Science.gov

Sample records for combined cooling heating

  1. Prototype solar heating and combined heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Eight prototype solar heating and combined heating and cooling systems are being developed. The effort includes development, manufacture, test, installation, maintenance, problem resolution, and performance evaluation.

  2. Prototype solar heating and combined heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Eight prototype solar heating and combined heating and cooling systems are considered. This effort includes development, manufacture, test, installation, maintenance, problem resolution, and performance evaluation.

  3. Prototype solar heating and combined heating cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The design and development of eight prototype solar heating and combined heating and cooling systems is discussed. The program management and systems engineering are reported, and operational test sites are identified.

  4. Prototype solar heating and combined heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Schedules and technical progress in the development of eight prototype solar heating and combined solar heating and cooling systems are reported. Particular emphasis is given to the analysis and preliminary design for the cooling subsystem, and the setup and testing of a horizontal thermal energy storage tank configuration and collector shroud evaluation.

  5. Prototype solar heating and combined heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    System analysis activities were directed toward refining the heating system parameters. Trade studies were performed to support hardware selections for all systems and for the heating only operational test sites in particular. The heating system qualification tests were supported by predicting qualification test component performance prior to conducting the test.

  6. Prototype solar heating and combined heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Designs were completed, hardware was received, and hardware was shipped to two sites. A change was made in the heat pump working fluid. Problem investigation of shroud coatings for the collector received emphasis.

  7. Combined microwave heating and surface cooling of the cornea.

    PubMed

    Trembly, B S; Keates, R H

    1991-01-01

    We investigated a nonsurgical means of reshaping the cornea to correct hyperopia, keratoconus, or myopia. The object was to heat the central stroma of the cornea to the shrinkage temperature of collagen, 55-58 degrees C. The heating device was an open-ended, coaxial, near-field applicator driven at 2450 MHz; it incorporates cooling of the cornea surface by flow of saline. We investigated the system theoretically by computing the 2-D, axisymmetric temperature distribution with the finite element method. We investigated the system experimentally by heating excised steer corneas. Histology showed the system could shrink the stroma to a depth of 0.6 mm while sparing the epithelium in 75% of cases; the diameter of shrinkage was 1.3 mm. Theory predicted a significantly deeper and narrower region of shrinkage than was observed.

  8. Renewable Heating and Cooling

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Renewable heating and cooling is a set of alternative resources and technologies that can be used in place of conventional heating and cooling technologies for common applications such as water heating, space heating, space cooling and process heat.

  9. A Novel Absorption Cycle for Combined Water Heating, Dehumidification, and Evaporative Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    CHUGH, Devesh; Gluesenkamp, Kyle R; Abdelaziz, Omar; Moghaddam, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    In this study, development of a novel system for combined water heating, dehumidification, and space evaporative cooling is discussed. Ambient water vapor is used as a working fluid in an open system. First, water vapor is absorbed from an air stream into an absorbent solution. The latent heat of absorption is transferred into the process water that cools the absorber. The solution is then regenerated in the desorber, where it is heated by a heating fluid. The water vapor generated in the desorber is condensed and its heat of phase change is transferred to the process water in the condenser. The condensed water can then be used in an evaporative cooling process to cool the dehumidified air exiting the absorber, or it can be drained if primarily dehumidification is desired. Essentially, this open absorption cycle collects space heat and transfers it to process water. This technology is enabled by a membrane-based absorption/desorption process in which the absorbent is constrained by hydrophobic vapor-permeable membranes. Constraining the absorbent film has enabled fabrication of the absorber and desorber in a plate-and-frame configuration. An air stream can flow against the membrane at high speed without entraining the absorbent, which is a challenge in conventional dehumidifiers. Furthermore, the absorption and desorption rates of an absorbent constrained by a membrane are greatly enhanced. Isfahani and Moghaddam (Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 2013) demonstrated absorption rates of up to 0.008 kg/m2s in a membrane-based absorber and Isfahani et al. (Int. J. Multiphase Flow, 2013) have reported a desorption rate of 0.01 kg/m2s in a membrane-based desorber. The membrane-based architecture also enables economical small-scale systems, novel cycle configurations, and high efficiencies. The absorber, solution heat exchanger, and desorber are fabricated on a single metal sheet. In addition to the open arrangement and membrane-based architecture, another novel feature of the

  10. Analysis of combined heat and mass transfer in closed-cycle adsorption cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hajji, A.

    1987-01-01

    A relationship for the solid-vapor adsorption equilibrium is proposed and proved to represent accurately the experimental data and to be convenient for numerical calculations. Formulas describing the process involved in closed-cycle cooling and heating systems are also derived. These formulas are first applied in a dynamic analysis of a closed-cycle solar adsorption refrigerator. A computer program was written to study the effect of the design parameters and operating conditions on the system performance. A second application concerns the simulation of the regenerative adsorption cooling systems which were recently introduced to increase the performance of adsorption machines. A computer program was developed to analyze the dynamic behavior of such systems. An analytical investigation of the vapor-liquid absorption is presented. Closed-form solution were obtained where the depth of the absorbing solution is taken into account. The effect of interfacial instability on heat and mass transfer is also modeled by introducing constant heat and mass transfer coefficients. An analysis of the fully developed natural convection heat and mass transfer between two inclined parallel plates is presented. Solvability conditions are determined and closed-form expressions for the temperature and concentration obtained.

  11. Combined refrigeration system with a liquid pre-cooling heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Gaul, Christopher J.

    2003-07-01

    A compressor-pump unit for use in a vapor-compression refrigeration system is provided. The compressor-pump unit comprises a driving device including a rotatable shaft. A compressor is coupled with a first portion of the shaft for compressing gaseous refrigerant within the vapor-compression refrigeration system. A liquid pump is coupled with a second portion of the shaft for receiving liquid refrigerant having a first pressure and for discharging the received liquid refrigerant at a second pressure with the second pressure being higher than the first pressure by a predetermined amount such that the discharged liquid refrigerant is subcooled. A pre-cooling circuit is connected to the liquid pump with the pre-cooling circuit being exposed to the gaseous refrigerant whereby the gaseous refrigerant absorbs heat from the liquid refrigerant, prior to the liquid refrigerant entering the liquid pump.

  12. Calculation of the Combined Heat Transfer Coefficient of Hot-face on Cast Iron Cooling Stave Based on Thermal Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Feng-guang; Zhang, Jian-liang; Zuo, Hai-bin; Qin, Xuan; Qi, Cheng-lin

    2017-03-01

    Cooling effects of the cast iron cooling stave were tested with a specially designed experimental furnace under the conditions of different temperatures of 800 °C, 900 °C, 1,000 °C and 1,100 °C as well as different cooling water velocities of 0.5 m·s-1, 1.0 m·s-1, 1.5 m·s-1 and 2.0 m·s-1. Furthermore, the combined heat transfer coefficient of hot-face on cast iron cooling stave (αh-i) was calculated by heat transfer theory based on the thermal test. The calculated αh-i was then applied in temperature field simulation of cooling stave and the simulation results were compared with the experimental data. The calculation of αh-i indicates that αh-i increases rapidly as the furnace temperature increases while it increases a little as the water velocity increases. The comparison of the simulation results with the experimental data shows that the simulation results fit well with the experiment data under different furnace temperatures.

  13. Heating, Cooling, Ventilating Handbook.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-01

    conditioners. Heaters. Blowers. Fire tube boilers. Water tube boilers. Electrostatic precipitators. Superheaters. Air handling systems, Work units. Abstract...install tubes. .................... . Analyze boiler water samples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Boiler, Water Tube Assist boiler inspector in...ANO INSTALL COOLING (CHILLEC WATER ) OR HEATING COIL CI1-99 TO% All HANDLING SYSTEM). No REPERENCE WOaRK UNIT DESCRIPTION NOUNS UNITS ViB I PwV-S-Rl

  14. Cab Heating and Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Damman, Dennis

    2005-10-31

    Schneider National, Inc., SNI, has concluded the Cab Heating and Cooling evaluation of onboard, engine off idling solutions. During the evaluation period three technologies were tested, a Webasto Airtronic diesel fired heater for cold weather operation, and two different approaches to cab cooling in warm weather, a Webasto Parking Cooler, phase change storage system and a Bergstrom Nite System, a 12 volt electrical air conditioning approach to cooling. Diesel fired cab heaters were concluded to provide adequate heat in winter environments down to 10 F. With a targeted idle reduction of 17%, the payback period is under 2 years. The Webasto Parking Cooler demonstrated the viability of this type of technology, but required significant driver involvement to achieve maximum performance. Drivers rated the technology as ''acceptable'', however, in individual discussions it became apparent they were not satisfied with the system limitations in hot weather, (over 85 F). The Bergstrom Nite system was recognized as an improvement by drivers and required less direct driver input to operate. While slightly improved over the Parking Cooler, the hot temperature limitations were only slightly better. Neither the Parking Cooler or the Nite System showed any payback potential at the targeted 17% idle reduction. Fleets who are starting at a higher idle baseline may have a more favorable payback.

  15. Solar heating and cooling system design and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The development of eight prototype solar heating and combined heating and cooling systems is reported. Manufacture, test, installation, maintenance, problem resolution, and monitoring the operation of prototype systems is included. Heating and cooling equipment for single family residential and commercial applications and eight operational test sites (four heating and four heating and cooling) is described.

  16. Solar heating and cooling system design and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The progress made in the manufacture, test, evaluation, installation, problem resolution, performance evaluation, and development of eight prototype solar heating and combined heating and cooling systems is described.

  17. Magnetic heating and cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Burnett, J.E.

    1993-08-03

    A method is described for pumping heat for heating or refrigeration, comprising the steps of: exposing a system comprising a magnetic fluid to a magnetic field; causing the magnetic fluid to absorb heat of magnetization; transferring heat from the system to a heat sink; causing the magnetic fluid to exit the magnetic field, undergoing the cooling effect therefrom; and transferring heat to the system from a heat source.

  18. Thermal and economic assessment of hot side sensible heat and cold side phase change storage combination fo absorption solar cooling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, M. K.; Morehouse, J. H.

    An analysis of a solar assisted absorption cooling system which employs a combination of phase change on the cold side and sensible heat storage on the hot side of the cooling machine for small commercial buildings is given. The year-round thermal performance of this system for space cooling were determined by simulation and compared against conventional cooling systems in three geographic locations: Phoenix, Arizona; Miami, Florida and Washington, D.C. The results indicate that the hot-cold storage combination has a considerable amount of energy and economical savings over hot side sensible heat storage. Using the hot-cold storage combination, the optimum collector areas for Washington, D.C., Phoenix and Miami are 355 m squared, 250 m squared and 495 m squared, respectively. Compared against conventional vapor compression chiller, the net solar fractions are 61, 67 and 69 percent, respectively.

  19. Novel Controls for Time-Dependent Economic Dispatch of Combined Cooling Heating and Power (CCHP)

    SciTech Connect

    Samuelsen, Scott; Brouwer, Jack

    2013-08-31

    The research and development effort detailed in this report directly addresses the challenge of reducing U.S. industrial energy and carbon intensity by contributing to an increased understanding of potential CCHP technology, the CCHP market and the challenges of widespread adoption. This study developed a number of new tools, models, and approaches for the design, control, and optimal dispatch of various CCHP technologies. The UC Irvine campus served as a ‘living laboratory’ of new CCHP technologies and enabled the design and demonstration of several novel control methods. In particular, the integration of large scale thermal energy storage capable of shifting an entire day of cooling demand required a novel approach to the CCHP dispatch optimization. The thermal energy storage proved an economically viable resource which reduced both costs and emissions by enabling generators and chillers to operate under steady high efficiency conditions at all times of the day.

  20. Comparative analysis of cooling systems for energy equipment of combined heat and power plants and nuclear power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reutov, B. F.; Lazarev, M. V.; Ermakova, S. V.; Zisman, S. L.; Kaplanovich, L. S.; Svetushkov, V. V.

    2016-07-01

    In the 20th century, the thermal power engineering in this country was oriented toward oncethrough cooling systems. More than 50% of the CHPP and NPP capacities with once-through cooling systems put into operation before the 1990s were large-scale water consumers but with minimum irretrievable water consumption. In 1995, the Water Code of the Russian Federation was adopted in which restrictions on application of once-through cooling systems for newly designed combined heat and power plants (CHPPs) were introduced for the first time. A ban on application of once-through systems was imposed by the current Water Code of the Russian Federation (Federal law no. 74-FZ, Art. 60 Cl. 4) not only for new CHPPs but also for those to be modified. Clause 4 of Article 60 of the Water Code of the Russian Federation contravenes law no. 7-FZ "On Protection of the Environment" that has priority significance, since the water environment is only part of the natural environment and those articles of the Water Code of the Russian Federation that are related directly to electric power engineering, viz., Articles 46 and 62. In recent decades, the search for means to increase revenue charges and the economic pressure on the thermal power industry caused introduction by law of charges for use of water by cooling systems irrespective of the latter's impact on the water quality of the source, the environment, the economic efficiency of the power production, and the living conditions of the people. The long-range annual increase in the water use charges forces the power generating companies to switch transfer once-through service water supply installations to recirculating water supply systems and once-through-recirculating systems with multiple reuse of warm water, which drastically reduces the technical, economic, and ecological characteristic of the power plant operation and also results in increasing power rates for the population. This work comprehensively substantiates the demands of

  1. Sun Heats, Cools Columbus Tech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School and University, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Solar energy heats and cools the newest building on the campus of Columbus Technical Institute in Ohio. A solar demonstration project grant from the Department of Energy covered about 77 percent of the solar cost. (Author/MLF)

  2. Heat pipe cooled power magnetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chester, M. S.

    1979-01-01

    A high frequency, high power, low specific weight (0.57 kg/kW) transformer developed for space use was redesigned with heat pipe cooling allowing both a reduction in weight and a lower internal temperature rise. The specific weight of the heat pipe cooled transformer was reduced to 0.4 kg/kW and the highest winding temperature rise was reduced from 40 C to 20 C in spite of 10 watts additional loss. The design loss/weight tradeoff was 18 W/kg. Additionally, allowing the same 40 C winding temperature rise as in the original design, the KVA rating is increased to 4.2 KVA, demonstrating a specific weight of 0.28 kg/kW with the internal loss increased by 50W. This space environment tested heat pipe cooled design performed as well electrically as the original conventional design, thus demonstrating the advantages of heat pipes integrated into a high power, high voltage magnetic. Another heat pipe cooled magnetic, a 3.7 kW, 20A input filter inductor was designed, developed, built, tested, and described. The heat pipe cooled magnetics are designed to be Earth operated in any orientation.

  3. Heat pipe turbine vane cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Langston, L.; Faghri, A.

    1995-10-01

    The applicability of using heat pipe principles to cool gas turbine vanes is addressed in this beginning program. This innovative concept involves fitting out the vane interior as a heat pipe and extending the vane into an adjacent heat sink, thus transferring the vane incident heat transfer through the heat pipe to heat sink. This design provides an extremely high heat transfer rate and an uniform temperature along the vane due to the internal change of phase of the heat pipe working fluid. Furthermore, this technology can also eliminate hot spots at the vane leading and trailing edges and increase the vane life by preventing thermal fatigue cracking. There is also the possibility of requiring no bleed air from the compressor, and therefore eliminating engine performance losses resulting from the diversion of compressor discharge air. Significant improvement in gas turbine performance can be achieved by using heat pipe technology in place of conventional air cooled vanes. A detailed numerical analysis of a heat pipe vane will be made and an experimental model will be designed in the first year of this new program.

  4. Heat pipe turbine vane cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Langston, L.; Faghri, A.

    1995-12-31

    The applicability of using heat pipe principles to cool gas turbine vanes is addressed in this beginning program. This innovative concept involves fitting out the vane interior as a heat pipe and extending the vane into an adjacent heat sink, thus transferring the vane incident heat transfer through the heat pipe to heat sink. This design provides an extremely high heat transfer rate and a uniform temperature along the vane due to the internal change of phase of the heat pipe working fluid. Furthermore, this technology can also eliminate hot spots at the vane leading and trailing edges and increase the vane life by preventing thermal fatigue cracking. There is also the possibility of requiring no bleed air from the compressor, and therefore eliminating engine performance losses resulting from the diversion of compressor discharge air. Significant improvement in gas turbine performance can be achieved by using heat pipe technology in place of conventional air cooled vanes. A detailed numerical analysis of a heat pipe vane will be made and an experimental model will be designed in the first year of this new program.

  5. Heating and Cooling System Design for a Modern Transportable Container

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, Jason E.

    2015-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has been tasked with the design of a modern transportable container (MTC) for use in high reliability transportation environments. The container is required to transport cargo capable of generating its own heat and operate under the United States’ climatic extremes. In response to these requirements, active heating and cooling is necessary to maintain a controlled environment inside the container. The following thesis project documents the design of an active heating, active cooling, and combined active heating and cooling system (now referred to as active heating and cooling systems) through computational thermal analyses, scoping of commercial system options, and mechanical integration with the container’s structure.

  6. Heat exchanger with auxiliary cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Coleman, John H.

    1980-01-01

    A heat exchanger with an auxiliary cooling system capable of cooling a nuclear reactor should the normal cooling mechanism become inoperable. A cooling coil is disposed around vertical heat transfer tubes that carry secondary coolant therethrough and is located in a downward flow of primary coolant that passes in heat transfer relationship with both the cooling coil and the vertical heat transfer tubes. A third coolant is pumped through the cooling coil which absorbs heat from the primary coolant which increases the downward flow of the primary coolant thereby increasing the natural circulation of the primary coolant through the nuclear reactor.

  7. Combining nanocalorimetry and dynamic transmission electron microscopy for in situ characterization of materials processes under rapid heating and cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Grapes, Michael D.; LaGrange, Thomas; Reed, Bryan W.; Campbell, Geoffrey H.; Friedman, Lawrence H.; LaVan, David A.; Weihs, Timothy P.

    2014-08-15

    Nanocalorimetry is a chip-based thermal analysis technique capable of analyzing endothermic and exothermic reactions at very high heating and cooling rates. Here, we couple a nanocalorimeter with an extremely fast in situ microstructural characterization tool to identify the physical origin of rapid enthalpic signals. More specifically, we describe the development of a system to enable in situ nanocalorimetry experiments in the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM), a time-resolved TEM capable of generating images and electron diffraction patterns with exposure times of 30 ns–500 ns. The full experimental system consists of a modified nanocalorimeter sensor, a custom-built in situ nanocalorimetry holder, a data acquisition system, and the DTEM itself, and is capable of thermodynamic and microstructural characterization of reactions over a range of heating rates (10{sup 2} K/s–10{sup 5} K/s) accessible by conventional (DC) nanocalorimetry. To establish its ability to capture synchronized calorimetric and microstructural data during rapid transformations, this work describes measurements on the melting of an aluminum thin film. We were able to identify the phase transformation in both the nanocalorimetry traces and in electron diffraction patterns taken by the DTEM. Potential applications for the newly developed system are described and future system improvements are discussed.

  8. Importance of combining convection with film cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colladay, R. S.

    1971-01-01

    The interaction of film and convection cooling and its effect on wall cooling efficiency is investigated analytically for two cooling schemes for advanced gas turbine applications. The two schemes are full coverage- and counterflow-film cooling. In full coverage film cooling, the cooling air issues from a large number of small discrete holes in the surface. Counterflow film cooling is a film-convection scheme with film injection from a slot geometry. The results indicate that it is beneficial to utilize as much of the cooling air heat sink as possible for convection cooling prior to ejecting it as a film.

  9. Importance of combining convection with film cooling.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colladay, R. S.

    1972-01-01

    The interaction of film and convection cooling and its effect on wall cooling efficiency is investigated analytically for two cooling schemes for advanced gas turbine applications. The two schemes are full coverage- and counterflow-film cooling. In full coverage film cooling, the cooling air issues from a large number of small discrete holes in the surface. Counterflow film cooling is a film-convection scheme with film injection from a slot geometry. The results indicate that it is beneficial to utilize as much of the cooling air heat sink as possible for convection cooling prior to ejecting it as a film.

  10. Combined Heat and Power

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    CHP is on-site electricity generation that captures the heat that would otherwise be wasted to provide useful thermal energy such as steam or hot water than can be used for space heating, cooling, domestic hot water and industrial processes.

  11. COMBINED ACTIVE/PASSIVE DECAY HEAT REMOVAL APPROACH FOR THE 24 MWt GAS-COOLED FAST REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    CHENG,L.Y.; LUDEWIG, H.

    2007-06-01

    Decay heat removal at depressurized shutdown conditions has been regarded as one of the key areas where significant improvement in passive response was targeted for the GEN IV GFR over the GCFR designs of thirty years ago. It has been recognized that the poor heat transfer characteristics of gas coolant at lower pressures needed to be accommodated in the GEN IV design. The design envelope has therefore been extended to include a station blackout sequence simultaneous with a small break/leak. After an exploratory phase of scoping analysis in this project, together with CEA of France, it was decided that natural convection would be selected as the passive decay heat removal approach of preference. Furthermore, a double vessel/containment option, similar to the double vessel/guard vessel approach of the SFR, was selected as the means of design implementation to reduce the PRA risks of the depressurization accident. However additional calculations in conjunction with CEA showed that there was an economic penalty in terms of decay heat removal system heat exchanger size, elevation heights for thermal centers, and most of all in guard containment back pressure for complete reliance on natural convection only. The back pressure ranges complicated the design requirements for the guard containment. Recognizing that the definition of a loss-of-coolant-accident in the GFR is a misnomer, since gas coolant will always be present, and the availability of some driven blower would reduce fuel temperature transients significantly; it was decided instead to aim for a hybrid active/passive combination approach to the selected BDBA. Complete natural convection only would still be relied on for decay heat removal but only after the first twenty four hours after the initiation of the accident. During the first twenty four hour period an actively powered blower would be relied on to provide the emergency decay power removal. However the power requirements of the active blower

  12. Passive thermosyphon solar heating and cooling module with supplementary heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A collection of three quarterly reports from Sigma Research, Inc., covering progress and status from January through September 1977 are presented. Three heat exchangers are developed for use in a solar heating and cooling system for installation into single-family dwellings. Each exchanger consists of one heating and cooling module and one submerged electric water heating element.

  13. Reducing home heating and cooling costs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    This report is in response to a request from the House Committee on Energy and Commerce that the Energy Information Administration (EIA) undertake a neutral, unbiased analysis of the cost, safety, and health and environmental effects of the three major heating fuels: heating oil, natural gas, and electricity. The Committee also asked EIA to examine the role of conservation in the choice of heating and cooling fuel. To accommodate a wide audience, EIA decided to respond to the Committee`s request in the context of a report on reducing home heating and cooling costs. Accordingly, this report discusses ways to weatherize the home, compares the features of the three major heating and cooling fuels, and comments on the types of heating and cooling systems on the market. The report also includes a worksheet and supporting tables that will help in the selection of a heating and/or cooling system.

  14. Heat pump system with selective space cooling

    DOEpatents

    Pendergrass, J.C.

    1997-05-13

    A reversible heat pump provides multiple heating and cooling modes and includes a compressor, an evaporator and heat exchanger all interconnected and charged with refrigerant fluid. The heat exchanger includes tanks connected in series to the water supply and a condenser feed line with heat transfer sections connected in counterflow relationship. The heat pump has an accumulator and suction line for the refrigerant fluid upstream of the compressor. Sub-cool transfer tubes associated with the accumulator/suction line reclaim a portion of the heat from the heat exchanger. A reversing valve switches between heating/cooling modes. A first bypass is operative to direct the refrigerant fluid around the sub-cool transfer tubes in the space cooling only mode and during which an expansion valve is utilized upstream of the evaporator/indoor coil. A second bypass is provided around the expansion valve. A programmable microprocessor activates the first bypass in the cooling only mode and deactivates the second bypass, and vice-versa in the multiple heating modes for said heat exchanger. In the heating modes, the evaporator may include an auxiliary outdoor coil for direct supplemental heat dissipation into ambient air. In the multiple heating modes, the condensed refrigerant fluid is regulated by a flow control valve. 4 figs.

  15. Heat pump system with selective space cooling

    DOEpatents

    Pendergrass, Joseph C.

    1997-01-01

    A reversible heat pump provides multiple heating and cooling modes and includes a compressor, an evaporator and heat exchanger all interconnected and charged with refrigerant fluid. The heat exchanger includes tanks connected in series to the water supply and a condenser feed line with heat transfer sections connected in counterflow relationship. The heat pump has an accumulator and suction line for the refrigerant fluid upstream of the compressor. Sub-cool transfer tubes associated with the accumulator/suction line reclaim a portion of the heat from the heat exchanger. A reversing valve switches between heating/cooling modes. A first bypass is operative to direct the refrigerant fluid around the sub-cool transfer tubes in the space cooling only mode and during which an expansion valve is utilized upstream of the evaporator/indoor coil. A second bypass is provided around the expansion valve. A programmable microprocessor activates the first bypass in the cooling only mode and deactivates the second bypass, and vice-versa in the multiple heating modes for said heat exchanger. In the heating modes, the evaporator may include an auxiliary outdoor coil for direct supplemental heat dissipation into ambient air. In the multiple heating modes, the condensed refrigerant fluid is regulated by a flow control valve.

  16. Heat pipe cooling for scramjet engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverstein, Calvin C.

    1986-01-01

    Liquid metal heat pipe cooling systems have been investigated for the combustor liner and engine inlet leading edges of scramjet engines for a missile application. The combustor liner is cooled by a lithium-TZM molybdenum annular heat pipe, which incorporates a separate lithium reservoir. Heat is initially absorbed by the sensible thermal capacity of the heat pipe and liner, and subsequently by the vaporization and discharge of lithium to the atmosphere. The combustor liner temperature is maintained at 3400 F or less during steady-state cruise. The engine inlet leading edge is fabricated as a sodium-superalloy heat pipe. Cooling is accomplished by radiation of heat from the aft surface of the leading edge to the atmosphere. The leading edge temperature is limited to 1700 F or less. It is concluded that heat pipe cooling is a viable method for limiting scramjet combustor liner and engine inlet temperatures to levels at which structural integrity is greatly enhanced.

  17. Heat pipe cooling system with sensible heat sink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverstein, Calvin C.

    1988-01-01

    A heat pipe cooling system which employs a sensible heat sink is discussed. With this type of system, incident aerodynamic heat is transported via a heat pipe from the stagnation region to the heat sink and absorbed by raising the temperature of the heat sink material. The use of a sensible heat sink can be advantageous for situations where the total mission heat load is limited, as it is during re-entry, and a suitable radiation sink is not available.

  18. Heat illness in the emergency department: keeping your cool.

    PubMed

    Santelli, Jaron; Sullivan, Julie M; Czarnik, Ann; Bedolla, John

    2014-08-01

    Heat illness spans a broad spectrum of disease, with outcomes ranging from benign rash to fatal heat stroke. Heat illness is broadly divided into 2 types: classic and exertional. Both types occur as a result of exposure to elevated temperature with inadequate thermoregulation; however, classic illness occurs without preceding physical activity. Treatment consists of rapid cooling, fluid replacement, and physiologic support. Other milder forms of heat illness include heat fatigue, heat syncope, heat edema, and heat rash. Drugs, drug combinations, drug side effects, and infections can also cause or complicate heat illness and these manifestations may not respond to standard cooling maneuvers and treatments alone; each requires specific additional therapy or antidotes to reverse the cycle of heat and organ damage. This review examines the physiology, diagnosis, and treatment of exertional, classic, and drug-induced hypothermia. Field and prehospital diagnosis and treatment are also reviewed, with recommendations for rehydration and monitoring in rhabdomyolysis.

  19. Combined Natural Gas and Solar Technologies for Heating and Cooling in the City of NIS in Serbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanović, Velimir P.; Bojić, Milorad Lj.

    2010-06-01

    The use of conventional systems for heat and electricity production in Niš and Serbia means a constant waste of energy, and money. This problem is present in both industrial and public sector. Using conventional systems, means not only low-energy efficient systems, and technologies, but also using very "dirty" technologies, which cause heavy environment pollution. The lack of electricity in our country, and region is also present. The gas pipeline in Niš was finished not long ago, and second gas pipeline is about to be made in the next couple of years. This opens a door for implementing new technologies and the use of new methods for production of heat and electricity, while preserving our environment. This paper reports discussion of this technology with management of public institutions, which use both heat and electricity.

  20. Bubble heating in Extreme Cooling Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Steven

    2007-09-01

    Our proposal targets `extreme cooling' clusters: those systems with the largest, fastest cooling rates that most severely challenge the AGN-heating paradigm for cluster cores. By targeting two X-ray bright `extreme cooling cluters' with the clearest radio bubbles in their cores, we seek to establish whether it is possible for AGN heating to balance cooling in such systems. If cooling is not balanced by some heat source, then large residual cooling rates should be detectable in the spectral X-ray data. We will measure the bubble properties precisely and map the spatial-spectral structure of the surrounding X-ray gas, searching for ghost bubbles, shocks, ripples, fronts and non-thermal emission.

  1. Heating and Cooling from the Ground Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Lisa M.

    1998-01-01

    Explains why converting to geothermal heating and cooling is a good option when constructing or retrofitting schools. Reasons discussed include competitive installation costs, lower operating and maintenance costs, greater building-design flexibility, and greater user satisfaction. (GR)

  2. Advances in Solar Heating and Cooling Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Dan S.

    1976-01-01

    Reports on technological advancements in the fields of solar collectors, thermal storage systems, and solar heating and cooling systems. Diagrams aid in the understanding of the thermodynamics of the systems. (CP)

  3. Solar residential heating and cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, D. E.; Humphries, W. R.

    1975-01-01

    System has been placed in operation to verify technical feasibility of using solar energy to provide residential heating and cooling. Complete system analysis was performed to provide design information.

  4. Conjugate heat transfer characterization in cooling channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cukurel, Beni; Arts, Tony; Selcan, Claudio

    2012-06-01

    Cooling technology of gas turbine blades, primarily ensured via internal forced convection, is aimed towards withdrawing thermal energy from the airfoil. To promote heat exchange, the walls of internal cooling passages are lined with repeated geometrical flow disturbance elements and surface non-uniformities. Raising the heat transfer at the expense of increased pressure loss; the goal is to obtain the highest possible cooling effectiveness at the lowest possible pressure drop penalty. The cooling channel heat transfer problem involves convection in the fluid domain and conduction in the solid. This coupled behavior is known as conjugate heat transfer. This experimental study models the effects of conduction coupling on convective heat transfer by applying iso-heat-flux boundary condition at the external side of a scaled serpentine passage. Investigations involve local temperature measurements performed by Infrared Thermography over flat and ribbed slab configurations. Nusselt number distributions along the wetted surface are obtained by means of heat flux distributions, computed from an energy balance within the metal domain. For the flat plate experiments, the effect of conjugate boundary condition on heat transfer is estimated to be in the order of 3%. In the ribbed channel case, the normalized Nusselt number distributions are compared with the basic flow features. Contrasting the findings with other conjugate and convective iso-heat-flux literature, a high degree of overall correlation is evident.

  5. Multilead, Vaporization-Cooled Soldering Heat Sink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, John

    1995-01-01

    Vaporization-cooled heat sink proposed for use during soldering of multiple electrical leads of packaged electronic devices to circuit boards. Heat sink includes compliant wicks held in grooves on edges of metal fixture. Wicks saturated with water. Prevents excessive increases in temperature at entrances of leads into package.

  6. Design and Economic Potential of an Integrated High-Temperature Fuel Cell and Absorption Chiller Combined Cooling, Heat, and Power System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosford, Kyle S.

    Clean distributed generation power plants can provide a much needed balance to our energy infrastructure in the future. A high-temperature fuel cell and an absorption chiller can be integrated to create an ideal combined cooling, heat, and power system that is efficient, quiet, fuel flexible, scalable, and environmentally friendly. With few real-world installations of this type, research remains to identify the best integration and operating strategy and to evaluate the economic viability and market potential of this system. This thesis informs and documents the design of a high-temperature fuel cell and absorption chiller demonstration system at a generic office building on the University of California, Irvine (UCI) campus. This work details the extension of prior theoretical work to a financially-viable power purchase agreement (PPA) with regard to system design, equipment sizing, and operating strategy. This work also addresses the metering and monitoring for the system showcase and research and details the development of a MATLAB code to evaluate the economics associated with different equipment selections, building loads, and economic parameters. The series configuration of a high-temperature fuel cell, heat recovery unit, and absorption chiller with chiller exhaust recirculation was identified as the optimal system design for the installation in terms of efficiency, controls, ducting, and cost. The initial economic results show that high-temperature fuel cell and absorption chiller systems are already economically competitive with utility-purchased generation, and a brief case study of a southern California hospital shows that the systems are scalable and viable for larger stationary power applications.

  7. 46 CFR 56.85-5 - Heating and cooling method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Heating and cooling method. 56.85-5 Section 56.85-5... APPURTENANCES Heat Treatment of Welds § 56.85-5 Heating and cooling method. Heat treatment may be accomplished by a suitable heating method that will provide the desired heating and cooling rates, the...

  8. 46 CFR 56.85-5 - Heating and cooling method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Heating and cooling method. 56.85-5 Section 56.85-5... APPURTENANCES Heat Treatment of Welds § 56.85-5 Heating and cooling method. Heat treatment may be accomplished by a suitable heating method that will provide the desired heating and cooling rates, the...

  9. 46 CFR 56.85-5 - Heating and cooling method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Heating and cooling method. 56.85-5 Section 56.85-5... APPURTENANCES Heat Treatment of Welds § 56.85-5 Heating and cooling method. Heat treatment may be accomplished by a suitable heating method that will provide the desired heating and cooling rates, the...

  10. 46 CFR 56.85-5 - Heating and cooling method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Heating and cooling method. 56.85-5 Section 56.85-5... APPURTENANCES Heat Treatment of Welds § 56.85-5 Heating and cooling method. Heat treatment may be accomplished by a suitable heating method that will provide the desired heating and cooling rates, the...

  11. 46 CFR 56.85-5 - Heating and cooling method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Heating and cooling method. 56.85-5 Section 56.85-5... APPURTENANCES Heat Treatment of Welds § 56.85-5 Heating and cooling method. Heat treatment may be accomplished by a suitable heating method that will provide the desired heating and cooling rates, the...

  12. Heat stress interaction with shade and cooling.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, D V

    1994-07-01

    Hot weather causes heat stress in dairy cattle. Although effects are more severe in hot climates, dairy cattle in areas with relatively moderate climates also are exposed to periods of heat stress. The resultant decrease in milk production and reproductive efficiency can be offset by implementation of a program consisting of cooling through shades, ventilation and spray, and fans. The economic benefit should be determined before installation of equipment to reduce heat stress.

  13. Combined Steady-State and Dynamic Heat Exchanger Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luyben, William L.; Tuzla, Kemal; Bader, Paul N.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a heat-transfer experiment that combines steady-state analysis and dynamic control. A process-water stream is circulated through two tube-in-shell heat exchangers in series. In the first, the process water is heated by steam. In the second, it is cooled by cooling water. The equipment is pilot-plant size: heat-transfer areas…

  14. Phonon Cooling by an Optomechanical Heat Pump.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ying; Bariani, F; Meystre, P

    2015-11-27

    We propose and analyze theoretically a cavity optomechanical analog of a heat pump that uses a polariton fluid to cool mechanical modes coupled to a single precooled phonon mode via external modulation of the substrate of the mechanical resonator. This approach permits us to cool phonon modes of arbitrary frequencies not limited by the cavity-optical field detuning deep into the quantum regime from room temperature.

  15. Liquid spray cooling of a heated surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grissom, W. M.; Wierum, F. A.

    1981-01-01

    The lowest surface temperature possible for the existance of spray evaporative cooling is determined experimentally to be a linear function of the impinging spray mass flux. A conduction-controlled analytical model of droplet evaporation gives fairly good agreement with experimental measurements at atmospheric pressure. At reduced pressures droplet evaporation rates are decreased significantly such that an optimum operating pressure exists for each desired surface heat flux. The initiation of the 'Leidenfrost state' provides the upper surface temperature bound for spray evaporative cooling.

  16. Preliminary design package for solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Summarized preliminary design information on activities associated with the development, delivery and support of solar heating and cooling systems is given. These systems are for single family dwellings and commercial applications. The heating/cooling system use a reversible vapor compression heat pump that is driven in the cooling mode by a Rankine power loop, and in the heating mode by a variable speed electric motor. The heating/cooling systems differ from the heating-only systems in the arrangement of the heat pump subsystem and the addition of a cooling tower to provide the heat sink for cooling mode operation.

  17. Solar-powered Rankine heat pump for heating and cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousseau, J.

    1978-01-01

    The design, operation and performance of a familyy of solar heating and cooling systems are discussed. The systems feature a reversible heat pump operating with R-11 as the working fluid and using a motor-driven centrifugal compressor. In the cooling mode, solar energy provides the heat source for a Rankine power loop. The system is operational with heat source temperatures ranging from 155 to 220 F; the estimated coefficient of performance is 0.7. In the heating mode, the vapor-cycle heat pump processes solar energy collected at low temperatures (40 to 80 F). The speed of the compressor can be adjusted so that the heat pump capacity matches the load, allowing a seasonal coefficient of performance of about 8 to be attained.

  18. Solar heating and cooling systems design and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The development and delivery of eight prototype solar heating and cooling systems for installation and operational test was reported. Two heating and six heating and cooling units will be delivered for single family residences, multiple family residences and commercial applications.

  19. Prototype solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A collection of monthly status reports on the development of eight prototype solar heating and cooling systems is presented. The effort calls for the development, manufacture, test, system installation, maintenance, problem resolution, and performance evaluation. The systems are 3, 25, and 75 ton size units.

  20. HEATING AND COOLING SYSTEM FOR CALUTRON

    DOEpatents

    Starr, A.M.

    1960-06-28

    An apparatus is invented for heating or cooling the electrostatic liner conventionally disposed in a calutron tank. The apparatus is additionally arranged to mount the liner in its intended position in a readily detachable manner so as to facilitate disassembly of the calutron.

  1. Solar Heating and Cooling: An Economic Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGarity, Arthur E.

    This study serves as an introduction to the important economic considerations that are necessary for an assessment of the potential for solar heating and cooling in the United States. The first chapter introduces the technology that is used to tap solar energy for residential and commercial applications and illustrates the potential significance…

  2. Keeping Cool in Extreme Heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Through a partnership with Unitika Ltd., NASA's Langley Research Center created a foam based on high temperature resistant polyimide chemistry. Licensed non-exclusively to SORDAL, Inc., the low-density foam, named TEEK, can be processed into forms or used to fill structures such as honeycomb. TEEK offers superior insulation and support qualities, with heat and flame resistance abilities.TEEK is a practical selection for hull insulation in the shipbuilding industry, with numerous potential applications in aerospace applications, fire-resistant construction materials, and a wide range of consumer products that will improve safety and energy efficiency. Other opportunities are available in the areas of automotive coatings and sealants, electrical components, and recreational equipment. SORDAL has introduced its new product in several different forms, under the name "SOLREX". The company is developing a new product called SORDAL Paper(TM) that will be used in conjunction with the polyimide foam to offer thermal protection in various products, such as fire resistant garments and prosthetics.

  3. Preliminary concepts for high-temperature mold heating and cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, J.P.

    1990-12-01

    The feasibility and limitations of various methods for mold heating and cooling were investigated. Two methods were chosen for evaluation: electrical heating and water cooling, and electrical heating and heat pipe conduction cooling. A model mold of each method was built. Test results indicated that the electrical heating and circulated water cooling was the better method. An injection mold utilizing this method was fabricated and temperature-cycled between 300 and 770{degree}F. 1 ref., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  4. Heat pipe radiation cooling of advanced hypersonic propulsion system components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. A.; Keddy, M.; Merrigan, M. A.; Silverstein, C. C.

    1991-01-01

    Heat transfer, heat pipe, and system studies were performed to assess the newly proposed heat pipe radiation cooling (HPRC) concept. With an HPRC system, heat is removed from the ramburner and nozzle of a hypersonic aircraft engine by a surrounding, high-temperature, heat pipe nacelle structure, transported to nearby external surfaces, and rejected to the environment by thermal radiation. With HPRC, the Mach number range available for using hydrocarbon fuels for aircraft operation extends into the Mach 4 to Mach 6 range, up from the current limit of about Mach 4. Heat transfer studies using a newly developed HPRC computer code determine cooling system and ramburner and nozzle temperatures, heat loads, and weights for a representative combined-cycle engine cruising at Mach 5 at 80,000 ft altitude. Heat pipe heat transport calculations, using the Los Alamos code HTPIPE, reveal that adequate heat trasport capability is available using molybdenum-lithium heat pipe technology. Results show that the HPRC system radiator area is limited in size to the ramburner-nozzle region of the engine nacelle; reasonable system weights are expected; hot section temperatures are consistent with advanced structural materials development goals; and system impact on engine performance is minimal.

  5. Cooling and Heating Functions of Photoionized Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnedin, Nickolay Y.; Hollon, Nicholas

    2012-10-01

    Cooling and heating functions of cosmic gas are crucial ingredients for any study of gas dynamics and thermodynamics in the interstellar and intergalactic media. As such, they have been studied extensively in the past under the assumption of collisional ionization equilibrium. However, for a wide range of applications, the local radiation field introduces a non-negligible, often dominant, modification to the cooling and heating functions. In the most general case, these modifications cannot be described in simple terms and would require a detailed calculation with a large set of chemical species using a radiative transfer code (the well-known code Cloudy, for example). We show, however, that for a sufficiently general variation in the spectral shape and intensity of the incident radiation field, the cooling and heating functions can be approximated as depending only on several photoionization rates, which can be thought of as representative samples of the overall radiation field. This dependence is easy to tabulate and implement in cosmological or galactic-scale simulations, thus economically accounting for an important but rarely included factor in the evolution of cosmic gas. We also show a few examples where the radiation environment has a large effect, the most spectacular of which is a quasar that suppresses gas cooling in its host halo without any mechanical or non-radiative thermal feedback.

  6. Market potential for solar heating and cooling in buildings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The use of solar heating and cooling for buildings as a method of conserving fossil fuels is discussed. The residential and commercial end use consumption of energy is tabulated. A survey to project the energy requirements for home and industry heating and cooling is developed. The survey indicates that there is a market potential for solar heating and cooling of buildings. A prediction of three to five billion dollars per year as the potential for solar heating and cooling is made.

  7. Cooling Acoustic Transducer with Heat Pipes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-29

    0013] Most transducer packages involve a stack of active ceramic. A Tonpilz transducer 10 in the prior art, as depicted in FIG. 1, consists...or corresponding parts throughout the several views and wherein: [0023] FIG. 1 is a prior art depiction of a Tonpilz transducer design; [0024...Distribution is unlimited Attorney Docket No. 97001 COOLING ACOUSTIC TRANSDUCER WITH HEAT PIPES STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The

  8. Cooling Acoustic Transcucer with Heat Pipes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-19

    pipes. [0013] Most transducer packages involve a stack of active ceramic. A Tonpilz transducer 10 in the prior art, as depicted in FIG. 1...identical or corresponding parts throughout the several views and wherein: [0023] FIG. 1 is a prior art depiction of a Tonpilz transducer design...Distribution is unlimited 20090916027 Attorney Docket No. 97001 COOLING ACOUSTIC TRANSDUCER WITH HEAT PIPES STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001

  9. Design of panel heating and cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bohle, J.; Klan, H.

    2000-07-01

    Panel heating and cooling systems use controlled temperature surfaces in the floor, walls, or ceiling of a conditioned space. The temperature is maintained by a circulating fluid through a circuit embedded in the panel. Heat transfer occurs by radiation and convection to or from a room. The performance of these systems may be determined by design calculations or testing. Thermal testing and system analysis by experiments are costly and inefficient. For different closed panel systems, finite element-based models and programs were developed by which temperature distribution in the construction, interdependence between performance and mean carrier fluid temperature, panel surface temperature, and room temperature can be calculated. One single power function product of all relevant parameters has been derived as an algorithm for performance calculations of panel heating and cooling systems, which can be adapted for other systems. Findings have been verified by experiment for floor heating panels with best results. These basic equations provided the design standards for German Standard DIN 4725, ''Thermal Output of Floor Heating'', which has been adopted as European Standard EN 1264. Finite element method calculation results were also compared with results from design calculations based on the ASHRAE method.

  10. Heating and cooling system. [for fatigue test specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imig, L. A.; Gardner, M. R. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A heating and cooling apparatus capable of cyclic heating and cooling of a test specimen undergoing fatigue testing is discussed. Cryogenic fluid is passed through a block clamped to the speciment to cool the block and the specimen. Heating cartridges penetrate the block to heat the block and the specimen to very hot temperaures. Control apparatus is provided to alternatively activate the cooling and heating modes to effect cyclic heating and cooling between very hot and very cold temperatures. The block is constructed of minimal mass to facilitate the rapid temperature changes.

  11. Heat can cool near-critical fluids.

    PubMed

    Beysens, Daniel; Fröhlich, Thomas; Garrabos, Yves

    2011-11-01

    We report experiments with very compressible fluids near the liquid-gas critical point. These experiments are performed (i) under microgravity in low Earth orbit by using SF(6) at liquidlike density and (ii) under Earth's gravity with CO(2) at gaslike density. The sample fluid is filled in an interferometer cell with its walls maintained at constant temperature. In situ thermistors measure the local fluid temperature. One of the thermistors is also used as a heat source to generate heat pulses. With no gravity-induced fluid convection, the evolution of fluid temperature is governed by the balance of heat flux between the thermal boundary layer of the heat source, which compresses the bulk fluid, and the thermal boundary layer at the wall, which expands it. When heat pulses are applied to the fluid under weak or Earth's gravity, a long thermal transient is observed at the end of the heat pulse where the bulk fluid temperature reaches significantly below the initial temperature. This unconventional cooling originates from the fast decompression of the fluid, which is induced by the rapid convectively disappearing hot boundary layer at the heat source, and the persistence of an anomalously thin cold boundary layer convectively induced at the cell wall. This striking phenomenon is observed in a large range of temperature, density, and various thermodynamic conditions. This anomalous cooling effect persists for an appreciable period of time corresponding to the diffusive destruction of the cold boundary layer. We found that the effect is also more pronounced when the free fall acceleration is large. We have analyzed the result by using a simple one-dimensional model with ad hoc convective heat losses.

  12. Solar heating and cooling: Technical data and systems analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    The solar energy research is reported including climatic data, architectural data, heating and cooling equipment, thermal loads, and economic data. Lists of data sources presented include: selected data sources for solar energy heating and cooling; bibliography of solar energy, and other energy sources; sources for manufacturing and sales, solar energy collectors; and solar energy heating and cooling projects.

  13. Solar thermal heating and cooling. A bibliography with abstracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arenson, M.

    1979-01-01

    This bibliographic series cites and abstracts the literature and technical papers on the heating and cooling of buildings with solar thermal energy. Over 650 citations are arranged in the following categories: space heating and cooling systems; space heating and cooling models; building energy conservation; architectural considerations, thermal load computations; thermal load measurements, domestic hot water, solar and atmospheric radiation, swimming pools; and economics.

  14. Hypersonic aerospace vehicle leading-edge cooling using heat-pipe, transpiration and film-cooling techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Modlin, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of cooling hypersonic-vehicle leading-edge structures exposed to severe aerodynamic surface heat fluxes was studied, using a combination of liquid-metal heat pipes and surface-mass-transfer cooling techniques. A generalized, transient, finite-difference-based hypersonic leading-edge cooling model was developed that incorporated these effects and was demonstrated on an assumed aerospace plane-type wing leading edge section and a SCRAMJET engine inlet leading-edge section. The hypersonic leading-edge cooling model was developed using an existing, experimentally verified heat-pipe model. Then the existing heat-pipe model was modified by adding both transpiration and film-cooling options as new surface boundary conditions. The models used to predict the leading-edge surface heat-transfer reduction effects of the transpiration and film cooling were modifications of more-generalized, empirically based models obtained from the literature. It is concluded that cooling leading-edge structures exposed to severe hypersonic-flight environments using a combination of liquid-metal heat pipe, surface transpiration, and film cooling methods appears feasible.

  15. Stagnation Point Heat Transfer with Gas Injection Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vancrayenest, B.; Tran, M. D.; Fletcher, D. G.

    2005-01-01

    The present paper deals with an experimental study of the stagnation-point heat transfer to a cooled copper surface with gas injection under subsonic conditions. Test were made with a probe that combined a steady-state water-cooled calorimeter that allows the capability to study convective blockage and to perform heat transfer measurements in presence of gas injection in the stagnation region. The copper probe was pierced by 52 holes, representing 2.4% of the total probe surface. The 1.2 MW high enthalpy plasma wind tunnel was operated at anode powers between 130 and 230 kW and a static pressures from 35 hPa up to 200 hPa. Air, carbon dioxide and argon were injected in the mass flow range 0-0.4 g/s in the boundary layer developed around the 50 mm diameter probe. The measured stagnation-point heat transfer rates are reported and discussed.

  16. Integrated Bulding Heating, Cooling and Ventilation Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Bing

    Current research studies show that building heating, cooling and ventilation energy consumption account for nearly 40% of the total building energy use in the U.S. The potential for saving energy through building control systems varies from 5% to 20% based on recent market surveys. In addition, building control affects environmental performances such as thermal, visual, air quality, etc., and occupancy such as working productivity and comfort. Building control has been proven to be important both in design and operation stages. Building control design and operation need consistent and reliable static and dynamic information from multiple resources. Static information includes building geometry, construction and HVAC equipment. Dynamic information includes zone environmental performance, occupancy and outside weather information during operation. At the same time, model-based predicted control can help to optimize energy use while maintaining indoor set-point temperature when occupied. Unfortunately, several issues in the current approach of building control design and operation impede achieving this goal. These issues include: a) dynamic information data such as real-time on-site weather (e.g., temperature, wind speed and solar radiation) and occupancy (number of occupants and occupancy duration in the space) are not readily available; b) a comprehensive building energy model is not fully integrated into advanced control for accuracy and robustness; c) real-time implementation of indoor air temperature control are rare. This dissertation aims to investigate and solve these issues based on an integrated building control approach. This dissertation introduces and illustrates a method for integrated building heating, cooling and ventilation control to reduce energy consumption and maintain indoor temperature set-point, based on the prediction of occupant behavior patterns and weather conditions. Advanced machine learning methods including Adaptive Gaussian Process

  17. Heat pipe cooling of power processing magnetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, I. G.; Chester, M.

