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Sample records for combination gene therapy

  1. Synergistic nanomedicine by combined gene and photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinhwan; Kim, Jihoon; Jeong, Cherlhyun; Kim, Won Jong

    2016-03-01

    To date, various nanomaterials with the ability for gene delivery or photothermal effect have been developed in the field of biomedicine. The therapeutic potential of these nanomaterials has raised considerable interests in their use in potential next-generation strategies for effective anticancer therapy. In particular, the advancement of novel nanomedicines utilizing both therapeutic strategies of gene delivery and photothermal effect has generated much optimism regarding the imminent development of effective and successful cancer treatments. In this review, we discuss current research progress with regard to combined gene and photothermal therapy. This review focuses on synergistic therapeutic systems combining gene regulation and photothermal ablation as well as logically designed nano-carriers aimed at enhancing the delivery efficiency of therapeutic genes using the photothermal effect. The examples detailed in this review provide insight to further our understanding of combinatorial gene and photothermal therapy, thus paving the way for the design of promising nanomedicines.

  2. Opportunities and challenges in combination gene cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Nastiuk, Kent L; Krolewski, John J

    2016-03-01

    Treatment for solid tumor malignancies, which constitute the majority of human cancers, is still dominated by surgery and radiotherapies. This is especially true for many localized solid tumors, which are often curable with these treatments. However, metastatic cancers are beyond the reach of these therapies, and many localized cancers that are initially treated with surgery and radiation will recur and metastasize. Thus, for over 60years there has been a concerted effort to develop effective drug treatments for metastatic cancers. Combination therapies are an increasingly important part of the anti-cancer drug armamentarium. In the case of cytotoxic chemotherapy, multi-drug regimens rapidly became the norm, as the earliest single agents were relatively ineffective. In contrast to chemotherapy, where combination therapies were required in order to achieve treatment efficacy, for both hormonal and targeted therapies the impetus to move toward the use of combination therapies is to prevent or reverse the development of treatment resistance. In addition, emerging evidence suggests that combination therapy may also improve cancer treatment by neutralizing an emerging treatment side effect termed therapy-induced metastasis, which accompanies some effective single agent therapies. Finally, although gene therapy is still far from use in the clinic, we propose that combination therapies may enhance its effectiveness.

  3. HIV-1 CCR5 gene therapy will fail unless it is combined with a suicide gene.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Aridaman; de Boer, Rob J

    2015-12-17

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (ART) has successfully turned Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) from a deadly pathogen into a manageable chronic infection. ART is a lifelong therapy which is both expensive and toxic, and HIV can become resistant to it. An alternative to lifelong ART is gene therapy that targets the CCR5 co-receptor and creates a population of genetically modified host cells that are less susceptible to viral infection. With generic mathematical models we show that gene therapy that only targets the CCR5 co-receptor fails to suppress HIV-1 (which is in agreement with current data). We predict that the same gene therapy can be markedly improved if it is combined with a suicide gene that is only expressed upon HIV-1 infection.

  4. HIV-1 CCR5 gene therapy will fail unless it is combined with a suicide gene

    PubMed Central

    Pandit, Aridaman; de Boer, Rob J.

    2015-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (ART) has successfully turned Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) from a deadly pathogen into a manageable chronic infection. ART is a lifelong therapy which is both expensive and toxic, and HIV can become resistant to it. An alternative to lifelong ART is gene therapy that targets the CCR5 co-receptor and creates a population of genetically modified host cells that are less susceptible to viral infection. With generic mathematical models we show that gene therapy that only targets the CCR5 co-receptor fails to suppress HIV-1 (which is in agreement with current data). We predict that the same gene therapy can be markedly improved if it is combined with a suicide gene that is only expressed upon HIV-1 infection. PMID:26674113

  5. Gene therapy for brain cancer: combination therapies provide enhanced efficacy and safety.

    PubMed

    Candolfi, Marianela; Kroeger, Kurt M; Muhammad, A K M G; Yagiz, Kader; Farrokhi, Catherine; Pechnick, Robert N; Lowenstein, Pedro R; Castro, Maria G

    2009-10-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary brain cancer in adults. Despite significant advances in treatment and intensive research, the prognosis for patients with GBM remains poor. Therapeutic challenges for GBM include its invasive nature, the proximity of the tumor to vital brain structures often preventing total resection, and the resistance of recurrent GBM to conventional radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Gene therapy has been proposed as a useful adjuvant for GBM, to be used in conjunction with current treatment. Work from our laboratory has shown that combination of conditional cytotoxic with immunotherapeutic approaches for the treatment of GBM elicits regression of large intracranial tumor masses and anti-tumor immunological memory in syngeneic rodent models of GBM. In this review we examined the currently available animal models for GBM, including rodent transplantable models, endogenous rodent tumor models and spontaneous GBM in dogs. We discuss non-invasive surrogate end points to assess tumor progression and therapeutic efficacy, such as behavioral tests and circulating biomarkers. Growing preclinical and clinical data contradict the old dogma that cytotoxic anti-cancer therapy would lead to an immune-suppression that would impair the ability of the immune system to mount an anti-tumor response. The implications of the findings reviewed indicate that combination of cytotoxic therapy with immunotherapy will lead to synergistic antitumor efficacy with reduced neurotoxicity and supports the clinical implementation of combined cytotoxic-immunotherapeutic strategies for the treatment of patients with GBM.

  6. Photothermal combined gene therapy achieved by polyethyleneimine-grafted oxidized mesoporous carbon nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Meng, Ying; Wang, Shanshan; Li, Chengyi; Qian, Min; Yan, Xueying; Yao, Shuangchao; Peng, Xiyue; Wang, Yi; Huang, Rongqin

    2016-09-01

    Combining controllable photothermal therapy and efficacious gene therapy in a single platform holds great promise in cancer therapy due to the enhanced combined therapeutic effects. Herein, polyethyleneimine-grafted oxidized mesoporous carbon nanospheres (OP) were developed for combined photothermal combined gene therapy in vitro and in vivo. The synthesized OP was characterized to have three dimensional spherical structure with uniformed diameter, ordered mesopores with graphitic domains, high water dispersion with zeta potential of +22 mV, and good biocompatibility. Consequently, OP was exploited as the photothermal convertor with strong NIR absorption and the gene vector via electrostatic interaction, which therefore cannot only deliver the therapeutic gene (pING4) to tumors for gene therapy, but also can eliminate the tumors by photothermal ablation. Moreover, the improved gene therapy accompanied by the NIR photothermally enhanced gene release was also well achieved based on OP. The excellent combined therapeutic effects demonstrated in vitro and in vivo suggested the OP's potential for cancer therapy.

  7. Correction of ADA-SCID by stem cell gene therapy combined with nonmyeloablative conditioning.

    PubMed

    Aiuti, Alessandro; Slavin, Shimon; Aker, Memet; Ficara, Francesca; Deola, Sara; Mortellaro, Alessandra; Morecki, Shoshana; Andolfi, Grazia; Tabucchi, Antonella; Carlucci, Filippo; Marinello, Enrico; Cattaneo, Federica; Vai, Sergio; Servida, Paolo; Miniero, Roberto; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Bordignon, Claudio

    2002-06-28

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy for adenosine deaminase (ADA)-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) has shown limited clinical efficacy because of the small proportion of engrafted genetically corrected HSCs. We describe an improved protocol for gene transfer into HSCs associated with nonmyeloablative conditioning. This protocol was used in two patients for whom enzyme replacement therapy was not available, which allowed the effect of gene therapy alone to be evaluated. Sustained engraftment of engineered HSCs with differentiation into multiple lineages resulted in increased lymphocyte counts, improved immune functions (including antigen-specific responses), and lower toxic metabolites. Both patients are currently at home and clinically well, with normal growth and development. These results indicate the safety and efficacy of HSC gene therapy combined with nonmyeloablative conditioning for the treatment of SCID.

  8. Gene therapy for severe combined immunodeficiency due to adenosine deaminase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Montiel-Equihua, Claudia A; Thrasher, Adrian J; Gaspar, H Bobby

    2012-02-01

    The severe combined immunodeficiency caused by the absence of adenosine deaminase (SCID-ADA) was the first monogenic disorder for which gene therapy was developed. Over 30 patients have been treated worldwide using the current protocols, and most of them have experienced clinical benefit; importantly, in the absence of any vector-related complications. In this document, we review the progress made so far in the development and establishment of gene therapy as an alternative form of treatment for ADA-SCID patients.

  9. Genes and Gene Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... correctly, a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... or prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  10. Development of gene therapy: potential in severe combined immunodeficiency due to adenosine deaminase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Montiel-Equihua, Claudia A; Thrasher, Adrian J; Gaspar, H Bobby

    2010-01-01

    The history of stem cell gene therapy is strongly linked to the development of gene therapy for severe combined immunodeficiencies (SCID) and especially adenosine deaminase (ADA)-deficient SCID. Here we discuss the developments achieved in over two decades of clinical and laboratory research that led to the establishment of a protocol for the autologous transplant of retroviral vector-mediated gene-modified hematopoietic stem cells, which has proved to be both successful and, to date, safe. Patients in trials in three different countries have shown long-term immunological and metabolic correction. Nevertheless, improvements to the safety profile of viral vectors are underway and will undoubtedly reinforce the position of stem cell gene therapy as a treatment option for ADA-SCID. PMID:24198507

  11. Development of gene therapy: potential in severe combined immunodeficiency due to adenosine deaminase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Montiel-Equihua, Claudia A; Thrasher, Adrian J; Gaspar, H Bobby

    2009-12-22

    The history of stem cell gene therapy is strongly linked to the development of gene therapy for severe combined immunodeficiencies (SCID) and especially adenosine deaminase (ADA)-deficient SCID. Here we discuss the developments achieved in over two decades of clinical and laboratory research that led to the establishment of a protocol for the autologous transplant of retroviral vector-mediated gene-modified hematopoietic stem cells, which has proved to be both successful and, to date, safe. Patients in trials in three different countries have shown long-term immunological and metabolic correction. Nevertheless, improvements to the safety profile of viral vectors are underway and will undoubtedly reinforce the position of stem cell gene therapy as a treatment option for ADA-SCID.

  12. Expanding the therapeutic index of radiation therapy by combining in situ gene therapy in the treatment of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Tetzlaff, Michael T; Teh, Bin S; Timme, Terry L; Fujita, Tetsuo; Satoh, Takefumi; Tabata, Ken-Ichi; Mai, Wei-Yuan; Vlachaki, Maria T; Amato, Robert J; Kadmon, Dov; Miles, Brian J; Ayala, Gustavo; Wheeler, Thomas M; Aguilar-Cordova, Estuardo; Thompson, Timothy C; Butler, E Brian

    2006-02-01

    The advances in radiotherapy (3D-CRT, IMRT) have enabled high doses of radiation to be delivered with the least possible associated toxicity. However, the persistence of cancer (local recurrence after radiotherapy) despite these increased doses as well as distant failure suggesting the existence of micro-metastases, especially in the case of higher risk disease, have underscored the need for continued improvement in treatment strategies to manage local and micro-metastatic disease as definitively as possible. This has prompted the idea that an increase in the therapeutic index of radiotherapy might be achieved by combining it with in situ gene therapy. The goal of these combinatorial therapies is to maximize the selective pressure against cancer cell growth while minimizing treatment-associated toxicity. Major efforts utilizing different gene therapy strategies have been employed in conjunction with radiotherapy. We reviewed our and other published clinical trials utilizing this combined radio-genetherapy approach including their associated pre-clinical in vitro and in vivo models. The use of in situ gene therapy as an adjuvant to radiation therapy dramatically reduced cell viability in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. No significant worsening of the toxicities normally observed in single-modality approaches were identified in Phase I/II clinical studies. Enhancement of both local and systemic T-cell activation was noted with this combined approach suggesting anti-tumor immunity. Early clinical outcome including biochemical and biopsy data was very promising. These results demonstrate the increased therapeutic efficacy achieved by combining in situ gene therapy with radiotherapy in the management of local prostate cancer. The combined approach maximizes tumor control, both local-regional and systemic through radio-genetherapy induced cytotoxicity and anti-tumor immunity.

  13. Near-infrared light triggered photodynamic therapy in combination with gene therapy using upconversion nanoparticles for effective cancer cell killing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Liu, Kai; Yang, Guangbao; Cheng, Liang; He, Lu; Liu, Yumeng; Li, Yonggang; Guo, Liang; Liu, Zhuang

    2014-07-01

    Upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) have drawn much attention in cancer imaging and therapy in recent years. Herein, we for the first time report the use of UCNPs with carefully engineered surface chemistry for combined photodynamic therapy (PDT) and gene therapy of cancer. In our system, positively charged NaGdF4:Yb,Er UCNPs with multilayered polymer coatings are synthesized via a layer by layer strategy, and then loaded simultaneously with Chlorin e6 (Ce6), a photosensitizing molecule, and small interfering RNA (siRNA), which targets the Plk1 oncogene. On the one hand, under excitation by a near-infrared (NIR) light at 980 nm, which shows greatly improved tissue penetration compared with visible light, cytotoxic singlet oxygen can be generated via resonance energy transfer from UCNPs to photosensitizer Ce6, while the residual upconversion luminescence is utilized for imaging. On the other hand, the silencing of Plk1 induced by siRNA delivered with UCNPs could induce significant cancer cell apoptosis. As the result of such combined photodynamic and gene therapy, a remarkably enhanced cancer cell killing effect is realized. Our work thus highlights the promise of UCNPs for imaging guided combination therapy of cancer.Upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) have drawn much attention in cancer imaging and therapy in recent years. Herein, we for the first time report the use of UCNPs with carefully engineered surface chemistry for combined photodynamic therapy (PDT) and gene therapy of cancer. In our system, positively charged NaGdF4:Yb,Er UCNPs with multilayered polymer coatings are synthesized via a layer by layer strategy, and then loaded simultaneously with Chlorin e6 (Ce6), a photosensitizing molecule, and small interfering RNA (siRNA), which targets the Plk1 oncogene. On the one hand, under excitation by a near-infrared (NIR) light at 980 nm, which shows greatly improved tissue penetration compared with visible light, cytotoxic singlet oxygen can be generated via

  14. Suicide gene and cytokines combined nonviral gene therapy for spontaneous canine melanoma.

    PubMed

    Finocchiaro, L M E; Fiszman, G L; Karara, A L; Glikin, G C

    2008-03-01

    Canine spontaneous melanoma is a highly aggressive tumor resistant to current therapies. We evaluated the safety, efficacy and antitumor effects of direct intratumor injections of lipoplexes encoding herpes simplex thymidine kinase coadministrated with ganciclovir, and irradiated transgenic xenogeneic cells secreting 20-30 mug day(-1) of human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and interleukin-2. Toxicity was minimal or absent in all patients. This combined treatment (CT) induced tumor regression and a pronounced immune cell infiltration. The objective responses (47%: 21/45) averaged 80% of tumor mass loss. Local CT also induced systemic antitumor response evidenced by complete remission of one pulmonary metastasis and by the significantly higher percentage of metastasis-free patients (76: 34/45)) until the study ending compared to untreated (UC: 29%, 5/17), surgery-treated (CX: 48%, 11/23) or suicide gene-treated controls (SG: 56%, 9/16) (Fisher's exact test). CT significantly improved median survival time: 160 (57-509) days compared to UC (69 (10-169)), CX (82 (43-216)) or SG (94 (46-159)). CT also increased (P<0.00001, Kaplan-Meier analysis) metastasis-free survival: >509 (57-509) days with respect to UC: 41 (10-169), CX: 133 (43-216) and SG: >159 (41-159). Therefore, CT controlled tumor growth by delaying or preventing distant metastasis, thereby significantly extending survival and recovering the quality of life.

  15. Gene Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells in an effort to treat or stop disease. Genes contain your DNA — the code that controls much of your body's form and function, from making you grow taller to regulating your body systems. Genes that don't work properly can cause disease. Gene therapy replaces a faulty gene or adds ...

  16. Lentiviral hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    De Ravin, Suk See; Wu, Xiaolin; Moir, Susan; Anaya-O'Brien, Sandra; Kwatemaa, Nana; Littel, Patricia; Theobald, Narda; Choi, Uimook; Su, Ling; Marquesen, Martha; Hilligoss, Dianne; Lee, Janet; Buckner, Clarissa M; Zarember, Kol A; O'Connor, Geraldine; McVicar, Daniel; Kuhns, Douglas; Throm, Robert E; Zhou, Sheng; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Hanson, I Celine; Cowan, Mort J; Kang, Elizabeth; Hadigan, Coleen; Meagher, Michael; Gray, John T; Sorrentino, Brian P; Malech, Harry L

    2016-04-20

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) is a profound deficiency of T, B, and natural killer (NK) cell immunity caused by mutations inIL2RGencoding the common chain (γc) of several interleukin receptors. Gamma-retroviral (γRV) gene therapy of SCID-X1 infants without conditioning restores T cell immunity without B or NK cell correction, but similar treatment fails in older SCID-X1 children. We used a lentiviral gene therapy approach to treat five SCID-X1 patients with persistent immune dysfunction despite haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplant in infancy. Follow-up data from two older patients demonstrate that lentiviral vector γc transduced autologous HSC gene therapy after nonmyeloablative busulfan conditioning achieves selective expansion of gene-marked T, NK, and B cells, which is associated with sustained restoration of humoral responses to immunization and clinical improvement at 2 to 3 years after treatment. Similar gene marking levels have been achieved in three younger patients, albeit with only 6 to 9 months of follow-up. Lentiviral gene therapy with reduced-intensity conditioning appears safe and can restore humoral immune function to posthaploidentical transplant older patients with SCID-X1.

  17. Efficacy of Gene Therapy for X-Linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hacein-Bey-Abina, Salima; Hauer, Julia; Lim, Annick; Picard, Capucine; Wang, Gary P.; Berry, Charles C.; Martinache, Chantal; Rieux-Laucat, Frédéric; Latour, Sylvain; Belohradsky, Bernd H.; Leiva, Lily; Sorensen, Ricardo; Debré, Marianne; Casanova, Jean Laurent; Blanche, Stephane; Durandy, Anne; Bushman, Frederic D.; Fischer, Alain; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND The outcomes of gene therapy to correct congenital immunodeficiencies are unknown. We reviewed long-term outcomes after gene therapy in nine patients with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1), which is characterized by the absence of the cytokine receptor common γ chain. METHODS The nine patients, who lacked an HLA-identical donor, underwent ex vivo retrovirus-mediated transfer of γ chain to autologous CD34+ bone marrow cells between 1999 and 2002. We assessed clinical events and immune function on long-term follow-up. RESULTS Eight patients were alive after a median follow-up period of 9 years (range, 8 to 11). Gene therapy was initially successful at correcting immune dysfunction in eight of the nine patients. However, acute leukemia developed in four patients, and one died. Transduced T cells were detected for up to 10.7 years after gene therapy. Seven patients, including the three survivors of leukemia, had sustained immune reconstitution; three patients required immunoglobulin-replacement therapy. Sustained thymopoiesis was established by the persistent presence of naive T cells, even after chemotherapy in three patients. The T-cell–receptor repertoire was diverse in all patients. Transduced B cells were not detected. Correction of the immunodeficiency improved the patients’ health. CONCLUSIONS After nearly 10 years of follow-up, gene therapy was shown to have corrected the immunodeficiency associated with SCID-X1. Gene therapy may be an option for patients who do not have an HLA-identical donor for hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation and for whom the risks are deemed acceptable. This treatment is associated with a risk of acute leukemia. (Funded by INSERM and others.) PMID:20660403

  18. Gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Williamson, B

    1982-07-29

    Gene therapy is not yet possible, but may become feasible soon, particularly for well understood gene defects. Although treatment of a patient raises no ethical problems once it can be done well, changing the genes of an early embryo is more difficult, controversial and unlikely to be required clinically.

  19. Gene Therapy Model of X-linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Using a Modified Foamy Virus Vector

    PubMed Central

    Horino, Satoshi; Uchiyama, Toru; So, Takanori; Nagashima, Hiroyuki; Sun, Shu-lan; Sato, Miki; Asao, Atsuko; Haji, Yoichi; Sasahara, Yoji; Candotti, Fabio; Tsuchiya, Shigeru; Kure, Shigeo; Sugamura, Kazuo; Ishii, Naoto

    2013-01-01

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) is an inherited genetic immunodeficiency associated with mutations in the common cytokine receptor γ chain (γc) gene, and characterized by a complete defect of T and natural killer (NK) cells. Gene therapy for SCID-X1 using conventional retroviral (RV) vectors carrying the γc gene results in the successful reconstitution of T cell immunity. However, the high incidence of vector-mediated T cell leukemia, caused by vector insertion near or within cancer-related genes has been a serious problem. In this study, we established a gene therapy model of mouse SCID-X1 using a modified foamy virus (FV) vector expressing human γc. Analysis of vector integration in a human T cell line demonstrated that the FV vector integration sites were significantly less likely to be located within or near transcriptional start sites than RV vector integration sites. To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy, bone marrow cells from γc-knockout (γc-KO) mice were infected with the FV vector and transplanted into γc-KO mice. Transplantation of the FV-treated cells resulted in the successful reconstitution of functionally active T and B cells. These data suggest that FV vectors can be effective and may be safer than conventional RV vectors for gene therapy for SCID-X1. PMID:23990961

  20. Gene therapy model of X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency using a modified foamy virus vector.

    PubMed

    Horino, Satoshi; Uchiyama, Toru; So, Takanori; Nagashima, Hiroyuki; Sun, Shu-Lan; Sato, Miki; Asao, Atsuko; Haji, Yoichi; Sasahara, Yoji; Candotti, Fabio; Tsuchiya, Shigeru; Kure, Shigeo; Sugamura, Kazuo; Ishii, Naoto

    2013-01-01

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) is an inherited genetic immunodeficiency associated with mutations in the common cytokine receptor γ chain (γc) gene, and characterized by a complete defect of T and natural killer (NK) cells. Gene therapy for SCID-X1 using conventional retroviral (RV) vectors carrying the γc gene results in the successful reconstitution of T cell immunity. However, the high incidence of vector-mediated T cell leukemia, caused by vector insertion near or within cancer-related genes has been a serious problem. In this study, we established a gene therapy model of mouse SCID-X1 using a modified foamy virus (FV) vector expressing human γc. Analysis of vector integration in a human T cell line demonstrated that the FV vector integration sites were significantly less likely to be located within or near transcriptional start sites than RV vector integration sites. To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy, bone marrow cells from γc-knockout (γc-KO) mice were infected with the FV vector and transplanted into γc-KO mice. Transplantation of the FV-treated cells resulted in the successful reconstitution of functionally active T and B cells. These data suggest that FV vectors can be effective and may be safer than conventional RV vectors for gene therapy for SCID-X1.

  1. [Oro-maxillofacial bone tissue engineering combining biomaterials, stem cells, and gene therapy].

    PubMed

    Myon, L; Ferri, J; Chai, F; Blanchemain, N; Raoul, G

    2011-09-01

    Improvements have been made in regenerative medicine, due to the development of tissue engineering and cellular therapy. Bone regeneration is an ambitious project, leading to many applications involving skull, maxillofacial, and orthopaedic surgery. Scaffolds, stem cells, and signals support bone tissue engineering. The scaffold physical and chemical properties promote cell invasion, guide their differentiation, and enable signal transmission. Scaffold may be inorganic or organic. Their conception was improved by the use of new techniques: self-assembled nanofibres, electrospinning, solution-phase separation, micropatterned hydrogels, bioprinting, and rapid prototyping. Cellular biology processes allow us to choose between embryonic stem cells or adult stem cells for regenerative medicine. Finally, communication between cells and their environment is essential; they use various signals to do so. The study of signals and their transmission led to the discovery and the use of Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP). The development of cellular therapy led to the emergence of a specific field: gene therapy. It relies on viral vectors, which include: retroviruses, adenoviruses and adeno-associated vectors (AAV). Non-viral vectors include plasmids and lipoplex. Some BMP genes have successfully been transfected. The ability to control transfected cells and the capacity to combine and transfect many genes involved in osseous healing will improve gene therapy.

  2. In vitro therapeutic effect of PDT combined with VEGF-A gene therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecaros, Rumwald Leo G.; Huang, Leaf; Hsu, Yih-Chih

    2014-02-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), commonly known as VEGF, is one of the primary factors that affect tumor angiogenesis. It was found to be expressed in cancer cell lines including oral squamous cell carcinoma. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a novel therapeutic modality to treat cancer by using a photosensitizer which is activated by a light source to produce reactive oxygen species and mediates oxygen-independent hypoxic conditions to tumor. Another emerging treatment to cure cancer is the use of interference RNA (e.g. siRNA) to silence a specific mRNA sequence. VEGF-A was found to be expressed in oral squamous cell carcinoma and overexpressed after 24 hour post-PDT by Western blot analysis. Cell viability was found to decrease at 25 nM of transfected VEGF-A siRNA. In vitro combined therapy of PDT and VEGF-A siRNA showed better response as compared with PDT and gene therapy alone. The results suggest that PDT combined with targeted gene therapy has a potential mean to achieve better therapeutic outcome.

  3. Combining cytotoxic and immune-mediated gene therapy to treat brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Curtin, James F; King, Gwendalyn D; Candolfi, Marianela; Greeno, Remy B; Kroeger, Kurt M; Lowenstein, Pedro R; Castro, Maria G

    2005-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a type of intracranial brain tumor, for which there is no cure. In spite of advances in surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, patients die within a year of diagnosis. Therefore, there is a critical need to develop novel therapeutic approaches for this disease. Gene therapy, which is the use of genes or other nucleic acids as drugs, is a powerful new treatment strategy which can be developed to treat GBM. Several treatment modalities are amenable for gene therapy implementation, e.g. conditional cytotoxic approaches, targeted delivery of toxins into the tumor mass, immune stimulatory strategies, and these will all be the focus of this review. Both conditional cytotoxicity and targeted toxin mediated tumor death, are aimed at eliminating an established tumor mass and preventing further growth. Tumors employ several defensive strategies that suppress and inhibit anti-tumor immune responses. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved in eliciting anti-tumor immune responses has identified promising targets for immunotherapy. Immunotherapy is designed to aid the immune system to recognize and destroy tumor cells in order to eliminate the tumor burden. Also, immune-therapeutic strategies have the added advantage that an activated immune system has the capability of recognizing tumor cells at distant sites from the primary tumor, therefore targeting metastasis distant from the primary tumor locale. Pre-clinical models and clinical trials have demonstrated that in spite of their location within the central nervous system (CNS), a tissue described as 'immune privileged', brain tumors can be effectively targeted by the activated immune system following various immunotherapeutic strategies. This review will highlight recent advances in brain tumor immunotherapy, with particular emphasis on advances made using gene therapy strategies, as well as reviewing other novel therapies that can be used in combination with immunotherapy. Another important

  4. Combining Cytotoxic and Immune-Mediated Gene Therapy to Treat Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Curtin, James F.; King, Gwendalyn D.; Candolfi, Marianela; Greeno, Remy B.; Kroeger, Kurt M.; Lowenstein, Pedro R.; Castro, Maria G.

    2006-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a type of intracranial brain tumor, for which there is no cure. In spite of advances in surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, patients die within a year of diagnosis. Therefore, there is a critical need to develop novel therapeutic approaches for this disease. Gene therapy, which is the use of genes or other nucleic acids as drugs, is a powerful new treatment strategy which can be developed to treat GBM. Several treatment modalities are amenable for gene therapy implementation, e.g. conditional cytotoxic approaches, targeted delivery of toxins into the tumor mass, immune stimulatory strategies, and these will all be the focus of this review. Both conditional cytotoxicity and targeted toxin mediated tumor death, are aimed at eliminating an established tumor mass and preventing further growth. Tumors employ several defensive strategies that suppress and inhibit anti-tumor immune responses. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved in eliciting anti-tumor immune responses has identified promising targets for immunotherapy. Immunotherapy is designed to aid the immune system to recognize and destroy tumor cells in order to eliminate the tumor burden. Also, immune-therapeutic strategies have the added advantage that an activated immune system has the capability of recognizing tumor cells at distant sites from the primary tumor, therefore targeting metastasis distant from the primary tumor locale. Pre-clinical models and clinical trials have demonstrated that in spite of their location within the central nervous system (CNS), a tissue described as ‘immune privileged’, brain tumors can be effectively targeted by the activated immune system following various immunotherapeutic strategies. This review will highlight recent advances in brain tumor immunotherapy, with particular emphasis on advances made using gene therapy strategies, as well as reviewing other novel therapies that can be used in combination with immunotherapy. Another

  5. Gene Therapy for X-Linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency: Where Do We Stand?

    PubMed Central

    Cavazzana, Marina; Six, Emmanuelle; Lagresle-Peyrou, Chantal; André-Schmutz, Isabelle; Hacein-Bey-Abina, Salima

    2016-01-01

    More than 20 years ago, X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) appeared to be the best condition to test the feasibility of hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy. The seminal SCID-X1 clinical studies, based on first-generation gammaretroviral vectors, demonstrated good long-term immune reconstitution in most treated patients despite the occurrence of vector-related leukemia in a few of them. This gene therapy has successfully enabled correction of the T cell defect. Natural killer and B cell defects were only partially restored, most likely due to the absence of a conditioning regimen. The success of these pioneering trials paved the way for the extension of gene-based treatment to many other diseases of the hematopoietic system, but the unfortunate serious adverse events led to extensive investigations to define the retrovirus integration profiles. This review puts into perspective the clinical experience of gene therapy for SCID-X1, with the development and implementation of new generations of safer vectors such as self-inactivating gammaretroviral or lentiviral vectors as well as major advances in integrome knowledge. PMID:26790362

  6. Combination Gene Therapy for Liver Metastasis of Colon Carcinoma in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shu-Hsai; Chen, X. H. Li; Wang, Yibin; Kosai, Ken-Ichiro; Finegold, Milton J.; Rich, Susan S.

    1995-03-01

    The efficacy of combination therapy with a "suicide gene" and a cytokine gene to treat metastatic colon carcinoma in the liver was investigated. Tumor in the liver was generated by intrahepatic injection of a colon carcinoma cell line (MCA-26) in syngeneic BALB/c mice. Recombinant adenoviral vectors containing various control and therapeutic genes were injected directly into the solid tumors, followed by treatment with ganciclovir. While the tumors continued to grow in all animals treated with a control vector or a mouse interleukin 2 vector, those treated with a herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase vector, with or without the coadministration of the mouse interleukin 2 vector, exhibited dramatic necrosis and regression. However, only animals treated with both vectors developed an effective systemic antitumoral immunity against challenges of tumorigenic doses of parental tumor cells inoculated at distant sites. The antitumoral immunity was associated with the presence of MCA-26 tumor-specific cytolytic CD8^+ T lymphocytes. The results suggest that combination suicide and cytokine gene therapy in vivo can be a powerful approach for treatment of metastatic colon carcinoma in the liver.

  7. Gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Drugan, A; Miller, O J; Evans, M I

    1987-01-01

    Severe genetic disorders are potentially correctable by the addition of a normal gene into tissues. Although the technical problems involving integration, stable expression, and insertional damage to the treated cell are not yet fully solved, enough scientific progress has already been made to consider somatic cell gene therapy acceptable from both the ethical and scientific viewpoints. The resolutions to problems evolving from somatic cell gene therapy will help to overcome the technical difficulties encountered presently with germ line gene manipulation. This procedure would then become morally permissible as it will cause, in time, a reduction in the pool of abnormal genes in the population. Enhancement genetic engineering is technically feasible but morally unacceptable. Eugenic genetic engineering is not technically possible or ethically permissible in the foreseeable future.

  8. Combined Tbet and IL12 gene therapy elicits and recruits superior antitumor immunity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yanyan; Chen, Lu; Lowe, Devin B; Storkus, Walter J; Taylor, Jennifer L

    2012-03-01

    We have recently shown that intratumor (i.t.) injection of syngenic dendritic cells (DC) engineered to express the transcription factor Tbet (TBX21) promotes protective type-1 T cell-mediated immunity via a mechanism that is largely interleukin (IL)-12p70-independent. Since IL-12 is a classical promoter of type-1 immunity, the current study was undertaken to determine whether gene therapy using combined Tbet and IL-12 complementary DNA (cDNA) would yield improved antitumor efficacy based on the complementary/synergistic action of these biologic modifiers. Mice bearing established subcutaneous (s.c.) tumors injected with DC concomitantly expressing ectopic Tbet and IL12 (i.e., DC.Tbet/IL12) displayed superior (i) rates of tumor rejection and extended overall survival, (ii) cross-priming of Tc1 reactive against antigens expressed within the tumor microenvironment, and (iii) infiltration of CD8(+) T cells into treated tumors in association with elevated locoregional production of CXCR3 ligand chemokines. In established bilateral tumor models, i.t. delivery of DC.Tbet/IL12 into a single lesion led to slowed growth or regression at both tumor sites. Furthermore, DC.Tbet/IL12 pulsed with tumor antigen-derived peptides and injected as a therapy distal to the tumor site prevented tumor growth and activated robust antigen-specific Tc1 responses. These data support the translation use of combined Tbet and IL-12p70 gene therapy in the cancer setting.

  9. Combining cell transplants or gene therapy with deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Nathan C; Starr, Philip A; Larson, Paul S; Ostrem, Jill L; Marks, William J; Lim, Daniel A

    2015-02-01

    Cell transplantation and gene therapy each show promise to enhance the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, because cell transplantation and gene therapy generally require direct delivery to the central nervous system, clinical trial design involves unique scientific, ethical, and financial concerns related to the invasive nature of the procedure. Typically, such biologics have been tested in PD patients who have not received any neurosurgical intervention. Here, we suggest that PD patients undergoing deep brain stimulation (DBS) device implantation are an ideal patient population for the clinical evaluation of cell transplantation and gene therapy. Randomizing subjects to an experimental group that receives the biologic concurrently with the DBS implantation-or to a control group that receives the DBS treatment alone-has several compelling advantages. First, this study design enables the participation of patients likely to benefit from DBS, many of whom simultaneously meet the inclusion criteria of biologic studies. Second, the need for a sham neurosurgical procedure is eliminated, which may reduce ethical concerns, promote patient recruitment, and enhance the blinding of surgical trials. Third, testing the biologic by "piggybacking" onto an established, reimbursable procedure should reduce the cost of clinical trials, which may allow a greater number of biologics to reach this critical stage of research translation. Finally, this clinical trial design may lead to combinatorial treatment strategies that provide PD patients with more durable control over disabling motor symptoms. By combining neuromodulation with biologics, we may also reveal important treatment paradigms relevant to other diseases of the brain.

  10. Cell and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Rao, Rajesh C; Zacks, David N

    2014-01-01

    Replacement or repair of a dysfunctional gene combined with promoting cell survival is a two-pronged approach that addresses an unmet need in the therapy of retinal degenerative diseases. In this chapter, we discuss various strategies toward achieving both goals: transplantation of wild-type cells to replace degenerating cells and to rescue gene function, sequential gene and cell therapy, and in vivo reprogramming of rods to cones. These approaches highlight cutting-edge advances in cell and gene therapy, and cellular lineage conversion in order to devise new therapies for various retinal degenerative diseases.

  11. Gene Therapy Studies in a Canine Model of X-Linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    De Ravin, Suk See; Malech, Harry L.; Sorrentino, Brian P.; Burtner, Christopher; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Since the occurrence of T cell leukemias in the original human γ-retroviral gene therapy trials for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID), considerable effort has been devoted to developing safer vectors. This review summarizes gene therapy studies performed in a canine model of XSCID to evaluate the efficacy of γ-retroviral, lentiviral, and foamy viral vectors for treating XSCID and a novel method of vector delivery. These studies demonstrate that durable T cell reconstitution and thymopoiesis with no evidence of any serious adverse events and, in contrast to the human XSCID patients, sustained marking in myeloid cells and B cells with reconstitution of normal humoral immune function can be achieved for up to 5 years without any pretreatment conditioning. The presence of sustained levels of gene-marked T cells, B cells, and more importantly myeloid cells for almost 5 years is highly suggestive of transduction of either multipotent hematopoietic stem cells or very primitive committed progenitors. PMID:25603151

  12. Combinational therapy of ischemic brain stroke by delivery of heme oxygenase-1 gene and dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Hyesun; Lee, Jiyoung; Hwang, Do Won; Kim, Soonhag; Hyun, Dong Keun; Choi, Joon Sig; Lee, Ja-kyeong; Lee, Minhyung

    2011-01-01

    Combinational therapies using genes and drugs are promising therapeutic strategies for various diseases. In this research, a co-delivery carrier of dexamethasone and plasmid DNA (pDNA) was developed by conjugation of dexamethasone to polyethylenimine (2 kDa, PEI2k) for combinational therapy of ischemic brain. Dynamic light scattering, atomic force microscopy and flow cytometry studies showed that the pDNA/dexamethasone-conjugated PEI2k (PEI2k-Dexa) complex was 150 nm in size and was taken up by cells more easily than PEI2k-Dexa only. The tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) level was decreased more efficiently by pDNA/PEI2k-Dexa complex than dexamethasone only in hypoxia activated Raw 264.7 macrophage cells, suggesting that pDNA/PEI2k-Dexa complex increased the delivery efficiency and therapeutic effect of dexamethasone. In in vitro transfection assay, PEI2k-Dexa had higher transfection efficiency than PEI2k and lipofectamine. However, the simple mixture of PEI2k and dexamethasone did not show this effect, suggesting that the conjugation of dexamethasone to polyethylenimine increased DNA delivery efficiency of PEI2k. To evaluate the effects of combinational therapy in vivo, pDNA/PEI2k-Dexa complex was applied to a transient focal ischemia animal model. At 24 h after the injection, mean infarction volume and the TNF-α level were reduced more efficiently in the pDNA/PEI2k-Dexa injection group, compared with the control, pDNA/PEI2k, or dexamethasone injection group. The infarction volume and inflammatory cytokines were further decreased by delivery of pSV-HO-1 using PEI2k-Dexa. Magnetic resonance imaging and microPET studies confirmed the therapeutic effect of pSV-HO-1/PEI2k-Dexa complex at 10 days after the injection. Therefore, pSV-HO-1/PEI2k-Dexa complexes may be useful in combinational therapy for ischemic diseases such as stroke.

  13. Autophagy and gene therapy combine in the treatment of liver disease.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Debra A; Klionsky, Daniel J

    2013-07-01

    Molecular biology holds the promise not only of increasing our understanding of basic cell biology, but also of advancing our ability to design targeted therapeutic methods for treating a range of diseases. One example that seems to hold tremendous potential is gene therapy, the use of exogenous DNA to replace or suppress a mutant gene in the patient's genome, or to boost the activity of a normal gene. A recent report (highlighted in a punctum in this issue of the journal) has brought autophagy into the gene therapy realm.

  14. Combination gene therapy targeting on interleukin-1β and RANKL for wear debris-induced aseptic loosening.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Jia, T-H; Zacharias, N; Gong, W; Du, H-X; Wooley, P H; Yang, S-Y

    2013-02-01

    This study investigated the efficacy of a combination gene therapy to repress interleukin-1 (IL-1) and receptor activator of nuclear factor NF-kappa B ligand (RANKL) for the treatment of particulate debris-induced aseptic loosening, and tried to explore the molecular mechanism of the exogenous gene modifications on osteoclastogenesis. RAW cells activated by titanium particles were transduced with DFG-IL-1Ra (retroviral vector encoding IL-1 receptor antagonist) and AAV-OPG (adeno-associated viral vectors-osteoprotegerin) individually or in combination for 4 weeks. Pro-inflammatory cytokines in culture media were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and gene expressions of RANK, IL-1β, c-Fos, TRAF6, JNK1 and CPK were examined using real-time PCR. An established knee-implant-failure mouse model was employed to evaluate the efficacy of the in vivo double-gene therapy. The surgical implantation of a titanium alloy pin into the proximal tibia was followed by monthly challenge with titanium debris. Peri-implant gene transfers of IL-1Ra and OPG (respectively or in combination) were given 3 weeks after surgery. The combination of OPG and IL-1Ra gene transfer exhibited strong synergetic effects in blockage of inflammation and osteoclastogenesis at 8 weeks after gene modification. The combination therapy reversed peri-implant bone resorption and restored implant stability when compared with either single gene transduction. Real-time PCR data indicated that the action of IL-1Ra gene therapy may be mediated via the JNK1 pathway, while the reduction of osteoclastogenesis by OPG gene modification may be regulated by c-Fos expression. In addition, both gene modifications resulted in significant diminishment of TRAF6 expression.

  15. Parkinson's disease: gene therapies.

    PubMed

    Coune, Philippe G; Schneider, Bernard L; Aebischer, Patrick

    2012-04-01

    With the recent development of effective gene delivery systems, gene therapy for the central nervous system is finding novel applications. Here, we review existing viral vectors and discuss gene therapy strategies that have been proposed for Parkinson's disease. To date, most of the clinical trials were based on viral vectors to deliver therapeutic transgenes to neurons within the basal ganglia. Initial trials used genes to relieve the major motor symptoms caused by nigrostriatal degeneration. Although these new genetic approaches still need to prove more effective than existing symptomatic treatments, there is a need for disease-modifying strategies. The investigation of the genetic factors implicated in Parkinson's disease is providing precious insights in disease pathology that, combined with innovative gene delivery systems, will hopefully offer novel opportunities for gene therapy interventions to slow down, or even halt disease progression.

  16. A Novel Combination of Thermal Ablation and Heat-Inducible Gene Therapy for Breast Cancer Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    and Heat-Inducible Gene Therapy for Breast Cancer Treatment PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Yunbo Liu...Breast Cancer Treatment 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-06-1-0461 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Yunbo Liu Pei Zhong...therapy (via the control of hsp70B-heat shock promoter) to improve the overall efficiency of breast cancer treatment . In the first year of the project

  17. Gene therapy for adenosine deaminase-deficient severe combined immune deficiency: clinical comparison of retroviral vectors and treatment plans.

    PubMed

    Candotti, Fabio; Shaw, Kit L; Muul, Linda; Carbonaro, Denise; Sokolic, Robert; Choi, Christopher; Schurman, Shepherd H; Garabedian, Elizabeth; Kesserwan, Chimene; Jagadeesh, G Jayashree; Fu, Pei-Yu; Gschweng, Eric; Cooper, Aaron; Tisdale, John F; Weinberg, Kenneth I; Crooks, Gay M; Kapoor, Neena; Shah, Ami; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Yu, Xiao-Jin; Smogorzewska, Monika; Wayne, Alan S; Rosenblatt, Howard M; Davis, Carla M; Hanson, Celine; Rishi, Radha G; Wang, Xiaoyan; Gjertson, David; Yang, Otto O; Balamurugan, Arumugam; Bauer, Gerhard; Ireland, Joanna A; Engel, Barbara C; Podsakoff, Gregory M; Hershfield, Michael S; Blaese, R Michael; Parkman, Robertson; Kohn, Donald B

    2012-11-01

    We conducted a gene therapy trial in 10 patients with adenosine deaminase (ADA)-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency using 2 slightly different retroviral vectors for the transduction of patients' bone marrow CD34(+) cells. Four subjects were treated without pretransplantation cytoreduction and remained on ADA enzyme-replacement therapy (ERT) throughout the procedure. Only transient (months), low-level (< 0.01%) gene marking was observed in PBMCs of 2 older subjects (15 and 20 years of age), whereas some gene marking of PBMC has persisted for the past 9 years in 2 younger subjects (4 and 6 years). Six additional subjects were treated using the same gene transfer protocol, but after withdrawal of ERT and administration of low-dose busulfan (65-90 mg/m(2)). Three of these remain well, off ERT (5, 4, and 3 years postprocedure), with gene marking in PBMC of 1%-10%, and ADA enzyme expression in PBMC near or in the normal range. Two subjects were restarted on ERT because of poor gene marking and immune recovery, and one had a subsequent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. These studies directly demonstrate the importance of providing nonmyeloablative pretransplantation conditioning to achieve therapeutic benefits with gene therapy for ADA-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency.

  18. Gene therapy for adenosine deaminase–deficient severe combined immune deficiency: clinical comparison of retroviral vectors and treatment plans

    PubMed Central

    Candotti, Fabio; Shaw, Kit L.; Muul, Linda; Carbonaro, Denise; Sokolic, Robert; Choi, Christopher; Schurman, Shepherd H.; Garabedian, Elizabeth; Kesserwan, Chimene; Jagadeesh, G. Jayashree; Fu, Pei-Yu; Gschweng, Eric; Cooper, Aaron; Tisdale, John F.; Weinberg, Kenneth I.; Crooks, Gay M.; Kapoor, Neena; Shah, Ami; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Yu, Xiao-Jin; Smogorzewska, Monika; Wayne, Alan S.; Rosenblatt, Howard M.; Davis, Carla M.; Hanson, Celine; Rishi, Radha G.; Wang, Xiaoyan; Gjertson, David; Yang, Otto O.; Balamurugan, Arumugam; Bauer, Gerhard; Ireland, Joanna A.; Engel, Barbara C.; Podsakoff, Gregory M.; Hershfield, Michael S.; Blaese, R. Michael; Parkman, Robertson

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a gene therapy trial in 10 patients with adenosine deaminase (ADA)–deficient severe combined immunodeficiency using 2 slightly different retroviral vectors for the transduction of patients' bone marrow CD34+ cells. Four subjects were treated without pretransplantation cytoreduction and remained on ADA enzyme-replacement therapy (ERT) throughout the procedure. Only transient (months), low-level (< 0.01%) gene marking was observed in PBMCs of 2 older subjects (15 and 20 years of age), whereas some gene marking of PBMC has persisted for the past 9 years in 2 younger subjects (4 and 6 years). Six additional subjects were treated using the same gene transfer protocol, but after withdrawal of ERT and administration of low-dose busulfan (65-90 mg/m2). Three of these remain well, off ERT (5, 4, and 3 years postprocedure), with gene marking in PBMC of 1%-10%, and ADA enzyme expression in PBMC near or in the normal range. Two subjects were restarted on ERT because of poor gene marking and immune recovery, and one had a subsequent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. These studies directly demonstrate the importance of providing nonmyeloablative pretransplantation conditioning to achieve therapeutic benefits with gene therapy for ADA-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency. PMID:22968453

  19. Inhibitory effect of endostatin gene therapy combined with phosphorus-32 colloid on tumour growth in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Gao, Huiqi; Zhu, Jing; Li, Yong; Fu, Peng; Shen, Baozhong

    2016-07-01

    Eighty healthy male Wistar rats, aged 5 weeks, weighing 100-120 g, were utilized for establishing tumour-bearing models by immediate Walker-256 cancerous ascites injection and randomly divided to four groups (n=20) treated with 0.2 ml solution containing saline, (32)P-colloid (0.3 mCi), endostatin gene (20 μg), endostatin gene combined with colloid (32)P. The effect of endostatin combined with a small dose of (32)P-colloidal on tumour growth in vivo was evaluated and the potential mechanism underlying the combined therapy was explored. We found that (32)P-colloid combined with endostatin exhibited higher inhibitory effect upon tumour growth compared with application of (32)P-colloid or endostatin alone, although three therapies all significantly inhibited tumour growth compared with saline control group. The higher inhibitory effect of (32)P-colloid combined with endostatin upon tumour growth might be attributed to a synergistic effect of inhibiting angiogenesis by endostatin and inducing apoptosis by (32)P-colloid, as demonstrated by microvessel density (MVD) and apoptotic index (AI) measurement. Combined therapy of (32)P-colloid and endostatin probably serves as a novel and efficacious therapy of tumour growth.

  20. Angiogenesis-targeting microbubbles combined with ultrasound-mediated gene therapy in brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Chang, En-Ling; Ting, Chien-Yu; Hsu, Po-Hong; Lin, Yu-Chun; Liao, En-Chi; Huang, Chiung-Yin; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Chan, Hong-Lin; Chiang, Chi-Shiun; Liu, Hao-Li; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Fan, Ching-Hsiang; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2017-04-10

    The major challenges in gene therapy for brain cancer are poor transgene expression due to the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and neurologic damage caused by conventional intracerebral injection. Non-viral gene delivery using ultrasound-targeted microbubble (MB) oscillation via the systematic transvascular route is attractive, but there is currently no high-yielding and targeted gene expression method. In this study, we developed a non-viral and angiogenesis-targeting gene delivery approach for efficient brain tumor gene therapy without brain damage. We developed a VEGFR2-targeted and cationic microbubble (VCMB) gene vector for use with transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS) exposure to allow transient gene delivery. The system was tested in a brain tumor model using the firefly luciferase gene and herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase/ganciclovir (pHSV-TK/GCV) with VCMBs under FUS exposure for transgene expression and anti-tumor effect. In vitro data showed that VCMBs have a high DNA-loading efficiency and high affinity for cancer cells. In vivo data confirmed that this technique enhanced gene delivery into tumor tissues without affecting normal brain tissues. The VCMB group resulted in higher luciferase expression (3.8 fold) relative to the CMB group (1.9 fold), and the direct injection group. The tumor volume on day 25 was significantly smaller in rats treated with the pHSV-TK/GCV system using VCMBs under FUS (9.7±5.2mm(3)) than in the direct injection group (40.1±4.3mm(3)). We demonstrated the successful use of DNA-loaded VCMBs and FUS for non-viral, non-invasive and targeted gene delivery to brain tumors.

  1. Peptide micelle-mediated delivery of tissue-specific suicide gene and combined therapy with avastin in a glioblastoma model.

    PubMed

    Oh, Binna; Han, Jaesik; Choi, Eunji; Tan, Xiaonan; Lee, Minhyung

    2015-04-01

    Bevacizumab (Avastin) is an angiogenesis inhibitor used as a treatment for various cancers. In this study, the combination therapy of Avastin and glioblastoma-specific thymidine kinase gene [pEpo-NI2-SV-herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase(HSVtk)] was evaluated in a glioblastoma animal model. The R7L10 peptide was used as a gene carrier of pEpo-NI2-SV-HSVtk. Gel retardation assays confirmed that R7L10 formed stable complexes with pEpo-NI2-SV-HSVtk. R7L10 protected DNA from nuclease digestion. R7L10 had lower transfection efficiency than polyethylenimine (PEI; 25 kDa). However, the in vitro and in vivo toxicity assays showed that R7L10 had lower cytotoxicity than PEI, suggesting that R7L10 is safer than PEI. For the combination therapy, Avastin was injected intravenously and the pEpo-NI2-SV-HSVtk/R7L10 complexes were injected intratumorally in the glioblastoma animal model. Tumor growth was most effectively inhibited by the combination therapy of Avastin and the gene. The immunostaining results confirmed that the HSVtk genes were expressed in the groups with the pEpo-NI2-SV-HSVtk/R7L10 complex. The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay showed a higher level of apoptotic cells in the combination group than the pEpo-NI2-SV-HSVtk/R7L10 complex or Avastin group. In conclusion, the combination of Avastin and the glioblastoma-specific HSVtk gene has a higher antitumor effect than single therapy of Avastin or HSVtk after intratumoral administration in glioblastoma animal model.

  2. A Novel Combination of Thermal Ablation and Heat-Inducible Gene Therapy for Breast Cancer Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    STATEMENT Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT High intensity focused ultrasound ...focused ultrasound (HIFU) thermal ablation and HIFU-induced gene therapy represents a promising approach in improving the overall efficacy and quality...R3230Ac cells with concentration from 0.5x106 /ml to 5x106/ml. The speed of sound and attenuation were measured in a broadband transmission ultrasound

  3. Gene therapy in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Si-Xue; Xia, Zhong-Sheng; Zhong, Ying-Qiang

    2014-10-07

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a highly lethal disease and notoriously difficult to treat. Only a small proportion of PC patients are eligible for surgical resection, whilst conventional chemoradiotherapy only has a modest effect with substantial toxicity. Gene therapy has become a new widely investigated therapeutic approach for PC. This article reviews the basic rationale, gene delivery methods, therapeutic targets and developments of laboratory research and clinical trials in gene therapy of PC by searching the literature published in English using the PubMed database and analyzing clinical trials registered on the Gene Therapy Clinical Trials Worldwide website (http://www. wiley.co.uk/genmed/ clinical). Viral vectors are main gene delivery tools in gene therapy of cancer, and especially, oncolytic virus shows brighter prospect due to its tumor-targeting property. Efficient therapeutic targets for gene therapy include tumor suppressor gene p53, mutant oncogene K-ras, anti-angiogenesis gene VEGFR, suicide gene HSK-TK, cytosine deaminase and cytochrome p450, multiple cytokine genes and so on. Combining different targets or combination strategies with traditional chemoradiotherapy may be a more effective approach to improve the efficacy of cancer gene therapy. Cancer gene therapy is not yet applied in clinical practice, but basic and clinical studies have demonstrated its safety and clinical benefits. Gene therapy will be a new and promising field for the treatment of PC.

  4. Gene therapy in periodontics.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Anirban; Singh, Nidhi; Saluja, Mini

    2013-03-01

    GENES are made of DNA - the code of life. They are made up of two types of base pair from different number of hydrogen bonds AT, GC which can be turned into instruction. Everyone inherits genes from their parents and passes them on in turn to their children. Every person's genes are different, and the changes in sequence determine the inherited differences between each of us. Some changes, usually in a single gene, may cause serious diseases. Gene therapy is 'the use of genes as medicine'. It involves the transfer of a therapeutic or working gene copy into specific cells of an individual in order to repair a faulty gene copy. Thus it may be used to replace a faulty gene, or to introduce a new gene whose function is to cure or to favorably modify the clinical course of a condition. It has a promising era in the field of periodontics. Gene therapy has been used as a mode of tissue engineering in periodontics. The tissue engineering approach reconstructs the natural target tissue by combining four elements namely: Scaffold, signaling molecules, cells and blood supply and thus can help in the reconstruction of damaged periodontium including cementum, gingival, periodontal ligament and bone.

  5. Human Gene Therapy: Genes without Frontiers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Eric J.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the latest advancements and setbacks in human gene therapy to provide reference material for biology teachers to use in their science classes. Focuses on basic concepts such as recombinant DNA technology, and provides examples of human gene therapy such as severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome, familial hypercholesterolemia, and…

  6. PSMA-Specific Theranostic Nanoplex for Combination of TRAIL Gene and 5-FC Prodrug Therapy of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhihang; Penet, Marie-France; Krishnamachary, Balaji; Banerjee, Sangeeta R.; Pomper, Martin G.; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic prostate cancer causes significant morbidity and mortality and there is a critical unmet need for effective treatments. We have developed a theranostic nanoplex platform for combined imaging and therapy of prostate cancer. Our prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) targeted nanoplex is designed to deliver plasmid DNA encoding tumor necrosis factor related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), together with bacterial cytosine deaminase (bCD) as a prodrug enzyme. Nanoplex specificity was tested using two variants of human PC3 prostate cancer cells in culture and in tumor xenografts, one with high PSMA expression and the other with negligible expression levels. The expression of EGFP-TRAIL was demonstrated by fluorescence optical imaging and real-time PCR. Noninvasive 19F MR spectroscopy detected the conversion of the nontoxic prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) to cytotoxic 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) by bCD. The combination strategy of TRAIL gene and 5-FC/bCD therapy showed significant inhibition of the growth of prostate cancer cells and tumors. These data demonstrate that the PSMA-specific theranostic nanoplex can deliver gene therapy and prodrug enzyme therapy concurrently for precision medicine in metastatic prostate cancer. PMID:26706476

  7. Targeted Gene Therapy for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-01

    From the studies performed during the last one year, we determined the effects of AAV-mediated anti-angiogenic gene therapy as a combination therapy...angiogenic gene therapy in combination with chemotherapy. In the next year, we will determine whether such a combination therapy would provide regression of established tumors.

  8. Sustained long-term immune responses after in situ gene therapy combined with radiotherapy and hormonal therapy in prostate cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Tetsuo; Teh, Bin S.; Mai, W.-Y.; Kusaka, Nobuyuki; Naruishi, Koji; Fattah, Elmoataz Abdel; Aguilar-Cordova, Estuardo; Butler, E. Brian; Thompson, Timothy C.

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To explore long-term immune responses after combined radio-gene-hormonal therapy. Methods and Materials: Thirty-three patients with prostate specific antigen 10 or higher or Gleason score of 7 or higher or clinical stage T2b to T3 were treated with gene therapy that consisted of 3 separate intraprostatic injections of AdHSV-tk on Days 0, 56, and 70. Each injection was followed by 2 weeks of valacyclovir. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy was delivered 2 days after the second AdHSV-tk injection for 7 weeks. Hormonal therapy was initiated on Day 0 and continued for 4 months or 2.3 years. Blood samples were taken before, during, and after treatment. Lymphocytes were analyzed by fluorescent antibody cell sorting (FACS). Results: Median follow-up was 26 months (range, 4-48 months). The mean percentages of DR{sup +}CD8{sup +} T cells were increased at all timepoints up to 8 months. The mean percentages of DR{sup +}CD4{sup +} T cells were increased later and sustained longer until 12 months. Long-term (2.3 years) use of hormonal therapy did not affect the percentage of any lymphocyte population. Conclusions: Sustained long-term (up to 8 to 12 months) systemic T-cell responses were noted after combined radio-gene-hormonal therapy for prostate cancer. Prolonged use of hormonal therapy does not suppress this response. These results suggest the potential for sustained activation of cell-mediated immune responses against cancer.

  9. Chemotherapy, IL-12 gene therapy and combined adjuvant therapy of HPV 16-associated MHC class I-proficient and -deficient tumours.

    PubMed

    Indrová, Marie; Bieblová, Jana; Jandlová, Tána; Vonka, Vladimír; Pajtasz-Piasecka, Elzbieta; Reinis, Milan

    2006-01-01

    Moderately immunogenic HPV 16-associated murine tumour cell line mimicking human HPV 16-associated neoplasms TC-1 (MHC class I(+)) and its variants, TC-1/P3C10 and TC-1/A9, with a marked down-regulation of MHC I molecules, were used to examine the effect of local interleukin 12 (IL-12) gene therapy for the treatment of early tumour transplants and minimal residual tumour disease obtained after cytoreductive chemotherapy (CMRTD). Experiments were designed to examine whether down-regulation of MHC class I molecules plays a role during chemotherapy and gene therapy of early tumour transplants. It was found that peritumoral administration of IL-12-producing tumour cell vaccines (single dose, day 8 after tumour cell administration) inhibited the growth of both TC-1 (MHC class I positive) tumours and their MHC class I-deficient variants. To investigate the antitumour effects in a clinically relevant setting, IL-12 gene therapy was utilised for the treatment of minimal residual tumour disease after cytoreductive chemotherapy. Intra-peritoneal treatment of tumour-bearing mice with ifosfamide derivative, CBM-4A, produced a significant tumour-inhibitory effect. This treatment was followed by peritumoral s.c. administration of genetically modified TC-1 (MHC class I positive) or MK16/I/IIIABC (MHC class I negative) vaccines producing IL-12 (single dose, day 7 after chemotherapy) or with recombinant interleukin 12 (rIL-12) in two cycles of 5 daily doses (days 8-19) after chemotherapy. This combined therapy significantly inhibited the growth of TC-1 and TC-1/A9 (MHC class I-) tumours. When the combined therapy of TC-1 (MHC class I positive) tumours was followed by peritumoral administration of bone marrow dendritic cell (BMDC) vaccines, the IL-12-mediated inhibitory effect was significantly boosted. In the next set of experiments, the impacts of chemotherapy and IL-12 adjuvant therapy on MHC class I surface expression were assessed. Chemotherapy and gene therapy of tumours led

  10. Combined autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell and gene therapy as the last resort for patients with critical limb ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Skóra, Jan; Pupka, Artur; Janczak, Dariusz; Barć, Piotr; Dawiskiba, Tomasz; Korta, Krzysztof; Baczyńska, Dagmara; Garcarek, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Our study was designed to investigate the safety and efficacy of combined autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell (MNC) and gene therapy in comparison to conventional drug therapy in patients with critical limb ischemia (CLI). Material and methods Thirty-two patients with CLI persisting for 12–48 months (average time 27.5 months) were randomized into 2 groups, each group consisting of 16 patients. In the first group, administration of autologous bone marrow MNC and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plasmid was performed. The patients from the second group were treated pharmacologically with pentoxifylline. Ankle-brachial index (ABI) was measured and angiography was performed before and finally 3 months after treatment. The pain was evaluated using the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) before and after 3 months. Results Ankle-brachial index improved significantly from 0.29 ±0.21 to 0.52 ±0.23 (p < 0.001) in 12 patients (75.0%) 3 months after the experimental therapy in group 1. In this group angiography showed the development of collateral vessels. Ischemic ulcers healed completely in 11 patients (68.75%). In group 2 the ABI did not improve in any patient; moreover the complete healing of skin ulcers was not found in any of the patients of this group. Amputation was performed in 4 (25.0%) patients in group 1, and in 8 patients (50%) from group 2. Conclusions These data after 3-month follow-up indicate that intramuscular injection of MNC combined with gene therapy in patients with chronic CLI is safe, and a more feasible and effective method of treatment than the conventional therapy. However, both therapies are limited by the degree of microcirculation damage. PMID:25995748

  11. Identification of novel enzyme-prodrug combinations for use in cytochrome P450-based gene therapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Alex; Huang, Zeqi; Jounaidi, Youssef; Waxman, David J

    2003-01-01

    Gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy can be used to increase the therapeutic activity of anti-cancer prodrugs that undergo liver cytochrome P450 (CYP)-catalyzed prodrug to active drug conversion. The present report describes a cell-culture-based assay to identify CYP gene-CYP prodrug combinations that generate bystander cytotoxic metabolites and that may potentially be useful for CYP-based gene therapy for cancer. A panel of rat liver microsomes, comprising distinct subsets of drug-inducible hepatic CYPs, was evaluated for prodrug activation in a four-day 9L gliosarcoma cell growth inhibition assay. A strong NADPH- and liver microsome-dependent increase in 9L cytotoxicity was observed for the CYP prodrugs cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, and methoxymorpholinyl doxorubicin (MMDX) but not with three other CYP prodrugs, procarbazine, dacarbazine, and tamoxifen. MMDX activation was potentiated approximately 250-fold by liver microsomes from dexamethasone-induced rats (IC(50) (MMDX) approximately 0.1nM), suggesting that dexamethasone-inducible CYP3A enzymes contribute to activation of this novel anthracycline anti-tumor agent. This CYP3A dependence was verified in studies using liver microsomes from uninduced male and female rats and by using the CYP3A-selective inhibitors troleandomycin and ketoconazole. These findings highlight the advantages of using cell culture assays to identify novel CYP prodrug-CYP gene combinations that are characterized by production of cell-permeable, cytotoxic metabolites and that may potentially be incorporated into CYP-based gene therapies for cancer treatment.

  12. Gene therapy for blindness.

    PubMed

    Sahel, José-Alain; Roska, Botond

    2013-07-08

    Sight-restoring therapy for the visually impaired and blind is a major unmet medical need. Ocular gene therapy is a rational choice for restoring vision or preventing the loss of vision because most blinding diseases originate in cellular components of the eye, a compartment that is optimally suited for the delivery of genes, and many of these diseases have a genetic origin or genetic component. In recent years we have witnessed major advances in the field of ocular gene therapy, and proof-of-concept studies are under way to evaluate the safety and efficacy of human gene therapies. Here we discuss the concepts and recent advances in gene therapy in the retina. Our review discusses traditional approaches such as gene replacement and neuroprotection and also new avenues such as optogenetic therapies. We conjecture that advances in gene therapy in the retina will pave the way for gene therapies in other parts of the brain.

  13. Myocardial gene therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isner, Jeffrey M.

    2002-01-01

    Gene therapy is proving likely to be a viable alternative to conventional therapies in coronary artery disease and heart failure. Phase 1 clinical trials indicate high levels of safety and clinical benefits with gene therapy using angiogenic growth factors in myocardial ischaemia. Although gene therapy for heart failure is still at the pre-clinical stage, experimental data indicate that therapeutic angiogenesis using short-term gene expression may elicit functional improvement in affected individuals.

  14. Gene therapy review.

    PubMed

    Moss, Joseph Anthony

    2014-01-01

    The use of genes to treat disease, more commonly known as gene therapy, is a valid and promising tool to manage and treat diseases that conventional drug therapies cannot cure. Gene therapy holds the potential to control a wide range of diseases, including cystic fibrosis, heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and blood diseases. This review assesses the current status of gene therapy, highlighting therapeutic methodologies and applications, terminology, and imaging strategies. This article presents an overview of roadblocks associated with each therapeutic methodology, along with some of the scientific, social, and ethical issues associated with gene therapy.

