the capacity of the water column methane filter, are thought to be mainly controlled by nutrient and redox dynamics, but little is known about the effects of ocean currents. Here we show that cold bottom water at methane seeps west of Svalbard, containing a large number of aerobic methanotrophs, was rapidly displaced by warmer water with a considerably smaller methanotrophic community. This community replacement led to a reduction of methane oxidation rates of 60 % and was independent of methane input. Measurements of temperature and salinity, combined with the output of a high-resolution ocean/sea-ice simulation model (VIKING20) showed that this water mass exchange was caused by short-term variations of the West Spitsbergen Current (WSC), which is characterized by two principal modes: The warm core of the WSC either flows along the continental shelf break and thus above the methane seeps (nearshore mode), or it meanders offshore thereby entraining colder shelf water, which then flows over the seeps (offshore mode). We could link the larger community to the colder shelf water during the offshore mode, and the smaller community and lower methane oxidation rates to the presence of the warmer WSC water above the seeps. As a result, the meandering of the WSC can be considered as an oceanographic switch severely reducing methanotrophic activity in the water column. Output from the ORCA12 model showed that strong and fluctuating bottom currents are common features at methane seep systems. We thus argue that the variability of physical water mass transport is a globally important control on the distribution and abundance of methanotrophs and

  6. Displacement Addition on Linking Extensional Fault Arrays in the Canyonlands Graben, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Commins, D. C.; Gupta, S.; Cartwright, J. A.; Phillips, W. M.

    2003-12-01

    immediately following linkage, and recovery to a standard D-l profile is gained through this process. (5) The locus of displacement accumulation is not fixed in time; the central fault segment does not always experience the greatest displacement enhancement. Preliminary results of cosmogenic 10Be exposure dating of bedrock with quartz from the Permian Cedar Mesa Sandstone indicate recent (<10ka) timing of rapid displacement addition on linking faults.

  7. Hydrological Perturbations Drive Biogeochemical Processes in Experimental Soil Columns from the Norman Landfill Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, B.; Mohanty, B. P.; McGuire, J. T.

    2010-12-01

    Fate and transport of contaminants in saturated and unsaturated zones is governed by biogeochemical processes that are complex and non-linearly coupled to each other. A fundamental understanding of the interactions between transport and reaction processes is essential to better characterize contaminant movement in the subsurface. The objectives of this study are to: i) develop quantitative relationships between hydrological (initial and boundary conditions, hydraulic conductivity ratio, and soil layering), geochemical (mineralogy, surface area, redox potential, and organic matter) and microbiological factors (MPN) that alter the biogeochemical processes, and ii) characterize the effect of hydrologic perturbations on coupled processes occurring at the column scale. The perturbations correspond to rainfall intensity, duration of wet and dry conditions, and water chemistry (pH). Soils collected from two locations with significantly different geochemistry at the Norman landfill site are used in this study. Controlled flow experiments were conducted on: i) two homogeneous soil columns, ii) a layered soil column, iii) a soil column with embedded clay lenses, and iv) a soil column with embedded clay lenses and one central macropore. Experimental observations showed enhanced biogeochemical activity at the interface of the layered and lensed columns over the texturally homogeneous soil columns. Multivariate statistical analysis showed that the most important processes were microbial reduction of Fe(III) and SO42-, and oxidation of reduced products in the columns. Modeling results from HP1 indicate least redox activity in the homogeneous sand column while the structurally heterogeneous columns utilize oxygen and nitrate from recharge as well as iron sulfide minerals already present in the columns as electron acceptors. Furthermore, the interface of the layered and lensed soil columns acts as a hotspot of biogeochemical activity due to increased transport timescale as a

  8. Cyclic performance of concrete-filled steel batten built-up columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razzaghi, M. S.; Khalkhaliha, M.; Aziminejad, A.

    2016-03-01

    Steel built-up batten columns are common types of columns in Iran and some other parts of the world. They are economic and have acceptable performance due to gravity loads. Although several researches have been conducted on the behavior of the batten columns under axial loads, there are few available articles about their seismic performance. Experience of the past earthquakes, particularly the 2003 Bam earthquake in Iran, revealed that these structural members are seismically vulnerable. Thus, investigation on seismic performance of steel batten columns due to seismic loads and providing a method for retrofitting them are important task in seismic-prone areas. This study aims to investigate the behavior of concrete-filled batten columns due to combined axial and lateral loads. To this end, nonlinear static analyses were performed using ANSYS software. Herein, the behaviors of the steel batten columns with and without concrete core were compared. The results of this study showed that concrete-filled steel batten columns, particularly those filled with high-strength concrete, may cause significant increases in energy absorption and capacity of the columns. Furthermore, concrete core may improve post-buckling behavior of steel batten columns.

