Science.gov

Sample records for combat air vehicles

  1. Origin and Control of the Flow Structure on Unmanned Combat Air Vehicle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    Prescrtbed by ANSI Ski Z3S.18 AFOSR Final Repot 013108 ORIGIN AND CONTROL OF THE FLOW STRUCTURE ON UNMANNED COMBAT AIR VEHICLES AFOSR GRANT #FA9550-05...1991) described low-dimensional models for flows past a grooved channel and circular cylinders. By employing a Galerkin method, a governing partial

  2. Preliminary performance estimates of an oblique, all-wing, remotely piloted vehicle for air-to-air combat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelms, W. P., Jr.; Bailey, R. O.

    1974-01-01

    A computerized aircraft synthesis program has been used to assess the effects of various vehicle and mission parameters on the performance of an oblique, all-wing, remotely piloted vehicle (RPV) for the highly maneuverable, air-to-air combat role. The study mission consists of an outbound cruise, an acceleration phase, a series of subsonic and supersonic turns, and a return cruise. The results are presented in terms of both the required vehicle weight to accomplish this mission and the combat effectiveness as measured by turning and acceleration capability. This report describes the synthesis program, the mission, the vehicle, and results from sensitivity studies. An optimization process has been used to establish the nominal RPV configuration of the oblique, all-wing concept for the specified mission. In comparison to a previously studied conventional wing-body canard design for the same mission, this oblique, all-wing nominal vehicle is lighter in weight and has higher performance.

  3. Customer Service Analysis of Air Combat Command Vehicle Maintenance Support

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-01

    levels of Vehicle Maintenance support. The research sample therefore was a nonprobability purposive sample limited to specific customers at ACC bases...accordance with the rules necessary to perform parametric analysis, even though this was a nonprobability purposive sample . However, the researchers...36 Summary .. ... . 38 III. Methodology 40 Literature Review .. . . 41 Population and Sample Identification 41 External Audit . . 43 Survey Design

  4. Unmanned Combat Aerial Vehicles: A Close Air Support Alternative

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    War College, Maxwell AFB AL, Jones Auditorium, 24 October 2002. 30 Terry Somerville , “Global Strike Task Force—Kicking Down the Door”, Air Force...2002, 34. 49 Anne Marie Squeo, “Pentagon’s Aerodynamic Shift—Ascendant Unmanned Planes May Mothball Some Manned Ones,” The Wall Street Journal, 14...2002. Somerville , Terry. “Global Strike Task Force—Kicking Down the Door.” Air Force Link, 10 August 2001, n.p. On-line. Internet, 12 November 2002

  5. 2008 Combat Vehicles Conference

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-22

    General Michael M. Brogan Combat Vehicles Conference Marine Corps Systems Command 21 October 2008 2 MCSC •LAV •AAV •Tank •HMMWV/ ECV •MRAP PEO LS...34,226 Total 56,649 1985 IOC 1996 M1114 armored HMMWV Limited Production 2006 M1100 series begins fielding scalable armor 2009-10 ECV II

  6. 2011 Combat Vehicles Conference

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-26

    Capability-Platform (JBC-P) • Light-weight Crew-served Weapons • Joint Capability Release ( JCR ) • Combat Vehicle Improvements Mr. Scott Davis PEO...WIN-T INC 3 JTRS CREW V2 Relocation/V3 CS 11-12 OoC ( JCR ) BFT II VRC 103 & 104 CS 13-14 MSS Duke TI OSRVT (Rover 6) Nett

  7. Combat vehicle stereo HMD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rallison, Richard D.; Schicker, Scott R.

    1991-08-01

    Combat vehicles of the future may be devoid of direct vision ports but will contain multiple displays creating a virtual environment. The transition from real to virtual can be facilitated by the use of a helmet-mounted display (HMD) that projects a portion of the virtual environment over the real world. The authors propose a simple, light-weight color stereo projection system that has the potential for meeting most of the desired characteristics at a reasonable cost. Imaging is accomplished using CR39 ophthalmic substrates off- axis 15 deg and distorted to correct for astigmatism. The images from two sources are transferred to the focuses by coherent fiber image conduit shaped at one end to minimize field curvature. The demonstrated field of view (FOV) is 15v X 40h deg using readily available image conduit and colored transparencies; maximum FOV is 60v X 90h deg.

  8. Combatting urban air pollution through Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) analysis, testing, and demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    Deteriorating urban air quality ranks as a top concern worldwide, since air pollution adversely affects both public health and the environment. The outlook for improving air quality in the world`s megacities need not be bleak, however, The use of natural gas as a transportation fuel can measurably reduce urban pollution levels, mitigating chronic threats to health and the environment. Besides being clean burning, natural gas vehicles (NGVs) are economical to operate and maintain. The current cost of natural gas is lower than that of gasoline. Natural gas also reduces the vehicle`s engine wear and noise level, extends engine life, and decreases engine maintenance. Today, about 700,000 NGVs operate worldwide, the majority of them converted from gasoline or diesel fuel. This article discusses the economic, regulatory and technological issues of concern to the NGV industry.

  9. 2006 Combat Vehicles Conference

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-25

    and Agreements Supply Chain Management Logistics Solutions for the Warfighter Guam & Saipan Diego Garcia Mediterranean SS KOCAK MV PHILLIPS MV...BUTTON MV LOPEZ USNS STOCKHAM SS PLESS MV HAUGE MV LUMMUS MV ANDERSON MV BONNYMAN USNS MARTIN SS OBREGON MV BAUGH MV WILLIAMS MV BOBO USNS WHEAT MPS...importantly it delivers the most valuable weapon on the battlefield – a soldier. LTC Erik Kurilla CDR, 1-24 Infantry Stryker Vehicles are 312 pieces

  10. 2010 Combat Vehicles Conference

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-09

    Overview Vehicles Power Road Ahead 10 11 0.00 20,000,000.00 40,000,000.00 60,000,000.00 80,000,000.00 100,000,000.00 120,000,000.00 LAV-25 HMMWV ( ECV ... ECV ) M1151 M-ATV Purchase Cost Purchase Cost 0 5000 10000 15000 20000 25000 30000 35000 40000 45000 LAV-25 HMMWV ( ECV ) M1151 M-ATV Cougar CAT I

  11. The Last Manned Fighter: Replacing Manned Fighters with Unmanned Combat Air Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    effects on aircraft design , particularly for stealth. Human pilots require space—space for an ejection seat , space for a control panel, space for...include no cockpit interface (which is signifi- cant for design , ergonomics , glass multifunction displays, etc.), no life-support equipment or...Looney, Prepress Production Daniel Armstrong, Cover Design Please send inquiries or comments to Editor The Wright Flyer Papers Air Command and Staff

  12. Air Combat Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    By adapting COSMIC's One-on-One Adaptive Maneuvering Logic (AML) for two versus one simulation, Link Division was able to reduce software and other design/development costs. Enhancements to the AML program developed by Link for simulation of two-versus one combat, two trainees can simultaneously engage a computer driven target, thereby doubling the training utility of the simulator.

  13. Interactive computerized air combat opponent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hankins, W. W., III

    1976-01-01

    A computer program developed to fly interactive one-on-one simulated air combat maneuvers against human pilots is described. The program which is called Adaptive Maneuvering Logic (AML), is being used in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center's Differential Maneuvering Simulator. The basic control logic evaluates the relative states of the two aircraft and reacts by choosing the best of several elemental maneuvers. Pilot comments and results obtained when the computer was flown against combat-qualified fighter pilots indicate that the program performs realistic maneuvers and offers a very competitive standard pilot.

  14. Air Combat Maneuvering Performance Measurement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-09-01

    several major purposes. First, it would provide improved feedback to Air Combat Maneuvering (ACM) students concerning their progress through the flight...materials and syllabi. Consistent patterns of weakness in the students would serve as an indicator of a need for adjustment and improvement in the program...adversary maneuvers. BFM students learn to perceive the aspect angle, angle-off, and closure rate of the opposing aircraft. They learn the proper maneuver

  15. Defense Science Board Study on Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and Uninhabited Combat Aerial Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-02-01

    Defense Science Board Study on Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and Uninhabited Combat Aerial Vehicles February 2004 Office...COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Defense Science Board Study on Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and Uninhabited Combat Aerial Vehicles 5a. CONTRACT...the Defense Science Board Task Force on Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and Uninhabited Combat Aerial Vehicles I am pleased to forward the final report of

  16. Composite structural armor for combat vehicle applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haskell, William E., III; Alesi, A. L.; Parsons, G. R.

    1990-01-01

    Several projects that have demonstrated the advantages of using thick composite armor technology for structural applications in armored combat vehicles are discussed. The first involved composite cargo doors for the Marine Corps LVTP-7 amphibious landing vehicle. Another was a demonstration composite turret that offered a weight reduction of 15.5 percent. The advantages of this composite armor compared to metallic armors used for combat vehicle hull and turret applications are reduced weight at equal ballistic protection; reduced back armor spall; excellent corrosion resistance; reduced production costs by parts consolidation; and inherent thermal and acoustic insulative properties. Based on the encouraging results of these past programs, the Demonstration Composite Hull Program was started in September 1986. To demonstrate this composite armor technology, the Army's newest infantry fighting vehicle, the Bradley Fighting Vehicle (BFV), was selected as a model. A composite infantry fighting vehicle, designated the CIFV for this program, has been designed and fabricated and is currently undergoing a 6000 mile field endurance test. The CIFV demonstration vehicle uses the BFV engine, transmission, suspension, track and other equipment.

  17. Night Performance of Combat Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-08

    from dark- full moon to-dark-overcast and record light level for each run. In each case instruct the driver to operate at maximum safe speed. c...elec- trical power demands on the vehicle determined. Tests are conducted at realistic ambient light levels from dark- full moon to dark-overcast. The

  18. Armored Combat Vehicles Science and Technology Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-01

    analysis0 SS 94 GHz TRANSMITTER/RECEIVER MODULE Provide low cost transciever modules for pulsed, FMCW or FSK radars at 35-100 Gfz. STAC!LTZATTOU...prepared by TACOM. 3 !. ... Ill11111iilIl 0 1 lPI IPIt’IlA BEST AVAILABLE.COPY The Armored Combat Vehicle Science and Technology Base Development program...classes of Army Systems including Radar , E-O, AD. Communications, Missiles and EW. NETWORK MANAGEMENT INTEGRATION - BATTLEFIELD INFORMATION

  19. The second X-45A Unmanned Combat Air Vehicle (UCAV) technology demonstrator aircraft during its maiden flight. The flight marks another milestone for the UCAV program, and verified the aircraft's flight control software

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-11-21

    The second X-45A Unmanned Combat Air Vehicle (UCAV) technology demonstrator completed its first flight on November 21, 2002, after taking off from a dry lakebed at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards Air Force Base, California. X-45A vehicle two flew for approximately 30 minutes and reached an airspeed of 195 knots and an altitude of 7500 feet. This flight validated the functionality of the UCAV flight software on the second air vehicle. Dryden is supporting the DARPA/Boeing team in the design, development, integration, and demonstration of the critical technologies, processes, and system attributes leading to an operational UCAV system. Dryden support of the X-45A demonstrator system includes analysis, component development, simulations, ground and flight tests.

  20. Nuclear air cushion vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    The state-of-the-art of the still-conceptual nuclear air cushion vehicle, particularly the nuclear powerplant is identified. Using mission studies and cost estimates, some of the advantages of nuclear power for large air cushion vehicles are described. The technology studies on mobile nuclear powerplants and conceptual ACV systems/missions studies are summarized.

  1. Aviators, Air Combat, and Combat Stress: An Air Force Commander’s Primer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-02-22

    airmen, and reviews the risky nature of the air combat environment. It goes on the describe the impact of stress on airmen and covers the Air Force’s...characteristics of airmen, and reviews the risky nature of the air combat environment. It goes on to describe the impact of stress on airmen and covers...sections review Air Force policy regarding aircrew psychological casualties as it has developed since the years of the First World War. The final parts of

  2. Nuclear air cushion vehicles.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    This paper serves several functions. It identifies the 'state-of-the-art' of the still-conceptual nuclear air cushion vehicle, particularly the nuclear powerplant. Using mission studies and cost estimates, the report describes some of the advantages of nuclear power for large air cushion vehicles. The paper also summarizes the technology studies on mobile nuclear powerplants and conceptual ACV systems/missions studies that have been performed at NASA Lewis Research Center.

  3. Automated Carrier Landing of an Unmanned Combat Aerial Vehicle Using Dynamic Inversion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    Combat Aerial Vehicle (UCAV) on an aircraft carrier. The Joint Unmanned Combat Air System (J-UCAS) Equivalent Model was used as the test aircraft . An...inner-loop DI controller was developed to control the pitch, roll, and yaw rate dynamics of the aircraft , while an outer-loop DI controller was...possible. First, I would like to thank the members of the AFRL/VACC directorate for their support on the aircraft model, especially Bill Blake, Jacob

  4. The Army’s Ground Combat Vehicle Program and Alternatives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    Current and Upgraded Bradley Infantry Fighting Vehicle Notional Ground Combat Vehicle Israeli Namer Armored Personnel Carrier German Puma ...19Option 1: Purchase the Israeli Namer APC 21 Option 2: Upgrade the Bradley IFV 26 Option 3: Purchase the German Puma IFV 28 Option 4: Cancel the GCV Program...2008 German Puma IFV 35 to 47 6 6.9 2011 2013 dollars) (Millions of Unit Costb Existing Vehicles Vehicles Requiring Development Into Service Year of

  5. Low Cost Air Combat Training System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Earl

    1987-10-01

    Air combat training has evolved into a highly sophisticated and expensive process. To effectively train fighter pilots in air-to-air combat, interaction between pilots is essential. This interaction can be accomplished using multiple low cost laser image projections of friend and/or foe aircraft controlled by pilots in a multiple dome configuration. A Laser Target Projector (LTP) produces a calligraphically written aircraft model comprised of up to 200 vectors which are updated at a 60 Hz rate. The resulting wire frame image imparts both position, velocity, distance and altitude information to the pilots. Using a laser light source guarantees high luminance levels and provides large depths of field. This large depth of field allows for unique packaging arrangements and cost saving attributes. The LTP has total dome coverage via a computer-controlled, servo-driven, gimb-alled two-axis assembly that projects the wire frame aircraft image onto the dome surface. To unburden the host computer, all dome-to-dome communication, real world-to-dome coordinate transformations and all geometry corrections are done by a special purpose high-speed computer called a Dome Master. Each dome has one Dome Master that can drive up to six LTP's. This paper will deal with the technical aspects of the design and development of the LTP and Dome Master as a low cost air combat training system.

  6. U.S. Air Force Combat Psychiatry.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    Philippines in 1942. Completing a combat tour in prior wars was not without psychological and psychosomatic cost. The prolonged tension led to progressive...in Pak Five. The theory was, a new pilot should have time to adjust to the concept of being blown away byh thoywsa e iltsol aetm real enemy bullet...be a *I roar of motors in the air, but that is the normal state over an airfield. The next minute enemy fighter planes are buzzing the field, bullets

  7. 2009 Combat Vehicles Conference (BRIEFING CHARTS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-14

    Ground Combat Systems Organizational Structure PEO BG David Ogg DPEO Mr. Mike Asada APEO Systems Engineering/ Chief Systems Engineer Mr. Anthony...Desmond APEO Business Management Mr. Art White PEO XO LTC Steven T. Wall APEO Corporate Information Mr. Don Papke APEO Operations Management Ms. Kristi...Sharp USMC LNO Maj Stefan Sneden ATEC LNO Ms. Gretchen McCoy APEO Logistics Mr. Ken Seibel Lightweight 155MM Howitzer Robotic Systems JPO Heavy

  8. Status of Efforts to Initiate an Amphibious Combat Vehicle Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-10

    the ACV program until 2018. the Department of Defense (DOD) canceled the Marine Corps’ Expeditionary Fighting Vehicle acquisition program due to...concerns regarding its affordability. The Amphibious Combat Vehicle ( ACV ) is a potential, but not yet initiated, successor program to the Expeditionary...findings and conclusions based on our audit objectives. This is the first of the mandated GAO reports. It discusses (1) the current status of the ACV

  9. Microclimate Cooling for Combat Vehicle Crewmen

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-18

    four days comprised the data generating portion of the trial. Day ;3 involved wearing the fully closed CW clothing system over the CVC uniform (MOPP...to a building where all data collection ,equipment was located. The vehicle had been wired for temperature measurements, ,and a network of cables...connected from the vehicle to the measuring and :monitoring equipment. This allowed on-line data collection and processing of Tre, ;Ts, interior and

  10. Combat Vehicle Cooling/Heating Design Investigation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    the performance and sizing effects of high humidity on the crew compartment conditioning equipment. Therefore, in 4 this report, when the term "off...temperature. Previous Army studies had fixed 850F effective tem- perature (ET) as the maximum allowable vehicle temperature to prevent personnel...studied by TRADOC. For this reason, a clear-cut selec- tion of a crew compartment design effective temperature was not possible for K 1this study

  11. Future Capabilities and Roles of Uninhabited Combat Aerial Vehicles (UCAV)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    http://www.darpa.mil/j-ucas/j-ucas.htm> [8 May 2004]. John W. Flade. “Teaching a New Dog Old Trick: Replacing Man with Artificial Intelligence in...Combat Aircraft.” USAWC Strategy Research Project. U.S. Army War College, Carlisle Barracks, PA 01 April 2000. David Glade . “Unmanned Aerial Vehicles... John P. Jumper. “Statement of

  12. Optics detection and laser countermeasures on a combat vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjöqvist, Lars; Allard, Lars; Pettersson, Magnus; Börjesson, Per; Lindskog, Nils; Bodin, Johan; Widén, Anders; Persson, Hâkan; Fredriksson, Jan; Edström, Sten

    2016-10-01

    Magnifying optical assemblies used for weapon guidance or rifle scopes may possess a threat for a combat vehicle and its personnel. Detection and localisation of optical threats is consequently of interest in military applications. Typically a laser system is used in optics detection, or optical augmentation, to interrogate a scene of interest to localise retroreflected laser radiation. One interesting approach for implementing optics detection on a combat vehicle is to use a continuous scanning scheme. In addition, optics detection can be combined with laser countermeasures, or a laser dazzling function, to efficiently counter an optical threat. An optics detection laser sensor demonstrator has been implemented on a combat vehicle. The sensor consists of a stabilised gimbal and was integrated together with a LEMUR remote electro-optical sight. A narrow laser slit is continuously scanned around the horizon to detect and locate optical threats. Detected threats are presented for the operator within the LEMUR presentation system, and by cueing a countermeasure laser installed in the LEMUR sensor housing threats can be defeated. Results obtained during a field demonstration of the optics detection sensor and the countermeasure laser will be presented. In addition, results obtained using a dual-channel optics detection system designed for false alarm reduction are also discussed.

  13. Multidimensional scaling analysis of simulated air combat maneuvering performance data.

    PubMed

    Polzella, D J; Reid, G B

    1989-02-01

    This paper describes the decomposition of air combat maneuvering by means of multidimensional scaling (MDS). MDS analyses were applied to performance data obtained from expert and novice pilots during simulated air-to-air combat. The results of these analyses revealed that the performance of expert pilots is characterized by advantageous maneuverability and intelligent energy management. It is argued that MDS, unlike simpler metrics, permits the investigator to achieve greater insights into the underlying structure associated with performance of a complex task.

  14. Air cushion vehicles: A briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. L.; Finnegan, P. M.

    1971-01-01

    Experience and characteristics; the powering, uses, and implications of large air cushion vehicles (ACV); and the conceptual design and operation of a nuclear powered ACV freighter and supporting facilities are described.

  15. Marine Corps Amphibious Combat Vehicle (ACV) and Marine Personnel Carrier (MPC): Background and Issues for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-26

    CRS Report for Congress Prepared for Members and Committees of Congress Marine Corps Amphibious Combat Vehicle ( ACV ) and Marine...Amphibious Combat Vehicle ( ACV ) and Marine Personnel Carrier (MPC):Background and Issues for Congress 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Marine Corps Amphibious Combat Vehicle ( ACV ) and Marine Personnel Carrier (MPC

  16. Marine Corps Amphibious Combat Vehicle (ACV) and Marine Personnel Carrier (MPC): Background and Issues for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-28

    Marine Corps Amphibious Combat Vehicle ( ACV ) and Marine Personnel Carrier (MPC): Background and Issues for Congress Andrew Feickert...00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Marine Corps Amphibious Combat Vehicle ( ACV ) and Marine Personnel Carrier (MPC):Background and...Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Marine Corps Amphibious Combat Vehicle ( ACV ) and Marine Personnel Carrier (MPC) Congressional Research Service Summary On

  17. A two-dimensional air-to-air combat game - Toward an air-combat advisory system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuman, Frank

    1987-01-01

    Air-to-air combat is modeled as a discrete differential game, and by constraining the game to searching for the best guidance laws from the sets of those considered for each opponent, feedback and outcome charts are obtained which can be used to turn one of the automatic opponents into an intelligent opponent against a human pilot. A one-on-one two-dimensional fully automatic, or manned versus automatic, air-to-air combat game has been designed which includes both attack and evasion alternatives for both aircraft. Guidance law selection occurs by flooding the initial-condition space with four simulated fights for each initial condition, depicting the various attack/evasion strategies for the two opponents, and recording the outcomes. For each initial condition, the minimax method from differential games is employed to determine the best choice from the available strategies.

  18. Active Behavior Recognition in Beyond Visual Range Air Combat

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    it takes to confidently classify agent behaviors. We present a formalism and algorithm for integrated planning and recognition , as well as its...BEHAVIOR RECOGNITION IN BVR AIR COMBAT useful could help provide insight into intelligent Q-value initialization and better guide the search algorithm . 7...Active Behavior Recognition in Beyond Visual Range Air Combat Ron Alford RONALD.ALFORD.CTR@NRL.NAVY.MIL ASEE Postdoctoral Fellow; Naval Research

  19. Analysis of a Light Cross Country Combat Vehicle - The Cobra

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1951-06-01

    it, and the difficulty of training operators; Besides*, equivalent effects are attainable by multiple-=guii salvos, f. A,sa-tisfarctQry^cha.iftce...atxlyOO^O^^r^s, " _._""’.._ ,- h. An extremely effective combination involves the use of four günsj, the new BAT projectile:, and tile Ciorrelated...de-grada’tipn to be anticipated between’’-’laboratory5’’ and "combat"’’ effectiveness vehicle- employment raises many questions, of types

  20. The Army’s Ground Combat Vehicle (GCV) Program: Background and Issues for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    Primes,” Defense News, May 18, 2009. 7 Marjorie Censer and Kate Brannen , “Army Assessing Brigade Combat Modernization in Plan Due to OSD...noted, information in this section is taken from Kate Brannen , “Army Launches Ground Combat Vehicle Contest,” Army Times, February 26, 2010. For... Brannen , “Army Launches Ground Combat Vehicle Contest,” Army Times, February 26, 2010. 16 Matthew Cox, “U.S. Army Chief Casey: Make GCV Lighter

  1. The Virtual Combat Air Staff. The Promise of Information Technologies,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-08-07

    Resource \\ cut 1 Combat i 1 power 1 T Chain of command & support hierarchy 1 1— Combat pow (air wings er 1 1...communications power at his fingertips than the entire Combat Operations Center used in two months in Desert Storm. The "L- T " called out to his boss...MR759.cover 8/7/96 12:07 PM Page 1 <^ Arthur F. Huber Philip S. Sauer J. Lawrence Hollett Kenneth Keskel William L. Shelton, Jr. John T

  2. Army Future Combat System (FCS) "Spin-Outs" and Ground Combat Vehicle (GCV): Background and Issues for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-30

    Vehicle (GCV): Background and Issues for Congress Andrew Feickert Specialist in Military Ground Forces Nathan Jacob Lucas Section Research Manager ...by 2017 . The Army states that a “new Ground Combat Vehicle, synchronized with upgrades, reset and divestiture of current vehicles is the most...not only because of its proven ability to manage highly conceptual and scientifically challenging projects, but also because he reportedly felt that

  3. The first X-45A Unmanned Combat Air Vehicle (UCAV) technology demonstrator completed its sixth flight on Dec. 19, 2002, raising its landing gear in flight for the first time. The X-45A flew for 40 minutes and reached an airspeed of 195 knots

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-12-19

    The first X-45A Unmanned Combat Air Vehicle (UCAV) technology demonstrator completed its sixth flight on Dec. 19, 2002, raising its landing gear in flight for the first time. The X-45A flew for 40 minutes and reached an airspeed of 195 knots and an altitude of 7,500 feet. Dryden is supporting the DARPA/Boeing team in the design, development, integration, and demonstration of the critical technologies, processes, and system attributes leading to an operational UCAV system. Dryden support of the X-45A demonstrator system includes analysis, component development, simulations, ground and flight tests.

  4. Artificial immune system approach for air combat maneuvering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneshige, John; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje

    2007-04-01

    Since future air combat missions will involve both manned and unmanned aircraft, the primary motivation for this research is to enable unmanned aircraft with intelligent maneuvering capabilities. During air combat maneuvering, pilots use their knowledge and experience of maneuvering strategies and tactics to determine the best course of action. As a result, we try to capture these aspects using an artificial immune system approach. The biological immune system protects the body against intruders by recognizing and destroying harmful cells or molecules. It can be thought of as a robust adaptive system that is capable of dealing with an enormous variety of disturbances and uncertainties. However, another critical aspect of the immune system is that it can remember how previous encounters were successfully defeated. As a result, it can respond faster to similar encounters in the future. This paper describes how an artificial immune system is used to select and construct air combat maneuvers. These maneuvers are composed of autopilot mode and target commands, which represent the low-level building blocks of the parameterized system. The resulting command sequences are sent to a tactical autopilot system, which has been enhanced with additional modes and an aggressiveness factor for enabling high performance maneuvers. Just as vaccinations train the biological immune system how to combat intruders, training sets are used to teach the maneuvering system how to respond to different enemy aircraft situations. Simulation results are presented, which demonstrate the potential of using immunized maneuver selection for the purposes of air combat maneuvering.

  5. Study of passive fuel tank inerting systems for ground combat vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormick, Steven J.; Motzenbecker, Peter F.; Clauson, Michael J.

    1988-09-01

    Many flammable materials are carried aboard combat vehicles, including fuel, hydraulic fluid, and munitions. A fire involving any of these can lead to destruction of the vehicle and injury to the crew. Ground combat vehicles have relied on fire extinguishing systems to protect the vehicles and crew, while aircraft use passive inerting techniques as well as fire extinguishing systems. The apparent disparity between ground combat vehicles and aircraft has caused the U.S. Congress to direct the Secretary of the Army to examine the use of passive, multiple-hit, fuel tank inerting systems in tracked and wheeled vehicles. This report examines passive fuel tank inerting techniques and provides an assessment of their applicability to ground combat vehicles. The extent of the hazard posed by the combat vehicle fuel tanks has been defined. The adequacy of the technology in reducing this hazard is evaluated for each technique considered. The current technology for the suppression of fires in and from vehicle fuel tanks available to and in use by the armed services, other government agencies, the private sector, and foreign armed services has also been examined. Attention was restricted to passive systems (systems which do not require any mechanical or electrical activation) which can suppress multiple occurrences of fire. Both fuel tank fillers and systems which surround the fuel tanks were considered. A review of currently available passive fuel tank inerting technologies has shown that the majority of these techniques are not effective for ground combat vehicles considering the large antiarmor threats. A significant quantity of testing has been conducted which bears this out. An exception to this are fuel tank jackets which show great promise in improving ground combat fire survivability. Futher development work must be done before this approach can be integrated into production vehicles or retrofitted into fielded vehicles. Proper fuel system and vehicle design, in

  6. Elevations. March Air Force Base, Riverside, California, Combat Operations Center, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Elevations. March Air Force Base, Riverside, California, Combat Operations Center, Combat Operations Building. By Moffatt and Nichol, Engineers, 122 West Fifth Street, Long Beach, California; for the Corps of Engineers, U.S. Army, Office of the District Engineer, Los Angeles, California. Drawing no. AW-60-02-03, sheet no. 14, approved March, 1962; specifications no. ENG-04-353-62-66; D.O. series AW 1596/14, Rev. "B"; file drawer 77-1/102. Last revised 3 October 1966. Scale one-eighth inch to one foot. 30x36 inches. photocopy on paper - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  7. Sections. March Air Force Base, Riverside, California, Combat Operations Center, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Sections. March Air Force Base, Riverside, California, Combat Operations Center, Combat Operations Building. By Moffatt and Nichol, Engineers, 122 West Fifth Street, Long Beach, California; for the Corps of Engineers, U.S. Army, Office of the District Engineer, Los Angeles, California. Drawing no. AW-60-02-03, sheet no. 14, approved March, 1962; specifications no. ENG-04-353-62-66; D.O. series AW 1596/15, Rev. "A"; file drawer 1290. Last revised 3 October 1966. Scale one-eighth inch to one foot. 30x36 inches. pencil on paper - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  8. The Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle (EELV) Acquisition and Combat Capability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-03-01

    8 October 1996, available from http://www.safaq.hq.af.mil/. 3Joseph C. Anselmo , “Air Force Readies Pick of Two EELV Finalists,” Aviation Week and...retrieve 8“Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle,” USAF Fact Sheet, Dec 1996. 9Ibid., n.p. 10Joseph C. Anselmo and Bruce A. Smith, “Cost Drives the EELV... Anselmo , Joseph C. “Air Force Readies Pick Of Two EELV Finalists.” Aviation Week and Space Technology, 9 December 1996, 3-4. Anselmo , Joseph C, and

  9. Anthropometry of the Clothed US Army Ground Troop and Combat Vehicle Crewman

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-01

    Faotwear Cover, Chemical Protective (Overboots); MIL-F-43987 Handwear Gloves. Combat Vehicle Crewman’s, Summer; LP/P DES 13-78 Clove Set, Chemical...Protective (Overbocts); MIL-F-43987 Handwear Clove Set, Chemicel Protective (Butyl Outer Gloves with Cotton Inner Cloves ); MIL-C-43971 Cloves , Combat Vehi le

  10. Intelligence Applied to Air Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, Robert; Gross, Anthony R.; Fletcher, L. Skip; Zornetzer, Steven (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The exponential growth in information technology has provided the potential for air vehicle capabilities that were previously unavailable to mission and vehicle designers. The increasing capabilities of computer hardware and software, including new developments such as neural networks, provide a new balance of work between humans and machines. This paper will describe several NASA projects, and review results and conclusions from ground and flight investigations where vehicle intelligence was developed and applied to aeronautical and space systems. In the first example, flight results from a neural network flight control demonstration will be reviewed. Using, a highly-modified F-15 aircraft, a NASA/Dryden experimental flight test program has demonstrated how the neural network software can correctly identify and respond to changes in aircraft stability and control characteristics. Using its on-line learning capability, the neural net software would identify that something in the vehicle has changed, then reconfigure the flight control computer system to adapt to those changes. The results of the Remote Agent software project will be presented. This capability will reduce the cost of future spacecraft operations as computers become "thinking" partners along with humans. In addition, the paper will describe the objectives and plans for the autonomous airplane program and the autonomous rotorcraft project. Technologies will also be developed.

  11. Air-to-air combat analysis - Review of differential-gaming approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardema, M. D.

    1981-01-01

    The problem of evaluating the combat performance of fighter/attack aircraft is discussed, and the mathematical nature of the problem is examined. The following approaches to air combat analysis are reviewed: (1) differential-turning differential game and (2) coplanar differential game. Selected numerical examples of these approaches are presented. The relative advantages and disadvantages of each are analyzed, and it is concluded that air combat analysis is an extremely difficult mathematical problem and that no one method of approach is best for all purposes. The paper concludes with a discussion of how the two approaches might be used in a complementary manner.

  12. X-45A Air Vehicle #1 during flight #13, with weapons bay door open

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-02-21

    The DARPA/U.S. Air Force X-45A Unmanned Combat Air Vehicle (UCAV) system demonstration program completed the first phase of demonstrations, known as Block I, on Feb. 28, 2003. The final Block I activities included two flights at Dryden, during which safe operation of the weapons bay door was verified at 35,000 feet and speeds of Mach 0.75, the maximum planned altitude and speed for the two X-45A demonstrator vehicles.

  13. Amphibious Combat Vehicle: Some Acquisition Activities Demonstrate Best Practices; Attainment of Amphibious Capability to be Determined

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AMPHIBIOUS COMBAT VEHICLE Some Acquisition Activities Demonstrate Best Practices ; Attainment of Amphibious Capability...Best Practices ; Attainment of Amphibious Capability to be Determined 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...VEHICLE Some Acquisition Activities Demonstrate Best Practices ; Attainment of Amphibious Capability to be Determined Why GAO Did This Study The

  14. Dying on the Vine: Air Combat Command’s Struggle to Provide Combat-Ready Aircrews with Limited Resources

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    of the B-1B RAP Tasking Memorandum in 2011. Lieutenant Colonel Di Gioia executed and/or planned B-1B missions in Operations Iraqi Freedom, Enduring...San Antonio to fly the T-6A. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This paper is dedicated to the men and women of Air Combat Command who provide the nation...worthwhile. ABSTRACT This study analyzes the ability of Air Combat Command’s (ACC) Ready Aircrew Program ( RAP ) to produce sufficient

  15. Fear and Loathing in the Air: Combat Fear and Stress in the Air Force

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    into three parts, each focusing on a major conflict—World War II, Korea, and Vietnam. Before beginning, it is important to explore what constitutes an...during the research process . 5. Did this change after the episode (new policy, changed policy)? How? This question helps understand how prepared...they not found in the post-Vietnam era? Has something else about air combat or the combatants changed since 1973? If so, what does this tell us

  16. Collaborative tactical behaviors for autonomous ground and air vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albus, James; Barbera, Anthony; Scott, Harry; Balakirsky, Stephen

    2005-05-01

    Tactical behaviors for autonomous ground and air vehicles are an area of high interest to the Army. They are critical for the inclusion of robots in the Future Combat System (FCS). Tactical behaviors can be defined at multiple levels: at the Company, Platoon, Section, and Vehicle echelons. They are currently being defined by the Army for the FCS Unit of Action. At all of these echelons, unmanned ground vehicles, unmanned air vehicles, and unattended ground sensors must collaborate with each other and with manned systems. Research being conducted at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and sponsored by the Army Research Lab is focused on defining the Four Dimensional Real-time Controls System (4D/RCS) reference model architecture for intelligent systems and developing a software engineering methodology for system design, integration, test and evaluation. This methodology generates detailed design requirements for perception, knowledge representation, decision making, and behavior generation processes that enable complex military tactics to be planned and executed by unmanned ground and air vehicles working in collaboration with manned systems.

  17. The Combat System Design and Test Criteria for Iguana TM Armored Vehicles.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-06-01

    stabilization, improved ride and agility, and reduced acoustic/IR signatures. The Iguana (trademark), a tracked vehicle concept based on a recently patented...hybrid armored vehicle drive systems. This thesis presents a combat system integration process for an Iguana (trademark) based armored vehicle. It lays...for night vision sensors. The U.S. Army Night Vision & Electronic Sensors Directorate’s ELIR92 and ACQUIRE computer programs are used to establish feasible Iguana (trademark) thermal night vision device performance requirements.

  18. Combat Air Forces Campaign Level Modernization Planning: A Study in Group Decision Making

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-03-01

    COMBAT AIR FORCES CAMPAIGN LEVEL MODERNIZATION PLANNING: A STUDY IN GROUP DECISION MAKING THESIS Ian L. Walker, Captain, USAF AFIT/GCA...ENV/03-10 COMBAT AIR FORCES CAMPAIGN LEVEL MODERNIZATION PLANNING: A STUDY IN GROUP DECISION MAKING THESIS Presented to the...AIR FORCES CAMPAIGN LEVEL MODERNIZATION PLANNING: A STUDY IN GROUP DECISION MAKING Ian L. Walker, BS, MPA Captain, USAF

  19. Real-time simulation of helicopter air-to-air combat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austin, Fred; George, Dino; Bivens, Court

    1991-01-01

    The AUTOMAN computer program develops automated maneuvering decisions for helicopters during air-to-air combat over hilly terrain. Recently, the capabilities of this program have been extended and enhanced significantly. The revised program was installed at the NASA Ames manned flight-simulation facility to drive a computer-generated image of an enemy helicopter, thereby providing an adversary for the human pilot. Maneuvers are selected by employing game theory. Enhancements include a guidance law for target acquisition when a firing opportunity arises; fire-control sequence logic; improved low-flying capabilities; line-of-sight computations for the cockpit field-of-view, terrain obstructions, and visual range limits; use of terrain for masking; air-to-air collision-avoidance maneuvers; decision on dispensing flares and chaff; and adjustable levels of pilot experience. The program was found to be extremely useful for both rotorcraft handling-quality evaluations and air-to-air combat training.

  20. UK Military Requirements for Unmanned Land Vehicle Combat Engineer Support

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-04-01

    Vehicle Systems Concepts and Integration. [les Avancees en concepts systemes pour vehicules et en integration] To order the complete compilation report...given the amount of information line of sight vision to the remote command vehicle. A that needs to be transmitted. Autonomous vehicles, minimum of

  1. Study on combat effectiveness of air defense missile weapon system based on queuing theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Z. Q.; Hao, J. X.; Li, L. J.

    2017-01-01

    Queuing Theory is a method to analyze the combat effectiveness of air defense missile weapon system. The model of service probability based on the queuing theory was constructed, and applied to analyzing the combat effectiveness of "Sidewinder" and "Tor-M1" air defense missile weapon system. Finally aimed at different targets densities, the combat effectiveness of different combat units of two types' defense missile weapon system is calculated. This method can be used to analyze the usefulness of air defense missile weapon system.

  2. The Combat Vehicle Command and Control System: Combat Performance of Armor Battalions Using Interactive Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-01

    A233 509) Goodman, G. W., Jr. (1993, May). U.S. Army synchronizes its combat arms with digital data. Armed Forces Journal International . 35...SitDisplay o Acetate overlays o FSE terminal o Paper message transcripts o SINCGARS radio simulators and journals o Fire support element (FSE...locations and status, and other pertinent information were maintained on wall charts and maps. The TOC staff maintained staff journals manually

  3. Mars 2050: Air Vehicles and Extreme Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvin, W. M.

    2017-02-01

    Technologies that lead to the development of air vehicles for Mars and deep drilling or rover access to the martian poles will enable pioneering exploration and science of the planet while also benefiting outer planet and ocean world missions.

  4. Air-To-Air Combat Skills: Contribution of Platform Motion to Initial Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-10-01

    Z. AU• 4- CONTRACT ON GRANT NUMBERR(J) Lawren e D/Pohlmann John C eed 9. PERFORMINO ORGANIZATION NAME" AND ADORESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT. TASK...this non-effectiveness, and possible simulator and tr".ning program modifications for improving this training effectiveness, ace di3cussed...23 4 -I,- gls. AIR-TO-AIR COMBAT SKILLS: CONTRIBUTION OF PLATFORM MOTION TO INITIAL TRAINING I. INrRODUCTION program . Regarding pilot experience, it

  5. Investigation of Control Algorithms for Tracked Vehicle Mobility Load Emulation for a Combat Hybrid Electric Power System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-30

    Investigation of Control Algorithms for Tracked Vehicle Mobility Load Emulation for a Combat Hybrid Electric Power System Jarrett Goodell and...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Investigation of Control Algorithms for Tracked Vehicle Mobility Load Emulation for a Combat Hybrid Electric Power System 5a...for ~ 22 ton tracked vehicle • Tested and Developed: – Motors, Generators, Batteries, Inverters, DC-DC Converters , Thermal Management, Pulse Power

  6. Nightfall: Machine Autonomy in Air-to-Air Combat

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    Chris Recker, Lt Col Jason Evenson, Maj Cyn- thia Wittnam, Maj Jason Haufschild, Capt Joe Rice , Capt D. Jerred Cooper, Capt Holden Leute, Capt Hudson...can- non round a “ golden BB,” then left unchecked a single FQ-X with a few hundred rounds of ammunition and sufficient fuel reserves is enough to...Ground (Joint Base Langley–Eustis, VA: Air Com- bat Command, 2012), especially 3–15, http://www.acc.af.mil/shared/media/document /afd-120319-025. pdf . 2

  7. 2007 Combat Vehicles Conference - Today’s Challenges: Fighting, Sustaining, Modernizing and Transforming

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-24

    High operating temperature power electronics (SiC) • Compact integrated hybrid power systems for future combat and wheeled vehicles • Battery...Evacuation Vehicle (MEV) 3 SBCT Fleet Management Flow Chart 2 0 0 7 New Vehicles S u s t a i n m e n tReset Maintenance Ft. Lewis Facility Battle...USF Stryker USF Stryker NBCRV MGS LRIP MS II (NBCRV) LRIP (17) Full Production PVT Ext. RAM TropicsIOT&E LRIP MS II (MGS) LRIP (14) Full Production MS

  8. Air quality impacts of electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Hartgen, D.T.; Murthy, M.; Cheung, N.N.Y.; Patten, J.A.

    1994-12-31

    The potential air quality impacts of electric vehicles in North Carolina are evaluated considering both air pollution reductions from less use of internal combustion engine vehicles and also additional air pollution at electric power plants. Using a consumer survey of 260 households, estimates of EV sales at $20,000 per vehicle, $15,000 and $10,000 are first made. EV purchases are classified as to whether they would be additional (new to family) or replacements of conventional cars. For additional vehicles, the extra pollution is computed as mileage driven, times KWH/mile, times power plant pollution rates. This pollution is then attributed directly to power plants, using NC pollution rates and the NC fuel mix. For replacement vehicles, EV pollution added to power plants is offset by direct pollution savings from ICE vahicles. Pollution effects are computed for each observation and displayed on a GIS of the state. Results show that EV air pollution effects are highly dependent on the assumptions made about the fraction of additional vs. replacement vehicles, and future power plant emission rates. The study concludes that EV effects on air pollution are highly uncertain.

  9. Power Supply and Integration in Future Combat Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-01

    the near term the prime power will be either a diesel engine or a turbine , and in the far term fuel cells may become viable options once their power...UNCLASSIFIED/UNLIMITED For a hydraulic drive using hydrokinetic or hydromechanical transmission as in most U.S military vehicles today, all of the

  10. Aerodynamics for Revolutionary Air Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellers, William L., III; Singer, Bart A.; Leavitt, Laurence D.

    2003-01-01

    Aeronautics research has seriously declined partly because of the perception that it is a mature science and only incremental improvements are possible. Recent aeronautics roadmapping activities at NASA Langley paint a different picture of the future. Breakthroughs are still felt to be possible if we expand the current design space of today's vehicles and optimize the airspace and vehicles as a system. The paper describes some of the challenges that the aircraft and airline industry face. These challenges include political, technical and environmental issues. Examples of the opportunities and technologies that could provide a different vision for the future are discussed.

  11. A preference-ordered discrete-gaming approach to air-combat analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, H. J.; Lefton, L.

    1978-01-01

    An approach to one-on-one air-combat analysis is described which employs discrete gaming of a parameterized model featuring choice between several closed-loop control policies. A preference-ordering formulation due to Falco is applied to rational choice between outcomes: win, loss, mutual capture, purposeful disengagement, draw. Approximate optimization is provided by an active-cell scheme similar to Falco's obtained by a 'backing up' process similar to that of Kopp. The approach is designed primarily for short-duration duels between craft with large-envelope weaponry. Some illustrative computations are presented for an example modeled using constant-speed vehicles and very rough estimation of energy shifts.

  12. A preference-ordered discrete-gaming approach to air-combat analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, H. J.; Lefton, L.

    1978-01-01

    An approach to one-on-one air-combat analysis is described which employs discrete gaming of a parameterized model featuring choice between several closed-loop control policies. A preference-ordering formulation due to Falco is applied to rational choice between outcomes: win, loss, mutual capture, purposeful disengagement, draw. Approximate optimization is provided by an active-cell scheme similar to Falco's obtained by a 'backing up' process similar to that of Kopp. The approach is designed primarily for short-duration duels between craft with large-envelope weaponry. Some illustrative computations are presented for an example modeled using constant-speed vehicles and very rough estimation of energy shifts.

  13. A qualitative analysis of future air combat with 'fire and forget' missiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinar, J.; Davidovitz, A.

    1987-01-01

    A set of previous examples have demonstrated that the two-target game formulation is adequate for modeling air-to-air combat between two aggressively motivated fighter aircraft. The present paper describes such an engagement between two aircraft of different speed but equipped with the same 'fire and forget' type guided missiles. The results of the analysis suggest a new concept of air combat tactics for future scenarios.

  14. A qualitative analysis of future air combat with 'fire and forget' missiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinar, J.; Davidovitz, A.

    1987-01-01

    A set of previous examples have demonstrated that the two-target game formulation is adequate for modeling air-to-air combat between two aggressively motivated fighter aircraft. The present paper describes such an engagement between two aircraft of different speed but equipped with the same 'fire and forget' type guided missiles. The results of the analysis suggest a new concept of air combat tactics for future scenarios.

  15. Virtual Combat Vehicle Experimentation for Duty Cycle Measurement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    Amethyst Leonid Loon Perseids ESS ESS RACK MC2 TMBS Rack SCRAMNet Interface SCRAMNet Figure 8. Computer and network architecture of the DCE3 simulator as...Inc. (RTI) [8]. It was used to seamlessly integrate the main processes on Emerald, Leonid, Amethyst , and Pyrite. Emerald, a quad-core Windows XP...SCRAMNet® interface. Amethyst ran the stealth viewer which gives a “parasail” view of the primary vehicle (using SimCreator’s IG). Pyrite runs sim

  16. A Novel Approach for Combat Vehicle Mobility Definition and Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    solutions. Some of the major applications include washing machines, rice cookers , image processing applications, anti-lock brake controls, and steering...parameters 2. Fuzzy mobility assessment rules 3. Fuzzy mobility definition 4. Fuzzy mobility assessment algorithm In general, tire pressure , weight...on how fast a vehicle can move while traversing through soft soil. Lower tire pressure and increased weight influences how the brake responds. The

  17. Air to air views of Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1959-01-01

    Air to air views of Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, transported via the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA), NASA 911, on its way to KSC, 05-06-91. JSC with Clear Creek and Egret Bay Blvd in the foreground and Clear Lake and Galveston Bay in the background

  18. A simulator investigation of air-to-air combat maneuvering for tilt-rotor aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, William A.; Isleib, Douglas; Johns, John

    1989-01-01

    As part of the Marine Corps's development of employment methods and maneuver techniques for the V-22 Osprey tilt-rotor aircraft, a piloted simulation study of one-on-one air-combat maneuvering (ACM) was conducted at NASA Ames. In addition to V-22 ACM, the simulation provided an opportunity for a preliminary investigation of maneuver requirements for a possible armed-escort tilt-rotor aircraft. Results from the study indicate that the tilt-rotor's low-speed masking and high-speed dash capabilities significantly enhance its survivability against both fixed-wing and helicopter aggressors. Furthermore, the tilt-rotor's conversion capability and, in turn, the variety and extent of its maneuvering characteristics make it an effective air-combat aircraft.

  19. Flexible-Wing-Based Micro Air Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ifju, Peter G.; Jenkins, David A.; Ettinger, Scott; Lian, Yong-Sheng; Shyy, Wei; Waszak, Martin R.

    2002-01-01

    This paper documents the development and evaluation of an original flexible-wing-based Micro Air Vehicle (MAV) technology that reduces adverse effects of gusty wind conditions and unsteady aerodynamics, exhibits desirable flight stability, and enhances structural durability. The flexible wing concept has been demonstrated on aircraft with wingspans ranging from 18 inches to 5 inches. Salient features of the flexible-wing-based MAV, including the vehicle concept, flexible wing design, novel fabrication methods, aerodynamic assessment, and flight data analysis are presented.