  15. Radiofrequency hyperthermia promotes the therapeutic effects on chemotherapeutic-resistant breast cancer when combined with heat shock protein promoter-controlled HSV-TK gene therapy: Toward imaging-guided interventional gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jingfeng; Wu, Xiaotian; Zhou, Fei; Zhou, Yurong; Huang, Tongchun; Liu, Fei; Han, Guocan; Chen, Luming; Bai, Weixian; Wu, Xia; Sun, Jihong; Yang, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    Objective Gene therapy is a frontier in modern medicine. In the present study, we explored a new technique for the effective treatment of multidrug-resistant (MDR) breast cancer by combining fully the advantages of multidisciplinary fields, including image-guided minimally invasive interventional oncology, radiofrequency technology, and direct intratumoral gene therapy. Results Combination treatment with PHSP-TK plus RFH resulted in significantly higher TK gene transfection/expression, as well as a lower cell proliferation rate and a higher cell apoptosis index, than those of control groups. In vivo validation experiments with MRI confirmed that combination therapy resulted in a significant reduction of relative tumor volume compared with those of control animals, which was supported by the results of histologic and apoptosis analyses. Materials and methods The heat shock protein promoter (PHSP) was used to precisely control the overexpression of thymidine kinase (TK) (PHSP-TK). Serial in vitro experiments were performed to confirm whether radiofrequency hyperthermia (RFH) could enhance PHSP-TK transfection and expression in a MDR breast cancer cell line (MCF7/Adr). Serial in vivo experiments were then carried out to validate the feasibility of the new technique, termed interventional RFH-enhanced direct intratumoral PHSP-TK gene therapy. The therapeutic effect of combination therapy was evaluated by MRI and confirmed by subsequent laboratory correlation. Conclusions This study has established “proof-of-principle” of a new technique, interventional RFH-enhanced local gene therapy for MDR breast cancer, which may open new avenues for the effective management of MDR breast cancers via the simultaneous integration of interventional oncology, RF technology, and direct intratumoral gene therapy. PMID:27542255

  16. Effect of combined VEGF165/ SDF-1 gene therapy on vascular remodeling and blood perfusion in cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Hu, Guo-Jie; Feng, Yu-Gong; Lu, Wen-Peng; Li, Huan-Ting; Xie, Hong-Wei; Li, Shi-Fang

    2016-12-16

    OBJECTIVE Therapeutic neovascularization is a promising strategy for treating patients after an ischemic stroke; however, single-factor therapy has limitations. Stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) proteins synergistically promote angiogenesis. In this study, the authors assessed the effect of combined gene therapy with VEGF165 and SDF-1 in a rat model of cerebral infarction. METHODS An adenoviral vector expressing VEGF165 and SDF-1 connected via an internal ribosome entry site was constructed (Ad- VEGF165-SDF-1). A rat model of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) was established; either Ad- VEGF165-SDF-1 or control adenovirus Ad- LacZ was stereotactically microinjected into the lateral ventricle of 80 rats 24 hours after MCAO. Coexpression and distribution of VEGF165 and SDF-1 were examined by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and immunofluorescence. The neurological severity score of each rat was measured on Days 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 after MCAO. Angiogenesis and vascular remodeling were evaluated via bromodeoxyuridine and CD34 immunofluorescence labeling. Relative cerebral infarction volumes were determined by T2-weighted MRI and triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. Cerebral blood flow, relative cerebral blood volume, and relative mean transmit time were assessed using perfusion-weighted MRI. RESULTS The Ad- VEGF165-SDF-1 vector mediated coexpression of VEGF165 and SDF-1 in multiple sites around the ischemic core, including the cortex, corpus striatum, and hippocampal granular layer. Coexpression of VEGF165 and SDF-1 improved neural function, reduced cerebral infarction volume, increased microvascular density and promoted angiogenesis in the ischemic penumbra, and improved cerebral blood flow and perfusion. CONCLUSIONS Combined VEGF165 and SDF-1 gene therapy represents a potential strategy for improving vascular remodeling and recovery of neural function after cerebral

  17. Combination of interleukin-12 gene therapy, metronomic cyclophosphamide and DNA cancer vaccination directs all arms of the immune system towards tumor eradication.

    PubMed

    Denies, Sofie; Cicchelero, Laetitia; Van Audenhove, Isabel; Sanders, Niek N

    2014-08-10

    In this work a combination therapy that acts upon the immune suppressive, the innate and specific arms of the immune system is proposed. This combination therapy, which consists of intratumoral interleukin-12 (IL-12) gene therapy, human tyrosinase (hTyr) DNA vaccination and metronomic cyclophosphamide (CPX), was evaluated in a B16-F10 mouse model. The following groups were compared: (1) no treatment, (2) control vector, (3) intratumoral IL-12 gene therapy, (4) intratumoral IL-12 gene therapy+metronomic CPX, (5) intratumoral IL-12 gene therapy+metronomic CPX+hTyr DNA vaccination. Next to clinical efficacy and safety, we characterized acute effects of IL-12 and anti-tumor immune response after a second tumor challenge. All treatment groups showed increased survival and higher cure rates than control groups. Survival of non-cured mice was increased when metronomic CPX was combined with IL-12 gene therapy. Furthermore, mice that received metronomic CPX had significantly lower percentages of regulatory T cells. Addition of the hTyr DNA vaccine increased cure rate and resulted in increased survival compared to other treatment groups. We also demonstrated that the manifest necrosis within days after IL-12 gene therapy is at least partly due to IL-12 mediated activation of NK cells. All cured mice were resistant to a second challenge. A humoral memory response against the tumor cells was observed in all groups that received IL-12 gene therapy, while a cellular memory response was observed only in the vaccinated mice. In conclusion, every component of this combination treatment contributed a unique immunologic trait with associated clinical benefits.

  18. Antiangiogenic Eye Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Corydon, Thomas J

    2015-08-01

    The idea of treating disease in humans with genetic material was conceived over two decades ago and with that a promising journey involving development and efficacy studies in cells and animals of a large number of novel therapeutic reagents unfolded. In the footsteps of this process, successful gene therapy treatment of genetic conditions in humans has shown clear signs of efficacy. Notably, significant advancements using gene supplementation and silencing strategies have been made in the field of ocular gene therapy, thereby pinpointing ocular gene therapy as one of the compelling "actors" bringing gene therapy to the clinic. Most of all, this success has been facilitated because of (1) the fact that the eye is an effortlessly accessible, exceedingly compartmentalized, and immune-privileged organ offering a unique advantage as a gene therapy target, and (2) significant progress toward efficient, sustained transduction of cells within the retina having been achieved using nonintegrating vectors based on recombinant adeno-associated virus and nonintegrating lentivirus vectors. The results from in vivo experiments and trials suggest that treatment of inherited retinal dystrophies, ocular angiogenesis, and inflammation with gene therapy can be both safe and effective. Here, the progress of ocular gene therapy is examined with special emphasis on the potential use of RNAi- and protein-based antiangiogenic gene therapy to treat exudative age-related macular degeneration.

  19. History of gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Wirth, Thomas; Parker, Nigel; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2013-08-10

    Two decades after the initial gene therapy trials and more than 1700 approved clinical trials worldwide we not only have gained much new information and knowledge regarding gene therapy in general, but also learned to understand the concern that has persisted in society. Despite the setbacks gene therapy has faced, success stories have increasingly emerged. Examples for these are the positive recommendation for a gene therapy product (Glybera) by the EMA for approval in the European Union and the positive trials for the treatment of ADA deficiency, SCID-X1 and adrenoleukodystrophy. Nevertheless, our knowledge continues to grow and during the course of time more safety data has become available that helps us to develop better gene therapy approaches. Also, with the increased understanding of molecular medicine, we have been able to develop more specific and efficient gene transfer vectors which are now producing clinical results. In this review, we will take a historical view and highlight some of the milestones that had an important impact on the development of gene therapy. We will also discuss briefly the safety and ethical aspects of gene therapy and address some concerns that have been connected with gene therapy as an important therapeutic modality.

  20. Combining bio-electrospraying with gene therapy: a novel biotechnique for the delivery of genetic material via living cells.

    PubMed

    Ward, Eliot; Chan, Emma; Gustafsson, Kenth; Jayasinghe, Suwan N

    2010-05-01

    The investigations reported in this article demonstrate the ability of bio-electrosprays and cell electrospinning to deliver a genetic construct in association with living cells. Previous studies on both bio-electrosprays and cell electrospinning demonstrated great promise for tissue engineering and regenerative biology/medicine. The investigations described herein widen the applicability of these biotechniques by combining gene therapy protocols, resulting in a novel drug delivery methodology previously unexplored. In these studies a human cell line was transduced with recombinant self-inactivating lentiviral particles. These particles incorporated a green fluorescent protein fused to an endosomal targeting construct. This construct encodes a peptide, which can subsequently be detected on the surface of cells by specific T-cells. The transduced cell line was subsequently manipulated in association with either bio-electrospraying or cell electrospinning. Hence this demonstrates (i) the ability to safely handle genetically modified living cells and (ii) the ability to directly form pre-determined architectures bearing living therapeutic cells. This merged technology demonstrates a unique approach for directly forming living therapeutic architectures for controlled and targeted release of experimental cells/genes, as well as medical cell/gene therapeutics for a plethora of biological and medical applications. Hence, such developments could be applied to personalised medicine.

  1. Formation of vascularized meniscal tissue by combining gene therapy with tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, Chisa; Ibarra, Clemente; Hannafin, Jo A; Torzilli, Peter A; Quitoriano, Mannix; Jen, Shih-Shi; Warren, Russell F; Crystal, Ronald G

    2002-02-01

    Ingrowth of host blood vessels into engineered tissues has potential benefits for successful transplantation of engineered tissues as well as healing of surrounding host tissues. In particular, the use of a vascularized bioengineered tissue could be beneficial for treating injuries to the meniscus, a structure in the knee where the lack of a vascular supply is associated with an inadequate healing response. In this study, gene transfer using an adenovirus vector encoding the hepatocyte growth factor gene (AdHGF) was used to induce blood vessel formation in tissue-engineered meniscus. Bovine meniscal cells were treated with AdHGF, a vector encoding a marker gene E. coli beta-galactosidase (Adbetagal), or no virus. Cells were seeded onto poly-glycolic acid felt scaffolds and then transplanted into the subcutaneous pouch of athymic nude mice for 8 weeks. Expression of the marker gene and HGF was detectable for several weeks after gene transfer. Ink injection studies showed that AdHGF-treated meniscal cells formed tissue which contained fourfold more blood vessels at 2 weeks (p < 0.02) and 2.5-fold more blood vessels at 8 weeks (p < 0.001) posttransplantation than controls. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to engineer a blood supply in the bioengineered meniscal tissue.

  2. Human gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, J S; Keating, A; Hozumi, N

    1997-01-01

    Human gene therapy and its application for the treatment of human genetic disorders, such as cystic fibrosis, cancer, and other diseases, are discussed. Gene therapy is a technique in which a functioning gene is inserted into a human cell to correct a genetic error or to introduce a new function to the cell. Many methods, including retroviral vectors and non-viral vectors, have been developed for both ex vivo and in vivo gene transfer into cells. Vectors need to be developed that efficiently transfer genes to target cells, and promoter systems are required that regulate gene expression according to physiologic needs of the host cell. There are several safety and ethical issues related to manipulating the human genome that need to be resolved. Current gene therapy efforts focus on gene insertion into somatic cells only. Gene therapy has potential for the effective treatment of genetic disorders, and gene transfer techniques are being used for basic research, for example, in cancer, to examine the underlying mechanism of disease. There are still many technical obstacles to be overcome before human gene therapy can become a routine procedure. The current human genome project provides the sequences of a vast number of human genes, leading to the identification, characterization, and understanding of genes that are responsible for many human diseases.

  3. [Gene therapy and ethics].

    PubMed

    Müller, H; Rehmann-Sutter, C

    1995-01-10

    Gene therapy represents a new strategy to treat human disorders. It was originally conceived as a cure for severe monogenetic disorders. Since its conception, the spectrum of possible application for gene therapy has been to include the treatment of acquired diseases, such as various forms of cancer and some viral infections, most notably human immune deficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis B virus. Since somatic gene therapy does not cause substantially new ethical problems, it has gained broad approval. This is by no means the case with germ-line gene therapy. Practically all bodies who were evaluating the related ethical aspects wanted to ban its medical application on grounds of fundamental and pragmatic considerations. In this review, practical and ethical views concerning gene therapy are summarized which were presented at the "Junitagung 1994" of the Swiss Society for Biomedical Ethics in Basle.

  4. Preclinical study on combined chemo- and nonviral gene therapy for sensitization of melanoma using a human TNF-alpha expressing MIDGE DNA vector.

    PubMed

    Kobelt, Dennis; Aumann, Jutta; Schmidt, Manuel; Wittig, Burghardt; Fichtner, Iduna; Behrens, Diana; Lemm, Margit; Freundt, Greta; Schlag, Peter M; Walther, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    Nonviral gene therapy represents a realistic option for clinical application in cancer treatment. This preclinical study demonstrates the advantage of using the small-size MIDGE(®) DNA vector for improved transgene expression and therapeutic application. This is caused by significant increase in transcription efficiency, but not by increased intracellular vector copy numbers or gene transfer efficiency. We used the MIDGE-hTNF-alpha vector for high-level expression of hTNF-alpha in vitro and in vivo for a combined gene therapy and vindesine treatment in human melanoma models. The MIDGE vector mediated high-level hTNF-alpha expression leads to sensitization of melanoma cells towards vindesine. The increased efficacy of this combination is mediated by remarkable acceleration and increase of initiator caspase 8 and 9 and effector caspase 3 and 7 activation. In the therapeutic approach, the nonviral intratumoral in vivo jet-injection gene transfer of MIDGE-hTNF-alpha in combination with vindesine causes melanoma growth inhibition in association with increased apoptosis in A375 cell line or patient derived human melanoma xenotransplant (PDX) models. This study represents a proof-of-concept for an anticipated phase I clinical gene therapy trial, in which the MIDGE-hTNF-alpha vector will be used for efficient combined chemo- and nonviral gene therapy of malignant melanoma.

  5. A novel cancer vaccine strategy with combined IL-18 and HSV-TK gene therapy driven by the hTERT promoter in a murine colorectal cancer model.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Kosuke; Hazama, Shoichi; Araki, Atsuhiro; Yoshimura, Kiyoshi; Iizuka, Norio; Yoshino, Shigefumi; Noma, Takafumi; Oka, Masaaki

    2014-10-01

    A therapeutic vaccine against minimal residual cancer cells is needed for the treatment of patients with colorectal cancer. Several gene therapy studies have revealed that the combination of a suicide gene and cytokine gene might induce effective antitumor immunity. In this study, we constructed an interleukin (IL)-18 and herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) expression vector driven by the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter to study the efficacy of combination gene therapy with IL-18 and the HSV-TK suicide gene. Low immunogenic colon 26 cells were used for transfection and inoculation into syngeneic BALB/c mice. Large established tumors of colon 26 transfectants expressing IL-18 and HSV-TK driven by the hTERT promoter were completely eradicated after GCV administration in syngeneic BALB/c mice. Immunohistochemical analysis at the tumor rejection sites revealed enormous infiltrations of CD8+ T lymphocytes as well as CD4+ T lymphocytes and CD11b+ monocytes. Moreover, established distant tumors were completely eradicated by vaccination with the IL-18 and HSV-TK transfectants in combination with GCV. These data suggest that the IL-18 and suicide gene therapy can elicit antitumor specific immunity. In conclusion, gene therapy with IL-18 and HSV-TK plasmid vector driven by the hTERT promoter may be useful for cancer vaccination.

  6. Core‑shell lipid polymer nanoparticles for combined chemo and gene therapy of childhood head and neck cancers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tiesong; Ma, Jing; Li, Chao; Lin, Ken; Lou, Fan; Jiang, Hongchao; Gao, Yingqin; Yang, Yanli; Ming, Cheng; Ruan, Biao

    2017-03-01

    Pediatric head and neck cancers account for overall 12% of all pediatric cancers. Despite recent advances in therapeutic modalities, children with tumor metastasis have poor prognosis. Therefore, there is an unmet need for new and effective treatment modalities for pediatric head and neck cancers. The present study describes a simple and efficient method for fabrication of cationic lipid‑polymer hybrid nanoparticles (CLPNs) for co‑delivery of cisplatin (CDDP) and DNA (CDDP/DNA CLPNs) for the therapy of childhood head and neck cancers. CDDP/DNA CLPNs were prepared by the modified double emulsion solvent evaporation method with self‑assembly. CDDP‑loaded CLPNs (CDDP CLPNs), CDDP-loaded polymeric nanoparticles (PNPs) (CDDP PNPs), and DNA‑loaded Lipofectamine® 2000 (DNA LIPO) were also prepared for comparison. The results illustrated that the concentration of the cationic lipid has influence on the characteristics of CLPNs. In vitro anticancer effect, in vitro transfection efficiency, in vivo antitumor and gene delivery efficacy of CDDP/DNA CLPNs have advantages over other formulations tested. In conclusion, outstanding delivery ability of CLPNs for both CDDP and DNA could combine the therapeutic efficiency of both drug and gene for the treatment of pediatric rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS).

  7. Disease correction by combined neonatal intracranial AAV and systemic lentiviral gene therapy in Sanfilippo Syndrome type B mice.

    PubMed

    Heldermon, C D; Qin, E Y; Ohlemiller, K K; Herzog, E D; Brown, J R; Vogler, C; Hou, W; Orrock, J L; Crawford, B E; Sands, M S

    2013-09-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIB (MPS IIIB) or Sanfilippo Syndrome type B is a lysosomal storage disease resulting from the deficiency of N-acetyl glucosaminidase (NAGLU) activity. We previously showed that intracranial adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based gene therapy results in partial improvements of several aspects of the disease. In an attempt to further correct the disease, MPS IIIB mice were treated at 2-4 days of age with intracranial AAV2/5-NAGLU (IC-AAV), intravenous lentiviral-NAGLU (IV-LENTI) or the combination of both (BOTH). The BOTH group had the most complete biochemical and histological improvements of any treatment group. Compared with untreated MPS IIIB animals, all treatments resulted in significant improvements in motor function (rotarod) and hearing (auditory-evoked brainstem response). In addition, each treatment group had a significantly increased median life span compared with the untreated group (322 days). The combination arm had the greatest increase (612 days), followed by IC-AAV (463 days) and IV-LENTI (358 days). Finally, the BOTH group had nearly normal circadian rhythm measures with improvement in time to activity onset. In summary, targeting both the systemic and central nervous system disease of MPS IIIB early in life appears to be the most efficacious approach for this inherited metabolic disorder.

  8. Regulated Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Breger, Ludivine; Wettergren, Erika Elgstrand; Quintino, Luis; Lundberg, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy represents a promising approach for the treatment of monogenic and multifactorial neurological disorders. It can be used to replace a missing gene and mutated gene or downregulate a causal gene. Despite the versatility of gene therapy, one of the main limitations lies in the irreversibility of the process: once delivered to target cells, the gene of interest is constitutively expressed and cannot be removed. Therefore, efficient, safe and long-term gene modification requires a system allowing fine control of transgene expression.Different systems have been developed over the past decades to regulate transgene expression after in vivo delivery, either at transcriptional or post-translational levels. The purpose of this chapter is to give an overview on current regulatory system used in the context of gene therapy for neurological disorders. Systems using external regulation of transgenes using antibiotics are commonly used to control either gene expression using tetracycline-controlled transcription or protein levels using destabilizing domain technology. Alternatively, specific promoters of genes that are regulated by disease mechanisms, increasing expression as the disease progresses or decreasing expression as disease regresses, are also examined. Overall, this chapter discusses advantages and drawbacks of current molecular methods for regulated gene therapy in the central nervous system.

  9. Ex Vivo γ-Retroviral Gene Therapy of Dogs with X-linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency and the Development of a Thymic T Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Douglas R.; Hartnett, Brian J.; Kennedy, Jeffrey S.; Vernau, William; Moore, Peter F.; O’Malley, Thomas; Burkly, Linda C.; Henthorn, Paula S.; Felsburg, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    We have previously shown that in vivo γ-retroviral gene therapy of dogs with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID) results in sustained T cell reconstitution and sustained marking in myeloid and B cells for up to 4 years with no evidence of any serious adverse effects. The purpose of this study was to determine whether ex vivo γ-retroviral gene therapy of XSCID dogs results in a similar outcome. Eight of 12 XSCID dogs treated with an average of dose of 5.8 × 106 transduced CD34+ cells/kg successfully engrafted producing normal numbers of gene-corrected CD45RA+ (naïve) T cells. However, this was followed by a steady decrease in CD45RA+ T cells, T cell diversity, and thymic output as measured by T cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) resulting in a T cell lymphopenia. None of the dogs survived past 11 months post treatment. At necropsy, few gene-corrected thymocytes were observed correlating with the TREC levels and one of the dogs was diagnosed with a thymic T cell lymphoma that was attributed to the gene therapy. This study highlights the outcome differences between the ex vivo and in vivo approach to γ-retroviral gene therapy and is the first to document a serious adverse event following gene therapy in a canine model of a human genetic disease. PMID:21536334

  10. Gene therapy for deafness.

    PubMed

    Kohrman, D C; Raphael, Y

    2013-12-01

    Hearing loss is the most common sensory deficit in humans and can result from genetic, environmental or combined etiologies that prevent normal function of the cochlea, the peripheral sensory organ. Recent advances in understanding the genetic pathways that are critical for the development and maintenance of cochlear function, as well as the molecular mechanisms that underlie cell trauma and death, have provided exciting opportunities for modulating these pathways to correct genetic mutations, to enhance the endogenous protective pathways for hearing preservation and to regenerate lost sensory cells with the possibility of ameliorating hearing loss. A number of recent animal studies have used gene-based therapies in innovative ways toward realizing these goals. With further refinement, some of the protective and regenerative approaches reviewed here may become clinically applicable.

  11. Local, non-viral IL-12 gene therapy using a water soluble lipopolymer as carrier system combined with systemic paclitaxel for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Janát-Amsbury, Margit Maria; Yockman, James W; Lee, Minhyung; Kern, Steven; Furgeson, Darin Y; Bikram, Malavosklish; Kim, Sung Wan

    2005-01-03

    Development of improved gene transfer methods is needed for gene therapy to achieve its clinical potential. The use of biocompatible polymeric gene carriers has shown effectiveness in overcoming the current problems associated with viral vectors in safety, immunogenicity and mutagenesis. Previous work has demonstrated that repeated, local, non-viral interleukin-12 (IL-12) gene delivery successfully slows down tumor progression, while improving immunogenicity. Combining IL-12 gene delivery with systemic paclitaxel (PCT) chemotherapy as a treatment for various subcutaneous mouse mammary carcinomas, we used PCT with either a biodegradable polymeric solubilizer, HySolv or Cremophor EL for systemic treatment and injected water soluble lipopolymer (WSLP)/plasmid-encoding IL-12 gene (p2CMVmIL-12) complexes local once every week. The amount of lung metastases being essential for survival as well as subcutaneous tumor volume were compared against untreated controls. We showed inhibition of tumor growth and decreased lung metastases in the combined WSLP/p2CMVmIL-12/HySolv group compared to the controls and the PCT only treated groups. Compared to Cremophor, HySolv performed better alone or in combination with IL-12. Using polymeric vectors as gene carrier systems in combination with improved systemic therapies provide evidence for the efficacy and feasibility of polymer-based drug delivery systems. Especially local cytokine gene delivery showed augmentation of systemic chemotherapy while reducing the hosts risk for further systemic toxicity.

  12. The effects of FGF-2 gene therapy combined with voluntary exercise on axonal regeneration across peripheral nerve gaps.

    PubMed

    Haastert, Kirsten; Ying, Zhe; Grothe, Claudia; Gómez-Pinilla, Fernando

    2008-10-10

    Studies were conducted to determine the possibility that voluntary exercise could enhance regenerative effects of gene therapy via Schwann cells (SC) over-expressing FGF-2. Sedentary or exercise rehabilitation conditions were therefore provided shortly after reconstructing 10mm sciatic nerve gaps in rats with silicone grafts. Exercise for 7 days elevated mRNA levels of regeneration associated proteins (GAP-43 and synapsin I) in lumbar spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia of SC transplanted, in contrast to non-cellular reconstructed rats. FGF-2 gene therapy followed by 25-27 days of exercise did enhance regeneration of myelinated axons in comparison to sedentary animals. Four weeks after surgery mRNA levels of regeneration associated proteins were significantly higher in lumbar spinal cord of running compared to sedentary SC transplanted animals. Our results suggest that voluntary exercise could reinforce the beneficial effects of SC transplantation and FGF-2 gene therapy in peripheral nerve reconstruction approaches.

  13. B Cell Function in Severe Combined Immunodeficiency after Stem Cell or Gene Therapy: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Rebecca H.

    2010-01-01

    While bone marrow transplantation has resulted in life-saving T cell reconstitution in infants with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), correction of B cell function has been more problematic. This review examines B cell reconstitution results presented in 19 reports from the United States and Europe on post-transplantation immune reconstitution in SCID over the past two decades. The analysis considered whether pre-transplantation conditioning regimens were used, the overall survival rate, the percentage with donor B cell chimerism, the percentage with B cell function, and the percentage of survivors requiring immunoglobulin (IG) replacement. The survival rates were higher at those Centers that did not use pre-transplant conditioning or post-transplantation graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis. The percentage of survivors with B cell chimerism and/or function was higher and the percentage requiring IG replacement was lower at those Centers that used pre-transplant conditioning. However there were substantial numbers of patients requiring IG replacement at all Centers. Thus, pre-transplant conditioning does not guarantee that B cell function will develop. Since most infants with SCID either present with serious infections or are diagnosed as newborns, one must decide whether there is justification for using agents that compromise innate immunity and have intrinsic toxicities to gain B cell immune reconstitution. PMID:20371393

  14. Gene therapy for hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Chuah, M K; Evens, H; VandenDriessche, T

    2013-06-01

    Hemophilia A and B are X-linked monogenic disorders resulting from deficiencies of factor VIII and FIX, respectively. Purified clotting factor concentrates are currently intravenously administered to treat hemophilia, but this treatment is non-curative. Therefore, gene-based therapies for hemophilia have been developed to achieve sustained high levels of clotting factor expression to correct the clinical phenotype. Over the past two decades, different types of viral and non-viral gene delivery systems have been explored for hemophilia gene therapy research with a variety of target cells, particularly hepatocytes, hematopoietic stem cells, skeletal muscle cells, and endothelial cells. Lentiviral and adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based vectors are among the most promising vectors for hemophilia gene therapy. In preclinical hemophilia A and B animal models, the bleeding phenotype was corrected with these vectors. Some of these promising preclinical results prompted clinical translation to patients suffering from a severe hemophilic phenotype. These patients receiving gene therapy with AAV vectors showed long-term expression of therapeutic FIX levels, which is a major step forwards in this field. Nevertheless, the levels were insufficient to prevent trauma or injury-induced bleeding episodes. Another challenge that remains is the possible immune destruction of gene-modified cells by effector T cells, which are directed against the AAV vector antigens. It is therefore important to continuously improve the current gene therapy approaches to ultimately establish a real cure for hemophilia.

  15. Combination electro-gene therapy using herpes virus thymidine kinase and interleukin-12 expression plasmids is highly efficient against murine carcinomas in vivo.

    PubMed

    Goto, Tomoaki; Nishi, Toru; Kobayashi, Osamu; Tamura, Takahiko; Dev, Sukhendu B; Takeshima, Hideo; Kochi, Masato; Kuratsu, Jun-ichi; Sakata, Tsuneaki; Ushio, Yukitaka

    2004-11-01

    We report the use of plasmid DNA-mediated combination gene therapy for tumor-bearing mice using in vivo electroporation, also called electro-gene therapy (EGT), that resulted in uncomplicated and complete cures in more than 90% of the mice. Subcutaneously inoculated CT26 tumors in syngeneic BALB/c mice were subjected to repeated EGT treatments consisting of intratumoral co-injection of naked plasmids encoding the cytokine interleukin-12 (IL-12) (p35 and p40 subunits) and the suicide gene herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk), followed by in vivo electroporation. The early anti-tumor effect was always stronger, and the rate of cure, as seen in the long-term follow-up, was always greater in the groups treated with combination EGT than in those treated with IL-12 or HSV-tk EGT alone. Systemic levels of IL-12 and IFN-gamma increased in both combination and IL-12-alone EGT-treated groups. Moreover, combination EGT for established subcutaneous tumors strongly reduced hematogenous lung metastases and increased survival time when live CT26 tumor cells were injected through the tail vein. Limited experiments on C57/B16 mice with murine melanoma also showed very similar trends. These results suggest that this simple and safe method of plasmid-mediated combination EGT may provide a potentially effective gene therapy for cancer.

  16. Apoptotic genes in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Opalka, Bertram; Dickopp, Alexandra; Kirch, Hans-Christoph

    2002-01-01

    Induction of apoptosis in malignant cells is a major goal of cancer therapy in general and of certain cancer gene therapy strategies in particular. Numerous apoptosis-regulating genes have been evaluated for this purpose. Besides the most prominent p53 gene others include p16, p21, p27, E2F genes, FHIT, PTEN and CASPASE genes. Recently, the potential for therapy of an adenoviral gene, E1A, known for a long time for its apoptosis-inducing activity, has been discovered. In experimental settings, these genes have proven their tumor-suppressive and apoptosis-inducing activity. Clinical trials are currently being performed with selected genes. By far the most studies transfer the p53 gene using retro- or adenoviral vectors. Disease stabilization or other benefits were observed in a limited number of patients when p53 was applied alone or in combination with cytotoxic drugs. A second proapoptotic gene that has entered clinical trials is adenovirus E1A. Here, too, disease stabilization as well as/or local regression in one case have been demonstrated in selected patients. In all cases, side effects were tolerable. To further improve E1A as a therapeutic transgene, we have deleted transforming domains from the adenovirus 5 and 12 13S cDNAs. Mutants were derived which had completely lost their transforming activity in combination with the E1B oncogene but retained a pronounced tumor-suppressive activity. Cells transduced with these constructs showed a highly reduced ability to grow in soft agar, and tumor growth in nude mice could be substantially suppressed. Outgrowing tumors had lost E1A expression when analyzed in Western blots. These E1A constructs may represent valuable tools for cancer gene therapy in the future.

  17. Immunotherapy and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Elizabeth

    2004-02-01

    The Immunotherapy and Gene Therapy meeting of the Academy of Medical Sciences reviewed the state-of-the-art and translational prospects for therapeutic interventions aimed at killing tumor cells, correcting genetic defects and developing vaccines for chronic infections. Crucial basic science concepts and information about dendritic cells, the structure and function of T-cell receptors, and manipulation of the immune response by cytokine antagonists and peptides were presented. This information underpins vaccine design and delivery, as well as attempts to immunomodulate autoimmune disease. Results from studies using anticancer DNA vaccines, which include appropriate signals for both the innate and adaptive immune response, were presented in several talks. The vaccines incorporated helper epitopes and cancer target epitopes such as immunoglobulin idiotypes (for lymphomas and myelomas), melanoma-associated antigens (for melanoma and other solid tumors) and minor histocompatibility antigens (for leukemia). The results of using vaccines employing similar principles and designed to reduce viral load in HIV/AIDS patients were also presented. The introduction of suicide genes incorporating the bacterial enzyme nitroreductase gene (ntr) targeted at tumor cells prior to administration of the prodrug CB-1954, converted by ntr into a toxic alkylating agent, was discussed against the background of clinical trials and improved suicide gene design. The introduction into hematopoietic stem cells of missing genes for the common gamma-chain, deficiency of which causes severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), used similar retroviral transduction. The outcome of treating six SCID patients in the UK, and ten in France was successful immune reconstitution in the majority of patients, but in two of the French cases a complication of lymphoproliferative disease due to insertional mutagenesis was observed. The adoptive transfer of T-cells specific for minor histocompatibility antigens (for

  18. Gene therapy for newborns.

    PubMed

    Kohn, D B; Parkman, R

    1997-07-01

    Application of gene therapy to treat genetic and infectious diseases may have several advantages if performed in newborns. Because of the minimal adverse effect of the underlying disease on cells of the newborn, the relatively small size of infants, and the large amount of future growth, gene therapy may be more successful in newborns than in older children or adults. The presence of umbilical cord blood from newborns provides a unique and susceptible target for the genetic modification of hematopoietic stem cells. In our first trial of gene therapy in newborns, we inserted a normal adenosine deaminase gene into umbilical cord blood cells of three neonates with a congenital immune deficiency. The trial demonstrated the successful transduction and engraftment of stem cells, which continue to contribute to leukocyte production more than 3 years later. A similar approach may be taken to insert genes that inhibit replication of HIV-1 into umbilical cord blood cells of HIV-1-infected neonates. Many other metabolic and infectious disorders could be treated by gene therapy during the neonatal period if prenatal diagnoses are made and the appropriate technical and regulatory requirements have been met.

  19. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Expansion and Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Korashon Lynn; Adair, Jennifer; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy remains a highly attractive treatment option for many disorders including hematologic conditions, immunodeficiencies including HIV/AIDS, and other genetic disorders like lysosomal storage diseases, among others. In this review, we discuss the successes, side effects, and limitations of current gene therapy protocols. In addition, we describe the opportunities presented by implementing ex vivo expansion of gene-modified HSCs, as well as summarize the most promising ex vivo expansion techniques currently available. We conclude by discussing how some of the current limitations of HSC gene therapy could be overcome by combining novel HSC expansion strategies with gene therapy. PMID:21999373

  20. Gene Therapy for Skin Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gorell, Emily; Nguyen, Ngon; Lane, Alfred; Siprashvili, Zurab

    2014-01-01

    The skin possesses qualities that make it desirable for gene therapy, and studies have focused on gene therapy for multiple cutaneous diseases. Gene therapy uses a vector to introduce genetic material into cells to alter gene expression, negating a pathological process. This can be accomplished with a variety of viral vectors or nonviral administrations. Although results are promising, there are several potential pitfalls that must be addressed to improve the safety profile to make gene therapy widely available clinically. PMID:24692191

  1. Alphaviruses in Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lundstrom, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Alphavirus vectors present an attractive approach for gene therapy applications due to the rapid and simple recombinant virus particle production and their broad range of mammalian host cell transduction. Mainly three types of alphavirus vectors, namely naked RNA, recombinant particles and DNA/RNA layered vectors, have been subjected to preclinical studies with the goal of achieving prophylactic or therapeutic efficacy, particularly in oncology. In this context, immunization with alphavirus vectors has provided protection against challenges with tumor cells. Moreover, alphavirus intratumoral and systemic delivery has demonstrated substantial tumor regression and significant prolonged survival rates in various animal tumor models. Recent discoveries of the strong association of RNA interference and disease have accelerated gene therapy based approaches, where alphavirus-based gene delivery can play an important role. PMID:25961488

  2. Combining Clozapine and Talk Therapies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulroy, Kevin

    Clozapine is an antipsychotic medication used in the treatment of schizophrenia. This paper reviews articles concerning clozapine therapy. It considers its benefits and dangers in various situations, and how it can be successfully combined with talk therapies. Studies are reviewed concerning patients in outpatient clinics, partial hospitalization…

  3. Insertional mutagenesis combined with acquired somatic mutations causes leukemogenesis following gene therapy of SCID-X1 patients.

    PubMed

    Howe, Steven J; Mansour, Marc R; Schwarzwaelder, Kerstin; Bartholomae, Cynthia; Hubank, Michael; Kempski, Helena; Brugman, Martijn H; Pike-Overzet, Karin; Chatters, Stephen J; de Ridder, Dick; Gilmour, Kimberly C; Adams, Stuart; Thornhill, Susannah I; Parsley, Kathryn L; Staal, Frank J T; Gale, Rosemary E; Linch, David C; Bayford, Jinhua; Brown, Lucie; Quaye, Michelle; Kinnon, Christine; Ancliff, Philip; Webb, David K; Schmidt, Manfred; von Kalle, Christof; Gaspar, H Bobby; Thrasher, Adrian J

    2008-09-01

    X-linked SCID (SCID-X1) is amenable to correction by gene therapy using conventional gammaretroviral vectors. Here, we describe the occurrence of clonal T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) promoted by insertional mutagenesis in a completed gene therapy trial of 10 SCID-X1 patients. Integration of the vector in an antisense orientation 35 kb upstream of the protooncogene LIM domain only 2 (LMO2) caused overexpression of LMO2 in the leukemic clone. However, leukemogenesis was likely precipitated by the acquisition of other genetic abnormalities unrelated to vector insertion, including a gain-of-function mutation in NOTCH1, deletion of the tumor suppressor gene locus cyclin-dependent kinase 2A (CDKN2A), and translocation of the TCR-beta region to the STIL-TAL1 locus. These findings highlight a general toxicity of endogenous gammaretroviral enhancer elements and also identify a combinatorial process during leukemic evolution that will be important for risk stratification and for future protocol design.

  4. Gene Therapy and Children (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Gene Therapy and Children KidsHealth > For Parents > Gene Therapy and ... by a "bad" gene. continue Two Types of Gene Therapy The two forms of gene therapy are: Somatic ...

  5. The ethics of gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Chan, Sarah; Harris, John

    2006-10-01

    Recent developments have progressed in areas of science that pertain to gene therapy and its ethical implications. This review discusses the current state of therapeutic gene technologies, including stem cell therapies and genetic modification, and identifies ethical issues of concern in relation to the science of gene therapy and its application, including the ethics of embryonic stem cell research and therapeutic cloning, the risks associated with gene therapy, and the ethics of clinical research in developing new therapeutic technologies. Additionally, ethical issues relating to genetic modification itself are considered: the significance of the human genome, the distinction between therapy and enhancement, and concerns regarding gene therapy as a eugenic practice.

  6. Combination vascular delivery of herpes simplex oncolytic viruses and amplicon mediated cytokine gene transfer is effective therapy for experimental liver cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Zager, J. S.; Delman, K. A.; Malhotra, S.; Ebright, M. I.; Bennett, J. J.; Kates, T.; Halterman, M.; Federoff, H.; Fong, Y.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Herpes simplex type I (HSV)-based vectors have been used experimentally for suicide gene therapy, immunomodulatory gene delivery, and direct oncolytic therapy. The current study utilizes the novel concept of regional delivery of an oncolytic virus in combination with or serving as the helper virus for packaging herpes-based amplicon vectors carrying a cytokine transgene, with the goal of identifying if this combination is more efficacious than either modality alone. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A replication competent oncolytic HSV (G207) and a replication incompetent HSV amplicon carrying the gene for the immunomodulatory cytokine IL-2 (HSV-IL2) were tested in murine syngeneic colorectal carcinoma and in rat hepatocellular carcinoma models. Liver tumors were treated with vascular delivery of (1) phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), (2) G207, (3) HSV-IL2, (4) G207 and HSV-IL2 mixed in combination (mG207/HSV- IL2), and (5) G207 as the helper virus for packaging the construct HSV-IL2 (pG207/HSV-IL2). RESULTS: Tumor burden was significantly reduced in all treatment groups in both rats and mice treated with high-dose G207, HSV-IL2, or both (p < 0.02). When a low dose of virus was used in mice, anti-tumor efficacy was improved by use of G207 and HSV-IL2 in combination or with HSV-IL2 packaged by G207 (p < 0.001). This improvement was abolished when CD4(+) and CD8(+) lymphocytes were depleted, implying that the enhanced anti-tumor response to low-dose combined therapy is immune mediated. CONCLUSIONS: Vascular regional delivery of oncolytic and amplicon HSV vectors can be used to induce improved anti-tumor efficacy by combining oncolytic and immunostimulatory strategies. PMID:11591892

  7. Improved Immunological Tolerance Following Combination Therapy with CTLA-4/Ig and AAV-Mediated PD-L1/2 Muscle Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Adriouch, Sahil; Franck, Emilie; Drouot, Laurent; Bonneau, Carole; Jolinon, Nelly; Salvetti, Anna; Boyer, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Initially thought as being non-immunogenic, recombinant AAVs have emerged as efficient vector candidates for treating monogenic diseases. It is now clear however that they induce potent immune responses against transgene products which can lead to destruction of transduced cells. Therefore, developing strategies to circumvent these immune responses and facilitate long-term expression of transgenic therapeutic proteins is a main challenge in gene therapy. We evaluated herein a strategy to inhibit the undesirable immune activation that follows muscle gene transfer by administration of CTLA-4/Ig to block the costimulatory signals required early during immune priming and by using gene transfer of PD-1 ligands to inhibit T cell functions at the tissue sites. We provide the proof of principle that this combination immunoregulatory therapy targeting two non-redundant checkpoints of the immune response, i.e., priming and effector functions, can improve persistence of transduced cells in experimental settings where cytotoxic T cells escape initial blockade. Therefore, CTLA-4/Ig plus PD-L1/2 combination therapy represents a candidate approach to circumvent the bottleneck of immune responses directed toward transgene products. PMID:22046170

  8. Gene Therapy for Diseases and Genetic Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... notable advancements are the following: Gene Therapy for Genetic Disorders Severe Combined Immune Deficiency (ADA-SCID) ADA- ... in preclinical animal models of this disease. Other genetic disorders After many years of laboratory and preclinical ...

  9. Enhanced EJ Cell Killing of 125I Radiation by Combining with Cytosine Deaminase Gene Therapy Regulated by Synthetic Radio-Responsive Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ling; Kang, Lei; Wang, Rong-Fu; Yan, Ping; Zhao, Qian; Yin, Lei; Guo, Feng-qin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aim: To investigate the enhancing effect of radionuclide therapy by the therapeutic gene placed under the control of radio-responsive promoter. Methods: The recombinant lentivirus E8-codA-GFP, including a synthetic radiation-sensitive promoter E8, cytosine deaminase (CD) gene, and green fluorescent protein gene, was constructed. The gene expression activated by 125I radiation was assessed by observation of green fluorescence. The ability of converting 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) to 5-fluorourial (5-FU) by CD enzyme was assessed by high-performance liquid chromatography. The viability of the infected cells exposed to 125I in the presence of 5-FC was determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, and the infected cells exposed to 125I alone served as negative control and 5-FU as positive control. Results: The recombinant lentiviral vector was constructed successfully. On exposure of infected cells to 125I, green fluorescence can be observed and 5-FU can be detected. MTT assay showed that the survival rate for infected cells treated with 125I was lower compared with the 125I control group, but higher than the positive control group. Conclusion: The synthetic promoter E8 can induce the expression of downstream CD gene under 125I radiation, and the tumor killing effect of 125I can be enhanced by combining CD gene therapy with radiosensitive promoter. PMID:26382009

  10. Dynamics of PBMC gene expression in hepatitis C virus genotype 1-infected patients during combined peginterferon/ribavirin therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ming-Ying; Huang, Ching-I; Hsieh, Ming-Yen; Hsieh, Tusty-Juan; Hsi, Edward; Tsai, Pei-Chien; Tsai, Yi-Shan; Lin, Ching-Chih; Hsieh, Meng-Hsuan; Liang, Po-Cheng; Lin, Yi-Hung; Hou, Nai-Jen; Yeh, Ming-Lun; Huang, Chung-Feng; Lin, Zu-Yau; Chen, Shinn-Cherng; Huang, Jee-Fu; Chuang, Wan-Long; Dai, Chia-Yen; Yu, Ming-Lung

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) can replicate in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), which can produce interferon to defend against virus infection. We hypothesized that dynamic gene expression in PBMCs might impact the treatment efficacy of peginterferon/ribavirin in HCV patients. PBMCs were collected at baseline, 1st week and 4th week of treatment from 27 chronic HCV-1 patients with 48-week peginterferon/ribavirin therapy (screening dataset n = 7; validation dataset n = 20). A sustained virologic response (SVR) was defined as undetectable HCV RNA throughout the 24 weeks after end-of-treatment. A complete early virologic response (cEVR) was defined as negative HCV RNA at treatment week 12. Forty-three differentially expressed genes identified by Affymetrix microarray were validated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Thirteen genes at week 1 and 24 genes at week 4 were upregulated in the SVR group compared with the non-SVR group. We selected 8 target genes (RSAD2, LOC26010, HERC5, HERC6, IFI44, SERPING1, IFITM3, and DDX60) at week 1 as the major components of the predictive model. This predictive model reliably stratified the responders and non-responders at week 1 (AUC = 0.89, p = 0.007 for SVR; AUC = 0.95, p = 0.003 for cEVR), especially among patients carrying the IL28B rs8099917 TT genotype (AUC = 0.89, p = 0.02 for SVR; AUC = 1.0, p = 0.008 for cEVR). The performance of this predictive model was superior to traditional predictors, including the rapid virologic response, viral load and IL28B genotype. PMID:27542257

  11. Evaluation of radiation effects against C6 glioma in combination with vaccinia virus-p53 gene therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gridley, D. S.; Andres, M. L.; Li, J.; Timiryasova, T.; Chen, B.; Fodor, I.; Nelson, G. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the antitumor effects of recombinant vaccinia virus-p53 (rVV-p53) in combination with radiation therapy against the C6 rat glioma, a p53 deficient tumor that is relatively radioresistant. VV-LIVP, the parental virus (Lister strain), was used as a control. Localized treatment of subcutaneous C6 tumors in athymic mice with either rVV-p53 or VV-LIVP together with tumor irradiation resulted in low tumor incidence and significantly slower tumor progression compared to the agents given as single modalities. Assays of blood and spleen indicated that immune system activation may account, at least partly, for the enhance tumor inhibition seen with combined treatment. No overt signs of treatment-related toxicity were noted.

  12. Combined Therapy for Postirradiation Infection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    weeks after ex- posure to ionizing radiation. Antibiotics alone do not provide adequate the- rapy for induced infections in neutropenic mice. Because... Antibiotics alone do not assure cure of infec- effect of TDM against different challenge doses tions or survival of irradiated animals of K. pneumoniae...Treated with Combined Therapy of TDM and Ceftriaxone. LD50/30 Antibiotic % Survival? .pneumoniae Therapy TDM/o TDM/s Saline Oil 5000 ceftriaxone 100 88 69

  13. [Combination therapy for invasive aspergillosis].

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Camps, Isabel

    2011-03-01

    The frequency of invasive fungal infections, and specifically invasive aspergillosis, has increased in the last few decades. Despite the development of new antifungal agents, these infections are associated with high mortality, ranging from 40% to 80%, depending on the patient and the localization of the infection. To reduce these figures, several therapeutic strategies have been proposed, including combination therapy. Most of the available data on the efficacy of these combinations are from experimental models, in vitro data and retrospective observational studies or studies with a small number of patients that have included both patients in first-line treatment and those receiving rescue therapy; in addition there are many patients with possible forms of aspergillosis and few with demonstrated or probable forms. To date, there is no evidence that combination therapy has significantly higher efficacy than monotherapy; however, combination therapy could be indicated in severe forms of aspergillosis, or forms with central nervous involvement or extensive pulmonary involvement with respiratory insufficiency, etc. Among the combinations, the association of an echinocandin--the group that includes micafungin--with voriconazole or liposomal amphotericin B seems to show synergy. These combinations are those most extensively studied in clinical trials and therefore, although the grade of evidence is low, are recommended by the various scientific societies.

  14. nanosheets for gene therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Zhongyang; Wang, Xin; Yuan, Renshun; Chen, Huabin; Zhi, Qiaoming; Gao, Ling; Wang, Bin; Guo, Zhaoji; Xue, Xiaofeng; Cao, Wei; Guo, Liang

    2014-10-01

    A new class of two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterial, transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) such as MoS2, MoSe2, WS2, and WSe2 which have fantastic physical and chemical properties, has drawn tremendous attention in different fields recently. Herein, we for the first time take advantage of the great potential of MoS2 with well-engineered surface as a novel type of 2D nanocarriers for gene delivery and therapy of cancer. In our system, positively charged MoS2-PEG-PEI is synthesized with lipoic acid-modified polyethylene glycol (LA-PEG) and branched polyethylenimine (PEI). The amino end of positively charged nanomaterials can bind to the negatively charged small interfering RNA (siRNA). After detection of physical and chemical characteristics of the nanomaterial, cell toxicity was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) was investigated as a well-known oncogene, which was a critical regulator of cell cycle transmission at multiple levels. Through knockdown of PLK1 with siRNA carried by novel nanovector, qPCR and Western blot were used to measure the interfering efficiency; apoptosis assay was used to detect the transfection effect of PLK1. All results showed that the novel nanocarrier revealed good biocompatibility, reduced cytotoxicity, as well as high gene-carrying ability without serum interference, thus would have great potential for gene delivery and therapy.

  15. Gene therapy in keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Farjadnia, Mahgol; Naderan, Mohammad; Mohammadpour, Mehrdad

    2015-01-01

    Keratoconus (KC) is the most common ectasia of the cornea and is a common reason for corneal transplant. Therapeutic strategies that can arrest the progression of this disease and modify the underlying pathogenesis are getting more and more popularity among scientists. Cumulating data represent strong evidence of a genetic role in the pathogenesis of KC. Different loci have been identified, and certain mutations have also been mapped for this disease. Moreover, Biophysical properties of the cornea create an appropriate candidate of this tissue for gene therapy. Immune privilege, transparency and ex vivo stability are among these properties. Recent advantage in vectors, besides the ability to modulate the corneal milieu for accepting the target gene for a longer period and fruitful translation, make a big hope for stupendous results reasonable. PMID:25709266

  16. Hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy for adenosine deaminase-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency leads to long-term immunological recovery and metabolic correction.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, H Bobby; Cooray, Samantha; Gilmour, Kimberly C; Parsley, Kathryn L; Zhang, Fang; Adams, Stuart; Bjorkegren, Emma; Bayford, Jinhua; Brown, Lucinda; Davies, E Graham; Veys, Paul; Fairbanks, Lynette; Bordon, Victoria; Petropoulou, Theoni; Petropolou, Theoni; Kinnon, Christine; Thrasher, Adrian J

    2011-08-24

    Genetic defects in the purine salvage enzyme adenosine deaminase (ADA) lead to severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) with profound depletion of T, B, and natural killer cell lineages. Human leukocyte antigen-matched allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) offers a successful treatment option. However, individuals who lack a matched donor must receive mismatched transplants, which are associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) for ADA-SCID is available, but the associated suboptimal correction of immunological defects leaves patients susceptible to infection. Here, six children were treated with autologous CD34-positive hematopoietic bone marrow stem and progenitor cells transduced with a conventional gammaretroviral vector encoding the human ADA gene. All patients stopped ERT and received mild chemotherapy before infusion of gene-modified cells. All patients survived, with a median follow-up of 43 months (range, 24 to 84 months). Four of the six patients recovered immune function as a result of engraftment of gene-corrected cells. In two patients, treatment failed because of disease-specific and technical reasons: Both restarted ERT and remain well. Of the four reconstituted patients, three remained off enzyme replacement. Moreover, three of these four patients discontinued immunoglobulin replacement, and all showed effective metabolic detoxification. All patients remained free of infection, and two cleared problematic persistent cytomegalovirus infection. There were no adverse leukemic side effects. Thus, gene therapy for ADA-SCID is safe, with effective immunological and metabolic correction, and may offer a viable alternative to conventional unrelated donor HSCT.

  17. Combined modality therapy for esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Bruce D

    2003-08-01

    Treatment approaches for esophageal cancer include primary treatment (surgical or nonsurgical) or adjuvant treatment (preoperative or postoperative). Primary treatments include surgery alone, radiation therapy alone, and radiation therapy plus chemotherapy (combined modality therapy). Adjuvant therapies include preoperative or postoperative radiation therapy, preoperative chemotherapy, and preoperative combined modality therapy. There is considerable controversy as to the ideal therapeutic approach. This review will examine the results of these approaches as well as combined modality therapy using novel regimens.

  18. [Basic principles of gene therapy].

    PubMed

    Vieweg, J

    1996-09-01

    The rapid development of recombinant DNA technology and our enhanced understanding of the genetic basis of human disease has facilitated the development of new molecular therapeutic modalities, termed gene therapy. Gene therapy involves the transfer of functional genes into somatic cells and their expression in target tissues in order to replace absent genes, correct defective genes, or induce antitumoral activity in the tumor-bearing host. Currently, an increasing number of gene therapy strategies are being investigated in experimental and clinical trials. Despite substantial progress, a number of technical and logistical hurdles must still be overcome before gene therapy can be safety and effectively applied in the human patient. Since gene therapy involves complex cell processing and can be time consuming and costly, simplifications or even alternative approaches will be necessary in order to establish this therapy as suitable for clinical use. This report reviews various gene therapy strategies and gene delivery techniques currently under clinical or experimental investigation. Special emphasis is given to cytokine gene therapy using gene-modified tumor vaccines for cancer treatment.

  19. A Novel Gene Gun-Mediated IL-12 Gene Therapy for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-10-01

    The results of this study show that particle-mediated IL-12 gene therapy was effective against mammary tumors in mouse models. IL-12 gene therapy of...combination with IL-12 gene therapy , IL-18 and ICE genes were found to be more effective in treatment of established TS/A mammary tumor than IL-12 alone. These...results suggest that particle-mediated IL-12 gene therapy , alone or in combination with other immunological approaches, may be effective for

  20. Gene therapy for psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Gelfand, Yaroslav; Kaplitt, Michael G

    2013-01-01

    Gene therapy has become of increasing interest in clinical neurosurgery with the completion of numerous clinical trials for Parkinson disease, Alzheimer disease, and pediatric genetic disorders. With improved understanding of the dysfunctional circuitry mediating various psychiatric disorders, deep brain stimulation for refractory psychiatric diseases is being increasingly explored in human patients. These factors are likely to facilitate development of gene therapy for psychiatric diseases. Because delivery of gene therapy agents would require the same surgical techniques currently being employed for deep brain stimulation, neurosurgeons are likely to lead the development of this field, as has occurred in other areas of clinical gene therapy for neurologic disorders. We review the current state of gene therapy for psychiatric disorders and focus specifically on particular areas of promising research that may translate into human trials for depression, drug addiction, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and schizophrenia. Issues that are relatively unique to psychiatric gene therapy are also discussed.

  1. Gene regulation in cancer gene therapy strategies.

    PubMed

    Scanlon, Ian; Lehouritis, Panos; Niculescu-Duvaz, Ion; Marais, Richard; Springer, Caroline J

    2003-10-01

    Regulation of expression in gene therapy is considered to be a very desirable goal, preventing toxic effects and improving biological efficacy. A variety of systems have been reported in an ever widening range of applications, this paper describes these systems with specific reference to cancer gene therapy.

  2. Gene Therapy for Autoimmune Disease.

    PubMed

    Shu, Shang-An; Wang, Jinjun; Tao, Mi-Hua; Leung, Patrick S C

    2015-10-01

    Advances in understanding the immunological and molecular basis of autoimmune diseases have made gene therapy a promising approach to treat the affected patients. Gene therapy for autoimmune diseases aims to regulate the levels of proinflammatory cytokines or molecules and the infiltration of lymphocytes to the effected sites through successful delivery and expression of therapeutic genes in appropriate cells. The ultimate goal of gene therapy is to restore and maintain the immune tolerance to the relevant autoantigens and improve clinical outcomes for patients. Here, we summarize the recent progress in identifying genes responsible for autoimmune diseases and present examples where gene therapy has been applied as treatments or prevention in autoimmune diseases both in animal models and the clinical trials. Discussion on the advantages and pitfalls of gene therapy strategies employed is provided. The intent of this review is to inspire further studies toward the development of new strategies for successful treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  3. Gene Therapy and Children (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Gene Therapy and Children KidsHealth > For Parents > Gene Therapy ... that don't respond to conventional therapies. About Genes Our genes help make us unique. Inherited from ...

  4. Gene therapy for hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Geoffrey L; Herzog, Roland W

    2015-01-01

    Hemophilia is an X-linked inherited bleeding disorder consisting of two classifications, hemophilia A and hemophilia B, depending on the underlying mutation. Although the disease is currently treatable with intravenous delivery of replacement recombinant clotting factor, this approach represents a significant cost both monetarily and in terms of quality of life. Gene therapy is an attractive alternative approach to the treatment of hemophilia that would ideally provide life-long correction of clotting activity with a single injection. In this review, we will discuss the multitude of approaches that have been explored for the treatment of both hemophilia A and B, including both in vivo and ex vivo approaches with viral and nonviral delivery vectors.

  5. Gene therapy on demand: site specific regulation of gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Jazwa, Agnieszka; Florczyk, Urszula; Jozkowicz, Alicja; Dulak, Jozef

    2013-08-10

    Since 1990 when the first clinical gene therapy trial was conducted, much attention and considerable promise have been given to this form of treatment. Gene therapy has been used with success in patients suffering from severe combined immunodeficiency syndromes (X-SCID and ADA-deficiency), Leber's congenital amaurosis, hemophilia, β-thalassemia and adrenoleukodystrophy. Last year, the first therapeutic vector (Glybera) for treatment of lipoprotein lipase deficiency has been registered in the European Union. Nevertheless, there are still several numerous issues that need to be improved to make this technique more safe, effective and easily accessible for patients. Introduction of the therapeutic gene to the given cells should provide the level of expression which will restore the production of therapeutic protein to normal values or will provide therapeutic efficacy despite not fully physiological expression. However, in numerous diseases the expression of therapeutic genes has to be kept at certain level for some time, and then might be required to be switched off to be activated again when worsening of the symptoms may aggravate the risk of disease relapse. In such cases the promoters which are regulated by local conditions may be more required. In this article the special emphasis is to discuss the strategies of regulation of gene expression by endogenous stimuli. Particularly, the hypoxia- or miRNA-regulated vectors offer the possibilities of tight but, at the same time, condition-dependent and cell-specific expression. Such means have been already tested in certain pathophysiological conditions. This creates the chance for the translational approaches required for development of effective treatments of so far incurable diseases.

  6. Gene therapy for malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Okura, Hidehiro; Smith, Christian A; Rutka, James T

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most frequent and devastating primary brain tumor in adults. Despite current treatment modalities, such as surgical resection followed by chemotherapy and radiotherapy, only modest improvements in median survival have been achieved. Frequent recurrence and invasiveness of GBM are likely due to the resistance of glioma stem cells to conventional treatments; therefore, novel alternative treatment strategies are desperately needed. Recent advancements in molecular biology and gene technology have provided attractive novel treatment possibilities for patients with GBM. Gene therapy is defined as a technology that aims to modify the genetic complement of cells to obtain therapeutic benefit. To date, gene therapy for the treatment of GBM has demonstrated anti-tumor efficacy in pre-clinical studies and promising safety profiles in clinical studies. However, while this approach is obviously promising, concerns still exist regarding issues associated with transduction efficiency, viral delivery, the pathologic response of the brain, and treatment efficacy. Tumor development and progression involve alterations in a wide spectrum of genes, therefore a variety of gene therapy approaches for GBM have been proposed. Improved viral vectors are being evaluated, and the potential use of gene therapy alone or in synergy with other treatments against GBM are being studied. In this review, we will discuss the most commonly studied gene therapy approaches for the treatment of GBM in preclinical and clinical studies including: prodrug/suicide gene therapy; oncolytic gene therapy; cytokine mediated gene therapy; and tumor suppressor gene therapy. In addition, we review the principles and mechanisms of current gene therapy strategies as well as advantages and disadvantages of each.

  7. Recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated gene transfer for the potential therapy of adenosine deaminase-deficient severe combined immune deficiency.

    PubMed

    Silver, Jared N; Elder, Melissa; Conlon, Thomas; Cruz, Pedro; Wright, Amy J; Srivastava, Arun; Flotte, Terence R

    2011-08-01

    Severe combined immune deficiency due to adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency is a rare, potentially fatal pediatric disease, which results from mutations within the ADA gene, leading to metabolic abnormalities and ultimately profound immunologic and nonimmunologic defects. In this study, recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors based on serotypes 1 and 9 were used to deliver a secretory version of the human ADA (hADA) gene to various tissues to promote immune reconstitution following enzyme expression in a mouse model of ADA deficiency. Here, we report that a single-stranded rAAV vector, pTR2-CB-Igκ-hADA, (1) facilitated successful gene delivery to multiple tissues, including heart, skeletal muscle, and kidney, (2) promoted ectopic expression of hADA, and (3) allowed enhanced serum-based enzyme activity over time. Moreover, the rAAV-hADA vector packaged in serotype 9 capsid drove partial, prolonged, and progressive immune reconstitution in ADA-deficient mice. Overview Summary Gene therapies for severe combined immune deficiency due to adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency (ADA-SCID) over two decades have exclusively involved retroviral vectors targeted to lymphocytes and hematopoietic progenitor cells. These groundbreaking gene therapies represented an unprecedented revolution in clinical medicine but in most cases did not fully correct the immune deficiency and came with the potential risk of insertional mutagenesis. Alternatively, recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors have gained attention as valuable tools for gene transfer, having demonstrated no pathogenicity in humans, minimal immunogenicity, long-term efficacy, ease of administration, and broad tissue tropism (Muzyczka, 1992 ; Flotte et al., 1993 ; Kessler et al., 1996 ; McCown et al., 1996 ; Lipkowitz et al., 1999 ; Marshall, 2001 ; Chen et al., 2003 ; Conlon and Flotte, 2004 ; Griffey et al., 2005 ; Pacak et al., 2006 ; Stone et al., 2008 ; Liu et al., 2009 ; Choi et al., 2010

  8. Combined gene/cell therapies provide long-term and pervasive rescue of multiple pathological symptoms in a murine model of globoid cell leukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ricca, Alessandra; Rufo, Nicole; Ungari, Silvia; Morena, Francesco; Martino, Sabata; Kulik, Wilem; Alberizzi, Valeria; Bolino, Alessandra; Bianchi, Francesca; Del Carro, Ubaldo; Biffi, Alessandra; Gritti, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Globoid cell leukodystrophy (GLD) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by deficient activity of β-galactocerebrosidase (GALC). The infantile forms manifest with rapid and progressive central and peripheral demyelination, which represent a major hurdle for any treatment approach. We demonstrate here that neonatal lentiviral vector-mediated intracerebral gene therapy (IC GT) or transplantation of GALC-overexpressing neural stem cells (NSC) synergize with bone marrow transplant (BMT) providing dramatic extension of lifespan and global clinical–pathological rescue in a relevant GLD murine model. We show that timely and long-lasting delivery of functional GALC in affected tissues ensured by the exclusive complementary mode of action of the treatments underlies the outstanding benefit. In particular, the contribution of neural stem cell transplantation and IC GT during the early asymptomatic stage of the disease is instrumental to enhance long-term advantage upon BMT. We clarify the input of central nervous system, peripheral nervous system and periphery to the disease, and the relative contribution of treatments to the final therapeutic outcome, with important implications for treatment strategies to be tried in human patients. This study gives proof-of-concept of efficacy, tolerability and clinical relevance of the combined gene/cell therapies proposed here, which may constitute a feasible and effective therapeutic opportunity for children affected by GLD. PMID:25749991

  9. Gene therapy in metachromatic leukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Sevin, C; Cartier-Lacave, N; Aubourg, P

    2009-01-01

    Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme arylsulfatase A. Deficiency of this enzyme results in intralysosomal storage of sphingolipid cerebroside 3-sulfates (sulfatides), which are abundant in myelin and neurons. A pathological hallmark of MLD is demyelination and neurodegeneration, causing various and ultimately lethal neurological symptoms. This review discusses the potential therapeutic application of hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy and intracerebral gene transfer (brain gene therapy) in patients with MLD.

  10. Combination angiostatic therapies: current status.

    PubMed

    Peyman, Gholam A; Fiscella, Richard; Conway, Mandi

    2009-06-01

    One of the most important obstacles to combining pharmaceutical agents to treat ocular diseases is the risk of physiochemical reactions. In intraocular administration, these reactions may produce incompatibility, instability, or both. They may change the nature of drug activity, and they may threaten normal cellular function, resulting in lens opacities, corneal toxicity, retinal cell damage, or other adverse outcomes. Although many medications have demonstrated efficacy or have shown promise when administered intravitreally, including antifungals, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha agents, mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors, metalloproteinase inhibitors, antiviral agents, antineoplastic compounds, and antivascular endothelial growth factor therapies, these have been typically tested as single agents. The potential for these agents to be combined will be largely determined by their physiochemical compatibility.

  11. Nanoparticles for Retinal Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Conley, Shannon M.; Naash, Muna I.

    2010-01-01

    Ocular gene therapy is becoming a well-established field. Viral gene therapies for the treatment of Leber’s congentinal amaurosis (LCA) are in clinical trials, and many other gene therapy approaches are being rapidly developed for application to diverse ophthalmic pathologies. Of late, development of non-viral gene therapies has been an area of intense focus and one technology, polymer-compacted DNA nanoparticles, is especially promising. However, development of pharmaceutically and clinically viable therapeutics depends not only on having an effective and safe vector but also on a practical treatment strategy. Inherited retinal pathologies are caused by mutations in over 220 genes, some of which contain over 200 individual disease-causing mutations, which are individually very rare. This review will focus on both the progress and future of nanoparticles and also on what will be required to make them relevant ocular pharmaceutics. PMID:20452457

  12. Gene therapy: proceed with caution.

    PubMed

    Grobstein, C; Flower, M

    1984-04-01

    On 6 February 1984 the Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee of the National Institutes of Health approved a recommendation that the committee provide prior review of research protocols involving human gene therapy. Grobstein and Flower trace the development of public policy in response to concerns about the dangers of gene therapy, especially as it applies to germ line alteration. They offer guidelines and propose principles for an oversight body to confront the immediate and long term technical, social, and ethical implications of human genetic modification. An accompanying article presents a plea for the development of gene therapy by the mother of three children who have sickle cell anemia.

  13. Impact of α-targeted radiation therapy on gene expression in a pre-clinical model for disseminated peritoneal disease when combined with paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Yong, Kwon Joong; Milenic, Diane E; Baidoo, Kwamena E; Brechbiel, Martin W

    2014-01-01

    To better understand the molecular basis of the enhanced cell killing effected by the combined modality of paclitaxel and ²¹²Pb-trastuzumab (Pac/²¹²Pb-trastuzumab), gene expression in LS-174T i.p. xenografts was investigated 24 h after treatment. Employing a real time quantitative PCR array (qRT-PCR array), 84 DNA damage response genes were quantified. Differentially expressed genes following therapy with Pac/²¹²Pb-trastuzumab included those involved in apoptosis (BRCA1, CIDEA, GADD45α, GADD45γ, GML, IP6K3, PCBP4, PPP1R15A, RAD21, and p73), cell cycle (BRCA1, CHK1, CHK2, GADD45α, GML, GTSE1, NBN, PCBP4, PPP1R15A, RAD9A, and SESN1), and damaged DNA repair (ATRX, BTG2, EXO1, FEN1, IGHMBP2, OGG1, MSH2, MUTYH, NBN, PRKDC, RAD21, and p73). This report demonstrates that the increased stressful growth arrest conditions induced by the Pac/²¹²Pb-trastuzumab treatment suppresses cell proliferation through the regulation of genes which are involved in apoptosis and damaged DNA repair including single and double strand DNA breaks. Furthermore, the study demonstrates that ²¹²Pb-trastuzumab potentiation of cell killing efficacy results from the perturbation of genes related to the mitotic spindle checkpoint and BASC (BRCA1-associated genome surveillance complex), suggesting cross-talk between DNA damage repair and the spindle damage response.

