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Sample records for combined granulocyte-colony stimulating

  1. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor in neutropenic patients with infective endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Borgbjerg, B. M.; Hovgaard, D.; Laursen, J. B.; Aldershvile, J.

    1998-01-01

    A well known complication in the treatment of infectious endocarditis is development of neutropenia caused by treatment with antibiotics in high concentrations over long periods. Neutropenia often necessitates discontinuation of antibiotic treatment. Three patients with infectious endocarditis who developed neutropenia are reported. The patients were treated with granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), a haematopoietic growth factor that stimulates neutrophils. G-CSF induced an immediate increase in white blood cell count, primarily neutrophils. G-CSF may be effective in ameliorating neutropenia in patients who receive antibiotics for treatment of infectious endocarditis.

 Keywords: granulocyte colony stimulating factor;  neutropenia;  endocarditis PMID:9505928

  2. Case Report: Combination Therapy with Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor in a Case of Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Derakhshanrad, Nazi; Saberi, Hooshang; Tayebi Meybodi, Keyvan; Taghvaei, Mohammad; Arjmand, Babak; Aghayan, Hamid Reza; Kohan, Amir Hassan; Haghpanahi, Mohammad; Rahmani, Shahrokh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Various neuroregenerative procedures have been recently employed along with neurorehabilitation programs to promote neurological function after Spinal Cord Injury (SCI), and recently most of them have focused on the acute stage of spinal cord injury. In this report, we present a case of acute SCI treated with neuroprotective treatments in conjunction with conventional rehabilitation program. Methods: A case of acute penetrative SCI (gunshot wound), 40 years old, was treated with intrathecal bone marrow derived stem cells and parenteral Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) along with rehabilitation program. The neurological outcomes as well as safety issues have been reported. Results: Assessment with American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA), showed neurological improvement, meanwhile he reported neuropathic pain, which was amenable to oral medication. Discussion: In the acute setting, combination therapy of G-CSF and intrathecal Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) was safe in our case as an adjunct to conventional rehabilitation programs. Further controlled studies are needed to find possible side effects, and establish net efficacy. PMID:26649168

  3. Effect of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor priming combined with low-dose cytarabine and homoharringtonine in higher risk myelodysplastic syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang-Xia; Zhang, Wang-Gang; He, Ai-Li; Cao, Xin-Mei; Chen, Yin-Xia; Zhao, Wan-Hong; Yang, Yun; Wang, Jian-Li; Zhang, Peng-Yu; Gu, Liu-Fang

    2016-09-01

    As sensitization of leukemia cells with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) can enhance the cytotoxicity of chemotherapy in myeloid malignancies, a pilot study was conducted in order to evaluate the effect of G-CSF priming combined with low-dose chemotherapy in patients with higher risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). The regimen, G-HA, consisted of cytarabine (Ara-C) 7.5mg/m(2)/12h by subcutaneous injection, days 1-14, homoharringtonine (HHT) 1.5mg/m(2)/day by intravenous continuous infusion, days 1-14, and G-CSF 150mg/m(2)/day by subcutaneous injection, days 0-14. 56 patients were enrolled, 34 patients (61%, 95% confidence interval: 51.44-70.56%) achieved complete remission (CR). Median duration of neutropenia was 7days (ranging from 2 to 16days). Grade 1-2 nonhematologic toxicities were documented, including nausea and vomiting (5%), liver function abnormality (5%), and heart function abnormality (2%). No central nervous system toxicity was found. Mortality within the first 4 weeks was 4%. The G-HA regimen is effective in remission induction for higher risk MDS patients and well tolerated due to the acceptable toxicity in maintenance therapy in the patients who cannot undergo Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). PMID:27497340

  4. Evaluating the effects of buffer conditions and extremolytes on thermostability of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor using high-throughput screening combined with design of experiments.

    PubMed

    Ablinger, Elisabeth; Hellweger, Monika; Leitgeb, Stefan; Zimmer, Andreas

    2012-10-15

    In this study, we combined a high-throughput screening method, differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF), with design of experiments (DoE) methodology to evaluate the effects of several formulation components on the thermostability of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). First we performed a primary buffer screening where we tested thermal stability of G-CSF in different buffers, pH values and buffer concentrations. The significance of each factor and the two-way interactions between them were studied by multivariable regression analysis. pH was identified as most critical factor regarding thermal stability. The most stabilizing buffer, sodium glutamate, and sodium acetate were determined for further investigations. Second we tested the effect of 6 naturally occurring extremolytes (trehalose, sucrose, ectoine, hydroxyectoine, sorbitol, mannitol) on the thermal stability of G-CSF, using a central composite circumscribed design. At low pH (3.8) and low buffer concentration (5 mM) all extremolytes led to a significant increase in thermal stability except the addition of ectoine which resulted in a strong destabilization of G-CSF. Increasing pH and buffer concentration led to an increase in thermal stability with all investigated extremolytes. The described systematic approach allowed to create a ranking of stabilizing extremolytes at different buffer conditions.

  5. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and reproductive medicine: A review

    PubMed Central

    Cavalcante, Marcelo Borges; Costa, Fabrício DA Silva; Barini, Ricardo; Araujo Júnior, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recently, the use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been proposed to improve pregnancy outcomes in reproductive medicine. Objective: A systematic review of the current use of G-CSF in patients who have difficulty conceiving and maintaining pregnancy was performed. Materials and Methods: Two electronic databases (PubMed/ Medline and Scopus) were searched. Study selection, data extraction and quality assessment were performed in duplicate. The subject codes used were granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, G-CSF, recurrent miscarriage, IVF failure, and endometrium. Results: The search of electronic databases resulted in 215 citations (PubMed/ Medline: 139 and Scopus: 76), of which 38 were present in both databases. Of the remaining 177 publications, seven studies were included in the present review. Conclusion: Treatment with G-CSF is a novel proposal for immune therapy in patients with recurrent miscarriage and implantation failure following cycles of IVF. However, a larger number of well-designed studies are required for this treatment to be established. PMID:26131007

  6. Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor reverts vascular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Squadrito, F; Altavilla, D; Squadrito, G; Campo, G M; Ioculano, M; Serranò, M; Minutoli, L; Arlotta, M; Musolino, C; Saitta, A; Caputi, A P

    1997-01-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the vascular effects of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rh G-CSF) in a rat model of irreversible vascular failure. Male anesthetized rats were subjected to the clamping of the splanchnic arteries for 45 min. This surgical procedure resulted in an irreversible state of shock (splanchnic artery occlusion shock) characterized by high mortality rate (0% survival, 120 min following the release of clamps), a profound hypotension and vascular dysfunction consisting of a marked hyporeactivity to phenylephrine (PE 1 nM-10 microM) of aortic rings. Administration of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (20 micrograms/kg i.v. 5 min after the release of occlusion) increased survival rate (90% 4 h after the release of occlusion), blunted the profound hypotension and reverted the marked vascular dysfunction. Finally, rh G-CSF inhibited the activity of inducible nitric oxide synthase in peritoneal macrophages activated with endotoxin. Our data suggest that rh G-CSF may influence vascular function when low-flow states occur.

  7. Plerixafor on-demand combined with chemotherapy and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor: significant improvement in peripheral blood stem cells mobilization and harvest with no increase in costs.

    PubMed

    Milone, Giuseppe; Martino, Massimo; Spadaro, Andrea; Leotta, Salvatore; Di Marco, Annalia; Scalzulli, Potito; Cupri, Alessandra; Di Martina, Valentina; Schinocca, Elena; Spina, Eleonora; Tripepi, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    To date, no prospective study on Plerixafor 'on-demand' in combination with chemotherapy and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been reported. We present an interim analysis of the first prospective study in which Plerixafor was administered on-demand in patients affected by multiple myeloma and lymphoma who received high dose cyclophosphamide or DHAP (dexamethasone, cytarabine, cisplatin) plus G-CSF to mobilize peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC). One hundred and two patients were evaluable for response. A cohort of 240 patients receiving the same mobilizing chemotherapy was retrospectively studied. Failure to mobilize CD34(+) cells in peripheral blood was reduced by 'on-demand' strategy compared to conventional mobilization; from 13·0 to 3·0% (P = 0·004). Failure to harvest CD34(+) cells 2 × 10(6) /kg decreased from 20·9 to 4·0% (P = 0·0001). The on-demand Plerixafor strategy also resulted in a lower rate of mobilization failure (P = 0·03) and harvest failure (P = 0·0008) when compared to a 'bias-adjusted set of controls'. Evaluation of economic costs of the two strategies showed that the overall cost of the two treatments were comparable when salvage mobilizations were taken into account. When in combination with cyclophosphamide or DHAP plus G-CSF, the 'on-demand' use of Plerixafor showed, in comparison to conventionally treated patients, a significant improvement in mobilization of PBSC with no increase in overall cost. PMID:24138497

  8. Recombinant granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in infectious diseases: still a debate.

    PubMed

    Wiedermann, F J; Mittermayr, M; Hoffmann, G; Schobersberger, W

    2001-02-15

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), a central mediator of the endogenous response to infection and inflammation, is approved for use in the prevention of infection-related complications in patients with nonmyeloid malignancies during antineoplastic therapy associated with high risk of severe neutropenia. Administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor results in improvement of host defence paired with anti-inflammatory effects. There is evidence from animal and clinical studies that administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor may also be beneficial in non-neutropenic infections. This review focuses mainly on the results of different animal and clinical studies of granulocyte colony stimulating factor used in the treatment of severe infections and sepsis.

  9. Osteoporosis in severe congenital neutropenia treated with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Bishop, N J; Williams, D M; Compston, J C; Stirling, D M; Prentice, A

    1995-04-01

    Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has substantially improved life expectancy for children with severe congenital neutropenia (SCN). Severe osteoporosis, reported in this population, may relate to the disease process, or be a therapeutic side-effect. This report details bone loss, quantitated absorptiometrically and histomorphometrically, in a child with SCN and vertebral collapse, and the positive response to anabolic steroid and bisphosphonate therapy.

  10. The Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor has a dual role in neuronal and vascular plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Wallner, Stephanie; Peters, Sebastian; Pitzer, Claudia; Resch, Herbert; Bogdahn, Ulrich; Schneider, Armin

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a growth factor that has originally been identified several decades ago as a hematopoietic factor required mainly for the generation of neutrophilic granulocytes, and is in clinical use for that. More recently, it has been discovered that G-CSF also plays a role in the brain as a growth factor for neurons and neural stem cells, and as a factor involved in the plasticity of the vasculature. We review and discuss these dual properties in view of the neuroregenerative potential of this growth factor. PMID:26301221

  11. Combination treatment of biomechanical support and targeted intra-arterial infusion of peripheral blood stem cells mobilized by granulocyte-colony stimulating factor for the osteonecrosis of the femoral head: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Mao, Qiang; Wang, Weidong; Xu, Taotao; Zhang, Shanxing; Xiao, Luwei; Chen, Di; Jin, Hongting; Tong, Peijian

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the benefits of combination treatment with mechanical support and targeted intra-arterial infusion of peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) mobilized by granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) via the medial circumflex femoral artery on the progression of osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). Fifty-five patients (89 hips) with early and intermediate stage ONFH were recruited and randomly assigned to combination treatment or mechanical support treatment (control group). All hips received mechanical support treatment (porous tantalum rod implantation). Then, hips in the combination treatment group were performed targeted intra-arterial infusion of PBSCs. At each follow-up, Harris hip score (HHS) and Association Research Circulation Osseous (ARCO) classification were used to evaluate the symptoms and progression of osteonecrosis. Total hip arthroplasty (THA) was assessed as an endpoint at each follow-up. At 36 months, 9 of the 41 hips (21.95%) in the control group progressed to clinical failure and underwent THA whereas only 3 of the 48 hips (6.25%) in the combination treatment group required THA (p = 0.031). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed a significant difference in the survival time between the two groups (log-rank test; p = 0.025). Compared to the control group, combination treatment significantly improved the HHS at 36 months (p = 0.003). At the final follow-up examination, radiological progression was noted in 13 of 41 hips (31.71%) for the control group, but in only 4 of 48 hips (8.33%) for the combination treatment group (p = 0.005). The overall collapse rates were 15.15% (5/33 hips) and 8.11% (3/37 hips) in the control and combination treatment groups, respectively. Targeted intra-arterial infusion of PBSCs is capable of enhancing the efficacy of biomechanical support in the treatment of ONFH. This clinical trial confirmed that the combination treatment might be a safe and feasible

  12. Neutrophil kinetics of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-induced neutropenia in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Yuji; Kawagishi, Mayumi; Kusaka, Masaru )

    1990-01-01

    Single injection of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) immediately induced a decrease in the number of circulating neutrophils in rats. This neutropenia occurred 10 minutes after the injection but disappeared 40 minutes after injection. This transient neutropenia was dose-dependently induced by rhG-CSF and also induced by repeated injections. We studied the kinetics of circulating neutrophils in transient neutropenia. rhG-CSF markedly decreased the number of {sup 3}H-diisopropylfluorophosphate ({sup 3}H-DFP) labeled neutrophils in the circulation 10 minutes after injection but the labeled neutrophils recovered to near the control level 40 minutes after the injection. These results indicate that the neutrophil margination accounts for the neutrophenia and the marginated neutrophils return to the circulation.

  13. Autopsy of anaplastic carcinoma of the pancreas producing granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Haruna; Eguchi, Noriaki; Sumimoto, Kyoku; Matsumoto, Kenta; Azakami, Takahiro; Sumida, Tomonori; Tamura, Tadamasa; Sumii, Masaharu; Uraoka, Naohiro; Shimamoto, Fumio

    2016-08-01

    A 50-year-old man presented to a nearby hospital with high fever and anorexia. An abdominal tumor was detected, and he was referred to our hospital. A pancreatic tumor was detected by computed tomography and abdominal ultrasonography. He had high fever, leukocytosis, and high serum granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). We performed a tumor biopsy and histological examination revealed anaplastic carcinoma of the pancreas. Based on the diagnosis, we initiated chemotherapy using gemcitabine plus S-1. However, the tumor rapidly progressed and he deteriorated and died 123 days after admission. As immunohistochemical study showed positive staining for G-CSF in the tumor cell, we diagnosed the tumor producing G-CSF during autopsy. Anaplastic carcinoma of the pancreas producing G-CSF is very rare, with 10 cases, including ours, reported in the literature. PMID:27498938

  14. RUNX1 haploinsufficiency results in granulocyte colony-stimulating factor hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Chin, D W L; Sakurai, M; Nah, G S S; Du, L; Jacob, B; Yokomizo, T; Matsumura, T; Suda, T; Huang, G; Fu, X-Y; Ito, Y; Nakajima, H; Osato, M

    2016-01-01

    RUNX1/AML1 is among the most commonly mutated genes in human leukemia. Haploinsufficiency of RUNX1 causes familial platelet disorder with predisposition to myeloid malignancies (FPD/MM). However, the molecular mechanism of FPD/MM remains unknown. Here we show that murine Runx1(+/-) hematopoietic cells are hypersensitive to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), leading to enhanced expansion and mobilization of stem/progenitor cells and myeloid differentiation block. Upon G-CSF stimulation, Runx1(+/-) cells exhibited a more pronounced phosphorylation of STAT3 as compared with Runx1(+/+) cells, which may be due to reduced expression of Pias3, a key negative regulator of STAT3 signaling, and reduced physical sequestration of STAT3 by RUNX1. Most importantly, blood cells from a FPD patient with RUNX1 mutation exhibited similar G-CSF hypersensitivity. Taken together, Runx1 haploinsufficiency appears to predispose FPD patients to MM by expanding the pool of stem/progenitor cells and blocking myeloid differentiation in response to G-CSF. PMID:26745853

  15. Hematologic improvement in dogs with parvovirus infection treated with recombinant canine granulocyte-colony stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Duffy, A; Dow, S; Ogilvie, G; Rao, S; Hackett, T

    2010-08-01

    Previously, dogs with canine parvovirus-induced neutropenia have not responded to treatment with recombinant human granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (rhG-CSF). However, recombinant canine G-CSF (rcG-CSF) has not been previously evaluated for treatment of parvovirus-induced neutropenia in dogs. We assessed the effectiveness of rcG-CSF in dogs with parvovirus-induced neutropenia with a prospective, open-label, nonrandomized clinical trial. Endpoints of our study were time to recovery of WBC and neutrophil counts, and duration of hospitalization. 28 dogs with parvovirus and neutropenia were treated with rcG-CSF and outcomes were compared to those of 34 dogs with parvovirus and neutropenia not treated with rcG-CSF. We found that mean WBC and neutrophil counts were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in the 28 dogs treated with rcG-CSF compared to disease-matched dogs not treated with rcG-CSF. In addition, the mean duration of hospitalization was reduced (P = 0.01) in rcG-CSF treated dogs compared to untreated dogs. However, survival times were decreased in dogs treated with rcG-CSF compared to untreated dogs. These results suggest that treatment with rcG-CSF was effective in stimulating neutrophil recovery and shortening the duration of hospitalization in dogs with parvovirus infection, but indicate the need for additional studies to evaluate overall safety of the treatment.

  16. Low-dose cytarabine and aclarubicin combined with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for the treatment of relapsed or primary refractory acute lymphocytic leukemia: a retrospective study of 25 Chinese patients.

    PubMed

    Xue, Sheng-Li; Cui, Hong-Xia; Zou, Jing-Ying; Xue, Meng-Xing; Tang, Xiao-Wen; Zhang, Yan-Ming; Wu, De-Pei

    2013-12-01

    Despite improvements in treatment, the prognosis of relapsed or primary refractory acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) remains poor, and outcomes are worse in older adults with the short first complete remission (CR). Attainment of the second CR by salvage therapy would improve the survival of these patients and may enable them to undergo curative treatment with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The fact that there are diverse salvage protocols for these adult patients but without a striking CR-induction efficacy indicates that efforts are still needed to indentify new effective reinduction regimens. In this study, the CAG regimen (cytarabine, 10 mg/m(2) subcutaneously every 12 h on days 1-14; aclarubicin, 5-7 mg/m(2) intravenously daily on days 1-8; and concurrent granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, 200 µg/m(2) /day subcutaneously) was administered to 25 patients with relapsed or refractory ALL, including 11 T-cell ALL (T-ALL) and 14 B-cell (B-ALL) patients (age range, 11-61 years; median age, 26 years), to assess its efficacy as a salvage therapy. One course of the CAG regimen resulted in an overall response [CR or partial remission (PR)] rate of 64%, a CR rate of 56% and generally mild adverse effects. An overall response was observed in all 11 T-ALL patients (10 CR and 1 PR) and 35.7% of B-ALL patients (p = 0.0009). The significant treatment potential of CAG regimen for relapsed or primary refractory ALL, especially for T-ALL patients, described in this report would prepare them for a second CR to pursue longer survival.

  17. Regulatory elements responsible for inducible expression of the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor gene in macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Nishizawa, M; Nagata, S

    1990-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) plays an essential role in granulopoiesis during bacterial infection. Macrophages produce G-CSF in response to bacterial endotoxins such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS). To elucidate the mechanism of the induction of G-CSF gene in macrophages or macrophage-monocytes, we have examined regulatory cis elements in the promoter of mouse G-CSF gene. Analyses of linker-scanning and internal deletion mutants of the G-CSF promoter by the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase assay have indicated that at least three regulatory elements are indispensable for the LPS-induced expression of the G-CSF gene in macrophages. When one of the three elements was reiterated and placed upstream of the TATA box of the G-CSF promoter, it mediated inducibility as a tissue-specific and orientation-independent enhancer. Although this element contains a conserved NF-kappa B-like binding site, the gel retardation assay and DNA footprint analysis with nuclear extracts from macrophage cell lines demonstrated that nuclear proteins bind to the DNA sequence downstream of the NF-kappa B-like element, but not to the conserved element itself. The DNA sequence of the binding site was found to have some similarities to the LPS-responsive element which was recently identified in the promoter of the mouse class II major histocompatibility gene. Images PMID:1691438

  18. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-producing hepatocellular carcinoma with abrupt changes

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Hiroaki; Komatsu, Shuhei; Takaki, Wataru; Okayama, Tokunari; Sawabe, Yasunori; Ishii, Michiaki; Kishimoto, Mitsuo; Otsuji, Eigo; Konosu, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-producing tumor is one of the rare types of cancer clinically characterized by an elevated fever and white blood cell (WBC) increment. Although G-CSF producing tumors have been reported in several types of cancer including those of the lungs, cervix and bladder, G-CSF producing hepatocellular carcinoma is extremely rare. Here, we report the case of a rapidly growing and poorly differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma producing G-CSF. The patient showed symptoms of continuous high fever, stomach pain and cough, and high serum WBC counts, C-reactive protein (CRP) and G-CSF levels were found in laboratory tests. After a radical hepatectomy, the patient completely recovered from the above symptoms and inflammatory state. The serum levels of G-CSF were reduced to normal levels after radical surgery. An immunohistochemical analysis revealed the overexpression of G-CSF in the cytoplasm of certain hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell. The patient’s serum WBC, CRP and G-CSF levels remained within normal levels in the six months after surgery without recurrence. This is the 9th case report of G-CSF producing hepatocellular carcinoma in English literature. We review the clinical characteristics of the G-CSF producing HCC and discuss a possible treatment strategy. PMID:27777880

  19. Endotoxin down-modulates granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor (CD114) on human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Hollenstein, U; Homoncik, M; Stohlawetz, P J; Marsik, C; Sieder, A; Eichler, H G; Jilma, B

    2000-07-01

    During infection, the development of nonresponsiveness to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) may be influenced by the down-modulation of G-CSF receptor (G-CSFR) by cytokines. This down-modulation was studied during experimental human endotoxemia. Healthy volunteers received either 2 ng/kg endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS], n=20) or placebo (n=10) in a randomized, controlled trial. Endotoxin infusion increased the mean fluorescence intensity of the neutrophil activation marker CD11b >300% after 1 h (P<.001 vs. placebo). LPS infusion down-modulated G-CSFR expression in as early as 60 min (-17%; P=.001 vs. placebo). Down-modulation was almost maximal at 90 min and persisted for 6 h (-50% from baseline; P<.0001 vs. placebo). Plasma levels of G-CSF started to increase only after G-CSFR down-modulation had occurred and peaked 37-fold above baseline at 4 h (P<.0001 vs. placebo). In conclusion, LPS down-modulates G-CSFR expression in humans, which may render neutrophils less responsive to the effects of G-CSF and, thereby, compromise host defense mechanisms.