  20. Air Cushion Crash Rescue Vehicle (ACCRV)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-01

    x 13.3 x 5.7 Battery Incl. Monitors 1 DC Defibril- 11.90 3.8 x 13.3 x 9.2 Battery Inc\\. lator 106 -) 0) ho cd o +-> w c cd 3...reverse if necessary and identify by block number) Current USAF crash rescue vehicles have been designed to operate on the roads, ramps, taxiways...Cushion Crash Rescue Vehicle (ACCRV) has been designed by integrating a retractable air cushion system with a crash rescue vehicle. This report

  1. Evaluation of the Combat Vehicle Command and Control System: Operational Effectiveness of an Armor Battalion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-01

    Armor Officer Advance 22 46.8 27 56.3 Course ( AOAC ) Armor Officer Basic 46 97.9 48 100 Course (AOBC) NCO!Enl isted Advanced NCO Course 3 3.3 17 17.7...Tank-Automotive Command (TACOM), Subject: Combat Vehicle Command and Control (CVCC) Programs, 22 March 1989. The CVCC research program investigates...18 Support Personnel ................... 19 Test Facilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..... 22 Training and Test

  2. Genetic Fuzzy Trees for Intelligent Control of Unmanned Combat Aerial Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernest, Nicholas D.

    Fuzzy Logic Control is a powerful tool that has found great success in a variety of applications. This technique relies less on complex mathematics and more "expert knowledge" of a system to bring about high-performance, resilient, and efficient control through linguistic classification of inputs and outputs and if-then rules. Genetic Fuzzy Systems (GFSs) remove the need of this expert knowledge and instead rely on a Genetic Algorithm (GA) and have similarly found great success. However, the combination of these methods suffer severely from scalability; the number of rules required to control the system increases exponentially with the number of states the inputs and outputs can take. Therefor GFSs have thus far not been applicable to complex, artificial intelligence type problems. The novel Genetic Fuzzy Tree (GFT) method breaks down complex problems hierarchically, makes sub-decisions when possible, and thus greatly reduces the burden on the GA. This development significantly changes the field of possible applications for GFSs. Within this study, this is demonstrated through applying this technique to a difficult air combat problem. Looking forward to an autonomous Unmanned Combat Aerial Vehicle (UCAV) in the 2030 time-frame, it becomes apparent that the mission, flight, and ground controls will utilize the emerging paradigm of Intelligent Systems (IS); namely, the ability to learn, adapt, exhibit robustness in uncertain situations, make sense of the data collected in real-time and extrapolate when faced with scenarios significantly different from those used in training. LETHA (Learning Enhanced Tactical Handling Algorithm) was created to develop intelligent controllers for these advanced unmanned craft as the first GFT. A simulation space referred to as HADES (Hoplological Autonomous Defend and Engage Simulation) was created in which LETHA can train the UCAVs. Equipped with advanced sensors, a limited supply of Self-Defense Missiles (SDMs), and a recharging

  3. Demonstration/Validation of Hazardous Air Pollutant-Free Adhesive Replacement for Federal Specification MMM-A-1617 Used on the M109A6 Paladin Heavy Brigade Combat Vehicle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    Vehicle Faye R. Toulan Dynamic Science, Inc. Patrice E. Dodson U.S. Army Tank-Automotive Armaments Command, Anniston Army Depot John J. La...Armaments Command, Anniston Army Depot, AL, 36201-4199 14. ABSTRACT The goal of the Sustainable Painting Operations for the Total Army (SPOTA) program is...847 as a suitable HAP-free replacement adhesive that conforms to MMM-A-1617. This report focuses on the field trial conducted at Anniston Army Depot

  4. Situation assessment for air combat based on the Bayesian networks technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhaolin; Yang, Hongwen; Hu, Weidong; Yu, Wenxian

    2005-11-01

    This paper researches on the method of situation assessment for the air combat based on the Bayesian networks technology. It analyzes the events occur in the process of air combat, and presents a hybrid method of fuzzy sets and Bayesian networks to detect these events. Then, it presents a method to construct Bayesian networks using the events and then uses the networks to reason the purpose of enemy fighter pilots. Finally, it shows the method by an illustrative example.

  5. Biofuels, vehicle emissions, and urban air quality.

    PubMed

    Wallington, Timothy J; Anderson, James E; Kurtz, Eric M; Tennison, Paul J

    2016-07-18

    Increased biofuel content in automotive fuels impacts vehicle tailpipe emissions via two mechanisms: fuel chemistry and engine calibration. Fuel chemistry effects are generally well recognized, while engine calibration effects are not. It is important that investigations of the impact of biofuels on vehicle emissions consider the impact of engine calibration effects and are conducted using vehicles designed to operate using such fuels. We report the results of emission measurements from a Ford F-350 fueled with either fossil diesel or a biodiesel surrogate (butyl nonanoate) and demonstrate the critical influence of engine calibration on NOx emissions. Using the production calibration the emissions of NOx were higher with the biodiesel fuel. Using an adjusted calibration (maintaining equivalent exhaust oxygen concentration to that of the fossil diesel at the same conditions by adjusting injected fuel quantities) the emissions of NOx were unchanged, or lower, with biodiesel fuel. For ethanol, a review of the literature data addressing the impact of ethanol blend levels (E0-E85) on emissions from gasoline light-duty vehicles in the U.S. is presented. The available data suggest that emissions of NOx, non-methane hydrocarbons, particulate matter (PM), and mobile source air toxics (compounds known, or suspected, to cause serious health impacts) from modern gasoline and diesel vehicles are not adversely affected by increased biofuel content over the range for which the vehicles are designed to operate. Future increases in biofuel content when accomplished in concert with changes in engine design and calibration for new vehicles should not result in problematic increases in emissions impacting urban air quality and may in fact facilitate future required emissions reductions. A systems perspective (fuel and vehicle) is needed to fully understand, and optimize, the benefits of biofuels when blended into gasoline and diesel.

  6. Covert air vehicle 2003 LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Spletzer, Barry Louis; Callow, Diane Schafer; Salton, Jonathan Robert; Fischer, Gary John

    2003-11-01

    This report describes the technical work carried out under a 2003 Laboratory Directed Research and Development project to develop a covert air vehicle. A mesoscale air vehicle that mimics a bird offers exceptional mobility and the possibility of remaining undetected during flight. Although some such vehicles exist, they are lacking in key areas: unassisted landing and launching, true mimicry of bird flight to remain covert, and a flapping flight time of any real duration. Current mainstream technology does not have the energy or power density necessary to achieve bird like flight for any meaningful length of time; however, Sandia has unique combustion powered linear actuators with the unprecedented high energy and power density needed for bird like flight. The small-scale, high-pressure valves and small-scale ignition to make this work have been developed at Sandia. We will study the feasibility of using this to achieve vehicle takeoff and wing flapping for sustained flight. This type of vehicle has broad applications for reconnaissance and communications networks, and could prove invaluable for military and intelligence operations throughout the world. Initial tests were conducted on scaled versions of the combustion-powered linear actuator. The tests results showed that heat transfer and friction effects dominate the combustion process at 'bird-like' sizes. The problems associated with micro-combustion must be solved before a true bird-like ornithopter can be developed.

  7. Flapping Wing Micro Air Vehicle Wing Manufacture and Force Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-03

    FLAPPING WING MICRO AIR VEHICLE WING MANUFACTURE AND FORCE TESTING THESIS Nathanael J...FLAPPING WING MICRO AIR VEHICLE WING MANUFACTURE AND FORCE TESTING THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics...March 2011 APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED AFIT/GA/ENY/11-M14 FLAPPING WING MICRO AIR VEHICLE WING MANUFACTURE AND FORCE

  8. Computer-automated opponent for manned air-to-air combat simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hankins, W. W., III

    1979-01-01

    Two versions of a real-time digital-computer program that operates a fighter airplane interactively against a human pilot in simulated air combat were evaluated. They function by replacing one of two pilots in the Langley differential maneuvering simulator. Both versions make maneuvering decisions from identical information and logic; they differ essentially in the aerodynamic models that they control. One is very complete, but the other is much simpler, primarily characterizing the airplane's performance (lift, drag, and thrust). Both models competed extremely well against highly trained U.S. fighter pilots.

  9. Autonomous unmanned air vehicles (UAV) techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Ming-Kai; Lee, Ting N.

    2007-04-01

    The UAVs (Unmanned Air Vehicles) have great potentials in different civilian applications, such as oil pipeline surveillance, precision farming, forest fire fighting (yearly), search and rescue, boarder patrol, etc. The related industries of UAVs can create billions of dollars for each year. However, the road block of adopting UAVs is that it is against FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) and ATC (Air Traffic Control) regulations. In this paper, we have reviewed the latest technologies and researches on UAV navigation and obstacle avoidance. We have purposed a system design of Jittering Mosaic Image Processing (JMIP) with stereo vision and optical flow to fulfill the functionalities of autonomous UAVs.

  10. The Army’s Ground Combat Vehicle (GCV) and Early Infantry Brigade Combat Team (E-IBCT) Programs: Background and Issues for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-07

    Carter: FCS Successor Effort Could Have Many Primes,” Defense News, May 18, 2009. 21 Marjorie Censer and Kate Brannen , “Army Assessing Brigade Combat...materiel solution decision at Milestone A.” 27 Unless otherwise noted, information in this section is taken from Kate Brannen , “Army Launches Ground...at Costly U.S. Defense Contracts,” Reuters, March 4, 2009. 29 Kate Brannen , “Army Launches Ground Combat Vehicle Contest,” Army Times, February 26

  11. The Army’s Ground Combat Vehicle (GCV) and Early Infantry Brigade Combat Team (E-IBCT) Programs: Background and Issues for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-18

    Bennett, “Carter: FCS Successor Effort Could Have Many Primes,” Defense News, May 18, 2009. 21 Marjorie Censer and Kate Brannen , “Army Assessing...solution decision at Milestone A.” 27 Unless otherwise noted, information in this section is taken from Kate Brannen , “Army Launches Ground Combat...28 Ross Colvin, “Obama Takes Aim at Costly U.S. Defense Contracts,” Reuters, March 4, 2009. 29 Kate Brannen , “Army Launches Ground Combat Vehicle

  12. Increasing the Combat Effectiveness of the Bradley Fighting Vehicle: New and Modified Thermal Training Procedures and Products

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    U.S. Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences Research Report 1518 Increasing the Combat Effectiveness of the Bradley Fighting ...Increasing the Combat Effectiveness of the Bradley Fighting Vehicle: New and Modified Thermal Training Procedures and Products 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S...by block numoer) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP Scanning techniques Thermal training, Bradley Fighting Thermal camouflage Thermal sight Venicie (BFV), inte

  13. Motor Vehicles, Air Pollution, and Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mark, Jason

    2000-04-01

    Despite years of technical progress, motor vehicles continue to be a leading cause of environmental damage in the United States. For example, today's cars and trucks are the largest source of air pollution in many urban areas. US motor vehicles also account for 25 percent of the nation's carbon emissions, more than most countries emit from all sources combined. Fortunately, a host of technical improvements are emerging that could go a long ways towards taking vehicles out of the pollution picture. In the near-term, improving on the century-old internal combustion engine can deliver much-needed incremental gains. But electric drive vehicles--whether powered by batteries, small engines in hybrid configuration, or fuel cells--ultimately offer the greatest promise. Such technologies could dramatically reduce energy use, greenhouse gas emissions, and key air pollutants. The bulk of technical attention in recent years has been focused on improving the passenger vehicle, which will be the dominant energy consumer in the transportation sector for years to come. But freight trucks are also of growing concern, both because their contribution to global warming is on the rise and because serious questions are being raised about the public health impact of diesel technology. As a result, heavy trucks are emerging as a priority issue. Capitalizing on the opportunity presented by new technologies will not only require continued technical innovation but also policy action. As research into improved engines, fuels, and drive systems bears fruit over the coming years, aggressive and prudent policies will ensure that these new options make it onto the road and deliver on their environmental promise.

  14. Intelligent Approaches in Improving In-vehicle Network Architecture and Minimizing Power Consumption in Combat Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    include washing machines , rice cookers, image processing applications , anti-lock brake controls , and steering controls . In general, fuzzy logic...its cognitive information to other in-vehicle network systems. In [58] a Fuzzy Logic Controller for Hybrid Electric Vehicle is proposed to maximize...provided to describe what is meant by ―optimal torque value‖. All the 121 rules in this fuzzy logic controller are static and have no flexibility to

  15. Ditching Simulation of Air and Space Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Mahesh; Mouillet, Jean-Baptiste; Burkhalter, Drew; Robert, Adrien; Schwoertzig, Thierry

    2014-06-01

    The impact on water of an aircraft or a re-entry space vehicle is a very complex event and considered as an important issue for the air and space industry. To ensure the safety of the crew and to limit the risks of loss of the vehicle, a prediction of its structural behaviour under various ditching configurations must be performed. Structural tests are very costly and must be limited in scale or number, so numerical simulations may be of great help for this purpose.Numerical simulations aim to predict the trajectory of the vehicle under impact, the pressure repartition on the body, structural stress, possible damages to the structure and occupant 'g' levels during impact. Physically, two types of configurations involving different phenomenon can be identified, vertical impacts and impacts with high horizontal components, where air entrapment, ventilation and cavitations can be the dimensioning factors.The purpose of this paper is to give an overview of the features of ALE (Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian) transient dynamic explicit simulation methods to perform such simulations. This paper details analysis of the critical simulation parameters, fluid dynamic calculations, CPU and model size reduction techniques, Fluid-Structure contact modelling, examples of such simulations, correlation to physical tests using Explicit Finite Element based code RADIOSS from Altair Engineering. Two examples of re-entry and ditching numerical simulation are discussed in this paper with comparisons to physical test data.

  16. An adaptive maneuvering logic computer program for the simulation of one-on-one air-to-air combat. Volume 1: General description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgin, G. H.; Fogel, L. J.; Phelps, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    A technique for computer simulation of air combat is described. Volume 1 decribes the computer program and its development in general terms. Two versions of the program exist. Both incorporate a logic for selecting and executing air combat maneuvers with performance models of specific fighter aircraft. In the batch processing version the flight paths of two aircraft engaged in interactive aerial combat and controlled by the same logic are computed. The realtime version permits human pilots to fly air-to-air combat against the adaptive maneuvering logic (AML) in Langley Differential Maneuvering Simulator (DMS). Volume 2 consists of a detailed description of the computer programs.

  17. Air cushion vehicles - Any potential for Canada?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laframboise, J. F.

    1987-09-01

    The present evaluation of air cushion vehicle (ACV) operational and commercial suitability in the Canadian context notes that the most successful and durable ACV applications are those in which only ACVs can perform the required mission. An important factor is the reliability of the craft being tested in a given field of operations. Because of their low ground pressure, ACVs can operate over low-cost trails with an efficiency that compares with that of trucks over conventional roads; this renders them especially attractive for transportation networks in the North West Territories.

  18. Rapid Prototyping-Unmanned Combat Air Vehicle (UCAV)/Sensorcraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    and Sergey Fonov Computational Sciences Branch Aeronautical Sciences Division JANUARY 2008 Final Report Approved for public...SIGNATURE PAGE Using Government drawings, specifications, or other data included in this document for any purpose other than Government procurement...does not in any way obligate the U.S. Government . The fact that the Government formulated or supplied the drawings, specifications, or other data does

  19. Air Combat Training: Good Stick Index Validation. Final Report for Period 3 April 1978-1 April 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Samuel B.; And Others

    A study was conducted to investigate and statistically validate a performance measuring system (the Good Stick Index) in the Tactical Air Command Combat Engagement Simulator I (TAC ACES I) Air Combat Maneuvering (ACM) training program. The study utilized a twelve-week sample of eighty-nine student pilots to statistically validate the Good Stick…

  20. Nonlinear dynamics of biomimetic micro air vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Y.; Kong, J.

    2008-02-01

    Flapping-wing micro air vehicles (FMAV) are new conceptual air vehicles that mimic the flying modes of birds and insects. They surpass the research fields of traditional airplane design and aerodynamics on application technologies, and initiate the applications of MEMS technologies on aviation fields. This paper studies a micro flapping mechanism that based upon insect thorax and actuated by electrostatic force. Because there are strong nonlinear coupling between the two physical domains, electrical and mechanical, the static and dynamic characteristics of this system are very complicated. Firstly, the nonlinear dynamic model of the electromechanical coupling system is set up according to the physical model of the flapping mechanism. The dynamic response of the system in constant voltage is studied by numerical method. Then the effect of damping and initial condition on dynamic characteristics of the system is analyzed in phase space. In addition, the dynamic responses of the system in sine voltage excitation are discussed. The results of research are helpful to the design, fabrication and application of the micro flapping mechanism of FMAV, and also to other micro electromechanical system that actuated by electrostatic force.

  1. Cooling System Design for PEM Fuel Cell Powered Air Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-18

    Research Laboratory (NRL) has developed a proton exchange membrane fuel cell ( PEMFC ) powered unmanned air vehicle (UAV) called the Ion Tiger. The Ion Tiger...to design a cooling system for the Ion Tiger and investigate cooling approaches that may be suitable for future PEMFC powered air vehicles. The...modifications) to other PEMFC systems utilizing a CHE for cooling. 18-06-2010 Memorandum Report Unmanned Air Vehicle UAV Fuel cell PEM Cooling Radiator January

  2. Development of a Computer Based Air Combat Maneuvering Range Debrief System. Volume I.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    cumulative training data or trend analysis infor- mation required to evaluate ACMR traliing progress on a longitudinal basis. m In general, current...Selected Objectives Imalight Air Combat Events Interaircraft Isometry i o Offensive vs defensive a Intial Traly Hoetae 1’, Radar contact Time-distance

  3. Combat Support Execution Planning and Control: An Assessment of Initial Implementations in Air Force Exercises

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    Brig Gen (Select) Jay Lindell, USAFE/A-4; Col Michael Isherwood, AFEUR Vice Commander; and Col Steven J. Depalmer, Commander, 32 Air Operations Group...Jamison for help in the AOC. We also thank TSgt Lynn deHaan, 32 AOG; TSgt David Paddock , 152 AOG; Lt Col Craig Donnely, Deputy Chief of Combat Plans; and

  4. Zinc air battery development for electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Putt, R.A.; Merry, G.W. )

    1991-07-01

    This report summarizes the results of research conducted during the sixteen month continuation of a program to develop rechargeable zinc-air batteries for electric vehicles. The zinc-air technology under development incorporates a metal foam substrate for the zinc electrode, with flow of electrolyte through the foam during battery operation. In this soluble'' zinc electrode the zincate discharge product dissolves completely in the electrolyte stream. Cycle testing at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, where the electrode was invented, and at MATSI showed that this approach avoids the zinc electrode shape change phenomenon. Further, electrolyte flow has been shown to be necessary to achieve significant cycle life (> 25 cycles) in this open system. Without it, water loss through the oxygen electrode results in high-resistance failure of the cell. The Phase I program, which focused entirely on the zinc electrode, elucidated the conditions necessary to increase electrode capacity from 75 to as much as 300 mAh/cm{sup 2}. By the end of the Phase I program over 500 cycles had accrued on one of the zinc-zinc half cells undergoing continuous cycle testing. The Phase II program continued the half cell cycle testing and separator development, further refined the foam preplate process, and launched into performance and cycle life testing of zinc-air cells.

  5. Zinc air battery development for electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putt, R. A.; Merry, G. W.

    1991-07-01

    This report summarizes the results of research conducted during the sixteen month continuation of a program to develop rechargeable zinc-air batteries for electric vehicles. The zinc-air technology under development incorporates a metal foam substrate for the zinc electrode, with flow of electrolyte through the foam during battery operation. In this 'soluble' zinc electrode the zincate discharge product dissolves completely in the electrolyte stream. Cycle testing at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, where the electrode was invented, and at MATSI showed that this approach avoids the zinc electrode shape change phenomenon. Further, electrolyte flow has been shown to be necessary to achieve significant cycle life (greater than 25 cycles) in this open system. Without it, water loss through the oxygen electrode results in high resistance failure of the cell. The Phase 1 program, which focused entirely on the zinc electrode, elucidated the conditions necessary to increase electrode capacity from 75 to as much as 300 mAh/sq cm. By the end of the Phase 1 program over 500 cycles had accrued on one of the zinc-zinc half cells undergoing continuous cycle testing. The Phase 2 program continued the half cell cycle testing and separator development, further refined the foam preplate process, and launched into performance and cycle life testing of zinc-air cells.

  6. Medium Altitude Endurance Unmanned Air Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, Larry L.

    1994-10-01

    The medium altitude endurance unmanned air vehicle (MAE UAV) program (formerly the tactical endurance TE UAV) is a new effort initiated by the Department of Defense to develop a ground launched UAV that can fly out 500 miles, remain on station for 24 hours, and return. It will transmit high resolution optical, infrared, and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of well-defended target areas through satellite links. It will provide near-real-time, releasable, low cost/low risk surveillance, targeting and damage assessment complementary to that of satellites and manned aircraft. The paper describes specific objectives of the MAE UAV program (deliverables and schedule) and the program's unique position as one of several programs to streamline the acquisition process under the cognizance of the newly established Airborne Reconnaissance Office. I discuss the system requirements and operational concept and describe the technical capabilities and characteristics of the major subsystems (airframe, propulsion, navigation, sensors, communication links, ground station, etc.) in some detail.

  7. Air cushion vehicles for arctic operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koleser, J.; Lavis, D. R.

    1986-09-01

    Attention is given to the results of the NAVSEA FY85 Surface Ship Concept Formulation Design Study for an initial operational capability year-2000 air cushion vehicle (ACV) suitable for logistics and general search/rescue duties in the Arctic. Two designs were developed during the study; the first utilized an ACV design synthesis math model while the second evolved as a derivative of an existing U.S. production craft. Both are regarded as feasible from an engineering and naval architectural standpoint. Results of performance and cost trade-off studies suggest that, for an Arctic ACV, gas turbines are the preferred power plant choice and an aluminum alloy is the preferred hull structural material choice. The most appropriate skirt height is approximately 12 ft.

  8. Architecture for an integrated real-time air combat and sensor network simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Criswell, Evans A.; Rushing, John; Lin, Hong; Graves, Sara

    2007-04-01

    An architecture for an integrated air combat and sensor network simulation is presented. The architecture integrates two components: a parallel real-time sensor fusion and target tracking simulation, and an air combat simulation. By integrating these two simulations, it becomes possible to experiment with scenarios in which one or both sides in a battle have very large numbers of primitive passive sensors, and to assess the likely effects of those sensors on the outcome of the battle. Modern Air Power is a real-time theater-level air combat simulation that is currently being used as a part of the USAF Air and Space Basic Course (ASBC). The simulation includes a variety of scenarios from the Vietnam war to the present day, and also includes several hypothetical future scenarios. Modern Air Power includes a scenario editor, an order of battle editor, and full AI customization features that make it possible to quickly construct scenarios for any conflict of interest. The scenario editor makes it possible to place a wide variety of sensors including both high fidelity sensors such as radars, and primitive passive sensors that provide only very limited information. The parallel real-time sensor network simulation is capable of handling very large numbers of sensors on a computing cluster of modest size. It can fuse information provided by disparate sensors to detect and track targets, and produce target tracks.

  9. Business Case Analysis of the Special Operations Air Mobility Vehicle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    costs relative to the V-22 Osprey, the newest troop transport helicopter, and the US Air Force (USAF) Predator, an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Drone ; (2...the V-22 Osprey, the newest troop transport helicopter, and the U.S. Air Force (USAF) Predator, an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Drone ; (2) perform an...1 A. DRONES : HOW THEY CONTRIBUTE TO THE FIGHT ........................2 B. THE OSPREY

  10. Aluminum Rich Epoxy Primer for Ground and Air Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-03-01

    UNCLASSIFIED DOCUMENT Aluminum Rich Epoxy Primer for Ground and Air Vehicles Monthly Technical Report for the Period: January 20, 2017...Objective: To further develop the Aluminum Rich Epoxy Primer systems for Air and Ground Vehicles while addressing the objective requirements...outlined within the BAA. Development Work: This past month has been spent evaluating different thixotrope systems for the Aluminum Rich

  11. Air Ground Integration and the Brigade Combat Team

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-13

    source of information on the ADAM Cell comes from FMI 3-01.50, Air Defense and Airspace Management Cell Operations. This publication outlines the...BCT. CPT Engelbrecht outlines issues with doctrine, organization, and training in preparing the ADAM Cell for operations. FMI 3-01.50 is full of...responsibilities of each cell within the BCT are clearly outlined by doctrine. Field Manual Interim ( FMI ) 3-01.50, Air Defense and Airspace Management Cell

  12. Combat Squadrons of the Air Force, World War II,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    7] Jun 1944; Korea, 13 Dec 195o-21 EMBLEM. A large, gray, caricatured Apr 1951. Air Force Outstanding Unit hippopotamus , winged light yellow or- Award...aerial bombs in saltire, surmounted by the head of a hippopotamus with mouth open, proper. (Approved 22 Nov 1943.) 504th FIGHTER LINEAGE. Constituted

  13. Air-Conditioning for Electric Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popinski, Z.

    1984-01-01

    Combination of ammonia-absorption refrigerator, roof-mounted solar collectors, and 200 degrees C service electric-vehicle motor provides evaporative space-heating/space cooling system for electric-powered and hybrid fuel/electric vehicles.

  14. Air-Conditioning for Electric Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popinski, Z.

    1984-01-01

    Combination of ammonia-absorption refrigerator, roof-mounted solar collectors, and 200 degrees C service electric-vehicle motor provides evaporative space-heating/space cooling system for electric-powered and hybrid fuel/electric vehicles.

  15. Zinc air battery development for electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putt, Ronald A.

    1990-05-01

    This document reports the progress and accomplishments of a 16 month program to develop a rechargeable zinc-air battery for electric vehicle propulsion, from October 1988 through January 1990. The program was the first stage in the transition of alkaline zinc electrode technology, invented at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, to private industry. The LBL invention teaches the use of a copper metal foam substrate for the zinc electrode, in combination with forced convection of electrolyte through the foam during battery operation. Research at LBL showed promise that this approach would avoid shape change (densification and dendrite growth), the primary failure mode of this electrode. The program comprised five tasks: (1) cell design, (2) capacity maximization, (3) cycle testing, (4) materials qualification, and (5) a cost/design study. The cell design contemplates a plate and frame stack, with alternating zinc and oxygen electrode frame assemblies between rigid end plates. A 200 Ah cell, as may be required for the EV application, would comprise a stack of five zinc and six oxygen electrode frame/assemblies.

  16. A high-fidelity batch simulation environment for integrated batch and piloted air combat simulation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, Kenneth H.; Mcmanus, John W.; Chappell, Alan R.

    1992-01-01

    A batch air combat simulation environment known as the Tactical Maneuvering Simulator (TMS) is presented. The TMS serves as a tool for developing and evaluating tactical maneuvering logics and to evaluate the tactical implications of perturbations to aircraft performance or supporting systems. The TMS is capable of simulating air combat between any number of engagement participants, with practical limits imposed by computer memory and processing power. Aircraft are modeled using equations of motion, control laws, aerodynamics and propulsive characteristics, and databases representative of a modern high-performance aircraft with and without thrust-vectoring capability are included. A Tactical Autopilot is implemented in the aircraft simulation model to convert guidance commands issued by computerized maneuvering logics in the form of desired angle-of-attack and wind axis-bank angle into inputs to the inner-loop control augmentation system of the aircraft.

  17. Project AIR FORCE Modeling Capabilities for Support of Combat Operations in Denied Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    Clark Air Base (Philippines), Darwin (Australia), Paya Lebar (Singapore), and U-Tapao (Thailand). A sixth option is a munitions ship, MUN2_Guam... Darwin . Network transportation costs also grow without access to facilities in Thailand. Figure 3.2. Cost Comparison Between Baseline and Denied...Robert S. Tripp, Louis Luangkesorn, Thomas Lang, and Charles Robert Roll, Jr., Evaluation of Options for Overseas Combat Support Basing, Santa Monica

  18. Predicting Air Combat Maneuvering (ACM) Performance: Fleet Fighter ACM Readiness Program Grades as Performance Criteria.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-01

    predict fleet aviator inflight performance using perceptual psychomotor and information processing tasks. The goal is to develop relevant laboratory...were useful in identifying successful and unsuccessful aviators in combat (Viet Nam). Bale at al. (2) evaluated F-4 ’Replacement Air Group (RAG...predict performance. Our approach used performance-based tests of cognitive* perceptual, and multitask functioning to predict fleet operational aviator

  19. An extended two-target differential game model for medium-range air combat game analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinar, J.

    1985-01-01

    The first phase of an investigation of a two-target game, representing an air combat with boresight limited all-aspect guided missiles is summarized. The results, obtained by using a line of sight coordinate system, are compared to a similar recently published work. The comparison indicates that improved insight, gained by using line of sight coordinates, allows to discover important new features of the game solution.

  20. Case-Based Behavior Recognition in Beyond Visual Range Air Combat

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    Case-Based Behavior Recognition in Beyond Visual Range Air Combat Hayley Borck 1 , Justin Karneeb 1 , Ron Alford 2 & David W. Aha 3 1Knexus...understanding the behaviors of hostile agents, which is challenging in partially observable environments such as the one we study. In particular, unobserved...hostile behaviors in our domain may alter the world state. To effectively counter hostile behaviors , they need to be recognized and predicted. We

  1. Risk Management Analysis of Air Ambulance Blood Product Administration in Combat Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-01

    Malsby, Victoria Chou, Robert T. Gerhardt, Kirby Gross, and Stacy Shackelford 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7...Analysis of Air Ambulance Blood Product Administration in Combat Operations Nicole Powell-Dunford , Jose F. Quesada , Robert F. Malsby , Victoria ...Center, Fort Bragg, NC; Kirby Gross, M.D., FACS, U.S. CENTCOM Joint Theatre Trauma Systems Director, MacDill AFB, FL; Victoria Chou, Ph.D., USAF

  2. Optical Embedded Dust Sensor for Engine Protection and Early Warning on M1 Abrams/Ground Combat Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-11

    Optical embedded dust sensor for engine protection and early warning on M1 Abrams/ground combat vehicles Hai Lina, Gregor A. Waldherrb, Timothy...Burch*a aIntelligent Optical Systems, 73 N. Vinedo Ave., Pasadena, CA, USA 91107-3759 bHal Technology, LLC, 7970 Cherry Avenue, Suite 303, Fontana, CA...the DoA, and shall not be used for advertising or product endorsement purposes. ABSTRACT The Dual Optical Embedded Dust Sensor (DOEDS) is designed

  3. Air change rates of motor vehicles and in-vehicle pollutant concentrations from secondhand smoke.

    PubMed

    Ott, Wayne; Klepeis, Neil; Switzer, Paul

    2008-05-01

    The air change rates of motor vehicles are relevant to the sheltering effect from air pollutants entering from outside a vehicle and also to the interior concentrations from any sources inside its passenger compartment. We made more than 100 air change rate measurements on four motor vehicles under moving and stationary conditions; we also measured the carbon monoxide (CO) and fine particle (PM(2.5)) decay rates from 14 cigarettes smoked inside the vehicle. With the vehicle stationary and the fan off, the ventilation rate in air changes per hour (ACH) was less than 1 h(-1) with the windows closed and increased to 6.5 h(-1) with one window fully opened. The vehicle speed, window position, ventilation system, and air conditioner setting was found to affect the ACH. For closed windows and passive ventilation (fan off and no recirculation), the ACH was linearly related to the vehicle speed over the range from 15 to 72 mph (25 to 116 km h(-1)). With a vehicle moving, windows closed, and the ventilation system off (or the air conditioner set to AC Max), the ACH was less than 6.6 h(-1) for speeds ranging from 20 to 72 mph (32 to 116 km h(-1)). Opening a single window by 3'' (7.6 cm) increased the ACH by 8-16 times. For the 14 cigarettes smoked in vehicles, the deposition rate k and the air change rate a were correlated, following the equation k=1.3a (R(2)=82%; n=14). With recirculation on (or AC Max) and closed windows, the interior PM(2.5) concentration exceeded 2000 microg m(-3) momentarily for all cigarettes tested, regardless of speed. The concentration time series measured inside the vehicle followed the mathematical solutions of the indoor mass balance model, and the 24-h average personal exposure to PM(2.5) could exceed 35 microg m(-3) for just two cigarettes smoked inside the vehicle.

  4. Interior view Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Satellite Communications Terminal, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  5. Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Vehicle ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Vehicle Refueling Station, Northeast of AGE Storage Facility at far northwest end of Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  6. Interior Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Gate House, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  7. Looking north Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking north - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Electric Substation, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  8. Analog analysis of a tracked air-cushion vehicle.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leatherwood, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    The dynamics of tracked air-cushion vehicles considered for high-speed ground transportation systems are examined using a vehicle model represented by a one-degree-of-freedom system. The respective equations of motion are derived, and the control system is discussed. The equations obtained for the cushion are solved using an analog computer. The computer showed the effect of the control technique on the relative motion between vehicle and guideway.

  9. Robotic air vehicle. Blending artificial intelligence with conventional software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnulty, Christa; Graham, Joyce; Roewer, Paul

    1987-01-01

    The Robotic Air Vehicle (RAV) system is described. The program's objectives were to design, implement, and demonstrate cooperating expert systems for piloting robotic air vehicles. The development of this system merges conventional programming used in passive navigation with Artificial Intelligence techniques such as voice recognition, spatial reasoning, and expert systems. The individual components of the RAV system are discussed as well as their interactions with each other and how they operate as a system.

  10. Section 609 of the Clean Air Act: Motor Vehicle Air Conditioning

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Fact sheet provides a general overview of EPA regulations under Section 609 of the Clean Air Act, which is focused on preventing the release of refrigerants during the servicing of motor vehicle air-conditioning systems and similar appliances.

  11. Machine & electrical double control air dryer for vehicle air braking system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuan; Yang, Liu; Wang, Xian Yan; Tan, Xiao Yan; Wang, Wei

    2017-09-01

    As is known to all, a vehicle air brake system, in which usually contains moisture. To solve the problem, it is common to use air dryer to dry compressed air effectively and completely remove the moisture and oil of braking system. However, the existing air dryer is not suitable for all commercial vehicles. According to the operational status of the new energy vehicles in the initial operating period, the structure design principle of the machine & electric control air dryer is expounded from the aspects of the structure and operating principle, research & development process.

  12. Gust Mitigation of Micro Air Vehicles Using Passive Articulated Wings

    PubMed Central

    Slegers, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    Birds and insects naturally use passive flexing of their wings to augment their stability in uncertain aerodynamic environments. In a similar manner, micro air vehicle designers have been investigating using wing articulation to take advantage of this phenomenon. The result is a class of articulated micro air vehicles where artificial passive joints are designed into the lifting surfaces. In order to analyze how passive articulation affects performance of micro air vehicles in gusty environments, an efficient 8 degree-of-freedom model is developed. Experimental validation of the proposed mathematical model was accomplished using flight test data of an articulated micro air vehicle obtained from a high resolution indoor tracking facility. Analytical investigation of the gust alleviation properties of the articulated micro air vehicle model was carried out using simulations with varying crosswind gust magnitudes. Simulations show that passive articulation in micro air vehicles can increase their robustness to gusts within a range of joint compliance. It is also shown that if articulation joints are made too compliant that gust mitigation performance is degraded when compared to a rigid system. PMID:24516368

  13. 78 FR 20881 - Control of Air Pollution From Motor Vehicles: Tier 3 Motor Vehicle Emission and Fuel Standards...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-08

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 80 RIN 2060-AQ86 Control of Air Pollution From Motor Vehicles: Tier 3 Motor Vehicle... hearings to be held for the proposed rule ``Control of Air Pollution from Motor Vehicles: Tier 3 Motor Vehicle Emission and Fuel Standards'' (the proposed rule is hereinafter referred to as ``Tier 3''),...

  14. Missions and vehicle concepts for modern, propelled, lighter-than-air vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardema, M. D.

    1984-01-01

    The results of studies conducted over the last 15 years to assess missions and vehicle concepts for modern, propelled, lighter-than-air vehicles (airships) were surveyed. Rigid and non-rigid airship concepts are considered. The use of airships for ocean patrol and surveillance is discussed along with vertical heavy lift airships. Military and civilian needs for high altitude platforms are addressed.

  15. Design and analysis of a gyroscopically controlled micro air vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorne, Christopher Everett

    Much of the current research on micro air vehicle design relies on aerodynamic forces for attitude control. The aerodynamic environment in which micro air vehicles operate is characterized by a low Reynolds number and is not fully understood, resulting in decreased performance and efficiency when compared to large-scale vehicles. In this work, we propose a new rotary-wing micro air vehicle design that utilizes gyroscopic dynamics for attitude control. Unlike traditional micro air vehicles where attitude control moments are generated by aerodynamic control surfaces, the proposed vehicle will leverage the existing angular momentum of its rotating components to generate gyroscopic moments for controlling attitude. We explore this paradigm in an effort to reduce mechanical complexity that is inherent in blade pitch modulation mechanisms such as the swashplate, and to increase agility and possibly even efficiency when compared to state-of-the-art micro vertical-take-off-and-landing vehicles. The evolution of the mechanical design, including the evaluation of three prototypes that explore the use of gyroscopic attitude control, is presented along with a comprehensive dynamic and aerodynamic model of the third prototype. Two controllers that utilize gyroscopic moments are developed and tested in simulation. In addition, several experiments were performed using a VICON motion tracking system and off-board control. These results will also be presented.

  16. Honeywell's organic air vehicle chemical-biological sensing platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Barry E.; Krafthefer, Brian; Knee, Daniel; Fulton, Vaughn M.; Law, Kristen

    2004-12-01

    Unmanned air vehicles (UAVs) today are mostly used for reconnaissance and sometimes weapons delivery. Remote sensing of chemical-biological (CB) agents is another beneficial use of UAVs. While remote sensing of CB agents can be done by LIDAR spectroscopy, this technology is less spatially precise and less sensitive than actual measurements on a collected sample. One family of UAVs of particularly unique benefit for CB sampling and in-flight analysis is the Honeywell family of Organic Air Vehicles (OAVs). This vehicle with its ability to hover and stare has the unique ability among UAVs to collect and analyze chem-bio samples from a specific location over extended periods of time. Such collections are not possible with other micro-air-vehicles (MAVs) that only operate in fly-by mode. This paper describes some of the Honeywell OAV features that are conducive to CB detection.

  17. An improved artificial bee colony algorithm based on balance-evolution strategy for unmanned combat aerial vehicle path planning.

    PubMed

    Li, Bai; Gong, Li-gang; Yang, Wen-lun

    2014-01-01

    Unmanned combat aerial vehicles (UCAVs) have been of great interest to military organizations throughout the world due to their outstanding capabilities to operate in dangerous or hazardous environments. UCAV path planning aims to obtain an optimal flight route with the threats and constraints in the combat field well considered. In this work, a novel artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm improved by a balance-evolution strategy (BES) is applied in this optimization scheme. In this new algorithm, convergence information during the iteration is fully utilized to manipulate the exploration/exploitation accuracy and to pursue a balance between local exploitation and global exploration capabilities. Simulation results confirm that BE-ABC algorithm is more competent for the UCAV path planning scheme than the conventional ABC algorithm and two other state-of-the-art modified ABC algorithms.

  18. An Improved Artificial Bee Colony Algorithm Based on Balance-Evolution Strategy for Unmanned Combat Aerial Vehicle Path Planning

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Li-gang; Yang, Wen-lun

    2014-01-01

    Unmanned combat aerial vehicles (UCAVs) have been of great interest to military organizations throughout the world due to their outstanding capabilities to operate in dangerous or hazardous environments. UCAV path planning aims to obtain an optimal flight route with the threats and constraints in the combat field well considered. In this work, a novel artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm improved by a balance-evolution strategy (BES) is applied in this optimization scheme. In this new algorithm, convergence information during the iteration is fully utilized to manipulate the exploration/exploitation accuracy and to pursue a balance between local exploitation and global exploration capabilities. Simulation results confirm that BE-ABC algorithm is more competent for the UCAV path planning scheme than the conventional ABC algorithm and two other state-of-the-art modified ABC algorithms. PMID:24790555

  19. Study of a very low cost air combat maneuvering trainer aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, G. C.; Bowles, J. V.

    1976-01-01

    A very low cost aircraft for performing Air Combat Maneuvering (ACM) training was studied using the BD-5J sport plane as a point of departure. The installation of a larger engine and increased fuel capacity were required to meet the performance and mission objectives. Reduced wing area increased the simulation of the ACM engagement, and a comparison with current tactical aircraft is presented. Other factors affecting the training transfer are considered analytically, but a flight evaluation is recommended to determine the concept utility.

  20. Redefining Combat Mission Reporting in Contemporary Operations: Focusing the Air Component’s Process in Support of the Joint Warfighter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-11

    REDEFINING COMBAT MISSION REPORTING IN CONTEMPORARY OPERATIONS: FOCUSING THE AIR COMPONENT’S PROCESS IN SUPPORT OF THE JOINT WARFIGHTER...Focusing the Air Component’s Process in Support of the Joint Warfighter 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6

  1. Air Superiority by the Numbers: Cutting Combat Air Forces in a Time of Uncertainty

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    iii ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I would first like to thank the men and women whom I have had the...sorties annually to complete the Ready Aircrew Program ( RAP ) tasking message and provide all Combat Mission Ready (CMR) and Basic Mission Capable (BMC...pilots the minimum level of proficiency with an 18 PMAI.53 This necessitates flying 250 sorties per month to meet RAP . To account for historical

  2. Army Air Ambulance Blood Product Program in the Combat Zone and Challenges to Best Practices.

    PubMed

    Powell-Dunford, Nicole; Quesada, Jose F; Gross, Kirby R; Shackelford, Stacy A

    2016-08-01

    Identify challenges and best practices in the development of an austere air ambulance transfusion program. A search of PubMed using combinations of the key terms 'prehospital,' 'blood product,' 'red blood cells,' 'damage control resuscitation,' 'transfusion,' 'air ambulance,' 'medical evacuation,' and 'medevac' yielded 196 articles for further analysis, with 14 articles suitable for addressing the background of prehospital transfusion within a helicopter. Retrospective analysis of unclassified briefs, after action reports, and procedures was also undertaken along with interview of subject matter experts. The initial series of 15 transfusions were discussed telephonically among flight crew, trauma surgeons, and lab specialists. Review of Joint Theater System data was readily available for 84 U.S. Army air ambulance transfusions between May-December 2012, with December marking the redeployment of the 25(th) Combat Aviation Brigade. Standardized implementation enabled safe blood product administration for 84 causalities from May-December 2012 without blood product shortage, expiration, or transfusion reaction. Challenges included developing transfusion competency, achieving high quality blood support, countering the potential for anti-U.S. sentiment, and diversity in coalition transfusion practices. Blood product administration aboard the air ambulance is logistically complex, requiring blood bank integration. Repetitive training enabled emergency medical technicians (EMTs) with basic medical training to safely perform transfusion in accordance with clinical operating guidelines. In the austere environment, logistic factors are significant challenges and political sensitivities are important considerations. Best practices may facilitate new en route transfusion programs. Powell-Dunford N, Quesada JF, Gross KR, Shackelford SA. Army air ambulance blood product program in the combat zone and challenges to best practices. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2016; 87(8):728-734.

  3. Assessment on motor vehicle emissions and air quality in Beijing

    SciTech Connect

    Lixin Fu; Jiming Hao; Kebin He; Dongquan He

    1996-12-31

    It is occasionally reported that hourly ozone concentrations exceed the National Air Quality Standard (NAQS) of China in recent years in Beijing, which indicates that motor vehicle emissions are more and more important to the total air quality in urban area of Beijing. A deep investigation was carried out to collect the information on road status, vehicle number and types, fuel consumption, traffic condition, and vehicle management in Beijing, so that the real world emission factors (CO, HC, NO{sub x}) could be calculated by MOBILE5a model. The calculated results were comparable with limited testing data from other former researches. With a detailed survey on emissions from other sources such as oil refueling, plants HC emission, and other stationary sources, the emission inventory are established and further projected for the future years, thus the emission contribution rates are obtained for motor vehicle emissions. The results are given for different seasons and different areas in Beijing.

  4. Age and belongingness moderate the effects of combat exposure on suicidal ideation among active duty Air Force personnel.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Craig J; McNaughton-Cassill, Mary; Osman, Augustine

    2013-09-25

    To determine if intensity of combat exposure relates to suicidal ideation among active duty Air Force personnel according to age and perceived belonging. Self-report measures of suicidal ideation, combat exposure (e.g., firing weapons, being fired upon), aftermath exposure (e.g., seeing dead bodies and devastation), emotional distress, belongingness, and perceived burdensomeness were completed by 273 (81.7% male; 67.8% Caucasian, 20.5% African American, 2.2% Native American,.7% Asian,.4% Pacific Islander, and 8.4% "other"; age M=25.99, SD=5.90) active duty Air Force Security Forces personnel. Multiple regression modeling was utilized to test the associations of combat exposure and aftermath exposure with recent suicidal ideation. A significant age-by-combat exposure interaction was found (B=0.014, SE=0.006, p=0.019), suggesting combat exposure and suicidal ideation was strongest among military personnel above the age of 34. The age-by-aftermath exposure interaction was not significant (B=-0.003, SE=0.004, p=0.460). A significant three-way interaction of age, combat exposure, and belongingness was also found (B=0.011, SE=0.005, p=0.042). The Johnson-Neyman test indicated that suicidal ideation was most severe among Airmen above the age of 29 years with high combat exposure and low levels of belongingness. Cross-sectional, self-report design limited to two Air Force units. A strong sense of belonging protects against suicidal ideation among Airmen above the age of 29 years who have been exposed to higher levels of combat. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of Intake Air Filter Condition on Vehicle Fuel Economy

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, Kevin M; Huff, Shean P; West, Brian H

    2009-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) jointly maintain a fuel economy website (www.fueleconomy.gov), which helps fulfill their responsibility under the Energy Policy Act of 1992 to provide accurate fuel economy information [in miles per gallon (mpg)] to consumers. The site provides information on EPA fuel economy ratings for passenger cars and light trucks from 1985 to the present and other relevant information related to energy use such as alternative fuels and driving and vehicle maintenance tips. In recent years, fluctuations in the price of crude oil and corresponding fluctuations in the price of gasoline and diesel fuels have renewed interest in vehicle fuel economy in the United States. (User sessions on the fuel economy website exceeded 20 million in 2008 compared to less than 5 million in 2004 and less than 1 million in 2001.) As a result of this renewed interest and the age of some of the references cited in the tips section of the website, DOE authorized the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Fuels, Engines, and Emissions Research Center (FEERC) to initiate studies to validate and improve these tips. This report documents a study aimed specifically at the effect of engine air filter condition on fuel economy. The goal of this study was to explore the effects of a clogged air filter on the fuel economy of vehicles operating over prescribed test cycles. Three newer vehicles (a 2007 Buick Lucerne, a 2006 Dodge Charger, and a 2003 Toyota Camry) and an older carbureted vehicle were tested. Results show that clogging the air filter has no significant effect on the fuel economy of the newer vehicles (all fuel injected with closed-loop control and one equipped with MDS). The engine control systems were able to maintain the desired AFR regardless of intake restrictions, and therefore fuel consumption was not increased. The carbureted engine did show a decrease in

  6. Open tube guideway for high speed air cushioned vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goering, R. S. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    This invention is a tubular shaped guideway for high-speed air-cushioned supported vehicles. The tubular guideway is split and separated such that the sides of the guideway are open. The upper portion of the tubular guideway is supported above the lower portion by truss-like structural members. The lower portion of the tubular guideway may be supported by the terrain over which the vehicle travels, on pedestals or some similar structure.

  7. Prototype air bag restraint for use in patrol vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Marts, D.J.; Barker, S.G.

    1995-03-01

    An air bag has been designed and laboratory tested for use in existing police vehicles that will restrain a person if he or she becomes violent. The device will prevent self-injury and protect the vehicle and officer. The device does not pose a suffocation hazard and can be quickly and easily inflated or deflated by the officer from the front seat. The device is ready for field testing.