  14. Gene therapy for inherited retinal degenerations.

    PubMed

    Dalkara, Deniz; Sahel, José-Alain

    2014-03-01

    Gene therapy is quickly becoming a reality applicable in the clinic for inherited retinal diseases. Progress over the past decade has moved proof-of-concept gene therapies from bench to bedside. The remarkable success in safety and efficacy, in the phase I/II clinical trials for the form of the severe childhood-onset blindness, Leber's Congenital Amaurosis (LCA) type II (due to mutations in the RPE65 gene) generated significant interest and opened up possibilities for a new era of retinal gene therapies. Success in these clinical trials was due to combining the favorable features of both the retina as a target organ and adeno-associated virus (AAV) as a vector. The retina offers several advantages for gene therapy approaches. It is an anatomically defined structure that is readily accessible for therapy and has some degree of immune privilege, making it suitable for application of viral vectors. AAV, on the other hand, is a non-pathogenic helper dependent virus that has little immunogenicity. This viral vector transduces quiescent cells efficiently and thanks to its small size diffuses well in the interneural matrix, making it suitable for applications in neural tissue. Building on this initial clinical success with LCA II, we have now many opportunities to extend this proof-of-concept to other retinal diseases. This article will discuss what are some of the most imminent targets for such therapies and what are the challenges that we face in moving these therapies to the clinic.

  15. Human Studies of Angiogenic Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Rajesh; Tongers, Jörn; Losordo, Douglas W.

    2009-01-01

    Despite significant advances in medical, interventional, and surgical therapy for coronary and peripheral arterial disease, the burden of these illnesses remains high. To address this unmet need, the science of therapeutic angiogenesis has been evolving for almost two decades. Early pre-clinical studies and phase I clinical trials achieved promising results with growth factors administered as recombinant proteins or as single-agent gene therapies, and data accumulated through 10 years of clinical trials indicate that gene therapy has an acceptable safety profile. However, more rigorous phase II and phase III clinical trials have failed to unequivocally demonstrate that angiogenic agents are beneficial under the conditions and in the patients studied to date. Investigators have worked to understand the biology of the vascular system and to incorporate their findings into new treatments for patients with ischemic disease. Recent gene- and cell-therapy trials have demonstrated the bioactivity of several new agents and treatment strategies. Collectively, these observations have renewed interest in the mechanisms of angiogenesis and deepened our understanding of the complexity of vascular regeneration. Gene therapy that incorporates multiple growth factors, approaches that combine cell and gene therapy, and the administration of "master switch" agents that activate numerous downstream pathways are among the credible and plausible steps forward. In this review, we will examine the clinical development of angiogenic therapy, summarize several of the lessons learned during the conduct of these trials, and suggest how this prior experience may guide the conduct of future preclinical investigations and clinical trials. PMID:19815827

  16. Strategies in Gene Therapy for Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Kwiatkowska, Aneta; Nandhu, Mohan S.; Behera, Prajna; Chiocca, E. Antonio; Viapiano, Mariano S.

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive form of brain cancer, with a dismal prognosis and extremely low percentage of survivors. Novel therapies are in dire need to improve the clinical management of these tumors and extend patient survival. Genetic therapies for GBM have been postulated and attempted for the past twenty years, with variable degrees of success in pre-clinical models and clinical trials. Here we review the most common approaches to treat GBM by gene therapy, including strategies to deliver tumor-suppressor genes, suicide genes, immunomodulatory cytokines to improve immune response, and conditionally-replicating oncolytic viruses. The review focuses on the strategies used for gene delivery, including the most common and widely used vehicles (i.e., replicating and non-replicating viruses) as well as novel therapeutic approaches such as stem cell-mediated therapy and nanotechnologies used for gene delivery. We present an overview of these strategies, their targets, different advantages, and challenges for success. Finally, we discuss the potential of gene therapy-based strategies to effectively attack such a complex genetic target as GBM, alone or in combination with conventional therapy. PMID:24202446

  17. Gene Therapy in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Fargnoli, Anthony S; Katz, Michael G; Bridges, Charles R; Hajjar, Roger J

    2016-10-28

    Heart failure is a significant burden to the global healthcare system and represents an underserved market for new pharmacologic strategies, especially therapies which can address root cause myocyte dysfunction. Modern drugs, surgeries, and state-of-the-art interventions are costly and do not improve survival outcome measures. Gene therapy is an attractive strategy, whereby selected gene targets and their associated regulatory mechanisms can be permanently managed therapeutically in a single treatment. This in theory could be sustainable for the patient's life. Despite the promise, however, gene therapy has numerous challenges that must be addressed together as a treatment plan comprising these key elements: myocyte physiologic target validation, gene target manipulation strategy, vector selection for the correct level of manipulation, and carefully utilizing an efficient delivery route that can be implemented in the clinic to efficiently transfer the therapy within safety limits. This chapter summarizes the key developments in cardiac gene therapy from the perspective of understanding each of these components of the treatment plan. The latest pharmacologic gene targets, gene therapy vectors, delivery routes, and strategies are reviewed.

  18. Gene therapy on the move

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, Kerstin B; Büning, Hildegard; Galy, Anne; Schambach, Axel; Grez, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    The first gene therapy clinical trials were initiated more than two decades ago. In the early days, gene therapy shared the fate of many experimental medicine approaches and was impeded by the occurrence of severe side effects in a few treated patients. The understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms leading to treatment- and/or vector-associated setbacks has resulted in the development of highly sophisticated gene transfer tools with improved safety and therapeutic efficacy. Employing these advanced tools, a series of Phase I/II trials were started in the past few years with excellent clinical results and no side effects reported so far. Moreover, highly efficient gene targeting strategies and site-directed gene editing technologies have been developed and applied clinically. With more than 1900 clinical trials to date, gene therapy has moved from a vision to clinical reality. This review focuses on the application of gene therapy for the correction of inherited diseases, the limitations and drawbacks encountered in some of the early clinical trials and the revival of gene therapy as a powerful treatment option for the correction of monogenic disorders. PMID:24106209

  19. Gene Therapy for Childhood Neurofibromatosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-13-1-0101 TITLE: Gene Therapy for Childhood ...May 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Gene Therapy for Childhood Neurofibromatosis 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0101 5c...technology. This approach still represents a plausible and very different way to treat childhood neurofibromatosis, as well as other solid tumors

  20. Update on gene therapy for immunodeficiencies.

    PubMed

    Kohn, Donald B

    2010-05-01

    Primary immune deficiencies (PID) are due to blood cell defects and can be treated with transplantation of normal hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) from another person (allogeneic). Gene therapy in which a patient's autologous HSC are genetically corrected represents an alternative treatment for patients with PID, which could avoid the immunologic risks of allogeneic HSCT and confer similar benefits. Recent clinical trials using gene therapy have led to immune restoration in patients with X-linked severe combined immune deficiency (XSCID), adenosine deaminase (ADA)-deficient SCID and chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). However, severe complications arose in several of the patients in whom the integrated retroviral vectors led to leukoproliferative disorders. New approaches using safer integrating vectors or direct correction of the defective gene underlying the PID are being developed and may lead to safer and effective gene therapy for PID.

  1. Gene Therapy for Pituitary Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Seilicovich, Adriana; Pisera, Daniel; Sciascia, Sandra A.; Candolfi, Marianela; Puntel, Mariana; Xiong, Weidong; Jaita, Gabriela; Castro, Maria G.

    2009-01-01

    Pituitary tumors are the most common primary intracranial neoplasms. Although most pituitary tumors are considered typically benign, others can cause severe and progressive disease. The principal aims of pituitary tumor treatment are the elimination or reduction of the tumor mass, normalization of hormone secretion and preservation of remaining pituitary function. In spite of major advances in the therapy of pituitary tumors, for some of the most difficult tumors, current therapies that include medical, surgical and radiotherapeutic methods are often unsatisfactory and there is a need to develop new treatment strategies. Gene therapy, which uses nucleic acids as drugs, has emerged as an attractive therapeutic option for the treatment of pituitary tumors that do not respond to classical treatment strategies if the patients become intolerant to the therapy. The development of animal models for pituitary tumors and hormone hypersecretion has proven to be critical for the implementation of novel treatment strategies and gene therapy approaches. Preclinical trials using several gene therapy approaches for the treatment of anterior pituitary diseases have been successfully implemented. Several issues need to be addressed before clinical implementation becomes a reality, including the development of more effective and safer viral vectors, uncovering novel therapeutic targets and development of targeted expression of therapeutic transgenes. With the development of efficient gene delivery vectors allowing long-term transgene expression with minimal toxicity, gene therapy will become one of the most promising approaches for treating pituitary adenomas. PMID:16457646

  2. Gene Therapy for "Bubble Boy" Disease.

    PubMed

    Hoggatt, Jonathan

    2016-07-14

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency results in the accumulation of toxic metabolites that destroy the immune system, causing severe combined immunodeficiency (ADA-SCID), often referred to as the "bubble boy" disease. Strimvelis is a European Medicines Agency approved gene therapy for ADA-SCID patients without a suitable bone marrow donor.

  3. Correction of Murine Rag2 Severe Combined Immunodeficiency by Lentiviral Gene Therapy Using a Codon-optimized RAG2 Therapeutic Transgene

    PubMed Central

    van Til, Niek P; de Boer, Helen; Mashamba, Nomusa; Wabik, Agnieszka; Huston, Marshall; Visser, Trudi P; Fontana, Elena; Poliani, Pietro Luigi; Cassani, Barbara; Zhang, Fang; Thrasher, Adrian J; Villa, Anna; Wagemaker, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    Recombination activating gene 2 (RAG2) deficiency results in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) with complete lack of T and B lymphocytes. Initial gammaretroviral gene therapy trials for other types of SCID proved effective, but also revealed the necessity of safe vector design. We report the development of lentiviral vectors with the spleen focus forming virus (SF) promoter driving codon-optimized human RAG2 (RAG2co), which improved phenotype amelioration compared to native RAG2 in Rag2−/− mice. With the RAG2co therapeutic transgene, T-cell receptor (TCR) and immunoglobulin repertoire, T-cell mitogen responses, plasma immunoglobulin levels and T-cell dependent and independent specific antibody responses were restored. However, the thymus double positive T-cell population remained subnormal, possibly due to the SF virus derived element being sensitive to methylation/silencing in the thymus, which was prevented by replacing the SF promoter by the previously reported silencing resistant element (ubiquitous chromatin opening element (UCOE)), and also improved B-cell reconstitution to eventually near normal levels. Weak cellular promoters were effective in T-cell reconstitution, but deficient in B-cell reconstitution. We conclude that immune functions are corrected in Rag2−/− mice by genetic modification of stem cells using the UCOE driven codon-optimized RAG2, providing a valid optional vector for clinical implementation. PMID:22692499

  4. Vectors for cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Russell, S J

    1996-09-01

    Many viral and non-viral vector systems have now been developed for gene therapy applications. In this article, the pros and cons of these vector systems are discussed in relation to the different cancer gene therapy strategies. The protocols used in cancer gene therapy can be broadly divided into six categories including gene transfer to explanted cells for use as cell-based cancer vaccines; gene transfer to a small number of tumour cells in situ to achieve a vaccine effect; gene transfer to vascular endothelial cells (VECs) lining the blood vessels of the tumour to interfere with tumour angiogenesis; gene transfer to T lymphocytes to enhance their antitumour effector capability; gene transfer to haemopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to enhance their resistance to cytotoxic drugs and gene transfer to a large number of tumour cells in situ to achieve nonimmune tumour reduction with or without bystander effect. Each of the six strategies makes unique demands on the vector system and these are discussed with reference to currently available vectors. Aspects of vector biology that are in need of further development are discussed in some detail. The final section points to the potential use of replicating viruses as delivery vehicles for efficient in vivo gene transfer to disseminated cancers.

  5. Gene Therapy in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Vinge, Leif Erik; Raake, Philip W.; Koch, Walter J.

    2008-01-01

    With increasing knowledge of basic molecular mechanisms governing the development of heart failure (HF), the possibility of specifically targeting key pathological players is evolving. Technology allowing for efficient in vivo transduction of myocardial tissue with long-term expression of a transgene enables translation of basic mechanistic knowledge into potential gene therapy approaches. Gene therapy in HF is in its infancy clinically with the predominant amount of experience being from animal models. Nevertheless, this challenging and promising field is gaining momentum as recent preclinical studies in larger animals have been carried out and, importantly, there are 2 newly initiated phase I clinical trials for HF gene therapy. To put it simply, 2 parameters are needed for achieving success with HF gene therapy: (1) clearly identified detrimental/beneficial molecular targets; and (2) the means to manipulate these targets at a molecular level in a sufficient number of cardiac cells. However, several obstacles do exist on our way to efficient and safe gene transfer to human myocardium. Some of these obstacles are discussed in this review; however, it primarily focuses on the molecular target systems that have been subjected to intense investigation over the last decade in an attempt to make gene therapy for human HF a reality. PMID:18566312

  6. Small RNA combination therapy for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Xue, Wen; Dahlman, James E; Tammela, Tuomas; Khan, Omar F; Sood, Sabina; Dave, Apeksha; Cai, Wenxin; Chirino, Leilani M; Yang, Gillian R; Bronson, Roderick; Crowley, Denise G; Sahay, Gaurav; Schroeder, Avi; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G; Jacks, Tyler

    2014-08-26

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) and siRNAs have enormous potential as cancer therapeutics, but their effective delivery to most solid tumors has been difficult. Here, we show that a new lung-targeting nanoparticle is capable of delivering miRNA mimics and siRNAs to lung adenocarcinoma cells in vitro and to tumors in a genetically engineered mouse model of lung cancer based on activation of oncogenic Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (Kras) and loss of p53 function. Therapeutic delivery of miR-34a, a p53-regulated tumor suppressor miRNA, restored miR-34a levels in lung tumors, specifically down-regulated miR-34a target genes, and slowed tumor growth. The delivery of siRNAs targeting Kras reduced Kras gene expression and MAPK signaling, increased apoptosis, and inhibited tumor growth. The combination of miR-34a and siRNA targeting Kras improved therapeutic responses over those observed with either small RNA alone, leading to tumor regression. Furthermore, nanoparticle-mediated small RNA delivery plus conventional, cisplatin-based chemotherapy prolonged survival in this model compared with chemotherapy alone. These findings demonstrate that RNA combination therapy is possible in an autochthonous model of lung cancer and provide preclinical support for the use of small RNA therapies in patients who have cancer.

  7. Gene Therapy for Metabolic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Randy J.; Venditti, Charles P.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Gene therapy has recently shown great promise as an effective treatment for a number of metabolic diseases caused by genetic defects in both animal models and human clinical trials. Most of the current success has been achieved using a viral mediated gene addition approach, but gene-editing technology has progressed rapidly and gene modification is being actively pursued in clinical trials. This review focuses on viral mediated gene addition approaches, because most of the current clinical trials utilize this approach to treat metabolic diseases. PMID:27853673

  8. Chitosan-based therapeutic nanoparticles for combination gene therapy and gene silencing of in vitro cell lines relevant to type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Jean, Myriam; Alameh, Mohamad; De Jesus, Diogo; Thibault, Marc; Lavertu, Marc; Darras, Vincent; Nelea, Monica; Buschmann, Michael D; Merzouki, Abderrazzak

    2012-01-23

    Glucagon like peptide 1 (GLP-1), a blood glucose homeostasis modulating incretin, has been proposed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, native GLP-1 pharmacokinetics reveals low bioavailability due to degradation by the ubiquitous dipeptydil peptidase IV (DPP-IV) endoprotease. In this study, the glucosamine-based polymer chitosan was used as a cationic polymer-based in vitro delivery system for GLP-1, DPP-IV resistant GLP-1 analogues and siRNA targeting DPP-IV mRNA. We found chitosans to form spherical nanocomplexes with these nucleic acids, generating two distinct non-overlapping size ranges of 141-283 nm and 68-129 nm for plasmid and siRNA, respectively. The low molecular weight high DDA chitosan 92-10-5 (degree of deacetylation, molecular weight and N:P ratio (DDA-Mn-N:P)) showed the highest plasmid DNA transfection efficiency in HepG2 and Caco-2 cell lines when compared to 80-10-10 and 80-80-5 chitosans. Recombinant native GLP-1 protein levels in media of transfected cells reached 23 ng/L while our DPP-IV resistant analogues resulted in a fivefold increase of GLP-1 protein levels (115 ng/L) relative to native GLP-1, and equivalent to the Lipofectamine positive control. We also found that all chitosan-DPP-IV siRNA nanocomplexes were capable of DPP-IV silencing, with 92-10-5 being significantly more effective in abrogating enzymatic activity of DPP-IV in media of silenced cells, and with no apparent cytotoxicity. These results indicate that specific chitosan formulations may be effectively used for the delivery of plasmid DNA and siRNA in a combination therapy of type 2 diabetes.

  9. Cytokine-enhanced vaccine and interferon-β plus suicide gene as combined therapy for spontaneous canine sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Finocchiaro, Liliana M E; Villaverde, Marcela S; Gil-Cardeza, María L; Riveros, María D; Glikin, Gerardo C

    2011-10-01

    Eleven soft tissue- and five osteosarcoma canine patients were subjected to: (i) periodic subcutaneous injection of irradiated xenogeneic cells secreting hGM-CSF and hIL-2 mixed with allogeneic or autologous tumor homogenates; and (ii) injections of cIFN-β and HSVtk-carrying lipoplexes and ganciclovir, marginal (after surgery) and/or intratumoral (in the case of partial tumor resection, local relapse or small surface tumors). This treatment alone (4 patients) or as surgery adjuvant (12 patients), was safe and well tolerated. In those patients presenting local disease (6/11), the suicide gene plus cIFN-β treatment induced local antitumor activity evidenced by the objective responses (3 complete, 2 partial) and stable diseases (2). In addition, the treatment prevented or delayed local relapse, regional metastases (lymph nodes developed only in 3/16) and distant metastases (0/16), suggesting a strong systemic antitumor immunity. The most encouraging result was the long survival times of 10 patients (>1 year, with good quality of life).

  10. The Effect of Gene Variants on Levonorgestrel Pharmacokinetics when Combined with Antiretroviral Therapy containing Efavirenz or Nevirapine.

    PubMed

    Neary, M; Lamorde, M; Olagunju, A; Darin, K M; Merry, C; Byakika-Kibwika, P; Back, D J; Siccardi, M; Owen, A; Scarsi, K K

    2017-02-10

    Reduced levonorgestrel concentrations from the levonorgestrel contraceptive implant was previously seen when given concomitantly with efavirenz. We sought to assess whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes involved in efavirenz and nevirapine metabolism were linked to these changes in levonorgestrel concentration. SNPs in CYP2B6, CYP2A6, NR1I2 and NR1I3 were analysed. Associations of participant demographics and genotype with levonorgestrel pharmacokinetics were evaluated in HIV-positive women using the levonorgestrel implant plus efavirenz- or nevirapine-based ART, in comparison to ART-naïve women using multivariate linear regression. Efavirenz group: CYP2B6 516G>T was associated with lower levonorgestrel log10 Cmax and log10 AUC. CYP2B6 15582C>T was associated with lower log10 AUC. Nevirapine group: CYP2B6 516G>T was associated with higher log10 Cmax and lower log10 Cmin . Pharmacogenetic variations influenced subdermal levonorgestrel pharmacokinetics in HIV-positive women, indicating that the magnitude of the interaction with non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) is influenced by host genetics. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Gene therapy for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jeffrey; Sun, Michael H; Kang, Quan; Peng, Ying; Jiang, Wei; Luu, Hue H; Luo, Qing; Park, Jae Yoon; Li, Yien; Haydon, Rex C; He, Tong-Chuan

    2005-04-01

    Efficacious bone regeneration could revolutionize the clinical management of many bone and musculoskeletal disorders. Bone has the unique ability to regenerate and continuously remodel itself throughout life. However, clinical situations arise when bone is unable to heal itself, as with segmental bone loss, fracture non-union, and failed spinal fusion. This leads to significant morbidity and mortality. Current attempts at improved bone healing have been met with limited success, fueling the development of improved techniques. Gene therapy in many ways represents an ideal approach for augmenting bone regeneration. Gene therapy allows specific gene products to be delivered to a precise anatomic location. In addition, the level of transgene expression as well as the duration of expression can be regulated with current techniques. For bone regeneration, the gene of interest should be delivered to the fracture site, expressed at appropriate levels, and then deactivated once the fracture has healed. Delivery of biological factors, mostly bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), has yielded promising results both in animal and clinical studies. There has also been tremendous work on discovering new growth factors and exploring previously defined ones. Finally, significant advances are being made in the delivery systems of the genes, ranging from viral and non-viral vectors to tissue engineering scaffolds. Despite some public hesitation to gene therapy, its use has great potential to expand our ability to treat a variety of human bone and musculoskeletal disorders. It is conceivable that in the near future gene therapy can be utilized to induce bone formation in virtually any region of the body in a minimally invasive manner. As bone biology and gene therapy research progresses, the goal of successful human gene transfer for augmentation of bone regeneration draws nearer.

  12. Human germline gene therapy reconsidered.

    PubMed

    Resnik, D B; Langer, P J

    2001-07-20

    This paper reevaluates the notion of human germline gene therapy (HGLGT) in light of developments in biomedicine, biotechnology, and ethical and policy analysis. The essay makes the following key points. First, because the distinction among "therapy," "prevention," and "enhancement" is not clear in human genetics, "gene therapy" is an inadequate descriptor of the process and goals of germline genetic alterations. The alternate use of the phrase "human germline genome modification" (HGLGM) could avoid a misleading label. Second, procedures that could be construed as genetic "enhancement" may not be as morally problematic as some have supposed, once one understands that the boundaries between therapy, prevention, and enhancement are not obvious in genetic medicine. Third, HGLGM might be the medically and morally most appropriate way of avoiding the birth of a child with a genetic disease in only a small range of cases. Fourth, there are still many ethical and scientific problems relating to the safety and efficacy of HGLGM.

  13. State-of-the-art human gene therapy: part I. Gene delivery technologies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Gao, Guangping

    2014-01-01

    Safe and effective gene delivery is a prerequisite for successful gene therapy. In the early age of human gene therapy, setbacks due to problematic gene delivery vehicles plagued the exciting therapeutic outcome. However, gene delivery technologies rapidly evolved ever since. With the advancement of gene delivery techniques, gene therapy clinical trials surged during the past decade. As the first gene therapy product (Glybera) has obtained regulatory approval and reached clinic, human gene therapy finally realized the promise that genes can be medicines. The diverse gene delivery techniques available today have laid the foundation for gene therapy applications in treating a wide range of human diseases. Some of the most urgent unmet medical needs, such as cancer and pandemic infectious diseases, have been tackled by gene therapy strategies with promising results. Furthermore, combining gene transfer with other breakthroughs in biomedical research and novel biotechnologies opened new avenues for gene therapy. Such innovative therapeutic strategies are unthinkable until now, and are expected to be revolutionary. In part I of this review, we introduced recent development of non-viral and viral gene delivery technology platforms. As cell-based gene therapy blossomed, we also summarized the diverse types of cells and vectors employed in ex vivo gene transfer. Finally, challenges in current gene delivery technologies for human use were discussed.

  14. Gene Therapy in Corneal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Qazi, Yureeda; Hamrah, Pedram

    2014-01-01

    Corneal transplantation is the most commonly performed organ transplantation. Immune privilege of the cornea is widely recognized, partly because of the relatively favorable outcome of corneal grafts. The first-time recipient of corneal allografts in an avascular, low-risk setting can expect a 90% success rate without systemic immunosuppressive agents and histocompatibility matching. However, immunologic rejection remains the major cause of graft failure, particularly in patients with a high risk for rejection. Corticosteroids remain the first-line therapy for the prevention and treatment of immune rejection. However, current pharmacological measures are limited in their side-effect profiles, repeated application, lack of targeted response, and short duration of action. Experimental ocular gene therapy may thus present new horizons in immunomodulation. From efficient viral vectors to sustainable alternative splicing, we discuss the progress of gene therapy in promoting graft survival and postulate further avenues for gene-mediated prevention of allogeneic graft rejection. PMID:24138037

  15. Gene therapy for Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fillat, Cristina; Altafaj, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    The presence of an additional copy of HSA21 chromosome in Down syndrome (DS) individuals leads to the overexpression of 30-50% of HSA21 genes. This upregulation can, in turn, trigger a deregulation on the expression of non-HSA21 genes. Moreover, the overdose of HSA21 microRNAs (miRNAs) may result in the downregulation of its target genes. Additional complexity can also arise from epigenetic changes modulating gene expression. Thus, a myriad of transcriptional and posttranscriptional alterations participate to produce abnormal phenotypes in almost all tissues and organs of DS individuals. The study of the physiological roles of genes dysregulated in DS, as well as their characterization in murine models with gene(s) dosage imbalance, pointed out several genes, and functional noncoding elements to be particularly critical in the etiology of DS. Recent findings indicate that gene therapy strategies-based on the introduction of genetic elements by means of delivery vectors-toward the correction of phenotypic abnormalities in DS are also very promising tool to identify HSA21 and non-HSA21 gene candidates, contributing to DS phenotype. In this chapter, we focus on the impact of normalizing the expression levels of up or downregulated genes to rescue particular phenotypes of DS. Attempts toward gene-based treatment approaches in mouse models will be discussed as new opportunities to ameliorate DS alterations.

  16. [Genetic basis of head and neck cancers and gene therapy].

    PubMed

    Özel, Halil Erdem; Özkırış, Mahmut; Gencer, Zeliha Kapusuz; Saydam, Levent

    2013-01-01

    Surgery and combinations of traditional treatments are not successful enough particularly for advanced stage head and neck cancer. The major disadvantages of chemotherapy and radiation therapy are the lack of specificity for the target tissue and toxicity to the patient. As a result, gene therapy may offer a more specific approach. The aim of gene therapy is to present therapeutic genes into cancer cells which selectively eliminate malignant cells with no systemic toxicity to the patient. This article reviews the genetic basis of head and neck cancers and important concepts in cancer gene therapy: (i) inhibition of oncogenes; (ii) tumor suppressor gene replacement; (iii) regulation of immune response against malignant cells; (iv) genetic prodrug activation; and (v) antiangiogenic gene therapy. Currently, gene therapy is not sufficient to replace the traditional treatments of head and neck cancers, however there is no doubt that it will have an important role in the near future.

  17. Ethics of Gene Therapy Debated.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borman, Stu

    1991-01-01

    Presented are the highlights of a press conference featuring biomedical ethicist LeRoy Walters of Georgetown University and attorney Andrew Kimbrell of the Foundation on Economic Trends. The opposing points of view of these two speakers serve to outline the pros and cons of the gene therapy issue. (CW)

  18. Combined Pharmacologic Therapy in Postmenopausal Osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yang; Gray, Dona L; Martinez, Dorothy S

    2017-03-01

    Antiresorptive agents for treating postmenopausal osteoporosis include selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM), bisphosphonates and denoumab. Teriparatide is the only Food and Drug Administration-approved anabolic agent. Synergistic effects of combining teriparatide with an antiresorptive agent have been proposed and studied. This article reviews the trial designs and the outcomes of combination therapies. Results of the combination therapy for teriparatide and bisphosphonates were mixed; while small increases of bone density were observed in the combination therapy of teriparatide and estrogen/SERM and that of teriparatide and denosumab. Those clinical studies were limited by small sample sizes and lack of fracture outcomes.

  19. Advances in gene therapy for ADA-deficient SCID.

    PubMed

    Aiuti, Alessandro

    2002-10-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA)-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) was the first inherited disease treated with gene therapy. The pilot gene therapy studies demonstrated the safety, therapeutic potential and limitations of ADA gene transfer into hematopoietic cells using retroviral vectors. This review describes the latest progress in ADA-SCID dinical trials using peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) and hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). PBL gene therapy was able to restore T-cell functions after discontinuation of ADA enzyme replacement therapy, but only partially corrected the purine metabolic defect. The development of improved HSC gene transfer protocols, combined with low intensity conditioning, allowed full correction of the immunological and metabolic ADA defects, with clinic benefit. These results have important implications for future applications of gene therapy in other disorders involving the hemapoietic system.

  20. [Gene therapy and Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Li, Wenwen; Zhou, Jun

    2015-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by the presence of extracellular β-amyloid in the senile plaques, intracellular aggregates of abnormal phosphorylation of tau protein in the neurofibrillary tangles, neuronal loss and cerebrovascular amyloidosis. The manifestations of clinical symptoms include memory impairment, cognitive decline, altered behavior and language deficit. Currently available drugs in AD therapy consist of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, NMDA receptor antagonists, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, etc. These drugs can only alleviate the symptoms of AD. Gene therapy is achieved by vector-mediated gene transfer technology, which can delivery DNA or RNA into target cells to promote the expression of a protective or therapeutic protein and silence certain virulence genes.

  1. Treating Immunodeficiency through HSC Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Booth, Claire; Gaspar, H Bobby; Thrasher, Adrian J

    2016-04-01

    Haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy has been successfully employed as a therapeutic option to treat specific inherited immune deficiencies, including severe combined immune deficiencies (SCID) over the past two decades. Initial clinical trials using first-generation gamma-retroviral vectors to transfer corrective DNA demonstrated clinical benefit for patients, but were associated with leukemogenesis in a number of cases. Safer vectors have since been developed, affording comparable efficacy with an improved biosafety profile. These vectors are now in Phase I/II clinical trials for a number of immune disorders with more preclinical studies underway. Targeted gene editing allowing precise DNA correction via platforms such as ZFNs, TALENs and CRISPR/Cas9 may now offer promising strategies to improve the safety and efficacy of gene therapy in the future.

  2. Gene Therapy: Implications for Craniofacial Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Scheller, Erica L.; Villa-Diaz, Luis G; Krebsbach, Paul H.

    2011-01-01

    Gene therapy in the craniofacial region provides a unique tool for delivery of DNA to coordinate protein production in both time and space. The drive to bring this technology to the clinic is derived from the fact that over 85% of the global population may at one time require repair or replacement of a craniofacial structure. This need ranges from mild tooth decay and tooth loss to temporomandibular joint disorders and large-scale reconstructive surgery. Our ability to insert foreign DNA into a host cell has been developing since early uses of gene therapy to alter bacterial properties for waste cleanup in the 1980s followed by successful human clinical trials in the 1990s to treat severe combined immunodeficiency. In the past twenty years the emerging field of craniofacial tissue engineering has adopted these techniques to enhance regeneration of mineralized tissues, salivary gland, periodontium, and to reduce tumor burden of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Studies are currently pursuing research on both biomaterial-mediated gene delivery as well as more clinically efficacious, though potentially more hazardous, viral methods. Though hundreds of gene therapy clinical trials have taken place in the past twenty years, we must still work to ensure an ideal safety profile for each gene and delivery method combination. With adequate genotoxicity testing, we can expect gene therapy to augment protein delivery strategies and potentially allow for tissue-specific targeting, delivery of multiple signals, and increased spatial and temporal control with the goal of natural tissue replacement in the craniofacial complex. PMID:22337437

  3. Gene Therapy Shows Promise for Aggressive Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_163824.html Gene Therapy Shows Promise for Aggressive Lymphoma Over one-third of patients appeared disease- ... 2017 (HealthDay News) -- An experimental gene therapy for aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma beat back more than a ...

  4. Gene therapy: X-SCID transgene leukaemogenicity.

    PubMed

    Thrasher, Adrian J; Gaspar, H Bobby; Baum, Christopher; Modlich, Ute; Schambach, Axel; Candotti, Fabio; Otsu, Makoto; Sorrentino, Brian; Scobie, Linda; Cameron, Ewan; Blyth, Karen; Neil, Jim; Abina, Salima Hacein-Bey; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Fischer, Alain

    2006-09-21

    Gene therapy has been remarkably effective for the immunological reconstitution of patients with severe combined immune deficiency, but the occurrence of leukaemia in a few patients has stimulated debate about the safety of the procedure and the mechanisms of leukaemogenesis. Woods et al. forced high expression of the corrective therapeutic gene IL2RG, which encodes the gamma-chain of the interleukin-2 receptor, in a mouse model of the disease and found that tumours appeared in a proportion of cases. Here we show that transgenic IL2RG does not necessarily have potent intrinsic oncogenic properties, and argue that the interpretation of this observation with respect to human trials is overstated.

  5. [Gene therapy of neurological diseases].

    PubMed

    Kahn, A; Haase, G; Akli, S; Guidotti, J E

    1996-01-01

    transgenes transferred through adenoviral vectors, we have constructed vectors with cDNAs or genes for various neutrophic factors: CNTF, NT3, BDNF and GDNF. These vectors were biologically active on target cells, ex vivo and in vivo. In the pmn mouse model of progressive motor neuronal degeneration, some of these vectors, alone or combined, allowed for prolongation of life of homozygous animals by more than two fold, and for decrease in the demyelination of phrenic nerve axons. Finally, we have also constructed an adenoviral vector carrying the alpha-hexosaminidase cDNA, encoding the enzyme subunit deficient in Tay Sachs patients. This vector permitted to normalize ganglioside metabolism in Tay Sachs fibroblasts and is currently tested in knock out mice deficient in hexosaminidase A. In spite of all these encouraging results, we are nevertheless aware that progress in vector design and delivery strategies will be needed before gene therapy can become a realistic therapeutical strategy in humans.

  6. American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Join ASGCT! Job Bank Donate Media The American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy The American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy is the primary professional membership organization for gene and cell therapy. The Society's members are scientists, physicians, patient advocates, and other ...

  7. Gene therapy: Myth or reality?

    PubMed

    Fischer, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy has become a reality, although still a fragile one. Clinical benefit has been achieved over the last 17years in a limited number of medical conditions for which pathophysiological studies determined that they were favorable settings. They include inherited disorders of the immune system, leukodystrophies, possibly hemoglobinopathies, hemophilia B, and retinal dystrophies. Advances in the treatment of B-cell leukemias and lymphomas have also been achieved. Advances in vector development and possible usage of gene editing may lead to significant advances over the next years.

  8. Orthopedic Gene Therapy in 2008

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Christopher H; Ghivizzani, Steven C; Robbins, Paul D

    2008-01-01

    Orthopedic disorders, although rarely fatal, are the leading cause of morbidity and impose a huge socioeconomic burden. Their prevalence will increase dramatically as populations age and gain weight. Many orthopedic conditions are difficult to treat by conventional means; however, they are good candidates for gene therapy. Clinical trials have already been initiated for arthritis and the aseptic loosening of prosthetic joints, and the development of bone-healing applications is at an advanced, preclinical stage. Other potential uses include the treatment of Mendelian diseases and orthopedic tumors, as well as the repair and regeneration of cartilage, ligaments, and tendons. Many of these goals should be achievable with existing technologies. The main barriers to clinical application are funding and regulatory issues, which in turn reflect major safety concerns and the opinion, in some quarters, that gene therapy should not be applied to nonlethal, nongenetic diseases. For some indications, advances in nongenetic treatments have also diminished enthusiasm. Nevertheless, the preclinical and early clinical data are impressive and provide considerable optimism that gene therapy will provide straightforward, effective solutions to the clinical management of several common debilitating disorders that are otherwise difficult and expensive to treat. PMID:19066598

  9. Gene Therapy Applications to Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    Over the past ten years significant advances have been made in the fields of gene therapy and tumour immunology, such that there now exists a considerable body of evidence validating the proof in the principle of gene therapy based cancer vaccines. While clinical benefit has so far been marginal, data from preclinical and early clinical trials of gene therapy combined with standard therapies are strongly suggestive of additional benefit. Many reasons have been proposed to explain the paucity of clinical responses to single agent vaccination strategies including the poor antigenicity of tumour cells and the development of tolerance through down-regulation of MHC, costimulatory, signal transduction, and other molecules essential for the generation of strong immune responses. In addition, there is now evidence from animal models that the growing tumour may actively inhibit the host immune response. Removal of the primary tumour prior to T cell transfer from the spleen of cancer bearing animals, led to effective tumour cell line specific immunity in the recipient mouse suggesting that there is an ongoing tumour-host interaction. This model also illustrates the potential difficulties of clinical vaccine trials in patients with advanced stage disease. PMID:12686721

  10. Advances of gene therapy for primary immunodeficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Candotti, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    In the recent past, the gene therapy field has witnessed a remarkable series of successes, many of which have involved primary immunodeficiency diseases, such as X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency, adenosine deaminase deficiency, chronic granulomatous disease, and Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome. While such progress has widened the choice of therapeutic options in some specific cases of primary immunodeficiency, much remains to be done to extend the geographical availability of such an advanced approach and to increase the number of diseases that can be targeted. At the same time, emerging technologies are stimulating intensive investigations that may lead to the application of precise genetic editing as the next form of gene therapy for these and other human genetic diseases. PMID:27508076

  11. Gene therapy approaches for spinal cord injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bright, Corinne

    As the biomedical engineering field expands, combination technologies are demonstrating enormous potential for treating human disease. In particular, intersections between the rapidly developing fields of gene therapy and tissue engineering hold promise to achieve tissue regeneration. Nonviral gene therapy uses plasmid DNA to deliver therapeutic proteins in vivo for extended periods of time. Tissue engineering employs biomedical materials, such as polymers, to support the regrowth of injured tissue. In this thesis, a combination strategy to deliver genes and drugs in a polymeric scaffold was applied to a spinal cord injury model. In order to develop a platform technology to treat spinal cord injury, several nonviral gene delivery systems and polymeric scaffolds were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Nonviral vector trafficking was evaluated in primary neuronal culture to develop an understanding of the barriers to gene transfer in neurons and their supporting glia. Although the most efficient gene carrier in vitro differed from the optimal gene carrier in vivo, confocal and electron microscopy of these nonviral vectors provided insights into the interaction of these vectors with the nucleus. A novel pathway for delivering nanoparticles into the nuclei of neurons and Schwann cells via vesicle trafficking was observed in this study. Reporter gene expression levels were evaluated after direct and remote delivery to the spinal cord, and the optimal nonviral vector, dose, and delivery strategy were applied to deliver the gene encoding the basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) to the spinal cord. An injectable and biocompatible gel, composed of the amphiphillic polymer poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(epsilon-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG-PCL-PEG) was evaluated as a drug and gene delivery system in vitro, and combined with the optimized nonviral gene delivery system to treat spinal cord injury. Plasmid DNA encoding the bFGF gene and the therapeutic NEP1--40 peptide

  12. Advancement and prospects of tumor gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Wang, Qing-Tao; Liu, He; Zhang, Zhen-Zhu; Huang, Wen-Lin

    2011-03-01

    Gene therapy is one of the most attractive fields in tumor therapy. In past decades, significant progress has been achieved. Various approaches, such as viral and non-viral vectors and physical methods, have been developed to make gene delivery safer and more efficient. Several therapeutic strategies have evolved, including gene-based (tumor suppressor genes, suicide genes, antiangiogenic genes, cytokine and oxidative stress-based genes) and RNA-based (antisense oligonucleotides and RNA interference) approaches. In addition, immune response-based strategies (dendritic cell- and T cell-based therapy) are also under investigation in tumor gene therapy. This review highlights the progress and recent developments in gene delivery systems, therapeutic strategies, and possible clinical directions for gene therapy.

  13. [Gene therapy of SCID-X1].

    PubMed

    Baum, C; Schambach, A; Modlich, U; Thrasher, A

    2007-12-01

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) is an inherited disease caused by inactivating mutations in the gene encoding the interleukin 2 receptor common gamma chain (IL2RG), which is located on the X-chromosome. Affected boys fail to develop two major effector cell types of the immune system (T cells and NK cells) and suffer from a functional B cell defect. Although drugs such as antibiotics can offer partial protection, the boys normally die in the first year of life in the absence of a curative therapy. For a third of the children, bone marrow transplantation from a fully matched donor is available and can cure the disease without major side effects. Mismatched bone marrow transplantation, however, is complicated by severe and potentially lethal side effects. Over the past decade, scientists worldwide have developed new treatments by introducing a correct copy of the IL2RG-cDNA. Gene therapy was highly effective when applied in young children. However, in a few patients the IL2RG-gene vector has unfortunately caused leukaemia. Activation of cellular proto-oncogenes by accidental integration of the gene vector has been identified as the underlying mechanism. In future clinical trials, improved vector technology in combination with other protocol modifications may reduce the risk of this side effect.

  14. MR-Guided Pulsed High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Enhancement of Gene Therapy Combined With Androgen Deprivation and Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    ultrasound . J. Acoust. Soc.Am. 72 1926-1932, (1982) (7) Neppiras E A. Acoustic cavitation . Physics reports 61(3): 159-251, (1980) (8) ter Haar G R, Daniels...Guided Pulsed High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Enhancement of 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-08-1-0469 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...failing to This work is aimed to study MR guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU) enhancement of gene therapy for Prostate Cancer. The

  15. Effects of combined PPAR-γ and PPAR-α agonist therapy on fructose induced NASH in rats: Modulation of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Abd El-Haleim, Enas A; Bahgat, Ashraf K; Saleh, Samira

    2016-02-15

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) gamma and alpha have been shown to play key roles in maintaining glucose and lipid homeostasis by acting as insulin sensitizers and lipid-lowering agents respectively, which would make them potential candidates for the treatment of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) characterized by insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, and hypertriglyceridemia. The effects of pioglitazone, a PPAR-γ agonist, and fenofibrate, a PPAR-α agonist, as monotherapy and in combination on the expressions of key genes linked to the development of NASH were studied in rats with fructose-induced NASH. Fructose-enriched diet was given to rats for 12 weeks. Fenofibrate (100mg/kg), pioglitazone (4 mg/kg) and combined treatment with both in half doses were given. Body weight, liver index, insulin resistance indices, triglycerides, oxidative stress markers, AST/ALT ratio and TNF-α were measured. Additionally, hepatic genes expressions of SOCS-3, sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c, fatty acid synthase, malonyl CoA decarboxylase, TGF-β1, and adipose tissue genes expressions of leptin and adiponectin were investigated. The combination of both drugs, in half doses, improved NASH-related disturbances similar to, or even better than, a full dose of fenofibrate alone possibly due to attenuating effects of pioglitazone on expression of genes responsible for insulin resistance, fatty acid synthesis and fibrosis in addition to correcting the balance between leptin and adiponectin. Histopathology confirmed the ability of this combination to decrease steatosis area and to normalize hepatic tissue structure. In Conclusion, dual activation of PPAR-γ and PPAR-α has remarkable effect in ameliorating NASH by modulation of some hepatic and adipose tissue genes expressions.

  16. Episomal vectors for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Ehrhardt, Anja; Haase, Rudolf; Schepers, Aloys; Deutsch, Manuel J; Lipps, Hans Joachim; Baiker, Armin

    2008-06-01

    The increasing knowledge of the molecular and genetic background of many different human diseases has led to the vision that genetic engineering might be used one day for their phenotypic correction. The main goal of gene therapy is to treat loss-of-function genetic disorders by delivering correcting therapeutic DNA sequences into the nucleus of a cell, allowing its long-term expression at physiologically relevant levels. Manifold different vector systems for the therapeutic gene delivery have been described over the recent years. They all have their individual advantages but also their individual limitations and must be judged on a careful risk/benefit analysis. Integrating vector systems can deliver genetic material to a target cell with high efficiency enabling long-term expression of an encoded transgene. The main disadvantage of integrating vector systems, however, is their potential risk of causing insertional mutagenesis. Episomal vector systems have the potential to avoid these undesired side effects, since they behave as separate extrachromosomal elements in the nucleus of a target cell. Within this article we present a comprehensive survey of currently available episomal vector systems for the genetic modification of mammalian cells. We will discuss their advantages and disadvantages and their applications in the context of basic research, biotechnology and gene therapy.

  17. Stem cell directed gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Engel, B C; Kohn, D B

    1999-05-01

    A potential therapeutic approach to HIV-1 infection is the genetic modification of cells of a patient to make them resistant to HIV-1. Hematopoietic stem cells are an attractive target for gene therapy of AIDS because of their ability to generate a broad repertoire of mature T lymphocytes, as well as the monocytic cells (macrophages, dendritic cells and microglia) which are also involved in HIV-1 pathogenesis. A number of synthetic "anti-HIV-1 genes" have been developed which inhibit HIV-1 replication. However, current methods for gene transfer into human hematopoietic stem cells, using retroviral vectors derived from the Moloney murine leukemia virus, have been minimally effective. Clinical trials performed to date in which hematopoietic cells from HIV-1-positive patients have been transduced with retroviral vectors and then reinfused have produced low to undetectable levels of gene-containing peripheral blood leukocytes. New vector delivery systems, such as lentiviral vectors, need to be developed to ensure efficient gene transfer and persistent transgene expression to provide life-long resistance to the cells targeted by HIV-1.

  18. Gene therapy for vision loss -- recent developments.

    PubMed

    Stieger, Knut; Lorenz, Birgit

    2010-11-01

    Retinal gene therapy mediated by adeno-associated virus (AAV) based gene transfer was recently proven to improve photoreceptor function in one form of inherited retinal blinding disorder associated with mutations in the RPE65 gene. Several clinical trials are currently ongoing, and more than 30 patients have been treated to date. Even though only a very limited number of patients will greatly benefit from this still experimental treatment protocol, the technique itself has been shown to be safe and will likely be used in other retinal disorders in the near future. A canine model for achromatopsia has been treated successfully as well as mouse models for different forms of Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). For patients with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP), a combined gene knockdown and gene addition therapy is being developed using RNA interference to block mRNA of the mutant allele. For those patients suffering from RP with unknown mutations, an AAV based transfer of bacterial forms of rhodopsin in the central retina might be an option to reactivate residual cones in the future.

  19. Gene therapy in the cornea: 2005--present.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Rajiv R; Tovey, Jonathan C K; Sharma, Ajay; Tandon, Ashish

    2012-01-01

    Successful restoration of vision in human patients with gene therapy affirmed its promise to cure ocular diseases and disorders. The efficacy of gene therapy is contingent upon vector and mode of therapeutic DNA introduction into targeted cells/tissues. The cornea is an ideal tissue for gene therapy due to its ease of access and relative immune-privilege. Considerable progress has been made in the field of corneal gene therapy in last 5 years. Several new gene transfer vectors, techniques and approaches have evolved. Although corneal gene therapy is still in its early stages of development, the potential of gene-based interventions to treat corneal abnormalities has begun to surface. Identification of next generation viral and nanoparticle vectors, characterization of delivered gene levels, localization, and duration in the cornea, and significant success in controlling corneal disorders, particularly fibrosis and angiogenesis, in experimental animal disease models, with no major side effects have propelled gene therapy a step closer toward establishing gene-based therapies for corneal blindness. Recently, researchers have assessed the delivery of therapeutic genes for corneal diseases and disorders due to trauma, infections, chemical, mechanical, and surgical injury, and/or abnormal wound healing. This review provides an update on the developments in gene therapy for corneal diseases and discusses the barriers that hinder its utilization for delivering genes in the cornea.

  20. Curing genetic disease with gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Williams, David A

    2014-01-01

    Development of viral vectors that allow high efficiency gene transfer into mammalian cells in the early 1980s foresaw the treatment of severe monogenic diseases in humans. The application of gene transfer using viral vectors has been successful in diseases of the blood and immune systems, albeit with several curative studies also showing serious adverse events (SAEs). In children with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1), chronic granulomatous disease, and Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, these SAEs were caused by inappropriate activation of oncogenes. Subsequent studies have defined the vector sequences responsible for these transforming events. Members of the Transatlantic Gene Therapy Consortium [TAGTC] have collaboratively developed new vectors that have proven safer in preclinical studies and used these vectors in new clinical trials in SCID-X1. These trials have shown evidence of early efficacy and preliminary integration analysis data from the SCID-X1 trial suggest an improved safety profile.

  1. [Gene therapy for adenosine deaminase deficiency].

    PubMed

    Sakiyama, Yukio; Ariga, Tadashi; Ohtsu, Makoto

    2005-03-01

    A four year-old boy with adenosine deaminase (ADA-) deficient severe combined immunodeficiency(SCID) receiving PEG-ADA was treated under a gene therapy protocol targeting peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) in 1995. After eleven infusions of autologous PBLs transduced with retroviral vector LASN encoding ADAcDNA, he exhibited increased levels of the CD8+ T lymphocytes, serum immunoglobulin, specific antibodies and delayed type hypersensitivity skin tests. Follow-up studies also provided evidence of long-term persistence and function of transduced PBLs with improvement in the immune function. However, the therapeutic effect of this gene therapy has been difficult to assess because of the concomitant treatment of PEG-ADA. Two ADA-SCID patients have been currently treated with autologous bone marrow CD34+ cells engineered with a retroviral vector GCsapM-ADA after discontinuation of PEG-ADA. The restoration of intracellular ADA enzymatic activity in lymphocytes and granulocytes resulted in correction of the systemic toxicity and liver function in the absence of PEG-ADA treatment. Both patients are at home where they are clinically well, and they do not experience adversed effect, with follow up being 12 months after CD34+ cells gene therapy.

  2. Gene therapy for bone healing.

    PubMed

    Evans, Christopher H

    2010-06-23

    Clinical problems in bone healing include large segmental defects, spinal fusions, and the nonunion and delayed union of fractures. Gene-transfer technologies have the potential to aid healing by permitting the local delivery and sustained expression of osteogenic gene products within osseous lesions. Key questions for such an approach include the choice of transgene, vector and gene-transfer strategy. Most experimental data have been obtained using cDNAs encoding osteogenic growth factors such as bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), BMP-4 and BMP-7, in conjunction with both nonviral and viral vectors using in vivo and ex vivo delivery strategies. Proof of principle has been convincingly demonstrated in small-animal models. Relatively few studies have used large animals, but the results so far are encouraging. Once a reliable method has been developed, it will be necessary to perform detailed pharmacological and toxicological studies, as well as satisfy other demands of the regulatory bodies, before human clinical trials can be initiated. Such studies are very expensive and often protracted. Thus, progress in developing a clinically useful gene therapy for bone healing is determined not only by scientific considerations, but also by financial constraints and the ambient regulatory environment.

  3. Gene therapy for bone healing

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Christopher H.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical problems in bone healing include large segmental defects, nonunion and delayed union of fractures, and spinal fusions. Gene-transfer technologies have the potential to aid healing by permitting the local delivery and sustained expression of osteogenic gene products within osseous lesions. Key questions for such an approach include the choice of transgene, vector and gene-transfer strategy. Most experimental data have been obtained using cDNAs encoding osteogenic growth factors such as bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), BMP-4 and BMP-7, in conjunction with both nonviral and viral vectors using in vivo and ex vivo delivery strategies. Proof of principle has been convincingly demonstrated in small-animal models. Relatively few studies have used large animals, but the results so far are encouraging. Once a reliable method has been developed, it will be necessary to perform detailed pharmacological and toxicological studies, as well as satisfy other demands of the regulatory bodies, before human clinical trials can be initiated. Such studies are very expensive and often protracted. Thus, progress in developing a clinically useful gene therapy for bone healing is determined not only by scientific considerations, but also by financial constraints and the ambient regulatory environment. PMID:20569532

  4. Suicide gene therapy in cancer: where do we stand now?

    PubMed

    Duarte, Sónia; Carle, Georges; Faneca, Henrique; de Lima, Maria C Pedroso; Pierrefite-Carle, Valérie

    2012-11-28

    Suicide gene therapy is based on the introduction into tumor cells of a viral or a bacterial gene, which allows the conversion of a non-toxic compound into a lethal drug. Although suicide gene therapy has been successfully used in a large number of in vitro and in vivo studies, its application to cancer patients has not reached the desirable clinical significance. However, recent reports on pre-clinical cancer models demonstrate the huge potential of this strategy when used in combination with new therapeutic approaches. In this review, we summarize the different suicide gene systems and gene delivery vectors addressed to cancer, with particular emphasis on recently developed systems and associated bystander effects. In addition, we review the different strategies that have been used in combination with suicide gene therapy and provide some insights into the future directions of this approach, particularly towards cancer stem cell eradication.

  5. A Novel Gene Gun-Mediated IL-12 Gene Therapy for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-01-01

    gene therapy . The results of the first year study, described in our previous Annual Report, show that gene gun-mediated IL-12 gene therapy is effective against breast tumors in mouse models. During the second year of this study we demonstrated that 4T1 tumor is weakly immunogenic, and it can induce a low level immune response. However, the anti-metastatic effect of IL-12 gene therapy against 4T1 tumor is not mediated by T cells, but rather involves NK cells. From several different immunomidulatory genes tested in combination with

  6. Targeted Gene Therapy of Cancer: Second Amendment toward Holistic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Barar, Jaleh; Omidi, Yadollah

    2013-01-01

    It seems solid tumors are developing smart organs with specialized cells creating specified bio-territory, the so called "tumor microenvironment (TME)", in which there is reciprocal crosstalk among cancer cells, immune system cells and stromal cells. TME as an intricate milieu also consists of cancer stem cells (CSCs) that can resist against chemotherapies. In solid tumors, metabolism and vascularization appears to be aberrant and tumor interstitial fluid (TIF) functions as physiologic barrier. Thus, chemotherapy, immunotherapy and gene therapy often fail to provide cogent clinical outcomes. It looms that it is the time to accept the fact that initiation of cancer could be generation of another form of life that involves a cluster of thousands of genes, while we have failed to observe all aspects of it. Hence, the current treatment modalities need to be re-visited to cover all key aspects of disease using combination therapy based on the condition of patients. Perhaps personalized cluster of genes need to be simultaneously targeted.

  7. Immunomodulatory gene therapy in lysosomal storage disorders

    PubMed Central

    Koeberl, D.D.; Kishnani, P.S.

    2010-01-01

    Significant advances in therapy for lysosomal storage disorders have occurred with an accelerating pace over the past decade. Although enzyme replacement therapy has improved the outcome of lysosomal storage disorders, antibody responses have occurred and sometimes prevented efficacy, especially in cross-reacting immune material negative patients with Pompe disease. Preclinical gene therapy experiments have revealed the relevance of immune responses to long-term efficacy. The choice of regulatory cassette played a critical role in evading humoral and cellular immune responses to gene therapy in knockout mouse models, at least in adult animals. Liver-specific regulatory cassettes prevented antibody formation and enhanced the efficacy of gene therapy. Regulatory T cells prevented transgene directed immune responses, as shown by adoptive transfer of antigen-specific immune tolerance to enzyme therapy. Immunomodulatory gene therapy with a very low vector dose could enhance the efficacy of enzyme therapy in Pompe disease and other lysosomal storage disorders. PMID:19807648

  8. Immunomodulatory gene therapy in lysosomal storage disorders.

    PubMed

    Koeberl, Dwight D; Kishnani, Priya S

    2009-12-01

    Significant advances in therapy for lysosomal storage disorders have occurred with an accelerating pace over the past decade. Although enzyme replacement therapy has improved the outcome of lysosomal storage disorders, antibody responses have occurred and sometimes prevented efficacy, especially in cross-reacting immune material negative patients with Pompe disease. Preclinical gene therapy experiments have revealed the relevance of immune responses to long-term efficacy. The choice of regulatory cassette played a critical role in evading humoral and cellular immune responses to gene therapy in knockout mouse models, at least in adult animals. Liver-specific regulatory cassettes prevented antibody formation and enhanced the efficacy of gene therapy. Regulatory T cells prevented transgene directed immune responses, as shown by adoptive transfer of antigen-specific immune tolerance to enzyme therapy. Immunomodulatory gene therapy with a very low vector dose could enhance the efficacy of enzyme therapy in Pompe disease and other lysosomal storage disorders.

  9. Recent progress in cerebrovascular gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Sato, Naoyuki; Shimamura, Munehisa; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2005-07-01

    Gene therapy provides a potential strategy for the treatment of cardiovascular disease such as peripheral arterial disease, myocardial infarction, restenosis after angioplasty, and vascular bypass graft occlusion. Currently, more than 20 clinical studies of gene therapy for cardiovascular disease are in progress. Although cerebrovascular gene therapy has not proceeded to clinical trials, in contrast to cardiovascular gene therapy, there have been several trials in experimental models. Three major potential targets for cerebrovascular gene therapy are vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), ischemic cerebrovascular disease, and restenosis after angioplasty, for which current therapy is often inadequate. In experimental SAH models, strategies using genes encoding a vasodilating protein or decoy oligodeoxynucleotides have been reported to be effective against vasospasm after SAH. In experimental ischemic cerebrovascular disease, gene therapy using growth factors, such as Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), or Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), has been reported to be effective for neuroprotection and angiogenesis. Nevertheless, cerebrovascular gene therapy for clinical human treatment still has some problems, such as transfection efficiency and the safety of vectors. Development of an effective and safe delivery system for a target gene will make human cerebrovascular gene therapy possible.

  10. Targeted Gene Therapy for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-08-01

    AD AWARD NUMBER DAMD17-97-1-7232 TITLE: Targeted Gene Therapy for Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jinha M. Park CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION...FUNDING NUMBERS Targeted Gene Therapy for Breast Cancer DAMD17-97-1-7232 6. AUTHOR(S) Jinha M. Park 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8...of surface mAb has been internalized by receptor-mediated endocytosis. These mAbs show promise in the specific delivery of gene therapy vectors

  11. Cardiac gene therapy: are we there yet?

    PubMed

    Matkar, P N; Leong-Poi, H; Singh, K K

    2016-08-01

    The incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is increasing throughout the world and is associated with elevated morbidity and mortality. Gene therapy to treat cardiac dysfunction is gaining importance because of the limited therapeutic benefit offered by pharmacotherapies. The growing knowledge of the complex signaling pathways and the development of sophisticated vectors and delivery systems, are facilitating identification and targeting of specific molecular candidates involved in initiation and progression of CVDs. Several preclinical and clinical studies have shown the therapeutic efficiency of gene therapy in different disease models and patients. Hence, gene therapy might plausibly become an unconventional treatment modality for CVD patients. In this review, we summarize the gene delivery carriers, modes of delivery, recent preclinical/clinical studies and potential therapeutic targets. We also briefly discuss the existing limitations of gene therapy, technical challenges surrounding gene carriers and delivery systems, and some approaches to overcome these limitations for bringing CVD gene therapy one step closer to reality.

  12. [Targeted therapies: sequential and combined treatments].

    PubMed

    Gross-Goupil, M; Escudier, B

    2010-01-01

    The treatment of metastatic kidney cancer has dramatically changed in the last three years, with demonstration of efficacy of sunitinib, sorafenib, temsirolimus, bevacizumab combined with interferon and more recently everolimus. Although the international guidelines have recently been reviewed, some major questions are still open. Particularly, the best order of administration of these targeted therapies should be considered, since sequential schedule becomes usual with the availability of these new agents. At the same time, the tolerability and efficacy of the combination of the targeted therapies are under investigation in clinical trials. We report recent studies, mainly presented during the ASCO 2007 and 2008 congress. Furthermore, other studies are ongoing to answer other important questions, to optimize the treatment of this disease, such as the role of nephrectomy in case of synchronous metastatic disease, or the efficacy of the targeted therapies in different histological subtype than clear cell carcinoma, or in neoadjuvant and adjuvant settings.

  13. Gene based therapies for kidney regeneration.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Manoe J; Arcolino, Fanny O; Schoor, Perry; Kok, Robbert Jan; Mastrobattista, Enrico

    2016-11-05

    In this review we provide an overview of the expanding molecular toolbox that is available for gene based therapies and how these therapies can be used for a large variety of kidney diseases. Gene based therapies range from restoring gene function in genetic kidney diseases to steering complex molecular pathways in chronic kidney disorders, and can provide a treatment or cure for diseases that otherwise may not be targeted. This approach involves the delivery of recombinant DNA sequences harboring therapeutic genes to improve cell function and thereby promote kidney regeneration. Depending on the therapy, the recombinant DNA will express a gene that directly plays a role in the function of the cell (gene addition), that regulates the expression of an endogenous gene (gene regulation), or that even changes the DNA sequence of endogenous genes (gene editing). Some interventions involve permanent changes in the genome whereas others are only temporary and leave no trace. Efficient and safe delivery are important steps for all gene based therapies and also depend on the mode of action of the therapeutic gene. Here we provide examples on how the different methods can be used to treat various diseases, which technologies are now emerging (such as gene repair through CRISPR/Cas9) and what the opportunities, perspectives, potential and the limitations of these therapies are for the treatment of kidney diseases.

  14. Towards gene therapy for deafness.

    PubMed

    Di Domenico, Marina; Ricciardi, Carmela; Martone, Tiziana; Mazzarella, Nicoletta; Cassandro, Claudia; Chiarella, Giuseppe; D'Angelo, Luigi; Cassandro, Ettore

    2011-10-01

    Many hearing disorders are associated with the damage or loss of sensory hair cells (HC) which can produce a profound and irreversible deafness. Apoptosis pathway is reported to play an important role leading to rapid expansion of the HC lesion after exposure to intense noise. Furthermore, progress made over the last year in understanding molecular mechanisms involved in the proliferative and regenerative capacity of sensory cells in the mammalian inner ear has raised the possibility that targeted therapies might prevent the loss of these cells and preserve the patient's hearing. A first step towards the successful therapeutic exploitation is a better understanding of the different pathways that control survival and proliferation of sensory cells. In this review, we provide an overview of recent findings concerning the possibility to prevent apoptosis in auditory cells. We also show the current knowledge on the molecular mechanisms involved in the potential regenerative behavior of these cells and the progress of gene therapy to prevent deafness noise-induced.

  15. Gene therapy for muscular dystrophy: current progress and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Trollet, Capucine; Athanasopoulos, Takis; Popplewell, Linda; Malerba, Alberto; Dickson, George

    2009-07-01

    Muscular dystrophies refer to a group of inherited disorders characterized by progressive muscle weakness, wasting and degeneration. So far, there is no effective treatment but new gene-based therapies are currently being developed with particular noted advances in using conventional gene replacement strategies, RNA-based approaches, or cell-based gene therapy with a main focus on Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). DMD is the most common and severe form of muscular dystrophy and current treatments are far from adequate. However, genetic and cell-based therapies, in particular exon skipping induced by antisense strategies, and corrective gene therapy via functionally engineered dystrophin genes hold great promise, with several clinical trials ongoing. Proof-of-concept of exon skipping has been obtained in animal models, and most recently in clinical trials; this approach represents a promising therapy for a subset of patients. In addition, gene-delivery-based strategies exist both for antisense-induced reading frame restoration, and for highly efficient delivery of functional dystrophin mini- and micro-genes to muscle fibres in vivo and muscle stem cells ex-vivo. In particular, AAV-based vectors show efficient systemic gene delivery to skeletal muscle directly in vivo, and lentivirus-based vectors show promise of combining ex vivo gene modification strategies with cell-mediated therapies.

  16. Gene therapy of primary T cell immunodeficiencies.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Alain; Hacein-Bey-Abina, Salima; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina

    2013-08-10

    Gene therapy of severe combined immunodeficiencies has been proven to be effective to provide sustained correction of the T cell immunodeficiencies. This has been achieved for 2 forms of SCID, i.e SCID-X1 (γc deficiency) and adenosine deaminase deficiency. Occurrence of gene toxicity generated by integration of first generation retroviral vectors, as observed in the SCID-X1 trials has led to replace these vectors by self inactivated (SIN) retro(or lenti) viruses that may provide equivalent efficacy with a better safety profile. Results of ongoing clinical studies in SCID as well as in other primary immunodeficiencies, such as the Wiskott Aldrich syndrome, will be thus very informative.

  17. Gene therapy: progress in childhood disease.

    PubMed

    Ginn, Samantha L; Alexander, Ian E

    2012-06-01

    The recent sequencing of the human genome combined with the development of massively high throughput genetic analysis technologies is driving unprecedented growth in our knowledge of the molecular basis of disease. While this has already had a major impact on our diagnostic power, the therapeutic benefits remain largely unrealised. This review examines progress in the exciting and challenging field of gene therapy. In particular we focus on the treatment of genetic disease in infants and children where the most significant successes have been observed to date, despite the majority of trial participants being adults. Notably, gene transfer to the haematopoietic compartment has provided the clearest examples of therapeutic benefit, particularly in the context of primary immunodeficiencies. The triumphs and tribulations of these successes are explored, and the key challenges confronting researchers as they seek to further advance the field are defined and discussed.