    1979-01-01

    The constant demand for increased power and reduced mass has raised the internal temperature of conventionally cooled power magnetics toward the upper limit of acceptability. The conflicting demands of electrical isolation, mechanical integrity, and thermal conductivity preclude significant further advancements using conventional approaches. However, the size and mass of multikilowatt power processing systems may be further reduced by the incorporation of heat pipe cooling directly into the power magnetics. Additionally, by maintaining lower more constant temperatures, the life and reliability of the magnetic devices will be improved. A heat pipe cooled transformer and input filter have been developed for the 2.4 kW beam supply of a 30-cm ion thruster system. This development yielded a mass reduction of 40% (1.76 kg) and lower mean winding temperature (20 C lower). While these improvements are significant, preliminary designs predict even greater benefits to be realized at higher power. This paper presents the design details along with the results of thermal vacuum operation and the component performance in a 3 kW breadboard power processor.

  18. Annual DOE Active Solar Heating and Cooling Contractors Review meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-09-01

    Ninety three project summaries dicussing the following aspects of active solar heating and cooling are presented: Rankine solar cooling systems; absorption solar cooling systems; desiccant solar cooling systems; solar heat pump systems; solar hot water systems; special projects (such as the National Solar Data Network, hybrid solar thermal/photovoltaic applications, and heat transfer and water migration in soils); administrative/management support; and solar collector, storage, controls, analysis, and materials technology.

  19. Thermocouple for heating and cooling of memory metal actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Charles (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A semiconductor thermocouple unit is provided for heating and cooling memory metal actuators. The semiconductor thermocouple unit is mounted adjacent to a memory metal actuator and has a heat sink attached to it. A flexible thermally conductive element extends between the semiconductor thermocouple and the actuator and serves as a heat transfer medium during heating and cooling operations.

  20. Heat pipe cooling of an aerospace foam mold manufacturing process

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, D.R.; Feldman, K.T.; Marjon, P.L.

    1980-01-01

    A passive heat pipe cooling system was developed to cool a Bendix foam mold used to manufacture aerospace foam parts. The cooling system consists of ten copper-water heat pipes with cooling fins implanted into the aluminum mold and cooled by a domestic size fan blowing ambient air. The number and location of the heat pipes was determined to provide the most effective cooling and mold isothermalization based on experimental measurements of mold temperatures during the exothermic foaming process and from practical considerations of the mold geometry and use. Performance tests were cnducted on an individual heat pipe and on the ten heat pipes implanted in the mold. Both exothermic foam heating and internal electrical heat input were used in the experiments. The experimental test results indicate that the heat pipe cooling system with a fan is four to six times faster than free convection cooling of the mold with no heat pipes or fan and nearly twice as fast as cooling by the fan only. Similarly fast increases in mold heating time in the cure furnace could be realized if the heat pipes are used during this part of the production process. The heat pipes also cool hot spots in the mold and help isothermalize the mold so that better quality foam parts should be produced.

  1. Solar heating and cooling systems design and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Solar heating and heating/cooling systems were designed for single family, multifamily, and commercial applications. Subsystems considered included solar collectors, heat storage systems, auxiliary energy sources, working fluids, and supplementary controls, piping, and pumps.

  2. Heat pipe cooling of power processing magnetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, I. G.; Chester, M. S.

    1979-01-01

    A heat pipe cooled transformer and input filter were developed for the 2.4 kW beam supply of a 30 cm ion thruster system. This development yielded a mass reduction of 40% (1.76 kg) and lower mean winding temperature (20 C lower). While these improvements are significant, preliminary designs predict even greater benefits to be realized at higher power. The design details are presented along with the results of thermal vacuum operation and the component performance in a 3 kW breadboard power processor.

  3. Radiation detector system having heat pipe based cooling

    DOEpatents

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Saveliev, Valeri D.; Barkan, Shaul

    2006-10-31

    A radiation detector system having a heat pipe based cooling. The radiation detector system includes a radiation detector thermally coupled to a thermo electric cooler (TEC). The TEC cools down the radiation detector, whereby heat is generated by the TEC. A heat removal device dissipates the heat generated by the TEC to surrounding environment. A heat pipe has a first end thermally coupled to the TEC to receive the heat generated by the TEC, and a second end thermally coupled to the heat removal device. The heat pipe transfers the heat generated by the TEC from the first end to the second end to be removed by the heat removal device.

  4. Solar heating and cooling diode module

    DOEpatents

    Maloney, Timothy J.

    1986-01-01

    A high efficiency solar heating system comprising a plurality of hollow modular units each for receiving a thermal storage mass, the units being arranged in stacked relation in the exterior frame of a building, each of the units including a port for filling the unit with the mass, a collector region and a storage region, each region having inner and outer walls, the outer wall of the collector region being oriented for exposure to sunlight for heating the thermal storage mass; the storage region having an opening therein and the collector region having a corresponding opening, the openings being joined for communicating the thermal storage mass between the storage and collector regions by thermosiphoning; the collector region being disposed substantially below and in parallel relation to the storage region in the modular unit; and the inner wall of the collector region of each successive modular unit in the stacked relation extending over the outer wall of the storage region of the next lower modular unit in the stacked relation for reducing heat loss from the system. Various modifications and alternatives are disclosed for both heating and cooling applications.

  5. Solar heating and cooling systems design and development. [prototype development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The development of twelve prototype solar heating/cooling systems, six heating and six heating and cooling systems, two each for single family, multi-family, and commercial applications, is reported. Schedules and technical discussions, along with illustrations on the progress made from April 1, 1977 through June 30, 1977 are detailed.

  6. 46 CFR 168.15-45 - Heating and cooling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Heating and cooling. 168.15-45 Section 168.15-45 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS CIVILIAN NAUTICAL SCHOOL VESSELS Accommodations § 168.15-45 Heating and cooling. All quarters must be adequately heated and...

  7. 46 CFR 168.15-45 - Heating and cooling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Heating and cooling. 168.15-45 Section 168.15-45 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS CIVILIAN NAUTICAL SCHOOL VESSELS Accommodations § 168.15-45 Heating and cooling. All quarters must be adequately heated and...

  8. 46 CFR 168.15-45 - Heating and cooling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Heating and cooling. 168.15-45 Section 168.15-45 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS CIVILIAN NAUTICAL SCHOOL VESSELS Accommodations § 168.15-45 Heating and cooling. All quarters must be adequately heated and...

  9. 46 CFR 168.15-45 - Heating and cooling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Heating and cooling. 168.15-45 Section 168.15-45 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS CIVILIAN NAUTICAL SCHOOL VESSELS Accommodations § 168.15-45 Heating and cooling. All quarters must be adequately heated and...

  10. 46 CFR 168.15-45 - Heating and cooling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Heating and cooling. 168.15-45 Section 168.15-45 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS CIVILIAN NAUTICAL SCHOOL VESSELS Accommodations § 168.15-45 Heating and cooling. All quarters must be adequately heated and...

  11. Fundamental research on convective heat transfer in electronic cooling technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, C. F.; Gan, Y. P.; Tian, Y. Q.; Lei, D. H.

    1992-03-01

    During the past six years comprehensive research programs have been conducted at the Beijing Polytechnic University to provide a better understanding of heat transfer characteristics of existing and condidate cooling techniques for electronic and microelectronic devices. This paper provides a review and summary of the programs with emphasis on direct liquid cooling. Included in this review are the heat transfer investigations related to the following cooling modes: liquid free, mixed and forced convection, liquid jet impingement, flowing liquid film cooling, pool boiling, spray cooling, foreign gas jet impingement in liquid pool, and forced convection air-cooling.

  12. Public policy for solar heating and cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirshberg, A. S.

    1976-01-01

    Recent analyses indicated that solar heating and cooling systems for residential buildings are nearly economically competitive with conventional fossil fuel or electric systems, the former having higher initial cost but a lower operating cost than the latter. The paper examines obstacles to the widespread acceptance and use of solar space conditioning systems and explores some general policies which could help to overcome them. The discussion covers such institutional barriers limiting the adoption of solar technologies as existing building codes, financing constraints, and organizational structure of the building industry. The potential impact of financial incentives is analyzed. It is noted that a tax incentive of 25% could speed the use of solar energy by 7 to 8 years and produce an 8% reduction in fossil fuel use by 1990. A preliminary incentive package which could be helpful in promoting solar energy both at federal and state levels is proposed, and the necessary incentive level is analysed.

  13. Design and optimization of geothermal power generation, heating, and cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanoglu, Mehmet

    Most of the world's geothermal power plants have been built in 1970s and 1980s following 1973 oil crisis. Urgency to generate electricity from alternative energy sources and the fact that geothermal energy was essentially free adversely affected careful designs of plants which would maximize their performance for a given geothermal resource. There are, however, tremendous potentials to improve performance of many existing geothermal power plants by retrofitting, optimizing the operating conditions, re-selecting the most appropriate binary fluid in binary plants, and considering cogeneration such as a district heating and/or cooling system or a system to preheat water entering boilers in industrial facilities. In this dissertation, some representative geothermal resources and existing geothermal power plants in Nevada are investigated to show these potentials. Economic analysis of a typical geothermal resource shows that geothermal heating and cooling may generate up to 3 times as much revenue as power generation alone. A district heating/cooling system is designed for its incorporation into an existing 27 MW air-cooled binary geothermal power plant. The system as designed has the capability to meet the entire heating needs of an industrial park as well as 40% of its cooling needs, generating potential revenues of $14,040,000 per year. A study of the power plant shows that evaporative cooling can increase the power output by up to 29% in summer by decreasing the condenser temperature. The power output of the plant can be increased by 2.8 percent by optimizing the maximum pressure in the cycle. Also, replacing the existing working fluid isobutane by butane, R-114, isopentane, and pentane can increase the power output by up to 2.5 percent. Investigation of some well-known geothermal power generation technologies as alternatives to an existing 12.8 MW single-flash geothermal power plant shows that double-flash, binary, and combined flash/binary designs can increase the

  14. Preliminary design activities for solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Information on the development of solar heating and cooling systems is presented. The major emphasis is placed on program organization, system size definition, site identification, system approaches, heat pump and equipment design, collector procurement, and other preliminary design activities.

  15. An experimental study of heat transfer around turbine airfoils with closed-loop cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Chih-Hung (Erik)

    Closed-Loop cooling has been identified as one of the promising cooling schemes for the next generation gas turbine systems. The closed-loop cooling design collects the spent coolants and directs them to be recovered to do useful work in engine cycle. Due to the requirement of the closed-loop cooling and adoption of innovative cooling methods, the geometric configuration of a closed-loop cooling design is usually complicated. The complexity induces the heat transfer and flow uncertainties and necessitates the detailed heat transfer study for the cooling design. The present research was designed to examine heat transfer of innovative closed-loop cooling designs of an advanced gas turbine system. A heat transfer measurement system employing the Thermochromic Liquid Crystal (TLC) has been developed in order to study detailed heat transfer of the complicated cooling designs. A hybrid technique has been proposed to combine two models: lumped heat capacity model and one-dimension model. The technique has been successfully demonstrated to be a reliable means by studying heat transfer phenomenon on pin fin arrays. Pin fin arrays, sometimes termed pedestals, are widely used in modern gas turbines to provide heat transfer enhancement. In addition, the study on pin fins array revealed effects of heat transfer by two increasingly important, yet not much being explored geometric parameters: shape of pin fin element and gap atop pin fin array. Heat transfer study using the measurement system has revealed detailed heat transfer distribution and eliminated heat transfer uncertainties for five scaled Perplex models of the most crucial designs in the closed-loop cooling system. This study has also demonstrated the improvement in design practice with assistance of the developed system. For a design that relies on the unverified data sets and correlation, the system provides a means to eliminate the uncertainties and provide prompt feedback to designers for modification of the design.

  16. Heating and Cooling Efficiency for Homes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Over 40 years ago, NASA developed Radiant Barrier technology to protect astronauts in the Apollo Program from temperatures that ranged from 250 F above to 400 F below zero Fahrenheit. This feat in temperature control technology enabled the astronauts to work inside the Apollo Command Module wearing short-sleeve shirts, with temperatures similar to those of a regular business office. The Radiant Barrier has been applied to virtually all spacecraft since then, including unmanned spacecraft with delicate instruments that need protection from temperature extremes. It is also applied to the astronauts space suits, protecting them during space walks. Made of aluminized polymer film, the Radiant Barrier both bars and lets in heat to maintain a consistent temperature in an environment where ordinary insulation methods will not suffice. The aluminization of the material provides a reflective surface that keeps more than 95 percent of the radiated energy in space from reaching the spacecraft s interior. In space suits, the thin and flexible material reflects the astronauts body heat back to them for warmth, while at the same time reflecting the sun s radiation away from them to keep them cool. Using conventional insulation, a space suit would have required a 7-foot-thick protective layer.

  17. Prototype solar heating and cooling systems, including potable hot water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomquist, D.; Oonk, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    Progress made in the development, delivery, and support of two prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water is reported. The system consists of the following subsystems: collector, auxiliary heating, potable hot water, storage, control, transport, and government-furnished site data acquisition. A comparison of the proposed Solaron Heat Pump and Solar Desiccant Heating and Cooling Systems, installation drawings, data on the Akron House at Akron, Ohio, and other program activities are included.

  18. Cooling-load implications for residential passive solar heating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, R. W.; McFarland, R. D.

    1983-11-01

    The quantification of cooling loads in residential buildings, particularly buildings with passive solar heating systems, is described, along with the computer simulation model used for calculating cooling loads. A sample of interim results is also presented. The objective of the research is to develop a simple analysis method, useful early in the design, to estimate the annual cooling energy requirement of a given building.

  19. Note: A passively cooled heat pipe for spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gillot, J; Lemarchand, C; Braud, I; Decamps, B; Gauguet, A; Vigué, J; Büchner, M

    2013-10-01

    We have developed and characterized a heat pipe for lithium spectroscopy, which is cooled only by air-convection, although its operating temperature is 330 °C: its construction is simple, of moderate cost and it is very reliable. A thermal model proves that heat-pipes without water cooling can be used up to considerably higher temperatures.

  20. Heat pipe cooling for scramjet engines. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Silverstein, C.C.

    1986-12-01

    Liquid metal heat pipe cooling systems have been investigated for the combustor liner and engine inlet leading edges of scramjet engines for a missile application. The combustor liner is cooled by a lithium-TZM molybdenum annular heat pipe, which incorporates a separate lithium reservoir. Heat is initially absorbed by the sensible thermal capacity of the heat pipe and liner, and subsequently by the vaporization and discharge of lithium to the atmosphere. The combustor liner temperature is maintained at 3400 F or less during steady-state cruise. The engine inlet leading edge is fabricated as a sodium-superalloy heat pipe. Cooling is accomplished by radiation of heat from the aft surface of the leading edge to the atmosphere. The leading edge temperature is limited to 1700 F or less. It is concluded that heat pipe cooling is a viable method for limiting scramjet combustor liner and engine inlet temperatures to levels at which structural integrity is greatly enhanced.

  1. Preliminary design package for prototype solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A summary is given of the preliminary analysis and design activity on solar heating and cooling systems. The analysis was made without site specific data other than weather; therefore, the results indicate performance expected under these special conditions. Major items include a market analysis, design approaches, trade studies and other special data required to evaluate the preliminary analysis and design. The program calls for the development and delivery of eight prototype solar heating and cooling systems for installation and operational test. Two heating and six heating and cooling units will be delivered for Single Family Residences, Multiple-family Residences and commercial applications.

  2. 24 CFR 3280.508 - Heat loss, heat gain and cooling load calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Heat loss, heat gain and cooling load calculations. 3280.508 Section 3280.508 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to... Thermal Protection § 3280.508 Heat loss, heat gain and cooling load calculations. (a) Information,...

  3. The NASA-Lewis/ERDA solar heating and cooling technology program. [project planning/energy policy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Couch, J. P.; Bloomfield, H. S.

    1975-01-01

    Plans by NASA to carry out a major role in a solar heating and cooling program are presented. This role would be to create and test the enabling technology for future solar heating, cooling, and combined heating/cooling systems. The major objectives of the project are to achieve reduction in solar energy system costs, while maintaining adequate performance, reliability, life, and maintenance characteristics. The project approach is discussed, and will be accomplished principally by contract with industry to develop advanced components and subsystems. Advanced hardware will be tested to establish 'technology readiness' both under controlled laboratory conditions and under real sun conditions.

  4. A thermosyphon heat pipe cooler for high power LEDs cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ji; Tian, Wenkai; Lv, Lucang

    2016-08-01

    Light emitting diode (LED) cooling is facing the challenge of high heat flux more seriously with the increase of input power and diode density. The proposed unique thermosyphon heat pipe heat sink is particularly suitable for cooling of high power density LED chips and other electronics, which has a heat dissipation potential of up to 280 W within an area of 20 mm × 22 mm (>60 W/cm2) under natural air convection. Meanwhile, a thorough visualization investigation was carried out to explore the two phase flow characteristics in the proposed thermosyphon heat pipe. Implementing this novel thermosyphon heat pipe heat sink in the cooling of a commercial 100 W LED integrated chip, a very low apparent thermal resistance of 0.34 K/W was obtained under natural air convection with the aid of the enhanced boiling heat transfer at the evaporation side and the enhanced natural air convection at the condensation side.

  5. Heat transfer and core neutronics considerations of the heat pipe cooled thermionic reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Determan, W. R.; Lewis, Brian

    The authors summarize the results of detailed neutronic and thermal-hydraulic evaluations of the heat pipe cooled thermionic (HPTI) reactor design, identify its key design attributes, and quantify its performance characteristics. The HPTI core uses modular, liquid-metal core heat transfer assemblies to replace the liquid-metal heat transport loop employed by in-core thermionic reactor designs of the past. The nuclear fuel, power conversion, heat transport, and heat rejection functions are all combined into a single modular unit. The reactor/converter assembly uses UN fuel pins to obtain a critical core configuration with in-core safety rods and reflector controls added to complete the subassembly. By thermally bonding the core heat transfer assemblies during the reactor core is coupled neutronically, thermally, and electrically into a modular assembly of individual power sources with cross-tied architecture. A forward-facing heat pipe radiator assembly extends from the reactor head in the shape of a frustum of a cone on the opposite side of the power system from the payload. Important virtues of the concept are the absence of any single-point failures and the ability of the core to effectively transfer the TFE waste heat load laterally to other in-core heat transfer assemblies in the event of multiple failures in either in-core and radiator heat pipes.

  6. Secular trends in monthly heating and cooling demands in Croatia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvitan, Lidija; Sokol Jurković, Renata

    2016-08-01

    This paper analyzes long-term heating and cooling trends for five locations in Croatia from 1901 to 2008 to assist in the revision of Croatia's heating and cooling energy policy. Trends in monthly heating degree-days (HDD) and cooling degree-days (CDD) were determined for three related temperature threshold values each and analyzed to provide insight into the influence of desired thermal comfort on the extent of changes in energy consumption. Monthly trends in the corresponding number of heating days (HD) and cooling days (CD) were also analyzed. A basic investigation of HDD, HD, CDD, and CD trends proved to be essential to the development of a complete description of important climate-related conditions that impact energy demands associated with heating and cooling. In a few cases, the dependence of the trends on the implemented temperature thresholds was rather pronounced and was reflected in great spatial and temporal variations in monthly trends. The statistical significance of the detected monthly trends illustrated a diverse range of possible impacts of climate changes on heating and cooling energy consumption both across and within three main climate regions in Croatia (continental, mountainous, and maritime). It is confirmed that the applied monthly scale for analyses is suitable for assessing heating and cooling practices.

  7. Heat transfer to the adsorbent in solar adsorption cooling device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilat, Peter; Patsch, Marek; Papucik, Stefan; Vantuch, Martin

    2014-08-01

    The article deals with design and construction of solar adsorption cooling device and with heat transfer problem in adsorber. The most important part of adsorption cooling system is adsorber/desorber containing adsorbent. Zeolith (adsorbent) type was chosen for its high adsorption capacity, like a coolant was used water. In adsorber/desorber occur, at heating of adsorbent, to heat transfer from heat change medium to the adsorbent. The time required for heating of adsorber filling is very important, because on it depend flexibility of cooling system. Zeolith has a large thermal resistance, therefore it had to be adapted the design and construction of adsorber. As the best shows the tube type of adsorber with double coat construction. By this construction is ensured thin layer of adsorbent and heating is quick in all volume of adsorbent. The process of heat transfer was experimentally measured, but for comparison simulated in ANSYS, too.

  8. District heating and cooling market assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Teotia, A.P.S.; Karvelas, D.E.; Daniels, E.J.; Anderson, J.L.

    1993-06-01

    For more than 10 years, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has supported research on and development of district steam, hot-water, and chilled-water systems in the residential and commercial sectors. In 1991, DOE sponsored a research project at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to reestimate the national market for district heating and cooling (DHC) systems to the year 2010. ANL had previously developed a DHC market-penetration model and used it to project future market penetration. The first step in the project was to conduct a literature search to identify major data sources on historical DHC markets and any past studies on the future market potential of DHC systems. On the basis of an evaluation of the available data and methodologies for estimating market penetration of new technologies, it was concluded that ANL should develop a new econometric model for forecasting DHC markets. By using the 1989 DOE/Energy Information Administration Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Surveys (CBECS) public-use-tape data, a model was estimated for steam, hot-water, and chilled-water demand in the buildings surveyed. The model provides estimates of building steam, hot-water, and chilled-water consumption and expenditures between now and the year 2010. The analysis shows that the total U.S. market for district steam, hot water, and chilled water could grow from 0.8 quadrillion British thermal units (quad) in 1989 to 1.0 quad by 2000 and 1.25 quad by 2010. The demand for chilled water could nearly double in the forecast period, and its share could approach one-third of the total DHC market. This model, and the results, should be of use to policymakers, researchers, and market participants involved in the planning and implementation of community-based, energy-conserving, and environmentally beneficial energy systems.

  9. Space cooling system using nocturnal heat rejection and sky radiation cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Satoshi; Saitoh, Takeo

    1998-07-01

    A space cooling system using natural energy, a range of atmospheric temperature and sky radiation, is considered. Behavior of the system using nocturnal heat rejection in the summer is characterized by numerical simulation. The system consists of sky radiators, a thermal energy storage tank, and an air-conditioner. The sky radiators are fin-tube heat exchanger type with fans. The air conditioner is water-to-air type. The water in the storage tank is circulated to the sky radiators by a pump at night to be cooled using forced convection of outdoor air and sky radiation cooling. In the daytime, the condenser of the air conditioner is cooled by the cold water in the storage tank. Total consumption of electric power for air conditioning is used for evaluating the system performance. From the calculation, it is found that there are optimum conditions to reduce the total consumption of electric power. The reason is that the storage system requires additional consumption of electric power by the sky radiator pump and fans though the system could reduce the consumption of electric power by the air conditioner. When the sky radiators are operated during some limited hours, the total consumption of electric power becomes smaller than that when the sky radiators are continuously operated throughout night. The consumption of electric power decreases as the capacity of the thermal energy storage tank increases. This system has a possibility to save energy and to level the uneven consumption of electric power throughout a 24-hour period. For an example of some operating condition, the total consumption of electric power is reduced by 2.4 % compared with a conventional system, and 19 % of the power is consumed late at night for operating the sky radiator pump and fans. Combining with seasonal thermal energy storage could more reduce demand for electricity or shift the demand to off-peak hours.

  10. Heat-driven acoustic cooling engine having no moving parts

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert; Hofler, Thomas J.

    1989-01-01

    A heat-driven acoustic cooling engine having no moving parts receives heat from a heat source. The acoustic cooling engine comprises an elongated resonant pressure vessel having first and second ends. A compressible fluid having a substantial thermal expansion coefficient and capable of supporting an acoustic standing wave is contained in the resonant pressure vessel. The heat source supplies heat to the first end of the vessel. A first heat exchanger in the vessel is spaced-apart from the first end and receives heat from the first end. A first thermodynamic element is adjacent to the first heat exchanger and converts some of the heat transmitted by the first heat exchanger into acoustic power. A second thermodynamic element has a first end located spaced-apart from the first thermodynamic element and a second end farther away from the first thermodynamic element than is its first end. The first end of the second thermodynamic element heats while its second end cools as a consequence of the acoustic power. A second heat exchanger is adjacent to and between the first and second thermodynamic elements. A heat sink outside of the vessel is thermally coupled to and receives heat from the second heat exchanger. The resonant pressure vessel can include a housing less than one-fourth wavelength in length coupled to a reservoir. The housing can include a reduced diameter portion communicating with the reservoir.

  11. Film-Cooling Heat-Transfer Measurements Using Liquid Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hippensteele, Steven A.

    1997-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: (1) The Transient Liquid-Crystal Heat-Transfer Technique; (2) 2-D Film-Cooling Heat-Transfer on an AlliedSignal Vane; and (3) Effects of Tab Vortex Generators on Surface Heat Transfer. Downstream of a Jet in Crossflow.

  12. The heat transfer of cooling fins on moving air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doetsch, Hans

    1935-01-01

    The present report is a comparison of the experimentally defined temperature and heat output of cooling fins in the air stream with theory. The agreement is close on the basis of a mean coefficient of heat transfer with respect to the total surface. A relationship is established between the mean coefficient of heat transfer, the dimensions of the fin arrangement, and the air velocity.

  13. Surface cooling of scramjet engine inlets using heat pipe, transpiration, and film cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Modlin, J.M.; Colwell, G.T. Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta )

    1992-09-01

    This article reports the results of applying a finite-difference-based computational technique to the problem of predicting the transient thermal behavior of a scramjet engine inlet exposed to a typical hypersonic flight aerodynamic surface heating environment, including type IV shock interference heating. The leading-edge cooling model utilized incorporates liquid metal heat pipe cooling with surface transpiration and film cooling. Results include transient structural temperature distributions, aerodynamic heat inputs, and surface coolant distributions. It seems that these cooling techniques may be used to hold maximum skin temperatures to near acceptable values during the severe aerodynamic and type IV shock interference heating effects expected on the leading edge of a hypersonic aerospace vehicle scramjet engine. 15 refs.

  14. Rapid PCR amplification using a microfluidic device with integrated microwave heating and air impingement cooling.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Kirsty J; Docker, Peter T; Yelland, John V; Dyer, Charlotte E; Greenman, John; Greenway, Gillian M; Haswell, Stephen J

    2010-07-07

    A microwave heating system is described for performing polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in a microfluidic device. The heating system, in combination with air impingement cooling, provided rapid thermal cycling with heating and cooling rates of up to 65 degrees C s(-1) and minimal over- or under-shoot (+/-0.1 degrees C) when reaching target temperatures. In addition, once the required temperature was reached it could be maintained with an accuracy of +/-0.1 degrees C. To demonstrate the functionality of the system, PCR was successfully performed for the amplification of the Amelogenin locus using heating rates and quantities an order of magnitude faster and smaller than current commercial instruments.

  15. Effect of Triangular Fins on Critical Heat Flux in Ethanol-cooled Combustion Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takegoshi, Masao; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Saito, Toshihito; Ono, Fumiei; Hiraiwa, Tetsuo; Tomioka, Sadatake

    A pressure-fed engine with a regeneratively-cooled combustion chamber is studied in JAXA. Operation chamber pressure is approximately 1 MPa. A proposed propellant combination is liquid oxygen and ethanol. However, it is necessary to understand the critical heat flux when ethanol is used as a coolant for regeneratively-cooled combustion chamber because the saturation pressure of it is 6.3 MPa. In general, it is known that the cooling wall with fins improves the cooling performance. In this study, the effect of triangular fins on critical heat flux of ethanol in ethanol-cooled combustion chamber was investigated. As the result, it was found that the critical heat flux of cooling wall with triangular fins was 23 % higher than that of that without fin in the same velocity condition of the coolant. The critical heat flux increases by the triangular fins on the cooling surface due to the effect of the combination cooling with film boiling and nucleate boiling.

  16. Cosmic ray heating in cool core clusters I: diversity of steady state solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, Svenja; Pfrommer, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    The absence of large cooling flows in cool core clusters appears to require self-regulated energy feedback by active galactic nuclei (AGNs) but the exact heating mechanism has not yet been identified. Here, we analyse whether a combination of cosmic ray (CR) heating and thermal conduction can offset radiative cooling. To this end, we compile a large sample of 39 cool core clusters and determine steady state solutions of the hydrodynamic equations that are coupled to the CR energy equation. We find solutions that match the observed density and temperature profiles for all our clusters well. Radiative cooling is balanced by CR heating in the cluster centres and by thermal conduction on larger scales, thus demonstrating the relevance of both heating mechanisms. Our mass deposition rates vary by three orders of magnitude and are linearly correlated to the observed star formation rates. Clusters with large mass deposition rates show larger cooling radii and require a larger radial extent of the CR injection function. Interestingly, our sample shows a continuous sequence in cooling properties: clusters hosting radio mini halos are characterised by the largest cooling radii, star formation and mass deposition rates in our sample and thus signal the presence of a higher cooling activity. The steady state solutions support the structural differences between clusters hosting a radio mini halo and those that do not.

  17. Heat-transfer processes in air-cooled engine cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinkel, Benjamin

    1938-01-01

    From a consideration of heat-transfer theory, semi-empirical expressions are set up for the transfer of heat from the combustion gases to the cylinder of an air-cooled engine and from the cylinder to the cooling air. Simple equations for the average head and barrel temperatures as functions of the important engine and cooling variables are obtained from these expressions. The expressions involve a few empirical constants, which may be readily determined from engine tests. Numerical values for these constants were obtained from single-cylinder engine tests for cylinders of the Pratt & Whitney 1535 and 1340-h engines. The equations provide a means of calculating the effect of the various engine and cooling variables on the cylinder temperatures and also of correlating the results of engine cooling tests. An example is given of the application of the equations to the correlation of cooling-test data obtained in flight.

  18. Emergency Decay Heat Removal in a GEN-IV Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Lap Y.; Ludewig, Hans; Jo, Jae

    2006-07-01

    A series of transient analyses using the system code RELAP5-3d has been performed to confirm the efficacy of a proposed hybrid active/passive combination approach to the decay heat removal for an advanced 2400 MWt GEN-IV gas-cooled fast reactor. The accident sequence of interest is a station blackout simultaneous with a small break (10 sq.inch/0.645 m{sup 2}) in the reactor vessel. The analyses cover the three phases of decay heat removal in a depressurization accident: (1) forced flow cooling by the power conversion unit (PCU) coast down, (2) active forced flow cooling by a battery powered blower, and (3) passive cooling by natural circulation. The blower is part of an emergency cooling system (ECS) that by design is to sustain passive decay heat removal via natural circulation cooling 24 hours after shutdown. The RELAP5 model includes the helium-cooled reactor, the ECS (primary and secondary side), the PCU with all the rotating machinery (turbine and compressors) and the heat transfer components (recuperator, pre-cooler and inter-cooler), and the guard containment that surrounds the reactor and the PCU. The transient analysis has demonstrated the effectiveness of passive decay heat removal by natural circulation cooling when the guard containment pressure is maintained at or above 800 kPa. (authors)

  19. High performance microchannel heat exchanger for cooling high heat load x-ray optical elements

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, U.S.; Rogers, C.S.; Mills, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    Analysis has been carried out to demonstrate that a liquid nitrogen cooled microchannel heat exchanger can be designed to maximize the heat transfer from silicon to the working fluid. The results show that the performance of the liquid nitrogen cooled microchannel heat exchanger is significantly enhanced by approximately three times over flowing water through microchannels.

  20. High performance microchannel heat exchanger for cooling high heat load x-ray optical elements

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, U.S.; Rogers, C.S.; Mills, D.M.

    1992-12-01

    Analysis has been carried out to demonstrate that a liquid nitrogen cooled microchannel heat exchanger can be designed to maximize the heat transfer from silicon to the working fluid. The results show that the performance of the liquid nitrogen cooled microchannel heat exchanger is significantly enhanced by approximately three times over flowing water through microchannels.

  1. Electrically heated tube investigation of cooling channel geometry effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Michael L.

    1995-01-01

    The results of an experimental investigation on the combined effects of cooling channel aspect ratio and curvature for rocket engines are presented. Symmetrically heated tubes with average heat fluxes up to 1.7 MW/m(exp 2) were used. The coolant was gaseous nitrogen at an inlet temperature of 280 K (500 R) and inlet pressures up to 1.0 x 10(exp 7) N/m(exp 2) (1500 psia). Two different tube geometries were tested: a straight, circular cross-section tube, and an aspect-ratio 10 cross-section tube with a 45 deg bend. The circular tube results are compared to classical models from the literature as validation of the system. The curvature effect data from the curved aspect-ratio 10 tube compare favorably to the empirical equations available in the literature for low aspect ratio tubes. This latter results suggest that thermal stratification of the coolant due to diminished curvature effect mixing may not be an issue for high aspect-ratio cooling channels.

  2. Comparison of solar heat pump systems to conventional methods for residential heating, cooling, and water heating, volume 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, P. J.; Morehouse, J. H.

    1980-04-01

    The series and parallel combined solar heat pump systems investigated are at best marginally competitive, on a 20 year life cycle cost basis, with conventional oil and electric furnace systems. The combined solar heat pump systems are not economically competitive with conventional gas furnace or stand alone heat pump systems for residential space heating, cooling and water heating. The combined solar heat pump systems do offer the potential for significant energy savings as compared to conventional furnace systems and the stand alone heat pump. The cost of that savings, however, is beyond that which the average consumer can be expected to pay. Barring unforeseen manufacturing process or materials breakthroughs, parallel systems prices are firm. The prices listed for series systems already include low cost site built collectors and an optimistic estimate of the liquid to air heat pump costs, and prices on other series system components are firm. A collector cost sensitivity analysis did not offer any encouraging directions towards significant systems cost reduction.

  3. Solar heating and cooling technical data and systems analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, D. L.

    1977-01-01

    The research activities described herein were concentrated on the areas of economics, heating and cooling systems, architectural design, materials characteristics, climatic conditions, educational information packages, and evaluation of solar energy systems and components.

  4. Science 101: What Are the Earth's Heating and Cooling Mechanisms?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Bill

    2015-01-01

    In this article, author Bill Robertson attempts to help readers understand some of the Earth's heating and cooling mechanisms and how they relate to global warming. Figures are provided to help facilitate learning.

  5. Solar heating and cooling systems design and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Progress in the development of prototype solar heating/cooling systems is reported. Results obtained from refinement/improvement of the single family, multifamily, and commercial systems configurations and generalized studies on several of the subsystems are presented.

  6. System design package for the solar heating and cooling central data processing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The central data processing system provides the resources required to assess the performance of solar heating and cooling systems installed at remote sites. These sites consist of residential, commercial, government, and educational types of buildings, and the solar heating and cooling systems can be hot-water, space heating, cooling, and combinations of these. The instrumentation data associated with these systems will vary according to the application and must be collected, processed, and presented in a form which supports continuity of performance evaluation across all applications. Overall software system requirements were established for use in the central integration facility which transforms raw data collected at remote sites into performance evaluation information for assessing the performance of solar heating and cooling systems.

  7. Subcontracted activities related to TES for building heating and cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, J.

    1980-01-01

    The subcontract program elements related to thermal energy storage for building heating and cooling systems are outlined. The following factors are included: subcontracts in the utility load management application area; life and stability testing of packaged low cost energy storage materials; and development of thermal energy storage systems for residential space cooling. Resistance storage heater component development, demonstration of storage heater systems for residential applications, and simulation and evaluation of latent heat thermal energy storage (heat pump systems) are also discussed. Application of thermal energy storage for solar application and twin cities district heating are covered including an application analysis and technology assessment of thermal energy storage.

  8. Subcontracted activities related to TES for building heating and cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, J.

    1980-03-01

    The subcontract program elements related to thermal energy storage for building heating and cooling systems are outlined. The following factors are included: subcontracts in the utility load management application area; life and stability testing of packaged low cost energy storage materials; and development of thermal energy storage systems for residential space cooling. Resistance storage heater component development, demonstration of storage heater systems for residential applications, and simulation and evaluation of latent heat thermal energy storage (heat pump systems) are also discussed. Application of thermal energy storage for solar application and twin cities district heating are covered including an application analysis and technology assessment of thermal energy storage.

  9. Coupled reactor kinetics and heat transfer model for heat pipe cooled reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Steven A.; Houts, Michael

    2001-02-01

    Heat pipes are often proposed as cooling system components for small fission reactors. SAFE-300 and STAR-C are two reactor concepts that use heat pipes as an integral part of the cooling system. Heat pipes have been used in reactors to cool components within radiation tests (Deverall, 1973); however, no reactor has been built or tested that uses heat pipes solely as the primary cooling system. Heat pipe cooled reactors will likely require the development of a test reactor to determine the main differences in operational behavior from forced cooled reactors. The purpose of this paper is to describe the results of a systems code capable of modeling the coupling between the reactor kinetics and heat pipe controlled heat transport. Heat transport in heat pipe reactors is complex and highly system dependent. Nevertheless, in general terms it relies on heat flowing from the fuel pins through the heat pipe, to the heat exchanger, and then ultimately into the power conversion system and heat sink. A system model is described that is capable of modeling coupled reactor kinetics phenomena, heat transfer dynamics within the fuel pins, and the transient behavior of heat pipes (including the melting of the working fluid). This paper focuses primarily on the coupling effects caused by reactor feedback and compares the observations with forced cooled reactors. A number of reactor startup transients have been modeled, and issues such as power peaking, and power-to-flow mismatches, and loading transients were examined, including the possibility of heat flow from the heat exchanger back into the reactor. This system model is envisioned as a tool to be used for screening various heat pipe cooled reactor concepts, for designing and developing test facility requirements, for use in safety evaluations, and for developing test criteria for in-pile and out-of-pile test facilities. .

  10. National Program for Solar Heating and Cooling of Buildings. Project Date Summaries. Vol. I: Commercial and Residential Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Energy Research and Development Administration, Washington, DC. Div. of Solar Energy.

    Three volumes present brief abstracts of projects funded by the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) and conducted under the National Program for Solar Heating and Cooling of Buildings through July 1976. The overall federal program includes demonstrations of heating and/or combined cooling for residential and commercial buildings…

  11. Development and testing of heat transport fluids for use in active solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, J. C.

    1981-01-01

    Work on heat transport fluids for use with active solar heating and cooling systems is described. Program objectives and how they were accomplished including problems encountered during testing are discussed.

  12. Solar space heating and cooling by selective use of the components of a desiccant cooling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbud, Ihsan Aladdin

    The economic advantages of by-passing various components of a desiccant cooling system under conditions not requiring their use are estimated by evaluating the annual costs of heating and cooling a commercial building in three representative U.S. cities. Life-cycle costs of systems employing solar heat for space heating and desiccant regeneration are compared with those using electric heat. The costs of purchasing and operating heating and desiccant cooling systems, with and without solar heat supply, are compared with those employing conventional heating and vapor compression cooling. The conditions under which commercial buildings can be cooled with desiccant systems at costs competitive with conventional systems are identified. A commercially available vapor compression air conditioner is used as a standard of comparison for energy consumption and room comfort. Heating and cooling requirements of the building are determined by use of the BLAST computer model in a simulation of long term system operation. Performance of the desiccant cooling system and life cycle savings obtained by its use are determined by simulation employing the TRNSYS computer model. TRNSYS compatible subroutines are developed to simulate operation of the desiccant equipment, the building, and the controllers that operate and monitor the system components. The results are presented in tabular and graphical form. This study shows that in the widely different climates represented in Los Angeles, New York, and Miami, by-passing various components in the desiccant cooling system when they are not needed is economically advantageous. Operation cost of the complete system decreased by 47.3% in Los Angeles, by 30.9% in New York City, and by 23.9% in Miami by not operating the desiccant wheel and other elements. The ventilation desiccant cooling system has major economic advantage over conventional systems under conditions of moderate humidity, as in Los Angeles and New York City. In Miami, however

  13. Solar-Heated and Cooled Office Building--Columbus, Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Final report documents solar-energy system installed in office building to provide space heating, space cooling and domestic hot water. Collectors mounted on roof track Sun and concentrate rays on fluid-circulating tubes. Collected energy is distributed to hot-water-fired absorption chiller and space-heating and domestic-hot-water preheating systems.

  14. Prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Progress is reviewed in the development, delivery, and support of two prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water. The system consisted of the following subsystems: collector, auxiliary heating, potable hot water, storage, control, transport, and government-furnished site data acquisition.

  15. Using the Earth to Heat and Cool Homes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Stephen G.

    The heat collecting capacity of the earth and or the earth's ground waters and surface waters exist as potential energy sources for home heating and cooling. Techniques and devices associated with use of the earth's thermal energy capabilities are presented and evaluated in this four-chapter report. Included in these chapters are: (1) descriptions…

  16. Computational Simulation of a Water-Cooled Heat Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozarth, Duane

    2008-01-01

    A Fortran-language computer program for simulating the operation of a water-cooled vapor-compression heat pump in any orientation with respect to gravity has been developed by modifying a prior general-purpose heat-pump design code used at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).

  17. Spray mist cooling heat transfer in glass tempering process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sozbir, Nedim; Yao, S. C.

    2016-10-01

    Energy saving is a very important issue in glass plants, especially in a glass tempering process, where very high velocity air jet impingement is applied during the cooling process of glass tempering. In fact, air compressor energy may be reduced by a spray cooling due to its high heat transfer capabilities. Presently, in this paper, both pure air and water mist spray cooling are investigated in the glass tempering process. The test results indicate that thin and low-cost tempered glass can be made by mist cooling without fracture. It is possible to find the optimal water flux and duration of mist application to achieve a desirable temperature distribution in the glass for deep penetration of the cooling front but without inducing cracking during the tempering. The use of mist cooling could give about 29 % air pressure reduction for 2-mm glass plate and 50 % reduction for both 3- and 4-mm glass plates.

  18. Estimating end-use emissions factors for policy analysis: the case of space cooling and heating.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Grant D

    2014-06-17

    This paper provides the first estimates of end-use specific emissions factors, which are estimates of the amount of a pollutant that is emitted when a unit of electricity is generated to meet demand from a specific end-use. In particular, this paper provides estimates of emissions factors for space cooling and heating, which are two of the most significant end-uses. The analysis is based on a novel two-stage regression framework that estimates emissions factors that are specific to cooling or heating by exploiting variation in cooling and heating demand induced by weather variation. Heating is associated with similar or greater CO2 emissions factor than cooling in all regions. The difference is greatest in the Midwest and Northeast, where the estimated CO2 emissions factor for heating is more than 20% larger than the emissions factor for cooling. The minor differences in emissions factors in other regions, combined with the substantial difference in the demand pattern for cooling and heating, suggests that the use of overall regional emissions factors is reasonable for policy evaluations in certain locations. Accurately quantifying the emissions factors associated with different end-uses across regions will aid in designing improved energy and environmental policies.

  19. A numerical model for the platelet heat-pipe-cooled leading edge of hypersonic vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongpeng; Liu, Weiqiang

    2016-01-01

    A new design, the platelet heat-pipe-cooled leading edge, is discussed for the thermal management to prevent damage to hypersonic vehicle leading edge component. For calculating the steady state behavior of platelet heat-pipe-cooled leading edge, a numerical model based on the principles of evaporation, convection, and condensation of a working fluid is presented. And then its effectiveness is validated by comparing the wall and vapor temperature against experimental data for a conventional heat pipe. Further investigations indicate that alloy IN718, with sodium as the working fluid is a feasible combination for Mach 8 flight with a 15 mm leading edge radius.

  20. Solar heating and cooling system design and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The progress of the program during the sixth program quarter is reported. The program calls for the development and delivery of eight prototype solar heating and cooling systems for installation and operational test. The William O'Brien single-family heating system was installed and is operational. The New Castle single-family heating residence is under construction. The Kansas University (KU) system is in the final design stages. The 25 ton cooling subsystem for KU is the debugging stage. Pressure drops that were greater than anticipated were encountered. The 3 ton simulation work is being finalized and the design parameters for the Rankine system were determined from simulation output.

  1. Heat Exchanger Design in Combined Cycle Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webber, H.; Feast, S.; Bond, A.

    Combined cycle engines employing both pre-cooled air-breathing and rocket modes of operation are the most promising propulsion system for achieving single stage to orbit vehicles. The air-breathing phase is purely for augmentation of the mission velocity required in the rocket phase and as such must be mass effective, re-using the components of the rocket cycle, whilst achieving adequate specific impulse. This paper explains how the unique demands placed on the air-breathing cycle results in the need for sophisticated thermodynamics and the use of a series of different heat exchangers to enable precooling and high pressure ratio compression of the air for delivery to the rocket combustion chambers. These major heat exchanger roles are; extracting heat from incoming air in the precooler, topping up cycle flow temperatures to maintain constant turbine operating conditions and extracting rejected heat from the power cycle via regenerator loops for thermal capacity matching. The design solutions of these heat exchangers are discussed.

  2. Dimensionless Model of a Thermoelectric Cooling Device Operating at Real Heat Transfer Conditions: Maximum Cooling Capacity Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnikov, A. A.; Kostishin, V. G.; Alenkov, V. V.

    2016-09-01

    Real operating conditions of a thermoelectric cooling device are in the presence of thermal resistances between thermoelectric material and a heat medium or cooling object. They limit performance of a device and should be considered when modeling. Here we propose a dimensionless mathematical steady state model, which takes them into account. Analytical equations for dimensionless cooling capacity, voltage, and coefficient of performance (COP) depending on dimensionless current are given. For improved accuracy a device can be modeled with use of numerical or combined analytical-numerical methods. The results of modeling are in acceptable accordance with experimental results. The case of zero temperature difference between hot and cold heat mediums at which the maximum cooling capacity mode appears is considered in detail. Optimal device parameters for maximal cooling capacity, such as fraction of thermal conductance on the cold side y, fraction of current relative to maximal j' are estimated in range of 0.38-0.44 and 0.48-0.95, respectively, for dimensionless conductance K' = 5-100. Also, a method for determination of thermal resistances of a thermoelectric cooling system is proposed.

  3. Thermodynamic analysis and optimization of air-cooled heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salimpour, Mohammad Reza; Bahrami, Zabihollah

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, a thermodynamic second-law analysis was performed to investigate the effects of different geometry and flow parameters on the air-cooled heat exchanger performance. For this purpose, the entropy generation due to heat transfer and pressure loss of internal and external flows of the air-cooled heat exchanger was calculated; and it was observed that the total entropy generation has a minimum at special tube-side Reynolds number. Also, it was seen that the increasing of the tube-side Reynolds number resulted in the rise of the irreversibility of the air-cooled heat exchanger. The results also showed when air-side Reynolds number decreased, the entropy generation rate of the external flow reduced. Finally, based on the computed results, a new correlation was developed to predict the optimum Reynolds number of the tube-side fluid flow.

  4. Direct electronic measurement of Peltier cooling and heating in graphene.

    PubMed

    Vera-Marun, I J; van den Berg, J J; Dejene, F K; van Wees, B J

    2016-05-10

    Thermoelectric effects allow the generation of electrical power from waste heat and the electrical control of cooling and heating. Remarkably, these effects are also highly sensitive to the asymmetry in the density of states around the Fermi energy and can therefore be exploited as probes of distortions in the electronic structure at the nanoscale. Here we consider two-dimensional graphene as an excellent nanoscale carbon material for exploring the interaction between electronic and thermal transport phenomena, by presenting a direct and quantitative measurement of the Peltier component to electronic cooling and heating in graphene. Thanks to an architecture including nanoscale thermometers, we detected Peltier component modulation of up to 15 mK for currents of 20 μA at room temperature and observed a full reversal between Peltier cooling and heating for electron and hole regimes. This fundamental thermodynamic property is a complementary tool for the study of nanoscale thermoelectric transport in two-dimensional materials.

  5. Direct electronic measurement of Peltier cooling and heating in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vera-Marun, I. J.; van den Berg, J. J.; Dejene, F. K.; van Wees, B. J.

    2016-05-01

    Thermoelectric effects allow the generation of electrical power from waste heat and the electrical control of cooling and heating. Remarkably, these effects are also highly sensitive to the asymmetry in the density of states around the Fermi energy and can therefore be exploited as probes of distortions in the electronic structure at the nanoscale. Here we consider two-dimensional graphene as an excellent nanoscale carbon material for exploring the interaction between electronic and thermal transport phenomena, by presenting a direct and quantitative measurement of the Peltier component to electronic cooling and heating in graphene. Thanks to an architecture including nanoscale thermometers, we detected Peltier component modulation of up to 15 mK for currents of 20 μA at room temperature and observed a full reversal between Peltier cooling and heating for electron and hole regimes. This fundamental thermodynamic property is a complementary tool for the study of nanoscale thermoelectric transport in two-dimensional materials.

  6. Direct electronic measurement of Peltier cooling and heating in graphene

    PubMed Central

    Vera-Marun, I. J.; van den Berg, J. J.; Dejene, F. K.; van Wees, B. J.

    2016-01-01

    Thermoelectric effects allow the generation of electrical power from waste heat and the electrical control of cooling and heating. Remarkably, these effects are also highly sensitive to the asymmetry in the density of states around the Fermi energy and can therefore be exploited as probes of distortions in the electronic structure at the nanoscale. Here we consider two-dimensional graphene as an excellent nanoscale carbon material for exploring the interaction between electronic and thermal transport phenomena, by presenting a direct and quantitative measurement of the Peltier component to electronic cooling and heating in graphene. Thanks to an architecture including nanoscale thermometers, we detected Peltier component modulation of up to 15 mK for currents of 20 μA at room temperature and observed a full reversal between Peltier cooling and heating for electron and hole regimes. This fundamental thermodynamic property is a complementary tool for the study of nanoscale thermoelectric transport in two-dimensional materials. PMID:27161186

  7. Combined air-oil cooling on a supercharged TC IC TAM diesel engine

    SciTech Connect

    Trenc, F. ); Pavletic, R. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1993-10-01

    In order to reduce the maximum cylinder wall temperatures of an air-cooled TC IC diesel engine with large longitudinal and circumferential temperature gradients, a curved, squared cross-sectional channel supplied with engine lubrication oil was introduced into the upper part of the cylinder wall. Numerical analyses of the heat transfer within the baseline air-cooled cylinder and intensive experimental work helped to understand the temperature situation in the cylinder at diverse engine running conditions. The results of the combined cooling were greatly affected by the design, dimensions, position of the channel, and the distribution of the cooling oil flow, and are presented in the paper.