  20. Protective effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on endotoxin shock in mice with retrovirus-induced immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Toki, S; Hiromatsu, K; Aoki, Y; Makino, M; Yoshikai, Y

    1997-10-01

    Mice with retrovirus-induced murine acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (MAIDS) were hypersensitive to lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced lethal shock accompanied by marked elevations of systematic interleukin 1beta (IL-beta) and interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) after LPS challenge. Pretreatment with 10 microg of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) protected MAIDS mice from hypersensitivity to LPS-induced lethal shock and this protection was concomitant with suppression of IFN-gamma production.

  1. Effect of in vivo infusion of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on immune function.

    PubMed

    Valente, John F; Alexander, J Wesley; Li, Bing-Guo; Noel, J Gregory; Custer, David A; Ogle, James D; Ogle, Cora K

    2002-01-01

    As the applications of hematopoietic growth factors increase, their complex impact on host defense and immune responses continues to unfold. The effect of the administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on bacterial defense, proliferation of lymphocytes, and cytokine production by lymphocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was studied. The effect of G-CSF administration on the phenotype of the cells in the major hematopoietic organs was studied as well. ACI rats were given 10 mg/kg/day G-CSF or vehicle daily for 4 days. Isolated bone marrow neutrophils and enterocytes from treated animals showed a greater bactericidal activity than controls. Proliferation of mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes and PBMC was reduced in G-CSF-treated animals. The production of proinflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and interleukin 6 (IL-6) by lymphocytes and PBMC was reduced by G-CSF pretreatment. G-CSF administration caused an increase in IL-4 (Th2 cytokine) release and a decrease in interferon-gamma (IFNgamma, Th1 cytokine) release by mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes. Cytometric analysis of cells in the progenitor cell region indicated a large increase in immature cells in the bone marrow of G-CSF-treated animals compared with sham along with an increase in B cells and a decrease in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). In addition, cytometric analysis showed a large increase in PMNs in blood and splenocytes of the treated animals compared with sham. This study confirms and extends previous observations that G-CSF administration has a number of effects that might simultaneously enhance host defense while reducing the risk of developing uncontrolled systemic inflammation. This may also be efficacious in prolonging graft survival and reducing graft vs. host disease.

  2. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in repeated IVF failure, a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Aleyasin, Ashraf; Abediasl, Zhila; Nazari, Atefeh; Sheikh, Mahdi

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies have revealed key roles for granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF) in embryo implantation process and maintenance of pregnancy, and some studies showed promising results by using local intrauterine infusion of GCSF in patients undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF). This multicenter, randomized, controlled trial included 112 infertile women with repeated IVF failure to evaluate the efficacy of systemic single-dose subcutaneous GCSF administration on IVF success in these women. In this study, the Long Protocol of ovarian stimulation was used for all participants. Sealed, numbered envelopes assigned 56 patients to receive subcutaneous 300 µg GCSF before implantation and 56 in the control group. The implantation (number of gestational sacs on the total number of transferred embryos), chemical pregnancy (positive serum β-HCG), and clinical pregnancy (gestational sac and fetal heart) rates were compared between the two groups. This trial is registered at www.irct.ir (IRCT201503119568N11). The successful implantation (18% vs 7.2%, P=0.007), chemical pregnancy (44.6% vs 19.6%, P=0.005), and clinical pregnancy (37.5% vs 14.3%, P=0.005) rates were significantly higher in the intervention group than in the control group. After adjustment for participants' age, endometrial thickness, good-quality oocyte counts, number of transferred embryos, and anti-Mullerian hormone levels, GCSF treatment remained significantly associated with successful implantation (OR=2.63, 95% CI=1.09-6.96), having chemical pregnancy (OR= 2.74, 95% CI=1.11-7.38) and clinical pregnancy (OR=2.94, 95% CI=1.23-8.33). In conclusion, administration of single-dose systemic subcutaneous GCSF before implantation significantly increases the IVF success, implantation, and pregnancy rates in infertile women with repeated IVF failure. PMID:26980809

  3. Amifostine plus granulocyte colony-stimulating factor therapy enhances recovery from supralethal radiation exposures: preclinical experience in animals models.

    PubMed

    Patchen, M L

    1995-01-01

    A murine model was used to explore whether the cytoprotective agent amifostine (WR-2721) can be used to protect a critical fraction of haemopoietic stem cells against radiation, and whether granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) can then be used to stimulate the protected cells to proliferate and reconstitute the haematopoietic system. Groups of C3H/HeN mice treated with 200 mg/kg amifostine i.p. 30 min before 60Co irradiation and/or 125 micrograms/kg G-CSF subcutaneously from days 1-16 post irradiation were compared. The dose reduction factor (DRF) of the combination of amifostine and G-CSF from LD50/30 values was greater than the sum of the DRFs for amifostine and G-CSF individually. Acceleration of recovery bone marrow and splenic multipotent stem cells (CFU-s) and granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells (GM-CFC), as well as of peripheral blood red and white cells and platelets, was greatest in mice treated with amifostine plus G-CSF. These studies suggest that amifostine and recombinant haematopoietic growth factors can be used in combination to reduce myelosuppression and lethality associated with radiation or radiomimetic drugs

  4. Effect of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on granulocytopenia in mice induced by irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fushiki, M.; Ono, K.; Sasai, K.; Shibamoto, Y.; Tsutsui, K.; Nishidai, T.; Takahashi, M.; Abe, M. )

    1990-02-01

    We report the effect of human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF) on the recovery from granulocytopenia induced by irradiation. Female 9-week old C3H/He mice were used. The irradiation schedule was as follows: Group 1 and 2 received whole-body irradiation of 1 Gy and 5 Gy, respectively, on day 0; Group 3 and 4 received whole-body irradiation of 0.5 and 1.0 Gy, respectively, for 5 consecutive days; Group 5 received upper hemibody irradiation of 3 Gy for 5 consecutive days. Daily subcutaneous injections of G-CSF (3 x 10(5) Unit/mouse) or 0.3 ml of saline to each group were started from the day after the first irradiation and continued for 18 days. Mice were sampled randomly from each group, and the total number of leukocytes, erythrocytes of peripheral blood, nucleated cells in femur, and spleen weight were counted and measured, respectively, on day 0, 3, 5, 7, 9, 12, and 18. The leukocyte counts decreased with an increase in radiation doses. In Group 1 and 2 mice, G-CSF enhanced the leukocyte count more than saline. In Group 3 mice, the recovery of leukocytopenia was facilitated by G-CSF, but in Group 4 mice, G-CSF had no effect on the leukocyte count decrease or on leukocytopenia recovery. In Group 5 mice, G-CSF greatly affected leukocytopenia recovery. Increase in spleen weight paralleled the peripheral leukocyte count. Daily administration of recombinant hG-CSF accelerated the granulocytopenia recovery which was induced by irradiation, and it may be a useful therapeutic agent for treating myelosuppressive cases.

  5. The effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in preclinical models of infection and acute inflammation.

    PubMed

    Marshall, John C

    2005-12-01

    The cytokine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a potent endogenous trigger for the release of neutrophils from bone marrow stores and for their activation for enhanced antimicrobial activity. G-CSF has been widely evaluated in preclinical models of acute illness, with generally promising though divergent results. A recombinant G-CSF molecule has recently undergone clinical trials to assess its efficacy as an adjuvant therapy in community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia, however, these studies failed to provide convincing evidence of benefit. We undertook a systematic review of the published literature reporting the effects of modulation of G-CSF in preclinical in vivo models to determine whether evidence of differential efficacy might explain the disappointing results of human studies and point to disease states that might be more likely to benefit from G-CSF therapy. G-CSF has been evaluated in 86 such studies involving a variety of different models. The strongest evidence of benefit was seen in studies involving intraperitoneal challenge with live organisms; benefit was evident whether the agent was given before or after challenge. G-CSF demonstrates anti-inflammatory activity in models of systemic challenge with viable organisms or endotoxin, but only when the agent is given before challenge; evidence of benefit after challenge was minimal. Preclinical models of intrapulmonary challenge only show efficacy when the cytokine is administered before the infectious challenge, and suggested harm in gram-negative pneumonia resulting from challenge with Escherichia coli or Klebsiella. There is little evidence for therapeutic efficacy in noninfectious models of acute illness. We conclude that the most promising populations for evaluation of G-CSF are neutropenic patients with invasive infection and patients with intra-abdominal infection, particularly those with the syndrome of tertiary, or recurrent, peritonitis. Significant variability in the design

  6. Clinical safety of tbo-filgrastim, a short-acting human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Pettengell, Ruth; Bias, Peter; Mueller, Udo; Lang, Nicole

    2016-06-01

    The recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) known as filgrastim (Tevagrastim(®), Ratiograstim(®), Biograstim(®)) in Europe (approved in 2008) and tbo-filgrastim (Granix(®)) in the USA (approved in 2012; Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd., Petach Tikva, Israel) is indicated to reduce the duration of severe neutropenia in patients with non-myeloid malignancies receiving myelosuppressive anti-cancer drugs associated with a clinically significant incidence of febrile neutropenia. This article presents pooled clinical data for tbo-filgrastim compared with Neupogen(®) (Amgen, Thousand Oaks, CA, USA) as well as tbo-filgrastim post-marketing safety data. The safety and efficacy of tbo-filgrastim were evaluated in three phase III studies in 677 patients receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy and study drug (348 patients with breast cancer, 237 with lung cancer, 92 with non-Hodgkin lymphoma). In each study, the efficacy of tbo-filgrastim was similar to that of Neupogen. Overall, 633 (93.5 %) patients receiving the study drug experienced 6093 treatment-emergent adverse events (AEs), most of which were related to chemotherapy. Adverse events related to the study drug (tbo-filgrastim or Neupogen) were experienced by 185 (27.3 %) patients; 19 (2.8 %) had severe drug-related AEs, 5 (0.7 %) had drug-related serious AEs, and 6 (0.9 %) discontinued the study due to drug-related AEs. Overall, the most common drug-related AEs were bone pain (7.1 %), myalgia (4.0 %), and asthenia (4.4 %). The post-marketing safety profile of tbo-filgrastim was consistent with that observed during the clinical studies. The availability of tbo-filgrastim, a G-CSF with safety and efficacy comparable to those of Neupogen, provides physicians with an alternative treatment option for supportive care of patients with non-myeloid malignancies receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy. PMID:26780505

  7. Characterization of the receptor binding determinants of granulocyte colony stimulating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Young, D. C.; Zhan, H.; Cheng, Q. L.; Hou, J.; Matthews, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    We performed a series of experiments using alanine-scanning mutagenesis to locate side chains within human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) that are involved in human G-CSF receptor binding. We constructed a panel of 28 alanine mutants that examined all surface exposed residues on helices A and D, as well as all charged residues on the surface of G-CSF. The G-CSF mutants were expressed in a transiently transfected mammalian cell line and quantitated by a sensitive biosensor method. We measured the activity of mutant proteins using an in vitro proliferation assay and an ELISA binding competition assay. These studies show that there is a region of five charged residues on helices A and C employed by G-CSF in binding its receptor, with the most important residue in this binding patch being Glu 19. Both wild-type G-CSF and the E19A mutant were expressed in E. coli. The re-folded proteins were found to have proliferative activities similar to the analogous proteins from mammalian cells: furthermore, biophysical analysis indicated that the E19A mutation does not cause gross structural perturbations in G-CSF. Although G-CSF is likely to signal through receptor homo-dimerization, we found no compelling evidence for a second receptor binding region. We also found no evidence of self-antagonism at high G-CSF concentrations, suggesting that, in contrast to human growth hormone (hGH) and erythropoietin (EPO), G-CSF probably does not signal via a pure 2:1 receptor ligand complex. Thus, G-CSF, while having a similar tertiary structure to hGH and EPO, uses different areas of the four helix bundle for high-affinity interaction with its receptor. PMID:9194183

  8. Use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor: a survey among Italian medical oncologists.

    PubMed

    Danova, Marco; Rosti, Giovanni; De Placido, Sabino; Bencardino, Katia; Venturini, Marco

    2005-12-01

    In October 2003, the Italian Association of Medical Oncology (AIOM) published its own guidelines on the use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). The present survey was conducted during the same period with the aim of collecting data on the current use of G-CSF to provide a starting point for future evaluations of the implementation of AIOM guidelines. From October 2003 to January 2004, 1591 AIOM members were asked to complete a questionnaire based on specific clinical scenarios, regarding the use of G-CSF for primary and secondary prophylaxis and treatment of neutropenia. The rate of response was 22%. For primary prophylaxis, the majority of physicians avoid using G-CSF, with no difference in cases of adjuvant, curative or palliative chemotherapy (CT). In fact, 67.2% to 74.9% would 'rarely or never' use G-CSF in the proposed clinical scenarios. In chemosensitive tumors, rather than reducing CT doses, 55.7% would use G-CSF as a secondary prophylaxis after afebrile neutropenia (AN), and 68.8% after febrile neutropenia (FN). In elderly patients experiencing FN, 35.7% would reduce the adjuvant CT doses and 23.1% would change the regimen. Most oncologists would use G-CSF to treat neutropenia, and the median duration of G-CSF treatment is less than 1 week and would depend on neutrophil count. Our survey shows that Italian oncologists are particularly oriented towards the use of G-CSF in clinical practice to maintain the CT dose intensity, and are sensitive to the prevention and treatment of not only FN, but also AN. Finally, Italian medical oncologists appear to be very cautious in introducing G-CSF when treating elderly patients. PMID:16273232

  9. Characterization of Stress-Exposed Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor Using ELISA and Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchida, Daisuke; Yamazaki, Katsuyoshi; Akashi, Satoko

    2014-10-01

    Information on the higher-order structure is important in the development of biopharmaceutical drugs. Recently, hydrogen/deuterium exchange coupled with mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) has been widely used as a tool to evaluate protein conformation, and unique automated systems for HDX-MS are now commercially available. To investigate the potential of this technique for the prediction of the activity of biopharmaceuticals, granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), which had been subjected to three different stress types, was analyzed using HDX-MS and through comparison with receptor-binding activity. It was found that HDX-MS, in combination with ion mobility separation, was able to identify conformational changes in G-CSF induced by stress, and a good correlation with the receptor-binding activity was demonstrated, which cannot be completely determined by conventional peptide mapping alone. The direct evaluation of biological activity using bioassay is absolutely imperative in biopharmaceutical development, but HDX-MS can provide the alternative information in a short time on the extent and location of the structural damage caused by stresses. Furthermore, the present study suggests the possibility of this system being a versatile evaluation method for the preservation stability of biopharmaceuticals.

  10. Using hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry to study conformational changes in granulocyte colony stimulating factor upon PEGylation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hui; Ahn, Joomi; Yu, Ying Qing; Tymiak, Adrienne; Engen, John R; Chen, Guodong

    2012-03-01

    PEGylation is the covalent attachment of polyethylene glycol to proteins, and it can be used to alter immunogenicity, circulating half life and other properties of therapeutic proteins. To determine the impact of PEGylation on protein conformation, we applied hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX MS) to analyze granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) upon PEGylation as a model system. The combined use of HDX automation technology and data analysis software allowed reproducible and robust measurements of the deuterium incorporation levels for peptic peptides of both PEGylated and non-PEGylated G-CSF. The results indicated that significant differences in deuterium incorporation were induced by PEGylation of G-CSF, although the overall changes observed were quite small. PEGylation did not result in gross conformational rearrangement of G-CSF. The data complexity often encountered in HDX MS measurements was greatly reduced through a data processing and presentation format designed to facilitate the comparison process. This study demonstrates the practical utility of HDX MS for comparability studies, process monitoring, and protein therapeutic characterization in the biopharmaceutical industry.

  11. The role of stem cell factor and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor in brain repair during chronic stroke.

    PubMed

    Piao, Chun-Shu; Gonzalez-Toledo, Maria E; Xue, Yue-Qiang; Duan, Wei-Ming; Terao, Satoshi; Granger, D Neil; Kelley, Roger E; Zhao, Li-Ru

    2009-04-01

    Chronic stroke is a highly important but under-investigated scientific problem in neurologic research. We have reported earlier that stem cell factor (SCF) in combination with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) treatment during chronic stroke improves functional outcomes. Here we have determined the contribution of bone marrow-derived cells in angiogenesis and neurogenesis, which are enhanced by SCF+G-CSF treatment during chronic stroke. Using bone marrow tracking, flow cytometry, 2-photon live brain imaging, and immunohistochemistry, we observed that the levels of circulating bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) (CD34+/c-kit+) were significantly increased by SCF+G-CSF treatment. In addition, live brain imaging revealed that numerous bone marrow-derived cells migrate into the brain parenchyma in the treated mice. We also found that bone marrow-derived cells, bone marrow-derived endothelial cells, vascular density, and bone marrow-derived neurons were significantly augmented by SCF+G-CSF. It is interesting that, in addition to the increase in bone marrow-derived endothelial cells, the number of bone marrow-derived pericytes was reduced after SCF+G-CSF treatment during chronic stroke. These data suggest that SCF+G-CSF treatment can enhance repair of brain damage during chronic stroke by mobilizing BMSCs, and promoting the contribution of bone marrow-derived cells to angiogenesis and neurogenesis. PMID:19209180

  12. Plerixafor and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for first-line steady-state autologous peripheral blood stem cell mobilization in lymphoma and multiple myeloma: results of the prospective PREDICT trial

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Nigel; Douglas, Kenny; Ho, Anthony D.; Mohty, Mohamad; Carlson, Kristina; Ossenkoppele, G.J.; Milone, Giuseppe; Pareja, Macarena Ortiz; Shaheen, Daniel; Willemsen, Arnold; Whitaker, Nicky; Chabannon, Christian

    2013-01-01

    In Europe, the combination of plerixafor + granulocyte colony-stimulating factor is approved for the mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells for autologous transplantation in patients with lymphoma and myeloma whose cells mobilize poorly. The purpose of this study was to further assess the safety and efficacy of plerixafor + granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for front-line mobilization in European patients with lymphoma or myeloma. In this multicenter, open label, single-arm study, patients received granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (10 μg/kg/day) subcutaneously for 4 days; on the evening of day 4 they were given plerixafor (0.24 mg/kg) subcutaneously. Patients underwent apheresis on day 5 after a morning dose of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. The primary study objective was to confirm the safety of mobilization with plerixafor. Secondary objectives included assessment of efficacy (apheresis yield, time to engraftment). The combination of plerixafor + granulocyte colony-stimulating factor was used to mobilize hematopoietic stem cells in 118 patients (90 with myeloma, 25 with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, 3 with Hodgkin's disease). Treatment-emergent plerixafor-related adverse events were reported in 24 patients. Most adverse events occurred within 1 hour after injection, were grade 1 or 2 in severity and included gastrointestinal disorders or injection-site reactions. The minimum cell yield (≥2×106 CD34+ cells/kg) was harvested in 98% of patients with myeloma and in 80% of those with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in a median of one apheresis. The optimum cell dose (≥5×106 CD34+ cells/kg for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma or ≥6×106 CD34+ cells/kg for myeloma) was harvested in 89% of myeloma patients and 48% of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients. In this prospective, multicenter European study, mobilization with plerixafor + granulocyte colony-stimulating factor allowed the majority of patients with myeloma or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma to undergo transplantation with

  13. Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) Improves Motor Recovery in the Rat Impactor Model for Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Dittgen, Tanjew; Pitzer, Claudia; Plaas, Christian; Kirsch, Friederike; Vogt, Gerhard; Laage, Rico; Schneider, Armin

    2012-01-01

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) improves outcome after experimental SCI by counteracting apoptosis, and enhancing connectivity in the injured spinal cord. Previously we have employed the mouse hemisection SCI model and studied motor function after subcutaneous or transgenic delivery of the protein. To further broaden confidence in animal efficacy data we sought to determine efficacy in a different model and a different species. Here we investigated the effects of G-CSF in Wistar rats using the New York University Impactor. In this model, corroborating our previous data, rats treated subcutaneously with G-CSF over 2 weeks show significant improvement of motor function. PMID:22253813

  14. The efficiency of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in hemorrhagic mucositis and febrile neutropenia resulted from methotrexate toxicity.

    PubMed

    Ozkol, Hatice Uce; Toptas, Tayfur; Calka, Omer; Akdeniz, Necmettin

    2015-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) remains one of the most frequently used anti-metabolite agents in dermatology. MTX is an analog of folate that competitively and irreversibly inhibits dihydrofolate reductase. Oral mucositis is a common side effect of chemotherapy drugs and is characterized by erythema, pain, poor oral intake, pseudomembranous destruction, open ulceration and hemorrhage of the oral mucosa. In this paper, we report a 32-year-old female with a case of mucositis due to MTX intoxication that resulted from an overdose for rheumatoid arthritis. The patient had abdominal pain, vomiting, and nausea. During follow-up, the patient's white blood cell count was found to be 0.9 × 10(9)/L (4-10 × 10(9)/L). The patient developed fever exceeding 40 °C. The patient was consulted to the hematology service. They suggested using granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for febrile neutropenia. On the fifth day of treatment, the white blood cell count reached 5.3 × 10(9)/L and the patient's fever and mucositis started to resolve. Here, we presented a case of hemorrhagic mucositis and febrile neutropenia resulted from high-dose MTX that responded very well to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor treatment and we reviewed the literature.

  15. Bone pain from granulocyte colony stimulating factor: does clinical trial sponsorship by a pharmaceutical company influence its reporting?

    PubMed

    Aldairy, Y; Nguyen, P L; Jatoi, A

    2011-01-01

    It is alleged that pharmaceutical companies sometimes unfairly present clinical trial results. To our knowledge, studies have not explored whether such alleged unfair reporting also occurs in the testing of palliative care agents in cancer patients, a particularly vulnerable group. Therefore, a systematic search was conducted to retrieve all published, prospective clinical trials that used granulocyte colony stimulating factor starting in 2003. Because granulocyte colony stimulating factor can cause severe bone pain - a concerning but historically under-reported symptom in cancer patients - this symptom was assessed to determine whether differences in reporting occurred based on pharmaceutical company-sponsorship. A total of 239 published clinical trials met the present study's eligibility criteria and were retrievable. Within this entire group of studies, 65 (27%) were pharmaceutical company-sponsored, and only 31 (13%) reported on bone pain. However, pharmaceutical company-sponsored trials reported on bone pain at a higher rate compared with other studies: 23% versus 9% (P= 0.005), and this conclusion did not change after adjusting for dose, use of the slow release formulation and year of publication. The reporting of adverse events from cancer symptom control and palliative care interventions should be improved - especially in trials not sponsored by pharmaceutical companies.