  8. Mathematical Model of an Air Cushion Vehicle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-05-01

    otion, cushion dynamics, control and machinery dynamics and water wave effects are mwdeled. DD IJ එ 1473 EOITION OF I NOV 6 IS OBSOLETE U...cushion pressure model, the calculations are based on scanty experimental and analytical evidence that should not be taken for more than what it is...updates are readily incorporated. Many of the forces acting on the vehicle are curve fits to experimental4data obtained by Bell Aerospace and used in their

  9. Electric Vehicle Preparedness - Implementation Approach for Electric Vehicles at Naval Air Station Whidbey Island. Task 4

    SciTech Connect

    Schey, Stephen; Francfort, Jim

    2015-06-01

    Several U.S. Department of Defense base studies have been conducted to identify potential U.S. Department of Defense transportation systems that are strong candidates for introduction or expansion of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs). This study is focused on the Naval Air Station Whidbey Island (NASWI) located in Washington State. Task 1 consisted of a survey of the non-tactical fleet of vehicles at NASWI to begin the review of vehicle mission assignments and types of vehicles in service. In Task 2, daily operational characteristics of vehicles were identified to select vehicles for further monitoring and attachment of data loggers. Task 3 recorded vehicle movements in order to characterize the vehicles’ missions. The results of the data analysis and observations were provided. Individual observations of the selected vehicles provided the basis for recommendations related to PEV adoption, i.e., whether a battery electric vehicle (BEV) or plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) (collectively PEVs) can fulfill the mission requirements. It also provided the basis for recommendations related to placement of PEV charging infrastructure. This report focuses on an implementation plan for the near-term adoption of PEVs into the NASWI fleet.

  10. TAC BRAWLER - An application of engagement simulation modeling to simulator visual system display requirements for air combat maneuvering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerchner, R. M.; Hughes, R. G.; Lee, A.

    1984-01-01

    The TAC BRAWLER air combat simulation models both the acquisition and use of visual information by the pilot. It was used to provide the designers of manned simulators for air-to-air combat with information regarding the training implications of display system resolution, inherent target contrast, field of view, and transport delay. Various display designs were simulated, and the resulting quantitative and qualitative differences in engagements were considered indicators of possible mistraining. Display resolution was found to alter combats primarily through its effect on detection ranges; the 'pixel averaging' contrast management technique was shown to largely compensate for this problem. Transport delay significantly degrades pilot tracking ability, but the training impact of the effect is unclear.

  11. TAC BRAWLER - An application of engagement simulation modeling to simulator visual system display requirements for air combat maneuvering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerchner, R. M.; Hughes, R. G.; Lee, A.

    1984-01-01

    The TAC BRAWLER air combat simulation models both the acquisition and use of visual information by the pilot. It was used to provide the designers of manned simulators for air-to-air combat with information regarding the training implications of display system resolution, inherent target contrast, field of view, and transport delay. Various display designs were simulated, and the resulting quantitative and qualitative differences in engagements were considered indicators of possible mistraining. Display resolution was found to alter combats primarily through its effect on detection ranges; the 'pixel averaging' contrast management technique was shown to largely compensate for this problem. Transport delay significantly degrades pilot tracking ability, but the training impact of the effect is unclear.

  12. A High-Fidelity Batch Simulation Environment for Integrated Batch and Piloted Air Combat Simulation Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, Kenneth H.; McManus, John W.; Chappell, Alan R.

    1992-01-01

    A batch air combat simulation environment known as the Tactical Maneuvering Simulator (TMS) is presented. The TMS serves as a tool for developing and evaluating tactical maneuvering logics. The environment can also be used to evaluate the tactical implications of perturbations to aircraft performance or supporting systems. The TMS is capable of simulating air combat between any number of engagement participants, with practical limits imposed by computer memory and processing power. Aircraft are modeled using equations of motion, control laws, aerodynamics and propulsive characteristics equivalent to those used in high-fidelity piloted simulation. Databases representative of a modern high-performance aircraft with and without thrust-vectoring capability are included. To simplify the task of developing and implementing maneuvering logics in the TMS, an outer-loop control system known as the Tactical Autopilot (TA) is implemented in the aircraft simulation model. The TA converts guidance commands issued by computerized maneuvering logics in the form of desired angle-of-attack and wind axis-bank angle into inputs to the inner-loop control augmentation system of the aircraft. This report describes the capabilities and operation of the TMS.

  13. Northwest passage: Trade route for large air cushion vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    A conceptual vehicle and powerplant (10,000-ton) nuclear-powered air-cushion vehicle (ACV) that could open the Northwest Passage and other Arctic passages to commercial traffic is identified. The report contains a description of the conceptual vehicle, including the powerplant and operations, an assessment of technical feasibility, estimates of capital and operating costs, and identification of eligible cargo and markets. A comparison of the nuclear ACV freighter with nuclear container ships shows that for containerized or roll-on/roll-off cargo the ACV would provide greatly reduced transit time between North Atlantic and North Pacific ports at a competitive cost.

  14. Yaw rate control of an air bearing vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walcott, Bruce L.

    1989-01-01

    The results of a 6 week project which focused on the problem of controlling the yaw (rotational) rate the air bearing vehicle used on NASA's flat floor facility are summarized. Contained within is a listing of the equipment available for task completion and an evaluation of the suitability of this equipment. The identification (modeling) process of the air bearing vehicle is detailed as well as the subsequent closed-loop control strategy. The effectiveness of the solution is discussed and further recommendations are included.

  15. Measurement of Vehicle Air Conditioning Pull-Down Period

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, John F.; Huff, Shean P.; Moore, Larry G.; West, Brian H.

    2016-08-01

    Air conditioner usage was characterized for high heat-load summer conditions during short driving trips using a 2009 Ford Explorer and a 2009 Toyota Corolla. Vehicles were parked in the sun with windows closed to allow the cabin to become hot. Experiments were conducted by entering the instrumented vehicles in this heated condition and driving on-road with the windows up and the air conditioning set to maximum cooling, maximum fan speed and the air flow setting to recirculate cabin air rather than pull in outside humid air. The main purpose was to determine the length of time the air conditioner system would remain at or very near maximum cooling power under these severe-duty conditions. Because of the variable and somewhat uncontrolled nature of the experiments, they serve only to show that for short vehicle trips, air conditioning can remain near or at full cooling capacity for 10-minutes or significantly longer and the cabin may be uncomfortably warm during much of this time.

  16. Estimation of weapon-radius versus maneuverability trade-off for air-to-air combat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, H. J.; Lefton, L.

    1977-01-01

    A chase in a horizontal plane between a pursuer with a large capture radius and a more maneuverable evading vehicle is examined with constant-speed vehicle models. An approximation to the 'sidestepping' maneuver of the Homicidal Chauffeur Game is modified to account for the effect of evader turning rate, and an estimate of capture radius required is so obtained which agrees remarkably well with Cockayne's point-capture result. The maneuver assumes central importance for barrier surfaces appearing in the Game of Two Cars. Results are given for required weapon capture-radius in terms of the maneuverability of the two vehicles. Some calculations of capture radius are presented.

  17. Estimation of weapon-radius versus maneuverability trade-off for air-to-air combat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, H. J.; Lefton, L.

    1977-01-01

    A chase in a horizontal plane between a pursuer with a large capture radius and a more maneuverable evading vehicle is examined with constant-speed vehicle models. An approximation to the 'sidestepping' maneuver of the Homicidal Chauffeur Game is modified to account for the effect of evader turning rate, and an estimate of capture radius required is so obtained which agrees remarkably well with Cockayne's point-capture result. The maneuver assumes central importance for barrier surfaces appearing in the Game of Two Cars. Results are given for required weapon capture-radius in terms of the maneuverability of the two vehicles. Some calculations of capture radius are presented.

  18. Unmanned Air Vehicle -Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Oppel, SNL 06134

    2013-04-17

    This package contains modules that model the mobility of systems such as helicopters and fixed wing flying in the air. This package currently models first order physics - basically a velocity integrator. UAV mobility uses an internal clock to maintain stable, high-fidelity simulations over large time steps This package depends on interface that reside in the Mobility package.

  19. Air-Breathing Launch Vehicle Technology Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trefny, Charles J.

    2003-01-01

    Of the technical factors that would contribute to lowering the cost of space access, reusability has high potential. The primary objective of the GTX program is to determine whether or not air-breathing propulsion can enable reusable single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) operations. The approach is based on maturation of a reference vehicle design with focus on the integration and flight-weight construction of its air-breathing rocket-based combined-cycle (RBCC) propulsion system.

  20. Study of long term options for electric vehicle air conditioning

    SciTech Connect

    Dieckmann, J.; Mallory, D.

    1991-07-01

    There are strong incentives in terms of national energy and environmental policy to encourage the commercialization of electrically powered vehicles in the U.S. Among these incentives are reduced petroleum consumption, improved electric generation capacity utilization, reduced IC engine emissions, and, depending on the primary fuel used for electric power generation, reduced emissions of carbon dioxide. A basic requirement for successfully commercializing any motor vehicle in the US is provision of adequate passenger comfort heating and air conditioning (cooling). Although air conditioning is generally sold as optional equipment, in excess of 80% of the automobiles and small trucks sold in the US have air conditioning systems. In current, pre-commercial electric vehicles, comfort heating is provided by a liquid fuel fired heater that heats water which is circulated through the standard heater core in the conventional interior air handling unit. Air conditioning is provided by electric motor driven compressors, installed in a system having, perhaps, an {open_quotes}upsized{close_quotes} condenser and a standard evaporator (front and rear evaporators in some instances) installed in the conventional interior air handler. Although this approach is adequate in the near term for initial commercialization efforts, a number of shortcomings of this arrangement, as well as longer range concerns need to be addressed. In this project, the long term alternatives for cooling and heating electric vehicles effectively, efficiently (with minimum range penalties), and without adverse environmental impacts have been examined. Identification of options that can provide both heating and cooling is important, in view of the disadvantages of carrying separate heating and cooling systems in the vehicle.

  1. Study of long term options for electric vehicle air conditioning

    SciTech Connect

    Dieckmann, J.; Mallory, D. , Inc., Cambridge, MA )

    1991-07-01

    There are strong incentives in terms of national energy and environmental policy to encourage the commercialization of electrically powered vehicles in the U.S. Among these incentives are reduced petroleum consumption, improved electric generation capacity utilization, reduced IC engine emissions, and, depending on the primary fuel used for electric power generation, reduced emissions of carbon dioxide. A basic requirement for successfully commercializing any motor vehicle in the US is provision of adequate passenger comfort heating and air conditioning (cooling). Although air conditioning is generally sold as optional equipment, in excess of 80% of the automobiles and small trucks sold in the US have air conditioning systems. In current, pre-commercial electric vehicles, comfort heating is provided by a liquid fuel fired heater that heats water which is circulated through the standard heater core in the conventional interior air handling unit. Air conditioning is provided by electric motor driven compressors, installed in a system having, perhaps, an [open quotes]upsized[close quotes] condenser and a standard evaporator (front and rear evaporators in some instances) installed in the conventional interior air handler. Although this approach is adequate in the near term for initial commercialization efforts, a number of shortcomings of this arrangement, as well as longer range concerns need to be addressed. In this project, the long term alternatives for cooling and heating electric vehicles effectively, efficiently (with minimum range penalties), and without adverse environmental impacts have been examined. Identification of options that can provide both heating and cooling is important, in view of the disadvantages of carrying separate heating and cooling systems in the vehicle.

  2. Flush Air Data Sensing System for Trans-Atmospheric Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellsworth, Joel

    2006-10-01

    With the emergence of multiple companies attempting to tap the space tourism market, as well as NASA's return to the moon initiative, an inexpensive but reliable means of determining wind relative vehicle attitude is becoming a necessity. The traditional means of obtaining air data (altitude, Mach number, angles of attack and sideslip) using fixed pitot probes and directional flow vanes is not viable for collecting data on high supersonic and hypersonic vehicles, due to the high temperatures and dynamic pressures. The solution is to use a matrix of flush mounted pressure ports on the vehicle nose or on an outboard wing leading edge. Since the ports will be located behind a detached shock wave at supersonic velocities, the temperatures will remain substantially lower. A Flush Air Data Sensing (FADS) system can also be used for subsonic conditions, although it must be calibrated for the effects of the vehicle geometry. The physics of air behavior and the mathematics of the solution algorithm will be presented. Several relevant examples of planned vehicles will be presented.

  3. Mechanically refuelable zinc/air electric vehicle cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noring, J.; Gordon, S.; Maimoni, A.; Spragge, M.; Cooper, J. F.

    1992-12-01

    Refuelable zinc/air batteries have long been considered for motive as well as stationary power because of a combination of high specific energy, low initial cost, and the possibility of mechanical recharge by electrolyte exchange and additions of metallic zinc. In this context, advanced slurry batteries, stationary packed bed cells, and batteries offering replaceable cassettes have been reported recently. The authors are developing self-feeding, particulate-zinc/air batteries for electric vehicle applications. Emissionless vehicle legislation in California motivated efforts to consider a new approach to providing an electric vehicle with long range (400 km), rapid refueling (10 minutes) and highway safe acceleration - factors which define the essential functions of common automobiles. Such an electric vehicle would not compete with emerging secondary battery vehicles in specialized applications (commuting vehicles, delivery trucks). Rather, different markets would be sought where long range or rapid range extension are important. Examples are: taxis, continuous-duty fork-lift trucks and shuttle busses, and general purpose automobiles having modest acceleration capabilities. In the long range, a mature fleet would best use regional plants to efficiently recover zinc from battery reaction products. One option would be to use chemical/thermal reduction to recover the zinc. The work described focuses on development of battery configurations which efficiently and completely consume zinc particles, without clogging or changing discharge characteristics.

  4. Mechanically refuelable zinc/air electric vehicle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Noring, J.; Gordon, S.; Maimoni, A.; Spragge, M.; Cooper, J.F.

    1992-12-01

    Refuelable zinc/air batteries have long been considered for motive as well as stationary power because of a combination of high specific energy, low initial cost, and the possibility of mechanical recharge by electrolyte exchange and additions of metallic zinc. In this context, advanced slurry batteries, stationary packed bed cells and batteries offering replaceable cassettes have been reported recently. The authors are developing self-feeding, particulate-zinc/air batteries for electric vehicle applications. Emissionless vehicle legislation in California motivated efforts to consider a new approach to providing an electric vehicle with long range (400 km), rapid refueling (10 minutes) and highway safe acceleration -- factors which define the essential functions of common automobiles. Such a electric vehicle would not compete with emerging secondary battery vehicles in specialized applications (commuting vehicles, delivery trucks). Rather, different markets would be sought where long range or rapid range extension are important. Examples are: taxis, continuous-duty fork-lift trucks and shuttle busses, and general purpose automobiles having modest acceleration capabilities. In the long range, a mature fleet would best use regional plants to efficiently recover zinc from battery reaction products. One option would be to use chemical/thermal reduction to recover the zinc. The work described in this report focuses on development of battery configurations which efficiently and completely consume zinc particles, without clogging or changing discharge characteristics.

  5. A piloted simulation investigation of yaw dynamics requirements for turreted gun use in low-level helicopter air combat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, William A.; Morris, Patrick M.; Williams, Jeffrey N.

    1988-01-01

    A piloted, fixed-base simulation study was conducted to investigate the handling qualities requirements for helicopter air-to-air combat using turreted guns in the near-terrain environment. The study used a version of the helicopter air combat system developed at NASA Ames Research Center for one-on-one air combat. The study focused on the potential trade-off between gun angular movement capability and required yaw axis response. Experimental variables included yaw axis response frequency and damping and the size of the gun-movement envelope. A helmet position and sighting system was used for pilot control of gun aim. Approximately 340 simulated air combat engagements were evaluated by pilots from the Army and industry. Results from the experiment indicate that a highly-damped, high frequency yaw response was desired for Level I handling qualities. Pilot preference for those characteristics became more pronounced as gun turret movement was restricted; however, a stable, slow-reacting platform could be used with a large turret envelope. Most pilots preferred to engage with the opponent near the own-ship centerline. Turret elevation restriction affected the engagement more than azimuth restrictions.

  6. A piloted simulation investigation of yaw dynamics requirements for turreted gun use in low-level helicopter air combat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, William A.; Morris, Patrick M.; Williams, Jeffrey N.

    1988-01-01

    A piloted, fixed-base simulation study was conducted to investigate the handling qualities requirements for helicopter air-to-air combat using turreted guns in the near-terrain environment. The study used a version of the helicopter air combat system developed at NASA Ames Research Center for one-on-one air combat. The study focused on the potential trade-off between gun angular movement capability and required yaw axis response. Experimental variables included yaw axis response frequency and damping and the size of the gun-movement envelope. A helmet position and sighting system was used for pilot control of gun aim. Approximately 340 simulated air combat engagements were evaluated by pilots from the Army and industry. Results from the experiment indicate that a highly-damped, high frequency yaw response was desired for Level I handling qualities. Pilot preference for those characteristics became more pronounced as gun turret movement was restricted; however, a stable, slow-reacting platform could be used with a large turret envelope. Most pilots preferred to engage with the opponent near the own-ship centerline. Turret elevation restriction affected the engagement more than azimuth restrictions.

  7. An Adaptive Path Planning Algorithm for Cooperating Unmanned Air Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, C.T.; Roberts, R.S.

    2000-09-12

    An adaptive path planning algorithm is presented for cooperating Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs) that are used to deploy and operate land-based sensor networks. The algorithm employs a global cost function to generate paths for the UAVs, and adapts the paths to exceptions that might occur. Examples are provided of the paths and adaptation.

  8. Adaptive path planning algorithm for cooperating unmanned air vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, C T; Roberts, R S

    2001-02-08

    An adaptive path planning algorithm is presented for cooperating Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs) that are used to deploy and operate land-based sensor networks. The algorithm employs a global cost function to generate paths for the UAVs, and adapts the paths to exceptions that might occur. Examples are provided of the paths and adaptation.

  9. Development of vehicle magnetic air conditioner (VMAC) technology. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gschneidner, Karl A., Jr.; Pecharsky, V.K.; Jiles, David; Zimm, Carl B.

    2001-08-28

    The objective of Phase I was to explore the feasibility of the development of a new solid state refrigeration technology - magnetic refrigeration - in order to reduce power consumption of a vehicle air conditioner by 30%. The feasibility study was performed at Iowa State University (ISU) together with Astronautics Corporation of America Technology Center (ACATC), Madison, WI, through a subcontract with ISU.

  10. Simulation study of plane motion of air cushion vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shu-Qin; Shi, Xiao-Cheng; Shi, Yi-Long; Bian, Xin-Qian

    2003-12-01

    This research is on horizontal plane motion equations of Air Cushion Vehicle (ACV) and its simulation. To investigate this, a lot of simulation study including ACV’s voyage and turning performance has been done. It was found that the voyage simulation results were accorded with ACV own characteristic and turning simulation results were accorded with USA ACV’s movement characteristic basically.

  11. A zinc-air battery and flywheel zero emission vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Tokarz, F.; Smith, J.R.; Cooper, J.; Bender, D.; Aceves, S.

    1995-10-03

    In response to the 1990 Clean Air Act, the California Air Resources Board (CARB) developed a compliance plan known as the Low Emission Vehicle Program. An integral part of that program was a sales mandate to the top seven automobile manufacturers requiring the percentage of Zero Emission Vehicles (ZEVs) sold in California to be 2% in 1998, 5% in 2001 and 10% by 2003. Currently available ZEV technology will probably not meet customer demand for range and moderate cost. A potential option to meet the CARB mandate is to use two Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) technologies, namely, zinc-air refuelable batteries (ZARBs) and electromechanical batteries (EMBs, i. e., flywheels) to develop a ZEV with a 384 kilometer (240 mile) urban range. This vehicle uses a 40 kW, 70 kWh ZARB for energy storage combined with a 102 kW, 0.5 kWh EMB for power peaking. These technologies are sufficiently near-term and cost-effective to plausibly be in production by the 1999-2001 time frame for stationary and initial vehicular applications. Unlike many other ZEVs currently being developed by industry, our proposed ZEV has range, acceleration, and size consistent with larger conventional passenger vehicles available today. Our life-cycle cost projections for this technology are lower than for Pb-acid battery ZEVs. We have used our Hybrid Vehicle Evaluation Code (HVEC) to simulate the performance of the vehicle and to size the various components. The use of conservative subsystem performance parameters and the resulting vehicle performance are discussed in detail.

  12. Air Force Combat Support: Adjusting Doctrine to Meet Expeditionary Air Force Requirements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Force Battlelab Briefing”: U.S Air Force Air Expeditionary Force Battlelab Web Page, on-line, Netscape , 15 Mar 00, available from www.mountain.af.mil...Expeditionary Air Force Web Site, slide 4, on- line, Netscape , 2 Apr 00, www.af.mil/eaf/master.ppt This slide portrays how the Air Force has changed since...Center Web Page, on-line, Netscape , 26 Mar 00, available from www.hqafdc.maxwell.af.mil/library/doctrine/afdd2brief.ppt: slide 2 2 “The little

  13. Death by a Thousand Cuts: Micro-Air Vehicles (MAV) in the Service of Air Force Missions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-04-01

    exotic approaches as air suction/injection along the wing surface (which might require micro -valves and micro - pumps ), wall heat transfer, or...AU/AWC/___/2001-4 AIR WAR COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY DEATH BY A THOUSAND CUTS: MICRO -AIR VEHICLES (MAV) IN THE SERVICE OF AIR FORCE MISSIONS by...Dates Covered (from... to) - Title and Subtitle Death by a thousand Cuts: Micro -Air Vehicles (MAV) in the Service of Air Force Missions Contract

  14. 40 CFR 86.1832-01 - Optional equipment and air conditioning for test vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... VEHICLES AND ENGINES (CONTINUED) General Compliance Provisions for Control of Air Pollution From New and In-Use Light-Duty Vehicles, Light-Duty Trucks, and Complete Otto-Cycle Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.1832-01...

  15. 40 CFR 86.1832-01 - Optional equipment and air conditioning for test vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... VEHICLES AND ENGINES General Compliance Provisions for Control of Air Pollution From New and In-Use Light-Duty Vehicles, Light-Duty Trucks, and Complete Otto-Cycle Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.1832-01 Optional...

  16. Missions and Vehicle Concepts for Modern, Propelled, Lighter-than-Air Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-02-01

    Williams, K, E , and Milton , J, T.i Coast Guard Missions for Lighter-Than-Air Vehicles. AIAA Paper 79-1570, 1g79. 2.2 Rappoport H. K.: Analysis of Coast...Aerocrane in British Columbia Logging Conditions. Forest Engineering Research Institute of Canada Report, undated, 3,15 Erickson , J, R,: Potential

  17. Two-target game model of an air combat with fire-and-forget all-aspect missiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidovitz, A.; Shinar, J.

    1989-01-01

    An air combat duel between similar aggressive fighter aircraft, both equipped with the same type of guided missiles, is formulated as a two-target differential game using the dynamic model of the game of two identical cars. Each of the identical target sets represents the effective firing envelope of an all-aspect fire-and-forget air-to-air missile. The firing range limits depend on the target aspect angle and are approximated by analytical functions. The maximum range, computed by taking into account the optimal missile avoidance maneuver of the target, determines the no-escape firing envelope. The solution consists of the decomposition of the game space into four regions: the respective winning zones of the two opponents, the draw zone, and the region where the game terminates by a mutual kill. The solution provides a new insight for future air combat analysis.

  18. Two-target game model of an air combat with fire-and-forget all-aspect missiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidovitz, A.; Shinar, J.

    1989-01-01

    An air combat duel between similar aggressive fighter aircraft, both equipped with the same type of guided missiles, is formulated as a two-target differential game using the dynamic model of the game of two identical cars. Each of the identical target sets represents the effective firing envelope of an all-aspect fire-and-forget air-to-air missile. The firing range limits depend on the target aspect angle and are approximated by analytical functions. The maximum range, computed by taking into account the optimal missile avoidance maneuver of the target, determines the no-escape firing envelope. The solution consists of the decomposition of the game space into four regions: the respective winning zones of the two opponents, the draw zone, and the region where the game terminates by a mutual kill. The solution provides a new insight for future air combat analysis.

  19. The U.S. Combat and Tactical Wheeled Vehicle Fleets: Issues and Suggestions for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    into being. At the point where the research team had formulated tentative observations about the issues confronting combat and tactical wheeled...The workshop featured a plenary session in which the project team briefed its observations and some tentative findings and subsequently lead...FY 2011 through FY 2027. The A4s feature a 500-hp Caterpillar C-15 engine, a 600-hp Allison 4500 SP/5-speed automatic transmission, power train

  20. Prospects for future hypersonic air-breathing vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beach, H. L., Jr.; Blankson, Isaiah M.

    1991-01-01

    The age of hypersonics is (almost) here. This is evident from the amount of activity in the United States, Europe, the USSR and Japan; this activity is a reflection of technical progress in key areas which will enable new vehicle systems, as well as renewed interest in the utilization of these systems. The current situation, at least in the United States, is the product of an interesting history which is briefly reviewed here. The context for hypersonic applications is discussed, but the emphasis is on hypersonic technology issues and needs, particularly for propulsion and technology integration. The paper concludes with prospects for accomplishing the objective of air-breathing hypersonic vehicle systems.

  1. Prospects for future hypersonic air-breathing vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beach, H. L., Jr.; Blankson, Isaiah M.

    1991-01-01

    The age of hypersonics is (almost) here. This is evident from the amount of activity in the United States, Europe, the USSR and Japan; this activity is a reflection of technical progress in key areas which will enable new vehicle systems, as well as renewed interest in the utilization of these systems. The current situation, at least in the United States, is the product of an interesting history which is briefly reviewed here. The context for hypersonic applications is discussed, but the emphasis is on hypersonic technology issues and needs, particularly for propulsion and technology integration. The paper concludes with prospects for accomplishing the objective of air-breathing hypersonic vehicle systems.

  2. Use of CR-39 films for nuclear radiation shielding efficacy evaluation of lining materials for combat vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalani, Deepak; Jodha, A. S.; Das, M. K.; Singh, R. K.; Baheti, G. L.

    2009-06-01

    All materials provide, to a lesser or greater extent, shielding against nuclear radiations. Armoured fighting vehicles (AFVs) have steel as the structural material, which appears to be a reasonably good gamma and neutron shield material but a shield of pure iron would not be equally effective against whole range of neutron energies as it has a few resonances in electron volt range, and it reduces energy of fast neutrons to lower energy neutrons. These neutrons will be absorbed through radiative capture and emit gamma radiations. Thus it is essential that an effective shield should contain a large amount of moderating material, hydrogen being preferred with low atomic number materials (B, C, Li) and lead (Pb) to ensure that the neutrons do not diffuse at intermediate energies in the shield as well as gamma attenuation will also take place. In order to have a suitable shield material for armoured vehicles which serves as neutron and gamma radiation attenuator, polyethylene polymer with fillers lining materials are preferred. These materials were evaluated against gamma and fast neutrons using radioactive sources for suitability to fitment into combat vehicle as per the requirement of protection factor values. The detector for gamma radiation was used as Nal(Tl) while for neutron, CR-39 film was used.

  3. Powering future vehicles with the refuelable zinc/air battery

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    A recent road test at LLNL underscored the zinc/air battery`s capacity to give electric vehicles some of the attractive features of gas-driven cars: a 400-km range between refueling, 10-minute refueling, and highway-safe acceleration. Developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the battery weights only one-sixth as much as standard lead/acid batteries and occupies one-third the space, yet costs less per mile to operate. What`s more, because the battery is easily refuelable, it promises trouble-free, nearly 24-hour-a-day operation for numerous kinds of electric vehicles, from forklifts to delivery vans and possibly, one day, personal automobiles. The test of a Santa Barbara Municipal Transit bus with a hybrid of zinc/air and lead/acid batteries capped a short development period for the zinc/air battery. The test run indicated the zinc/air battery`s potential savings in vehicle weight from 5.7 to 4.0 metric tons, in battery weight from 2.0 to 0.3 metric tons, in battery volume from 0.79 to 0.25 m{sup 3}, and in electricity cost from 5.6 cents per mile to 4.7 cents per mile. The power, however, remains the same.

  4. [Motor vehicle source contributions to air pollutants in Beijing].

    PubMed

    Hao, J; Wu, Y; Fu, L; He, K; He, D

    2001-09-01

    Beijing's motor vehicle emission inventory based on GIS technology was developed, and used to estimate the contribution rate of different types of vehicles and different areas of vehicles to the total vehicular emissions in the urban area of Beijing. ISCST3, a gaussian dispersion air quality model, was modified at low wind speed condition, and then used to facilitate the study of the spatial and temporal distribution of CO and NOx concentrations in Beijing. It was shown that vehicle source emissions of CO and NOx accounted for 76.8% and 40.2%, respectively, of the total emissions in 1995. The simulation results also showed that emissions from the vehicle sources had contributed 76.5% and 68.4% of the total CO and NOx concentrations in urban atmosphere of Beijing in 1995, and were even higher at down-town and near the arteries. Therefore, strategies for CO and NOx pollution control will of necessity need to focus on the vehicle sources.

  5. Environmental impact on crew of armoured vehicles: Effects of 24 h combat exercise in a hot desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, A. P.; Majumdar, D.; Bhatia, M. R.; Srivastava, K. K.; Selvamurthy, W.

    1995-06-01

    A field study was undertaken to investigate the effects of combined noise, vibration and heat stress on the physiological functions of the crew of armoured vehicles during prolonged combat exercise in a desert. The sound pressure level of noise was measured with a sound level meter and accelerations by vibration analyser. The thermal load on the crew was evaluated by calculating the wet bulb globe temperature index. The physiological responses of the subjects ( n=9), included significant increases in the heart rate, 24 h water intake and urinary catecholamine concentration. A significant decrease was recorded in body mass, peak expiratory flow rate and 24 h urinary output. The high heat load on the crew resulted in a hypohydration of 3% body mass and appeared to be the dominant factor in producing the physiological strain.

  6. Environmental impact on crew of armoured vehicles: effects of 24 h combat exercise in a hot desert.

    PubMed

    Singh, A P; Majumdar, D; Bhatia, M R; Srivastava, K K; Selvamurthy, W

    1995-11-01

    A field study was undertaken to investigate the effects of combined noise, vibration and heat stress on the physiological functions of the crew of armoured vehicles during prolonged combat exercise in a desert. The sound pressure level of noise was measured with a sound level meter and accelerations by vibration analyser. The thermal load on the crew was evaluated by calculating the wet bulb globe temperature index. The physiological responses of the subjects (n = 9), included significant increases in the heart rate, 24 h water intake and urinary catecholamine concentration. A significant decrease was recorded in body mass, peak expiratory flow rate and 24 h urinary output. The high heat load on the crew resulted in a hypohydration of 3% body mass and appeared to be the dominant factor in producing the physiological strain.

  7. Optical embedded dust sensor for engine protection and early warning on M1 Abrams/ground combat vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hai; Waldherr, Gregor A.; Burch, Timothy

    2012-06-01

    The Dual Optical Embedded Dust Sensor (DOEDS) is designed for the sensitive, accurate detection of particles for preventive health monitoring of the AGT1500 engine and M1 Abrams/Ground Combat Vehicles (GCVs). DOEDS is a real-time sensor that uses an innovative combination of optical particle sensing technologies and mechanical packaging in a rugged, compact and non-intrusive optical design. The optical sensor, implementing both a single particle sensor and a mass sensor, can operate in harsh environments (up to 400°F) to meet the particle size, size distribution, mass concentration, and response time criteria. The sensor may be flush- or inline-mounted in multiple engine locations and environments.

  8. Army Ground Vehicle Propulsion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-25

    IV (> 75 bhp ) compliant COTS engines and directly integrate into current and new heavy-duty vehicles. • Combat vehicle: permanent armor...propulsion system volume [ bhp /ft3] — Air filtration requirements, thermal management system, transmission, engine, ducting requirements, final drives...transmission 40 ft3;  engine 31 ft3;  air filtration 31 ft3 o Bradley FIV: Cummins VTA903 has SHRR of 0.6 BHP / BHP vs. today’s COTS > 0.85

  9. Pitching stability analysis of half-rotating wing air vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoyi; Wu, Yang; Li, Qian; Li, Congmin; Qiu, Zhizhen

    2017-06-01

    Half-Rotating Wing (HRW) is a new power wing which had been developed by our work team using rotating-type flapping instead of oscillating-type flapping. Half-Rotating Wing Air Vehicle (HRWAV) is similar as Bionic Flapping Wing Air Vehicle (BFWAV). It is necessary to guarantee pitching stability of HRWAV to maintain flight stability. The working principle of HRW was firstly introduced in this paper. The rule of motion indicated that the fuselage of HRWAV without empennage would overturn forward as it generated increased pitching movement. Therefore, the empennage was added on the tail of HRWAV to balance the additional moment generated by aerodynamic force during flight. The stability analysis further shows that empennage could weaken rapidly the pitching disturbance on HRWAV and a new balance of fuselage could be achieved in a short time. Case study using numerical analysis verified correctness and validity of research results mentioned above, which could provide theoretical guidance to design and control HRWAV.

  10. Developments in skirt systems for air cushion vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inch, Peter; Prentice, Mark E.; Lewis, Carol Jean

    The present evaluation of the development status of air-cushion vehicle (ACV) skirts emphasizes the materials employed, with a view to the formulation of materials-performance requirements for next-generation AVCs and, in particular, an 'air-cushion catamaran' surface-effect ship (SES). Attention is given to novel skirt-design features which furnish substantial savings in maintenance costs. The employment of extant test rig data and the use of CAD methods are discussed, and the features of a novel system for the direct fixing of a bow finger onto an SES structure are noted.

  11. Episodic air quality impacts of plug-in electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razeghi, Ghazal; Carreras-Sospedra, Marc; Brown, Tim; Brouwer, Jack; Dabdub, Donald; Samuelsen, Scott

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, the Spatially and Temporally Resolved Energy and Environment Tool (STREET) is used in conjunction with University of California Irvine - California Institute of Technology (UCI-CIT) atmospheric chemistry and transport model to assess the impact of deploying plug-in electric vehicles and integrating wind energy into the electricity grid on urban air quality. STREET is used to generate emissions profiles associated with transportation and power generation sectors for different future cases. These profiles are then used as inputs to UCI-CIT to assess the impact of each case on urban air quality. The results show an overall improvement in 8-h averaged ozone and 24-h averaged particulate matter concentrations in the South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB) with localized increases in some cases. The most significant reductions occur northeast of the region where baseline concentrations are highest (up to 6 ppb decrease in 8-h-averaged ozone and 6 μg/m3 decrease in 24-h-averaged PM2.5). The results also indicate that, without integration of wind energy into the electricity grid, the temporal vehicle charging profile has very little to no effect on urban air quality. With the addition of wind energy to the grid mix, improvement in air quality is observed while charging at off-peak hours compared to the business as usual scenario.

  12. Computational fluid dynamics challenges for hybrid air vehicle applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrin, M.; Biava, M.; Steijl, R.; Barakos, G. N.; Stewart, D.

    2017-06-01

    This paper begins by comparing turbulence models for the prediction of hybrid air vehicle (HAV) flows. A 6 : 1 prolate spheroid is employed for validation of the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method. An analysis of turbulent quantities is presented and the Shear Stress Transport (SST) k-ω model is compared against a k-ω Explicit Algebraic Stress model (EASM) within the unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) framework. Further comparisons involve Scale Adaptative Simulation models and a local transition transport model. The results show that the flow around the vehicle at low pitch angles is sensitive to transition effects. At high pitch angles, the vortices generated on the suction side provide substantial lift augmentation and are better resolved by EASMs. The validated CFD method is employed for the flow around a shape similar to the Airlander aircraft of Hybrid Air Vehicles Ltd. The sensitivity of the transition location to the Reynolds number is demonstrated and the role of each vehicle£s component is analyzed. It was found that the ¦ns contributed the most to increase the lift and drag.

  13. Meeting Unmanned Air Vehicle Platform Challenges Using Oblique Wing Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-01

    R.K., PALMER, M.E., “ Morphing UCAV wings , Incorporating in-Plane & Fold-Tip Types – Aerodynamic Design Studies”, AIAA-2006-2835. 25th Applied Aero...control (S & C) issues. Sweep changes will further complicate the matter. Conventional TE controls may not be adequate. Morphing wing structures and... morphings • Formation positioning changes, relative size effects Meeting Unmanned Air Vehicle Platform Challenges Using Oblique Wing Aircraft RTO-MP

  14. Modern Air Combat Developments and Their Influence on Neck and Back Pain in F-16 Pilots.

    PubMed

    Thoolen, Stijn J J; van den Oord, Marieke H A H

    2015-11-01

    Neck and back pain in fighter pilots remains a serious occupational problem. We hypothesized that recent advances such as the joint helmet mounted cueing system (JHMCS) in modern air combat might contribute to the development of spinal complaints in F-16 pilots. Surveyed were 59 F-16 pilots of the Royal Netherlands Air Force who were compared to 49 F-16 pilots who filled in a similar questionnaire in 2007. The prevalence of neck and back pain, work situations, and capacity of the pilot were analyzed. The self-reported 1-yr prevalence of regular or continuous neck and lower back pain in 2014 were 22% and 31%, respectively, compared to both being 12% in 2007. Age, military flying experience, total number of flying hours, flying hours on the F-16, and total number of hours flown with night vision goggles (NVG) were significantly higher in 2014. In 2014, 95% flew with JHMCS, compared to 0% in 2007. Flying with JHMCS (88%), NVG (88%), type of flight (63%), and sitting posture (50%) were the most reported causes of flight-related neck pain. Sitting posture (89%), duration of flight (56%), and seat (44%) were among the reported causes of back pain. The increasing trend of neck and lower back pain might be caused by multiple changes in both the work situation and capacity of the pilots since 2007. Future innovations will increase the load on the pilot's spine. To successfully address their spinal problems in the future, fighter pilots must be monitored continuously.

  15. Piloted simulation of one-on-one helicopter air combat at NOE flight levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, M. S.; Aiken, E. W.

    1985-01-01

    A piloted simulation designed to examine the effects of terrain proximity and control system design on helicopter performance during one-on-one air combat maneuvering (ACM) is discussed. The NASA Ames vertical motion simulator (VMS) and the computer generated imagery (CGI) systems were modified to allow two aircraft to be independently piloted on a single CGI data base. Engagements were begun with the blue aircraft already in a tail-chase position behind the red, and also with the two aircraft originating from positions unknown to each other. Maneuvering was very aggressive and safety requirements for minimum altitude, separation, and maximum bank angles typical of flight test were not used. Results indicate that the presence of terrain features adds an order of complexiaty to the task performed over clear air ACM and that mix of attitude and rate command-type stability and control augmentation system (SCAS) design may be desirable. The simulation system design, the flight paths flown, and the tactics used were compared favorably by the evaluation pilots to actual flight test experiments.

  16. Potential air pollutant emission from private vehicles based on vehicle route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huboyo, H. S.; Handayani, W.; Samadikun, B. P.

    2017-06-01

    Air emissions related to the transportation sector has been identified as the second largest emitter of ambient air quality in Indonesia. This is due to large numbers of private vehicles commuting within the city as well as inter-city. A questionnaire survey was conducted in Semarang city involving 711 private vehicles consisting of cars and motorcycles. The survey was conducted in random parking lots across the Semarang districts and in vehicle workshops. Based on the parking lot survey, the average distance private cars travelled in kilometers (VKT) was 17,737 km/year. The machine start-up number of cars during weekdays; weekends were on average 5.19 and 3.79 respectively. For motorcycles the average of kilometers travelled was 27,092 km/year. The machine start-up number of motorcycles during weekdays and weekends were on average 5.84 and 3.98, respectively. The vehicle workshop survey showed the average kilometers travelled to be 9,510 km/year for motorcycles, while for private cars the average kilometers travelled was 21,347 km/year. Odometer readings for private cars showed a maximum of 3,046,509 km and a minimum of 700 km. Meanwhile, for motorcycles, odometer readings showed a maximum of 973,164 km and a minimum of roughly 54.24 km. Air pollutant emissions on East-West routes were generally higher than those on South-North routes. Motorcycles contribute significantly to urban air pollution, more so than cars. In this study, traffic congestion and traffic volume contributed much more to air pollution than the impact of fluctuating terrain.

  17. 78 FR 29815 - Control of Air Pollution From Motor Vehicles: Tier 3 Motor Vehicle Emission and Fuel Standards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-21

    ...This action would establish more stringent vehicle emissions standards and reduce the sulfur content of gasoline beginning in 2017, as part of a systems approach to addressing the impacts of motor vehicles and fuels on air quality and public health. The proposed gasoline sulfur standard would make emission control systems more effective for both existing and new vehicles, and would enable more......

  18. Air liquefaction and enrichment system propulsion in reusable launch vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, W.H.; Yi, A.C.

    1994-07-01

    A concept is shown for a fully reusable, Earth-to-orbit launch vehicle with horizontal takeoff and landing, employing an air-turborocket for low speed and a rocket for high-speed acceleration, both using liquid hydrogen for fuel. The turborocket employs a modified liquid air cycle to supply the oxidizer. The rocket uses 90% pure liquid oxygen as its oxidizer that is collected from the atmosphere, separated, and stored during operation of the turborocket from about Mach 2 to 5 or 6. The takeoff weight and the thrust required at takeoff are markedly reduced by collecting the rocket oxidizer in-flight. This article shows an approach and the corresponding technology needs for using air liquefaction and enrichment system propulsion in a single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) vehicle. Reducing the trajectory altitude at the end of collection reduces the wing area and increases payload. The use of state-of-the-art materials, such as graphite polyimide, in a direct substitution for aluminum or aluminum-lithium alloy, is critical to meet the structure weight objective for SSTO. Configurations that utilize `waverider` aerodynamics show great promise to reduce the vehicle weight. 5 refs.

  19. In-vehicle particle air pollution and its mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartakovsky, L.; Baibikov, V.; Czerwinski, J.; Gutman, M.; Kasper, M.; Popescu, D.; Veinblat, M.; Zvirin, Y.

    2013-01-01

    This work presents results of particle mass, number and size measurements inside passenger cars (PCs), vans and urban buses. Effects of the in-cabin air purifier on particle concentrations and average size inside a vehicle are studied. Use of the air purifier leads to a dramatic reduction, by 95-99%, in the measured ultrafine particles number concentration inside a vehicle compared with outside readings. Extremely low particle concentrations may be reached without a danger of vehicle occupants' exposure to elevated CO2 levels. The lowest values of particle concentrations inside a PC without air purifier are registered under the recirculation ventilation mode, but the issue of CO2 accumulation limits the use of this mode to very short driving events. Lower PM concentrations are found inside newer cars, if this ventilation mode is used. Great differences by a factor of 2.5-3 in PM10 concentrations are found between the PCs and the buses. Smoking inside a car leads to a dramatic increase, by approximately 90 times, in PM2.5 concentrations.

  20. Air liquefaction and enrichment system propulsion in reusable launch vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, W. H.; Yi, A. C.

    1994-07-01

    A concept is shown for a fully reusable, Earth-to-orbit launch vehicle with horizontal takeoff and landing, employing an air-turborocket for low speed and a rocket for high-speed acceleration, both using liquid hydrogen for fuel. The turborocket employs a modified liquid air cycle to supply the oxidizer. The rocket uses 90% pure liquid oxygen as its oxidizer that is collected from the atmosphere, separated, and stored during operation of the turborocket from about Mach 2 to 5 or 6. The takeoff weight and the thrust required at takeoff are markedly reduced by collecting the rocket oxidizer in-flight. This article shows an approach and the corresponding technology needs for using air liquefaction and enrichment system propulsion in a single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) vehicle. Reducing the trajectory altitude at the end of collection reduces the wing area and increases payload. The use of state-of-the-art materials, such as graphite polyimide, in a direct substitution for aluminum or aluminum-lithium alloy, is critical to meet the structure weight objective for SSTO. Configurations that utilize 'waverider' aerodynamics show great promise to reduce the vehicle weight.

  1. Roadmap for a New Command: Lessons from Strategic Air Command and Air Combat Command

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    may frequently happen . But, the organization adapts to localized crises and displays some resiliency. From this phase, the organization moves to...officers, Major General Clements McMullen, hand carry a letter to General Kenney that concluded with “If anything should happen and units of the...reshape the military services. The Air Force must adapt or go the way of the dinosaurs .”58F4 In concert with these initiatives was the placement of

  2. 78 FR 32223 - Control of Air Pollution From Motor Vehicles: Tier 3 Motor Vehicle Emission and Fuel Standards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 80, 85, 86, 600, 1036, 1037, 1065, and 1066 RIN 2060-A0 Control of Air Pollution From... (``EPA'') is announcing an extension of the public comment period for the proposed rule ``Control of Air Pollution from Motor Vehicles: Tier 3 Motor Vehicle Emission and Fuel Standards'' (the proposed rule...

  3. Potential impacts of electric vehicles on air quality in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Chen, Jen-Ping; Tsai, I-Chun; He, Qingyang; Chi, Szu-Yu; Lin, Yi-Chiu; Fu, Tzung-May

    2016-10-01

    The prospective impacts of electric vehicle (EV) penetration on the air quality in Taiwan were evaluated using an air quality model with the assumption of an ambitious replacement of current light-duty vehicles under different power generation scenarios. With full EV penetration (i.e., the replacement of all light-duty vehicles), CO, VOCs, NOx and PM2.5 emissions in Taiwan from a fleet of 20.6 million vehicles would be reduced by 1500, 165, 33.9 and 7.2Ggyr(-1), respectively, while electric sector NOx and SO2 emissions would be increased by up to 20.3 and 12.9Ggyr(-1), respectively, if the electricity to power EVs were provided by thermal power plants. The net impacts of these emission changes would be to reduce the annual mean surface concentrations of CO, VOCs, NOx and PM2.5 by about 260, 11.3, 3.3ppb and 2.1μgm(-3), respectively, but to increase SO2 by 0.1ppb. Larger reductions tend to occur at time and place of higher ambient concentrations and during high pollution events. Greater benefits would clearly be attained if clean energy sources were fully encouraged. EV penetration would also reduce the mean peak-time surface O3 concentrations by up to 7ppb across Taiwan with the exception of the center of metropolitan Taipei where the concentration increased by <2ppb. Furthermore, full EV penetration would reduce annual days of O3 pollution episodes by ~40% and PM2.5 pollution episodes by 6-10%. Our findings offer important insights into the air quality impacts of EV and can provide useful information for potential mitigation actions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A piloted simulation of helicopter air combat to investigate effects of variations in selected performance and control response characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Michael S.; Mansur, M. Hossein; Chen, Robert T. N.

    1987-01-01

    A piloted simulation study investigating handling qualities and flight characteristics required for helicopter air to air combat is presented. The Helicopter Air Combat system was used to investigate this role for Army rotorcraft. Experimental variables were the maneuver envelope size (load factor and sideslip), directional axis handling qualities, and pitch and roll control-response type. Over 450 simulated, low altitude, one-on-one engagements were conducted. Results from the experiment indicate that a well damped directional response, low sideforce caused by sideslip, and some effective dihedral are all desirable for weapon system performance, good handling qualities, and low pilot workload. An angular rate command system was favored over the attitude type pitch and roll response for most applications, and an enhanced maneuver envelope size over that of current generation aircraft was found to be advantageous. Pilot technique, background, and experience are additional factors which had a significant effect on performance in the air combat tasks investigated. The implication of these results on design requirements for future helicopters is presented.