  8. Variable Conductance Heat Pipe Cooling of Stirling Convertor and General Purpose Heat Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarau, Calin; Schwendeman, Carl; Anderson, William G.; Cornell, Peggy A.; Schifer, Nicholas A.

    2013-01-01

    In a Stirling Radioisotope Power System (RPS), heat must be continuously removed from the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules to maintain the modules and surrounding insulation at acceptable temperatures. The Stirling convertor normally provides this cooling. If the Stirling convertor stops in the current system, the insulation is designed to spoil, preventing damage to the GPHS at the cost of an early termination of the mission. An alkali-metal Variable Conductance Heat Pipe (VCHP) can be used to passively allow multiple stops and restarts of the Stirling convertor. In a previous NASA SBIR Program, Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc. (ACT) developed a series of sodium VCHPs as backup cooling systems for Stirling RPS. The operation of these VCHPs was demonstrated using Stirling heater head simulators and GPHS simulators. In the most recent effort, a sodium VCHP with a stainless steel envelope was designed, fabricated and tested at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) with a Stirling convertor for two concepts; one for the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) back up cooling system and one for the Long-lived Venus Lander thermal management system. The VCHP is designed to activate and remove heat from the stopped convertor at a 19 degC temperature increase from the nominal vapor temperature. The 19 degC temperature increase from nominal is low enough to avoid risking standard ASRG operation and spoiling of the Multi-Layer Insulation (MLI). In addition, the same backup cooling system can be applied to the Stirling convertor used for the refrigeration system of the Long-lived Venus Lander. The VCHP will allow the refrigeration system to: 1) rest during transit at a lower temperature than nominal; 2) pre-cool the modules to an even lower temperature before the entry in Venus atmosphere; 3) work at nominal temperature on Venus surface; 4) briefly stop multiple times on the Venus surface to allow scientific measurements. This paper presents the experimental

  9. Vortex-augmented cooling tower - windmill combination

    DOEpatents

    McAllister, J.E. Jr.

    1982-09-02

    A cooling tower for cooling large quantities of effluent water from a production facility by utilizing natural wind forces includes the use of a series of helically directed air inlet passages extending outwardly from the base of the tower to introduce air from any direction in a swirling vortical pattern while the force of the draft created in the tower makes it possible to place conventional power generating windmills in the air passage to provide power as a by-product.

  10. Heat transfer and turbulence in a turbulated blade cooling circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abuaf, N.; Kercher, D. M.

    1992-06-01

    The aero-thermal performance of a typical turbine blade three-pass turbulated cooling circuit geometry was investigated in a 10X plexiglas test model. The model closely duplicated the blade's leading edge, midchord and trailing edge cooling passage geometries. Steady state heat transfer coefficient distributions along the blade pressure side wall (convex surface) of the cooling circuit passages were measured with a thin-foil heater and a liquid crystal temperature sensor assembly. The heat transfer experiments were conducted on rib-roughened channels with staggered turbulators along the convex and concave surfaces of the cooling passages. Mid-channel axial velocity and turbulence intensity measurements were taken by hot wire anemometry at each passage end of the three-pass cooling circuit to characterize and relate the local thermal performance to the turbulence intensity levels. The near-atmospheric experimental data are compared with results of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis at the operating internal environment for a 1X rotating model of the blade cooling circuit and other turbulator channel geometry heat transfer data investigations. The comparison between the measurements and analysis is encouraging. Differences with other heat transfer data appear reasonably understood and explainable.

  11. Heat transfer and turbulence in a turbulated blade cooling circuit

    SciTech Connect

    Abuaf, N. ); Kercher, D.M. )

    1994-01-01

    The aerothermal performance of a typical turbine blade three-pass turbulated cooling circuit geometry was investigated in a 10X plexiglass test model. The model closely duplicated the blade's leading edge, midchord, and trailing edge cooling passage geometries. Steady-state heat transfer coefficient distributions along the blade pressure side wall (convex surface) of the cooling circuit passages were measured with a thin-foil heater and a liquid crystal temperature sensor assembly. The heat transfer experiments were conducted on rib-roughened channels with staggered turbulators along the convex and concave surfaces of the cooling passages. Midchannel axial velocity and turbulence intensity measurements were taken by hot-wire anemometry at each passage end of the three-pass cooling circuit to characterize and relate the experimental data are compared with results of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis at the operating internal environment for a 1X rotating model of the blade cooling circuit and other turbulator channel geometry heat transfer data investigations. The comparison between the measurements and analysis is encouraging. Differences with other heat transfer data appear reasonably understood and explainable.

  12. The development of a solar residential heating and cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The MSFC solar heating and cooling facility was assembled to demonstrate the engineering feasibility of utilizing solar energy for heating and cooling buildings, to provide an engineering evaluation of the total system and the key subsystems, and to investigate areas of possible improvement in design and efficiency. The basic solar heating and cooling system utilizes a flat plate solar energy collector, a large water tank for thermal energy storage, heat exchangers for space heating, and an absorption cycle air conditioner for space cooling. A complete description of all systems is given. Development activities for this test system included assembly, checkout, operation, modification, and data analysis, all of which are discussed. Selected data analyses for the first 15 weeks of testing are included, findings associated with energy storage and the energy storage system are outlined, and conclusions resulting from test findings are provided. An evaluation of the data for summer operation indicates that the current system is capable of supplying an average of 50 percent of the thermal energy required to drive the air conditioner. Preliminary evaluation of data collected for operation in the heating mode during the winter indicates that nearly 100 percent of the thermal energy required for heating can be supplied by the system.

  13. The effect of passive heating and face cooling on perceived exertion during exercise in the heat.

    PubMed

    Armada-da-Silva, P A S; Woods, J; Jones, D A

    2004-05-01

    Increased body temperature is thought to be an important component of the higher perception of exertion that is a feature of fatigue during exercise in the heat but a causal relationship has yet to be demonstrated. We have investigated the effect of passive heating on the perception of exertion during a standard bout of exercise and also assessed the effect of cooling the head on compensating for the increased body temperature on the feelings of exertion. Ten male subjects performed a 14-min cycling exercise [average power approximately 63% of maximum power output ( W(max))] at an ambient temperature of 35 degrees C at resting rectal temperature [mean (SD): 37.49 (0.27) degrees C; control (CON) trial] on one occasion, and after sitting in a sauna to raise rectal temperature [mean (SD): 38.95(0.13) degrees C; sauna (SAU) trial]. During the exercise, subjects reported their ratings of overall perceived exertion (RPE), perceived exertion of the legs (RPE(legs)) and thermal comfort (TC). A blood sample was collected by the end of the exercise for determination of plasma glucose, lactate and prolactin and haematocrit. RPE values were significantly elevated after passive heating [mean (SE): 14.5 (0.7) units in CON and 17.2 (0.5) units in SAU, at the end of exercise; P<0.001] as were the RPE(legs) ( P<0.01), while ratings of TC were similar in CON and SAU trials. Passive heating increased blood glucose ( P<0.05) but had no effect on lactate at the end of the exercise. Plasma prolactin was markedly elevated as a result of the sauna exposure [mean (SE): 1598 (152) versus 225 (31) mU l(-1) in SAU and CON trials, respectively; P<0.001]. Six of the subjects repeated the two trials but with the face cooled during exercise (trials CON(FAN) and SAU(FAN)) that was achieved by combining face fanning and spraying the face with a mist of cooled water. Face cooling decreased RPE values after sauna to a point that no differences between the two conditions existed. RPE(legs) scores and

  14. Vitrification and Devitrification of Rigid Amorphous Fraction of PET during Quasi-isothermal Cooling and Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cebe, Peggy; Chen, Huipeng

    2009-03-01

    Poly(ethylene terephthalate), PET, was studied by quasi-isothermal (QI) Temperature Modulated Differential Scanning Calorimetry (TMDSC). For the first time, both the temperature dependent crystalline fraction and rigid amorphous fraction (RAF) were quantitatively analyzed during QI cooling and reheating. Specific reversing heat capacity measurements show that most RAF vitrifies step by step during QI cooling after completion of crystallization. Upon subsequent QI reheating, the RAF devitrifies also step by step and only a small RAF of 0.04 remains at 470K, while melting starts above 473K. To obtain the exact temperature of the start of melting, heat capacity measurements were made using subsequent standard DSC heating, after QI cooling. By combining this method with the QI results, the temperature dependent phase fractions were obtained during standard DSC heating. We conclude that RAF completely devitrifies before the temperature reaches the crystal melting endotherm under the conditions used in this work.

  15. Spray Cooling Modeling: Droplet Sub-Cooling Effect on Heat Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, Joseph E.; Selvam, R. P.; Silk, Eric A.

    2008-01-21

    Spray cooling has become increasingly popular as a thermal management solution for high-heat flux (>100 W/cm{sup 2}) applications such as laser diodes and radars. Research has shown that using sub-cooled liquid can increase the heat flux from the hot surface. The objective of this study was to use a multi-phase numerical model to simulate the effect of a sub-cooled droplet impacting a growing vapor bubble in a thin (<100 {mu}m) liquid film. The two-phase model captured the liquid-vapor interface using the level set method. The effects of surface tension, viscosity, gravity and phase change were accounted for by using a modification to the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, which were solved using the finite difference method. The computed liquid-vapor interface and temperature distributions were visualized for better understanding of the heat removal process. To understand the heat transfer mechanisms of sub-cooled droplet impact on a growing vapor bubble, various initial droplet temperatures were modeled (from 20 deg. C below saturation temperature to saturation temperature). This may provide insights into how to improve the heat transfer in future spray cooling systems.

  16. Behavioural responses to hypothalamic cooling and heating in the rat.

    PubMed

    Cabanac, M; Dib, B

    1983-03-28

    Rats with hypothalamic thermodes had their hypothalamus cooled or warmed for short sessions. In a first series of experiments, rats could bar-press to obtain fanning with cool air. Cooling the hypothalamus did not suppress or inhibit this behaviour although rectal temperature was markedly increased. In a second series of experiments, bar-pressing would warm the water flowing in the thermode. The rats thus self suppressed the cooling of their hypothalamus. This behaviour was absent at 10 degrees C ambient temperature, and increased with increasing ambient temperature up to 35 degrees C. The result of this behaviour was a small hyperthermia in warm and hot environment compared to control when the rats could not self-suppress the cooling of hypothalamus. The results of both experiments suggest that no conscious direct sensation is aroused by hypothalamic cooling. Hypothalamic heating increased the rat's bar-pressing for cool air and decreased the rat's rectal temperature. When pressure on the lever would suppress a warm hypothalamic stimulus rats self-cooled their hypothalamus, especially in warm environments. Such behaviour resulted in an increased somatic hyperthermia due to the warm environment and hypothalamic cooling. These results are compatible with the hypothesis of a direct conscious sensation from a warm hypothalamus.

  17. Heat transfer from protein crystals: implications for flash-cooling and X-ray beam heating.

    PubMed

    Kriminski, S; Kazmierczak, M; Thorne, R E

    2003-04-01

    Three problems involving heat transfer from a protein crystal to a cooling agent are analyzed: flash-cooling in a cold nitrogen- or helium-gas stream, plunge-cooling into liquid nitrogen, propane or ethane and crystal heating in a cold gas stream owing to X-ray absorption. Heat transfer occurs by conduction inside the crystal and by convection from the crystal's outer surface to the cooling fluid. For flash-cooling in cold gas streams, heat transfer is limited by the rate of external convection; internal temperature gradients and crystal strains during cooling are very small. Helium gas provides only a threefold improvement in cooling rates relative to nitrogen because its much larger thermal conductivity is offset by its larger kinematic viscosity. Characteristic cooling times vary with crystal size L as L(3/2) and theoretical estimates of these times are consistent with experiments. Plunge-cooling into liquid cryogens, which can give much smaller convective thermal resistances provided that surface boiling is eliminated, can increase cooling rates by more than an order of magnitude. However, the internal conduction resistance is no longer negligible, producing much larger internal temperature gradients and strains that may damage larger crystals. Based on this analysis, factors affecting the success of flash-cooling experiments can be ordered from most to least important as follows: (1) crystal solvent content and solvent composition, (2) crystal size and shape, (3) amount of residual liquid around the crystal, (4) cooling method (liquid plunge versus gas stream), (5) choice of gas/liquid and (6) relative speed between cooling fluid and crystal. Crystal heating by X-ray absorption on present high-flux beamlines should be small. For a fixed flux and illuminated area, heating can be reduced by using crystals with areas normal to the beam that are much larger than the beam area.

  18. Post-dryout heat transfer in sodium-cooled fast reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, F.B.; Pedersen, D.R.

    1982-01-01

    The heat-transfer behavior of a heat-generating, dry, particulate bed resulting from a postulated core meltdown accident in sodium-cooled fast reactors is investigated theoretically. The processes of combined conduction and thermal radiation in the dry particulate bed and transient heat conduction in the structure in contact with the bed are modeled. Also modeled is the contribution of direct gamma-ray radiation to heat transfer. Results for the transient temperature distribution of the system are obtained by the method of successive approximation. Various post-dryout situations are considered and the conditions leading either to an incipient melting system or to a coolable non-melting system are identified. These are found to depend on four groups of dimensionless parameters, namely, the thermal property group, the radiation and internal heating group, the gamma-ray heating group, and the external cooling group.

  19. Solar residential heating and cooling system development test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, W. R.; Melton, D. E.

    1974-01-01

    A solar heating and cooling system is described, which was installed in a simulated home at Marshall Space Flight Center. Performance data are provided for the checkout and initial operational phase for key subsystems and for the total system. Valuable information was obtained with regard to operation of a solar cooling system during the first summer of operation. Areas where improvements and modifications are required to optimize such a system are discussed.

  20. The Impact of Heat Release in Turbine Film Cooling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    AFIT/GAE/ENY/08-J02 Abstract The Ultra Compact Combustor is a design that integrates a turbine vane into the combustor flow path. Because...of the high fuel-to-air ratio and short combustor flow path, a significant potential exists for unburned fuel to enter the turbine. Using...contemporary turbine cooling vane designs, the injection of oxygen-rich turbine cooling air into a combustor flow containing unburned fuel could result in heat

  1. Supercritical oxygen heat transfer. [regenerative cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, R. G.; Rousar, D. C.

    1977-01-01

    Heat transfer to supercritical oxygen was experimentally measured in electrical heated tubes. Experimental data were obtained for pressures ranging from 17 to 34.5 MPa (2460 to 5000 psia), and heat fluxes from 2 to 90 million w/sq cm (1.2 to 55 Btu/(sq in. sec)). Bulk temperatures ranged from 96 to 217 K (173 to 391 R). Experimental data obtained by other investigators were added to this to increase the range of pressure down to 2 MPa (290 psia) and increase the range of bulk temperature up to 566 K (1019 R). From this compilation of experimental data a correlating equation was developed which predicts over 95% of the experimental data within + or - 30%.

  2. Heat pipe cooled heat rejection subsystem modelling for nuclear electric propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moriarty, Michael P.

    1993-01-01

    NASA LeRC is currently developing a FORTRAN based computer model of a complete nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) vehicle that can be used for piloted and cargo missions to the Moon or Mars. Proposed designs feature either a Brayton or a K-Rankine power conversion cycle to drive a turbine coupled with rotary alternators. Both ion and magnetoplasmodynamic (MPD) thrusters will be considered in the model. In support of the NEP model, Rocketdyne is developing power conversion, heat rejection, and power management and distribution (PMAD) subroutines. The subroutines will be incorporated into the NEP vehicle model which will be written by NASA LeRC. The purpose is to document the heat pipe cooled heat rejection subsystem model and its supporting subroutines. The heat pipe cooled heat rejection subsystem model is designed to provide estimate of the mass and performance of the equipment used to reject heat from Brayton and Rankine cycle power conversion systems. The subroutine models the ductwork and heat pipe cooled manifold for a gas cooled Brayton; the heat sink heat exchanger, liquid loop piping, expansion compensator, pump and manifold for a liquid loop cooled Brayton; and a shear flow condenser for a K-Rankine system. In each case, the final heat rejection is made by way of a heat pipe radiator. The radiator is sized to reject the amount of heat necessary.

  3. Heat pipe cooled heat rejection subsystem modelling for nuclear electric propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriarty, Michael P.

    1993-11-01

    NASA LeRC is currently developing a FORTRAN based computer model of a complete nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) vehicle that can be used for piloted and cargo missions to the Moon or Mars. Proposed designs feature either a Brayton or a K-Rankine power conversion cycle to drive a turbine coupled with rotary alternators. Both ion and magnetoplasmodynamic (MPD) thrusters will be considered in the model. In support of the NEP model, Rocketdyne is developing power conversion, heat rejection, and power management and distribution (PMAD) subroutines. The subroutines will be incorporated into the NEP vehicle model which will be written by NASA LeRC. The purpose is to document the heat pipe cooled heat rejection subsystem model and its supporting subroutines. The heat pipe cooled heat rejection subsystem model is designed to provide estimate of the mass and performance of the equipment used to reject heat from Brayton and Rankine cycle power conversion systems. The subroutine models the ductwork and heat pipe cooled manifold for a gas cooled Brayton; the heat sink heat exchanger, liquid loop piping, expansion compensator, pump and manifold for a liquid loop cooled Brayton; and a shear flow condenser for a K-Rankine system. In each case, the final heat rejection is made by way of a heat pipe radiator. The radiator is sized to reject the amount of heat necessary.

  4. Transition from heating to cooling of channeled ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Toepffer, Christian

    2006-06-15

    Experiments showing a transverse heating or cooling of channeled ion beams are explained in terms of electron capture and loss processes between the projectile ions and the target. Such processes violate reversibility as the projectile captures electrons from occupied bound states and loses them to unoccupied weakly bound or continuum states. The transition probabilities for the transfer of electrons are calculated in the impact parameter Born approximation. Their dependence on the distance from the crystal strings is determined by scale factors which depend in turn on the relative velocity and the binding energies of the transferred electrons in the projectile and in the crystal, respectively. The appearance of transverse heating and cooling depends on the relative size of the scale factors for capture and loss. The transition from heating to cooling as function of velocity is described in good agreement with the experiments.

  5. EVA space suit Evaporative Cooling/Heating Glove System (ECHGS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coss, F. A.

    1976-01-01

    A new astronaut glove, the Evaporative Cooling/Heating Glove System (ECHGS), was designed and developed to allow the handling of objects between -200 F and +200 F. Active heating elements, positioned at each finger pad, provide additional heat to the finger pads from the rest of the finger. A water evaporative cooling system provides cooling by the injection of water to the finger areas and the subsequent direct evaporation to space. Thin, flexible insulation has been developed for the finger areas to limit thermal conductivity. Component and full glove tests have shown that the glove meets and exceeds the requirements to hold a 11/2 inch diameter bar at + or - 200 F for three minutes within comfort limits. The ECHGS is flexible, lightweight and comfortable. Tactility is reasonable and small objects can be identified especially by the fingertips beyond the one half width active elements.

  6. Heat Transfer on a Film-Cooled Rotating Blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Vijay K.

    1999-01-01

    A multi-block, three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code has been used to compute heat transfer coefficient on the blade, hub and shroud for a rotating high-pressure turbine blade with 172 film-cooling holes in eight rows. Film cooling effectiveness is also computed on the adiabatic blade. Wilcox's k-omega model is used for modeling the turbulence. Of the eight rows of holes, three are staggered on the shower-head with compound-angled holes. With so many holes on the blade it was somewhat of a challenge to get a good quality grid on and around the blade and in the tip clearance region. The final multi-block grid consists of 4784 elementary blocks which were merged into 276 super blocks. The viscous grid has over 2.2 million cells. Each hole exit, in its true oval shape, has 80 cells within it so that coolant velocity, temperature, k and omega distributions can be specified at these hole exits. It is found that for the given parameters, heat transfer coefficient on the cooled, isothermal blade is highest in the leading edge region and in the tip region. Also, the effectiveness over the cooled, adiabatic blade is the lowest in these regions. Results for an uncooled blade are also shown, providing a direct comparison with those for the cooled blade. Also, the heat transfer coefficient is much higher on the shroud as compared to that on the hub for both the cooled and the uncooled cases.

  7. Heat exchanger. [rocket combustion chambers and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolowski, D. E. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A heat exchanger, as exemplified by a rocket combustion chamber, is constructed by stacking thin metal rings having microsized openings therein at selective locations to form cooling passages defined by an inner wall, an outer wall and fins. Suitable manifolds are provided at each end of the rocket chamber. In addition to the cooling channel openings, coolant feed openings may be formed in each of rings. The coolant feed openings may be nested or positioned within generally U-shaped cooling channel openings. Compression on the stacked rings may be maintained by welds or the like or by bolts extending through the stacked rings.

  8. Solar-heating and cooling demonstration project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Florida Solar Energy Center has retrofitted office building, approximately 5,000 square feet of area, with solar heating and air-conditioning. Information on operation, installation, controls, and hardware for system is contained in 164 page report. Document includes manufacturer's product literature and detailed drawings.

  9. Energy Integrated Lighting-Heating-Cooling System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meckler, Gershon; And Others

    1964-01-01

    Energy balance problems in the design of office buildings are analyzed. Through the use of integrated systems utilizing dual purpose products, a controlled environment with minimum expenditure of energy, equipment and space can be provided. Contents include--(1) office building occupancy loads, (2) office building heating load analysis, (3) office…

  10. Implementation of Biogas Stations into Smart Heating and Cooling Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milčák, P.; Konvička, J.; Jasenská, M.

    2016-10-01

    The paper is aimed at the description of implementation of a biogas station into software environment for the "Smart Heating and Cooling Networks". The aim of this project is creation of a software tool for preparation of operation and optimization of treatment of heat/cool in small regions. In this case, the biogas station represents a kind of renewable energy source, which, however, has its own operational specifics which need to be taken into account at the creation of an implementation project. For a specific biogas station, a detailed computational model was elaborated, which is parameterized in particular for an optimization of the total computational time.

  11. Concerning the improvement of solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashidov, Iu. K.

    It is suggested that systems of solar heating and cooling can be simplified by the use of 'organized hydrothermal processes' (OHP) in the elements (e.g., circulation systems and heat storage units) of such systems. This paper defines and classifies such processes. Design diagrams are presented for two types of systems: (1) a heating, hot-water, and storage system with one-phase OHPs; and (2) a gravity-assisted heat pipe and an adsorption-type solar refrigeration system with two-phase OHPs.

  12. Waste-Heat-Driven Cooling Using Complex Compound Sorbents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rocketfeller, Uwe; Kirol, Lance; Khalili, Kaveh

    2004-01-01

    Improved complex-compound sorption pumps are undergoing development for use as prime movers in heat-pump systems for cooling and dehumidification of habitats for humans on the Moon and for residential and commercial cooling on Earth. Among the advantages of sorption heat-pump systems are that they contain no moving parts except for check valves and they can be driven by heat from diverse sources: examples include waste heat from generation of electric power, solar heat, or heat from combustion of natural gas. The use of complex compound sorbents in cooling cycles is not new in itself: Marketing of residential refrigerators using SrCl2 was attempted in the 1920s and 30s and was abandoned because heat- and mass-transfer rates of the sorbents were too low. Addressing the issue that gave rise to the prior abandonment of complex compound sorption heat pumps, the primary accomplishment of the present development program thus far has been the characterization of many candidate sorption media, leading to large increases in achievable heat- and mass-transfer rates. In particular, two complex compounds (called "CC260-1260" and "CC260-2000") were found to be capable of functioning over the temperature range of interest for the lunar-habitat application and to offer heat- and mass-transfer rates and a temperature-lift capability adequate for that application. Regarding the temperature range: A heat pump based on either of these compounds is capable of providing a 95-K lift from a habitable temperature to a heat-rejection (radiator) temperature when driven by waste heat at an input temperature .500 K. Regarding the heat- and mass-transfer rates or, more precisely, the power densities made possible by these rates: Power densities observed in tests were 0.3 kilowatt of cooling per kilogram of sorbent and 2 kilowatts of heating per kilogram of sorbent. A prototype 1-kilowatt heat pump based on CC260-2000 has been built and demonstrated to function successfully.

  13. Testing Thermal Properties of the Cooling Device with Heat Pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemec, P.; Čaja, A.; Malcho, M.

    2013-04-01

    Paper deal about testing of device with heat pipes and about research alternative possible applications of heat pipes and potential improvements in purpose effective heat sink from power switches of device. This device is used in various static and moveable applications. Testing device is part of control unit in rail vehicle. The amount of heat produced by power switches depend from working conditions of static converter. Great impact on heat sink has, how as season also this if the vehicle is moving or don't moving. If the vehicle is moving the heat transfer form energy converter to surrounding is caused by forced convection of air flow around device. But the critical conditions occur if the vehicle doesn't move, because the application of this cooling device is based on natural convection. The study deal solution of the problem heat transfer from energy converter to surrounding by natural convection.

  14. Kovar Micro Heat Pipe Substrates for Microelectronic Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, David A.; Burchett, Steven N.; Kravitz, Stanley H.; Robino, Charles V.; Schmidt, Carrie; Tigges, Chris P.

    1999-04-01

    We describe the development of a new technology for cooling microelectronics. This report documents the design, fabrication, and prototype testing of micro scale heat pipes embedded in a flat plate substrate or heat spreader. A thermal model tuned to the test results enables us to describe heat transfer in the prototype, as well as evaluate the use of this technology in other applications. The substrate walls are Kovar alloy, which has a coefficient of thermal expansion close to that of microelectronic die. The prototype designs integrating micro heat pipes with Kovar enhance thermal conductivity by more than a factor of two over that of Kovar alone, thus improving the cooling of micro-electronic die.

  15. Postponement of incipient collapse due to work-induced heat stress by limited cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blockley, W. V.

    1973-01-01

    Four subjects completed five treadmill training sessions under comfortable to cool conditions and were calibrated to find an optimum combination of speed and grade on the treadmill which would produce a metabolic rate of 2000 Btu-hr. Dressed in an Apollo liquid cooling garment, each man underwent a total of four experiments in which the rate of heat extraction from the liquid cooling garment was adjusted to an amount which would cause a storage within the body of 1000 Btu/hr. Physiological measurements included skin temperature at 9 locations, rectal and ear canal probes, and heart rate. The increases in tolerance time for the various subjects and the various methods of emergency cooling, ranged from a low of six minutes to a high of 48 minutes, or from 8 to 102% of the baseline tolerance times. The largest gains were achieved in a subject whose tolerance endpoint was atypical, and whose baseline heat tolerance was unsually low.

  16. Corrosion inhibitors for solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Deramus, G. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Problems dealing with corrosion and corrosion protection of solar heating and cooling systems are discussed. A test program was conducted to find suitable and effective corrosion inhibitors for systems employing either water or antifreeze solutions for heat transfer and storage. Aluminum-mild-steel-copper-stainless steel assemblies in electrical contact were used to simulate a multimetallic system which is the type most likely to be employed. Several inhibitors show promise for this application.

  17. Heat Transfer Measurements for a Film Cooled Turbine Vane Cascade

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    experimental results. We used a transient thermochromic liquid crystal technique to obtain steady state heat transfer data on the mid-span geometry of an... liquid crystal , film cooling, turbine vane 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON Douglas R. Thurman a. REPORT U b...used a transient liquid crystal technique to obtain the heat transfer data. Mach number and Reynolds 2 number nearly match real engine

  18. Advanced turbine cooling, heat transfer, and aerodynamic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Je-Chin Han; Schobeiri, M.T.

    1995-10-01

    The contractual work is in three parts: Part I - Effect of rotation on enhanced cooling passage heat transfer, Part II - Effect on Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) spallation on surface heat transfer, and Part III - Effect of surface roughness and trailing edge ejection on turbine efficiency under unsteady flow conditions. Each section of this paper has been divided into three parts to individually accommodate each part. Part III is further divided into Parts IIIa and IIIb.

  19. Advanced turbine cooling, heat transfer, and aerodynamic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Je-Chin; Schobeiri, M.T.

    1995-12-31

    The contractual work is in three parts: Part I - Effect of rotation on enhanced cooling passage heat transfer, Part II - Effect of Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) spallation on surface heat transfer, and Part III - Effect of surface roughness and trailing edge ejection on turbine efficiency under unsteady flow conditions. Each section of this paper has been divided into three parts to individually accommodate each part. Part III is further divided into Parts IIIa and IIIb.

  20. Liquid cooled plate heat exchanger for battery cooling of an electric vehicle (EV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M. M.; Rahman, H. Y.; Mahlia, T. M. I.; Sheng, J. L. Y.

    2016-03-01

    A liquid cooled plate heat exchanger was designed to improve the battery life of an electric vehicle which suffers from premature aging or degradation due to the heat generation during discharging and charging period. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was used as a tool to analyse the temperature distribution when a constant surface heat flux was set at the bottom surface of the battery. Several initial and boundary conditions were set based on the past studies on the plate heat exchanger in the simulation software. The design of the plate heat exchanger was based on the Nissan Leaf battery pack to analyse the temperature patterns. Water at different mass flow rates was used as heat transfer fluid. The analysis revealed the designed plate heat exchanger could maintain the surface temperature within the range of 20 to 40°C which is within the safe operating temperature of the battery.

  1. Liquid jet impingement cooling with diamond substrates for extremely high heat flux applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lienhard, J.H. V; Khounsary, A.M.

    1993-09-01

    The combination of impinging jets and diamond substrates may provide an effective solution to a class of extremely high heat flux problems in which very localized heat loads must be removed. Some potential applications include the cooling of high-heat-load components in synchrotron x-ray, fusion, and semiconductor laser systems. Impinging liquid jets are a very effective vehicle for removing high heat fluxes. The liquid supply arrangement is relatively simple, and low thermal resistances can be routinely achieved. A jet`s cooling ability is a strong function of the size of the cooled area relative to the jet diameter. For relatively large area targets, the critical heat fluxes can approach 20 W/mm{sup 2}. In this situation, burnout usually originates at the outer edge of the cooled region as increasing heat flux inhibits the liquid supply. Limitations from liquid supply are minimized when heating is restricted to the jet stagnation zone. The high stagnation pressure and high velocity gradients appear to suppress critical flux phenomena, and fluxes of up to 400 W/mm{sup 2} have been reached without evidence of burnout. Instead, the restrictions on heat flux are closely related to properties of the cooled target. Target properties become an issue owing to the large temperatures and large temperature gradients that accompany heat fluxes over 100 W/mm{sup 2}. These conditions necessitate a target with both high thermal conductivity to prevent excessive temperatures and good mechanical properties to prevent mechanical failures. Recent developments in synthetic diamond technology present a possible solution to some of the solid-side constraints on heat flux. Polycrystalline diamond foils can now be produced by chemical vapor deposition in reasonable quantity and at reasonable cost. Synthetic single crystal diamonds as large as 1 cm{sup 2} are also available.

  2. System design and installation for RS600 programmable control system for solar heating and cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Procedures for installing, operating, and maintaining a programmable control system which utilizes a F8 microprocessor to perform all timing, control, and calculation functions in order to customize system performance to meet individual requirements for solar heating, combined heating and cooling, and/or hot water systems are described. The manual discusses user configuration and options, displays, theory of operation, trouble-shooting procedures, and warranty and assistance. Wiring lists, parts lists, drawings, and diagrams are included.

  3. Developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-24

    The objective is to develop and test various integrated solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water systems, and to evaluate their performance. Systems composed of new, as well as previously tested, components are carefully integrated so that effects of new components on system performance can be clearly delineated. The SEAL-DOE program includes six tasks which have received funding for the 1991--92 fifteen-month period. These include: (1) a project employing isothermal operation of air and liquid solar space heating systems; (2) a project to build and test several generic solar water heaters; (3) a project that will evaluate advanced solar domestic hot water components and concepts and integrate them into solar domestic hot water systems; (4) a liquid desiccant cooling system development project; (5) a project that will perform system modeling and analysis work on solid desiccant cooling systems research; and (6) a management task. The objectives and progress in each task are described in this report.

  4. Solar heating and cooling system installed at Leavenworth, Kansas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A solar heating and cooling is described which is designed to furnish 90 percent of the overall heating load, 70 percent of the cooling load and 100 percent of the domestic hot water load. The building has two floors with a total of 12,000 square feet gross area. The system has 120 flat-plate liquid solar panels with a net area of 2,200 square feet. Five 3 ton Arkla solar assisted absorption units provide the cooling, in conjunction with a 3,000 gallon chilled water storage tank. Two 3,000 gallon storage tanks are provided with one designated for summer use, whereas both tanks are utilized during winter.

  5. Solar heating and cooling system installed at Leavenworth, Kansas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-06-01

    A solar heating and cooling is described which is designed to furnish 90 percent of the overall heating load, 70 percent of the cooling load and 100 percent of the domestic hot water load. The building has two floors with a total of 12,000 square feet gross area. The system has 120 flat-plate liquid solar panels with a net area of 2,200 square feet. Five 3 ton Arkla solar assisted absorption units provide the cooling, in conjunction with a 3,000 gallon chilled water storage tank. Two 3,000 gallon storage tanks are provided with one designated for summer use, whereas both tanks are utilized during winter.

  6. Prototype solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A combination of monthly progress reports are presented. It contains a summary of activities and progress made from November 1, 1978, to February 28, 1979. The effort calls for the development, manufacture, test, system installation, maintenance, problem resolution, and performance evaluation.

  7. Corrosion inhibitors for solar-heating and cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.

    1979-01-01

    Report describes results of tests conducted to evaluate abilities of 12 candidate corrosion inhibitors to protect aluminum, steel, copper, or stainless steel at typical conditions encountered in solar heating and cooling systems. Inhibitors are based on sodium salts including nitrates, borates, silicates, and phosphates.

  8. A data acquisition system for water heating and cooling experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perea Martins, J. E. M.

    2017-01-01

    This work presents a simple analogue waterproof temperature probe design and its electronic interfacing with a computer to compose a data acquisition system for water temperature measurement. It also demonstrates the system usage through an experiment to verify the water heating period with an electric heater and another to verify the Newton’s law of cooling

  9. Solar Heating and Cooling of Residential Buildings: Design of Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Univ., Ft. Collins. Solar Energy Applications Lab.

    This is the second of two training courses designed to develop the capability of practitioners in the home building industry to design solar heating and cooling systems. The course is organized in 23 modules to separate selected topics and to facilitate learning. Although a compact schedule of one week is shown, a variety of formats can be…

  10. Inhibitor analysis for a solar heating and cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabony, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    A study of potential corrosion inhibitors for the NASA solar heating and cooling system which uses aluminum solar panels is provided. Research consisted of testing using a dynamic corrosion system, along with an economic analysis of proposed corrosion inhibitors. Very good progress was made in finding a suitable inhibitor for the system.

  11. Solar heating and cooling system design and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The design and development of marketable solar heating and cooling systems for single family and commercial applications is described. The delivery, installation, and monitoring of the prototype systems are discussed. Seven operational test sites are discussed in terms of system performance. Problems encountered with equipment and installation were usually due to lack of skills required for solar system installation.

  12. International Energy Agency Solar Heating and Cooling Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, A. J.

    This trip was undertaken to participate in and represent the United States Industry at the International Energy Agency (IEA) Solar Heating and Cooling Program (SHCP) Task 14 Workshop. The meeting took place at the A1 Bani Hotel in Rome Italy.

  13. AUTOMATED MALLEABLE ANNEALING OVENS SLOWLY HEAT AND COOL CASTINGS AS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    AUTOMATED MALLEABLE ANNEALING OVENS SLOWLY HEAT AND COOL CASTINGS AS THEY MOVE IN BINS ALONG TRACKS IN THE OVEN BOTTOM IN THE MALLEABLE ANNEALING BUILDING. THIS PROCESS TRANSFORMS BRITTLE WHITE IRON CASTINGS INTO SOFTER, STRONGER MALLEABLE IRON. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Malleable Annealing Building, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  14. Feasibility of cogenerated district heating and cooling for North Loop project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, R. W.

    1982-03-01

    A thermal-economic analysis was performed in order to determine feasibility of cogeneration with central heating and cooling for Chicago's North Loop Development Project. Heating, cooling and electrical loads were predicted by using energy data according to use and floor area, representative of downtown Chicago. The central facility proposed would supply cogenerated heating for a part of the development's demand and about one half of the cooling demand by means of combined conventional and cogeneration equipment together on the 4-pipe distribution system. Electricity would also be distributed and used to substantially displace purchases. Additional options are also discussed and, if economical, could make implementation more attractive. Four alternatives involving gas turbines and diesels were selected for study and are reported. Energy savings extend over the assumed 25 years of the project and are indexed to inflation and fuel-cost escalation. It would appear that cogeneration could assist economic development of the North Loop Project.

  15. District heating/cooling feasibility study for Jamestown, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Oliker, I.; Buffa, W.; Harms, R.; Preston, E.

    1982-12-01

    The results of the District Heating/Cooling Feasibility Study for Jamestown, NY are presented. The heat source for the system is a power plant located within the city limits. Several options for the extraction of heat from the power plant are developed and heat balances are presented. The options are based on the development of a hot water district heating system. The geography and climate of the area are discussed and the primary potential district heat district is described. The heat load assessment was based on fuel consumption data collected from a sampling of various types of structures and operations. The methodology is presented in detail followed by the block-by-block results which include the heated floor space, the annual total fuel consumed, the annual fuel consumed for comfort use, and the peak heat rate demands. The heating fuel demand and consumption for most of the major industries in the city is presented. A transmission and distribution system is developed to deliver heat from the power plant to the district heating customers. The piping design is described and the proposed pipe routing for the primary district is presented. Cost estimates are presented for the different district heating options developed. The cost of heat from the Jamestown district heating system has been determined using the required revenue approach to determine the minimum rate the utility must charge for district heat in order to break even. An analysis has also been performed to determine the maximum allowable charge for district heat that would allow consumers to recover their retrofit expenses in a five year period.

  16. Heat-pump cool storage in a clathrate of freon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomlinson, J. J.

    Presented are the analytical description and assessment of a unique heat pump/storage system in which the conventional evaporator of the vapor compression cycle is replaced by a highly efficient direct contract crystallizer. The thermal storage technique requires the formation of a refrigerant gas hydrate (a clathrate) and exploits an enthalpy of reaction comparable to the heat of fusion of ice. Additional system operational benefits include cool storage at the favorable temperatures of 4 to 7 C (40 to 45 F), and highly efficient heat transfer ates afforded by he direct contact mechanism. In addition, the experimental approach underway at ORNL to study such a system is discussed.

  17. Steamtown District Heating and Cooling Project, Scranton, Pennsylvania. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1990-04-01

    This report summarizes the activities of a study intended to examine the feasibility of a district heating and cooling alternative for the Steamtown National Historic Site in Scranton, PA. The objective of the study was to investigate the import of steam from the existing district heating system in Scranton which is operated by the Community Central Energy Corporation and through the use of modern technology provide hot and chilled water to Steamtown for its internal heating and cooling requirements. Such a project would benefit Steamtown by introducing a clean technology, eliminating on-site fuel use, avoiding first costs for central heating and cooling plants and reducing operation and maintenance expenditures. For operators of the existing district heating system, this project represents an opportunity to expand their customer base and demonstrate new technologies. The study was conducted by Joseph Technology Corporation, Inc. and performed for the Community Central Energy Corporation through a grant by the US Department of Energy. Steamtown was represented by the National Park Service, the developers of the site.

  18. Mold Heating and Cooling Pump Package Operator Interface Controls Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Josh A. Salmond

    2009-08-07

    The modernization of the Mold Heating and Cooling Pump Package Operator Interface (MHC PP OI) consisted of upgrading the antiquated single board computer with a proprietary operating system to off-the-shelf hardware and off-the-shelf software with customizable software options. The pump package is the machine interface between a central heating and cooling system that pumps heat transfer fluid through an injection or compression mold base on a local plastic molding machine. The operator interface provides the intelligent means of controlling this pumping process. Strict temperature control of a mold allows the production of high quality parts with tight tolerances and low residual stresses. The products fabricated are used on multiple programs.

  19. A dual-cooled hydrogen-oxygen rocket engine heat transfer analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kacynski, Kenneth J.; Kazaroff, John M.; Jankovsky, Robert S.

    1991-01-01

    The potential benefits of simultaneously using hydrogen and oxygen as rocket engine coolants are described. A plug-and-spool rocket engine was examined at heat fluxes ranging from 9290 to 163,500 kW/sq m, using a combined 3-D conduction/advection analysis. Both counter flow and parallel flow cooling arrangements were analyzed. The results indicate that a significant amount of heat transfer to the oxygen occurs, reducing both the hot side wall temperature of the rocket engine and also reducing the exit temperature of the hydrogen coolant. In all heat flux and coolant flow rates examined, the total amount of heat transferred to the oxygen was found to be largely independent of the oxygen coolant flow direction. At low heat flux/low coolant flow (throttled) conditions, the oxygen coolant absorbed more than 30 percent of the overall heat transfer from the rocket engine exhaust gasses. Also, hot side wall temperatures were judged to decrease by approximately 120 K in the throat area and up to a 170 K combustion chamber wall temperature reduction is expected if dual cooling is applied. The reduction in combustion chamber wall temperatures at throttled conditions is especially desirable since tha analysis indicates that a double temperature maxima, one at the throat and another in the combustion chamber, occurs with a traditional hydrogen cooled only engine. Conversely, a dual cooled engine essentially eliminates any concern for overheating in the combustion chamber.

  20. An experimental study of heat pipe thermal management system with wet cooling method for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Rui; Gu, Junjie; Liu, Jie

    2015-01-01

    An effective battery thermal management (BTM) system is required for lithium-ion batteries to ensure a desirable operating temperature range with minimal temperature gradient, and thus to guarantee their high efficiency, long lifetime and great safety. In this paper, a heat pipe and wet cooling combined BTM system is developed to handle the thermal surge of lithium-ion batteries during high rate operations. The proposed BTM system relies on ultra-thin heat pipes which can efficiently transfer the heat from the battery sides to the cooling ends where the water evaporation process can rapidly dissipate the heat. Two sized battery packs, 3 Ah and 8 Ah, with different lengths of cooling ends are used and tested through a series high-intensity discharges in this study to examine the cooling effects of the combined BTM system, and its performance is compared with other four types of heat pipe involved BTM systems and natural convection cooling method. A combination of natural convection, fan cooling and wet cooling methods is also introduced to the heat pipe BTM system, which is able to control the temperature of battery pack in an appropriate temperature range with the minimum cost of energy and water spray.

  1. Cool Mist Irrigation Improves Heat Dissipation during Surgical Bone Drilling.

    PubMed

    Siljander, Breana R; Wang, Anthony C; Zhang, Lihui; Shih, Albert J; Sullivan, Stephen E; Tai, Bruce L

    2014-08-01

    Objective High-speed drilling generates heat in small cavities and may pose a risk for neurovascular tissues. We hypothesize that a continuous pressurized cold mist could be an alternative approach for better cooling during drilling of bone to access cranial lesions. This study aims to examine this idea experimentally. Design Ex-vivo drilling tests with controlled speed, feed, and depth were performed on cortical bone samples. Thermocouples were embedded underneath the drilling path to compare the temperature rises under mist cooling (at 3°C, < 300 mL/h) and flood irrigation (at 22°C, > 800 mL/h). Results A significant difference exists between these two systems (p value < 0.05). The measured temperature was ∼ 4°C lower for mist cooling than for flood irrigation, even with less than a third of the flow rate. Conclusion Experimental data indicate the capability of mist cooling to reduce heat generation while simultaneously enabling flow reduction and targeted cooling. An improved field of view in an extremely narrow access corridor may be achieved with this technology.

  2. Heat pipe cooled reactors for multi-kilowatt space power supplies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranken, W. A.; Houts, M. G.

    Three nuclear reactor space power system designs are described that demonstrate how the use of high temperature heat pipes for reactor heat transport, combined with direct conversion of heat to electricity, can result in eliminating pumped heat transport loops for both primary reactor cooling and heat rejection. The result is a significant reduction in system complexity that leads to very low mass systems with high reliability, especially in the power range of 1 to 20 kWe. In addition to removing heat exchangers, electromagnetic pumps, and coolant expansion chambers, the heat pipe/direct conversion combination provides such capabilities as startup from the frozen state, automatic rejection of reactor decay heat in the event of emergency or accidental reactor shutdown, and the elimination of single point failures in the reactor cooling system. The power system designs described include a thermoelectric system that can produce 1 to 2 kWe, a bimodal modification of this system to increase its power level to 5 kWe and incorporate high temperature hydrogen propulsion capability, and a moderated thermionic reactor concept with 5 to 20 kWe power output that is based on beryllium modules that thermally couple cylindrical thermionic fuel elements (TFE's) to radiator heat pipes.

  3. Superfluid heat conduction and the cooling of magnetized neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Cirigliano, Vincenzo; Reddy, Sanjay; Sharma, Rishi; Aguilera, Deborah N

    2008-01-01

    We report on a new mechanism for heat conduction in the neutron star crust. We find that collective modes of superftuid neutron matter, called superfiuid phonons (sPhs), can influence heat conduction in magnetized neutron stars. They can dominate the heat conduction transverse to magnetic field when the magnetic field B {approx}> 10{sup 13} C. At density p {approx_equal} 10{sup 12}--10{sup 14} g/cm{sup 3} the conductivity due to sPhs is significantly larger than that due to lattice phonons and is comparable to electron conductivity at when temperature {approx_equal} 10{sup 8} K. This new mode of heat conduction can limit the surface anisotropy in highly magnetized neutron stars. Cooling curves of magnetized neutron stars with and without superfluid heat conduction show observationally discernible differences.

  4. Climatic indicators for estimating residential heating and cooling loads

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Y.J.; Ritschard, R.; Bull, J.; Chang, L.

    1986-11-01

    An extensive data base of residential energy use generated with the DOE-2.1A simulation code provides an opportunity for correlating building loads predicted by an hourly simulation model to commonly used climatic parameters such as heating and cooling degree-days, and to newer parameters such as insolation-days and latent enthalpy-days. The identification of reliable climatic parameters for estimating cooling loads and the incremental loads for individual building components, such as changing ceiling and wall R-values, infiltration rates or window areas is emphasized.

  5. Cooling through heat pumps powered by a combustion engine for natural gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janovcová, Martina; Jandačka, Jozef; Kiš, Roman

    2014-08-01

    The heat pump can be used both for heating and hot water in winter, but in the case of reversible heat pumps also air-conditioning in summer. Currently, air conditioners are becoming standard equipment for residential and industrial buildings. Heating and cooling occurs separately in many cases, ie that for the purpose of heating is used a separate heat source and for the cooling production other source of cold with own equipment and distribution systems. The heat pump is one device that can heat and cool often at a much lower price. This article deals with the research parameters of the gas heat pump in cooling mode.

  6. Computer cooling using a two phase minichannel thermosyphon loop heated from horizontal and vertical sides and cooled from vertical side

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieliński, Henryk; Mikielewicz, Jarosław

    2010-10-01

    In the present paper it is proposed to consider the computer cooling capacity using the thermosyphon loop. A closed thermosyphon loop consists of combined two heaters and a cooler connected to each other by tubes. The first heater may be a CPU processor located on the motherboard of the personal computer. The second heater may be a chip of a graphic card placed perpendicular to the motherboard of personal computer. The cooler can be placed above the heaters on the computer chassis. The thermosyphon cooling system on the use of computer can be modeled using the rectangular thermosyphon loop with minichannels heated at the bottom horizontal side and the bottom vertical side and cooled at the upper vertical side. The riser and a downcomer connect these parts. A one-dimensional model of two-phase flow and heat transfer in a closed thermosyphon loop is based on mass, momentum, and energy balances in the evaporators, rising tube, condenser and the falling tube. The separate two-phase flow model is used in calculations. A numerical investigation for the analysis of the mass flux rate and heat transfer coefficient in the steady state has been accomplished.

  7. Using containment analysis to improve component cooling water heat exchanger limits

    SciTech Connect

    Da Silva, H.C.; Tajbakhsh, A.

    1995-12-31

    The Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station design requires that exit temperatures from the Component Cooling Water Heat Exchanger remain below 330.37 K during the Emergency Core Cooling System recirculation stage, following a hypothetical Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA). Due to measurements indicating a higher than expected combination of: (a) high fouling factor in the Component Cooling Water Heat Exchanger with (b) high ultimate heat sink temperatures, that might lead to temperatures in excess of the 330.37 K limit, if a LOCA were to occur, TUElectric adjusted key flow rates in the Component Cooling Water network. This solution could only be implemented with improvements to the containment analysis methodology of record. The new method builds upon the CONTEMPT-LT/028 code by: (a) coupling the long term post-LOCA thermohydraulics with a more detailed analytical model for the complex Component Cooling Water Heat Exchanger network and (b) changing the way mass and energy releases are calculated after core reflood and steam generator energy is dumped to the containment. In addition, a simple code to calculate normal cooldowns was developed to confirm RHR design bases were met with the improved limits.

  8. A fundamentally new approach to air-cooled heat exchangers.

    SciTech Connect

    Koplow, Jeffrey P.