  16. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor therapy to induce neovascularization in ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Ripa, Rasmus Sejersten

    2012-03-01

    Cell based therapy for ischemic heart disease has the potential to reduce post infarct heart failure and chronic ischemia. Treatment with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) mobilizes cells from the bone marrow to the peripheral blood. Some of these cells are putative stem or progenitor cells. G-CSF is injected subcutaneously. This therapy is intuitively attractive compared to other cell based techniques since repeated catheterizations and ex vivo cell purification and expansion are avoided. Previous preclinical and early clinical trials have indicated that treatment with G-CSF leads to improved myocardial perfusion and function in acute or chronic ischemic heart disease. The hypothesis of this thesis is that patient with ischemic heart disease will benefit from G-CSF therapy. We examined this hypothesis in two clinical trials with G-CSF treatment to patients with either acute myocardial infarction or severe chronic ischemic heart disease. In addition, we assed a number of factors that could potentially affect the effect of cell based therapy. Finally, we intended to develop a method for in vivo cell tracking in the heart. Our research showed that subcutaneous G-CSF along with gene therapy do not improve myocardial function in patients with chronic ischemia despite a large increase in circulation bone marrow-derived cells. Also, neither angina pectoris nor exercise capacity was improved compared to placebo treatment. We could not identify differences in angiogenic factors or bone marrow-derived cells in the blood that could explain the neutral effect of G-CSF. Next, we examined G-CSF as adjunctive therapy following ST segment elevation myocardial infarction. We did not find any effect of G-CSF neither on the primary endpoint--regional myocardial function--nor on left ventricular ejection fraction (secondary endpoint) compared to placebo treatment. In subsequent analyses, we found significant differences in the types of cells mobilized from the bone marrow

  17. Increased platelet aggregation and in vivo platelet activation after granulocyte colony-stimulating factor administration. A randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Spiel, Alexander O; Bartko, Johann; Schwameis, Michael; Firbas, Christa; Siller-Matula, Jolanta; Schuetz, Matthias; Weigl, Manuela; Jilma, Bernd

    2011-04-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) stimulates the bone marrow to produce granulocytes and stem cells and is widely used to accelerate neutrophil recovery after chemotherapy. Interestingly, specific G-CSF receptors have been demonstrated not only on myeloid cells, but also on platelets. Data on the effects of G-CSF on platelet function are limited and partly conflicting. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of G-CSF on platelet aggregation and in vivo platelet activation. Seventy-eight, healthy volunteers were enrolled into this randomised, placebo-controlled trial. Subjects received 5 μg/kg methionyl human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (r-metHuG-CSF, filgrastim) or placebo subcutaneously for four days. We determined platelet aggregation with a whole blood impedance aggregometer with various, clinically relevant platelet agonists (adenosine diphosphate [ADP], collagen, arachidonic acid [AA], ristocetin and thrombin receptor activating peptide 6 [TRAP]). Filgrastim injection significantly enhanced ADP (+40%), collagen (+60%) and AA (+75%)-induced platelet aggregation (all p<0.01 as compared to placebo and p<0.001 as compared to baseline). In addition, G-CSF enhanced ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation (+18%) whereas TRAP-induced platelet aggregation decreased slightly (-14%) in response to filgrastim. While baseline aggregation with all agonists was only slightly but insignificantly higher in women than in men, this sex difference was enhanced by G-CSF treatment, and became most pronounced for ADP after five days (p<0.001). Enhanced platelet aggregation translated into a 75% increase in platelet activation as measured by circulating soluble P-selectin. G-CSF enhances platelet aggregation and activation in humans. This may put patients suffering from cardiovascular disease and cancer at risk for thrombotic events. PMID:21301783

  18. Giant Cell Arteritis which Developed after the Administration of Granulocyte-colony Stimulating Factor for Cyclic Neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Umeda, Masataka; Ikenaga, Jin; Koga, Tomohiro; Michitsuji, Toru; Shimizu, Toshimasa; Fukui, Shoichi; Nishino, Ayako; Nakasima, Yoshikazu; Kawashiri, Sin-Ya; Iwamoto, Naoki; Ichinose, Kunihiro; Hirai, Yasuko; Tamai, Mami; Nakamura, Hideki; Origuchi, Tomoki; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    A 78-year-old woman diagnosed with cyclic neutropenia 5 years previously had been treated with recombinant granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). She developed fever, tenderness and distension of temporal arteries after the treatment with G-CSF. Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography revealed wall thickening of the temporal arteries. She was therefore diagnosed with giant cell arteritis (GCA). Small vessel vasculitis has been reported as a complication of G-CSF. However, the development of large vessel vasculitis after G-CSF treatment is quite rare. To our knowledge, the present case is the first report of GCA suspected to be associated with coexisting cyclic neutropenia and G-CSF treatment. PMID:27523011

  19. Weekly CODE chemotherapy with recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for relapsed or refractory small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sato, K; Tsuchiya, S; Minato, K; Sunaga, N; Ishihara, S I; Makimoto, T; Naruse, I; Hoshino, H; Watanabe, S; Saitoh, R; Mori, M

    2000-01-01

    We used cisplatin, vincristine, doxorubicin, and etoposide (CODE) plus recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) weekly for salvage chemotherapy in relapsed or refractory small cell lung cancer (SCLC). We reviewed the medical charts of patients between January 1993 and December 1996 at the National Nishi-Gunma Hospital. Twenty patients were treated with salvage chemotherapy. The overall response rate was 55.0%. The median survival time of extensive disease patients from the start of CODE therapy was 23 weeks and the 1-year survival rate was 21.0%. Toxicities were severe, especially in myelosuppression. CODE could be selected as a salvage therapy for chemotherapy- relapsed SCLC cases.

  20. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 enhances pro-angiogenic effect of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yaohong; Shao, Hongwei; Eton, Darwin; Yang, Zhe; Alonso-Diaz, Luis; Zhang, Hongkun; Schulick, Andrew; Livingstone, Alan S.; Yu, Hong

    2008-01-01

    Objective Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) mobilizes bone marrow mononuclear cells into the peripheral circulation. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) enhances the homing of progenitor cells mobilized from the bone marrow and augments neovascularization in ischemic tissue. We hypothesize that SDF-1 will boost the pro-angiogenic effect of G-CSF. Methods and results NIH 3T3 cells retrovirally transduced with SDF-1α gene (NIH 3T3/SDF-1) were used to deliver SDF-1 in vitro and in vivo. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) co-cultured with NIH 3T3/SDF-1 cells using cell culture inserts migrated faster and were less apoptotic compared to those not exposed to SDF-1. NIH 3T3/SDF-1 (106 cells) were injected into the ischemic muscles immediately after resection of the left femoral artery and vein of C57BL/6J mice. G-CSF (25 μg/kg/day) was injected intraperitioneally daily for 3 days after surgery. Blood perfusion was examined using a laser Doppler perfusion imaging system. The perfusion ratio of ischemic/non-ischemic limb increased to 0.57±0.03 and 0.50±0.06 with the treatment of either SDF-1 or G-CSF only, respectively, 3 weeks after surgery, which was significantly higher than the saline-injected control group (0.41±0.01, P<0.05). Combined treatment with both SDF-1 and G-CSF resulted in an even better perfusion ratio of 0.69±0.08 (P<0.05 versus the single treatment groups). Mice were sacrificed 21 days after surgery. Immunostaining and Western blot assay of the tissue lysates showed that the injected NIH 3T3/SDF-1 survived and expressed SDF-1. CD34+ cells were detected with immunostaining, capillary density was assessed with alkaline phosphatase staining, and the apoptosis of muscle cells was viewed using an in situ cell death detection kit. More CD34+ cells, increased capillary density, and less apoptotic muscle cells were found in both G-CSF and SDF-1 treated group (P<0.05 versus other groups). Conclusion Combination of G-CSF-mediated progenitor cell

  1. Administration of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) for the intracranial hemorrhage in two dogs: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kang, M H; Park, H M

    2016-01-01

    Two dogs with generalized seizures were evaluated. The dogs were diagnosed with traumatic intracranial hemorrhages based on the history, neurological examinations, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain. Treatment was started with oxygen, prednisolone and anticonvulsant agents. No further seizure activity was observed after treatment in both dogs, however cushing reflex was detected in case 1 and a left-sided hemi-paresis was detected in case 2. Further supportive treatment with recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) was attempted. No abnormal signs were noted in either of the dogs and no recurrence was noted 16 and 14 months later, in case 1 and 2, respectively. These cases indicate that a combination of rhG-CSF treatment with previous therapy could be used in dogs with traumatic brain injury. PMID:27656233

  2. Administration of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) for the intracranial hemorrhage in two dogs: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kang, M. H.; Park, H. M.

    2016-01-01

    Two dogs with generalized seizures were evaluated. The dogs were diagnosed with traumatic intracranial hemorrhages based on the history, neurological examinations, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain. Treatment was started with oxygen, prednisolone and anticonvulsant agents. No further seizure activity was observed after treatment in both dogs, however cushing reflex was detected in case 1 and a left-sided hemi-paresis was detected in case 2. Further supportive treatment with recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) was attempted. No abnormal signs were noted in either of the dogs and no recurrence was noted 16 and 14 months later, in case 1 and 2, respectively. These cases indicate that a combination of rhG-CSF treatment with previous therapy could be used in dogs with traumatic brain injury.

  3. Administration of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) for the intracranial hemorrhage in two dogs: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kang, M. H.; Park, H. M.

    2016-01-01

    Two dogs with generalized seizures were evaluated. The dogs were diagnosed with traumatic intracranial hemorrhages based on the history, neurological examinations, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain. Treatment was started with oxygen, prednisolone and anticonvulsant agents. No further seizure activity was observed after treatment in both dogs, however cushing reflex was detected in case 1 and a left-sided hemi-paresis was detected in case 2. Further supportive treatment with recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) was attempted. No abnormal signs were noted in either of the dogs and no recurrence was noted 16 and 14 months later, in case 1 and 2, respectively. These cases indicate that a combination of rhG-CSF treatment with previous therapy could be used in dogs with traumatic brain injury. PMID:27656233

  4. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor administration to healthy volunteers: analysis of the immediate activating effects on circulating neutrophils.

    PubMed

    de Haas, M; Kerst, J M; van der Schoot, C E; Calafat, J; Hack, C E; Nuijens, J H; Roos, D; van Oers, R H; von dem Borne, A E

    1994-12-01

    In four healthy volunteers, we analyzed in detail the immediate in vivo effects on circulating neutrophils of subcutaneous administration of 300 micrograms of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). Neutrophil activation was assessed by measurement of degranulation. Mobilization of secretory vesicles was shown by a decrease in leukocyte alkaline phosphatase content of the circulating neutrophils. Furthermore, shortly postinjection, Fc gamma RIII was found to be upregulated from an intracellular pool that we identified by immunoelectron microscopy as secretory vesicles. Intravascular release of specific granules was shown by increased plasma levels of lactoferrin and by upregulation of the expression of CD66b and CD11b on circulating neutrophils. Moreover, measurement of fourfold elevated plasma levels of elastase, bound to its physiologic inhibitor alpha 1-antitrypsin, indicated mobilization of azurophil granules. However, no expression of CD63, a marker of azurophil granules, was observed on circulating neutrophils. G-CSF--induced mobilization of secretory vesicles and specific granules could be mimicked in whole blood cultures in vitro, in contrast to release of azurophil granules. Therefore, we postulate that the most activated neutrophils leave the circulation, as observed shortly postinjection, and undergo subsequent stimulation in the endothelial microenvironment, resulting in mobilization of azurophil granules. Our data demonstrate that G-CSF should be regarded as a potent immediate activator of neutrophils in vivo.

  5. Effects of a granulocyte colony stimulating factor, Neulasta, in mini pigs exposed to total body proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanzari, Jenine K.; Krigsfeld, Gabriel S.; Shuman, Anne L.; Diener, Antonia K.; Lin, Liyong; Mai, Wilfried; Kennedy, Ann R.

    2015-04-01

    Astronauts could be exposed to solar particle event (SPE) radiation, which is comprised mostly of proton radiation. Proton radiation is also a treatment option for certain cancers. Both astronauts and clinical patients exposed to ionizing radiation are at risk for loss of white blood cells (WBCs), which are the body's main defense against infection. In this report, the effect of Neulasta treatment, a granulocyte colony stimulating factor, after proton radiation exposure is discussed. Mini pigs exposed to total body proton irradiation at a dose of 2 Gy received 4 treatments of either Neulasta or saline injections. Peripheral blood cell counts and thromboelastography parameters were recorded up to 30 days post-irradiation. Neulasta significantly improved WBC loss, specifically neutrophils, in irradiated animals by approximately 60% three days after the first injection, compared to the saline treated, irradiated animals. Blood cell counts quickly decreased after the last Neulasta injection, suggesting a transient effect on WBC stimulation. Statistically significant changes in hemostasis parameters were observed after proton radiation exposure in both the saline and Neulasta treated irradiated groups, as well as internal organ complications such as pulmonary changes. In conclusion, Neulasta treatment temporarily alleviates proton radiation-induced WBC loss, but has no effect on altered hemostatic responses.

  6. Effects of a granulocyte colony stimulating factor, Neulasta, in mini pigs exposed to total body proton irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Sanzari, Jenine K.; Krigsfeld, Gabriel S.; Shuman, Anne L.; Diener, Antonia K.; Lin, Liyong; Mai, Wilfried; Kennedy, Ann R.

    2015-01-01

    Astronauts could be exposed to solar particle event (SPE) radiation, which is comprised mostly of proton radiation. Proton radiation is also a treatment option for certain cancers. Both astronauts and clinical patients exposed to ionizing radiation are at risk for white blood cell (WBC) loss, which are the body’s main defense against infection. In this report, the effect of Neulasta treatment, a granulocyte colony stimulating factor, after proton radiation exposure is discussed. Mini pigs exposed to total body proton irradiation at a dose of 2 Gy received 4 treatments of either Neulasta or saline injections. Peripheral blood cell counts and thromboelastography parameters were recorded up to 30 days post-irradiation. Neulasta significantly improved white blood cell (WBC), specifically neutrophil, loss in irradiated animals by approximately 60% three days after the first injection, compared to the saline treated irradiated animals. Blood cell counts quickly decreased after the last Neulasta injection, suggesting a transient effect on WBC stimulation. Statistically significant changes in hemostasis parameters were observed after proton radiation exposure in both the saline and Neulasta treated irradiated groups, as well internal organ complications such as pulmonary changes. In conclusion, Neulasta treatment temporarily alleviates proton radiation-induced WBC loss, but has no effect on altered hemostatic responses. PMID:25909052

  7. Randomized Trial of Two Dosages of Prophylactic Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor after Induction Chemotherapy in Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Inaba, Hiroto; Cao, Xueyuan; Pounds, Stanley; Pui, Ching-Hon; Rubnit, Jeffrey E.; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Razzouk, Bassem I.

    2010-01-01

    Background Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is effective in accelerating neutrophil recovery after intensive chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, the optimal G-CSF dosage for patients with AML has not been determined. To our knowledge, G-CSF dosages have not been compared in a randomized AML study. Methods Patients enrolled on the St. Jude AML97 protocol who remained on study after window therapy were eligible to participate. The effect of the dosage of G-CSF given after induction chemotherapy courses 1 and 2 was analyzed in 46 patients randomly assigned in a double-blinded manner to receive 5 or 10 μg/kg/day of G-CSF. The number of days of G-CSF treatment, neutropenia (absolute neutrophil count < 0.5 × 109/L), and hospitalization; the number of episodes of febrile neutropenia, grade 2-4 infection, and antimicrobial therapy; transfusion requirements; the cost of supportive care; and survival were compared between the two study arms. Results We found no statistically significant difference between the two arms in any of the endpoints measured. Conclusions The higher G-CSF dosage (10 μg/kg/day) offers no greater benefit than the lower dosage (5 μg/kg/day) in patients undergoing intensive chemotherapy for AML. PMID:21381017

  8. GRANULOCYTE COLONY-STIMULATING FACTOR: MOLECULAR MECHANISMS OF ACTION DURING STEADY STATE AND ‘EMERGENCY’ HEMATOPOIESIS

    PubMed Central

    Panopoulos, Athanasia D.; Watowich, Stephanie S.

    2008-01-01

    Neutrophils are phagocytes whose principal function is to maintain anti-bacterial immunity. Neutrophils ingest and kill invading bacteria, releasing cytotoxic, chemotactic and inflammatory mediators at sites of infection. This serves to control the immediate host immune response and attract other cells, such as macrophages and dendritic cells, which are important for establishing long-term adaptive immunity. Neutrophils thus contribute to both the initiation and the maintenance of inflammation at sites of infection. Aberrant neutrophil activity is deleterious; suppressed responses can cause extreme susceptibility to infection while overactivation can lead to excessive inflammation and tissue damage. This review will focus on neutrophil regulation by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), the principal cytokine controlling neutrophil development and function. The review will emphasize the molecular aspects of G-CSF-driven granulopoiesis in steady state (healthy) conditions and during demand-driven or ‘emergency’ conditions elicited by infection or clinical administration of G-CSF. Understanding the molecular control of granulopoiesis will aid in the development of new approaches designed to treat disorders of neutrophil production and function. PMID:18400509

  9. Effect of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) on IVF outcomes in infertile women: An RCT

    PubMed Central

    Eftekhar, Maryam; Hosseinisadat, Robabe; Baradaran, Ramesh; Naghshineh, Elham

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite major advances in assisted reproductive techniques, the implantation rates remain relatively low. Some studies have demonstrated that intrauterine infusion of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) improves implantation in infertile women. Objective: To assess the G-CSF effects on IVF outcomes in women with normal endometrial thickness. Materials and methods: In this randomized controlled clinical trial, 100 infertile women with normal endometrial thickness who were candidate for IVF were evaluated in two groups. Exclusion criteria were positive history of repeated implantation failure (RIF), endocrine disorders, severe endometriosis, congenital or acquired uterine anomaly and contraindication for G-CSF (renal disease, sickle cell disease, or malignancy). In G-CSF group (n=50), 300 µg trans cervical intrauterine of G-CSF was administered at the oocyte retrieval day. Controls (n=50) were treated with standard protocol. Chemical, clinical and ongoing pregnancy rates, implantation rate, and miscarriage rate were compared between groups. Results: Number of total and mature oocytes (MII), two pronuclei (2PN), total embryos, transferred embryos, quality of transferred embryos, and fertilization rate did not differ significantly between two groups. So there were no significant differences between groups in chemical, clinical and ongoing pregnancy rate, implantation rate, and miscarriage rate Conclusion: our result showed in normal IVF patients with normal endometrial thickness, the intrauterine infusion of G-CSF did not improve pregnancy outcomes. PMID:27326420

  10. Phenotypic features of first-generation transgenic goats for human granulocyte-colony stimulation factor production in milk.

    PubMed

    Batista, Ribrio I T P; Melo, Carlos H S; Souza-Fabjan, Joanna M G; Teixeira, Dárcio I A; Melo, Luciana M; Freitas, Vicente J F

    2014-11-01

    Human granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (hG-CSF) is a hematopoietic growth factor used in neutropenic patients. It is produced in transgenic bacteria or cultured mammalian cells. As an alternative, we now show that hG-CSF can be expressed in the mammary gland of first-generation (F1) transgenic goats during induced lactation. Despite lower milk production, transgenic females presented a similar milk composition (fat, protein and lactose) when compared to non-transgenic (p > 0.05) ones. The mean concentration (±SD) of recombinant hG-CSF in milk during lactation was 360 ± 178 µg ml(-1). All clinical parameters, as well as kidney and liver function, indicated that F1 transgenic goats were healthy. Additionally, no ectopic hG-CSF expression was detected in studied tissues of F1 transgenic males. Thus, F1 hG-CSF-transgenic goats can express the recombinant protein in milk at quantities compatible with their use as bioreactors in a commercial-scale protein-production program.

  11. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor decreases the extent of ovarian damage caused by cisplatin in an experimental rat model

    PubMed Central

    Akdemir, Ali; Akman, Levent; Ergenoglu, Ahment Mete; Yeniel, Ahmet Ozgur; Erbas, Oytun; Yavasoglu, Altug; Terek, Mustafa Cosan; Taskiran, Dilek

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) can decrease the extent of ovarian follicle loss caused by cisplatin treatment. Methods Twenty-one adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were used. Fourteen rats were administered 2 mg/kg/day cisplatin by intraperitoneal injection twice per week for five weeks (total of 20 mg/kg). Half of the rats (n=7) were treated with 1 mL/kg/day physiological saline, and the other half (n=7) were treated with 100 µg/kg/day G-CSF. The remaining rats (n=7, control group) received no therapy. The animals were then euthanized, and both ovaries were obtained from all animals, fixed in 10% formalin, and stored at 4℃ for paraffin sectioning. Blood samples were collected by cardiac puncture and stored at -30℃ for hormone assays. Results All follicle counts (primordial, primary, secondary, and tertiary) and serum anti-Müllerian hormone levels were significantly increased in the cisplatin+G-CSF group compared to the cisplatin+physiological saline group. Conclusion G-CSF was beneficial in decreasing the severity of follicle loss in an experimental rat model of cisplatin chemotherapy. PMID:25142624

  12. Intranasal Delivery of Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Enhances Its Neuroprotective Effects Against Ischemic Brain Injury in Rats.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bao-liang; He, Mei-qing; Han, Xiang-yu; Sun, Jing-yi; Yang, Ming-feng; Yuan, Hui; Fan, Cun-dong; Zhang, Shuai; Mao, Lei-lei; Li, Da-wei; Zhang, Zong-yong; Zheng, Cheng-bi; Yang, Xiao-yi; Li, Yang V; Stetler, R Anne; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a hematopoietic growth factor with strong neuroprotective properties. However, it has limited capacity to cross the blood-brain barrier and thus potentially limiting its protective capacity. Recent studies demonstrated that intranasal drug administration is a promising way in delivering neuroprotective agents to the central nervous system. The current study therefore aimed at determining whether intranasal administration of G-CSF increases its delivery to the brain and its neuroprotective effect against ischemic brain injury. Transient focal cerebral ischemia in rat was induced with middle cerebral artery occlusion. Our resulted showed that intranasal administration is 8-12 times more effective than subcutaneous injection in delivering G-CSF to cerebrospinal fluid and brain parenchyma. Intranasal delivery enhanced the protective effects of G-CSF against ischemic injury in rats, indicated by decreased infarct volume and increased recovery of neurological function. The neuroprotective mechanisms of G-CSF involved enhanced upregulation of HO-1 and reduced calcium overload following ischemia. Intranasal G-CSF application also promoted angiogenesis and neurogenesis following brain ischemia. Taken together, G-CSF is a legitimate neuroprotective agent and intranasal administration of G-CSF is more effective in delivery and neuroprotection and could be a practical approach in clinic.