  18. Bone Marrow Gene Therapy for HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-Carrillo, Elena; Berkhout, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow gene therapy remains an attractive option for treating chronic immunological diseases, including acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This technology combines the differentiation and expansion capacity of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) with long-term expression of therapeutic transgenes using integrating vectors. In this review we summarize the potential of bone marrow gene therapy for the treatment of HIV/AIDS. A broad range of antiviral strategies are discussed, with a particular focus on RNA-based therapies. The idea is to develop a durable gene therapy that lasts the life span of the infected individual, thus contrasting with daily drug regimens to suppress the virus. Different approaches have been proposed to target either the virus or cellular genes encoding co-factors that support virus replication. Some of these therapies have been tested in clinical trials, providing proof of principle that gene therapy is a safe option for treating HIV/AIDS. In this review several topics are discussed, ranging from the selection of the antiviral molecule and the viral target to the optimal vector system for gene delivery and the setup of appropriate preclinical test systems. The molecular mechanisms used to formulate a cure for HIV infection are described, including the latest antiviral strategies and their therapeutic applications. Finally, a potent combination of anti-HIV genes based on our own research program is described. PMID:26193303

  19. Bone Marrow Gene Therapy for HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Carrillo, Elena; Berkhout, Ben

    2015-07-17

    Bone marrow gene therapy remains an attractive option for treating chronic immunological diseases, including acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This technology combines the differentiation and expansion capacity of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) with long-term expression of therapeutic transgenes using integrating vectors. In this review we summarize the potential of bone marrow gene therapy for the treatment of HIV/AIDS. A broad range of antiviral strategies are discussed, with a particular focus on RNA-based therapies. The idea is to develop a durable gene therapy that lasts the life span of the infected individual, thus contrasting with daily drug regimens to suppress the virus. Different approaches have been proposed to target either the virus or cellular genes encoding co-factors that support virus replication. Some of these therapies have been tested in clinical trials, providing proof of principle that gene therapy is a safe option for treating HIV/AIDS. In this review several topics are discussed, ranging from the selection of the antiviral molecule and the viral target to the optimal vector system for gene delivery and the setup of appropriate preclinical test systems. The molecular mechanisms used to formulate a cure for HIV infection are described, including the latest antiviral strategies and their therapeutic applications. Finally, a potent combination of anti-HIV genes based on our own research program is described.

  20. Gene therapy for primary adaptive immune deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Alain; Hacein-Bey-Abina, Salima; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina

    2011-06-01

    Gene therapy has become an option for the treatment of 2 forms of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID): X-linked SCID and adenosine deaminase deficiency. The results of clinical trials initiated more than 10 years ago testify to sustained and reproducible correction of the underlying T-cell immunodeficiency. Successful treatment is based on the selective advantage conferred on T-cell precursors through their expression of the therapeutic transgene. However, "first-generation" retroviral vectors also caused leukemia in some patients with X-linked SCID because of the constructs' tendency to insert into active genes (eg, proto-oncogenes) in progenitor cells and transactivate an oncogene through a viral element in the long terminal repeat. These elements have been deleted from the vectors now in use. Together with the use of lentiviral vectors (which are more potent for transducing stem cells), these advances should provide a basis for the safe and effective extension of gene therapy's indications in the field of primary immunodeficiencies. Nevertheless, this extension will have to be proved by examining the results of the ongoing clinical trials.

  1. Combination Therapy Accelerates Diabetic Wound Closure

    PubMed Central

    Allen Jr., Robert J.; Soares, Marc A.; Haberman, Ilyse D.; Szpalski, Caroline; Schachar, Jeffrey; Lin, Clarence D.; Nguyen, Phuong D.; Saadeh, Pierre B.; Warren, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-healing foot ulcers are the most common cause of non-traumatic amputation and hospitalization amongst diabetics in the developed world. Impaired wound neovascularization perpetuates a cycle of dysfunctional tissue repair and regeneration. Evidence implicates defective mobilization of marrow-derived progenitor cells (PCs) as a fundamental cause of impaired diabetic neovascularization. Currently, there are no FDA-approved therapies to address this defect. Here we report an endogenous PC strategy to improve diabetic wound neovascularization and closure through a combination therapy of AMD3100, which mobilizes marrow-derived PCs by competitively binding to the cell surface CXCR4 receptor, and PDGF-BB, which is a protein known to enhance cell growth, progenitor cell migration and angiogenesis. Methods and Results Wounded mice were assigned to 1 of 5 experimental arms (n = 8/arm): saline treated wild-type, saline treated diabetic, AMD3100 treated diabetic, PDGF-BB treated diabetic, and AMD3100/PDGF-BB treated diabetic. Circulating PC number and wound vascularity were analyzed for each group (n = 8/group). Cellular function was assessed in the presence of AMD3100. Using a validated preclinical model of type II diabetic wound healing, we show that AMD3100 therapy (10 mg/kg; i.p. daily) alone can rescue diabetes-specific defects in PC mobilization, but cannot restore normal wound neovascularization. Through further investigation, we demonstrate an acquired trafficking-defect within AMD3100-treated diabetic PCs that can be rescued by PDGF-BB (2 μg; topical) supplementation within the wound environment. Finally, we determine that combination therapy restores diabetic wound neovascularization and accelerates time to wound closure by 40%. Conclusions Combination AMD3100 and PDGF-BB therapy synergistically improves BM PC mobilization and trafficking, resulting in significantly improved diabetic wound closure and neovascularization. The success of this

  2. Gene therapy oversight: lessons for nanobiotechnology.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Susan M; Gupta, Rishi; Kohlhepp, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Oversight of human gene transfer research ("gene therapy") presents an important model with potential application to oversight of nanobiology research on human participants. Gene therapy oversight adds centralized federal review at the National Institutes of Health's Office of Biotechnology Activities and its Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee to standard oversight of human subjects research at the researcher's institution (by the Institutional Review Board and, for some research, the Institutional Biosafety Committee) and at the federal level by the Office for Human Research Protections. The Food and Drug Administration's Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research oversees human gene transfer research in parallel, including approval of protocols and regulation of products. This article traces the evolution of this dual oversight system; describes how the system is already addressing nanobiotechnology in gene transfer: evaluates gene therapy oversight based on public opinion, the literature, and preliminary expert elicitation; and offers lessons of the gene therapy oversight experience for oversight of nanobiotechnology.

  3. Translational Approaches towards Cancer Gene Therapy: Hurdles and Hopes

    PubMed Central

    Barar, Jaleh; Omidi, Yadollah

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Of the cancer gene therapy approaches, gene silencing, suicide/apoptosis inducing gene therapy, immunogene therapy and targeted gene therapy are deemed to sub-stantially control the biological consequences of genomic changes in cancerous cells. Thus, a large number of clinical trials have been conducted against various malignancies. In this review, we will discuss recent translational progresses of gene and cell therapy of cancer. Methods Essential information on gene therapy of cancer were reviewed and discussed towards their clinical translations. Results Gene transfer has been rigorously studied in vitro and in vivo, in which some of these gene therapy endeavours have been carried on towards translational investigations and clinical applications. About 65% of gene therapy trials are related to cancer therapy. Some of these trials have been combined with cell therapy to produce personalized medicines such as Sipuleucel-T (Provenge®, marketed by Dendreon, USA) for the treatment of asymptomatic/minimally symptomatic metastatic hormone-refractory prostate cancer. Conclusion Translational approach links two diverse boundaries of basic and clinical researches. For successful translation of geno-medicines into clinical applications, it is essential 1) to have the guidelines and standard operating procedures for development and application of the genomedicines specific to clinically relevant biomarker(s); 2) to conduct necessary animal experimental studies to show the “proof of concept” for the proposed genomedicines; 3) to perform an initial clinical investigation; and 4) to initiate extensive clinical trials to address all necessary requirements. In short, translational researches need to be refined to accelerate the geno-medicine development and clinical applications. PMID:23678451

  4. Approaches to mitochondrial gene therapy.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Gerard G M; Weissig, Volkmar

    2004-09-01

    Since their discovery during the end of the 80's the number of diseases found to be associated with defects in the mitochondrial genome has grown significantly. Organs affected by mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) include in decreasing order of vulnerability the brain, skeletal muscle, heart, kidney and liver. Hence neuromuscular and neurodegenerative diseases represent the two largest groups of mtDNA diseases. Despite major advances in understanding mtDNA defects at the genetic and biochemical level, there is however no satisfactory treatment available to the vast majority of patients. This is largely due to the fact that most of these patients have respiratory chain defects, i.e. defects that involve the final common pathway of oxidative metabolism, making it impossible to bypass the defect by administering alternative metabolic carriers of energy. Conventional biochemical treatment having reached an impasse, the exploration of gene therapeutic approaches for patients with mtDNA defects is warranted. For now mitochondrial gene therapy appears to be only theoretical and speculative. Any possibility for gene replacement is dependent on the development of an efficient mitochondrial transfection vector. In this review we describe the current state of the development of mitochondria-specific DNA delivery systems. We summarize our own efforts in exploring the properties of dequalinium and other similar cationic bolaamphiphiles with delocalized charge centers, for the design of a vector suited for the transport of DNA to mitochondria in living cells. Further, we outline some unique hurdles that need to be overcome if the development of such delivery systems is to progress.

  5. The roles of traditional Chinese medicine in gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Ling, Chang-quan; Wang, Li-na; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Yuan-hui; Yin, Zi-fei; Wang, Meng; Ling, Chen

    2014-03-01

    The field of gene therapy has been increasingly studied in the last four decades, and its clinical application has become a reality in the last 15 years. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), an important component of complementary and alternative medicine, has evolved over thousands of years with its own unique system of theories, diagnostics and therapies. TCM is well-known for its various roles in preventing and treating infectious and chronic diseases, and its usage in other modern clinical practice. However, whether TCM can be applied alongside gene therapy is a topic that has not been systematically examined. Here we provide an overview of TCM theories in relation to gene therapy. We believe that TCM theories are congruent with some principles of gene therapy. TCM-derived drugs may also act as gene therapy vehicles, therapeutic genes, synergistic therapeutic treatments, and as co-administrated drugs to reduce side effects. We also discuss in this review some possible approaches to combine TCM and gene therapy.

  6. Gene therapy for high-grade glioma

    PubMed Central

    Natsume, Atsushi

    2008-01-01

    The treatment of high-grade gliomas remains difficult despite recent advances in surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. True advances may emerge from the increasing understanding in molecular biology and discovery of novel mechanisms for the delivery of tumoricidal agents. In an attempt to overcome this formidable neoplasm, molecular approaches using gene therapy have been investigated clinically since 1992. The clinical trials have mainly been classified into three approaches: suicide gene therapy, immune gene therapy and oncolytic viral therapy. In this article, we review these approaches, which have been studied in previous and ongoing clinical trials. PMID:19262115

  7. Nanoparticle-Based Combination Therapy for Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Yhee, Ji Young; Son, Sejin; Lee, Hyukjin; Kim, Kwangmeyung

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, combination of different types of therapies using nanoparticles has emerged as an advanced strategy for cancer treatment. Most of all, combination of chemotherapeutic drug and siRNA in nanoformulation has shown a great potential, because siRNA-mediated specific gene silencing can compensate for the incomplete anti-cancer actions of chemotherapy. In this article, nanoparticle-based combination therapy for cancer treatment is introduced to be focused on the therapeutic chemical and siRNA combination. It is classified into 3 groups: 1) general chemotherapy combined with siRNA carrying nanoparticle, 2) co-delivery of chemical and siRNA therapeutics within a single nanoparticle, and 3) Use of multiple nanoparticles for chemical and siRNA therapeutics. The purpose of the combination and the mechanisms of anti-cancer action was described according to the categories. Examples of some recent developments of nanotechnology-based chemo- and siRNA- therapeutics combination therapy are summarized for better understanding of its practical application.

  8. Engineering Factor Viii for Hemophilia Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Sean A.; Dong, Biao; Firrman, Jenni A.; Moore, Andrea R.; Sang, Nianli; Xiao, Weidong

    2012-01-01

    Current treatment of hemophilia A by intravenous infusion of factor VIII (fVIII) concentrates is very costly and has a potential adverse effect of developing inhibitors. Gene therapy, on the other hand, can potentially overcome these limitations associated with fVIII replacement therapy. Although hemophilia B gene therapy has achieved promising outcomes in human clinical trials, hemophilia A gene therapy lags far behind. Compared to factor IX, fVIII is a large protein which is difficult to express at sustaining therapeutic levels when delivered by either viral or non-viral vectors. To improve fVIII gene delivery, numerous strategies have been exploited to engineer the fVIII molecule and overcome the hurdles preventing long term and high level expression. Here we reviewed these strategies, and discussed their pros and cons in human gene therapy of hemophilia A. PMID:23565342

  9. Gene therapy prospects--intranasal delivery of therapeutic genes.

    PubMed

    Podolska, Karolina; Stachurska, Anna; Hajdukiewicz, Karolina; Małecki, Maciej

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy is recognized to be a novel method for the treatment of various disorders. Gene therapy strategies involve gene manipulation on broad biological processes responsible for the spreading of diseases. Cancer, monogenic diseases, vascular and infectious diseases are the main targets of gene therapy. In order to obtain valuable experimental and clinical results, sufficient gene transfer methods are required. Therapeutic genes can be administered into target tissues via gene carriers commonly defined as vectors. The retroviral, adenoviral and adeno-associated virus based vectors are most frequently used in the clinic. So far, gene preparations may be administered directly into target organs or by intravenous, intramuscular, intratumor or intranasal injections. It is common knowledge that the number of gene therapy clinical trials has rapidly increased. However, some limitations such as transfection efficiency and stable and long-term gene expression are still not resolved. Consequently, great effort is focused on the evaluation of new strategies of gene delivery. There are many expectations associated with intranasal delivery of gene preparations for the treatment of diseases. Intranasal delivery of therapeutic genes is regarded as one of the most promising forms of pulmonary gene therapy research. Gene therapy based on inhalation of gene preparations offers an alternative way for the treatment of patients suffering from such lung diseases as cystic fibrosis, alpha-1-antitrypsin defect, or cancer. Experimental and first clinical trials based on plasmid vectors or recombinant viruses have revealed that gene preparations can effectively deliver therapeutic or marker genes to the cells of the respiratory tract. The noninvasive intranasal delivery of gene preparations or conventional drugs seems to be very encouraging, although basic scientific research still has to continue.

  10. Cancer gene therapy targeting cellular apoptosis machinery.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lin-Tao; Chen, Si-Yi; Yang, An-Gang

    2012-11-01

    The unraveling of cellular apoptosis machinery provides novel targets for cancer treatment, and gene therapy targeting this suicidal system has been corroborated to cause inflammation-free autonomous elimination of neoplastic cells. The apoptotic machinery can be targeted by introduction of a gene encoding an inducer, mediator or executioner of apoptotic cell death or by inhibition of anti-apoptotic gene expression. Strategies targeting cancer cells, which are achieved by selective gene delivery, specific gene expression or secretion of target proteins via genetic modification of autologous cells, dictate the outcome of apoptosis-based cancer gene therapy. Despite so far limited clinical success, gene therapy targeting the apoptotic machinery has great potential to benefit patients with threatening malignancies provided the availability of efficient and specific gene delivery and administration systems.

  11. Mechanism of enhanced responses after combination photodynamic therapy (cPDT) in carcinoma cells involves C/EBP-mediated transcriptional upregulation of the coproporphyrinogen oxidase (CPO) gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Sanjay; Hasan, Tayyaba; Maytin, Edward V.

    2013-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with aminolevulinate (ALA) is widely accepted as an effective treatment for superficial carcinomas and pre-cancers. However, PDT is still suboptimal for deeper tumors, mainly due to inadequate ALA penetration and subsequent conversion to PpIX. We are interested in improving the effectiveness of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for deep tumors, using a combination approach (cPDT) in which target protoporphyrin (PpIX) levels are significantly enhanced by differentiation caused by giving Vitamin D or methotrexate (MTX) for 3 days prior to ALAPDT. In LNCaP and MEL cells, a strong correlation between inducible differentiation and expression of C/EBP transcription factors, as well as between differentiation and mRNA levels of CPO (a key heme-synthetic enzyme), indicates the possibility of CPO transcriptional regulation by the C/EBPs. Sequence analysis of the first 1300 base pairs of the murine CPO upstream region revealed 15 consensus C/EBP binding sites. Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assays (EMSA) proved that these sites form specific complexes that have strong, moderate or weak affinities for C/EBPs. However, in the context of the full-length CPO promoter, inactivation of any type of site (strong or weak) reduced CPO promoter activity (luciferase assay) to nearly the same extent, suggesting cooperative interactions. A comparative analysis of murine and human CPO promoters revealed possible protein-protein interactions between C/EBPs and several neighboring transcription factors such as NFkB, Sp1, AP-1, CBP/p300 and CREB (an enhanceosome complex). Overall, these results confirm that C/EBP's are important for CPO expression via complex mechanisms which upregulate PpIX and enhance the outcome of cPDT.

  12. Gene therapy for childhood immunological diseases.

    PubMed

    Kohn, D B

    2008-01-01

    Gene therapy using autologous hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) that are corrected with the normal gene may have a beneficial effect on blood cell production or function, without the immunologic complications of allogeneic HSC transplantation. Childhood immunological diseases are highly favorable candidates for responses to gene therapy using HSC. Hemoglobinopathies, lysosomal and metabolic disorders and defects of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells should also be ameliorated by gene therapy using autologous HSC. At present, gene therapy has been beneficial for patients with XSCID, ADA-deficient SCID and chronic granulomatous disease. The principle that partial marrow conditioning increases engraftment of gene-corrected HSC has been demonstrated. Clinical trials are being developed in Europe and the United States to treat several other genetic blood cell disorders. This progress is tempered by the serious complication observed in XSCID patients developing T lymphoproliferative disease. New methods for gene transfer (lentiviral and foamy viral vectors, semi-viral systems and gene correction) may retain or further increase the efficacy and decrease the risks from gene therapy using HSC. Ultimately, the relative benefits and risks of autologous gene therapy will be weighed against other available options (for example, allogeneic HSCT) to determine the treatment of choice.

  13. Gene therapy for CNS diseases – Krabbe disease

    PubMed Central

    Rafi, Mohammad A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary This is a brief report of the 19th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy that took place from May 4th through May 7th, 2016 in Washington, DC, USA. While the meeting provided many symposiums, lectures, and scientific sessions this report mainly focuses on one of the sessions on the "Gene Therapy for central nervous system (CNS) Diseases" and specifically on the "Gene Therapy for the globoid cell leukodystrophy or Krabbe disease. Two presentations focused on this subject utilizing two animal models of this disease: mice and dog models. Different serotypes of adeno-associate viral vectors (AAV) alone or in combination with bone marrow transplantations were used in these research projects. The Meeting of the ASGCT reflected continuous growth in the fields of gene and cell therapy and brighter forecast for efficient treatment options for variety of human diseases. PMID:27525222

  14. Pneumonia in immunocompetent patients: combination antibiotic therapy.

    PubMed

    Salva, S; Borgatta, B; Rello, J

    2014-04-01

    Pneumonia's burden is still important worldwide not only because of its high incidence and mortality, but also for the elevated costs related to it. Despite the concerted efforts to reduce the incidence of sepsis-related complications, they continue to represent a major human and economic burden. The cornerstone of sepsis management is early appropriate empiric broad spectrum antibiotics, resuscitation, and source control. The association between inappropriate use of antibiotics and increased mortality is the rationale for the use of empiric antibiotic combination therapy in critically ill patients. The aim of this manuscript was to discuss recent literature regarding the management of severe pneumonia, both community-acquired and hospital-acquired/ventilator-associated, in critically ill patients. Use of combination therapy is warranted in severe infections with shock; considerations should be made on the importance of optimal antibiotic administration and adverse reactions, thus providing guidance for a rational use of antibiotics.

  15. The Combination of CRISPR/Cas9 and iPSC Technologies in the Gene Therapy of Human β-thalassemia in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Zhanhui; Niu, Xiaohua; He, Wenyin; Chen, Yuchang; Song, Bing; Xian, Yexing; Fan, Di; Tang, Daolin; Sun, Xiaofang

    2016-01-01

    β-thalassemia results from point mutations or small deletions in the β-globin (HBB) gene that ultimately cause anemia. The generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from the somatic cells of patients in combination with subsequent homologous recombination-based gene correction provides new approaches to cure this disease. CRISPR/Cas9 is a genome editing tool that is creating a buzz in the scientific community for treating human diseases, especially genetic disorders. Here, we reported that correction of β-thalassemia mutations in patient-specific iPSCs using the CRISPR/Cas9 tool promotes hematopoietic differentiation in vivo. CRISPR/Cas9-corrected iPSC-derived hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) were injected into sublethally-irradiated NOD-scid-IL2Rg−/− (NSI) mice. HBB expression was observed in these HSCs after hematopoietic differentiation in the NSI mice. Importantly, no tumor was found in the livers, lungs, kidneys, or bone marrow at 10 weeks in the NSI mice after implantation with these HSCs. Collectively, our findings demonstrated that CRISPR/Cas9 successfully corrects β-thalassemia mutations in patient-specific iPSCs. These CRISPR/Cas9-corrected iPSC-derived HSCs express normal HBB in mice without tumorigenic potential, suggesting a safe strategy for personalized treatment of β-thalassemia. PMID:27581487

  16. [Combination therapy of chronic bacterial prostatitis].

    PubMed

    Khryanin, A A; Reshetnikov, O V

    2016-08-01

    The article discusses the possible etiological factors in the development of chronic bacterial prostatitis. The authors presented a comparative long-term analysis of morbidity from non-viral sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in Russia. Against the background of general decline in STIs incidence, a significant percentage of them is made up by urogenital trichomoniasis. The findings substantiated the advantages of combination therapy (ornidazole and ofloxacin) for bacterial urinary tract infections.

  17. Candidate diseases for prenatal gene therapy.

    PubMed

    David, Anna L; Waddington, Simon N

    2012-01-01

    Prenatal gene therapy aims to deliver genes to cells and tissues early in prenatal life, allowing correction of a genetic defect, before irreparable tissue damage has occurred. In contrast to postnatal gene therapy, prenatal application may target genes to a large population of stem cells, and the smaller fetal size allows a higher vector to target cell ratio to be achieved. Early gestation delivery may allow the development of immune tolerance to the transgenic protein, which would facilitate postnatal repeat vector administration if needed. Moreover, early delivery would avoid anti-vector immune responses which are often acquired in postnatal life. The NIH Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee considered that a candidate disease for prenatal gene therapy should pose serious morbidity and mortality risks to the fetus or neonate, and not have any effective postnatal treatment. Prenatal gene therapy would therefore be appropriate for life-threatening disorders, in which prenatal gene delivery maintains a clear advantage over cell transplantation or postnatal gene therapy. If deemed safer and more efficacious, prenatal gene therapy may be applicable for nonlethal conditions if adult gene transfer is unlikely to be of benefit. Many candidate diseases will be inherited congenital disorders such as thalassaemia or lysosomal storage disorders. However, obstetric conditions such as fetal growth restriction may also be treated using a targeted gene therapy approach. In each disease, the condition must be diagnosed prenatally, either via antenatal screening and prenatal diagnosis, for example, in the case of hemophilias, or by ultrasound assessment of the fetus, for example, congenital diaphragmatic hernia. In this chapter, we describe some examples of the candidate diseases and discuss how a prenatal gene therapy approach might work.

  18. Stem-Cell-Based Gene Therapy for HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Anjie; Kitchen, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Despite the enormous success of combined anti-retroviral therapy, HIV infection is still a lifelong disease and continues to spread rapidly worldwide. There is a pressing need to develop a treatment that will cure HIV infection. Recent progress in stem cell manipulation and advancements in humanized mouse models have allowed rapid developments of gene therapy for HIV treatment. In this review, we will discuss two aspects of HIV gene therapy using human hematopoietic stem cells. The first is to generate immune systems resistant to HIV infection while the second strategy involves enhancing anti-HIV immunity to eliminate HIV infected cells. PMID:24368413

  19. Stem-cell-based gene therapy for HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Anjie; Kitchen, Scott

    2013-12-24

    Despite the enormous success of combined anti-retroviral therapy, HIV infection is still a lifelong disease and continues to spread rapidly worldwide. There is a pressing need to develop a treatment that will cure HIV infection. Recent progress in stem cell manipulation and advancements in humanized mouse models have allowed rapid developments of gene therapy for HIV treatment. In this review, we will discuss two aspects of HIV gene therapy using human hematopoietic stem cells. The first is to generate immune systems resistant to HIV infection while the second strategy involves enhancing anti-HIV immunity to eliminate HIV infected cells.

  20. Recent advances in fetal gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Suzanne M K; Rahim, Ahad A; Chan, Jerry K Y; David, Anna L; Peebles, Donald M; Coutelle, Charles; Waddingtont, Simon N

    2011-04-01

    Over the first decade of this new millennium gene therapy has demonstrated clear clinical benefits in several diseases for which conventional medicine offers no treatment. Clinical trials of gene therapy for single gene disorders have recruited predominantly young patients since older subjects may have suffered irrevocablepathological changes or may not be available because the disease is lethal relatively early in life. The concept of fetal gene therapy is an extension of this principle in that diseases in which irreversible changes occur at or beforebirth can be prevented by gene supplementation or repair in the fetus or associated maternal tissues. This article ccnsiders the enthusiasm and skepticism held for fetal gene therapy and its potential for clinical application. It coversa spectrum of candidate diseases for fetal gene therapy including Pompe disease, Gaucher disease, thalassemia, congenital protein C deficiency and cystic fibrosis. It outlines successful and not-so-successful examples of fetal gene therapy in animal models. Finally the application and potential of fetal gene transfer as a fundamental research tool for developmental biology and generation of somatic transgenic animals is surveyed.

  1. Treatment of ocular disorders by gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Solinís, M Ángeles; del Pozo-Rodríguez, Ana; Apaolaza, Paola S; Rodríguez-Gascón, Alicia

    2015-09-01

    Gene therapy to treat ocular disorders is still starting, and current therapies are primarily experimental, with most human clinical trials still in research state, although beginning to show encouraging results. Currently 33 clinical trials have been approved, are in progress, or have been completed. The most promising results have been obtained in clinical trials of ocular gene therapy for Leber Congenital Amaurosis, which have prompted the study of several ocular diseases that are good candidates to be treated with gene therapy: glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa, or choroideremia. The success of gene therapy relies on the efficient delivery of the genetic material to target cells, achieving optimum long-term gene expression. Although viral vectors have been widely used, their potential risk associated mainly with immunogenicity and mutagenesis has promoted the design of non-viral vectors. In this review, the main administration routes and the most studied delivery systems, viral and non-viral, for ocular gene therapy are presented. The primary ocular disease candidates to be treated with gene therapy have been also reviewed, including the genetic basis and the most relevant preclinical and clinical studies.

  2. The hair follicle as a target for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S; Domashenko, A; Cotsarelis, G

    2001-01-01

    The hair follicle possesses progenitor cells for continued hair follicle cycling and for epidermal keratinocytes, melanocytes and Langerhans cells. These different cell types can be targeted by topical gene delivery to mouse skin. Using a combination of liposomes and DNA, we demonstrated the feasibility of targeting hair follicle cells in human scalp xenografts as well. We defined liposome composition and stage of the hair cycle as important parameters influencing transfection of human hair follicles. Transfection occurred only during anagen onset. Considerations and obstacles for using gene therapy to treat alopecias and skin disease are discussed. A theoretical framework for future gene therapy treatments for cutaneous and systemic disorders is presented.

  3. Vectors--shuttle vehicles for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Wilson, J M

    1997-01-01

    Gene therapy is being considered for the treatment of various inherited and acquired disorders. The basic premise of this new therapeutic modality is manipulation of gene expression towards a therapeutic end. The early development of the field focused on a technique called ex vivo gene therapy in which autologous cells are genetically manipulated in culture prior to transplantation. Recent advances have stimulated the development of in vivo gene therapy approaches based on direct delivery of the therapeutic gene to cells in vivo. The rate-limiting technologies of gene therapy are the gene delivery vehicles, called vectors, used to accomplish gene transfer. The most efficient vectors are based on recombinant versions of viruses with retroviral vectors serving as prototypes. This viral vector system has been exploited in ex vivo approaches of gene therapy in which cultured, dividing cells are transduced with the recombinant virus resulting in integration of the proviral DNA into the chromosomal DNA of the recipient cell. The use of retroviral vectors in gene therapy has been restricted to ex vivo approaches because of difficulties in purifying the virion and the requirement that the target cell is dividing at the time of transduction. More recently, vectors based on adenoviruses have been developed for in vivo gene therapy. These viruses can be grown in large quantities and highly purified. Importantly, they efficiently transduce the recombinant genome into non-dividing cells. Applications include in vivo gene delivery to a variety of targets such as muscle, lung, liver and the central nervous system. Clinical trials of in vivo delivery with adenoviruses have been undertaken for the treatment of cystic fibrosis.

  4. Utilizing combination therapy for ethnic skin.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Susan C

    2007-07-01

    A major issue in treating acne in individuals of color is the need to treat and prevent postinflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH), which is common in this population. This subset analysis reports the pigmentary changes in subjects of color with acne who were enrolled in a community-based trial comparing 3 different topical therapeutic regimens. All subjects received combination clindamycin 1%-benzoyl peroxide (BPO) 5% topical gel containing glycerin and dimethicone. Subjects were randomized to receive this combination therapy in addition to either a tretinoin microsphere (RAM) gel at concentrations of either 0.04% or 0.1% or adapalene (AP) gel 0.1%. There was a trend toward better resolution of hyperpigmentation in the subjects receiving the clindamycin-BPO topical gel in combination with RAM gel 0.04%.

  5. Combination therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Buonerba, Carlo; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Current therapy for metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC) consists of the serial administration of single agents. Combinations of VEGF and mTOR inhibitors have been disappointing in previous randomized trials. However, the combination of lenvatinib, a multitargeted agent that inhibits VEGF as well as FGF receptors, and everolimus demonstrated promising results in a randomized phase II trial. Moreover, the emergence of programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1) inhibitors has spawned the investigation of combinations of these agents with VEGF inhibitors and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) inhibitors. These ongoing phase III trials in conjunction with the development of predictive biomarkers and agents inhibiting novel therapeutic targets may provide much needed advances in this still largely incurable disease. PMID:27047959

  6. Combined surgery and photodynamic therapy of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douplik, Alexandre

    According to the recent guidelines, the gold standard is resecting an extra 0.5-3 cm beyond the lesion margins that are visually detected and/or biopsy confirmed depending on type of malignancy and its localisation to avoid missing the residuals of the tumour. Often, such a large resection leads to dysfunctions of the organ or tissues, which underwent the surgery. In some cases, an extra tumour-free margin cannot be achieved because of tumour proximity to vital sites such as major vascular or nerve structures. Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) is an emerging clinical modality to locally destroy cancer lesions selectively. The limitation of photodynamic therapy is the curable depth of an order of one centimetre or less. A combination of cancer surgery following by PDT can bring a benefit to reduce the resection and minimise the impact on the organ or tissue functionality. Combination of cancer surgery and photodynamic therapy provides another opportunity-fluorescence image guidance of cancer removal. Most of the photosensitizers intensively fluoresce and hence facilitate a strong fluorescence contrast versus healthy adjacent tissues.

  7. Gene Therapy Techniques for Peripheral Arterial Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Manninen, Hannu I.; Maekinen, Kimmo

    2002-03-15

    Somatic gene therapy is the introduction of new genetic material into selective somatic cells with resulting therapeutic benefits. Vascular wall and, subsequently, cardiovascular diseases have become an interesting target for gene therapy studies.Arteries are an attractive target for gene therapy since vascular interventions, both open surgical and endovascular, are well suited for minimally invasive, easily monitored gene delivery. Promising therapeutic effects have been obtained in animal models in preventing post-angioplasty restenosis and vein graft thickening, as well as increasing blood flow and collateral development in ischemic limbs.First clinical trials suggest a beneficial effect of vascular endothelial growth factor in achieving therapeutic angiogenesis in chronic limb ischemia and the efficacy of decoy oligonucleotides to prevent infrainguinal vein graft stenosis. However, further studies are mandatory to clarify the safety issues, to develop better gene delivery vectors and delivery catheters, to improve transgene expression, as well as to find the most effective and safe treatment genes.

  8. In Vivo Noninvasive Imaging for Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    Gene therapy is reaching a stage where some clinical benefits have been demonstrated on patients involved in phase I/II clinical trials. However, in many cases, the clinical benefit is hardly measurable and progress in the improvement of gene therapy formulations is hampered by the lack of objective clinical endpoints to measure transgene delivery and to quantitate transgene expression. However, these endpoints rely almost exclusively on the analysis of biopsies by molecular and histopathological methods. These methods provide only a limited picture of the situation. Therefore, there is a need for a technology that would allow precise, spacio-temporal measurement of gene expression on a whole body scale upon administration of the gene delivery vector. In the field of gene therapy, a considerable effort is being invested in the development of noninvasive imaging of gene expression and this review presents the various strategies currently being developed. PMID:12721514

  9. Gene, stem cell, and future therapies for orphan diseases.

    PubMed

    Phillips, M Ian

    2012-08-01

    There are an estimated 7,000 "orphan diseases," but treatments are currently available for only about 5% of them. Recent progress in the advanced platforms of gene therapy, stem cell therapy, gene modification, and gene correction offers possibilities for new therapies and cures for rare diseases. Many rare diseases are genetic in origin, and gene therapy is being successfully applied to treat them. Human stem cell therapy, apart from bone marrow transplants, is still experimental. Genetic modification of stem cells can make stem cell-based products more effective. Autologous induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, when combined with new classes of artificial nucleases, have great potential in the ex vivo repair of specific mutated DNA sequences (zinc-finger proteins and transactivator-like effector nucleases). Patient-specific iPS cells can be corrected and transplanted back into the patient. Stem cells secrete paracrine factors that could become new therapeutic tools in the treatment of orphan diseases. Gene therapy and stem cell therapy with DNA repair are promising approaches to the treatment of rare, intractable diseases.

  10. State-of-the-art human gene therapy: part II. Gene therapy strategies and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Gao, Guangping

    2014-09-01

    In Part I of this Review (Wang and Gao, 2014), we introduced recent advances in gene delivery technologies and explained how they have powered some of the current human gene therapy applications. In Part II, we expand the discussion on gene therapy applications, focusing on some of the most exciting clinical uses. To help readers to grasp the essence and to better organize the diverse applications, we categorize them under four gene therapy strategies: (1) gene replacement therapy for monogenic diseases, (2) gene addition for complex disorders and infectious diseases, (3) gene expression alteration targeting RNA, and (4) gene editing to introduce targeted changes in host genome. Human gene therapy started with the simple idea that replacing a faulty gene with a functional copy can cure a disease. It has been a long and bumpy road to finally translate this seemingly straightforward concept into reality. As many disease mechanisms unraveled, gene therapists have employed a gene addition strategy backed by a deep knowledge of what goes wrong in diseases and how to harness host cellular machinery to battle against diseases. Breakthroughs in other biotechnologies, such as RNA interference and genome editing by chimeric nucleases, have the potential to be integrated into gene therapy. Although clinical trials utilizing these new technologies are currently sparse, these innovations are expected to greatly broaden the scope of gene therapy in the near future.

  11. Biodegradable nanoparticles for gene therapy technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinkhani, Hossein; He, Wen-Jie; Chiang, Chiao-Hsi; Hong, Po-Da; Yu, Dah-Shyong; Domb, Abraham J.; Ou, Keng-Liang

    2013-07-01

    Rapid propagations in materials technology together with biology have initiated great hopes in the possibility of treating many diseases by gene therapy technology. Viral and non-viral gene carriers are currently applied for gene delivery. Non-viral technology is safe and effective for the delivery of genetic materials to cells and tissues. Non-viral systems are based on plasmid expression containing a gene encoding a therapeutic protein and synthetic biodegradable nanoparticles as a safe carrier of gene. Biodegradable nanoparticles have shown great interest in drug and gene delivery systems as they are easy to be synthesized and have no side effect in cells and tissues. This review provides a critical view of applications of biodegradable nanoparticles on gene therapy technology to enhance the localization of in vitro and in vivo and improve the function of administered genes.

  12. Current developments in anti-HIV/AIDS gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Tsygankov, Alexander Y

    2009-02-01

    Since the introduction of highly active retroviral therapy (HAART) in 1996, dramatic improvements in therapeutic treatment modalities for HIV type 1 (HIV-1) infection have occurred. Potent drug combinations in HAART regimens efficiently block HIV-1 replication in most patients; however, multiple shortcomings of HAART are apparent and require novel treatments that can be utilized in combination with HAART or as stand-alone therapies. Gene therapy of HIV-1 represents one such treatment and several strategies are currently under development. This review focuses on advancements in the gene therapy of HIV/AIDS by highlighting the progress made in selecting new therapeutic targets and developing novel tools to exert an effect on these targets. In addition, new trends emerging from this progress are summarized. This review is based primarily on literature published between 2006 and 2008.

  13. Gene Therapy: A Paradigm Shift in Dentistry.

    PubMed

    Siddique, Nida; Raza, Hira; Ahmed, Sehrish; Khurshid, Zohaib; Zafar, Muhammad Sohail

    2016-11-10

    Gene therapy holds a promising future for bridging the gap between the disciplines of medicine and clinical dentistry. The dynamic treatment approaches of gene therapy have been advancing by leaps and bounds. They are transforming the conventional approaches into more precise and preventive ones that may limit the need of using drugs and surgery. The oral cavity is one of the most accessible areas for the clinical applications of gene therapy for various oral tissues. The idea of genetic engineering has become more exciting due to its advantages over other treatment modalities. For instance, the body is neither subjected to an invasive surgery nor deep wounds, nor is it susceptible to systemic effects of drugs. The aim of this article is to review the gene therapy applications in the field of dentistry. In addition, therapeutic benefits in terms of treatment of diseases, minimal invasion and maximum outcomes have been discussed.

  14. Gene Therapy: A Paradigm Shift in Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Siddique, Nida; Raza, Hira; Ahmed, Sehrish; Khurshid, Zohaib; Zafar, Muhammad Sohail

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy holds a promising future for bridging the gap between the disciplines of medicine and clinical dentistry. The dynamic treatment approaches of gene therapy have been advancing by leaps and bounds. They are transforming the conventional approaches into more precise and preventive ones that may limit the need of using drugs and surgery. The oral cavity is one of the most accessible areas for the clinical applications of gene therapy for various oral tissues. The idea of genetic engineering has become more exciting due to its advantages over other treatment modalities. For instance, the body is neither subjected to an invasive surgery nor deep wounds, nor is it susceptible to systemic effects of drugs. The aim of this article is to review the gene therapy applications in the field of dentistry. In addition, therapeutic benefits in terms of treatment of diseases, minimal invasion and maximum outcomes have been discussed. PMID:27834914

  15. Clinical applications of retinal gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Lipinski, Daniel M; Thake, Miriam; MacLaren, Robert E

    2013-01-01

    Many currently incurable forms of blindness affecting the retina have a genetic etiology and several others, such as those resulting from retinal vascular disturbances, respond to repeated, potentially indefinite administration of molecular based treatments. The recent clinical advances in retinal gene therapy have shown that viral vectors can deliver genes safely to the retina and the promising initial results from a number of clinical trials suggest that certain diseases may potentially be treatable. Gene therapy provides a means of expressing proteins within directly transduced cells with far greater efficacy than might be achieved by traditional systemic pharmacological approaches. Recent developments have demonstrated how vector gene expression may be regulated and further improvements to vector design have limited side effects and improved safety profiles. These recent steps have been most significant in bringing gene therapy into the mainstream of ophthalmology. Nevertheless translating retinal gene therapy from animal research into clinical trials is still a lengthy process, including complexities in human retinal diseases that have been difficult to model in the laboratory. The focus of this review is to summarize the genetic background of the most common retinal diseases, highlight current concepts of gene delivery technology, and relate those technologies to pre-clinical and clinical gene therapy studies.

  16. Tumor Static Concentration Curves in Combination Therapy.

    PubMed

    Cardilin, Tim; Almquist, Joachim; Jirstrand, Mats; Sostelly, Alexandre; Amendt, Christiane; El Bawab, Samer; Gabrielsson, Johan

    2017-03-01

    Combination therapies are widely accepted as a cornerstone for treatment of different cancer types. A tumor growth inhibition (TGI) model is developed for combinations of cetuximab and cisplatin obtained from xenograft mice. Unlike traditional TGI models, both natural cell growth and cell death are considered explicitly. The growth rate was estimated to 0.006 h(-1) and the natural cell death to 0.0039 h(-1) resulting in a tumor doubling time of 14 days. The tumor static concentrations (TSC) are predicted for each individual compound. When the compounds are given as single-agents, the required concentrations were computed to be 506 μg · mL(-1) and 56 ng · mL(-1) for cetuximab and cisplatin, respectively. A TSC curve is constructed for different combinations of the two drugs, which separates concentration combinations into regions of tumor shrinkage and tumor growth. The more concave the TSC curve is, the lower is the total exposure to test compounds necessary to achieve tumor regression. The TSC curve for cetuximab and cisplatin showed weak concavity. TSC values and TSC curves were estimated that predict tumor regression for 95% of the population by taking between-subject variability into account. The TSC concept is further discussed for different concentration-effect relationships and for combinations of three or more compounds.

  17. Combination therapies in ophthalmology: implications for intravitreal delivery.

    PubMed

    Peyman, Gholam A; Hosseini, Kamran

    2011-01-01

    Most pathological processes involve complex molecular pathways that can only be modified or blocked by a combination of medications. Combination therapy has become a common practice in medicine. In ophthalmology, this approach has been used effectively to treat bacterial, fungal, proliferative/neoplastic, and inflammatory eye diseases and vascular proliferation. Combination therapy also encompasses the synergistic effect of electromagnetic radiation and medications. However, combination therapy can augment inherent complications of individual interventions, therefore vigilance is required. Complications of combination therapy include potential incompatibility among compounds and tissue toxicity. Understanding these effects will assist the ophthalmologist in his decision to maximize the benefits of combination therapy while avoiding an unfavorable outcome.

  18. Combination Therapies in Ophthalmology: Implications for Intravitreal Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Peyman, Gholam A.; Hosseini, Kamran

    2011-01-01

    Most pathological processes involve complex molecular pathways that can only be modified or blocked by a combination of medications. Combination therapy has become a common practice in medicine. In ophthalmology, this approach has been used effectively to treat bacterial, fungal, proliferative/neoplastic, and inflammatory eye diseases and vascular proliferation. Combination therapy also encompasses the synergistic effect of electromagnetic radiation and medications. However, combination therapy can augment inherent complications of individual interventions, therefore vigilance is required. Complications of combination therapy include potential incompatibility among compounds and tissue toxicity. Understanding these effects will assist the ophthalmologist in his decision to maximize the benefits of combination therapy while avoiding an unfavorable outcome. PMID:22454705

  19. Gene therapy for human genetic disease?

    PubMed

    Friedmann, T; Roblin, R

    1972-03-03

    In our view, gene therapy may ameliorate some human genetic diseases in the future. For this reason, we believe that research directed at the development of techniques for gene therapy should continue. For the foreseeable future, however, we oppose any further attempts at gene therapy in human patients because (i) our understanding of such basic processes as gene regulation and genetic recombination in human cells is inadequate; (ii) our understanding of the details of the relation between the molecular defect and the disease state is rudimentary for essentially all genetic diseases; and (iii) we have no information on the short-range and long-term side effects of gene therapy. We therefore propose that a sustained effort be made to formulate a complete set of ethicoscientific criteria to guide the development and clinical application of gene therapy techniques. Such an endeavor could go a long way toward ensuring that gene therapy is used in humans only in those instances where it will prove beneficial, and toward preventing its misuse through premature application. Two recent papers have provided new demonstrations of directed genetic modification of mammalian cells. Munyon et al. (44) restored the ability to synthesize the enzyme thymidine kinase to thymidine kinase-deficient mouse cells by infection with ultraviolet-irradiated herpes simplex virus. In their experiments the DNA from herpes simplex virus, which contains a gene coding for thymidine kinase, may have formed a hereditable association with the mouse cells. Merril et al. (45) reported that treatment of fibroblasts from patients with galactosemia with exogenous DNA caused increased activity of a missing enzyme, alpha-D-galactose-l-phosphate uridyltransferase. They also provided some evidence that the change persisted after subculturing the treated cells. If this latter report can be confirmed, the feasibility of directed genetic modification of human cells would be clearly demonstrated, considerably

  20. Cardiovascular gene therapy for myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Scimia, Maria C; Gumpert, Anna M; Koch, Walter J

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Cardiovascular gene therapy is the third most popular application for gene therapy, representing 8.4% of all gene therapy trials as reported in 2012 estimates. Gene therapy in cardiovascular disease is aiming to treat heart failure from ischemic and non-ischemic causes, peripheral artery disease, venous ulcer, pulmonary hypertension, atherosclerosis and monogenic diseases, such as Fabry disease. Areas covered In this review, we will focus on elucidating current molecular targets for the treatment of ventricular dysfunction following myocardial infarction (MI). In particular, we will focus on the treatment of i) the clinical consequences of it, such as heart failure and residual myocardial ischemia and ii) etiological causes of MI (coronary vessels atherosclerosis, bypass venous graft disease, in-stent restenosis). Expert opinion We summarise the scheme of the review and the molecular targets either already at the gene therapy clinical trial phase or in the pipeline. These targets will be discussed below. Following this, we will focus on what we believe are the 4 prerequisites of success of any gene target therapy: safety, expression, specificity and efficacy (SESE). PMID:24328708

  1. Gene therapy for primary immunodeficiencies: Part 1.

    PubMed

    Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Fischer, Alain; Hacein-Bey-Abina, Salima; Aiuti, Alessandro

    2012-10-01

    Over 60 patients affected by SCID due to IL2RG deficiency (SCID-X1) or adenosine deaminase (ADA)-SCID have received hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy in the past 15 years using gammaretroviral vectors, resulting in immune reconstitution and clinical benefit in the majority of them. However, the occurrence of insertional oncogenesis in the SCID-X1 trials has led to the development of new clinical trials based on integrating vectors with improved safety design as well as investigation on new technologies for highly efficient gene targeting and site-specific gene editing. Here we will present the experience and perspectives of gene therapy for SCID-X1 and ADA-SCID and discuss the pros and cons of gene therapy in comparison to allogeneic transplantation.

  2. Progress in gene therapy for neurological disorders

    PubMed Central

    Simonato, Michele; Bennett, Jean; Boulis, Nicholas M.; Castro, Maria G.; Fink, David J.; Goins, William F.; Gray, Steven J.; Lowenstein, Pedro R.; Vandenberghe, Luk H.; Wilson, Thomas J.; Wolfe, John H.; Glorioso, Joseph C.

    2013-01-01

    Diseases of the nervous system have devastating effects and are widely distributed among the population, being especially prevalent in the elderly. These diseases are often caused by inherited genetic mutations that result in abnormal nervous system development, neurodegeneration, or impaired neuronal function. Other causes of neurological diseases include genetic and epigenetic changes induced by environmental insults, injury, disease-related events or inflammatory processes. Standard medical and surgical practice has not proved effective in curing or treating these diseases, and appropriate pharmaceuticals do not exist or are insufficient to slow disease progression. Gene therapy is emerging as a powerful approach with potential to treat and even cure some of the most common diseases of the nervous system. Gene therapy for neurological diseases has been made possible through progress in understanding the underlying disease mechanisms, particularly those involving sensory neurons, and also by improvement of gene vector design, therapeutic gene selection, and methods of delivery. Progress in the field has renewed our optimism for gene therapy as a treatment modality that can be used by neurologists, ophthalmologists and neurosurgeons. In this Review, we describe the promising gene therapy strategies that have the potential to treat patients with neurological diseases and discuss prospects for future development of gene therapy. PMID:23609618

  3. Progress in gene therapy for neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Simonato, Michele; Bennett, Jean; Boulis, Nicholas M; Castro, Maria G; Fink, David J; Goins, William F; Gray, Steven J; Lowenstein, Pedro R; Vandenberghe, Luk H; Wilson, Thomas J; Wolfe, John H; Glorioso, Joseph C

    2013-05-01

    Diseases of the nervous system have devastating effects and are widely distributed among the population, being especially prevalent in the elderly. These diseases are often caused by inherited genetic mutations that result in abnormal nervous system development, neurodegeneration, or impaired neuronal function. Other causes of neurological diseases include genetic and epigenetic changes induced by environmental insults, injury, disease-related events or inflammatory processes. Standard medical and surgical practice has not proved effective in curing or treating these diseases, and appropriate pharmaceuticals do not exist or are insufficient to slow disease progression. Gene therapy is emerging as a powerful approach with potential to treat and even cure some of the most common diseases of the nervous system. Gene therapy for neurological diseases has been made possible through progress in understanding the underlying disease mechanisms, particularly those involving sensory neurons, and also by improvement of gene vector design, therapeutic gene selection, and methods of delivery. Progress in the field has renewed our optimism for gene therapy as a treatment modality that can be used by neurologists, ophthalmologists and neurosurgeons. In this Review, we describe the promising gene therapy strategies that have the potential to treat patients with neurological diseases and discuss prospects for future development of gene therapy.

  4. Combination immunotherapy and photodynamic therapy for cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamblin, Michael R.; Castano, Ana P.; Mroz, Pawel

    2006-02-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death among modern people largely due to metastatic disease. The ideal cancer treatment should target both the primary tumor and the metastases with minimal toxicity towards normal tissue. This is best accomplished by priming the body's immune system to recognize the tumor antigens so that after the primary tumor is destroyed, distant metastases will also be eradicated. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) involves the IV administration of photosensitizers followed by illumination of the tumor with red light producing reactive oxygen species leading to vascular shutdown and tumor cell death. Anti-tumor immunity is stimulated after PDT due to the acute inflammatory response, generation of tumor-specific antigens, and induction of heat-shock proteins. Combination regimens using PDT and immunostimulating treatments are likely to even further enhance post-PDT immunity. These immunostimulants are likely to include products derived from pathogenic microorganisms that are effectively recognized by Toll-like receptors and lead to upregulation of transcription factors for cytokines and inflammatory mediators. The following cascade of events causes activation of macrophages, dendritic and natural killer cells. Exogenous cytokine administration can be another way to increase PDT-induced immunity as well as treatment with a low dose of cyclophosphamide that selectively reduces T-regulatory cells. Although so far these combination therapies have only been used in animal models, their use in clinical trials should receive careful consideration.

  5. Hybrid nanoparticles for combination therapy of cancer

    PubMed Central

    He, Chunbai; Lu, Jianqin; Lin, Wenbin

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticle anticancer drug delivery enhances therapeutic efficacies and reduces side effects by improving pharmacokinetics and biodistributions of the drug payloads in animal models. Despite promising preclinical efficacy results, monotherapy nanomedicines have failed to produce enhanced response rates over conventional chemotherapy in human clinical trials. The discrepancy between preclinical data and clinical outcomes is believed to result from the less pronounced enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect in and the heterogeneity of human tumors as well as the intrinsic/acquired drug resistance to monotherapy over the treatment course. To address these issues, recent efforts have been devoted to developing nanocarriers that can efficiently deliver multiple therapeutics with controlled release properties and increased tumor deposition. In ideal scenarios, the drug or therapeutic modality combinations have different mechanisms of action to afford synergistic effects. In this review, we summarize recent progress in designing hybrid nanoparticles for the co-delivery of combination therapies, including multiple chemotherapeutics, chemotherapeutics and biologics, chemotherapeutics and photodynamic therapy, and chemotherapeutics and radiotherapy. The in vitro and in vivo anticancer effects are also discussed. PMID:26387745

  6. Ectopic pregnancy treatment by combination therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chudecka-Głaz, Anita; Kuźniak, Sławomir; Menkiszak, Janusz

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Detectability of early stages of ectopic pregnancies has increased due to improvements in ultrasonographic and biochemical techniques. Since the patients’ future procreative plans must be taken into consideration when commencing treatment, the goal of this work was to compare the effects of treatment methods and their impact on fertility. The study included 91 patients treated surgically for ectopic pregnancy. The choice of treatment depended on patients’ general condition, ultrasonographic evaluation and serum level of beta-hCG. A combination of laparoscopic and conservative systemic treatment was applied in 70% of cases. More rapid beta-hCG reduction was noted when laparoscopy and intra-oviductal injection of hyperosmolar glucose or methotrexate (MTX) were combined with intramuscular administration of MTX at a dose of 50 mg/m2. Follow-up examination of 66 patients revealed that the greatest number of spontaneous pregnancies (48%) resulted after this combination therapy. We conclude that this combination treatment is safe and provides satisfactory results in terms of future fertility. PMID:28352846

  7. Virotherapy: cancer gene therapy at last?

    PubMed Central

    Bilsland, Alan E.; Spiliopoulou, Pavlina; Evans, T. R. Jeffry

    2016-01-01

    For decades, effective cancer gene therapy has been a tantalising prospect; for a therapeutic modality potentially able to elicit highly effective and selective responses, definitive efficacy outcomes have often seemed out of reach. However, steady progress in vector development and accumulated experience from previous clinical studies has finally led the field to its first licensed therapy. Following a pivotal phase III trial, Imlygic (talimogene laherparepvec/T-Vec) received US approval as a treatment for cutaneous and subcutaneous melanoma in October 2015, followed several weeks later by its European authorisation. These represent the first approvals for an oncolytic virotherapy. Imlygic is an advanced-generation herpesvirus-based vector optimised for oncolytic and immunomodulatory activities. Many other oncolytic agents currently remain in development, providing hope that current success will be followed by other diverse vectors that may ultimately come to constitute a new class of clinical anti-cancer agents. In this review, we discuss some of the key oncolytic viral agents developed in the adenovirus and herpesvirus classes, and the prospects for further enhancing their efficacy by combining them with novel immunotherapeutic approaches. PMID:27635234

  8. The Association of Substitutions in the Hepatitis C Virus Subtype 1b Core Gene and IL28B Polymorphisms With the Response to Peg-IFNα-2a/RBV Combination Therapy in Azerbaijani Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bokharaei-Salim, Farah; Salehi-Vaziri, Mostafa; Sadeghi, Farzin; Esghaei, Maryam; Monavari, Seyed Hamidreza; Alavian, Seyed Moayed; Fakhim, Shahin; Keyvani, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Background The hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has been identified as a leading cause of progressive liver diseases worldwide. Despite new treatment strategies, pegylated interferon alfa-2a (Peg-IFNα-2a), in combination with ribavirin (RBV), still represents the gold standard of therapy for hepatitis C in developing countries. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the association of substitutions in the HCV subtype 1b (HCV-1b) core protein and the rs12979860 polymorphism in the interleukin 28B gene (IL28B) with the response to Peg-IFNα-2a/RBV combination therapy in Azerbaijani patients. Patients and Methods A total of fifty-one chronically HCV-1b-infected Azerbaijani patients were enrolled in this cross-sectional study from March 2010 to June 2015. After RNA extraction from pre-treatment plasma, the core region of the HCV genome was amplified using the nested reverse transcription (RT) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method, followed by standard sequencing. In addition, genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) specimens, and the rs12979860 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was identified using a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay. Results In this study, a significant association was observed between the non-responders and relapsers to antiviral therapy and substitutions in the HCV-1b core region at positions 43 (R43K, P = 0.047), 70 (R70Q, P < 0.001), 91 (M91L, P = 0.037), and 106 (S106N, P = 0.018). Concerning the IL28B polymorphism, the results showed that sustained virological response was significantly associated with homozygous CC patients (P = 0.009) as compared with other genotypes, while homozygous TT subjects were associated with HCV relapse after therapy (P = 0.006). Conclusions The data of the present study suggest that amino acid substitutions at position 43, 70, 91, and 106 in the HCV-1b core protein are correlated with the response to the Peg-IFNα-2a/RBV treatment in

  9. Gene therapy: a primer for neurosurgeons.

    PubMed

    Chiocca, E Antonio

    2003-08-01

    Gene therapy involves the transfer of genes into cells with therapeutic intent. Although several methods can accomplish this, vectors based on viruses still provide the most efficient approach. For neurosurgical purposes, preclinical and clinical applications in the areas of glioma therapy, spinal neurosurgery, and neuroprotection for treatment of Parkinson's disease and cerebral ischemia are reviewed. In general, therapies applied in the neurosurgical realm have proven relatively safe, despite occasional, well-publicized cases of morbidity and death in non-neurosurgical trials. However, continued clinical and preclinical research in this area is critical, to fully elucidate potential toxicities and to generate truly effective treatments that can be applied in neurological diseases.

  10. Gene and Cell Therapy for Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Cardiac gene and cell therapy have both entered clinical trials aimed at ameliorating ventricular dysfunction in patients with chronic congestive heart failure. The transduction of myocardial cells with viral constructs encoding a specific cardiomyocyte Ca2+ pump in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), SRCa2+-ATPase has been shown to correct deficient Ca2+ handling in cardiomyocytes and improvements in contractility in preclinical studies, thus leading to the first clinical trial of gene therapy for heart failure. In cell therapy, it is not clear whether beneficial effects are cell-type specific and how improvements in contractility are brought about. Despite these uncertainties, a number of clinical trials are under way, supported by safety and efficacy data from trials of cell therapy in the setting of myocardial infarction. Safety concerns for gene therapy center on inflammatory and immune responses triggered by viral constructs, and for cell therapy with myoblast cells, the major concern is increased incidence of ventricular arrhythmia after cell transplantation. Principles and mechanisms of action of gene and cell therapy for heart failure are discussed, together with the potential influence of reactive oxygen species on the efficacy of these treatments and the status of myocardial-delivery techniques for viral constructs and cells. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 11, 2025–2042. PMID:19416058

  11. Perspectives of gene therapy in stem cell tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Goessler, Ulrich Reinhart; Riedel, Katrin; Hormann, Karl; Riedel, Frank

    2006-01-01

    Tissue engineering is an interdisciplinary field that applies the principles of engineering and life sciences toward the development of biological substitutes that restore, maintain or improve tissue function. It is hoped that forming tissue de novo will overcome many problems in plastic surgery associated with such areas as wound healing and the immunogenicity of transplanted tissue that lead to dysfunctional repair. Gene therapy is the science of the transfer of genetic material into individuals for therapeutic purposes by altering cellular function or structure at the molecular level. Recently, tissue engineering has been used in conjunction with gene therapy as a hybrid approach. This combination of stem-cell-based tissue engineering with gene therapy has the potential to provide regenerative tissue cells within an environment of optimal regulatory protein expression and would have many benefits in various areas such as the transplantation of skin, cartilage or bone. The aim of this review is to outline tissue engineering and possible applications of gene therapy in the field of biomedical engineering as well as basic principles of gene therapy, vectors and gene delivery.

  12. Clinical applications of gene therapy for primary immunodeficiencies.

    PubMed

    Cicalese, Maria Pia; Aiuti, Alessandro

    2015-04-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) have represented a paradigmatic model for successes and pitfalls of hematopoietic stem cells gene therapy. First clinical trials performed with gamma retroviral vectors (γ-RV) for adenosine deaminase severe combined immunodeficiency (ADA-SCID), X-linked SCID (SCID-X1), and Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) showed that gene therapy is a valid therapeutic option in patients lacking an HLA-identical donor. No insertional mutagenesis events have been observed in more than 40 ADA-SCID patients treated so far in the context of different clinical trials worldwide, suggesting a favorable risk-benefit ratio for this disease. On the other hand, the occurrence of insertional oncogenesis in SCID-X1, WAS, and chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) RV clinical trials prompted the development of safer vector construct based on self-inactivating (SIN) retroviral or lentiviral vectors (LVs). Here we present the recent results of LV-mediated gene therapy for WAS showing stable multilineage engraftment leading to hematological and immunological improvement, and discuss the differences with respect to the WAS RV trial. We also describe recent clinical results of SCID-X1 gene therapy with SIN γ-RV and the perspectives of targeted genome editing techniques, following early preclinical studies showing promising results in terms of specificity of gene correction. Finally, we provide an overview of the gene therapy approaches for other PIDs and discuss its prospects in relation to the evolving arena of allogeneic transplant.

  13. Human gene therapy and slippery slope arguments.

    PubMed Central

    McGleenan, T

    1995-01-01

    Any suggestion of altering the genetic makeup of human beings through gene therapy is quite likely to provoke a response involving some reference to a 'slippery slope'. In this article the author examines the topography of two different types of slippery slope argument, the logical slippery slope and the rhetorical slippery slope argument. The logical form of the argument suggests that if we permit somatic cell gene therapy then we are committed to accepting germ line gene therapy in the future because there is no logically sustainable distinction between them. The rhetorical form posits that allowing somatic cell therapy now will be taking the first step on a slippery slope which will ultimately lead to the type of genocide perpetrated by the Nazis. The author tests the validity of these lines of argument against the facts of human gene therapy and concludes that because of their dependence on probabilities that cannot be empirically proven they should be largely disregarded in the much more important debate on moral line-drawing in gene therapy. PMID:8778459

  14. [Gene therapy--hopes and fears].

    PubMed

    Pietrzyk, J J

    1998-01-01

    Gene therapy assumes the correction of a genetic defect by the delivery of a correct DNA sequence to the target cells. Depending on the target cells two types gene therapy have been defined: somatic and germinal. By July 1998, 351 protocols of somatic therapy were approved by the Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee. The majority of protocols focus on cancer therapy and monogenic diseases. By now, still there is more unfulfilled expectation than clinically sound achievements, since no effective prevention or successful treatment for genetic diseases or cancer have been developed. Germline genetic modification is considered as the treatment of choice for such a diseases like retinoblastoma. Tay-Sachs, Lesch-Nyhan and metachromatic leuko-dystrophy. This approach which is still illegal or prohibited by rules in many European countries, is gathering more and more advocates. Once we learn how to control gene expression the perspectives for clinical application of gene therapy might be enormous. The safety of genetic modification of gametes or embryonal stem cells remains to be properly addressed and successfully solved. The ethical issues of germinal gene therapy are still the subject of controversial opinions among the scientists, lawyers and philosophers.

  15. Novel Cell and Gene Therapies for HIV

    PubMed Central

    Hoxie, James A.; June, Carl H.

    2012-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy dramatically improves survival in HIV-infected patients. However, persistence of HIV in reservoirs has necessitated lifelong treatment that can be complicated by cumulative toxicities, incomplete immune restoration, and the emergence of drug-resistant escape mutants. Cell and gene therapies offer the promise of preventing progressive HIV infection by interfering with HIV replication in the absence of chronic antiviral therapy. Individuals homozygous for a deletion in the CCR5 gene (CCR5Δ32) are largely resistant to infection from R5-topic HIV-1 strains, which are most commonly transmitted. A recent report that an HIV-infected patient with relapsed acute myelogenous leukemia was effectively cured from HIV infection after transplantation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSC) from a CCR5Δ32 homozygous donor has generated renewed interest in developing treatment strategies that target viral reservoirs and generate HIV resistance in a patient’s own cells. Although the development of cell-based and gene transfer therapies has been slow, progress in a number of areas is evident. Advances in the fields of gene-targeting strategies, T-cell-based approaches, and HSCs have been encouraging, and a series of ongoing and planned trials to establish proof of concept for strategies that could lead to successful cell and gene therapies for HIV are under way. The eventual goal of these studies is to eliminate latent viral reservoirs and the need for lifelong antiretroviral therapy. PMID:23028130

  16. Alphavirus vectors for cancer gene therapy (review).

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Ryuya

    2004-04-01

    Alphaviruses have several characteristics that make them attractive as gene therapy vectors such as transient and high-level expression of a heterologous gene. Alphavirus vectors, Semliki Forest virus (SFV), Sindbis virus (SIN) and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE) have been developed as gene expression vectors. Alphaviruses are positive-strand RNA viruses that can mediate efficient cytoplasmic gene expression in mammalian cells. The alphavirus RNA replication machinery has been engineered for high level heterologous gene expression. Since an RNA virus vector cannot integrate into chromosomal DNA, concerns about cell transformation are reduced. Alphavirus vectors demonstrate promise for the safe tumor-killing and tumor-specific immune responses. Recombinant alphavirus RNA replicons may facilitate gene therapy of cancer.

  17. Gene replacement therapy for hereditary emphysema

    SciTech Connect

    Skolnick, A.

    1989-11-10

    Investigators suggest that human trials of gene therapy to correct a genetic disorder that usually leads to emphysema early in life may be only a few years away. Speaking at the American Lung Association's Second Annual Science Writers' Forum, R. G. Crystal, chief of the Pulmonary Branch of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute offered an explanation of how hereditary emphysema may be more amenable to genetic therapy than other such diseases. In persons who lack a functioning gene for alpha{sup 1}-antitrypsin, a proteolytic enzyme, neutrophil elastase, attacks the walls of the lungs' alveoli, eventually leading to progressive pulmonary function loss. Two animal models of gene insertion are described.

  18. Gene therapy to treat cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Bongianino, Rossana; Priori, Silvia G

    2015-09-01

    Gene therapy to treat electrical dysfunction of the heart is an appealing strategy because of the limited therapeutic options available to manage the most-severe cardiac arrhythmias, such as ventricular tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation, and asystole. However, cardiac genetic manipulation is challenging, given the complex mechanisms underlying arrhythmias. Nevertheless, the growing understanding of the molecular basis of these diseases, and the development of sophisticated vectors and delivery strategies, are providing researchers with adequate means to target specific genes and pathways involved in disorders of heart rhythm. Data from preclinical studies have demonstrated that gene therapy can be successfully used to modify the arrhythmogenic substrate and prevent life-threatening arrhythmias. Therefore, gene therapy might plausibly become a treatment option for patients with difficult-to-manage acquired arrhythmias and for those with inherited arrhythmias. In this Review, we summarize the preclinical studies into gene therapy for acquired and inherited arrhythmias of the atria or ventricles. We also provide an overview of the technical advances in the design of constructs and viral vectors to increase the efficiency and safety of gene therapy and to improve selective delivery to target organs.