  5. Combat Vehicle Command and Control System (CVC2): The Development of the Measures and Evaluation Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    8217"k- i L-’ ’< Mica Soverei r’nc• pal Advisor Da Boje ,Ass e Advisor " "au H. Moo , Chairman, Command, Control, and Communications Academic Group ii...C2Oat mth tC0 ia XDesofts bCl2 CO n ET SN CS&CSS 00 60PSC COO P13 NET NOtTE CVt2 SYSTEM NODE IN ALL CV2 d IecLiES Figure 2-1: CVCC System Diagram...aware of brigade order. *4ie• al ’, CP OJC collects ri ullates 0stlimates. a. S3, FSE, and combat trains CP provide current and accurate friendly

  6. The Army’s Ground Combat Vehicle (GCV) Program: Background and Issues for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-28

    Puma IFV that was developed based on lessons learned from Iraq and Afghanistan. SAIC also emphasized all work, including production, would take place...for proposal and aspects of the team’s bid were discounted because of a lack of familiarity with the German Puma infantry fighting vehicle that

  7. Conceptual design of flapping-wing micro air vehicles.

    PubMed

    Whitney, J P; Wood, R J

    2012-09-01

    Traditional micro air vehicles (MAVs) are miniature versions of full-scale aircraft from which their design principles closely follow. The first step in aircraft design is the development of a conceptual design, where basic specifications and vehicle size are established. Conceptual design methods do not rely on specific knowledge of the propulsion system, vehicle layout and subsystems; these details are addressed later in the design process. Non-traditional MAV designs based on birds or insects are less common and without well-established conceptual design methods. This paper presents a conceptual design process for hovering flapping-wing vehicles. An energy-based accounting of propulsion and aerodynamics is combined with a one degree-of-freedom dynamic flapping model. Important results include simple analytical expressions for flight endurance and range, predictions for maximum feasible wing size and body mass, and critical design space restrictions resulting from finite wing inertia. A new figure-of-merit for wing structural-inertial efficiency is proposed and used to quantify the performance of real and artificial insect wings. The impact of these results on future flapping-wing MAV designs is discussed in detail.

  8. High specific energy and specific power aluminum/air battery for micro air vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kindler, A.; Matthies, L.

    2014-06-01

    Micro air vehicles developed under the Army's Micro Autonomous Systems and Technology program generally need a specific energy of 300 - 550 watt-hrs/kg and 300 -550 watts/kg to operate for about 1 hour. At present, no commercial cell can fulfill this need. The best available commercial technology is the Lithium-ion battery or its derivative, the Li- Polymer cell. This chemistry generally provides around 15 minutes flying time. One alternative to the State-of-the Art is the Al/air cell, a primary battery that is actually half fuel cell. It has a high energy battery like aluminum anode, and fuel cell like air electrode that can extract oxygen out of the ambient air rather than carrying it. Both of these features tend to contribute to a high specific energy (watt-hrs/kg). High specific power (watts/kg) is supported by high concentration KOH electrolyte, a high quality commercial air electrode, and forced air convection from the vehicles rotors. The performance of this cell with these attributes is projected to be 500 watt-hrs/kg and 500 watts/kg based on simple model. It is expected to support a flying time of approximately 1 hour in any vehicle in which the usual limit is 15 minutes.

  9. Air Combat Maneuver, A Computer-Operated Simulation Model of a Strike Group, Its Escorts, and Enemy Interceptors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-14

    Introduction -General ... . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.2 Basic Capabilities and Limitations .. . . . . . . . I 1.3 System Functional Overview...to run and use the model. 1.2 BASIC CAPABILITIES AND LIMITATIONS : The AIR COMBAT MANEU- VER Model is a computer-operated logic model which simulates...following attributes: Maximum and 90-pct detection ranges, target signature for 90-pct detec- tion, sweep rate and width, upper and lower sweep limits , and

  10. 75 FR 15620 - Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards; Air Brake Systems

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-30

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration 49 CFR Part 571 RIN 2127-AK62 Federal Motor Vehicle Safety... that amended the Federal motor vehicle safety standard for air brake systems by requiring substantial... 37122) amending Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) No. 121, Air Brake Systems, to...

  11. Projection Moire Interferometry Measurements of Micro Air Vehicle Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, Gary A.; Bartram, Scott M.; Waszak, Martin R.; Jenkins, Luther N.

    2001-01-01

    Projection Moire Interferometry (PMI) has been used to measure the structural deformation of micro air vehicle (MAV) wings during a series of wind tunnel tests. The MAV wings had a highly flexible wing structure, generically reminiscent of a bat s wing, which resulted in significant changes in wing shape as a function of MAV angle-of-attack and simulated flight speed. This flow-adaptable wing deformation is thought to provide enhanced vehicle stability and wind gust alleviation compared to rigid wing designs. Investigation of the potential aerodynamic benefits of a flexible MAV wing required measurement of the wing shape under aerodynamic loads. PMI was used to quantify the aerodynamically induced changes in wing shape for three MAV wings having different structural designs and stiffness characteristics. This paper describes the PMI technique, its application to MAV testing, and presents a portion of the PMI data acquired for the three different MAV wings tested.

  12. Operational noise data for the LACV-30 air cushion vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schomer, P. D.

    1985-03-01

    Operational data for the LACV-30 air cushion vehicle were gathered and developed into sound exposure level vs distance curves. These data are available for the Army Environmental Hygiene Agency (AEHA) to use in developing noise zone maps for LACV-30 operations in support of the Army Installation Compatible Use Program (ICUZ). ICUZ defines Hand use compatible with various noise levels and establishes a policy for achieving such uses. Although the Army classifies the LACV-30 as an amphibious vehicle, an examination of its noise characteristics and operations showed it most closely resembles a helicopter. Thus, the methodology for gathering rotary wing aircraft data was used. Measurements of LACV-30's passby runs over water at various distances and speeds were similar in concept to flyover and flyby measurements for helicopters, and the land maneuver measurements corresponded most nearly to a helicopter's hover measurements.

  13. Projection moire interferometry measurements of micro air vehicle wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, Gary A.; Bartram, Scott M.; Waszak, Martin R.; Jenkins, Luther N.

    2001-11-01

    Projection Moire Interferometry (PMI) has been used to measure the structural deformation of micro air vehicle (MAV) wings during a series of wind tunnel tests. The MAV wings had a highly flexible wing structure, generically reminiscent of a bat's wing, which resulted in significant changes in wing shape as a function of MAV angle-of-attack and simulated flight speed. This flow-adaptable wing deformation is thought to provide enhanced vehicle stability and wind gust alleviation compared to rigid wing designs. Investigation of the potential aerodynamic benefits of a flexible MAV wing required measurement of the wing shape under aerodynamic loads. PMI was used to quantify the aerodynamically induced changes in wing shape for three MAV wings having different structural designs and stiffness characteristics. This paper describes the PMI technique, its application to MAV testing, and presents a portion of the PMI data acquired for the three different MAV wings tested.

  14. Design Guidelines for Prevention of Corrosion in Combat and Tactical Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-01

    Compositon L is for use in areas where air quality standards restrict solvent emissions into the atmosphere. Under the composition L standard, certain...a corrosion-inhibiting, lead- and chromate-free primer, formulated so as to meet air pollution requirements regarding solvent emissions . The film...such as toluene di- isocyanate , which contain two or more -NCO groups. Like the epoxide functionality, -NCO will link up with virtually anything that has

  15. Technical Challenges of the U.S. Army’s Ground Combat Vehicle Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    damage. A spall liner is a soft material, often specially treated glass fiber, mounted in the crew compartment of a vehicle. The spall liner serves...parameter. Hazell, Paul, Ceramic Armour : Design and Defeat Mechanisms, Canberra, Australia, Argos Press, January 2006. 58 Department of Defense...composites such as Kevlar or spun glass . SWAP. Space, weight, armor, power. A term used to indicate that these parameters must be traded against each other

  16. Evaluation of the Combat Vehicle Command and Control System. Operational Effectiveness of an Armor Battalion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-31

    Mr. Robert Pollock , Mr. Ronald Reyna, Mr. Charles Sawyer, Mr. Daniel Schultz, Mr. Timothy Voss, Mr. Harold Wager, and Mr. Charles West. Personnel of...task of tactical navigation. One such system is the POSNAV system developed for the MIA2 tank (Garth, 1992). Using on-board inertial technology...handle. QOS . The POSNAV component provides information on own- vehicle location and heading, based on a simulated on-board inertial system. This

  17. Army Combat Vehicles: Industrial Base Study’s Approach Met Research Standards

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    in the study are sufficiently valid and reliable for the study’s purposes . Presentation includes clearly documenting the study’s results in a way...sufficient actions to ensure the data used were valid and reliable for the study’s purposes , such as obtaining data directly from the individual...Armored Multi- Purpose Vehicle BAE BAE Systems, Inc. DOD Department of Defense GDLS General Dynamics Land Systems Contents This is a work of

  18. Comparative Analysis of Leasing versus Buying General Purpose Vehicles (Sedan) in the Korean Air Force

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-03-01

    COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF LEASING VERSUS BUYING GENERAL PURPOSE VEHICLES (SEDAN) IN THE KOREAN AIR FORCE...leasing versus buying vehicle study started from the recognition of this situation in which ROKAF needs an efficient and effective vehicle procurement...versus buying vehicles , which has been used in buying versus leasing decision. This research analyzed two variables, logistics benefits and costs, and

  19. Creating new cities through the large air-cushion vehicle.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. L.; Finnegan, P. M.

    1972-01-01

    The air-cushion vehicle (ACV) can travel over concrete roads, grass, sand, mud, swamp, snow, ice, and water. This mobility makes possible a totally new geographical freedom in choosing transportation routes, locating ports, and laying out a city. By the 1980s fleets of large ACV freighters could begin carrying ocean-going cargo. The mobility of an ACV fleet would allow placing hoverports away from areas now crowded. New cities could rise along shallow or reef-bound seacoasts and rivers, just as cities once rose around deep-water seaports.

  20. Thirty years of research and development of air cushion vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertelsen, William R.

    This paper describes the conception of the air cushion vehicle (ACV) from experiments with the ground effect of a VTOL aircraft model. Then it describes the evolution of the ultimate ACV drive system through building and testing many models and 16 full-scale ACV to arrive at complete controllability. Adequate control of the frictionless craft, which are without inherent yaw stability, requires control force of the order of magnitude of propulsion. The derived gimbal fans provide such control force in the form of direct thrust, which is instantly available in any of 360 degrees, meterable, instantly cancelable, and reversible.

  1. Environmental Assessment for Air Force Research Laboratory Space Vehicles Integrated Experiments Division Office Space at Kirtland Air Force Base, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    AIR FORCE RESEARCH LABORATORY SPACE VEHICLES INTEGRATED EXPERMENTS DIVISION OFFICE SPACE AT KIRTLAND AIR FORCE ... Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB). The office building would house the Air Force Research Laboratory Space Vehicles Integrated Experiments Division...ADDRESS(ES) Air Force Research Laboratory ,Space Vehicles Directorate,3550 Aberdeen Ave. SE, Kirtland

  2. Effect of Intake Air Filter Condition on Light-Duty Gasoline Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, John F; Huff, Shean P; West, Brian H; Norman, Kevin M

    2012-01-01

    Proper maintenance can help vehicles perform as designed, positively affecting fuel economy, emissions, and the overall drivability. This effort investigates the effect of one maintenance factor, intake air filter replacement, with primary focus on vehicle fuel economy, but also examining emissions and performance. Older studies, dealing with carbureted gasoline vehicles, have indicated that replacing a clogged or dirty air filter can improve vehicle fuel economy and conversely that a dirty air filter can be significantly detrimental to fuel economy. The effect of clogged air filters on the fuel economy, acceleration and emissions of five gasoline fueled vehicles is examined. Four of these were modern vehicles, featuring closed-loop control and ranging in model year from 2003 to 2007. Three vehicles were powered by naturally aspirated, port fuel injection (PFI) engines of differing size and cylinder configuration: an inline 4, a V6 and a V8. A turbocharged inline 4-cylinder gasoline direct injection (GDI) engine powered vehicle was the fourth modern gasoline vehicle tested. A vintage 1972 vehicle equipped with a carburetor (open-loop control) was also examined. Results reveal insignificant fuel economy and emissions sensitivity of modern vehicles to air filter condition, but measureable effects on the 1972 vehicle. All vehicles experienced a measured acceleration performance penalty with clogged intake air filters.

  3. CARS Temperature and Species Measurements For Air Vehicle Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Gord, James R.; Grisch, Frederic; Klimenko, Dmitry; Clauss, Walter

    2005-01-01

    The coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) method has recently been used in the United States and Europe to probe several different types of propulsion systems for air vehicles. At NASA Langley Research Center in the United States, CARS has been used to simultaneously measure temperature and the mole fractions of N2, O2 and H2 in a supersonic combustor, representative of a scramjet engine. At Wright- Patterson Air Force Base in the United States, CARS has been used to simultaneously measure temperature and mole fractions of N2, O2 and CO2, in the exhaust stream of a liquid-fueled, gas-turbine combustor. At ONERA in France and the DLR in Germany researchers have used CARS to measure temperature and species concentrations in cryogenic LOX-H2 rocket combustion chambers. The primary aim of these measurements has been to provide detailed flowfield information for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code validation.

  4. Marine Corps Amphibious Combat Vehicle (ACV) and Marine Personnel Carrier (MPC): Background and Issues for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-03-08

    operations. On June 14, 2013, Marine leadership put the MPC program “on ice” due to budgetary pressures but suggested the program might be resurrected some... resurrect ” the MPC in March 2014. The Marines designated the MPC as ACV Increment 1.1 and planned to acquire about 200 vehicles. The Marines also plan to...MPC. In June 2013, citing budgetary pressures, the Marines reportedly put the MPC program “on ice” and suggested that it might not be resurrected for

  5. Marine Corps Amphibious Combat Vehicle (ACV) and Marine Personnel Carrier (MPC): Background and Issues for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-26

    operations. On June 14, 2013, Marine leadership put the MPC program “on ice” due to budgetary pressures but suggested the program might be resurrected ... resurrect ” the MPC in March 2014. The Marines designated the MPC as ACV Increment 1.1 and planned to acquire about 200 vehicles. The Marines also...and suggested that it might not be resurrected for about 10 years. 2 While some have questioned why the Marines cannot simply “adopt” a U.S. Army

  6. Marine Corps Amphibious Combat Vehicle (ACV) and Marine Personnel Carrier (MPC): Background and Issues for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-03

    operations. On June 14, 2013, Marine leadership put the MPC program “on ice” due to budgetary pressures but suggested the program might be resurrected ... resurrect ” the MPC in March 2014. The Marines designated the MPC as ACV Increment 1.1 and planned to acquire about 200 vehicles. The Marines also plan...program “on ice” and suggested that it might not be resurrected for about 10 years. 2 With the Marines involved in decades-long land conflicts in

  7. Marine Corps Amphibious Combat Vehicle (ACV) and Marine Personnel Carrier (MPC): Background and Issues for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-09

    operations. On June 14, 2013, Marine leadership put the MPC program “on ice” due to budgetary pressures but suggested the program might be resurrected ... resurrect ” the MPC in March 2014. The Marines designated the MPC as ACV Increment 1.1 and planned to acquire about 200 vehicles. The Marines also...suggested that it might not be resurrected for about 10 years. 2 While some have questioned why the Marines cannot simply “adopt” a U.S. Army personnel

  8. Uninhabited Combat Aerial Vehicles: Airpower by the People, for the People, But Not With the People

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-06-01

    Internet, April 17, 1999, available from http://www.ipcress.com/writer/ area51 /rainbow.html. 92 procurement of UAVs because of their comparatively low...www.ipcress.com/writer/ area51 /rainbow.html. “Reaching for the Stars.” Air Force News, 2 pages. On-line. Internet, March 15, 1999. Available from http://www.af.mil

  9. Vulnerability/Lethality Modeling of Armored Combat Vehicles - Status and Recommendations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-02-01

    Dynamics Land Systems FMC Corporation ATTN: Dr. Paulus Kersten Northern Ordnance Division P.O. Box 2074 ATTN: M3-11, Barry Brown Warren, MI 48317 4800...Road Bel Air, MD 21014 St. Louis, MO 63124 1 Dr. A. E. Schmidlin, MG Robert Kirwan (USA Ret), DA Consultant DA Consultant 28 Highview Road 10213

  10. Low Earth Orbit Raider (LER) winged air launch vehicle concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feaux, Karl; Jordan, William; Killough, Graham; Miller, Robert; Plunk, Vonn

    1989-01-01

    The need to launch small payloads into low earth orbit has increased dramatically during the past several years. The Low Earth orbit Raider (LER) is an answer to this need. The LER is an air-launched, winged vehicle designed to carry a 1500 pound payload into a 250 nautical mile orbit. The LER is launched from the back of a 747-100B at 35,000 feet and a Mach number of 0.8. Three staged solid propellant motors offer safe ground and flight handling, reliable operation, and decreased fabrication cost. The wing provides lift for 747 separation and during the first stage burn. Also, aerodynamic controls are provided to simplify first stage maneuvers. The air-launch concept offers many advantages to the consumer compared to conventional methods. Launching at 35,000 feet lowers atmospheric drag and other loads on the vehicle considerably. Since the 747 is a mobile launch pad, flexibility in orbit selection and launch time is unparalleled. Even polar orbits are accessible with a decreased payload. Most importantly, the LER launch service can come to the customer, satellites and experiments need not be transported to ground based launch facilities. The LER is designed to offer increased consumer freedom at a lower cost over existing launch systems. Simplistic design emphasizing reliability at low cost allows for the light payloads of the LER.

  11. Updraft Model for Development of Autonomous Soaring Uninhabited Air Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    Large birds and glider pilots commonly use updrafts caused by convection in the lower atmosphere to extend flight duration, increase cross-country speed, improve range, or simply to conserve energy. Uninhabited air vehicles may also have the ability to exploit updrafts to improve performance. An updraft model was developed at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center (Edwards, California) to investigate the use of convective lift for uninhabited air vehicles in desert regions. Balloon and surface measurements obtained at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Surface Radiation station (Desert Rock, Nevada) enabled the model development. The data were used to create a statistical representation of the convective velocity scale, w*, and the convective mixing-layer thickness, zi. These parameters were then used to determine updraft size, vertical velocity profile, spacing, and maximum height. This paper gives a complete description of the updraft model and its derivation. Computer code for running the model is also given in conjunction with a check case for model verification.

  12. GPS Auto-Navigation Design for Unmanned Air Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nilsson, Caroline C. A.; Heinzen, Stearns N.; Hall, Charles E., Jr.; Chokani, Ndaona

    2003-01-01

    A GPS auto-navigation system is designed for Unmanned Air Vehicles. The objective is to enable the air vehicle to be used as a test-bed for novel flow control concepts. The navigation system uses pre-programmed GPS waypoints. The actual GPS position, heading, and velocity are collected by the flight computer, a PC104 system running in Real-Time Linux, and compared with the desired waypoint. The navigator then determines the necessity of a heading correction and outputs the correction in the form of a commanded bank angle, for a level coordinated turn, to the controller system. This controller system consists of 5 controller! (pitch rate PID, yaw damper, bank angle PID, velocity hold, and altitude hold) designed for a closed loop non-linear aircraft model with linear aerodynamic coefficients. The ability and accuracy of using GPS data, is validated by a GPS flight. The autopilots are also validated in flight. The autopilot unit flight validations show that the designed autopilots function as designed. The aircraft model, generated on Matlab SIMULINK is also enhanced by the flight data to accurately represent the actual aircraft.

  13. Flexible Wing Base Micro Aerial Vehicles: Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs) for Surveillance and Remote Sensor Delivery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ifju, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs) will be developed for tracking individuals, locating terrorist threats, and delivering remote sensors, for surveillance and chemical/biological agent detection. The tasks are: (1) Develop robust MAV platform capable of carrying sensor payload. (2) Develop fully autonomous capabilities for delivery of sensors to remote and distant locations. The current capabilities and accomplishments are: (1) Operational electric (inaudible) 6-inch MAVs with novel flexible wing, providing superior aerodynamic efficiency and control. (2) Vision-based flight stability and control (from on-board cameras).

  14. Unmanned Combat Aerial Vehicles: Examining the Political, Moral, and Social Implications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    even the White House if desired.9 Admittedly, current UCAVs like the Predator are not impervious to ground and airborne threats such as surface-to-air...Technology and the Revenge of Unintended Consequences, (New York, NY: Alfred A. Knopf, 1996), 1-5. 91 Other examples concern the introduction of kudzu ...vine and technology driven devices. Kudzu vine was introduced in the 1950s as a way to prevent erosion. It is now a huge problem in the south because

  15. Power packs: A passive approach to extinguishing fire in combat vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finnerty, Anthony E.; Polyanski, Stanley

    1991-01-01

    Thin (12.7 and 6.4 mm) panels of fire extinguishing powder in a honeycomb matrix were tested for their ability to extinguish fires in the FAASV ammunition resupply vehicle. These powder packs were applied to the exterior of hydraulic fluid reservoirs and fuel cells for protection from hydrocarbon fires caused by shaped charge jets penetrating the fluid containers. It was found that a surround of 12.7-mm-thick panels was required to achieve a sub 250-ms fire-out time with no second-degree burns expected to personnel with hot hydraulic fluid reservoirs. Power packs as thin as 6.4 mm provided the same protection in the case of hot diesel fuel.

  16. Infrared and visible combat identification marking materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Keefe, Eoin; Shohet, Adam; Swan, Martin

    2007-04-01

    Historically, it is believed that fratricide accounts for up to 15% of friendly casualties during operations and a UK MoD report identifies that almost half of all such casualties occur in situations involving ground units only. Such risks can be mitigated, to an extent, via operational awareness and effective communications. However, recent conflicts have involved a much more dynamic, complex and technically sophisticated battlefield than previously experienced. For example, Operation Telic (Desert Storm) involved almost one million combatants and ten thousand armoured vehicles in the coalition force, advancing across an extensive battlefront at high speed during daylight and at night, making effective use of a range of electro-optic sensors. The accelerated tempo of battle means that front lines can undergo rapid, punctuated advances that can leave individual combat units with a much degraded situational awareness, particularly of where they are in relation to other 'friendly' combatants. Consequently, there is a need for a robust, low cost, low weight, compact, unpowered, interoperable, Combat Identification technique for use with popular electro-optic sensors which can be deployed, and is effective, at the individual combat unit level. In this paper we discuss ground-to-ground combat identification materials that meet these requirements, all of which are based on the air-to-ground Mirage TM vehicle marking material. We show some preliminary ground-to-ground data collected from the new variant Mirage TM material in recent experimental trials conducted during the day, evening and at night.

  17. Detecting Intelligent Agent Behavior with Environment Abstraction in Complex Air Combat Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    by concept explorations, “wh optimizations of the models co y at multiple levels, the onceptual framework also 12, 13]. Starting from the tual...l with the modeling layer – where we have in frameworks as well as dynamic system forma Finally, the pragmatic level includes use of ON A: Approved...levels N (EA) rm and the DIS nal capabilities, on in a combat he entire combat formation to the orm level. The frastructure) are m2DIS API as

  18. Resources and Fact Sheets on Servicing Motor Vehicle Air Conditioners (Summary Page)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Page provides links to resources that can assist motor vehicle air-conditioning system technicians in understanding system servicing requirements and best practices, and learn about alternative refrigerants.

  19. A Study of Fluidic Gun Stabilization Systems for Combat Vehicles. Revision B

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-28

    remain constant over this range of Reynolds number. Li [ 27 - - LuLI 04 144 ’U𔃾 44a w Oft 28 1. ii 4.4 4.4I 0 w * U ’I 0, 𔃼 .’ I II 1S P64 OdV ’ I 29 By...PA 18974Ct ATTN: R. NcGiboney, 30424 Naval Air Systems Command Department of the Navy Washit•gton, DC 񓆈 ATTN: CODL .IR-52022J, D. Houck Director US

  20. Measurement of air exchange rate of stationary vehicles and estimation of in-vehicle exposure.

    PubMed

    Park, J H; Spengler, J D; Yoon, D W; Dumyahn, T; Lee, K; Ozkaynak, H

    1998-01-01

    The air exchange rates or air changes per hour (ACH) were measured under 4 conditions in 3 stationary automobiles. The ACH ranged between 1.0 and 3.0 h-1 with windows closed and no mechanical ventilation, between 1.8 and 3.7 h-1 for windows closed with fan set on recirculation, between 13.3 and 26.1 h-1 for window open with no mechanical ventilation, and between 36.2 and 47.5 h-1 for window closed with the fan set on fresh air. ACHs for windows closed with no ventilation were higher for the older automobile than for the newer automobiles. With the windows closed and fan turned off, ACH was not influenced by wind speed (p > 0.05). When the window was open, ACH appeared to be greatly affected by wind speed (R2 = 0.86). These measurements are relevant to understanding exposures inside automobiles to sources such as dry-cleaned clothes, cigarettes and airbags. Therefore, to understand the in-vehicle exposure to these internal sources, perchloroethylene (PCE) emitted from dry-cleaned clothes and environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) inside a vehicle were modeled for simulated driving cycles. Airbag deployment was also modeled for estimating exposure level to alkaline particulate and carbon monoxide (CO). Average exposure to PCE inside a vehicle for 30 minutes period was high (approximately 780 micrograms/m3); however, this is only 6% of the two-week exposure that is influenced by the storage of dry cleaned clothing at home. On the other hand, the exposure levels of respirable suspended particulate (RSP) and formaldehyde due to ETS could reach 2.1 mg/m3 and 0.11 ppm, respectively, when a person smokes inside a driving car even with the window open. In modeling the in-vehicle concentrations following airbag deployment, the average CO level over 20 minutes would not appear to present problem (less than 28 ppm). The peak concentration of respirable particulate would have exceeded 140 mg/m3. Since most of the particle mass is composed of alkaline material, these high levels

  1. Flexible Wing Base Micro Aerial Vehicles: Composite Materials for Micro Air Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ifju, Peter G.; Ettinger, Scott; Jenkins, David; Martinez, Luis

    2002-01-01

    This paper will discuss the development of the University of Florida's Micro Air Vehicle concept. A series of flexible wing based aircraft that possess highly desirable flight characteristics were developed. Since computational methods to accurately model flight at the low Reynolds numbers associated with this scale are still under development, our effort has relied heavily on trial and error. Hence a time efficient method was developed to rapidly produce prototype designs. The airframe and wings are fabricated using a unique process that incorporates carbon fiber composite construction. Prototypes can be fabricated in around five man-hours, allowing many design revisions to be tested in a short period of time. The resulting aircraft are far more durable, yet lighter, than their conventional counterparts. This process allows for thorough testing of each design in order to determine what changes were required on the next prototype. The use of carbon fiber allows for wing flexibility without sacrificing durability. The construction methods developed for this project were the enabling technology that allowed us to implement our designs. The resulting aircraft were the winning entries in the International Micro Air Vehicle Competition for the past two years. Details of the construction method are provided in this paper along with a background on our flexible wing concept.

  2. A novel zinc-air battery for electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, P.N.

    1995-07-01

    A new type of zinc electrode is matched with new bifunctional air electrodes to produce a zinc-air battery of a novel design. The zinc electrode is a flow-thru type made from copper foam-metal. The air electrode uses corrosion resistant carbon black as a high area support for a highly dispersed spinel oxide electrocatalyst. The battery design employs flowing electrolyte, 12 M KOH saturated or supersaturated with zincate. Single cells as large as 200 cm{sup 2} (1/5 EV design scale) having a capacity of 20 AH have been tested with C/4--C/16 constant current cycling. More extensive and realistic life cycle testing was done with 2 Ah cells, including the Simplified Federal Urban Driving Schedule (SFUDS) cycle. This testing has confirmed that these cells can provide the necessary transient power response required for urban EV applications. The cells achieved an average of 72 SFUDS repetitions (7.2 hrs) per discharge cycle, more than twice the number with a sealed lead acid EV battery in similar testing. The full scale (30 kWh) EV battery design based on these single cell tests indicate an energy density of 90--100 Wh/kg, 60--80 W/kg, and a very low materials cost ($50 per kWh). These results indicate this battery would provide at least twice the vehicle range of a lead acid battery of the same volume at a comparable or even lower materials cost.

  3. Zinc air battery development for electric vehicles. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Putt, R.A.; Merry, G.W.

    1991-07-01

    This report summarizes the results of research conducted during the sixteen month continuation of a program to develop rechargeable zinc-air batteries for electric vehicles. The zinc-air technology under development incorporates a metal foam substrate for the zinc electrode, with flow of electrolyte through the foam during battery operation. In this ``soluble`` zinc electrode the zincate discharge product dissolves completely in the electrolyte stream. Cycle testing at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, where the electrode was invented, and at MATSI showed that this approach avoids the zinc electrode shape change phenomenon. Further, electrolyte flow has been shown to be necessary to achieve significant cycle life (> 25 cycles) in this open system. Without it, water loss through the oxygen electrode results in high-resistance failure of the cell. The Phase I program, which focused entirely on the zinc electrode, elucidated the conditions necessary to increase electrode capacity from 75 to as much as 300 mAh/cm{sup 2}. By the end of the Phase I program over 500 cycles had accrued on one of the zinc-zinc half cells undergoing continuous cycle testing. The Phase II program continued the half cell cycle testing and separator development, further refined the foam preplate process, and launched into performance and cycle life testing of zinc-air cells.

  4. Vehicle expectations in air transportation for the year 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hearth, D. P.

    1980-01-01

    This paper is intended to provide an overview of the air transportation system for the year 2000 in terms of vehicle expectations. Emphasis is placed on civil air transportation with the time period approached from the standpoint of evolutionary changes for the near term and also with the assumption of more revolutionary changes for the far term. The view along the evolutionary path begins with a historical review of airline market growth and the impact that technologies have had on airplane designs. Projections of the life expectancy of existing, derivative, and new airplanes are examined in terms of their productivity and fuel efficiency in view of the present and projected fuel usage and availability. The factors influencing airline growth are outlined and some views on whether another new generation of subsonic airplanes are in the offing are given along with an assessment of the economic viability of an advanced commercial supersonic transport in terms of its higher speed, higher productivity, and higher fuel usage. With regard to revolutionary changes, major technology breakthroughs are assumed to occur at a specified date. As an example, the impact of a dramatic reduction in skin friction drag is examined in terms of its effect on the airplane configuration, its propulsion systems, it projected fuel usage, and the air transportation system in which it must operate.

  5. Vehicle expectations in air transportation for the year 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hearth, D. P.

    1980-01-01

    This paper is intended to provide an overview of the air transportation system for the year 2000 in terms of vehicle expectations. Emphasis is placed on civil air transportation with the time period approached from the standpoint of evolutionary changes for the near term and also with the assumption of more revolutionary changes for the far term. The view along the evolutionary path begins with a historical review of airline market growth and the impact that technologies have had on airplane designs. Projections of the life expectancy of existing, derivative, and new airplanes are examined in terms of their productivity and fuel efficiency in view of the present and projected fuel usage and availability. The factors influencing airline growth are outlined and some views on whether another new generation of subsonic airplanes are in the offing are given along with an assessment of the economic viability of an advanced commercial supersonic transport in terms of its higher speed, higher productivity, and higher fuel usage. With regard to revolutionary changes, major technology breakthroughs are assumed to occur at a specified date. As an example, the impact of a dramatic reduction in skin friction drag is examined in terms of its effect on the airplane configuration, its propulsion systems, it projected fuel usage, and the air transportation system in which it must operate.

  6. Air Intakes for High Speed Vehicles (Prises d’Air pour Vehicules a Grande Vitesse)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    Complex Configurations - Recent Progress AGARD AG-309. March 1988 REPORTS (R) Aircraft Dynawics at High Angles of AttackL Experiments and Modelling AGARD...A/I Computational Methods for Aerodynamic Design (Inverse) and Optimization AGARD CP-463, March 1990 Applications of Mesh Generation to Complex 3-D...the air vehicle configuration. Flow field structures are essentially very complex . Over the last two decades there has been a continuous evolution

  7. Investigating the correlation of the U.S. Air Force Physical Fitness Test to combat-based fitness: a women-only study.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Tarah; White, Edward D; Ritschel, Daniel

    2014-06-01

    The primary objective in this research involves determining the Air Force Physical Fitness Test's (AFPFT) predictability of combat fitness and whether measures within the AFPFT require modification to increase this predictability further. We recruited 60 female volunteers and compared their performance on the AFPFT to the Marine Combat Fitness Test, the proxy for combat fitness. We discovered little association between the two (R(2) of 0.35), however, this association significantly increased (adjusted R(2) of 0.56) when utilizing the raw scores of the AFPFT instead of using the gender/age scoring tables. Improving on these associations, we develop and propose a simple ordinary least squares regression model that minimally impacts the AFPFT testing routine. This two-event model for predicting combat fitness incorporates the 1.5-mile run along with the number of repetitions of a 30-lb dumbbell from chest height to overhead with arms extended during a 2-minute time span. These two events predicted combat fitness as assessed by the Marine Combat Fitness Test with an adjusted R(2) of 0.82. By adopting this model, we greatly improve the Air Force's ability to assess combat fitness for women. Reprint & Copyright © 2014 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  8. Virtual flight simulation of a dual rotor micro air vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Hongming

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, a new computational method is developed based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) coupled with rigid body dynamics (RBD) and flight control law in an in-house programmed source code. The CFD solver is established based on momentum source method, preconditioning method, lower-upper symmetric Gauss-Seidel iteration method, and moving overset grid method. Two-equation shear-stress transport k - ω turbulence model is employed to close the governing equations. Third-order Adams prediction-correction method is used to couple CFD and RBD in the inner iteration. The wing-rock motion of the delta wing is simulated to validate the capability of the computational method for virtual flight simulation. Finally, the developed computational method is employed to simulate the longitudinal virtual flight of a dual rotor micro air vehicle (MAV). Results show that the computational method can simulate the virtual flight of the dual rotor MAV.

  9. Flow sensitive actuators for micro-air vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, V.; Hays, M.; Fernandez, E.; Oates, W.; Alvi, F. S.

    2011-10-01

    A macrofiber piezoelectric composite has been developed for boundary layer management of micro-air vehicles (MAVs). Specifically, a piezoelectric composite that is capable of self-sensing and controlling flow has been modeled, designed, fabricated, and tested in wind tunnel studies to quantify performance characteristics, such as the velocity field response to actuation, which is relevant for actively managing boundary layers (laminar and transition flow control). A nonlinear piezoelectric plate model was utilized to design the active structure for flow control. The dynamic properties of the piezoelectric composite actuator were also evaluated in situ during wind tunnel experiments to quantify sensing performance. Results based on velocity field measurements and unsteady pressure measurements show that these piezoelectric macrofiber composites can sense the state of flow above the surface and provide sufficient control authority to manipulate the flow conditions for transition from laminar to turbulent flow.

  10. Computer-aided conceptual design of Air Cushion Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Band, E. G. U.; Lavis, D. R.

    This paper describes the development and use of a computer-aided design tool which has been used to explore preferred options for amphibious Air-Cushion Vehicle (ACV) and Surface-Effect Ship (SES) designs in support of U.S. Navy and U.S. Army programs. The tool, referred to as the ACV Design Synthesis Model (ADSM), is an interactive computer program which provides a description of feasible ACV or SES concepts that could be developed, by a competent design team, to perform the mission described by the input parameters. The paper discusses how the program was used to explore parametrically the design of a range of self-propelled hoverbarges to meet requirements of the U.S. Army Logistics Over the Shore (LOTS) phases of an amphibious landing. Examples of results are presented to illustrate the method used in determining design and performance trade-offs.

  11. Investigation of an energy harvesting small unmanned air vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magoteaux, Kyle C.; Sanders, Brian; Sodano, Henry A.

    2008-03-01

    The addition of energy harvesting is investigated to determine the benefits of its integration into a small unmanned air vehicle (UAV). Specifically, solar and piezoelectric energy harvesting techniques were selected and their basic functions analyzed. The initial investigation involved using a fundamental law of thermodynamics, entropy generation, to analyze the small UAV with and without energy harvesting. A notional mission was developed for the comparison that involved the aircraft performing a reconnaissance mission. The analysis showed that the UAV with energy harvesting generated less entropy. However, the UAV without energy harvesting outperformed the other UAV in total flight time at the target. The analysis further looked at future energy harvesting technologies and their effect on the energy harvesting UAV to conduct the mission. The results of the mission using the advanced solar technology showed that the effectiveness of the energy harvesting vehicle would increase. Designs for integrating energy harvesting into the small UAV system were also developed and tests were conducted to show how the energy harvesting designs would perform. It was demonstrated that the addition of the solar and piezoelectric devices would supply usable power for charging batteries and sensors and that it would be advantageous to implement them into a small UAV.

  12. Integration of an Autopilot for a Micro Air Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platanitis, George; Shkarayev, Sergey

    2005-01-01

    Two autopilots providing autonomous flight capabilities are presented herein. The first is the Pico-Pilot, demonstrated for the 12-inch size class of micro air vehicles. The second is the MicroPilot MP2028(sup g), where its integration into a 36-inch Zagi airframe (tailless, elevons only configuration) is investigated and is the main focus of the report. Analytical methods, which include the use of the Advanced Aircraft Analysis software from DARCorp, were used to determine the stability and control derivatives, which were then validated through wind tunnel experiments. From the aerodynamic data, the linear, perturbed equations of motion from steady-state flight conditions may be cast in terms of these derivatives. Using these linear equations, transfer functions for the control and navigation systems were developed and feedback control laws based on Proportional, Integral, and Derivative (PID) control design were developed to control the aircraft. The PID gains may then be programmed into the autopilot software and uploaded to the microprocessor of the autopilot. The Pico-Pilot system was flight tested and shown to be successful in navigating a 12-inch MAV through a course defined by a number of waypoints with a high degree of accuracy, and in 20 mph winds. The system, though, showed problems with control authority in the roll and pitch motion of the aircraft: causing oscillations in these directions, but the aircraft maintained its heading while following the prescribed course. Flight tests were performed in remote control mode to evaluate handling, adjust trim, and test data logging for the Zagi with integrated MP2028(sup g). Ground testing was performed to test GPS acquisition, data logging, and control response in autonomous mode. Technical difficulties and integration limitations with the autopilot prevented fully autonomous flight from taking place, but the integration methodologies developed for this autopilot are, in general, applicable for unmanned air

  13. Air pollution and health risks due to vehicle traffic

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kai; Batterman, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    Traffic congestion increases vehicle emissions and degrades ambient air quality, and recent studies have shown excess morbidity and mortality for drivers, commuters and individuals living near major roadways. Presently, our understanding of the air pollution impacts from congestion on roads is very limited. This study demonstrates an approach to characterize risks of traffic for on- and near-road populations. Simulation modeling was used to estimate on- and near-road NO2 concentrations and health risks for freeway and arterial scenarios attributable to traffic for different traffic volumes during rush hour periods. The modeling used emission factors from two different models (Comprehensive Modal Emissions Model and Motor Vehicle Emissions Factor Model version 6.2), an empirical traffic speed–volume relationship, the California Line Source Dispersion Model, an empirical NO2–NOx relationship, estimated travel time changes during congestion, and concentration–response relationships from the literature, which give emergency doctor visits, hospital admissions and mortality attributed to NO2 exposure. An incremental analysis, which expresses the change in health risks for small increases in traffic volume, showed non-linear effects. For a freeway, “U” shaped trends of incremental risks were predicted for on-road populations, and incremental risks are flat at low traffic volumes for near-road populations. For an arterial road, incremental risks increased sharply for both on- and near-road populations as traffic increased. These patterns result from changes in emission factors, the NO2–NOx relationship, the travel delay for the on-road population, and the extended duration of rush hour for the near-road population. This study suggests that health risks from congestion are potentially significant, and that additional traffic can significantly increase risks, depending on the type of road and other factors. Further, evaluations of risk associated with congestion

  14. Air pollution and health risks due to vehicle traffic.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Batterman, Stuart

    2013-04-15

    Traffic congestion increases vehicle emissions and degrades ambient air quality, and recent studies have shown excess morbidity and mortality for drivers, commuters and individuals living near major roadways. Presently, our understanding of the air pollution impacts from congestion on roads is very limited. This study demonstrates an approach to characterize risks of traffic for on- and near-road populations. Simulation modeling was used to estimate on- and near-road NO2 concentrations and health risks for freeway and arterial scenarios attributable to traffic for different traffic volumes during rush hour periods. The modeling used emission factors from two different models (Comprehensive Modal Emissions Model and Motor Vehicle Emissions Factor Model version 6.2), an empirical traffic speed-volume relationship, the California Line Source Dispersion Model, an empirical NO2-NOx relationship, estimated travel time changes during congestion, and concentration-response relationships from the literature, which give emergency doctor visits, hospital admissions and mortality attributed to NO2 exposure. An incremental analysis, which expresses the change in health risks for small increases in traffic volume, showed non-linear effects. For a freeway, "U" shaped trends of incremental risks were predicted for on-road populations, and incremental risks are flat at low traffic volumes for near-road populations. For an arterial road, incremental risks increased sharply for both on- and near-road populations as traffic increased. These patterns result from changes in emission factors, the NO2-NOx relationship, the travel delay for the on-road population, and the extended duration of rush hour for the near-road population. This study suggests that health risks from congestion are potentially significant, and that additional traffic can significantly increase risks, depending on the type of road and other factors. Further, evaluations of risk associated with congestion must

  15. Reynolds Number Effects on Thrust Coefficients and PIV for Flapping Wing Micro Air Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-09

    16 Figure 6. AeroVironment Nano Hummingbird [Keennon 2012] ................................................ 17 Figure 7. Berkeley Micro ...Keennon, M., Klingebiel, K., Won, H., Andriukov, A., “Development of the Nano Hummingbird: A Tailless Flapping Wing Micro Air Vehicle,” AIAA 2012...REYNOLDS NUMBER EFFECTS ON THRUST COEFFICIENTS AND PIV FOR FLAPPING WING MICRO AIR VEHICLES

  16. Air Vehicle Technology Integration Program (AVTIP). Delivery Order 0004: Advanced Sol-Gel Adhesion Processes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-04-01

    AFRL-ML-WP-TR-2003-4173 AIR VEHICLE TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION PROGRAM (AVTIP) Delivery Order 0004: Advanced Sol-Gel Adhesion Processes Kay Y...2001 – 03/31/2002 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER F33615-00-D-3052 5b. GRANT NUMBER 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE AIR VEHICLE TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION PROGRAM

  17. Limited Evaluation of Handling Qualities for a Supersonic Tailless Air Vehicle (Project HAVE STAV)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    Instantaneous Center of Rotation, LAMARS (Large Amplitude Multimode Aerospace Simulator), Long-Range Strike Aircraft , STAV (Supersonic Tailless Air...conventional design aspects combined to form an aircraft with a supersonic tailless delta configuration. Figure 1 shows an artist’s rendering of a...potential Supersonic Tailless Air Vehicle (STAV). Such vehicles are known to be aerodynamically complex aircraft with distinctive flight dynamic

  18. 9 CFR 3.138 - Primary conveyances (motor vehicle, rail, air, and marine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Primary conveyances (motor vehicle, rail, air, and marine). 3.138 Section 3.138 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... (motor vehicle, rail, air, and marine). (a) The animal cargo space of primary conveyances used...

  19. 9 CFR 3.88 - Primary conveyances (motor vehicle, rail, air, and marine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Primary conveyances (motor vehicle, rail, air, and marine). 3.88 Section 3.88 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... conveyances (motor vehicle, rail, air, and marine). (a) The animal cargo space of primary conveyances used...

  20. 9 CFR 3.88 - Primary conveyances (motor vehicle, rail, air, and marine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Primary conveyances (motor vehicle, rail, air, and marine). 3.88 Section 3.88 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... conveyances (motor vehicle, rail, air, and marine). (a) The animal cargo space of primary conveyances used...

  1. 9 CFR 3.138 - Primary conveyances (motor vehicle, rail, air, and marine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Primary conveyances (motor vehicle, rail, air, and marine). 3.138 Section 3.138 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... (motor vehicle, rail, air, and marine). (a) The animal cargo space of primary conveyances used...

  2. H-CANYON AIR EXHAUST TUNNEL INSPECTION VEHICLE DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Minichan, R.; Fogle, R.; Marzolf, A.

    2011-05-24

    The H-Canyon at Savannah River Site is a large concrete structure designed for chemical separation processes of radioactive material. The facility requires a large ventilation system to maintain negative pressure in process areas for radioactive contamination control and personnel protection. The ventilation exhaust is directed through a concrete tunnel under the facility which is approximately five feet wide and 8 feet tall that leads to a sand filter and stack. Acidic vapors in the exhaust have had a degrading effect on the surface of the concrete tunnels. Some areas have been inspected; however, the condition of other areas is unknown. Experience from historical inspections with remote controlled vehicles will be discussed along with the current challenge of inspecting levels below available access points. The area of interest in the exhaust tunnel must be accessed through a 14 X 14 inch concrete plug in the floor of the hot gang valve corridor. The purpose for the inspection is to determine the condition of the inside of the air tunnel and establish if there are any structural concerns. Various landmarks, pipe hangers and exposed rebar are used as reference points for the structural engineers when evaluating the current integrity of the air tunnel.

  3. Air Force Combat Wings: Lineage and Honors Histories, 1947-1977

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-01

    Col Louis W. 1 Jul 1972- (detached 2 Jul-28 Dec Weber , 1 Tul 1972; Coi Waymond C. 0973). 75th. 1 Jul 1972 -. 76th: 1 Oct Nutt, 20 Nov 1973- Col Charles...Motto: SABER ES PODER - in Tunisia Sep 1943, thereafter per- Knowledge is power. (Approved on 4 formed combat reconnaissance in the Sep 1953.) MTO and

  4. Analysis of Air Land Combat Tactics Using JANUS(T) System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-01

    FORTRAN, a structured Digital Equipment Corporation extension of FORTRAN-77. [Ref.5: p. 221 b. Model Resolution The JANUS (T) combat simulation...reviewed and analy,,ed within the context of military operations research; thus, the analysis of the assumptions underlying the JANUSi (T) model are outside

  5. An Investigation of Combat Knowledge and Attitudes of Women in the United States Air Force

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    of Technology (AU), Wright Patterson AFB OH, September 1979 (AD-A075592). 10. Cecil , Major Thomas H. Women in Combat-.-Pros and Cons. Research Report...Task Force on Women in tnh MilitarL. Report, Washington: Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense (FM&P), January 1988 (AD-A190369). 20. Goldman

  6. Impact of Solar Control PVB Glass on Vehicle Interior Temperatures, Air-Conditioning Capacity, Fuel Consumption, and Vehicle Range

    SciTech Connect

    Rugh, J.; Chaney, L.; Venson, T.; Ramroth, L.; Rose, M.

    2013-04-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the impact of Saflex1 S-series Solar Control PVB (polyvinyl butyral) configurations on conventional vehicle fuel economy and electric vehicle (EV) range. The approach included outdoor vehicle thermal soak testing, RadTherm cool-down analysis, and vehicle simulations. Thermal soak tests were conducted at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Vehicle Testing and Integration Facility in Golden, Colorado. The test results quantified interior temperature reductions and were used to generate initial conditions for the RadTherm cool-down analysis. The RadTherm model determined the potential reduction in air-conditioning (A/C) capacity, which was used to calculate the A/C load for the vehicle simulations. The vehicle simulation tool identified the potential reduction in fuel consumption or improvement in EV range between a baseline and modified configurations for the city and highway drive cycles. The thermal analysis determined a potential 4.0% reduction in A/C power for the Saflex Solar PVB solar control configuration. The reduction in A/C power improved the vehicle range of EVs and fuel economy of conventional vehicles and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.

  7. Air-Sea Interaction Measurements from the Controlled Towed Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khelif, D.; Bluth, R. T.; Jonsson, H.; Barge, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Controlled Towed Vehicle (CTV) uses improved towed drone technology to actively maintain via a radar altimeter and controllable wing a user-set height that can be as low as the canonical reference height of 10 m above the sea surface. After take-off, the drone is released from the tow aircraft on a ~700-m stainless steel cable. We have instrumented the 0.23 m diameter and 2.13 m long drone with high fidelity instruments to measure the means and turbulent fluctuations of 3-D wind vector, temperature, humidity, pressure, CO2 and IR sea surface temperature. Data are recorded internally at 40 Hz and simultaneously transmitted to the tow aircraft via dedicated wireless Ethernet link. The CTV accommodates 40 kg of instrument payload and provides it with 250 W of continuous power through a ram air propeller-driven generator. Therefore its endurance is only limited by that of the tow aircraft.We will discuss the CTV development, the engineering challenges and solutions that have been successfully implemented to overcome them. We present results from recent flights as low as 9 m over the coastal ocean and comparisons of profiles and turbulent fluxes from the CTV and the tow aircraft. Manned aircraft operation at low-level boundary-layer flights is very limited. Dropsondes and UAS (Unmanned Aerial Systems) and UAS are alternates for measurements near the ocean surface. However, dropsondes have limited sensor capability and do not measure fluxes, and most present UAS vehicles do not have the payload and power capacity nor the low-flying ability in high winds over the oceans. The CTV therefore, fills a needed gap between the dropsondes, in situ aircraft, and UAS. The payload, capacity and power of the CTV makes it suitable for a variety of atmospheric research measurements. Other sensors to measure aerosol, chemistry, radiation, etc., could be readily accommodated in the CTV.