  13. Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule-1 regulates granulopoiesis by inhibition of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hao; Shively, John E

    2010-10-29

    Although carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule-1 (CEACAM1) is an activation marker for neutrophils and delays neutrophil apoptosis, the role of CEACAM1 in granulopoiesis and neutrophil-dependent host immune responses has not been investigated. CEACAM1 expression correlated with granulocytic differentiation, and Ceacam1(-/-) mice developed neutrophilia because of loss of the Src-homology-phosphatase-1 (SHP-1)-dependent inhibition of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor (G-CSFR) signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat3) pathway provided by CEACAM1. Moreover, Ceacam1(-/-) mice were hypersensitive to Listeria Monocytogenes (LM) infection with an accelerated mortality. Reintroduction of CEACAM1 into Ceacam1(-/-) bone marrow restored normal granulopoiesis and host sensitivity to LM infection, while mutation of its immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs) abrogated this restoration. shRNA-mediated reduction of Stat3 amounts rescued normal granulopoiesis, attenuating host sensitivity to LM infection in Ceacam1(-/-) mice. Thus, CEACAM1 acted as a coinhibitory receptor for G-CSFR regulating granulopoiesis and host innate immune response to bacterial infections.

  14. Enhanced expression of DNA topoisomerase II by recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in human leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Towatari, M; Ito, Y; Morishita, Y; Tanimoto, M; Kawashima, K; Morishima, Y; Andoh, T; Saito, H

    1990-11-15

    The effect of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on DNA topoisomerase II (topo II) expression was studied in two human acute myelogenous leukemia cell lines, NKM-1 and NOMO-1, which express G-CSF receptor and proliferate in response to exogenous G-CSF. Northern blot analysis revealed that the level of topo II mRNA in 16-h stimulated cells in serum-free medium with G-CSF (10 ng/ml) was approximately 2-fold higher than that in cells without G-CSF. Enhanced topo II mRNA expression was detectable within 3 h after the addition of G-CSF. Topo II activity in crude nuclear extracts from 16-h G-CSF-stimulated cells was also found to be approximately 2-fold greater than that from unstimulated cells. According to in vitro cytotoxic assay, the sensitivity of G-CSF-stimulated cells to intercalating (daunorubicin) and nonintercalating (etoposide) topo II-targeting drugs increased significantly, whereas no enhancement of sensitivity was observed with an alkylating agent (4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide). The augmented drug sensitivity observed was not due to the increased level of drug transport, as suggested by the similar extent of [3H]etoposide uptake between G-CSF-stimulated and unstimulated cells. By measuring the topo II mRNA and the cytotoxicity of the above mentioned drugs, we obtained essentially the same results in G-CSF-responsive leukemia cells isolated from three acute myeloblastic leukemia patients, as observed in the cultured cell lines. These findings strongly suggest that the sensitivity to "topo II-targeting drugs" could be augmented by exogenous G-CSF through elevated topo II activity in G-CSF-responsive leukemia cells. PMID:1699657

  15. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor impairs CD8(+) T cell functionality by interfering with central activation elements.

    PubMed

    Bunse, C E; Tischer, S; Lahrberg, J; Oelke, M; Figueiredo, C; Blasczyk, R; Eiz-Vesper, B

    2016-07-01

    Besides mobilizing stem cells into the periphery, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been shown to influence various types of innate and adaptive immune cells. For example, it impairs the effector function of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). It is assumed that this effect is mediated indirectly by monocytes, regulatory T cells and immunomodulatory cytokines influenced by G-CSF. In this study, isolated G-CSF-treated CD8(+) T cells were stimulated antigen-dependently with peptide-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC)-coupled artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPCs) or stimulated antigen-independently with anti-CD3/CD28 stimulator beads. By measuring the changes in interferon (IFN)-γ and granzyme B expression at the mRNA and protein level, we showed for the first time that G-CSF has a direct effect on CD8(+) CTLs, which was confirmed based on the reduced production of IFN-γ and granzyme B by the cytotoxic T cell line TALL-104 after G-CSF treatment. By investigating further elements affected by G-CSF in CTLs from stem cell donors and untreated controls, we found a decreased phosphorylation of extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase (Lck) and CD3ζ after G-CSF treatment. Additionally, miRNA-155 and activation marker expression levels were reduced. In summary, our results show that G-CSF directly influences the effector function of cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells and affects various elements of T cell activation. PMID:26990855

  16. Up-regulation of transferrin receptor gene expression by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in human myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Morishita, Y; Kataoka, T; Towatari, M; Ito, T; Inoue, H; Ogura, M; Morishima, Y; Saito, H

    1990-12-15

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) enhanced surface transferrin receptor (TfR) expression in two human myeloid leukemia cell lines, NKM-1 and NOMO-1, which possess G-CSF receptors. Radioligand-binding assay revealed that 10 ng/ml G-CSF significantly increased TfR to 186 +/- 20 and 276 +/- 38% of control for NKM-1 cells and NOMO-1 cells, respectively, in a 24-h culture. Scatchard analysis showed the increase of transferrin (Tf)-binding sites but no change in the receptor affinity. The enhanced TfR expression was not mediated either by the kinetic change of receptor cycling or by cellular iron content. Immunoprecipitation with anti-TfR antibody was used, and the increased biosynthesis of the receptor was demonstrated in G-CSF-stimulated cells. Northern blot analysis showed a 2- to 3-fold increase of TfR mRNA of NKM-1 cells cultured in medium containing Tf and G-CSF, whereas the mRNA declined without G-CSF. The effect of G-CSF on the TfR mRNA was observed within 2 h, which preceded the increase of surface TfR and the transition to the S phase of the cell cycle. G-CSF also potentiated TfR expression in freshly obtained myeloid leukemia cells. The present study shows up-regulation of TfR expression by G-CSF in myeloid leukemia cells and provides evidence that the regulation is mediated by controlling the steady-state level of the mRNA. PMID:1701357

  17. A novel combinatorial therapy with pulp stem cells and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for total pulp regeneration.

    PubMed

    Iohara, Koichiro; Murakami, Masashi; Takeuchi, Norio; Osako, Yohei; Ito, Masataka; Ishizaka, Ryo; Utunomiya, Shinji; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Matsushita, Kenji; Nakashima, Misako

    2013-07-01

    Treatment of deep caries with pulpitis is a major challenge in dentistry. Stem cell therapy represents a potential strategy to regenerate the dentin-pulp complex, enabling conservation and restoration of teeth. The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of pulp stem cell transplantation as a prelude for the impending clinical trials. Clinical-grade pulp stem cells were isolated and expanded according to good manufacturing practice conditions. The absence of contamination, abnormalities/aberrations in karyotype, and tumor formation after transplantation in an immunodeficient mouse ensured excellent quality control. After autologous transplantation of pulp stem cells with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) in a dog pulpectomized tooth, regenerated pulp tissue including vasculature and innervation completely filled in the root canal, and regenerated dentin was formed in the coronal part and prevented microleakage up to day 180. Transplantation of pulp stem cells with G-CSF yielded a significantly larger amount of regenerated dentin-pulp complex compared with transplantation of G-CSF or stem cells alone. Also noteworthy was the reduction in the number of inflammatory cells and apoptotic cells and the significant increase in neurite outgrowth compared with results without G-CSF. The transplanted stem cells expressed angiogenic/neurotrophic factors. It is significant that G-CSF together with conditioned medium of pulp stem cells stimulated cell migration and neurite outgrowth, prevented cell death, and promoted immunosuppression in vitro. Furthermore, there was no evidence of toxicity or adverse events. In conclusion, the combinatorial trophic effects of pulp stem cells and G-CSF are of immediate utility for pulp/dentin regeneration, demonstrating the prerequisites of safety and efficacy critical for clinical applications.

  18. Efficient Process Development of Recombinant Human Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (rh-GCSF) Production in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Babaeipour, Valiollah; Khanchezar, Sirwan; Mofid, Mohammad Reza; Pesaran Hagi Abbas, Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: The protein hormone granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF) stimulates the production of white blood cells and plays an important role in medical treatment of cancer patients. Methods: An efficient process was developed for heterologous expression of the human GCSF in E. coli BL21 (DE3). The feeding rate was adjusted to achieve the maximum attainable specific growth rate under critical value. In this method, specific growth rate was maintained at the maximum value of 0.55 h-1 at the beginning of feeding to 0.4 h-1 at the induction time. Recombinant human GCSF (rh-GCSF) was produced as inclusion body. At first, inclusion bodies were released by cell disruption and then washed, solubilized and refolded. Finally, the rh-GCSF was purified by cation exchange chromatography. Results: Obviouly, higher specific growth rate decreases process time and consequently increases productivity. The final concentration of biomass and GCSF was achieved 126 g DCW.l-1 and 32.1 g.l-1. Also, the final specific yield (YP/X) and total productivity of rh-GCSF were obtained 254 mg.g-1 DCW and 1.83 g.l-1.h-1, respectively. According to the available data, this is one of the highest YP/X and productivity that has been reported for any human protein which is expressed in E. coli. Recovery yield of purification process was %40 and purity of recombinant protein was over than 99%. The circular dichroism spectra of purified rh-GCSF, Neupogen® and PD-Grastim showed that all proteins have a similar secondary structure. Conclusion: Modified exponential feeding strategy for fed-batch cultivation of recombinant E. coli, results in minimum fed-batch duration and maximum productivity. PMID:25864815

  19. Immunomodulation Induced by Stem Cell Mobilization and Harvesting in Healthy Donors: Increased Systemic Osteopontin Levels after Treatment with Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor

    PubMed Central

    Melve, Guro Kristin; Ersvaer, Elisabeth; Akkök, Çiğdem Akalın; Ahmed, Aymen Bushra; Kristoffersen, Einar K.; Hervig, Tor; Bruserud, Øystein

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral blood stem cells from healthy donors mobilized by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and harvested by leukapheresis are commonly used for allogeneic stem cell transplantation. The frequency of severe graft versus host disease is similar for patients receiving peripheral blood and bone marrow allografts, even though the blood grafts contain more T cells, indicating mobilization-related immunoregulatory effects. The regulatory phosphoprotein osteopontin was quantified in plasma samples from healthy donors before G-CSF treatment, after four days of treatment immediately before and after leukapheresis, and 18–24 h after apheresis. Myeloma patients received chemotherapy, combined with G-CSF, for stem cell mobilization and plasma samples were prepared immediately before, immediately after, and 18–24 h after leukapheresis. G-CSF treatment of healthy stem cell donors increased plasma osteopontin levels, and a further increase was seen immediately after leukapheresis. The pre-apheresis levels were also increased in myeloma patients compared to healthy individuals. Finally, in vivo G-CSF exposure did not alter T cell expression of osteopontin ligand CD44, and in vitro osteopontin exposure induced only small increases in anti-CD3- and anti-CD28-stimulated T cell proliferation. G-CSF treatment, followed by leukapheresis, can increase systemic osteopontin levels, and this effect may contribute to the immunomodulatory effects of G-CSF treatment. PMID:27447610

  20. Improved Production and Characterization of Recombinant Human Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor from E. coli under Optimized Downstream Processes.

    PubMed

    Vemula, Sandeep; Thunuguntla, Rahul; Dedaniya, Akshay; Kokkiligadda, Sujana; Palle, Chaitanya; Ronda, Srinivasa Reddy

    2015-04-01

    This work reports the upstream and downstream process of recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3)pLysS. The fed batch mode was selected for the maximum output of biomass (6.4g/L) and purified rhG-CSF (136mg/L) under suitable physicochemical environment. The downstream processing steps viz., recovery, solubilization, refolding and concentration were optimized in this study. The maximum rhG-CSF inclusion bodies recovery yield (97%) was accomplished with frequent homogenization and sonication procedure. An efficient solubilization (96%) of rhG-CSF inclusion bodies were observed with 8M urea at pH 9.5. Refolding efficiency studies showed maximum refolding ⩾86% and ⩾84% at 20°C and pH 9 respectively. The renatured protein solution was concentrated, clarified and partially purified (⩾95%) by the cross flow filtration technique. The concentrated protein was further purified by a single step size exclusion chromatography with ⩾98% purity. The characterization of purified rhG-CSF molecular mass as evidenced by SDS-PAGE, western blot and LC/MS analysis was shown to be 18.8kDa. The secondary structure of rhG-CSF was evaluated by the CD spectroscopic technique based on the helical structural components. The biological activity of the purified rhG-CSF showed a similar activity of cell proliferation with the standard rhG-CSF. Overall, the results demonstrate an optimized downstream process for obtaining high yields of biologically active rhG-CSF.

  1. Effect of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on efficacy of radiation therapy in tumor-bearing rats

    SciTech Connect

    Koji Kabaya; Masahiko Watanabe; Masaru Kusaka; Hiromichi Akahori; Masatoshi Seki; Masato Fushiki

    1994-07-01

    The effect of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on radiation-induced neutropenia and on growth of transplanted tumors treated by irradiation was investigated using tumor-bearing rats as a model for radiation therapy. In a preliminary study using normal rats, neutropenia induced by upper hemi-body irradiation at 3 Gy/day 5 times a week for 3 weeks was prevented by consecutive subcutaneous injections of rhG-CSF at 100 {mu}g/kg/day. Rats bearing Walker-256, a mammary tumor, were scheduled to receive upper hemibody irradiation at 3 Gy/day for 15 times in 3 weeks if white blood cell (WBC) counts were maintained above 3,000/{mu}l. In control tumor-bearing rats not receiving rhG-CSF, irradiation was often withheld because of the decrease in WBC counts below 3,000/{mu}l. In contrast, a decrease in WBC counts below 3,000/{mu}l was rarely found in tumor-bearing rats injected daily with rhG-CSF. The average number of radiation treatments in control rats and rats treated with rhG-CSF was about 8 and 14, respectively, out of the scheduled 15 treatments in 3 weeks. Treatment with rgG-CSF made it possible to complete the radiation therapy regimen and thus inhibit the growth of the transplanted tumor more effectively. These results suggest that rgG-CSF may be useful to ensure radiation therapy on schedule in cancer patients. 20 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Clinical practice in febrile neutropenia risk assessment and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor primary prophylaxis of febrile neutropenia in Poland

    PubMed Central

    Chmielowska, Ewa; Filipczyk-Cisarż, Emilia; Krzemieniecki, Krzysztof; Leśniewski-Kmak, Krzysztof; Litwiniuk, Maria M.; Wieruszewska-Kowalczyk, Karolina; Kosno-Kruszewska, Elżbieta

    2014-01-01

    Aim of the study The first aim was to investigate the knowledge and awareness of oncologists concerning febrile neutropenia (FN) risk assessment and indications for granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) primary prophylaxis (PP), based on current therapeutic guidelines (PTOK and EORTC). The second aim was to educate the oncologists on best practices for risk assessment and neutropenia management. Material and methods The project participants included 169 oncologists from 7 regions working in large specialist oncological centres, university hospitals, regional and city hospitals, specialist outpatient clinics, and oncological wards in small local hospitals. The participants completed a questionnaire based on seven prepared clinical cases of patients with different tumour types and patient characteristics, receiving chemotherapy (CT), and with different levels of FN risk. Participants answered questions related to FN risk assessment and G-CSF use. After completing the questionnaire, the participants proceeded to an educational module in which they were provided with an analysis of correct diagnostic and therapeutic procedures according to the PTOK and EORTC guidelines. Results and Conclusions Febrile neutropenia risk assessment was found to be a routine procedure performed for over 90% of the clinical cases by the participant oncologists. However, the FN risk assessment of clinical cases was correct and consistent with therapeutic guidelines in only 65% of responses. Indications for G-CSF PP were properly identified in 76% of responses and it appeared that indications for G-CSF PP were more likely to be correctly identified in patients receiving high-risk or low-risk regimens than in those receiving intermediate-risk regimens, where the decision to give G-CSF PP is based on additional assessment of patient risk factors. The vast majority of participants who correctly identified the need for PP administered G-CSF in accordance with the dose and schedule

  3. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor for acute-on-chronic liver failure: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chavez-Tapia, Norberto C; Mendiola-Pastrana, Indira; Ornelas-Arroyo, Victoria J; Noreña-Herrera, Camilo; Vidaña-Perez, Desiree; Delgado-Sanchez, Guadalupe; Uribe, Misael; Barrientos-Gutierrez, Tonatiuh

    2015-01-01

    Acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) is associated with increased short and long-term mortality. Animal models of liver failure have demonstrated that granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) accelerates the liver regeneration process and improves survival. However, clinical evidence regarding the use of G-CSF in ACLF remains scarce. The aim of this study was to assess the benefits and harms of G-CSF in patients with acute-on-chronic liver failure. An electronic search was made in The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE and LILACS up to November 2013. Randomized clinical trials comparing the use of any regimen of G-CSF against placebo or no intervention in patients with ACLF were included. Primary outcomes included overal mortality, mortality due multi-organ failure, and adverse events. Relative risk (RR) and mean difference (MD) were used. Two trials involving 102 patients were included. A significant reduction in short-term overall mortality was observed in patients receiving G-CSF compared to controls (RR 0.56; 95%CI 0.39,0.80). G-CSF failed to reduce mortality secondary to gastrointestinal bleeding (RR 1.45; 95%CI 0.50, 4.27). Adverse effects reported included: fever, rash, herpes zoster, headache and nausea. In conclusion, the use of G-CSF for the treatment of patients with ACLF significantly reduced short-term mortality. While the evidence is still limited, the apparent benefit observed on short-term mortality, mild adverse effects and lack of an alternative therapy make the use of G-CSF in ACLF patients a reasonable alternative when liver transplantation is contraindicated or unavailable.

  4. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) production in hemorrhagic shock requires both the ischemic and resuscitation phase.

    PubMed

    Hierholzer, C; Kelly, E; Billiar, T R; Tweardy, D J

    1997-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is the cytokine that is critical for polymorphonuclear neutrophilic granulocyte (PMN) production as well as being a potent agonist of PMN activation. We have recently reported that in the lung and the liver of rats resuscitated after hemorrhagic shock (HS) G-CSF mRNA expression is induced. It is not known if both phases of HS, the ischemic and the reperfusion phase, are required for G-CSF mRNA induction. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that the upregulation of G-CSF mRNA expression is the consequence of HS followed by resuscitation and that ischemia alone is insufficient to induce G-CSF mRNA expression in the affected organs. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to resuscitated and unresuscitated shock protocols of varying severity. Control animals were subjected to anesthesia and all surgical preparations except for hemorrhage. Lungs and livers were isolated and their RNA extracted. Using semiquantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), we demonstrated that G-CSF mRNA was induced in the lung and liver of shock animals above the level observed in control animals. Upregulation of G-CSF mRNA relative to controls occurred only in animals undergoing resuscitated HS and not in ones subjected to unresuscitated HS. These results indicate that G-CSF production specific for the hemorrhage component of shock is dependent on resuscitation. As a consequence, the production of this cytokine may be decreased through modifications in the resuscitation protocols.

  5. Identification of a novel Stat3 recruitment and activation motif within the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, A; Dyer, K F; Cascio, M; Mietzner, T A; Tweardy, D J

    1999-01-01

    Stat3 is essential for early embryonic development and for myeloid differentiation induced by the cytokines granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Two isoforms of Stat3 have been identified, (p92) and beta (p83), which have distinct transcriptional and biological functions. Activation of both Stat3 and Stat3beta requires the distal cytoplasmic domain of the G-CSFR, which contains four Tyr at positions 704, 729, 744, and 764. The studies reported here were undertaken to determine which, if any, of these tyrosine residues participated in Stat3/beta recruitment and activation. We showed that Stat3 and Stat3beta were affinity purified using phosphopeptides containing Y704 and Y744 but not by nonphosphorylated peptide analogues or by phosphopeptides containing Y729 and Y764. Complementary results were obtained in studies examining the ability of these peptides to destabilize and inhibit DNA binding of activated Stat3. Both Y704 and Y744 contributed to optimal activation of Stat3/beta in M1 murine myeloid leukemia cells containing wild-type and Y-to-F mutant G-CSFR constructs. Carboxy-terminal to Y704 at the +3 position is Gln; YXXQ represents a consensus Stat3 recruitment and activation motif. Y744 is followed at the +3 position by Cys (C); YXXC, represents a novel motif implicated in the recruitment and activation of Stat3. Modeling of the SH2 domain of Stat3 based on homologous SH2 domains of known structure revealed polar residues whose side chains contact the +3 position. This substitution may confer specificity for the Y704- and Y744-based ligands by allowing H-bond formation between the binding surface and the Gln or Cys found at the respective +3 position.