  19. Why commercialization of gene therapy stalled; examining the life cycles of gene therapy technologies.

    PubMed

    Ledley, F D; McNamee, L M; Uzdil, V; Morgan, I W

    2014-02-01

    This report examines the commercialization of gene therapy in the context of innovation theories that posit a relationship between the maturation of a technology through its life cycle and prospects for successful product development. We show that the field of gene therapy has matured steadily since the 1980s, with the congruent accumulation of >35 000 papers, >16 000 US patents, >1800 clinical trials and >$4.3 billion in capital investment in gene therapy companies. Gene therapy technologies comprise a series of dissimilar approaches for gene delivery, each of which has introduced a distinct product architecture. Using bibliometric methods, we quantify the maturation of each technology through a characteristic life cycle S-curve, from a Nascent stage, through a Growing stage of exponential advance, toward an Established stage and projected limit. Capital investment in gene therapy is shown to have occurred predominantly in Nascent stage technologies and to be negatively correlated with maturity. Gene therapy technologies are now achieving the level of maturity that innovation research and biotechnology experience suggest may be requisite for efficient product development. Asynchrony between the maturation of gene therapy technologies and capital investment in development-focused business models may have stalled the commercialization of gene therapy.

  20. Gene therapy outpaces haplo for SCID-X1.

    PubMed

    Kohn, Donald B

    2015-06-04

    In this issue of Blood, Touzot et al report that autologous gene therapy/hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) for infants with X-linked severe combined immune deficiency (SCID-X1) lacking a matched sibling donor may have better outcomes than haploidentical (haplo) HSCT. Because gene therapy represents an autologous transplant, it obviates immune suppression before and after transplant, eliminates risks of graft versus host disease (GVHD), and, as the authors report, led to faster immunological reconstitution after transplant than did haplo transplant.

  1. Non-viral gene therapy for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Wegman, Fiona; Oner, F Cumhur; Dhert, Wouter J A; Alblas, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    The possibilities of using gene therapy for bone regeneration have been extensively investigated. Improvements in the design of new transfection agents, combining vectors and delivery/release systems to diminish cytotoxicity and increase transfection efficiencies have led to several successful in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo strategies. These include growth factor or short interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA) delivery, or even enzyme replacement therapies, and have led to increased osteogenic differentiation and bone formation in vivo. These results provide optimism to consider use in humans with some of these gene-delivery strategies in the near future.

  2. The case for intrauterine gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Mattar, Citra N; Waddington, Simon N; Biswas, Arijit; Davidoff, Andrew M; Choolani, Mahesh; Chan, Jerry K Y; Nathwani, Amit C

    2012-10-01

    Single-gene disorders can cause perinatal mortality or severe permanent morbidity. Intrauterine gene therapy seeks to correct the genetic defect in the early stages of pathogenesis through delivery of a vector system expressing the therapeutic transgene to the fetus. Advantages of intrauterine gene therapy include prevention of irreversible organ damage, potentially inducing central tolerance and wider bio-distribution, including the brain after delivery of vector. Already, proof-of-cure has been demonstrated in knockout animal models for several diseases. Long-term outcomes pertaining to efficacy and durability of transgene expression and safety are under investigation in clinically relevant non-human primate models. Bystander effects in the mother from transplacental vector trafficking require further assessment. In this chapter, we discuss the candidate diseases amenable to intrauterine gene therapy, current state-of-the-art evidence, and potential clinical applications.

  3. Targeted polymeric nanoparticles for cancer gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jayoung; Wilson, David R.; Zamboni, Camila G.; Green, Jordan J.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, advances in designing polymeric nanoparticles for targeted cancer gene therapy are reviewed. Characterization and evaluation of biomaterials, targeting ligands, and transcriptional elements are each discussed. Advances in biomaterials have driven improvements to nanoparticle stability and tissue targeting, conjugation of ligands to the surface of polymeric nanoparticles enable binding to specific cancer cells, and the design of transcriptional elements has enabled selective DNA expression specific to the cancer cells. Together, these features have improved the performance of polymeric nanoparticles as targeted non-viral gene delivery vectors to treat cancer. As polymeric nanoparticles can be designed to be biodegradable, non-toxic, and to have reduced immunogenicity and tumorigenicity compared to viral platforms, they have significant potential for clinical use. Results of polymeric gene therapy in clinical trials and future directions for the engineering of nanoparticle systems for targeted cancer gene therapy are also presented. PMID:26061296

  4. Employment of Salmonella in Cancer Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Che-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    One of the primary limitations of cancer gene therapy is lack of selectivity of the therapeutic gene to tumor cells. Current efforts are focused on discovering and developing tumor-targeting vectors that selectively target only cancer cells but spare normal cells to improve the therapeutic index. The use of preferentially tumor-targeting bacteria as vectors is one of the innovative approaches for the treatment of cancer. This is based on the observation that some obligate or facultative-anaerobic bacteria are capable of multiplying selectively in tumors and inhibiting their growth. In this study, we exploited attenuated Salmonella as a tumoricidal agent and a vector to deliver genes for tumor-targeted gene therapy. Attenuated Salmonella, carrying a eukaryotic expression plasmid encoding an anti-angiogenic gene, was used to evaluate its' ability for tumor targeting and gene delivery in murine tumor models. We also investigated the use of a polymer to modify or shield Salmonella from the pre-existing immune response in the host in order to improve gene delivery to the tumor. These results suggest that tumor-targeted gene therapy using Salmonella carrying a therapeutic gene, which exerts tumoricidal and anti-angiogenic activities, represents a promising strategy for the treatment of tumors.

  5. Molecular imaging and cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Saadatpour, Z; Bjorklund, G; Chirumbolo, S; Alimohammadi, M; Ehsani, H; Ebrahiminejad, H; Pourghadamyari, H; Baghaei, B; Mirzaei, H R; Sahebkar, A; Mirzaei, H; Keshavarzi, M

    2016-11-18

    Gene therapy is known as one of the most advanced approaches for therapeutic prospects ranging from tackling genetic diseases to combating cancer. In this approach, different viral and nonviral vector systems such as retrovirus, lentivirus, plasmid and transposon have been designed and employed. These vector systems are designed to target different therapeutic genes in various tissues and cells such as tumor cells. Therefore, detection of the vectors containing therapeutic genes and monitoring of response to the treatment are the main issues that are commonly faced by researchers. Imaging techniques have been critical in guiding physicians in the more accurate and precise diagnosis and monitoring of cancer patients in different phases of malignancies. Imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) are non-invasive and powerful tools for monitoring of the distribution of transgene expression over time and assessing patients who have received therapeutic genes. Here, we discuss most recent advances in cancer gene therapy and molecular approaches as well as imaging techniques that are utilized to detect cancer gene therapeutics and to monitor the patients' response to these therapies worldwide, particularly in Iranian Academic Medical Centers and Hospitals.Cancer Gene Therapy advance online publication, 18 November 2016; doi:10.1038/cgt.2016.62.

  6. Current status of haemophilia gene therapy.

    PubMed

    High, K H; Nathwani, A; Spencer, T; Lillicrap, D

    2014-05-01

    After many reports of successful gene therapy studies in small and large animal models of haemophilia, we have, at last, seen the first signs of success in human patients. These very encouraging results have been achieved with the use of adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors in patients with severe haemophilia B. Following on from these initial promising studies, there are now three ongoing trials of AAV-mediated gene transfer in haemophilia B all aiming to express the factor IX gene from the liver. Nevertheless, as discussed in the first section of this article, there are still a number of significant hurdles to overcome if haemophilia B gene therapy is to become more widely available. The second section of this article deals with the challenges relating to factor VIII gene transfer. While the recent results in haemophilia B are extremely encouraging, there is, as yet, no similar data for factor VIII gene therapy. It is widely accepted that this therapeutic target will be significantly more problematic for a variety of reasons including accommodating the larger factor VIII cDNA, achieving adequate levels of transgene expression and preventing the far more frequent complication of antifactor VIII immunity. In the final section of the article, the alternative approach of lentiviral vector-mediated gene transfer is discussed. While AAV-mediated approaches to transgene delivery have led the way in clinical haemophilia gene therapy, there are still a number of potential advantages of using an alternative delivery vehicle including the fact that ex vivo host cell transduction will avoid the likelihood of immune responses to the vector. Overall, these are exciting times for haemophilia gene therapy with the likelihood of further clinical successes in the near future.

  7. Fetal gene therapy: opportunities and risks.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Anna M; Schoeberlein, Andreina; Surbek, Daniel

    2009-08-10

    Advances in human prenatal medicine and molecular genetics have allowed the diagnosis of many genetic diseases early in gestation. In-utero transplantation of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) has been successfully used as a therapy in different animal models and recently also in human fetuses. Unfortunately, clinical success of this novel treatment is limited by the lack of donor cell engraftment in non-immunocompromised hosts and is thus restricted to diseases where the fetus is affected by severe immunodeficiency. Gene therapy using genetically modified autologous HSC circumvents allogeneic HLA barriers and constitutes one of the most promising new approaches to correct genetic deficits in the fetus. Recent developments of strategies to overcome failure of efficient transduction of quiescent hematopoietic cells include the use of new vector constructs and transduction protocols. These improvements open new perspectives for gene therapy in general and for prenatal gene transfer in particular. The fetus may be especially susceptible for successful gene therapy due to the immunologic naiveté of the immature hematopoietic system during gestation, precluding an immune reaction towards the transgene. Ethical issues, in particular those regarding treatment safety, must be taken into account before clinical trials with fetal gene therapy in human pregnancies can be initiated.

  8. Gene therapy legislation in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Bleijs, D A; Haenen, I T W C; Bergmans, J E N

    2007-10-01

    Several regulatory organisations are involved in the assessment of clinical gene therapy trials involving genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in The Netherlands. Medical, ethical and scientific aspects are, for instance, evaluated by the Central Committee on Research Involving Human Subjects (CCMO). The Ministry of Housing, Spatial Planning and the Environment (VROM) is the competent authority for the environmental risk assessment according to the deliberate release Directive 2001/18/EC. A Gene Therapy Office has been established in order to streamline the different national review processes and to enable the official procedures to be completed as quickly as possible. Although the Gene Therapy Office improved the application process at the national level, there is a difference of opinion between the EU member states with respect to the EU Directive according to which gene therapy trials are assessed, that urges for harmonisation. This review summarises the gene therapy legislation in The Netherlands and in particular The Netherlands rationale to follow Directive 2001/18/EC for the environmental risk assessment.

  9. Microneedles As a Delivery System for Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Li, Hui; Shi, De; Liu, Zhenguo; Yuan, Weien

    2016-01-01

    Gene delivery systems can be divided to two major types: vector-based (either viral vector or non-viral vector) and physical delivery technologies. Many physical carriers, such as electroporation, gene gun, ultrasound start to be proved to have the potential to enable gene therapy. A relatively new physical delivery technology for gene delivery consists of microneedles (MNs), which has been studied in many fields and for many molecule types and indications. Microneedles can penetrate the stratum corneum, which is the main barrier for drug delivery through the skin with ease of administration and without significant pain. Many different kinds of MNs, such as metal MNs, coated MNs, dissolving MNs have turned out to be promising in gene delivery. In this review, we discussed the potential as well as the challenges of utilizing MNs to deliver nucleic acids for gene therapy. We also proposed that a combination of MNs and other gene delivery approaches may lead to a better delivery system for gene therapy. PMID:27303298

  10. Therapeutic genes for anti-HIV/AIDS gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Bovolenta, Chiara; Porcellini, Simona; Alberici, Luca

    2013-01-01

    The multiple therapeutic approaches developed so far to cope HIV-1 infection, such as anti-retroviral drugs, germicides and several attempts of therapeutic vaccination have provided significant amelioration in terms of life-quality and survival rate of AIDS patients. Nevertheless, no approach has demonstrated efficacy in eradicating this lethal, if untreated, infection. The curative power of gene therapy has been proven for the treatment of monogenic immunodeficiensies, where permanent gene modification of host cells is sufficient to correct the defect for life-time. No doubt, a similar concept is not applicable for gene therapy of infectious immunodeficiensies as AIDS, where there is not a single gene to be corrected; rather engineered cells must gain immunotherapeutic or antiviral features to grant either short- or long-term efficacy mostly by acquisition of antiviral genes or payloads. Anti-HIV/AIDS gene therapy is one of the most promising strategy, although challenging, to eradicate HIV-1 infection. In fact, genetic modification of hematopoietic stem cells with one or multiple therapeutic genes is expected to originate blood cell progenies resistant to viral infection and thereby able to prevail on infected unprotected cells. Ultimately, protected cells will re-establish a functional immune system able to control HIV-1 replication. More than hundred gene therapy clinical trials against AIDS employing different viral vectors and transgenes have been approved or are currently ongoing worldwide. This review will overview anti-HIV-1 infection gene therapy field evaluating strength and weakness of the transgenes and payloads used in the past and of those potentially exploitable in the future.

  11. Gene Therapy for Fracture Repair

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    chemotactic factor for human mast cells. J. Immunol. 153: 3717-3723. 36 41. Ono I, Yamashita T, Hida T, Jin HY, Ito Y, Hamada H, Akasaka Y, Ishii T...1994;153:3717–23. [37] Ono I, Yamashita T, Hida T, Jin HY, Ito Y, Hamada H, et al. Local administration of hepatocyte growth factor gene enhances the

  12. Engineering targeted viral vectors for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Waehler, Reinhard; Russell, Stephen J; Curiel, David T

    2007-08-01

    To achieve therapeutic success, transfer vehicles for gene therapy must be capable of transducing target cells while avoiding impact on non-target cells. Despite the high transduction efficiency of viral vectors, their tropism frequently does not match the therapeutic need. In the past, this lack of appropriate targeting allowed only partial exploitation of the great potential of gene therapy. Substantial progress in modifying viral vectors using diverse techniques now allows targeting to many cell types in vitro. Although important challenges remain for in vivo applications, the first clinical trials with targeted vectors have already begun to take place.

  13. Haemophilia gene therapy: Progress and challenges.

    PubMed

    Lheriteau, Elsa; Davidoff, Andrew M; Nathwani, Amit C

    2015-09-01

    Current treatment for haemophilia entails life-long intravenous infusion of clotting factor concentrates. This is highly effective at controlling and preventing haemorrhage and its associated complications. Clotting factor replacement therapy is, however, demanding, exceedingly expensive and not curative. In contrast, gene therapy for haemophilia offers the potential of a cure as a result of continuous endogenous expression of biologically active factor VIII (FVIII) or factor IX (FIX) proteins following stable transfer of a normal copy of the respective gene. Our group has recently established the first clear proof-of-concept for a gene therapy approach to the treatment of severe haemophilia B. This entails a single intravenous administration of an adeno-associated virus vector encoding an optimised FIX gene, resulting in a long-term (>4 years) dose dependent increase in plasma FIX levels at therapeutic levels without persistent or late toxicity. Gene therapy therefore has the potential to change the treatment paradigm for haemophilia but several hurdles need to be overcome before this can happen. This review provides a summary of the progress made to date and discusses the remaining changes.

  14. Radiopharmaceutical and Gene Therapy Program

    SciTech Connect

    Buchsbaum, Donald J.

    2006-02-09

    The objective of our research program was to determine whether novel receptors can be induced in solid cancers as a target for therapy with radiolabeled unmodified peptides that bind to the receptors. The hypothesis was that induction of a high number of receptors on the surface of these cancer cells would result in an increased uptake of the radiolabeled monomeric peptides as compared to published results with radiolabeled antibodies or peptides to naturally expressed antigens or receptors, and therefore a better therapeutic outcome. The following is a summary of published results.

  15. Macrophage mediated PCI enhanced gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie, Catherine E.; Zamora, Genesis; Kwon, Young J.; Berg, Kristian; Madsen, Steen J.; Hirschberg, Henry

    2015-03-01

    Photochemical internalization (PCI) is a photodynamic therapy-based approach for improving the delivery of macromolecules and genes into the cell cytosol. Prodrug activating gene therapy (suicide gene therapy) employing the transduction of the E. coli cytosine deaminase (CD) gene into tumor cells, is a promising method. Expression of this gene within the target cell produces an enzyme that converts the nontoxic prodrug, 5-FC, to the toxic metabolite, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). 5-FC may be particularly suitable for brain tumors, because it can readily cross the bloodbrain barrier (BBB). In addition the bystander effect, where activated drug is exported from the transfected cancer cells into the tumor microenvironment, plays an important role by inhibiting growth of adjacent tumor cells. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are frequently found in and around glioblastomas. Monocytes or macrophages (Ma) loaded with drugs, nanoparticles or photosensitizers could therefore be used to target tumors by local synthesis of chemo attractive factors. The basic concept is to combine PCI, to enhance the ex vivo transfection of a suicide gene into Ma, employing specially designed core/shell NP as gene carrier.

  16. Genome editing for human gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Meissner, Torsten B; Mandal, Pankaj K; Ferreira, Leonardo M R; Rossi, Derrick J; Cowan, Chad A

    2014-01-01

    The rapid advancement of genome-editing techniques holds much promise for the field of human gene therapy. From bacteria to model organisms and human cells, genome editing tools such as zinc-finger nucleases (ZNFs), TALENs, and CRISPR/Cas9 have been successfully used to manipulate the respective genomes with unprecedented precision. With regard to human gene therapy, it is of great interest to test the feasibility of genome editing in primary human hematopoietic cells that could potentially be used to treat a variety of human genetic disorders such as hemoglobinopathies, primary immunodeficiencies, and cancer. In this chapter, we explore the use of the CRISPR/Cas9 system for the efficient ablation of genes in two clinically relevant primary human cell types, CD4+ T cells and CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. By using two guide RNAs directed at a single locus, we achieve highly efficient and predictable deletions that ablate gene function. The use of a Cas9-2A-GFP fusion protein allows FACS-based enrichment of the transfected cells. The ease of designing, constructing, and testing guide RNAs makes this dual guide strategy an attractive approach for the efficient deletion of clinically relevant genes in primary human hematopoietic stem and effector cells and enables the use of CRISPR/Cas9 for gene therapy.

  17. [Gene therapy for inherited retinal dystrophies].

    PubMed

    Côco, Monique; Han, Sang Won; Sallum, Juliana Maria Ferraz

    2009-01-01

    The inherited retinal dystrophies comprise a large number of disorders characterized by a slow and progressive retinal degeneration. They are the result of mutations in genes that express in either the photoreceptor cells or the retinal pigment epithelium. The mode of inheritance can be autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X linked recessive, digenic or mitochondrial DNA inherited. At the moment, there is no treatment for these conditions and the patients can expect a progressive loss of vision. Accurate genetic counseling and support for rehabilitation are indicated. Research into the molecular and genetic basis of disease is continually expanding and improving the prospects for rational treatments. In this way, gene therapy, defined as the introduction of exogenous genetic material into human cells for therapeutic purposes, may ultimately offer the greatest treatment for the inherited retinal dystrophies. The eye is an attractive target for gene therapy because of its accessibility, immune privilege and translucent media. A number of retinal diseases affecting the eye have known gene defects. Besides, there is a well characterized animal model for many of these conditions. Proposals for clinical trials of gene therapy for inherited retinal degenerations owing to defects in the gene RPE65, have recently received ethical approval and the obtained preliminary results brought large prospects in the improvement on patient's quality of life.

  18. Renal diseases as targets of gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Brett; Giannoukakis, Nick; Trucco, Massimo

    2008-01-01

    A number of renal pathologies exist that have seen little or no improvement in treatment methods over the past 20 years. These pathologies include acute and chronic kidney diseases as well as posttransplant kidney survival and host rejection. A novel approach to treatment methodology may provide new insight to further progress our understanding of the disease and overall patient outcome. Recent advances in human genomics and gene delivery systems have opened the door to possible cures through the direct modulation of cellular genes. These techniques of gene therapy have not been extensively applied to renal pathologies, but clinical trials on other organ systems and kidney research in animal models hold promise. Techniques have employed viral and nonviral vectors to deliver gene modulating compounds directly into the cell. These vectors have the capability to replace defective alleles, express novel genes, or suppress the expression of pathogenic genes in a wide variety of kidney cell types. Focus has also been placed on ex vivo modification of kidney tissue to promote allograft survival and limit the resulting immune response to the transplanted organ. This could prove a valuable alternative to current immunosuppressive drugs and their deleterious effects on patients. While continued research and clinical trials are needed to identify a robust system of gene delivery, gene therapy techniques have great potential to treat kidney disease at the cellular level and improve patient quality of life.

  19. Combined therapy for post-irradiation infection

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, T.B.; Madonna, G.S.; Ledney, G.D.; Brook, I.

    1989-01-01

    Increased susceptibility to bacterial infection, probably by translocation from the intestinal flora, can be a lethal complication for 2-3 weeks after exposure to ionizing radiation. Antibiotics alone do not provide adequate therapy for induced infections in neutropenic mice. Because some substances that are derived from bacterial cell walls activate macrophages and stimulate nonspecific resistance to infection, such agents might be used to prevent or treat postirradiation infections. In this study, a cell-wall glycolipid, trehalose dimycolate (TDM), was evaluated together with a third-generation cephalosporin, ceftriaxone, for their separate and combined effects on survival of B6D2F1 female mice that were exposed to the sublethal dose of 7.0 Gy Co radiation and challenged s.c. with lethal doses of Klebsiella pneumoniae. A single injection of TDM inoculated i.p. 1 hr postirradiation increased 30-day survival to 80% after a lethal challenge by K. pneumoniae 4 days later. When the challenge dose of K. pneumoniae was increased to 5000 Ld 50/30 on Day 4, all mice died.

  20. Artemisinin combination therapy for vivax malaria?

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Nicholas M.; Anstey, Nicholas M.; Angus, Brian J.; Nosten, Francois; Price, Ric N.

    2012-01-01

    Early parasitological diagnosis and treatment with artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACT) are seen as key components of global malaria elimination programmes. In general, use of ACTs has been limited to patients with falciparum malaria whereas blood-stage P. vivax infections are mostly still treated with chloroquine. We review the evidence for the relative benefits and disadvantages of the existing ‘separate’ treatment approach versus a ‘unified’ ACT-based strategy for treating P. falciparum and P. vivax infections in regions where both species are endemic (co-endemic). The ‘separate’ treatment scenario is justifiable where P. vivax remains sensitive to chloroquine and providing that diagnostic tests reliably distinguish P. vivax from P. falciparum. However, with the high frequency of misdiagnosis in routine practice and the rise and spread of chloroquine-resistant P. vivax, there may be a compelling rationale for a unified ACT-based strategy for vivax and falciparum malaria in all co-endemic areas. Analyses of the cost-effectiveness of ACTs for both Plasmodium species are required to assess the role of these drugs in vivax malaria control and elimination efforts. PMID:20510281

  1. Gene therapy and tissue engineering for sports medicine.

    PubMed

    Huard, Johnny; Li, Yong; Peng, Hairong; Fu, Freddie H

    2003-02-01

    Sports injuries usually involve tissues that display a limited capacity for healing. The treatment of sports injuries has improved over the past 10 to 20 years through sophisticated rehabilitation programs, novel operative techniques, and advances in the field of biomechanical research. Despite this considerable progress, no optimal solution has been found for treatment of various sports-related injuries, including muscle injuries, ligament and tendon ruptures, central meniscal tears, cartilage lesions, and delayed bone fracture healing. New biological approaches focus on the treatment of these injuries with growth factors to stimulate and hasten the healing process. Gene therapy using the transfer of defined genes encoding therapeutic proteins represents a promising way to efficiently deliver suitable growth factors into the injured tissue. Tissue engineering, which may eventually be combined with gene therapy, may potentially result in the creation of tissues or scaffolds for regeneration of tissue defects following trauma. In this article we will discuss why gene therapy and tissue engineering are becoming increasingly important in modern orthopaedic sports medicine practice. We then will review recent research achievements in the area of gene therapy and tissue engineering for sports-related injuries, and highlight the potential clinical applications of this technology in the treatment of patients with musculoskeletal problems following sports-related injuries.

  2. Gene repair and transposon-mediated gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Paul D; Augustin, Lance B; Kren, Betsy T; Steer, Clifford J

    2002-01-01

    The main strategy of gene therapy has traditionally been focused on gene augmentation. This approach typically involves the introduction of an expression system designed to express a specific protein in the transfected cell. Both the basic and clinical sciences have generated enough information to suggest that gene therapy would eventually alter the fundamental practice of modern medicine. However, despite progress in the field, widespread clinical applications and success have not been achieved. The myriad deficiencies associated with gene augmentation have resulted in the development of alternative approaches to treat inherited and acquired genetic disorders. One, derived primarily from the pioneering work of homologous recombination, is gene repair. Simply stated, the process involves targeting the mutation in situ for gene correction and a return to normal gene function. Site-specific genetic repair has many advantages over augmentation although it too is associated with significant limitations. This review outlines the advantages and disadvantages of gene correction. In particular, we discuss technologies based on chimeric RNA/DNA oligonucleotides, single-stranded and triplex-forming oligonucleotides, and small fragment homologous replacement. While each of these approaches is different, they all share a number of common characteristics, including the need for efficient delivery of nucleic acids to the nucleus. In addition, we review the potential application of a novel and exciting nonviral gene augmentation strategy--the Sleeping Beauty transposon system.

  3. Clinical adenoviral gene therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Schenk, Ellen; Essand, Magnus; Bangma, Chris H; Barber, Chris; Behr, Jean-Paul; Briggs, Simon; Carlisle, Robert; Cheng, Wing-Shing; Danielsson, Angelika; Dautzenberg, Iris J C; Dzojic, Helena; Erbacher, Patrick; Fisher, Kerry; Frazier, April; Georgopoulos, Lindsay J; Hoeben, Rob; Kochanek, Stefan; Koppers-Lalic, Daniela; Kraaij, Robert; Kreppel, Florian; Lindholm, Leif; Magnusson, Maria; Maitland, Norman; Neuberg, Patrick; Nilsson, Berith; Ogris, Manfred; Remy, Jean-Serge; Scaife, Michelle; Schooten, Erik; Seymour, Len; Totterman, Thomas; Uil, Taco G; Ulbrich, Karel; Veldhoven-Zweistra, Joke L M; de Vrij, Jeroen; van Weerden, Wytske; Wagner, Ernst; Willemsen, Ralph

    2010-07-01

    Prostate cancer is at present the most common malignancy in men in the Western world. When localized to the prostate, this disease can be treated by curative therapy such as surgery and radiotherapy. However, a substantial number of patients experience a recurrence, resulting in spreading of tumor cells to other parts of the body. In this advanced stage of the disease only palliative treatment is available. Therefore, there is a clear clinical need for new treatment modalities that can, on the one hand, enhance the cure rate of primary therapy for localized prostate cancer and, on the other hand, improve the treatment of metastasized disease. Gene therapy is now being explored in the clinic as a treatment option for the various stages of prostate cancer. Current clinical experiences are based predominantly on trials with adenoviral vectors. As the first of a trilogy of reviews on the state of the art and future prospects of gene therapy in prostate cancer, this review focuses on the clinical experiences and progress of adenovirus-mediated gene therapy for this disease.

  4. Gene Therapy for Fracture Repair

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-12-01

    relative transgene expression efficiencies for the MLV-based and lentiviral-based vectors, the Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (EGFP) was used as...for both Cy3 and Cy5 2,-15i Hybridized to to Aigilent Rat -s 2-- Gene Chip - iGnTrr. . tea 2 ug universal RNAw silx sl59 (?es) Cy310-0 (control) 1...fractures were also examined at sacrifice for evidence of fibrosis due to irritation or migration of the stabilizing pin. None was observed and the fracture

  5. [Developments in gene delivery vectors for ocular gene therapy].

    PubMed

    Khabou, Hanen; Dalkara, Deniz

    2015-05-01

    Gene therapy is quickly becoming a reality applicable in the clinic for inherited retinal diseases. Its remarkable success in safety and efficacy, in clinical trials for Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA) type II generated significant interest and opened up possibilities for a new era of retinal gene therapies. Success in these clinical trials was mainly due to the favorable characteristics of the retina as a target organ. The eye offers several advantages as it is readily accessible and has some degree of immune privilege making it suitable for application of viral vectors. The viral vectors most frequently used for retinal gene delivery are lentivirus, adenovirus and adeno-associated virus (AAV). Here we will discuss the use of these viral vectors in retinal gene delivery with a strong focus on favorable properties of AAV. Thanks to its small size, AAV diffuses well in the inter-neural matrix making it suitable for applications in neural retina. Building on this initial clinical success with LCA II, we have now many opportunities to extend this proof-of-concept to other retinal diseases using AAV as a vector. This article will discuss what are some of the most imminent cellular targets for such therapies and the AAV toolkit that has been built to target these cells successfully. We will also discuss some of the challenges that we face in translating AAV-based gene therapies to the clinic.

  6. Gene Therapy of Human Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-10-01

    anticoagulation are ineligible. Study Design. Patients will undergo surgical removal of metastatic disease under local anesthesia in order to provide...tolerate this treatment . Gene Therapy of Human Breast Cancer - Appendix F 1 1 . Patients who require anticoagulation are not eligible. 12 . There i...pregnancy, or lactation, or any significant uncontrolled medical or pyschiatric illness. Patients wh� require corticosteroids or anticoagulation are

  7. Gene therapy in dentistry: present and future.

    PubMed

    Baum, Bruce J

    2014-12-01

    Gene therapy is one of several novel biological treatments under active study for a wide variety of clinical applications, including many relevant to dentistry. This review will provide some background on this therapeutic approach, assess the current state of its applications generally, and in the oral cavity, and suggest the implications for its use in the next 25 years.

  8. Gene therapy and targeted toxins for glioma.

    PubMed

    Castro, Maria G; Candolfi, Marianela; Kroeger, Kurt; King, Gwendalyn D; Curtin, James F; Yagiz, Kader; Mineharu, Yohei; Assi, Hikmat; Wibowo, Mia; Ghulam Muhammad, A K M; Foulad, David; Puntel, Mariana; Lowenstein, Pedro R

    2011-06-01

    The most common primary brain tumor in adults is glioblastoma. These tumors are highly invasive and aggressive with a mean survival time of 15-18 months from diagnosis to death. Current treatment modalities are unable to significantly prolong survival in patients diagnosed with glioblastoma. As such, glioma is an attractive target for developing novel therapeutic approaches utilizing gene therapy. This review will examine the available preclinical models for glioma including xenographs, syngeneic and genetic models. Several promising therapeutic targets are currently being pursued in pre-clinical investigations. These targets will be reviewed by mechanism of action, i.e., conditional cytotoxic, targeted toxins, oncolytic viruses, tumor suppressors/oncogenes, and immune stimulatory approaches. Preclinical gene therapy paradigms aim to determine which strategies will provide rapid tumor regression and long-term protection from recurrence. While a wide range of potential targets are being investigated preclinically, only the most efficacious are further transitioned into clinical trial paradigms. Clinical trials reported to date are summarized including results from conditionally cytotoxic, targeted toxins, oncolytic viruses and oncogene targeting approaches. Clinical trial results have not been as robust as preclinical models predicted; this could be due to the limitations of the GBM models employed. Once this is addressed, and we develop effective gene therapies in models that better replicate the clinical scenario, gene therapy will provide a powerful approach to treat and manage brain tumors.

  9. Aptamer-mediated cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Dongxi; Shigdar, Sarah; Qiao, Greg; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Li, Yong; Wei, Ming Q; Qiao, Liang; Shamaileh, Hadi Al; Zhu, Yimin; Zheng, Conglong; Pu, Chunwen; Duan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Cancer as a genetic disorder is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Conventional anticancer options such as chemo- and/or radio-therapy have their own drawbacks and could not provide a cure in most cases at present. More effective therapeutic strategies with less side effects are urgently needed. Aptamers, also known as chemical antibodies, are single strand DNA or RNA molecules that can bind to their target molecules with high affinity and specificity. Such site-specific binding ability of aptamers facilitates the delivery and interaction of exogenous nucleic acids with diseased genes. Thus, aptamer-guided gene therapy has emerged as a promising anticancer strategy in addition to the classic treatment regimen. Aptamers can directly deliver anti-cancer nucleic acids, e.g. small interfering RNA, micro RNA, antimicroRNA and small hairpin RNA, to cancer cells or function as a targeting ligand to guide nanoparticles containing therapeutic nucleic acids. This review focuses on recent progress in aptamer-mediated gene therapy for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma and other types of cancers, shedding light on the potential of this novel approach of targeted cancer gene therapy.

  10. Gene Therapy and Targeted Toxins for Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Maria G.; Candolfi, Marianela; Kroeger, Kurt; King, Gwendalyn D.; Curtin, James F.; Yagiz, Kader; Mineharu, Yohei; Assi, Hikmat; Wibowo, Mia; Muhammad, AKM Ghulam; Foulad, David; Puntel, Mariana; Lowenstein, Pedro R.

    2011-01-01

    The most common primary brain tumor in adults is glioblastoma. These tumors are highly invasive and aggressive with a mean survival time of nine to twelve months from diagnosis to death. Current treatment modalities are unable to significantly prolong survival in patients diagnosed with glioblastoma. As such, glioma is an attractive target for developing novel therapeutic approaches utilizing gene therapy. This review will examine the available preclinical models for glioma including xenographs, syngeneic and genetic models. Several promising therapeutic targets are currently being pursued in pre-clinical investigations. These targets will be reviewed by mechanism of action, i.e., conditional cytotoxic, targeted toxins, oncolytic viruses, tumor suppressors/oncogenes, and immune stimulatory approaches. Preclinical gene therapy paradigms aim to determine which strategies will provide rapid tumor regression and long-term protection from recurrence. While a wide range of potential targets are being investigated preclinically, only the most efficacious are further transitioned into clinical trial paradigms. Clinical trials reported to date are summarized including results from conditionally cytotoxic, targeted toxins, oncolytic viruses and oncogene targeting approaches. Clinical trial results have not been as robust as preclinical models predicted; this could be due to the limitations of the GBM models employed. Once this is addressed, and we develop effective gene therapies in models that better replicate the clinical scenario, gene therapy will provide a powerful approach to treat and manage brain tumors. PMID:21453286

  11. Gene Insertion Into Genomic Safe Harbors for Human Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Papapetrou, Eirini P; Schambach, Axel

    2016-01-01

    Genomic safe harbors (GSHs) are sites in the genome able to accommodate the integration of new genetic material in a manner that ensures that the newly inserted genetic elements: (i) function predictably and (ii) do not cause alterations of the host genome posing a risk to the host cell or organism. GSHs are thus ideal sites for transgene insertion whose use can empower functional genetics studies in basic research and therapeutic applications in human gene therapy. Currently, no fully validated GSHs exist in the human genome. Here, we review our formerly proposed GSH criteria and discuss additional considerations on extending these criteria, on strategies for the identification and validation of GSHs, as well as future prospects on GSH targeting for therapeutic applications. In view of recent advances in genome biology, gene targeting technologies, and regenerative medicine, gene insertion into GSHs can potentially catalyze nearly all applications in human gene therapy. PMID:26867951

  12. Growth factor gene therapy for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Tuszynski, Mark H; U, Hoi Sang; Alksne, John; Bakay, Roy A; Pay, Mary Margaret; Merrill, David; Thal, Leon J

    2002-11-15

    The capacity to prevent neuronal degeneration and death during the course of progressive neurological disorders such as Alzheimer disease (AD) would represent a significant advance in therapy. Nervous system growth factors are families of naturally produced proteins that, in animal models, exhibit extensive potency in preventing neuronal death due to a variety of causes, reversing age-related atrophy of neurons, and ameliorating functional deficits. The main challenge in translating growth factor therapy to the clinic has been delivery of growth factors to the brain in sufficient concentrations to influence neuronal function. One means of achieving growth factor delivery to the central nervous system in a highly targeted, effective manner may be gene therapy. In this article the authors summarize the development and implementation of nerve growth factor gene delivery as a potential means of reducing cell loss in AD.

  13. Optimizing ribozymes for somatic cell gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Branch, A D; Klotman, P E

    1998-01-01

    Therapeutic ribozymes are created through a multistep process that requires trial and error. There are few established rules governing ribozyme design, but guidelines are emerging. It is not yet known whether hammerheads and hairpins, the two ribozymes most widely studied as potential gene therapy agents, have the inherent capability to ablate single genes. Their capacity for specificity and selectivity remains to be explored through rigorous experimentation. These experiments require a battery of control molecules, the characteristics of which are outlined here. Methods for completing the steps in the ribozyme development process, from the selection of a target gene to the quantitation of RNA levels, are also presented and discussed.

  14. Gene therapy used for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Heyde, Mieke; Partridge, Kris A; Oreffo, Richard O C; Howdle, Steven M; Shakesheff, Kevin M; Garnett, Martin C

    2007-03-01

    This review highlights the advances at the interface between tissue engineering and gene therapy. There are a large number of reports on gene therapy in tissue engineering, and these cover a huge range of different engineered tissues, different vectors, scaffolds and methodology. The review considers separately in-vitro and in-vivo gene transfer methods. The in-vivo gene transfer method is described first, using either viral or non-viral vectors to repair various tissues with and without the use of scaffolds. The use of a scaffold can overcome some of the challenges associated with delivery by direct injection. The ex-vivo method is described in the second half of the review. Attempts have been made to use this therapy for bone, cartilage, wound, urothelial, nerve tissue regeneration and for treating diabetes using viral or non-viral vectors. Again porous polymers can be used as scaffolds for cell transplantation. There are as yet few comparisons between these many different variables to show which is the best for any particular application. With few exceptions, all of the results were positive in showing some gene expression and some consequent effect on tissue growth and remodelling. Some of the principal advantages and disadvantages of various methods are discussed.

  15. Cardiac gene therapy: optimization of gene delivery techniques in vivo.

    PubMed

    Katz, Michael G; Swain, JaBaris D; White, Jennifer D; Low, David; Stedman, Hansell; Bridges, Charles R

    2010-04-01

    Vector-mediated cardiac gene therapy holds tremendous promise as a translatable platform technology for treating many cardiovascular diseases. The ideal technique is one that is efficient and practical, allowing for global cardiac gene expression, while minimizing collateral expression in other organs. Here we survey the available in vivo vector-mediated cardiac gene delivery methods--including transcutaneous, intravascular, intramuscular, and cardiopulmonary bypass techniques--with consideration of the relative merits and deficiencies of each. Review of available techniques suggests that an optimal method for vector-mediated gene delivery to the large animal myocardium would ideally employ retrograde and/or anterograde transcoronary gene delivery,extended vector residence time in the coronary circulation, an increased myocardial transcapillary gradient using physical methods, increased endothelial permeability with pharmacological agents, minimal collateral gene expression by isolation of the cardiac circulation from the systemic, and have low immunogenicity.

  16. Transcriptional Targeting in Cancer Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    Cancer gene therapy has been one of the most exciting areas of therapeutic research in the past decade. In this review, we discuss strategies to restrict transcription of transgenes to tumour cells. A range of promoters which are tissue-specific, tumour-specific, or inducible by exogenous agents are presented. Transcriptional targeting should prevent normal tissue toxicities associated with other cancer treatments, such as radiation and chemotherapy. In addition, the specificity of these strategies should provide improved targeting of metastatic tumours following systemic gene delivery. Rapid progress in the ability to specifically control transgenes will allow systemic gene delivery for cancer therapy to become a real possibility in the near future. PMID:12721516

  17. The gene therapy revolution in ophthalmology.

    PubMed

    Al-Saikhan, Fahad I

    2013-04-01

    The advances in gene therapy hold significant promise for the treatment of ophthalmic conditions. Several studies using animal models have been published. Animal models on retinitis pigmentosa, Leber's Congenital Amaurosis (LCA), and Stargardt disease have involved the use of adeno-associated virus (AAV) to deliver functional genes into mice and canines. Mice models have been used to show that a mutation in cGMP phosphodiesterase that results in retinitis pigmentosa can be corrected using rAAV vectors. Additionally, rAAV vectors have been successfully used to deliver ribozyme into mice with a subsequent improvement in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. By using dog models, researchers have made progress in studying X-linked retinitis pigmentosa which results from a RPGR gene mutation. Mouse and canine models have also been used in the study of LCA. The widely studied form of LCA is LCA2, resulting from a mutation in the gene RPE65. Mice and canines that were injected with normal copies of RPE65 gene showed signs such as improved retinal pigment epithelium transduction, visual acuity, and functional recovery. Studies on Stargardt disease have shown that mutations in the ABCA4 gene can be corrected with AAV vectors, or nanoparticles. Gene therapy for the treatment of red-green color blindness was successful in squirrel monkeys. Plans are at an advanced stage to begin clinical trials. Researchers have also proved that CD59 can be used with AMD. Gene therapy is also able to treat primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) in animal models, and studies show it is economically viable.

  18. Recent progress in gene therapy for hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Chuah, Marinee K; Nair, Nisha; VandenDriessche, Thierry

    2012-06-01

    Hemophilia A and B are X-linked monogenic disorders caused by deficiencies in coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) and factor IX (FIX), respectively. Current treatment for hemophilia involves intravenous infusion of clotting factor concentrates. However, this does not constitute a cure, and the development of gene-based therapies for hemophilia to achieve prolonged high level expression of clotting factors to correct the bleeding diathesis are warranted. Different types of viral and nonviral gene delivery systems and a wide range of different target cells, including hepatocytes, skeletal muscle cells, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), and endothelial cells, have been explored for hemophilia gene therapy. Adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based and lentiviral vectors are among the most promising vectors for hemophilia gene therapy. Stable correction of the bleeding phenotypes in hemophilia A and B was achieved in murine and canine models, and these promising preclinical studies prompted clinical trials in patients suffering from severe hemophilia. These studies recently resulted in the first demonstration that long-term expression of therapeutic FIX levels could be achieved in patients undergoing gene therapy. Despite this progress, there are still a number of hurdles that need to be overcome. In particular, the FIX levels obtained were insufficient to prevent bleeding induced by trauma or injury. Moreover, the gene-modified cells in these patients can become potential targets for immune destruction by effector T cells, specific for the AAV vector antigens. Consequently, more efficacious approaches are needed to achieve full hemostatic correction and to ultimately establish a cure for hemophilia A and B.

  19. Progress and prospects: gene therapy for inherited immunodeficiencies.

    PubMed

    Qasim, W; Gaspar, H B; Thrasher, A J

    2009-11-01

    Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is now widely used to treat primary immunodeficiencies (PID). For patients with specific disorders (severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID)-X1, adenosine deaminase deficiency (ADA)-SCID, X-chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) and Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome (WAS)) who lack a suitable human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched donor, gene therapy has offered an important alternative treatment option. The success of gene therapy can be attributed, in part, to the selective advantage offered to gene-corrected cells, the avoidance of graft-versus-host disease and to the use of pre-conditioning in patients with chemotherapy to facilitate engraftment of corrected cells. Adverse events have been encountered and this has led to detailed characterization of retroviral vector integration profiles. A new generation of self-inactivating retroviral and lentiviral vectors have been designed to address these safety concerns, and are at an advanced stage of preparation for the next phase of clinical testing.

  20. [The hair follicle as a target for gene therapy].

    PubMed

    Cotsarelis, G

    2002-05-01

    The hair follicle possesses progenitor cells required for continuous hair follicle cycling and for epidermal keratinocytes, melanocytes and Langerhans cells. These different cell types can be the target of topical gene delivery in the skin of the mouse. Using a combination of liposomes and DNA, we demonstrate the feasibility of targeting hair follicle cells in human scalp xenografts. We consider liposome composition and stage of the hair cycle as important parameters influencing transfection of human hair follicles. Transfection is possible only during the early anagen phase. Factors and obstacles for the use of gene therapy in treating alopecia and skin diseases are discussed. A theoretical framework for future treatment of cutaneous and systemic disorders using gene therapy is presented.

  1. Gene therapy for primary immunodeficiencies: current status and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Qasim, Waseem; Gennery, Andrew R

    2014-06-01

    Gene therapy using autologous haematopoietic stem cells offers a valuable treatment option for patients with primary immunodeficiencies who do not have access to an HLA-matched donor, although such treatments have not been without their problems. This review details gene therapy trials for X-linked and adenosine deaminase (ADA)-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) and chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). X-linked SCID was chosen for gene therapy because of previous 'natural' genetic correction through a reversion event in a single lymphoid precursor, demonstrating limited thymopoiesis and restricted T-lymphocyte receptor repertoire, showing selective advantage of progenitors possessing the wild-type gene. In early studies, patients were treated with long terminal repeats-intact gamma-retroviral vectors, without additional chemotherapy. Early results demonstrated gene-transduced cells, sustained thymopoiesis, and a diverse T-lymphocyte repertoire with normal function. Serious adverse effects were subsequently reported in 5 of 20 patients, with T-lymphocyte leukaemia developing, secondary to the viral vector integrating adjacent to a known oncogene. New trials using self-inactivating gamma-retroviral vectors are progressing. Trials for ADA-SCID using gamma-retroviral vectors have been successful, with no similar serious adverse effects reported; trials using lentiviral vectors are in progress. Patients with WAS and CGD treated with early gamma-retroviral vectors have developed similar lymphoproliferative adverse effects to those seen in X-SCID--current trials are using new-generation vectors. Targeted gene insertion using homologous recombination of corrected gene sequences by cellular DNA repair pathways following targeted DNA breakage will improve efficacy and safety of gene therapy. A number of new techniques are discussed.

  2. [Application of gene therapy to oncologic ophthalmology].

    PubMed

    Philiponnet, A; Grange, J-D; Baggetto, L G

    2014-02-01

    Since the discovery of the structure of DNA in 1953 by Watson and Crick, our understanding of the genetic causes and the regulations involved in tumor development have hugely increased. The important amount of research developed since then has led to the development of gene therapy, which specifically targets and treats cancer cells by interacting with, and correcting their genetic material. This study is a review of the most accomplished research using gene therapy aimed at treating malignant ophthalmologic diseases, and focuses more specifically on uveal melanoma and retinoblastoma. Such approaches are remarkable regarding the efficiency and the cellular targeting specificity. However, gene therapy-based treatments are so recent that many long-term interrogations subsist. The majority of the reviewed studies are conducted in vitro or in murine models, thereby requiring several years before the resulting therapies become part of the daily ophthalmologists' arsenal. However, the recent spectacular developments based on advanced scientific knowledge justify an up-to-date review that would benefit the ophthalmologist community.

  3. Gene therapy for brain tumors: basic developments and clinical implementation.

    PubMed

    Assi, Hikmat; Candolfi, Marianela; Baker, Gregory; Mineharu, Yohei; Lowenstein, Pedro R; Castro, Maria G

    2012-10-11

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and deadliest of adult primary brain tumors. Due to its invasive nature and sensitive location, complete resection remains virtually impossible. The resistance of GBM against chemotherapy and radiotherapy necessitate the development of novel therapies. Gene therapy is proposed for the treatment of brain tumors and has demonstrated pre-clinical efficacy in animal models. Here we review the various experimental therapies that have been developed for GBM including both cytotoxic and immune stimulatory approaches. We also review the combined conditional cytotoxic immune stimulatory therapy that our lab has developed which is dependent on the adenovirus mediated expression of the conditional cytotoxic gene, Herpes Simplex Type 1 Thymidine Kinase (TK) and the powerful DC growth factor Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt3L). Combined delivery of these vectors elicits tumor cell death and an anti-tumor adaptive immune response that requires TLR2 activation. The implications of our studies indicate that the combined cytotoxic and immunotherapeutic strategies are effective strategies to combat deadly brain tumors and warrant their implementation in human Phase I clinical trials for GBM.

  4. Gene Therapy for Brain Tumors: Basic Developments and Clinical Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Assi, Hikmat; Candolfi, Marianela; Baker, Gregory; Mineharu, Yohei; Lowenstein, Pedro R; Castro, Maria G

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and deadliest of adult primary brain tumors. Due to its invasive nature and sensitive location, complete resection remains virtually impossible. The resistance of GBM against chemotherapy and radiotherapy necessitate the development of novel therapies. Gene therapy is proposed for the treatment of brain tumors and has demonstrated pre-clinical efficacy in animal models. Here we review the various experimental therapies that have been developed for GBM including both cytotoxic and immune stimulatory approaches. We also review the combined conditional cytotoxic immune stimulatory therapy that our lab has developed which is dependent on the adenovirus mediated expression of the conditional cytotoxic gene, Herpes Simplex Type 1 Thymidine Kinase (TK) and the powerful DC growth factor Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt3L). Combined delivery of these vectors elicits tumor cell death and an anti-tumor adaptive immune response that requires TLR2 activation. The implications of our studies indicate that the combined cytotoxic and immunotherapeutic strategies are effective strategies to combat deadly brain tumors and warrant their implementation in human Phase I clinical trials for GBM. PMID:22906921

  5. Alternative strategies for gene therapy of hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Robert R; Shi, Qizhen

    2010-01-01

    Hemophilia A and B are monogenic disorders that were felt to be ideal targets for initiation of gene therapy. Although the first hemophilia gene therapy trial has been over 10 years ago, few trials are currently actively recruiting. Although preclinical studies in animals were promising, levels achieved in humans did not achieve long-term expression at adequate levels to achieve cures. Transplantation as a source of cellular replacement therapy for both hemophilia A and B have been successful following liver transplantation in which the recipient produces normal levels of either factor VIII (FVIII) or factor IX (FIX). Most of these transplants have been conducted for the treatment of liver failure rather than for "curing" hemophilia. There are a variety of new strategies for delivering the missing clotting factor through ectopic expression of the deficient protein. One approach uses hematopoietic stem cells using either a nonspecific promoter or using a lineage-specific promoter. An alternative strategy includes enhanced expression in endothelial cells or blood-outgrowth endothelial cells. An additional approach includes the expression of FVIII or FIX intraarticularly to mitigate the intraarticular bleeding that causes much of the disability for hemophilia patients. Because activated factor VII (FVIIa) can be used to treat patients with inhibitory antibodies to replacement clotting factors, preclinical gene therapy has been performed using platelet- or liver-targeted FVIIa expression. All of these newer approaches are just beginning to be explored in large animal models. Whereas improved recombinant replacement products continue to be the hallmark of hemophilia therapy, the frequency of replacement therapy is beginning to be addressed through longer-acting replacement products. A safe cure of hemophilia is still the desired goal, but many barriers must still be overcome.

  6. Gene Therapy for the Treatment of Primary Immune Deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Caroline Y; Kohn, Donald B

    2016-05-01

    The use of gene therapy in the treatment of primary immune deficiencies (PID) has advanced significantly in the last decade. Clinical trials for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency, adenosine deaminase deficiency (ADA), chronic granulomatous disease, and Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome have demonstrated that gene transfer into hematopoietic stem cells and autologous transplant can result in clinical improvement and is curative for many patients. Unfortunately, early clinical trials were complicated by vector-related insertional mutagenic events for several diseases with the exception of ADA-deficiency SCID. These results prompted the current wave of clinical trials for primary immunodeficiency using alternative retro- or lenti-viral vector constructs that are self-inactivating, and they have shown clinical efficacy without leukemic events thus far. The field of gene therapy continues to progress, with improvements in viral vector profiles, stem cell culturing techniques, and site-specific genome editing platforms. The future of gene therapy is promising, and we are quickly moving towards a time when it will be a standard cellular therapy for many forms of PID.

  7. Fetal muscle gene therapy/gene delivery in large animals.

    PubMed

    Abi-Nader, Khalil N; David, Anna L

    2011-01-01

    Gene delivery to the fetal muscles is a potential strategy for the early treatment of muscular dystrophies. In utero muscle gene therapy can also be used to treat other genetic disorders such as hemophilia, where the missing clotting proteins may be secreted from the treated muscle. In the past few years, studies in small animal models have raised the hopes that a phenotypic cure can be obtained after fetal application of gene therapy. Studies of efficacy and safety in large animals are, however, essential before clinical application can be considered in the human fetus. For this reason, the development of clinically applicable strategies for the delivery of gene therapy to the fetal muscles is of prime importance. In this chapter, we describe the protocols for in utero ultrasound-guided gene delivery to the ovine fetal muscle in early gestation. In particular, procedures to inject skeletal muscle groups such as the thigh and thoracic musculature and targeting the diaphragm in the fetus are described in detail.

  8. Newer gene editing technologies toward HIV gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Manjunath, N; Yi, Guohua; Dang, Ying; Shankar, Premlata

    2013-11-14

    Despite the great success of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in ameliorating the course of HIV infection, alternative therapeutic approaches are being pursued because of practical problems associated with life-long therapy. The eradication of HIV in the so-called "Berlin patient" who received a bone marrow transplant from a CCR5-negative donor has rekindled interest in genome engineering strategies to achieve the same effect. Precise gene editing within the cells is now a realistic possibility with recent advances in understanding the DNA repair mechanisms, DNA interaction with transcription factors and bacterial defense mechanisms. Within the past few years, four novel technologies have emerged that can be engineered for recognition of specific DNA target sequences to enable site-specific gene editing: Homing Endonuclease, ZFN, TALEN, and CRISPR/Cas9 system. The most recent CRISPR/Cas9 system uses a short stretch of complementary RNA bound to Cas9 nuclease to recognize and cleave target DNA, as opposed to the previous technologies that use DNA binding motifs of either zinc finger proteins or transcription activator-like effector molecules fused to an endonuclease to mediate sequence-specific DNA cleavage. Unlike RNA interference, which requires the continued presence of effector moieties to maintain gene silencing, the newer technologies allow permanent disruption of the targeted gene after a single treatment. Here, we review the applications, limitations and future prospects of novel gene-editing strategies for use as HIV therapy.

  9. Noninvasive tracking of gene transcript and neuroprotection after gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Ren, J; Chen, Y I; Liu, C H; Chen, P-C; Prentice, H; Wu, J-Y; Liu, P K

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy holds exceptional potential for translational medicine by improving the products of defective genes in diseases and/or providing necessary biologics from endogenous sources during recovery processes. However, validating methods for the delivery, distribution and expression of the exogenous genes from such therapy can generally not be applicable to monitor effects over the long term because they are invasive. We report here that human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF) complimentary DNA (cDNA) encoded in self-complementary adeno-associated virus-type 2 adeno-associated virus, as delivered through eye drops at multiple time points after cerebral ischemia using bilateral carotid occlusion for 60 min (BCAO-60) led to significant reduction in mortality rates, cerebral atrophy and neurological deficits in C57black6 mice. Most importantly, we validated hG-CSF cDNA expression using translatable magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in living brains. This noninvasive approach for monitoring exogenous gene expression in the brains has potential for great impact in the area of experimental gene therapy in animal models of heart attack, stroke, Alzheimer's dementia, Parkinson's disorder and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and the translation of such techniques to emergency medicine.

  10. [Combination of Targeted Therapy and Immunotherapy for Cancer].

    PubMed

    Kadowaki, Norimitsu

    2015-09-01

    Targeted therapies and immunotherapies attack tumor cells through different mechanisms. In addition, these therapies exhibit quick and delayed effects, respectively, and therefore, these therapies are complementary. Furthermore, targeted therapies may enhance the function of immune cells, and therefore, both the therapies are expected to have a synergistic effect. Antitumor immune responses comprise several steps including dendritic cell activation, T cell activation, and dampening tumor-induced immunosuppression; targeted drugs that work at each step have been reported. Clinical trials of rational combinations of both therapies, while avoiding severe adverse events, will greatly advance cancer treatments in the near future.

  11. Engineering HSV-1 vectors for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Goins, William F; Huang, Shaohua; Cohen, Justus B; Glorioso, Joseph C

    2014-01-01

    Virus vectors have been employed as gene transfer vehicles for various preclinical and clinical gene therapy applications, and with the approval of Glybera (alipogene tiparvovec) as the first gene therapy product as a standard medical treatment (Yla-Herttuala, Mol Ther 20: 1831-1832, 2013), gene therapy has reached the status of being a part of standard patient care. Replication-competent herpes simplex virus (HSV) vectors that replicate specifically in actively dividing tumor cells have been used in Phase I-III human trials in patients with glioblastoma multiforme, a fatal form of brain cancer, and in malignant melanoma. In fact, T-VEC (talimogene laherparepvec, formerly known as OncoVex GM-CSF) displayed efficacy in a recent Phase III trial when compared to standard GM-CSF treatment alone (Andtbacka et al. J Clin Oncol 31: sLBA9008, 2013) and may soon become the second FDA-approved gene therapy product used in standard patient care. In addition to the replication-competent oncolytic HSV vectors like T-VEC, replication-defective HSV vectors have been employed in Phase I-II human trials and have been explored as delivery vehicles for disorders such as pain, neuropathy, and other neurodegenerative conditions. Research during the last decade on the development of HSV vectors has resulted in the engineering of recombinant vectors that are totally replication defective, nontoxic, and capable of long-term transgene expression in neurons. This chapter describes methods for the construction of recombinant genomic HSV vectors based on the HSV-1 replication-defective vector backbones, steps in their purification, and their small-scale production for use in cell culture experiments as well as preclinical animal studies.

  12. [Combined therapy with etanercept and systemic drugs or phototherapy].

    PubMed

    Belinchón, I; Ballester, I

    2010-05-01

    Biological therapy has been shown to have a very satisfactory antipsoriasic effect. However, this response is not always achieved in all the patients and may be insufficient for others. Thus, strategies have recently been designed, among which the use of combined therapies with biological and systemic drugs or phototherapy have been designed. In this work, we have reviewed the combined therapy with etanercept, systemic drugs and phototherapy and present the case of a patient with psoriasis treated with etanercept and narrow band UVB.

  13. [New possibilities will open up in human gene therapy].

    PubMed

    Portin, Petter

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy is divided into somatic and germ line therapy. The latter involves reproductive cells or their stem cells, and its results are heritable. The effects of somatic gene therapy are generally restricted to a single tissue of the patient in question. Until now, all gene therapies in the world have belonged to the regime of somatic therapy, germ line therapy having been a theoretical possibility only. Very recently, however, a method has been developed which is applicable to germ line therapy as well. In addition to technical challenges, severe ethical problems are associated with germ line therapy, demanding opinion statement.

  14. Methods to monitor gene therapy with molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Waerzeggers, Yannic; Monfared, Parisa; Viel, Thomas; Winkeler, Alexandra; Voges, Jürgen; Jacobs, Andreas H

    2009-06-01

    Recent progress in scientific and clinical research has made gene therapy a promising option for efficient and targeted treatment of several inherited and acquired disorders. One of the most critical issues for ensuring success of gene-based therapies is the development of technologies for non-invasive monitoring of the distribution and kinetics of vector-mediated gene expression. In recent years many molecular imaging techniques for safe, repeated and high-resolution in vivo imaging of gene expression have been developed and successfully used in animals and humans. In this review molecular imaging techniques for monitoring of gene therapy are described and specific use of these methods in the different steps of a gene therapy protocol from gene delivery to assessment of therapy response is illustrated. Linking molecular imaging (MI) to gene therapy will eventually help to improve the efficacy and safety of current gene therapy protocols for human application and support future individualized patient treatment.

  15. Inhibition of nuclear factor-{kappa}B and target genes during combined therapy with proteasome inhibitor bortezomib and reirradiation in patients with recurrent head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Van Waes, Carter . E-mail: vanwaesc@nidcd.nih.gov; Chang, Angela A.; Lebowitz, Peter F.; Druzgal, Colleen H.; Chen, Zhong; Elsayed, Yusri A.; Sunwoo, John B.; Rudy, Susan; Morris, John C.; Mitchell, James B.; Camphausen, Kevin; Gius, David; Adams, Julian; Sausville, Edward A.; Conley, Barbara A.

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To examine the effects the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (VELCADE) on transcription factor nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) and target genes and the feasibility of combination therapy with reirradiation in patients with recurrent head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods and Materials: The tolerability and response to bortezomib 0.6 mg/m{sup 2} and 0.9 mg/m{sup 2} given twice weekly concurrent with daily reirradiation to 50-70 Gy was explored. Blood proteasome inhibition and NF-{kappa}B-modulated cytokines and factors were measured. Proteasome inhibition, nuclear localization of NF-{kappa}B phospho-p65, apoptosis, and expression of NF-{kappa}B-modulated mRNAs were compared in serial biopsies from accessible tumors. Results: The maximally tolerated dose was exceeded, and study was limited to 7 and 2 patients, respectively, given bortezomib 0.6 mg/m{sup 2} and 0.9 mg/m{sup 2}/dose with reirradiation. Grade 3 hypotension and hyponatremia were dose limiting. Mucositis was Grade 3 or less and was delayed. The mean blood proteasome inhibition at 1, 24, and 48 h after 0.6 mg/m{sup 2} was 32%, 16%, and 7% and after 0.9 mg/m{sup 2} was 56%, 26%, and 14%, respectively. Differences in proteasome and NF-{kappa}B activity, apoptosis, and expression of NF-{kappa}B-modulated cell cycle, apoptosis, and angiogenesis factor mRNAs were detected in 2 patients with minor tumor reductions and in serum NF-{kappa}B-modulated cytokines in 1 patient with a major tumor reduction. Conclusions: In combination with reirradiation, the maximally tolerated dose of bortezomib was exceeded at a dose of 0.6 mg/m{sup 2} and the threshold of proteasome inhibition. Although this regimen with reirradiation is not feasible, bortezomib induced detectable differences in NF-{kappa}B localization, apoptosis, and NF-{kappa}B-modulated genes and cytokines in tumor and serum in association with tumor reduction, indicating that other schedules of bortezomib combined with primary

  16. AAV-mediated gene therapy for hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Couto, Linda B; Pierce, Glenn F

    2003-10-01

    Gene therapy for hemophilia has been contemplated since the coagulation Factor genes responsible for the disease were cloned 20 years ago. Multiple approaches towards the delivery of Factors VIII or IX, the defective genes in the most common forms of hemophilia, have resulted in positive results in animals, and largely equivocal results in human clinical testing. Use of vectors based on adeno-associated virus has led to robust and sustained cures in hemophilic mice and dogs, and intriguing preliminary results in small or ongoing clinical trials. As more clinical experience is gained, solving delivery issues will be of paramount importance and will lead to more clinical success. This success will permit hemophilia to be cured following a single injection of the normal gene.

  17. Ten years of gene therapy for primary immune deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Aiuti, Alessandro; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia

    2009-01-01

    Gene therapy with hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) is an attractive therapeutic strategy for several forms of primary immunodeficiencies. Current approaches are based on ex vivo gene transfer of the therapeutic gene into autologous HSC by vector-mediated gene transfer. In the past decade, substantial progress has been achieved in the treatment of severe combined immundeficiencies (SCID)-X1, adenosine deaminase (ADA)-deficient SCID, and chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). Results of the SCID gene therapy trials have shown long-term restoration of immune competence and clinical benefit in over 30 patients. The inclusion of reduced-dose conditioning in the ADA-SCID has allowed the engraftment of multipotent gene-corrected HSC at substantial level. In the CGD trial significant engraftment and transgene expression were observed, but the therapeutic effect was transient. The occurrence of adverse events related to insertional mutagenesis in the SCID-X1 and CGD trial has highlighted the limitations of current retroviral vector technology. For future applications the risk-benefit evaluation should include the type of vector employed, the disease background and the nature of the transgene. The use of self-inactivating lentiviral vectors will provide significant advantages in terms of natural gene regulation and reduction in the potential for adverse mutagenic events. Following recent advances in preclinical studies, lentiviral vectors are now being translated into new clinical approaches, such as Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome.

  18. Novel AIDS therapies based on gene editing.

    PubMed

    Khalili, Kamel; White, Martyn K; Jacobson, Jeffrey M

    2017-02-16

    HIV/AIDS remains a major public health issue. In 2014, it was estimated that 36.9 million people are living with HIV worldwide, including 2.6 million children. Since the advent of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), in the 1990s, treatment has been so successful that in many parts of the world, HIV has become a chronic condition in which progression to AIDS has become increasingly rare. However, while people with HIV can expect to live a normal life span with cART, lifelong medication is required and cardiovascular, renal, liver, and neurologic diseases are still possible, which continues to prompt research for a cure for HIV. Infected reservoir cells, such as CD4+ T cells and myeloid cells, allow persistence of HIV as an integrated DNA provirus and serve as a potential source for the re-emergence of virus. Attempts to eradicate HIV from these cells have focused mainly on the so-called "shock and kill" approach, where cellular reactivation is induced so as to trigger the purging of virus-producing cells by cytolysis or immune attack. This approach has several limitations and its usefulness in clinical applications remains to be assessed. Recent advances in gene-editing technology have allowed the use of this approach for inactivating integrated proviral DNA in the genome of latently infected cells or knocking out HIV receptors. Here, we review this strategy and its potential to eliminate the latent HIV reservoir resulting in a sterile cure of AIDS.

  19. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Sertraline, or a Combination in Childhood Anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Walkup, John T.; Albano, Anne Marie; Piacentini, John; Birmaher, Boris; Compton, Scott N.; Sherrill, Joel T.; Ginsburg, Golda S.; Rynn, Moira A.; McCracken, James; Waslick, Bruce; Iyengar, Satish; March, John S.; Kendall, Philip C.