  8. Air Force’s Combat Aircraft: A Future Holding into the Past

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-07

    command of the air by bombing the enemy air arm into extinction would doom its enemy to perpetual bombardment.22 The Germans needed control of the...2002), 218. 22 Giulio Douhet and Dino Farrari, The Command of the Air (Washington D.C.: Air Force History and Museums Program, 1998), 3. 8...Force, 2009. Douhet, Giulio and Dino Farrari. The Command of the Air. Washington, DC: Air Force History and Museums Program, 1998. Drew

  9. Cost Comparison of the Navy’s Air Combat Environment Test and Evaluation Facility (ACETEF) and the Air Force’s Electronic Combat Integrated Test (ECIT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    placed into operation. The chamber is 60 feet wide by 100 feet long by 40 feet high.5 It has a 30-ton crane in the ceiling, has a 40 foot (width) by 20...air rmg access to Support he SIL operatng ruumen. Should --.’ A ~ be meet them equuunenu their Costa ane not considere VIIn this 48adma.T at fo m g the

  10. Transportation vehicle energy intensities. A joint DOT/NASA reference paper. [energy consumption of air and ground vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mascy, A. C.; Paullin, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    A compilation of data on the energy consumption of air and ground vehicles is presented. The ratio BTU/ASM, British Thermal Units/Available Seat Mile, is used to express vehicle energy intensiveness, and related to the energy consumed directly in producing seat-mile or ton-mile productivity. Data is presented on passenger and freight vehicles which are in current use or which are about to enter service, and advanced vehicles which may be operational in the 1980's and beyond. For the advanced vehicles, an estimate is given of the date of initial operational service, and the performance characteristics. Other key considerations in interpreting energy intensiveness for a given mode are discussed, such as: load factors, operations, overhead energy consumption, and energy investments in new structure and equipment.

  11. Combat Vehicle Technology Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-01

    Advanced Integrated Propulsion System ........................ 23 2.3. Turbine Engine Technology ....... ............. .... . . .... . 23 2.4. Variable...volume and weight. o Advanced Integrated Volume/Weight The performance requirements for the diesel Propulsion System Reduction, Greater or turbine engine...stations. A 40-50 percent improvement in fuel economy is expected. o Turbine Engine Increased power, A program is nearing completion to Reduced Fuel

  12. Staging Options for the Air Force’s Electronic Combat Test Capability: a Cost Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-01

    strategic in nature and completely different than daily operating decisions (20:6). Horngren , in his book Cost Accounting: A Managerial Emphasis...capital projects (5). The net present value model is also referred to as the discounted cash-flow model. Horngren states that "[blecause the discounted...Office, September 1986. 10. Fletcher, Capt Charles D. Design Reguirements for a Decision Suport System for the Dynamic Retasking of Electronic Combat

  13. Environmental Assessment: Combat Information Transport System Upgrade Vandenberg Air Force Base, California

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-21

    pocket gopher (Thomomys bottae), bobcat (Felis rufus), and coyote (Canis latrans) . 3.2.4. Sensitive Plant Communities and Special Status Species...REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2006 to 00-00-2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Final Environmental Assessment: Combat Information Transport System...Construction Equipment The type of construction equipment that would be used for implementing the Proposed Action is presented in Table 2.1. The exact type

  14. Peacetime Physical Fitness and its Effect on Combat Readiness: An Air Force Perspective

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-04

    apparent that, from a physical fitness/healthy lifestyle perspesztive, the military was not in an optimal readiness posture. In February 1980, the...withstand the rigors of combat. More than ten years ago it became apparent that, from a physical fitness/healthy lifestyle perspective, the military was...other words, a person can lift heavier weights, run faster or just plain exercise more. Increased physical fitness is often reflected by physiological

  15. Installation Restoration Program. Preliminary Assessment: 280th Combat Communications Squadron, Abston Air National Guard, Alabama Air National Guard, Montgomery, Alabama.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-02-01

    Standard -c,- 298 (Rev 2-89) Oreicr’nbpd biv a N ’t0 139-1S I INSTALLATION RESTORATION PROGRAM PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT I 280th COMBAT COMMUNICATIONS... standard reference sources. I I 1-2 U I I I o Site Inspection/Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study The Site Inspection consists of field...the pathways of contaminant migration. If applicable, a public health evaluation is performed to analyze the collected data. Field tests, which may

  16. Aerial networking communication solutions using Micro Air Vehicle (MAV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, Shyam; de Graaf, Maurits; Hoekstra, Gerard; Corporaal, Henk; Wijtvliet, Mark; Cuadros Linde, Javier

    2014-10-01

    The application of a Micro Air Vehicle (MAV) for wireless networking is slowly gaining significance in the field of network robotics. Aerial transport of data requires efficient network protocols along with accurate positional adjustment of the MAV to minimize transaction times. In our proof of concept, we develop an Aerial networking protocol for data transfer using the technology of Disruption Tolerant Networks (DTN), a store-and-forward approach for environments that deals with disrupted connectivity. Our results show that close interaction between networking and flight behavior helps in efficient data exchange. Potential applications are in areas where network infrastructure is minimal or unavailable and distances may be large. For example, forwarding video recordings during search and rescue, agriculture, swarm communication, among several others. A practical implementation and validation, as described in this paper, presents the complex dynamics of wireless environments and poses new challenges that are not addressed in earlier work on this topic. Several tests are evaluated in a practical setup to display the networking MAV behavior during such an operation.

  17. Dynamics, stability, and control analyses of flapping wing micro-air vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlowski, Christopher T.; Girard, Anouck R.

    2012-05-01

    The paper presents an overview of the various analyses of flight dynamics, stability, and control of flapping wing micro-air vehicles available in the literature. The potential benefits of flapping wing micro-air vehicles for civil, military, and search and rescue operations are numerous. The majority of the flight dynamics research involves the standard aircraft (6DOF) equations of motion, although a growth is evident in examining the multibody flight dynamics models of flapping wing micro-air vehicles. The stability of flapping wing micro-air vehicles is largely studied in the vicinity of hover and forward flight. The majority of stability studies focus on linear, time-invariant stability in the vicinity of reference flight conditions, such as hover or forward flight. The consistent result is that flapping wing micro-air vehicles are unstable in an open loop setting. The unstable result is based on linear and nonlinear stability analyses. Control has been demonstrated for hovering and forward flight through various methods, both linear and nonlinear in nature. The entirety of reported research into the stability and control of flapping wing micro-air vehicles has neglected the mass effects of the wings on the position and orientation of the central body. Successful control of a flapping wing micro-air vehicle, with the wings' mass effects included, is still an open research area.

  18. 9 CFR 3.62 - Primary conveyances (motor vehicle, rail, air, and marine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., blowers, or air conditioners, shall be used in any cargo space containing live rabbits when the ambient..., rail, air, and marine). 3.62 Section 3.62 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... (motor vehicle, rail, air, and marine). (a) The animal cargo space of primary conveyances used in...

  19. 9 CFR 3.62 - Primary conveyances (motor vehicle, rail, air, and marine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., blowers, or air conditioners, shall be used in any cargo space containing live rabbits when the ambient..., rail, air, and marine). 3.62 Section 3.62 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... (motor vehicle, rail, air, and marine). (a) The animal cargo space of primary conveyances used in...

  20. 9 CFR 3.62 - Primary conveyances (motor vehicle, rail, air, and marine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., blowers, or air conditioners, shall be used in any cargo space containing live rabbits when the ambient..., rail, air, and marine). 3.62 Section 3.62 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... (motor vehicle, rail, air, and marine). (a) The animal cargo space of primary conveyances used in...

  1. 9 CFR 3.62 - Primary conveyances (motor vehicle, rail, air, and marine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., blowers, or air conditioners, shall be used in any cargo space containing live rabbits when the ambient..., rail, air, and marine). 3.62 Section 3.62 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... (motor vehicle, rail, air, and marine). (a) The animal cargo space of primary conveyances used in...

  2. Development of Micro Air Vehicle Technology With In-Flight Adaptive-Wing Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, Martin R. (Technical Monitor); Shkarayev, Sergey; Null, William; Wagner, Matthew

    2004-01-01

    This is a final report on the research studies, "Development of Micro Air Vehicle Technology with In-Flight Adaptrive-Wing Structure". This project involved the development of variable-camber technology to achieve efficient design of micro air vehicles. Specifically, it focused on the following topics: 1) Low Reynolds number wind tunnel testing of cambered-plate wings. 2) Theoretical performance analysis of micro air vehicles. 3) Design of a variable-camber MAV actuated by micro servos. 4) Test flights of a variable-camber MAV.

  3. A Discussion of Aerodynamic Control Effectors (ACEs) for Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.

    2002-01-01

    A Reynolds number based, unmanned air vehicle classification structure has been developed which identifies four classes of unmanned air vehicle concepts. The four unmanned air vehicle (UAV) classes are; Micro UAV, Meso UAV, Macro UAV, and Mega UAV. In a similar fashion a labeling scheme for aerodynamic control effectors (ACE) was developed and eleven types of ACE concepts were identified. These eleven types of ACEs were laid out in a five (5) layer scheme. The final section of the paper correlated the various ACE concepts to the four UAV classes and ACE recommendations are offered for future design activities.

  4. Membrane and adaptively-shaped wings for micro air vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Yongsheng

    Micro air vehicles (MAVs), with wing span of 15 cm or less and flight speed around 10 m/s, have many applications in both civilian and military areas. The Reynolds number based on the given parameters is around 10 4, which often yields insufficient lift-to-drag ratio. Furthermore, one expects the unsteady effect to be noticeable for such flight vehicles. The flexible wing has been demonstrated to exhibit favorable characteristics such as passive adaptation to the flight; environment and delayed stall. The present study focuses on developing computational and modeling capabilities to better understand the MAV aerodynamics. Both flexible wings, utilizing membrane materials, and adaptively-shaped wings, utilizing piezo-actuated flaps, have been studied. In the adaptively-shaped wing study, we use piezo-actuated flaps to actively control the flow. We assess the impacts of the flap geometry, flapping amplitude, and turbulence; modeling on the flow structure with a parallel experimental effort. The membrane wing uses a passive control mechanism to delay the stall angle and to provide a smoother flight platform. Our study focuses on the mutual interactions between the membrane wing and its surrounding viscous flow. We compare the lift-to-drag ratio and the flow structure between the flexible wing and the corresponding rigid wing. We also investigate the aerodynamic characteristics associated with the low Reynolds number and low aspect ratio wing. To assist our study, we propose an automatic and efficient moving grid technique to facilitate the fluid and structure interaction computations; we also present a dynamic membrane model to study the intrinsic large deformation of the flexible membrane wing. Solutions obtained from the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations are presented to highlight, the salient features of the wing aerodynamics. Besides the aerodynamic study, we also perform shape optimization to improve the membrane wing performance. Since direct

  5. Artificial Neural Systems Application to the Simulation of Air Combat Decision Making

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-01

    AIRCREW TRAINING RESEARCH DIVISION Williams Air Force Base , AZ 85240-457 L A B April 1992 0 Final Technical Paper for Period September 1988 - November 1991...R A T 0 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. R Y 92-14072 92 5 o 11E AIR FORCE SYSTEMS COMMAND BROOKS AIR FORCE BASE , TEXAS 78235...Training Research Division Williams Air Force Base , AZ 85240-6457 11. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Armstrong Laboratory Technical Monitor: Dr. Richard A. Thurman

  6. Unmanned air vehicle (UAV) ultra-persitence research

    SciTech Connect

    Dron, S. B.

    2012-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories and Northrop Grumman Corporation Integrated Systems, Unmanned Systems (NGIS UMS) collaborated to further ultra-persistence technologies for unmanned air vehicles (UAVs). The greatest shortfalls in UAV capabilities have been repeatedly identified as (1) insufficient flight persistence or 'hang time,' (2) marginal electrical power for running higher power avionics and payload systems, and (3) inadequate communications bandwidth and reach. NGIS UMS requested support from Sandia to develop an ultra-persistent propulsion and power system (UP3S) for potential incorporation into next generation UAV systems. The team members tried to determine which energy storage and power generation concepts could most effectively push UAV propulsion and electrical power capabilities to increase UAV sortie duration from days to months while increasing available electrical power at least two-fold. Primary research and development areas that were pursued included these goals: perform general system engineering and integration analyses; develop initial thermal and electrical power estimates; provide mass, volume, dimensional, and balance estimates; conduct preliminary safety assessments; assess logistics support requirements; perform, preliminary assessments of any security and safeguards; evaluate options for removal, replacement, and disposition of materials; generally advance the potential of the UP3S concept. The effort contrasted and compared eight heat sources technologies, three power conversion, two dual cycle propulsion system configurations, and a single electrical power generation scheme. Overall performance, specific power parameters, technical complexities, security, safety, and other operational features were successfully investigated. Large and medium sized UAV systems were envisioned and operational flight profiles were developed for each concept. Heat source creation and support challenges for domestic and expeditionary operations were

  7. The New Close Air Support Weapon: Unmanned Combat Aerial Vehicle in 2010 and Beyond.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    General Staff College in partial fulfillment of the requiremenits for the deg~ ree MASTER OF MILITARY ART AND SCIENCE Military History 𔃾 ~by 4 SHARON L...Perimeter offered a first-hand glimpse into some CAS strike results. Major General Laurence B. Keiser, commander of the 2d Infantry Division, credited

  8. Operator State Estimation for Adaptive Aiding in Uninhabited Combat Air Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    determining sleep stages . For example, multivariate methods and power measures of EEG have been used to detect differences in Rapid Eye Movement...REM) sleep and other sleep stages (Uchida, Feinberg, March, Atsumi, and Maloney, 1999; Guevara, Lorenzo, Arce, Ramos, and Cori-Cabrera, 1995). Other...researchers have used artificial neural networks and EEG to 15 classify sleep stages (Grözinger, Rösche, and Klöppel, 1995; Roberts and Tarassenko

  9. A Systems Engineering Approach in Providing Air Defense Support to Ground Combat Vehicle Maneuver Forces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    Langford Second Reader: Douglas Nelson THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 Public...Author: Jianhao Ng Approved by: Gary O. Langford, Ph.D. Thesis Advisor Douglas Nelson , Ph.D. Second Reader Cliff Whitcomb, Ph.D. Chair, Department...our weekly discussions so inspiring. To Professor Douglas Nelson , Ph.D., thank you for providing your experience, insightful comments, and edits to

  10. Uninhabited Combat Air Vehicles and Commercial Satellites: ’The Missing Link’

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-04-01

    the 2nd Annual Space Policy and Architecture Symposium, Crystal City Marriot Hotel Arlington Va, 11 Feb 97, 2. 2 Ibid. 3 Ibid. 4 General Thomas S... Marriot Hotel Arlington Va, 11 Feb 97. 2. Long, Mark. The 1992/1993 World Satellite Almanac. Mark Long. Third Edition. Winter Beach Florida: MLE INC

  11. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Satellite Communications Terminal, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  12. 77 FR 3386 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Pennsylvania; Clean Vehicles Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-24

    ... revision contains Pennsylvania's Clean Vehicle Program, which adopts California's second generation low... maintain attainment of the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for ozone. DATES: Effective Date..., Nitrogen dioxide, Ozone, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements, Volatile organic compounds. Dated...

  13. Transition to Low-GWP Alternatives in Passenger Vehicle Air Conditioners

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This fact sheet provides current information on low global warming potential (GWP) alternatives in newly manufactured passenger vehicle air conditioners (ACs), in lieu of high-GWP hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs).

  14. Transitioning to Low-GWP Alternatives in Motor Vehicle Air Conditioning Systems

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This fact sheet provides information on low-GWP alternatives in newly manufactured motor vehicle air conditioning systems. It discusses HFC alternatives, market trends, challenges to market entry for alternatives, and potential solutions.

  15. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Microwave Equipment Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  16. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Civil Engineering Storage Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  17. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Techinical Equipment Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  18. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Techinical Equipment Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  19. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Emergency Generator Enclosure, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  20. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Clean Lubrication Oil Storage Tank & Enclosure, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  1. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Supply Warehouse, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  2. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Electric Substation, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  3. Biomimetic Micro Air Vehicle Testing Development and Small Scale Flapping-Wing Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    Gautam, J ., and Massey, K ., “The Development of a Miniature Flexible Flapping Wing Mechanism for Use in a Robotic Air Vehicle,” 45th AIAA Aerospace...Air Vehicles in the Service of Air Force Missions”’ Occasional Paper No. 29, Air War College, Jul. 2002. Isaac, K ., Colozza, A., Rolwes, J ., “Force...358, No. 1437, 29 Sept. 2003, pp. 1577-1587. PA, 1997. Noonan, K ., Yeager, W., Singleton, J ., Wilbur, M., Mirick, Paul H., “Wind Tunnel Evaluation

  4. Air Vehicle Technology Integration Program (AVTIP). Delivery Order 0054: Opportune Landing Site (OLS) Critical Experiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    AFRL-RB-WP-TR-2009-3118 AIR VEHICLE TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION PROGRAM (AVTIP) Delivery Order 0054: Opportune Landing Site (OLS) Critical...VEHICLE TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION PROGRAM (AVTIP) Delivery Order 0054: Opportune Landing Site (OLS) Critical Experiment 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER F33615-00

  5. Fugitive particulate air emissions from off-road vehicle maneuvers at military training lands

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Military training lands used for off-road vehicle maneuvers may be subject to severe soil loss and air quality degradation as a result of severe wind erosion. The objective of this study was to measure suspended particulate matter resulting from various different vehicle training scenarios. Soil s...

  6. Assessing the Link between Environmental Concerns and Consumers' Decisions to Use Clean-Air Vehicles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plax, Timothy G.; Kearney, Patricia; Ross, Ted J.; Jolly, J. Christopher

    2008-01-01

    A consulting contract with the California Air Resources Board led to a project examining how California drivers' and fleet managers' perceptions, attitudes, and consumer behavior regarding Clean Vehicle Technologies influenced their own energy choices when it came to purchasing vehicles. The consultants examined archival research, conducted focus…

  7. [Impact of heavy-duty diesel vehicles on air quality and control of their emissions].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lei; Wang, Bo-Guang; Tang, Da-Gang

    2011-08-01

    Through an analysis of the characteristics of diesel vehicle emissions and motor vehicle emissions inventories, this paper examines the impact of heavy-duty diesel vehicles on air quality in China as well as issues related to the control of their emissions. Heavy-duty diesel vehicles emit large amounts of nitrogen oxides and particulate matter. Nitrogen oxides is one of the important precursors for the formation of secondary particles and ozone in the atmosphere, causing regional haze. Diesel particulate matter is a major toxic air pollutant with adverse effect on human health, and in particular, the ultrafine particles in 30-100 nm size range can pose great health risks because of its extremely small sizes. Motor vehicles have become a major source of air pollution in many metropolitan areas and city cluster in China, and among them the heavy-duty diesel vehicles are a dominant contributor of nitrogen oxides and particulate matter emissions. Hence, controlling heavy-duty diesel vehicle emissions should be a key component of an effective air quality management plan, and a number of issues related to heavy-duty diesel vehicle emissions need to be addressed.

  8. Assessing the Link between Environmental Concerns and Consumers' Decisions to Use Clean-Air Vehicles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plax, Timothy G.; Kearney, Patricia; Ross, Ted J.; Jolly, J. Christopher

    2008-01-01

    A consulting contract with the California Air Resources Board led to a project examining how California drivers' and fleet managers' perceptions, attitudes, and consumer behavior regarding Clean Vehicle Technologies influenced their own energy choices when it came to purchasing vehicles. The consultants examined archival research, conducted focus…

  9. Robust Adaptive Flight Control Design of Air-breathing Hypersonic Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-07

    control of an air-breathing hypersonic vehicle in the cruise phase of flight. The first type of controller uses dynamic inversion and the second one is...both controllers is enhanced by augmenting them with a fast disturbance observer. The controller is derived using dynamic inversion technique, by...the controller using dynamic inversion , which is very difficult to achieve in the case of air-breathing hypersonic vehicle. Hence, constrained neuro

  10. Initial Investigation on the Aerodynamic Performance of Flapping Wings for Nano Air Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    Initial investigation on the aerodynamic performance of flapping wings for nano air vehicles F. Lesage N. Hamel DRDC Valcartier X. Huang W. Yuan M...TM 2007-550 February 2008 Initial investigation on the aerodynamic performance of flapping wings for nano air vehicles F. Lesage N. Hamel...reconnaissance asset available for military use. There is strong evidence that for very small craft, flapping-wing performance is superior to other

  11. The promise of air cargo: System aspects and vehicle design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, A. H., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The current operation of the air cargo system is reviewed. An assessment of the future of air cargo is provided by: (1) analyzing statistics and trends, (2) by noting system problems and inefficiencies, (3) by analyzing characteristics of 'air eligible' commodities, and (4) by showing the promise of new technology for future cargo aircraft with significant improvements in costs and efficiency. The following topics are discussed: (1) air cargo demand forecasts; (2) economics of air cargo transport; (3) the integrated air cargo system; (4) evolution of airfreighter design; and (5) the span distributed load concept.

  12. A Comparative Analysis of Internal and External Solutions to Provide Air Combat Maneuvering Instrumentation (ACMI) Functionality

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-06-01

    interview by author, 17 March 2000, Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama. 15 Jim Beaver, Software Eningeer , Smith Industries. Telephone interview by author...Software Eningeer , Smith Industries. Telephone interview by author, 10 Apr 2000, Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama. Boeing F-15E Suite 3 1553 Multiplex Bus #5

  13. Energy-Based Design Methodology for Air Vehicle Systems: Aerodynamic Correlation Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    ENERGY -BASED DESIGN METHODOLOGY FOR AIR VEHICLE SYSTEMS : AERODYNAMIC CORRELATION STUDY AFOSR: FA9550-64-"t/Dr. John Schmisseur AFOSR-NA C>(4-1-0- I...drag estimation and vehicle-level utilization of energy . The exergy utilization of a wing in a steady, low subsonic, three-dimensional, viscous flow...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Energy -Based Design Methodology For Air Vehicle 5b. GRANT NUMBER Systems : Aerodynamic Correlation Study FA9550,-64 (9 4-1-- !(1 5c

  14. Vehicle performance optimization utilizing the air turbo-ramjet propulsion system: Methodology development and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Kirk Le

    The ATR (Air TurboRocket) is an air breathing propulsion system in which the turbocompressor turbine is powered by a hot drive gas which is generated independently of the air flow through the compressor. The ATR has a lower specific impulse (Isp) and higher thrust compared to a similar size turbojet but a lower thrust and higher Isp compared to similar size solid rocket motor (SRM). This work defines the benefits of ATR propulsion for tactical vehicles. ATR simulation codes were developed to support analysis of hypothetical ATR powered vehicles. Both turbojet powered and SRM powered vehicles were also evaluated against range and time of flight as the major evaluation criteria. This analysis required the use of an existing turbojet code, a solid rocket motor (SRM) model, an aerodynamics predictor code (DATCOM) and a two dimensional, flat earth trajectory analysis code (ZTRAJ). Two weight class vehicles (800 and 3500 lbsbm) launched at Mach 0.9 and 10000 feet altitude were evaluated as well as a low Mach (0.1) launch of the 800 lbsbm class vehicle. These vehicles, with the three propulsion system options, required nine vehicle/trajectory analyses. The results of these analyses show that only the ATR powered vehicle is able to simultaneously meet minimum range and maximum flight time requirements. The SRM powered vehicle (because of its low Isp) only achieves about 50% of the range of the ATR powered vehicle. The turbojet powered vehicle (because of its low thrust) required more than 30% of the flight time required by the ATR powered vehicle for the same range.

  15. Clean Air Act Vehicle and Engine Enforcement Case Resolutions

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Clean Air Act requires new engines and equipment sold or distributed in the United States to be certified to meet EPA-established emissions requirements to protect public health and the environment from air pollution.

  16. Probabilistic statistical modeling of air pollution from vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adikanova, Saltanat; Malgazhdarov, Yerzhan A.; Madiyarov, Muratkan N.; Temirbekov, Nurlan M.

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the work is to create a probabilistic-statistical mathematical model for the distribution of emissions from vehicles. In this article, it is proposed to use the probabilistic and statistical approach for modeling the distribution of harmful impurities in the atmosphere from vehicles using the example of the Ust-Kamenogorsk city. Using a simplified methodology of stochastic modeling, it is possible to construct effective numerical computational algorithms that significantly reduce the amount of computation without losing their accuracy.

  17. Computational Fluid Dynamics Study for a Deep Stall Air Vehicle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-31

    pointing without the complexity and weight of morphing aircraft or gimbaled sensors. Small UAVs have received recent attention for several urban...202) 767-0608 Deep-stall Aerodynamics Incompressible flow Unstructured grid The aerodynamic characteristics of a vehicle in deep-stall conditions are...the wing tip and b) digitized points. ..2   Fig. 2. CAD representation of the Deep-Stall Vehicle

  18. Operation Noble Eagle and the Use of Combat Air Patrols for Homeland Defense

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    aviation security , together with the absence of terrorist attacks on the homeland and of no actionable intelligence indicating an imminent air threat in America. The following sub-areas were researched to help evaluate and recommend changes to the current ONE CAP policy: the history of air defense in America; U.S. air defense mistakes on 9/11 and the evolution of ONE; improvements in the intelligence community and aviation security since 9/11; specific threats to aviation and the risk of another 9/11-style attack in the United States; and the cost and

  19. Tools for the Conceptual Design and Engineering Analysis of Micro Air Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    George and Silin, Dmytro and Shakarayev, Sergev, “Autopilot Integration into Micro Air Vehicles.” in Introduction to The Design of Fixed-Wing Micro Air...Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden, 2001. 43. Moschetta, Jean-Marc and Bataill , Boris and Thipyopas, Chinnapat and Shkarayev, Sergey

  20. 76 FR 17487 - Protection of Stratospheric Ozone: New Substitute in the Motor Vehicle Air Conditioning Sector...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-29

    ...-OAR-2006-0664-0056.2). (HF is a severe irritant to the skin, eyes, and respiratory system.) The SAE... suppliers an additional refrigerant option for motor vehicle air conditioning (MVAC) systems in new... air conditioning (MVAC) systems in new passenger cars and light-duty trucks. Businesses in this...

  1. 9 CFR 3.88 - Primary conveyances (motor vehicle, rail, air, and marine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE STANDARDS Specifications for the Humane Handling... conveyances (motor vehicle, rail, air, and marine). (a) The animal cargo space of primary conveyances used to... cargo space must have a supply of air that is sufficient for the normal breathing of all the animals...

  2. 9 CFR 3.88 - Primary conveyances (motor vehicle, rail, air, and marine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE STANDARDS Specifications for the Humane Handling... conveyances (motor vehicle, rail, air, and marine). (a) The animal cargo space of primary conveyances used to... cargo space must have a supply of air that is sufficient for the normal breathing of all the animals...

  3. 9 CFR 3.114 - Primary conveyances (motor vehicle, rail, air and marine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., rail, air and marine). 3.114 Section 3.114 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... conveyances (motor vehicle, rail, air and marine). (a) The animal cargo space of primary conveyances used in.... (e) The interiors of animal cargo spaces in primary conveyances must be kept clean. (f) Live...

  4. 9 CFR 3.114 - Primary conveyances (motor vehicle, rail, air and marine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., rail, air and marine). 3.114 Section 3.114 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... conveyances (motor vehicle, rail, air and marine). (a) The animal cargo space of primary conveyances used in.... (e) The interiors of animal cargo spaces in primary conveyances must be kept clean. (f) Live...

  5. Quantification of Cross-coupling and Motion Feedthrough for Multiaxis Controllers Used in an Air Combat Flying Task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewell, W. E.; Citurs, K. D.

    1984-01-01

    A real-time piloted simulation of an air-to-air combat flying task using a wings-level-turn aircraft and various novel controllers was conducted. One objective is to quantify how the pilot interacts with the controllers and control modes, including: (1) controller versus aircraft response; (2) proprioceptive cross-coupling among axes of the controllers; and (3) biodynamic cross-coupling between the aircraft motions and the controllers. In order to aid in identifying the items listed above, both the target aircraft and the large amplitude multimode aerospace research simulator (LAMARS) motion system were distributed with quasi-random sums-of-sinusoids. Since the disturbances were separated in frequency, spectral analysis techniques were used to identify the three items listed. The results of the spectral analysis of controller motions from the two-axis side stick, a twist grip mounted on the side stick, a thumb button mounted on the side stick, and conventional rudder pedals are presented. Conclusions and recommendations for further research are also presented.

  6. Micro air vehicle motion tracking and aerodynamic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlig, Daniel V.

    Aerodynamic performance of small-scale fixed-wing flight is not well understood, and flight data are needed to gain a better understanding of the aerodynamics of micro air vehicles (MAVs) flying at Reynolds numbers between 10,000 and 30,000. Experimental studies have shown the aerodynamic effects of low Reynolds number flow on wings and airfoils, but the amount of work that has been conducted is not extensive and mostly limited to tests in wind and water tunnels. In addition to wind and water tunnel testing, flight characteristics of aircraft can be gathered through flight testing. The small size and low weight of MAVs prevent the use of conventional on-board instrumentation systems, but motion tracking systems that use off-board triangulation can capture flight trajectories (position and attitude) of MAVs with minimal onboard instrumentation. Because captured motion trajectories include minute noise that depends on the aircraft size, the trajectory results were verified in this work using repeatability tests. From the captured glide trajectories, the aerodynamic characteristics of five unpowered aircraft were determined. Test results for the five MAVs showed the forces and moments acting on the aircraft throughout the test flights. In addition, the airspeed, angle of attack, and sideslip angle were also determined from the trajectories. Results for low angles of attack (less than approximately 20 deg) showed the lift, drag, and moment coefficients during nominal gliding flight. For the lift curve, the results showed a linear curve until stall that was generally less than finite wing predictions. The drag curve was well described by a polar. The moment coefficients during the gliding flights were used to determine longitudinal and lateral stability derivatives. The neutral point, weather-vane stability and the dihedral effect showed some variation with different trim speeds (different angles of attack). In the gliding flights, the aerodynamic characteristics

  7. Design criteria for light high speed desert air cushion vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abulnaga, B. E.

    An evaluation is made of the applicability and prospective performance of ACVs in trans-Saharan cargo transport, in view of the unique characteristics of the dry sand environment. The lightweight/high-speed ACV concept envisioned is essentially ground effect aircraftlike, with conventional wheels as a low-speed backup suspension system. A propeller is used in ground effect cruise. Attention is given to the effects on vehicle stability and performance of sandy surface irregularities of the desert topography and of cross-winds from various directions relative to vehicle movement.

  8. Consequential life cycle air emissions externalities for plug-in electric vehicles in the PJM interconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weis, Allison; Jaramillo, Paulina; Michalek, Jeremy

    2016-02-01

    We perform a consequential life cycle analysis of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs), hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), and conventional gasoline vehicles in the PJM interconnection using a detailed, normative optimization model of the PJM electricity grid that captures the change in power plant operations and related emissions due to vehicle charging. We estimate and monetize the resulting human health and environmental damages from life cycle air emissions for each vehicle technology. We model PJM using the most recent data available (2010) as well as projections of the PJM grid in 2018 and a hypothetical scenario with increased wind penetration. We assess a range of sensitivity cases to verify the robustness of our results. We find that PEVs have higher life cycle air emissions damages than gasoline HEVs in the recent grid scenario, which has a high percentage of coal generation on the margin. In particular, battery electric vehicles with large battery capacity can produce two to three times as much air emissions damage as gasoline HEVs, depending on charge timing. In our future 2018 grid scenarios that account for predicted coal plant retirements, PEVs would produce air emissions damages comparable to or slightly lower than HEVs.

  9. Proposal for a Vehicle Level Test Procedure to Measure Air Conditioning Fuel Use

    SciTech Connect

    Rugh, J. P.

    2010-04-01

    The air-conditioning (A/C) compressor load significantly impacts the fuel economy of conventional vehicles and the fuel use/range of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV). A National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) vehicle performance analysis shows the operation of the air conditioner reduces the charge depletion range of a 40-mile range PHEV from 18% to 30% in a worst case hot environment. Designing for air conditioning electrical loads impacts PHEV and electric vehicle (EV) energy storage system size and cost. While automobile manufacturers have climate control procedures to assess A/C performance, and the U.S. EPA has the SCO3 drive cycle to measure indirect A/C emissions, there is no automotive industry consensus on a vehicle level A/C fuel use test procedure. With increasing attention on A/C fuel use due to increased regulatory activities and the development of PHEVs and EVs, a test procedure is needed to accurately assess the impact of climate control loads. A vehicle thermal soak period is recommended, with solar lamps that meet the SCO3 requirements or an alternative heating method such as portable electric heaters. After soaking, the vehicle is operated over repeated drive cycles or at a constant speed until steady-state cabin air temperature is attained. With this method, the cooldown and steady-state A/C fuel use are measured. This method can be run at either different ambient temperatures to provide data for the GREEN-MAC-LCCP model temperature bins or at a single representative ambient temperature. Vehicles with automatic climate systems are allowed to control as designed, while vehicles with manual climate systems are adjusted to approximate expected climate control settings. An A/C off test is also run for all drive profiles. This procedure measures approximate real-world A/C fuel use and assess the impact of thermal load reduction strategies.

  10. Global Combat Support Basing. Robust Prepositioning Strategies for Air Force War Reserve Material

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    bibliographical references. ISBN 978- 0 -8330-4766-3 (pbk. : alk. paper) 1. Air bases, American. 2. United States. Air Force—Operational readiness...Optimized for predictable costs Optimized for total system costs 600 400 200 100 700 500 300 800 0 C o st ( $m ill io n s) 44% reduction in total...S.4 Optimized globally Optimized according to AOR 400 200 100 300 500 0 C o st ( $m ill io n s) aContingency-dependent bPredictable boundary of U.S

  11. CSAR-eXit: The Future of Air Force Combat Search and Rescue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    lines is high. At the same time the DoD must remain a trusted steward of the nation’s talent and treasure. It is our Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen and...1 Dec 1946 – 8 Jul 1952 The last line of the Air Force Vision states, “We will excel as stewards of all Air Force resources in service to the...aircrew prior to their capture would have significantly changed the political calculus . I am not suggesting that a recovery would have been AU/ACSC

  12. Project AIR FORCE Assessment of Operation Desert Shield. The Buildup of Combat Power

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    8217 , I~I, ’H I’ I 94 21 DTzc QUAWL 1nfwamD I :1 The research reported here was sponsored by the United States Air Force A %4Qte.- 4 dT under Contract...Defen. .. ISBN: 0-8330-1521-4 RAND is a nonprofit institution that seeks to improve pnhhc policy thiough research and analysis. RAND’s publications do...release; distribution unlimifted iii Preface This monograph is a declassified version of an earlier Project AIR FORCE report, R-4147-AF, desc ibing the

  13. Sustainability Action Planning and Initiatives at Twentynine Palms Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center (MCAGCC)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    sources by FY 2020 7.5% 11.5% 18.3% Currently at 6.2%; photovoltaic and geothermal targeted Use of petroleum products by vehicle fleets reduced 30% by... teleworking at least once per week, on a regular, recurring basis, by FY 2020 15% 21% 30% Need policy 50% of non-hazardous waste diverted from disposal...electronic products disposed in environmentally sound manner 100% 100% 100% Compliant 100% of DoD personnel and contractors who apply pesticides are

  14. Modeling and analysis of an articulated winged micro air vehicle for gust mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oduyela, Adetunji Y.

    Articulated micro air vehicles are a class of micro air vehicles comprised of a main center body attached to outer wings on both sides. As in the case of a single rigid micro air vehicle, the center body and the attached bodies in the articulated case are all responsible for the generation of aerodynamic forces and moments during flight resulting in a multibody system. While many approaches have been taken in the literature to model the system of equations resulting from such a complicated multibody system, this dissertation presents an approach based on a Newton-Euler multibody dynamics formulation where the multiple bodies are attached together with suitable joints. The number and type of joints determines the level of articulation and total degree of freedom for the entire system. Unlike most articulated air vehicle model formulations available in the literature, the final model formulation presented in this work provides joint force and moment data acting on the articulated MAV during flight. This feature allows such information to be available during the vehicle design and development stage where appropriate spring and dampers for the system are selected based on mission requirements. Experimental validation of the proposed mathematical model using experimental flight test data obtained from UAHuntsville's Autonomous Tracking and Optical Measurements laboratory allowed the comparison of the flight test results and model simulations. Analytical investigation of the gust alleviation properties of the articulated 8 degree-of-freedom micro air vehicle model was carried out using simulations with varying crosswind gust magnitudes and shows that the passive articulation in micro air vehicles increases their robustness to gusts when suitable joint parameters are selected.

  15. Affordable Flight Demonstration of the GTX Air-Breathing SSTO Vehicle Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krivanek, Thomas M.; Roche, Joseph M.; Riehl, John P.; Kosareo, Daniel N.

    2003-01-01

    The rocket based combined cycle (RBCC) powered single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) reusable launch vehicle has the potential to significantly reduce the total cost per pound for orbital payload missions. To validate overall system performance, a flight demonstration must be performed. This paper presents an overview of the first phase of a flight demonstration program for the GTX SSTO vehicle concept. Phase 1 will validate the propulsion performance of the vehicle configuration over the supersonic and hypersonic air- breathing portions of the trajectory. The focus and goal of Phase 1 is to demonstrate the integration and performance of the propulsion system flowpath with the vehicle aerodynamics over the air-breathing trajectory. This demonstrator vehicle will have dual mode ramjetkcramjets, which include the inlet, combustor, and nozzle with geometrically scaled aerodynamic surface outer mold lines (OML) defining the forebody, boundary layer diverter, wings, and tail. The primary objective of this study is to demon- strate propulsion system performance and operability including the ram to scram transition, as well as to validate vehicle aerodynamics and propulsion airframe integration. To minimize overall risk and develop ment cost the effort will incorporate proven materials, use existing turbomachinery in the propellant delivery systems, launch from an existing unmanned remote launch facility, and use basic vehicle recovery techniques to minimize control and landing requirements. A second phase would demonstrate propulsion performance across all critical portions of a space launch trajectory (lift off through transition to all-rocket) integrated with flight-like vehicle systems.

  16. Factors Affecting the Transfer of Basic Combat Skills Training in the Air Force

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    In 2004 civilian corporations spent $80 billion on formal training programs (Clark & Kwinn, 2005). In 2005, the USAF planned to spend over $9M in...Studies, Vol. 9, 1-16. Beck, G. M. (2004). An analysis of the Air Force Basic Comunications Officer Training course : the impact of trainee and

  17. Combat Support Execution Planning and Control. An Assessment of Initial Implementations in Air Force Exercises

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    Steven J. Depalmer, Commander, 32 Air Operations Group. Their units provided the core personnel in the exercise training audience for AC04. General...152 AOG), Lt Col Ronald Yakkel, and Maj Marc Jamison for help in the AOC. We also thank TSgt Lynn deHaan, 32 AOG; TSgt David Paddock , 152 AOG; Lt

  18. Prospects for future hypersonic air-breathing vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beach, H. L., Jr.; Blankson, Isaiah M.

    1991-01-01

    An overview of the technical progress achieved in key areas of hypersonic airbreathing vehicle development is presented. The context for hypersonic applications is discussed with emphasis placed on technology issues and requirements, particularly for propulsion and technology integration. Attention is given to CFD technology which allows the consideration of configurations and extrapolations to flight conditions that cannot be simulated on the ground.

  19. Prospects for future hypersonic air-breathing vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beach, H. L., Jr.; Blankson, Isaiah M.

    1991-01-01

    An overview of the technical progress achieved in key areas of hypersonic airbreathing vehicle development is presented. The context for hypersonic applications is discussed with emphasis placed on technology issues and requirements, particularly for propulsion and technology integration. Attention is given to CFD technology which allows the consideration of configurations and extrapolations to flight conditions that cannot be simulated on the ground.

  20. Strategic Implications of U.S. Fighter Force Reductions: Air-to-Air Combat Modeling Using Lanchester Equations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    and ensure air dominance is ours for the future generations ahead. 69 Bibliography Anderson, Eric C. and Jeffrey G. Engstrom. Capabilities... Sheppard , Chris. “The F-35 and Legacy Aircraft: The Case of the F-16 (Part 1).” Second Line of Defense. March 2010a. 71 -----. “The

  1. Short-term outcomes of US Air Force Critical Care Air Transport Team (CCATT) patients evacuated from a combat setting.

    PubMed

    Lairet, Julio; King, James; Vojta, Leslie; Beninati, William

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the short-term outcomes (during air transport) of patients managed by the United States Air Force Critical Care Air Transport Teams (CCATT). This is a retrospective chart review of patients who were transported by CCATT between March 1, 2007 and June 30, 2008. A standardized abstraction form was used. Patients were classified as medical or trauma. Care given inflight was documented, including mechanical ventilation, vasoactive medication administration, and administration of blood products. Short-term events (during air transport) included death, oxyhemoglobin desaturation, hypotension, decline in neurological status, development of anuria or oliguria, and dislodgement of endotracheal and chest tubes. A total of 656 patient moves met inclusion criteria, of which 425 (64.8%) were trauma and 231 (35.2%) were medical. Mechanical ventilation was required by 318 (49%), 68 (10%) received vasoactive medications, and 43 (7%) required blood products during the flight. There were a total of 75 events documented on 65 patient transports (10%). Of these, 19 were oxyhemoglobin desaturation, 29 were hypotension, 3 were decline in neurological status, and 23 were due to anuria or oliguria. We did not encounter any deaths or loss of airway or chest tubes during transport. CCATTs are a successful platform in transporting critically injured/ill patients with minimal short-term complications.

  2. Valuation of plug-in vehicle life-cycle air emissions and oil displacement benefits.

    PubMed

    Michalek, Jeremy J; Chester, Mikhail; Jaramillo, Paulina; Samaras, Constantine; Shiau, Ching-Shin Norman; Lave, Lester B

    2011-10-04

    We assess the economic value of life-cycle air emissions and oil consumption from conventional vehicles, hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs), plug-in hybrid-electric vehicles (PHEVs), and battery electric vehicles in the US. We find that plug-in vehicles may reduce or increase externality costs relative to grid-independent HEVs, depending largely on greenhouse gas and SO(2) emissions produced during vehicle charging and battery manufacturing. However, even if future marginal damages from emissions of battery and electricity production drop dramatically, the damage reduction potential of plug-in vehicles remains small compared to ownership cost. As such, to offer a socially efficient approach to emissions and oil consumption reduction, lifetime cost of plug-in vehicles must be competitive with HEVs. Current subsidies intended to encourage sales of plug-in vehicles with large capacity battery packs exceed our externality estimates considerably, and taxes that optimally correct for externality damages would not close the gap in ownership cost. In contrast, HEVs and PHEVs with small battery packs reduce externality damages at low (or no) additional cost over their lifetime. Although large battery packs allow vehicles to travel longer distances using electricity instead of gasoline, large packs are more expensive, heavier, and more emissions intensive to produce, with lower utilization factors, greater charging infrastructure requirements, and life-cycle implications that are more sensitive to uncertain, time-sensitive, and location-specific factors. To reduce air emission and oil dependency impacts from passenger vehicles, strategies to promote adoption of HEVs and PHEVs with small battery packs offer more social benefits per dollar spent.

  3. Valuation of plug-in vehicle life-cycle air emissions and oil displacement benefits

    PubMed Central

    Michalek, Jeremy J.; Chester, Mikhail; Jaramillo, Paulina; Samaras, Constantine; Shiau, Ching-Shin Norman; Lave, Lester B.

    2011-01-01

    We assess the economic value of life-cycle air emissions and oil consumption from conventional vehicles, hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs), plug-in hybrid-electric vehicles (PHEVs), and battery electric vehicles in the US. We find that plug-in vehicles may reduce or increase externality costs relative to grid-independent HEVs, depending largely on greenhouse gas and SO2 emissions produced during vehicle charging and battery manufacturing. However, even if future marginal damages from emissions of battery and electricity production drop dramatically, the damage reduction potential of plug-in vehicles remains small compared to ownership cost. As such, to offer a socially efficient approach to emissions and oil consumption reduction, lifetime cost of plug-in vehicles must be competitive with HEVs. Current subsidies intended to encourage sales of plug-in vehicles with large capacity battery packs exceed our externality estimates considerably, and taxes that optimally correct for externality damages would not close the gap in ownership cost. In contrast, HEVs and PHEVs with small battery packs reduce externality damages at low (or no) additional cost over their lifetime. Although large battery packs allow vehicles to travel longer distances using electricity instead of gasoline, large packs are more expensive, heavier, and more emissions intensive to produce, with lower utilization factors, greater charging infrastructure requirements, and life-cycle implications that are more sensitive to uncertain, time-sensitive, and location-specific factors. To reduce air emission and oil dependency impacts from passenger vehicles, strategies to promote adoption of HEVs and PHEVs with small battery packs offer more social benefits per dollar spent. PMID:21949359

  4. Command in Air War: Centralized vs. Decentralized Control of Combat Airpower

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-19

    January 2003, available at http://www.usni.org/Proceedings/Articles03/PROvego01.htm. 16 Robert R . Leonhard, The Principles of War for the Information...then use information technology to monitor the implementation of the details and adjust as necessary. Another, Mustafa R . Koprucu, Major, USAF...Mustafa R . Koprucu, Maj, USAF, �The Limits of Decentralized Execution: The Effects of Technology on a Central Air Force Tenet,� (Master�s thesis

  5. Building Combat Strength through Logistics: Translating the New Air Force Logistics Concept of Operations into Action

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-31

    and external changes to the logistics environment. Wilder, Lim- exlStlflig luglstA LS CUL~ pL uro perOlu(v’it n itut-ma1 • ll , n ly nL ot in•1e are...GEN CAMPBELL USA: E/LG BRIG GEN BRACKEN AFLC/XR Up I WORKING- ...--- WORKING GROUP GROUP Fig 9. Air Force CLOUT Steerinj Group Structure. Within that

  6. An Analysis of Modeling Satellite Data in Air Land Combat Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    of the spectral regions (20:71-72). When the man in the hot air balloon spotted something of interest, he would call or come down out of the balloon...pulses 12 Remotely Imagery in the ultra-violet, Sensed visible, infrared, and microwave Data spectral regions . IMAGE Observations with image scanners...standard deviation, respectively, of the differences between observations. The rejection region for the hypothesis tests occurred when tpaired ? t,n-l

  7. Combat Pair: The Evolution of Air Force-Navy Integration in Strike Warfare

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    in the White Sands area of New Mexico . The broader exercise of which this evolu- tion was a part was a continuing effort directed by the chairman of...Washington, D.C.: Department of the Air Force, December 1992, p. 6. 6 John Dalton, Admiral Jeremy Boorda, and General Carl Mundy , Jr., “Forward...General Carl Mundy , Jr., “Forward . . . from the Sea,” Proceedings, December 1994. Davidson, Lieutenant General Phillip B., USA (Ret.), Vietnam at

  8. Environmental Assessment for Combat Arms Training Maintenance (CATM) Range at Langley Air Force Base, Virginia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    to eliminate airborne lead. With the start of building construction, the building site would be graded and sediment and erosion controls would be...also help stabilize the soil by controlling wind and water erosion , reducing noise levels, and cleansing pollutants from the air. Trees also provide...Virginia Coastal Zone Management Program. Standard construction and demolition practices would be applied to control sedimentation and erosion during

  9. A Benchmark Study of the Air Force Program Executive Office for Combat and Mission Support

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-05

    Award for Academic Excellence. Capt. Finkenstadt earned his commission through Officer Training School, Maxwell AFB, AL, in 2007, where he earned...College of the Air Force, where he earned the Pitsenbarger Award for Academic Excellence. Capt. Finkenstadt holds certifications in both DAWIA APDP...contractor employees (newer slides are breaking this out into full-time equivalents [FTE] and part-time equivalents [ PTE ]). The program owner can

  10. Investigation of the Influence of Air Defense Artillery on Combat Pilot Suppression and Attrition Management Practices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-01

    with regulatory requirements. It has been given no primary distribution other than to DTIC and will be available only through DTIC or the National...should not be construed as an official Department of the Army position , policy, or decision, unless so designated by other authorized documents. 1992...Army Field Artillery School , 1979.) The issue of interest in this report is whether performance is degraded in air-to-ground missions that are disrupted

  11. Simulation-Based Acquisition of the Future Air-Land Combat System (acquisition par la simulation des systemes futurs de combat aeroterresire)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-11-01

    assistés par ordinateur appropriés ; conserver une approche utilisateur. Vérification, validation et traçabilité (des alternatives et des décisions) sont...nouveaux concepts pour le combat aéroterrestre ont été définis, basés sur une approche système de systèmes, et qui se fondent sur des avancées...technologiques récentes, comme les robots ou les capteurs miniaturisés. Afin d’explorer les différents concepts et d’engager les phases de conception des

  12. An Expert Fault Diagnosis System for Vehicle Air Conditioning Product Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, C. F.; Tee, B. T.; Khalil, S. N.; Chen, W.; Rauterberg, G. W. M.