  6. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor administration to HIV-infected subjects augments reduced leukotriene synthesis and anticryptococcal activity in neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, M J; Phare, S M; George, S; Peters-Golden, M; Kazanjian, P H

    1998-01-01

    Neutrophil (PMN) dysfunction occurs in HIV infection. Leukotrienes (LT) are mediators derived from the 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) pathway that play a role in host defense and are synthesized by PMN. We investigated the synthesis of LT by PMN from HIV-infected subjects. There was a reduction (4.0+/-1.3% of control) in LT synthesis in PMN from HIV-infected compared with normal subjects. This was associated with reduced expression of 5-LO-activating protein (31.2+/-9.6% of normal), but not of 5-LO itself. Since HIV does not directly infect PMN, we considered that these effects were due to reduced release of cytokines, such as granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). We examined the effect of G-CSF treatment (300 microgram daily for 5 d) on eight HIV-infected subjects. PMN were studied in vitro before therapy (day 1) and on days 4 and 7. LTB4 synthesis was increased on day 4 of G-CSF treatment, and returned toward day 1 levels on day 7. 5-LO and 5-LO-activating protein expression were increased in parallel. As a functional correlate to this increase in PMN LT synthesis by G-CSF, we examined the effects on killing of Cryptococcus neoformans. Anticryptococcal activity of PMN from HIV-infected subjects was less than that of PMN from normal subjects. G-CSF treatment improved fungistatic activity of PMN. This increase in antifungal activity was attenuated by in vitro treatment with the LT synthesis inhibitor, MK-886. In conclusion, PMN from HIV-infected subjects demonstrate reduced 5-LO metabolism and antifungal activity in vitro, which was reversed by in vivo G-CSF therapy. PMID:9710433

  7. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor improves Parkinson's disease associated with co-morbid depression: An experimental exploratory study

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Ajay; Chopra, Kanwaljit; Medhi, Bikash

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) in the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD), the second most common neurodegenerative disease characterized by muscle and movement disorder, often associated with depression. PD is very difficult to treat. Hence, the present study was aimed to evaluate the effect of G-CSF in PD associated with depression. Materials and Methods: Adult Wistar male rats weighing about 180-250 g were selected and divided into five groups in parallel designed method namely; control group (n = 5); sham operated group (n = 5); Vehicle group (n = 5); G-CSF group (70 μg/kg, s.c.) (n = 5) and L-DOPA group (n = 5). The rats were treated with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) on day 0 and then treatment was continued for 14 day of L-DOPA/carbidopa, whereas G-CSF (70 μg/kg, s.c.) was given from day 1 to 6. Thereafter, adhesive removal and forced swim tests were conducted to evaluate the behavioral outcome of G-CSF treatment. The finding was correlated and analyzed with Nissl staining findings for the final conclusion. Results: The behavioral parameters were assessed and found to be ameliorate the symptoms of Parkinson's and reduced the depression like behavior in PD. The histological findings were supported the behavioral findings and showed pathological improvement. Conclusion: As a preliminary work, the present study first time suggested that G-CSF have a potential role in PD and associated depression. PMID:24347771

  8. Drugs elevating extracellular adenosine promote regeneration of haematopoietic progenitor cells in severely myelosuppressed mice: their comparison and joint effects with the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Michal; Pospísil, Milan; Znojil, Vladimír; Vacek, Antonín; Weiterova, Lenka; Holá, Jirina; Vácha, Jirí

    2002-01-01

    We tested capabilities of drugs elevating extracellular adenosine and of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) given alone or in combination to modulate regeneration from severe myelosuppression resulting from combined exposure of mice to ionizing radiation and carboplatin. Elevation of extracellular adenosine was induced by joint administration of dipyridamole (DP), a drug inhibiting the cellular uptake of adenosine, and adenosine monophosphate (AMP), serving as an adenosine prodrug. DP+AMP, G-CSF or all these drugs in combination were administered in a 4-d treatment regimen starting on day 3 after induction of myelosuppression. Comparable enhancements of haematopoietic regeneration due to elevation of extracellular adenosine or to action of G-CSF were demonstrated as shown by elevated numbers of haematopoietic progenitor cells for granulocytes/macrophages (GM-CFC) and erythrocytes (BFU-E) in the bone marrow and spleen in early time intervals after termination of the drug treatment, i.e. on days 7 and 10 after induction of myelosuppression. Coadministration of all the drugs further potentiated the restoration of progenitor cell pools in the haematopoietic organs. The effects of the drug treatments on progenitor cells were reflected in the peripheral blood in later time intervals of days 15 and 20 after induction of myelosuppression, especially as significantly elevated numbers of granulocytes and less pronounced elevation of lymphocytes and erythrocytes. The results substantiate the potential of drugs elevating extracellular adenosine for clinical utilization in myelosuppressive states, e.g. those accompanying oncological radio- and chemotherapy.

  9. Tachyplesin III and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor enhance the efficacy of tazobactam/piperacillin in a neutropenic mouse model of polymicrobial peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Cirioni, Oscar; Ghiselli, Roberto; Kamysz, Wojciech; Orlando, Fiorenza; Silvestri, Carmela; Mocchegiani, Federico; Di Matteo, Fabio; Kamysz, Elzbieta; Riva, Alessandra; Rocchi, Marco; Saba, Vittorio; Scalise, Giorgio; Giacometti, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the efficacy of tazobactam/piperacillin (TZP), tachyplesin III and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) in an experimental murine neutropenic intraabdominal infection. BALB/c male mice were rendered neutropenic by intraperitoneal administration of cyclophosphamide on days -4 and -2 pre-infection. Septic shock was induced by cecal ligation and puncture. Animals received intravenously isotonic sodium chloride solution (control group C1), 1mg/kg of tachyplesin III, 120 mg/kg of TZP, 0.1mg/kg of G-CSF, tachyplesin III plus TZP, G-CSF plus TZP and finally tachyplesin III plus G-CSF plus TZP, respectively. Lethality, bacterial growth in blood, peritoneum, spleen, liver, and mesenteric lymph nodes, endotoxin, IL-6 and TNF-alpha concentrations in plasma were evaluated. All compounds reduced the lethality when compared to controls. Endotoxin and cytokine plasma levels were significantly higher in TZP-treated animals compared to tachyplesin III-treated animals. Finally, all drug combinations showed to be the most effective treatment in reducing all variables measured. Interestingly, the strongest results concerning the bacterial growth inhibition, lethality and endotoxemia were obtained when the three compounds were contemporaneously administered. The presence of their positive interaction makes tachyplesin III and G-CSF potentially valuable as an adjuvant for antimicrobial chemotherapy of sepsis.

  10. High pH solubilization and chromatography-based renaturation and purification of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor from inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Fan, Hua; Liu, Jiahua; Wang, Minhong; Wang, Lili; Wang, Chaozhan

    2012-03-01

    Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) is a very efficient therapeutic protein drug which has been widely used in human clinics to treat cancer patients suffering from chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. In this study, rhG-CSF was solubilized from inclusion bodies by using a high-pH solution containing low concentration of urea. It was found that solubilization of the rhG-CSF inclusion bodies greatly depended on the buffer pH employed; alkalic pH significantly favored the solubilization. In addition, when small amount of urea was added to the solution at high pH, the solubilization was further enhanced. After solubilization, the rhG-CSF was renatured with simultaneous purification by using weak anion exchange, strong anion exchange, and hydrophobic interaction chromatography, separately. The results indicated that the rhG-CSF solubilized by the high-pH solution containing low concentration of urea had much higher mass recovery than the one solubilized by 8 M urea when using anyone of the three refolding methods employed in this work. In the case of weak anion exchange chromatography, the high pH solubilized rhG-CSF could get a mass recovery of 73%. The strategy of combining solubilization of inclusion bodies at high pH with refolding of protein using liquid chromatography may become a routine method for protein production from inclusion bodies.

  11. Pretransplant Mobilization with Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Improves B-Cell Reconstitution by Lentiviral Vector Gene Therapy in SCID-X1 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Huston, Marshall W.; Riegman, Adriaan R.A.; Yadak, Rana; van Helsdingen, Yvette; de Boer, Helen; van Til, Niek P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy is a demonstrated effective treatment for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1), but B-cell reconstitution and function has been deficient in many of the gene therapy treated patients. Cytoreductive preconditioning is known to improve HSC engraftment, but in general it is not considered for SCID-X1 since the poor health of most of these patients at diagnosis and the risk of toxicity preclude the conditioning used in standard bone marrow stem cell transplantation. We hypothesized that mobilization of HSC by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) should create temporary space in bone marrow niches to improve engraftment and thereby B-cell reconstitution. In the present pilot study supplementing our earlier preclinical evaluation (Huston et al., 2011), Il2rg−/− mice pretreated with G-CSF were transplanted with wild-type lineage negative (Lin−) cells or Il2rg−/− Lin− cells transduced with therapeutic IL2RG lentiviral vectors. Mice were monitored for reconstitution of lymphocyte populations, level of donor cell chimerism, and antibody responses as compared to 2 Gy total body irradiation (TBI), previously found effective in promoting B-cell reconstitution. The results demonstrate that G-CSF promotes B-cell reconstitution similar to low-dose TBI and provides proof of principle for an alternative approach to improve efficacy of gene therapy in SCID patients without adverse effects associated with cytoreductive conditioning. PMID:25222508

  12. The Role of Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor in the Neutrophilia Observed in the Fetal Inflammatory Response Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Romero, Roberto; Berry, Stanley M.; Hassan, Sonia S.; Yoon, Bo Hyun; Edwin, Samuel; Mazor, Moshe

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Fetal neutrophilia is present in two-thirds of cases with the fetal inflammatory response syndrome (FIRS). The mechanisms responsible for this finding have not been elucidated. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) is the primary physiologic regulator of neutrophil production and plays a key role in the rapid generation and release of neutrophils in stressful conditions (i.e., infection). The objective of this study was to determine: 1) whether FIRS was associated with changes in fetal plasma G-CSF concentrations; and 2) if fetal plasma G-CSF concentrations correlated with fetal neutrophil counts, chorioamnionitis, neonatal morbidity/mortality and cordocentesis-to-delivery interval. STUDY DESIGN Percutaneous umbilical cord blood sampling was performed in a population of patients with preterm labor (n=107). A fetal plasma interleukin-6 (IL-6) concentration >11 pg/mL was used to define FIRS. Cord blood G-CSF was measured by a sensitive and specific immunoassay. An absolute neutrophil count was determined and corrected for gestational age. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, survival analysis and Cox proportional hazard model were employed. RESULTS 1) G-CSF was detected in all fetal blood samples; 2) fetuses with FIRS had a higher median fetal plasma G-CSF concentration than those without FIRS (p<0.001); 3) a fetal plasma G-CSF concentration ≥134 pg/mL (derived from an ROC curve) was associated with a shorter cordocentesis-to-delivery interval, a higher frequency of chorioamnionitis (clinical and histological), intra-amniotic infection, and composite neonatal morbidity/mortality than a fetal plasma concentration below this cut-off; and 4) a fetal plasma G-CSF concentration ≥134 pg/mL was associated with a shorter cordocentesis-to-delivery interval (hazard ratio 3.2; 95% confidence interval 1.8-5.8) after adjusting for confounders. CONCLUSIONS 1) G-CSF concentrations are higher in the peripheral blood of fetuses with FIRS than in

  13. Myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia following adjuvant chemotherapy with and without granulocyte colony-stimulating factors for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Calip, Gregory S; Malmgren, Judith A; Lee, Wan-Ju; Schwartz, Stephen M; Kaplan, Henry G

    2015-11-01

    Risk of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) post-breast cancer treatment with adjuvant chemotherapy and granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF) is not fully characterized. Our objective was to estimate MDS/AML risk associated with specific breast cancer treatments. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of women aged ≥66 years with stage I-III breast cancer between 2001 and 2009 using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare database. Women were classified as receiving treatment with radiation, chemotherapy, and/or G-CSF. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazards models to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) for MDS/AML risk. Among 56,251 breast cancer cases, 1.2 % developed MDS/AML during median follow-up of 3.2 years. 47.1 % of women received radiation and 14.3 % received chemotherapy. Compared to breast cancer cases treated with surgery alone, those treated with chemotherapy (HR = 1.38, 95 %-CI 0.98-1.93) and chemotherapy/radiation (HR = 1.77, 95 %-CI 1.25-2.51) had increased risk of MDS/AML, but not radiation alone (HR = 1.08, 95 % CI 0.86-1.36). Among chemotherapy regimens and G-CSF, MDS/AML risk was differentially associated with anthracycline/cyclophosphamide-containing regimens (HR = 1.86, 95 %-CI 1.33-2.61) and filgrastim (HR = 1.47, 95 %-CI 1.05-2.06), but not pegfilgrastim (HR = 1.10, 95 %-CI 0.73-1.66). We observed increased MDS/AML risk among older breast cancer survivors treated with anthracycline/cyclophosphamide chemotherapy that was enhanced by G-CSF. Although small, this risk warrants consideration when determining adjuvant chemotherapy and neutropenia prophylaxis for breast cancer patients.

  14. Thiotepa cyclophosphamide followed by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor mobilized allogeneic peripheral blood cells in adults with advanced leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bacigalupo, A; Van Lint, M T; Valbonesi, M; Lercari, G; Carlier, P; Lamparelli, T; Gualandi, F; Occhini, D; Bregante, S; Valeriani, A; Piaggio, G; Pitto, A; Benvenuto, F; Figari, O; De Stefano, G; Caimo, A; Sessarego, M

    1996-07-01

    Thirty-one patients (median age, 44 years) with advanced hematologic malignancies were given thiotepa 15 mg/kg, and cyclophosphamide 120 (n = 14) or 150 (n = 17) mg/kg followed by unfractionated peripheral blood stem cell transplants (PBSCT) from genotypically identical siblings (n = 28) or one antigen mismatched family donor (n = 3). Donors were mobilized with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor 5 to 10 microgram/kg/d for 6 days and underwent two to three leukapheresis on days +5, +6, +7. The median cell yield per donor expressed/kg of recipients body weight was as follows: nucleated cells 13 x 10(8)/kg; CD34+ cells 6 x 10(6)/kg; colony-forming unit-granulocyte macrophage 38 x 10(4)/kg, and CD3+ cells 449 x 10(6)/kg. The diagnoses were chronic myeloid leukemia (n = 4), acute myeloid (n = 9) or lymphoid leukemia (n = 2), acute myelofibrosis (n = 2), multiple myeloma (n = 1), lymphoma (n = 6), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (n = 1) myelodysplasia (n = 6). Twenty-eight patients had advanced disease, 29 patients were first grafts, and 2 were second transplants 3 and 9 years after the first. Neutrophil counts of 0.5 x 10(9)/L and platelet counts of 30 x 10(9)/L platelets were both achieved on day +14 (median). Engraftment could be proven by sex markers or DNA polymorphism in 29 of 31 patients: one had early leukemia relapse and one patient was unevaluable because of early death. Acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was scored as minimal or absent (grade 0 to 1) in 14 patients, moderate (grade II) in 13, and severe (grade III to IV) in four. Causes of death were leukemia (n = 4), acute GVHD (n = 4, with associated cytomegalovirus infections in three), sepsis (n = 1), liver failure (n = 1), multiorgan failure (n = 1), and hemorrhage (n = 1). The actuarial transplant mortality is 29%, the actuarial relapse rate 22%. Nineteen patients survive with a median follow up of 288 days (100-690). The actuarial 2-year survival is 57%. Three patients received PBSCT from family

  15. Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 negatively regulates granulocyte colony-stimulating factor production by breast tumor-associated macrophages that mediate tumor angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Samineni, Sridhar; Zhang, Zhifang; Shively, John E

    2013-07-15

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1), a cell adhesion molecule expressed on epithelial cells and activated immune cells, is downregulated in many cancers and plays a role in inhibition of inflammation in part by inhibition of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) production by myeloid cells. As macrophages are associated with a poor prognosis in breast cancer, but play important roles in normal breast, we hypothesized that CEACAM1 downregulation would lead to tumor promotion under inflammatory conditions. Cocultures of proinflammatory M1 macrophages with CEACAM1 negative MCF7 breast cells produced high levels of G-CSF (10 ng/mL) compared to CEACAM1-transfected MCF7/4S cells (1 ng/mL) or anti-inflammatory M2 macrophage cocultures (0.5 or 0.1 ng/mL, MCF7 or MCF7/4S, respectively). The expression of CEACAM1 on M1s was much greater than for M2s and was observed only in cocultures with either MCF7 or MCF7/4S cells. When M1 macrophages were mixed with MCF7 cells and implanted in murine mammary fat pads of nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient mice, tumor size and blood vessel density were significantly greater than MCF7 or MCF7/4S only tumors which were hardly detected after 8 weeks of growth. In contrast, M1 cells had a much reduced effect on MCF7/4S tumor growth and blood vessel density, indicating that the tumor inhibitory effect of CEACAM1 is most likely related to its anti-inflammatory action on inflammatory macrophages. These results support our previous finding that CEACAM1 inhibits both G-CSF production by myeloid cells and G-CSF-stimulated tumor angiogenesis.

  16. Lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP) blockade augments the protective effect of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in a rat sepsis model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Anding; Weiss, Stefanie; Fang, Haoshu; Claus, Ralf A; Rödel, Jürgen; Dirsch, Olaf; Dahmen, Uta

    2015-05-01

    The effect of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on sepsis is discussed controversially in clinical studies. We previously demonstrated that G-CSF treatment induced lipopolysaccharide (LPS) sensitization via up-regulation of LPS-binding protein (LBP). We hypothesized that the futile effect of G-CSF-treatment in sepsis might be due to its ability to up-regulate LBP. Therefore, blockade of LBP may attenuate the G-CSF-induced LPS sensitization and protect animals from polymicrobial sepsis. Endogenous LBP levels were up-regulated by pretreatment with G-CSF, and the LBP protein was blocked by administration of a specific blocking peptide-LBPK95A. Polymicrobial sepsis was induced by intraperitoneal injection of feces slurry. Rats were monitored every 3 up to 72 h to observe the survival rate. Tissue injury, bacterial infiltration, local inflammatory response, and neutrophil infiltration at 0, 2, and 12 h after the septic insult were analyzed. The survival benefit of G-CSF pretreatment was improved when combined with LBPK95A treatment (control vs. G-CSF vs. combi: 36% vs. 56% vs. 93%; P < 0.05). Combined treatment of G-CSF and LBPK95A was associated with the minimal tissue damage. Treatment with LBPK95A significantly inhibited the neutrophil infiltration without interfering with the bacterial clearance. The G-CSF-induced inflammatory sensitization effect was inhibited by LBPK95A, indicated by the decrease of cytokines expression, and the activation of nuclear factor kappa B and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signaling pathway. In conclusion, these results suggested that the effect of prophylactic augmentation of the host's response via G-CSF pretreatment was further enhanced by inhibition of the up-regulation of LBP.

  17. Prevention of corticosteroid-induced suppression of human polymorphonuclear leukocyte-induced damage of Aspergillus fumigatus hyphae by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and gamma interferon.

    PubMed Central

    Roilides, E; Uhlig, K; Venzon, D; Pizzo, P A; Walsh, T J

    1993-01-01

    Neutrophils (PMNs) are a critical line of defense against Aspergillus fumigatus infection. Increased frequency of invasive aspergillosis has been observed in patients receiving corticosteroids, suggesting a deleterious effect of these compounds on PMN antifungal function. To investigate this hypothesis and to determine the potential preventive utility of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), the effects of hydrocortisone (HCS) and dexamethasone (DXS) on PMN-induced damage of Aspergillus fumigatus hyphae were studied with or without pretreatment of PMNs with G-CSF and IFN-gamma. PMNs treated with HCS (> or = 3,000 microM) or DXS (> or = 10 microM) during a 2-h colorimetric tetrazolium metabolic assay (using methylthiotetrazolium) showed suppressed percentage of hyphal damage (P < 0.02). In addition, both HCS (> or = 30 microM) and DXS (> or = 1 microM) significantly suppressed oxidative burst measured as superoxide anion release by PMNs in response to opsonized and nonopsonized hyphae as well as to N-formylmethionyl leucyl phenylalanine. Pretreatment of PMNs with G-CSF (4,000 U/ml) and/or IFN-gamma (100 and 1,000 U/ml) for 90 min prevented the suppression of hyphal damage that occurred in the presence of HCS (3,000 microM; P < 0.01) or DXS (10 microM; P < or = 0.001). G-CSF (4,000 U/ml) and IFN-gamma (100 U/ml) combined had an additive effect on increasing the antifungal activity of HCS-treated but not of DXS-treated PMNs compared with IFN-gamma alone (P = 0.015). Thus, these findings reveal that corticosteroids impair PMN function in response to A. fumigatus and that G-CSF and IFN-gamma prevent this impairment. PMID:7691757

  18. Stem cell mobilisation by granulocyte-colony stimulating factor in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Long-term results of the REVIVAL-2 trial.

    PubMed

    Steppich, Birgit; Hadamitzky, Martin; Ibrahim, Tareq; Groha, Philip; Schunkert, Heribert; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig; Kastrati, Adnan; Ott, Ilka

    2016-04-01

    Treatment with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) mobilises cells from the bone marrow to the peripheral blood. Previous preclinical and early clinical trials may suggest that treatment with G-CSF leads to improved myocardial perfusion and function in acute or chronic ischaemic heart disease. In the REVIVAL-2 study we found that stem cell mobilisation by G-CSF does not influence infarct size, left ventricular function and coronary restenosis in patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI) that underwent successful percutaneous coronary intervention. The objective of the present analysis was to assess the impact of G-CSF treatment on seven-year clinical outcomes from the REVIVAL-2 trial. In the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled REVIVAL-2 study, 114 patients with the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction were enrolled five days after successful reperfusion by percutaneous coronary intervention. Patients were assigned to receive 10 µg/kg G-CSF (n=56) or placebo (n=58) for five days. The primary endpoint for this long-term outcome analysis was the composite of death, myocardial infarction or stroke seven years after randomisation. The endpoint occurred in 14.3 % of patients in the G-CSF group versus 17.2 % assigned to placebo (p=0.67). The combined incidence of death or myocardial infarction occurred in 14.3 % of the patients assigned to G-CSF and 15.5 % of the patients assigned to placebo (p=0.85). In conclusion, these long-term follow-up data show that G-CSF does not improve clinical outcomes of patients with acute myocardial infarction.

  19. Health, economic, and quality-of-life effects of erythropoietin and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for the treatment of myelodysplastic syndromes: a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Casadevall, Nicole; Durieux, Pierre; Dubois, Stéphanie; Hemery, François; Lepage, Eric; Quarré, Marie-Catherine; Damaj, Gandhi; Giraudier, Stéphane; Guerci, Agnès; Laurent, Guy; Dombret, Hervé; Chomienne, Christine; Ribrag, Vincent; Stamatoullas, Aspasia; Marie, Jean-Pierre; Vekhoff, Anne; Maloisel, Frédéric; Navarro, Robert; Dreyfus, François; Fenaux, Pierre

    2004-07-15

    In myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), anemia responds to recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) alone and in combination with recombinant human granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (rHuGCSF) in 10% to 20% and in 35% to 40% of patients, respectively. We randomly divided 60 patients with low-grade anemic MDS and serum EPO levels lower than 500 IU/L (500 mU/mL) into 2 groups: rHuEPO + rHuG-CSF (arm A) and supportive care (arm B). After 12 weeks, those who had erythroid responses were given rHuEPO alone for 40 additional weeks. They were also given rHuG-CSF if they had relapses. A response was considered major if the hemoglobin (Hb) level was 115 g/L (11.5 g/dL) or higher and minor Hb increase was 15 g/L (1.5 g/dL) or more or if it remained stable without transfusion. Ten of 24 patients responded in arm A, and 0 of 26 responded in arm B (P =.01). Eight patients in arm A continued rHuEPO therapy alone, and 6 had relapses. Responses were always restored when rHuG-CSF was reintroduced. Mean direct costs per patient were 26,723 euros (arm A) and 8,746 euros (arm B). Quality of life was assessed with a Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Anemia (FACT-An) scale. Similar percentages of patients from both arms showed significant clinical improvement. rHuEPO plus rHuG-CSF led to responses in 41.7% of MDS patients. This treatment was expensive. No effect on quality of life was demonstrated.