    2010-01-01

    We describe breakthrough results obtained in a feasibility study of a fundamentally new architecture for air-cooled heat exchangers. A longstanding but largely unrealized opportunity in energy efficiency concerns the performance of air-cooled heat exchangers used in air conditioners, heat pumps, and refrigeration equipment. In the case of residential air conditioners, for example, the typical performance of the air cooled heat exchangers used for condensers and evaporators is at best marginal from the standpoint the of achieving maximum the possible coefficient of performance (COP). If by some means it were possible to reduce the thermal resistance of these heat exchangers to a negligible level, a typical energy savings of order 30% could be immediately realized. It has long been known that a several-fold increase in heat exchanger size, in conjunction with the use of much higher volumetric flow rates, provides a straight-forward path to this goal but is not practical from the standpoint of real world applications. The tension in the market place between the need for energy efficiency and logistical considerations such as equipment size, cost and operating noise has resulted in a compromise that is far from ideal. This is the reason that a typical residential air conditioner exhibits significant sensitivity to reductions in fan speed and/or fouling of the heat exchanger surface. The prevailing wisdom is that little can be done to improve this situation; the 'fan-plus-finned-heat-sink' heat exchanger architecture used throughout the energy sector represents an extremely mature technology for which there is little opportunity for further optimization. But the fact remains that conventional fan-plus-finned-heat-sink technology simply doesn't work that well. Their primary physical limitation to performance (i.e. low thermal resistance) is the boundary layer of motionless air that adheres to and envelops all surfaces of the heat exchanger. Within this boundary layer

  9. What are the relative roles of heating and cooling in generating solar wind temperature anisotropies?

    PubMed

    Maruca, B A; Kasper, J C; Bale, S D

    2011-11-11

    Temperature anisotropy in the solar wind results from a combination of mechanisms of anisotropic heating (e.g., cyclotron-resonant heating and dissipation of kinetic Alfvén waves) and cooling (e.g., Chew-Goldberger-Low double-adiabatic expansion). In contrast, anisotropy-driven instabilities such as the cyclotron, mirror, and firehose instabilities limit the allowable departure of the plasma from isotropy. This study used data from the Faraday cups on the Wind spacecraft to examine scalar temperature and temperature components of protons. Plasma unstable to the mirror or firehose instability was found to be about 3-4 times hotter than stable plasma. Since anisotropy-driven instabilities are not understood to heat the plasma, these results suggest that heating processes are more effective than cooling processes at creating and maintaining proton temperature anisotropy in the solar wind.

  10. Heat Transfer Measurements for a Film Cooled Turbine Vane Cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poinsatte, Philip E.; Heidmann, James D.; Thurman, Douglas R.

    2008-01-01

    Experimental heat transfer and pressure measurements were obtained on a large scale film cooled turbine vane cascade. The objective was to investigate heat transfer on a commercial high pressure first stage turbine vane at near engine Mach and Reynolds number conditions. Additionally blowing ratios and coolant density were also matched. Numerical computations were made with the Glenn-HT code of the same geometry and compared with the experimental results. A transient thermochromic liquid crystal technique was used to obtain steady state heat transfer data on the mid-span geometry of an instrumented vane with 12 rows of circular and shaped film cooling holes. A mixture of SF6 and Argon gases was used for film coolant to match the coolant-to-gas density ratio of a real engine. The exit Mach number and Reynolds number were 0.725 and 2.7 million respectively. Trends from the experimental heat transfer data matched well with the computational prediction, particularly for the film cooled case.

  11. Study on heat pipe sink for cooling high power LED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhibin; Zhang, Yuebin; Wang, Zhongdong; Xie, Shasha; Hao, Yang

    2012-10-01

    Considering the characteristic of energy-saving about high power LED device, a method to decrease the junction temperature greatly under the natural convection condition is studied in this article. Using the heat pipe technology, a cooling system is designed in which the target heat source is the LED module (0.025m×0.025m×0.005m), with 30W input power. The mechanism and routes of heat transfer are analyzed in detail, the thermal network model is established to calculate the thermal resistance of each part in the cooling system, the total thermal resistance was calculated to be 0.8964°C /W and the junction temperature was 47.39°C . Meanwhile, the finite element method was used to simulate this cooling system, and got that the junction temperature was 47.54°C , and the error of the two means is only 0.15°C , it indicates that applying heat-pipe technology can solve the problem of high junction temperature in LED devices under the natural convection conditions, which can guide the actual project in the thermal design.

  12. Cooling/heating module for tissue chambers and solutions: theoretical considerations and practical design.

    PubMed

    Datyner, N B; Cohen, I S

    1991-11-01

    We provide a theoretical framework for the estimation of the performance of a modular cooling/heating device for tissue baths. The framework can be adapted to other designs using Peltier elements for cooling and heating. The design employs a Peltier as a heat pump and a flat heat pipe to transport heat to or from a 'remote' site. In the cooling mode heat from the hot side of the Peltier is removed by a heat sink cooled by a fan. The small cross section of the heat pipe permits cooling/heating of tissue chambers on microscope stages or in locations where it would be impractical to mount a Peltier element. The faces of the heat pipe can be used to pre-cool/heat solutions using a simple capillary heat exchanger.

  13. Turbulence convective heat transfer for cooling the photovoltaic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arianmehr, Iman

    Solar PV (photovoltaic) is a rapidly advancing renewable energy technology which converts sunlight directly into electricity. One of the outstanding challenges of the current PV technology is the reduction in its conversion efficiency with increasing PV panel temperature, which is closely associated with the increase in solar intensity and the ambient temperature surrounding the PV panels. To more effectively capture the available energy when the sun is most intense, significant efforts have been invested in active and passive cooling research over the last few years. While integrated cooling systems can lead to the highest total efficiencies, they are usually neither the most feasible nor the most cost effective solutions. This work examines some simple passive means of manipulating the prevailing wind turbulence to enhance convective heat transfer over a heated plate in a wind tunnel.

  14. Correlating equations for impingement cooling of small heat sources with multiple circular liquid jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Womac, D. J.; Incropera, F. P.; Ramadhyani, S.

    1994-05-01

    Experiments were performed to investigate single-phase heat transfer from a 12.7 mm x 12.7 mm heat source to 2 x 2 and 3 x 3 arrays of free-surface and submerged jets. The objective was to study the efficacy of using arrays of free surface or submerged liquid jets to cool a small, chip-like heat source. The data are correlated by obtaining area-weighted combinations of separate correlations associated with impingement and wall jet region.

  15. Analysis of shape of porous cooled medium for an imposed surface heat flux and temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.

    1973-01-01

    The surface of a porous cooled medium is to be maintained at a specified design temperature while being subjected to uniform heating by an external source. An analytical method is given for determining the shape of the medium surface that will satisfy these boundary conditions. The analysis accounts for temperature dependent variations of fluid density and viscosity and for temperature dependent matrix thermal conductivity. The energy equation is combined with Darcy's law in such a way that a potential can be defined that satisfies Laplace's equation. All of the heat-transfer and flow quantities are expressed in terms of this potential. The determination of the shape of the porous cooled region is thereby reduced to a free-boundary problem such as in inviscid free jet theory. Two illustrative examples are carried out: a porous leading edge with coolant supplied through a slot and a porous cooled duct with a rectangular outer boundary.

  16. Unsteady conjugate heat transfer analysis for impinging jet cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tejero, F.; Flaszyński, P.; Szwaba, R.; Telega, J.

    2016-10-01

    The paper presents the numerical investigations of the heat transfer on a flat plate cooled by a single impinging jet. The thermal conductivity of the plate was modified from a high thermal case (steel -λ= 35 W/m/K) to a low one (steel alloy Inconel -λ= 9.8 W/m/K). The numerical simulations results are compared with the experimental data from the Institute of Fluid-Flow Machinery Polish Academy of Sciences, Gdansk (Poland). The numerical simulations are carried out by means of Ansys/Fluent and k-ω SST turbulence model and the temperature evolution on the target plate is investigated by conjugated heat transfer computations.

  17. Building heating and cooling applications thermal energy storage program overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eissenberg, D. M.

    1980-01-01

    Thermal energy storage technology and development of building heating and cooling applications in the residential and commercial sectors is outlined. Three elements are identified to undergo an applications assessment, technology development, and demonstration. Emphasis is given to utility load management thermal energy system application where the stress is on the 'customer side of the meter'. Thermal storage subsystems for space conditioning and conservation means of increased thermal mass within the building envelope and by means of low-grade waste heat recovery are covered.

  18. (Thermal energy storage technologies for heating and cooling applications)

    SciTech Connect

    Tomlinson, J.J.

    1990-12-19

    Recent results from selected TES research activities in Germany and Sweden under an associated IEA annex are discussed. In addition, several new technologies for heating and cooling of buildings and automobiles were reviewed and found to benefit similar efforts in the United states. Details of a meeting with Didier-Werke AG, a leading German ceramics manufacturer who will provide TES media necessary for the United States to complete field tests of an advanced high temperature latent heat storage material, are presented. Finally, an overview of the December 1990 IEA Executive Committee deliberations on TES is presented.

  19. Thermal energy storage technologies for heating and cooling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomlinson, John J.

    1990-12-01

    Recent results from selected thermal energy storage (TES) research activities in Germany and Sweden are discussed. In addition, several new technologies for heating and cooling of buildings and automobiles were reviewed and found to benefit similar efforts in the United states. Details of a meeting with Didier-Werke AG, a leading German ceramics manufacturer who will provide TES media necessary for the United States to complete field tests of an advanced high temperature latent heat storage material, are presented. Finally, an overview of the December 1990 International Energy Agency (IEA) Executive Committee deliberations on TES is presented.

  20. Strategy Guideline. Accurate Heating and Cooling Load Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Burdick, Arlan

    2011-06-01

    This guide presents the key criteria required to create accurate heating and cooling load calculations and offers examples of the implications when inaccurate adjustments are applied to the HVAC design process. The guide shows, through realistic examples, how various defaults and arbitrary safety factors can lead to significant increases in the load estimate. Emphasis is placed on the risks incurred from inaccurate adjustments or ignoring critical inputs of the load calculation.

  1. BETTER DUCT SYSTEMS FOR HOME HEATING AND COOLING.

    SciTech Connect

    ANDREWS,J.

    2001-01-01

    This is a series of six guides intended to provide a working knowledge of residential heating and cooling duct systems, an understanding of the major issues concerning efficiency, comfort, health, and safety, and practical tips on installation and repair of duct systems. These guides are intended for use by contractors, system designers, advanced technicians, and other HVAC professionals. The first two guides are also intended to be accessible to the general reader.

  2. Strategy Guideline: Accurate Heating and Cooling Load Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Burdick, A.

    2011-06-01

    This guide presents the key criteria required to create accurate heating and cooling load calculations and offers examples of the implications when inaccurate adjustments are applied to the HVAC design process. The guide shows, through realistic examples, how various defaults and arbitrary safety factors can lead to significant increases in the load estimate. Emphasis is placed on the risks incurred from inaccurate adjustments or ignoring critical inputs of the load calculation.

  3. Solar heating and cooling technical data and systems analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, D. L.

    1976-01-01

    The acquisition and processing of selected parametric data for inclusion in a computerized Data Base using the Marshall Information Retrieval and Data System (MIRADS) developed by NASA-MSFC is discussed. This data base provides extensive technical and socioeconomic information related to solar energy heating and cooling on a national scale. A broadly based research approach was used to assist in the support of program management and the application of a cost-effective program for solar energy development and demonstration.

  4. Better Duct Systems for Home Heating and Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-11-01

    Duct systems used in forced-air space-conditioning systems are a vital element in home energy efficiency. How well a system works makes a big difference in the cost and the effectiveness of heating and cooling a home. At the same time, a duct system that is poorly designed or maintained can have a detrimental effect on the health of the people who live in the house, through the unintended distribution of indoor air pollution.

  5. Cooling by heating: Restoration of the third law of thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Sørdal, V B; Bergli, J; Galperin, Y M

    2016-03-01

    We have made a simple and natural modification of a recent quantum refrigerator model presented by Cleuren et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 120603 (2012)]. The original model consist of two metal leads acting as heat baths and a set of quantum dots that allow for electron transport between the baths. It was shown to violate the dynamic third law of thermodynamics (the unattainability principle, which states that cooling to absolute zero in finite time is impossible). By taking into consideration the finite energy level spacing Δ, in metals we restore the third law while keeping all of the original model's thermodynamic properties intact down to the limit of k(B)T ∼ Δ, where the cooling rate is quenched. The spacing Δ depends on the confinement of the electrons in the lead and therefore, according to our result larger samples (with smaller level spacing), could be cooled efficiently to lower absolute temperatures than smaller ones. However, a large lead makes the assumption of instant equilibration of electrons implausible; in reality one would only cool a small part of the sample and we would have a nonequilibrium situation. This property is expected to be model independent and raises the question whether we can find an optimal size for the lead that is to be cooled.

  6. Fluorescence Thermometry Characterization of Microchannel Cooling Performance with Sidewall Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae Jin; Hidrovo, Carlos

    2014-11-01

    Microchannel cooling of complex circuitry in microelectronics and LOC systems is an area of continued research that is constantly evolving. As such, it is important to properly evaluate the heat removal efficiency of the microchannels in near wall heating configurations. In this talk we evaluate the cooling efficiency of microchannels with microheaters embedded on the sidewalls. The microchannels are fabricated using soft lithography and the embedded joule heaters are created by filling molten low melting temperature alloys in two satellite microchannels and solidifying them. In order to assess the thermal transport rate, fluorescent images of the fluid mixed with two temperature-sensitive dyes were captured and pre-conditioned with an image-distortion correction algorithm. By taking their ratiometric value versus temperature measurements, results show that the heat removal efficiency initially increases as a function of Re and then plateaus at about 50 percent once Re is greater than 20. This behavior is the result of a decreasing advective resistance with increasing flow rate, where the ratio of the substrate-environment resistance to the wall-fluid convective resistance determines the ultimate performance of the cooling microchannel.

  7. A direct-interface, fusible heat sink for astronaut cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lomax, Curtis; Webbon, B. W.

    1990-01-01

    Astronaut cooling during extravehicular activity is a critical design issue in developing a portable life support system that meets the requirements of a space station mission. Some of the requirements are that the cooling device can be easily regenerable and nonventing during operation. In response to this, a direct-interface, fusible heat sink prototype with freezable quick-disconnects was developed. A proof-of-concept prototype was constructed and tested that consists of an elastic container filled with normal tap water and having two quick-disconnects embedded in a wall. These quick-disconnects are designed so that they may be frozen with the ice and yet still be joined to the cooling system, allowing an immediate flow path. The inherent difficulties in a direct-interface heat sink have been overcome, i.e., (1) establishing an initial flow path; (2) avoiding low-flow freeze-up; and (3) achieving adequate heat-transfer rates at the end of the melting process. The requirements, design, fabrication, and testing are discussed.

  8. 40 CFR 463.10 - Applicability; description of the contact cooling and heating water subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... contact cooling and heating water subcategory. 463.10 Section 463.10 Protection of Environment... FORMING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Contact Cooling and Heating Water Subcategory § 463.10 Applicability; description of the contact cooling and heating water subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges...

  9. 40 CFR 463.10 - Applicability; description of the contact cooling and heating water subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... contact cooling and heating water subcategory. 463.10 Section 463.10 Protection of Environment... FORMING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Contact Cooling and Heating Water Subcategory § 463.10 Applicability; description of the contact cooling and heating water subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges...

  10. Does the hair influence heat extraction from the head during head cooling under heat stress?

    PubMed

    Shin, Sora; Park, Joonhee; Lee, Joo-Young

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of head hair on thermoregulatory responses when cooling the head under heat stress. Eight young males participated in six experimental conditions: normal hair (100-130 mm length) and cropped hair (5 mm length) with three water inlet temperatures of 10, 15, and 20°C. The head and neck of subjects were cooled by a liquid perfused hood while immersing legs at 42°C water for 60 min in a sitting position at the air temperature of 28°C with 30% RH. The results showed that heat removal from the normal hair condition was not significantly different from the cropped hair condition. Rectal and mean skin temperatures, and sweat rate showed no significant differences between the normal and cropped hair conditions. Heat extraction from the head was significantly greater in 10°C than in 15 or 20°C cooling (p<0.05) for both normal and cropped hair, whereas subjects preferred the 15°C more than the 10 or 20°C cooling regimen. These results indicate that the selection of effective cooling temperature is more crucial than the length of workers' hair during head cooling under heat stress, and such selection should be under the consideration of subjective perceptions with physiological responses.

  11. Does the hair influence heat extraction from the head during head cooling under heat stress?

    PubMed Central

    SHIN, Sora; PARK, Joonhee; LEE, Joo-Young

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of head hair on thermoregulatory responses when cooling the head under heat stress. Eight young males participated in six experimental conditions: normal hair (100–130 mm length) and cropped hair (5 mm length) with three water inlet temperatures of 10, 15, and 20°C. The head and neck of subjects were cooled by a liquid perfused hood while immersing legs at 42°C water for 60 min in a sitting position at the air temperature of 28°C with 30% RH. The results showed that heat removal from the normal hair condition was not significantly different from the cropped hair condition. Rectal and mean skin temperatures, and sweat rate showed no significant differences between the normal and cropped hair conditions. Heat extraction from the head was significantly greater in 10°C than in 15 or 20°C cooling (p<0.05) for both normal and cropped hair, whereas subjects preferred the 15°C more than the 10 or 20°C cooling regimen. These results indicate that the selection of effective cooling temperature is more crucial than the length of workers’ hair during head cooling under heat stress, and such selection should be under the consideration of subjective perceptions with physiological responses. PMID:26165361

  12. Vapor Jet Ejector Used to Generate Free Waste Heat Driven Cooling in Military Environmental Cooling Units

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    vap erant vapor is or by a J-tub essure side of using similar pressure incre ump in order o the diesel-e per heat excha recovered at to the exhaus...top of the a tering the com at exchanger. g of the conve id flow. A nit essure pulsati tor where the ed in the cool erature level. ger where wa

  13. Combination solar photovoltaic heat engine energy converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.

    1987-01-01

    A combination solar photovoltaic heat engine converter is proposed. Such a system is suitable for either terrestrial or space power applications. The combination system has a higher efficiency than either the photovoltaic array or the heat engine alone can attain. Advantages in concentrator and radiator area and receiver mass of the photovoltaic heat engine system over a heat-engine-only system are estimated. A mass and area comparison between the proposed space station organic Rankine power system and a combination PV-heat engine system is made. The critical problem for the proposed converter is the necessity for high temperature photovoltaic array operation. Estimates of the required photovoltaic temperature are presented.

  14. Heat Transfer Experiments in the Internal Cooling Passages of a Cooled Radial Turbine Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B. V.; Wagner, J. H.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted (1) to experimentally measure, assess and analyze the heat transfer within the internal cooling configuration of a radial turbine rotor blade and (2) to obtain heat transfer data to evaluate and improve computational fluid dynamics (CFD) procedures and turbulent transport models of internal coolant flows. A 1.15 times scale model of the coolant passages within the NASA LERC High Temperature Radial Turbine was designed, fabricated of Lucite and instrumented for transient beat transfer tests using thin film surface thermocouples and liquid crystals to indicate temperatures. Transient heat transfer tests were conducted for Reynolds numbers of one-fourth, one-half, and equal to the operating Reynolds number for the NASA Turbine. Tests were conducted for stationary and rotating conditions with rotation numbers in the range occurring in the NASA Turbine. Results from the experiments showed the heat transfer characteristics within the coolant passage were affected by rotation. In general, the heat transfer increased and decreased on the sides of the straight radial passages with rotation as previously reported from NASA-HOST-sponsored experiments. The heat transfer in the tri-passage axial flow region adjacent to the blade exit was relatively unaffected by rotation. However, the heat transfer on one surface, in the transitional region between the radial inflow passage and axial, constant radius passages, decreased to approximately 20 percent of the values without rotation. Comparisons with previous 3-D numerical studies indicated regions where the heat transfer characteristics agreed and disagreed with the present experiment.

  15. Environmental Heat Transfer to a Microclimate Cooling System During Heat Exposure.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    models, heat transfer measured during future physiological tests can be apportioned between Q^ and Qt^y. Introduction Heat stress and the resultant...is prudent to institute countermeasures to heat stress when work is required in environments where heat dissipation is limited. One countermeasure...19.0 14.2 Min 60 26.2 19.2 21.1 15.0 10 Table 8 - Heat transfer (w) at the calves during whole-body cooling. Time 15°C 20°C 25°C 30°C Min 0 -2.5

  16. Modeling active galactic nucleus feedback in cool-core clusters: The balance between heating and cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuan; Bryan, Greg L.

    2014-07-01

    We study the long-term evolution of an idealized cool-core galaxy cluster under the influence of momentum-driven active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback using three-dimensional high-resolution (60 pc) adaptive mesh refinement simulations. The feedback is modeled with a pair of precessing jets whose power is calculated based on the accretion rate of the cold gas surrounding the supermassive black hole (SMBH). The intracluster medium first cools into clumps along the propagation direction of the jets. As the jet power increases, gas condensation occurs isotropically, forming spatially extended structures that resemble the observed Hα filaments in Perseus and many other cool-core clusters. Jet heating elevates the gas entropy, halting clump formation. The cold gas that is not accreted onto the SMBH settles into a rotating disk of ∼10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}. The hot gas cools directly onto the disk while the SMBH accretes from its innermost region, powering the AGN that maintains a thermally balanced state for a few Gyr. The mass cooling rate averaged over 7 Gyr is ∼30 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, an order of magnitude lower than the classic cooling flow value. Medium resolution simulations produce similar results, while in low resolution runs, the cluster experiences cycles of gas condensation and AGN outbursts. Owing to its self-regulating mechanism, AGN feedback can successfully balance cooling with a wide range of model parameters. Our model also produces cold structures in early stages that are in good agreement with the observations. However, the long-lived massive cold disk is unrealistic, suggesting that additional physical processes are still needed.

  17. Heating and cooling of municipal buildings with waste heat from ground water

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, D.S.; Hochgraf, J.

    1980-10-01

    The feasibility of using waste heat from municipal water wells to replace natural gas for heating of the City Hall, Fire Station, and Community Hall in Wilmer, Texas was studied. At present, the 120/sup 0/F well water is cooled by dissipating the excess heat through evaporative cooling towers before entering the distribution system. The objective of the study was to determine the pumping cycle of the well and determine the amount of available heat from the water for a specified period. This data were correlated with the heating and cooling demand of the City's buildings, and a conceptual heat recovery system will be prepared. The system will use part or all of the excess heat from the water to heat the buildings, thereby eliminating the use of natural gas. The proposed geothermal retrofit of the existing natural gas heating system is not economical because the savings in natural gas does not offset the capital cost of the new equipment and the annual operating and maintenance costs. The fuel savings and power costs are a virtual trade-off over the 25-year period. The installation and operation of the system was estimated to cost $105,000 for 25 years which is an unamortized expense. In conclusion, retrofitting the City of Wilmer's municipal buildings is not feasible based on the economic analysis and fiscal projections as presented.

  18. Alleviation of heat strain by cooling different body areas during red pepper harvest work at WBGT 33 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeong-Wha; Kim, Myung-Ju; Lee, Joo-Young

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of different types of personal cooling equipments (PCE) on the alleviation of heat strain during red pepper harvest simulated in a climatic chamber. The experiment consisted of eight conditions: 1) Control, 2) Neck cooling scarf A with a cooling area of 68 cm2, 3) Neck cooling scarf B (cooling area 154 cm2), 4) Brimmed hat with a frozen gel pack, 5) Cooling vest (cooling area 606 cm2), 6) Hat+Neck Scarf B, 7) Hat+Vest, and 8) Hat+Neck Scarf B+Vest. Twelve subjects worked a red pepper harvest simulated in a climatic chamber of WBGT 33 degrees C. The result showed that rectal temperature (T(re)) was effectively maintained under 38 degrees C by wearing PCE. Mean skin temperature (T(sk)) and heart rate (HR) became more stable through wearing PCE. When wearing the 'Hat+Scarf B+Vest', particularly, T(sk) and HR quickly decreased to the comfort level during the mid-rest stage. We confirmed that the vest with a cooling area of only 3.3% body surface area (BSA) was effective in alleviating heat strain in a simulated harvest work. Furthermore, the heat strain of farm workers can be considerably eliminated by the combination of the cooling vest, a scarf, and a brimmed hat, with the total cooling area of 4.2% BSA.

  19. Tests of a reduced-scale experimental model of a building solar heating-cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkoong, D.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental solar heating and cooling system model has been built and operated, combining elements that are programmable (e.g., heating and cooling load of a building and collected solar energy) with experimental equipment. The experimental system model was based on the loads and components used in the Solar Building Test Facility (SBTF), which includes a 1394 sq m solar collector field at NASA Langley. These tests covered 5 continuous days under summer conditions. For the system model up to 55 percent of the simulated collected solar energy was used for the building load. This amount of solar energy supplied 35 percent of the building cooling load. Heat loss was significant. If tank heat loss were eliminated, which would make it similar to the actual SBTF, 75 percent of the collected solar energy would be used. This amount would supply approximately 50 percent of the building cooling load. A higher fraction of solar energy is possible with a more performance-optimized system.

  20. Global Warming Impacts on Heating and Cooling Degree-Days in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petri, Y.; Caldeira, K.

    2014-12-01

    Anthropogenic climate change is expected to significantly alter residential air conditioning and space heating requirements, which account for 41% of U.S. household energy expenditures. The degree-day method can be used for reliable estimation of weather related building energy consumption and costs, as well as outdoor climatic thermal comfort. Here, we use U.S. Climate Normals developed by NOAA based on weather station observations along with Climate Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5) multi-model ensemble simulations. We add the projected change in heating and cooling degree-days based on the climate models to the estimates based on the NOAA U.S. Climate Normals to project future heating and cooling degree-days. We find locations with the lowest and highest combined index of cooling (CDDs) and heating degree-days (HDDs) for the historical period (1981 - 2010) and future period (2080 - 2099) under the Representation Concentration Pathway 8.5 (RCP8.5) climate change scenario. Our results indicate that in both time frames and among the lower 48 states, coastal areas in the West and South California will have the smallest degree-day sum (CDD + HDD), and hence from a climatic perspective become the best candidates for residential real estate. The Rocky Mountains region in Wyoming, in addition to northern Minnesota and North Dakota, will have the greatest CDD + HDD. While global warming is projected to reduce the median heating and cooling demand (- 5%) at the end of the century, CDD + HDD will decrease in the North, with an opposite effect in the South. This work could be helpful in deciding where to live in the United States based on present and future thermal comfort, and could also provide a basis for estimates of changes in heating and cooling energy demand.

  1. Enhanced heat transfer surface for cast-in-bump-covered cooling surfaces and methods of enhancing heat transfer

    DOEpatents

    Chiu, Rong-Shi Paul; Hasz, Wayne Charles; Johnson, Robert Alan; Lee, Ching-Pang; Abuaf, Nesim

    2002-01-01

    An annular turbine shroud separates a hot gas path from a cooling plenum containing a cooling medium. Bumps are cast in the surface on the cooling side of the shroud. A surface coating overlies the cooling side surface of the shroud, including the bumps, and contains cooling enhancement material. The surface area ratio of the cooling side of the shroud with the bumps and coating is in excess of a surface area ratio of the cooling side surface with bumps without the coating to afford increased heat transfer across the element relative to the heat transfer across the element without the coating.

  2. National commercial solar heating and cooling demonstration: purposes, program activities, and implications for future programs

    SciTech Connect

    Koontz, R.; Genest, M.; Bryant, B.

    1980-05-01

    The Solar Heating and Cooling Demonstration Act of 1974 created a set of activities to demonstrate the potential use of solar heating within a three-year period and of combined solar heating and cooling within a five-year period. This study assesses the Commercial Demonstration Program portion of the activity in terms of its stated goals and objectives. The primary data base was DOE contractor reports on commercial demonstration projects. It was concluded that the program did not provide data to support a positive decision for the immediate construction or purchase of commercial solar systems. However, the program may have contributed to other goals in the subsequent legislation; i.e., research and development information, stimulation of the solar industry, and more informed policy decisions.

  3. Rod Bundle Heat Transfer: Steady-State Steam Cooling Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Spring, J.P.; McLaughlin, D.M.

    2006-07-01

    Through the joint efforts of the Pennsylvania State University and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, an experimental rod bundle heat transfer (RBHT) facility was designed and built. The rod bundle consists of a 7 x 7 square pitch array with spacer grids and geometry similar to that found in a modern pressurized water reactor. From this facility, a series of steady-state steam cooling experiments were performed. The bundle inlet Reynolds number was varied from 1 400 to 30 000 over a pressure range from 1.36 to 4 bars (20 to 60 psia). The bundle inlet steam temperature was controlled to be at saturation for the specified pressure and the fluid exit temperature exceeded 550 deg. C in the highest power tests. One important quantity of interest is the local convective heat transfer coefficient defined in terms of the local bulk mean temperature of the flow, local wall temperature, and heat flux. Steam temperatures were measured at the center of selected subchannels along the length of the bundle by traversing miniaturized thermocouples. Using an analogy between momentum and energy transport, a method was developed for relating the local subchannel centerline temperature measurement to the local bulk mean temperature. Wall temperatures were measured using internal thermocouples strategically placed along the length of each rod and the local wall heat flux was obtained from an inverse conduction program. The local heat transfer coefficient was calculated from the data at each rod thermocouple location. The local heat transfer coefficients calculated for locations where the flow was fully developed were compared against several published correlations. The Weisman and El-Genk correlations were found to agree best with the RBHT steam cooling data, especially over the range of turbulent Reynolds numbers. The effect of spacer grids on the heat transfer enhancement was also determined from instrumentation placed downstream of the spacer grid locations. The local

  4. Heat transfer during heat sterilization and cooling processes of canned products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dincer, I.

    In this paper, an analysis of transient heat transfer during heat sterilization and cooling processes of a cylindrical canned product is presented. In the analysis, most practical case including the boundary condition of third kind (i.e., convection boundary condition, leading to 0.1 <= Bi <= 100) was employed. A simple analytical model for determining effective heat transfer coefficients for such products is developed. For the heat sterilization process, heating coefficient is incorporated into heat transfer coefficient model. An experimental study was performed to measure the thermal center temperatures of the short-cylindrical canned products (i.e., Tuna fish) during heat sterilization at the retort medium temperatures of 115∘C and 121∘C, and during cooling process at 16∘C. The effective heat transfer coefficient model used the experimental temperature data. Using these effective heat transfer coefficients the center temperature distributions were calculated and compared with the experimental temperature distributions. Agreement was found considerably high. The results of the present study indicate that the heat-transfer analysis technique and heat-transfer coefficient model are reliable, and can provide accurate results for such problems.

  5. District heating and cooling: a 28-city assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Meshenberg, M.J.

    1983-08-01

    Findings of a project that assessed the potential for construction of district heating and cooling (DHC) systems in 28 US cities are presented. The project sought to determine whether DHC could promote local community and economic development. In the preliminary assessment, 17 of the cities identified up to 23 projects that could be built within three to five years. Most of these projects would rely on nonscarce heat sources such as refuse or geothermal energy, and to improve financial feasibility, the majority would cogenerate electricity along with heat. Many would use existing power plants or industrial boilers to hold down capital costs. Overall, the projects could generate as amany as 24,000 jobs and retain $165 million that otherwise could leave the communities, thereby helping to stabilize local economies.

  6. Ground Source Geothermal District Heating and Cooling System

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, James William

    2016-10-21

    Ball State University converted its campus from a coal-fired steam boiler district heating system to a ground source heat pump geothermal district system that produces simultaneously hot water for heating and chilled water for cooling. This system will include the installation of 3,600 four hundred feet deep vertical closed loop boreholes making it the largest ground source geothermal district system in the country. The boreholes will act as heat exchangers and transfer heat by virtue of the earth’s ability to maintain an average temperature of 55 degree Fahrenheit. With growing international concern for global warming and the need to reduce worldwide carbon dioxide loading of the atmosphere geothermal is poised to provide the means to help reduce carbon dioxide emissions. The shift from burning coal to utilizing ground source geothermal will increase electrical consumption but an overall decrease in energy use and reduction in carbon dioxide output will be achieved. This achievement is a result of coupling the ground source geothermal boreholes with large heat pump chiller technology. The system provides the thermodynamic means to move large amounts of energy with limited energy input. Ball State University: http://cms.bsu.edu/About/Geothermal.aspx

  7. Combined Effects of Wakes and Jet Pulsing on Film Cooling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    water as a refer- ence. Constant current cold- wire and constant temperature hot - wire anemometry were used to measure flow temperature and velocity...Temperature measurements were made using an infrared camera, thermocouples, and constant current (cold wire ) anemometry . The local film cooling effectiveness...and heat transfer coefficient were de- termined from the measured temperatures. Phase locked flow temperature fields were determined from cold- wire

  8. Combined Effects of Wakes and Jet Pulsing on Film Cooling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-01

    water as a refer- ence. Constant current cold- wire and constant temperature hot - wire anemometry were used to measure flow temperature and velocity...Temperature measurements were made using an infrared camera, thermocouples, and constant current (cold wire ) anemometry . The local film cooling effectiveness...and heat transfer coefficient were de- termined from the measured temperatures. Phase locked flow temperature fields were determined from cold- wire

  9. Annual DOE active solar heating and cooling contractors' review meeting. Premeeting proceedings and project summaries

    SciTech Connect

    None,

    1981-09-01

    Ninety-three project summaries are presented which discuss the following aspects of active solar heating and cooling: Rankine solar cooling systems; absorption solar cooling systems; desiccant solar cooling systems; solar heat pump systems; solar hot water systems; special projects (such as the National Solar Data Network, hybrid solar thermal/photovoltaic applications, and heat transfer and water migration in soils); administrative/management support; and solar collector, storage, controls, analysis, and materials technology. (LEW)

  10. Ground-Coupled Heating-Cooling Systems in Urban Areas: How Sustainable Are They?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Younger, Paul L.

    2008-01-01

    Ground-coupled heating-cooling systems (GCHCSs) exchange heat between the built environment and the subsurface using pipework buried in trenches or boreholes. If heat pumps in GCHCSs are powered by "green electricity," they offer genuine carbon-free heating-cooling; for this reason, there has been a surge in the technology in recent…

  11. Thermal-structural analysis of the platelet heat-pipe-cooled leading edge of hypersonic vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongpeng, Liu; Weiqiang, Liu

    2016-10-01

    One of the main challenges for the hypersonic vehicle is its thermal protection, more specifically, the cooling of its leading edge. To investigate the feasibility of a platelet heat-pipe-cooled leading edge structure, thermal/stress distributions for steady-state flight conditions are calculated numerically. Studies are carried on for IN718/Na, C-103/Na and T-111/Li compatible material combinations of heat pipe under nominal operations and a central heat pipe failure cases, and the influence of wall thickness on the design robustness is also investigated. And the heat transfer limits (the sonic limit, the capillary limit and the boiling limit) are also computed to check the operation of platelet heat pipes. The results indicate that, with a 15 mm leading edge radius and a wall thickness of 0.5 mm, C-103/Na and T-111/Li combinations of heat pipe is capable of withstanding both nominal and failure conditions for Mach 8 and Mach 10 flight respectively.

  12. Solar heating and cooling of residential buildings: design of systems, 1980 edition

    SciTech Connect

    1980-09-01

    This manual was prepared primarily for use in conducting a practical training course on the design of solar heating and cooling systems for residential and small office buildings, but may also be useful as a general reference text. The content level is appropriate for persons with different and varied backgrounds, although it is assumed that readers possess a basic understanding of heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems of conventional (non-solar) types. This edition is a revision of the manual with the same title, first printed and distributed by the US Government Printing Office in October 1977. The manual has been reorganized, new material has been added, and outdated information has been deleted. Only active solar systems are described. Liquid and air-heating solar systems for combined space and service water heating or service water heating are included. Furthermore, only systems with proven experience are discussed to any extent.

  13. Heating and Cooling of Flare Loops in a C5.7 Two-ribbon Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Sarah; Qiu, Jiong

    2016-05-01

    Heating and cooling of flare plasmas can be studied using models constrained by observations. In this work, we analyze and model thermal evolution of a C5.7 two-ribbon flare that occurred on December 26, 2011. The flare was observed by AIA. Two hundred flare loops are identified, which formed sequentially during one hour. Light curves of these flare loops in multiple EUV bands are analyzed to derive the duration and timing of flare emission in each bandpass. These timescales usually reflect cooling of flare plasmas from 10~MK to successively lower temperatures. We then use a zero-dimensional enthalpy-based thermal evolution of loops (EBTEL) model to study flare heating and cooling. Several variations on the EBTEL model are assessed. The first model uses an impulsive heating function inferred from the rapid rise of the foot-point UV emission. Synthetic emission from this model evolves and decays more quickly than the observations, as many models do. Two other variations on the model are analyzed, in an attempt to counter this. In one variation the heating function is a combination of an impulsive pulse followed by an extended tail (i.e., continuous heating). The other model uses reduced thermal conduction to slow the flares evolution. These models are compared with one another and the observations, to evaluate effects of different mechanisms governing the thermal evolution of flare plasmas.

  14. Titanium based flat heat pipes for computer chip cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soni, Gaurav; Ding, Changsong; Sigurdson, Marin; Bozorgi, Payam; Piorek, Brian; MacDonald, Noel; Meinhart, Carl

    2008-11-01

    We are developing a highly conductive flat heat pipe (called Thermal Ground Plane or TGP) for cooling computer chips. Conventional heat pipes have circular cross sections and thus can't make good contact with chip surface. The flatness of our TGP will enable conformal contact with the chip surface and thus enhance cooling efficiency. Another limiting factor in conventional heat pipes is the capillary flow of the working fluid through a wick structure. In order to overcome this limitation we have created a highly porous wick structure on a flat titanium substrate by using micro fabrication technology. We first etch titanium to create very tall micro pillars with a diameter of 5 μm, a height of 40 μm and a pitch of 10 μm. We then grow a very fine nano structured titania (NST) hairs on all surfaces of the pillars by oxidation in H202. In this way we achieve a wick structure which utilizes multiple length scales to yield high performance wicking of water. It's capable of wicking water at an average velocity of 1 cm/s over a distance of several cm. A titanium cavity is laser-welded onto the wicking substrate and a small quantity of water is hermetically sealed inside the cavity to achieve a TGP. The thermal conductivity of our preliminary TGP was measured to be 350 W/m-K, but has the potential to be several orders of magnitude higher.

  15. The effects of passive heating and head-cooling on perception of exercise in the heat.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Shona E; Mündel, Toby; Jones, David A

    2008-09-01

    The capacity to perform exercise is reduced in a hot environment when compared to cooler conditions. A limiting factor appears to be a higher core body temperature (T (core)) and it has been suggested that an elevated T (core) reduces the drive to exercise, this being reflected in higher ratings of perceived exertion (RPE). The purpose of the present study was to determine whether passive heating to increase T (core) would have a detrimental effect on RPE and thermal comfort during subsequent exercise in the heat and whether head-cooling during passive heating would attenuate these unpleasant sensations of an elevated T (core) during subsequent exercise in the heat. Nine physically-active, non-heat-acclimated volunteers [6 males, 3 females; age: 21 +/- 1 year, VO(2max) 50 +/- 9 ml kg(-1).min(-1), peak power output: 286 +/- 43 W (mean +/- SD)] performed two 12-minute constant-load cycling tests at 70% VO(2max) in a warm-dry environment (34 +/- 1 degrees C, relative humidity <30%) separated by a period of passive heating in a sauna (68 +/- 3 degrees C) to increase T (core). In one trial, subjects had their head and face cooled continually in the sauna (HC), the other trial was a control (CON). Passive heating increased T (core) by 1.22 +/- 0.03 degrees C in the CON and by 0.75 +/- 0.07 degrees C in the HC trial (P < 0.01). Passive heating increased weighted mean skin temperature (T (msk)) in both the CON and HC trials (P < 0.01), however, head-cooling lowered T (msk) during passive heating (P < 0.05). Exercise time following passive heating was reduced in both the CON and HC trials (P < 0.05). Passive heating increased RPE (P < 0.01), however, RPE was lower following passive heating with head-cooling (P < 0.05). There was a significant correlation between T (core) and RPE (r = 0.82, P < 0.001). In conclusion, our results suggest increased RPE during exercise in the heat is primarily due to the increase in T (core). Furthermore, head-cooling attenuates the rise in T

  16. 1992 National census for district heating, cooling and cogeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    District energy systems are a major part of the energy use and delivery infrastructure of the United States. With nearly 6,000 operating systems currently in place, district energy represents approximately 800 billion BTU per hour of installed thermal production capacity, and provides over 1.1 quadrillion BTU of energy annually -- about 1.3% of all energy used in the US each year. Delivered through more that 20,000 miles of pipe, this energy is used to heat and cool almost 12 billion square feet of enclosed space in buildings that serve a diverse range of office, education, health care, military, industrial and residential needs. This Census is intended to provide a better understanding of the character and extent of district heating, cooling and cogeneration in the United States. It defines a district energy system as: Any system that provides thermal energy (steam, hot water, or chilled water) for space heating, space cooling, or process uses from a central plant, and that distributes the energy to two or more buildings through a network of pipes. If electricity is produced, the system is a cogenerating facility. The Census was conducted through surveys administered to the memberships of eleven national associations and agencies that collectively represent the great majority of the nation`s district energy system operators. Responses received from these surveys account for about 11% of all district systems in the United States. Data in this report is organized and presented within six user sectors selected to illustrate the significance of district energy in institutional, community and utility settings. Projections estimate the full extent of district energy systems in each sector.

  17. Direct contact liquid-liquid heat exchanger for solar heated and cooled buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaki, S.; Brothers, P.

    1980-06-01

    The technical and economic feasibility of using a direct contract liquid-liquid heat exchanger (DCLLHE) storage unit in a solar heating and cooling system is established. Experimental performance data were obtained from the CSU Solar House I using a DCLLHE for both heating and cooling functions. A simulation model for the system was developed. The model was validated using the experimental data and applied in five different climatic regions of the country for a complete year. The life-cycle cost of the system was estimated for each application. The results are compared to a conventional solar system, using a standard shell-and-tube heat exchanger. It is concluded that while there is a performance advantage with a DCLLHE system over a conventional solar system, the advantage is not sufficiently large to overcome slightly higher capital and operating costs for the DCLLHE system.

  18. Modular cogeneration in district heating and cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, J.W.; Aalto, P.; Gleason, T.C.J.; Skalafuris, A.J.

    1987-12-01

    The use of prepackaged cogeneration systems of modular size (100 kWe - 10 MWe) in conjunction with district heating and cooling is proposed as a way to enhance the energy conservation potential of both cogeneration and district energy systems. This report examines the technical and institutional aspects of this marriage of technologies, and develops a research agenda whose goal is to define this potential use of cogeneration more accurately and to develop the generic technology base needed to bring it to actuality. 11 refs.

  19. Testability of a heat pipe cooled thermionic reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, Richard E.; Harlan Horner, M.

    1992-01-01

    As part of the Air Force Phillips Laboratory thermionics program, Rocketdyne performed a design study for an in-core thermionic fuel element (TFE) heat pipe cooled reactor power system. This effort involved a testability evaluation that was performed starting with testing of individual components, followed by testing at various stages of fabrication, and concluding with full system acceptance and qualification testing. It was determined that the system could be thoroughly tested to ensure a high probability of successful operation in space after launch.

  20. Heating and cooling gas-gun targets: nuts and bolts

    SciTech Connect

    Gustavsen, Richard L; Bartram, Brian D; Gehr, Russell J; Bucholtz, Scott M

    2009-01-01

    The nuts and bolts of a system used to heat and cool gas-gun targets is described. We have now used the system for more than 35 experiments, all of which have used electromagnetic gauging. Features of the system include a cover which is removed (remotely) just prior to projectile impact and the widespread use of metal/polymer insulations. Both the cover and insulation were required to obtain uniform temperatures in samples with low thermal conductivity. The use of inexpensive video cameras to make remote observations of the cover removal was found to be very useful. A brief catalog of useful glue, adhesive tape, insulation, and seal materials is given.

  1. Direct contact liquid-liquid heat exchanger for solar-heated and cooled buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaki, S.; Brothers, P.

    1980-06-01

    The procedure used was to obtain experimental performance data from a solar system using a DCLLHE for both heating and cooling functions, develop a simulation model for the system, validate the model using the data, apply the model in five different climatic regions of the country for a complete year, and estimate the life-cycle cost of the system for each application. The results are compared to a conventional solar system, using a standard shell-and-tube heat exchanger.

  2. System Analysis for Decay Heat Removal in Lead-Bismuth Cooled Natural Circulated Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Takaaki Sakai; Yasuhiro Enuma; Takashi Iwasaki; Kazuhiro Ohyama

    2002-07-01

    Decay heat removal analyses for lead-bismuth cooled natural circulation reactors are described in this paper. A combined multi-dimensional plant dynamics code (MSG-COPD) has been developed to conduct the system analysis for the natural circulation reactors. For the preliminary study, transient analysis has been performed for a 100 MWe lead-bismuth-cooled reactor designed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). In addition, decay heat removal characteristics of a 400 MWe lead-bismuth-cooled natural circulation reactor designed by Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) has been evaluated by using MSG-COPD. PRACS (Primary Reactor Auxiliary Cooling System) is prepared for the JNC's concept to get sufficient heat removal capacity. During 2000 sec after the transient, the outlet temperature shows increasing tendency up to the maximum temperature of 430 Centigrade, because the buoyancy force in a primary circulation path is temporary reduced. However, the natural circulation is recovered by the PRACS system and the out let temperature decreases successfully. (authors)

  3. System Analysis for Decay Heat Removal in Lead-Bismuth-Cooled Natural-Circulation Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Takaaki; Enuma, Yasuhiro; Iwasaki, Takashi

    2004-03-15

    Decay heat removal analyses for lead-bismuth-cooled natural-circulation reactors are described in this paper. A combined multidimensional plant dynamics code (MSG-COPD) has been developed to conduct the system analysis for the natural-circulation reactors. For the preliminary study, transient analysis has been performed for a 300-MW(thermal) lead-bismuth-cooled reactor designed by Argonne National Laboratory. In addition, decay heat removal characteristics of a 400-MW(electric) lead-bismuth-cooled natural-circulation reactor designed by the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) has been evaluated by using MSG-COPD. The primary reactor auxiliary cooling system (PRACS) is prepared for the JNC concept to get sufficient heat removal capacity. During 2000 s after the transient, the outlet temperature shows increasing tendency up to the maximum temperature of 430 deg. C because the buoyancy force in a primary circulation path is temporarily reduced. However, the natural circulation is recovered by the PRACS system, and the outlet temperature decreases successfully.

  4. Fluid-cooled heat sink with improved fin areas and efficiencies for use in cooling various devices

    SciTech Connect

    Bharathan, Desikan; Bennion, Kevin; Kelly, Kenneth; Narumanchi, Sreekant

    2015-04-21

    The disclosure provides a fluid-cooled heat sink having a heat transfer base and a plurality of heat transfer fins in thermal communication with the heat transfer base, where the heat transfer base and the heat transfer fins form a central fluid channel through which a forced or free cooling fluid may flow. The heat transfer pins are arranged around the central fluid channel with a flow space provided between adjacent pins, allowing for some portion of the central fluid channel flow to divert through the flow space. The arrangement reduces the pressure drop of the flow through the fins, optimizes average heat transfer coefficients, reduces contact and fin-pin resistances, and reduces the physical footprint of the heat sink in an operating environment.

  5. Effectiveness of an air-cooled vest using selected air temperature and humidity combinations.

    PubMed

    Pimental, N A; Cosimini, H M; Sawka, M N; Wenger, C B

    1987-02-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of an air-cooled vest in reducing thermal strain of subjects exercising in the heat (49 degrees C dry bulb (db), 20 degrees C dew point (dp] in chemical protective clothing. Four male subjects attempted 300-min heat exposures at two metabolic rates (175 and 315 W) with six cooling combinations--control (no vest) and five different db and dp combinations. Air supplied to the vest at 15 scfm ranged from 20-27 degrees C db, 7-18 degrees C dp; theoretical cooling capacities were 498-687 W. Without the vest, endurance times were 118 min (175 W) and 73 min (315 W). Endurance times with the vest were 300 min (175 W) and 242-300 min (315 W). The five cooling combinations were similarly effective in reducing thermal strain and extending endurance time, although there was a trend for the vest to be more effective when supplied with air at the lower dry bulb temperature. At 175 W, subjects maintained a constant body temperature; at 315 W, the vest's ability to extend endurance is limited to about 5 hours.

  6. Developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    The objective is to develop and test various integrated solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water systems, and to evaluate their performance. Systems composed of new, as well a previously tested, components are carefully integrated so that effects of new components on system performance can be clearly delineated. The SEAL-DOE program includes six tasks which have received funding for the 1991--1992 fifteen-month period. These include: (1) a project employing isothermal operation of air and liquid solar space hearing systems, (2) a project to build and test several generic solar water heaters, (3) a project that will evaluate advanced solar domestic hot water components and concepts and integrate them into solar domestic hot water systems, (4) a liquid desiccant cooling system development project, (5) a project that will perform system modeling and analysis work on solid desiccant cooling systems research, and (6) a management task. The objectives and progress in each task are described in this report. 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Thermal storage studies for solar heating and cooling: Applications using chemical heat pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offenhartz, P. O.

    1981-04-01

    The simulation of chemical heat pumps and simulations (including heating, cooling, and domestic hot water) were performed for Washington, D.C. and Ft. Worth, Texas. Direct weekly comparisons of the H2SO4/H2O and CaCl2/CH3OH cycles were carried out. Projected performance of the NH4NO3/NH3 cycle was also investigated, and was identical to H2SO4/H2O. In all simulated cases, the solar collector is a fixed evacuated tube system. With standard residential loads, the chemical heat pumps performed well. Gas fired backup via the heat pump was quite effective in reducing fossil fuel consumption. Chemical heat pumps are designed to reject heat at relatively high temperatures, however, they are also effective in providing domestic hot water.

  8. Natural Convection Heat Transfer in a Rectangular Liquid Metal Pool With Bottom Heating and Top Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Il S.; Yu, Yong H.; Son, Hyoung M.; Hwang, Jin S.; Suh, Kune Y.