    2015-09-01

    The paper describes the development of the vehicle air-conditioning fault diagnosis system in automotive industries with expert system shell. The main aim of the research is to diagnose the problem of new vehicle air-conditioning system development process and select the most suitable solution to the problems. In the vehicle air-conditioning manufacturing industry, process can be very costly where an expert and experience personnel needed in certain circumstances. The expert of in the industry will retire or resign from time to time. When the expert is absent, their experience and knowledge is difficult to retrieve or lost forever. Expert system is a convenient method to replace expert. By replacing the expert with expert system, the accuracy of the processes will be increased compared to the conventional way. Therefore, the quality of product services that are produced will be finer and better. The inputs for the fault diagnosis are based on design data and experience of the engineer.

  13. Landing Craft Air Cushion (LCAC) Vehicle Crew Selection: An Overview.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-06-01

    perceptual and psychomotor skills to operate. Control of the LCAC is similar to an aircraft although vehicle responses to control inputs are much...perceptual information, rapid cognitive processing abilities, fine psychomotor skills , and time-sharing ability. Thus, skills required to operate the...then combined to form a composite score This composite score is assumed to be a good indicator for the more complex psychomotor skills relevant to

  14. Distributed pheromone-based swarming control of unmanned air and ground vehicles for RSTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauter, John A.; Mathews, Robert S.; Yinger, Andrew; Robinson, Joshua S.; Moody, John; Riddle, Stephanie

    2008-04-01

    The use of unmanned vehicles in Reconnaissance, Surveillance, and Target Acquisition (RSTA) applications has received considerable attention recently. Cooperating land and air vehicles can support multiple sensor modalities providing pervasive and ubiquitous broad area sensor coverage. However coordination of multiple air and land vehicles serving different mission objectives in a dynamic and complex environment is a challenging problem. Swarm intelligence algorithms, inspired by the mechanisms used in natural systems to coordinate the activities of many entities provide a promising alternative to traditional command and control approaches. This paper describes recent advances in a fully distributed digital pheromone algorithm that has demonstrated its effectiveness in managing the complexity of swarming unmanned systems. The results of a recent demonstration at NASA's Wallops Island of multiple Aerosonde Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs) and Pioneer Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGVs) cooperating in a coordinated RSTA application are discussed. The vehicles were autonomously controlled by the onboard digital pheromone responding to the needs of the automatic target recognition algorithms. UAVs and UGVs controlled by the same pheromone algorithm self-organized to perform total area surveillance, automatic target detection, sensor cueing, and automatic target recognition with no central processing or control and minimal operator input. Complete autonomy adds several safety and fault tolerance requirements which were integrated into the basic pheromone framework. The adaptive algorithms demonstrated the ability to handle some unplanned hardware failures during the demonstration without any human intervention. The paper describes lessons learned and the next steps for this promising technology.

  15. Multi-Disciplinary Design Optimization of Hypersonic Air-Breathing Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Peng; Tang, Zhili; Sheng, Jianda

    2016-06-01

    A 2D hypersonic vehicle shape with an idealized scramjet is designed at a cruise regime: Mach number (Ma) = 8.0, Angle of attack (AOA) = 0 deg and altitude (H) = 30kms. Then a multi-objective design optimization of the 2D vehicle is carried out by using a Pareto Non-dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm II (NSGA-II). In the optimization process, the flow around the air-breathing vehicle is simulated by inviscid Euler equations using FLUENT software and the combustion in the combustor is modeled by a methodology based on the well known combination effects of area-varying pipe flow and heat transfer pipe flow. Optimization results reveal tradeoffs among total pressure recovery coefficient of forebody, lift to drag ratio of vehicle, specific impulse of scramjet engine and the maximum temperature on the surface of vehicle.

  16. Study of Micro-Sized Technology, Micro Air Vehicles, and Design of a Payload Carrying Flapping Wing Micro Air Vehicle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    performed by large, expensive, high-performance piloted aircraft . More recently, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) have taken over numerous battlefield...piloted military aircraft . Their reduced size has numerous benefits. Secondly, UAVs are stealthier than their manned counterparts, using the same... aircraft also require less logistical support than full size piloted jets. Today’s piloted military aircraft are equipped with numerous sensor

  17. Experimental investigation of a quad-rotor biplane micro air vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanowicz, Christopher Michael

    Micro air vehicles are expected to perform demanding missions requiring efficient operation in both hover and forward flight. This thesis discusses the development of a hybrid air vehicle which seamlessly combines both flight capabilities: hover and high-speed forward flight. It is the quad-rotor biplane, which weighs 240 grams and consists of four propellers with wings arranged in a biplane configuration. The performance of the vehicle system was investigated in conditions representative of flight through a series of wind tunnel experiments. These studies provided an understanding of propeller-wing interaction effects and system trim analysis. This showed that the maximum speed of 11 m/s and a cruise speed of 4 m/s were achievable and that the cruise power is approximately one-third of the hover power. Free flight testing of the vehicle successfully highlighted its ability to achieve equilibrium transition flight. Key design parameters were experimentally investigated to understand their effect on overall performance. It was found that a trade-off between efficiency and compactness affects the final choice of the design. Design improvements have allowed for decreases in vehicle weight and ground footprint, while increasing structural soundness. Numerous vehicle designs, models, and flight tests have proven system scalability as well as versatility, including an upscaled model to be utilized in an extensive commercial package delivery system. Overall, the quad-rotor biplane is proven to be an efficient and effective multi-role vehicle.

  18. U.S. Army Air Forces in World War II. Combat Chronology 1941-1945

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    Vincent and Lt Col David L (‘Tex’) Hill, moves into E China along the Hengyang-Kweilin line. This brings US aircraft within range of all major...make contact. The airplanes swing E and bomb mili- tary installations at Baguio. Tarlac, Tuguegarao, and A/Fs at Cabantuan are also attacked. By 1130...and Fourth AFs are made responsible for air def on the E and W coasts, respectively. CG First AF orders I BC to begin overwater rcn with all available

  19. Planning Considerations for the Combat Employment of Air Power in Peacetime Contingency Operations. CLIC Papers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-01

    Letter for commanders." Washington, DC, f the secretary of the Air Force, April 1986, p. 2. 2. Brauer , Richard F., Jr., Lieutenant Colonel, USAF. Essavs...AFM 2-XX /Draft) Tactical DeceDtion. 11. Hiatt, Fred . "U.S. Attack on Libya: A Raid That Went Right ’These Bombs Are for You, Colonel’ . Ig...Washinston Post. 20 April 1986. 12. Iklb, Fred C., et al. Discriminate Deterrence. Report of The Commission On Inteqrated Long-Term Stratesy. washington

  20. Configuration Studies of Personal Air Vehicles. Personal Air Vehicle and Flying Jeep Concepts: A Commentary on Promising Approaches or What Goes Around Comes Around (About Every Twenty Years)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, David W.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA/Langley Personal Air Vehicle (PAV) Exploration (PAVE) and the DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency) Dual Air/Road Transportation System (DARTS) projects were established to investigate the feasibility of creating vehicles which could replace, or at the very least augment, personal ground and air transportation schemes. This overall goal implies integrating several technology areas with practical everyday transportation requirements to design a class of vehicles which will achieve the following goals: (1) Vertical, Extremely Short, or Short Takeoff and Landing (VTOL, ESTOL, STOL) capability; (2) Operation at block speeds markedly faster than current combinations of land and air transportation, particularly in critical market areas; (3) Unit cost comparable to current luxury cars and small general aviation aircraft; (4) Excellent reliability; (5) Excellent safety; (6) Ability to integrate with existing land and air transportation systems. The conclusions of these configuration studies are summarized as follows: (1) Creation of the five assigned configurations prompted added explorations, some of which were dead-ends; (2) Some components could be common to all configurations such as avionics and dual-mode suspension schemes; (3) Single-Mode PAVs can be created by removing dual-mode-specific items; (4) Aviation history provided some intriguing starting points, as in what goes around comes around; (5) CTOL (Conventional Take-off and Landing) and STOL dual-mode PAVs look feasible with single-mode PAVs being simplifications of the dual-mode approach; (6) VTOL PAVs will require development; (7) More exotic collapsing mechanisms mechanisms need development; (8) As a teaching tool, PAVs are not yet a well-enough bounded design problem.

  1. On-Line Trajectory Optimization for Autonomous Air Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-31

    equations of motion to handle cooperative path planning for multi-vehicles. • Application of genetic algorithms (GA) to solve multiple initial...1 17 1 165 sinsincos D vDD D uDDD Kg yy y xyy ψ λ ψψ λλ& (2.24) where 32 3 11 AAD = (2.25) 322 AfVfD −= (2.26) y yx ffBVAfffVABAVAD...value was needed, a variable step sweep was employed to find it. Otherwise the GA was used[26-28]. To begin the genetic algorithm, a set of 48

  2. Improving the aluminum-air battery system for use in electrical vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shaohua

    The objectives of this study include improvement of the efficiency of the aluminum/air battery system and demonstration of its ability for vehicle applications. The aluminum/air battery system can generate enough energy and power for driving ranges and acceleration similar to that of gasoline powered cars. Therefore has the potential to be a power source for electrical vehicles. Aluminum/air battery vehicle life cycle analysis was conducted and compared to that of lead/acid and nickel-metal hydride vehicles. Only the aluminum/air vehicles can be projected to have a travel range comparable to that of internal combustion engine vehicles (ICE). From this analysis, an aluminum/air vehicle is a promising candidate compared to ICE vehicles in terms of travel range, purchase price, fuel cost, and life cycle cost. We have chosen two grades of Al alloys (Al alloy 1350, 99.5% and Al alloy 1199, 99.99%) in our study. Only Al 1199 was studied extensively using Na 2SnO3 as an electrolyte additive. We then varied concentration and temperature, and determined the effects on the parasitic (corrosion) current density and open circuit potential. We also determined cell performance and selectivity curves. To optimize the performance of the cell based on our experiments, the recommended operating conditions are: 3--4 N NaOH, about 55°C, and a current density of 150--300 mA/cm2. We have modeled the cell performance using the equations we developed. The model prediction of cell performance shows good agreement with experimental data. For better cell performance, our model studies suggest use of higher electrolyte flow rate, smaller cell gap, higher conductivity and lower parasitic current density. We have analyzed the secondary current density distributions in a two plane, parallel Al/air cell and a wedge-type Al/air cell. The activity of the cathode has a large effect on the local current density. With increases in the cell gap, the local current density increases, but the increase is

  3. Affordable Flight Demonstration of the GTX Air-Breathing SSTO Vehicle Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krivanek, Thomas M.; Roche, Joseph M.; Riehl, John P.; Kosareo, Daniel N.

    2002-01-01

    The rocket based combined cycle (RBCC) powered single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) reusable launch vehicle has the potential to significantly reduce the total cost per pound for orbital payload missions. To validate overall system performance, a flight demonstration must be performed. This paper presents an overview of the first phase of a flight demonstration program for the GTX SSTO vehicle concept. Phase 1 will validate the propulsion performance of the vehicle configuration over the supersonic and hypersonic airbreathing portions of the trajectory. The focus and goal of Phase 1 is to demonstrate the integration and performance of the propulsion system flowpath with the vehicle aerodynamics over the air-breathing trajectory. This demonstrator vehicle will have dual mode ramjet/scramjets, which include the inlet, combustor, and nozzle with geometrically scaled aerodynamic surface outer mold lines (OML) defining the forebody, boundary layer diverter, wings, and tail. The primary objective of this study is to demonstrate propulsion system performance and operability including the ram to scram transition, as well as to validate vehicle aerodynamics and propulsion airframe integration. To minimize overall risk and development cost the effort will incorporate proven materials, use existing turbomachinery in the propellant delivery systems, launch from an existing unmanned remote launch facility, and use basic vehicle recovery techniques to minimize control and landing requirements. A second phase would demonstrate propulsion performance across all critical portions of a space launch trajectory (lift off through transition to all-rocket) integrated with flight-like vehicle systems.

  4. Propulsion integration of hypersonic air-breathing vehicles utilizing a top-down design methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, Brad Kenneth

    In recent years, a focus of aerospace engineering design has been the development of advanced design methodologies and frameworks to account for increasingly complex and integrated vehicles. Techniques such as parametric modeling, global vehicle analyses, and interdisciplinary data sharing have been employed in an attempt to improve the design process. The purpose of this study is to introduce a new approach to integrated vehicle design known as the top-down design methodology. In the top-down design methodology, the main idea is to relate design changes on the vehicle system and sub-system level to a set of over-arching performance and customer requirements. Rather than focusing on the performance of an individual system, the system is analyzed in terms of the net effect it has on the overall vehicle and other vehicle systems. This detailed level of analysis can only be accomplished through the use of high fidelity computational tools such as Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) or Finite Element Analysis (FEA). The utility of the top-down design methodology is investigated through its application to the conceptual and preliminary design of a long-range hypersonic air-breathing vehicle for a hypothetical next generation hypersonic vehicle (NHRV) program. System-level design is demonstrated through the development of the nozzle section of the propulsion system. From this demonstration of the methodology, conclusions are made about the benefits, drawbacks, and cost of using the methodology.

  5. Vehicle height and posture control of the electronic air suspension system using the hybrid system approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaoqiang; Cai, Yingfeng; Chen, Long; Liu, Yanling; Wang, Shaohua

    2016-03-01

    The electronic air suspension (EAS) system can improve ride comfort, fuel economy and handling safety of vehicles by adjusting vehicle height. This paper describes the development of a novel controller using the hybrid system approach to adjust the vehicle height (height control) and to regulate the roll and pitch angles of the vehicle body during the height adjustment process (posture control). The vehicle height adjustment system of EAS poses challenging hybrid control problems, since it features different discrete modes of operation, where each mode has an associated linear continuous-time dynamic. In this paper, we propose a novel approach to the modelling and controller design problem for the vehicle height adjustment system of EAS. The system model is described firstly in the hybrid system description language (HYSDEL) to obtain a mixed logical dynamical (MLD) hybrid model. For the resulting model, a hybrid model predictive controller is tuned to improve the vehicle height and posture tracking accuracy and to achieve the on-off statuses direct control of solenoid valves. The effectiveness and performance of the proposed approach are demonstrated by simulations and actual vehicle tests.

  6. Use of cooperative unmanned air and ground vehicles for detection and disposal of mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawodny MacArthur, Erica; MacArthur, Donald; Crane, Carl

    2005-11-01

    The objective of this research is to extend the sensing capabilities of a multi-vehicle ground system by incorporating the environmental perception abilities of unmanned aerial vehicles. The aerial vehicle used in this research is a Miniature Aircraft Gas Xcell RC helicopter. It is outfitted with a sensor payload containing stereo vision cameras, GPS, and a digital compass. Geo- referenced images are gathered using the above sensors that are used in this research to create a map of the operating region. The ground vehicle used in this research is an automated Suzuki Mini-Quad ATV. It has the following onboard sensors: single-vision camera, laser range device, digital compass, GPS, and an encoder. The ground vehicle uses the above sensors and the map provided by the helicopter to traverse the region, locate, and isolate simulated land mines. The base station consists of a laptop that provides a communication link between the aerial and ground vehicle systems. It also provides the operator with system operation information and statistics. All communication between the vehicles and the base station is performed using JAUS (Joint Architecture for Unmanned Systems) messages. The JAUS architecture is employed as a means to organize inter-vehicle and intra-vehicle communication and system component hierarchy. The purpose of JAUS is to provide interoperability between various unmanned systems and subsystems for both military and commercial applications. JAUS seeks to achieve this through the development of functionally cohesive building blocks called components whose interface messages are clearly defined. The JAUS architecture allows for a layered control strategy which has specific message sets for each layer of control. Implementation of the JAUS architecture allows for ease of software development for a multi- vehicle system. This experiment demonstrates how an air-ground vehicle system can be used to cooperatively locate and dispose of simulated mines.

  7. Thermal Protection / Light Weight Materials Development for Future Air Force Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    based on moisture evaporative cooling, superconducting heat pipe arrays and thermal ceramic protective coatings for future Air Force vehicles, and...matrix fibrous composites based on moisture evaporative cooling, superconducting heat pipe arrays, and thermal ceramic protective coatings for future Air...fibers—remain in the composite to direct fluids through the structure.  The superconducting heat pipes that the proposal was based upon remain

  8. Computerized Vehicle Routing Programs and Their Effect on Vehicle Utilization in the Air Force

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-01

    Ballou , Ronald H. Business Logistics Management (Third Edition). Englewood Cliffs NJ: Prentice Hall, Inc., 1992. 2. Ballou , Ronald H. and Yogesh K...3. Ballou , Ronald H. "Heuristics: Rules of Thumb for Logistics Decision Making," Journal of Business Logistics , 10:122-132 (January 1990). 4. Bodin...Agarwal. "A Performance Comparison of Several Popular Algorithms for Vehicle Routing and Scheduling," Journal of Business Logistics , 9:51-65 (January 1989

  9. Predicting Air Quality at First Ingress into Vehicles Visiting the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Romoser, Amelia A; Scully, Robert R; Limero, Thomas F; De Vera, Vanessa; Cheng, Patti F; Hand, Jennifer J; James, John T; Ryder, Valerie E

    2017-02-01

    NASA regularly performs ground-based offgas tests (OGTs), which allow prediction of accumulated volatile pollutant concentrations at first entry on orbit, on whole modules and vehicles scheduled to connect to the International Space Station (ISS). These data guide crew safety operations and allow for estimation of ISS air revitalization systems impact from additional pollutant load. Since volatiles released from vehicle, module, and payload materials can affect crew health and performance, prediction of first ingress air quality is important. To assess whether toxicological risk is typically over or underpredicted, OGT and first ingress samples from 10 vehicles and modules were compared. Samples were analyzed by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The rate of pollutant accumulation was extrapolated over time. Ratios of analytical values and Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations were used to predict total toxicity values (T-values) at first entry. Results were also compared by compound. Frequently overpredicted was 2-butanone (9/10), whereas propanal (6/10) and ethanol (8/10) were typically underpredicted, but T-values were not substantially affected. Ingress sample collection delay (estimated by octafluoropropane introduced from ISS atmosphere) and T-value prediction accuracy correlated well (R2 = 0.9008), highlighting the importance of immediate air sample collection and accounting for ISS air dilution. Importantly, T-value predictions were conservative 70% of the time. Results also suggest that T-values can be normalized to octafluoropropane levels to adjust for ISS air dilution at first ingress. Finally, OGT and ingress sampling has allowed small leaks in vehicle fluid systems to be recognized and addressed.Romoser AA, Scully RR, Limero TF, De Vera V, Cheng PF, Hand JJ, James JT, Ryder VE. Predicting air quality at first ingress into vehicles visiting the International Space Station. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017; 88(2):104-113.

  10. Autonomous Soaring for Improved Endurance of a Small Uninhabited Air Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    A relatively unexplored method to improve the endurance of an autonomous aircraft is to use buoyant plumes of air found in the lower atmosphere called thermals or updrafts. Glider pilots and birds commonly use updrafts to improve range, endurance, or cross-country speed. This report presents a quantitative analysis of a small electric-powered uninhabited air vehicle using updrafts to extend its endurance over a target location. A three-degree-of-freedom simulation of the uninhabited air vehicle was used to determine the yearly effect of updrafts on performance. Surface radiation and rawinsonde balloon measurements taken at Desert Rock, Nevada, were used to determine updraft size, strength, spacing, shape, and maximum height for the simulation. A fixed-width spiral path was used to search for updrafts at the same time as maintaining line-of-sight to the surface target position. Power was used only when the aircraft was flying at the lower-altitude limit in search of updrafts. Results show that an uninhabited air vehicle with a nominal endurance of 2 hours can fly a maximum of 14 hours using updrafts during the summer and a maximum of 8 hours during the winter. The performance benefit and the chance of finding updrafts both depend on what time of day the uninhabited air vehicle is launched. Good endurance and probability of finding updrafts during the year was obtained when the uninhabited air vehicle was launched 30 percent into the daylight hours after sunrise each day. Yearly average endurance was found to be 8.6 hours with these launch times.

  11. Design and analysis of aluminum/air battery system for electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shaohua; Knickle, Harold

    Aluminum (Al)/air batteries have the potential to be used to produce power to operate cars and other vehicles. These batteries might be important on a long-term interim basis as the world passes through the transition from gasoline cars to hydrogen fuel cell cars. The Al/air battery system can generate enough energy and power for driving ranges and acceleration similar to gasoline powered cars. From our design analysis, it can be seen that the cost of aluminum as an anode can be as low as US 1.1/kg as long as the reaction product is recycled. The total fuel efficiency during the cycle process in Al/air electric vehicles (EVs) can be 15% (present stage) or 20% (projected) comparable to that of internal combustion engine vehicles (ICEs) (13%). The design battery energy density is 1300 Wh/kg (present) or 2000 Wh/kg (projected). The cost of battery system chosen to evaluate is US 30/kW (present) or US$ 29/kW (projected). Al/air EVs life-cycle analysis was conducted and compared to lead/acid and nickel metal hydride (NiMH) EVs. Only the Al/air EVs can be projected to have a travel range comparable to ICEs. From this analysis, Al/air EVs are the most promising candidates compared to ICEs in terms of travel range, purchase price, fuel cost, and life-cycle cost.

  12. Technology Assessment of Avanced propulsion Systems for Some Classes of Combat Vehicles. Volume 3. Appendices G-M.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-09-01

    cost or performance of armored land canbat vehicles or of high-speed ships. Relative payoffs within each set of goals are also estimated. This report is...what is judged to be physically possi- ble and which together in relevant sets would have a major im- pact on the cost or performance of armored land...innovations and improvements. I: Cost is perhaps the principal impediment to increased appli- cation of the Stirling engine. The cost arises from the

  13. An Exploration of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles in the Army’s Future Combat Systems Family of Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    III Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (CL III UAV) is a multifunction aerial system capable of providing reconnaissance, security/early warning , target...aerial system capable of providing reconnaissance, security/early warning , target acquisition, and designation for the Infantry Company and MCS Platoon...MASINT, SIGINT, and EO/ IR . It is employed within 16 teams of both manned and unmanned robotics sensor platforms as well as unattended systems

  14. Development of Micro Air Reconnaissance Vehicle as a Test Bed for Advanced Sensors and Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Qamar A.; Vranas, Thomas L.; Fox, Robert L.; Kuhn, Theodore R.; Ingham, John; Logan, Michael J.; Barnes, Kevin N.; Guenther, Benjamin F.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a Micro/Mini Air Reconnaissance Vehicle for advanced sensors and electronics at NASA Langley Research Center over the last year. This vehicle is expected to have a total weight of less than four pounds, a design velocity of 40 mph, an endurance of 15-20 minutes, and a maximum range of 5km. The vehicle has wings that are simple to detach yet retain the correct alignment. The upper fuselage surface has a quick release hatch used to access the interior and also to mount the varying propulsion systems. The sensor suite developed for this vehicle consists of a Pitot-static measurement system for determining air speed, an absolute pressure measurement for determining altitude, magnetic direction measurement, and three orthogonal gyros to determine body angular rates. Swarming GPS-guidance and in-flight maneuvering is discussed, as well as design and installation of some other advance sensors like MEMS microphones, infrared cameras, GPS, humidity sensors, and an ultrasonic sonar sensor. Also low cost, small size, high performance control and navigation system for the Micro Air Vehicle is discussed. At the end, laboratory characterization of different sensors, motors, propellers, and batteries will be discussed.

  15. Design of an air sampler for a small unmanned aerial vehicle.

    PubMed

    Peräjärvi, K; Lehtinen, J; Pöllänen, R; Toivonen, H

    2008-01-01

    In the aftermath of a nuclear accident or malevolent act, it is of paramount importance to have the capability to monitor airborne radioactive substances by collecting air samples. For potentially dangerous missions, the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority of Finland (STUK) has developed an air sampler to be used on a small unmanned aerial vehicle. When a Petrianov or Fluoropore filter is used in the sampler and the air velocity is 71 km h(-1), the air flow rate through the filter is 0.73 m(3) h(-1) or 0.23 m(3) h(-1), respectively. The present article introduces the developed air sampler using fluid dynamic simulations and wind tunnel data. The operation of the system was validated by collecting airborne radioactive aerosols from air.

  16. Air Vehicle Technology Integration Program (AVTIP). Delivery Order 0020: Prediction of Manufacturing Tolerances for Laminar Flow, Task 6

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    AFRL-VA-WP-TR-2007-3086 AIR VEHICLE TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION PROGRAM (AVTIP) Delivery Order 0020: Prediction of Manufacturing Tolerances for...NUMBER F33615-00-D-3054-0020 5b. GRANT NUMBER 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE AIR VEHICLE TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION PROGRAM (AVTIP) Delivery Order 0020

  17. CFD based aerodynamic modeling to study flight dynamics of a flapping wing micro air vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rege, Alok Ashok

    The demand for small unmanned air vehicles, commonly termed micro air vehicles or MAV's, is rapidly increasing. Driven by applications ranging from civil search-and-rescue missions to military surveillance missions, there is a rising level of interest and investment in better vehicle designs, and miniaturized components are enabling many rapid advances. The need to better understand fundamental aspects of flight for small vehicles has spawned a surge in high quality research in the area of micro air vehicles. These aircraft have a set of constraints which are, in many ways, considerably different from that of traditional aircraft and are often best addressed by a multidisciplinary approach. Fast-response non-linear controls, nano-structures, integrated propulsion and lift mechanisms, highly flexible structures, and low Reynolds aerodynamics are just a few of the important considerations which may be combined in the execution of MAV research. The main objective of this thesis is to derive a consistent nonlinear dynamic model to study the flight dynamics of micro air vehicles with a reasonably accurate representation of aerodynamic forces and moments. The research is divided into two sections. In the first section, derivation of the nonlinear dynamics of flapping wing micro air vehicles is presented. The flapping wing micro air vehicle (MAV) used in this research is modeled as a system of three rigid bodies: a body and two wings. The design is based on an insect called Drosophila Melanogaster, commonly known as fruit-fly. The mass and inertial effects of the wing on the body are neglected for the present work. The nonlinear dynamics is simulated with the aerodynamic data published in the open literature. The flapping frequency is used as the control input. Simulations are run for different cases of wing positions and the chosen parameters are studied for boundedness. Results show a qualitative inconsistency in boundedness for some cases, and demand a better

  18. An Analysis of Skill Requirements for Operators of Amphibious Air Cushion Vehicles (ACVs).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKnight, A. James; And Others

    This report describes the skills required in the operation of an amphibious air cushion vehicle (ACV) in Army tactical and logistic missions. The research involved analyzing ACV characteristics, operating requirements, environmental effects, and results of a simulation experiment. The analysis indicates that ACV operation is complicated by an…

  19. Rehabilitation of the Rocket Vehicle Integration Test Stand at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Daniel S.; Ray, Ronald J.; Phillips, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Since initial use in 1958 for the X-15 rocket-powered research airplane, the Rocket Engine Test Facility has proven essential for testing and servicing rocket-powered vehicles at Edwards Air Force Base. For almost two decades, several successful flight-test programs utilized the capability of this facility. The Department of Defense has recently demonstrated a renewed interest in propulsion technology development with the establishment of the National Aerospace Initiative. More recently, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration is undergoing a transformation to realign the organization, focusing on the Vision for Space Exploration. These initiatives provide a clear indication that a very capable ground-test stand at Edwards Air Force Base will be beneficial to support the testing of future access-to-space vehicles. To meet the demand of full integration testing of rocket-powered vehicles, the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, the Air Force Flight Test Center, and the Air Force Research Laboratory have combined their resources in an effort to restore and upgrade the original X-15 Rocket Engine Test Facility to become the new Rocket Vehicle Integration Test Stand. This report describes the history of the X-15 Rocket Engine Test Facility, discusses the current status of the facility, and summarizes recent efforts to rehabilitate the facility to support potential access-to-space flight-test programs. A summary of the capabilities of the facility is presented and other important issues are discussed.

  20. 78 FR 11122 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Pennsylvania; Motor Vehicle...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-15

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Pennsylvania; Motor.... SUMMARY: EPA is proposing to approve a State Implementation Plan (SIP) revision submitted by the... Philadelphia Area) to reflect the use of the most recent version of the Motor Vehicle Emission Simulator...

  1. 78 FR 25858 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Pennsylvania; Motor Vehicle...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Pennsylvania; Motor Vehicle Emissions Budgets for the Pennsylvania Counties in the Philadelphia-Wilmington, PA-NJ-DE 1997...

  2. 40 CFR 86.1832-01 - Optional equipment and air conditioning for test vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... VEHICLES AND ENGINES (CONTINUED) General Compliance Provisions for Control of Air Pollution From New and In... and 86.1828-01: (a)(1) Where it is expected that more than 33 percent of a car line, within a test... with that item in that car line, within that test group. (2) Where it is expected that 33 percent...

  3. 40 CFR 86.1832-01 - Optional equipment and air conditioning for test vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... VEHICLES AND ENGINES (CONTINUED) General Compliance Provisions for Control of Air Pollution From New and In... and 86.1828-01: (a)(1) Where it is expected that more than 33 percent of a car line, within a test... with that item in that car line, within that test group. (2) Where it is expected that 33 percent...

  4. 9 CFR 3.114 - Primary conveyances (motor vehicle, rail, air and marine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE STANDARDS Specifications for the Humane Handling... conveyances (motor vehicle, rail, air and marine). (a) The animal cargo space of primary conveyances used in... animal cargo space must be constructed and maintained in a manner that will prevent the ingress of engine...

  5. 9 CFR 3.138 - Primary conveyances (motor vehicle, rail, air, and marine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE STANDARDS Specifications for the Humane Handling... (motor vehicle, rail, air, and marine). (a) The animal cargo space of primary conveyances used in... comfort of the live animals contained therein at all times. (b) The animal cargo space shall be...

  6. 9 CFR 3.138 - Primary conveyances (motor vehicle, rail, air, and marine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE STANDARDS Specifications for the Humane Handling... (motor vehicle, rail, air, and marine). (a) The animal cargo space of primary conveyances used in... comfort of the live animals contained therein at all times. (b) The animal cargo space shall be...

  7. 9 CFR 3.114 - Primary conveyances (motor vehicle, rail, air and marine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE STANDARDS Specifications for the Humane Handling... conveyances (motor vehicle, rail, air and marine). (a) The animal cargo space of primary conveyances used in... animal cargo space must be constructed and maintained in a manner that will prevent the ingress of engine...

  8. 9 CFR 3.62 - Primary conveyances (motor vehicle, rail, air, and marine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... temperature in the animal cargo space is 75 °F (23.9 °C) or higher. The ambient temperature within the animal... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Primary conveyances (motor vehicle, rail, air, and marine). 3.62 Section 3.62 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT...

  9. An Analysis of Skill Requirements for Operators of Amphibious Air Cushion Vehicles (ACVs).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKnight, A. James; And Others

    This report describes the skills required in the operation of an amphibious air cushion vehicle (ACV) in Army tactical and logistic missions. The research involved analyzing ACV characteristics, operating requirements, environmental effects, and results of a simulation experiment. The analysis indicates that ACV operation is complicated by an…

  10. 9 CFR 3.114 - Primary conveyances (motor vehicle, rail, air and marine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Primary conveyances (motor vehicle, rail, air and marine). 3.114 Section 3.114 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH..., Care, Treatment, and Transportation of Marine Mammals Transportation Standards § 3.114 Primary...

  11. CRITERIA AND AIR TOXIC EMISSIONS FROM IN-USE, LOW EMISSION VEHICLES (LEVS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency implemented a program to identify tailpipe emissions of criteria and air toxic contaminants from in-use, light-duty Low Emission Vehicles (LEVs). EPA recruited twenty-five LEVs in 2002, and measured emissions on a chassis dynamometer usin...

  12. Ancillary benefits for climate change mitigation and air pollution control in the world's motor vehicle fleets.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Michael P

    2008-01-01

    The global motor vehicle population has grown very rapidly in the past half century and is expected to continue to grow rapidly for the next several decades, especially in developing countries. As a result, vehicles are a major source of urban air pollution in many cities and are the fastest-growing source of greenhouse emissions. Strategies exist to reduce both problems, but many countries emphasize one over the other rather than pursuing strategies that reduce both concerns. Using diesel as an example, this article illustrates that it is now possible not only to reduce carbon dioxide with the increased use of diesel vehicles but also to improve urban air pollution. Doing so requires both stringent emissions regulations and clean fuels. Several principles contained in the Bellagio Memorandum are highlighted as guides for policy makers.

  13. Feasibility report: Operation of light air cushion vehicle at McMurdo Sound, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dibbern, J. S.

    1987-02-01

    This report explores the viability of the use of an air cushion vehicle (ACV) or hovercraft to perform logistic and scientific support in the area of McMurdo Station, Antarctica. After a review of personnel assets and facilities at McMurdo Station to support the ACV plus a reconnaissance of the five major routes selected, it appears that an air cushion vehicle in the 1 to 1 1/2 ton payload class would be of significant value to support operations. It would reduce transit times for surface vehicle traverses on the routes selected and reduce requirements for expenditure of helicopter flight time in others. Of major significance is the ability to handle passenger/shuttle requirements between the Scott Base transition and Williams Field Skiway. Use of the ACV for high frequency passenger operations would help preserve the snow road for cargo operations during periods of road deterioration.

  14. Laryngeal mask airway as a rescue device for failed endotracheal intubation during scene-to-hospital air transport of combat casualties.

    PubMed

    Shavit, Itai; Aviram, Eliad; Hoffmann, Yoav; Biton, Oded; Glassberg, Elon

    2017-06-27

    Advanced airway management of combat casualties during scene-to-hospital air transport is challenging. Because of the short transport time, flight physicians of the Israeli military airborne combat evacuation unit are approved for the use of a laryngeal mask airway (LMA) in the event of failed endotracheal intubation (ETI). The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of LMA use during scene-to-hospital transport of combat casualties in Israel. A retrospective cohort analysis of all combat casualties treated with ETI during scene-to-hospital transport over a 3-year period was carried out. Successful LMA insertion was defined as satisfactory placement of the device on the basis of adequate chest expansion with bag-mask ventilation. The median flight time from scene to hospital was 13 min [interquartile range (IQR): 9-15 min]. Sixty-five casualties underwent ETI attempts, 47 successful and 18 failed. All 18 casualties who had failed ETI underwent LMA insertion as a rescue treatment. Six casualties suffered from traumatic brain injury, six had firearm injuries, two had blast injuries, and two had inhalational injuries. LMA insertion was successful in 16/18 (88.9%) casualties, 14 survived to hospital discharge, whereas two were declared dead upon hospital arrival. Two cases of LMA insertion were unsuccessful, but patients survived to hospital discharge. Among the 16 successful cases, the median oxygen saturation on scene-pickup before LMA insertion and on hospital-handover with LMA in place were 90% (IQR: 84-96%) and 98% (IQR: 96-99%), respectively (P<0.0001, the 95% confidence interval for difference between medians was 4-11). The findings of this study suggest that in the event of failed ETI, combat casualties can be treated effectively with LMA during a short scene-to-hospital transport time.

  15. Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster decelerator subsystem - Air drop test vehicle/B-52 design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runkle, R. E.; Drobnik, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    The air drop development test program for the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster Recovery System required the design of a large drop test vehicle that would meet all the stringent requirements placed on it by structural loads, safety considerations, flight recovery system interfaces, and sequence. The drop test vehicle had to have the capability to test the drogue and the three main parachutes both separately and in the total flight deployment sequence and still be low-cost to fit in a low-budget development program. The design to test large ribbon parachutes to loads of 300,000 pounds required the detailed investigation and integration of several parameters such as carrier aircraft mechanical interface, drop test vehicle ground transportability, impact point ground penetration, salvageability, drop test vehicle intelligence, flight design hardware interfaces, and packaging fidelity.

  16. Improving Air Force Command and Control Through Enhanced Agile Combat Support Planning, Execution, Monitoring, and Control Processes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    mission support (A7) planning input. The resulting tent city had to be relocated because of flooding and encroachment on explosive safety areas. If...combat support planning were better integrated with opera- tional planning, the tent city–location issue might have been identified earlier during the...shortfalls are consis- tent with current process shortfalls. Existing tools do not provide an integrated view of combat support process performance

  17. An Air-Launched Low-Cost Launch Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, Gary C.

    2005-02-01

    The QuickReach concept is a responsive, mobile, air-launched, two-stage liquid pressure-fed rocket that is capable of placing nearly 2,000 pounds into low earth orbit. The rocket is extracted from a transport aircraft using gravity and a small drogue parachute for orientation stabilization. The design of the container holding the rocket allows the use of existing transport aircraft without any modification. Propulsion is LOX and propane using the Vapak concept for tank pressurization. Structures make use of advanced composites.

  18. Geometry Modeling and Adaptive Control of Air-Breathing Hypersonic Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vick, Tyler Joseph

    Air-breathing hypersonic vehicles have the potential to provide global reach and affordable access to space. Recent technological advancements have made scramjet-powered flight achievable, as evidenced by the successes of the X-43A and X-51A flight test programs over the last decade. Air-breathing hypersonic vehicles present unique modeling and control challenges in large part due to the fact that scramjet propulsion systems are highly integrated into the airframe, resulting in strongly coupled and often unstable dynamics. Additionally, the extreme flight conditions and inability to test fully integrated vehicle systems larger than X-51 before flight leads to inherent uncertainty in hypersonic flight. This thesis presents a means to design vehicle geometries, simulate vehicle dynamics, and develop and analyze control systems for hypersonic vehicles. First, a software tool for generating three-dimensional watertight vehicle surface meshes from simple design parameters is developed. These surface meshes are compatible with existing vehicle analysis tools, with which databases of aerodynamic and propulsive forces and moments can be constructed. A six-degree-of-freedom nonlinear dynamics simulation model which incorporates this data is presented. Inner-loop longitudinal and lateral control systems are designed and analyzed utilizing the simulation model. The first is an output feedback proportional-integral linear controller designed using linear quadratic regulator techniques. The second is a model reference adaptive controller (MRAC) which augments this baseline linear controller with an adaptive element. The performance and robustness of each controller are analyzed through simulated time responses to angle-of-attack and bank angle commands, while various uncertainties are introduced. The MRAC architecture enables the controller to adapt in a nonlinear fashion to deviations from the desired response, allowing for improved tracking performance, stability, and

  19. Zinc/air fuel cell for electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Cherepy, N. J.; Krueger, R.; Cooper, J. F.

    1999-01-01

    We are conducting tests of an advanced zinc/air fuel cell design to determine effectiveness in various commercial applications. Our 322-cm2 cell uses gravity-fed zinc pellets as the anode, 12 M KOH electrolyte, and an air cathode catalyzed by a cobalt-porphyrin complex on carbon black. A single 322 cm2 cell runs at a standard operating power of 38 W (1200 W/m2) at 39 A (1245 A/m2) and 0.96 V with a power density of 2400 W/m2 at 0.67 V. With improved current collection hardware, already demonstrated in the laboratory, power generation increases to -3600 W/m2 at 1V. We conducted a 50-hour test in which a cell generated 587 Ah and 569 Wh. The power that may be generated increases by a factor of 2.5 between T = 28 °C and 52 °C. Electrolyte capacity, without stabilization additives, was measured at 147 Ah/L

  20. Air-Powered Projectile Launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, T.; Bjorklund, R. A.; Elliott, D. G.; Jones, L. K.

    1987-01-01

    Air-powered launcher fires plastic projectiles without using explosive propellants. Does not generate high temperatures. Launcher developed for combat training for U.S. Army. With reservoir pressurized, air launcher ready to fire. When pilot valve opened, sleeve (main valve) moves to rear. Projectile rapidly propelled through barrel, pushed by air from reservoir. Potential applications in seismic measurements, avalanche control, and testing impact resistance of windshields on vehicles.

  1. Air-Powered Projectile Launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, T.; Bjorklund, R. A.; Elliott, D. G.; Jones, L. K.

    1987-01-01

    Air-powered launcher fires plastic projectiles without using explosive propellants. Does not generate high temperatures. Launcher developed for combat training for U.S. Army. With reservoir pressurized, air launcher ready to fire. When pilot valve opened, sleeve (main valve) moves to rear. Projectile rapidly propelled through barrel, pushed by air from reservoir. Potential applications in seismic measurements, avalanche control, and testing impact resistance of windshields on vehicles.

  2. Effect of vehicle type on the performance of second generation air bags for child occupants.

    PubMed

    Arbogast, Kristy B; Durbin, Dennis R; Kallan, Michael J; Winston, Flaura K

    2003-01-01

    Passenger air bags experienced considerable design modification in the late 1990s, principally to mitigate risks to child passengers. This study utilized Data from the Partners for Child Passenger Safety study, a large-scale child-focused crash surveillance system, to examine the effect of vehicle type on the differential performance of first and second generation air bags on injuries to restrained children in frontal impact crashes. Our results show that the benefit of second-generation air bags was seen in passenger cars - those children exposed to second-generation air bags were half as likely to sustain a serious injury - and minivans. However, in SUVs the data suggest no reduction in injury risk with the new designs. This field data provides crucial real-world experience to the automotive industry as they work towards the next generation of air bag designs.

  3. Effect of Vehicle type on the Performance of Second Generation Air Bags for Child Occupants

    PubMed Central

    Arbogast, Kristy B.; Durbin, Dennis R.; Kallan, Michael J.; Winston, Flaura K.

    2003-01-01

    Passenger air bags experienced considerable design modification in the late 1990s, principally to mitigate risks to child passengers. This study utilized Data from the Partners for Child Passenger Safety study, a large-scale child-focused crash surveillance system, to examine the effect of vehicle type on the differential performance of first and second generation air bags on injuries to restrained children in frontal impact crashes. Our results show that the benefit of second-generation air bags was seen in passenger cars – those children exposed to second-generation air bags were half as likely to sustain a serious injury – and minivans. However, in SUVs the data suggest no reduction in injury risk with the new designs. This field data provides crucial real-world experience to the automotive industry as they work towards the next generation of air bag designs. PMID:12941218

  4. Performance Validation Approach for the GTX Air-Breathing Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trefny, Charles J.; Roche, Joseph M.

    2002-01-01

    The primary objective of the GTX effort is to determine whether or not air-breathing propulsion can enable a launch vehicle to achieve orbit in a single stage. Structural weight, vehicle aerodynamics, and propulsion performance must be accurately known over the entire flight trajectory in order to make a credible assessment. Structural, aerodynamic, and propulsion parameters are strongly interdependent, which necessitates a system approach to design, evaluation, and optimization of a single-stage-to-orbit concept. The GTX reference vehicle serves this purpose, by allowing design, development, and validation of components and subsystems in a system context. The reference vehicle configuration (including propulsion) was carefully chosen so as to provide high potential for structural and volumetric efficiency, and to allow the high specific impulse of air-breathing propulsion cycles to be exploited. Minor evolution of the configuration has occurred as analytical and experimental results have become available. With this development process comes increasing validation of the weight and performance levels used in system performance determination. This paper presents an overview of the GTX reference vehicle and the approach to its performance validation. Subscale test rigs and numerical studies used to develop and validate component performance levels and unit structural weights are outlined. The sensitivity of the equivalent, effective specific impulse to key propulsion component efficiencies is presented. The role of flight demonstration in development and validation is discussed.

  5. A regional review of air medical transports for fatal motor vehicle crashes.

    PubMed

    Garthe, E A; Mango, N K; Prenney, B

    2000-01-01

    This article presents study results from an assessment of the performance of the air medical (and advanced life support) components of the EMS system in response to fatal motor vehicle crashes. Results are presented for one of Massachusetts' five EMS regions, including the finding that air medical transports are involved in 20% of the fatal crashes for the region and transport 11% of the involved individuals. Although the study focused on air medical utilization, it also identified issues related to the future implementation of motor vehicle automatic crash notification (ACN) and telematics that could relay crash severity data from onboard computers (e.g., event data recorders) to auto manufacturers' help centers or state emergency call centers. This technology will place new demands on state EMS systems. To meet the challenges posed by these technological changes, states will need to assess the type and number of EMS services required to respond to ACN motor vehicle crashes and develop methods to determine what level of service to deploy based on the information relayed from the vehicles. An initial step in this evaluation process is to determine the current use of EMS resources to place planned system changes and demand into context.

  6. Impact of aeroelasticity on propulsion and longitudinal flight dynamics of an air-breathing hypersonic vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raney, David L.; Mcminn, John D.; Pototzky, Anthony S.; Wooley, Christine L.

    1993-01-01

    Many air-breathing hypersonic aerospacecraft design concepts incorporate an elongated fuselage forebody acting as the aerodynamic compression surface for a hypersonic combustion module, or scram jet. This highly integrated design approach creates the potential for an unprecedented form of aero-propulsive-elastic interaction in which deflections of the vehicle fuselage give rise to propulsion transients, producing force and moment variations that may adversely impact the rigid body flight dynamics and/or further excite the fuselage bending modes. To investigate the potential for such interactions, a math model was developed which included the longitudinal flight dynamics, propulsion system, and first seven elastic modes of a hypersonic air-breathing vehicle. Perturbation time histories from a simulation incorporating this math model are presented that quantify the propulsive force and moment variations resulting from aeroelastic vehicle deflections. Root locus plots are presented to illustrate the effect of feeding the propulsive perturbations back into the aeroelastic model. A concluding section summarizes the implications of the observed effects for highly integrated hypersonic air-breathing vehicle concepts.

  7. A fast ascent trajectory optimization method for hypersonic air-breathing vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murillo, Oscar J., Jr.

    The objective of this dissertation is to investigate a fast and reliable method to generate three-dimensional optimal ascent trajectories for hypersonic air-breathing vehicles. The problem is notoriously difficult because of the strong nonlinear coupling amongst aerodynamics, propulsion, vehicle attitude and trajectory state. As such an algorithm matures, the ultimate goal is to realize optimal closed-loop ascent guidance for hypersonic air-breathing vehicles. The problem is formulated as a fuel-optimal control problem. The corresponding necessary conditions are given. It is shown how the original problem of search for the optimal control commands can be reduced to a univariate root-finding problem at each point along the trajectory. A finite difference scheme is used to numerically solve the associated two-point-boundary-value problem. Evaluation of the approach is done through open-loop solutions and closed-loop simulations. The results show promising potential of the proposed approach as a rapid trajectory optimization tool for the class of hypersonic air-breathing vehicles.

  8. Impact of aeroelasticity on propulsion and longitudinal flight dynamics of an air-breathing hypersonic vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raney, David L.; McMinn, John D.; Pototzky, Anthony S.; Wooley, Christine L.