  20. Mobilization and collection of CD34+ cells for autologous transplantation of peripheral blood hematopoietic progenitor cells in children: analysis of two different granulocyte-colony stimulating factor doses

    PubMed Central

    Eid, Kátia Aparecida de Brito; Miranda, Eliana Cristina Martins; Aguiar, Simone dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The use of peripheral hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) is the cell choice in autologous transplantation. The classic dose of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) for mobilization is a single daily dose of 10 μg/kg of patient body weight. There is a theory that higher doses of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor applied twice daily could increase the number of CD34+ cells collected in fewer leukapheresis procedures. Objective The aim of this study was to compare a fractionated dose of 15 μg G-CSF/kg of body weight and the conventional dose of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor in respect to the number of leukapheresis procedures required to achieve a minimum collection of 3 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight. Methods Patients were divided into two groups: Group 10 – patients who received a single daily dose of 10 μg G-CSF/kg body weight and Group 15 – patients who received a fractioned dose of 15 μg G-CSF/kg body weight daily. The leukapheresis procedure was carried out in an automated cell separator. The autologous transplantation was carried out when a minimum number of 3 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight was achieved. Results Group 10 comprised 39 patients and Group 15 comprised 26 patients. A total of 146 apheresis procedures were performed: 110 (75.3%) for Group 10 and 36 (24.7%) for Group 15. For Group 10, a median of three (range: 1–7) leukapheresis procedures and a mean of 8.89 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight (±9.59) were collected whereas for Group 15 the corresponding values were one (range: 1–3) and 5.29 × 106 cells/kg body weight (±4.95). A statistically significant difference was found in relation to the number of apheresis procedures (p-value <0.0001). Conclusions To collect a minimum target of 3 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight, the administration of a fractionated dose of 15 μg G-CSF/kg body weight significantly decreased the number of leukapheresis procedures performed. PMID:26041417

  1. Cell acidification in apoptosis: granulocyte colony-stimulating factor delays programmed cell death in neutrophils by up-regulating the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase.

    PubMed Central

    Gottlieb, R A; Giesing, H A; Zhu, J Y; Engler, R L; Babior, B M

    1995-01-01

    Neutrophils in tissue culture spontaneously undergo programmed cell death (apoptosis), a process characterized by well-defined morphological alterations affecting the cell nucleus. We found that these morphological changes were preceded by intracellular acidification and that acidification and the apoptotic changes in nuclear morphology were both delayed by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). Among the agents that defend neutrophils against intracellular acidification is a vacuolar H(+)-ATPase that pumps protons out of the cytosol. When this proton pump was inhibited by bafilomycin A1, G-CSF no longer protected the neutrophils against apoptosis. We conclude that G-CSF delays apoptosis in neutrophils by up-regulating the cells' vacuolar H(+)-ATPase and that intracellular acidification is an early event in the apoptosis program. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7541139

  2. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) can allow treatment with clozapine in a patient with severe benign ethnic neutropaenia (BEN): a case report.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Benjamin W J; Williams, Hugh R J; Gee, Siobhan H; Whiskey, Eromona; Rodrigues, Joseph P; Mijovic, Aleksandar; MacCabe, James H

    2012-09-01

    Clozapine is the treatment of choice for treatment-resistant schizophrenia, but it is associated with a risk of neutropaenia and agranulocytosis. Clozapine use is regulated by mandatory blood monitoring in the UK, requiring cessation of treatment should the absolute neutrophil count (ANC) drop below specified values. Benign reductions in the ANC in non-white populations are common, and this can preclude a patient from receiving treatment with clozapine. A diagnosis of benign ethnic neutropaenia can reduce these treatment restrictions (UK specific), but the degree of neutropaenia can be significant enough to still prevent treatment. In this report, we show that response to granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) may be quite variable and difficult to predict, but with careful monitoring it can be used to increase the ANC count and allow continued treatment with clozapine.

  3. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) can allow treatment with clozapine in a patient with severe benign ethnic neutropaenia (BEN): a case report.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Benjamin W J; Williams, Hugh R J; Gee, Siobhan H; Whiskey, Eromona; Rodrigues, Joseph P; Mijovic, Aleksandar; MacCabe, James H

    2012-09-01

    Clozapine is the treatment of choice for treatment-resistant schizophrenia, but it is associated with a risk of neutropaenia and agranulocytosis. Clozapine use is regulated by mandatory blood monitoring in the UK, requiring cessation of treatment should the absolute neutrophil count (ANC) drop below specified values. Benign reductions in the ANC in non-white populations are common, and this can preclude a patient from receiving treatment with clozapine. A diagnosis of benign ethnic neutropaenia can reduce these treatment restrictions (UK specific), but the degree of neutropaenia can be significant enough to still prevent treatment. In this report, we show that response to granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) may be quite variable and difficult to predict, but with careful monitoring it can be used to increase the ANC count and allow continued treatment with clozapine. PMID:22719015

  4. Enhancement of in vitro and in vivo anti-tumor activity of anti-GD2 monoclonal antibody 220-51 against human neuroblastoma by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, M; Horibe, K; Furukawa, K

    1998-10-01

    We have evaluated the anti-tumor effect of anti-GD2 mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb) 220-51 against human neuroblastoma cell line TGW in vitro and in vivo. The mAb 220-51 was able to mediate complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) using human effector cells. In the presence of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), granulocyte ADCC was significantly augmented in vitro. When mAb 220-51 was administered to tumor-bearing nude mice, tumor growth was significantly inhibited as compared with untreated controls. Administration of recombinant murine GM-CSF in combination with mAb 220-51 significantly enhanced the anti-tumor effect of mAb in vivo. Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) combined with mAb 220-51 was also able to enhance it, although granulocyte ADCC was not affected by the presence of recombinant human G-CSF in vitro. Moreover, GM-CSF and G-CSF work additively to enhance the anti-tumor effect of mAb 220-51 in vivo. The GM-CSF and G-CSF may have a clinical potency in immunotherapy with anti-GD2 mAb for the treatment of neuroblastoma.

  5. An early granulocyte colony-stimulating factor treatment attenuates neuropathic pain through activation of mu opioid receptors on the injured nerve

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Ming-Feng; Yeh, Shin-Rung; Lo, Ai-Lun; Chao, Po-Kuan; Lee, Yun-Lin; Hung, Yu-Hui; Lu, Kwok-Tung; Ro, Long-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have shown that the mu opioid receptor (MOR) located in the peripheral nerves can be activated after nerve injury and that it attenuates peripheral nociceptive signals to the spinal dorsal horn. Various cytokines and phosphorylated-p38 (p-p38) activation in the dorsal horn also play an important role in neuropathic pain development. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (GCSF) is a growth factor that can stimulate granulocyte formation and has been shown to exert an analgesic effect on neuropathic pain through recruiting opioid-containing leukocytes to the injured nerve. However, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Herein, the results of behavior tests in addition to MOR levels in the injured sciatic nerve and the levels of p-p38 and various cytokines in the spinal dorsal horn were studied in vehicle-treated or GCSF-treated chronic constriction injured (CCI) rats at different time points (i.e., 1, 3, and 7 days, respectively) after nerve injury. The results showed that a single early systemic GCSF treatment after nerve injury can up-regulate MORs in the injured nerve, which can decrease peripheral nociceptive signals. Thereafter, those changes suppress the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6 but enhance the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-4, followed by decreases in p-p38 in the dorsal horn, and thus further attenuate neuropathic pain. PMID:27180600

  6. A Randomized Controlled Phase III Trial of Recombinant Human Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (Filgrastim) for Treatment of Severe Chronic Neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    Dale, David C.; Bonilla, Mary Ann; Davis, Mark W.; Nakanishi, Arline M.; Hammond, William P.; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Wang, Winfred; Jakubowski, Ann; Winton, Elliott; Lalezari, Parviz; Robinson, William; Glaspy, John A.; Emerson, Steve; Gabrilove, Janice; Vincent, Martha; Boxer, Laurence A.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with idiopathic, cyclic, and congenital neutropenia have recurrent severe bacterial infections. One hundred twenty-three patients with recurrent infections and severe chronic neutropenia (absolute neutrophil count < 0.5 × 109/L) due to these diseases were enrolled in this multi-center phase III trial. They were randomized to either immediately beginning recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (filgrastim) (3.45 to 11.50 μg/kg/d, subcutaneously) or entering a 4-month observation period followed by filgrastim administration. Blood neutrophil counts, bone marrow (BM) cell histology, and incidence and duration of infection-related events were monitored. Of the 123 patients enrolled, 120 received filgrastim. On therapy, 108 patients had a median absolute neutrophil count of ≥ 1.5 × 109/L. Examination of BM aspirates showed increased proportions of maturing neutrophils. Infection-related events were significantly decreased (P < .05) with approximately 50% reduction in the incidence and duration of infection-related events and almost 70% reduction in duration of antibiotic use. Asymptomatic splenic enlargement occurred frequently: adverse events frequently reported were bone pain, headache, and rash, which were generally mild and easily manageable. These data indicate that treatment of patients with severe chronic neutropenia with filgrastim results in a stimulation of BM production and maturation of neutrophils, an increase in circulating neutrophils, and a reduction in infection-related events. PMID:8490166

  7. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor signalling via Janus kinase 2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, J; Fraser, F W; Riley, C; Ahmed, N; McCulloch, D R; Ward, A C

    2014-01-01

    Background: Ovarian cancer remains a major cause of cancer mortality in women, with only limited understanding of disease aetiology at the molecular level. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a key regulator of both normal and emergency haematopoiesis, and is used clinically to aid haematopoietic recovery following ablative therapies for a variety of solid tumours including ovarian cancer. Methods: The expression of G-CSF and its receptor, G-CSFR, was examined in primary ovarian cancer samples and a panel of ovarian cancer cell lines, and the effects of G-CSF treatment on proliferation, migration and survival were determined. Results: G-CSFR was predominantly expressed in high-grade serous ovarian epithelial tumour samples and a subset of ovarian cancer cell lines. Stimulation of G-CSFR-expressing ovarian epithelial cancer cells with G-CSF led to increased migration and survival, including against chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. The effects of G-CSF were mediated by signalling via the downstream JAK2/STAT3 pathway. Conclusion: This study suggests that G-CSF has the potential to impact on ovarian cancer pathogenesis, and that G-CSFR expression status should be considered in determining appropriate therapy. PMID:24220695

  8. Repeated courses of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: clinical and biological results from a prospective multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Chiò, Adriano; Mora, Gabriele; La Bella, Vincenzo; Caponnetto, Claudia; Mancardi, Gianluigi; Sabatelli, Mario; Siciliano, Gabriele; Silani, Vincenzo; Corbo, Massimo; Moglia, Cristina; Calvo, Andrea; Mutani, Roberto; Rutella, Sergio; Gualandi, Francesca; Melazzini, Mario; Scimè, Rosanna; Petrini, Mario; Bondesan, Paola; Garbelli, Silvia; Mantovani, Stefania; Bendotti, Caterina; Tarella, Corrado

    2011-02-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) induces a transient mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells from bone marrow to peripheral blood. Our aim was to evaluate safety of repeated courses of G-CSF in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), assessing disease progression and changes in chemokine and cytokine levels in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Twenty-four ALS patients entered an open-label, multicenter trial in which four courses of G-CSF and mannitol were administered at 3-month intervals. Levels of G-CSF were increased after treatment in the serum and CSF. Few and transitory adverse events were observed. No significant reduction of the mean monthly decrease in ALSFRS-R score and forced vital capacity was observed. A significant reduction in CSF levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and interleukin-17 (IL-17) was observed. G-CSF treatment was safe and feasible in a multicenter series of ALS patients. A decrease in the CSF levels of proinflammatory cytokines MCP-1 and IL-17 was found, indicating a G-CSF-induced central anti-inflammatory response. PMID:21254083

  9. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor does not enhance recruitment of bone marrow-derived cells in rats with acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Sato, Daisuke; Otani, Hajime; Fujita, Masanori; Shimazu, Takayuki; Yoshioka, Kei; Enoki, Chiharu; Minato, Naoki; Iwasaka, Toshiji

    2012-09-01

    Despite the potential benefit of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) therapy in patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI), the efficacy of G-CSF in regenerating the heart after MI remains controversial. The authors hypothesize that the limited efficacy of G-CSF is related to its inhibitory effect on recruitment of bone marrow-derived cells (BMCs) to the infarcted tissue. MI was induced in rats with intrabone marrow-bone marrow transplantation from syngenic rats expressing green fluorescence protein to track BMCs. G-CSF was administered for five days after the onset of MI. G-CSF increased the number of CD45(+) cells in the peripheral circulation but did not increase their recruitment to the heart. G-CSF had no effect on myocardial stromal-derived factor-1 alpha and chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4 (CXCR4) expression in mononuclear cells in the peripheral blood and CXCR4(+) cells in the heart. G-CSF had no effect on angiogenesis, myocardial fibrosis or left ventricular function four weeks after MI. These results suggest that G-CSF mobilizes BMCs to the peripheral circulation but does not increase recruitment to the infarcted myocardium despite preservation of the stromal-derived factor-1 alpha/CXCR4 axis. PMID:23620693

  10. Unrelated donor granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized peripheral blood mononuclear cell transplantation after nonmyeloablative conditioning: the effect of postgrafting mycophenolate mofetil dosing.

    PubMed

    Maris, Michael B; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Storer, Barry E; Maloney, David G; Shizuru, Judith A; Agura, Edward; Kliem, Constanze; Pulsipher, Michael; Maziarz, Richard T; McSweeney, Peter A; Wade, James; Langston, Amelia A; Chauncey, Thomas R; Bruno, Benedetto; Blume, Karl G; Storb, Rainer

    2006-04-01

    We previously reported results in 71 patients with advanced hematologic malignancies given HLA-matched unrelated granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized peripheral blood mononuclear cell (G-PBMC) grafts after fludarabine 90 mg/m(2), 2 Gy of total body irradiation, and postgrafting mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) 15 mg/kg twice daily and cyclosporine 6.25 mg/kg twice daily orally. Graft rejection was 15%; the cumulative probability of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was 52%. According to MMF pharmacokinetic studies, which showed a short half-life of its active metabolite, mycophenolic acid, we increased MMF dosing from 15 mg/kg twice daily to 15 mg/kg 3 times daily to increase immunosuppression and reduce the incidence of both graft rejection and acute GVHD. Among 103 patients so treated, graft rejection occurred in 5%, whereas acute GVHD remained at 53%. Outcomes were compared with results of previous G-PBMC recipients given MMF twice daily. Infection rates were slightly higher with MMF 3 times daily than with MMF twice daily. Nevertheless, 2-year nonrelapse mortality and overall and progression-free survivals were similar for MMF 3-times-daily and twice-daily patients (19%, 58%, and 49% versus 20%, 48%, and 37%, respectively). Nonmyeloablative conditioning with postgrafting cyclosporine and MMF given 3 times daily allowed 95% durable engraftment of unrelated donor G-PBMC grafts.

  11. Effect of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on hemodynamic and cytokine response in a porcine model of Pseudomonas sepsis.

    PubMed

    Haberstroh, J; Breuer, H; Lücke, I; Massarrat, K; Früh, R; Mand, U; Hagedorn, P; Brunnberg, L; von Specht, B U

    1995-09-01

    To investigate the effect of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) on sepsis, chronically catheterized conscious pigs were challenged with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (8 x 10(7) colony-forming units kg-1 h-1) for 84 h (Group A, n = 8). Group B (n = 7) also received rhG-CSF at 5 micrograms kg-1 d-1, the first dose being given 30 min before starting bacterial infusion. Two of the animals in Group A died from pulmonary failure, whereas all those treated with rh-GCSF survived. Fever, severe pulmonary hypertension and systemic hypotension--the latter accompanied at first by a transient hypodynamic, and later a hyperdynamic response--were observed in all of the animals. In Group B, however, the rise in temperature, mean pulmonary arterial pressure (at a later stage of the observation), plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor, and endotoxin were significantly less than in Group A. In the rhG-CSF-treated pigs, an initial leukopenia completely recovered within 24 h (p < .05 vs. Group A). These data suggest that rhG-CSF might be beneficial in the treatment of sepsis.

  12. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study of Iranian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Amirzagar, Nasibeh; Nafissi, Shahriar; Tafakhori, Abbas; Modabbernia, Amirhossein; Amirzargar, Aliakbar; Ghaffarpour, Majid; Siroos, Bahaddin

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy and tolerability of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in subjects with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Methods Forty subjects with ALS were randomly assigned to two groups, which received either subcutaneous G-CSF (5 µg/kg/q12h) or placebo for 5 days. The subjects were then followed up for 3 months using the ALS Functional Rating Scale-Revised (ALSFRS-R), manual muscle testing, ALS Assessment Questionnaire-40, and nerve conduction studies. CD34+/CD133+ cell count and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) levels were evaluated at baseline. Results The rate of disease progression did not differ significantly between the two groups. The reduction in ALSFRS-R scores was greater in female subjects in the G-CSF group than in their counterparts in the placebo group. There was a trend toward a positive correlation between baseline CSF MCP-1 levels and the change in ALSFRS-R scores in both groups (Spearman's ρ=0.370, p=0.070). Conclusions With the protocol implemented in this study, G-CSF is not a promising option for the treatment of ALS. Furthermore, it may accelerate disease progression in females. PMID:25851895

  13. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF): A saturated fatty acid-induced myokine with insulin-desensitizing properties in humans

    PubMed Central

    Ordelheide, Anna-Maria; Gommer, Nadja; Böhm, Anja; Hermann, Carina; Thielker, Inga; Machicao, Fausto; Fritsche, Andreas; Stefan, Norbert; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Staiger, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Objective Circulating long-chain free fatty acids (FFAs) are important metabolic signals that acutely enhance fatty acid oxidation, thermogenesis, energy expenditure, and insulin secretion. However, if chronically elevated, they provoke inflammation, insulin resistance, and β-cell failure. Moreover, FFAs act via multiple signaling pathways as very potent regulators of gene expression. In human skeletal muscle cells differentiated in vitro (myotubes), we have shown in previous studies that the expression of CSF3, the gene encoding granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), is markedly induced upon FFA treatment and exercise. Methods and results We now report that CSF3 is induced in human myotubes by saturated, but not unsaturated, FFAs via Toll-like receptor 4-dependent and -independent pathways including activation of Rel-A, AP-1, C/EBPα, Src, and stress kinases. Furthermore, we show that human adipocytes and myotubes treated with G-CSF become insulin-resistant. In line with this, a functional polymorphism in the CSF3 gene affects adipose tissue- and whole-body insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in human subjects with elevated plasma FFA concentrations. Conclusion G-CSF emerges as a new player in FFA-induced insulin resistance and thus may be of interest as a target for prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:27069870

  14. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor promotes tumor angiogenesis via increasing circulating endothelial progenitor cells and Gr1+CD11b+ cells in cancer animal models.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Tatsuma; Ebihara, Satoru; Asada, Masanori; Kanda, Akio; Sasaki, Hidetada; Yamaya, Mutsuo

    2006-01-01

    Recombinant granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is used for cancer patients with myelosuppression induced by chemotherapy. G-CSF has been reported to progress tumor growth and angiogenesis, but the precise mechanism of tumor angiogenesis activated by G-CSF has not been fully clarified. N-terminal-mutated recombinant human G-CSF administration increased WBCs and neutrophils in peripheral blood and reduced bone marrow stromal cell-derived factor-1 in mice, indicating its biological relevance. Mice were inoculated with Lewis lung carcinoma cells (LLCs) or KLN205 cells and treated with G-CSF. G-CSF accelerated tumor growth and intratumoral vessel density, while it did not accelerate proliferation of LLCs, KLN205 cells or human umbilical vein endothelial cells in vitro. In the absence of tumors, G-CSF did not increase circulating cells that displayed phenotypic characteristics of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). In the presence of tumors, G-CSF increased circulating EPCs. In addition, G-CSF treatment increased immune suppressor and endothelial cell-differentiating Gr1+CD11b+ cells in tumor-bearing mice. We conclude that G-CSF promotes tumor growth by activating tumor angiogenesis via increasing circulating EPCs and Gr1+CD11b+ cells in cancer animal models.

  15. Effect of Periodic Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Administration on Endothelial Progenitor Cells and Different Monocyte Subsets in Pediatric Patients with Muscular Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Sienkiewicz, Dorota; Grubczak, Kamil; Okurowska-Zawada, Bożena; Paszko-Patej, Grażyna; Miklasz, Paula; Singh, Paulina; Radzikowska, Urszula; Kulak, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MD) are heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by progressive muscle dysfunction. There is a large body of evidence indicating that angiogenesis is impaired in muscles of MD patients. Therefore, induction of dystrophic muscle revascularization should become a novel approach aimed at diminishing the extent of myocyte damage. Recently, we and others demonstrated that administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) resulted in clinical improvement of patients with neuromuscular disorders. To date, however, the exact mechanisms underlying these beneficial effects of G-CSF have not been fully understood. Here we used flow cytometry to quantitate numbers of CD34+ cells, endothelial progenitor cells, and different monocyte subsets in peripheral blood of pediatric MD patients treated with repetitive courses of G-CSF administration. We showed that repetitive cycles of G-CSF administration induced efficient mobilization of above-mentioned cells including cells with proangiogenic potential. These findings contribute to better understanding the beneficial clinical effects of G-CSF in pediatric MD patients. PMID:26770204

  16. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor inhibits Fas-triggered apoptosis in bone marrow cells isolated from patients with refractory anemia with ringed sideroblasts.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Mende, J; Tehranchi, R; Forsblom, A M; Joseph, B; Christensson, B; Fadeel, B; Zhivotovsky, B; Hellström-Lindberg, E

    2001-05-01

    Treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) plus erythropoietin may synergistically improve hemoglobin levels and reduce bone marrow apoptosis in patients with refractory anemia with ringed sideroblasts (RARS). Fas-induced caspase activity is increased in RARS bone marrow cells. We showed that G-CSF significantly reduced Fas-mediated caspase-8 and caspase-3-like activity and the degree of nuclear apoptotic changes in bone marrow from nine RARS patients. A decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species occurred in Fas-treated cells, but became significant only 24 h after changes in caspase activity and decrease in proliferation. G-CSF also reduced the magnitude of these late apoptotic changes. In CD34-selected normal cells, G-CSF induced myeloid colony growth, and an overall small decrease in the number of erythroid colonies. By contrast, G-CSF induced a 33-263% increase of erythroid colony formation in CD34+ cells from four of five RARS patients with severely reduced erythroid growth, while the normal or slightly reduced erythroid growth of three other patients was not influenced by G-CSF. This study suggests that G-CSF may reduce the pathologically increased caspase activity and concomitant apoptotic changes, and promote erythroid growth and differentiation of stem cells from RARS patients. Our data support the clinical benefit of G-CSF in this subgroup of myelodysplastic syndromes.