    2006-07-01

    An experimental study is performed to investigate the natural convection heat transfer characteristics with subcooled coolant to create engineering database for basic applications in a lead alloy cooled reactor. Tests are performed in the ALTOS (Applied Liquid-metal Thermal Operation Study) apparatus as part of MITHOS (Metal Integrated Thermo Hydrodynamic Operation System). A relationship is determined between the Nusselt number Nu and the Rayleigh number Ra in the liquid metal rectangular pool. Results are compared with correlations and experimental data in the literature. Given the similar Ra condition, the present test results for Nu of the liquid metal pool with top subcooling are found to be similar to those predicted by the existing correlations or experiments. The current test results are utilized to develop natural convection heat transfer correlations applicable to low Prandtl number Pr fluids that are heated from below and cooled by the external coolant above. Results from this study are slated to be used in designing BORIS (Battery Optimized Reactor Integral System), a small lead cooled modular fast reactor for deployment at remote sites cycled with MOBIS (Modular Optimized Brayton Integral System) for electricity generation, tied with NAVIS (Naval Application Vessel Integral System) for ship propulsion, joined with THAIS (Thermochemical Hydrogen Acquisition Integral System) for hydrogen production, and coupled with DORIS (Desalination Optimized Reactor Integral System) for seawater desalination. Tests are performed with Wood's metal (Pb-Bi-Sn-Cd) filling a rectangular pool whose lower surface is heated and upper surface cooled by forced convection of water. The test section is 20 cm long, 11.3 cm high and 15 cm wide. The simulant has a melting temperature of 78 deg. C. The constant temperature and heat flux condition was realized for the bottom heating once the steady state had been met. The test parameters include the heated bottom surface temperature

  9. Fluid flow and heat convection studies for actively cooled airframes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, A. F.

    This report details progress made on the jet impingement - liquid crystal - digital imaging experiment. With the design phase complete, the experiment is currently in the construction phase. In order to reach this phase two design related issues were resolved. The first issue was to determine NASP leading edge active cooling design parameters. Meetings were arranged with personnel at SAIC International, Torrance, CA in order to obtain recent publications that characterized expected leading edge heat fluxes as well as other details of NASP operating conditions. The information in these publications was used to estimate minimum and maximum jet Reynolds numbers needed to accomplish the required leading edge cooling, and to determine the parameters of the experiment. The details of this analysis are shown in Appendix A. One of the concerns for the NASP design is that of thermal stress due to large surface temperature gradients. Using a series of circular jets to cool the leading edge will cause a non-uniform temperature distribution and potentially large thermal stresses. Therefore it was decided to explore the feasibility of using a slot jet to cool the leading edge. The literature contains many investigations into circular jet heat transfer but few investigations of slot jet heat transfer. The first experiments will be done on circular jets impinging on a fiat plate and results compared to previously published data to establish the accuracy of the method. Subsequent experiments will be slot jets impinging on full scale models of the NASP leading edge. Table 1 shows the range of parameters to be explored. Next a preliminary design of the experiment was done. Previous papers which used a similar experimental technique were studied and elements of those experiments adapted to the jet impingement study. Trade-off studies were conducted to determine which design was the least expensive, easy to construct, and easy to use. Once the final design was settled, vendors were

  10. Fluid flow and heat convection studies for actively cooled airframes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, A. F.

    1993-01-01

    This report details progress made on the jet impingement - liquid crystal - digital imaging experiment. With the design phase complete, the experiment is currently in the construction phase. In order to reach this phase two design related issues were resolved. The first issue was to determine NASP leading edge active cooling design parameters. Meetings were arranged with personnel at SAIC International, Torrance, CA in order to obtain recent publications that characterized expected leading edge heat fluxes as well as other details of NASP operating conditions. The information in these publications was used to estimate minimum and maximum jet Reynolds numbers needed to accomplish the required leading edge cooling, and to determine the parameters of the experiment. The details of this analysis are shown in Appendix A. One of the concerns for the NASP design is that of thermal stress due to large surface temperature gradients. Using a series of circular jets to cool the leading edge will cause a non-uniform temperature distribution and potentially large thermal stresses. Therefore it was decided to explore the feasibility of using a slot jet to cool the leading edge. The literature contains many investigations into circular jet heat transfer but few investigations of slot jet heat transfer. The first experiments will be done on circular jets impinging on a fiat plate and results compared to previously published data to establish the accuracy of the method. Subsequent experiments will be slot jets impinging on full scale models of the NASP leading edge. Table 1 shows the range of parameters to be explored. Next a preliminary design of the experiment was done. Previous papers which used a similar experimental technique were studied and elements of those experiments adapted to the jet impingement study. Trade-off studies were conducted to determine which design was the least expensive, easy to construct, and easy to use. Once the final design was settled, vendors were

  11. Leading edge film cooling effects on turbine blade heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Vijay K.; Gaugler, Raymond E.

    1995-01-01

    An existing three dimensional Navier-Stokes code, modified to include film cooling considerations, has been used to study the effect of spanwise pitch of shower-head holes and coolant to mainstream mass flow ratio on the adiabatic effectiveness and heat transfer coefficient on a film-cooled turbine vane. The mainstream is akin to that under real engine conditions with stagnation temperature = 1900 K and stagnation pressure = 3 MPa. It is found that with the coolant to mainstream mass flow ratio fixed, reducing P, the spanwise pitch for shower-head holes, from 7.5 d to 3.0 d, where d is the hole diameter, increases the average effectiveness considerably over the blade surface. However, when P/d= 7.5, increasing the coolant mass flow increases the effectiveness on the pressure surface but reduces it on the suction surface due to coolant jet lift-off. For P/d = 4.5 or 3.0, such an anomaly does not occur within the range of coolant to mainstream mass flow ratios analyzed. In all cases, adiabatic effectiveness and heat transfer coefficient are highly three-dimensional.

  12. Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) Decay Heat Removal Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    K. D. Weaver; L-Y. Cheng; H. Ludewig; J. Jo

    2005-09-01

    Current research and development on the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) has focused on the design of safety systems that will remove the decay heat during accident conditions, ion irradiations of candidate ceramic materials, joining studies of oxide dispersion strengthened alloys; and within the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) the fabrication of carbide fuels and ceramic fuel matrix materials, development of non-halide precursor low density and high density ceramic coatings, and neutron irradiation of candidate ceramic fuel matrix and metallic materials. The vast majority of this work has focused on the reference design for the GFR: a helium-cooled, direct power conversion system that will operate with an outlet temperature of 850ºC at 7 MPa. In addition to the work being performed in the United States, seven international partners under the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) have identified their interest in participating in research related to the development of the GFR. These are Euratom (European Commission), France, Japan, South Africa, South Korea, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. Of these, Euratom (including the United Kingdom), France, and Japan have active research activities with respect to the GFR. The research includes GFR design and safety, and fuels/in-core materials/fuel cycle projects. This report is a compilation of work performed on decay heat removal systems for a 2400 MWt GFR during this fiscal year (FY05).

  13. Hybrid space heating/cooling system with Trombe wall, underground venting, and assisted heat pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirley, J. W.; James, L. C.; Stevens, S.; Autry, A. N.; Nussbaum, M.; McQueen, S. V.

    1983-06-01

    A hybrid solar system/ground loop which automatically assists the standard, thermostatically controlled home heating/cooling system was designed and monitored. The input from the homeowner was limited to normal thermostat operations. During the course of the project it was determined that to effectively gather data and control the various component interactions, a microcomputer based control system would also allow the HVAC system to be optimized by simple changes to software. This flexibility in an untested concept helped us to achieve optimum system performance. Control ranged from direct solar heating and direct ground loop cooling modes, to assistance of the heat pump by both solar space and ground loop. Sensors were strategically placed to provide data on response of the Trombe wall (surface, 4 in. deep, 8 in. deep), and the ground loop (inlet, 3/4 length, outlet). Microcomputer hardware and computer programs were developed to make cost effective decisions between the various modes of operation.

  14. Numerical comparison of convective heat transfer augmentation devices used in cooling channels of hypersonic vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maldonado, Jaime J.

    1994-01-01

    Hypersonic vehicles are exposed to extreme thermal conditions compared to subsonic aircraft; therefore, some level of thermal management is required to protect the materials used. Normally, hypersonic vehicles experience the highest temperatures in the nozzle throat, and aircraft and propulsion system leading edges. Convective heat transfer augmentation techniques can be used in the thermal management system to increase heat transfer of the cooling channels in those areas. The techniques studied in this report are pin-fin, offset-fin, ribbed and straight roughened channel. A smooth straight channel is used as the baseline for comparing the techniques. SINDA '85, a lumped parameter finite difference thermal analyzer, is used to model the channels. Subroutines are added to model the fluid flow assuming steady one dimensional compressible flow with heat addition and friction. Correlations for convective heat transfer and friction are used in conjunction with the fluid flow analysis mentioned. As expected, the pin-fin arrangement has the highest heat transfer coefficient and the largest pressure drop. All the other devices fall in between the pin-fin and smooth straight channel. The selection of the best heat augmentation method depends on the design requirements. A good approach may be a channel using a combination of the techniques. For instance, several rows of pin-fins may be located at the region of highest heat flux, surrounded by some of the other techniques. Thus, the heat transfer coefficient is maximized at the region of highest heat flux while the pressure drop is not excessive.

  15. Comparison of measured and predicted sensible heating and cooling loads for six test buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, D.M.; Walton, G.N.; Licitra, B.A.; Cavanaugh, K.

    1986-06-01

    Hourly sensible heating and cooling loads for six test buildings were predicted using two computer programs, called TARP and EMPS. The predicted loads were compared to corresponding measured loads for winter heating, spring heating, and summer cooling periods. Both computer programs predicted the general trends of the measured data.

  16. Solar Heating and Cooling of Residential Buildings: Sizing, Installation and Operation of Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Univ., Ft. Collins. Solar Energy Applications Lab.

    This training course and a companion course titled "Design of Systems for Solar Heating and Cooling of Residential Buildings," are designed to train home designers and builders in the fundamentals of solar hydronic and air systems for space heating and cooling and domestic hot water heating for residential buildings. Each course, organized in 22…

  17. Solar Heating and Cooling of Buildings (Phase O). Volume 1: Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TRW Systems Group, Redondo Beach, CA.

    The purpose of this study was to establish the technical and economic feasibility of using solar energy for the heating and cooling of buildings. Five selected building types in 14 selected cities were used to determine loads for space heating, space cooling and dehumidification, and domestic service hot water heating. Relying on existing and…

  18. Solar energy to heat and cool a new NASA Langley office building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maag, W. L.

    1974-01-01

    A solar heating and cooling system will be installed at a new NASA office building. The objective of this project is to establish a full-scale working test-bed facility to investigate solar energy for heating and cooling buildings. The energy collected will provide between 80 and 100 percent of the heating and cooling requirements during the cool months and between one-half and two-thirds of the cooling requirements in the summer. Thermal energy storage will be provided to bridge the gap between cloudy and clear days.

  19. Experimentally Determined Heat Transfer Coefficients for Spacesuit Liquid Cooled Garments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant; Watts, Carly; Rhodes, Richard; Anchondo, Ian; Westheimer, David; Campbell, Colin; Vonau, Walt; Vogel, Matt; Conger, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    A Human-In-The-Loop (HITL) Portable Life Support System 2.0 (PLSS 2.0) test has been conducted at NASA Johnson Space Center in the PLSS Development Laboratory from October 27, 2014 to December 19, 2014. These closed-loop tests of the PLSS 2.0 system integrated with human subjects in the Mark III Suit at 3.7 psi to 4.3 psi above ambient pressure performing treadmill exercise at various metabolic rates from standing rest to 3000 BTU/hr (880 W). The bulk of the PLSS 2.0 was at ambient pressure but effluent water vapor from the Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME) and the Auxiliary Membrane Evaporator (Mini-ME), and effluent carbon dioxide from the Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) were ported to vacuum to test performance of these components in flight-like conditions. One of the objectives of this test was to determine the heat transfer coefficient (UA) of the Liquid Cooling Garment (LCG). The UA, an important factor for modeling the heat rejection of an LCG, was determined in a variety of conditions by varying inlet water temperature, flowrate, and metabolic rate. Three LCG configurations were tested: the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) LCG, the Oceaneering Space Systems (OSS) LCG, and the OSS auxiliary LCG. Other factors influencing accurate UA determination, such as overall heat balance, LCG fit, and the skin temperature measurement, will also be discussed.

  20. Counter flow cooling drier with integrated heat recovery

    DOEpatents

    Shivvers, Steve D.

    2009-08-18

    A drier apparatus for removing water or other liquids from various materials includes a mixer, drying chamber, separator and regenerator and a method for use of the apparatus. The material to be dried is mixed with a heated media to form a mixture which then passes through the chamber. While passing through the chamber, a comparatively cool fluid is passed counter current through the mixture so that the mixture becomes cooler and drier and the fluid becomes hotter and more saturated with moisture. The mixture is then separated into drier material and media. The media is transferred to the regenerator and heated therein by the hot fluid from the chamber and supplemental heat is supplied to bring the media to a preselected temperature for mixing with the incoming material to be dried. In a closed loop embodiment of the apparatus, the fluid is also recycled from the regenerator to the chamber and a chiller is utilized to reduce the temperature of the fluid to a preselected temperature and dew point temperature.

  1. Ultimate Heat Sink Thermal Performance and Water Utilization: Measurements on Cooling and Spray Ponds

    SciTech Connect

    Athey, G. F.; Hadlock, R. K.; Abbey, O. B.

    1982-02-01

    A data acquisition research program, entitled "Ultimate Heat Sink Performance Field Experiments," has been brought to completion. The primary objective is to obtain the requisite data to characterize thermal performance and water utilization for cooling ponds and spray ponds at elevated temperature. Such data are useful for modeling purposes, but the work reported here does not contain modeling efforts within its scope. The water bodies which have been studied are indicative of nuclear reactor ultimate heat sinks, components of emergency core cooling systems. The data reflect thermal performance and water utilization for meteorological and solar influences which are representative of worst-case combinations of conditions. Constructed water retention ponds, provided with absolute seals against seepage, have been chosen as facilities for the measurement programs; the first pond was located at Raft River, Idaho, and the second at East Mesa, California. The data illustrate and describe, for both cooling ponds and spray ponds, thermal performance and water utilization as the ponds cool from an initially elevated temperature. To obtain the initial elevated temperature, it has been convenient to conduct the measurements at geothermal sites having large supplies and delivery rates of hot geothermal fluid. The data are described and discussed in the text, and presented in the form of data volumes as appendices.

  2. Nerve conduction block using combined thermoelectric cooling and high frequency electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, D Michael; Foldes, Emily L; Bhadra, Niloy; Kilgore, Kevin L

    2010-10-30

    Conduction block of peripheral nerves is an important technique for many basic and applied neurophysiology studies. To date, there has not been a technique which provides a quickly initiated and reversible "on-demand" conduction block which is both sustainable for long periods of time and does not generate activity in the nerve at the onset of the conduction block. In this study we evaluated the feasibility of a combined method of nerve block which utilizes two well established nerve blocking techniques in a rat and cat model: nerve cooling and electrical block using high frequency alternating currents (HFAC). This combined method effectively makes use of the contrasting features of both nerve cooling and electrical block using HFAC. The conduction block was initiated using nerve cooling, a technique which does not produce nerve "onset response" firing, a prohibitive drawback of HFAC electrical block. The conduction block was then readily transitioned into an electrical block. A long-term electrical block is likely preferential to a long-term nerve cooling block because nerve cooling block generates large amounts of exhaust heat, does not allow for fiber diameter selectivity and is known to be unsafe for prolonged delivery.

  3. Neck-cooling improves repeated sprint performance in the heat

    PubMed Central

    Sunderland, Caroline; Stevens, Ryan; Everson, Bethan; Tyler, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effect of neck-cooling during exercise on repeated sprint ability in a hot environment. Seven team-sport playing males completed two experimental trials involving repeated sprint exercise (5 × 6 s) before and after two 45 min bouts of a football specific intermittent treadmill protocol in the heat (33.0 ± 0.2°C; 53 ± 2% relative humidity). Participants wore a neck-cooling collar in one of the trials (CC). Mean power output and peak power output declined over time in both trials but were higher in CC (540 ± 99 v 507 ± 122 W, d = 0.32; 719 ± 158 v 680 ± 182 W, d = 0.24 respectively). The improved power output was particularly pronounced (d = 0.51–0.88) after the 2nd 45 min bout but the CC had no effect on % fatigue. The collar lowered neck temperature and the thermal sensation of the neck (P < 0.001) but had no effect on heart rate, fluid loss, fluid consumption, lactate, glucose, plasma volume change, cortisol, or thermal sensation (P > 0.05). There were no trial differences but interaction effects were demonstrated for prolactin concentration and rating of perceived exertion (RPE). Prolactin concentration was initially higher in the collar cold trial and then was lower from 45 min onwards (interaction trial × time P = 0.04). RPE was lower during the football intermittent treadmill protocol in the collar cold trial (interaction trial × time P = 0.01). Neck-cooling during exercise improves repeated sprint performance in a hot environment without altering physiological or neuroendocrinological responses. RPE is reduced and may partially explain the performance improvement. PMID:26594177

  4. Neck-cooling improves repeated sprint performance in the heat.

    PubMed

    Sunderland, Caroline; Stevens, Ryan; Everson, Bethan; Tyler, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effect of neck-cooling during exercise on repeated sprint ability in a hot environment. Seven team-sport playing males completed two experimental trials involving repeated sprint exercise (5 × 6 s) before and after two 45 min bouts of a football specific intermittent treadmill protocol in the heat (33.0 ± 0.2°C; 53 ± 2% relative humidity). Participants wore a neck-cooling collar in one of the trials (CC). Mean power output and peak power output declined over time in both trials but were higher in CC (540 ± 99 v 507 ± 122 W, d = 0.32; 719 ± 158 v 680 ± 182 W, d = 0.24 respectively). The improved power output was particularly pronounced (d = 0.51-0.88) after the 2nd 45 min bout but the CC had no effect on % fatigue. The collar lowered neck temperature and the thermal sensation of the neck (P < 0.001) but had no effect on heart rate, fluid loss, fluid consumption, lactate, glucose, plasma volume change, cortisol, or thermal sensation (P > 0.05). There were no trial differences but interaction effects were demonstrated for prolactin concentration and rating of perceived exertion (RPE). Prolactin concentration was initially higher in the collar cold trial and then was lower from 45 min onwards (interaction trial × time P = 0.04). RPE was lower during the football intermittent treadmill protocol in the collar cold trial (interaction trial × time P = 0.01). Neck-cooling during exercise improves repeated sprint performance in a hot environment without altering physiological or neuroendocrinological responses. RPE is reduced and may partially explain the performance improvement.

  5. Film cooling effectiveness and heat transfer with injection through holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eriksen, V. L.

    1971-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the local film cooling effectiveness and heat transfer downstream of injection of air through discrete holes into a turbulent boundary layer of air on a flat plate is reported. Secondary air is injected through a single hole normal to the main flow and through both a single hole and a row of holes spaced at three diameter intervals with an injection angle of 35 deg to the main flow. Two values of the mainstream Reynolds number are used; the blowing rate is varied from 0.1 to 2.0. Photographs of a carbon dioxide-water fog injected into the main flow at an angle of 90 deg are also presented to show interaction between the jet and mainstream.

  6. Natural/passive solar heating and cooling for poultry sheds

    SciTech Connect

    Abd El-Salam, E.M.

    1980-12-01

    Arid climates, as in Egypt and the Middle-East regions, are characterized by large durinal and seasonal temperature variation coupled with clear skies and ample sunshine duration. Partial stabilization of indoor thermal environment in habitation is of great comfort for human and have large effects on animals or birds productivities. In case of poultry or animal sheds, can have some economical turn over in terms of increased egg or animal productivity and reduction of mortality rates if their indoor thermal environment is favorably controlled. Poultry birds are sensitive to changes of ambient temperatures, humidity and other environmental variables. This investigation describes an unconventional method of maintaining moderate thermal environment within poultry sheds by using the roof for storage of heat and coolness in appropriate seasons. During winter, underground water is circulated through specially designed pipe matrix imbeded in the roof slab and through radiant wall panels.

  7. Active solar heating and cooling information user study

    SciTech Connect

    Belew, W.W.; Wood, B.L.; Marle, T.L.; Reinhardt, C.L.

    1981-01-01

    The results of a series of telephone interviews with groups of users of information on active solar heating and cooling (SHAC). An earlier study identified the information user groups in the solar community and the priority (to accelerate solar energy commercialization) of getting information to each group. In the current study only high-priority groups were examined. Results from 19 SHAC groups respondents are analyzed in this report: DOE-Funded Researchers, Non-DOE-Funded Researchers, Representatives of Manufacturers (4 groups), Distributors, Installers, Architects, Builders, Planners, Engineers (2 groups), Representatives of Utilities, Educators, Cooperative Extension Service County Agents, Building Owners/Managers, and Homeowners (2 groups). The data will be used as input to the determination of information products and services the Solar Energy Research Institute, the Solar Energy Information Data Bank Network, and the entire information outreach community should be preparing and disseminating.

  8. Developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaki, S.

    1989-05-01

    The objective is to develop and test various integrated solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water systems, and to evaluate their performance. Systems composed of new, as well as previously tested, components are carefully integrated so that effects of new components on system performance can be clearly delineated. The program for 1989-90 is separated into seven tasks. There are asks for each of the three solar houses, a project to build and test several generic solar water heaters, a task involving development of an improved evacuated tube collector, a management task, and a task under which an international workshop will test IEA Task 4 models. The objectives and progress in each task are described in this report.

  9. A dual-cooled hydrogen-oxygen rocket engine heat transfer analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kacynski, Kenneth J.; Kazaroff, John M.; Jankovsky, Robert S.

    1991-01-01

    The potential benefits of simultaneously using hydrogen and oxygen as rocket engine coolants are described. A plug-and-spool rocket engine was examined at heat fluxes ranging from 9290 to 163,500 kW/sq m, using a combined 3D conduction/advection analysis. Both counterflow and parallel flow cooling arrangements were analyzed. The results indicate that a significant amount of heat transfer to the oxygen occurs, reducing both the hot-side wall temperature of the rocket engine and also reducing the exit temperature of the hydrogen coolant. The total heat transferred to the oxygen was found to be largely independent of the oxygen coolant flow direction. The reduction in combustion chamber wall temperatures at throttled conditions is especially desirable since the analysis indicates that double temperature maxima, one at the throat and another in the combustion chamber, occur with a traditional hydrogen-only cooled engine. A dual-cooled engine eliminates any concern for overheating in the combustion chamber.

  10. Heat pipe and surface mass transfer cooling of hypersonic vehicle structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colwell, Gene T.; Modlin, James M.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of determining the feasibility of cooling hypersonic vehicle leading-edge structures exposed to severe aerodynamic surface heating using heat pipe and mass transfer cooling techniques is addressed. A description is presented of a numerical finite-difference-based hypersonic leading-edge cooling model incorporating poststartup liquid metal heat pipe cooling with surface transpiration and film cooling to predict the transient structural temperature distributions and maximum surface temperatures of hypersonic vehicle leading edge. An application of this model to the transient cooling of a typical aerospace plane wing leading-edge section. The results of this application indicated that liquid metal heat pipe cooling alone is insufficient to maintain surface temperatures below an assumed maximum level of 1800 K for about one-third of a typical aerospace plane ascent trajectory through the earth's atmosphere.

  11. A Comparison of Mixed-Method Cooling Interventions on Preloaded Running Performance in the Heat.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Christopher J; Bennett, Kyle J M; Sculley, Dean V; Callister, Robin; Taylor, Lee; Dascombe, Ben J

    2017-03-01

    Stevens, CJ, Bennett, KJM, Sculley, DV, Callister, R, Taylor, L, and Dascombe, BJ. A comparison of mixed-method cooling interventions on preloaded running performance in the heat. J Strength Cond Res 31(3): 620-629, 2017-The purpose of this investigation was to assess the effect of combining practical methods to cool the body on endurance running performance and physiology in the heat. Eleven trained male runners completed 4 randomized, preloaded running time trials (20 minutes at 70% V[Combining Dot Above]O2max and a 3 km time trial) on a nonmotorized treadmill in the heat (33° C). Trials consisted of precooling by combined cold-water immersion and ice slurry ingestion (PRE), midcooling by combined facial water spray and menthol mouth rinse (MID), a combination of all methods (ALL), and control (CON). Performance time was significantly faster in MID (13.7 ± 1.2 minutes; p < 0.01) and ALL (13.7 ± 1.4 minutes; p = 0.04) but not PRE (13.9 ± 1.4 minutes; p = 0.24) when compared with CON (14.2 ± 1.2 minutes). Precooling significantly reduced rectal temperature (initially by 0.5 ± 0.2° C), mean skin temperature, heart rate and sweat rate, and increased iEMG activity, whereas midcooling significantly increased expired air volume and respiratory exchange ratio compared with control. Significant decreases in forehead temperature, thermal sensation, and postexercise blood prolactin concentration were observed in all conditions compared with control. Performance was improved with midcooling, whereas precooling had little or no influence. Midcooling may have improved performance through an attenuated inhibitory psychophysiological and endocrine response to the heat.

  12. Air-Cooled Heat Exchanger for High-Temperature Power Electronics: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Waye, S. K.; Lustbader, J.; Musselman, M.; King, C.

    2015-05-06

    This work demonstrates a direct air-cooled heat exchanger strategy for high-temperature power electronic devices with an application specific to automotive traction drive inverters. We present experimental heat dissipation and system pressure curves versus flow rate for baseline and optimized sub-module assemblies containing two ceramic resistance heaters that provide device heat fluxes. The maximum allowable junction temperature was set to 175 deg.C. Results were extrapolated to the inverter scale and combined with balance-of-inverter components to estimate inverter power density and specific power. The results exceeded the goal of 12 kW/L and 12 kW/kg for power density and specific power, respectively.

  13. Remote Measurement of Heat Flux from Power Plant Cooling Lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, Alfred J.; Kurzeja, Robert J.; Villa-Aleman, Eliel; Bollinger, James S.; Pendergast, Malcolm M.

    2013-06-01

    Laboratory experiments have demonstrated a correlation between the rate of heat loss q" from an experimental fluid to the air above and the standard deviation σ of the thermal variability in images of the fluid surface. These experimental results imply that q" can be derived directly from thermal imagery by computing σ. This paper analyses thermal imagery collected over two power plant cooling lakes to determine if the same relationship exists. Turbulent boundary layer theory predicts a linear relationship between q" and σ when both forced (wind driven) and free (buoyancy driven) convection are present. Datasets derived from ground- and helicopter-based imagery collections had correlation coefficients between σ and q" of 0.45 and 0.76, respectively. Values of q" computed from a function of σ and friction velocity u* derived from turbulent boundary layer theory had higher correlations with measured values of q" (0.84 and 0.89). Finally, this research may be applicable to the problem of calculating losses of heat from the ocean to the atmosphere during high-latitude cold-air outbreaks because it does not require the information typically needed to compute sensible, evaporative, and thermal radiation energy losses to the atmosphere.

  14. The development of a solar-powered residential heating and cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Efforts to demonstrate the engineering feasibility of utilizing solar power for residential heating and cooling are described. These efforts were concentrated on the analysis, design, and test of a full-scale demonstration system which is currently under construction at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama. The basic solar heating and cooling system under development utilizes a flat plate solar energy collector, a large water tank for thermal energy storage, heat exchangers for space heating and water heating, and an absorption cycle air conditioner for space cooling.

  15. Cooling device featuring thermoelectric and diamond materials for temperature control of heat-dissipating devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandersande, Ian W. (Inventor); Ewell, Richard (Inventor); Fleurial, Jean-Pierre (Inventor); Lyon, Hylan B. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A cooling device for lowering the temperature of a heat-dissipating device. The cooling device includes a heat-conducting substrate (composed, e.g., of diamond or another high thermal conductivity material) disposed in thermal contact with the heat-dissipating device. During operation, heat flows from the heat-dissipating device into the heat-conducting substrate, where it is spread out over a relatively large area. A thermoelectric cooling material (e.g., a Bi.sub.2 Te.sub.3 -based film or other thermoelectric material) is placed in thermal contact with the heat-conducting substrate. Application of electrical power to the thermoelectric material drives the thermoelectric material to pump heat into a second heat-conducting substrate which, in turn, is attached to a heat sink.

  16. Skin cooling maintains cerebral blood flow velocity and orthostatic tolerance during tilting in heated humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Thad E.; Cui, Jian; Zhang, Rong; Witkowski, Sarah; Crandall, Craig G.

    2002-01-01

    Orthostatic tolerance is reduced in the heat-stressed human. The purpose of this project was to identify whether skin-surface cooling improves orthostatic tolerance. Nine subjects were exposed to 10 min of 60 degrees head-up tilting in each of four conditions: normothermia (NT-tilt), heat stress (HT-tilt), normothermia plus skin-surface cooling 1 min before and throughout tilting (NT-tilt(cool)), and heat stress plus skin-surface cooling 1 min before and throughout tilting (HT-tilt(cool)). Heating and cooling were accomplished by perfusing 46 and 15 degrees C water, respectively, though a tube-lined suit worn by each subject. During HT-tilt, four of nine subjects developed presyncopal symptoms resulting in the termination of the tilt test. In contrast, no subject experienced presyncopal symptoms during NT-tilt, NT-tilt(cool), or HT-tilt(cool). During the HT-tilt procedure, mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) decreased. However, during HT-tilt(cool), MAP, total peripheral resistance, and CBFV were significantly greater relative to HT-tilt (all P < 0.01). No differences were observed in calculated cerebral vascular resistance between the four conditions. These data suggest that skin-surface cooling prevents the fall in CBFV during upright tilting and improves orthostatic tolerance, presumably via maintenance of MAP. Hence, skin-surface cooling may be a potent countermeasure to protect against orthostatic intolerance observed in heat-stressed humans.

  17. Experimental study of heat transfer in a 7-element bundle cooled with supercritical Freon-12

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, G.; Shelegov, A. S.; Kirillov, P. L.; Pioro, I. L.; Harvel, G.

    2012-07-01

    Experimental data on Supercritical-Water (SCW) cooled bundles are very limited. Major problems with performing such experiments are technical difficulties in testing and experimental costs at high pressures, temperatures and heat fluxes. Also, there are only a few SCW experimental setups currently in the world capable of providing data. Supercritical Water-cooled nuclear Reactors (SCWRs), as one of the six concepts of Generation IV reactors, cannot be designed without such data. Therefore, a preliminary approach uses modeling fluids such as carbon dioxide and refrigerants instead of water is practical. In particularly, experiments in supercritical refrigerant-cooled bundles can be used. One of the SC modeling fluids typically used is Freon-12 (R-12) with the critical pressure of 4.136 MPa and the critical temperature of 111.97 deg. C. These conditions correspond to the critical pressure of 22.064 MPa and critical temperature of 373.95 deg. C in water. A set of experimental data obtained at the Inst. of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE, Obninsk, Russia) in a vertically-oriented bundle cooled with supercritical R-12 was analyzed. This dataset consisted of 20 runs. The test section was 7-element bundle installed in a hexagonal flow channel with 3 grid spacers. Data was collected at pressures of approximately 4.65 MPa for several different combinations of wall and bulk-fluid temperatures that were below, at, or above the pseudo-critical temperature. The values of mass flux were ranged from 400 to 1320 kg/m{sup 2}s and inlet temperatures ranged from 72 to 120 deg. C. The test section consisted of fuel-element simulators that were 9.5 mm in OD with the total heated length of about 1 m. Bulk-fluid and wall temperature profiles were recorded using a combination of 8 different thermocouples. Analysis of the data has confirmed that there are three distinct heat-transfer regimes for forced convention in supercritical fluids: 1) Normal heat transfer; 2) Deteriorated heat

  18. Evaluation of the Impact of Slab Foundation Heat Transfer on Heating and Cooling in Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, D.; Kono, J.; Vieira, R.; Gu, L.

    2016-09-01

    During the last three decades of energy-efficiency research, there has been limited study of heat transfer to slab-on-grade foundations in cooling-dominated climates. Most experimental research has focused on the impact of slab-on-grade foundations and insulation schemes on heat losses in heating-dominated climates. This is surprising because the floor area in single-family homes is generally equal to wall area, window area, or attic area, all of which have been extensively evaluated for heat-transfer properties. Moreover, slab foundations are the most common foundation type in cooling-dominated climates. Slab-on-grade construction is very popular in southern states, accounting for 77% of new home floors according to 2014 U.S. Census data. There is a widespread perception that tile flooring, as opposed to carpet, provides a cooler home interior in warm climates. Empirical research is needed because building energy simulation software programs running DOE-2 and EnergyPlus engines often rely on simplified models to evaluate the influence of flooring on interior temperature, even though in some cases more detailed models exist. The U.S. Department of Energy Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction (BA-PIRC) performed experiments in the Florida Solar Energy Center’s Flexible Residential Test Facility intended to assess for the first time (1) how slab-on-grade construction influences interior cooling in a cooling-dominated climate and (2) how the difference in a carpeted versus uncarpeted building might influence heating and cooling energy use. Two nominally identical side-by-side residential buildings were evaluated during the course of 1 year, from 2014 to 2015: the east building with a pad and carpet floor and the west building with a bare slab floor. A detailed grid shows temperature measurements taken on the slab surface at various locations as well as at depths of 1.0 ft, 2 ft, 5.0 ft, 10.0 ft, and 20.0 ft below the surface. Temperature

  19. Urban heat island and its effect on the cooling and heating demands in urban and suburban areas of Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Memon, Rizwan Ahmed; Leung, Dennis Y. C.; Liu, Chun-Ho; Leung, Michael K. H.

    2011-03-01

    This study investigates the urban heat island characteristics of four major areas of Hong Kong. The areas of study include a densely populated and well-developed commercial area (i.e., Tsim Sha Tsui) and three suburban areas (i.e., Cheung Chau, Lau Fau Shan and Sha Tin) with differing degrees of development. The weather station data of respective areas were acquired from the Hong Kong Observatory. The urban heat island intensity, determined as the air-temperature difference between the selected urban/suburban area and the reference rural area (i.e., Ta Kuw Ling) with thin population and lush vegetation, was used for the analysis. Results showed stronger heat island effect during winter and nighttime than during summer and daytime. An investigation of the cooling and heating degree days indicate that all areas have observed higher number of cooling degree days. However, the cooling degree days were the maximum while heating degree days were the minimum in the urban area (i.e., Tsim Sha Tsui). Clearly, the minimum heating degree days and the maximum cooling degree days in the urban area were a direct consequence of urban heat island. The 10-year (i.e., from 1995 to 2005) average shows that Cheung Chau experienced the least number of cooling degree days while Lau Fau Shan experienced the highest number of heating degree days. Seemingly, the area of Cheung Chau offers better thermal comfort conditions with the minimum number of cooling and heating degree days.

  20. Solar heating and cooling of residential buildings: sizing, installation and operation of systems. 1980 edition

    SciTech Connect

    1980-09-01

    This manual was prepared as a text for a training course on solar heating and cooling of residential buildings. The course and text are directed toward sizing, installation, operation, and maintenance of solar systems for space heating and hot water supply, and solar cooling is treated only briefly. (MHR)

  1. 21 CFR 211.46 - Ventilation, air filtration, air heating and cooling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ventilation, air filtration, air heating and cooling. 211.46 Section 211.46 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Buildings and Facilities § 211.46 Ventilation, air filtration, air heating and cooling. (a)...

  2. 21 CFR 211.46 - Ventilation, air filtration, air heating and cooling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ventilation, air filtration, air heating and cooling. 211.46 Section 211.46 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Buildings and Facilities § 211.46 Ventilation, air filtration, air heating and cooling. (a)...

  3. 21 CFR 211.46 - Ventilation, air filtration, air heating and cooling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ventilation, air filtration, air heating and cooling. 211.46 Section 211.46 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Buildings and Facilities § 211.46 Ventilation, air filtration, air heating and cooling. (a)...

  4. 21 CFR 211.46 - Ventilation, air filtration, air heating and cooling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ventilation, air filtration, air heating and cooling. 211.46 Section 211.46 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Buildings and Facilities § 211.46 Ventilation, air filtration, air heating and cooling. (a)...

  5. Solar Heating and Cooling of Buildings: Phase 0. Executive Summary. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westinghouse Electric Corp., Baltimore, MD.

    After the Westinghouse Electric Corporation made a comprehensive analysis of the technical, economic, social, environmental, and institutional factors affecting the feasibility of utilizing solar energy for heating and cooling buildings, it determined that solar heating and cooling systems can become competitive in most regions of the country in…

  6. System design package for a solar heating and cooling system installed at Akron, Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Information used to evaluate the design of a solar heating, cooling, and domestic hot water system is given. A conventional heat pump provides summer cooling items as the design data brochure, system performance specification, system hazard analysis, spare parts list, and detailed design drawings. A solar system is installed in a single-family dwelling at Akron, Ohio, and at Duffield, Virginia.

  7. Numerical Examination of the Performance of a Thermoelectric Cooler with Peltier Heating and Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang Nyung; Kim, Jeongho

    2015-10-01

    There has recently been much progress in the development of materials with higher thermoelectric performance, leading to the design of thermoelectric devices for generation of electricity and for heating or cooling. Local heating can be achieved by current flow through an electric resistance, and local heating and cooling can be performed by Peltier heating and cooling. In this study, we developed computer software that can be used to predict the Seebeck and Peltier effects for thermoelectric devices. The temperature, electric potential, heat flow, electric current, and coefficient of performance were determined, with the objective of investigating the Peltier effect in a thermoelectric device. In addition to Peltier heating and cooling, Joule and Thomson heating were quantitatively evaluated for the thermoelectric device.

  8. Film cooling on a convex wall: Heat transfer and hydrodynamic measurements for full and partial coverage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuhama, K.

    Discrete-hole injection is widely used for turbine-blade cooling in high-efficiency turbine engines. Detailed measurements of the spanwise-averaged heat transfer and the local hydrodynamics of a film-cooled flow on a convex wall, for both full and partial coverage are reported. Hydrodynamic boundary-layer profiles were measured with a triple hot-wire probe. Three mean-velocity components and six turbulence quantities were simultaneously measured; inside the blown region strong three-dimensionality was observed. The flow field seems divided into two types of lanes: those with injection holes and lanes without. The flow in lanes with holes was strongly affected by injection, but in the lane without holes only small effects were observed. A prediction program, STAN-FC-CRV (combining STANCOOL and STANCURV), was tested for four representative cases. Comparison of predictions with experimental data shows reasonable agreement, but further modification is necessary for the injection model.

  9. Utilization of the horizontal ground heat exchanger in the heating and cooling system of a residential building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanuszkiewicz-Drapała, Małgorzata; Bury, Tomasz

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents the results of thermodynamic analyses of a system using a horizontal ground heat exchanger to cool a residential building in summer and heat it in the autumn-winter period. The main heating device is a vapour compression heat pump with the ground as the lower heat source. The aim of the analyses is to examine the impact of heat supply to the ground in the summer period, when the building is cooled, on the operation of the heating system equipped with a heat pump in the next heating season, including electricity consumption. The processes occurring in cooling and heating systems have an unsteady nature. The main results of the calculations are among others the time-dependent values of heat fluxes extracted from or transferred to the ground heat exchanger, the fluxes of heat generated by the heat pump and supplied to the heated building by an additional heat source, the parameters in characteristic points of the systems, the temperature distributions in the ground and the driving electricity consumption in the period under analysis. The paper presents results of analysis of cumulative primary energy consumption of the analyzed systems and cumulative emissions of harmful substances.

  10. Innovative Miniaturized Heat Pumps for Buildings: Modular Thermal Hub for Building Heating, Cooling and Water Heating

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-01

    BEETIT Project: Georgia Tech is using innovative components and system design to develop a new type of absorption heat pump. Georgia Tech’s new heat pumps are energy efficient, use refrigerants that do not emit greenhouse gases, and can run on energy from combustion, waste heat, or solar energy. Georgia Tech is leveraging enhancements to heat and mass transfer technology possible in microscale passages and removing hurdles to the use of heat-activated heat pumps that have existed for more than a century. Use of microscale passages allows for miniaturization of systems that can be packed as monolithic full-system packages or discrete, distributed components enabling integration into a variety of residential and commercial buildings. Compared to conventional heat pumps, Georgia Tech’s design innovations will create an absorption heat pump that is much smaller, has higher energy efficiency, and can also be mass produced at a lower cost and assembly time.

  11. Experimental Study of Vane Heat Transfer and Film Cooling at Elevated Levels of Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ames, Forrest E.

    1996-01-01

    This report documents the results of an experimental study on the influence of high level turbulence on vane film cooling and the influence of film cooling on vane heat transfer. Three different cooling configurations were investigated which included one row of film cooling on both pressure and suction surfaces, two staggered rows of film cooling on both suction and pressure surfaces, and a shower-head cooling array. The turbulence had a strong influence on film cooling effectiveness, particularly on the pressure surface where local turbulence levels were the highest. For the single row of holes, the spanwise mixing quickly reduced centerline effectiveness levels while mixing in the normal direction was more gradual. The film cooling had a strong influence on the heat transfer in the laminar regions of the vane. The effect of film cooling on heat transfer was noticeable in the turbulent regions but augmentation ratios were significantly lower. In addition to heat transfer and film cooling, velocity profiles were taken downstream of the film cooling rows at three spanwise locations. These profile comparisons documented the strong spanwise mixing due to the high turbulence. Total pressure exit measurements were also documented for the three configurations.

  12. Effects of droplet velocity, diameter, and film height on heat removal during cryogen spray cooling.

    PubMed

    Pikkula, Brian M; Tunnell, James W; Chang, David W; Anvari, Bahman

    2004-08-01

    Cryogen spray cooling (CSC) is an effective method to reduce or eliminate epidermal damage during laser treatment of various dermatoses. This study sought to determine the effects of specific cryogen properties on heat removal. Heat removal was quantified using an algorithm that solved an inverse heat conduction problem from internal temperature measurements made within a skin phantom. A nondimensional parameter, the Weber number, characterized the combined effects of droplet velocity, diameter, and surface tension. CSC experiments with laser irradiation were conducted on ex vivo human skin samples to assess the effect of Weber number on epidermal protection. An empirical relationship between heat removal and the difference in droplet temperature and the substrate, droplet velocity, and diameter was obtained. Histological sections of irradiated ex vivo human skin demonstrated that sprays with higher Weber numbers increased epidermal protection. Results indicate that the cryogen film acts as an impediment to heat transfer between the impinging droplets and the substrate. This study offers the importance of Weber number in heat removal and epidermal protection.

  13. An evaluation of enhanced cooling techniques for high-heat load absorbers.

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, S.; Doose, C.; Rotela, E.; Barickowski, A.

    2002-10-28

    Many components of the storage ring and front ends in the third generation of light sources are subjected to high heat loads from intense x-rays. Temperature rises and thermal stresses in these components must be kept within acceptable limits of critical heat flux and low-cycle fatigue failure. One of the design solutions is to improve heat transfer to the cooling water either by increasing water velocity in the cooling channels or by using inserts, such as porous media, twisted tapes and wire springs. In this paper we present experimental and analytical results to compare various enhanced cooling techniques for conditions specific to heating from an x-ray fan.

  14. Recovery Act: Cedarville School District Retrofit of Heating and Cooling Systems with Geothermal Heat Pumps and Ground Source Water Loops

    SciTech Connect

    Jarrell, Mark

    2013-09-30

    Cedarville School District retrofitted the heating and cooling systems in three campus areas (High School, Middle School, and Upper Elementary School) with geothermal heat pumps and ground source water loops, as a demonstration project for the effective implementation of geothermal heat pump systems and other energy efficiency and air quality improvements.

  15. Experimental validation of advanced regulations for superconducting magnet cooling undergoing periodic heat loads

    SciTech Connect

    Lagier, B.; Rousset, B.; Hoa, C.; Bonnay, P.

    2014-01-29

    Superconducting magnets used in tokamaks undergo periodic heat load caused by cycling plasma operations inducing AC losses, neutrons fluxes and eddy currents in magnet structures. In the cryogenic system of JT60-SA tokamak, the Auxiliary Cold Box (ACB) distributes helium from the refrigerator to the cryogenic users and in particular to the superconducting magnets. ACB comprises a saturated helium bath with immersed heat exchangers, extracting heat from independent cooling loops. The supercritical helium flow in each cooling loop is driven by a cold circulator. In order to safely operate the refrigerator during plasma pulses, the interface between the ACB and the refrigerator shall be as stable as possible, with well-balanced bath inlet and outlet mass flows during cycling operation. The solution presented in this paper relies on a combination of regulations to smooth pulsed heat loads and to keep a constant refrigeration power during all the cycle. Two smoothing strategies are presented, both regulating the outlet mass flow of the bath: the first one using the bath as a thermal buffer and the second one storing energy in the loop by varying the cold circulator speed. The bath outlet mass flow is also controlled by an immersed resistive heater which enables a constant evaporation rate in the bath when power coming from the loops is decreasing. The refrigeration power is controlled so that the compensating power remains within an acceptable margin. Experimental validation is achieved using the HELIOS facility. This facility running at CEA Grenoble since 2010 is a scaled down model of the ACB bath and Central Solenoid magnet cooling loop of the JT60-SA tokamak. Test results show performances and robustness of the regulations.

  16. Experimental validation of advanced regulations for superconducting magnet cooling undergoing periodic heat loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagier, B.; Rousset, B.; Hoa, C.; Bonnay, P.

    2014-01-01

    Superconducting magnets used in tokamaks undergo periodic heat load caused by cycling plasma operations inducing AC losses, neutrons fluxes and eddy currents in magnet structures. In the cryogenic system of JT60-SA tokamak, the Auxiliary Cold Box (ACB) distributes helium from the refrigerator to the cryogenic users and in particular to the superconducting magnets. ACB comprises a saturated helium bath with immersed heat exchangers, extracting heat from independent cooling loops. The supercritical helium flow in each cooling loop is driven by a cold circulator. In order to safely operate the refrigerator during plasma pulses, the interface between the ACB and the refrigerator shall be as stable as possible, with well-balanced bath inlet and outlet mass flows during cycling operation. The solution presented in this paper relies on a combination of regulations to smooth pulsed heat loads and to keep a constant refrigeration power during all the cycle. Two smoothing strategies are presented, both regulating the outlet mass flow of the bath: the first one using the bath as a thermal buffer and the second one storing energy in the loop by varying the cold circulator speed. The bath outlet mass flow is also controlled by an immersed resistive heater which enables a constant evaporation rate in the bath when power coming from the loops is decreasing. The refrigeration power is controlled so that the compensating power remains within an acceptable margin. Experimental validation is achieved using the HELIOS facility. This facility running at CEA Grenoble since 2010 is a scaled down model of the ACB bath and Central Solenoid magnet cooling loop of the JT60-SA tokamak. Test results show performances and robustness of the regulations.

  17. Thermal design for areas of interference heating on actively cooled hypersonic aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, R. L.; Stone, J. E.

    1978-01-01

    Numerous actively cooled panel design alternatives for application in regions on high speed aircraft that are subject to interference heating effects were studied. Candidate design concepts were evaluated using mass, producibility, reliability and inspectability/maintainability as figures of merit. Three design approaches were identified as superior within certain regimes of the matrix of design heating conditions considered. Only minor modifications to basic actively cooled panel design are required to withstand minor interference heating effects. Designs incorporating internally finned coolant tubes to augment heat transfer are recommended for moderate design heating conditions. At severe heating conditions, an insulated panel concept is required.

  18. Fluidized bed heat exchanger with water cooled air distributor and dust hopper

    DOEpatents

    Jukkola, Walfred W.; Leon, Albert M.; Van Dyk, Jr., Garritt C.; McCoy, Daniel E.; Fisher, Barry L.; Saiers, Timothy L.; Karstetter, Marlin E.

    1981-11-24

    A fluidized bed heat exchanger is provided in which air is passed through a bed of particulate material containing fuel. A steam-water natural circulation system is provided for heat exchange and the housing of the heat exchanger has a water-wall type construction. Vertical in-bed heat exchange tubes are provided and the air distributor is water-cooled. A water-cooled dust hopper is provided in the housing to collect particulates from the combustion gases and separate the combustion zone from a volume within said housing in which convection heat exchange tubes are provided to extract heat from the exiting combustion gases.

  19. Chapter 23: Combined Heat and Power

    SciTech Connect

    Simons, George; Barsun, Stephan

    2016-11-01

    This protocol defines a combined heat and power (CHP) measure as a system that sequentially generates both electrical energy and useful thermal energy from one fuel source at a host customer's facility or residence. This protocol is aimed primarily at regulators and administrators of ratepayer-funded CHP programs; however, project developers may find the protocol useful to understand how CHP projects are evaluated.

  20. Experimental evaluation of an adaptive Joule-Thomson cooling system including silicon-microfabricated heat exchanger and microvalve components.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Weibin; Park, Jong M; White, Michael J; Nellis, Gregory F; Gianchandani, Yogesh B

    2011-03-01

    This article reports the evaluation of a Joule-Thomson (JT) cooling system that combines two custom micromachined components-a Si/glass-stack recuperative heat exchanger and a piezoelectrically actuated expansion microvalve. With the microvalve controlling the flow rate, this system can modulate cooling to accommodate varying refrigeration loads. The perforated plate Si/glass heat exchanger is fabricated with a stack of alternating silicon plates and Pyrex glass spacers. The microvalve utilizes a lead zirconate titanate actuator to push a Si micromachined valve seat against a glass plate, thus modulating the flow passing through the gap between the valve seat and the glass plate. The fabricated heat exchanger has a footprint of 1 × 1 cm(2) and a length of 35 mm. The size of the micromachined piezoelectrically actuated valve is about 1 × 1 × 1 cm(3). In JT cooling tests, the temperature of the system was successfully controlled by adjusting the input voltage of the microvalve. When the valve was fully opened (at an input voltage of -30 V), the system cooled down to a temperature as low as 254.5 K at 430 kPa pressure difference between inlet and outlet at steady state and 234 K at 710 kPa in a transient state. The system provided cooling powers of 75 mW at 255 K and 150 mW at 258 K. Parasitic heat loads at 255 K are estimated at approximately 700 mW.

  1. A multifunction wall system for application with solar heating and ground cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, J. F.; Schubert, R. P.

    1985-01-01

    The research presented in this report is an exploration of one alternative energy building system concept which is attempting to produce performance characteristics in a way closely approaching those of conventional fossil fuel heating and cooling systems. This alternative energy building system is a multifunction wall system for application with solar-heating and ground-cooling. The concept of the system is to expand the use of structure and enclosure elements of a building to function additionally as: (1) the ductwork for the solar-heated or earth-cooled air; (2) the heat transfer membrane between the heated or cooled air and the living environment of the building; (3) the heat storage medium (in winter); and (4) the temperature leveling and control medium. All these functions are integrated into a single wall construction using a new concrete block, surface-bonding cement, and the exterior insulation system. This report presents the series of experiments conducted on the Multifunction Wall System.