    1993-04-01

    Many air-breathing hypersonic aerospacecraft design concepts incorporate an elongated fuselage forebody acting as the aerodynamic compression surface for a hypersonic combustion module, or scram jet. This highly integrated design approach creates the potential for an unprecedented form of aero-propulsive-elastic interaction in which deflections of the vehicle fuselage give rise to propulsion transients, producing force and moment variations that may adversely impact the rigid body flight dynamics and/or further excite the fuselage bending modes. To investigate the potential for such interactions, a math model was developed which included the longitudinal flight dynamics, propulsion system, and first seven elastic modes of a hypersonic air-breathing vehicle. Perturbation time histories from a simulation incorporating this math model are presented that quantify the propulsive force and moment variations resulting from aeroelastic vehicle deflections. Root locus plots are presented to illustrate the effect of feeding the propulsive perturbations back into the aeroelastic model. A concluding section summarizes the implications of the observed effects for highly integrated hypersonic air-breathing vehicle concepts.

  9. Impact of aeroelasticity on propulsion and longitudinal flight dynamics of an air-breathing hypersonic vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raney, David L.; Mcminn, John D.; Pototzky, Anthony S.; Wooley, Christine L.

    1993-01-01

    Many air-breathing hypersonic aerospacecraft design concepts incorporate an elongated fuselage forebody acting as the aerodynamic compression surface for a hypersonic combustion module, or scram jet. This highly integrated design approach creates the potential for an unprecedented form of aero-propulsive-elastic interaction in which deflections of the vehicle fuselage give rise to propulsion transients, producing force and moment variations that may adversely impact the rigid body flight dynamics and/or further excite the fuselage bending modes. To investigate the potential for such interactions, a math model was developed which included the longitudinal flight dynamics, propulsion system, and first seven elastic modes of a hypersonic air-breathing vehicle. Perturbation time histories from a simulation incorporating this math model are presented that quantify the propulsive force and moment variations resulting from aeroelastic vehicle deflections. Root locus plots are presented to illustrate the effect of feeding the propulsive perturbations back into the aeroelastic model. A concluding section summarizes the implications of the observed effects for highly integrated hypersonic air-breathing vehicle concepts.

  10. Concentrations of air toxics in motor vehicle-dominated environments.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Eric M; Campbell, David E; Zielinska, Barbara; Arnott, William P; Chow, Judith C

    2011-02-01

    We at the Desert Research Institute (DRI*) measured volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including several mobile-source air toxics (MSATs), particulate matter with a mass mean aerodynamic diameter < or = 2.5 pm (PM2.5), black carbon (BC), nitrogen oxides (NOx), particulate matter (PM), and carbon monoxide (CO) on highways in Los Angeles County during summer and fall 2004, to characterize the diurnal and seasonal variations in measured concentrations related to volume and mix of traffic. Concentrations of on-road pollutants were then compared to corresponding measurements at fixed monitoring sites. The on-road concentrations of CO and MSATs were higher in the morning under stable atmospheric conditions and during periods of higher traffic volumes. In contrast, BC concentrations, measured as particulate light absorption, were higher on truck routes during the midday sampling periods despite more unstable atmospheric conditions. Compared to the measurements at the three near-road sites, the 1-hour averages of on-road BC concentrations were as much as an order of magnitude higher. The peak 1-minute average concentrations were two orders of magnitude higher for BC and were between two and six times higher for PM2.5 mass. The on-road concentrations of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) during the summer were 3.5 +/- 0.7 and 1.2 +/- 0.6 times higher during morning and afternoon commuting periods, respectively, compared to annual average 24-hour concentrations measured at air toxic monitoring network sites. These ratios were higher during the fall, with smaller diurnal differences (4.8 +/- 0.7 and 3.9 +/- 0.6 for morning and afternoon commuting periods, respectively). Ratios similar to those for BTEX were obtained for 1,3-butadiene (BD) and styrene. On-road concentrations of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were up to two times higher than at air toxics monitoring sites, with fall ratios slightly higher than summer ratios. Chemical mass balance (CMB) receptor

  11. UGVs in future combat systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fish, Scott

    2004-09-01

    The Army and Office of the Secretary of Defense agreed in May 2003 that the Future Combat Systems (FCS) Program had achieved sufficient maturity to pass what is referred to as "Milestone B." This milestone cleared the way for the Army and DARPA to award Boeing/SAIC FCS Lead System Integrator a 7 year System Design and Development Contract with options leading to production of systems and a Fielded Operational Capability in the year 2012. The breadth of the FCS Program is unique for DoD. It encompasses at least 7 variants of manned ground vehicles, 6 variants of unmanned ground vehicles, 4 unmanned aerial vehicles, unattended sensors, and the critical integration of these assets through a common Command/Control/Communications (C4ISR) backbone and protocol. As such, it has both internal program developments and strong linkages with existing programs in weapons, communications, sensors, command and control, and soldier integrated systems. An important new capability area for FCS is the integrated use of Unmanned Systems (both air and ground). This paper will deal with the LSI efforts associated with the UGV systems and additional detail will be available from the contractor teams working with us on each of these systems in later talks.

  12. Simultaneously reducing CO2 and particulate exposures via fractional recirculation of vehicle cabin air.

    PubMed

    Jung, Heejung S; Grady, Michael L; Victoroff, Tristan; Miller, Arthur L

    2017-07-01

    Prior studies demonstrate that air recirculation can reduce exposure to nanoparticles in vehicle cabins. However when people occupy confined spaces, air recirculation can lead to carbon dioxide (CO2) accumulation which can potentially lead to deleterious effects on cognitive function. This study proposes a fractional air recirculation system for reducing nanoparticle concentration while simultaneously suppressing CO2 levels in the cabin. Several recirculation scenarios were tested using a custom-programmed HVAC (heat, ventilation, air conditioning) unit that varied the recirculation door angle in the test vehicle. Operating the recirculation system with a standard cabin filter reduced particle concentrations to 1000 particles/cm(3), although CO2 levels rose to 3000 ppm. When as little as 25% fresh air was introduced (75% recirculation), CO2 levels dropped to 1000 ppm, while particle concentrations remained below 5000 particles/cm(3). We found that nanoparticles were removed selectively during recirculation and demonstrated the trade-off between cabin CO2 concentration and cabin particle concentration using fractional air recirculation. Data showed significant increases in CO2 levels during 100% recirculation. For various fan speeds, recirculation fractions of 50-75% maintained lower CO2 levels in the cabin, while still reducing particulate levels. We recommend fractional recirculation as a simple method to reduce occupants' exposures to particulate matter and CO2 in vehicles. A design with several fractional recirculation settings could allow air exchange adequate for reducing both particulate and CO2 exposures. Developing this technology could lead to reductions in airborne nanoparticle exposure, while also mitigating safety risks from CO2 accumulation.

  13. Simultaneously reducing CO2 and particulate exposures via fractional recirculation of vehicle cabin air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Heejung S.; Grady, Michael L.; Victoroff, Tristan; Miller, Arthur L.

    2017-07-01

    Prior studies demonstrate that air recirculation can reduce exposure to nanoparticles in vehicle cabins. However when people occupy confined spaces, air recirculation can lead to carbon dioxide (CO2) accumulation which can potentially lead to deleterious effects on cognitive function. This study proposes a fractional air recirculation system for reducing nanoparticle concentration while simultaneously suppressing CO2 levels in the cabin. Several recirculation scenarios were tested using a custom-programmed HVAC (heat, ventilation, air conditioning) unit that varied the recirculation door angle in the test vehicle. Operating the recirculation system with a standard cabin filter reduced particle concentrations to 1000 particles/cm3, although CO2 levels rose to 3000 ppm. When as little as 25% fresh air was introduced (75% recirculation), CO2 levels dropped to 1000 ppm, while particle concentrations remained below 5000 particles/cm3. We found that nanoparticles were removed selectively during recirculation and demonstrated the trade-off between cabin CO2 concentration and cabin particle concentration using fractional air recirculation. Data showed significant increases in CO2 levels during 100% recirculation. For various fan speeds, recirculation fractions of 50-75% maintained lower CO2 levels in the cabin, while still reducing particulate levels. We recommend fractional recirculation as a simple method to reduce occupants' exposures to particulate matter and CO2 in vehicles. A design with several fractional recirculation settings could allow air exchange adequate for reducing both particulate and CO2 exposures. Developing this technology could lead to reductions in airborne nanoparticle exposure, while also mitigating safety risks from CO2 accumulation.

  14. Simultaneously reducing CO2 and particulate exposures via fractional recirculation of vehicle cabin air

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Heejung S.; Grady, Michael L.; Victoroff, Tristan; Miller, Arthur L.

    2017-01-01

    Prior studies demonstrate that air recirculation can reduce exposure to nanoparticles in vehicle cabins. However when people occupy confined spaces, air recirculation can lead to carbon dioxide (CO2) accumulation which can potentially lead to deleterious effects on cognitive function. This study proposes a fractional air recirculation system for reducing nanoparticle concentration while simultaneously suppressing CO2 levels in the cabin. Several recirculation scenarios were tested using a custom-programmed HVAC (heat, ventilation, air conditioning) unit that varied the recirculation door angle in the test vehicle. Operating the recirculation system with a standard cabin filter reduced particle concentrations to 1000 particles/cm3, although CO2 levels rose to 3000 ppm. When as little as 25% fresh air was introduced (75% recirculation), CO2 levels dropped to 1000 ppm, while particle concentrations remained below 5000 particles/cm3. We found that nanoparticles were removed selectively during recirculation and demonstrated the trade-off between cabin CO2 concentration and cabin particle concentration using fractional air recirculation. Data showed significant increases in CO2 levels during 100% recirculation. For various fan speeds, recirculation fractions of 50–75% maintained lower CO2 levels in the cabin, while still reducing particulate levels. We recommend fractional recirculation as a simple method to reduce occupants’ exposures to particulate matter and CO2 in vehicles. A design with several fractional recirculation settings could allow air exchange adequate for reducing both particulate and CO2 exposures. Developing this technology could lead to reductions in airborne nanoparticle exposure, while also mitigating safety risks from CO2 accumulation. PMID:28781568

  15. Assessment of air quality in a commercial cattle transport vehicle in Swedish summer and winter conditions.

    PubMed

    Wikner, I; Gebresenbet, G; Nilsson, C

    2003-03-01

    Transport by road can induce significant stress in cattle. Thermal stress is among the main stress producing factors during transport. The provision of ventilation in livestock transport vehicles is usually through openings along the sides of the vehicle. The incoming air will affect air quality inside by regulating temperature, relative humidity, gas levels and levels of other contaminants. The aim of the present investigation was to map out the air quality in a commercial cattle transport vehicle under various climatic conditions and with varying stocking densities and transport times. Distributions of air temperature, relative humidity and concentrations of ammonia, carbon dioxide, oxygen and methane have been determined during 35 experimental journeys. In average the mean temperature inside the compartment was about 3 degrees C and 6 degrees C higher than outside temperature in summer (+7.8(-)+24.0 degrees C) and winter (-24.3(-)+12.7 degrees C) conditions respectively. The temperature increment inside, as could be expected from theory, increased with reduced ventilation and increased animal density. Many stops to load new animals lowered the temperature increment and relative humidity in winter time. In summer more stops made the compartment temperature and relative humidity increase. The inside temperature distribution was less than about 3 degrees C during both summer and winter season. Average ammonia level varied between 3 and 6 ppm depending on stocking density and number of stops with a maximum value of 18 ppm. No detectable methane levels could be found inside the compartment at any time.

  16. The Effects of Buffeting and other Transonic Phenomena on Maneuvering Combat Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-07-01

    flight Pilot (personnel) Buffeting Control Environment Design Fighter aircraft Human factors engineering I4.UDC 533.652.5:533.6.011.35 IS...principle; indeed, often the test vehicle in question has been the forerunner of an operational type. 1.1 AIR TO AIR COMBAT When the fighter pilot is...situated. To the fighter pilot who knows his aircraft, buffet onset is a valuable source of information in moments of intense activity when he is not

  17. Determining air quality and greenhouse gas impacts of hydrogen infrastructure and fuel cell vehicles.

    PubMed

    Stephens-Romero, Shane; Carreras-Sospedra, Marc; Brouwer, Jacob; Dabdub, Donald; Samuelsen, Scott

    2009-12-01

    Adoption of hydrogen infrastructure and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (HFCVs) to replace gasoline internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles has been proposed as a strategy to reduce criteria pollutant and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the transportation sector and transition to fuel independence. However, it is uncertain (1) to what degree the reduction in criteria pollutants will impact urban air quality, and (2) how the reductions in pollutant emissions and concomitant urban air quality impacts compare to ultralow emission gasoline-powered vehicles projected for a future year (e.g., 2060). To address these questions, the present study introduces a "spatially and temporally resolved energy and environment tool" (STREET) to characterize the pollutant and GHG emissions associated with a comprehensive hydrogen supply infrastructure and HFCVs at a high level of geographic and temporal resolution. To demonstrate the utility of STREET, two spatially and temporally resolved scenarios for hydrogen infrastructure are evaluated in a prototypical urban airshed (the South Coast Air Basin of California) using geographic information systems (GIS) data. The well-to-wheels (WTW) GHG emissions are quantified and the air quality is established using a detailed atmospheric chemistry and transport model followed by a comparison to a future gasoline scenario comprised of advanced ICE vehicles. One hydrogen scenario includes more renewable primary energy sources for hydrogen generation and the other includes more fossil fuel sources. The two scenarios encompass a variety of hydrogen generation, distribution, and fueling strategies. GHG emissions reductions range from 61 to 68% for both hydrogen scenarios in parallel with substantial improvements in urban air quality (e.g., reductions of 10 ppb in peak 8-h-averaged ozone and 6 mug/m(3) in 24-h-averaged particulate matter concentrations, particularly in regions of the airshed where concentrations are highest for the gasoline scenario).

  18. Concentrations of vehicle-related air pollutants in an urban parking garage.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung R; Dominici, Francesca; Buckley, Timothy J

    2007-11-01

    There is growing evidence that traffic-related air pollution poses a public health threat, yet the dynamics of human exposure are not well understood. The urban parking garage is a microenvironment that is of concern but has not been characterized. Using time-resolved measurement methods, we evaluated air toxics levels within an urban parking garage and assessed the influence of vehicle activity and type on their levels. Carbon monoxide (CO) and particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (pPAH) were measured with direct-reading instruments. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured in 30 min intervals using a sorbent tube loaded sequential sampler. Vehicle volume and type were evaluated by video recording. Sampling was conducted from June 24 to July 17, 2002. We observed garage traffic median volumes of 71 counts/h on weekdays and 6 counts/h on weekends. The 12-fold reduction in traffic volume from weekday to weekend corresponded with a decrease in median air pollution that varied from a minimum 2- (CO) to a maximum 7 (pPAH)-fold. The actual 30-min median weekday and weekend values were: CO--2.6/1.2 ppm; pPAH--19/2.6 ng/m(3); 1,3-butadiene-0.5/0.2 microg/m(3), MTBE-7.4/0.4 microg/m(3); and benzene-2.7/0.3 microg/m(3). The influence of traffic was quantified using longitudinal models. The pollutant coefficients provide an indication of the average air pollution vehicle source contribution and ranged from 0.31 (CO) to 1.08 (pPAH) percent increase/vehicle count. For some pollutants, a slightly higher (0.5-0.6%) coefficient was observed for light-trucks relative to cars. This study has public health relevance in providing a unique assessment of air pollution levels and source contribution for the urban parking garage.

  19. Determining If the United States Military is Ready to Eliminate Its Pilots: Use of Combat Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-01

    congress, Air Force Chief of Staff, General Michael E. Ryan , reported, “The Global Hawk program will provide a cost-effective and useful system to the...24General Michael E. Ryan , USAF, “AF Posture Statement 2000;” available from http://www.house.gov/hasc/testimony/106thcongress/00-02-10ryan.htm...March 1999. Available from http://www.defenselink.mil/news/Mar1999/b03241999_bt123- 99.html. Internet. Accessed 14 January 2001. 92 Ryan , Michael E

  20. Combat games

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardema, M. D.; Heymann, M.; Rajan, N.

    1985-01-01

    A mathematical formulation is proposed of a combat game between two opponents with offensive capabilities and offensive objective is proposed. Resolution of the combat involves solving two differential games with state constraints. Depending on the game dynamics and parameters, the combat can terminate in one of four ways: the first player wins; the second player wins; a draw (neither wins); or joint capture. In the first two cases, the optimal strategies of the two players are determined from suitable zero-sum games, whereas in the latter two the relevant games are nonzero-sum. Further, to avoid certain technical difficulties, the concept of a delta-combat game is introduced.

  1. Orbit-on-demand vehicle propelled by air-turborocket/ramjet engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartung, L.; Karkow, J.; Ordway, W.; Pickett, D.; Muras, A.

    1986-06-01

    A preliminary design study has been completed for a fully reusable, single-stage-to-orbit transatmospheric vehicle. The specified mission capability was to lift a 20,000 lb payload to low earth orbit. A ground accelerator-assisted horizontal take-off was chosen to increase operational flexibility. The multi-mode propulsion system included the use of air-turborocket, ramjet, scramjet and rocket engines. Weight and performance estimates were obtained for the vehicle. A computer package was developed to perform aerothermodynamic analyses of the propulsion modes throughout the flight environment from take-off to low earth orbit. Results are presented for a semi-optimized trajectory. The analysis indicates that a vehicle of this type has great potential for providing low cost, flexible access to space.

  2. Cleaning the air and improving health with hydrogen fuel-cell vehicles.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, M Z; Colella, W G; Golden, D M

    2005-06-24

    Converting all U.S. onroad vehicles to hydrogen fuel-cell vehicles (HFCVs) may improve air quality, health, and climate significantly, whether the hydrogen is produced by steam reforming of natural gas, wind electrolysis, or coal gasification. Most benefits would result from eliminating current vehicle exhaust. Wind and natural gas HFCVs offer the greatest potential health benefits and could save 3700 to 6400 U.S. lives annually. Wind HFCVs should benefit climate most. An all-HFCV fleet would hardly affect tropospheric water vapor concentrations. Conversion to coal HFCVs may improve health but would damage climate more than fossil/electric hybrids. The real cost of hydrogen from wind electrolysis may be below that of U.S. gasoline.

  3. The Digital Twin Paradigm for Future NASA and U.S. Air Force Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaessgen, Edward H.; Stargel, D. S.

    2012-01-01

    Future generations of NASA and U.S. Air Force vehicles will require lighter mass while being subjected to higher loads and more extreme service conditions over longer time periods than the present generation. Current approaches for certification, fleet management and sustainment are largely based on statistical distributions of material properties, heuristic design philosophies, physical testing and assumed similitude between testing and operational conditions and will likely be unable to address these extreme requirements. To address the shortcomings of conventional approaches, a fundamental paradigm shift is needed. This paradigm shift, the Digital Twin, integrates ultra-high fidelity simulation with the vehicle s on-board integrated vehicle health management system, maintenance history and all available historical and fleet data to mirror the life of its flying twin and enable unprecedented levels of safety and reliability.

  4. Design and analysis of biomimetic joints for morphing of micro air vehicles.

    PubMed

    Grant, Daniel T; Abdulrahim, Mujahid; Lind, Rick

    2010-12-01

    Flight capability for micro air vehicles is rapidly maturing throughout the aviation community; however, mission capability has not yet matured at the same pace. Maintaining trim during a descent or in the presence of crosswinds remains challenging for fixed-wing aircraft but yet is routinely performed by birds. This paper presents an overview of designs that incorporate morphing to enhance their flight characteristics. In particular, a series of joints and structures is adopted from seagulls to alter either the dihedral or sweep of the wings and thus alter the flight characteristics. The resulting vehicles are able to trim with significantly increased angles of attack and sideslip compared to traditional fixed-wing vehicles.

  5. Orbit-on-demand vehicle propelled by air-turborocket/ramjet engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartung, L.; Karkow, J.; Ordway, W.; Pickett, D.; Muras, A.

    1986-01-01

    A preliminary design study has been completed for a fully reusable, single-stage-to-orbit transatmospheric vehicle. The specified mission capability was to lift a 20,000 lb payload to low earth orbit. A ground accelerator-assisted horizontal take-off was chosen to increase operational flexibility. The multi-mode propulsion system included the use of air-turborocket, ramjet, scramjet and rocket engines. Weight and performance estimates were obtained for the vehicle. A computer package was developed to perform aerothermodynamic analyses of the propulsion modes throughout the flight environment from take-off to low earth orbit. Results are presented for a semi-optimized trajectory. The analysis indicates that a vehicle of this type has great potential for providing low cost, flexible access to space.

  6. Analysis of possible improvement of acceleration of a high-velocity air-breathing flying vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goonko, Yu. P.; Mazhul, I. I.

    2008-09-01

    Results of parametric calculations of the total aeropropulsive characteristics and characteristics of acceleration of a small-scale high-velocity flying vehicle with an air-breathing engine are presented. Integral parameters of acceleration from the flight Mach number M∞ = 4 to M∞ = 7 are determined, namely, the time required fuel stock, and range. A schematic configuration of the vehicle is considered, which allows studying the basic parameters, such as the forebody shape, the angles of surfaces of compression of the stream captured by the inlet, angles of external aerodynamic surfaces of the airframe, relative planform area of the wing panels, and relative area of the nozzle cross section. A comparative estimate of the effect of these parameters shows that it is possible to improve the characteristics of acceleration of vehicles of the type considered.

  7. Flexible Wing Base Micro Aerial Vehicles: Towards Flight Autonomy: Vision-Based Horizon Detection for Micro Air Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nechyba, Michael C.; Ettinger, Scott M.; Ifju, Peter G.; Wazak, Martin

    2002-01-01

    Recently substantial progress has been made towards design building and testifying remotely piloted Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs). This progress in overcoming the aerodynamic obstacles to flight at very small scales has, unfortunately, not been matched by similar progress in autonomous MAV flight. Thus, we propose a robust, vision-based horizon detection algorithm as the first step towards autonomous MAVs. In this paper, we first motivate the use of computer vision for the horizon detection task by examining the flight of birds (biological MAVs) and considering other practical factors. We then describe our vision-based horizon detection algorithm, which has been demonstrated at 30 Hz with over 99.9% correct horizon identification, over terrain that includes roads, buildings large and small, meadows, wooded areas, and a lake. We conclude with some sample horizon detection results and preview a companion paper, where the work discussed here forms the core of a complete autonomous flight stability system.

  8. An Air-Breathing Launch Vehicle Concept for Single-Stage-to-Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trefny, Charles J.

    1999-01-01

    The "Trailblazer" is a 300-lb payload, single-stage-to-orbit launch vehicle concept that uses air-breathing propulsion to reduce the required propellant fraction. The integration of air-breathing propulsion is done considering performance, structural and volumetric efficiency, complexity, and design risk. The resulting configuration is intended to be viable using near-term materials and structures. The aeropropulsion performance goal for the Trailblazer launch vehicle is an equivalent effective specific impulse (I*) of 500 sec. Preliminary analysis shows that this requires flight in the atmosphere to about Mach 10, and that the gross lift-off weight is 130,000 lb. The Trailblazer configuration and proposed propulsion system operating modes are described. Preliminary performance results are presented, and key technical issues are highlighted. An overview of the proposed program plan is given.

  9. Three-dimensional air quality simulation study on low-emission vehicles in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunimi, H.; Ishizawa, S.; Yoshikawa, Y.

    The effect of low-emission vehicles on improving air quality in Southern California was analyzed using a three-dimensional simulation model. Simulations were performed using 1987 emission data and meteorological data released by the California Air Resources Board. Exhaust emission data at TLEV, LEV and ZEV levels were used in the analysis. The results show that a reduction in reactive organic gases (ROG) has a large effect on reducing the ozone concentration. The ozone reduction effects of alternative fuels like methanol or compressed natural gas can also be analyzed at the same stage as exhaust emissions from conventional gasoline vehicles by applying the maximum incremental reactivity index to correct measured ROG data. The ROG/NO x ratio at the time of peak ozone concentration correlates well with the ozone level, suggesting that a reduction in NO x emissions does not always lower the ozone concentration.

  10. The influence of air bags and restraining devices on extremity injuries in motor vehicle collisions.

    PubMed

    McGovern, M K; Murphy, R X; Okunski, W J; Wasser, T E

    2000-05-01

    The influence of air bags and other restraining devices on injury after motor vehicle collisions is not well defined. This study examined the relationship between the use of restraining devices and the incidence of extremity injuries in motor vehicle collisions. A retrospective analysis was performed on motor vehicle collision data submitted to the Pennsylvania Trauma Outcome Study database from 1990 through 1995. Criteria for submission included trauma patients who were admitted to the intensive care unit, who died during hospitalization, who were hospitalized for more than 72 hours, or who were transferred in or out of the receiving hospital. A total of 21,875 patients met these criteria. These patients were analyzed for the presence or absence of upper and lower extremity injuries and were compared based on their use of restraining devices. Restraining devices were categorized into four groups: air bag alone, air bag and seat belt, seat belt or carseat without air bag, and no restraining device. Statistical analysis was performed using the chi-squared test of association. For contingency tables with small expected frequencies, Fisher's exact test was used. Study participants included 11,688 men and 10,185 women with a mean age of 38 +/- 20 years. There were 16,033 drivers and 5,842 passengers. Air bags were deployed in 472 instances. In 297 of these cases, additional restraint was provided with a seat belt. In 6,632 cases, air bags were not deployed; however, patients were restrained with either a seat belt or a carseat. In 14,771 cases, patients were not restrained. When comparing restraining devices as a group vs. no restraint, there was a significant decrease in the incidence of upper (p = 0.018) and lower (p < 0.001) extremity injuries. Air bags, however, were associated with an increased incidence of both upper (p = 0.033) and lower (p = 0.002) extremity injuries when compared with no restraint or when compared among patients who were restrained. As a group

  11. Crash scene photography in motor vehicle crashes without air bag deployment.

    PubMed

    Newgard, Craig D; Martens, Katherine A; Lyons, Evelyn M

    2002-09-01

    To determine whether vehicle characteristics, measured using crash scene photography, are associated with anatomic patterns of injury and severity of injury sustained in motor vehicle crashes (MVCs) without air bag deployment. A prospective observational study was conducted over 22 months, using 12 fire departments serving two hospitals. Two vehicle photographs (exterior and interior) were taken at each MVC. Vehicular variables were assigned by grading the photographs with a standardized scoring system, and outcome information on each patient was collected by chart review. Five hundred fifty-nine patients were entered into the study. Frontal crashes and increasing passenger space intrusion (PSI) were associated with head, facial, and lower-extremity injuries, while rear crashes were associated with spinal injuries. Restraint use had a protective effect in head, facial, and upper and lower extremity injuries, yet was associated with higher odds of spinal injury. Lack of restraint use, increasing PSI, and steering wheel deformity were associated with an increased hospital length of stay and hospital charges, yet only steering wheel deformity was associated with increasing injury severity when adjusting for other crash variables. Out-of-hospital variables, as obtained from crash vehicle photography, are associated with injury site, injury severity, hospital length of stay, and hospital charges in patients involved in MVCs without air bag deployment.

  12. Emissions of halocarbons from mobile vehicle air conditioning system in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Yan, H H; Guo, H; Ou, J M

    2014-08-15

    During the implementation of Montreal Protocol, emission inventories of halocarbons in different sectors at regional scale are fundamental to the formulation of relevant management strategy and inspection of the implementation efficiency. This study investigated the emission profile of halocarbons used in the mobile vehicle air conditioning system, the leading sector of refrigeration industry in terms of the refrigerant bank, market and emission, in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, using a bottom-up approach developed by 2006 IPCC Good Practice Guidance. The results showed that emissions of CFC-12 peaked at 53 tons ODP (Ozone Depletion Potential) in 1992 and then gradually diminished, whereas HFC-134a presented an increasing emission trend since 1990s and the emissions of HFC-134a reached 65,000 tons CO2-equivelant (CO2-eq) by the end of 2011. Uncertainty analysis revealed relatively high levels of uncertainties for special-purpose vehicles and government vehicles. Moreover, greenhouse gas (GHG) abatements under different scenarios indicated that potential emission reduction of HFC-134a ranged from 4.1 to 8.4 × 10(5)tons CO2-eq. The findings in this study advance our knowledge of halocarbon emissions from mobile vehicle air conditioning system in Hong Kong.

  13. A Predictive Model for Vehicle Air Exchange Rates based on a Large, Representative Sample

    PubMed Central

    Fruin, Scott A.; Hudda, Neelakshi; Sioutas, Constantinos; Delfino, Ralph J.

    2014-01-01

    The in-vehicle microenvironment is an important route of exposure to traffic-related pollutants, particularly ultrafine particles. However, significant particle losses can occur under conditions of low air exchange rate (AER) when windows are closed and air is recirculating. AERs are lower for newer vehicles and at lower speeds. Despite the importance of AER in affecting in-vehicle particle exposures, few studies have characterized AER and all have tested only a small number of cars. One reason for this is the difficulty in measuring AER with tracer gases such as SF6 the most common method. We developed a simplified yet accurate method for determining AER using the occupants’ own production of CO2 a convenient compound to measure. By measuring initial CO2 build-up rates and equilibrium values of CO2 at fixed speeds, AER was calculated for 59 vehicles representative of California’s fleet. AER measurements correlated and agreed well with the largest other study conducted (R2=0.83). Multi-variable models captured 70% of the variability in observed AER using only age, mileage, manufacturer and speed. These results will be useful to exposure and epidemiological studies since all model variable values are easily obtainable through questionnaire. PMID:21428392

  14. Predictive model for vehicle air exchange rates based on a large, representative sample.

    PubMed

    Fruin, Scott A; Hudda, Neelakshi; Sioutas, Constantinos; Delfino, Ralph J

    2011-04-15

    The in-vehicle microenvironment is an important route of exposure to traffic-related pollutants, particularly ultrafine particles. However, significant particle losses can occur under conditions of low air exchange rate (AER) when windows are closed and air is recirculating. AERs are lower for newer vehicles and at lower speeds. Despite the importance of AER in affecting in-vehicle particle exposures, few studies have characterized AER and all have tested only a small number of cars. One reason for this is the difficulty in measuring AER with tracer gases such as SF(6), the most common method. We developed a simplified yet accurate method for determining AER using the occupants' own production of CO(2), a convenient compound to measure. By measuring initial CO(2) build-up rates and equilibrium values of CO(2) at fixed speeds, AER was calculated for 59 vehicles representative of California's fleet. AER measurements correlated and agreed well with the largest other study conducted (R(2) = 0.83). Multivariable models captured 70% of the variability in observed AER using only age, mileage, manufacturer, and speed. These results will be useful to exposure and epidemiological studies since all model variable values are easily obtainable through questionnaire.

  15. Hot-Air Jets/Ceramic Heat Exchangers/ Materials for Nose Cones and Reentry Vehicles

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1957-09-07

    L57-5383 Hot-air jets employing ceramic heat exchangers played an important role at Langley in the study of materials for ballistic missile nose cones and re-entry vehicles. Here a model is being tested in one of theses jets at 4000 degrees Fahrenheit in 1957. Photograph published in Engineer in Charge: A History of the Langley Aeronautical Laboratory, 1917-1958 by James R. Hansen. Page 477.

  16. The system integration and verification testing of an orbital maneuvering vehicle for an air bearing floor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, N. L., Jr.; Martin, M. F.; Paulukaitis, K. R.; Haslam, J. W., Jr.; Henderson, D. E.

    1986-01-01

    The teleoperator and Robotics Evaluation Facility (TOREF) is composed of a 4,000 square foot precision air bearing floor, the Teleoperator Motion Base, the Target Motion and Support Simulator, the mock-ups of the Hubble Space Telescope, Multi-mission Modular Spacecraft, and the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV). The TOREF and its general capabilities to support the OMV and other remote system simulations; the facility operating procedures and requirements; and the results of generic OMV investigations are summarized.

  17. 75 FR 6338 - Protection of Stratospheric Ozone: New Substitute in the Motor Vehicle Air Conditioning Sector...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-09

    ...EPA issued a proposed rule in the Federal Register of October 19, 2009, proposing to find HFO-1234yf acceptable, subject to use conditions as a substitute for CFC-12 in motor vehicle air conditioning. The proposed substitute is a non-ozone-depleting substance and consequently does not contribute to stratospheric ozone depletion. In response to requests from several stakeholders and to allow comments on new supporting materials, this action reopens the public comment period through February 24, 2010.

  18. Air Cushion Vehicle Operator Training System (ACVOTS). Simulator Requirements Analysis. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    disadvantaqes associated with a model , however, remain. The laser-based system is currently underaoina extended evaluation in a helicopter simulator designed for... model . The basic system is well established, if rather ineffi- cient in its use of power and inflexible in nature. Some special design of the probe would...N-25-82 -22 . , ~it TRAINING SYSTEMS _ ANALYSIS & DESIGN L L" AIR CUSHION VEHICLE L OPERATOR TRAINING SYSTEM (ACVOTS) SIMULATOR REQUIREMENTS

  19. Wing Force & Moment Characterization of Flapping Wings for Micro Air Vehicle Application

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-21

    Reynolds number. Reynolds num- ber of hummingbird ( Lampornis clemenciae) is 14,300 with a wing length of 85 mm, aspect ratio of 8.2, total stroke amplitude...the capability to hover as witnessed in insects and hummingbirds . These properties make FWMAVs more suitable for micro air vehicle mis- sions such as...reconnaissance and surveillance, specially, in confined areas. The aerodynamics of flapping wings, such as that of insects and hummingbirds , is

  20. Combat cueing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachejian, Kerry C.; Vujcic, Doug

    1998-08-01

    The combat cueing (CBT-Q) research effort will develop and demonstrate a portable tactical information system that will enhance the effectiveness of small unit military operations by providing real-time target cueing information to individual warfighters and teams. CBT-Q consists of a network of portable radio frequency (RF) 'modules' and is controlled by a body-worn 'user station' utilizing a head mounted display . On the battlefield, CBT-Q modules will detect an enemy transmitter and instantly provide the warfighter with an emitter's location. During the 'fog of battle', CBT-Q would tell the warfighter, 'Look here, right now individuals into the RF spectrum, resulting in faster target engagement times, increased survivability, and reduce the potential for fratricide. CBT-Q technology can support both mounted and dismounted tactical forces involved in land, sea and air warfighting operations. The CBT-Q system combines robust geolocation and signal sorting algorithms with hardware and software modularity to offer maximum utility to the warfighter. A single CBT-Q module can provide threat RF detection. Three networked CBT-Q modules can provide emitter positions using a time difference of arrival (TDOA) technique. The TDOA approach relies on timing and positioning data derived from a global positioning systems. The information will be displayed on a variety of displays, including a flat-panel head mounted display. The end results of the program will be the demonstration of the system with US Army Scouts in an operational environment.

  1. Air Quality Impacts of Electrifying Vehicles and Equipment Across the United States.

    PubMed

    Nopmongcol, Uarporn; Grant, John; Knipping, Eladio; Alexander, Mark; Schurhoff, Rob; Young, David; Jung, Jaegun; Shah, Tejas; Yarwood, Greg

    2017-03-07

    U.S.-wide air quality impacts of electrifying vehicles and off-road equipment are estimated for 2030 using 3-D photochemical air quality model and detailed emissions inventories. Electrification reduces tailpipe emissions and emissions from petroleum refining, transport, and storage, but increases electricity demand. The Electrification Case assumes approximately 17% of light duty and 8% of heavy duty vehicle miles traveled and from 17% to 79% of various off-road equipment types considered good candidates for electrification is powered by electricity. The Electrification Case raises electricity demand by 5% over the 2030 Base Case but nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions decrease by 209 thousand tons (3%) overall. Emissions of other criteria pollutants also decrease. Air quality benefits of electrification are modest, mostly less than 1 ppb for ozone and 0.5 μg m(-3) for fine particulate matter (PM2.5), but widespread. The largest reductions for ozone and PM occur in urban areas due to lower mobile source emissions. Electrifying off-road equipment yields more benefits than electrifying on-road vehicles. Reduced crude oil imports and associated marine vessel emissions cause additional benefits in port cities. Changes in other gas and PM emissions, as well as impacts on acid and nutrient deposition, are discussed.

  2. A hybrid approach to modeling and control of vehicle height for electronically controlled air suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaoqiang; Cai, Yingfeng; Wang, Shaohua; Liu, Yanling; Chen, Long

    2016-01-01

    The control problems associated with vehicle height adjustment of electronically controlled air suspension (ECAS) still pose theoretical challenges for researchers, which manifest themselves in the publications on this subject over the last years. This paper deals with modeling and control of a vehicle height adjustment system for ECAS, which is an example of a hybrid dynamical system due to the coexistence and coupling of continuous variables and discrete events. A mixed logical dynamical (MLD) modeling approach is chosen for capturing enough details of the vehicle height adjustment process. The hybrid dynamic model is constructed on the basis of some assumptions and piecewise linear approximation for components nonlinearities. Then, the on-off statuses of solenoid valves and the piecewise approximation process are described by propositional logic, and the hybrid system is transformed into the set of linear mixed-integer equalities and inequalities, denoted as MLD model, automatically by HYSDEL. Using this model, a hybrid model predictive controller (HMPC) is tuned based on online mixed-integer quadratic optimization (MIQP). Two different scenarios are considered in the simulation, whose results verify the height adjustment effectiveness of the proposed approach. Explicit solutions of the controller are computed to control the vehicle height adjustment system in realtime using an offline multi-parametric programming technology (MPT), thus convert the controller into an equivalent explicit piecewise affine form. Finally, bench experiments for vehicle height lifting, holding and lowering procedures are conducted, which demonstrate that the HMPC can adjust the vehicle height by controlling the on-off statuses of solenoid valves directly. This research proposes a new modeling and control method for vehicle height adjustment of ECAS, which leads to a closed-loop system with favorable dynamical properties.

  3. Urban emissions hotspots: Quantifying vehicle congestion and air pollution using mobile phone GPS data.

    PubMed

    Gately, Conor K; Hutyra, Lucy R; Peterson, Scott; Sue Wing, Ian

    2017-10-01

    On-road emissions vary widely on time scales as short as minutes and length scales as short as tens of meters. Detailed data on emissions at these scales are a prerequisite to accurately quantifying ambient pollution concentrations and identifying hotspots of human exposure within urban areas. We construct a highly resolved inventory of hourly fluxes of CO, NO2, NOx, PM2.5 and CO2 from road vehicles on 280,000 road segments in eastern Massachusetts for the year 2012. Our inventory integrates a large database of hourly vehicle speeds derived from mobile phone and vehicle GPS data with multiple regional datasets of vehicle flows, fleet characteristics, and local meteorology. We quantify the 'excess' emissions from traffic congestion, finding modest congestion enhancement (3-6%) at regional scales, but hundreds of local hotspots with highly elevated annual emissions (up to 75% for individual roadways in key corridors). Congestion-driven reductions in vehicle fuel economy necessitated 'excess' consumption of 113 million gallons of motor fuel, worth ∼ $415M, but this accounted for only 3.5% of the total fuel consumed in Massachusetts, as over 80% of vehicle travel occurs in uncongested conditions. Across our study domain, emissions are highly spatially concentrated, with 70% of pollution originating from only 10% of the roads. The 2011 EPA National Emissions Inventory (NEI) understates our aggregate emissions of NOx, PM2.5, and CO2 by 46%, 38%, and 18%, respectively. However, CO emissions agree within 5% for the two inventories, suggesting that the large biases in NOx and PM2.5 emissions arise from differences in estimates of diesel vehicle activity. By providing fine-scale information on local emission hotspots and regional emissions patterns, our inventory framework supports targeted traffic interventions, transparent benchmarking, and improvements in overall urban air quality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Assessing the Future Vehicle Fleet Electrification: The Impacts on Regional and Urban Air Quality.

    PubMed

    Ke, Wenwei; Zhang, Shaojun; Wu, Ye; Zhao, Bin; Wang, Shuxiao; Hao, Jiming

    2017-01-17

    There have been significant advancements in electric vehicles (EVs) in recent years. However, the different changing patterns in emissions at upstream and on-road stages and complex atmospheric chemistry of pollutants lead to uncertainty in the air quality benefits from fleet electrification. This study considers the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) region in China to investigate whether EVs can improve future air quality. The Community Multiscale Air Quality model enhanced by the two-dimensional volatility basis set module is applied to simulate the temporally, spatially, and chemically resolved changes in PM2.5 concentrations and the changes of other pollutants from fleet electrification. A probable scenario (Scenario EV1) with 20% of private light-duty passenger vehicles and 80% of commercial passenger vehicles (e.g., taxis and buses) electrified can reduce average PM2.5 concentrations by 0.4 to 1.1 μg m(-3) during four representative months for all urban areas of YRD in 2030. The seasonal distinctions of the air quality impacts with respect to concentration reductions in key aerosol components are also identified. For example, the PM2.5 reduction in January is mainly attributed to the nitrate reduction, whereas the secondary organic aerosol reduction is another essential contributor in August. EVs can also effectively assist in mitigating NO2 concentrations, which would gain greater reductions for traffic-dense urban areas (e.g., Shanghai). This paper reveals that the fleet electrification in the YRD region could generally play a positive role in improving regional and urban air quality.

  5. Ambient particulate air pollution from vehicles promotes lipid peroxidation and inflammatory responses in rat lung.

    PubMed

    Pereira, C E L; Heck, T G; Saldiva, P H N; Rhoden, C R

    2007-10-01

    Oxidative stress plays a major role in the pathogenesis of particle-dependent lung injury. Ambient particle levels from vehicles have not been previously shown to cause oxidative stress to the lungs. The present study was conducted to a) determine whether short-term exposure to ambient levels of particulate air pollution from vehicles elicits inflammatory responses and lipid peroxidation in rat lungs, and b) determine if intermittent short-term exposures (every 4 days) induce some degree of tolerance. Three-month-old male Wistar rats were exposed to ambient particulate matter (PM) from vehicles (N = 30) for 6 or 20 continuous hours, or for intermittent (5 h) periods during 20 h for 4 consecutive days or to filtered air (PM <10 microm; N = 30). Rats continuously breathing polluted air for 20 h (P-20) showed a significant increase in the total number of leukocytes in bronchoalveolar lavage compared to control (C-20: 2.61 x 105 +/- 0.51;P-20: 5.01 x 105 +/- 0.81; P < 0.05) and in lipid peroxidation ([MDA] nmol/mg protein: C-20: 0.148 +/- 0.01; P-20: 0.226 +/- 0.02; P < 0.05). Shorter exposure (6 h) and intermittent 5-h exposures over a period of 4 days did not cause significant changes in leukocytes. Lipid damage resulting from 20-h exposure to particulate air pollution did not cause a significant increase in lung water content. These data suggest oxidative stress as one of the mechanisms responsible for the acute adverse respiratory effects of particles, and suggest that short-term inhalation of ambient particulate air pollution from street with high automobile traffic represents a biological hazard.

  6. AirCRED : the rationale and structure of a tool for estimating air pollutant reduction credits for alternative fuel vehicles.

    SciTech Connect

    Saricks, C. L.; Energy Systems

    2002-01-01

    Primarily to assist the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities coalitions in estimating the net benefits of reducing air pollutant emissions gained by acquiring original equipment manufacture (OEM) alternativefuel vehicles (AFVs), Argonne National Laboratory has developed a graphical user interface-based benefit calculation model called AirCred. The application of this modeling tool has been extended to the estimation of state implementation plan credits for AFVs that may be claimed in nonattainment and maintenance regions for ozone and carbon monoxide. The tool also has been approved for and applied to the quantification of projected program benefits in applications for grant support to purchase OEM AFVs under the U.S. Department of Transportation's Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Program. First, the model's founding principles and relatively simple mechanics are presented, accompanied by graphic displays of data input screens and comparative results for various vehicular categories. Current and future plans are cited for enhancement of the tool, including its respecification for consistency with MOBILE6 and for air planning in the yet-to-be-designated nonattainment areas for ambient particulate matter of 2.5 {mu}m and smaller. Then some issues and controversies about how and where AirCred should be applied are chronicled. Finally, some example applications are presented to illustrate the residual benefits of AFVs over time relative to their conventionally fueled counterparts of the same (recent) model year. Results indicate that AFVs of certain categories will remain viable and attractive candidates for reducing air emissions in ozone and carbon monoxide air quality control regions well into the future.

  7. Increasing the efficiency of the resonance method for breaking an ice cover with simultaneous movement of two air cushion vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozin, V. M.; Zemlyak, V. L.; Rogozhnikova, E. G.

    2017-03-01

    This paper describes a study on the possibility of increasing the efficiency of the resonance method for breaking an ice cover due to the flexural-gravitational wave interference arising during simultaneous movement of several air cushion vehicles.

  8. Landing Characteristics of a Re-entry Vehicle with Canted Multiple Air Bag Load Alleviation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Investigation of the Landing Characteristics of a Re-entry Vehicle Having a Canted Multiple Air Bag Load Alleviation System. An investigation was made to determine the landing-impact characteristics of a reentry vehicle having a multiple-air-bag load-alleviation system. A 1/16-scale dynamic model having four canted air bags was tested at flight-path angles of 90 degrees (vertical), 45 degrees, and 27 degrees for a parachute or paraglider vertical letdown velocity of 30 feet per second (full scale). Landings were made on concrete at attitudes ranging from -l5 degrees to 20 degrees. The friction coefficient between the model heat shield and the concrete was approximately 0.4. An aluminum diaphragm, designed to rupture at 10.8 pounds per square inch gage, was used to maintain initial pressure in the air bags for a short time period. [Entire movie available on DVD from CASI as Doc ID 20070030986. Contact help@sti.nasa.gov

  9. Air quality and climate impacts due to CNG conversion of motor vehicles in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Wadud, Zia; Khan, Tanzila

    2013-12-17

    Dhaka had recently experienced rapid conversion of its motor vehicle fleet to run on compressed natural gas (CNG). This paper quantifies ex-post the air quality and climate benefits of the CNG conversion policy, including monetary valuations, through an impact pathway approach. Around 2045 (1665) avoided premature deaths in greater Dhaka (City Corporation) can be attributed to air quality improvements from the CNG conversion policy in 2010, resulting in a saving of around USD 400 million. Majority of these health benefits resulted from the conversion of high-emitting diesel vehicles. CNG conversion was clearly detrimental from climate change perspective using the changes in CO2 and CH4 only (CH4 emissions increased); however, after considering other global pollutants (especially black carbon), the climate impact was ambiguous. Uncertainty assessment using input distributions and Monte Carlo simulation along with a sensitivity analysis show that large uncertainties remain for climate impacts. For our most likely estimate, there were some climate costs, valued at USD 17.7 million, which is an order of magnitude smaller than the air quality benefits. This indicates that such policies can and should be undertaken on the grounds of improving local air pollution alone and that precautions should be taken to reduce the potentially unintended increases in GHG emissions or other unintended effects.

  10. Improving the accuracy of vehicle emissions profiles for urban transportation greenhouse gas and air pollution inventories.

    PubMed

    Reyna, Janet L; Chester, Mikhail V; Ahn, Soyoung; Fraser, Andrew M

    2015-01-06

    Metropolitan greenhouse gas and air emissions inventories can better account for the variability in vehicle movement, fleet composition, and infrastructure that exists within and between regions, to develop more accurate information for environmental goals. With emerging access to high quality data, new methods are needed for informing transportation emissions assessment practitioners of the relevant vehicle and infrastructure characteristics that should be prioritized in modeling to improve the accuracy of inventories. The sensitivity of light and heavy-duty vehicle greenhouse gas (GHG) and conventional air pollutant (CAP) emissions to speed, weight, age, and roadway gradient are examined with second-by-second velocity profiles on freeway and arterial roads under free-flow and congestion scenarios. By creating upper and lower bounds for each factor, the potential variability which could exist in transportation emissions assessments is estimated. When comparing the effects of changes in these characteristics across U.S. cities against average characteristics of the U.S. fleet and infrastructure, significant variability in emissions is found to exist. GHGs from light-duty vehicles could vary by -2%-11% and CAP by -47%-228% when compared to the baseline. For heavy-duty vehicles, the variability is -21%-55% and -32%-174%, respectively. The results show that cities should more aggressively pursue the integration of emerging big data into regional transportation emissions modeling, and the integration of these data is likely to impact GHG and CAP inventories and how aggressively policies should be implemented to meet reductions. A web-tool is developed to aide cities in improving emissions uncertainty.