  9. Effect of column dimension on observed column efficiency in very high pressure liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wu, Naijun; Bradley, Ashley C

    2012-10-26

    The effect of extra-column volume on observed linear velocity was investigated for columns of various internal diameters in very high pressure liquid chromatography. The results showed that the observed linear velocities were approximately 4.5, 9.5, 16.8, and 39.5% lower than the linear velocities corrected for the extra-column volume contribution for 4.6, 3.0, 2.1, and 1.0mm internal diameter columns, respectively. An empirical relationship between extra-column band broadening and extra-column volume was obtained using 50 cm long tubings of various internal diameters. The peak variance from the extra-column volume is near linearly proportional to the square of the extra-column volume for tubings with 0.0635-0.178 mm (0.025-0.07 in.) i.d. using a 50/50 acetonitrile/water mobile phase at flow rates greater than 0.3 mL/min. The effect of column internal diameter and column length on observed efficiency was studied using 50mm columns with four different column internal diameters and 2.1mm i.d columns with three different lengths. The results showed that the observed column efficiencies for 3.0, 2.1, and 1.0mm internal diameter columns were 18, 33, and 73% lower than that for a 4.6mm internal diameter column for benzophenone (k=5.5), respectively. An approximate 20% decrease in theoretical plate number was observed for propiophenone (k=3.3) using a 50 mm × 2.1 mm column packed with 1.7 μm particles compared to a 150 mm × 2.1 mm column packed with 5.0 μm particles, while the former column provided 9 fold faster separation. It is the column to extra column volume ratio instead of absolute extra-column volume that determines the degree of extra-column band-broadening in VHPLC.

  10. Synthesis of Ion Microbeam Column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mui, Peter Hon-Fung

    1995-01-01

    Electrostatic lenses have traditionally been designed by analyzing and combining different electrode configurations. Computational complexity typically limits such systems to a few geometrically simple elements, where the component interactions are neglected and not exploited to combat the various aberrations. Recently, Szilagyi and Szep have demonstrated that an axially symmetric column of circular plates, with the electrode potentials optimized for focusing, can surpass the typical conventional designs by many times in performance. Following the footsteps of pioneers like Burfoot and Hawkes, we partition the plates in order to transcend the limitations set by Scherzer's theorem on the chromatic and spherical aberrations of axially symmetric structures. Two algorithms, one based upon integral asymptotics and one upon the Levinson algorithm. for Toeplitz matrix inversion, are developed to complement the charge-density method in analyzing the new column structures. Various optimization schemes are combined to avoid shallow minima at a reasonable computational cost. With each plate partitioned into four sectors, we show that the interactions between the monopole and the quadrupole components can increase the output current density by more than 400% over the axially symmetric structure. By adjusting the sector potentials, we can realize systems capable of both focusing and deflecting the beam. In comparison to some existing designs, our systems excel in both performance and compactness, sometimes by many hundred percents. We then further partition the plates to generate the "octupole" deflectors and correctors. We show that the "octupole" deflectors can drastically slow down the beam degradation with deflection distance and that the correctors can further increase the output current density by more than 300%. Finally, we apply linear system theories to the study of the first-order properties of optical systems with different symmetries. We showed, without resorting to

  11. Collapse of a Liquid Column: Numerical Simulation and Experimental Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruchaga, Marcela A.; Celentano, Diego J.; Tezduyar, Tayfun E.

    2007-03-01

    This paper is focused on the numerical and experimental analyses of the collapse of a liquid column. The measurements of the interface position in a set of experiments carried out with shampoo and water for two different initial column aspect ratios are presented together with the corresponding numerical predictions. The experimental procedure was found to provide acceptable recurrence in the observation of the interface evolution. Basic models describing some of the relevant physical aspects, e.g. wall friction and turbulence, are included in the simulations. Numerical experiments are conducted to evaluate the influence of the parameters involved in the modeling by comparing the results with the data from the measurements. The numerical predictions reasonably describe the physical trends.

  12. Displacement Damage in Bipolar Linear Integrated Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rax, B. G.; Johnston, A. H.; Miyahira, T.

    2000-01-01

    Although many different processes can be used to manufacture linear integrated circuits, the process that is used for most circuits is optimized for high voltage -- a total power supply voltage of about 40 V -- and low cost. This process, which has changed little during the last twenty years, uses lateral and substrate p-n-p transistors. These p-n-p transistors have very wide base regions, increasing their sensitivity to displacement damage from electrons and protons. Although displacement damage effects can be easily treated for individual transistors, the net effect on linear circuits can be far more complex because circuit operation often depends on the interaction of several internal transistors. Note also that some circuits are made with more advanced processes with much narrower base widths. Devices fabricated with these newer processes are not expected to be significantly affected by displacement damage for proton fluences below 1 x 10(exp 12) p/sq cm. This paper discusses displacement damage in linear integrated circuits with more complex failure modes than those exhibited by simpler devices, such as the LM111 comparator, where the dominant response mode is gain degradation of the input transistor. Some circuits fail catastrophically at much lower equivalent total dose levels compared to tests with gamma rays. The device works satisfactorily up to nearly 1 Mrad(Si) when it is irradiated with gamma rays, but fails catastrophically between 50 and 70 krad(Si) when it is irradiated with protons.