  2. Monitoring of Building Heating and Cooling Systems Based on Geothermal Heat Pump in Galicia (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias, M.; Rodriguez, J.; Franco, D.

    2012-10-01

    In November 2009 was signed an agreement between Galicia's Government and EnergyLab to develop a project related with the geothermal heatpumps (hereafter, GSHP) technology. That project consisted in replacing the existing thermal equipment generators (diesel boilers and air-water heat pumps) by GSHP systems in representative public buildings: two nursery schools, a university library, a health centre and a residential building. This new systems will reach the demands of existing heating, cooling and domestic hot water (hereafter, DHW). These buildings can serve as examples of energy and economic savings that can offer this technology. We will show detailed analysis of the GSHP facilities monitored, since the starting-up of them. Which includes: COP's, EER's, energy consumption, operating costs, operation hours of the system, economic and emissions comparative, geothermal exchange evolution graphs, environmental conditions evolution graphs (temperature and demands), etc. The results presented show an example of the important benefits of the GSHP technology and the significant savings that can offer its implementation for heating, cooling and DHW production. Note to the reader: The article number has been corrected on web pages on November 22, 2013.

  3. Hybrid space heating/cooling system with Trombe wall, underground venting, and assisted heat pump

    SciTech Connect

    Shirley, J.W.; James, L.C.; Stevens, S.; Autry, A.N.; Nussbaum, M.; MacQueen, S.V.

    1983-06-22

    Our goal was to design and monitor a hybrid solar system/ground loop which automatically assists the standard, thermostatically controlled home heating/cooling system. The input from the homeowner was limited to normal thermostat operations. During the course of the project it was determined that to effectively gather data and control the various component interactions, a micro-computer based control system would also allow the HVAC system to be optimized by simple changes to software. This flexibility in an untested concept helped us to achieve optimum system performance. Control ranged from direct solar heating and direct ground loop cooling modes, to assistance of the heat pump by both solar space and ground loop. Sensors were strategically placed to provide data on response of the Trombe wall (surface, 4 in. deep, 8 in. deep), and the ground loop (inlet, 3/4 length, outlet). Micro-computer hardware and computer programs were developed to make cost effective decisions between the various modes of operation. Although recent advances in micro-computer hardware make similar control systems more readily achievable utilizing standard components, attention to the decision making criteria will always be required.

  4. Water chemistry of a combined-cycle power plant's auxiliary equipment cooling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larin, B. M.; Korotkov, A. N.; Oparin, M. Yu.; Larin, A. B.

    2013-04-01

    Results from an analysis of methods aimed at reducing the corrosion rate of structural metal used in heat-transfer systems with water coolant are presented. Data from examination of the closed-circuit system for cooling the auxiliary mechanisms of a combined-cycle plant-based power unit and the results from adjustment of its water chemistry are given. A conclusion is drawn about the possibility of using a reagent prepared on the basis of sodium sulfite for reducing the corrosion rate when the loss of coolant is replenished with nondeaerated water.

  5. Passive solar space heating and cooling. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). NewSearch

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the passive use of solar energy for space heating and cooling in buildings, houses, and homes. Citations discuss the design, performance, models, and economic analysis of heating and cooling systems. Topics include solar architecture, energy consumption analysis, energy conservation, and heat recovery. Also included are thermal comfort, quality of life, and housing for the elderly. (Contains a minimum of 209 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  6. Transient Response to Rapid Cooling of a Stainless Steel Sodium Heat Pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mireles, Omar R.; Houts, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    Compact fission power systems are under consideration for use in long duration space exploration missions. Power demands on the order of 500 W, to 5 kW, will be required for up to 15 years of continuous service. One such small reactor design consists of a fast spectrum reactor cooled with an array of in-core alkali metal heat pipes coupled to thermoelectric or Stirling power conversion systems. Heat pipes advantageous attributes include a simplistic design, lack of moving parts, and well understood behavior. Concerns over reactor transients induced by heat pipe instability as a function of extreme thermal transients require experimental investigations. One particular concern is rapid cooling of the heat pipe condenser that would propagate to cool the evaporator. Rapid cooling of the reactor core beyond acceptable design limits could possibly induce unintended reactor control issues. This paper discusses a series of experimental demonstrations where a heat pipe operating at near prototypic conditions experienced rapid cooling of the condenser. The condenser section of a stainless steel sodium heat pipe was enclosed within a heat exchanger. The heat pipe - heat exchanger assembly was housed within a vacuum chamber held at a pressure of 50 Torr of helium. The heat pipe was brought to steady state operating conditions using graphite resistance heaters then cooled by a high flow of gaseous nitrogen through the heat exchanger. Subsequent thermal transient behavior was characterized by performing an energy balance using temperature, pressure and flow rate data obtained throughout the tests. Results indicate the degree of temperature change that results from a rapid cooling scenario will not significantly influence thermal stability of an operating heat pipe, even under extreme condenser cooling conditions.

  7. Solar-heated and cooled savings and loan building-1-Leavenworth, Kanasas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Report describes heating and cooling system which furnishes 90 percent of annual heating load, 70 percent of cooling load, and all hot water for two-story building. Roof-mounted flat-plate collectors allow three distinct flow rates and are oriented south for optimum energy collection. Building contains fully automated temperature controls is divided into five temperature-load zones, each with independent heat pump.

  8. Thermostructural applications of heat pipes for cooling leading edges of high-speed aerospace vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camarda, Charles J.; Glass, David E.

    1992-01-01

    Heat pipes have been considered for use on wing leading edge for over 20 years. Early concepts envisioned metal heat pipes cooling a metallic leading edge. Several superalloy/sodium heat pipes were fabricated and successfully tested for wing leading edge cooling. Results of radiant heat and aerothermal testing indicate the feasibility of using heat pipes to cool the stagnation region of shuttle-type space transportation systems. The test model withstood a total seven radiant heating tests, eight aerothermal tests, and twenty-seven supplemental radiant heating tests. Cold-wall heating rates ranged from 21 to 57 Btu/sq ft-s and maximum operating temperatures ranged from 1090 to 1520 F. Follow-on studies investigated the application of heat pipes to cool the stagnation regions of single-stage-to-orbit and advanced shuttle vehicles. Results of those studies indicate that a 'D-shaped' structural design can reduce the mass of the heat-pipe concept by over 44 percent compared to a circular heat-pipe geometry. Simple analytical models for heat-pipe startup from the frozen state (working fluid initially frozen) were adequate to approximate transient, startup, and steady-state heat-pipe performance. Improvement in analysis methods has resulted in the development of a finite-element analysis technique to predict heat-pipe startup from the frozen state. However, current requirements of light-weight design and reliability suggest that metallic heat pipes embedded in a refractory composite material should be used. This concept is the concept presently being evaluated for NASP. A refractory-composite/heat-pipe-cooled wing leading edge is currently being considered for the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP). This concept uses high-temperature refractory-metal/lithium heat pipes embedded within a refractory-composite structure and is significantly lighter than an actively cooled wing leading edge because it eliminates the need for active cooling during ascent and descent. Since the

  9. Thermal Energy Corporation Combined Heat and Power Project

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, E. Bruce; Brown, Tim; Mardiat, Ed

    2011-12-31

    To meet the planned heating and cooling load growth at the Texas Medical Center (TMC), Thermal Energy Corporation (TECO) implemented Phase 1 of a Master Plan to install an additional 32,000 tons of chilled water capacity, a 75,000 ton-hour (8.8 million gallon) Thermal Energy Storage (TES) tank, and a 48 MW Combined Heat and Power (CHP) system. The Department of Energy selected TMC for a $10 million grant award as part of the Financial Assistance Funding Opportunity Announcement, U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology, Recovery Act: Deployment of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Systems, District Energy Systems, Waste Energy Recovery Systems, and Efficiency Industrial Equipment Funding Opportunity Number: DE-FOA-0000044 to support the installation of a new 48 MW CHP system at the TMC located just outside downtown Houston. As the largest medical center in the world, TMC is home to many of the nation's best hospitals, physicians, researchers, educational institutions, and health care providers. TMC provides care to approximately six million patients each year, and medical instruction to over 71,000 students. A medical center the size of TMC has enormous electricity and thermal energy demands to help it carry out its mission. Reliable, high-quality steam and chilled water are of utmost importance to the operations of its many facilities. For example, advanced medical equipment, laboratories, laundry facilities, space heating and cooling all rely on the generation of heat and power. As result of this project TECO provides this mission critical heating and cooling to TMC utilizing a system that is both energy-efficient and reliable since it provides the capability to run on power independent of the already strained regional electric grid. This allows the medical center to focus on its primary mission providing top quality medical care and instruction without worrying about excessive energy costs or the loss of heating and cooling due to the risk of power

  10. CO2 heat pumps for commercial building applications with simultaneous heating and cooling demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharkar, Supriya

    Many commercial buildings, including data centers, hotels and hospitals, have a simultaneous heating and cooling demand depending on the season, occupation and auxiliary equipment. A data center on the Purdue University, West Lafayette campus is used as a case study. The electrical equipment in data centers produce heat, which must be removed to prevent the equipment temperature from rising to a certain level. With proper integration, this heat has the potential to be used as a cost-effective energy source for heating the building in which the data center resides or the near-by buildings. The proposed heat pump system utilizes carbon dioxide with global warming potential of 1, as the refrigerant. System simulations are carried out to determine the feasibility of the system for a 12-month period. In addition, energy, environmental and economic analyses are carried out to show the benefits of this alternative technology when compared to the conventional system currently installed in the facility. Primary energy savings of ~28% to ~61%, a payback period of 3 to 4.5 years and a decrease in the environmental impact value by ~36% makes this system an attractive option. The results are then extended to other commercial buildings.

  11. Exergy analysis of an integrated solid oxide fuel cell and organic Rankine cycle for cooling, heating and power production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Sulaiman, Fahad A.; Dincer, Ibrahim; Hamdullahpur, Feridun

    The study examines a novel system that combined a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and an organic Rankine cycle (ORC) for cooling, heating and power production (trigeneration) through exergy analysis. The system consists of an SOFC, an ORC, a heat exchanger and a single-effect absorption chiller. The system is modeled to produce a net electricity of around 500 kW. The study reveals that there is 3-25% gain on exergy efficiency when trigeneration is used compared with the power cycle only. Also, the study shows that as the current density of the SOFC increases, the exergy efficiencies of power cycle, cooling cogeneration, heating cogeneration and trigeneration decreases. In addition, it was shown that the effect of changing the turbine inlet pressure and ORC pump inlet temperature are insignificant on the exergy efficiencies of the power cycle, cooling cogeneration, heating cogeneration and trigeneration. Also, the study reveals that the significant sources of exergy destruction are the ORC evaporator, air heat exchanger at the SOFC inlet and heating process heat exchanger.

  12. Organic Fluids and Passive Cooling in a Supercritical Rankine Cycle for Power Generation from Low Grade Heat Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidhi, Rachana

    Low grade heat sources have a large amount of thermal energy content. Due to low temperature, the conventional power generation technologies result in lower efficiency and hence cannot be used. In order to efficiently generate power, alternate methods need to be used. In this study, a supercritical organic Rankine cycle was used for heat source temperatures varying from 125°C to 200°C. Organic refrigerants with zero ozone depletion potential and their mixtures were selected as working fluid for this study while the cooling water temperature was changed from 10-25°C. Operating pressure of the cycle has been optimized for each fluid at every heat source temperature to obtain the highest thermal efficiency. Energy and exergy efficiencies of the thermodynamic cycle have been obtained as a function of heat source temperature. Efficiency of a thermodynamic cycle depends significantly on the sink temperature. At areas where water cooling is not available and ambient air temperature is high, efficient power generation from low grade heat sources may be a challenge. Use of passive cooling systems coupled with the condenser was studied, so that lower sink temperatures could be obtained. Underground tunnels, buried at a depth of few meters, were used as earth-air-heat-exchanger (EAHE) through which hot ambient air was passed. It was observed that the air temperature could be lowered by 5-10°C in the EAHE. Vertical pipes were used to lower the temperature of water by 5°C by passing it underground. Nocturnal cooling of stored water has been studied that can be used to cool the working fluid in the thermodynamic cycle. It was observed that the water temperature can be lowered by 10-20°C during the night when it is allowed to cool. The amount of water lost was calculated and was found to be approximately 0.1% over 10 days. The different passive cooling systems were studied separately and their effects on the efficiency of the thermodynamic cycle were investigated. They were

  13. Design of Water-Drip Cooling Facilities for Heat Treatment of Mill Rollers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudin, Yu. V.; Maisuradze, M. V.; Anufriev, N. P.

    2013-07-01

    Water-drip cooling devices based on centrifugal jet atomizers are studied experimentally. Their main operating characteristics such as the irrigation density, the uniformity of the distribution of irrigation over the cooled surface, the dependence of the heat transfer factor on the surface temperature, etc. are determined. The effect of the design and production parameters of the quenching facilities on their operating characteristics and mode of cooling of large steel articles is considered for mill rollers as an example. The results of the tests are used to design cooling facilities and heat treatment processes for mill rollers with the use of water-drip quenching.

  14. Passive containment cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Conway, Lawrence E.; Stewart, William A.

    1991-01-01

    A containment cooling system utilizes a naturally induced air flow and a gravity flow of water over the containment shell which encloses a reactor core to cool reactor core decay heat in two stages. When core decay heat is greatest, the water and air flow combine to provide adequate evaporative cooling as heat from within the containment is transferred to the water flowing over the same. The water is heated by heat transfer and then evaporated and removed by the air flow. After an initial period of about three to four days when core decay heat is greatest, air flow alone is sufficient to cool the containment.

  15. Method of and means for passively cooling a shelter containing a heat source

    SciTech Connect

    Rambach, C.

    1981-10-06

    The passive cooling of a shelter containing a heat source is achieved by utilizing a thermal liquid in an accumulator, a first heat transfer loop for thermosiphonically transferring heat from the interior of the shelter to the liquid in the accumulator when the liquid is cooler than the interior of the shelter, and a second heat transfer loop for thermosiphonically transferring heat from the liquid in the accumulator to the environment when the latter is cooler than the liquid in the accumulator.

  16. [Effect of cold and cool herbs on liver mitochondria proteome of rats with heat symptom].

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Lu, De-Zhao; Tang, Li-Hua; Wo, Xing-De; Yang, Zhen

    2013-12-01

    In the 1960s, modern science began involving the essence of heat syndrome, but there have still no in-depth systematic studies on pathological mechanisms of heat syndrome and action mechanisms of cold and cool herbs. In this study, the animal model with heat syndrome was set up by feeding herbs with hot property, and then cold and cool herbs was applied in the experimental therapy. The two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry technologies were adopted to compare the liver mitochondria proteome of the rats of the heat syndrome model and the ones treated with cold and cool herbs, so as to discover specificity-related proteins after heat syndrome and treatment with cold and cool herbs.

  17. Can Reptile Embryos Influence Their Own Rates of Heating and Cooling?

    PubMed Central

    Du, Wei-Guo; Tu, Ming-Chung; Shine, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Previous investigations have assumed that embryos lack the capacity of physiological thermoregulation until they are large enough for their own metabolic heat production to influence nest temperatures. Contrary to intuition, reptile embryos may be capable of physiological thermoregulation. In our experiments, egg-sized objects (dead or infertile eggs, water-filled balloons, glass jars) cooled down more rapidly than they heated up, whereas live snake eggs heated more rapidly than they cooled. In a nest with diel thermal fluctuations, that hysteresis could increase the embryo’s effective incubation temperature. The mechanisms for controlling rates of thermal exchange are unclear, but may involve facultative adjustment of blood flow. Heart rates of snake embryos were higher during cooling than during heating, the opposite pattern to that seen in adult reptiles. Our data challenge the view of reptile eggs as thermally passive, and suggest that embryos of reptile species with large eggs can influence their own rates of heating and cooling. PMID:23826200

  18. 46 CFR 92.20-50 - Heating and cooling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) under normal operating conditions without curtailing ventilation. (c) Radiators and other heating... the occupants. Pipes leading to radiators or heating apparatus must be insulated where those...

  19. 46 CFR 92.20-50 - Heating and cooling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) under normal operating conditions without curtailing ventilation. (c) Radiators and other heating... the occupants. Pipes leading to radiators or heating apparatus must be insulated where those...

  20. 46 CFR 92.20-50 - Heating and cooling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) under normal operating conditions without curtailing ventilation. (c) Radiators and other heating... the occupants. Pipes leading to radiators or heating apparatus must be insulated where those...

  1. 46 CFR 92.20-50 - Heating and cooling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) under normal operating conditions without curtailing ventilation. (c) Radiators and other heating... the occupants. Pipes leading to radiators or heating apparatus must be insulated where those...

  2. 46 CFR 92.20-50 - Heating and cooling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) under normal operating conditions without curtailing ventilation. (c) Radiators and other heating... the occupants. Pipes leading to radiators or heating apparatus must be insulated where those...

  3. Multicriteria aided design of integrated heating-cooling energy systems in buildings.

    PubMed

    Mróz, Tomasz M

    2010-08-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the possible application of integrated heating-cooling systems in buildings. The general algorithm of integrated heating-cooling system design aid was formulated. The evaluation criteria of technically acceptable variants were defined. Fossil fuel energy consumption, carbon dioxide emission, investment, and total exploitation cost were identified as the most important factors describing the considered decision problem. The multicriteria decision aid method ELECTRE III was proposed as the decision tool for the choice of the most compromised variant. The proposed method was used for a case study calculation-the choice of an integrated heating-cooling system for an office building.

  4. Solar heating and cooling demonstration project at the Florida solar energy center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-02-01

    The retrofitted solar heating and cooling system installed at the Florida Solar Energy Center is described. The system was designed to supply approximately 70 percent of the annual cooling and 100 percent of the heating load. The project provides unique high temperature, nonimaging, nontracking, evacuated tube collectors. The design of the system was kept simple and employs five hydronic loops. They are energy collection, chilled water production, space cooling, space heating and energy rejection. Information is provided on the system's acceptance test results operation, controls, hardware and installation, including detailed drawings.

  5. Solar heating and cooling demonstration project at the Florida solar energy center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The retrofitted solar heating and cooling system installed at the Florida Solar Energy Center is described. The system was designed to supply approximately 70 percent of the annual cooling and 100 percent of the heating load. The project provides unique high temperature, nonimaging, nontracking, evacuated tube collectors. The design of the system was kept simple and employs five hydronic loops. They are energy collection, chilled water production, space cooling, space heating and energy rejection. Information is provided on the system's acceptance test results operation, controls, hardware and installation, including detailed drawings.

  6. Subsystem design package for Mod 2 site data acquisition system: Solar heating and cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The Mod II Site Data Acquisition Subsystem (SDAS) is designed to collect data from sensors located on residential or commercial buildings using a solar heating and/or cooling system. The SDAS takes the data obtained from sensors located on the solar heating and/or cooling system, processes the data into a suitable format, stores the data for a period of time, and provides the capability for both telephone retrieval by the Central Data Processing System (CDPS) and manual retrieval of the data for transfer to the central site. The unit is designed so it will not degrade the operation of the solar heating/cooling system which it is monitoring.

  7. Survey and evaluation of available thermal insulation materials for use on solar heating and cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-03-01

    This is the final report of a survey and evaluation of insulation materials for use with components of solar heating and cooling systems. The survey was performed by mailing questionnaires to manufacturers of insulation materials and by conducting an extensive literature search to obtain data on relevant properties of various types of insulation materials. The study evaluated insulation materials for active and passive solar heating and cooling systems and for multifunction applications. Primary and secondary considerations for selecting insulation materials for various components of solar heating and cooling systems are presented.

  8. Conjugate heat transfer investigation on the cooling performance of air cooled turbine blade with thermal barrier coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Yongbin; Ma, Chao; Ge, Bing; Zang, Shusheng

    2016-08-01

    A hot wind tunnel of annular cascade test rig is established for measuring temperature distribution on a real gas turbine blade surface with infrared camera. Besides, conjugate heat transfer numerical simulation is performed to obtain cooling efficiency distribution on both blade substrate surface and coating surface for comparison. The effect of thermal barrier coating on the overall cooling performance for blades is compared under varied mass flow rate of coolant, and spatial difference is also discussed. Results indicate that the cooling efficiency in the leading edge and trailing edge areas of the blade is the lowest. The cooling performance is not only influenced by the internal cooling structures layout inside the blade but also by the flow condition of the mainstream in the external cascade path. Thermal barrier effects of the coating vary at different regions of the blade surface, where higher internal cooling performance exists, more effective the thermal barrier will be, which means the thermal protection effect of coatings is remarkable in these regions. At the designed mass flow ratio condition, the cooling efficiency on the pressure side varies by 0.13 for the coating surface and substrate surface, while this value is 0.09 on the suction side.

  9. Energy Integrated Design of Lighting, Heating, and Cooling Systems, and Its Effect on Building Energy Requirements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meckler, Gershon

    Comments on the need for integrated design of lighting, heating, and cooling systems. In order to eliminate the penalty of refrigerating the lighting heat, minimize the building non-usable space, and optimize the total energy input, a "systems approach" is recommended. This system would employ heat-recovery techniques based on the ability of the…

  10. Correlations of Nucleate Boiling Heat Transfer and Critical Heat Flux for External Reactor Vessel Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    J. Yang; F. B. Cheung; J. L. Rempe; K. Y. Suh; S. B. Kim

    2005-07-01

    Four types of steady-state boiling experiments were conducted to investigate the efficacy of two distinctly different heat transfer enhancement methods for external reactor vessel cooling under severe accident conditions. One method involved the use of a thin vessel coating and the other involved the use of an enhanced insulation structure. By comparing the results obtained in the four types of experiments, the separate and integral effect of vessel coating and insulation structure were determined. Correlation equations were obtained for the nucleate boiling heat transfer and the critical heat flux. It was found that both enhancement methods were quite effective. Depending on the angular location, the local critical heat flux could be enhanced by 1.4 to 2.5 times using vessel coating alone whereas it could be enhanced by 1.8 to 3.0 times using an enhanced insulation structure alone. When both vessel coating and insulation structure were used simultaneously, the integral effect on the enhancement was found much less than the product of the two separate effects, indicating possible competing mechanisms (i.e., interference) between the two enhancement methods.

  11. Heat Transfer Characteristics and Performance of a Spirally Coiled Heat Exchanger under Sensible Cooling Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wongwises, Somchai; Naphon, Paisarn

    In the present study, new experimental data on the heat transfer characteristics and the performance of a spirally coiled heat exchanger under sensible cooling conditions is presented. The spiral-coil heat exchanger consists of a steel shell and a spirally coiled tube unit. The spiral-coil unit consists of six layers of concentric spirally coiled tubes. Each tube is fabricated by bending a 9.27mm diameter straight copper tube into a spiral-coil of five turns. The innermost and outermost diameters of each spiral-coil are 67.7 and 227.6mm, respectively. Air and water are used as working fluids in shell side and tube side, respectively. A mathematical model based on the conservation of energy is developed to determine the heat transfer characteristics. There is a reasonable agreement between the results obtained from the experiment and those obtained from the model and a good agreement for the high air mass flow rate region. The results obtained from the parametric study are also discussed.

  12. Effects of Hot Streak and Phantom Cooling on Heat Transfer in a Cooled Turbine Stage Including Particulate Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Bons, Jeffrey; Ameri, Ali

    2016-01-08

    The objective of this research effort was to develop a validated computational modeling capability for the characterization of the effects of hot streaks and particulate deposition on the heat load of modern gas turbines. This was accomplished with a multi-faceted approach including analytical, experimental, and computational components. A 1-year no cost extension request was approved for this effort, so the total duration was 4 years. The research effort succeeded in its ultimate objective by leveraging extensive experimental deposition studies complemented by computational modeling. Experiments were conducted with hot streaks, vane cooling, and combinations of hot streaks with vane cooling. These studies contributed to a significant body of corporate knowledge of deposition, in combination with particle rebound and deposition studies funded by other agencies, to provide suitable conditions for the development of a new model. The model includes the following physical phenomena: elastic deformation, plastic deformation, adhesion, and shear removal. It also incorporates material property sensitivity to temperature and tangential-normal velocity rebound cross-dependencies observed in experiments. The model is well-suited for incorporation in CFD simulations of complex gas turbine flows due to its algebraic (explicit) formulation. This report contains model predictions compared to coefficient of restitution data available in the open literature as well as deposition results from two different high temperature turbine deposition facilities. While the model comparisons with experiments are in many cases promising, several key aspects of particle deposition remain elusive. The simple phenomenological nature of the model allows for parametric dependencies to be evaluated in a straightforward manner. This effort also included the first-ever full turbine stage deposition model published in the open literature. The simulations included hot streaks and simulated vane cooling

  13. Closed Form Equations for the Preliminary Design of a Heat-Pipe-Cooled Leading Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, David E.

    1998-01-01

    A set of closed form equations for the preliminary evaluation and design of a heat-pipe-cooled leading edge is presented. The set of equations can provide a leading-edge designer with a quick evaluation of the feasibility of using heat-pipe cooling. The heat pipes can be embedded in a metallic or composite structure. The maximum heat flux, total integrated heat load, and thermal properties of the structure and heat-pipe container are required input. The heat-pipe operating temperature, maximum surface temperature, heat-pipe length, and heat pipe-spacing can be estimated. Results using the design equations compared well with those from a 3-D finite element analysis for both a large and small radius leading edge.

  14. Comparison of waste heat driven and electrically driven cooling systems for a high ambient temperature, off-grid application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, Christopher P.

    Forward army bases in off-grid locations with high temperatures require power and cooling capacity. Each gallon of fuel providing electrical power passes through a complex network, introducing issues of safety and reliability if this network is interrupted. Instead of using an engine and an electrically powered cooling system, a more efficient combined heat and power (CHP) configuration with a smaller engine and LiBr/Water absorption system (AS) powered by waste heat could be used. These two configurations were simulated in both steady state and transient conditions, in ambient temperatures up to 52°C, providing up to 3 kW of non-cooling electricity, and 5.3 kW of cooling. Unlike conventional AS's which crystallize at high temperatures and use bulky cooling towers, the proposed AS's avoid crystallization and have air-cooled HXs for portability. For the hottest transient week, the results showed fuel savings of 34-37%, weight reduction of 11-19%, and a volumetric footprint 3-10% smaller.

  15. Study of heat exchange in cooling systems of heat-stressed structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vikulin, A. V.; Yaroslavtsev, N. L.; Zemlyanaya, V. A.

    2017-01-01

    Increasing working parameters of the cycle of gas-turbine engines, complicating design of gas-turbine plants, as well as growing aerodynamic, thermal, static, and dynamic loads, necessitate the development of promising cooling systems for heat-stressed structures. This work is devoted to an experimental study of heat exchange in ducts equipped with systems of inclined and cross walls (fins). It has been found that an increase in the Reynolds number Re from 3000 to 20000 leads to a decrease in the heat exchange, which is characterized by the relative Nusselt number overline{Nu}, by 19-30% at the angle of inclination of the walls φ = 0, 40°, 50°, and 90° if the length of the walls x w is comparable to the spacing b s and by 12-15% at φ = 30° and 90° if x w ≫ b s. If cross walls are used in cooling ducts, the length of the walls x w plays the governing role; an increase in this characteristic from 1.22 × 10-3 to 3.14 × 10-3 m leads to an increase in the intensity of heat exchange by 30-40% and to a decrease in the capacity of the entire system of the walls. It has been shown that, on surfaces with wavy fins, the intensity of heat exchange is closest to that determined in the models under study. For example, values of the Colborne criterion StPr2/3 for ducts equipped with wavy fins and for the models under study differ only slightly (by 2-20% depending on the value of the angle φ). However, the difference for surfaces with short plate fins and ducts equipped with inclined walls is high (30-40%). This is due to the design features of these surfaces and to the severe effect of the inlet portion on heat exchange, since the surfaces are characterized by a higher ratio of the duct length to the hydraulic diameter L/d h at small fin thicknesses ((0.1-0.15) × 10-3 m). The experimental results can be used in developing designs of nozzle and rotor blades of high-temperature gas turbines in gas-turbine engines and plants.

  16. Microstructural engineering applied to the controlled cooling of steel wire rod: Part I. Experimental design and heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, P. C.; Hawbolt, E. B.; Brimacombe, J. K.

    1991-11-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a mathematical model which incorporates heat flow, phase transformation kinetics, and property-structure-composition relationships to predict the mechanical properties of steel rod being control cooled under industrial conditions. Thus, the principles of microstructural engineering have been brought to bear on this interdisciplinary problem by combining computer modeling with laboratory measurements of heat flow, austenite decomposition kinetics, microstructure and mechanical properties, and industrial trials to determine heat transfer and obtain rod samples under known conditions. Owing to the length and diversity of the study, it is reported in three parts,[8191]the first of which is concerned with the heat flow measurements. A relatively simple and reliable technique, involving a preheated steel rod instrumented with a thermocouple secured at its centerline, has been devised to determine the cooling rate in different regions of the moving bed of rod loops on an operating Stelmor line. The measured thermal response of the rod has been analyzed by two transient conduction models (lumped and distributed parameter, respectively) to yield overall heat-transfer coefficients for radiation and convection. The adequacy of the technique has been checked by cooling instrumented rods under well-defined, air crossflow conditions in the laboratory and comparing measured heat-transfer coefficients to values predicted from well-established equations. The industrial thermal measurements have permitted the characterization of a coefficient to account for radiative interaction among adjacent rod loops near the edge and at the center of the bed.

  17. District heating/cooling feasibility study for Jamestown, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Oliker, I.; Buffa, W.; Harms, R.; Preston, E.

    1982-12-01

    The report describes the results of a district heating feasibility study for Jamestown, New York based on the use of a power plant located within the city limits. Several options for the extraction of heat from the power plant were developed, with heat balances presented, based on the development of a hot water district heating system. The geography and climate of the area are discussed, as well as the primary potential heat district. The heat load assessment was based on fuel consumption data collected from a sampling of various types of structures and operations. The report presents the methodology in detail, along with block-by-block results including heated floor space, total annual fuel consumed, and peak heat rate demands. A transmission and distribution system was then developed for delivering heat from the power plant to the district heating customers.

  18. An experimental study of turbine vane heat transfer with leading edge and downstream film cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nirmalan, V.; Hylton, L. D.

    1989-06-01

    This paper presents the effects of downstream film cooling, with and without leading edge showerhead film cooling, on turbine-vane external heat transfer. Steady-state experimental measurements were made in a three-vane linear two-dimensional cascade. The principal independent parameters were maintained over ranges consistent with actual engine conditions. The test matrix was structured to provide an assessment of the independent influence of parameters of interest, namely, exit Mach number, exit Reynolds number, coolant-to-gas temperature ratio, and coolant-to-gas pressure ratio. The data obtained indicate that considerable cooling benefits can be achieved by utilizing downstream film cooling. The downstream film cooling process was shown to be a complex interaction of two competing mechanisms. The thermal dilution effect, associated with the injection of relatively cold fluid, results in a decrease in the heat transfer to the airfoil. Conversely, the turbulence augmentation, produced by the injection process, results in increased heat transfer to the airfoil.

  19. Cool-down and frozen start-up behavior of a grooved water heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jang, Jong Hoon

    1990-01-01

    A grooved water heat pipe was tested to study its characteristics during the cool-down and start-up periods. The water heat pipe was cooled down from the ambient temperature to below the freezing temperature of water. During the cool-down, isothermal conditions were maintained at the evaporator and adiabatic sections until the working fluid was frozen. When water was frozen along the entire heat pipe, the heat pipe was rendered inactive. The start-up of the heat pipe from this state was studied under several different operating conditions. The results show the existence of large temperature gradients between the evaporator and the condenser, and the moving of the melting front of the working fluid along the heat pipe. Successful start-up was achieved for some test cases using partial gravity assist. The start-up behavior depended largely on the operating conditions.

  20. Evaporative cooling of ventral regions of the skin in heat-stressed laying hens.

    PubMed

    Wolfenson, D; Bachrach, D; Maman, M; Graber, Y; Rozenboim, I

    2001-07-01

    Laying hens held in battery cages in naturally ventilated poultry houses in hot countries usually develop hyperthermia, which adversely affects their performance. The present means of cooling alleviate to some degree, but cannot eliminate, the stress imposed by heat. A new approach to cooling of laying hens was developed, based on wetting the skin and promoting evaporation of water from the ventral regions of the bird. The type of plumage in the ventral regions and the exposed skin of the apteria enable more efficient wetting than is possible with dorsal cooling. A ventral cooling regime, comprising an initial period of frequent wettings followed by intermittent wetting for 10 s every 30 min was able to maintain normothermia of laying hens subjected to a 10-h period of heat exposure. Dorsal cooling was less efficient; body temperature and respiration rate were higher and skin temperatures were lower than in ventrally cooled hens. During 10 d of heat exposure, ventrally cooled hens maintained egg weight and shell index (mg/cm2), whereas their food intake decreased moderately. In contrast, egg weight, shell index, and food intake all decreased markedly in uncooled or dorsally cooled hens. Transient alterations in plasma concentrations of corticosterone, progesterone, and estradiol were noted in uncooled and dorsally cooled hens but not in ventrally cooled hens. Results indicate that ventral cooling is an efficient method to alleviate heat stress in laying hens during summer. Successful implementation of ventral cooling in poultry houses will depend on optimal installation of sprinklers and on minimal wetting of manure.

  1. Decay Heat Removal in GEN IV Gas-Cooled Fast Reactors

    DOE PAGES

    Cheng, Lap-Yan; Wei, Thomas Y. C.

    2009-01-01

    The safety goal of the current designs of advanced high-temperature thermal gas-cooled reactors (HTRs) is that no core meltdown would occur in a depressurization event with a combination of concurrent safety system failures. This study focused on the analysis of passive decay heat removal (DHR) in a GEN IV direct-cycle gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) which is based on the technology developments of the HTRs. Given the different criteria and design characteristics of the GFR, an approach different from that taken for the HTRs for passive DHR would have to be explored. Different design options based on maintaining core flow weremore » evaluated by performing transient analysis of a depressurization accident using the system code RELAP5-3D. The study also reviewed the conceptual design of autonomous systems for shutdown decay heat removal and recommends that future work in this area should be focused on the potential for Brayton cycle DHRs.« less

  2. Better Duct Systems for Home Heating and Cooling; Building Technologies Program (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    2004-11-01

    Duct systems used in forced-air space-conditioning systems are a vital element in home energy efficiency. How well a system works makes a big difference in the cost and the effectiveness of heating and cooling a home.

  3. Characterization of selected application of biomass energy technologies and a solar district heating and cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    D'Alessio, Dr., Gregory J.; Blaunstein, Robert P.

    1980-09-01

    The following systems are discussed: energy self-sufficient farms, wood gasification, energy from high-yield silviculture farms, and solar district heating and cooling. System descriptions and environmental data are included for each one. (MHR)

  4. DETAIL OF HEATING/COOLING SYSTEM, A/C MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT ROOM, FACING NORTHEAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF HEATING/COOLING SYSTEM, A/C MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT ROOM, FACING NORTHEAST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 34, Operations Support Building, Freedom Road, Southwest of Launch Stand CX-34, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  5. Initial evaluation of floor cooling on lactating sows under severe acute heat stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives were to evaluate an acute heat stress protocol for lactating sows and evaluate preliminary estimates of water flow rates required to cool sows. Twelve multiparous sows were provided with a cooling pad built with an aluminum plate surface, high-density polyethylene base and copper pipe...

  6. Geothermal potential for heating and cooling facilities, San Bernardino Valley College, San Bernardino, California

    SciTech Connect

    Gemeinhardt, M.A.; Tharaldson, L.C.

    1981-07-01

    The potential for converting to geothermal heating at the campus of San Bernardino Valley College is considered. Also considered is the possibility of using well water for water cooled condenser cooling of air conditioning equipment. To provide water supply a production well, water distribution system and an injection well would be installed for each system.

  7. The effects of leading edge and downstream film cooling on turbine vane heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hylton, L. D.; Nirmalan, V.; Sultanian, B. K.; Kaufman, R. M.

    1988-01-01

    The progress under contract NAS3-24619 toward the goal of establishing a relevant data base for use in improving the predictive design capabilities for external heat transfer to turbine vanes, including the effect of downstream film cooling with and without leading edge showerhead film cooling. Experimental measurements were made in a two-dimensional cascade previously used to obtain vane surface heat transfer distributions on nonfilm cooled airfoils under contract NAS3-22761 and leading edge showerhead film cooled airfoils under contract NAS3-23695. The principal independent parameters (Mach number, Reynolds number, turbulence, wall-to-gas temperature ratio, coolant-to-gas temperature ratio, and coolant-to-gas pressure ratio) were maintained over ranges consistent with actual engine conditions and the test matrix was structured to provide an assessment of the independent influence of parameters of interest, namely, exit Mach number, exit Reynolds number, coolant-to-gas temperature ratio, and coolant-to-gas pressure ratio. Data provide a data base for downstream film cooled turbine vanes and extends the data bases generated in the two previous studies. The vane external heat transfer obtained indicate that considerable cooling benefits can be achieved by utilizing downstream film cooling. The data obtained and presented illustrate the interaction of the variables and should provide the airfoil designer and computational analyst the information required to improve heat transfer design capabilities for film cooled turbine airfoils.

  8. The effects of leading edge and downstream film cooling on turbine vane heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hylton, L. D.; Nirmalan, V.; Sultanian, B. K.; Kaufman, R. M.

    1988-11-01

    The progress under contract NAS3-24619 toward the goal of establishing a relevant data base for use in improving the predictive design capabilities for external heat transfer to turbine vanes, including the effect of downstream film cooling with and without leading edge showerhead film cooling. Experimental measurements were made in a two-dimensional cascade previously used to obtain vane surface heat transfer distributions on nonfilm cooled airfoils under contract NAS3-22761 and leading edge showerhead film cooled airfoils under contract NAS3-23695. The principal independent parameters (Mach number, Reynolds number, turbulence, wall-to-gas temperature ratio, coolant-to-gas temperature ratio, and coolant-to-gas pressure ratio) were maintained over ranges consistent with actual engine conditions and the test matrix was structured to provide an assessment of the independent influence of parameters of interest, namely, exit Mach number, exit Reynolds number, coolant-to-gas temperature ratio, and coolant-to-gas pressure ratio. Data provide a data base for downstream film cooled turbine vanes and extends the data bases generated in the two previous studies. The vane external heat transfer obtained indicate that considerable cooling benefits can be achieved by utilizing downstream film cooling. The data obtained and presented illustrate the interaction of the variables and should provide the airfoil designer and computational analyst the information required to improve heat transfer design capabilities for film cooled turbine airfoils.

  9. Ice pack heat sink subsystem, phase 2. [astronaut life support cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roebelen, G. J., Jr.; Kellner, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    The report describes the design, development, fabrication, and test at one gravity of a prototype ice pack heat sink subsystem to be used eventually for astronaut cooling during manned space missions; the investigation of thermal storage material with the objective of uncovering materials with heats of fusion and/or solution in the range of 300 Btu/lb (700 kilojoules/kilogram); and the planned procedure for implementing an ice pack heat sink subsystem flight experiment. In normal use, excess heat in the liquid cooling garment (LCG) coolant is transferred to a reusable/regenerable ice pack heat sink. For emergency operation, or for extension of extravehicular activity mission time after all the ice has melted, water from the ice pack is boiled to vacuum, thereby continuing to remove heat from the LCG coolant. This subsystem incorporates a quick disconnect thermal interface between the ice pack heat sink and the subsystem heat exchanger.

  10. Preliminary design package for residential heating/cooling system: Rankine air conditioner redesign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A summary of the preliminary redesign and development of a marketable single family heating and cooling system is presented. The interim design and schedule status of the residential (3-ton) redesign, problem areas and solutions, and the definition of plans for future design and development activities were discussed. The proposed system for a single-family residential heating and cooling system is a single-loop, solar-assisted, hydronic-to-warm-air heating subsystem with solar-assisted domestic water heating and a Rankine-driven expansion air-conditioning subsystem.

  11. Determination of the heat transfer capability of laser mirrors with cooled cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhernovyi, Yu. V.; Odnorozhenko, I. G.; Potyagailo, D. B.; Romanchuk, Ya. P.

    1992-09-01

    A mathematical model of steady-state heat transfer in a laser mirror involving cooled prismatically shaped cells has been developed. Using cooling systems with hexahedral and tetrahedral cells (by the number of side walls) as examples, the influence of the mirror illumination nonuniformity, reflector thickness, and other parameters on the effective heat-transfer coefficient and thermal head coefficient is investigated; the physical limits for heat-transfer characteristics in the case of an unlimited increase in heat transfer from the surfaces of the cell walls have been determined.

  12. Solar heating and cooling system installed at RKL Controls Company, Lumberton, New Jersey. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1981-03-01

    Solar heating and cooling of a 40,000 square foot manufacturing building, sales offices and the solar computer control center/display room are described. Information on system description, test data, major problems and resolutions, performance, operation and maintenance manual, manufacturer's literature and as-built drawings are provided also. The solar system is composed of 6000 square feet of Sunworks double glazed flat plate collectors, external above ground storage subsystem, controls, ARKLA absorption chiller, heat recovery and a cooling tower.

  13. The Effects of Exercise, Heat, and Microclimate Cooling on Terminal Stroke Volume in Men and Women

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    NAVAL HEALTH RESEARCH CENTER THE EFFECTS OF EXERCISE, HEAT AND MICROCLIMATE COOLING ON TERMINAL STROKE VOLUME IN MEN AND WOMEN...20372-5300 THE EFFECTS OF EXERCISE, HEAT AND MICROCLIMATE COOLING ON TERMINAL STROKE VOLUME IN MEN AND WOMEN Naval Health Research Center...We have previously reported that in lieu of the more common end-of-test criteria such as core temperature < 39°C, and heart rate (HR) < 180 bpm

  14. Coloration affects heating and cooling in three color morphs of the Australian bluetongue lizard, Tiliqua scincoides.

    PubMed

    Geen, Michael R S; Johnston, Gregory R

    2014-07-01

    The color-mediated thermoregulation hypothesis predicts that dark body color (low reflectance) allows organisms to gain heat more efficiently than does pale coloration (high reflectance). This prediction is intuitive and widely assumed to be true, but has poor empirical support. We used rare, captive-bred, mutant melanistic, albino and wild-type Australian bluetongue lizards, Tiliqua scincoides to measure the effects of skin reflectance on the heating and cooling rates. We measured heating under an artificial radiant heat source and cooling rates in an ice-cooled box using live lizards in a room with still air. The effect of skin reflectance on heat transfer was clear, despite the substantial influence of body size. Melanistic T. scincoides showed low reflectance and gained heat faster than highly reflective albinos. Melanistic lizards also lost heat faster than albinos. Wild-type lizards were intermediate in reflectance, gained heat at rates indistinguishable from melanistic lizards, and lost heat at rates indistinguishable from albino lizards. This study system allowed us to control for variables that were confounded in other studies and may explain the inconsistent support for the color-mediated thermoregulation hypothesis. Our results provide clear evidence that skin reflectance influences the rate of heating and cooling in ectotherms.

  15. Heat Transfer Prediction of Film Cooling in Supersonic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luchi, Riccardo; Salvadori, Simone; Martelli, Francesco

    2008-09-01

    Considering the modern high pressure stages of gas turbines, the flow over the suction side of the blades can be affected by the presence of shock impingement and boundary layer separation. Furthermore, it should be pointed out that the combustor exit temperature reaches values which are close to the allowable material limit. Then, a cooling system based on the film cooling approach should be designed to prevent failure. The interaction between the ejected coolant and the shock impingement must be studied to achieve a higher efficiency of the cooling system. The proposed approach is based on the numerical evaluation of a film cooled test section experimentally studied at the University of Karlsruhe. The testing rig consists in a converging-diverging nozzle that accelerates the flow up to sonic conditions while an oblique shock is generated at the nozzle exit section. Three cases have been studied, changing the cooling holes position with respect to the shock impingement over the cooled surface. The obtained results are presented and compared with the experimental data. The used solver is the in-house CFD 3D code HybFlow, developed at the University of Florence. This study has been carried out in the frame of the EU funded TATEF2 project.

  16. Contribution of heat transfer to turbine blades and vanes for high temperature industrial gas turbines. Part 1: Film cooling.

    PubMed

    Takeishi, K; Aoki, S

    2001-05-01

    This paper deals with the contribution of heat transfer to increase the turbine inlet temperature of industrial gas turbines in order to attain efficient and environmentally benign engines. High efficiency film cooling, in the form of shaped film cooling and full coverage film cooling, is one of the most important cooling technologies. Corresponding heat transfer tests to optimize the film cooling effectiveness are shown and discussed in this first part of the contribution.

  17. Combined heat recovery and make-up water heating system

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.Y.

    1988-05-24

    A cogeneration plant is described comprising in combination: a first stage source of hot gas; a duct having an inlet for receiving the hot gas and an outlet stack open to the atmosphere; a second stage recovery heat steam generator including an evaporator situated in the duct, and economizer in the duct downstream of the evaporator, and steam drum fluidly connected to the evaporator and the economizer; feedwater supply means including a deaerator heater and feedwater pump for supplying deaerated feedwater to the steam drum through the economizer; makeup water supply means including a makeup pump for delivering makeup water to the deaerator heater; means fluidly connected to the steam drum for supplying auxiliary steam to the deaerator heater; and heat exchanger means located between the deaerator and the economizer, for transferring heat from the feedwater to the makeup water, thereby increasing the temperature of the makeup water delivered to the deaerator and decreasing the temperature of the feedwater delivered to the economizer, without fluid exchange.

  18. Numerical investigations of transient heat transfer characteristics and vitrification tendencies in ultra-fast cell cooling processes.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Anjun; Han, Xu; Critser, John K; Ma, Hongbin

    2006-06-01

    During freezing, cells are often damaged directly or indirectly by ice formation. Vitrification is an alternative approach to cryopreservation that avoids ice formation. The common method to achieve vitrification is to use relatively high concentrations of cryoprotectant agents (CPA) in combination with a relatively slow cooling rate. However, high concentrations of CPAs have potentially damaging toxic and/or osmotic effects on cells. Therefore, establishing methods to achieve vitrification with lower concentrations of CPAs through ultra-fast cooling rates would be advantageous in these aspects. These ultra-fast cooling rates can be realized by a cooling system with an ultra-high heat transfer coefficient (h) between the sample and coolant. The oscillating motion heat pipe (OHP), a novel cooling device utilizing the pressure change to excite the oscillation motion of the liquid plugs and vapor bubbles, can significantly increase h and may fulfill this aim. The current investigation was designed to numerically study the effects of different values of h on the transient heat transfer characteristics and vitrification tendencies of the cell suspension during the cooling processes in an ultra-thin straw (100 microm in diameter). The transient temperature distribution, the cooling rate and the volume ratio (x) of the ice quantity to the maximum crystallizable ice of the suspension were calculated. From these numerical results, it is concluded that the ultra-high h (>10(4) W/m2 K) obtained by OHPs could facilitate vitrification by efficiently decreasing x as well as the time to pass through the dangerous temperature region where the maximum ice formation happens. For comparison, OHPs can decrease both of the parameters to less than 20% of those from the widely used open pulled straw methods. Therefore, the OHP method will be a promising approach to improving vitrification tendencies of CPA solutions and could also decrease the required concentration of CPAs for

  19. 46 CFR 72.20-50 - Heating and cooling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... operating conditions without curtailing ventilation. (c) Radiators and other heating apparatus must be so... leading to radiators or heating apparatus must be insulated where those pipes create a hazard to...

  20. 46 CFR 72.20-50 - Heating and cooling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... operating conditions without curtailing ventilation. (c) Radiators and other heating apparatus must be so... leading to radiators or heating apparatus must be insulated where those pipes create a hazard to...

  1. 46 CFR 72.20-50 - Heating and cooling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... operating conditions without curtailing ventilation. (c) Radiators and other heating apparatus must be so... leading to radiators or heating apparatus must be insulated where those pipes create a hazard to...

  2. 46 CFR 72.20-50 - Heating and cooling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... operating conditions without curtailing ventilation. (c) Radiators and other heating apparatus must be so... leading to radiators or heating apparatus must be insulated where those pipes create a hazard to...

  3. 46 CFR 72.20-50 - Heating and cooling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... operating conditions without curtailing ventilation. (c) Radiators and other heating apparatus must be so... leading to radiators or heating apparatus must be insulated where those pipes create a hazard to...

  4. Energy-Storage Modules for Active Solar Heating and Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    34 page report describes a melting salt hydrate that stores 12 times as much heat as rocks and other heavy materials. Energy is stored mostly as latent heat; that is, heat that can be stored and recovered without any significant change in temperature. Report also describes development, evaluation and testing of permanently sealed modules containing salt hydrate mixture.

  5. Applications of heat pipes to cool PWBS and hybrid microcircuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekhon, K. S.

    1986-01-01

    Some of the advanced thermal management techniques used to reduce operating junction temperature under extreme environmental temperature conditions are discussed. Heat pipes in actual electronic packaging applications, and those under development, are discussed. Performance characteristics of heat pipes are given, and examples are described of how thermal problems in electronic packaging are solved through the use of heat pipes.