    2009-01-01

    Background Anxiety disorders are common psychiatric conditions affecting children and adolescents. Although cognitive behavioral therapy and selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors have shown efficacy in treating these disorders, little is known about their relative or combined efficacy. Methods In this randomized, controlled trial, we assigned 488 children between the ages of 7 and 17 years who had a primary diagnosis of separation anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, or social phobia to receive 14 sessions of cognitive behavioral therapy, sertraline (at a dose of up to 200 mg per day), a combination of sertraline and cognitive behavioral therapy, or a placebo drug for 12 weeks in a 2:2:2:1 ratio. We administered categorical and dimensional ratings of anxiety severity and impairment at baseline and at weeks 4, 8, and 12. Results The percentages of children who were rated as very much or much improved on the Clinician Global Impression-Improvement scale were 80.7% for combination therapy (P<0.001), 59.7% for cognitive behavioral therapy (P<0.001), and 54.9% for sertraline (P<0.001); all therapies were superior to placebo (23.7%). Combination therapy was superior to both monotherapies (P<0.001). Results on the Pediatric Anxiety Rating Scale documented a similar magnitude and pattern of response; combination therapy had a greater response than cognitive behavioral therapy, which was equivalent to sertraline, and all therapies were superior to placebo. Adverse events, including suicidal and homicidal ideation, were no more frequent in the sertraline group than in the placebo group. No child attempted suicide. There was less insomnia, fatigue, sedation, and restlessness associated with cognitive behavioral therapy than with sertraline. Conclusions Both cognitive behavioral therapy and sertraline reduced the severity of anxiety in children with anxiety disorders; a combination of the two therapies had a superior response rate. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT

  20. Is cancer gene therapy an empty suit?

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Malcolm K; Gottschalk, Stephen; Leen, Ann M; Vera, Juan F

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy as a treatment for cancer is regarded as high in promise, but low in delivery, a deficiency that has become more obvious with ever-increasing reports of the successful correction of monogenic disorders by this approach. We review the commercial and scientific obstacles that have led to these delays and describe how they are progressively being overcome. Recent and striking successes and correspondingly increased commercial involvement suggest that gene transfer could finally become a powerful method for development of safe and effective cancer therapeutic drugs. PMID:24079872

  1. Cardiac gene therapy: from concept to reality.

    PubMed

    Kratlian, Razmig Garo; Hajjar, Roger J

    2012-03-01

    Heart failure is increasing in incidence throughout the world, especially in industrialized countries. Although the current therapeutic modalities have been successful in stabilizing the course of heart failure, morbidity and mortality remain quite high and there remains a great need for innovative breakthroughs that will offer new treatment strategies for patients with advanced forms of the disease. The past few years have witnessed a greater understanding of the molecular underpinnings of the failing heart, paving the way for novel strategies in modulating the cellular environment. As such, gene therapy has recently emerged as a powerful tool offering the promise of a new paradigm for alleviating heart failure. Current gene therapy research for heart failure is focused on exploring potential cellular targets and preclinical and clinical studies are ongoing toward the realization of this goal. Efforts also include the development of sophisticated viral vectors and vector delivery methods for efficient transduction of cardiomyocytes.

  2. Targeting tumor suppressor genes for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yunhua; Hu, Xiaoxiao; Han, Cecil; Wang, Liana; Zhang, Xinna; He, Xiaoming; Lu, Xiongbin

    2015-12-01

    Cancer drugs are broadly classified into two categories: cytotoxic chemotherapies and targeted therapies that specifically modulate the activity of one or more proteins involved in cancer. Major advances have been achieved in targeted cancer therapies in the past few decades, which is ascribed to the increasing understanding of molecular mechanisms for cancer initiation and progression. Consequently, monoclonal antibodies and small molecules have been developed to interfere with a specific molecular oncogenic target. Targeting gain-of-function mutations, in general, has been productive. However, it has been a major challenge to use standard pharmacologic approaches to target loss-of-function mutations of tumor suppressor genes. Novel approaches, including synthetic lethality and collateral vulnerability screens, are now being developed to target gene defects in p53, PTEN, and BRCA1/2. Here, we review and summarize the recent findings in cancer genomics, drug development, and molecular cancer biology, which show promise in targeting tumor suppressors in cancer therapeutics.

  3. Pluripotent Stem Cells and Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Simara, Pavel; Motl, Jason A.; Kaufman, Dan S.

    2013-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells represent an accessible cell source for novel cell-based clinical research and therapies. With the realization of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), it is possible to produce almost any desired cell type from any patient's cells. Current developments in gene modification methods have opened the possibility for creating genetically corrected human iPSCs for certain genetic diseases that could be used later in autologous transplantation. Promising preclinical studies have demonstrated correction of disease-causing mutations in a number of hematological, neuronal and muscular disorders. This review aims to summarize these recent advances with a focus on iPSC generation techniques, as well as gene modification methods. We will then further discuss some of the main obstacles remaining to be overcome before successful application of human pluripotent stem cell-based therapy arrives in the clinic and what the future of stem cell research may look like. PMID:23353080

  4. Positron emission tomography and gene therapy: basic concepts and experimental approaches for in vivo gene expression imaging.

    PubMed

    Peñuelas, Iván; Boán, JoséF; Martí-Climent, Josep M; Sangro, Bruno; Mazzolini, Guillermo; Prieto, Jesús; Richter, José A

    2004-01-01

    More than two decades of intense research have allowed gene therapy to move from the laboratory to the clinical setting, where its use for the treatment of human pathologies has been considerably increased in the last years. However, many crucial questions remain to be solved in this challenging field. In vivo imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) by combination of the appropriate PET reporter gene and PET reporter probe could provide invaluable qualitative and quantitative information to answer multiple unsolved questions about gene therapy. PET imaging could be used to define parameters not available by other techniques that are of substantial interest not only for the proper understanding of the gene therapy process, but also for its future development and clinical application in humans. This review focuses on the molecular biology basis of gene therapy and molecular imaging, describing the fundamentals of in vivo gene expression imaging by PET, and the application of PET to gene therapy, as a technology that can be used in many different ways. It could be applied to avoid invasive procedures for gene therapy monitoring; accurately diagnose the pathology for better planning of the most adequate therapeutic approach; as treatment evaluation to image the functional effects of gene therapy at the biochemical level; as a quantitative noninvasive way to monitor the location, magnitude and persistence of gene expression over time; and would also help to a better understanding of vector biology and pharmacology devoted to the development of safer and more efficient vectors.

  5. [The return of germline gene therapy].

    PubMed

    Jordan, Bertrand

    2015-01-01

    The recent development of a powerful and flexible genome editing technique (the CRISP-cas9 method) accelerates tremendously the production of animal models and will significantly enhance the perspectives of (somatic) gene therapy. However, it also raises a real possibility of germline modifications in humans, with therapeutic aims or for "improvement": this raises thorny ethical questions that are no longer theoretical (as in the 1990s) but will have to be faced in the very near future.

  6. Pirfenidone enhances the efficacy of combined radiation and sunitinib therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Seo-Hyun; Nam, Jae-Kyung; Jang, Junho; Lee, Hae-June Lee, Yoon-Jin

    2015-06-26

    Radiotherapy is a widely used treatment for many tumors. Combination therapy using anti-angiogenic agents and radiation has shown promise; however, these combined therapies are reported to have many limitations in clinical trials. Here, we show that radiation transformed tumor endothelial cells (ECs) to fibroblasts, resulting in reduced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) response and increased Snail1, Twist1, Type I collagen, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β release. Irradiation of radioresistant Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) tumors greater than 250 mm{sup 3} increased collagen levels, particularly in large tumor vessels. Furthermore, concomitant sunitinib therapy did not show a significant difference in tumor inhibition versus radiation alone. Thus, we evaluated multimodal therapy that combined pirfenidone, an inhibitor of TGF-induced collagen production, with radiation and sunitinib treatment. This trimodal therapy significantly reduced tumor growth, as compared to radiation alone. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that radiation-induced collagen deposition and tumor microvessel density were significantly reduced with trimodal therapy, as compared to radiation alone. These data suggest that combined therapy using pirfenidone may modulate the radiation-altered tumor microenvironment, thereby enhancing the efficacy of radiation therapy and concurrent chemotherapy. - Highlights: • Radiation changes tumor endothelial cells to fibroblasts. • Radio-resistant tumors contain collagen deposits, especially in tumor vessels. • Pirfenidone enhances the efficacy of combined radiation and sunitinib therapy. • Pirfenidone reduces radiation-induced collagen deposits in tumors.

  7. Tripartite meeting in gene and cell therapy, 2008: Irish Society for Gene and Cell Therapy, British Society for Gene Therapy, and International Society for Cell and Gene Therapy of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Guinn, Barbara; Casey, Garrett; Collins, Sara; O'Brien, Tim; Alexander, M Yvonne; Tangney, Mark

    2008-10-01

    The second annual meeting of the Irish Society for Gene and Cell Therapy was held in Cork, Ireland on May 15 and 16, 2008 (http://crr.ucc.ie/isgct/). The meeting was jointly organized with the British Society for Gene Therapy and the International Society for Cell and Gene Therapy of Cancer. Because of the location of the conference and the co-organization of this meeting with the British and International Gene Therapy societies, the meeting enjoyed a range of talks from some of the major leaders in the field. Particularly notable were the talented molecular and cell biologists from Ireland who have contributed cutting edge science to the field of gene therapy. Topics including cardiovascular disease, repair of single-gene disorders, and cancer gene therapy were discussed with presentations ranging from basic research to translation into the clinic. Here we describe some of the most exciting presentations and their potential impact on imminent clinical gene therapy trials.

  8. Gene therapies development: slow progress and promising prospect

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Eve; Rémuzat, Cécile; Auquier, Pascal; Toumi, Mondher

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: In 1989, the concept of human gene therapies has emerged with the first approved human gene therapy trial of Rosenberg et al. Gene therapies are considered as promising therapies applicable to a broad range of diseases. Objective: The objective of this study was to review the descriptive data on gene therapy clinical trials conducted worldwide between 1989 and 2015, and to discuss potential success rates of these trials over time and anticipated market launch in the upcoming years. Methods: A publicly available database, ‘Gene Therapy Clinical Trials Worldwide’, was used to extract descriptive data on gene therapy clinical trials: (1) number of trials per year between 1989 and 2015; (2) countries; (3) diseases targeted by gene therapies; (4) vectors used for gene delivery; (5) trials status; (6) phases of development. Results: Between 1989 and 2015, 2,335 gene therapy clinical trials have been completed, were ongoing or approved (but not started) worldwide. The number of clinical trials did not increase steadily over time; it reached its highest peak in 2015 (163 trials). Almost 95% of the trials were in early phases of development and 72% were ongoing. The United States undertook 67% of gene therapy clinical trials. The majority of gene therapies clinical trials identified targeted cancer diseases. Conclusion: The first gene therapy was approved in the European Union in 2012, after two decades of dashed expectations. This approval boosted the investment in developing gene therapies. Regulators are creating a specific path for rapid access of those new therapies, providing hope for manufacturers, healthcare professionals, and patients. However, payers are increasingly scrutinizing the additional benefits of the new therapies. Major steps forward are expected in the field of gene therapies in the future. PMID:28265348

  9. Hyperbaric oxygen in chronic traumatic brain injury: oxygen, pressure, and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Harch, Paul G

    2015-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is a treatment for wounds in any location and of any duration that has been misunderstood for 353 years. Since 2008 it has been applied to the persistent post-concussion syndrome of mild traumatic brain injury by civilian and later military researchers with apparent conflicting results. The civilian studies are positive and the military-funded studies are a mixture of misinterpreted positive data, indeterminate data, and negative data. This has confused the medical, academic, and lay communities. The source of the confusion is a fundamental misunderstanding of the definition, principles, and mechanisms of action of hyperbaric oxygen therapy. This article argues that the traditional definition of hyperbaric oxygen therapy is arbitrary. The article establishes a scientific definition of hyperbaric oxygen therapy as a wound-healing therapy of combined increased atmospheric pressure and pressure of oxygen over ambient atmospheric pressure and pressure of oxygen whose main mechanisms of action are gene-mediated. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy exerts its wound-healing effects by expression and suppression of thousands of genes. The dominant gene actions are upregulation of trophic and anti-inflammatory genes and down-regulation of pro-inflammatory and apoptotic genes. The combination of genes affected depends on the different combinations of total pressure and pressure of oxygen. Understanding that hyperbaric oxygen therapy is a pressure and oxygen dose-dependent gene therapy allows for reconciliation of the conflicting TBI study results as outcomes of different doses of pressure and oxygen.

  10. Frontiers in Suicide Gene Therapy of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Malecki, Marek

    2012-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the American Cancer Society (ACS) predict that 1,638,910 men and women will be diagnosed with cancer in the USA in 2012. Nearly 577,190 patients will die of cancer of all sites this year. Patients undergoing current systemic therapies will suffer multiple side effects from nausea to infertility. Potential parents, when diagnosed with cancer, will have to deposit oocytes or sperm prior to starting systemic radiation or chemo-therapy for the future genetic testing and in vitro fertilization, while trying to avoid risks of iatrogenic mutations in their germ cells. Otherwise, children of parents treated with systemic therapies, will be at high risk of developing genetic disorders. According to these predictions, this year will carry another, very poor therapeutic record again. The ultimate goal of cancer therapy is the complete elimination of all cancer cells, while leaving all healthy cells unharmed. One of the most promising therapeutic strategies in this regard is cancer suicide gene therapy (CSGT), which is rapidly progressing into new frontiers. The therapeutic success, in CSGT, is primarily contingent upon precision in delivery of the therapeutic transgenes to the cancer cells only. This is addressed by discovering and targeting unique or / and over-expressed biomarkers displayed on the cancer cells and cancer stem cells. Specificity of cancer therapeutic effects is further enhanced by designing the DNA constructs, which put the therapeutic genes under the control of the cancer cell specific promoters. The delivery of the suicidal genes to the cancer cells involves viral, as well as synthetic vectors, which are guided by cancer specific antibodies and ligands. The delivery options also include engineered stem cells with tropisms towards cancers. Main mechanisms inducing cancer cells’ deaths include: transgenic expression of thymidine kinases, cytosine deaminases, intracellular antibodies, telomeraseses, caspases, DNases

  11. Combination Therapy for Advanced Kaposi Sarcoma

    Cancer.gov

    In this clinical trial, adult patients with any form of advanced Kaposi sarcoma will be treated with liposomal doxorubicin and bevacizumab every 3 weeks for a maximum of six treatments.  Patients who respond to this therapy or have stable disease will rec

  12. Recombinant adenovirus vectors for gene therapy and clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Nász, I; Adám, E

    2001-01-01

    In the last decade adenovirus (AdV) vectors have emerged as promising technology in gene therapy. They have been used for genetic modification of a variety of somatic cells in vitro and in vivo. They have been widely used as gene delivery vectors in experiments both with curative and preventive purposes. AdV vectors have been used in the experimental and in some extent in the clinical gene therapy of a variety of cancers. The combination of recombinant AdV technology with chemotherapy (pro drug system) seems to be promising, too. AdV vectors offer several advantages over other vectors. Replication defective vectors can be produced in very high titers (10(11) pfu/ml) thus allowing a substantially greater efficiency of direct gene transfer; they have the capacity to infect both replicating and nonreplicating (quiescent) cells from a variety of tissues and species. Several important limitations of adenovirus mediated gene transfer are also known, such as the relatively short-term (transient) expression of foreign genes, induction of the host humoral and cellular immune response to viral proteins and viral infected cells, which may substantially inhibit the effect of repeated treatment with AdV vectors, the limited cloning capacity and the lack of target cell specificity. However, the well-understood structure, molecular biology and host cell interactions of AdV-s offer some potential solutions to these limitations.

  13. Cancer gene therapy utilized ultrasound (US)-sensitive liposome as non-viral vector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Ryo; Oda, Yusuke; Namai, Eisuke; Nishiie, Norihito; Hirata, Keiichi; Taira, Yuichiro; Utoguchi, Naoki; Negichi, Yoichi; Maruyama, Kazuo

    2010-03-01

    Sonoporation is an attractive technique to develop non-invasive and non-viral gene delivery system. However, simple sonoporation using only ultrasound (US) is not enough to establish effective cancer gene therapy because of low efficiency of gene delivery. Therefore, we improved this problem by the combination of US and novel US-sensitive liposome (Bubble liposome) which was a liposome containing US imaging gas (perfluoropropane). This was an effective gene delivery system with collapse (cavitation) that was induced by US exposure to Bubble liposome. In this study, we assessed the ability of this system in cancer gene therapy using IL-12 cording plasmid DNA. The combination of Bubble liposomes and ultrasound was dramatically suppressed tumor growth. Therefore, we concluded that the combination of Bubble liposomes and ultrasound would be a good non-viral vector system in IL-12 cancer gene therapy.

  14. New frontiers in the therapy of primary immunodeficiency: From gene addition to gene editing.

    PubMed

    Kohn, Donald B; Kuo, Caroline Y

    2017-03-01

    The most severe primary immune deficiency diseases (PIDs) have been successfully treated with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for more than 4 decades. However, such transplantations have the best outcomes when there is a well-matched donor available because immune complications, such as graft-versus-host disease, are greater without a matched sibling donor. Gene therapy has been developed as a method to perform autologous transplantations of a patient's own stem cells that are genetically corrected. Through an iterative bench-to-bedside-and-back process, methods to efficiently add new copies of the relevant gene to hematopoietic stem cells have led to safe and effective treatments for several PIDs, including forms of severe combined immune deficiency, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, and chronic granulomatous disease. New methods for gene editing might allow additional PIDs to be treated by gene therapy because they will allow the endogenous gene to be repaired and expressed under its native regulatory elements, which are essential for genes involved in cell processes of signaling, activation, and proliferation. Gene therapy is providing exciting new treatment options for patients with PIDs, and advances are sure to continue.

  15. Engineering blood vessels by gene and cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Zarbiv, Gabriel; Preis, Meir; Ben-Yosef, Yaara; Flugelman, Moshe Y

    2007-08-01

    Cardiovascular-related syndromes are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Arterial narrowing and blockage due to atherosclerosis cause reduced blood flow to the brain, heart and legs. Bypass surgery to improve blood flow to the heart and legs in these patients is performed in hundreds of thousands of patients every year. Autologous grafts, such as the internal thoracic artery and saphenous vein, are used in most patients, but in a significant number of patients such grafts are not available and synthetic grafts are used. Synthetic grafts have higher failure rates than autologous grafts due to thrombosis and scar formation within graft lumen. Cell and gene therapy combined with tissue engineering hold a great promise to provide grafts that will be biocompatible and durable. This review describes the field of vascular grafts in the context of tissue engineering using cell and gene therapies.

  16. Gene expression-targeted isoflavone therapy.

    PubMed

    Węgrzyn, Alicja

    2012-04-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSD) form a group of inherited metabolic disorders caused by dysfunction of one of the lysosomal proteins, resulting in the accumulation of certain compounds. Although these disorders are among first genetic diseases for which specific treatments were proposed, there are still serious unsolved problems that require development of novel therapeutic procedures. An example is neuronopathy, which develops in most of LSD and cannot be treated efficiently by currently approved therapies. Recently, a new potential therapy, called gene expression-targeted isoflavone therapy (GET IT), has been proposed for a group of LSD named mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS), in which storage of incompletely degraded glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) results in severe symptoms of virtually all tissues and organs, including central nervous system. The idea of this therapy is to inhibit synthesis of GAGs by modulating expression of genes coding for enzymes involved in synthesis of these compounds. Such a modulation is possible by using isoflavones, particularly genistein, which interfere with a signal transduction process necessary for stimulation of expression of certain genes. Results of in vitro experiments and studies on animal models indicated a high efficiency of GET IT, including correction of behavior of affected mice. However, clinical trials, performed with soy isoflavone extracts, revealed only limited efficacy. This caused a controversy about GET IT as a potential, effective treatment of patients suffering from MPS, especially neuronopathic forms of these diseases. It this critical review, I present possible molecular mechanisms of therapeutic action of isoflavones (particularly genistein) and suggest that efficacy of GET IT might be sufficiently high when using relatively high doses of synthetic genistein (which was employed in experiments on cell cultures and mouse models) rather than low doses of soy isoflavone extracts (which were used in clinical trials). This

  17. Pluripotent Stem Cells for Gene Therapy of Degenerative Muscle Diseases.

    PubMed

    Loperfido, Mariana; Steele-Stallard, Heather B; Tedesco, Francesco Saverio; VandenDriessche, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells represent a unique source for cell-based therapies and regenerative medicine. The intrinsic features of these cells such as their easy accessibility and their capacity to be expanded indefinitely overcome some limitations of conventional adult stem cells. Furthermore, the possibility to derive patient-specific induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells in combination with the current development of gene modification methods could be used for autologous cell therapies of some genetic diseases. In particular, muscular dystrophies are considered to be a good candidate due to the lack of efficacious therapeutic treatments for patients to date, and in view of the encouraging results arising from recent preclinical studies. Some hurdles, including possible genetic instability and their efficient differentiation into muscle progenitors through vector/transgene-free methods have still to be overcome or need further optimization. Additionally, engraftment and functional contribution to muscle regeneration in pre-clinical models need to be carefully assessed before clinical translation. This review offers a summary of the advanced methods recently developed to derive muscle progenitors from pluripotent stem cells, as well as gene therapy by gene addition and gene editing methods using ZFNs, TALENs or CRISPR/Cas9. We have also discussed the main issues that need to be addressed for successful clinical translation of genetically corrected patient-specific pluripotent stem cells in autologous transplantation trials for skeletal muscle disorders.

  18. Combination treatment including targeted therapy for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yuan; Wang, Anqiang; Zhang, Haohai; Yang, Xiaobo; Wan, Xueshuai; Lu, Xin; Sang, Xinting; Zhao, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    Management of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), one of the most lethal cancers worldwide, has presented a therapeutic challenge over past decades. Most patients with advanced HCC and a low possibility of surgical resection have limited treatment options and no alternative but to accept local or palliative treatment. In the new era of cancer therapy, increasing numbers of molecular targeted agents (MTAs) have been applied in the treatment of advanced HCC. However, mono-targeted therapy has shown disappointing outcomes in disease control, primarily because of tumor heterogeneity and complex cell signal transduction. Because incapacitation of a single target is insufficient for cancer suppression, combination treatment for targeted therapy has been proposed and experimentally tested in several clinical trials. In this article, we review research studies aimed to enhance the efficacy of targeted therapy for HCC through combination strategies. Combination treatments involving targeted therapy for advanced HCC are compared and discussed. PMID:27626176

  19. Combined versus monotherapy or concurrent therapy for treatment of thalassaemia.

    PubMed

    Song, Ta-Shu; Hsieh, Yow-Wen; Peng, Ching-Tien; Chen, Tai-Lin; Lee, Hong-Zin; Chung, Jing-Gung; Hour, Mann-Jen

    2014-01-01

    A combined deferasirox (DFX) and deferiprone (DFP) treatment protocol for relieving thalassemia patients' iron-overload was designed and the pharmacokinetic study was performed by LC-MS/MS. For this open-label, randomized trial, eight patients were recruited and randomly allocated to different treatment regimens: (A) monotherapy with single oral dose of DFX 30 mg/kg, (B) monotherapy with DFP 80 mg/kg/day, twice daily, (C) combined therapy with DFX and DFP (DFX 30 mg/kg for first dose, DFP 40 mg/kg 7 hours later, and DFP 40 mg/kg after another 7 h) and (D) concurrent therapy with DFX 30 mg/kg and DFP 80 mg/kg. Descriptive statistics evaluated pharmacokinetic parameters, AUC0-t, AUC0-inf, Cmax, Tmax, T1/2 and MRT. A positive pharmacokinetic drug interaction was observed in combined therapy. In case of DFX, combined therapy tallied about 2-fold larger than monotherapy in AUC, 1.5-fold larger in Cmax, 1 h longer in Tmax, but 1 h shorter in T1/2. Regarding DFP, most such parameters of combined therapy concurred with monotherapy. Conversely, negative drug interaction was observed in concurrent therapy. With DFX, concurrent therapy attained 1.2- to 2.2-fold lower than monotherapy in AUC0-t and Cmax, 0.6-h shorter in Tmax, and 3-fold longer in T1/2. With DFP, concurrent therapy proved approximately 2-fold larger than monotherapy in AUC and Cmax, 2.5-fold longer in T1/2, and 1.4-fold longer in MRT. Follow-up of subjects' clinical examinations and subjective symptoms showed no adverse events. Our findings showed the combined therapy had advantages, safe, convenient and painless for patients, over the existing concurrent therapy with deferoxamine (DFO) and DFX.

  20. Antioxidant gene therapy against neuronal cell death

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-Yepes, Juliana; Zavala-Flores, Laura; Annadurai, Anandhan; Wang, Fang; Skotak, Maciej; Chandra, Namas; Li, Ming; Pappa, Aglaia; Martinez-Fong, Daniel; Razo, Luz Maria Del; Quintanilla-Vega, Betzabet; Franco, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a common hallmark of neuronal cell death associated with neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, as well as brain stroke/ischemia and traumatic brain injury. Increased accumulation of reactive species of both oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen (RNS) has been implicated in mitochondrial dysfunction, energy impairment, alterations in metal homeostasis and accumulation of aggregated proteins observed in neurodegenerative disorders, which lead to the activation/modulation of cell death mechanisms that include apoptotic, necrotic and autophagic pathways. Thus, the design of novel antioxidant strategies to selectively target oxidative stress and redox imbalance might represent important therapeutic approaches against neurological disorders. This work reviews the evidence demonstrating the ability of genetically encoded antioxidant systems to selectively counteract neuronal cell loss in neurodegenerative diseases and ischemic brain damage. Because gene therapy approaches to treat inherited and acquired disorders offer many unique advantages over conventional therapeutic approaches, we discussed basic research/clinical evidence and the potential of virus-mediated gene delivery techniques for antioxidant gene therapy. PMID:24333264

  1. Combination therapy of biologics with traditional agents in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Guenther, Lyn C

    2011-06-01

    Although biologics are very efficacious as monotherapy in patients with psoriasis, combination treatment with traditional systemic and topical therapies may increase the speed of onset and enhance efficacy without significant additional toxicity. In contrast, in psoriatic arthritis, the addition of methotrexate to anti-tumour necrosis factor-alpha therapy does not enhance efficacy in either the skin or joints.

  2. Combined modality therapy for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Bruce D; Röedel, Claus; Valentini, Vincenzo

    2010-01-01

    The standard adjuvant treatment for cT3 and/or N+ rectal cancer is preoperative chemoradiation. However, there are many controversies regarding this approach. These include the role of short course radiation, whether postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy necessary for all patients and whether the type of surgery after chemoradiation should be based on the response rate. More accurate imaging techniques and/or molecular markers may help identify patients with positive pelvic nodes to reduce the chance of overtreatment with preoperative therapy. Will more effective systemic agents both improve the results of radiation as well as modify the need for pelvic radiation? These questions and others remain active areas of clinical investigation.

  3. Combination Therapies for Traumatic Brain Injury: Prospective Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Ramona

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) initiates a cascade of numerous pathophysiological events that evolve over time. Despite the complexity of TBI, research aimed at therapy development has almost exclusively focused on single therapies, all of which have failed in multicenter clinical trials. Therefore, in February 2008 the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, with support from the National Institute of Child Health and Development, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, and the Department of Veterans Affairs, convened a workshop to discuss the opportunities and challenges of testing combination therapies for TBI. Workshop participants included clinicians and scientists from a variety of disciplines, institutions, and agencies. The objectives of the workshop were to: (1) identify the most promising combinations of therapies for TBI; (2) identify challenges of testing combination therapies in clinical and pre-clinical studies; and (3) propose research methodologies and study designs to overcome these challenges. Several promising combination therapies were discussed, but no one combination was identified as being the most promising. Rather, the general recommendation was to combine agents with complementary targets and effects (e.g., mechanisms and time-points), rather than focusing on a single target with multiple agents. In addition, it was recommended that clinical management guidelines be carefully considered when designing pre-clinical studies for therapeutic development. To overcome the challenges of testing combination therapies it was recommended that statisticians and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration be included in early discussions of experimental design. Furthermore, it was agreed that an efficient and validated screening platform for candidate therapeutics, sensitive and clinically relevant biomarkers and outcome measures, and standardization and data sharing across centers would greatly facilitate the development of

  4. Gene therapy targeting inflammation in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Van-Assche, Tim; Huygelen, Veronique; Crabtree, Mark J; Antoniades, Charalambos

    2011-12-01

    The extensive cross-talk between the immune system and vasculature leading to the infiltration of immune cells into the vascular wall is a major step in atherogenesis. In this process, reactive oxygen species play a crucial role, by inducing the oxidation of LDL and the formation of foam cells, and by activating a number of redox-sensitive transcriptional factors such as nuclear factor kappa B (NFkappa B) or activating protein 1 (AP1), that regulate the expression of multiple pro/anti inflammatory genes involved in atherogenesis. Delivery of genes encoding antioxidant defense enzymes (e.g. superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase or heme oxygenase- 1) or endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), suppress atherogenesis in animal models. Similarly, delivery of genes encoding regulators of redox sensitive transcriptional factors (e.g. NF-kappa B, AP-1, Nrf2 etc) or reactive oxygen species scavengers have been successfully used in experimental studies. Despite the promising results from basic science, the clinical applicability of these strategies has proven to be particularly challenging. Issues regarding the vectors used to deliver the genes (and the development of immune responses or other side effects) and the inability of sufficient and sustained local expression of these genes at the target-tissue are some of the main reasons preventing optimism regarding the use of these strategies at a clinical level. Therefore, although premature to discuss about effective "gene therapy" in atherosclerosis at a clinical level, gene delivery techniques opened new horizons in cardiovascular research, and the development of new vectors may allow their extensive use in clinical trials in the future.

  5. Gene therapy for ocular diseases meditated by ultrasound and microbubbles (Review).

    PubMed

    Wan, Caifeng; Li, Fenghua; Li, Hongli

    2015-10-01

    The eye is an ideal target organ for gene therapy as it is easily accessible and immune‑privileged. With the increasing insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms of ocular diseases, gene therapy has been proposed as an effective approach. Successful gene therapy depends on efficient gene transfer to targeted cells to prove stable and prolonged gene expression with minimal toxicity. At present, the main hindrance regarding the clinical application of gene therapy is not the lack of an ideal gene, but rather the lack of a safe and efficient method to selectively deliver genes to target cells and tissues. Ultrasound‑targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD), with the advantages of high safety, repetitive applicability and tissue targeting, has become a potential strategy for gene‑ and drug delivery. When gene‑loaded microbubbles are injected, UTMD is able to enhance the transport of the gene to the targeted cells. High‑amplitude oscillations of microbubbles act as cavitation nuclei which can effectively focus ultrasound energy, produce oscillations and disruptions that increase the permeability of the cell membrane and create transient pores in the cell membrane. Thereby, the efficiency of gene therapy can be significantly improved. The UTMD‑mediated gene delivery system has been widely used in pre‑clinical studies to enhance gene expression in a site‑specific manner in a variety of organs. With reasonable application, the effects of sonoporation can be spatially and temporally controlled to improve localized tissue deposition of gene complexes for ocular gene therapy applications. In addition, appropriately powered, focused ultrasound combined with microbubbles can induce a reversible disruption of the blood‑retinal barrier with no significant side effects. The present review discusses the current status of gene therapy of ocular diseases as well as studies on gene therapy of ocular diseases meditated by UTMD.

  6. Carfilzomib Triple Combination Therapy: A Review in Relapsed Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Hoy, Sheridan M

    2016-04-01

    Carfilzomib (Kyprolis®) is a proteasome inhibitor that binds selectively and irreversibly to the 20S proteasome (the proteolytic core particle within the 26S proteasome), inducing growth arrest and apoptosis. This intravenous drug is approved in the EU and the USA as combination therapy with oral lenalidomide and intravenous or oral dexamethasone for the treatment of patients with multiple myeloma who have received at least one prior therapy. In the multinational, phase III ASPIRE study in this patient population, carfilzomib triple combination therapy significantly prolonged progression-free survival (PFS), reflecting a clinically relevant gain in PFS of 8.7 months, compared with lenalidomide plus dexamethasone. Improvements in overall response rate and patients' global health status were also observed with carfilzomib triple combination therapy. A significant improvement in overall survival (OS) is yet to be demonstrated, with the prespecified stopping boundary not crossed at the time of the prespecified interim analysis, although OS data were not mature by the cut-off date. Carfilzomib triple combination therapy had a manageable tolerability profile. The incidences of the most frequently reported grade 3 or higher adverse events of special interest (with the exception of neutropenia, anaemia and thrombocytopenia) were low in both the carfilzomib triple combination therapy and lenalidomide plus dexamethasone groups. Although final OS data are awaited, current evidence suggests carfilzomib in combination with lenalidomide and dexamethasone is a welcome addition to the treatment options currently available for patients with relapsed multiple myeloma.

  7. Combination therapy with conditionally replicating adenovirus and replication defective adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Choon-Taek; Park, Kyung-Ho; Yanagisawa, Kiyoshi; Adachi, Yasushi; Ohm, Joyce E; Nadaf, Sorena; Dikov, Mikhail M; Curiel, David T; Carbone, David P

    2004-09-15

    Low gene transfer rate is the most substantial hurdle in the practical application of gene therapy. One strategy to improve transfer efficiency is the use of a conditionally replicating adenovirus (CRAD) that can selectively replicate in tumor cells. We hypothesized that conventional E1-deleted adenoviruses (ad) can become replication-competent when cotransduced with a CRAD to selectively supply E1 in trans in tumors. The resulting selective production of large numbers of the E1-deleted ad within the tumor mass will increase the transduction efficiency. We used a CRAD (Delta24RGD) that produces a mutant E1 without the ability to bind retinoblastoma but retaining viral replication competence in cancer cells with a defective pRb/p16. Ad-lacZ, adenovirus-luciferase (ad-luc), and adenovirus insulin-like growth factor-1R/dominant-negative (ad-IGF-1R/dn; 482, 950) are E1-deleted replication-defective adenoviruses. The combination of CRAD and ad-lacZ increased the transduction efficiency of lacZ to 100% from 15% observed with ad-lacZ alone. Transfer of media of CRAD and ad-lacZ cotransduced cells induced the transfer of lacZ (media transferable bystander effect). Combination of CRAD and ad-IGF-1R/dn increased the production of truncated IGF-1R or soluble IGF-1R > 10 times compared with transduction with ad-IGF-1R/dn alone. Combined intratumoral injection of CRAD and ad-luc increased the luciferase expression about 70 times compared with ad-luc alone without substantial systemic spread. Combined intratumoral injection of CRAD and ad-IGF-1R/482 induced stronger growth suppression of established lung cancer xenografts than single injections. The combination of CRAD and E1-deleted ad induced tumor-specific replication of CRAD and E1-deleted ad and increased the transduction rate and therapeutic efficacy of these viruses in model tumors.

  8. Gene therapy: Into the home stretch

    SciTech Connect

    Culliton, B.J.

    1990-08-31

    Tumors cannot live without blood. Shut off the blood vessels that feed a tumor and the tumor will turn black and shrivel away. That simple idea lies behind the first attempt to cure a disease by gene therapy, expected to take place at the National Cancer Institute in the next few weeks. When it does, it will test a technique that worked like a charm in mice. When a potent natural killer called tumor necrosis factor, or TNF, is injected into the bloodstream of mice, it begins to shrink tumors within hours, sometimes even minutes. But so far, attempts to recreate that miracle in people with cancer have not fared as well. TNF has been given intravenously to more than 35 patients in experiments that were a failure. Researchers hope to deliver TNF in much larger doses directly to a tumor by packaging the gene for TNF inside special lymphocytes that have a natural affinity for cancer.

  9. Combination Therapies for Lysosomal Storage Diseases: A Complex Answer to a Simple Problem

    PubMed Central

    Macauley, Shannon L

    2017-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are a group of 40–50 rare monogenic disorders that result in disrupted lysosomal function and subsequent lysosomal pathology. Depending on the protein or enzyme deficiency associated with each disease, LSDs affect an array of organ systems and elicit a complex set of secondary disease mechanisms that make many of these disorders difficult to fully treat. The etiology of most LSDs is known and the innate biology of lysosomal enzymes favors therapeutic intervention, yet most attempts at treating LSDs with enzyme replacement strategies fall short of being curative. Even with the advent of more sophisticated approaches, like substrate reduction therapy, pharmacologic chaperones, gene therapy or stem cell therapy, comprehensive treatments for LSDs have yet to be achieved. Given the limitations with individual therapies, recent research has focused on using a combination approach to treat LSDs. By coupling protein-, cell-, and gene- based therapies with small molecule drugs, researchers have found greater success in eradicating the clinical features of disease. This review seeks to discuss the positive and negatives of singular therapies used to treat LSDs, and discuss how, in combination, studies have demonstrated a more holistic benefit on pathological and functional parameters. By optimizing routes of delivery, therapeutic timing, and targeting secondary disease mechanisms, combination therapy represents the future for LSD treatment. PMID:27491211

  10. Combined aspirin and anticoagulant therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    So, Charlotte H; Eckman, Mark H

    2017-01-01

    The combined use of aspirin and oral anticoagulant therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and stable coronary artery disease (CAD) has been questioned due to an increased risk of major bleeding with little to no benefit in preventing ischemic events. (1) To better understand patterns and indications for combined antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy and identify patients who might reasonably be treated with oral anticoagulant (OAC) therapy alone. (2) To perform an updated literature review regarding the use of combined antiplatelet and OAC therapy in patients with AF and stable CAD. Retrospective review. Patients within the University of Cincinnati Health System with a diagnosis of non-valvular AF, excluding those with acute coronary syndrome or revascularization within the last 12 months. Numbers and indications for combined antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy and sequence of events leading to the initiation of each. Of 948 patients receiving OAC, 430 (45 %) were receiving concomitant OAC and aspirin. Among patients receiving combined antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy, 49 and 42 % of patients respectively, had CAD or DM. In a more detailed analysis including chart review of 219 patients receiving combined OAC and aspirin, 27 % had a diagnosis of CAD and 14 % had a diagnosis of DM prior to the development of AF. These patients were initially treated with aspirin. Warfarin was added when they subsequently developed AF but aspirin wasn't discontinued. A surprisingly large proportion of patients (22.8 %) had no obvious indication for dual therapy. Prior myocardial infarction, CAD, vascular disease and DM (among others) increase the likelihood of receiving combined antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy among patients with AF. A literature review suggests this may lead to increased major bleeding with little benefit in decreasing either AF-related stroke or cardiovascular events.

  11. The future of human gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Rubanyi, G M

    2001-06-01

    Human gene therapy (HGT) is defined as the transfer of nucleic acids (DNA) to somatic cells of a patient which results in a therapeutic effect, by either correcting genetic defects or by overexpressing proteins that are therapeutically useful. In the past, both the professional and the lay community had high (sometimes unreasonably high) expectations from HGT because of the early promise of treating or preventing diseases effectively and safely by this new technology. Although the theoretical advantages of HGT are undisputable, so far HGT has not delivered the promised results: convincing clinical efficacy could not be demonstrated yet in most of the trials conducted so far, while safety concerns were raised recently as the consequence of the "Gelsinger Case" in Philadelphia. This situation resulted from the by now well-recognized disparity between theory and practice. In other words, the existing technologies could not meet the practical needs of clinically successful HGT so far. However, over the past years, significant progress was made in various enabling technologies, in the molecular understanding of diseases and the manufacturing of vectors. HGT is a complex process, involving multiple steps in the human body (delivery to organs, tissue targeting, cellular trafficking, regulation of gene expression level and duration, biological activity of therapeutic protein, safety of the vector and gene product, to name just a few) most of which are not completely understood. The prerequisite of successful HGT include therapeutically suitable genes (with a proven role in pathophysiology of the disease), appropriate gene delivery systems (e.g., viral and non-viral vectors), proof of principle of efficacy and safety in appropriate preclinical models and suitable manufacturing and analytical processes to provide well-defined HGT products for clinical investigations. The most promising areas for gene therapy today are hemophilias, for monogenic diseases, and cardiovascular

  12. Study of the combined treatment of lung cancer using gene-loaded immunomagnetic albumin nanospheres in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Liang, Chen; Hou, Xinxin; Wang, Ling; Zhang, Dongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Combination therapy for lung cancer has garnered widespread attention. Radiation therapy, gene therapy, and molecular targeted therapy for lung cancer have certain effects, but the disadvantages of these treatment methods are evident. Combining these methods can decrease their side effects and increase their curative effects. In this study, we constructed a pYr-ads-8-5HRE-cfosp-iNOS-IFNG plasmid (a gene circuit that can express IFNγ), which is a gene circuit, and used that plasmid together with C225 (cetuximab) to prepare gene-loaded immunomagnetic albumin nanospheres (IMANS). Moreover, we investigated the therapeutic effects of gene-loaded IMANS in combination with radiation therapy on human lung cancer in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that this gene circuit was successively constructed and confirmed that the expression of INFγ was increased due to the gene circuit. Gene-loaded IMANS combined with radiation therapy demonstrated improved results in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, gene-loaded IMANS enhanced the efficacy of combination therapy, solved problems related to gene transfer, and specifically targeted lung cancer cells. PMID:27042059

  13. Corneal gene therapy: basic science and translational perspective.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Rajiv R; Rodier, Jason T; Sharma, Ajay

    2013-07-01

    Corneal blindness is the third leading cause of blindness worldwide. Gene therapy is an emerging technology for corneal blindness due to the accessibility and immune-privileged nature of the cornea, ease of vector administration and visual monitoring, and ability to perform frequent noninvasive corneal assessment. Vision restoration by gene therapy is contingent upon vector and mode of therapeutic gene introduction into targeted cells/tissues. Numerous efficacious vectors, delivery techniques, and approaches have evolved in the last decade for developing gene-based interventions for corneal diseases. Maximizing the potential benefits of gene therapy requires efficient and sustained therapeutic gene expression in target cells, low toxicity, and a high safety profile. This review describes the basic science associated with many gene therapy vectors and the present progress of gene therapy carried out for various ocular surface disorders and diseases.

  14. Corneal Gene Therapy: Basic Science and Translational Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Rajiv R.; Rodier, Jason T.; Sharma, Ajay

    2013-01-01

    Corneal blindness is the third leading cause of blindness worldwide. Gene therapy is an emerging technology for corneal blindness due to the accessibility and immune-privileged nature of the cornea, ease of vector administration and visual monitoring, and ability to perform frequent noninvasive corneal assessment. Vision restoration by gene therapy is contingent upon vector and mode of therapeutic gene introduction into targeted cells/tissues. Numerous efficacious vectors, delivery techniques, and approaches have evolved in last decade for developing gene-based interventions for corneal diseases. Maximizing the potential benefits of gene therapy requires efficient and sustained therapeutic gene expression in target cells, low toxicity, and a high safety profile. This review describes the basic science associated with many gene therapy vectors and the present progress of gene therapy carried out for various ocular surface disorders and diseases. PMID:23838017

  15. Assessment of combination therapy in BALB/c mice injected with carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae strains

    PubMed Central

    Salloum, Noor A.; Kissoyan, Kohar Annie B.; Fadlallah, Sukayna; Cheaito, Katia; Araj, George F.; Wakim, Rima; Kanj, Souha; Kanafani, Zeina; Dbaibo, Ghassan; Matar, Ghassan M.

    2015-01-01

    Monotherapeutic options for carbapenem resistant infections are limited. Studies suggest that combination therapy may be associated with better outcomes than monotherapies. However, this is still controversial. This study assessed, the efficacy of combination therapy against carbapenem resistant Enterobacteriaceae harboring singly various extended spectrum beta lactamase or carbapenemase encoding genes. Thus, four isolates harboring either blaCTXM-15, blaCTXM-15 and blaOXA-48, blaNDM-1, or blaKPC-2 genes were selected for testing. Minimal inhibitory concentration was determined by broth dilution method. Gene transcript levels on single and combined treatments were done in vitro and in vivo by qRT-PCR. Assessment of treatments was done in BALB/c mice according to a specific protocol. As such, the qRT-PCR revealed a significant decrease of transcript levels in all isolates upon using rifampicin or tigecycline, singly or in combination with colistin. However, variable levels were obtained using colistin singly or in combination with meropenem or fosfomycin. In vivo assessment showed that all combinations used were effective against isolates harboring blaCTXM-15, blaOXA-48, and blaNDM-1. Conversely, the most significant combination against the isolate harboring blaKPC-2 gene was colistin with either carbapenem, fosfomycin, or kanamycin. As a conclusion, combination therapy selected based on the type of carbapenemase produced, appeared to be non-toxic and might be effective in BALB/c mice. Therefore, the use of a rationally optimized combination therapy might lead to better results than monotherapy, however, clinical trials are needed for human consumption. PMID:26441926

  16. Primary combined-modality therapy for esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Bruce D

    2006-04-01

    Based on positive results from the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 85-01 trial, the conventional nonsurgical treatment of esophageal carcinoma is combined-modality therapy. Dose intensification of the RTOG 85-01 regimen, examined in the Intergroup (INT)-0123/RTOG 94-05 trial, did not improve local control or survival. Areas of clinical investigation include the development of combined-modality therapy regimens with newer systemic agents, the use of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission tomography to assist in the development of innovative radiation treatment planning techniques, and the identification of prognostic molecular markers. The addition of surgery following primary combined-modality therapy apparently does not improve survival, but this finding is controversial.

  17. Combined photovacuum therapy of copulative dysfunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menyaev, Yulian A.; Zharov, Vladimir P.; Mishanin, Evgeniy A.; Kuzmich, Aleksandr P.; Bessonov, Sergey E.

    2006-02-01

    One of the important problems of modern medicine is treatment of urogenital diseases. 1-2 There is a set of the treatment methods for such problems, but any of them does not obey the modern physicians completely. 3-4 Our aim is to present the new combined therapeutic apparatus called "Yarovit" (produced in Russia, in collaboration between Bauman Moscow State University of Technology and Scientific Production Association and Medical Center "Yarovit") which successfully applied in clinics for cure the patients with copulative dysfunction diseases. 5-6 At this apparatus "Yarovit" (description model have abbreviation AMVL-0 1) there is a combination of vacuum decompression (0.1-0.4 kgs/cm2) and light emitting diodes matrix system (660 nm, 1-3 mW/cm2). In treatment procedure apparatus can be applied together with expanded module "Intratherm" (39 °C on average), which has rectal heating elements. The latest clinical studies were made together with volunteer participation of more then one hundred patients, and received results showed the good dynamic of healing. That let to conclude these combinations of physical therapeutic methods supplement each other and in conjunction provides a significant clinical effect. The further developments of such apparatuses are discussed.

  18. Drug combination therapy increases successful drug repositioning.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Sanderson, Philip E; Zheng, Wei

    2016-07-01

    Repositioning of approved drugs has recently gained new momentum for rapid identification and development of new therapeutics for diseases that lack effective drug treatment. Reported repurposing screens have increased dramatically in number in the past five years. However, many newly identified compounds have low potency; this limits their immediate clinical applications because the known, tolerated plasma drug concentrations are lower than the required therapeutic drug concentrations. Drug combinations of two or more compounds with different mechanisms of action are an alternative approach to increase the success rate of drug repositioning.

  19. Perspectives on best practices for gene therapy programs.

    PubMed

    Cheever, Thomas R; Berkley, Dale; Braun, Serge; Brown, Robert H; Byrne, Barry J; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S; Cwik, Valerie; Duan, Dongsheng; Federoff, Howard J; High, Katherine A; Kaspar, Brian K; Klinger, Katherine W; Larkindale, Jane; Lincecum, John; Mavilio, Fulvio; McDonald, Cheryl L; McLaughlin, James; Weiss McLeod, Bonnie; Mendell, Jerry R; Nuckolls, Glen; Stedman, Hansell H; Tagle, Danilo A; Vandenberghe, Luk H; Wang, Hao; Wernett, Pamela J; Wilson, James M; Porter, John D; Gubitz, Amelie K

    2015-03-01

    With recent successes in gene therapy trials for hemophilia and retinal diseases, the promise and prospects for gene therapy are once again garnering significant attention. To build on this momentum, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and the Muscular Dystrophy Association jointly hosted a workshop in April 2014 on "Best Practices for Gene Therapy Programs," with a focus on neuromuscular disorders. Workshop participants included researchers from academia and industry as well as representatives from the regulatory, legal, and patient advocacy sectors to cover the gamut from preclinical optimization to intellectual property concerns and regulatory approval. The workshop focused on three key issues in the field: (1) establishing adequate scientific premise for clinical trials in gene therapy, (2) addressing regulatory process issues, and (3) intellectual property and commercialization issues as they relate to gene therapy. The outcomes from the discussions at this workshop are intended to provide guidance for researchers and funders in the gene therapy field.

  20. Oxaliplatin-based combined-modality therapy for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Bruce D

    2003-08-01

    There are two conventional treatments for clinically resectable rectal cancer. The first is surgery, and, if the tumor is T3 and/or N1-2, this is followed by postoperative combined-modality therapy. The second, for patients with ultrasound T3 or clinical T4 disease, is preoperative combined-modality therapy followed by surgery and postoperative chemotherapy. In this review, the results of these approaches as well as novel combined-modality approaches using oxaliplatin-based regimens will be presented.

  1. Laser-electromagnetism combined therapy in chronic prostatitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Rong; Liu, Lina; Ye, Meiyun; Li, Yongzeng; Lin, Aizhen

    2005-01-01

    The therapeutic effectiveness of laser-electromagnetism combined therapy in chronic prostatitis is studied. Four patients were treated by irradiating the prostate"s correlative parts and acupoints with 650nm semiconductor laser and pulse electromagnetism respectively. Three of them were recovery and only one was ineffective. This demonstrates the feasibility of using laser-combined electromagnetism for assistant treatment on chronic prostatitis. A further study on combined therapy of chronic prostatitis using 810nm, 650nm semiconductor laser and pulse electromagnetic wave is also introduced.

  2. Gene therapy for monogenic disorders of the bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sujal; Thrasher, Adrian J; Gaspar, H Bobby

    2015-06-05

    Ex-vivo gene transfer of autologous haematopoietic stem cells in patients with monogenic diseases of the bone marrow has emerged as a new therapeutic approach, mainly in patients lacking a suitable donor for transplant. The encouraging results of initial clinical trials of gene therapy for primary immunodeficiencies were tempered by the occurrence of genotoxicity in a number of patients. Over the last decade, safer viral vectors have been developed to overcome the risk of insertional mutagenesis and have led to impressive clinical outcomes with considerably improved safety. We review the efforts in specific immunodeficiencies including adenosine deaminase deficiency, X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency, chronic granulomatous disease and Wiskott Aldrich syndrome. Major recent progress has also been made in haemoglobinopathies, such as beta-thalassaemia, sickle cell disease and Fanconi anaemia, and also specific lysosomal storage diseases, which, although not strictly bone marrow specific conditions, have been effectively treated by bone marrow-based treatment. The success of these recent studies and the advent of new technologies, such as gene editing, suggest that gene therapy could become a more generally applied treatment modality for a number of haematopoietic disorders.

  3. Combined cannabinoid therapy via an oromucosal spray.

    PubMed

    Perez, Jordi

    2006-08-01

    Extensive basic science research has identified the potential therapeutic benefits of active compounds extracted from the Cannabis sativa L. plant (the cannabinoids). It is recognized that a significant proportion of patients suffering with the debilitating symptoms of pain and spasticity in multiple sclerosis or other conditions smoke cannabis despite the legal implications and stigma associated with this controlled substance. GW Pharmaceuticals have developed Sativex (GW- 1,000-02), a combined cannabinoid medicine that delivers and maintains therapeutic levels of two principal cannabinoids, delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD), via an oromucosal pump spray, that aims to minimize psychotropic side effects. Sativex has proved to be well tolerated and successfully self-administered and self-titrated in both healthy volunteers and patient cohorts. Clinical assessment of this combined cannabinoid medicine has demonstrated efficacy in patients with intractable pain (chronic neuropathic pain, pain due to brachial plexus nerve injury, allodynic peripheral neuropathic pain and advanced cancer pain), rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis (bladder problems, spasticity and central pain), with no significant intoxication-like symptoms, tolerance or withdrawal syndrome.

  4. The promise of gene therapy in gastrointestinal and liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, J; Herraiz, M; Sangro, B; Qian, C; Mazzolini, G; Melero, I; Ruiz, J

    2003-01-01

    Gene therapy consists of the transfer of genetic material to cells to achieve a therapeutic goal. In the field of gastroenterology and hepatology gene therapy has produced considerable expectation as a potential tool in the management of conditions that lack effective therapy including non-resectable neoplasms of the liver, pancreas and gastrointestinal tract, chronic viral hepatitis unresponsive to interferon therapy, liver cirrhosis, and inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:12651882

  5. Practical combination therapy based on pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Philip A

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a complex, chronic, and progressive condition that often necessitates the use of multiple medications to achieve glycemic goals. Clinical guidelines generally recommend intensifying pharmacotherapy if glycemic goals are not achieved after 3 months of treatment. However, for many patients with type 2 diabetes, treatment intensification is delayed or does not occur. Initiating combination therapy early in the disease course has the potential to delay disease progression and improve patient outcomes. Guidelines generally provide a list of agents that may be used in combination regimens and emphasize individualization of treatment. The purpose of this review is to discuss the rationale for combination therapy, considering treatment effects on pathophysiologic aspects of type 2 diabetes and individual drug profiles. The combination of newer antidiabetes therapies with complementary mechanisms of action provides the opportunity to target multiple sites of tissue, organ, and cellular dysfunction. PMID:27826204

  6. Gene replacement therapy for genetic hepatocellular jaundice.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Remco; Beuers, Ulrich; Bosma, Piter J

    2015-06-01

    Jaundice results from the systemic accumulation of bilirubin, the final product of the catabolism of haem. Inherited liver disorders of bilirubin metabolism and transport can result in reduced hepatic uptake, conjugation or biliary secretion of bilirubin. In patients with Rotor syndrome, bilirubin (re)uptake is impaired due to the deficiency of two basolateral/sinusoidal hepatocellular membrane proteins, organic anion-transporting polypeptide 1B1 (OATP1B1) and OATP1B3. Dubin-Johnson syndrome is caused by a defect in the ATP-dependent canalicular transporter, multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2), which mediates the export of conjugated bilirubin into bile. Both disorders are benign and not progressive and are characterised by elevated serum levels of mainly conjugated bilirubin. Uridine diphospho-glucuronosyl transferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) is responsible for the glucuronidation of bilirubin; deficiency of this enzyme results in unconjugated hyperbilirubinaemia. Gilbert syndrome is the mild and benign form of inherited unconjugated hyperbilirubinaemia and is mostly caused by reduced promoter activity of the UGT1A1 gene. Crigler-Najjar syndrome is the severe inherited form of unconjugated hyperbilirubinaemia due to mutations in the UGT1A1 gene, which can cause kernicterus early in life and can be even lethal when left untreated. Due to major disadvantages of the current standard treatments for Crigler-Najjar syndrome, phototherapy and liver transplantation, new effective therapeutic strategies are under development. Here, we review the clinical features, pathophysiology and genetic background of these inherited disorders of bilirubin metabolism and transport. We also discuss the upcoming treatment option of viral gene therapy for genetic disorders such as Crigler-Najjar syndrome and the possible immunological consequences of this therapy.

  7. Central Leptin Gene Therapy to Reduce Breast Cancer Risk Factors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    W81XWH-04-1-0701 TITLE: Central Leptin Gene Therapy to Reduce Breast Cancer Risk Factors PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Urszula T. Iwaniec...CONTRACT NUMBER Central Leptin Gene Therapy to Reduce Breast Cancer Risk Factors 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-04-1-0701 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...control of obesity through centrally administered, recombinant adeno-associated virus leptin gene (rAAV-lep) therapy will decrease the incidence of

  8. 78 FR 70307 - Guidance for Industry: Preclinical Assessment of Investigational Cellular and Gene Therapy...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-25

    ... Investigational Cellular and Gene Therapy Products; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION... entitled ``Guidance for Industry: Preclinical Assessment of Investigational Cellular and Gene Therapy... and Gene Therapies (OCTGT). The product areas covered by this guidance are cellular therapy,...

  9. Combination azelaic acid therapy for acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Webster, G

    2000-08-01

    There is no topical antiacne medication that acts against all four of the major pathophysiologic features of acne: hyperkeratinization, sebum production, bacterial proliferation, and inflammation. Topical azelaic acid cream helps both to normalize keratinization and to reduce the proliferation of Propionibacterium acnes, and has proven to be effective against both noninflammatory and inflammatory lesions. The results of a recent study now demonstrate that its efficacy can be enhanced, and patient ratings of overall impression improved, when it is used in combination with other topical medications such as benzoyl peroxide 4% gel, clindamycin 1% gel, tretinoin 0.025% cream, and erythromycin 3%/benzoyl peroxide 5% gel. Furthermore, another study has shown that azelaic acid plus benzoyl peroxide achieves greater efficacy and higher patient ratings of convenience than monotherapy with erythromycin-benzoyl peroxide gel.

  10. Combining Cancer Immunotherapy and Targeted Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ribas, Antoni; Wolchok, Jedd D.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to pharmacologically modulate key signaling pathways that drive tumor growth and progression, but do not negatively impact the function of lymphocytes, provides avenues for rational combinatorial approaches to improve the antitumor activity of tumor immunotherapies. Novel targeted agents can very specifically block oncogenic events in cancer cells, leading to a pro-apoptotic milieu and a potential increase in sensitivity to recognition and attack by cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Furthermore, targeted pathway modulation in lymphocytes may change their function and have activating effects in some instances. When tested together with recently developed powerful tumor immunotherapies, such combinations may exploit the highly specific targeting of oncogenes with small molecule inhibitors to lead to high frequency of tumor regressions, and merge this benefit with the durable responses achievable with effective tumor immunotherapies. PMID:23561594

  11. Levofloxacin and indolicidin for combination antimicrobial therapy.

    PubMed

    Ghaffar, Khairunnisa Abdul; Hussein, Waleed M; Khalil, Zeinab G; Capon, Robert J; Skwarczynski, Mariusz; Toth, Istvan

    2015-01-01

    Despite the increasing need for antibiotics to fight infectious diseases, fewer new antibiotics are available on the market. Unfortunately, developing a new class of antibiotics is associated with high commercial risk. Therefore, modification or combination of existing antibiotics to improve their efficacy is a promising strategy. Herein, we conjugated the antibiotic, levofloxacin, with two peptides, i.e. an antimicrobial peptide indolicidin and a cell penetrating peptide (TAT). Glycolic acid and glycine linkers were used between levofloxacin and peptides. We developed an optimized condition for coupling of levofloxacin via its carboxylic group to glycolic acid using solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS). Antibacterial and haemolytic assays were carried out on the conjugates and only the levofloxacin-indolicidin conjugate demonstrated moderate antibacterial activity. Interestingly, physical mixture of levofloxacin and indolicidin showed improvement in the activity against Gram-positive bacteria.

  12. Progresses towards safe and efficient gene therapy vectors.

    PubMed

    Chira, Sergiu; Jackson, Carlo S; Oprea, Iulian; Ozturk, Ferhat; Pepper, Michael S; Diaconu, Iulia; Braicu, Cornelia; Raduly, Lajos-Zsolt; Calin, George A; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana

    2015-10-13

    The emergence of genetic engineering at the beginning of the 1970's opened the era of biomedical technologies, which aims to improve human health using genetic manipulation techniques in a clinical context. Gene therapy represents an innovating and appealing strategy for treatment of human diseases, which utilizes vehicles or vectors for delivering therapeutic genes into the patients' body. However, a few past unsuccessful events that negatively marked the beginning of gene therapy resulted in the need for further studies regarding the design and biology of gene therapy vectors, so that this innovating treatment approach can successfully move from bench to bedside. In this paper, we review the major gene delivery vectors and recent improvements made in their design meant to overcome the issues that commonly arise with the use of gene therapy vectors. At the end of the manuscript, we summarized the main advantages and disadvantages of common gene therapy vectors and we discuss possible future directions for potential therapeutic vectors.

  13. A Novel Gene Gun-Mediated IL-12 Gene Therapy for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    The overall goal of our research is to develop an immunological approach for breast cancer gene therapy . The results of the first year study...described in our previous Annual Report, show that gene gun-mediated Th-12 gene therapy is effective against breast tumors in mouse models. During the second...effect of IL-l2 gene therapy against 4T1 tumor is not mediated by T cells, but rather involves NK cells. From several different immunomodulatory genes

  14. Propranolol, doxycycline and combination therapy for the treatment of rosacea.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Min; Mun, Je-Ho; Song, Margaret; Kim, Hoon-Soo; Kim, Byung-Soo; Kim, Moon-Bum; Ko, Hyun-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Doxycycline is the standard systemic treatment for rosacea. Recently, there have been a few reports on β-adrenergic blockers such as nadolol, carvedilol and propranolol for suppressing flushing reactions in rosacea. To our knowledge, there are no comparative studies of propranolol and doxycycline, and combination therapy using both. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the efficacy and safety of monotherapy of propranolol, doxycycline and combination therapy. A total of 78 patients who visited Pusan National University Hospital and were diagnosed with rosacea were included in this study. Among them, 28 patients were in the propranolol group, 22 the doxycycline group and 28 the combination group. We investigated the patient global assessment (PGA), investigator global assessment (IGA), assessment of rosacea clinical score (ARCS) and adverse effects. Improvement in PGA and IGA scores from baseline was noted in all groups, and the combination therapy was found to be the most effective during the entire period, but this was statistically insignificant. The reduction rate of ARCS during the treatment period was also highest in the combination group (57.4%), followed by the doxycycline group (52.2%) and the propranolol group (51.0%). Three patients in the combination group had mild and transient gastrointestinal disturbances but there was no significant difference from the other groups. We conclude that the combination therapy of doxycycline and propranolol is effective and safe treatment for rosacea and successful for reducing both flushing and papulation in particular.

  15. Customized biomaterials to augment chondrocyte gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Izath Nizeet; Trippel, Stephen; Shi, Shuiliang; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2017-02-07

    A persistent challenge in enhancing gene therapy is the transient availability of the target gene product. This is particularly true in tissue engineering applications. The transient exposure of cells to the product could be insufficient to promote tissue regeneration. Here we report the development of a new material engineered to have a high affinity for a therapeutic gene product. We focus on insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) for its highly anabolic effects on many tissues such as spinal cord, heart, brain and cartilage. One of the ways that tissues store IGF-I is through a group of insulin like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs), such as IGFBP-5. We grafted the IGF-I binding peptide sequence from IGFBP-5 onto alginate in order to retain the endogenous IGF-I produced by transfected chondrocytes. This novel material bound IGF-I and released the growth factor for at least 30days in culture. We found that this binding enhanced the biosynthesis of transfected cells up to 19-fold. These data demonstrate the coordinated engineering of cell behavior and material chemistry to greatly enhance extracellular matrix synthesis and tissue assembly, and can serve as a template for the enhanced performance of other therapeutic proteins.

  16. Lentiviral Vectors and Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Castellani, Stefano; Conese, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a chronic autosomic recessive syndrome, caused by mutations in the CF Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) gene, a chloride channel expressed on the apical side of the airway epithelial cells. The lack of CFTR activity brings a dysregulated exchange of ions and water through the airway epithelium, one of the main aspects of CF lung disease pathophysiology. Lentiviral (LV) vectors, of the Retroviridae family, show interesting properties for CF gene therapy, since they integrate into the host genome and allow long-lasting gene expression. Proof-of-principle that LV vectors can transduce the airway epithelium and correct the basic electrophysiological defect in CF mice has been given. Initial data also demonstrate that LV vectors can be repeatedly administered to the lung and do not give rise to a gross inflammatory process, although they can elicit a T cell-mediated response to the transgene. Future studies will clarify the efficacy and safety profile of LV vectors in new complex animal models with CF, such as ferrets and pigs. PMID:21994643

  17. [Development of gene therapy in major brain diseases].

    PubMed

    Fan, Li; Jiang, Xin-guo

    2010-09-01

    In recent years, the development of molecular biology and medicine has prompted the research of gene therapy for brain diseases. In this review, we summarized the current gene therapy approaches of major brain diseases. Against the pathogenesis of major brain diseases, including brain tumors, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and cerebrovascular disorders, there are several effective gene therapy strategies. It is no doubt that, gene therapy, as a novel treatment, is of great significance for understanding the causes, as well as comprehensive treatment for brain diseases.

  18. Gene therapy takes a cue from HAART: combinatorial antiviral therapeutics reach the clinic.

    PubMed

    Shah, Priya S; Schaffer, David V

    2010-06-16

    For the first time, scientists have tested a combination of three RNA-based gene therapies, delivered via a lentiviral vector, to target HIV in patients. This study not only demonstrates the safety and long-term viability of this approach, but also highlights areas in which focused improvements in gene therapy strategies may provide the most impact in increasingly translating promise in the laboratory to efficacy in the clinic.

  19. [The gene therapy for a patient with ADA deficiency; report of the first gene therapy trial in Japan].

    PubMed

    Ariga, T; Kawamura, N; Sakiyama, Y

    1997-06-01

    Since the first gene therapy clinical trial for an ADA deficient patient was performed in September 1990, 10 ADA deficient patients have been enrolled in gene therapy clinical trial. We have been performing the first gene therapy trial in Japan for a 5 year boy with ADA deficiency since August 1995. Activated T cells from the patient's peripheral mononuclear cells were transduced by a retrovirus vector, LASN, which contained cDNA of human ADA gene, and re-infused to him intravenously after 7-11 days. We have already performed 10 cycles of the therapy for the patient. Here, we report the successful results of the gene therapy with laboratory and clinical evaluation. Furthermore, we overview the results of gene therapy for ADA deficient patients which were recently reported from 4 other groups.

  20. Progress and prospects: hurdles to cardiovascular gene therapy clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Hedman, M; Hartikainen, J; Ylä-Herttuala, S

    2011-08-01

    Several gene therapy approaches have been designed for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. A positive finding is that the safety of cardiovascular gene therapy has been excellent even in long-term follow-up. However, several hurdles to this field are still present. A major disappointing feature of the trials is that while preclinical and uncontrolled phase-I gene therapy trials have been positive, none of the randomized controlled phase-II/III cardiovascular gene therapy trials have shown clinically relevant positive effects. Low gene transfer efficiency seems to be associated with several trials. A sophisticated efficient delivery method for cardiovascular applications is still lacking and only low concentrations of the gene product are produced in the target tissues. Only a few gene therapy vectors can be produced in large scale. In addition, inflammatory reactions against vectors and inability to regulate gene expression are still present. Furthermore, a strong placebo effect is affecting the results in gene therapy trials, and long-term trials have become more difficult to conduct because of the multiplicity of therapies applied simultaneously on the patients. This review summarizes advances and obstacles of current cardiovascular clinical gene therapy trials.