  13. Insect Wing Displacement Measurement Using Digital Holography

    SciTech Connect

    Aguayo, Daniel D.; Mendoza Santoyo, Fernando; Torre I, Manuel H. de la; Caloca Mendez, Cristian I.

    2008-04-15

    Insects in flight have been studied with optical non destructive techniques with the purpose of using meaningful results in aerodynamics. With the availability of high resolution and large dynamic range CCD sensors the so called interferometric digital holographic technique was used to measure the surface displacement of in flight insect wings, such as butterflies. The wings were illuminated with a continuous wave Verdi laser at 532 nm, and observed with a CCD Pixelfly camera that acquire images at a rate of 11.5 frames per second at a resolution of 1392x1024 pixels and 12 Bit dynamic range. At this frame rate digital holograms of the wings were captured and processed in the usual manner, namely, each individual hologram is Fourier processed in order to find the amplitude and phase corresponding to the digital hologram. The wings displacement is obtained when subtraction between two digital holograms is performed for two different wings position, a feature applied to all consecutive frames recorded. The result of subtracting is seen as a wrapped phase fringe pattern directly related to the wing displacement. The experimental data for different butterfly flying conditions and exposure times are shown as wire mesh plots in a movie of the wings displacement.

  14. Ko Displacement Theory for Structural Shape Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.

    2010-01-01

    The development of the Ko displacement theory for predictions of structure deformed shapes was motivated in 2003 by the Helios flying wing, which had a 247-ft (75-m) wing span with wingtip deflections reaching 40 ft (12 m). The Helios flying wing failed in midair in June 2003, creating the need to develop new technology to predict in-flight deformed shapes of unmanned aircraft wings for visual display before the ground-based pilots. Any types of strain sensors installed on a structure can only sense the surface strains, but are incapable to sense the overall deformed shapes of structures. After the invention of the Ko displacement theory, predictions of structure deformed shapes could be achieved by feeding the measured surface strains into the Ko displacement transfer functions for the calculations of out-of-plane deflections and cross sectional rotations at multiple locations for mapping out overall deformed shapes of the structures. The new Ko displacement theory combined with a strain-sensing system thus created a revolutionary new structure- shape-sensing technology.

  15. RECOVERY OF METAL USING ALUMINUM DISPLACEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The removal of typical metals (Cu, Pb, Sn, Ni) from printed circuit and metal finishing waste streams was evaluated using displacement with aluminum. he metal is recovered as non-hazardous metal particles and can be recycled by smelting. n acceptable aluminum metal configuration ...

  16. Opening Doors for the Displaced Worker.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Martha Norris

    2000-01-01

    Describes the many benefits now available to laid-off and displaced textile and apparel-related workers through the North American Free Trade Agreement's Transitional Adjustment Allowance (NAFTA-TAA), which allows them to attend college for the first time. Examines the effectiveness of the TAA program and concludes that there is room for…

  17. Retraining Displaced Workers--Barriers and Facilitators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolansky, William D.

    Although plant closings and layoffs have been happening for a long time, today's recessions, major changes in the structure of the economy, and a tight job market have combined to make plant closings a more serious problem. Workers are faced with unemployment from both traditional labor-displacing changes, such as the increasing use of robotics;…

  18. Job Displacement and the Rural Worker.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Podgursky, Michael

    High rates of unemployment in rural areas poses questions as what education can do with the problem. This report examines the effects of rural American economies as they grow away from agriculture and toward dependence on manufacturing and service industries. Using data from the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics' Displaced Worker Survey, the…

  19. Positive displacement cylinder measures corrosive liquid volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mariman, R. A.; Vendl, C. J.

    1966-01-01

    Positive displacement cylinder accurately measures volumetric flow rates of corrosive liquids. The cylinder is compatible with corrosive liquids and handles flow rates from zero to 75 gpm at pressures to 900 psig with an accuracy of 0.25 per cent.

  20. Effect of aileron displacement on wing characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heald, R H

    1933-01-01

    The effect of aileron displacement on wing characteristics has been investigated for the Clark Y and the U.S.A. 27 wing sections equipped with rectangular ailerons. The airfoils, rectangular in plan, and having a 10 inch chord and 60 inch span, were mounted on a model fuselage.