  6. The Corrected Simulation Method of Critical Heat Flux Prediction for Water-Cooled Divertor Based on Euler Homogeneous Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingyang; Han, Le; Chang, Haiping; Liu, Nan; Xu, Tiejun

    2016-02-01

    An accurate critical heat flux (CHF) prediction method is the key factor for realizing the steady-state operation of a water-cooled divertor that works under one-sided high heating flux conditions. An improved CHF prediction method based on Euler's homogeneous model for flow boiling combined with realizable k-ɛ model for single-phase flow is adopted in this paper in which time relaxation coefficients are corrected by the Hertz-Knudsen formula in order to improve the calculation accuracy of vapor-liquid conversion efficiency under high heating flux conditions. Moreover, local large differences of liquid physical properties due to the extreme nonuniform heating flux on cooling wall along the circumference direction are revised by formula IAPWS-IF97. Therefore, this method can improve the calculation accuracy of heat and mass transfer between liquid phase and vapor phase in a CHF prediction simulation of water-cooled divertors under the one-sided high heating condition. An experimental example is simulated based on the improved and the uncorrected methods. The simulation results, such as temperature, void fraction and heat transfer coefficient, are analyzed to achieve the CHF prediction. The results show that the maximum error of CHF based on the improved method is 23.7%, while that of CHF based on uncorrected method is up to 188%, as compared with the experiment results of Ref. [12]. Finally, this method is verified by comparison with the experimental data obtained by International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), with a maximum error of 6% only. This method provides an efficient tool for the CHF prediction of water-cooled divertors. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (No. 2010GB104005) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51406085)

  7. Roof aperture system for selective collection and control of solar energy for building heating, cooling and daylighting

    DOEpatents

    Sanders, William J.; Snyder, Marvin K.; Harter, James W.

    1983-01-01

    The amount of building heating, cooling and daylighting is controlled by at least one pair of solar energy passing panels, with each panel of the pair of panels being exposed to a separate direction of sun incidence. A shutter-shade combination is associated with each pair of panels and the shutter is connected to the shade so that rectilinear movement of the shutter causes pivotal movement of the shade.

  8. STABLE HEATING OF CLUSTER COOLING FLOWS BY COSMIC-RAY STREAMING

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Yutaka; Ohira, Yutaka

    2011-09-10

    We study heating of cool cores in galaxy clusters by cosmic-ray (CR) streaming using numerical simulations. In this model, CRs are injected by the central active galactic nucleus (AGN) and move outward with Alfven waves. The waves are excited by the streaming itself and become nonlinear. If magnetic fields are large enough, CRs can prevail in and heat the entire core because of a large Alfven velocity. We find that the CR streaming can stably heat both high- and low-temperature clusters for a long time without the assistance of thermal conduction, and it can prevent the development of massive cooling flows. If there is even a minor contribution from thermal conduction, the heating can be stabilized further. We discuss the reason for the stability and indicate that the CR pressure is insensitive to changes in the intracluster medium (ICM) and that the density dependence of the heating term is similar to that of radiative cooling.

  9. Optimal Cooling Load and COP Relationship of a Four-Heat-Reservoir Endoreversible Absorption Refrigeration Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lingen; Zheng, Tong; Sun, Fengrui; Wu, Chih

    2004-06-01

    On the basis of a four-heat-reservoir endoreversible absorption refrigeration cycle model, another linear heat transfer law [i.e., the heat-flux] is adopted, the fundamental optimal relation between the coefficient of performance (COP) and the cooling load, as well as the maximum cooling load and the corresponding COP of the cycle coupled to constant-temperature heat reservoirs are derived by using finite-time thermodynamics or thermodynamic optimization. The optimal distribution of the heat-transfer surface areas is also obtained. Moreover, the effects of the cycle parameters on the COP and the cooling load of the cycle are studied by detailed numerical examples. The results obtained herein are of importance to the optimal design and performance improvement of an absorption refrigeration cycle.

  10. The influence of nanoparticle migration on forced convective heat transfer of nanofluid under heating and cooling regimes.

    PubMed

    Kozlova, Sofya V; Ryzhkov, Ilya I

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, laminar convective heat transfer of water-alumina nanofluid in a circular tube with uniform heat flux at the tube wall is investigated. The investigation is performed numerically on the basis of two-component model, which takes into account nanoparticle transport by diffusion and thermophoresis. Two thermal regimes at the tube wall, heating and cooling, are considered and the influence of nanoparticle migration on the heat transfer is analyzed comparatively. The intensity of thermophoresis is characterized by a new empirical model for thermophoretic mobility. It is shown that the nanoparticle volume fraction decreases (increases) in the boundary layer near the wall under heating (cooling) due to thermophoresis. The corresponding variations of nanofluid properties and flow characteristics are presented and discussed. The intensity of heat transfer for the model with thermophoresis in comparison to the model without thermophoresis is studied by plotting the dependence of the heat transfer coefficient on the Peclet number. The effectiveness of water-alumina nanofluid is analyzed by plotting the average heat transfer coefficient against the required pumping power. The analysis of the results reveals that the water-alumina nanofluid shows better performance in the heating regime than in the cooling regime due to thermophoretic effect.

  11. Heating-Cooling Asymmetry in the δ-γ Transformation in Plutonium: Clausius-Clapeyron Considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Daniel S.; Mitchell, Jeremy Neil

    2015-07-27

    Slides discuss the subject under the following topics: Pu phase transformations and features of the γ-δ transformation (heating-cooling asymmetry, cooling rate, effect of impurities); pressure effects in γ-δ transformations; Clausius-Clapeyron analysis; and discussion of heating-cooling asymmetry in the γ-δ transformation. The following conclusions are reached: burst behavior and extended transformation range due to pressure arrest; low slope of P-T curve for γ-δ favors this transformation for pressure arrest; asymmetry w.r.t. direction of transformation likely due to defects.

  12. Heat acclimation improves intermittent sprinting in the heat but additional pre-cooling offers no further ergogenic effect.

    PubMed

    Castle, Paul; Mackenzie, Richard W; Maxwell, Neil; Webborn, Anthony D J; Watt, Peter W

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of 10 days of heat acclimation with and without pre-cooling on intermittent sprint exercise performance in the heat. Eight males completed three intermittent cycling sprint protocols before and after 10 days of heat acclimation. Before acclimation, one sprint protocol was conducted in control conditions (21.8 ± 2.2°C, 42.8 ± 6.7% relative humidity) and two sprint protocols in hot, humid conditions (33.3 ± 0.6°C, 52.2 ± 6.8% relative humidity) in a randomized order. One hot, humid condition was preceded by 20 min of thigh pre-cooling with ice packs (-16.2 ± 4.5°C). After heat acclimation, the two hot, humid sprint protocols were repeated. Before heat acclimation, peak power output declined in the heat (P < 0.05) but pre-cooling prevented this. Ten days of heat acclimation reduced resting rectal temperature from 37.8 ± 0.3°C to 37.4 ± 0.3°C (P < 0.01). When acclimated, peak power output increased by ∼2% (P < 0.05, main effect) and no reductions in individual sprint peak power output were observed. Additional pre-cooling offered no further ergogenic effect. Unacclimated athletes competing in the heat should pre-cool to prevent reductions in peak power output, but heat acclimate for an increased peak power output.

  13. Heating and cooling of a two-dimensional electron gas by terahertz radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Budkin, G. V.; Tarasenko, S. A.

    2011-04-15

    The absorption of terahertz radiation by free charge carriers in n-type semiconductor quantum wells accompanied by the interaction of electrons with acoustic and optical phonons is studied. It is shown that intrasubband optical transitions can cause both heating and cooling of the electron gas. The cooling of charge carriers occurs in a certain temperature and radiation frequency region where light is most efficiently absorbed due to intrasubband transitions with emission of optical phonons. In GaAs quantum wells, the optical cooling of electrons occurs most efficiently at liquid nitrogen temperatures, while cooling is possible even at room temperature in GaN heterostructures.

  14. Production and physiological responses of heat-stressed lactating dairy cattle to conductive cooling.

    PubMed

    Perano, Kristen M; Usack, Joseph G; Angenent, Largus T; Gebremedhin, Kifle G

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this research was to test the effectiveness of conductive cooling in alleviating heat stress of lactating dairy cows. A conductive cooling system was built with waterbeds (Dual Chamber Cow Waterbeds, Advanced Comfort Technology Inc., Reedsburg, WI) modified to circulate chilled water. The experiment lasted 7 wk. Eight first-lactation Holstein cows producing 34.4±3.7kg/d of milk at 166±28 d in milk were used in the study. Milk yield, dry matter intake (DMI), and rectal temperature were recorded twice daily, and respiration rate was recorded 5 times per day. During wk 1, the cows were not exposed to experimental heat stress or conductive cooling. For the remaining 6 wk, the cows were exposed to heat stress from 0900 to 1700h each day. During these 6 wk, 4 of the 8 cows were cooled with conductive cooling (experimental cows), and the other 4 were not cooled (control cows). The study consisted of 2 thermal environment exposures (temperature-humidity index mean ± standard deviation of 80.7±0.9 and 79.0±1.0) and 2 cooling water temperatures (circulating water through the water mattresses at temperatures of 4.5°C and 10°C). Thus, a total of 4 conductive cooling treatments were tested, with each treatment lasting 1 wk. During wk 6, the experimental and control cows were switched and the temperature-humidity index of 79.0±1.0 with 4.5°C cooling water treatment was repeated. During wk 7, waterbeds were placed directly on concrete stalls without actively cooling the water. Least squares means and P-values for the different treatments were calculated with multivariate mixed models. Conductively cooling the cows with 4.5°C water decreased rectal temperature by 1.0°C, decreased respiration rate by 18 breaths/min, increased milk yield by 5%, and increased DMI by 14% compared with the controls. When the results from the 2 cooling water temperatures (4.5°C and 10°C circulating water) were compared, we found that the rectal temperature from 4.5

  15. Experimental investigation of heat transfer and flow using V and broken V ribs within gas turbine blade cooling passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sourabh; Amano, R. S.

    2015-05-01

    Gas turbines are extensively used for aircraft propulsion, land-based power generation, and various industrial applications. With an increase in turbine rotor inlet temperatures, developments in innovative gas turbine cooling technology enhance the efficiency and power output; these advancements of turbine cooling have allowed engine designs to exceed normal material temperature limits. For internal cooling design, techniques for heat extraction from the surfaces exposed to hot stream of gas are based on an increase in the heat transfer areas and on the promotion of turbulence of the cooling flow. In this study, an improvement in performance is obtained by casting repeated continuous V- and broken V-shaped ribs on one side of the two pass square channels into the core of the blade. A detailed experimental investigation is done for two pass square channels with a 180° turn. Detailed heat transfer distribution occurring in the ribbed passage is reported for a steady state experiment. Four different combinations of 60° V- and broken 60° V-ribs in a channel are considered. A series of thermocouples are used to obtain the temperature on the channel surface and local heat transfer coefficients are obtained for Reynolds numbers 16,000, 56,000 and 85,000 within the turbulent flow regime. Area averaged data are calculated in order to compare the overall performance of the tested ribbed surface and to evaluate the degree of heat transfer enhancement induced by the rib. Flow within the channels is characterized by heat transfer enhancing ribs, bends, rotation and buoyancy effects. A series of experimental measurements is performed to predict the overall performance of the channel. This paper presents an attempt to collect information about the Nusselt number, the pressure drop and the overall performance of the eight different ribbed ducts at the specified Reynolds number. The main contribution of this study is to evaluate the best combination of rib arrangements

  16. Method and system for simulating heat and mass transfer in cooling towers

    DOEpatents

    Bharathan, Desikan; Hassani, A. Vahab

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is a system and method for simulating the performance of a cooling tower. More precisely, the simulator of the present invention predicts values related to the heat and mass transfer from a liquid (e.g., water) to a gas (e.g., air) when provided with input data related to a cooling tower design. In particular, the simulator accepts input data regarding: (a) cooling tower site environmental characteristics; (b) cooling tower operational characteristics; and (c) geometric characteristics of the packing used to increase the surface area within the cooling tower upon which the heat and mass transfer interactions occur. In providing such performance predictions, the simulator performs computations related to the physics of heat and mass transfer within the packing. Thus, instead of relying solely on trial and error wherein various packing geometries are tested during construction of the cooling tower, the packing geometries for a proposed cooling tower can be simulated for use in selecting a desired packing geometry for the cooling tower.

  17. Directly connected heat exchanger tube section and coolant-cooled structure

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Coico, Patrick A.; Graybill, David P.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J.; Schmidt, Roger R.; Steinke, Mark E.

    2015-09-15

    A method is provided for fabricating a cooling apparatus for cooling an electronics rack, which includes an air-to-liquid heat exchanger, one or more coolant-cooled structures, and a tube. The heat exchanger is associated with the electronics rack and disposed to cool air passing through the rack, includes a plurality of coolant-carrying tube sections, each tube section having a coolant inlet and outlet, one of which is coupled in fluid communication with a coolant loop to facilitate flow of coolant through the tube section. The coolant-cooled structure(s) is in thermal contact with an electronic component(s) of the rack, and facilitates transfer of heat from the component(s) to the coolant. The tube connects in fluid communication one coolant-cooled structure and the other of the coolant inlet or outlet of the one tube section, and facilitates flow of coolant directly between that coolant-carrying tube section of the heat exchanger and the coolant-cooled structure.

  18. Off-axis cooling of rotating devices using a crank-shaped heat pipe

    DOEpatents

    Jankowski, Todd A.; Prenger, F. Coyne; Waynert, Joseph A.

    2007-01-30

    The present invention is a crank-shaped heat pipe for cooling rotating machinery and a corresponding method of manufacture. The crank-shaped heat pipe comprises a sealed cylindrical tube with an enclosed inner wick structure. The crank-shaped heat pipe includes a condenser section, an adiabatic section, and an evaporator section. The crank-shape is defined by a first curve and a second curve existing in the evaporator section or the adiabatic section of the heat pipe. A working fluid within the heat pipe provides the heat transfer mechanism.

  19. The development of radiant cooler and cryogenic heat pipes for 200K cryogenic optical system cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Enguang; Wu, Yinong; Yang, Xiaofeng; Mu, Yongbin

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a heat transfer system, in which a radiant cooler, cryogenic heat pipes and flexible thermal links were developed for heat transfer, by which a cryogenic system was cooled down to 200K from room temperature. A scrolling mechanism was designed for the radiant cooler to anti-contamination and block sunlight in the initial orbit phase. The cryogenic heat pipe is a type of grooved heat pipe with the working fluid of ethane and working temperature ranging from 160K to 210K. Some experimental and simulation results of the radiant cooler, cryogenic heat pipes will be discussed in this paper.

  20. Contact-cooled U-monochromators for high heat load x-ray beamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Khounsary, A.; Yun, W.; Trakhtenberg, E.; Xu, S.; Assoufid, L.; Lee, W.K.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the design, expected performance, and preliminary test results of a contact-cooled monochromator for use on high heat load x-ray beamlines. The monochromator has a cross section in the shape of the letter U. This monochromator should be suitable for handing heat fluxes up to 5 W/square millimeter. As such, for the present application, it is compatible with the best internally cooled crystal monochromators. There are three key features in the design of this monochromator. First, it is contact cooled, thereby eliminating fabrication of cooling channels, bonding, and undesirable strains in the monochromator due to coolant-manifold-to-crystal-interface. Second, by illuminating the entire length of the crystal and extracting the central part of the reflected beam, sharp slope changes in the beam profile and thus slope errors are avoided. Last, by appropriate cooling of the crystal, tangential slope error can be substantially reduced.

  1. Experimental study on corrugated cross-flow air-cooled plate heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Minsung; Baik, Young-Jin; Park, Seong-Ryong; Ra, Ho-Sang; Lim, Hyug

    2010-11-15

    Experimental study on cross-flow air-cooled plate heat exchangers (PHEs) was performed. The two prototype PHEs were manufactured in a stack of single-wave plates and double-wave plates in parallel. Cooling air flows through the PHEs in a crosswise direction against internal cooling water. The heat exchanger aims to substitute open-loop cooling towers with closed-loop water circulation, which guarantees cleanliness and compactness. In this study, the prototype PHEs were tested in a laboratory scale experiments. From the tests, double-wave PHE shows approximately 50% enhanced heat transfer performance compared to single-wave PHE. However, double-wave PHE costs 30% additional pressure drop. For commercialization, a wide channel design for air flow would be essential for reliable performance. (author)

  2. A Numerical Analysis of Heat Transfer and Effectiveness on Film Cooled Turbine Blade Tip Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ameri, A. A.; Rigby, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    A computational study has been performed to predict the distribution of convective heat transfer coefficient on a simulated blade tip with cooling holes. The purpose of the examination was to assess the ability of a three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes solver to predict the rate of tip heat transfer and the distribution of cooling effectiveness. To this end, the simulation of tip clearance flow with blowing of Kim and Metzger was used. The agreement of the computed effectiveness with the data was quite good. The agreement with the heat transfer coefficient was not as good but improved away from the cooling holes. Numerical flow visualization showed that the uniformity of wetting of the surface by the film cooling jet is helped by the reverse flow due to edge separation of the main flow.

  3. A feasibility study of heat-pipe-cooled leading edges for hypersonic cruise aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverstein, C. C.

    1971-01-01

    A theoretical study of the use of heat pipe structures for cooling the leading edges of hypersonic cruise aircraft was carried out over a Mach number range of 6 to 12. Preliminary design studies showed that a heat pipe cooling structure with a 33-in. chordwise length could maintain the maximum temperature of a 65 deg sweepback wing with a 0.5-in. leading edge radius below 1600 F during cruise at Mach 8. A few relatively minor changes in the steady-state design of the structure were found necessary to insure satisfactory cooling during the climb to cruise speed and altitude. It was concluded that heat pipe cooling is an attractive, feasible technique for limiting leading edge temperatures of hypersonic cruise aircraft.

  4. Dropwise Evaporative Cooling of Heated Surfaces with Various Wettability Characteristics Obtained by Nanostructure Modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian-nan; Zhang, Zhen; Ouyang, Xiao-long; Jiang, Pei-xue

    2016-03-01

    A numerical and experimental investigation was conducted to analyze dropwise evaporative cooling of heated surfaces with various wettability characteristics. The surface wettability was tuned by nanostructure modifications. Spray-cooling experiments on these surfaces show that surfaces with better wettability have better heat transfer rate and higher critical heat flux (CHF). Single droplet impingement evaporative cooling of a heated surface was then investigated numerically with various wettability conditions to characterize the effect of contact angle on spray-cooling heat transfer. The volume of fluid (VOF) model with variable-time stepping was used to capture the time-dependent liquid-gas interface motion throughout the computational domain with the kinetic theory model used to predict the evaporation rate at the liquid-gas interface. The numerical results agree with the spray-cooling experiments that dropwise evaporative cooling is much better on surfaces with better wettability because of the better liquid spreading and convection, better liquid-solid contact, and stronger liquid evaporation.

  5. Dropwise Evaporative Cooling of Heated Surfaces with Various Wettability Characteristics Obtained by Nanostructure Modifications.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian-Nan; Zhang, Zhen; Ouyang, Xiao-Long; Jiang, Pei-Xue

    2016-12-01

    A numerical and experimental investigation was conducted to analyze dropwise evaporative cooling of heated surfaces with various wettability characteristics. The surface wettability was tuned by nanostructure modifications. Spray-cooling experiments on these surfaces show that surfaces with better wettability have better heat transfer rate and higher critical heat flux (CHF). Single droplet impingement evaporative cooling of a heated surface was then investigated numerically with various wettability conditions to characterize the effect of contact angle on spray-cooling heat transfer. The volume of fluid (VOF) model with variable-time stepping was used to capture the time-dependent liquid-gas interface motion throughout the computational domain with the kinetic theory model used to predict the evaporation rate at the liquid-gas interface. The numerical results agree with the spray-cooling experiments that dropwise evaporative cooling is much better on surfaces with better wettability because of the better liquid spreading and convection, better liquid-solid contact, and stronger liquid evaporation.

  6. Bringing Engineering Design into High School Science Classrooms: The Heating/Cooling Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apedoe, Xornam S.; Reynolds, Birdy; Ellefson, Michelle R.; Schunn, Christian D.

    2008-10-01

    Infusing engineering design projects in K-12 settings can promote interest and attract a wide range of students to engineering careers. However, the current climate of high-stakes testing and accountability to standards leaves little room to incorporate engineering design into K-12 classrooms. We argue that design-based learning, the combination of scientific inquiry and engineering design, is an approach that can be used to meet both K-12 educators' and engineering advocates' goals. This paper describes an 8-week high school curriculum unit, the Heating/Cooling System, in which engineering design is used to teach students central and difficult chemistry concepts such as atomic interactions, reactions, and energy changes in reactions. The goals of the paper are to (1) describe this successful design-based unit, (2) provide guidelines for incorporating design-based learning into other science topics, and (3) provide some evidence of its value for teaching difficult chemistry concepts and increasing interest in engineering careers.

  7. Solar-heating and cooling system design package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Package of information includes design data, performance specifications, drawings, hazard analysis, and spare parts list for commercially produced system installed in single-family dwelling in Akron, Ohio. System uses air flat-plate collectors, 12000 kg rock storage and backup heat pump. Solar portion requires 0.7 kW, and provides 35% of average total heating load including hot water. Information aids persons considering installing solar home-heating systems.

  8. Heat-Pipe Array for Large-Area Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelstein, F.; Brown, R. F.

    1986-01-01

    High rates of heat transfer anticipated. Prototype evaporative cold plate gathers waste heat from equipment mounted on it. Plate made by welding together flanges of several sections of heat pipe. Since plate separates liquid and vapor phases at inlet and outlet ports, eliminates complexities and uncertainties of two-phase flow in zero gravity. On earth, inlet valve enables plate to operate at relatively-large height differences with other plates in same system.

  9. Crosslinked crystalline polymer and methods for cooling and heating

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, Ival O.; Botham, Ruth A.; Ball, III, George L.

    1980-01-01

    The invention relates to crystalline polyethylene pieces having optimum crosslinking for use in storage and recovery of heat, and it further relates to methods for storage and recovery of heat using crystalline polymer pieces having optimum crosslinking for these uses. Crystalline polymer pieces are described which retain at least 70% of the heat of fusion of the uncrosslinked crystalline polymer and yet are sufficiently crosslinked for the pieces not to stick together upon being cycled above and below the melting point of said polymer, preferably at least 80% of the heat of fusion with no substantial sticking together.

  10. Hybrid cooling vest for cooling between exercise bouts in the heat: Effects and practical considerations.

    PubMed

    Chan, Albert P C; Yang, Yang; Song, Wen-Fang; Wong, Del P

    2017-01-01

    While continuous cooling strategies may induce some ergonomic problems to occupational workers, cooling between work bouts may be an alternative for cooling them down in hot environments. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of wearing a newly designed hybrid cooling vest (HCV) between two bouts of exercise. Inside a climatic chamber set at an air temperature of 37°C and a relative humidity of 60%, twelve male participants underwent two bouts of intermittent exercise interspersed with a 30min between-bout recovery session, during which HCV or a passive rest without any cooling (PAS) was administered. The results indicated that thermoregulatory, physiological, and perceptual strains were significantly lower in HCV than those in PAS during the recovery session (p≤0.022), which were accompanied with a large effect of cooling (Cohen's d=0.84-2.11). For the second exercise bout, the exercise time following HCV (22.13±12.27min) was significantly longer than that following PAS (11.04±3.40min, p=0.005, d=1.23) During this period, core temperature Tc was significantly lower by 0.14±0.0.15°C in HCV than that in PAS. The heart rate drift over time was declined by 2±2bpmmin(-1) (p=0.001, d=1.00) and the rise in physiological strain index was reduced by 0.11±0.12unitmin(-1) (p=0.010, d=0.96) following the use of HCV. These findings suggested that using HCV could accelerate between-bout recovery and improve subsequent exercise performance by the enlarged body core temperature margin and blunted cardiovascular drift.

  11. 25 CFR 36.104 - What are the requirements for heating, ventilation, cooling and lighting at dormitories?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., cooling and lighting at dormitories? 36.104 Section 36.104 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF... requirements for heating, ventilation, cooling and lighting at dormitories? (a) All dormitories must be designed to meet or exceed the standards for heating, ventilation, cooling, and lighting set out in...

  12. 25 CFR 36.104 - What are the requirements for heating, ventilation, cooling and lighting at dormitories?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., cooling and lighting at dormitories? 36.104 Section 36.104 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF... requirements for heating, ventilation, cooling and lighting at dormitories? (a) All dormitories must be designed to meet or exceed the standards for heating, ventilation, cooling, and lighting set out in...

  13. Evaluation of a Passive Heat Exchanger Based Cooling System for Fuel Cell Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colozza, Anthony J.; Burke, Kenneth A.

    2011-01-01

    Fuel cell cooling is conventionally performed with an actively controlled, dedicated coolant loop that exchanges heat with a separate external cooling loop. To simplify this system the concept of directly cooling a fuel cell utilizing a coolant loop with a regenerative heat exchanger to preheat the coolant entering the fuel cell with the coolant exiting the fuel cell was analyzed. The preheating is necessary to minimize the temperature difference across the fuel cell stack. This type of coolant system would minimize the controls needed on the coolant loop and provide a mostly passive means of cooling the fuel cell. The results indicate that an operating temperature of near or greater than 70 C is achievable with a heat exchanger effectiveness of around 90 percent. Of the heat exchanger types evaluated with the same type of fluid on the hot and cold side, a counter flow type heat exchanger would be required which has the possibility of achieving the required effectiveness. The number of heat transfer units required by the heat exchanger would be around 9 or greater. Although the analysis indicates the concept is feasible, the heat exchanger design would need to be developed and optimized for a specific fuel cell operation in order to achieve the high effectiveness value required.

  14. Timonium Elementary School Solar Energy Heating and Cooling Augmentation Experiment. Final Engineering Report. Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    AAI Corp., Baltimore, MD.

    This report covers a two-year and seven-month solar space heating and cooling experiment conducted at the Timonium Elementary School, Timonium, Maryland. The system was designed to provide a minimum of 50 percent of the energy required during the heating season and to determine the feasibility of using solar energy to power absorption-type…

  15. Evaluation of a sodium/Hastelloy-X heat pipe for wing leading edge cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Merrigan, M.A.; Sena, J.T.; Glass, D.E.

    1996-12-31

    This report covers assembly of a sodium heat pipe, testing to verify performance during start-up and under steady-state conditions with stagnation point heat loads to about 80 W/cm{sup 2}, performance analysis and evaluation. Evaluation of this leading edge cooling concept is offered and recommendations for further research discussed.

  16. Passive cryogenic cooling of electrooptics with a heat pipe/radiator.

    PubMed

    Nelson, B E; Goldstein, G A

    1974-09-01

    The current status of the heat pipe is discussed with particular emphasis on applications to cryogenic thermal control. The competitive nature of the passive heat pipe/radiator system is demonstrated through a comparative study with other candidate systems for a 1-yr mission. The mission involves cooling a spaceborne experiment to 100 K while it dissipates 10 W.

  17. 40 CFR 463.10 - Applicability; description of the contact cooling and heating water subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) PLASTICS MOLDING AND... cooling and heating water subcategory are processes where process water comes in contact with plastic materials or plastic products for the purpose of heat transfer during plastics molding and forming....

  18. 16 CFR 305.14 - Energy information disclosures for heating and cooling equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Energy information disclosures for heating... (âAPPLIANCE LABELING RULEâ) Required Disclosures § 305.14 Energy information disclosures for heating and cooling equipment. (a) Required information: Manufacturers and private labelers of central...

  19. Measuring the Specific Heat of Metals by Cooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dittrich, William; Minkin, Leonid; Shapovalov, Alexander S.

    2010-01-01

    Three in one? Yes, three standard undergraduate thermodynamics experiments in one, not an oval can of lubricating oil. Previously it has been shown that the PASCO scientific apparatus for measuring coefficients of thermal expansion of metals can also be used to illustrate Newton's law of cooling in the same experiment. Now it will be shown that by…

  20. Experimental determination of average turbulent heat transfer and friction factor in stator internal rib-roughened cooling channels.

    PubMed

    Battisti, L; Baggio, P

    2001-05-01

    In gas turbine cooling design, techniques for heat extraction from the surfaces exposed to the hot stream are based on the increase of the inner heat transfer areas and on the promotion of the turbulence of the cooling flow. This is currently obtained by casting periodic ribs on one or more sides of the serpentine passages into the core of the blade. Fluid dynamic and thermal behaviour of the cooling flow have been extensively investigated by means of experimental facilities and many papers dealing with this subject have appeared in the latest years. The evaluation of the average value of the heat transfer coefficient most of the time is inferred from local measurements obtained by various experimental techniques. Moreover the great majority of these studies are not concerned with the overall average heat transfer coefficient for the combined ribs and region between them, but do focus just on one of them. This paper presents an attempt to collect information about the average Nusselt number inside a straight ribbed duct. Series of measurements have been performed in steady state eliminating the error sources inherently connected with transient methods. A low speed wind tunnel, operating in steady state flow, has been built to simulate the actual flow condition occurring in a rectilinear blade cooling channel. A straight square channel with 20 transverse ribs on two sides has been tested for Re of about 3 x 10(4), 4.5 x 10(4) and 6 x 10(4). The ribbed wall test section is electrically heated and the heat removed by a stationary flow of known thermal and fluid dynamic characteristics.

  1. Phase change based cooling for high burst mode heat loads with temperature regulation above the phase change temperature

    DOEpatents

    The United States of America as represented by the United States Department of Energy

    2009-12-15

    An apparatus and method for transferring thermal energy from a heat load is disclosed. In particular, use of a phase change material and specific flow designs enables cooling with temperature regulation well above the fusion temperature of the phase change material for medium and high heat loads from devices operated intermittently (in burst mode). Exemplary heat loads include burst mode lasers and laser diodes, flight avionics, and high power space instruments. Thermal energy is transferred from the heat load to liquid phase change material from a phase change material reservoir. The liquid phase change material is split into two flows. Thermal energy is transferred from the first flow via a phase change material heat sink. The second flow bypasses the phase change material heat sink and joins with liquid phase change material exiting from the phase change material heat sink. The combined liquid phase change material is returned to the liquid phase change material reservoir. The ratio of bypass flow to flow into the phase change material heat sink can be varied to adjust the temperature of the liquid phase change material returned to the liquid phase change material reservoir. Varying the flowrate and temperature of the liquid phase change material presented to the heat load determines the magnitude of thermal energy transferred from the heat load.

  2. Vehicle cabin cooling system for capturing and exhausting heated boundary layer air from inner surfaces of solar heated windows

    DOEpatents

    Farrington, Robert B.; Anderson, Ren

    2001-01-01

    The cabin cooling system includes a cooling duct positioned proximate and above upper edges of one or more windows of a vehicle to exhaust hot air as the air is heated by inner surfaces of the windows and forms thin boundary layers of heated air adjacent the heated windows. The cabin cooling system includes at least one fan to draw the hot air into the cooling duct at a flow rate that captures the hot air in the boundary layer without capturing a significant portion of the cooler cabin interior air and to discharge the hot air at a point outside the vehicle cabin, such as the vehicle trunk. In a preferred embodiment, the cooling duct has a cross-sectional area that gradually increases from a distal point to a proximal point to the fan inlet to develop a substantially uniform pressure drop along the length of the cooling duct. Correspondingly, this cross-sectional configuration develops a uniform suction pressure and uniform flow rate at the upper edge of the window to capture the hot air in the boundary layer adjacent each window.

  3. Verifying heat transfer analysis of high pressure cooled turbine blades and disk.

    PubMed

    Yamawaki, S

    2001-05-01

    To demonstrate cooling and heat transfer technology, a core engine test was conducted with a turbine inlet temperature 1700 degrees C. Measurement data were compared with predictions for a vane, a blade, and a disk. Measured cooling effectiveness of the blade and the vane agreed well with predictions. CFD analysis was carried out for verification of the heat transfer coefficient which was adopted from a heat conduction analysis over the disk. The CFD model including bolt heads showed better results than an axisymmetric model.

  4. Study on heat transfer coefficients during cooling of PET bottles for food beverages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liga, Antonio; Montesanto, Salvatore; Mannella, Gianluca A.; La Carrubba, Vincenzo; Brucato, Valerio; Cammalleri, Marco

    2016-08-01

    The heat transfer properties of different cooling systems dealing with Poly-Ethylene-Terephthalate (PET) bottles were investigated. The heat transfer coefficient (Ug) was measured in various fluid dynamic conditions. Cooling media were either air or water. It was shown that heat transfer coefficients are strongly affected by fluid dynamics conditions, and range from 10 W/m2 K to nearly 400 W/m2 K. PET bottle thickness effect on Ug was shown to become relevant under faster fluid dynamics regimes.

  5. Effects of mass flow rate and droplet velocity on surface heat flux during cryogen spray cooling.

    PubMed

    Karapetian, Emil; Aguilar, Guillermo; Kimel, Sol; Lavernia, Enrique J; Nelson, J Stuart

    2003-01-07

    Cryogen spray cooling (CSC) is used to protect the epidermis during dermatologic laser surgery. To date, the relative influence of the fundamental spray parameters on surface cooling remains incompletely understood. This study explores the effects of mass flow rate and average droplet velocity on the surface heat flux during CSC. It is shown that the effect of mass flow rate on the surface heat flux is much more important compared to that of droplet velocity. However, for fully atomized sprays with small flow rates, droplet velocity can make a substantial difference in the surface heat flux.

  6. Design and operation of a solar heating and cooling system for a residential size building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littles, J. W.; Humphries, W. R.; Cody, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    The first year of operation of solar house is discussed. Selected design information, together with a brief system description is included. The house was equipped with an integrated solar heating and cooling system which uses fully automated state-of-the art. Evaluation of the data indicate that the solar house heating and cooling system is capable of supplying nearly 100 percent of the thermal energy required for heating and approximately 50 percent of the thermal energy required to operate the absorption cycle air conditioner.

  7. Heating, cooling, and uplift during Tertiary time, northern Sangre de Cristo Range, Colorado ( USA).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindsay, D.A.; Andriessen, P.A.M.; Wardlaw, B.R.

    1986-01-01

    Paleozoic sedimentary rocks in a wide area of the northern Sangre de Cristo Range show effects of heating during Tertiary time. Heating is tentatively interpreted as a response to burial during Laramide folding and thrusting and also to high heat flow during Rio Grande rifting. Fission-track ages of apatite across a section of the range show that rocks cooled abruptly below 120oC, the blocking temperature for apatite, approx 19 Ma ago. Cooling was probably in response to rapid uplift and erosion of the northern Sangre de Cristo Range during early Rio Grande rifting.-from Authors

  8. Assessment of district heating/cooling potential in Holland, Michigan. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-07-01

    A study undertaken to evaluate the potential for district heating/cooling (DHC) in the City of Holland, Michigan is documented. The purpose of the study was to assess the concept of delivering energy from a centralized source (or several sources) through a piping network to many end users for heating domestic hot water, space heating, space cooling and industrial process use. The Holland community was involved through representation of various businesses, agencies and community groups as part of an Assessment Work Group (AWG) membership. The AWG worked throughout the study with the BPW staff and consultants. Conclusions and recommendations of the study reflect the joint effort.

  9. Uncertainty Analysis of Heat Transfer to Supercritical Hydrogen in Cooling Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locke, Justin M.; Landrum, D. Brian

    2005-01-01

    Sound understanding of the cooling efficiency of supercritical hydrogen is crucial to the development of high pressure thrust chambers for regeneratively cooled LOX/LH2 rocket engines. This paper examines historical heat transfer correlations for supercritical hydrogen and the effects of uncertainties in hydrogen property data. It is shown that uncertainty due to property data alone can be as high as 10%. Previous heated tube experiments with supercritical hydrogen are summarized, and data from a number of heated tube experiments are analyzed to evaluate conditions for which the available correlations are valid.

  10. Vortex-augmented cooling tower-windmill combination

    DOEpatents

    McAllister, Jr., John E.

    1985-01-01

    A cooling tower for cooling large quantities of effluent water from a production facility by utilizing natural wind forces includes the use of a series of helically directed air inlet passages extending outwardly from the base of the tower to introduce air from any direction in a swirling vortical pattern while the force of the draft created in the tower makes it possible to place conventional power generating windmills in the air passages to provide power as a by-product.

  11. Thermal fatigue experiment of screw cooling tube under one-sided heating condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezato, Koichiro; Suzuki, Satoshi; Sato, Kazuyoshi; Akiba, Masato

    2004-08-01

    This paper presents the results of thermal fatigue experiments of a cooling tube with a helical triangular fin on its inner cooling surface, namely a screw tube. The screw tube is directly machined in a CuCrZr heat sink bar with slits at its heated side. The thermal fatigue experiments are carried out at 20 and 30 MW/m 2. Water leakages from fatigue cracks, found at the slit of the heat sink, occurred at around 4500th and 1400th cycles at 20 and 30 MW/m 2, respectively. These results show good agreement with lifetime predictions using Manson-Coffin's law based on finite element analyses. Fractographic observations show the fatigue cracks starting from the outer heated surface at the slit region of the cooling channel and propagating toward its inner surface.

  12. Solar heating and cooling demonstration project at the Florida Solar Energy Center

    SciTech Connect

    Hankins, J.D.

    1980-02-01

    The retrofitted solar heating and cooling system installed at the Florida Solar Energy Center is described. Information is provided on the system's test, operation, controls, hardware and installation, including detailed drawings. The Center's office building, approximately 5000 square feet of space, with solar air conditioning and heating as a demonstration of the technical feasibility is located just north of Port Canaveral, Florida. The system was designed to supply approximately 70% of the annual cooling and 100% of the heating load. The project provides unique high-temperature, non-imaging, non-tracking, evacuated-tube collectors. The design of the system was kept simple and employs five hydronic loops. They are energy collection, chilled water production, space cooling, space heating and energy rejection.

  13. Flow structure and heat exchange analysis in internal cooling channel of gas turbine blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szwaba, Ryszard; Kaczynski, Piotr; Doerffer, Piotr; Telega, Janusz

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents the study of the flow structure and heat transfer, and also their correlations on the four walls of a radial cooling passage model of a gas turbine blade. The investigations focus on heat transfer and aerodynamic measurements in the channel, which is an accurate representation of the configuration used in aeroengines. Correlations for the heat transfer coefficient and the pressure drop used in the design of radial cooling passages are often developed from simplified models. It is important to note that real engine passages do not have perfect rectangular cross sections, but include corner fillet, ribs with fillet radii and special orientation. Therefore, this work provides detailed fluid flow and heat transfer data for a model of radial cooling geometry which possesses very realistic features.

  14. Ice Pack Heat Sink Subsystem - Phase I. [astronaut liquid cooling garment design and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roebelen, G. J., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    This paper describes the design and test at one-g of a functional laboratory model (non-flight) Ice Pack Heat Sink Subsystem to be used eventually for astronaut cooling during manned space missions. In normal use, excess heat in the liquid cooling garment (LCG) coolant is transferred to a reusable/regenerable ice pack heat sink. For emergency operation, or for extension of extravehicular activity mission time after all the ice has melted, water from the ice pack is boiled to vacuum, thereby continuing to remove heat from the LCG coolant. This subsystem incorporates a quick connect/disconnect thermal interface between the ice pack heat sink and the subsystem heat exchanger.

  15. Experimental evaluation of an adaptive Joule–Thomson cooling system including silicon-microfabricated heat exchanger and microvalve components

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Weibin; Park, Jong M.; White, Michael J.; Nellis, Gregory F.; Gianchandani, Yogesh B.

    2011-01-01

    This article reports the evaluation of a Joule–Thomson (JT) cooling system that combines two custom micromachined components—a Si/glass-stack recuperative heat exchanger and a piezoelectrically actuated expansion microvalve. With the microvalve controlling the flow rate, this system can modulate cooling to accommodate varying refrigeration loads. The perforated plate Si/glass heat exchanger is fabricated with a stack of alternating silicon plates and Pyrex glass spacers. The microvalve utilizes a lead zirconate titanate actuator to push a Si micromachined valve seat against a glass plate, thus modulating the flow passing through the gap between the valve seat and the glass plate. The fabricated heat exchanger has a footprint of 1×1 cm2 and a length of 35 mm. The size of the micromachined piezoelectrically actuated valve is about 1×1×1 cm3. In JT cooling tests, the temperature of the system was successfully controlled by adjusting the input voltage of the microvalve. When the valve was fully opened (at an input voltage of −30 V), the system cooled down to a temperature as low as 254.5 K at 430 kPa pressure difference between inlet and outlet at steady state and 234 K at 710 kPa in a transient state. The system provided cooling powers of 75 mW at 255 K and 150 mW at 258 K. Parasitic heat loads at 255 K are estimated at approximately 700 mW. PMID:21552354

  16. Economic analysis of the integrated heating and cooling potential of a residential passive-solar water wall design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roach, F.; Mangeng, C.; Kirschner, C.; Ben-David, S.

    Preliminary performance estimates for the heating and cooling potential of water walls were made. These estimates include the Btu displacement that is attributable to a 300-square foot water wall design in a 1200-square foot residence. The design is for a forced ventalation water wall system that includes the fans and ducting necessary to achieve a 3000-cfm flow of air. The cooling and heating energy displacement estimates are combined with appropriate region-specific fuel prices, system costs, and general economic parameters in a lifecycle cost analysis of this fixed-size water wall design. The economic indicators used to discusse the results include net present value and a total cost goal. Input data and results are presented in mapped form and used to assess the energy savings potential of the water wall in 220 regions of the continental United States.

  17. Directly connected heat exchanger tube section and coolant-cooled structure

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J; Coico, Patrick A; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Schmidt, Roger R; Steinke, Mark E

    2014-04-01

    A cooling apparatus for an electronics rack is provided which includes an air-to-liquid heat exchanger, one or more coolant-cooled structures and a tube. The heat exchanger, which is associated with the electronics rack and disposed to cool air passing through the rack, includes a plurality of distinct, coolant-carrying tube sections, each tube section having a coolant inlet and a coolant outlet, one of which is coupled in fluid communication with a coolant loop to facilitate flow of coolant through the tube section. The coolant-cooled structure(s) is in thermal contact with an electronic component(s) of the rack, and facilitates transfer of heat from the component(s) to the coolant. The tube connects in fluid communication one coolant-cooled structure and the other of the coolant inlet or outlet of the one tube section, and facilitates flow of coolant directly between that coolant-carrying tube section of the heat exchanger and the coolant-cooled structure.

  18. Heat exchanger and water tank arrangement for passive cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Gillett, J.E.; Johnson, F.T.; Orr, R.S.; Schulz, T.L.

    1993-11-30

    A water storage tank in the coolant water loop of a nuclear reactor contains a tubular heat exchanger. The heat exchanger has tube sheets mounted to the tank connections so that the tube sheets and tubes may be readily inspected and repaired. Preferably, the tubes extend from the tube sheets on a square pitch and then on a rectangular pitch there between. Also, the heat exchanger is supported by a frame so that the tank wall is not required to support all of its weight. 6 figures.

  19. A combined gas cooled nuclear reactor and fuel cell cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, David J.

    Rising oil costs, global warming, national security concerns, economic concerns and escalating energy demands are forcing the engineering communities to explore methods to address these concerns. It is the intention of this thesis to offer a proposal for a novel design of a combined cycle, an advanced nuclear helium reactor/solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) plant that will help to mitigate some of the above concerns. Moreover, the adoption of this proposal may help to reinvigorate the Nuclear Power industry while providing a practical method to foster the development of a hydrogen economy. Specifically, this thesis concentrates on the importance of the U.S. Nuclear Navy adopting this novel design for its nuclear electric vessels of the future with discussion on efficiency and thermodynamic performance characteristics related to the combined cycle. Thus, the goals and objectives are to develop an innovative combined cycle that provides a solution to the stated concerns and show that it provides superior performance. In order to show performance, it is necessary to develop a rigorous thermodynamic model and computer program to analyze the SOFC in relation with the overall cycle. A large increase in efficiency over the conventional pressurized water reactor cycle is realized. Both sides of the cycle achieve higher efficiencies at partial loads which is extremely important as most naval vessels operate at partial loads as well as the fact that traditional gas turbines operating alone have poor performance at reduced speeds. Furthermore, each side of the cycle provides important benefits to the other side. The high temperature exhaust from the overall exothermic reaction of the fuel cell provides heat for the reheater allowing for an overall increase in power on the nuclear side of the cycle. Likewise, the high temperature helium exiting the nuclear reactor provides a controllable method to stabilize the fuel cell at an optimal temperature band even during transients helping

  20. Heat conduction in cooling flows. [in clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bregman, Joel N.; David, L. P.

    1988-01-01

    It has been suggested that electron conduction may significantly reduce the accretion rate (and star foramtion rate) for cooling flows in clusters of galaxies. A numerical hydrodynamics code was used to investigate the time behavior of cooling flows with conduction. The usual conduction coefficient is modified by an efficiency factor, mu, to realize the effects of tangled magnetic field lines. Two classes of models are considered, one where mu is independent of position and time, and one where inflow stretches the field lines and changes mu. In both cases, there is only a narrow range of initial conditions for mu in which the cluster accretion rate is reduced while a significant temperature gradient occurs. In the first case, no steady solution exists in which both conditions are met. In the second case, steady state solutions occur in which both conditions are met, but only for a narrow range of initial values where mu = 0.001.

  1. Natural Convection Heat Transfer in a Rectangular Water Pool with Internal Heating and Top and Bottom Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jong K.; Lee, Seung D.; Suh, Kune Y.

    2006-07-01

    During a severe accident, the reactor core may melt and be relocated to the lower plenum to form a hemispherical pool. If there is no effective cooling mechanism, the core debris may heat up and the molten pool run into natural convection. Natural convection heat transfer was examined in SIGMA RP (Simulant Internal Gravitated Material Apparatus Rectangular Pool). The SIGMA RP apparatus comprises a rectangular test section, heat exchanger, cartridge heaters, cooling jackets, thermocouples and a data acquisition system. The internal heater heating method was used to simulate uniform heat source which is related to the modified Rayleigh number Ra'. The test procedure started with water, the working fluid, filling in the test section. There were two boundary conditions: one dealt with both walls being cooled isothermally, while the other had to with only the upper wall being cooled isothermally. The heat exchanger was utilized to maintain the isothermal boundary condition. Four side walls were surrounded by the insulating material to minimize heat loss. Tests were carried out at 10{sup 11} < Ra' < 10{sup 13}. The SIGMA RP tests with an appropriate cartridge heater arrangement showed excellent uniform heat generation in the pool. The steady state was defined such that the temperature fluctuation stayed within {+-}0.2 K over a time period of 5,000 s. The conductive heat transfer was dominant below the critical Rayleigh number Ra'c, whereas the convective heat transfer picked up above Ra'{sub c}. In the top and bottom boundary cooling condition, the upward Nusselt number Nu{sub up} was greater than the downward Nusselt number Nu{sub dn}. In particular, the discrepancy between Nu{sub up} and Nu{sub dn} widened with Ra'. The Nu{sub up} to Nu{sub dn} ratio was varied from 7.75 to 16.77 given 1.45 x 10{sup 12} < Ra' < 9.59 x 10{sup 13}. On the other hand, Nu{sub up} was increased in absence of downward heat transfer for the case of top cooling. The current rectangular pool

  2. Green Chemical Treatments for Heating and Cooling Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    of condenser wa- ter treatment with a key ingredient being polyaspartate (PASP). Polyaspar- tic acid was the 1996 Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge...cooling water biocide tetrakis (hy- droxymethyl) phosphonium sulfate (THPS). THPS won the Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award in 1997. The...Legionella pneumophila bacterium, which causes Legion- naire’s Disease. 2.3 Steam Line Treatment The third and final product in the Green Chemistry project

  3. Solar atrium: A hybrid solar heating and cooling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueland, M.

    1980-06-01

    The atrium is designed to be constructed of materials and equipment that are economical and readily available. Cost effectiveness of installation and operation is a primary design objective. The solar atrium is a further development of efforts begun in the 1930's and 1940's to design houses that would obtain a major portion of their heating from the Sun. The early solar house experiments proved the benefits of large glazed areas for trapping solar energy. However, they were not equipped to collect and store surplus solar energy, nor were they equipped to control heat losses through glass areas at night or during cloudy days. The solar atrium incorporates the large glass areas of the earlier houses and adds facilities for heat storage and control of heat losses through glass. Progress and plans are outlined.

  4. 46 CFR 190.20-50 - Heating and cooling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... the space. (b) Radiators and other heating apparatus must be so placed and shielded, where necessary, to avoid risk of fire, danger or discomfort to the occupants. Pipes leading to radiators or...

  5. 46 CFR 190.20-50 - Heating and cooling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... the space. (b) Radiators and other heating apparatus must be so placed and shielded, where necessary, to avoid risk of fire, danger or discomfort to the occupants. Pipes leading to radiators or...

  6. 46 CFR 190.20-50 - Heating and cooling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the space. (b) Radiators and other heating apparatus must be so placed and shielded, where necessary, to avoid risk of fire, danger or discomfort to the occupants. Pipes leading to radiators or...

  7. 46 CFR 190.20-50 - Heating and cooling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the space. (b) Radiators and other heating apparatus must be so placed and shielded, where necessary, to avoid risk of fire, danger or discomfort to the occupants. Pipes leading to radiators or...

  8. 46 CFR 190.20-50 - Heating and cooling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... the space. (b) Radiators and other heating apparatus must be so placed and shielded, where necessary, to avoid risk of fire, danger or discomfort to the occupants. Pipes leading to radiators or...

  9. Performance evaluation on an air-cooled heat exchanger for alumina nanofluid under laminar flow.

    PubMed

    Teng, Tun-Ping; Hung, Yi-Hsuan; Teng, Tun-Chien; Chen, Jyun-Hong

    2011-08-09

    This study analyzes the characteristics of alumina (Al2O3)/water nanofluid to determine the feasibility of its application in an air-cooled heat exchanger for heat dissipation for PEMFC or electronic chip cooling. The experimental sample was Al2O3/water nanofluid produced by the direct synthesis method at three different concentrations (0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 wt.%). The experiments in this study measured the thermal conductivity and viscosity of nanofluid with weight fractions and sample temperatures (20-60°C), and then used the nanofluid in an actual air-cooled heat exchanger to assess its heat exchange capacity and pressure drop under laminar flow. Experimental results show that the nanofluid has a higher heat exchange capacity than water, and a higher concentration of nanoparticles provides an even better ratio of the heat exchange. The maximum enhanced ratio of heat exchange and pressure drop for all the experimental parameters in this study was about 39% and 5.6%, respectively. In addition to nanoparticle concentration, the temperature and mass flow rates of the working fluid can affect the enhanced ratio of heat exchange and pressure drop of nanofluid. The cross-section aspect ratio of tube in the heat exchanger is another important factor to be taken into consideration.