  17. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor permits dose intensification by interval compression in the treatment of Ewing's sarcomas and soft tissue sarcomas in children.

    PubMed

    Womer, R B; Daller, R T; Fenton, J G; Miser, J S

    2000-01-01

    71 children with sarcomas were treated in a prospective pilot study to determine whether granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) permits compression of the interval between chemotherapy cycles. Patients had Ewing's sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumour (PNET), rhabdomyosarcoma, non-rhabdo soft tissue sarcomas or other advanced soft tissue tumours. The chemotherapy alternated vincristine-doxorubicin-cyclophosphamide and ifosfamide-etoposide, with G-CSF between courses. Therapy had two phases: induction (six cycles) and continuation (six cycles), which included primary tumour treatment with surgery and/or radiation. Chemotherapy cycles began every 14 days, or upon absolute neutrophil count (ANC) and platelet count recovery. The median chemotherapy cycle interval was 16 (11-48) days in the induction phase, with a median average relative dose intensification (ARDI) of 1.27 compared with every-21-day therapy. In the continuation phase, the median cycle interval was 21 days, with a median ARDI of 1.10. Radiation therapy prolonged chemotherapy intervals, whilst erythropoietin shortened them. Toxicity was modest for such chemotherapy. Event-free survival is comparable with or superior to that in recent large studies. G-CSF permits intensification of this regimen through interval compression. The impact of this approach on efficacy remains to be determined in a randomised trial. PMID:10741300

  18. [Two cases of malignant lymphoma with high fever and C-reactive protein (CRP) elevation after treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)].

    PubMed

    Kanbayashi, Yuko; Mukoyama, Naoki; Nishida, Katsuji; Shimizu, Daisuke; Matsumoto, Yosuke; Nomura, Kenichi; Horiike, Shigeo; Taniwaki, Masafumi

    2006-01-01

    We present two cases of malignant lymphoma that developed a high fever that eventually reached an extremely high 38.9 degrees C. The C-reactive protein( CRP) elevation also climbed to a very high 12.2 mg/dl after treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). In the one case, after stem cells were mobilized with CHASER therapy (cyclophosphamide, cytarabine, etoposide, dexamethasone and rituximab) followed by G-CSF (filgrastim 600 microg/day) subcutaneous daily, the serum CRP level rose to a maximum of 5.6 mg/dl, with a maximum fever elevation of 38.9 degrees C. In the other case, after the subject was given CHASE therapy followed by subcutaneous treatment with G-CSF (filgrastim 75 microg/day) daily, the maximum serum CRP level was 12.2 mg/dl along with a maximum fever of 38.9 degrees C. Although no infection was found in either case, multiple antibacterial agents were ineffective;after discontinuation of G-CSF, fever dissipated and the serum CRP level became negative. G-CSF induces the proliferation and differentiation of neutrophils and also causes the mobilization of mature neutrophils from hematopoietic tissues. With the increasing propensity to G-CSF, we must keep in mind the possibility of such adverse reactions so as to serve the overall best interests of the patient.

  19. pH responsive granulocyte colony-stimulating factor variants with implications for treating Alzheimer's disease and other central nervous system disorders.

    PubMed

    Heinzelman, Pete; Schoborg, Jennifer A; Jewett, Michael C

    2015-10-01

    Systemic injection of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has yielded encouraging results in treating Alzheimer's Disease (AD) and other central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Making G-CSF a viable AD therapeutic will, however, require increasing G-CSF's ability to stimulate neurons within the brain. This objective could be realized by increasing transcytosis of G-CSF across the blood brain barrier (BBB). An established correlation between G-CSF receptor (G-CSFR) binding pH responsiveness and increased recycling of G-CSF to the cell exterior after endocytosis motivated development of G-CSF variants with highly pH responsive G-CSFR binding affinities. These variants will be used in future validation of our hypothesis that increased BBB transcytosis can enhance G-CSF therapeutic efficacy. Flow cytometric screening of a yeast-displayed library in which G-CSF/G-CSFR interface residues were mutated to histidine yielded a G-CSF triple His mutant (L109H/D110H/Q120H) with highly pH responsive binding affinity. This variant's KD, measured by surface plasmon resonance (SPR), increases ∼20-fold as pH decreases from 7.4 to below histidine's pKa of ∼6.0; an increase 2-fold greater than for previously reported G-CSF His mutants. Cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) enabled expression and purification of soluble, bioactive G-CSF triple His variant protein, an outcome inaccessible via Escherichia coli inclusion body refolding. This purification and bioactivity validation will enable future identification of correlations between pH responsiveness and transcytosis in BBB cell culture model and animal experiments. Furthermore, the library screening and CFPS methods employed here could be applied to developing other pH responsive hematopoietic or neurotrophic factors for treating CNS disorders. PMID:25877663

  20. Modulation of JAK2, STAT3 and Akt1 proteins by granulocyte colony stimulating factor following carbon monoxide poisoning in male rat.

    PubMed

    Hashemzaei, Mahmoud; Imen Shahidi, Mohsen; Moallem, Seyyed Adel; Abnous, Khalil; Ghorbani, Maryam; Mohamadpour, Amir Hooshang

    2016-10-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is an odorless, colorless, tasteless and non-irritating by-product of inefficient combustion of hydrocarbon fuels such as motor vehicle exhausted gases. It is the leading cause of mortality in the USA among all unintentional toxicants. Male rats exposed to CO poisoning in the heart has many cardiovascular effects such as, cardiomyopathy, tachycardia, arrhythmias, and ischemia and in severe cases, myocardial infarction (MI) and cardiac arrest. Cardiomyocyte apoptosis is one of the most frequent consequences in the heart. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a cytokine that mobilizes and differentiates granulocytes from stem cells. It can stimulate many anti-apoptotic pathways such as JAK2-STAT3 and PI3-Akt kinases following cardiac ischemia. G-CSF exerts its anti-apoptotic effects through binding to its specific cell surface receptor. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the mechanism of anti-apoptotic effect of G-CSF following CO poisoning. Rats were exposed to CO 1500 or 3000 ppm for 60 min. Animals received G-CSF 100 μg/kg subcutaneously for five consecutive days after CO intoxication. Western blot analysis was used to evaluate the expression of six proteins namely JAK2, p-JAK2, STAT3, p-STAT3, Akt1 and p-Akt1 following G-CSF 100 μg/kg consecutive dose administration after CO poisoning. There was a significant difference between phosphorylated proteins including p-JAK2, p-STAT3 and p-Akt1 in the G-CSF groups and those in control groups and there were not any significant differences in total protein among the groups. PMID:26810905

  1. pH responsive granulocyte colony-stimulating factor variants with implications for treating Alzheimer's disease and other central nervous system disorders.

    PubMed

    Heinzelman, Pete; Schoborg, Jennifer A; Jewett, Michael C

    2015-10-01

    Systemic injection of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has yielded encouraging results in treating Alzheimer's Disease (AD) and other central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Making G-CSF a viable AD therapeutic will, however, require increasing G-CSF's ability to stimulate neurons within the brain. This objective could be realized by increasing transcytosis of G-CSF across the blood brain barrier (BBB). An established correlation between G-CSF receptor (G-CSFR) binding pH responsiveness and increased recycling of G-CSF to the cell exterior after endocytosis motivated development of G-CSF variants with highly pH responsive G-CSFR binding affinities. These variants will be used in future validation of our hypothesis that increased BBB transcytosis can enhance G-CSF therapeutic efficacy. Flow cytometric screening of a yeast-displayed library in which G-CSF/G-CSFR interface residues were mutated to histidine yielded a G-CSF triple His mutant (L109H/D110H/Q120H) with highly pH responsive binding affinity. This variant's KD, measured by surface plasmon resonance (SPR), increases ∼20-fold as pH decreases from 7.4 to below histidine's pKa of ∼6.0; an increase 2-fold greater than for previously reported G-CSF His mutants. Cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) enabled expression and purification of soluble, bioactive G-CSF triple His variant protein, an outcome inaccessible via Escherichia coli inclusion body refolding. This purification and bioactivity validation will enable future identification of correlations between pH responsiveness and transcytosis in BBB cell culture model and animal experiments. Furthermore, the library screening and CFPS methods employed here could be applied to developing other pH responsive hematopoietic or neurotrophic factors for treating CNS disorders.

  2. Crystallization of a 2:2 complex of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (GCSF) with the ligand-binding region of the GCSF receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Honjo, Eijiro; Tamada, Taro; Maeda, Yoshitake; Koshiba, Takumi; Matsukura, Yasuko; Okamoto, Tomoyuki; Ishibashi, Matsujiro; Tokunaga, Masao; Kuroki, Ryota

    2005-08-01

    A 2:2 complex of highly purified GCSF receptor (Ig-CRH) with GCSF was crystallized. The crystal diffracted to 2.8 Å resolution with sufficient quality for further structure determination. The granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (GCSF) receptor receives signals for regulating the maturation, proliferation and differentiation of the precursor cells of neutrophilic granulocytes. The signalling complex composed of two GCSFs (GCSF, 19 kDa) and two GCSF receptors (GCSFR, 34 kDa) consisting of an Ig-like domain and a cytokine-receptor homologous (CRH) domain was crystallized. A crystal of the complex was grown in 1.0 M sodium formate and 0.1 M sodium acetate pH 4.6 and belongs to space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 (or its enantiomorph P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 110.1, c = 331.8 Å. Unfortunately, this crystal form did not diffract beyond 5 Å resolution. Since the heterogeneity of GCSF receptor appeared to prevent the growth of good-quality crystals, the GCSF receptor was fractionated by anion-exchange chromatography. Crystals of the GCSF–fractionated GCSF receptor complex were grown as a new crystal form in 0.2 M ammonium phosphate. This new crystal form diffracted to beyond 3.0 Å resolution and belonged to space group P3{sub 1}21 (or its enantiomorph P3{sub 2}21), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 134.8, c = 105.7 Å.

  3. A trial of recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor for the treatment of very low birthweight infants with presumed sepsis and neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    Russell, A; Emmerson, A; Wilkinson, N; Chant, T; Sweet, D; Halliday, H; Holland, B; Davies, E

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—The primary objective was to investigate the safety of recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) for the treatment of very low birthweight infants (VLBW) with sepsis and relative neutropenia, specifically with regard to worsening of respiratory distress and thrombocytopenia and all cause mortality. Secondary objectives were to evaluate duration of ventilation, intensive care, and antibiotic use as markers of efficacy.
DESIGN—Neonates (⩽ 28 days) in intensive care, with birth weights of 500-1500 g, absolute neutrophil count (ANC) of ⩽ 5 × 109/l, and clinical evidence of sepsis, were randomly assigned to receive either rhG-CSF (10 µg/kg/day) administered intravenously (n = 13), or placebo (n = 15) for a maximum of 14 days, in addition to standard treatment and antibiotics. All adverse events, oxygenation index, incidence of thrombocytopenia, all cause mortality, duration of ventilation, intensive care and antibiotic treatment, and ANC recovery were compared between the two groups.
RESULTS—Adverse events and oxygenation index were not increased by, and thrombocytopenia was not attributable to, treatment with rhG-CSF. At 6 and 12 months postmenstrual age, there were significantly fewer deaths in the group receiving rhG-CSF (1/13 v 7/15; p ⩽ 0.038). There was a non-significant trend towards a reduction in duration of ventilation, intensive care, and antibiotic use in the rhG-CSF group. There was a significantly more rapid increase in ANC in the rhG-CSF treated babies (p < 0.001).
CONCLUSIONS—In a small randomised placebo controlled trial in a highly selected group of neonates, adjuvant treatment with rhG-CSF increased ANC rapidly, and no treatment related adverse events were identified. Mortality at 6 and 12 months postmenstrual age was significantly lower in the treatment group. A large trial investigating efficacy in a similar group of neonates is warranted.
 PMID:11320043

  4. Effect of a long-term treatment with a low-dose granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on post-infarction process in the heart

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Hideshi; Takemura, Genzou; Li, Yiwen; Ohno, Takamasa; Li, Longhu; Maruyama, Rumi; Esaki, Masayasu; Miyata, Shusaku; Kanamori, Hiromitsu; Ogino, Atsushi; Nakagawa, Munehiro; Minatoguchi, Shinya; Fujiwara, Takako; Fujiwara, Hisayoshi

    2008-01-01

    Although beneficial effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) have been demonstrated on post-myocardia infarction (MI) process, the mechanisms and feasibility are not fully agreed yet. We investigated effects of a long-term treatment with a low-dose G-CSF started 1 day after the onset of MI, on post-infarction process. One day after being made MI by left coronary ligation, mice were given G-CSF (10 μg/kg/day) for 4 weeks. The G-CSF treatment resulted in a significant mitigation of cardiac remodelling and dysfunction. In the G-CSF-treated hearts, the infarcted scar was smaller with less fibrosis and abundant vessels while in the non-infarcted area, hypertrophic cardiomyocytes with attenuated degenerative changes and reduced fibrosis were apparent. These effects were accompanied by activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and Akt and also by up-regulation of GATA-4, myosin heavy chain and matrix metalloproteinases-2 and -9. Apoptosis of cardiomyocytes appeared insignificant at any stages. Parthenolide, a STAT3 inhibitor, completely abolished the beneficial effects of G-CSF on cardiac function and remodelling with loss of effect on both anti-cardiomyocyte degeneration and anti-fibrosis. In contrast, wortmannin, an Akt inhibitor, did not affect G-CSF-induced benefis despite cancelling vessel increase. In conclusion, treatment with G-CSF at a small dose but for a long duration beneficially affects the post-infarction process possibly through STAT3-mediated anti-cardiomyocyte degeneration and anti-fibrosis, but not through anti-cardiomyocyte apoptosis or Akt-mediated angio-genesis. The findings may also imply a more feasible way of G-CSF administration in the clinical settings. PMID:18298650

  5. Effectiveness of daily versus non-daily granulocyte colony-stimulating factors in patients with solid tumours undergoing chemotherapy: a multivariate analysis of data from current practice

    PubMed Central

    Almenar Cubells, D; Bosch Roig, C; Jiménez Orozco, E; Álvarez, R; Cuervo, JM; Díaz Fernández, N; Sánchez Heras, AB; Galán Brotons, A; Giner Marco, V; Codes M De Villena, M

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a multicentre, retrospective, observational study including patients with solid tumours (excluding breast cancer) that received granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF) and chemotherapy. We investigated the effectiveness of daily vs. non-daily G-CSFs (pegfilgrastim) adjusting by potential confounders. The study included 391 patients (211 daily G-CSF; 180 pegfilgrastim), from whom 47.3% received primary prophylaxis (PP) (57.8% pegfilgrastim), 26.3% secondary prophylaxis (SP: initiation after cycle 1 and no reactive treatment in any cycle) (51.5% pegfilgrastim) and 26.3% reactive treatment (19.4% pegfilgrastim). Only 42.2% of patients with daily G-CSF and 46.2% with pegfilgrastim initiated prophylaxis within 72 h after chemotherapy, and only 10.5% of patients with daily G-CSF received it for ≥7 days. In the multivariate models, daily G-CSF was associated with higher risk of grade 3-4 neutropenia (G3-4N) vs. pegfilgrastim [odds ratio (OR): 1.73, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.004–2.97]. Relative to SP, PP protected against G3-4N (OR for SP vs. PP: 6.0, 95%CI: 3.2–11.4) and febrile neutropenia (OR: 3.1, 95%CI: 1.1–8.8), and was associated to less chemotherapy dose delays and reductions (OR for relative dose intensity <85% for SP vs. PP: 3.1, 95%CI: 1.7–5.4) and higher response rate (OR: 2.1, 95%CI: 1.2–3.7). Data suggest that pegfilgrastim, compared with a daily G-CSF, and PP, compared with SP, could be more effective in preventing neutropenia and its related events in the clinical practice. PMID:23331323

  6. Increased susceptibility to liver injury after hemorrhagic shock in rats chronically fed ethanol: role of nuclear factor-kappa B, interleukin-6, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Ono, Masafumi; Yu, Bi; Hardison, Edith G; Mastrangelo, Mary-Ann A; Tweardy, David J

    2004-06-01

    Chronic ethanol use preceding severe trauma and hemorrhagic shock (HS) is associated with an increased incidence of multiorgan failure (MOF) and death; however, the molecular basis for this increased susceptibility is unknown. We previously demonstrated that production of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), mediated by nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappa B), each make essential contributions to organ injury and inflammation in a rodent model of controlled HS, and we proposed in this study to examine the hypothesis that the increased susceptibility to MOF after shock/trauma in the setting of chronic ethanol use is due to an exaggerated activation of NF-kappa B and production of these proinflammatory cytokines. We observed increased HS-induced liver injury 4 h after resuscitation in rats fed the ethanol-containing Lieber-DeCarli liquid diet for 8 weeks compared with rats fed the control liquid diet (3-fold increase in serum alanine aminotransferase [ALT], P = 0.008, and 2-fold increase in focal liver necrosis, P = 0.005). The increased liver injury in the ethanol-fed HS rats was accompanied by a 70% increase in liver NF-kappa B activation (P < 0.05), a 3- to 5-fold increase in hepatocyte and Kupffer cell production of IL-6 and G-CSF (P < 0.05 for each), and a 2-fold increase in neutrophil infiltration (P < 0.005) compared with the control diet-fed HS rats. Thus, increased susceptibility to HS-induced liver injury in the setting of chronic ethanol use may be mediated, at least in part, by increased NF-kappa B activation resulting in increased local production of IL-6 and G-CSF and increased infiltration of neutrophils, which can damage liver cells directly and contribute to impaired sinusoidal blood flow.

  7. Effectiveness of daily versus non-daily granulocyte colony-stimulating factors in patients with solid tumours undergoing chemotherapy: a multivariate analysis of data from current practice.

    PubMed

    Almenar Cubells, D; Bosch Roig, C; Jiménez Orozco, E; Álvarez, R; Cuervo, J M; Díaz Fernández, N; Sánchez Heras, A B; Galán Brotons, A; Giner Marco, V; Codes M De Villena, M

    2013-05-01

    We conducted a multicentre, retrospective, observational study including patients with solid tumours (excluding breast cancer) that received granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF) and chemotherapy. We investigated the effectiveness of daily vs. non-daily G-CSFs (pegfilgrastim) adjusting by potential confounders. The study included 391 patients (211 daily G-CSF; 180 pegfilgrastim), from whom 47.3% received primary prophylaxis (PP) (57.8% pegfilgrastim), 26.3% secondary prophylaxis (SP: initiation after cycle 1 and no reactive treatment in any cycle) (51.5% pegfilgrastim) and 26.3% reactive treatment (19.4% pegfilgrastim). Only 42.2% of patients with daily G-CSF and 46.2% with pegfilgrastim initiated prophylaxis within 72 h after chemotherapy, and only 10.5% of patients with daily G-CSF received it for ≥ 7 days. In the multivariate models, daily G-CSF was associated with higher risk of grade 3-4 neutropenia (G3-4N) vs. pegfilgrastim [odds ratio (OR): 1.73, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.004-2.97]. Relative to SP, PP protected against G3-4N (OR for SP vs. PP: 6.0, 95%CI: 3.2-11.4) and febrile neutropenia (OR: 3.1, 95%CI: 1.1-8.8), and was associated to less chemotherapy dose delays and reductions (OR for relative dose intensity <85% for SP vs. PP: 3.1, 95%CI: 1.7-5.4) and higher response rate (OR: 2.1, 95%CI: 1.2-3.7). Data suggest that pegfilgrastim, compared with a daily G-CSF, and PP, compared with SP, could be more effective in preventing neutropenia and its related events in the clinical practice.

  8. CHOP chemotherapy with preemptive granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in elderly patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: a dose-intensity analysis.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, J O; Grossbard, M; Shulman, L N; Neuberg, D

    2000-12-01

    This prospective trial was designed to determine the safety and efficacy of full-dose, on-time chemotherapy in elderly patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Twenty patients (median age, 71 years; range, 66 to 80 years) were enrolled in a phase II, multicenter trial to receive cyclophosphamide/doxorubicin/vincristine/prednisone (CHOP) supported by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). CHOP was given in standard doses. Six cycles were planned every 21 days, with G-CSF starting on day 3 and continuing until the absolute neutrophil count was greater than 10,000/microL. Consolidation radiation therapy was permitted. Restaging was performed following cycles 4 and 6. By the age-adjusted International Prognostic Index, four patients were low, 10 were low-intermediate, four were high-intermediate, and two were high risk. Eighteen cases completed all 6 cycles. The average cycle length for all 112 cycles was 21.7 days. The dose intensities (corrected for delay) for each agent were cyclophosphamide 97.3%, doxorubicin 97.3%, vincristine 91.5%, and prednisone 97.3%. Treatment-related complications included grade 4 leukopenia and grade 4 thrombocytopenia in 11.6% and 3.6% of cycles, respectively. Hospitalization for neutropenia and fever was needed for 7.1% of cycles. There was no grade 3/4 cardiac toxicity. No treatment-related mortality occurred. All toxicities were reversible. There were 12 (60%) complete responses, four (20%) gallium-negative partial responses, and four patients (20%) with progressive disease. With a median follow-up of 2.29 years, progression-free and overall survival rates at 2 years are 42% (90% confidence interval: 23%-61%) and 66% (90% confidence interval: 47%-85%), respectively. Using preemptive G-CSF, full-dose CHOP can be administered safely to elderly patients.

  9. Effect of immobilized granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on hemopoietic precursors of various classes during cytostatic-induced myelosuppression.