  11. High Altitude Long Endurance Air Vehicle Analysis of Alternatives and Technology Requirements Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickol, Craig L.; Guynn, Mark D.; Kohout, Lisa L.; Ozoroski, Thomas A.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a variety of High Altitude Long Endurance (HALE) Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) conceptual designs for two operationally useful missions (hurricane science and communications relay) and compare their performance and cost characteristics. Sixteen potential HALE UAV configurations were initially developed, including heavier-than-air (HTA) and lighter-than-air (LTA) concepts with both consumable fuel and solar regenerative (SR) propulsion systems. Through an Analysis of Alternatives (AoA) down select process, the two leading consumable fuel configurations (one each from the HTA and LTA alternatives) and an HTA SR configuration were selected for further analysis. Cost effectiveness analysis of the consumable fuel configurations revealed that simply maximizing vehicle endurance can lead to a sub-optimum system solution. An LTA concept with a hybrid propulsion system (solar arrays and a hydrogen-air proton exchange membrane fuel cell) was found to have the best mission performance; however, an HTA diesel-fueled wing-body-tail configuration emerged as the preferred consumable fuel concept because of the large size and technical risk of the LTA concept. The baseline missions could not be performed by even the best HTA SR concept. Mission and SR technology trade studies were conducted to enhance understanding of the potential capabilities of such a vehicle. With near-term technology SR-powered HTA vehicles are limited to operation in favorable solar conditions, such as the long days and short nights of summer at higher latitudes. Energy storage system specific energy and solar cell efficiency were found to be the key technology areas for enhancing HTA SR performance.

  12. An Archaeological Curation-Needs Assessment for Fort Irwin, Naval Air Station, North Island, Edwards Air Force Base, Marine Corps Air-Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-01-01

    Management of Archaeological Collections (MCX-CMAC), located at the St. Louis District, conducted an investigation of all archaeological materials and...evidence documenting widespread deterioration and neglect of many of the Air Force, Army, and Navy archaeological collections. None of the 18...repositories are in full compliance with 36 CFR Part 79 (Curation of Federally-Owned and Administered Archaeological Collections) and one-half were not designed for, or adapted to, the requirements of a modem curation center.

  13. Analysis of a combat problem - The turret game

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardema, M.; Heymann, M.; Rajan, N.

    1987-01-01

    The turret game is defined and solved to illustrate the nature of games of combat. This game represents a highly simplified version of air combat, yet it is sufficiently complex so as to exhibit a rich variety of combat phenomena. A review of the formulation of delta-combat games is included.

  14. Sabers, Lances, B-17s and F-105s: An Essay on the Human Element, Napoleonic Warfare, and Air Combat.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-01

    Defense Technical Information Center. Request must include the author’s name and complete title of the study. This document may be reproduced for use in...situations during early 19th-century ground warfare and modern aerial combat. Using Clausewitz as a basis, it demonstrates enough comparisons to validate this...value of military history. That military history in one form or another is important has long been known. Debates about the proper way to study and use

  15. Interfacing the Defense Standard Ammunition Computer System and the Air Force Combat Ammunition System: A Search for an Alternate Method.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    for controlling , financing, planning , programming, and budgeting of items in 114 %..-.o .. .. . .......... o •........................... the...S. Barnes, for all the guidance received throughout this effort, and to my reader, Capt Rich Mabe , for his suggestions which helped me organize the...questions about the Combat Ammunition System and the World Wide Military Command and Control System. Finally, I would like to thank the members of my

  16. A Comparison of the US Air Force Fitness Test and Sister Services’ Combat-Oriented Fitness Tests

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    chest down. 6) While the examiner holds the subject’s knees straight, the subject stands erect, barefooted , and with feet together, and then bends over...predictability of the Combat Composite proxy, although diminishing returns limits the feasibility of going beyond the two (1/2-mile run and 30-lb. lifts...done.” It created an advantage for those going at the end of each testing group. Secondly, this event required subjective scoring. The

  17. An Overview of Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles for Air Quality Measurements: Present Applications and Future Prospectives

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Tommaso Francesco; Gonzalez, Felipe; Miljievic, Branka; Ristovski, Zoran D.; Morawska, Lidia

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of air quality has been traditionally conducted by ground based monitoring, and more recently by manned aircrafts and satellites. However, performing fast, comprehensive data collection near pollution sources is not always feasible due to the complexity of sites, moving sources or physical barriers. Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) equipped with different sensors have been introduced for in-situ air quality monitoring, as they can offer new approaches and research opportunities in air pollution and emission monitoring, as well as for studying atmospheric trends, such as climate change, while ensuring urban and industrial air safety. The aims of this review were to: (1) compile information on the use of UAVs for air quality studies; and (2) assess their benefits and range of applications. An extensive literature review was conducted using three bibliographic databases (Scopus, Web of Knowledge, Google Scholar) and a total of 60 papers was found. This relatively small number of papers implies that the field is still in its early stages of development. We concluded that, while the potential of UAVs for air quality research has been established, several challenges still need to be addressed, including: the flight endurance, payload capacity, sensor dimensions/accuracy, and sensitivity. However, the challenges are not simply technological, in fact, policy and regulations, which differ between countries, represent the greatest challenge to facilitating the wider use of UAVs in atmospheric research. PMID:27420065

  18. An Overview of Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles for Air Quality Measurements: Present Applications and Future Prospectives.

    PubMed

    Villa, Tommaso Francesco; Gonzalez, Felipe; Miljievic, Branka; Ristovski, Zoran D; Morawska, Lidia

    2016-07-12

    Assessment of air quality has been traditionally conducted by ground based monitoring, and more recently by manned aircrafts and satellites. However, performing fast, comprehensive data collection near pollution sources is not always feasible due to the complexity of sites, moving sources or physical barriers. Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) equipped with different sensors have been introduced for in-situ air quality monitoring, as they can offer new approaches and research opportunities in air pollution and emission monitoring, as well as for studying atmospheric trends, such as climate change, while ensuring urban and industrial air safety. The aims of this review were to: (1) compile information on the use of UAVs for air quality studies; and (2) assess their benefits and range of applications. An extensive literature review was conducted using three bibliographic databases (Scopus, Web of Knowledge, Google Scholar) and a total of 60 papers was found. This relatively small number of papers implies that the field is still in its early stages of development. We concluded that, while the potential of UAVs for air quality research has been established, several challenges still need to be addressed, including: the flight endurance, payload capacity, sensor dimensions/accuracy, and sensitivity. However, the challenges are not simply technological, in fact, policy and regulations, which differ between countries, represent the greatest challenge to facilitating the wider use of UAVs in atmospheric research.

  19. Indoor air as a vehicle for human pathogens: Introduction, objectives, and expectation of outcome.

    PubMed

    Sattar, Syed A

    2016-09-02

    Airborne spread of pathogens can be rapid, widespread, and difficult to prevent. In this international workshop, a panel of 6 experts will expound on the following: (1) the potential for indoor air to spread a wide range of human pathogens, plus engineering controls to reduce the risk for exposure to airborne infectious agents; (2) the behavior of aerosolized infectious agents indoors and the use of emerging air decontamination technologies; (3) a survey of quantitative methods to recover infectious agents and their surrogates from indoor air with regard to survival and inactivation of airborne pathogens; (4) mathematical models to predict the movement of pathogens indoors and the use of such information to optimize the benefits of air decontamination technologies; and (5) synergy between different infectious agents, such as legionellae and fungi, in the built environment predisposing to possible transmission-related health impacts of aerosolized biofilm-based opportunistic pathogens. After the presentations, the panel will address a set of preformulated questions on selection criteria for surrogate microbes to study the survival and inactivation of airborne human pathogens, desirable features of technologies for microbial decontamination of indoor air, knowledge gaps, and research needs. It is anticipated that the deliberations of the workshop will provide the attendees with an update on the significance of indoor air as a vehicle for transmitting human pathogens with a brief on what is currently being done to mitigate the risks from airborne infectious agents.

  20. Health effects associated with passenger vehicles: monetary values of air pollution.

    PubMed

    Marzouk, Mohamed; Madany, Magdy

    2012-01-01

    Air pollution is regarded as one of the highest priorities in environmental protection in both developed and developing countries. High levels of air pollution have adverse effects on human health that might cause premature death. This study presents the monetary value estimates for the adverse human health effects resulted from ambient air pollution. It aids decision makers to set priorities in the public health relevance of pollution abatement. The main driver of policymaker is the need to reduce the avoidable cardiopulmonary morbidity and mortality from pollutant exposures. The monetary valuation involves 2 steps: (i) relate levels of pollutants to mortality and morbidity (concentration-response relationships) and (ii) apply unit economic values. Cost of air pollution associated with passenger vehicles running over a major traffic bridge (6th of October Elevated Highway) is presented as a case study to demonstrate the use of monetary value of air pollution. The study proves that the cost of air pollution is extremely high and should not be overlooked.

  1. OCTAVE: a bioinspired visuo-motor control system for the guidance of micro-air-vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffier, Franck; Franceschini, Nicolas

    2003-04-01

    We have developed a visually based autopilot for Micro Air Vehicles (MAV), which we have called OCTAVE (Optical altitude Control sysTem for Autonomous VEhicles). First we built a miniature MAV and an indoor test-bed. The mini-helicopter is tethered to a whirling arm and rotates around a central pole equipped with ground-truth positioning sensors for experimental evaluation. The 100-gram rotorcraft lifts itself by means of a single rotor that can also be tilted forward (pitch) to give the craft a horizontal thrust component (propulsive force). The helicopter"s eye is automatically oriented downwards over an environment composed of contrasting features randomly arranged on the floor. Here we show the feasibility of a ground avoiding system based on a low complexity opto-electronic system. The latter relies on an Elementary Motion Detector (EMD) that estimates the optic flow in the downward direction. The EMD functional structure is directly inspired by that of the fly"s EMDs, the functional scheme of which has been elucidated at our Laboratory by performing electrophysiological recordings while applying optical microstimuli to the retina. The OCTAVE autopilot makes the aircraft capable of effective terrain following at various speeds: the MAV performs reproducible manoeuvers such as smooth cruise flight over a planar ground and hill climbing. The overall processing electronics is very light-weight, which makes it highly suitable for mounting on-board micro air vehicles with an avionic payload in the order of only a few grams.

  2. Wind and water tunnel testing of a morphing aquatic micro air vehicle.

    PubMed

    Siddall, Robert; Ortega Ancel, Alejandro; Kovač, Mirko

    2017-02-06

    Aerial robots capable of locomotion in both air and water would enable novel mission profiles in complex environments, such as water sampling after floods or underwater structural inspections. The design of such a vehicle is challenging because it implies significant propulsive and structural design trade-offs for operation in both fluids. In this paper, we present a unique Aquatic Micro Air Vehicle (AquaMAV), which uses a reconfigurable wing to dive into the water from flight, inspired by the plunge diving strategy of water diving birds in the family Sulidae. The vehicle's performance is investigated in wind and water tunnel experiments, from which we develop a planar trajectory model. This model is used to predict the dive behaviour of the AquaMAV, and investigate the efficacy of passive dives initiated by wing folding as a means of water entry. The paper also includes first field tests of the AquaMAV prototype where the folding wings are used to initiate a plunge dive.

  3. Prospects for utilization of air liquefaction and enrichment system (ALES) propulsion in fully reusable launch vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, W. H.; Yi, A. C.

    1993-01-01

    A concept is shown for a fully reusable, earth to orbit launch vehicle with horizontal takeoff and landing, employing an air-turborocket for low speed and a rocket for high speed acceleration, both using LH2 fuel. The turborocket employs a modified liquid air cycle to supply the oxidizer. The rocket uses 90 percent pure LOX that is collected from the atmosphere, separated, and stored during operation of the turborocket from about Mach 2 to Mach 5 or 6. The takeoff weight and the thrust required at takeoff are markedly reduced by collecting the rocket oxidizer in-flight. The paper shows an approach and the corresponding technology needs for using ALES propulsion in a SSTO vehicle. Reducing the trajectory altitude at the end of collection reduces the wing area and increases payload. The use of state-of-the-art materials, such as graphite polyimide, is critical to meet the structure weight objective for SSTO. Configurations that utilize 'waverider' aerodynamics show great promise to reduce the vehicle weight.

  4. Design of a Flush Airdata System (FADS) for the Hypersonic Air Launched Option (HALO) Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.; Moes, Timothy R.; Deets, Dwain A. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a design study for a pressure based Flush airdata system (FADS) on the Hypersonic Air Launched Option (HALO) Vehicle. The analysis will demonstrate the feasibility of using a pressure based airdata system for the HALO and provide measurement uncertainty estimates along a candidate trajectory. The HALO is a conceived as a man-rated vehicle to be air launched from an SR-71 platform and is proposed as a testbed for an airbreathing hydrogen scramjet. A feasibility study has been performed and indicates that the proposed trajectory is possible with minimal modifications to the existing SR71 vehicle. The mission consists of launching the HALO off the top of an SR-71 at Mach 3 and 80,000 ft. A rocket motor is then used to accelerate the vehicle to the test condition. After the scramjet test is completed the vehicle will glide to a lakebed runway landing. This option provides reusability of the vehicle and scramjet engine. The HALO design will also allow for various scramjet engine and flowpath designs to be flight tested. For the HALO flights, measurements of freestream airdata are considered to be a mission critical to perform gain scheduling and trajectory optimization. One approach taken to obtaining airdata involves measurement of certain parameters such as external atmospheric winds, temperature, etc to estimate the airdata quantities. This study takes an alternate approach. Here the feasibility of obtaining airdata using a pressure-based flush airdata system (FADS) methods is assessed. The analysis, although it is performed using the HALO configuration and trajectory, is generally applicable to other hypersonic vehicles. The method to be presented offers the distinct advantage of inferring total pressure, Mach number, and flow incidence angles, without stagnating the freestream flow. This approach allows for airdata measurements to be made using blunt surfaces and significantly diminishes the heating load at the sensor. In the FADS concept a

  5. Concepts of Combat Modelling for Long-Range Air Armament Planning and Their Implementation in the ’Tactical Air War Analysis Game’.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    transparency. The author’s ex- periences in this thesis effort support the importance of this demand. Szymczak [Ref. 19: p. 72] has proposed that three...19. Szymczak , R. W., Transferability of Combat Models, Limitations Imposed by Documentation Pr-actFices, Thesis, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey

  6. Optimization of a Localized Air Conditioning System Using Thermoelectric Coolers for Commercial Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Qiushi; Deng, Yadong; Su, Chuqi; Wang, Yiping

    2016-11-01

    To improve the thermal comfort and energy saving of commercial vehicles, an auxiliary air conditioning (AC) system has been constructed. Several distributed components using thermoelectric coolers were applied in a localized AC system to adjust the microclimate around the driver only. A computational fluid dynamics model of a commercial vehicle cabin with a driver was built, the temperature field of the cabin investigated, and the thermal comfort analyzed. Based on the results of the simulations, the temperature around the cold side of the thermoelectric coolers is discussed and optimized by means of the response surface methodology and a multiobjective genetic algorithm. To validate the simulation and optimization results, a bench test was carried out; the results obtained from the simulation showed good agreement with the experimental results.

  7. Air-Breathing Hypersonic Vehicle Tracking Control Based on Adaptive Dynamic Programming.

    PubMed

    Mu, Chaoxu; Ni, Zhen; Sun, Changyin; He, Haibo

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a data-driven supplementary control approach with adaptive learning capability for air-breathing hypersonic vehicle tracking control based on action-dependent heuristic dynamic programming (ADHDP). The control action is generated by the combination of sliding mode control (SMC) and the ADHDP controller to track the desired velocity and the desired altitude. In particular, the ADHDP controller observes the differences between the actual velocity/altitude and the desired velocity/altitude, and then provides a supplementary control action accordingly. The ADHDP controller does not rely on the accurate mathematical model function and is data driven. Meanwhile, it is capable to adjust its parameters online over time under various working conditions, which is very suitable for hypersonic vehicle system with parameter uncertainties and disturbances. We verify the adaptive supplementary control approach versus the traditional SMC in the cruising flight, and provide three simulation studies to illustrate the improved performance with the proposed approach.

  8. In-vehicle exposures to particulate air pollution in Canadian metropolitan areas: the urban transportation exposure study.

    PubMed

    Weichenthal, Scott; Van Ryswyk, Keith; Kulka, Ryan; Sun, Liu; Wallace, Lance; Joseph, Lawrence

    2015-01-06

    Commuters may be exposed to increased levels of traffic-related air pollution owing to close proximity to traffic-emissions. We collected in-vehicle and roof-top air pollution measurements over 238 commutes in Montreal, Toronto, and Vancouver, Canada between 2010 and 2013. Voice recordings were used to collect real-time information on traffic density and the presence of diesel vehicles and multivariable linear regression models were used to estimate the impact of these factors on in-vehicle pollutant concentrations (and indoor/outdoor ratios) along with parameters for road type, land use, and meteorology. In-vehicle PM2.5 and NO2 concentrations consistently exceeded regional outdoor levels and each unit increase in the rate of encountering diesel vehicles (count/min) was associated with substantial increases (>100%) in in-vehicle concentrations of ultrafine particles (UFPs), black carbon, and PM2.5 as well as strong increases (>15%) in indoor/outdoor ratios. A model based on meteorology and the length of highway roads within a 500 m buffer explained 53% of the variation in in-vehicle UFPs; however, models for PM2.5 (R(2) = 0.24) and black carbon (R(2) = 0.30) did not perform as well. Our findings suggest that vehicle commuters experience increased exposure to air pollutants and that traffic characteristics, land use, road types, and meteorology are important determinants of these exposures.

  9. Flexible Wing Base Micro Aerial Vehicles: Vision-Guided Flight Stability and Autonomy for Micro Air Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ettinger, Scott M.; Nechyba, Michael C.; Ifju, Peter G.; Wazak, Martin

    2002-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made recently towards design building and test-flying remotely piloted Micro Air Vehicle's (MAVs). We seek to complement this progress in overcoming the aerodynamic obstacles to.flight at very small scales with a vision stability and autonomy system. The developed system based on a robust horizon detection algorithm which we discuss in greater detail in a companion paper. In this paper, we first motivate the use of computer vision for MAV autonomy arguing that given current sensor technology, vision may he the only practical approach to the problem. We then briefly review our statistical vision-based horizon detection algorithm, which has been demonstrated at 30Hz with over 99.9% correct horizon identification. Next we develop robust schemes for the detection of extreme MAV attitudes, where no horizon is visible, and for the detection of horizon estimation errors, due to external factors such as video transmission noise. Finally, we discuss our feed-back controller for self-stabilized flight, and report results on vision autonomous flights of duration exceeding ten minutes.

  10. Spatially- and Temporally-Resolved Measurements of Roadway Air Pollution Using a Zero-Emission Electric Vehicle

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vehicle-related air pollution has an intrinsically dynamic nature. Recent field measurements and modeling work have demonstrated that near-road topography may modify levels of air pollutants reaching populations residing and working in close proximity to roadways. However, the ma...

  11. 77 FR 16988 - Protection of Stratospheric Ozone: Amendment to HFO-1234yf SNAP Rule for Motor Vehicle Air...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-23

    ... procedure, Air pollution control, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements, Stratospheric ozone layer. Dated... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 82 RIN 2060-AR20 Protection of Stratospheric Ozone: Amendment to HFO-1234yf SNAP Rule... substitute for ozone- depleting substances (ODSs) in the motor vehicle air conditioning end- use within...

  12. Spatially- and Temporally-Resolved Measurements of Roadway Air Pollution Using a Zero-Emission Electric Vehicle

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vehicle-related air pollution has an intrinsically dynamic nature. Recent field measurements and modeling work have demonstrated that near-road topography may modify levels of air pollutants reaching populations residing and working in close proximity to roadways. However, the ma...

  13. Comprehensive modeling and control of flexible flapping wing micro air vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogar, Stephen Michael

    Flapping wing micro air vehicles hold significant promise due to the potential for improved aerodynamic efficiency, enhanced maneuverability and hover capability compared to fixed and rotary configurations. However, significant technical challenges exist to due the lightweight, highly integrated nature of the vehicle and coupling between the actuators, flexible wings and control system. Experimental and high fidelity analysis has demonstrated that aeroelastic effects can change the effective kinematics of the wing, reducing vehicle stability. However, many control studies for flapping wing vehicles do not consider these effects, and instead validate the control strategy with simple assumptions, including rigid wings, quasi-steady aerodynamics and no consideration of actuator dynamics. A control evaluation model that includes aeroelastic effects and actuator dynamics is developed. The structural model accounts for geometrically nonlinear behavior using an implicit condensation technique and the aerodynamic loads are found using a time accurate approach that includes quasi-steady, rotational, added mass and unsteady effects. Empirically based parameters in the model are fit using data obtained from a higher fidelity solver. The aeroelastic model and its ingredients are compared to experiments and computations using models of higher fidelity, and indicate reasonable agreement. The developed control evaluation model is implemented in a previously published, baseline controller that maintains stability using an asymmetric wingbeat, known as split-cycle, along with changing the flapping frequency and wing bias. The model-based controller determines the control inputs using a cycle-averaged, linear control design model, which assumes a rigid wing and no actuator dynamics. The introduction of unaccounted for dynamics significantly degrades the ability of the controller to track a reference trajectory, and in some cases destabilizes the vehicle. This demonstrates the

  14. Survey of Aerothermodynamics Facilities Useful for the Design of Hypersonic Vehicles Using Air-Breathing Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, James O.; Deiwert, George S.

    1997-01-01

    This paper surveys the use of aerothermodynamic facilities which have been useful in the study of external flows and propulsion aspects of hypersonic, air-breathing vehicles. While the paper is not a survey of all facilities, it covers the utility of shock tunnels and conventional hypersonic blow-down facilities which have been used for hypersonic air-breather studies. The problems confronting researchers in the field of aerothermodynamics are outlined. Results from the T5 GALCIT tunnel for the shock-on lip problem are outlined. Experiments on combustors and short expansion nozzles using the semi-free jet method have been conducted in large shock tunnels. An example which employed the NASA Ames 16-Inch shock tunnel is outlined, and the philosophy of the test technique is described. Conventional blow-down hypersonic wind tunnels are quite useful in hypersonic air-breathing studies. Results from an expansion ramp experiment, simulating the nozzle on a hypersonic air-breather from the NASA Ames 3.5 Foot Hypersonic wind tunnel are summarized. Similar work on expansion nozzles conducted in the NASA Langley hypersonic wind tunnel complex is cited. Free-jet air-frame propulsion integration and configuration stability experiments conducted at Langley in the hypersonic wind tunnel complex on a small generic model are also summarized.

  15. Structural Sizing of a 25,000-lb Payload, Air-Breathing Launch Vehicle For Single-Stage-To-Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roche, Joseph M.; Kosareo, Daniel N.; Palac, Don (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    In support of NASA's Air-Breathing Launch Vehicle (ABLV) study, a 25,000-lb payload version of the GTX (formerly Trailblazer) reference vehicle concept was developed. The GTX is a vertical lift-off, reusable, single-stage-to-orbit launch vehicle concept that uses hypersonic air-breathing propulsion in a rocket-based combined-cycle (RBCC) propulsion system to reduce the required propellant fraction. To achieve this goal the vehicle and propulsion system must be well integrated both aerodynamically and structurally to reduce weight. This study demonstrates the volumetric and structural efficiency of a vertical takeoff, horizontal landing, hypersonic vehicle with a circular cross section. A departure from the lifting body concepts, this design philosophy is even extended to the engines, which have semicircular nacelles symmetrically mounted on the vehicle. Material candidates with a potential for lightweight and simplicity have been selected from a set of near term technologies (5 to 10 years). To achieve the mission trajectory, preliminary weight estimates show the vehicle's gross lift-off weight is 1.26 x 10(exp 6) lb. The structural configuration of the GTX vehicle and its propulsion system are described. The vehicle design benefits are presented, and key technical issues are highlighted.

  16. Structural Sizing of a 25,000-lb Payload, Air-breathing Launch Vehicle for Single-stage-to-orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roche, Joseph M.; Kosareo, Daniel N.

    2001-01-01

    In support of NASA's Air-Breathing Launch Vehicle (ABLV) study, a 25,000-lb payload version of the GTX (formerly Trailblazer) reference vehicle concept was developed. The GTX is a vertical lift-off, reusable, single-stage-to-orbit launch vehicle concept that uses hypersonic air-breathing propulsion in a rocket-based combined-cycle (RBCC) propulsion system to reduce the required propellant fraction. To achieve this goal the vehicle and propulsion system must be well integrated both aerodynamically and structurally to reduce weight. This study demonstrates the volumetric and structural efficiency of a vertical takeoff, horizontal landing, hypersonic vehicle with a circular cross section. A departure from the lifting body concepts, this design philosophy is even extended to the engines, which have semicircular nacelles symmetrically mounted on the vehicle. Material candidates with a potential for lightweight and simplicity have been selected from a set of near term technologies (five to ten years). To achieve the mission trajectory, preliminary weight estimates show the vehicle's gross lift-off weight is 1.26 x 10(exp 6) lb. The structural configuration of the GTX vehicle and its propulsion system are described. The vehicle design benefits are presented, and key technical issues are highlighted.

  17. Design of an airborne launch vehicle for an air launched space booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Chin; Choi, Rich; Cohen, Scott; Dumont, Brian; Gibin, Mauricius; Jorden, Rob; Poth, Stefan

    1993-01-01

    A conceptual design is presented for a carrier vehicle for an air launched space booster. This airplane is capable of carrying a 500,000 pound satellite launch system to an altitude over 40,000 feet for launch. The airplane features a twin fuselage configuration for improved payload and landing gear integration, a high aspect ratio wing for maneuverability at altitude, and is powered by six General Electric GE-90 engines. The analysis methods used and the systems employed in the airplane are discussed. Launch costs are expected to be competitive with existing launch systems.

  18. Model Update of a Micro Air Vehicle (MAV) Flexible Wing Frame with Uncertainty Quantification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reaves, Mercedes C.; Horta, Lucas G.; Waszak, Martin R.; Morgan, Benjamin G.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a procedure to update parameters in the finite element model of a Micro Air Vehicle (MAV) to improve displacement predictions under aerodynamics loads. Because of fabrication, materials, and geometric uncertainties, a statistical approach combined with Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (MDO) is used to modify key model parameters. Static test data collected using photogrammetry are used to correlate with model predictions. Results show significant improvements in model predictions after parameters are updated; however, computed probabilities values indicate low confidence in updated values and/or model structure errors. Lessons learned in the areas of wing design, test procedures, modeling approaches with geometric nonlinearities, and uncertainties quantification are all documented.

  19. Multi-Reflex Propulsion Systems for Space and Air Vehicles and Energy Transfer for Long Distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolonkin, A.

    The purpose of this article is to call attention to the revolutionary idea of light multi-reflection. This idea allows the design of new engines, space and air propulsion systems, storage (of a beam and solar energy), transmitters of energy (to millions of kilometers), creation of new weapons, etc. This method and the main innovations were offered by the author in 1983 in the former USSR. Now the author shows in a series of articles the immense possibilities of this idea in many fields of engineering - astronautics, aviation, energy, optics, direct converter of light (laser beam) energy to mechanical energy (light engine), to name a few. This article considers the multi-reflex propulsion systems for space and air vehicles and energy transmitter for long distances in space.

  20. Progress report on Bertelsen research and development of an air cushion crawler all-terrain vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertelsen, W. R.

    1987-06-01

    The ACV is an exceptional amphibian but it is not, nor is any other existing craft, an all-terrain vehicle (ATV). Using the best elements of the ACV in an air-cushion crawler tractor, a true ATV can be attained. A conventional crawler drive train will propel two tracks as pressurized, propulsive pontoons. The key to a successful ATV is in perfecting efficient, durable, sliding seals to allow the belt to move in its orbit around the track unit and maintain its internal pressure. After deriving the adequate seal, a 12 inch wide x 86 inch long endless rubber belt was fitted bilateral seals and slide plates with internal guide wheels fore and aft with a 21 inch wheel base. From this approximately one-quarter scale model, full-scale air track crawlers, true ATVs, of any size and capacity can be produced.

  1. Urban ozone air quality impact of emissions from vehicles using reformulated gasolines and M85

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chock, D. P.; Winkler, S. L.; Chang, T. Y.; Rudy, S. J.; Shen, Z. K.

    The urban ozone air quality impact of exhaust emissions from vehicles using reformulated gasolines and flexible/variable-fuel vehicles using M85 has been studied using emissions data from the Auto/Oil Air Quality Improvement Research Program and a single-cell trajectory air quality model with two different chemical mechanisms (the updated version of Carbon-Bond-IV (CB4) and the LCC mechanism). Peak ozone concentrations are predicted for each fuel for all combinations of the following ambient conditions: low and high atmospheric dilution or mixing height, four NMOG/NO x ratios, two each of the initial NMOG concentration, the vehicular contribution to the ambient air, and the NMOG composition of the initial ambient mixture. The ozone impact of a fuel dependent strongly on the atmospheric dilution and NMOG/NO x ratio of an area. The differences in ozone impact among fuels are limited under the condition of high atmospheric dilution and a high NMOG/NO x ratio. The ozone-forming potentials (OFPs) for the exhaust emissions based on the maximum incremental reactivities (MIRs) for various fuels are generally well correlated with model-calculated peak ozone levels at a low NMOG/NO x ratio. These OFPs can serve to separate out fuels with rather different reactivities, but not fuels with comparable reactivities. Model-calculated ozone levels for various fuels based on CB4 and LCC mechanisms are relatively well correlated at low NMOG/NO x ratios, but much less so at higher ratios. Fuels with a high aromatic content, including high-toluene fuels, tend to be ranked more favorably by CB4 than by LCC. On the other hand, M85 is ranked more favorably by LCC than by CB4. Fuels with a low 90% boiling point and a low content of aromatics and olefins are generally less reactive. M85 would be an attractive fuel if the formaldehyde emissions could be curtailed significantly.

  2. Multi-sensor fusion techniques for state estimation of micro air vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donavanik, Daniel; Hardt-Stremayr, Alexander; Gremillion, Gregory; Weiss, Stephan; Nothwang, William

    2016-05-01

    Aggressive flight of micro air vehicles (MAVs) in unstructured, GPS-denied environments poses unique challenges for estimation of vehicle pose and velocity due to the noise, delay, and drift in individual sensor measurements. Maneuvering flight at speeds in excess of 5 m/s poses additional challenges even for active range sensors; in the case of LIDAR, an assembled scan of the vehicles environment will in most cases be obsolete by the time it is processed. Multi-sensor fusion techniques which combine inertial measurements with passive vision techniques and/or LIDAR have achieved breakthroughs in the ability to maintain accurate state estimates without the use of external positioning sensors. In this paper, we survey algorithmic approaches to exploiting sensors with a wide range of nonlinear dynamics using filter and bundle-adjustment based approaches for state estimation and optimal control. From this foundation, we propose a biologically-inspired framework for incorporating the human operator in the loop as a privileged sensor in a combined human/autonomy paradigm.

  3. Internal air flow analysis of a bladeless micro aerial vehicle hemisphere body using computational fluid dynamic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, M. N. K.; Zuradzman, M. Razlan; Hazry, D.; Khairunizam, Wan; Shahriman, A. B.; Yaacob, S.; Ahmed, S. Faiz; Hussain, Abadalsalam T.

    2014-12-01

    This paper explain the analysis of internal air flow velocity of a bladeless vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) Micro Aerial Vehicle (MAV) hemisphere body. In mechanical design, before produce a prototype model, several analyses should be done to ensure the product's effectiveness and efficiency. There are two types of analysis method can be done in mechanical design; mathematical modeling and computational fluid dynamic. In this analysis, I used computational fluid dynamic (CFD) by using SolidWorks Flow Simulation software. The idea came through to overcome the problem of ordinary quadrotor UAV which has larger size due to using four rotors and the propellers are exposed to environment. The bladeless MAV body is designed to protect all electronic parts, which means it can be used in rainy condition. It also has been made to increase the thrust produced by the ducted propeller compare to exposed propeller. From the analysis result, the air flow velocity at the ducted area increased to twice the inlet air. This means that the duct contribute to the increasing of air velocity.

  4. Internal air flow analysis of a bladeless micro aerial vehicle hemisphere body using computational fluid dynamic

    SciTech Connect

    Othman, M. N. K. E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Zuradzman, M. Razlan E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Hazry, D. E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Khairunizam, Wan E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Shahriman, A. B. E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Yaacob, S. E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Ahmed, S. Faiz E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; and others

    2014-12-04

    This paper explain the analysis of internal air flow velocity of a bladeless vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) Micro Aerial Vehicle (MAV) hemisphere body. In mechanical design, before produce a prototype model, several analyses should be done to ensure the product's effectiveness and efficiency. There are two types of analysis method can be done in mechanical design; mathematical modeling and computational fluid dynamic. In this analysis, I used computational fluid dynamic (CFD) by using SolidWorks Flow Simulation software. The idea came through to overcome the problem of ordinary quadrotor UAV which has larger size due to using four rotors and the propellers are exposed to environment. The bladeless MAV body is designed to protect all electronic parts, which means it can be used in rainy condition. It also has been made to increase the thrust produced by the ducted propeller compare to exposed propeller. From the analysis result, the air flow velocity at the ducted area increased to twice the inlet air. This means that the duct contribute to the increasing of air velocity.

  5. Survey of Aerothermodynamics Facilities Useful for the Design of Hypersonic Vehicles Using Air-Breathing Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, James O.; Deiwert, G. S.

    1997-01-01

    The dream of producing an air-breathing, hydrogen fueled, hypervelocity aircraft has been before the aerospace community for decades. However, such a craft has not yet been realized, even in an experimental form. Despite the simplicity and beauty of the concept, many formidable problems must be overcome to make this dream a reality. This paper summarizes the aero/aerothermodynamic issues that must be addressed to make the dream a reality and discusses how aerothermodynamics facilities and their modem companion, real-gas computational fluid dynamics (CFD), can help solve the problems blocking the way to realizing the dream. The approach of the paper is first to outline the concept of an air-breathing hypersonic vehicle and then discuss the nose-to-tail aerothermodynamics issues and special aerodynamic problems that arise with such a craft. Then the utility of aerothermodynamic facilities and companion CFD analysis is illustrated by reviewing results from recent United States publications wherein these problems have been addressed. Papers selected for the discussion have k e n chosen such that the review will serve to survey important U.S. aero/aerothermodynamic real gas and conventional wind tunnel facilities that are useful in the study of hypersonic, hydrogen propelled hypervelocity vehicles.

  6. Air quality impacts of climate mitigation: UK policy and passenger vehicle choice.

    PubMed

    Mazzi, Eric A; Dowlatabadi, Hadi

    2007-01-15

    In 2001-2002 the UK began taxing vehicles according to CO2 emission rates. Since then, there has been a significant increase in consumer choice of small cars and diesel engines. We estimate CO2 reductions and air quality impacts resulting from UK consumers switching from petrol to diesel cars from 2001 to 2020. Annual reductions of 0.4 megatons (Mt) of CO2 and 1 million barrels of oil are estimated from switching to diesels. However, diesels emit higher levels of particulate matter estimated to result in 90 deaths annually (range 20-300). We estimate 570, 460, and 0 additional deaths per Mt of CO2 abated, for Euro III, Euro IV, and post-Euro IV emission class vehicles, respectively. CO2 policies are suspected to have contributed substantially to diesel growth, but the magnitude of impact has yet to be quantified rigorously. To the extent that CO2 policies contribute to diesel growth, coordinating CO2 controls with tightening of emission standards would save lives. This research shows that climate policy, while reducing fuel use and CO2, does not always ensure ancillary health benefits. Lessons from the UK can help inform policies designed elsewhere which strive to balance near-term ambient air quality and health with long-term climate mitigation.

  7. Impact of multisource VOC emission on in-vehicle air quality: test chamber simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodzik, K.; Faber, J.; Goƚda-Kopek, A.; Łomankiewicz, D.

    2016-09-01

    Air quality inside vehicle may be strongly influenced by the presence of volatile organic compounds (VOC). The sources of these compounds may be different. In case of new vehicles VOC mainly originate from off-gassing of interior materials, while in used cars exterior pollution, like exhaust gases, starts to dominate. The aim of this work was to check the influence of multiple VOC sources on concentration of volatile organic compounds emitted from car interior parts. For this purpose material emission tests were performed in 1 m3 emission testing chamber (WKE 1000, Weiss, Germany) at 65 °C, 5% RH and with air exchange. Three different car parts were studied: sun visor, headlining, and handbrake lever cover. It was stated that volatile organic compounds concentration inside test chamber during the test performed with three different parts inside was significantly lower than those being result of addition of the results obtained for parts tested separately. Presented results indicate interactions between different materials and their emissions as well as prove that some of materials acts like sorbents.

  8. Linear Heave Dynamics of an Air-Cushion Vehicle Bag-and-Finger Skirt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Joon; Sullivan, Phillip A.

    Results from a linear analysis of the heave dynamics of an air-cushion vehicle equipped with a bag-and-finger skirt are described. A two-dimensional section of the cushion is subject to pure heave or long-wave surface motion inputs. The skirt mass is lumped in the fingers, with the bag being modelled as a combination of massless inelastic membranes and links. The airflows from bag to cushion and from cushion to atmosphere are assumed quasisteady, and the bag and cushion volumes are modelled as lumped pneumatic capacitances. For a configuration representative of a 37t vehicle, frequency response characteristics show the effect of skirt geometry and mass changes, and cushion capacitance. The results suggest that changes in skirt geometry cannot be used to radically modify an undesirable heave response, but reducing the skirt mass may be effective. The air compressibility also affects heave response at high frequencies, with the effect becoming more prominent at the low cushion-flow rates now used in practice.

  9. Combat Search and Rescue Air Force Doctrine Document 2-1.6 Compliments Joint Pub 3-50.2, 3-50.21, 3-50.3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    History). 1980. Veda Incorporated, Combat Search and Rescue Report to the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the Executive Agent for Combat Search and Rescue...Combat Search and Rescue Requirements and Capabilities Study. ( Veda Incor- porated, Washington D.C.). 1997. 30 Veith, George J., Code Name

  10. Neighborhood-scale air quality impacts of emissions from motor vehicles and aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Wonsik; Hu, Shishan; He, Meilu; Kozawa, Kathleen; Mara, Steve; Winer, Arthur M.; Paulson, Suzanne E.

    2013-12-01

    A mobile monitoring platform (MMP) was used to measure real-time air pollutant concentrations in different built environments of Boyle Heights (BH, a lower-income community enclosed by several freeways); Downtown Los Angeles (DTLA, adjacent to BH with taller buildings and surrounded by several freeways); and West Los Angeles (WLA, an affluent community traversed by two freeways) in summer afternoons of 2008 and 2011 (only for WLA). Significant inter-community and less significant but observable intra-community differences in traffic-related pollutant concentrations were observed both in the residential neighborhoods studied and on their arterial roadways between BH, DTLA, and WLA, particularly for ultrafine particles (UFP). HEV, defined as vehicles creating plumes with concentrations more than three standard deviations from the adjusted local baseline, were encountered during 6-13% of sampling time, during which they accounted for 17-55% of total UFP concentrations both on arterial roadways and in residential neighborhoods. If instead a single threshold value is used to define HEVs in all areas, HEV's were calculated to make larger contributions to UFP concentrations in BH than other communities by factors of 2-10 or more. Santa Monica Airport located in WLA appears to be a significant source for elevated UFP concentrations in nearby residential neighborhoods 80-400 m downwind. In the WLA area, we also showed, on a neighborhood scale, striking and immediate reductions in particulate pollution (˜70% reductions in both UFP and, somewhat surprisingly, PM2.5), corresponding to dramatic decreases in traffic densities during an I-405 closure event (“Carmageddon”) compared to non-closure Saturday levels. Although pollution reduction due to decreased traffic is not unexpected, this dramatic improvement in particulate pollution provides clear evidence air quality can be improved through strategies such as heavy-duty-diesel vehicle retrofits, earlier retirement of HEV

  11. Anything But: Joint Air-Ground Training at the U.S. Army Ground Combat Training Centers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-03

    Carl A. Spaatz, the Commander of Northwest African Air Forces, and British Air Marshall Sir Arthur Coningham, the Commander of Allied Tactical Air...The first characteristic is where the Army focuses its efforts. The teachings of Prussian military theorist Carl von Clausewitz dominate... Carl von. On War, edited by Michael Howard and Peter Paret, translated by Michael Howard and Peter Paret (New York: Everyman’s Library, 1993), 268

  12. DETAIL OF DOORWAY INTO COMBAT INTELLIGENCE ROOM. view TO WEST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF DOORWAY INTO COMBAT INTELLIGENCE ROOM. view TO WEST. - Plattsburgh Air Force Base, Target Intelligence Training Building-Combat Center, Off Connecticut Road, east of Idaho Avenue, Plattsburgh, Clinton County, NY

  13. Theoretical investigation of heave dynamics of an air cushion vehicle bag and finger skirt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Joon

    This thesis describes a theoretical investigation of the nonlinear and linear heave dynamics of an air cushion vehicle (ACV) equipped with a bag and finger skirt system with the purpose of understanding the skirt's effect on the vehicle heave dynamics. Throughout the course of this work, the pure heave motion of a two dimensional section of the skirt is investigated using several mathematical models. Both the nonlinear and linearized analyses include a detailed model of the skirt geometry, which is modelled as a combination of inelastic membranes and links. Air flow processes from the bag to the cushion and from the cushion to the atmosphere are assumed to be quasisteady, and the bag and cushion volumes are modelled as lumped pneumatic capacitances. The modulation of the escaping cushion air by skirt-ground contact is also included. The nonlinear simulations reveal that characteristically nonlinear dynamical phenomena such as period doubling and chaos can be expected to occur during the normal operation of ACVs. Furthermore, a configuration representative of a 37 tonne vehicle shows a resonance at frequencies in the range for which humans are most sensitive. Although these results thus show that some aspects of the bag and finger skirt heave dynamics can be highly nonlinear, they indicate that under certain circumstances, standard linear techniques can yield useful insights. Results from the linear analysis suggest that changes in skirt geometry cannot be used to radically modify the undesirable heave response of the bag and finger skirt, but reducing the skirt mass is quite effective. The pneumatic capacitance of the bag and cushion volume proves to be an important factor in the heave response. In particular, it contributes to heave instability. The air compressibility also affects heave response at high frequencies, with the effect becoming more prominent as the flow rate is reduced. The importance of unsteady fan effects on ACV dynamics is investigated by the

  14. Computations of a Maneuvering Unmanned Combat Air Vehicle Using a High-Order Overset-Grid Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    to types of maneuvering, unmanned aircraft may involve turbulent flow, and nonlinear vortex dynamics. In the massive separation whose simulation places...a Traditional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes canonical low sweep delta wing and a generic, tailless , (RANS) approaches are inadequate to capture...configuration. This UCAV For a =60, Figure 13a, this low pressure region emerges configuration is a tailless delta-wing configuration with a downstream of the

  15. Vehicle cabin cooling system for capturing and exhausting heated boundary layer air from inner surfaces of solar heated windows

    DOEpatents

    Farrington, Robert B.; Anderson, Ren

    2001-01-01

    The cabin cooling system includes a cooling duct positioned proximate and above upper edges of one or more windows of a vehicle to exhaust hot air as the air is heated by inner surfaces of the windows and forms thin boundary layers of heated air adjacent the heated windows. The cabin cooling system includes at least one fan to draw the hot air into the cooling duct at a flow rate that captures the hot air in the boundary layer without capturing a significant portion of the cooler cabin interior air and to discharge the hot air at a point outside the vehicle cabin, such as the vehicle trunk. In a preferred embodiment, the cooling duct has a cross-sectional area that gradually increases from a distal point to a proximal point to the fan inlet to develop a substantially uniform pressure drop along the length of the cooling duct. Correspondingly, this cross-sectional configuration develops a uniform suction pressure and uniform flow rate at the upper edge of the window to capture the hot air in the boundary layer adjacent each window.

  16. Joint Test Project Report of Combat Air Support Target Acquisition Program. SEEKVAL. Project IA2. Direct Visual Imagery Experiments.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-01-01

    V **5 %a Ih,,.ltted % Z % * Li \\ -Trr fl. T.W .4..’% MISSION" 4, TAGET " .4" ,\\ . ,s . ".. p ... ..... % ’ ,,0. Target 4-2 is a vehicle park located...dk ,: .: ,-, ,. ,... . ,,,,VI 4P......,.. ... . , .. *...-.. -.. l *4. W: ’: i 1 *: ,, .,. .:-. -% - C" ." __I 41 -5, TAGET ’I e. . Target

  17. The potential impacts of electric vehicles on air quality in the urban areas of Barcelona and Madrid (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soret, A.; Guevara, M.; Baldasano, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    This work analyses the potential air quality improvements resulting from three fleet electrification scenarios (∼13, 26 and 40%) by replacing conventional vehicles with Electric Battery Vehicles (EBVs), Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEVs) and Hybrid Electric Vehicles (HEVs). This study has been performed for the cities of Barcelona and Madrid (Spain), where road transport is the primary emission source. In these urban areas, several air quality problems are present, mainly related to NO2 and particulate matter. The WRF-ARW/HERMESv2/CMAQ model system has been applied at high spatial (1 × 1 km2) and temporal (1 h) resolution. The results show that fleet electrification offers a potential for emission abatement, especially related to NOx and CO. Regarding the more ambitious scenario (∼40% fleet electrification), reductions of 11% and 17% of the total NOx emissions are observed in Barcelona and Madrid respectively. These emissions reductions involve air quality improvements in NO2 maximum hourly values up to 16%: reductions up to 30 and 35 μg m-3 in Barcelona and Madrid, respectively. Furthermore, an additional scenario has been defined considering electric generation emissions associated with EBVs and PHEVs charging from a combined-cycle power plant. These charging emissions would produce slight NO2 increases in the downwind areas of <3 μg m-3. Thus, fleet electrification would improve urban air quality even when considering emissions associated with charging electric vehicles. However, two further points should be considered. First, fleet electrification cannot be considered a unique solution, and other management strategies may be defined. This is especially important with respect to particulate matter emissions, which are not significantly reduced by fleet electrification (<5%) due to the high weight of non-exhaust emissions. Second, a significant introduction of electric vehicles (26-40%) involving all vehicle categories is required to improve urban

  18. Mach 6.5 air induction system design for the Beta 2 two-stage-to-orbit booster vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Midea, Anthony C.

    1991-01-01

    A preliminary, two-dimensional, mixed compression air induction system is designed for the Beta II Two Stage to Orbit booster vehicle to minimize installation losses and efficiently deliver the required airflow. Design concepts, such as an external isentropic compression ramp and a bypass system were developed and evaluated for performance benefits. The design was optimized by maximizing installed propulsion/vehicle system performance. The resulting system design operating characteristics and performance are presented. The air induction system design has significantly lower transonic drag than similar designs and only requires about 1/3 of the bleed extraction. In addition, the design efficiently provides the integrated system required airflow, while maintaining adequate levels of total pressure recovery. The excellent performance of this highly integrated air induction system is essential for the successful completion of the Beta II booster vehicle mission.

  19. Impact of emerging technologies on future combat aircraft agility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Luat T.; Gilert, William P.

    1990-01-01

    The foreseeable character of future within-visual-range air combat entails a degree of agility which calls for the integration of high-alpha aerodynamics, thrust vectoring, intimate pilot/vehicle interfaces, and advanced weapons/avionics suites, in prospective configurations. The primary technology-development programs currently contributing to these goals are presently discussed; they encompass the F-15 Short Takeoff and Landing/Maneuver Technology Demonstrator Program, the Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability Program, the High Angle-of-Attack Technology Program, and the X-29 Technology Demonstrator Program.

  20. Impact of emerging technologies on future combat aircraft agility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Luat T.; Gilert, William P.

    1990-01-01

    The foreseeable character of future within-visual-range air combat entails a degree of agility which calls for the integration of high-alpha aerodynamics, thrust vectoring, intimate pilot/vehicle interfaces, and advanced weapons/avionics suites, in prospective configurations. The primary technology-development programs currently contributing to these goals are presently discussed; they encompass the F-15 Short Takeoff and Landing/Maneuver Technology Demonstrator Program, the Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability Program, the High Angle-of-Attack Technology Program, and the X-29 Technology Demonstrator Program.