  1. Prospectives for Gene Therapy of Retinal Degenerations

    PubMed Central

    Thumann, Gabriele

    2012-01-01

    Retinal degenerations encompass a large number of diseases in which the retina and associated retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells progressively degenerate leading to severe visual disorders or blindness. Retinal degenerations can be divided into two groups, a group in which the defect has been linked to a specific gene and a second group that has a complex etiology that includes environmental and genetic influences. The first group encompasses a number of relatively rare diseases with the most prevalent being Retinitis pigmentosa that affects approximately 1 million individuals worldwide. Attempts have been made to correct the defective gene by transfecting the appropriate cells with the wild-type gene and while these attempts have been successful in animal models, human gene therapy for these inherited retinal degenerations has only begun recently and the results are promising. To the second group belong glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and diabetic retinopathy (DR). These retinal degenerations have a genetic component since they occur more often in families with affected probands but they are also linked to environmental factors, specifically elevated intraocular pressure, age and high blood sugar levels respectively. The economic and medical impact of these three diseases can be assessed by the number of individuals affected; AMD affects over 30 million, DR over 40 million and glaucoma over 65 million individuals worldwide. The basic defect in these diseases appears to be the relative lack of a neurogenic environment; the neovascularization that often accompanies these diseases has suggested that a decrease in pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), at least in part, may be responsible for the neurodegeneration since PEDF is not only an effective neurogenic and neuroprotective agent but also a potent inhibitor of neovascularization. In the last few years inhibitors of vascularization, especially antibodies against vascular endothelial cell

  2. Improved animal models for testing gene therapy for atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Du, Liang; Zhang, Jingwan; De Meyer, Guido R Y; Flynn, Rowan; Dichek, David A

    2014-04-01

    Gene therapy delivered to the blood vessel wall could augment current therapies for atherosclerosis, including systemic drug therapy and stenting. However, identification of clinically useful vectors and effective therapeutic transgenes remains at the preclinical stage. Identification of effective vectors and transgenes would be accelerated by availability of animal models that allow practical and expeditious testing of vessel-wall-directed gene therapy. Such models would include humanlike lesions that develop rapidly in vessels that are amenable to efficient gene delivery. Moreover, because human atherosclerosis develops in normal vessels, gene therapy that prevents atherosclerosis is most logically tested in relatively normal arteries. Similarly, gene therapy that causes atherosclerosis regression requires gene delivery to an existing lesion. Here we report development of three new rabbit models for testing vessel-wall-directed gene therapy that either prevents or reverses atherosclerosis. Carotid artery intimal lesions in these new models develop within 2-7 months after initiation of a high-fat diet and are 20-80 times larger than lesions in a model we described previously. Individual models allow generation of lesions that are relatively rich in either macrophages or smooth muscle cells, permitting testing of gene therapy strategies targeted at either cell type. Two of the models include gene delivery to essentially normal arteries and will be useful for identifying strategies that prevent lesion development. The third model generates lesions rapidly in vector-naïve animals and can be used for testing gene therapy that promotes lesion regression. These models are optimized for testing helper-dependent adenovirus (HDAd)-mediated gene therapy; however, they could be easily adapted for testing of other vectors or of different types of molecular therapies, delivered directly to the blood vessel wall. Our data also supports the promise of HDAd to deliver long

  3. Nanoparticles for cancer gene therapy: Recent advances, challenges, and strategies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kui; Kievit, Forrest M; Zhang, Miqin

    2016-12-01

    Compared to conventional treatments, gene therapy offers a variety of advantages for cancer treatment including high potency and specificity, low off-target toxicity, and delivery of multiple genes that concurrently target cancer tumorigenesis, recurrence, and drug resistance. In the past decades, gene therapy has undergone remarkable progress, and is now poised to become a first line therapy for cancer. Among various gene delivery systems, nanoparticles have attracted much attention because of their desirable characteristics including low toxicity profiles, well-controlled and high gene delivery efficiency, and multi-functionalities. This review provides an overview on gene therapeutics and gene delivery technologies, and highlight recent advances, challenges and insights into the design and the utility of nanoparticles in gene therapy for cancer treatment.

  4. Sui generis: gene therapy and delivery systems for the treatment of glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Kane, J Robert; Miska, Jason; Young, Jacob S; Kanojia, Deepak; Kim, Julius W; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2015-03-01

    Gene therapy offers a multidimensional set of approaches intended to treat and cure glioblastoma (GBM), in combination with the existing standard-of-care treatment (surgery and chemoradiotherapy), by capitalizing on the ability to deliver genes directly to the site of neoplasia to yield antitumoral effects. Four types of gene therapy are currently being investigated for their potential use in treating GBM: (i) suicide gene therapy, which induces the localized generation of cytotoxic compounds; (ii) immunomodulatory gene therapy, which induces or augments an enhanced antitumoral immune response; (iii) tumor-suppressor gene therapy, which induces apoptosis in cancer cells; and (iv) oncolytic virotherapy, which causes the lysis of tumor cells. The delivery of genes to the tumor site is made possible by means of viral and nonviral vectors for direct delivery of therapeutic gene(s), tumor-tropic cell carriers expressing therapeutic gene(s), and "intelligent" carriers designed to increase delivery, specificity, and tumoral toxicity against GBM. These vehicles are used to carry genetic material to the site of pathology, with the expectation that they can provide specific tropism to the desired site while limiting interaction with noncancerous tissue. Encouraging preclinical results using gene therapies for GBM have led to a series of human clinical trials. Although there is limited evidence of a therapeutic benefit to date, a number of clinical trials have convincingly established that different types of gene therapies delivered by various methods appear to be safe. Due to the flexibility of specialized carriers and genetic material, the technology for generating new and more effective therapies already exists.

  5. Revertant mosaicism in skin: natural gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lai-Cheong, Joey E.; McGrath, John A.; Uitto, Jouni

    2011-01-01

    Revertant mosaicism is a naturally occurring phenomenon involving spontaneous correction of a pathogenic mutation in a somatic cell. Recent studies suggest that it is not a rare event and that it could be clinically relevant to phenotypic expression and patient treatment. Indeed, revertant cell therapy represents a potential “natural gene therapy” because in vivo reversion obviates the need for further genetic correction. Revertant mosaicism has been observed in several inherited conditions, including epidermolysis bullosa, a heterogeneous group of blistering skin disorders. These diseases provide a useful model for studying revertant mosaicism because of the visual and accessible nature of skin. This overview highlights the latest developments in revertant mosaicism and the translational implications germane to heritable skin disorders. PMID:21195026

  6. Engineering AAV receptor footprints for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Madigan, Victoria J; Asokan, Aravind

    2016-06-01

    Adeno-associated viruses (AAV) are currently at the forefront of human gene therapy clinical trials as recombinant vectors. Significant progress has been made in elucidating the structure, biology and tropisms of different naturally occurring AAV isolates in the past decade. In particular, a spectrum of AAV capsid interactions with host receptors have been identified and characterized. These studies have enabled a better understanding of key determinants of AAV cell recognition and entry in different hosts. This knowledge is now being applied toward engineering new, lab-derived AAV capsids with favorable transduction profiles. The current review conveys a structural perspective of capsid-glycan interactions and provides a roadmap for generating synthetic strains by engineering AAV receptor footprints.

  7. Genetically engineering adenoviral vectors for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Coughlan, Lynda

    2014-01-01

    Adenoviral (Ad) vectors are commonly used for various gene therapy applications. Significant advances in the genetic engineering of Ad vectors in recent years has highlighted their potential for the treatment of metastatic disease. There are several methods to genetically modify the Ad genome to incorporate retargeting peptides which will redirect the natural tropism of the viruses, including homologous recombination in bacteria or yeast. However, homologous recombination in yeast is highly efficient and can be achieved without the need for extensive cloning strategies. In addition, the method does not rely on the presence of unique restriction sites within the Ad genome and the reagents required for this method are widely available and inexpensive. Large plasmids containing the entire adenoviral genome (~36 kbp) can be modified within Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast and genomes easily rescued in Escherichia coli hosts for analysis or amplification. A method for two-step homologous recombination in yeast is described in this chapter.

  8. Gastrointestinal Toxicities With Combined Antiangiogenic and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pollom, Erqi L.; Deng, Lei; Pai, Reetesh K.; Brown, J. Martin; Giaccia, Amato; Loo, Billy W.; Shultz, David B.; Le, Quynh Thu; Koong, Albert C.; Chang, Daniel T.

    2015-07-01

    Combining the latest targeted biologic agents with the most advanced radiation technologies has been an exciting development in the treatment of cancer patients. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is an ablative radiation approach that has become established for the treatment of a variety of malignancies, and it has been increasingly used in combination with biologic agents, including those targeting angiogenesis-specific pathways. Multiple reports have emerged describing unanticipated toxicities arising from the combination of SBRT and angiogenesis-targeting agents, particularly of late luminal gastrointestinal toxicities. In this review, we summarize the literature describing these toxicities, explore the biological mechanism of action of toxicity with the combined use of antiangiogenic therapies, and discuss areas of future research, so that this combination of treatment modalities can continue to be used in broader clinical contexts.

  9. The companions: regulatory T cells and gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Eghtesad, Saman; Morel, Penelope A; Clemens, Paula R

    2009-01-01

    Undesired immunological responses to products of therapeutic gene replacement have been obstacles to successful gene therapy. Understanding such responses of the host immune system to achieve immunological tolerance to a transferred gene product is therefore crucial. In this article, we review relevant studies of immunological responses to gene replacement therapy, the role of immunological tolerance mediated by regulatory T cells in down-regulating the unwanted immune responses, and the interrelationship of the two topics. PMID:19368560

  10. The role of combination therapy in the treatment of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ruilope, L M; Coca, A

    1998-01-01

    Antihypertensive therapy is indicated for reducing the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality that accompanies arterial hypertension. Usually, pharmacological treatment is started as monotherapy, which, if unsuccessful, is followed by sequential monotherapy, or by combination therapy. Recent data indicate that combination therapy is required in more than 50% of the hypertensive population when the goal is to reduce blood pressure to below 140/90 mm Hg. The choice and doses of drugs used in combination therapy should be such that their synergistic effect on blood pressure is maximized, the tolerability of the drugs is maintained and side-effects are minimized. The combination of a dihydropyridine calcium antagonist with a beta-blocker or an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor is one of the most commonly used combination therapies. Two randomized, double-blind, parallel-group studies compared the antihypertensive effects of the dihydropyridine, barnidipine, with the beta-blocker, atenolol (n = 247), and the ACE inhibitor, enalapril (n = 155). The efficacy and tolerability of barnidipine in combination with either atenolol or enalapril was also investigated. Monotherapy with barnidipine was as effective in reducing blood pressure as monotherapy with either atenolol or enalapril. Combining barnidipine with either atenolol or enalapril reduced blood pressure further, and significantly increased the percentage of patients attaining the required reduction in blood pressure. When patients whose blood pressure was not adequately controlled by enalapril monotherapy were switched to barnidipine monotherapy, the majority then achieved the desired reduction in blood pressure. These results indicate that if barnidipine monotherapy fails to lower blood pressure to the desired values, its combination with either a beta-blocker or an ACE inhibitor is effective and well tolerated.

  11. New approaches to gene and cell therapy for hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Ohmori, T; Mizukami, H; Ozawa, K; Sakata, Y; Nishimura, S

    2015-06-01

    Hemophilia is considered suitable for gene therapy because it is caused by a single gene abnormality, and therapeutic coagulation factor levels may vary across a broad range. Recent success of hemophilia B gene therapy with an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector in a clinical trial showed the real prospect that, through gene therapy, a cure for hemophilia may become a reality. However, AAV-mediated gene therapy is not applicable to patients with hemophilia A at present, and neutralizing antibodies against AAV reduce the efficacy of AAV-mediated strategies. Because patients that benefit from AAV treatment (hemophilia B without neutralizing antibodies) are estimated to represent only 15% of total patients with hemophilia, the development of basic technologies for hemophilia A and those that result in higher therapeutic effects are critical. In this review, we present an outline of gene therapy methods for hemophilia, including the transition of technical developments thus far and our novel techniques.

  12. [Gene replacement therapy in achromatopsia type 2].

    PubMed

    Mühlfriedel, R; Tanimoto, N; Seeliger, M W

    2014-03-01

    Achromatopsia is an autosomal recessive inherited retinal disease caused by a complete loss of cone photoreceptor function. About 80 % of achromatopsia patients show mutations in the alpha or beta subunit (A3 and B3) of the cGMP controlled cation channel CNG (cyclic nucleotide-gated channel) of cone photoreceptors. Homologous to the human disease, CNGA3 deficient mice reveal a loss of cone specific functionality leading to degeneration of affected cone photoreceptors. The Institute for Ophthalmic Research in Tübingen has now succeeded in curing achromatopsia ACHM2 in an animal model. In this article, we explain the recombinant adeno-associated virus-based approach in detail. Furthermore, applied non-invasive diagnostic techniques for quality and success control, ERG, SLO and OCT, are described. The success of the therapy is indicated by a restored cone photoreceptor function as well as the neuronal processing of retinal signals resulting in a specific, cone-mediated behaviour. The outstanding results derived from the animal model are the starting point for the first human translation of a gene therapy for achromatopsia in Germany.

  13. Study Of Laser Hyperthermia, Photodynamic Therapy And The Combined Therapy For Human Pancreatic Cancer Cell Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajiri, Hisao

    1988-06-01

    I have conducted laser hyperthermia, photodynamic therapy (PDT) and the combined therapy of laser hyperthermia and PDT for solid tumor of human pancreatic carcinoma transplanted to nude mice. Following experimental therapies have begun 5-6 weeks after transplantation. 1) Laser hyperthermia: The Frosted Probe was punctured under controlling temperature near the margin of a tumor at 42-43C with 3W for 10 minutes. This therapy caused 70-80% necrosis of the total area of pancreatic tumors after 7 days of the treatment. 2) PDT: Argon dye laser was irradiated into a tumor with 300-400mW in 72 hours after hematoporphyrine derivative (HpD) in a dose of 3mg/kg was intravenously injected. Histological changes detected 7 days after the therapy were coagulated necrosis and fibrosis in the tissues ranging from 30-50% of the area. 3) The combined therapy of laser hyperthermia and PDT: A new quartz fiber, which was originally designed to deliver both Nd:YAG laser and argon dye laser simultaneously, was used. Conditions of laser hyperthermia and PDT were same as above. Necrosis amounted 100% of the total area in tumors of 3 out of 6 mice histopathologically 7 days after the therapy. As for the remaining 3 mice, almost all tissues changed into necrosis. Effects of thermal and laser energy to the tumor tissues were also studied by in vitro experiments under the same conditions. The most remarkable decrease in viability was recognized in the combined therapy of laser hyperthermia and PDT among three types of therapies in vitro. The combined therapy of laser hyperthermia and PDT has proven to be highly effective by in vivo and in vitro study using human pancreatic cancer cell line. It will thus be possible to adopt the therapy, with the use of the new quartz fiber, as one of the useful endoscopic laser therapies.

  14. Gene Therapy and Gene Editing for the Corneal Dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Williams, Keryn A; Irani, Yazad D

    2016-01-01

    Despite ever-increasing understanding of the genetic underpinnings of many corneal dystrophies, gene therapy designed to ameliorate disease has not yet been reported in any human patient. In this review, we explore the likely reasons for this apparent failure of translation. We identify the requirements for success: the genetic defect involved must have been identified and mapped, vision in the affected patient must be significantly impaired or likely to be impaired, no better or equivalently effective treatment must be available, the treatment must be capable of modulating corneal pathology, and delivery of the construct to the appropriate cell must be practicable. We consider which of the corneal dystrophies might be amenable to treatment by genetic manipulations, summarize existing therapeutic options for treatment, and explore gene editing using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat/Cas and other similar transformative technologies as the way of the future. We then summarize recent laboratory-based advances in gene delivery and the development of in vitro and in vivo models of the corneal dystrophies. Finally, we review recent experimental work that has increased our knowledge of the pathobiology of these conditions.

  15. Current genome editing tools in gene therapy: new approaches to treat cancer.

    PubMed

    Shuvalov, Oleg; Petukhov, Alexey; Daks, Alexandra; Fedorova, Olga; Ermakov, Alexander; Melino, Gerry; Barlev, Nickolai A

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy suggests a promising approach to treat genetic diseases by applying genes as pharmaceuticals. Cancer is a complex disease, which strongly depends on a particular genetic make-up and hence can be treated with gene therapy. From about 2,000 clinical trials carried out so far, more than 60% were cancer targeted. Development of precise and effective gene therapy approaches is intimately connected with achievements in the molecular biology techniques. The field of gene therapy was recently revolutionized by the introduction of "programmable" nucleases, including ZFNs, TALENs, and CRISPR, which target specific genomic loci with high efficacy and precision. Furthermore, when combined with DNA transposons for the delivery purposes into cells, these programmable nucleases represent a promising alternative to the conventional viral-mediated gene delivery. In addition to "programmable" nucleases, a new class of TALE- and CRISPR-based "artificial transcription effectors" has been developed to mediate precise regulation of specific genes. In sum, these new molecular tools may be used in a wide plethora of gene therapy strategies. This review highlights the current status of novel genome editing tools and discusses their suitability and perspectives in respect to cancer gene therapy studies.

  16. The Application of Nanoparticles in Gene Therapy and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    HERRANZ, FERNANDO; ALMARZA, ELENA; RODRÍGUEZ, IGNACIO; SALINAS, BEATRIZ; ROSELL, YAMILKA; DESCO, MANUEL; BULTE, JEFF W.; RUIZ-CABELLO, JESÚS

    2012-01-01

    The combination of nanoparticles, gene therapy, and medical imaging has given rise to a new field known as gene theranostics, in which a nanobioconjugate is used to diagnose and treat the disease. The process generally involves binding between a vector carrying the genetic information and a nanoparticle, which provides the signal for imaging. The synthesis of this probe generates a synergic effect, enhancing the efficiency of gene transduction and imaging contrast. We discuss the latest approaches in the synthesis of nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging, gene therapy strategies, and their conjugation and in vivo application. PMID:21484943

  17. Drug Delivery Systems and Combination Therapy by Using Vinca Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chun-Ting; Huang, Yen-Wei; Yang, Chih-Hui; Huang, Keng-Shiang

    2015-01-01

    Developing new methods for chemotherapy drug delivery has become a topic of great concern. Vinca alkaloids are among the most widely used chemotherapy reagents for tumor therapy; however, their side effects are particularly problematic for many medical doctors. To reduce the toxicity and enhance the therapeutic efficiency of vinca alkaloids, many researchers have developed strategies such as using liposome-entrapped drugs, chemical- or peptide-modified drugs, polymeric packaging drugs, and chemotherapy drug combinations. This review mainly focuses on the development of a vinca alkaloid drug delivery system and the combination therapy. Five vinca alkaloids (eg, vincristine, vinblastine, vinorelbine, vindesine, and vinflunine) are reviewed. PMID:25877096

  18. Combination Therapy for Rheumatoid Arthritis in the Era of Biologicals

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Early, aggressive disease management is critical for halting disease progression and joint destruction in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Combination therapy with at least two disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, such as methotrexate (MTX), sulfasalazine, or hydroxychloroquine, is often more effective than monotherapy in reducing disease activity. Biologic therapies represent more effective and tolerable treatment options that, when combined with MTX, have been shown to dramatically reduce inflammation, inhibit radiographic progression, and induce remission. Although several types of treatment strategies are used in clinical practice, the most aggressive approaches that target early disease have shown the most promise in reversing disease progression and reducing disease-related costs. PMID:18751844

  19. Gene replacement therapy for retinal CNG channelopathies.

    PubMed

    Schön, Christian; Biel, Martin; Michalakis, Stylianos

    2013-10-01

    Visual phototransduction relies on the function of cyclic nucleotide-gated channels in the rod and cone photoreceptor outer segment plasma membranes. The role of these ion channels is to translate light-triggered changes in the second messenger cyclic guanosine 3'-5'-monophosphate levels into an electrical signal that is further processed within the retinal network and then sent to higher visual centers. Rod and cone photoreceptors express distinct CNG channels. The rod photoreceptor CNG channel is composed of one CNGB1 and three CNGA1 subunits, whereas the cone channel is formed by one CNGB3 and three CNGA3 subunits. Mutations in any of these channel subunits result in severe and currently untreatable retinal degenerative diseases like retinitis pigmentosa or achromatopsia. In this review, we provide an overview of the human diseases and relevant animal models of CNG channelopathies. Furthermore, we summarize recent results from preclinical gene therapy studies using adeno-associated viral vectors and discuss the efficacy and translational potential of these gene therapeutic approaches.

  20. Development of mitochondrial gene replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shaharyar M; Bennett, James P

    2004-08-01

    Many "classic" mitochondrial diseases have been described that arise from single homoplasmic mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). These diseases typically affect nonmitotic tissues (brain, retina, muscle), present with variable phenotypes, can appear sporadically, and are untreatable. Evolving evidence implicates mtDNA abnormalities in diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and type II diabetes, but specific causal mutations for these conditions remain to be defined. Understanding the mtDNA genotype-phenotype relationships and developing specific treatment for mtDNA-based diseases is hampered by inability to manipulate the mitochondrial genome. We present a novel protein transduction technology ("protofection") that allows insertion and expression of the human mitochondrial genome into mitochondria of living cells. With protofection, the mitochondrial genotype can be altered, or exogenous genes can be introduced to be expressed and either retained in mitochondria or be directed to other organelles. Protofection also delivers mtDNA in vivo, opening the way to rational development of mitochondrial gene replacement therapy of mtDNA-based diseases.

  1. A Double Selection Approach to Achieve Specific Expression of Toxin Genes for Ovarian Cancer Gene Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    specific expression of toxin genes for ovarian cancer gene therapy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: David T. Curiel, M.D., Ph.D. Gene Siegal...A double selection approach to achieve specific expression of toxin genes for ovarian cancer gene therapy 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-05-1-0035...cancer. This system should result in highly efficient and specific expression of toxin encoding genes in tumor cells, enabling these cells to be

  2. Viability of long-term gene therapy in the cochlea.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Patrick J; Wise, Andrew K; Flynn, Brianna O; Nayagam, Bryony A; Richardson, Rachael T

    2014-04-22

    Gene therapy has been investigated as a way to introduce a variety of genes to treat neurological disorders. An important clinical consideration is its long-term effectiveness. This research aims to study the long-term expression and effectiveness of gene therapy in promoting spiral ganglion neuron survival after deafness. Adenoviral vectors modified to express brain derived neurotrophic factor or neurotrophin-3 were unilaterally injected into the guinea pig cochlea one week post ototoxic deafening. After six months, persistence of gene expression and significantly greater neuronal survival in neurotrophin-treated cochleae compared to the contralateral cochleae were observed. The long-term gene expression observed indicates that gene therapy is potentially viable; however the degeneration of the transduced cells as a result of the original ototoxic insult may limit clinical effectiveness. With further research aimed at transducing stable cochlear cells, gene therapy may be an efficacious way to introduce neurotrophins to promote neuronal survival after hearing loss.

  3. Gene therapy of the brain: the trans-vascular approach.

    PubMed

    Schlachetzki, Felix; Zhang, Yun; Boado, Ruben J; Pardridge, William M

    2004-04-27

    Many chronic neurologic diseases do not respond to small molecule therapeutics, and have no effective long-term therapy. Gene therapy offers the promise of an effective cure for both genetic and acquired brain disease. However, the limiting problem in brain gene therapy is delivery to brain followed by regulation of the expression of the transgene. Present day gene vectors do not cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Consequently, brain gene therapy requires craniotomy and the local injection of a viral gene vector. However, there are few brain disorders that can be effectively treated with local injection. Most applications of gene therapy require global expression in the brain of the exogenous gene, and this can only be achieved with a noninvasive delivery through the BBB--the trans-vascular route to brain. An additional consideration is the potential toxicity of all viral and nonviral approaches, which may either integrate into the host genome and cause insertional mutagenesis or cause inflammation in the brain. Nonviral, noninvasive gene therapy of the brain is now possible with the development of a new approach to targeting therapeutic genes to the brain following an IV administration. This approach utilizes genetically engineered molecular Trojan horses, which ferry the gene across the BBB and into neurons. Global and reversible expression of therapeutic genes in the human brain without surgery and without viral vectors is now possible.

  4. Development of a Nanotechnology Platform for Prostate Cancer Gene Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    metastatic and characterized to be CAR¯/HER2¯. This means that they are not a good candidate for adenoviral gene therapy or Herceptin anti-HER2...and can potentially be used in the treatment of the patients that do not respond to adenoviral gene therapy or Herceptin immunotherapy.     5

  5. Prospects for Gene Therapy in the Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rattazzi, Mario C.; LaFauci, Giuseppe; Brown, W. Ted

    2004-01-01

    Gene therapy is unarguably the definitive way to treat, and possibly cure, genetic diseases. A straightforward concept in theory, in practice it has proven difficult to realize, even when directed to easily accessed somatic cell systems. Gene therapy for diseases in which the central nervous system (CNS) is the target organ presents even greater…

  6. Regulatory considerations for translating gene therapy: a European Union perspective.

    PubMed

    Galli, Maria Cristina

    2009-11-11

    A preclinical study on a gene therapy approach for treatment of the severe muscle weakness associated with a variety of neuromuscular disorders provides a forum to discuss the translational challenges of gene therapy from a regulatory point of view. In this Perspective, the findings are considered from the view of European regulatory requirements for first clinical use.

  7. Gene therapy: a possible future standard for HIV care.

    PubMed

    Abou-El-Enein, Mohamed; Bauer, Gerhard; Reinke, Petra

    2015-07-01

    Despite undeniable accomplishments in developing cell and gene therapeutic strategies to combat HIV infection, key social, economic, and policy-related challenges still need to be overcome for any future commercialization efforts of these novel therapies to be successful. Here, we address these challenges and structure a framework for eradicating HIV/AIDS using gene therapy.

  8. Gene therapy in head and neck cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Chisholm, E; Bapat, U; Chisholm, C; Alusi, G; Vassaux, G

    2007-01-01

    Gene therapy for cancer is a rapidly evolving field with head and neck squamous cell cancer being one of the more frequently targeted cancer types. The number of clinical trials in the UK is growing and there is already a commercially available agent in China. Various gene therapy strategies along with delivery mechanisms for targeting head and neck cancer are reviewed. PMID:18057169

  9. Newer approaches in topical combination therapy for acne.

    PubMed

    Fu, Lisa W; Vender, Ronald B

    2011-10-01

    Acne vulgaris is a common chronic inflammatory cutaneous disease involving the pilosebaceous unit. Its pathophysiology is multifactorial and complex, including obstruction of the pilosebaceous unit due to increased sebum production, abnormal keratinization, proliferation of Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes), and inflammation. Topical agents are the most commonly used therapy for acne. First generation topicals mainly consist of single agent retinoids, benzoyl peroxide (BPO) and antibacterials that target comedones, P. acnes, and inflammation. Novel topical therapies include combination products with advanced vehicle formulations that target multiple acne pathophysiologies and offer simplified treatment regimes. For example, the combination of clindamycin and tretinoin in a unique vehicle formulation allows for progressive follicle penetration and decreased irritation, resulting in increased efficacy. Furthermore, adapalene or clindamycin with BPO combinations target comedones, inflammation, and P. acnes synergistically. These newer combination products have the potential to increase both efficacy and patient adherence when compared with single agent treatment.

  10. Combination DMARD therapy including corticosteroids in early rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Möttönen, T T; Hannonen, P J; Boers, M

    1999-01-01

    A number of reports indicating the growing acceptance of simultaneous therapy with multiple disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs), as well as the use of more aggressive treatment measures in the early phases of disease to combat rheumatoid arthritis (RA), have appeared during the last decade. However, only a few randomized controlled clinical trials have been conducted on the use of DMARD combinations in early RA. We review these trials in this article. In two separate one-year studies combination therapy with sulphasalazine (SSZ) and methotrexate (MTX) seemed to offer no benefits compared to either drug used as monotherapy. On the other hand, the DMARD combinations so far proven to be superior to single DMARDs have initially also included a corticosteroid component. In the COBRA study (Combinatietherapie Bij Reumatoide Artritis) the combination of SSZ (2 gm/day), MTX (7.5 mg/week for 40 weeks), and prednisolone (Prd) (initially 60 mg/day, tapered in 6 weekly steps to 7.5 mg/day and stopped after 28 weeks) compared to SSZ alone (2 gm/day) resulted in significantly better clinical outcomes at week 28. Although the difference in clinical response between the treatment arms was lost at week 58, the progression of joint damage remained statistically significantly slower at week 80 in the patients initially assigned to the combination therapy. Furthermore, in the FIN-RACo trial (Finnish Rheumatoid Arthritis Combination Therapy Trial), therapy using a "tailored-steps" strategy with SSZ (1-2 gm/day), MTX (7.5-1.5 mg/week), hydroxychloroquine (300 mg/day), and Prd (up to 10 mg/day) yielded a significantly increased remission rate and less peripheral joint damage at two years than the single DMARD treatment strategy (initially SSZ 2 gm/day), with or without Prd. Adverse effects in both study arms were comparable. Two additional preliminary reports (in abstract form) suggest that intensive local therapy in the form of intra-articular injections added to single or

  11. Combination antibiotic therapy for community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Jesus; Rello, Jordi

    2011-11-23

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common and potentially serious illness that is associated with morbidity and mortality. Although medical care has improved during the past decades, it is still potentially lethal. Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most frequent microorganism isolated. Treatment includes mandatory antibiotic therapy and organ support as needed. There are several antibiotic therapy regimens that include β-lactams or macrolides or fluoroquinolones alone or in combination. Combination antibiotic therapy achieves a better outcome compared with monotherapy and it should be given in the following subset of patients with CAP: outpatients with comorbidities and previous antibiotic therapy, nursing home patients with CAP, hospitalized patients with severe CAP, bacteremic pneumococcal CAP, presence of shock, and necessity of mechanical ventilation. Better outcome is associated with combination therapy that includes a macrolide for wide coverage of atypical pneumonia, polymicrobial pneumonia, or resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae. Macrolides have shown different properties other than antimicrobial activity, such as anti-inflammatory properties. Although this evidence comes from observational, most of them retrospective and nonblinded studies, the findings are consistent. Ideally, a prospective, multicenter, randomized trial should be performed to confirm these findings.

  12. A snapshot of gene therapy in Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Linden, Rafael; Matte, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy attempts the insertion and expression of exogenous genetic material in cells for therapeutic purposes. Conceived in the 1960s, gene therapy reached its first clinical trial at the end of the 1980s and by December 2013 around 600 genuine open clinical trials of gene therapy were registered at NIH Clinical Trials Database. Here, we summarize the current efforts towards the development of gene therapy in Latin America. Our survey shows that the number of scientists involved in the development of gene therapy and DNA vaccines in Latin America is still very low. Higher levels of investment in this technology are necessary to boost the advancement of innovation and intellectual property in this field in a way that would ease both the social and financial burden of various medical conditions in Latin America. PMID:24764763

  13. A snapshot of gene therapy in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Linden, Rafael; Matte, Ursula

    2014-03-01

    Gene therapy attempts the insertion and expression of exogenous genetic material in cells for therapeutic purposes. Conceived in the 1960s, gene therapy reached its first clinical trial at the end of the 1980s and by December 2013 around 600 genuine open clinical trials of gene therapy were registered at NIH Clinical Trials Database. Here, we summarize the current efforts towards the development of gene therapy in Latin America. Our survey shows that the number of scientists involved in the development of gene therapy and DNA vaccines in Latin America is still very low. Higher levels of investment in this technology are necessary to boost the advancement of innovation and intellectual property in this field in a way that would ease both the social and financial burden of various medical conditions in Latin America.

  14. Cardiac gene therapy: Recent advances and future directions.

    PubMed

    Mason, Daniel; Chen, Yu-Zhe; Krishnan, Harini Venkata; Sant, Shilpa

    2015-10-10

    Gene therapy has the potential to serve as an adaptable platform technology for treating various diseases. Cardiovascular disease is a major cause of mortality in the developed world and genetic modification is steadily becoming a more plausible method to repair and regenerate heart tissue. Recently, new gene targets to treat cardiovascular disease have been identified and developed into therapies that have shown promise in animal models. Some of these therapies have advanced to clinical testing. Despite these recent successes, several barriers must be overcome for gene therapy to become a widely used treatment of cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we evaluate specific genetic targets that can be exploited to treat cardiovascular diseases, list the important delivery barriers for the gene carriers, assess the most promising methods of delivering the genetic information, and discuss the current status of clinical trials involving gene therapies targeted to the heart.

  15. Combination therapy in hypertension: an Asia-Pacific consensus viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Abdul Rahman, Abdul Rashid; Reyes, Eugenio B; Sritara, Piyamitr; Pancholia, Arvind; Van Phuoc, Dang; Tomlinson, Brian

    2015-05-01

    Hypertension incurs a significant healthcare burden in Asia-Pacific countries, which have suboptimal rates of blood pressure (BP) treatment and control. A consensus meeting of hypertension experts from the Asia-Pacific region convened in Hanoi, Vietnam, in April 2013. The principal objectives were to discuss the growing problem of hypertension in the Asia-Pacific region, and to develop consensus recommendations to promote standards of care across the region. A particular focus was recommendations for combination therapy, since it is known that most patients with hypertension will require two or more antihypertensive drugs to achieve BP control, and also that combinations of drugs with complementary mechanisms of action achieve BP targets more effectively than monotherapy. The expert panel reviewed guidelines for hypertension management from the USA and Europe, as well as individual Asia-Pacific countries, and devised a treatment matrix/guide, in which they propose the preferred combination therapy regimens for patients with hypertension, both with and without compelling indications. This report summarizes key recommendations from the group, including recommended antihypertensive combinations for specific patient populations. These strategies generally entail initiating therapy with free drug combinations, starting with the lowest available dosage, followed by treatment with single-pill combinations once the BP target has been achieved. A single reference for the whole Asia-Pacific region may contribute to increased consistency of treatment and greater proportions of patients achieving BP control, and hence reducing hypertension-related morbidity and mortality.

  16. [Local combined therapy of vaginal infections by nifuratel-nistatin].

    PubMed

    Jahić, Mahira; Balić, Adem; Nurkić, Mahmud; Dragović, Jasmina; Adzajlić, Amela; Habibović, Amra; Mesalić, Lejla; Zigić, Aza

    2010-02-01

    A test included 40 women in the reproductive age with clinical symptoms of vaginitis and microbiological examination. They were treated by combined therapy of vaginal tablets of nifuratel, 500 mg and nistatin 200 000 i. u. during six days, after which they underwent gynaecological reexamination and repeated microbiological examination of vaginal and cervical smears. An analiysis of vaginal secretion found bacterial flora in 34 smears (65%), fungus (Candida albicans) in 15 (24%) and Trichomonas vaginalis in 7 (11%). Local vaginal therapy in vaginitis caused by Trichomonas vaginalis was successfull in all 7 patients, vaginitis caused by Candida albicans was successly treated in 14 (93%) patients. Bacterial vaginitis was cured in 29 (71%) patients during this tharapy. Local vaginal combined therapy of nifuratel and nistatin is eficient in patients with vaginitis caused by fungi and Trichomonas vaginalis too.

  17. Advances in Gene Therapy for Diseases of the Eye

    PubMed Central

    Petit, Lolita; Khanna, Hemant; Punzo, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Over the last few years, huge progress has been made with regard to the understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases of the eye. Such knowledge has led to the development of gene therapy approaches to treat these devastating disorders. Challenges regarding the efficacy and efficiency of therapeutic gene delivery have driven the development of novel therapeutic approaches, which continue to evolve the field of ocular gene therapy. In this review article, we will discuss the evolution of preclinical and clinical strategies that have improved gene therapy in the eye, showing that treatment of vision loss has a bright future. PMID:27178388

  18. Combination therapy for malaria in Africa: hype or hope?

    PubMed Central

    Bloland, P. B.; Ettling, M.; Meek, S.

    2000-01-01

    The development of resistance to drugs poses one of the greatest threats to malaria control. In Africa, the efficacy of readily affordable antimalarial drugs is declining rapidly, while highly efficacious drugs tend to be too expensive. Cost-effective strategies are needed to extend the useful life spans of antimalarial drugs. Observations in South-East Asia on combination therapy with artemisinin derivatives and mefloquine indicate that the development of resistance to both components is slowed down. This suggests the possibility of a solution to the problem of drug resistance in Africa, where, however, there are major obstacles in the way of deploying combination therapy effectively. The rates of transmission are relatively high, a large proportion of asymptomatic infection occurs in semi-immune persons, the use of drugs is frequently inappropriate and ill-informed, there is a general lack of laboratory diagnoses, and public health systems in sub-Saharan Africa are generally weak. Furthermore, the cost of combination therapy is comparatively high. We review combination therapy as used in South-East Asia and outline the problems that have to be overcome in order to adopt it successfully in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:11196485

  19. Combination therapy for salvaging a failing, experimental skin flap.

    PubMed

    Shah, D K; Zhang, W X; Forman, D L; Prabhat, A; Urken, M L; Weinberg, H

    1996-08-01

    The failing free flap remains a major problem for the reconstructive surgeon. Many and varied pharmacologic agents have been utilized to reverse the effects of ischemia in these flaps. Treatments have been aimed at inhibiting presumed causative factors in the no-reflow phenomenon. Therapy has generally been single in nature and designed to affect only one of these presumed factors. In this study, several pharmacologic agents were utilized individually or in combination therapy as postischemic washouts, in an effort to attack the multiple causative factors in the no-reflow phenomenon and to improve flap survival in a rat abdominal skin flap model. The treatment agents included lactated Ringer's, superoxide dismutase, and urokinase, with each used independently as a postischemic perfusion washout. Combination therapy utilized an initial postischemic perfusion with urokinase, followed by a second perfusion washout with superoxide dismutase. After 18 hr of primary ischemia, there was increased flap survival in the animals undergoing perfusion washout with either superoxide dismutase alone or with combined urokinase and superoxide dismutase washouts, compared to all other treatments (p < 0.001). It was found that flaps undergoing combined urokinase and superoxide dismutase postischemic perfusion washouts demonstrated significantly improved survival after 20 hr of primary ischemia, compared to all other therapies (p < 0.05). By demonstrating improved survival when a thrombolytic agent is used in conjunction with an oxygen free radical scavenger, these findings may have implications in the treatment of clinically failing free flaps.

  20. Bortezomib induces caspase-dependent apoptosis in Hodgkin lymphoma cell lines and is associated with reduced c-FLIP expression: a gene expression profiling study with implications for potential combination therapies.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaoxian; Qiu, Wansong; Kung, Jiachun; Zhao, Xinyu; Peng, Xuejun; Yegappan, Mani; Yen-Lieberman, Belinda; Hsi, Eric D

    2008-02-01

    The Hodgkin cells and Reed-Sternberg cells (HRS) of classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL) are derived from germinal center B cells. The pathogenesis of CHL is unclear but constitutive activation of NFkappaB may contribute. Proteasome inhibition aimed at inhibiting NFkappaB has been shown to result in apoptosis in HRS cells. Here we investigated the effects of bortezomib, a proteasome inhibitor, in HRS cells with a combination of functional assays and gene expression profiling (GEP). Exposure of KMH2 and L428 cells to bortezomib resulted in inhibition of proliferation and induction of apoptosis. Gene expression analysis of KMH2 cells by oligonucleotide cDNA microarrays showed that a limited set of genes were differentially expressed involving several key cellular pathways including cell cycle and apoptosis. Among them, the caspase 8 inhibitor cFLIP was down-regulated and confirmed by Q-PCR. Given the evidence that cFLIP in HRS cells contribute to cells' insensitive to death receptor-mediated apoptosis, we combined bortezomib and TRAIL. This combination caused further down-regulation of cFLIP protein and increased apoptosis in CHL cells demonstrated by PARP p85 immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting. Such apoptotic effects were inhibited by caspase inhibitor z-VAD-FMK, confirming the pro-apoptotic effects of bortezomib and TRAIL are caspase-dependent. Bortezomib has no detectable effect on expression of TRAIL receptor DR4/DR5 in these two cell lines. Tissue microarray analysis of primary Hodgkin lymphomas displayed that 82% cases (95/116) expressed cFLIP in Reed-Sternberg cells. The discovery of apoptotic pathways that can be manipulated by proteasome inhibition provides rationale for the combination of bortezomib and agents such as TRAIL in CHL treatment.

  1. Human gene therapy: a brief overview of the genetic revolution.

    PubMed

    Misra, Sanjukta

    2013-02-01

    Advances in biotechnology have brought gene therapy to the forefront of medical research. The prelude to successful gene therapy i.e. the efficient transfer and expression of a variety of human gene into target cells has already been accomplished in several systems. Safe methods have been devised to do this, using several viral and no-viral vectors. Two main approaches emerged: in vivo modification and ex vivo modification. Retrovirus, adenovirus, adeno-associated virus are suitable for gene therapeutic approaches which are based on permanent expression of the therapeutic gene. Non-viral vectors are far less efficient than viral vectors, but they have advantages due to their low immunogenicity and their large capacity for therapeutic DNA. To improve the function of non-viral vectors, the addition of viral functions such as receptor mediated uptake and nuclear translocation of DNA may finally lead to the development of an artificial virus. Gene transfer protocols have been approved for human use in inherited diseases, cancers and acquired disorders. In 1990, the first successful clinical trial of gene therapy was initiated for adenosine deaminase deficiency. Since then, the number of clinical protocols initiated worldwide has increased exponentially. Although preliminary results of these trials are somewhat disappointing, but human gene therapy dreams of treating diseases by replacing or supplementing the product of defective or introducing novel therapeutic genes. So definitely human gene therapy is an effective addition to the arsenal of approaches to many human therapies in the 21st century.

  2. [Progress on study of achromatopsia and targeted gene therapy].

    PubMed

    Dai, Xu-feng; Pang, Ji-jing

    2012-08-01

    Achromatopsia is an early onset retinal dystrophy that causes severe visual impairment. To date, four genes have been found to be implicated in achromatopsia-associated mutations: guanine nucleotide-binding protein (GNAT2), cyclic nucleotide-gated channel alpha-3 (CNGA3), cyclic nucleotide-gated channel beta-3 (CNGB3) and phosphodiesterase 6C (PDE6C). Even with early onset, the slow progress and the good responses to gene therapy in animal models render achromatopsia a very attractive candidate for human gene therapy after the successful of the Phase I clinical trials of Leber's congenital amaurosis. With the development of molecular genetics and the therapeutic gene replacement technology, the adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector-mediated gene therapy for achromatopsia in the preclinical animal experiments achieved encouraging progress in the past years. This article briefly reviews the recent research achievements of achromatopsia with gene therapy.

  3. Genome Editing Gene Therapy for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Hotta, Akitsu

    2015-09-22

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe genetic disorder caused by loss of function of the dystrophin gene on the X chromosome. Gene augmentation of dystrophin is challenging due to the large size of the dystrophin cDNA. Emerging genome editing technologies, such as TALEN and CRISPR-Cas9 systems, open a new erain the restoration of functional dystrophin and are a hallmark of bona fide gene therapy. In this review, we summarize current genome editing approaches, properties of target cell types for ex vivo gene therapy, and perspectives of in vivo gene therapy including genome editing in human zygotes. Although technical challenges, such as efficacy, accuracy, and delivery of the genome editing components, remain to be further improved, yet genome editing technologies offer a new avenue for the gene therapy of DMD.

  4. Neural stem cell-based gene therapy for brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung U

    2011-03-01

    Advances in gene-based medicine since 1990s have ushered in new therapeutic strategy of gene therapy for inborn error genetic diseases and cancer. Malignant brain tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme and medulloblastoma remain virtually untreatable and lethal. Currently available treatment for brain tumors including radical surgical resection followed by radiation and chemotherapy, have substantially improved the survival rate in patients suffering from these brain tumors; however, it remains incurable in large proportion of patients. Therefore, there is substantial need for effective, low-toxicity therapies for patients with malignant brain tumors, and gene therapy targeting brain tumors should fulfill this requirement. Gene therapy for brain tumors includes many therapeutic strategies and these strategies can be grouped in two major categories: molecular and immunologic. The widely used molecular gene therapy approach is suicide gene therapy based on the conversion of non-toxic prodrugs into active anticancer agents via introduction of enzymes and genetic immunotherapy involves the gene transfer of immune-stimulating cytokines including IL-4, IL-12 and TRAIL. For both molecular and immune gene therapy, neural stem cells (NSCs) can be used as delivery vehicle of therapeutic genes. NSCs possess an inherent tumor tropism that supports their use as a reliable delivery vehicle to target therapeutic gene products to primary brain tumors and metastatic cancers throughout the brain. Significance of the NSC-based gene therapy for brain tumor is that it is possible to exploit the tumor-tropic property of NSCs to mediate effective, tumor-selective therapy for primary and metastatic cancers in the brain and outside, for which no tolerated curative treatments are currently available.

  5. Mechanically enhanced microcapsules for cellular gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Shen, F; Mazumder, M A J; Burke, N A D; Stöver, H D H; Potter, M A

    2009-07-01

    Microcapsules bearing a covalently cross-linked coating have been developed for cellular gene therapy as an improvement on alginate-poly(L-lysine)-alginate (APA) microcapsules that only have ionic cross-linking. In this study, two mutually reactive polyelectrolytes, a polycation (designated C70), poly([2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl]trimethylammonium chloride-co-2-aminoethyl methacrylate hydrochloride) and a polyanion (designated A70), poly(sodium methacrylate-co-2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl acetoacetate), were used during the microcapsule fabrication. Ca-alginate beads were sequentially laminated with C70, A70, poly(L-lysine) (PLL), and alginate. The A70 reacts with both C70 and PLL to form a approximately 30 microm thick covalently cross-linked interpenetrating polymer network on the surface of the capsules. Confocal images confirmed the location of the C70/A70/PLL network and the stability of the network after 4 weeks implantation in mice. The mechanical and chemical resistance of the capsules was tested with a "stress test" where microcapsules were gently shaken in 0.003% EDTA for 15 min. APA capsules disappeared during this treatment, whereas the modified capsules, even those that had been retrieved from mice after 4-weeks implantation, remained intact. Analysis of solutions passing through model flat membranes showed that the molecular weight cut-off of alginate-C70-A70-PLL-alginate is similar to that of alginate-PLL-alginate. Recombinant cells encapsulated in APA and modified capsules were able to secrete luciferase into culture media. The modified capsules were found to capture some components of regular culture media used during preparation, causing an immune reaction in implanted mice, but use of UltraCulture serum-free medium was found to prevent this immune reaction. In vivo biocompatibility of the new capsules was similar to the APA capsules, with no sign of clinical toxicity on complete blood counts and liver function tests. The increased stability of the

  6. Gene therapy for eye as regenerative medicine? Lessons from RPE65 gene therapy for Leber's Congenital Amaurosis.

    PubMed

    Rakoczy, Elizabeth P; Narfström, Kristina

    2014-11-01

    Recombinant virus mediated gene therapy of Leber's Congenital Amaurosis has provided a wide range of data on the utility of gene replacement therapy for recessive diseases. Studies to date demonstrate that gene therapy in the eye is safe and can result in long-term recovery of visual function, but they also highlight that further research is required to identify optimum intervention time-points, target populations and the compatibility of associate therapies. This article is part of a directed issue entitled: Regenerative Medicine: the challenge of translation.

  7. Biosensor-controlled gene therapy/drug delivery with nanoparticles for nanomedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prow, Tarl W.; Rose, William A.; Wang, Nan; Reece, Lisa M.; Lvov, Yuri; Leary, James F.

    2005-04-01

    Nanomedicine involves cell-by-cell regenerative medicine, either repairing cells one at a time or triggering apoptotic pathways in cells that are not repairable. Multilayered nanoparticle systems are being constructed for the targeted delivery of gene therapy to single cells. Cleavable shells containing targeting, biosensing, and gene therapeutic molecules are being constructed to direct nanoparticles to desired intracellular targets. Therapeutic gene sequences are controlled by biosensor-activated control switches to provide the proper amount of gene therapy on a single cell basis. The central idea is to set up gene therapy "nanofactories" inside single living cells. Molecular biosensors linked to these genes control their expression. Gene delivery is started in response to a biosensor detected problem; gene delivery is halted when the cell response indicates that more gene therapy is not needed. Cell targeting of nanoparticles, both nanocrystals and nanocapsules, has been tested by a combination of fluorescent tracking dyes, fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Intracellular targeting has been tested by confocal microscopy. Successful gene delivery has been visualized by use of GFP reporter sequences. DNA tethering techniques were used to increase the level of expression of these genes. Integrated nanomedical systems are being designed, constructed, and tested in-vitro, ex-vivo, and in small animals. While still in its infancy, nanomedicine represents a paradigm shift in thinking-from destruction of injured cells by surgery, radiation, chemotherapy to cell-by-cell repair within an organ and destruction of non-repairable cells by natural apoptosis.

  8. Il2rg gene-targeted severe combined immunodeficiency pigs.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shunichi; Iwamoto, Masaki; Saito, Yoriko; Fuchimoto, Daiichiro; Sembon, Shoichiro; Suzuki, Misae; Mikawa, Satoshi; Hashimoto, Michiko; Aoki, Yuki; Najima, Yuho; Takagi, Shinsuke; Suzuki, Nahoko; Suzuki, Emi; Kubo, Masanori; Mimuro, Jun; Kashiwakura, Yuji; Madoiwa, Seiji; Sakata, Yoichi; Perry, Anthony C F; Ishikawa, Fumihiko; Onishi, Akira

    2012-06-14

    A porcine model of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) promises to facilitate human cancer studies, the humanization of tissue for xenotransplantation, and the evaluation of stem cells for clinical therapy, but SCID pigs have not been described. We report here the generation and preliminary evaluation of a porcine SCID model. Fibroblasts containing a targeted disruption of the X-linked interleukin-2 receptor gamma chain gene, Il2rg, were used as donors to generate cloned pigs by serial nuclear transfer. Germline transmission of the Il2rg deletion produced healthy Il2rg(+/-) females, while Il2rg(-/Y) males were athymic and exhibited markedly impaired immunoglobulin and T and NK cell production, robustly recapitulating human SCID. Following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, donor cells stably integrated in Il2rg(-/Y) heterozygotes and reconstituted the Il2rg(-/Y) lymphoid lineage. The SCID pigs described here represent a step toward the comprehensive evaluation of preclinical cellular regenerative strategies.

  9. Combining HDAC inhibitors with oncolytic virotherapy for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Hiroshi; Nguyen, Tran; Chiocca, Ennio Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) enzymes play a critical role in the epigenetic regulation of cellular functions and signaling pathways in many cancers. HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) have been validated for single use or in combination with other drugs in oncologic therapeutics. An even more novel combination therapy with HDACi is to use them with an oncolytic virus. HDACi may lead to an amplification of tumor-specific lytic effects by facilitating increased cycles of viral replication, but there may also be direct anticancer effects of the drug by itself. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms of anti-cancer effects of the combination of oncolytic viruses with HDACi.

  10. Building a roadmap for developing combination therapies for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Perry, Daniel; Sperling, Reisa; Katz, Russell; Berry, Donald; Dilts, David; Hanna, Debra; Salloway, Stephen; Trojanowski, John Q; Bountra, Chas; Krams, Michael; Luthman, Johan; Potkin, Steven; Gribkoff, Val; Temple, Robert; Wang, Yaning; Carrillo, Maria C; Stephenson, Diane; Snyder, Heather; Liu, Enchi; Ware, Tony; McKew, John; Fields, F Owen; Bain, Lisa J; Bens, Cynthia

    2015-03-01

    Combination therapy has proven to be an effective strategy for treating many of the world's most intractable diseases. A growing number of investigators in academia, industry, regulatory agencies, foundations and advocacy organizations are interested in pursuing a combination approach to treating Alzheimer's disease. A meeting co-hosted by the Accelerate Cure/Treatments for Alzheimer's Disease Coalition, the Critical Path Institute and the Alzheimer's Association addressed challenges in designing clinical trials to test multiple treatments in combination and outlined a roadmap for making such trials a reality.

  11. Combined clustering models for the analysis of gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Angelova, M. Ellman, J.

    2010-02-15

    Clustering has become one of the fundamental tools for analyzing gene expression and producing gene classifications. Clustering models enable finding patterns of similarity in order to understand gene function, gene regulation, cellular processes and sub-types of cells. The clustering results however have to be combined with sequence data or knowledge about gene functionality in order to make biologically meaningful conclusions. In this work, we explore a new model that integrates gene expression with sequence or text information.

  12. Potential gene therapy strategies for cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sell, Stewart

    2006-10-01

    To be maximally effective, therapy of cancer must be directed against both the resting stem cells and the proliferating cells of the cancer. The cell populations of both normal and cancer tissues consist of resting stem cells, proliferating transit-amplifying cells, terminally differentiating cells and dying (apoptotic) cells. The difference between normal tissue renewal and growth of cancers is that some of the transit-amplifying cells in the cancer population do not mature into terminally differentiating cells, but instead continue to proliferate and do not die (maturation arrest). Because of this the number of cancer cells increase, whereas the cell population of normal tissues remains a relatively constant. Conventional radiation treatment and chemotherapy kill the actively proliferating transit- amplifying cells of the cancer. Differentiation therapy, using specific targeted inhibitors of activation, effectively induces differentiation of the proliferating transit-amplifying cancer cells. However, even if the proliferating cancer cells are completely inhibited or eliminated, the cancer stem cells may restore the transit-amplifying population, so that clinical remission is usually temporary. The hypothesis presented in this paper is that successful cancer therapy must be directed against both the resting stem cells and the proliferating cells of the cancer. This may be possible if specific stem cell signals are inhibited using gene therapy, while at the same time attacking proliferating cells by conventional radiation treatment or chemotherapy. With advances in approaches using specific inhibitory RNA, such combination therapy may now be possible, but critical problems in delivering the inhibitory effect specifically to the cancer stem cells have yet to be worked out.

  13. Prospect of gene therapy for cardiomyopathy in hereditary muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Yongping; Binalsheikh, Ibrahim M.; Leach, Stacey B.; Domeier, Timothy L.; Duan, Dongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cardiac involvement is a common feature in muscular dystrophies. It presents as heart failure and/or arrhythmia. Traditionally, dystrophic cardiomyopathy is treated with symptom-relieving medications. Identification of disease-causing genes and investigation on pathogenic mechanisms have opened new opportunities to treat dystrophic cardiomyopathy with gene therapy. Replacing/repairing the mutated gene and/or targeting the pathogenic process/mechanisms using alternative genes may attenuate heart disease in muscular dystrophies. Areas covered Duchenne muscular dystrophy is the most common muscular dystrophy. Duchenne cardiomyopathy has been the primary focus of ongoing dystrophic cardiomyopathy gene therapy studies. Here, we use Duchenne cardiomyopathy gene therapy to showcase recent developments and to outline the path forward. We also discuss gene therapy status for cardiomyopathy associated with limb-girdle and congenital muscular dystrophies, and myotonic dystrophy. Expert opinion Gene therapy for dystrophic cardiomyopathy has taken a slow but steady path forward. Preclinical studies over the last decades have addressed many fundamental questions. Adeno-associated virus-mediated gene therapy has significantly improved the outcomes in rodent models of Duchenne and limb girdle muscular dystrophies. Validation of these encouraging results in large animal models will pave the way to future human trials. PMID:27340611

  14. Synergistic combination dry powders for inhaled antimicrobial therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heng, Desmond; Lee, Sie Huey; Teo, Jeanette; Ng, Wai Kiong; Chan, Hak-Kim; Tan, Reginald B. H.

    2013-06-01

    Combination products play an important role in medicine as they offer improved clinical effectiveness, enhanced patient adherence, and reduced administrative costs. In combination antimicrobial therapy, the desired outcome is to extend the antimicrobial spectrum and to achieve a possible synergistic effect. However, adverse antagonistic species may sometimes emerge from such combinations, leading to treatment failure. Therefore, it is crucial to screen the drug candidates for compatibility and possible antagonistic interactions. This work aims to develop a novel synergistic dry powder inhaler (DPI) formulation for antimicrobial combination therapy via the pulmonary route. Binary and ternary combinations were prepared via spray drying on a BUCHI® Nano Spray Dryer B-90. All powders were within the respirable size range, and were consisted of spherical particles that were slightly corrugated. The powers yielded fine particle fractions (of the loaded dose) of over 40% when dispersed using an Aerolizer® DPI at 60 L/min. Time-kill studies carried out against common respiratory tract pathogenic bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumonia and Acinetobacter baumannii at 1x the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) over 24 hours revealed no antagonistic behavior for both combinations. While the interactions were generally found to be indifferent, a favorable synergistic effect was detected in the binary combination when it was tested against Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria.

  15. Gene Therapy for Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Feuer, William J.; Schiffman, Joyce C.; Davis, Janet L.; Porciatti, Vittorio; Gonzalez, Phillip; Koilkonda, Rajeshwari D.; Yuan, Huijun; Lalwani, Anil; Lam, Byron L.; Guy, John

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a disorder characterized by severe and rapidly progressive visual loss when caused by a mutation in the mitochondrial gene encoding NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase subunit 4 (ND4). We have initiated a gene therapy trial to determine the safety and tolerability of escalated doses of an adeno-associated virus vector (AAV) expressing a normal ND4 complementary DNA in patients with a G to A mutation at nucleotide 11778 of the mitochondrial genome. Design In this prospective open-label trial (NCT02161380), the study drug (self-complementary AAV [scAAV]2(Y444,500,730F)-P1ND4v2) was intravitreally injected unilaterally into the eyes of 5 blind participants with G11778A LHON. Four participants with visual loss for more than 12 months were treated. The fifth participant had visual loss for less than 12 months. The first 3 participants were treated at the low dose of vector (5 × 109 vg), and the fourth participant was treated at the medium dose (2.46 × 1010 vg). The fifth participant with visual loss for less than 12 months received the low dose. Treated participants were followed for 90 to 180 days and underwent ocular and systemic safety assessments along with visual structure and function examinations. Participants Five legally blind patients with G11778A LHON. Main Outcome Measures Loss of visual acuity. Results Visual acuity as measured by the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) eye chart remained unchanged from baseline to 3 months in the first 3 participants. For 2 participants with 90-day follow-up, acuity increased from hand movements to 7 letters in 1 and by 15 letters in 1, representing an improvement equivalent to 3 lines. No one lost vision, and no serious adverse events were observed. Minor adverse events included a transient increase of intraocular pressure (IOP), exposure keratitis, subconjunctival hemorrhage, a sore throat, and a transient increase in neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) against

  16. Optimizing antimicrobial therapy of sepsis and septic shock: focus on antibiotic combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-Grande, Gloria; Kumar, Anand

    2015-02-01

    There has been little improvement in septic shock mortality in the past 70 years, despite ever more broad-spectrum and potent antimicrobials. In the past, resuscitative elements have been the primary area of clinical septic shock management and research. The question of the optimal use of antimicrobial therapy was relatively ignored in recent decades. This review explores the pathophysiology of sepsis in an attempt to produce a better understanding and define key determinants of antimicrobial therapy response in septic shock. Optimizing existing antimicrobials delivery can drive significant improvements in the outcome of sepsis and septic shock. Inappropriate antimicrobial selection and dosing or delays in the administration substantially increase mortality and morbidity in life-threatening infections. Definitive combination therapy (where a pathogen known to be susceptible to a given agent is additionally covered by another agent) remains controversial. Although some in vitro studies, animal models, and clinical studies of infection including endocarditis, gram-negative bacteremia, and neutropenic infections have supported combination therapy, the potential clinical benefit in other severe infections has been questioned. Several meta-analyses have failed to demonstrate improvement of outcome with combination therapy in immunocompetent patients with sepsis and/or gram-negative bacteremia. These meta-analyses did not undertake subgroup analyses of the septic shock population. This article reviews the existing evidence supporting combination therapy for severe infections, sepsis, and septic shock.

  17. Effects of thermal therapy combining sauna therapy and underwater exercise in patients with fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Shuji; Shimodozono, Megumi; Etoh, Seiji; Miyata, Ryuji; Kawahira, Kazumi

    2011-08-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is a chronic disorder that is characterized by widespread pain with localized tenderness. We aimed to investigate whether thermal therapy combining sauna therapy and underwater exercise improved pain, symptoms, and quality of life (QOL) in FMS patients. Forty-four female FMS patients who fulfilled the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria received 12-week thermal therapy program comprising sauna therapy once daily for 3 days/week and underwater exercise once daily for 2 days/week. Pain, symptoms, and QOL were assessed using a pain visual analog scale (VAS), a fibromyalgia impact questionnaire (FIQ), and a short form 36-item questionnaire (SF-36), respectively. All of the patients reported significant reductions in pain and symptoms of 31-77% after the 12-week thermal therapy program, which remained relatively stable (28-68%) during the 6-month follow-up period (that is, the thermal therapy program improved both the short-term and the long-term VAS and FIQ scores). Improvements were also observed in the SF-36 score. Thermal therapy combining sauna therapy and underwater exercise improved the QOL as well as the pain and symptoms of FMS patients.

  18. Bio and nanotechnological strategies for tumor-targeted gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jeong-Hun; Toita, Riki; Katayama, Yoshiki

    2010-01-01

    Gene therapy is a new medical approach for the treatment of tumors. For safe and efficient gene therapy, therapeutic genes need to be delivered efficiently into the target tumor cells. Development of gene delivery systems to specifically recognize and target tumor cells and to distinguish them from normal cells, especially in the same tissue or organ, is one of the most important issues regarding the present gene delivery methodologies. The enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect using the characteristics of angiogenic tumor blood vessels, as well as gene delivery systems recognizing hyperactivated receptors or intracellular signals, is broadly applied to tumor-targeted gene therapy. In addition, bacterial vectors can be a useful means for targeting hypoxic or anoxic regions of a tumor.

  19. Evaluation of ADA gene expression and transduction efficiency in ADA/SCID patients undergoing gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Carlucci, F; Tabucchi, A; Aiuti, A; Rosi, F; Floccari, F; Pagani, R; Marinello, E

    2004-10-01

    A capillary electrophoresis (CE) method was developed for ADA/SCID diagnosis and monitoring of enzyme replacement therapy, as well as for exploring the transfection efficiency for different retroviral vectors in gene therapy.

  20. Gene therapy for immune disorders: good news tempered by bad news.

    PubMed

    Puck, Jennifer M; Malech, Harry L

    2006-04-01

    After a dozen years of human gene therapy trials characterized by minimal gene correction and disappointing clinical impact, the field of gene therapy received some good news in 2000. Infants with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency who received retroviral gene addition to cells from their bone marrow developed impressive immune reconstitution. During the following 2 years, additional patients were treated and the news was even better-babies receiving gene therapy had sustained T-cell production and in several cases developed better cell function than most patients treated with standard bone marrow transplants. Unfortunately, bad news followed. Three of the patients experienced leukemic T-cell expansions, found to be associated with retroviral insertions into genomic DNA. Where does the field stand today?

  1. Development of a Gene Therapy Trial for Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    used to restrict adenovirus replication in hepatocellular and prostate carcinomas via alpha-fetoprotein and PSA promoters [21, 33]. Gene therapy with...control of PSES to direct adenovirus replication , and HSV-TK gene, a pro-drug enzyme gene, under the control of m6 enhancer to maximize cell-killing

  2. Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene therapy in the canine model.

    PubMed

    Duan, Dongsheng

    2015-03-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked lethal muscle disease caused by dystrophin deficiency. Gene therapy has significantly improved the outcome of dystrophin-deficient mice. Yet, clinical translation has not resulted in the expected benefits in human patients. This translational gap is largely because of the insufficient modeling of DMD in mice. Specifically, mice lacking dystrophin show minimum dystrophic symptoms, and they do not respond to the gene therapy vector in the same way as human patients do. Further, the size of a mouse is hundredfolds smaller than a boy, making it impossible to scale-up gene therapy in a mouse model. None of these limitations exist in the canine DMD (cDMD) model. For this reason, cDMD dogs have been considered a highly valuable platform to test experimental DMD gene therapy. Over the last three decades, a variety of gene therapy approaches have been evaluated in cDMD dogs using a number of nonviral and viral vectors. These studies have provided critical insight for the development of an effective gene therapy protocol in human patients. This review discusses the history, current status, and future directions of the DMD gene therapy in the canine model.

  3. [First fixed dose combination perindopril arginine-indapamide-amlodipine: new approach in combination therapy in hypertension].