  10. Performance evaluation on an air-cooled heat exchanger for alumina nanofluid under laminar flow

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzes the characteristics of alumina (Al2O3)/water nanofluid to determine the feasibility of its application in an air-cooled heat exchanger for heat dissipation for PEMFC or electronic chip cooling. The experimental sample was Al2O3/water nanofluid produced by the direct synthesis method at three different concentrations (0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 wt.%). The experiments in this study measured the thermal conductivity and viscosity of nanofluid with weight fractions and sample temperatures (20-60°C), and then used the nanofluid in an actual air-cooled heat exchanger to assess its heat exchange capacity and pressure drop under laminar flow. Experimental results show that the nanofluid has a higher heat exchange capacity than water, and a higher concentration of nanoparticles provides an even better ratio of the heat exchange. The maximum enhanced ratio of heat exchange and pressure drop for all the experimental parameters in this study was about 39% and 5.6%, respectively. In addition to nanoparticle concentration, the temperature and mass flow rates of the working fluid can affect the enhanced ratio of heat exchange and pressure drop of nanofluid. The cross-section aspect ratio of tube in the heat exchanger is another important factor to be taken into consideration. PMID:21827644

  11. Cooling of a rectangular microchannel heat sink with ammonia gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adham, Ahmed Mohammed; Mohd-Ghazali, Normah; Ahmad, Robiah

    2012-06-01

    The increased global demands for the minimization of integrated circuits used in electronic devices have led manufacturing companies to direct their resources towards research in that area. The minimization processes provided very powerful electronic chips but with a very large amount of heat generation. One of the methods applied to remove the heat produced is to use a microchannel heat sink. Past optimization attempts have looked at the microchannel geometry, material, and coolant types using various models to represent the heat sink. This paper reports the analytical study on the optimization of the thermal resistance and pressure drop of a rectangular microchannel heat sink using a new coolant, ammonia gas. The effect of different channel aspect ratio was investigated. Significant reduction in thermal resistance was obtained with 0.218 K/W for ammonia gas compared to that of 0.266 k/W for air under the same operating conditions. The total pressure drop achieved was 5.36 mbar and 9.52 mbar for ammonia and air respectively. The results indicate promising potential for ammonia gas as a coolant for rectangular microchannel heat sink.

  12. OHMIC HEATING SUSPENDS, NOT REVERSES, THE COOLING CONTRACTION OF HOT JUPITERS

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yanqin; Lithwick, Yoram

    2013-01-20

    We study the radius evolution of close-in extra-solar Jupiters under Ohmic heating, a mechanism that was recently proposed to explain the large observed sizes of many of these planets. Planets are born with high entropy and they subsequently cool and contract. We focus on two cases: first, that Ohmic heating commences when the planet is hot (high entropy); and second, that it commences after the planet has cooled. In the former case, we use analytical scaling and numerical experiments to confirm that Ohmic heating is capable of suspending the cooling as long as a few percent of the stellar irradiation is converted into Ohmic heating and the planet has a surface wind that extends to pressures of {approx}10 bar or deeper. For these parameters, the radii at which cooling is stalled are consistent with (or larger than) the observed radii of most planets. The only two exceptions are WASP-17b and HAT-P-32b. In contrast to the high entropy case, we show that Ohmic heating cannot significantly re-inflate planets after they have already cooled. This leads us to suggest that the diversity of radii observed in hot Jupiters may be partially explained by the different epochs at which they are migrated to their current locations.

  13. Heat-driven liquid metal cooling device for the thermal management of a computer chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Kun-Quan; Liu, Jing

    2007-08-01

    The tremendous heat generated in a computer chip or very large scale integrated circuit raises many challenging issues to be solved. Recently, liquid metal with a low melting point was established as the most conductive coolant for efficiently cooling the computer chip. Here, by making full use of the double merits of the liquid metal, i.e. superior heat transfer performance and electromagnetically drivable ability, we demonstrate for the first time the liquid-cooling concept for the thermal management of a computer chip using waste heat to power the thermoelectric generator (TEG) and thus the flow of the liquid metal. Such a device consumes no external net energy, which warrants it a self-supporting and completely silent liquid-cooling module. Experiments on devices driven by one or two stage TEGs indicate that a dramatic temperature drop on the simulating chip has been realized without the aid of any fans. The higher the heat load, the larger will be the temperature decrease caused by the cooling device. Further, the two TEGs will generate a larger current if a copper plate is sandwiched between them to enhance heat dissipation there. This new method is expected to be significant in future thermal management of a desk or notebook computer, where both efficient cooling and extremely low energy consumption are of major concern.

  14. Convective Heat Transfer with and without Film Cooling in High Temperature, Fuel Rich and Lean Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiner, Nathan J.

    Modern turbine engines require high turbine inlet temperatures and pressures to maximize thermal efficiency. Increasing the turbine inlet temperature drives higher heat loads on the turbine surfaces. In addition, increasing pressure ratio increases the turbine coolant temperature such that the ability to remove heat decreases. As a result, highly effective external film cooling is required to reduce the heat transfer to turbine surfaces. Testing of film cooling on engine hardware at engine temperatures and pressures can be exceedingly difficult and expensive. Thus, modern studies of film cooling are often performed at near ambient conditions. However, these studies are missing an important aspect in their characterization of film cooling effectiveness. Namely, they do not model effect of thermal property variations that occur within the boundary and film cooling layers at engine conditions. Also, turbine surfaces can experience significant radiative heat transfer that is not trivial to estimate analytically. The present research first computationally examines the effect of large temperature variations on a turbulent boundary layer. Subsequently, a method to model the effect of large temperature variations within a turbulent boundary layer in an environment coupled with significant radiative heat transfer is proposed and experimentally validated. Next, a method to scale turbine cooling from ambient to engine conditions via non-dimensional matching is developed computationally and the experimentally validated at combustion temperatures. Increasing engine efficiency and thrust to weight ratio demands have driven increased combustor fuel-air ratios. Increased fuel-air ratios increase the possibility of unburned fuel species entering the turbine. Alternatively, advanced ultra-compact combustor designs have been proposed to decrease combustor length, increase thrust, or generate power for directed energy weapons. However, the ultra-compact combustor design requires a

  15. A Combined Experimental/Computational Study of Flow in Turbine Blade Cooling Passage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tse, D. G. N.; Kreskovsky, J. P.; Shamroth, S. J.; Mcgrath, D. B.

    1994-01-01

    Laser velocimetry was utilized to map the velocity field in a serpentine turbine blade cooling passage at Reynolds and Rotation numbers of up to 25.000 and 0.48. These results were used to assess the combined influence of passage curvature and Coriolis force on the secondary velocity field generated. A Navier-Stokes code (NASTAR) was validated against incompressible test data and then used to simulate the effect of buoyancy. The measurements show a net convection from the low pressure surface to high pressure surface. The interaction of the secondary flows induced by the turns and rotation produces swirl at the turns, which persisted beyond 2 hydraulic diameters downstream of the turns. The incompressible flow field predictions agree well with the measured velocities. With radially outward flow, the buoyancy force causes a further increase in velocity on the high pressure surface and a reduction on the low pressure surface. The results were analyzed in relation to the heat transfer measurements of Wagner et al. (1991). Predicted heat transfer is enhanced on the high pressure surfaces and in turns. The incompressible flow simulation underpredicts heat transfer in these locations. Improvements observed in compressible flow simulation indicate that the buoyancy force may be important.

  16. Effect of Gas/Steam Turbine Inlet Temperatures on Combined Cycle Having Air Transpiration Cooled Gas Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.; Singh, O.

    2012-10-01

    Worldwide efforts are being made for further improving the gas/steam combined cycle performance by having better blade cooling technology in topping cycle and enhanced heat recovery in bottoming cycle. The scope of improvement is possible through turbines having higher turbine inlet temperatures (TITs) of both gas turbine and steam turbine. Literature review shows that a combined cycle with transpiration cooled gas turbine has not been analyzed with varying gas/steam TITs. In view of above the present study has been undertaken for thermodynamic study of gas/steam combined cycle with respect to variation in TIT in both topping and bottoming cycles, for air transpiration cooled gas turbine. The performance of combined cycle with dual pressure heat recovery steam generator has been evaluated for different cycle pressure ratios (CPRs) varying from 11 to 23 and the selection diagrams presented for TIT varying from 1,600 to 1,900 K. Both the cycle efficiency and specific work increase with TIT for each pressure ratio. For each TIT there exists an optimum pressure ratio for cycle efficiency and specific work. For the CPR of 23 the best cycle performance is seen at a TIT of 1,900 K for maximum steam temperature of 570 °C, which gives the cycle efficiency of 60.9 % with net specific work of 909 kJ/kg.

  17. Solar heating and cooling system installed at Columbus, Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The Solar Energy System was installed as a part of a new construction of a college building. The building will house classrooms and laboratories, administrative offices and three lecture halls. The Solar Energy System consists of 4,096 square feet (128 panels) Owens/Illinois Evacuated Glass Tube Collector Subsystem, and a 5,000 gallon steel tank below ground storage system. Hot water is circulated between the collectors and storage tank, passing through a water/lithium bromide absorption chiller to cool the building.

  18. Analytical and experimental studies of heat pipe radiation cooling of hypersonic propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. A.; Merrigan, M. A.; Elder, M. G.; Sena, J. T.; Keddy, E. S.; Silverstein, C. C.

    1992-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies were completed to assess the feasibility of using high-temperature heat pipes to cool hypersonic engine components. This new approach involves using heat pipes to transport heat away from the combustor, nozzle, or inlet regions, and to reject it to the environment by thermal radiation from an external heat pipe nacelle. For propulsion systems using heat pipe radiation cooling (HPRC), it is possible to continue to use hydrocarbon fuels into the Mach 4 to Mach 6 speed range, thereby enhancing the economic attractiveness of commercial or military hypersonic flight. In the second-phase feasibility program recently completed, it is found that heat loads produced by considering both convection and radiation heat transfer from the combustion gas can be handled with HPRC design modifications. The application of thermal insulation to ramburner and nozzle walls was also found to reduce the heat load by about one-half and to reduce peak HPRC system temperatures to below 2700 F. In addition, the operation of HPRC at cruise conditions of around Mach 4.5 and at an altitude of 90,000 ft lowers the peak hot-section temperatures to around 2800 F. An HPRC heat pipe was successfully fabricated and tested at Mach 5 conditions of heat flux, heat load, and temperature.

  19. Analytical and experimental studies of heat pipe radiation cooling of hypersonic propulsion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.A.; Merrigan, M.A.; Elder, M.G.; Sena, J.T.; Keddy, E.S.; Silverstein, C.C.

    1992-06-01

    Preliminary, research-oriented, analytical and experimental studies were completed to assess the feasibility of using high-temperature heat pipes to cool hypersonic engine components. This new approach involves using heat pipes to transport heat away from the combustor, nozzle, or inlet regions, and to reject it to the environment by thermal radiation from an external heat pipe nacelle. For propulsion systems using heat pipe radiation cooling (HPRC), it is possible to continue to use hydrocarbon fuels into the Mach 4 to Mach 6 speed range, thereby enhancing the economic attractiveness of commercial or military hypersonic flight. In the second-phase feasibility program recently completed, we found that heat loads produced by considering both convection and radiation heat transfer from the combustion gas can be handled with HPRC design modifications. The application of thermal insulation to ramburner and nozzle walls was also found to reduce the heat load by about one-half and to reduce peak HPRC system temperatures to below 2700{degrees}F. In addition, the operation of HPRC at cruise conditions of around Mach 4.5 and at an altitude of 90, 000 ft lowers peak hot section temperatures to around 2800{degrees}F. An HPRC heat pipe was successfully fabricated and tested at Mach 5 conditions of heat flux, heat load, and temperature. 24 refs.

  20. Analytical and experimental studies of heat pipe radiation cooling of hypersonic propulsion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.A.; Merrigan, M.A.; Elder, M.G.; Sena, J.T.; Keddy, E.S. ); Silverstein, C.C. )

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary, research-oriented, analytical and experimental studies were completed to assess the feasibility of using high-temperature heat pipes to cool hypersonic engine components. This new approach involves using heat pipes to transport heat away from the combustor, nozzle, or inlet regions, and to reject it to the environment by thermal radiation from an external heat pipe nacelle. For propulsion systems using heat pipe radiation cooling (HPRC), it is possible to continue to use hydrocarbon fuels into the Mach 4 to Mach 6 speed range, thereby enhancing the economic attractiveness of commercial or military hypersonic flight. In the second-phase feasibility program recently completed, we found that heat loads produced by considering both convection and radiation heat transfer from the combustion gas can be handled with HPRC design modifications. The application of thermal insulation to ramburner and nozzle walls was also found to reduce the heat load by about one-half and to reduce peak HPRC system temperatures to below 2700{degrees}F. In addition, the operation of HPRC at cruise conditions of around Mach 4.5 and at an altitude of 90, 000 ft lowers peak hot section temperatures to around 2800{degrees}F. An HPRC heat pipe was successfully fabricated and tested at Mach 5 conditions of heat flux, heat load, and temperature. 24 refs.

  1. Solar heating, cooling, and hot water systems installed at Richland, Washington

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The project described is part of the U. S. Department of Energy's solar demonstration program, and became operational in April 1978. The solar system uses 6,000 square feet of flat-plate liquid collectors in a closed loop to deliver solar energy through a liquid-liquid heat exchanger to the building heat-pump duct work or 9,000-gallon thermal energy storage tank. A 25-ton Arkla solar-driven absorption chiller provides the cooling, in conjunction with a 2,000 gallon chilled water storage tank and reflective ponds on three sides of the building surplus heat. A near-by building is essentially identical except for having conventional heat-pump heating and cooling, and can serve as an experimental control. An on-going public relations program was provided from the beginning of the program, and resulted in numerous visitors and tour groups.

  2. Development of New Air-Cooled Heat Pump Chiller 'Compact Cube'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ookoshi, Yasushi; Ito, Takuya; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Kato, Yohei; Ochiai, Yasutaka; Tanaka, Kosuke; Uji, Yoshihiro; Nakayama, Hiroshi

    Further improvement of the performance is requested to air-cooled heat pump chiller from the viewpoint of the global warming prevention. Smaller unit is needed to facilitate the renewal from absorption chiller to air-cooled heat pump chiller. To meet such needs, we developed compact new air-cooled heat pump chiller with high efficiency, 'Compact cube'. The developed machine is side-flow type with U-shaped fin and tube heat exchangers. With this structure, the uniform air velocity, high packed density of the heat exchangers, and the unit miniaturization have been implemented. The refrigeration cycle with two-evaporating temperature has also been implemented. The cooling COP of this cycle is 2% higher compared with conventional one-evaporating temperature cycle because of the rise of average evaporating temperature. In a new model, a new control system, which controls both capacity of compressors and air flow rate corresponding to heat load, has been implemented. As a result, the developed machine achieved IPLV(Integrated Part load Value) to 6.2(MCHV-P1800AE) which is 29% better than the conventional unit.

  3. Solar thermoelectric cooling using closed loop heat exchangers with macro channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atta, Raghied M.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we describe the design, analysis and experimental study of an advanced coolant air conditioning system which cools or warms airflow using thermoelectric (TE) devices powered by solar cells. Both faces of the TE devices are directly connected to closed-loop highly efficient channels plates with macro scale channels and liquid-to-air heat exchangers. The hot side of the system consists of a pump that moves a coolant through the hot face of the TE modules, a radiator that drives heat away into the air, and a fan that transfer the heat over the radiator by forced convection. The cold side of the system consists also of a pump that moves coolant through the cold face of the TE modules, a radiator that drives cold away into the air, and a fan that blows cold air off the radiator. The system was integrated with solar panels, tested and its thermal performance was assessed. The experimental results verify the possibility of heating or cooling air using TE modules with a relatively high coefficient of performance (COP). The system was able to cool a closed space of 30 m3 by 14 °C below ambient within 90 min. The maximum COP of the whole system was 0.72 when the TE modules were running at 11.2 Å and 12 V. This improvement in the system COP over the air cooled heat sink is due to the improvement of the system heat exchange by means of channels plates.

  4. Intermittent microclimate cooling during exercise-heat stress in US army chemical protective clothing.

    PubMed

    Cadarette, Bruce S; Cheuvront, Samuel N; Kolka, Margaret A; Stephenson, Lou A; Montain, Scott J; Sawka, Michael N

    2006-02-10

    The effectiveness of intermittent, microclimate cooling for men who worked in US Army chemical protective clothing (modified mission-oriented protective posture level 3; MOPP 3) was examined. The hypothesis was that intermittent cooling on a 2 min on-off schedule using a liquid cooling garment (LCG) covering 72% of the body surface area would reduce heat strain comparably to constant cooling. Four male subjects completed three experiments at 30 degrees C, 30% relative humidity wearing the LCG under the MOPP 3 during 80 min of treadmill walking at 224 +/- 5 W . m(-2). Water temperature to the LCG was held constant at 21 degrees C. The experiments were; 1) constant cooling (CC); 2) intermittent cooling at 2-min intervals (IC); 3) no cooling (NC). Core temperature increased (1.6 +/- 0.2 degrees C) in NC, which was greater than IC (0.5 +/- 0.2 degrees C) and CC (0.5 +/- 0.3 degrees C) ( p < 0.05). Mean skin temperature was higher during NC (36.1 +/- 0.4 degrees C) than IC (33.7 +/- 0.6 degrees C) and CC (32.6 +/- 0.6 degrees C) and mean skin temperature was higher during IC than CC ( p < 0.05). Mean heart rate during NC (139 +/- 9 b . min(-1)) was greater than IC (110 +/- 10 b . min(-1)) and CC (107 +/- 9 b . min(-1)) ( p < 0.05). Cooling by conduction (K) during NC (94 +/- 4 W . m(-2)) was lower than IC (142 +/- 7 W . m(-2)) and CC (146 +/- 4 W . m(-2)) ( p < 0.05). These findings suggest that IC provided a favourable skin to LCG gradient for heat dissipation by conduction and reduced heat strain comparable to CC during exercise-heat stress in chemical protective clothing.

  5. Cooling of organic light-emitting diode display panels with heat pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sure, Anita; Vankayala, Gowtham Kumar; Baranwal, Vaibhav; Paramanandam, Karthikeyan; Sarma, Kalluri R.; Asokan, S.

    2016-05-01

    Organic light-emitting diode half life is a function of temperature and it decreases with increase in operating temperature. Hence thermal management is important for the efficient operation of OLED based displays. High luminance applications like aerospace cockpits require high power densities which lead to increase in their operating temperatures. Passive cooling is the preferred choice in aerospace applications. In this work passive cooling option with heat pipes is studied and implemented to reduce the display temperature rise.

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF A SOFTWARE DESIGN TOOL FOR HYBRID SOLAR-GEOTHERMAL HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS IN HEATING- AND COOLING-DOMINATED BUILDINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Yavuzturk, C. C.; Chiasson, A. D.; Filburn, T. P.

    2012-11-29

    provided that is based on mathematically robust, validated models. An automated optimization tool is used to balance ground loads and incorporated into the simulation engine. With knowledge of the building loads, thermal properties of the ground, the borehole heat exchanger configuration, the heat pump peak hourly and seasonal COP for heating and cooling, the critical heat pump design entering fluid temperature, and the thermal performance of a solar collector, the total GHX length can be calculated along with the area of a supplemental solar collector array and the corresponding reduced GHX length. An economic analysis module allows for the calculation of the lowest capital cost combination of solar collector area and GHX length. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS This project was funded by the United States Department of Energy DOE-DE-FOA-0000116, Recovery Act Geothermal Technologies Program: Ground Source Heat Pumps. The lead contractor, The University of Hartford, was supported by The University of Dayton, and the Oak Ridge National Laboratories. All funding and support for this project as well as contributions of graduate and undergraduate students from the contributing institutions are gratefully acknowledged.

  7. Methodology for characterizing heat removal mechanism in human skin during cryogen spray cooling.

    PubMed

    Pikkula, Brian M; Tunnell, James W; Anvari, Bahman

    2003-05-01

    Cryogen spray cooling (CSC) reduces epidermal damage during laser treatment of various dermatoses. The goal of this study was to determine the heat removal mechanism in skin and quantify the amount in response to CSC. Thermocouples were imbedded in four model substrates with a range of thermal diffusivities, greater than three orders of magnitude in difference, to measure the temperature profiles in response to CSC and sapphire contact cooling, which removes heat completely by conduction. An algorithm solving an inverse heat conduction problem was subsequently used to quantify the amount of heat removal from the substrates using the measured temperatures. The interface thermal conductance and internal temperatures within the substrates were computed by a finite difference algorithm that solved the heat conduction equation. Results verify a marked increase in heat removal and interface thermal conductance with increasing thermal diffusivity. By estimation from the model substrate results, heat removal and interface thermal conductance values for skin were obtained. Data demonstrate that during CSC, evaporation is the dominant heat transfer mechanism in materials with higher thermal diffusivities; however, conductive cooling dominates in substrates with lower thermal diffusivities such as skin.

  8. Methodology for estimation of time-dependent surface heat flux due to cryogen spray cooling.

    PubMed

    Tunnell, James W; Torres, Jorge H; Anvari, Bahman

    2002-01-01

    Cryogen spray cooling (CSC) is an effective technique to protect the epidermis during cutaneous laser therapies. Spraying a cryogen onto the skin surface creates a time-varying heat flux, effectively cooling the skin during and following the cryogen spurt. In previous studies mathematical models were developed to predict the human skin temperature profiles during the cryogen spraying time. However, no studies have accounted for the additional cooling due to residual cryogen left on the skin surface following the spurt termination. We formulate and solve an inverse heat conduction (IHC) problem to predict the time-varying surface heat flux both during and following a cryogen spurt. The IHC formulation uses measured temperature profiles from within a medium to estimate the surface heat flux. We implement a one-dimensional sequential function specification method (SFSM) to estimate the surface heat flux from internal temperatures measured within an in vitro model in response to a cryogen spurt. Solution accuracy and experimental errors are examined using simulated temperature data. Heat flux following spurt termination appears substantial; however, it is less than that during the spraying time. The estimated time-varying heat flux can subsequently be used in forward heat conduction models to estimate temperature profiles in skin during and following a cryogen spurt and predict appropriate timing for onset of the laser pulse.

  9. Solar heating and cooling system design and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Application surveys and performance studies were conducted to determine a solar heating and hot water configuration that could be used in a variety of applications, and to identify subsystem modules that could be utilized in a building block fashion to adapt hardware items to single and multi-family residential and commercial systems. Topics discussed include: subsystem development for the solar collectors, controls, other components, energy management module, and the heating system configuration test. Operational tests conducted at an Illinois farmhouse, and a YWCA in Spokane, Washington are discussed.

  10. An experimental study of heat transfer and film cooling on low aspect ratio turbine nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeishi, K.; Matsuura, M.; Aoki, S.; Sato, T.

    1989-06-01

    The effects of the three-dimensional flow field on the heat transfer and the film cooling on the endwall, suction and pressure surface of an airfoil were studied using a low speed, fully annular, low aspect h/c = 0.5 vane cascade. The predominant effects that the horseshoe vortex, secondary flow, and nozzle wake increases in the heat transfer and decreases in the film cooling on the suction vane surface and the endwall were clearly demonstrated. In addition, it was demonstrated that secondary flow has little effect on the pressure surface. Pertinent flow visualization of the flow passage was also carried out for better understanding of these complex phenomena. Heat transfer and film cooling on the fully annular vane passage surface is discussed.

  11. Geothermal district heating and cooling of hotel/casinos in downtown Reno, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Cerci, Y.; Kanoglu, M.; Cengel, Y.A.; Turner, R.H.

    1996-12-31

    In this paper, potential revenues from the proposed geothermal district heating/cooling system for the hotel/casino complexes in downtown Reno, Nevada are estimated by analyzing their actual electricity and natural gas bills during 1993 through 1994. The geothermal system appears to be feasible, and financially very attractive. The geothermal district system can meet the entire heating and cooling requirements of the hotel/casinos, generating total potential revenues of $3,486,000 per year. Also, other buildings around the downtown area such as Saint Mary`s Hospital, several motels, business complexes, Washoe County School District Building, and even the UNR campus will add extra potential revenues, if these buildings are connected to the geothermal grid. Since most buildings around the downtown use central heating and cooling system, the retrofit costs for the both system should be minimal.

  12. Combined heat and power for the City of London

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, P.

    1994-06-01

    The first phase of an innovative combined heat and power (CHP) system for the City of London is now almost complete and should be operating at full capacity by the end of 1994. Test runs are taking place. The system is powered by two large 18-cylinder Waertsilae Vasa 46GD multifuel engines developing a total of just under 32 MW of power. The engines drive ABB Stromberg HSG 160O water-cooled generators with electrical efficiencies exceeding 97%. The station will use natural gas and heavy fuel oil to generate electricity for the grid, hot water for district heating and chilled water for air conditioning. In the first phase of the project, underground pipework and cabling will connect the power station to various buildings in the City including the Barbican Center, Guildhall and the Museum of London/Bastion House. State-of-the-art emission control equipment has been installed to reduce NO[sub x] and SO[sub 2] by over 90%. 5 figs.

  13. Mathematical equations for heat conduction in the fins of air-cooled engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, R R; Brown, W B

    1923-01-01

    The problem considered in this report is that of reducing actual geometrical area of fin-cooling surface, which is, of course, not uniform in temperature, to equivalent cooling area at one definite temperature, namely, that prevailing on the cylinder wall at the point of attachment of the fin. This makes it possible to treat all the cooling surface as if it were part of the cylinder wall and 100 per cent effective. The quantities involved in the equations are the geometrical dimensions of the fin, thermal conductivity of the material composing it, and the coefficient of surface heat dissipation between the fin and the air streams.

  14. Cooling system for removing metabolic heat from an hermetically sealed spacesuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webbon, B. W.; Vykukal, H. C.; Williams, B. A. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An improved cooling and ventilating system is described for removing metabolic heat, waste gases and water vapor generated by a wearer of an hermetically sealed spacesuit. The cooling system was characterized by a body suit, having a first circuit for simultaneously establishing a cooling flow of water through the thorax and head sections of the body suit. Circulation patches were included mounted in the thorax section and head section of the body suit. A second circuit for discharing a flow of gas throughout the spacesuit and a disconnect unit for coupling the circuits with a life support system externally related to the spacesuit were provided.

  15. Assessment of NASA Dual Microstructure Heat Treatment Method Utilizing Ladis SuperCooler(trademark) Cooling Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemsky, Joe; Gayda, John (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    The intent of this investigation was to demonstrate the NASA DMHT method with a tailored Ladish SuperCool(Trademark) cooling method on a Rolls-Royce AE2100, stage 3 disk shape. One disk each of two alloys, LSHR and ME3, were successfully converted as shown by macrostructure. DMHT heating time selection and cooling rate was aided by finite element modeling analysis. Residual stresses were also predicted and reported. Detailed microstructural analysis was performed by NASA and included in this report. Mechanical property characterization, also planned by NASA, is incomplete at this time and not part of this report.

  16. Apparatus and methods of reheating gas turbine cooling steam and high pressure steam turbine exhaust in a combined cycle power generating system

    DOEpatents

    Tomlinson, Leroy Omar; Smith, Raub Warfield

    2002-01-01

    In a combined cycle system having a multi-pressure heat recovery steam generator, a gas turbine and steam turbine, steam for cooling gas turbine components is supplied from the intermediate pressure section of the heat recovery steam generator supplemented by a portion of the steam exhausting from the HP section of the steam turbine, steam from the gas turbine cooling cycle and the exhaust from the HP section of the steam turbine are combined for flow through a reheat section of the HRSG. The reheated steam is supplied to the IP section inlet of the steam turbine. Thus, where gas turbine cooling steam temperature is lower than optimum, a net improvement in performance is achieved by flowing the cooling steam exhausting from the gas turbine and the exhaust steam from the high pressure section of the steam turbine in series through the reheater of the HRSG for applying steam at optimum temperature to the IP section of the steam turbine.

  17. Studies of Phase Change Materials and a Latent Heat Storage Unit Used for a Natural Circulation Cooling/Latent Heat Storage System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakitani, Katsumi; Honda, Hiroshi

    Experiments were performed to investigate feasibility of using organic materials as a PCM for a latent heat storage unit of a natural circulation cooling/latent heat storage system. This system was designed to cool a shelter accommodating telecommunication equipment located in subtropical deserts or similar regions without using a power source. Taking into account practical considerations and the results of various experiments regarding the thermodynamic properties, thermal degradation, and corrosiveness to metals, lauric acid and iron was selected for the PCM and the latent heat storage unit material, respectively. Cyclic heating and cooling of the latent heat storage unit undergoing solid-liquid phase change was repeated for more than 430 days. The results showed that the heating-cooling curve was almost unchanged between the early stage and the 1,870th cycle. It was concluded that the latent heat storage unit could be used safely for more than ten years as a component of the cooling system.

  18. High intensity heat-pulse source operates without cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, L. D.

    1970-01-01

    Tungsten-iodine quartz lamp with on-off control is mounted at focus of ellipsoidal reflector and shutter is mounted at conjugate focus. Flux sensor monitors lamp and actuates shutter which emits a heat pulse when the radiant flux builds up to requisite level.

  19. Corrosion inhibitors for solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.

    1978-01-01

    Inhibitors which appeared promising in previous tests and additional inhibitors including several proprietary products were evaluated. Evaluation of the inhibitors was based on corrosion protection afforded an aluminum-mild steel-copper-stainless steel assembly in a hot corrosive water. Of the inhibitors tested two were found to be effective and show promise for protecting multimetallic solar heating systems.

  20. PREFACE: 7th International Conference on Cooling & Heating Technologies (ICCHT 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-09-01

    The Kyoto protocol has initiated a pledge from almost all developing and developed countries to be committed to reducing CO2 emissions. Development of new renewable energy technologies are also of interest in this conference. Greenhouse gases have contributed to global warming and other man-made disasters. Cooling and Heating communities also have responsibilities towards the commitment of reducing the greenhouse gas emissions. In addition, depleting natural resources also act as a threat to the Cooling and Heating industries, causing them to develop highly efficient equipment and innovative technologies. The 1st International Conference on Cooling & Heating Technologies was held in Hanoi Vietnam (Jan. 2005). Whereas the 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th ICCHT conferences were held in Dalian, China (Jul. 2006), Tokyo, Japan (Jul. 2007), Jinhae, Korea (Oct. 2008) and Bandung, Indonesia (Dec. 2010) respectively. The 6th International Conference on Cooling & Heating Technologies (ICCTH2012) was held in Xi'an in China on November 9-12, 2012. It is our pleasure to welcome you to the 7th International Conference on Cooling & Heating Technologies (ICCTH2014) on 4th - 6th November 2014 at the Grand Dorsett Subang Hotel, Subang Jaya, Selangor Darul Ehsan, Malaysia The Theme of the Conference is ''Sustainability and Innovation in Heating & Cooling Technologies''. The sub-themes are:- • CO2 Reduction and Low Carbon Technologies • HVAC System and Natural Ventilation • Energy & Alternative Energy • Computational Fluid Dynamics • Low Temperature & Refrigeration Engineering In conjunction with the Conference, an Exhibition will be organized as an integral part of the Conference. Project experiences, product solutions, new applications and state-of-the art information will be highlighted.

  1. The variation of heat transfer coefficient, adiabatic effectiveness and aerodynamic loss with film cooling hole shape.

    PubMed

    Sargison, J E; Guo, S M; Oldfield, M L; Rawlinson, A J

    2001-05-01

    The heat transfer coefficient and adiabatic effectiveness of cylindrical, fan shaped holes and a slot are presented for the region zero to 50 diameters downstream of the holes. Narrow-band liquid crystals were used on a heated flat plate with heated air coolant. These parameters have been measured in a steady state, low speed facility at engine representative Reynolds number based on hole diameter and pressure difference ratio (ideal momentum flux ratio). The aerodynamic loss due to each of the film cooling geometries has been measured using a traverse of the boundary layer far downstream of the film cooling holes. Compared to the cylindrical holes, the fan shaped hole case showed an improvement in the uniformity of cooling downstream of the holes and in the level of laterally averaged film cooling effectiveness. The fan effectiveness approached the slot level and both the fan and cylindrical hole cases show lower heat transfer coefficients than the slot and non film cooled cases based on the laterally averaged results. The drawback to the fan shaped hole was that the aerodynamic loss was significantly higher than both the slot and cylindrical hole values due to inefficient diffusion in the hole exit expansion.

  2. User manual for AQUASTOR: a computer model for cost analysis of aquifer thermal energy storage coupled with district heating or cooling systems. Volume I. Main text

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, H.D.; Brown, D.R.; Reilly, R.W.

    1982-04-01

    A computer model called AQUASTOR was developed for calculating the cost of district heating (cooling) using thermal energy supplied by an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system. The AQUASTOR model can simulate ATES district heating systems using stored hot water or ATES district cooling systems using stored chilled water. AQUASTOR simulates the complete ATES district heating (cooling) system, which consists of two principal parts: the ATES supply system and the district heating (cooling) distribution system. The supply system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of thermal energy supplied to the distribution system by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the exploration, development, and operation of the ATES supply system. The distribution system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of heat (chill) delivered by the distribution system to the end-users by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the construction and operation of the distribution system. The model combines the technical characteristics of the supply system and the technical characteristics of the distribution system with financial and tax conditions for the entities operating the two systems into one techno-economic model. This provides the flexibility to individually or collectively evaluate the impact of different economic and technical parameters, assumptions, and uncertainties on the cost of providing district heating (cooling) with an ATES system. This volume contains the main text, including introduction, program description, input data instruction, a description of the output, and Appendix H, which contains the indices for supply input parameters, distribution input parameters, and AQUASTOR subroutines.

  3. Regulation of Star Formation amidst Heating and Cooling in Galaxies and Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaddi, Sravani

    Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound systems in the Universe and often host the largest galaxies (known as the brightest cluster galaxies (BCG)) at its centers. These BCG's are embedded in hot 1-10 keV X-ray gas. A subset of galaxy clusters known as cool-core clusters show sharply peaked X-ray emission and high central densities, demonstrating cooling of the surrounding halo gas in timescales much shorter than a Hubble time. These observations led to the development of a simple cooling flow model. In the absence of an external heating process, a cooling flow model predicts that the hot intracluster medium gas in these dense cores would hydrostatically cool, generating cooling flows in the center of the cluster. This cooled gas will eventually collapse to form stars and contribute to the bulk of galaxy mass. The rates of star formation actually observed in the clusters however are far less than predicted by the cooling flow model, suggesting a non-gravitational heating source. Active galactic nuclei (AGN), galaxies hosting a supermassive black hole that ejects outflows via accretion, is currently the leading heating mechanism (referred to as AGN feedback) explaining the observed deficit in the star formation rates. AGN feedback also offers an elegant explanation to the observed black hole and galaxy co-evolution. Much of the evidence for AGN feedback has been obtained from studies focussed on galaxy clusters and luminous massive systems with little evidence that it occurs in more typical systems in the local universe. Our research investigates this less explored area to address the importance of AGN heating in the regulation of star formation in typical early type galaxies in the local universe. We selected a sample of 200+ early type, low redshift galaxies and carried out a multiple wavelength study using archival observed in the UV, IR and radio. Our results suggest that early type galaxies in the current epoch are rarely powerful AGN and AGN

  4. Modeling Free Convection Flow of Liquid Hydrogen within a Cylindrical Heat Exchanger Cooled to 14 K

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A.; Oxford U.; Yang, S.W.; Green, M.A.; Lau, W.

    2004-05-08

    A liquid hydrogen in a absorber for muon cooling requires that up to 300 W be removed from 20 liters of liquid hydrogen. The wall of the container is a heat exchanger between the hydrogen and 14 K helium gas in channels within the wall. The warm liquid hydrogen is circulated down the cylindrical walls of the absorber by free convection. The flow of the hydrogen is studied using FEA methods for two cases and the heat transfer coefficient to the wall is calculated. The first case is when the wall is bare. The second case is when there is a duct some distance inside the cooled wall.

  5. Central unresolved issues in thermal energy storage for building heating and cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Swet, C.J.; Baylin, F.

    1980-07-01

    This document explores the frontier of the rapidly expanding field of thermal energy storage, investigates unresolved issues, outlines research aimed at finding solutions, and suggests avenues meriting future research. Issues related to applications include value-based ranking of storage concepts, temperature constraints, consistency of assumptions, nomenclature and taxonomy, and screening criteria for materials. Issues related to technologies include assessing seasonal storage concepts, diurnal coolness storage, selection of hot-side storage concepts for cooling-only systems, phase-change storage in building materials, freeze protection for solar water heating systems, and justification of phase-change storage for active solar space heating.

  6. Experiments on the Recovery of Waste Heat in Cooling Ducts, Special Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverstein, Abe

    1939-01-01

    Tests have been conducted in the N.A.C.A. full-scale wind tunnel to investigate the partial recovery of the heat energy which is apparently wasted in the cooling of aircraft engines. The results indicate that if the radiator is located in an expanded duct, a part of the energy lost in cooling is recovered; however, the energy recovery is not of practical importance up to airplane speeds of 400 miles per hour. Throttling of the duct flow occurs with heated radiators and must be considered in designing the duct outlets from data obtained with cold radiators in the ducts.

  7. System design package for solar heating and cooling site data acquisition subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The Site Data Acquisition Subsystem (SDAS) designed to collect data from sensors located on residential or commercial buildings using a solar heating and/or cooling system is described. It takes the data obtained from sensors located on the solar system, processes the data into suitable format, stores the data for a period of time, and provides the capability for either telephone retrieval by the central data processing system or manual retrieval of the data for transfer to a central site. The SDAS is also designed so that it will not degrade the operation of the solar heating/cooling system which it is monitoring.

  8. Solar heating and cooling system installed at RKL Controls Company, Lumberton, New Jersey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The final results of the design and operation of a computer controlled solar heated and cooled 40,000 square foot manufacturing building, sales office, and computer control center/display room are summarized. The system description, test data, major problems and resolutions, performance, operation and maintenance manual, equipment manufacturers' literature, and as-built drawings are presented. The solar system is composed of 6,000 square feet of flat plate collectors, external above ground storage subsystem, controls, absorption chiller, heat recovery, and a cooling tower.

  9. Combined vapor compression/absorption heat pump cycles for engine-driven heat pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radermacher, Reinhard; Herold, Keith E.; Howe, Lawrence A.

    1988-12-01

    The performance of three combined absorption/vapor compression cycles for gas-fired internal combustion engine driven heat pumps was theoretically assessed. Two cycles were selected for the preliminary design of breadboard systems using only off-the-shelf components. The first cycle, based on the working pair ammonia/water, is termed the simple-cycle. The second cycle, based on the working pair lithium-bromide/water, is termed the compressor enhanced double-effect chiller. Both cycles are found to be technically feasible. The coefficient of performance and the capacity are increased by up to 21 percent for cooling in the first case (compressor efficiency of 0.7) and by up to 14 percent in the second (compressor efficiency of 0.5). Both were compared against the engine drive R22 vapor compression heat pump. The performance of actual machinery for both cycles is, in the current design, hampered by the fact that the desired oil-free compressors have poor isentropic efficiencies. Oil lubricated compressors together with very effective oil separators would improve the performance of the combined LiBr/water cycle to 23 percent.

  10. Analysis of field test data on residential heating and cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talbert, S. G.

    1980-12-01

    The computer program using field site data collected on 48 homes located in six cities in different climatic regions of the United States is discussed. In addition, a User's Guide was prepared for the computer program which is contained in a separate two-volume document entitled User's Guide for REAP: Residential Energy Analysis Program. Feasibility studies were conducted pertaining to potential improvements for REAP, including: the addition of an oil-furnace model; improving the infiltration subroutine; adding active and/or passive solar subroutines; incorporating a thermal energy storage model; and providing dual HVAC systems (e.g., heat pump-gas furnace). The purpose of REAP is to enable building designers and energy analysts to evaluate how such factors as building design, weather conditions, internal heat loads, and HVAC equipment performance, influence the energy requirements of residential buildings.

  11. Effects of cooling system parameters on heat transfer in PAFC stack. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali A.

    1985-01-01

    Analytical and experimental study for the effects of cooling system parameters on the heat transfer and temperature distribution in the electrode plates of a phosphoric acid fuel-cell has been conducted. An experimental set-up that simulates the operating conditions prevailing in a phosphoric-acid fuel-cell stack was designed and constructed. The set-up was then used to measure the overall heat transfer coefficient, the thermal contact resistance, and the electrode temperature distribution for two different cooling plate configurations. Two types of cooling plate configurations, serpentine and straight, were tested. Air, water, and oil were used as coolants. Measurements for the heat transfer coefficient and the thermal contact resistance were made for various flow rates ranging from 16 to 88 Kg/hr, and stack clamping pressure ranging from O to 3448 Kpa. The experimental results for the overall heat transfer coefficient were utilized to derive mathematical relations for the overall heat transfer coefficient as a function of stack clamping pressure and Reynolds number for the three coolants. The empirically derived formulas were incorporated in a previously developed computer program to predict electrodes temperature distribution and the performance of the stack cooling system. The results obtained were then compared with those available in the literature. The comparison showed maximum deviation of +/- 11%.

  12. Decay-phase cooling and inferred heating of M- and X-class solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Daniel F.; Gallagher, Peter T.; Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Milligan, Ryan O.

    2013-11-20

    In this paper, the cooling of 72 M- and X-class flares is examined using GOES/XRS and SDO/EVE. The observed cooling rates are quantified and the observed total cooling times are compared with the predictions of an analytical zero-dimensional hydrodynamic model. We find that the model does not fit the observations well, but does provide a well-defined lower limit on a flare's total cooling time. The discrepancy between observations and the model is then assumed to be primarily due to heating during the decay phase. The decay-phase heating necessary to account for the discrepancy is quantified and found be ∼50% of the total thermally radiated energy, as calculated with GOES. This decay-phase heating is found to scale with the observed peak thermal energy. It is predicted that approximating the total thermal energy from the peak is minimally affected by the decay-phase heating in small flares. However, in the most energetic flares the decay-phase heating inferred from the model can be several times greater than the peak thermal energy.

  13. municipal recreation center is heated and cooled by solar energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Major fraction of energy requirements for community building is ksupplied by Sun. The 238 flat plate solar collectors are roof mounted on single story structure enclosing gymnasium, locker area, and health care clinic; heat exchanger transfers collected energy to 6,000 gallon storage tank. Final report chronicles project from inception to completion, documenting performance, costs, operating modes, and data acquisition system. Appendix contains manufacturers' product literature and engineering drawings.

  14. Passive decay heat removal system for water-cooled nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, Charles W.

    1991-01-01

    A passive decay-heat removal system for a water-cooled nuclear reactor employs a closed heat transfer loop having heat-exchanging coils inside an open-topped, insulated box located inside the reactor vessel, below its normal water level, in communication with a condenser located outside of containment and exposed to the atmosphere. The heat transfer loop is located such that the evaporator is in a position where, when the water level drops in the reactor, it will become exposed to steam. Vapor produced in the evaporator passes upward to the condenser above the normal water level. In operation, condensation in the condenser removes heat from the system, and the condensed liquid is returned to the evaporator. The system is disposed such that during normal reactor operations where the water level is at its usual position, very little heat will be removed from the system, but during emergency, low water level conditions, substantial amounts of decay heat will be removed.

  15. Palm Cooling and Heating Delays Fatigue During Resistance Exercise in Women.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Young S; Robergs, Robert A; Mermier, Christine M; Schneider, Suzanne M; Gurney, Alfred B

    2015-08-01

    We previously reported that cold application to the palms between sets of high-intensity bench press exercise produces an ergogenic effect in men. In this study, we hypothesized that palm cooling (PC) or heating during rest intervals between high-intensity weight training sets will increase total repetitions and exercise volume load (kilograms) in resistance trained female subjects in a thermoneutral (TN) environment. Eight female subjects (mean ± SD, age = 25 ± 6 years, height = 160 ± 6 cm, body mass = 56 ± 7 kg, 1-repetition maximum [1RM] = 52 ± 6 kg, weight training experience = 6 ± 2 years) completed 4 sets of 85% 1RM bench press exercise to failure, with 3-minute rest intervals. Exercise trials were performed in a counterbalanced order on 3 days, separated by at least 3 days in TN, Palm heating (PH), and PC conditions. Heating and cooling were applied by placing both hands in a hand cooling device with the hand plate set to 45° C for heating and 10° C for cooling. Data were analyzed using a 2-factor repeated-measures analysis of variance and Tukey's post hoc tests. Palm cooling repetitions were significantly higher than TN repetitions during the second set, and PH repetitions were significantly higher than those of TN during the fourth set. Total exercise volume load (kilograms) for both PC (1,387 ± 358) and PH (1,349 ± 267) were significantly higher than TN (1,187 ± 262). In women, both heating and cooling of the palms between sets of resistance exercise increased the total exercise volume load performed. This ergogenic response to a peripheral sensory input is consistent with the central governor theory of muscular fatigue.

  16. Temperature effects in supercritical fluid chromatography: a trade-off between viscous heating and decompression cooling.

    PubMed

    De Pauw, Ruben; Choikhet, Konstantin; Desmet, Gert; Broeckhoven, Ken

    2014-10-24

    The study of radial and axial temperature profiles always has been an area interest both in liquid chromatography (LC) and supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC). Whereas in LC always an increase in temperature is observed due to the dominance of viscous heating, in SFC, especially for low modifier content, a decrease in temperature is found due to the much larger decompression cooling. However, for higher modifier content and higher operating pressure, the temperature effects become a trade-off between viscous heating and decompression cooling, since in SFC the latter is a strong function of operating pressure and mobile phase composition. At a temperature of 40°C and for neat CO2, the effect of decompression cooling and viscous heating cancel each other out at a pressure 450bar. This pressure decreases almost linearly with volume fraction of methanol to 150bar at 25vol%. As a result, both cooling and heating effects can be observed when operating at high back pressure, large column pressure drops or high modifier content. For example at a back pressure of 150bar and a column pressure drop of 270bar decompression cooling is observed throughout the column. However at 300bar back pressure and the same pressure drop, the mobile phase heats up in the first part of the column due to viscous heating and then cools in the second part due to decompression cooling. When coupling columns (2.1mm×150mm, 1.8μm fully porous particles) at very high operating pressure (e.g. 750bar for 8vol%), the situation is even more complex. E.g. at a back pressure of 150bar and using 8vol% methanol, viscous heating is only observed in the first column whereas only decompression cooling in the second. Further increasing the inlet pressure up to 1050bar resulted in no excessive temperature differences along the column. This implies that the inlet pressure of SFC instrumentation could be expanded above 600bar without additional band broadening caused by excessive radial temperature

  17. Preliminary feasibility study of heating and cooling alternatives for Nebraska Western College, Scottsbluff, Nebraska

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-03-01

    The existence of a recently-recognized, low-temperature, geothermal resource under central and western Nebraska represents a potential alternate energy source. The feasibility of using that resource for space heating and cooling at Nebraska Western College, Scottsbluff, Nebraska, as an alternative to that facility's current, natural-gas fired, heating and cooling system is explored. This study addresses: (1) the geological (hydrological) aspects of such a project; (2) the retrofitting requirements for modifying the existing heating plants to accommodate the geothermal resource; (3) the possible use of shallow, unconfined groundwater with heat pumps as another energy alternative; and (4) the economic costs and benefits of both deep and shallow-water hydrothermal application.

  18. Vegetable oils: liquid coolants for solar heating and cooling applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ingley, H A

    1980-02-01

    It has been proposed that vegetable oils, renewable byproducts of agriculture processes, be investigated for possible use as liquid coolants. The major thrust of the project was to investigate several thermophysical properties of the four vegetable oils selected. Vapor pressures, specific heat, viscosity, density, and thermal conductivity were determined over a range of temperatures for corn, soybean, peanut, and cottonseed oil. ASTM standard methods were used for these determinations. In addition, chemical analyses were performed on samples of each oil. The samples were collected before and after each experiment so that any changes in composition could be noted. The tests included iodine number, fatty acid, and moisture content determination. (MHR)

  19. Thermionic nuclear reactor with internal heat distribution and multiple duct cooling

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, C.R.; Perry, L.W. Jr.

    1975-11-01

    A Thermionic Nuclear Reactor is described having multiple ribbon-like coolant ducts passing through the core, intertwined among the thermionic fuel elements to provide independent cooling paths. Heat pipes are disposed in the core between and adjacent to the thermionic fuel elements and the ribbon ducting, for the purpose of more uniformly distributing the heat of fission among the thermionic fuel elements and the ducts.

  20. Survival and germination of Clostridium perfringens spores during heating and cooling of ground pork.

    PubMed

    Márquez-González, M; Cabrera-Díaz, E; Hardin, M D; Harris, K B; Lucia, L M; Castillo, A

    2012-04-01

    The effect of heating rate on the heat resistance, germination, and outgrowth of Clostridium perfringens spores during cooking of cured ground pork was investigated. Inoculated cured ground pork portions were heated from 20 to 75°C at a rate of 4, 8, or 12°C/h and then held at 75°C for 48 h. No significant differences (P > 0.05) in the heat resistance of C. perfringens spores were observed in cured ground pork heated at 4, 8, or 12°C/h. At heating rates of 8 and 12°C/h, no significant differences in the germination and outgrowth of spores were observed (P > 0.05). However, when pork was heated at 4°C/h, growth of C. perfringens occurred when the temperature of the product was between 44 and 56°C. In another set of experiments, the behavior of C. perfringens spores under temperature abuse conditions was studied in cured and noncured ground pork heated at 4°C/h and then cooled from 54.4 to 7.2°C within 20 h. Temperature abuse during cooling of noncured ground pork resulted in a 2.8-log CFU/g increase in C. perfringens. In cured ground pork, C. perfringens decreased by 1.1 log CFU/g during cooling from 54.4 to 36.3°C and then increased by 0.9 log CFU/g until the product reached 7.2°C. Even when the initial level of C. perfringens spores in cured ground pork was 5 log CFU/g, the final counts after abusive cooling did not exceed 3.4 log CFU/g. These results suggest that there is no risk associated with C. perfringens in cured pork products under the tested conditions.