    PubMed

    Jr, Jiří Widimský

    2014-09-01

    Use of fixed combination of antihypertensive drugs clearly improves compliance to the pharmacological therapy, control of hypertension and prognosis. Based on the current guidelines triple antihypertensive therapy with RAS-blocker, calcium channel blocker (CCB) and diuretic represents the standard and best option. The article introduces first and innovative fixed triple combination of perindopril arginine + indapamide + amlodipine (Triplixam®). This type of therapy is suitable for patients already treated with free combinations of three antihypertensive drugs or in those hypertensives with uncontrolled hypertension on two antihypertensive molecules (approx. 60% of all hypertensive population). Fixed combination of perindopril arginine + indapamid + amlodipin is indicated also in severe hypertension (approx. 30% of pts). Large clinical data from various morbidity-mortality studies related to each of these substances are discussed as well as basic pharmacological characteristics. Based on the results from ADVANCE-CCB study combination of perindopril arginine + indapamide + CCB decreases total mortality in hypertension by 28%. Another discussed study-PIANIST confirmed significant antihypertensive effect of Triplixam® on large sample of patients with various stages of hypertension. Triplixam® in addition to that has very good tolerance with low side effects profile, flexibility of the dosages and large body of evidence of positive impact on prognosis of hypertensive patients. Use of Triplixam® may improve control of hypertension in the Czech Republic.Key words: amlodipine - fixed combination - hypertension - indapamide - perindopril arginine - therapy.

  4. Innovative treatment approaches for rheumatoid arthritis. Combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Borigini, M J; Paulus, H E

    1995-11-01

    It is accepted that combination DMARD therapy is a useful tool in current rheumatological practice. However, well-designed, large, long-term, controlled clinical trials are needed to determine which combinations, dosage schedules, and sequences of administration are most beneficial and least toxic. Until we develop treatment regimens that reliably induce and sustain acceptable control of disease manifestations in all patients for the rest of their natural lifespan, daily oral prednisone will continue to be a troublesome component of 'bridge' therapy, as it becomes the sole surviving constant in complex regimens whose other components are eventually discontinued because of toxicity, lack of efficacy, or non-compliance. We have often seen patients in whom the replacement of a well-tolerated but presumable ineffective DMARD with another DMARD has led to worsening of disease, when the modest benefits of the discontinued DMARD were lost before the hoped for onset of benefit from its replacement became evident. Since the toxicity of combinations of DMARDs has not appeared to be excessive, one can reasonably add the second DMARD to the first, while carefully monitoring for adverse effects and planning ton continue the combination until increased benefit occurs. Subsequently, if the second DMARD is not tolerated, the partial benefit from the first has not been given up, and a longer duration of treatment with the initial DMARD is sometimes associated with satisfactory improvement. If better control of rheumatoid arthritis is evident after 3-6 months of treatment with the combination of DMARDs, one must still decide whether to stop the first DMARD, stop the second, or continue with the combination. In the absence of major toxicity, we are most likely to choose to continue the combination if the patient has had a good response, thus inadvertently embarking on prolonged combined DMARD therapy (Paulus, 1990). Of course, other drugs besides those discussed above are available

  5. [Ethical guidelines on genetic testing and gene therapy].

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Yoshimitsu

    2005-03-01

    According to the recent and rapid advances in molecular genetics research, genetic testing and gene therapy have a potential of giving unexpected influence to the human beings. To prevent and to solve various ethical, legal and social implementations (ELSI) of genetic testing and gene therapy, several guidelines have been established. In Japan, all researchers and all clinicians have to know and keep the following three guidelines on genetic testing and a guideline on gene therapy: 1) "Guidelines for Researches on Human Genome and Gene (2001)" by the three Ministries (Education, Health and Economy), 2) "Guidelines for Genetic Testing (2001)" by the Genetic--medicine--related 10 societies, 3) "Ethical Principles on Entrusted Genetic Testing (2001)" by the Japan Registered Clinical Laboratories Association, and 4) "Guidelines for Clinical Research on Gene Therapy (2002)" by the two Ministries (Health and Education).

  6. Current status of gene therapy for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Reinecke, J; Koch, H; Meijer, H; Granrath, M; Schulitz, K P; Wehling, P

    1999-02-01

    Despite the high prevalence of the disease, at present little effective pharmacological treatment of rheumatoid arthritis is available. Novel approaches utilising biological agents have resulted in the development of new antiarthritic and antiinflammatory agents, such as tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha)-specific antibodies and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra). Local gene therapy not only allows the pharmaceutical use of these biologicals, but also allows for continuous drug supply, which is necessary for chronic diseases like rheumatoid arthritis. We discuss the basics of rheumatoid arthritis therapy, candidate genes and possible gene transfer methods. A current clinical gene therapy trial is focusing on the IL-1 system using IL-1ra as a transgene. The transfer system, clinical protocol and preliminary results are described. After treatment of 11 patients we feel that gene therapy will offer potential as a new avenue to treat rheumatoid arthritis.

  7. Gene therapy for heart failure: where do we stand?

    PubMed

    Naim, Charbel; Yerevanian, Armen; Hajjar, Roger J

    2013-02-01

    Advances in understanding of the molecular basis of myocardial dysfunction, together with the development of increasingly efficient gene transfer technology, has placed heart failure within reach of gene-based therapy. Multiple components of cardiac contractility, including the Beta-adrenergic system, the calcium channel cycling pathway, and cytokine mediated cell proliferation, have been identified as appropriate targets for gene therapy. The development of efficient and safe vectors such as adeno-associated viruses and polymer nanoparticles has provided an opportunity for clinical application for gene therapy. The recent successful and safe completion of a phase 2 trial targeting the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase pump (SERCA2a) has the potential to open a new era for gene therapy in the treatment of heart failure.

  8. Safety profile, efficacy, and biodistribution of a bicistronic high-capacity adenovirus vector encoding a combined immunostimulation and cytotoxic gene therapy as a prelude to a phase I clinical trial for glioblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Puntel, Mariana; Ghulam, Muhammad A.K.M.; Farrokhi, Catherine; VanderVeen, Nathan; Paran, Christopher; Appelhans, Ashley; Kroeger, Kurt M.; Salem, Alireza; Lacayo, Liliana; Pechnick, Robert N.; Kelson, Kyle R.; Kaur, Sukhpreet; Kennedy, Sean; Palmer, Donna; Ng, Philip; and others

    2013-05-01

    Adenoviral vectors (Ads) are promising gene delivery vehicles due to their high transduction efficiency; however, their clinical usefulness has been hampered by their immunogenicity and the presence of anti-Ad immunity in humans. We reported the efficacy of a gene therapy approach for glioma consisting of intratumoral injection of Ads encoding conditionally cytotoxic herpes simplex type 1 thymidine kinase (Ad-TK) and the immunostimulatory cytokine fms-like tyrosine kinase ligand 3 (Ad-Flt3L). Herein, we report the biodistribution, efficacy, and neurological and systemic effects of a bicistronic high-capacity Ad, i.e., HC-Ad-TK/TetOn-Flt3L. HC-Ads elicit sustained transgene expression, even in the presence of anti-Ad immunity, and can encode large therapeutic cassettes, including regulatory elements to enable turning gene expression “on” or “off” according to clinical need. The inclusion of two therapeutic transgenes within a single vector enables a reduction of the total vector load without adversely impacting efficacy. Because clinically the vectors will be delivered into the surgical cavity, normal regions of the brain parenchyma are likely to be transduced. Thus, we assessed any potential toxicities elicited by escalating doses of HC-Ad-TK/TetOn-Flt3L (1 × 10{sup 8}, 1 × 10{sup 9}, or 1 × 10{sup 10} viral particles [vp]) delivered into the rat brain parenchyma. We assessed neuropathology, biodistribution, transgene expression, systemic toxicity, and behavioral impact at acute and chronic time points. The results indicate that doses up to 1 × 10{sup 9} vp of HC-Ad-TK/TetOn-Flt3L can be safely delivered into the normal rat brain and underpin further developments for its implementation in a phase I clinical trial for glioma. - Highlights: ► High capacity Ad vectors elicit sustained therapeutic gene expression in the brain. ► HC-Ad-TK/TetOn-Flt3L encodes two therapeutic genes and a transcriptional switch. ► We performed a dose escalation study at

  9. Combining molecular targeted agents with radiation therapy for malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Scaringi, Claudia; Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi; Minniti, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    The expansion in understanding the molecular biology that characterizes cancer cells has led to the rapid development of new agents to target important molecular pathways associated with aberrant activation or suppression of cellular signal transduction pathways involved in gliomagenesis, including epidermal growth factor receptor, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, mammalian target of rapamycin, and integrins signaling pathways. The use of antiangiogenic agent bevacizumab, epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors gefitinib and erlotinib, mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors temsirolimus and everolimus, and integrin inhibitor cilengitide, in combination with radiation therapy, has been supported by encouraging preclinical data, resulting in a rapid translation into clinical trials. Currently, the majority of published clinical studies on the use of these agents in combination with radiation and cytotoxic therapies have shown only modest survival benefits at best. Tumor heterogeneity and genetic instability may, at least in part, explain the poor results observed with a single-target approach. Much remains to be learned regarding the optimal combination of targeted agents with conventional chemoradiation, including the use of multipathways-targeted therapies, the selection of patients who may benefit from combined treatments based on molecular biomarkers, and the verification of effective blockade of signaling pathways. PMID:23966794

  10. Gene Therapy, Early Promises, Subsequent Problems, and Recent Breakthroughs

    PubMed Central

    Razi Soofiyani, Saeideh; Baradaran, Behzad; Lotfipour, Farzaneh; Kazemi, Tohid; Mohammadnejad, Leila

    2013-01-01

    Gene therapy is one of the most attractive fields in medicine. The concept of gene delivery to tissues for clinical applications has been discussed around half a century, but scientist’s ability to manipulate genetic material via recombinant DNA technology made this purpose to reality. Various approaches, such as viral and non-viral vectors and physical methods, have been developed to make gene delivery safer and more efficient. While gene therapy initially conceived as a way to treat life-threatening disorders (inborn errors, cancers) refractory to conventional treatment, to date gene therapy is considered for many non–life-threatening conditions including those adversely influence on a patient’s quality of life. Gene therapy has made significant progress, including tangible success, although much slower than was initially predicted. Although, gene therapies still at a fairly primitive stage, it is firmly science based. There is justifiable hope that with enhanced pathobiological understanding and biotechnological improvements, gene therapy will be a standard part of clinical practice within 20 years. PMID:24312844

  11. [Polymeric nanoparticles with therapeutic gene for gene therapy: I. Preparation and in vivo gene transfer study].

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Song, Cunxian; Sun, Hongfan; Wu, Li; Tang, Lina; Leng, Xigang; Wang, Pengyan; Xu, Yiyao; Li, Yongjun; Guan, Heng

    2005-06-01

    VEGF nanoparticle (VEGF-NP) was prepared by a multi-emulsification technique using a biodegradable poly-dl-lactic-co-glycolic (PLGA) as matrix material. The nanoparticles were characterized for size, VEGF loading capacity, and in vitro release. VEGF-NP and naked VEGF plasmid were intramuscularly injected into the ischemia site of the rabbit chronic hindlimb ischemia model and the efficiency of VEGF-NP as gene delivery carrier for gene therapy in animal model was evaluated. Gene therapuetic effect was assessed evaluated by RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and angiography assay. The average size of VEGF-NP was around 300 nm. The encapsulation efficiency of VEGF was above 96%. Loading amount of VEGF in the nanoparticles was about 4%. In vitro, nanoparticles maintained sustained-release of VEGF for two weeks. Two weeks post gene injection the capillary density in VEGF-NP group (81.22 per mm2) was significantly higher than that in control group (29.54 mm2). RT-PCR results showed greatly higher VEGF expression in VEGF-NP group (31.79au * mm) than that in naked VEGF group (9.15 au * mm). As a carrier system for gene therapy in animal model, VEGF-NP is much better than naked DNA plasmid. The results demonstrate great possibility of using NP carrier in human gene therapy.

  12. NT-07PHASE 1-2 DOSE-ESCALATION STUDY OF VB-111, AN ANTI-ANGIOGENIC GENE THERAPY, AS MONOTHERAPY AND IN COMBINATION WITH BEVACIZUMAB, IN PATIENTS WITH RECURRENT GLIOBLASTOMA

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Andrew; Cohen, Yael; Vredenburgh, James; Peters, Katherine; Blumenthal, Deborah; Bokstein, Felix; Breitbart, Eyal; Bangio, Livnat; Sher, Naamit; Harats, Dror; Wen, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: VB-111 is an anti-angiogenic agent consisting of a non-replicating adenovirus vector (Ad-5) with a modified murine pre-proendothelin promoter leading to apoptosis of tumor vasculature by expressing a fas-chimera transgene in angiogenic endothelial cells. Safety and efficacy of VB-111 alone and in combination with bevacizumab (BEV) were evaluated for patients with recurrent Glioblastoma (rGBM) in this phase 1-2 dose-escalation study. METHODS: VB-111 was administered as a single intravenous infusion at escalating doses from 1x1012 to 1x1013 viral particles (VPs), followed by repeat doses of 3x1012 or 1x1013 every 2 months. The protocol was amended to add-on BEV 10mg/Kg every 2 weeks upon further progression. Assessments included safety, pharmacokinetics, tumor response (RANO criteria) and overall survival (OS). RESULTS: Forty-six patients at 4 recruiting medical centers in the US and Israel received up to 13 repeat doses of VB-111. Of these 30 received the high dose (1x1013). There were 22 related adverse events, 19 CTCAE grade 1-2. The median OS was 360 [range: 70-574] and 266 days [range: 28-664] for patients receiving at least one high dose vs. subjects who received lower doses, respectively (p NS). Progression free survival was 63 vs. 55 days for patients who received high vs. lower doses, respectively (p = 0.01). Median follow-up was 232 days. Six patients had a partial response and/or prolonged disease stability (≥180 days). Tumor growth rates showed a statistically significant dose response. Eleven patients received combination therapy of VB-111 with BEV after progression on VB-111 alone. Median time to second progression was 93 days. VB-111 was safe and well tolerated both as monotherapy and combined therapy. CONCLUSIONS: VB-111 was safe and well tolerated as monotherapy and in combination with BEV in patients with recurrent glioblastoma. Encouraging tumor growth attenuation and responses were seen. Overall survival was about 3 months longer

  13. Large animal models of neurological disorders for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Gagliardi, Christine; Bunnell, Bruce A

    2009-01-01

    he development of therapeutic interventions for genetic disorders and diseases that affect the central nervous system (CNS) has proven challenging. There has been significant progress in the development of gene therapy strategies in murine models of human disease, but gene therapy outcomes in these models do not always translate to the human setting. Therefore, large animal models are crucial to the development of diagnostics, treatments, and eventual cures for debilitating neurological disorders. This review focuses on the description of large animal models of neurological diseases such as lysosomal storage diseases, Parkinsons disease, Huntingtons disease, and neuroAIDS. The review also describes the contributions of these models to progress in gene therapy research.

  14. Does human gene therapy raise new ethical questions?

    PubMed

    Tauer, C A

    1990-01-01

    Consideration of the ethics of human gene therapy does not seem to raise questions that have never been asked before. However, particularly when gene therapy is extended to modification of the germ cells, several ethical issues take on an added importance or significance. These issues are: (i) possible moral limitations on tampering with "human nature"; (ii) the extent of our responsibility to future generations; (iii) the appropriate use of early human embryos in genetic research. Furthermore, standard norms in clinical and research ethics require careful application to trials of human gene therapy, even if only somatic rather than germ-line improvements are sought.

  15. Identification of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Engraftment Genes in Gene Therapy Studies.

    PubMed

    Powers, John M; Trobridge, Grant D

    2013-09-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) therapy using replication-incompetent retroviral vectors is a promising approach to provide life-long correction for genetic defects. HSC gene therapy clinical studies have resulted in functional cures for several diseases, but in some studies clonal expansion or leukemia has occurred. This is due to the dyregulation of endogenous host gene expression from vector provirus insertional mutagenesis. Insertional mutagenesis screens using replicating retroviruses have been used extensively to identify genes that influence oncogenesis. However, retroviral mutagenesis screens can also be used to determine the role of genes in biological processes such as stem cell engraftment. The aim of this review is to describe the potential for vector insertion site data from gene therapy studies to provide novel insights into mechanisms of HSC engraftment. In HSC gene therapy studies dysregulation of host genes by replication-incompetent vector proviruses may lead to enrichment of repopulating clones with vector integrants near genes that influence engraftment. Thus, data from HSC gene therapy studies can be used to identify novel candidate engraftment genes. As HSC gene therapy use continues to expand, the vector insertion site data collected will be of great interest to help identify novel engraftment genes and may ultimately lead to new therapies to improve engraftment.

  16. Combinational chelation therapy abrogates lead-induced neurodegeneration in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Pachauri, Vidhu; Saxena, Geetu; Mehta, Ashish; Mishra, Deepshikha; Flora, Swaran J.S.

    2009-10-15

    Lead, a ubiquitous and potent neurotoxicant causes oxidative stress which leads to numerous neurobehavioral and physiological alterations. The ability of lead to bind sulfhydryl groups or compete with calcium could be one of the reasons for its debilitating effects. In the present study, we addressed: i) if chelation therapy could circumvent the altered oxidative stress and prevent neuronal apoptosis in chronic lead-intoxicated rats, ii) whether chelation therapy could reverse biochemical and behavioral changes, and iii) if mono or combinational therapy with captopril (an antioxidant) and thiol chelating agents (DMSA/MiADMSA) is more effective than individual thiol chelator in lead-exposed rats. Results indicated that lead caused a significant increase in reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide, and intracellular free calcium levels along with altered behavioral abnormalities in locomotor activity, exploratory behavior, learning, and memory that were supported by changes in neurotransmitter levels. A fall in membrane potential, release of cytochrome c, and DNA damage indicated mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis. Most of these alterations showed significant recovery following combined therapy with captopril with MiADMSA and to a smaller extend with captopril + DMSA over monotherapy with these chelators. It could be concluded from our present results that co-administration of a potent antioxidant (like captopril) might be a better treatment protocol than monotherapy to counter lead-induced oxidative stress. The major highlight of the work is an interesting experimental evidence of the efficacy of combinational therapy using an antioxidant with a thiol chelator in reversing neurological dystrophy caused due to chronic lead exposure in rats.

  17. Imaging techniques: new avenues in cancer gene and cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Saadatpour, Z; Rezaei, A; Ebrahimnejad, H; Baghaei, B; Bjorklund, G; Chartrand, M; Sahebkar, A; Morovati, H; Mirzaei, H R; Mirzaei, H

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is one of the world's most concerning health problems and poses many challenges in the range of approaches associated with the treatment of cancer. Current understanding of this disease brings to the fore a number of novel therapies that can be useful in the treatment of cancer. Among them, gene and cell therapies have emerged as novel and effective approaches. One of the most important challenges for cancer gene and cell therapies is correct monitoring of the modified genes and cells. In fact, visual tracking of therapeutic cells, immune cells, stem cells and genetic vectors that contain therapeutic genes and the various drugs is important in cancer therapy. Similarly, molecular imaging, such as nanosystems, fluorescence, bioluminescence, positron emission tomography, single photon-emission computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, have also been found to be powerful tools in monitoring cancer patients who have received therapeutic cell and gene therapies or drug therapies. In this review, we focus on these therapies and their molecular imaging techniques in treating and monitoring the progress of the therapies on various types of cancer.

  18. The interplay of post-translational modification and gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Osamor, Victor Chukwudi; Chinedu, Shalom N; Azuh, Dominic E; Iweala, Emeka Joshua; Ogunlana, Olubanke Olujoke

    2016-01-01

    Several proteins interact either to activate or repress the expression of other genes during transcription. Based on the impact of these activities, the proteins can be classified into readers, modifier writers, and modifier erasers depending on whether histone marks are read, added, or removed, respectively, from a specific amino acid. Transcription is controlled by dynamic epigenetic marks with serious health implications in certain complex diseases, whose understanding may be useful in gene therapy. This work highlights traditional and current advances in post-translational modifications with relevance to gene therapy delivery. We report that enhanced understanding of epigenetic machinery provides clues to functional implication of certain genes/gene products and may facilitate transition toward revision of our clinical treatment procedure with effective fortification of gene therapy delivery. PMID:27013864

  19. Pharmaceutical emulsions: a new approach for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Verissimo, Lourena Mafra; Lima, Lucymara Fassarela Agnez; Egito, Lucila Carmem Monte; de Oliveira, Anselmo Gomes; do Egito, E Sócrates Tabosa

    2010-06-01

    The concept of gene therapy involves the experimental transfer of a therapeutic gene into an individual's cells and tissues to replace an abnormal gene aiming to treat a disease, or to use the gene to treat a disease just like a medicine, improving the clinical status of a patient. The achievement of a foreigner nucleic acid into a population of cells requires its transfer to the target. Therefore, it is essential to create carriers (vectors) that transfer and protect the nucleic acid until it reaches the target. The obvious disadvantages of the use of viral vectors have directed the research for the development of a nonviral organized system such as emulsions. In fact, recently, there has been an increase of interest in its use in biotechnology as a nonviral vector for gene therapy. This review focuses on the progress of cationic emulsions and the improvement of the formulations, as a potential delivery system for gene therapy.

  20. Alphavirus vectors for vaccine production and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Lundstrom, Kenneth

    2003-06-01

    Alphavirus vectors demonstrate high expression of heterologous proteins in a broad range of host cells. Replication-deficient as well as replication-competent variants exist. Systemic delivery of many viral antigens has elicited strong antibody responses in immunized mice and primates, and protection against challenges with lethal viruses was obtained. Similarly, prophylactic vaccination was established against tumor challenges. Attention has been paid to the engineering of improved targeting to immunologically active cells, such as dendritic cells. In the area of gene therapy, intratumoral injections of alphavirus vectors have resulted in potentially promising tumor rejection. Moreover, encapsulation of alphavirus particles into liposomes demonstrated efficient tumor targeting in mice with severe combined immunodeficiency, which permitted the initiation of clinical trials for patients with advanced kidney carcinoma and melanoma.

  1. Optimising treatment for COPD--new strategies for combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Welte, T

    2009-08-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a multi-component disease characterised by airflow limitation and airway inflammation. Exacerbations of COPD have a considerable impact on the quality of life, daily activities and general well-being of patients and are a great burden on the health system. Thus, the aims of COPD management include not only relieving symptoms and preventing disease progression but also preventing and treating exacerbations. Attention towards the day-to-day burden of the disease is also required in light of evidence that suggests COPD may be variable throughout the day with morning being the time when symptoms are most severe and patients' ability to perform regular morning activities the most problematic. While available therapies improve clinical symptoms and decrease airway inflammation, they do not unequivocally slow long-term progression or address all disease components. With the burden of COPD continuing to increase, research into new and improved treatment strategies to optimise pharmacotherapy is ongoing - in particular, combination therapies, with a view to their complementary modes of action enabling multiple components of the disease to be addressed. Evidence from recent clinical trials indicates that triple therapy, combining an anticholinergic with an inhaled corticosteroid and a long-acting beta(2)-agonist, may provide clinical benefits additional to those associated with each treatment alone in patients with more severe COPD. This article reviews the evidence for treatment strategies used in COPD with a focus on combination therapies and introduces the 3-month CLIMB study (Evaluation of Efficacy and Safety of Symbicort as an Add-on Treatment to Spiriva in Patients With Severe COPD) which investigated the potential treatment benefits of combining tiotropium with budesonide/formoterol in patients with COPD with regard to lung function, exacerbations, symptoms and morning activities.

  2. Combined-modality therapy for rectal cancer using irinotecan.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Bruce D

    2002-05-01

    Preoperative or postoperative pelvic radiation plus concurrent fluorouracil-based chemotherapy is standard adjuvant treatment for patients with T3 and/or N1/2 rectal cancer. Newer chemotherapeutic regimens have been developed for the treatment of patients with metastatic disease. Irinotecan (CPT-11, Camptosar)-based regimens have improved survival in patients with metastatic disease and are being actively investigated in combination with pelvic radiation therapy for patients with rectal cancer.

  3. Gene therapy in the management of oral cancer: review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ayllón Barbellido, Sonia; Campo Trapero, Julián; Cano Sánchez, Jorge; Perea García, Miguel A; Escudero Castaño, Nayra; Bascones Martínez, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Gene therapy essentially consists of introducing specific genetic material into target cells without producing toxic effects on surrounding tissue. Advances over recent decades in the surgical, radiotherapeutic and chemotherapeutic treatment of oral cancer patients have not produced a significant improvement in patient survival. Increasing interest is being shown in developing novel therapies to reverse oral epithelial dysplastic lesions. This review provides an update on transfer techniques, therapeutic strategies, and the clinical applications and limitations of gene therapy in the management of oral cancer and precancer. We highlight the combination of gene therapy with chemotherapy (e.g., 5-Fluoracil) and immunotherapy, given the promising results obtained in the use of adenovirus to act at altered gene level (e.g., p53). Other techniques such as suicide gene therapy, use of oncolytic viruses or the use of antisense RNA have shown positive although very preliminary results. Therefore, further research into these promising gene therapy techniques is required to assess their true efficacy and safety in the management of these lesions.

  4. Genetic basis and gene therapy trials for thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Al-Humadi, Hussam; Zarros, Apostolos; Al-Saigh, Rafal; Liapi, Charis

    2010-01-01

    Gene therapy is regarded as one of the most promising novel therapeutic approaches for hopeless cases of thyroid cancer and those not responding to traditional treatment. In the last two decades, many studies have focused on the genetic factors behind the origin and the development of thyroid cancer, in order to investigate and shed more light on the molecular pathways implicated in different differentiated or undifferentiated types of thyroid tumors. We, herein, review the current data on the main genes that have been proven to (or thought to) be implicated in thyroid cancer etiology, and which are involved in several well-known signaling pathways (such as the mitogen-activated protein kinase and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/Akt pathways). Moreover, we review the results of the efforts made through multiple gene therapy trials, via several gene therapy approaches/strategies, on different thyroid carcinomas. Our review leads to the conclusion that future research efforts should seriously consider gene therapy for the treatment of thyroid cancer, and, thus, should: (a) shed more light on the molecular basis of thyroid cancer tumorigenesis, (b) focus on the development of novel gene therapy approaches that can achieve the required antitumoral efficacy with minimum normal tissue toxicity, as well as (c) perform more gene therapy clinical trials, in order to acquire more data on the efficacy of the examined approaches and to record the provoked adverse effects.

  5. Stem Cell Gene Therapy for Fanconi Anemia: Report from the 1st International Fanconi Anemia Gene Therapy Working Group Meeting

    PubMed Central

    Tolar, Jakub; Adair, Jennifer E; Antoniou, Michael; Bartholomae, Cynthia C; Becker, Pamela S; Blazar, Bruce R; Bueren, Juan; Carroll, Thomas; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Clapp, D Wade; Dalgleish, Robert; Galy, Anne; Gaspar, H Bobby; Hanenberg, Helmut; Von Kalle, Christof; Kiem, Hans-Peter; Lindeman, Dirk; Naldini, Luigi; Navarro, Susana; Renella, Raffaele; Rio, Paula; Sevilla, Julián; Schmidt, Manfred; Verhoeyen, Els; Wagner, John E; Williams, David A; Thrasher, Adrian J

    2011-01-01

    Survival rates after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for Fanconi anemia (FA) have increased dramatically since 2000. However, the use of autologous stem cell gene therapy, whereby the patient's own blood stem cells are modified to express the wild-type gene product, could potentially avoid the early and late complications of allogeneic HCT. Over the last decades, gene therapy has experienced a high degree of optimism interrupted by periods of diminished expectation. Optimism stems from recent examples of successful gene correction in several congenital immunodeficiencies, whereas diminished expectations come from the realization that gene therapy will not be free of side effects. The goal of the 1st International Fanconi Anemia Gene Therapy Working Group Meeting was to determine the optimal strategy for moving stem cell gene therapy into clinical trials for individuals with FA. To this end, key investigators examined vector design, transduction method, criteria for large-scale clinical-grade vector manufacture, hematopoietic cell preparation, and eligibility criteria for FA patients most likely to benefit. The report summarizes the roadmap for the development of gene therapy for FA. PMID:21540837

  6. Optimal Lipid Modification: The Rationale for Combination Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Backes, James M; Gibson, Cheryl A; Howard, Patricia A

    2005-01-01

    Background An emphasis on more aggressive lipid-lowering, particularly of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, to improve patient outcomes has led to an increased use of combination lipid-lowering drugs. This strategy, while potentially beneficial, has triggered concerns regarding fears of adverse effects, harmful drug interactions, and patient nonadherence. Objective To present key data regarding combination lipid-altering therapy including use, rationale, major trials, benefits, potential adverse effects, compliance issues, and limitations. Method Literature was obtained from MEDLINE (1966 – June 2005) and references from selected articles. Results A substantial body of evidence from epidemiological data and clinical trials indicates that aggressive lipid modification, especially low-density lipoprotein reduction, is associated with reduced cardiovascular events. Numerous studies utilizing various combinations of cholesterol-lowering agents including statin/fibrate, statin/niacin, statin/bile acid resin, and statin/ezetimibe have demonstrated significant changes in the lipid profile with acceptable safety. Long-term trials of combination therapy evaluating clinical outcomes or surrogate markers of cardiovascular disease, while limited, are promising. Conclusion Combining lipid-altering agents results in additional improvements in lipoproteins and has the potential to further reduce cardiovascular events beyond that of monotherapy. PMID:17315604

  7. Tmc gene therapy restores auditory function in deaf mice.

    PubMed

    Askew, Charles; Rochat, Cylia; Pan, Bifeng; Asai, Yukako; Ahmed, Hena; Child, Erin; Schneider, Bernard L; Aebischer, Patrick; Holt, Jeffrey R

    2015-07-08

    Genetic hearing loss accounts for up to 50% of prelingual deafness worldwide, yet there are no biologic treatments currently available. To investigate gene therapy as a potential biologic strategy for restoration of auditory function in patients with genetic hearing loss, we tested a gene augmentation approach in mouse models of genetic deafness. We focused on DFNB7/11 and DFNA36, which are autosomal recessive and dominant deafnesses, respectively, caused by mutations in transmembrane channel-like 1 (TMC1). Mice that carry targeted deletion of Tmc1 or a dominant Tmc1 point mutation, known as Beethoven, are good models for human DFNB7/11 and DFNA36. We screened several adeno-associated viral (AAV) serotypes and promoters and identified AAV2/1 and the chicken β-actin (Cba) promoter as an efficient combination for driving the expression of exogenous Tmc1 in inner hair cells in vivo. Exogenous Tmc1 or its closely related ortholog, Tmc2, were capable of restoring sensory transduction, auditory brainstem responses, and acoustic startle reflexes in otherwise deaf mice, suggesting that gene augmentation with Tmc1 or Tmc2 is well suited for further development as a strategy for restoration of auditory function in deaf patients who carry TMC1 mutations.

  8. Hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy for adenosine deaminase deficient-SCID.

    PubMed

    Aiuti, Alessandro; Brigida, Immacolata; Ferrua, Francesca; Cappelli, Barbara; Chiesa, Robert; Marktel, Sarah; Roncarolo, Maria-Grazia

    2009-01-01

    Gene therapy is a highly attractive strategy for many types of inherited disorders of the immune system. Adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficient-severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) has been the target of several clinical trials based on the use of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells engineered with retroviral vectors. The introduction of a low intensity conditioning regimen has been a crucial factor in achieving stable engrafment of hematopoietic stem cells and therapeutic levels of ADA-expressing cells. Recent studies have demonstrated that gene therapy for ADA-SCID has favorable safety profile and is effective in restoring normal purine metabolism and immune functions. Stem cell gene therapy combined with appropriate conditioning regimens might be extended to other genetic disorders of the hematopoietic system.

  9. Bacteriophage-Derived Vectors for Targeted Cancer Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pranjol, Md Zahidul Islam; Hajitou, Amin

    2015-01-01

    Cancer gene therapy expanded and reached its pinnacle in research in the last decade. Both viral and non-viral vectors have entered clinical trials, and significant successes have been achieved. However, a systemic administration of a vector, illustrating safe, efficient, and targeted gene delivery to solid tumors has proven to be a major challenge. In this review, we summarize the current progress and challenges in the targeted gene therapy of cancer. Moreover, we highlight the recent developments of bacteriophage-derived vectors and their contributions in targeting cancer with therapeutic genes following systemic administration. PMID:25606974

  10. Clinical potential of gene therapy: towards meeting the demand.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, J L; Rasko, J E J

    2014-03-01

    Since the discovery that new genetic material could be transferred into human cells resulting in induced expression of genes and proteins, clinicians and scientists have been working to harness the technology for clinical outcomes. This article provides a summary of the current status of developments within the broad discipline of clinical gene therapy. In pursuing the treatment of diverse clinical conditions, a wide variety of therapeutics, each tailor-made, may be required. Gene therapy offers the possibility of accurately and specifically targeting particular genetic abnormalities through gene correction, addition or replacement. It represents a compelling idea that adds a new dimension to our portfolio of credible therapeutic choices.

  11. Genetic correction using engineered nucleases for gene therapy applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongmei Lisa; Nakano, Takao; Hotta, Akitsu

    2014-01-01

    Genetic mutations in humans are associated with congenital disorders and phenotypic traits. Gene therapy holds the promise to cure such genetic disorders, although it has suffered from several technical limitations for decades. Recent progress in gene editing technology using tailor-made nucleases, such as meganucleases (MNs), zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), TAL effector nucleases (TALENs) and, more recently, CRISPR/Cas9, has significantly broadened our ability to precisely modify target sites in the human genome. In this review, we summarize recent progress in gene correction approaches of the human genome, with a particular emphasis on the clinical applications of gene therapy.

  12. Alphavirus vectors as tools in neuroscience and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Lundstrom, Kenneth

    2016-05-02

    Alphavirus-based vectors have been engineered for in vitro and in vivo expression of heterelogous genes. The rapid and easy generation of replication-deficient recombinant particles and the broad range of host cell infection have made alphaviruses attractive vehicles for applications in neuroscience and gene therapy. Efficient delivery to primary neurons and hippocampal slices has allowed localization studies of gene expression and electrophysiological recordings of ion channels. Alphavirus vectors have also been applied for in vivo delivery to rodent brain. Due to the strong local transient expression provided by alphavirus vectors a number of immunization and gene therapy approaches have demonstrated both therapeutic and prophylactic efficacy in various animal models.

  13. Regulatory Oversight of Gene Therapy and Cell Therapy Products in Korea.

    PubMed

    Choi, Minjoung; Han, Euiri; Lee, Sunmi; Kim, Taegyun; Shin, Won

    2015-01-01

    The Ministry of Food and Drug Safety regulates gene therapy and cell therapy products as biological products under the authority of the Pharmaceutical Affairs Act. As with other medicinal products, gene therapy and cell therapy products are subject to approval for use in clinical trials and for a subsequent marketing authorization and to post-market surveillance. Research and development of gene therapy and cell therapy products have been progressing rapidly in Korea with extensive investment, offering great potential for the treatment of various serious diseases. To facilitate development of safe and effective products and provide more opportunities to patients suffering from severe diseases, several regulatory programs, such as the use of investigational products for emergency situations, fast-track approval, prereview of application packages, and intensive regulatory consultation, can be applied to these products. The regulatory approach for these innovative products is case by case and founded on science-based review that is flexible and balances the risks and benefits.

  14. Gene Therapy Helps 2 Babies Fight Type of Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_163244.html Gene Therapy Helps 2 Babies Fight Type of Leukemia Tweaking T-cells ... 25, 2017 WEDNESDAY, Jan. 25, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Two infants with an advanced form of leukemia are ...

  15. Potential application of gene therapy to X-linked agammaglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Thomas; Calmels, Boris; Barlogis, Vincent; Michel, Gérard; Tonnelle, Cécile; Chabannon, Christian

    2007-08-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA), or Bruton's disease, is the most common human primary humoral immunodeficiency. XLA is caused by mutations of the Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK), a key regulator of B-cell physiology. Since the mid 80's, substitutive therapy by intravenous gammaglobulin infusions has significantly improved XLA patient survival and quality of life. Nevertheless, some frequent affections persist despite treatment, and lead to handicapping and further to morbid clinical complications for XLA individuals. Development of gene therapy by transfer of the BTK gene into hematopoietic progenitors could represent an alternative strategy for the treatment of Bruton's disease, with the advantage of a definitive cure for XLA patients. Gene therapy of XLA could be considered as a paradigm for future expansion of gene therapy approaches for many other diseases, since future utilization may be strictly dependent on a marked improvement of risk-benefit ratio compared to pre-existing treatments.

  16. Investor Outlook: Gene Therapy Picking up Steam; At a Crossroads.

    PubMed

    Schimmer, Joshua; Breazzano, Steven

    2016-09-01

    The gene therapy field continues to pick up steam with recent successes in a number of different therapeutic indications that highlight the potential for the platform. As the field continues to make progress, a growing data set of long-term safety and efficacy data will continue to define gene therapy's role, determining ultimately how widely it may be used beyond rare, serious diseases with high unmet needs. New technologies often take unanticipated twists and turns as patient exposure accumulates, and gene therapy may be no exception. That said, with many diseases that have no other treatment options beyond gene therapy and that present considerable morbidity and mortality, the field appears poised to withstand some minor and even major bumps in the road should they emerge.

  17. Gene Therapy: a Breakthrough for Sickle Cell Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Gene Therapy: A Breakthrough for Sickle Cell Anemia? But treatment has only been given to one ... to treat, or even potentially cure, sickle cell anemia. The findings come from just one patient, a ...

  18. Development of hybrid viral vectors for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shuohao; Kamihira, Masamichi

    2013-01-01

    Adenoviral, retroviral/lentiviral, adeno-associated viral, and herpesviral vectors are the major viral vectors used in gene therapy. Compared with non-viral methods, viruses are highly-evolved, natural delivery agents for genetic materials. Despite their remarkable transduction efficiency, both clinical trials and laboratory experiments have suggested that viral vectors have inherent shortcomings for gene therapy, including limited loading capacity, immunogenicity, genotoxicity, and failure to support long-term adequate transgenic expression. One of the key issues in viral gene therapy is the state of the delivered genetic material in transduced cells. To address genotoxicity and improve the therapeutic transgene expression profile, construction of hybrid vectors have recently been developed. By adding new abilities or replacing certain undesirable elements, novel hybrid viral vectors are expected to outperform their conventional counterparts with improved safety and enhanced therapeutic efficacy. This review provides a comprehensive summary of current achievements in hybrid viral vector development and their impact on the field of gene therapy.

  19. Stem cell gene therapy: the risks of insertional mutagenesis and approaches to minimize genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chuanfeng; Dunbar, Cynthia E

    2011-12-01

    Virus-based vectors are widely used in hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy, and have the ability to integrate permanently into genomic DNA, thus driving long-term expression of corrective genes in all hematopoietic lineages. To date, HSC gene therapy has been successfully employed in the clinic for improving clinical outcomes in small numbers of patients with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1), adenosine deaminase deficiency (ADA-SCID), adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD), thalassemia, chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), and Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS). However, adverse events were observed during some of these HSC gene therapy clinical trials, linked to insertional activation of proto-oncogenes by integrated proviral vectors leading to clonal expansion and eventual development of leukemia. Numerous studies have been performed to understand the molecular basis of vector-mediated genotoxicity, with the aim of developing safer vectors and lower-risk gene therapy protocols. This review will summarize current information on the mechanisms of insertional mutagenesis in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells due to integrating gene transfer vectors, discuss the available assays for predicting genotoxicity and mapping vector integration sites, and introduce newly-developed approaches for minimizing genotoxicity as a way to further move HSC gene therapy forward into broader clinical application.

  20. New insights and unresolved issues regarding insertional mutagenesis in X-linked SCID gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Pike-Overzet, Karin; van der Burg, Mirjam; Wagemaker, Gerard; van Dongen, Jacques J M; Staal, Frank J T

    2007-11-01

    The oncogenic potential of retrovirus-mediated gene therapy has been re-emphasized because four patients developed T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL)-like disease from an otherwise successful gene therapy trial for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (X-linked SCID). X-linked SCID, a disease caused by inactivating mutations in the IL2Rgamma gene, is part of a heterogeneous group of SCIDs characterized by the lack of T cells in conjunction with the absence of B and/or natural killer (NK) cells. Gene therapy approaches are being developed for this group of diseases. In this review we discuss the various forms of SCID in relation to normal T-cell development. In addition, we consider the possible role of LMO2 and other T-ALL oncogenes in the development of adverse effects as seen in the X-linked SCID gene therapy trial. Furthermore, we debate whether the integration near the LMO2 locus is sufficient to result in T-ALL-like proliferations or whether the gamma-retroviral viral expression of the therapeutic IL2RG gene contributes to leukemogenesis. Finally, we review some newly developed murine models that may have added value for gene therapy safety studies.

  1. Combined immunomodulator and antimicrobial therapy eliminates polymicrobial sepsis and modulates cytokine production in combined injured mice

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Thomas B.; Bolduc, David L.; Ledney, G. David; Kiang, Juliann G.; Fatanmi, Oluseyi O.; Wise, Stephen Y.; Romaine, Patricia L. P.; Newman, Victoria L.; Singh, Vijay K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: A combination therapy for combined injury (CI) using a non-specific immunomodulator, synthetic trehalose dicorynomycolate and monophosphoryl lipid A (STDCM-MPL), was evaluated to augment oral antimicrobial agents, levofloxacin (LVX) and amoxicillin (AMX), to eliminate endogenous sepsis and modulate cytokine production. Materials and methods: Female B6D2F1/J mice received 9.75 Gy cobalt-60 gamma-radiation and wound. Bacteria were isolated and identified in three tissues. Incidence of bacteria and cytokines were compared between treatment groups. Results: Results demonstrated that the lethal dose for 50% at 30 days (LD50/30) of B6D2F1/J mice was 9.42 Gy. Antimicrobial therapy increased survival in radiation-injured (RI) mice. Combination therapy increased survival after RI and extended survival time but did not increase survival after CI. Sepsis began five days earlier in CI mice than RI mice with Gram-negative species predominating early and Gram-positive species increasing later. LVX plus AMX eliminated sepsis in CI and RI mice. STDCM-MPL eliminated Gram-positive bacteria in CI and most RI mice but not Gram-negative. Treatments significantly modulated 12 cytokines tested, which pertain to wound healing or elimination of infection. Conclusions: Combination therapy eliminates infection and prolongs survival time but does not assure CI mouse survival, suggesting that additional treatment for proliferative-cell recovery is required. PMID:25994812

  2. Prevailing public perceptions of the ethics of gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Robillard, Julie M; Roskams-Edris, Dylan; Kuzeljevic, Boris; Illes, Judy

    2014-08-01

    Gene therapy research is advancing rapidly, and hopes of treating a large number of brain disorders exist alongside ethical concerns. Most surveys of public attitudes toward these ethical issues are already dated and the content of these surveys has been researcher-driven. To examine current public perceptions, we developed an online instrument that is responsive and relevant to the latest research about ethics, gene therapy, and the brain. The 16-question survey was launched with the platform Amazon Mechanical Turk and was made available to residents of Canada and the United States. The survey was divided into six themes: (1) demographic information, (2) general opinions about gene therapy, (3) medical applications of gene therapy, (4) identity and moral/belief systems, (5) enhancement, and (6) risks. We received and analyzed responses from a total of 467 participants. Our results show that a majority of respondents (>90%) accept gene therapy as a treatment for severe illnesses such as Alzheimer disease, but this receptivity decreases for conditions perceived as less severe such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (79%), and for nontherapeutic applications (47%). The greatest area of concern for the application of gene therapy to brain conditions is the fear of not receiving sufficient information before undergoing the treatment. The main ethical concerns with enhancement were the potential for disparities in resource allocation, access to the procedure, and discrimination. When comparing these data with those from the 1990s, our findings suggest that the acceptability of gene therapy is increasing and that this trend is occurring despite lingering concerns over ethical issues. Providing the public and patients with up-to-date information and opportunities to engage in the discourse about areas of research in gene therapy is a priority.

  3. Combined therapy using acupressure therapy, hypnotherapy, and transcendental meditation versus placebo in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bay, Roohallah; Bay, Fatemeh

    2011-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes is one of the most widespread diseases in the world. The main aim of this research was to evaluate the effect of combined therapy using acupressure therapy, hypnotherapy, and transcendental meditation (TM) on the blood sugar (BS) level in comparison with placebo in type 2 diabetic patients. We used "convenience sampling" for selection of patients with type 2 diabetes; 20 patients were recruited. For collection of data, we used an identical quasi-experimental design called "nonequivalent control group." Therapy sessions each lasting 60-90 min were carried out on 10 successive days. We prescribed 2 capsules (containing 3g of wheat flour each) for each member of the placebo group (one for evening and one for morning). Pre-tests, post-tests, and follow-up tests were conducted in a medical laboratory recognized by the Ministry of Health and Medical Education of Iran. Mean BS level in the post-tests and follow-up tests for the experimental group was reduced significantly in comparison with the pre-tests whereas in the placebo group no changes were observed. Combined therapy including acupressure therapy, hypnotherapy, and TM reduced BS of type 2 diabetic patients and was more effective than placebo therapy on this parameter.

  4. Mesenchymal stromal cells retrovirally transduced with prodrug-converting genes are suitable vehicles for cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Ďuriniková, E; Kučerová, L; Matúšková, M

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) possess a set of several fairly unique properties which make them ideally suitable both for cellular therapies and regenerative medicine. These include: relative ease of isolation, the ability to differentiate along mesenchymal and non-mesenchymal lineages in vitro and the ability to be extensively expanded in culture without a loss of differentiative capacity. MSC are not only hypoimmunogenic, but they mediate immunosuppression upon transplantation, and possess pronounced anti-inflammatory properties. They are able to home to damaged tissues, tumors, and metastases following systemic administration. The ability of homing holds big promise for tumor-targeted delivery of therapeutic agents. Viruses are naturally evolved vehicles efficiently transferring their genes into host cells. This ability made them suitable for engineering vector systems for the delivery of genes of interest. MSC can be retrovirally transduced with genes encoding prodrug-converting genes (suicide genes), which are not toxic per se, but catalyze the formation of highly toxic metabolites following the application of a nontoxic prodrug. The homing ability of MSC holds advantages compared to virus vehicles which display many shortcomings in effective delivery of the therapeutic agents. Gene therapies mediated by viruses are limited by their restricted ability to track cancer cells infiltrating into the surrounding tissue, and by their low migratory capacity towards tumor. Thus combination of cellular therapy and gene delivery is an attractive option - it protects the vector from immune surveillance, and supports targeted delivery of a therapeutic gene/protein to the tumor site.

  5. Gene therapy and peripheral nerve repair: a perspective

    PubMed Central

    Hoyng, Stefan A.; de Winter, Fred; Tannemaat, Martijn R.; Blits, Bas; Malessy, Martijn J. A.; Verhaagen, Joost

    2015-01-01

    Clinical phase I/II studies have demonstrated the safety of gene therapy for a variety of central nervous system disorders, including Canavan’s, Parkinson’s (PD) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD), retinal diseases and pain. The majority of gene therapy studies in the CNS have used adeno-associated viral vectors (AAV) and the first AAV-based therapeutic, a vector encoding lipoprotein lipase, is now marketed in Europe under the name Glybera. These remarkable advances may become relevant to translational research on gene therapy to promote peripheral nervous system (PNS) repair. This short review first summarizes the results of gene therapy in animal models for peripheral nerve repair. Secondly, we identify key areas of future research in the domain of PNS-gene therapy. Finally, a perspective is provided on the path to clinical translation of PNS-gene therapy for traumatic nerve injuries. In the latter section we discuss the route and mode of delivery of the vector to human patients, the efficacy and safety of the vector, and the choice of the patient population for a first possible proof-of-concept clinical study. PMID:26236188

  6. Perspectives on Best Practices for Gene Therapy Programs

    PubMed Central

    Cheever, Thomas R.; Berkley, Dale; Braun, Serge; Brown, Robert H.; Byrne, Barry J.; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S.; Cwik, Valerie; Duan, Dongsheng; Federoff, Howard J.; High, Katherine A.; Kaspar, Brian K.; Klinger, Katherine W.; Larkindale, Jane; Lincecum, John; Mavilio, Fulvio; McDonald, Cheryl L.; McLaughlin, James; Weiss McLeod, Bonnie; Mendell, Jerry R.; Nuckolls, Glen; Stedman, Hansell H.; Tagle, Danilo A.; Vandenberghe, Luk H.; Wang, Hao; Wernett, Pamela J.; Wilson, James M.; Porter, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract With recent successes in gene therapy trials for hemophilia and retinal diseases, the promise and prospects for gene therapy are once again garnering significant attention. To build on this momentum, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and the Muscular Dystrophy Association jointly hosted a workshop in April 2014 on “Best Practices for Gene Therapy Programs,” with a focus on neuromuscular disorders. Workshop participants included researchers from academia and industry as well as representatives from the regulatory, legal, and patient advocacy sectors to cover the gamut from preclinical optimization to intellectual property concerns and regulatory approval. The workshop focused on three key issues in the field: (1) establishing adequate scientific premise for clinical trials in gene therapy, (2) addressing regulatory process issues, and (3) intellectual property and commercialization issues as they relate to gene therapy. The outcomes from the discussions at this workshop are intended to provide guidance for researchers and funders in the gene therapy field. PMID:25654329

  7. Gene therapy for the fetus: is there a future?

    PubMed

    David, Anna L; Peebles, Donald

    2008-02-01

    Gene therapy uses the intracellular delivery of genetic material for the treatment of disease. A wide range of diseases - including cancer, vascular and neurodegenerative disorders and inherited genetic diseases - are being considered as targets for this therapy in adults. There are particular reasons why fetal application might prove better than application in the adult for treatment, or even prevention of early-onset genetic disorders such as cystic fibrosis and Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Research shows that gene transfer to the developing fetus targets rapidly expanding populations of stem cells, which are inaccessible after birth, and indicates that the use of integrating vector systems results in permanent gene transfer. In animal models of congenital disease such as haemophilia, studies show that the functionally immature fetal immune system does not respond to the product of the introduced gene, and therefore immune tolerance can be induced. This means that treatment could be repeated after birth, if that was necessary to continue to correct the disease. For clinicians and parents, fetal gene therapy would give a third choice following prenatal diagnosis of inherited disease, where termination of pregnancy or acceptance of an affected child are currently the only options. Application of this therapy in the fetus must be safe, reliable and cost-effective. Recent developments in the understanding of genetic disease, vector design, and minimally invasive delivery techniques have brought fetal gene therapy closer to clinical practice. However more research needs to be done in before it can be introduced as a therapy.

  8. Gene therapy and peripheral nerve repair: a perspective.

    PubMed

    Hoyng, Stefan A; de Winter, Fred; Tannemaat, Martijn R; Blits, Bas; Malessy, Martijn J A; Verhaagen, Joost

    2015-01-01

    Clinical phase I/II studies have demonstrated the safety of gene therapy for a variety of central nervous system disorders, including Canavan's, Parkinson's (PD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD), retinal diseases and pain. The majority of gene therapy studies in the CNS have used adeno-associated viral vectors (AAV) and the first AAV-based therapeutic, a vector encoding lipoprotein lipase, is now marketed in Europe under the name Glybera. These remarkable advances may become relevant to translational research on gene therapy to promote peripheral nervous system (PNS) repair. This short review first summarizes the results of gene therapy in animal models for peripheral nerve repair. Secondly, we identify key areas of future research in the domain of PNS-gene therapy. Finally, a perspective is provided on the path to clinical translation of PNS-gene therapy for traumatic nerve injuries. In the latter section we discuss the route and mode of delivery of the vector to human patients, the efficacy and safety of the vector, and the choice of the patient population for a first possible proof-of-concept clinical study.

  9. Correction of Monogenic and Common Retinal Disorders with Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Sengillo, Jesse D; Justus, Sally; Cabral, Thiago; Tsang, Stephen H

    2017-01-27

    The past decade has seen major advances in gene-based therapies, many of which show promise for translation to human disease. At the forefront of research in this field is ocular disease, as the eye lends itself to gene-based interventions due to its accessibility, relatively immune-privileged status, and ability to be non-invasively monitored. A landmark study in 2001 demonstrating successful gene therapy in a large-animal model for Leber congenital amaurosis set the stage for translation of these strategies from the bench to the bedside. Multiple clinical trials have since initiated for various retinal diseases, and further improvements in gene therapy techniques have engendered optimism for alleviating inherited blinding disorders. This article provides an overview of gene-based strategies for retinal disease, current clinical trials that engage these strategies, and the latest techniques in genome engineering, which could serve as the next frontline of therapeutic interventions.

  10. Bioethical conflicts of gene therapy: a brief critical review.

    PubMed

    Freire, José Ednésio da Cruz; Medeiros, Suelen Carneiro de; Lopes Neto, Antônio Viana; Monteiro Júnior, José Edvar; Sousa, Antônio Juscelino Sudário; Rocha, Antônio José; Menezes, Léa Maria Bezerra de

    2014-01-01

    Methods and techniques employed in gene therapy are reviewed in parallel with pertinent ethical conflicts. Clinical interventions based on gene therapy techniques preferentially use vectors for the transportation of therapeutic genes, however little is known about the potential risks and damages to the patient. Thus, attending carefully to the clinical complications arising as well as to security is essential. Despite the scientific and technological advances, there are still many uncertainties about the side effects of gene therapy. Moreover, there is a need, above all, to understand the principles of bioethics as both science and ethics, in accordance with its socioecological responsibility, in order to prioritize the health and welfare of man and nature, using properly natural resources and technology. Therefore, it is hard to determine objective results and to which extent the insertion of genes can affect the organism, as well as the ethical implication.

  11. Correction of Monogenic and Common Retinal Disorders with Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sengillo, Jesse D.; Justus, Sally; Cabral, Thiago; Tsang, Stephen H.

    2017-01-01

    The past decade has seen major advances in gene-based therapies, many of which show promise for translation to human disease. At the forefront of research in this field is ocular disease, as the eye lends itself to gene-based interventions due to its accessibility, relatively immune-privileged status, and ability to be non-invasively monitored. A landmark study in 2001 demonstrating successful gene therapy in a large-animal model for Leber congenital amaurosis set the stage for translation of these strategies from the bench to the bedside. Multiple clinical trials have since initiated for various retinal diseases, and further improvements in gene therapy techniques have engendered optimism for alleviating inherited blinding disorders. This article provides an overview of gene-based strategies for retinal disease, current clinical trials that engage these strategies, and the latest techniques in genome engineering, which could serve as the next frontline of therapeutic interventions. PMID:28134823

  12. Gene therapy in dentistry: tool of genetic engineering. Revisited.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Khushboo; Singh, Saurabh; Garg, Kavita Nitish

    2015-03-01

    Advances in biotechnology have brought gene therapy to the forefront of medical research. The concept of transferring genes to tissues for clinical applications has been discussed nearly half a century, but the ability to manipulate genetic material via recombinant DNA technology has brought this goal to reality. The feasibility of gene transfer was first demonstrated using tumour viruses. This led to development of viral and nonviral methods for the genetic modification of somatic cells. Applications of gene therapy to dental and oral problems illustrate the potential impact of this technology on dentistry. Preclinical trial results regarding the same have been very promising. In this review we will discuss methods, vectors involved, clinical implication in dentistry and scientific issues associated with gene therapy.

  13. Noncoding oligonucleotides: the belle of the ball in gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Shum, Ka-To; Rossi, John J

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy carries the promise of cures for many diseases based on manipulating the expression of a person's genes toward the therapeutic goal. The relevance of noncoding oligonucleotides to human disease is attracting widespread attention. Noncoding oligonucleotides are not only involved in gene regulation, but can also be modified into therapeutic tools. There are many strategies that leverage noncoding oligonucleotides for gene therapy, including small interfering RNAs, antisense oligonucleotides, aptamers, ribozymes, decoys, and bacteriophage phi 29 RNAs. In this chapter, we will provide a broad, comprehensive overview of gene therapies that use noncoding oligonucleotides for disease treatment. The mechanism and development of each therapeutic will be described, with a particular focus on its clinical development. Finally, we will discuss the challenges associated with developing nucleic acid therapeutics and the prospects for future success.

  14. Gene transfer as a future therapy for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Müller-Ladner, Ulf; Pap, Thomas; Gay, Renate E; Gay, Steffen

    2003-07-01

    Inhibiting key pathogenic processes within the rheumatoid synovium is a most attractive goal to achieve, and the number of potential intra- and extracellular pathways operative in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) that could be used for a gene therapy strategy is increasing continuously. Gene transfer or gene therapy might also be one of the approaches to solve the problem of long-term expression of therapeutic genes, in order to replace the frequent application of recombinant proteins, in the future. However, at present, gene therapy has not reached a realistic clinical stage, which is mainly due to severe side effects in humans, the complexity of RA pathophysiology and the current state of available gene transfer techniques. On the other hand, novel gene delivery systems are not restricted to vectors or certain types of cells, as mobile cells including macrophages, dendritic cells, lymphocytes and multipotent stem cells can also be used as smart gene transfer vehicles. Moreover, the observation in animal models that application of viral vectors into a joint can exert additional therapeutic effects in nearby joints might also facilitate the transfer from animal to human gene therapy. Future strategies will also examine the potential of novel long-term expression vectors such as lentiviruses and cytomegalovirus (CMV)-based viruses as a basis for future clinical trials in RA.

  15. Dual-therapeutic reporter genes fusion for enhanced cancer gene therapy and imaging.

    PubMed

    Sekar, T V; Foygel, K; Willmann, J K; Paulmurugan, R

    2013-05-01

    Two of the successful gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapies include herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase (HSV1-TK) enzyme-ganciclovir prodrug and the Escherichia coli nitroreductase (NTR) enzyme-CB1954 prodrug strategies; these enzyme-prodrug combinations produce activated cytotoxic metabolites of the prodrugs capable of tumor cell death by inhibiting DNA synthesis and killing quiescent cells, respectively. Both these strategies also affect significant bystander cell killing of neighboring tumor cells that do not express these enzymes. We have developed a dual-combination gene strategy, where we identified HSV1-TK and NTR fused in a particular orientation can effectively kill tumor cells when the tumor cells are treated with a fusion HSV1-TK-NTR gene- along with a prodrug combination of GCV and CB1954. In order to determine whether the dual-system demonstrate superior therapeutic efficacy than either HSV1-TK or NTR systems alone, we conducted both in vitro and in vivo tumor xenograft studies using triple negative SUM159 breast cancer cells, by evaluating the efficacy of cell death by apoptosis and necrosis upon treatment with the dual HSV1-TK genes-GCV-CB1954 prodrugs system, and compared the efficiency to HSV1-TK-GCV and NTR-CB1954. Our cell-based studies, tumor regression studies in xenograft mice, histological analyses of treated tumors and bystander studies indicate that the dual HSV1-TK-NTR-prodrug system is two times more efficient even with half the doses of both prodrugs than the respective single gene-prodrug system, as evidenced by enhanced apoptosis and necrosis of tumor cells in vitro in culture and xenograft of tumor tissues in animals.

  16. The use of gene therapy tools in reproductive immunology research.

    PubMed

    Zenclussen, Ana Claudia; Zenclussen, Maria L; Ritter, Thomas; Volk, Hans D

    2005-10-01

    Mammalian pregnancy is a complex phenomenon allowing the maternal immune system to support its allogeneic fetus, while still being effective against pathogens. Gene therapy approaches have the potential to treat devastating inherited diseases for which there is a little hope of finding a conventional cure. In reproductive medicine, experimental trials have been made so far only for correcting gene defects in utero. The use of gene therapy for improving pregnancy-rate success or avoiding pregnancy-related diseases i.e. miscarriage or pre-eclampsia, remains a very distant goal with unresolved moral and ethical aspects. However, gene therapy may help determining the role of several genes in supporting fetal growth and/or avoiding its rejection experimentally and might further help to identify new targets of intervention. Gene therapy strategies to avoid fetal rejection may include the transfer and expression of cyto-protective molecules locally at the fetal-placental interface. In addition, the ex-vivo genetic modification of immune cells for tolerance induction is a novel and tempting approach. In this regard, we have confirmed the role of the cyto-protective and immunomodulatory molecule Heme Oxygenase-1 (HO-1), by treating animals undergoing abortion with an adenovirus coding for HO-1. Since the sole application of a control vector did not provoke deleterious effects in pregnancy outcome, we propose the use of experimental gene therapy for unveiling molecular and cellular pathways leading to pregnancy success.

  17. Progress in gene therapy of dystrophic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Lai, Y; Duan, D

    2012-06-01

    The heart is frequently afflicted in muscular dystrophy. In severe cases, cardiac lesion may directly result in death. Over the years, pharmacological and/or surgical interventions have been the mainstay to alleviate cardiac symptoms in muscular dystrophy patients. Although these traditional modalities remain useful, the emerging field of gene therapy has now provided an unprecedented opportunity to transform our thinking/approach in the treatment of dystrophic heart disease. In fact, the premise is already in place for genetic correction. Gene mutations have been identified and animal models are available for several types of muscular dystrophy. Most importantly, innovative strategies have been developed to effectively deliver therapeutic genes to the heart. Dystrophin-deficient Duchenne cardiomyopathy is associated with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the most common lethal muscular dystrophy. Considering its high incidence, there has been a considerable interest and significant input in the development of Duchenne cardiomyopathy gene therapy. Using Duchenne cardiomyopathy as an example, here we illustrate the struggles and successes experienced in the burgeoning field of dystrophic heart disease gene therapy. In light of abundant and highly promising data with the adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector, we have specially emphasized on AAV-mediated gene therapy. Besides DMD, we have also discussed gene therapy for treating cardiac diseases in other muscular dystrophies such as limb-girdle muscular dystrophy.

  18. Progresses towards safe and efficient gene therapy vectors

    PubMed Central

    Chira, Sergiu; Jackson, Carlo S.; Oprea, Iulian; Ozturk, Ferhat; Pepper, Michael S.; Diaconu, Iulia; Braicu, Cornelia; Raduly, Lajos-Zsolt; Calin, George A.; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of genetic engineering at the beginning of the 1970′s opened the era of biomedical technologies, which aims to improve human health using genetic manipulation techniques in a clinical context. Gene therapy represents an innovating and appealing strategy for treatment of human diseases, which utilizes vehicles or vectors for delivering therapeutic genes into the patients' body. However, a few past unsuccessful events that negatively marked the beginning of gene therapy resulted in the need for further studies regarding the design and biology of gene therapy vectors, so that this innovating treatment approach can successfully move from bench to bedside. In this paper, we review the major gene delivery vectors and recent improvements made in their design meant to overcome the issues that commonly arise with the use of gene therapy vectors. At the end of the manuscript, we summarized the main advantages and disadvantages of common gene therapy vectors and we discuss possible future directions for potential therapeutic vectors. PMID:26362400

  19. A Novel Gene Gun-Mediated IL-12 Gene Therapy for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-10-01

    immunogenic 4T1 tumor, primary tumor growth was not affected by IL-12 gene therapy , although lung metastasis was significantly reduced. The anti...metastatically effect in the 4T1 model appears to be T cell independent, and we are investigating its mechanism. These results suggest that a similar gene therapy protocol may be useful in human breast cancer treatment.

  20. Carfilzomib boosted combination therapy for relapsed multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Raphael E; Manasanch, Elisabet E

    2017-01-01

    Carfilzomib is a proteasome inhibitor that binds selectively and irreversibly to the 20S proteasome, the proteolytic core particle within the 26S proteasome, resulting in the accumulation of proteasome substrates and ultimately growth arrest and apoptosis of tumor cells. The development and ultimate approval of this medication by regulatory agencies has been an important step toward improving clinical outcomes in multiple myeloma. Although initially approved as a single agent for the treatment of multiply relapsed and/or refractory myeloma, in the USA, it is now widely used in the early relapse setting in combination with lenalidomide and dexamethasone. Carfilzomib has also been studied in combination with second-generation immunomodulatory drugs, histone deacetylase inhibitors, alkylating agents and other novel medications. In this review article, we will discuss the efficacy, safety, tolerability and quality of life of carfilzomib-based combination therapies, as well as novel agents, for relapsed multiple myeloma. PMID:28243125

  1. Combination therapy in rheumatoid arthritis: updated systematic review.

    PubMed

    Verhoeven, A C; Boers, M; Tugwell, P

    1998-06-01

    In a second update of a systematic review, many new developments in the combined drug treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are highlighted. In early RA patients, step-down bridge therapy that includes corticosteroids leads to much enhanced efficacy at acceptable or low toxicity. The effects on joint damage may be persistent, but the symptomatic effects are probably dependent on continued corticosteroid dosing. In late patients, cyclosporin improves a suboptimal clinical response to methotrexate, and the triple combination of methotrexate, sulphasalazine and hydroxychloroquine appears to be clinically better than the components. Other combinations are either untested, tested at low sample size, or show negative interaction. In view of the low volume of evidence, most studies need confirmation by replication.

  2. Combined medication and cognitive therapy for generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Crits-Christoph, Paul; Newman, Michelle G; Rickels, Karl; Gallop, Robert; Gibbons, Mary Beth Connolly; Hamilton, Jessica L; Ring-Kurtz, Sarah; Pastva, Amy M

    2011-12-01

    The current study assessed efficacy of combined cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and venlafaxine XR compared to venlafaxine XR alone in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) within settings where medication is typically offered as the treatment for this disorder. Patients with DSM-IV-diagnosed GAD who were recently enrolled in a long-term venlafaxine XR study were randomly offered (n=77), or not offered (n=40), the option of adding 12 sessions of CBT. Of those offered CBT, 33% (n=26) accepted and attended at least one treatment session. There were no differences between the combined treatment group and the medication only group on primary or secondary efficacy measures in any of the sample comparisons. Many patients who present in medical/psychopharmacology settings seeking treatment for GAD decline the opportunity to receive adjunctive treatment. Of those that receive CBT, there appears to be no additional benefit of combined treatment compared to venlafaxine XR alone.

  3. Carfilzomib boosted combination therapy for relapsed multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Raphael E; Manasanch, Elisabet E

    2017-01-01

    Carfilzomi