    PubMed

    Dygai, A M; Skurikhin, E G; Andreeva, T V; Madonov, P G; Vereshagin, E I; Kinsht, D N; Pershina, O V; Khmelevskaya, E S

    2010-09-01

    Experiments were performed on the model of cytostatic myelosuppression induced by cyclophosphamide. We compared the effect of immobilized granulocyte CSF (the preparation was created in Russia) and reference standard preparation of granulocyte CSF on the development of neutrophilic leukopenia and hemopoietic precursors of various classes. It was found that preparations of granulocyte CSF decreased the duration and degree of peripheral blood neutropenia. The granulocytopoiesis-stimulating effect was related to stimulation of multipotent hemopoietic precursors, granulocyte-erythroid-macrophage-megakaryocyte precursors, and granulocyte precursors. Induction of division and maturation of multipotent hemopoietic precursors, granulocyte-erythroid-macrophage-megakaryocyte precursors, and granulocyte precursors and recovery of cellularity of the granulocytic hemopoietic stem after administration of immobilized granulocyte CSF were observed at later terms compared to treatment with the reference preparation of granulocyte CSF.

  10. Treatment of adjuvant arthritis with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor and peptide derived from heat shock protein 65.

    PubMed

    Brendolan, Andrea; Higuchi, Masanori; Sibley, Richard; Strober, Samuel

    2003-01-01

    Adjuvant arthritis in Lewis rats is induced by the subcutaneous injection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in mineral oil, and the predominant T cell immune reactivity is against the heat shock protein 65 derived peptide 176-190. We treated Lewis rats with human recombinant G-CSF followed by (i.v) administration of peptide 176-190 after induction of adjuvant arthritis (AA), and observed decreased disease severity, joint destruction, new bone formation and joint ankylosis. Treatment with G-CSF alone was also effective, but to a lesser extent. In addition, we found that splenocytes from rats treated with G-CSF had reduced antigen presenting capacity compared with splenocytes from vehicle treated rats. Primed lymph node cells from G-CSF plus peptide treated rats showed a marked reduction in proliferation and secretion of IFN-gamma after stimulation with the heat shock protein peptide in vitro as compared to controls.

  11. Regulation of Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor and Its Receptor in Skeletal Muscle is Dependent Upon the Type of Inflammatory Stimulus.

    PubMed

    Wright, Craig Robert; Brown, Erin Louise; Della Gatta, Paul A; Fatouros, Ioannis G; Karagounis, Leonidas G; Terzis, Gerasimos; Mastorakos, Georgios; Michailidis, Yannis; Mandalidis, Dimitris; Spengos, Kontantinos; Chatzinikolaou, Athanasios; Methenitis, Spiros; Draganidis, Dimitrios; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z; Russell, Aaron Paul

    2015-09-01

    The cytokine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) binds to its receptor (G-CSFR) to stimulate hematopoietic stem cell mobilization, myelopoiesis, and the production and activation of neutrophils. In response to exercise-induced muscle damage, G-CSF is increased in circulation and G-CSFR has recently been identified in skeletal muscle cells. While G-CSF/G-CSFR activation mediates pro- and anti-inflammatory responses, our understanding of the role and regulation in the muscle is limited. The aim of this study was to investigate, in vitro and in vivo, the role and regulation of G-CSF and G-CSFR in skeletal muscle under conditions of muscle inflammation and damage. First, C2C12 myotubes were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with and without G-CSF to determine if G-CSF modulates the inflammatory response. Second, the regulation of G-CSF and its receptor was measured following eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage and the expression levels we investigated for redox sensitivity by administering the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC). LPS stimulation of C2C12 myotubes resulted in increases in G-CSF, interleukin (IL)-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) messenger RNA (mRNA) and an increase in G-CSF, IL-6, and MCP-1 release from C2C12 myotubes. The addition of G-CSF following LPS stimulation of C2C12 myotubes increased IL-6 mRNA and cytokine release into the media, however it did not affect MCP-1 or TNFα. Following eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage in humans, G-CSF levels were either marginally increased in circulation or remain unaltered in skeletal muscle. Similarly, G-CSFR levels remained unchanged in response to damaging exercise and G-CSF/G-CSFR did not change in response to NAC. Collectively, these findings suggest that G-CSF may cooperate with IL-6 and potentially promote muscle regeneration in vitro, whereas in vivo aseptic inflammation induced by exercise did not change G-CSF and G

  12. New Role for Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor-Induced Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase 1/2 in Histone Modification and Retinoic Acid Receptor α Recruitment to Gene Promoters: Relevance to Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia Cell Differentiation ▿

    PubMed Central

    Cassinat, B.; Zassadowski, F.; Ferry, C.; Llopis, L.; Bruck, N.; Lainey, E.; Duong, V.; Cras, A.; Despouy, G.; Chourbagi, O.; Beinse, G.; Fenaux, P.; Rochette Egly, C.; Chomienne, C.

    2011-01-01

    The induction of the granulocytic differentiation of leukemic cells by all-trans retinoic acid (RA) has been a major breakthrough in terms of survival for acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) patients. Here we highlight the synergism and the underlying novel mechanism between RA and the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) to restore differentiation of RA-refractory APL blasts. First, we show that in RA-refractory APL cells (UF-1 cell line), PML-RA receptor alpha (RARα) is not released from target promoters in response to RA, resulting in the maintenance of chromatin repression. Consequently, RARα cannot be recruited, and the RA target genes are not activated. We then deciphered how the combination of G-CSF and RA successfully restored the activation of RA target genes to levels achieved in RA-sensitive APL cells. We demonstrate that G-CSF restores RARα recruitment to target gene promoters through the activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway and the subsequent derepression of chromatin. Thus, combinatorial activation of cytokines and RARs potentiates transcriptional activity through epigenetic modifications induced by specific signaling pathways. PMID:21262770

  13. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor for hematopoietic stem cell donation from healthy female donors during pregnancy and lactation: what do we know?

    PubMed

    Pessach, Ilias; Shimoni, Avichai; Nagler, Arnon

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hematopoietic growth factors (HGFs) are mostly used as supportive measures to reduce infectious complications associated with neutropenia. Over the past decade, the use of HGFs became a common method for mobilizing human CD34+ stem cells, either for autologous or allogeneic transplantation. However, since their introduction the long-term safety of the procedure has become a major focus of discussion and research. Most information refers to healthy normal donors and data concerning pregnant and lactating women are scarce. The clinical question, which is the core of this review, is whether stem cell donation, preceded by administration of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) for mobilization, is a safe procedure for pregnant donors. METHODS Literature searches were performed in Pubmed for English language articles published before the end of May 2012, focusing on G-CSF administration during pregnancy, lactation and hematopoietic stem cell donation. Searches included animal and human studies. RESULTS Data from animals (n = 15 studies) and women (n = 46 studies) indicate that G-CSF crosses the placenta, stimulates fetal granulopoiesis, improves neonatal survival mostly for very immature infants, promotes trophoblast growth and placental metabolism and has an anti-abortive role. Granulocyte macrophage-CSF is a key cytokine in the maternal immune tolerance towards the implanted embryo and exerts protective long-term programming effects to preimplantation embryos. The available data suggest that probably CSFs should not be administered during the time of most active organogenesis (first trimester), except perhaps for the first week during which implantation takes place. Provided CSF is administered during the second and third trimesters, it appears to be safe, and pregnant women receiving the CSF treatment can become hematopoietic stem cell donors. There are also risks related to the anesthesia, which is required for the bone marrow aspiration. During

  14. Enhancement of innate immunity with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor did not mitigate disease in pigs infected with a highly pathogenic Chinese PRRSV strain.

    PubMed

    Schlink, Sarah N; Lager, Kelly M; Brockmeier, Susan L; Loving, Crystal L; Miller, Laura C; Vorwald, Ann C; Yang, Han-Chun; Kehrli, Marcus E; Faaberg, Kay S

    2016-10-15

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is responsible for one of the most economically important diseases in swine worldwide. It causes reproductive failure in sows and pneumonia in pigs that predisposes them to secondary bacterial infections. Methods to control PRRSV and/or limit secondary bacterial infections are desired to reduce the impact of this virus on animal health. Neutrophils play a major role in combatting infection; they can act as phagocytes as well as produce and release lytic enzymes that have potent antimicrobial effects leading to the destruction and clearance of bacterial pathogens. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a cytokine that controls the production, differentiation and function of granulocytes (including neutrophils) from the bone marrow. Recent work from our laboratory has shown that encoding porcine G-CSF in a replication-defective adenovirus (Ad5-G-CSF) and delivering a single dose to pigs induced a neutrophilia lasting more than two weeks. As secondary bacterial infection is a common occurrence following PRRSV infection, particularly following challenge with highly pathogenic (HP)-PRRSV, the aim of the current study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a single prophylactic dose of adenovirus-encoded G-CSF to mitigate secondary bacterial disease associated with HP-PRRSV infection. Administration of Ad5-G-CSF induced a significant neutrophilia as expected. However, between 1 and 2days following HP-PRRSV challenge the number of circulating neutrophils decreased dramatically in the HP-PRRSV infected group, but not the non-infected Ad5-G-CSF group. Ad5-G-CSF administration induced monocytosis as well, which was also reduced by HP-PRRSV challenge. There was no difference in the progression of disease between the Ad5-G-CSF and Ad5-empty groups following HP-PRRSV challenge, with pneumonia and systemic bacterial infection occurring in both treatment groups. Given the impact of HP-PRRSV infection on the

  15. The pros and cons of split-dose granulocyte colony-stimulating factor alone rather than a single high dose for hematopoietic progenitor cell mobilization in small children (< 15 kg) with solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Merlin, Etienne; Piguet, Christophe; Auvrignon, Anne; Rubie, Hervé; Deméocq, François; Kanold, Justyna

    2006-07-01

    Hematopoietic progenitor cells were mobilized in 34 children with solid tumors weighing < or = 15 kg using granulocyte colony-stimulating factor alone at the doses of 10, 20 or 2 x 12 microg/kg/day. The mobilization with 2 x 12 microg/kg/day was more efficient than that with 10 mg/kg/day. Although the superiority of the split-dose compared to the single, high daily dose (20 microg/kg/day) was not statistically significant, our results suggest that the 2 x 12 microg/kg/day regimen is interesting.

  16. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor potentiates differentiation induction by all-trans retinoic acid and arsenic trioxide and enhances arsenic uptake in the acute promyelocytic leukemia cell line HT93A.

    PubMed

    Iriyama, Noriyoshi; Yuan, Bo; Hatta, Yoshihiro; Horikoshi, Akira; Yoshino, Yuta; Toyoda, Hiroo; Aizawa, Shin; Takeuchi, Jin

    2012-11-01

    The effects of arsenic trioxide (ATO), all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), alone or in combination, were investigated by focusing on differentiation, growth inhibition and arsenic uptake in the acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) cell line HT93A. ATO induced differentiation at low concentrations (0.125 µM) and apoptosis at high concentrations (1-2 µM). Furthermore, ATRA induced greater differentiation than ATO. No synergistic effect of ATRA and ATO was found on differentiation. G-CSF promoted differentiation-inducing activities of both ATO and ATRA. The combination of ATRA and G-CSF showed maximum differentiation and ATO addition was not beneficial. Addition of 1 µM ATRA and/or 50 ng/ml G-CSF to ATO did not affect apoptosis compared to ATO treatment alone. ATRA induced expression of aquaporin-9 (AQP9), a transmembrane transporter recognized as a major pathway of arsenic uptake, in a time- and dose-dependent manner. However, treatment with 1 µM ATRA decreased arsenic uptake by 43.7% compared to control subject. Although G-CSF addition did not enhance AQP9 expression in the cells, the reduced arsenic uptake was recovered to the same level as that in controls. ATRA decreased cell viability and addition of 50 ng/ml G-CSF to ATRA significantly increased the number of viable cells compared with that in ATRA alone treated cells. G-CSF not only promotes differentiation-inducing activities of both ATRA and ATO, but also makes APL cells vulnerable to increased arsenic uptake. These observations provide new insights into combination therapy using these three agents for the treatment of APL.

  17. Neuroprotective effects of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in a rat model of anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (rAION).

    PubMed

    Chang, Chung-Hsing; Huang, Tzu-Lun; Huang, Shun-Ping; Tsai, Rong-Kung

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the neuroprotective effects of recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), as administered in a rat model of anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (rAION). Using laser-induced photoactivation of intravenously administered Rose Bengal in the optic nerve head of 60 adult male Wistar rats, an anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (rAION) was inducted. Rats either immediately received G-CSF (subcutaneous injections) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) for 5 consecutive days. Rats were euthanized at 4 weeks post infarct. Density of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) was counted using retrograde labeling of Fluoro-gold. Visual function was assessed by flash visual-evoked potentials (FVEP) at 4 weeks. TUNEL assay in the retinal sections and immunohistochemical staining of ED1 (marker of macrophage/microglia) were investigated in the optic nerve (ON) specimens. The RGC densities in the central and mid-peripheral retinas in the G-CSF treated rats were significantly higher than those of the PBS-treated rats (survival rate was 71.4% vs. 33.2% in the central retina; 61.8% vs. 22.7% in the mid-peripheral retina, respectively; both p < 0.05). FVEP measurements showed a significantly better preserved latency and amplitude of the p1 wave in the G-CSF-treated rats than that of the PBS-treated rats (latency120 ± 11 ms vs. 142 ± 12 ms, p = 0.03; amplitude 50 ± 11 μv vs. 31 ± 13 μv, p = 0.04). TUNEL assays showed fewer apoptotic cells in the retinal ganglion cell layers of G-CSF treated rats [2.1 ± 1.0 cells/high power field (HPF) vs. 8.0 ± 1.5/HPF; p = 0.0001]. In addition, the number of ED1 positive cells was attenuated at the optic nerve sections of G-CSF-treated rats (16 ± 6/HPF vs. 35 ± 10/HPF; p = 0.016). In conclusion, administration of G-CSF is neuroprotective in the rat model of anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, as demonstrated both structurally by RGC density and functionally by

  18. Clinical observation of the therapeutic effects of pegylated recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in patients with concurrent chemoradiotherapy-induced grade IV neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    WU, FENG-PENG; WANG, JUN; WANG, HUI; LI, NA; GUO, YIN; CHENG, YUN-JIE; LIU, QING; YANG, XIANG-RAN

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the efficacy and side-effects of preventive treatment with pegylated recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (PEG-rhG-CSF) on concurrent chemoradiotherapy-induced grade IV neutropenia and to provide a rational basis for its clinical application. A total of 114 patients with concurrent chemoradiotherapy-induced grade IV neutropenia were enrolled. A randomized approach was used to divide the patients into an experimental group and a control group. The experimental group included three subgroups, namely a P-50 group, P-100 group and P + R group. The P-50 group had 42 cases, which were given a single 50-μg/kg subcutaneous injection of PEG-rhG-CSF. The P-100 group had 30 cases, which received a single 100-μg/kg subcutaneous injection of PEG-rhG-CSF. The P + R group comprised 22 cases, which were given a single 50-μg/kg subcutaneous injection of PEG-rhG-CSF and rhG-CSF 5 μg/kg/day; when the absolute neutrophil count (ANC) was ≥2.0×109/l, the administration of rhG-CSF was stopped. The control group (RC group) comprised 20 patients, who received rhG-CSF 5 μg/kg/day by subcutaneous injection until the ANC was ≥2.0×109/l. Changes in the neutrophil proliferation rate and ANC values over time, the neutropenic symptom remission time and incidence of adverse drug reactions were analyzed statistically in each group of patients. In the experimental group, the neutrophil proliferation rate and ANC values were significantly higher than those in the control group; the clinical effects began 12–24 h after treatment in the experimental group, and indicated that the treatment improved neutropenia in ~48 h after treatment. There was no significant difference in the neutrophil proliferation rate and ANC values between the P-50 and P+R groups. In the experimental group, the remission time of neutropenia-induced fever and muscle pain after administration was significantly shorter than that in the control group

  19. [Sequential treatment with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (GCSF) and human recombinant erythropoietin (rH-EPO) in anemia of a patient with myelodysplastic syndrome and high blood transfusion requirements)].

    PubMed

    Borbolla-Escoboza, J R; González-Avante, C M; López-Hernández, M A; Flores-Chapa, J D; Collados-Larumbe, M T

    1997-01-01

    We describe the case of a patient with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) classified as Refractory Anemia with our Excess blasts, who suffered from high transfusional requirements and who did not respond to the administrations of B12 vitamin, folates, danazol, low dose cytarabine or recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO). The patient was administered two cytokines: granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) followed by rHuEPO. The patient remained transfusion free for more than 4 months until his death from causes not related to MDS or the therapy he received. It is the opinion of the authors that the initial G-CSF administration stimulated the early erythroid precursors, making them capable of finishing their maturation when rHuEPO was administered. We believe that this could be a useful therapeutic measure in the treatment of patients with MDS and high transfusional requirements.

  20. Synergy of interleukin 1 and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor: in vivo stimulation of stem-cell recovery and hematopoietic regeneration following 5-fluorouracil treatment of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, M.A.S.; Warren, D.J.

    1987-10-01

    The human bladder carcinoma cell line 5637 produces hematopoietic growth factors (granulocyte and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF and GM-CSF)) and hemopoietin 1, which synergizes with CSFs to stimulate colony formation by primitive hematopoietic stem cells in 5-fluorouracil-treated mouse bone marrow. Molecular and functional properties of hemopoietin 1 identified it as identical to interleukin 1..cap alpha.. (IL-1..cap alpha..). When bone marrow cells from 5-fluorouracil-treated mice were cultured in suspension for 7 days with recombinant human IL-1..cap alpha.. and/or G-CSF, it was found that the two factors synergized to enhance recovery of myelopoietic cells and colony-forming cells of both high and low proliferative potential. G-CSF alone did not sustain these populations, but the combination had greater-than-additive stimulating capacity. In vivo, 5-fluorouracil (150 mg/kg) produced profound myelosuppression and delayed neutrophil regeneration for up to 2 weeks in C3H/HeJ mice. Daily administration of recombinant human G-CSF or human IL-1..cap alpha.. accelerated recovery of stem cells, progenitor cells, and blood neutrophils by up to 4 days in 5-fluorouracil-treated C3H/HeJ and B6D2F/sub 1/ mice. The combination of IL-1..cap alpha.. and G-CSF acted synergistically, reducing neutropenia and accelerating recovery of normal neutrophil numbers by up to 7 days. These results indicate the possible therapeutic potential of combination therapy with IL-1 and hematopoietic growth factors such as G-CSF in the treatment of chemotherapy- or radiation-induced myelosuppression.

  1. Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor and Physiotherapy after Stroke: Results of a Feasibility Randomised Controlled Trial: Stem Cell Trial of Recovery EnhanceMent after Stroke-3 (STEMS-3 ISRCTN16714730)

    PubMed Central

    Sprigg, Nikola; O’Connor, Rebecca; Woodhouse, Lisa; Krishnan, Kailash; England, Timothy J.; Connell, Louise A.; Walker, Marion F.; Bath, Philip M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) mobilises endogenous haematopoietic stem cells and enhances recovery in experimental stroke. Recovery may also be dependent on an enriched environment and physical activity. G-CSF may have the potential to enhance recovery when used in combination with physiotherapy, in patients with disability late after stroke. Methods A pilot 2 x 2 factorial randomised (1:1) placebo-controlled trial of G-CSF (double-blind), and/or a 6 week course of physiotherapy, in 60 participants with disability (mRS >1), at least 3 months after stroke. Primary outcome was feasibility, acceptability and tolerability. Secondary outcomes included death, dependency, motor function and quality of life measured 90 and 365 days after enrolment. Results Recruitment to the trial was feasible and acceptable; of 118 screened patients, 92 were eligible and 32 declined to participate. 60 patients were recruited between November 2011 and July 2013. All participants received some allocated treatment. Although 29 out of 30 participants received all 5 G-CSF/placebo injections, only 7 of 30 participants received all 18 therapy sessions. G-CSF was well tolerated but associated with a tendency to more adverse events than placebo (16 vs 10 patients, p = 0.12) and serious adverse events (SAE) (9 vs 3, p = 0.10). On average, patients received 14 (out of 18 planned) therapy sessions, interquartile range [12, 17]. Only a minority (23%) of participants completed all physiotherapy sessions, a large proportion of sessions (114 of 540, 21%) were cancelled due to patient (94, 17%) and therapist factors (20, 4%). No significant differences in functional outcomes were detected in either the G-CSF or physiotherapy group at day 90 or 365. Conclusions Delivery of G-CSF is feasible in chronic stroke. However, the study failed to demonstrate feasibility for delivering additional physiotherapy sessions late after stroke therefore a definitive study using this trial design

  2. Early measurement of CD34+ cells in peripheral blood after cyclophosphamide and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor treatment predicts later CD34+ mobilisation failure and is a possible criterion for guiding “on demand” use of plerixafor

    PubMed Central

    Milone, Giuseppe; Tripepi, Giovanni; Martino, Massimo; Ancora, Flavia; Bartolozzi, Benedetta; Spadaro, Andrea; Nozzoli, Chiara; La Fauci, Alessia; Amico, Irene; Leotta, Salvatore; Poidomani, Massimo; Irrera, Giuseppe; Iacopino, Pasquale; Saccardi, Riccardo; Guidi, Stefano; Bosi, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Background Early identification of predictive factors of failure to mobilise CD34+ cells could enable rational use of plerixafor during first mobilisation, avoiding the need for a second mobilisation course. However, “on demand” administration of plerixafor needs to be driven by established parameters to avoid inappropriate use. Materials and methods To address this issue, we studied the value of the peripheral blood CD34+ count, measured early (on days +10, +11, +12 and +13), in predicting the mobilisation outcome in the ensuing days. We retrospectively collected data from three Italian centres on 233 patients affected by multiple myeloma or lymphoma who underwent a first or second attempt at mobilisation with cyclophosphamide 4 g/m2 and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. To assess the diagnostic value of peripheral blood white blood cell and CD34+ cell counts with respect to “mobilisation failure”, we considered failed mobilisation as “disease” and the CD34+ cell count in peripheral blood, on a specific day, as a “diagnostic test”. For various thresholds, we measured sensitivity, false positive rate, specificity and positive predictive value (PPV) as well as the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curves (AUC). Results A CD34+ cell count <10×106/L on day 13 had high sensitivity (1.00) and high specificity (1.00) for predicting subsequent mobilisation failure, with an AUC of 1.0. However, good prediction was also obtained using a lower threshold (CD34+ cell count: <6×106/L) at an earlier time (day 12). The PPV of the day 13 threshold was 1.00 while that of the day 12 one was 0.87. Discussion We propose that patients with <6×106/L CD34+ cells in peripheral blood on day 12 and <10×106/L on day 13 following mobilisation with cyclophosphamide 4 g/m2 and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor are candidates for “on demand” use of plerixafor, making the administration of this expensive agent more efficient and avoiding its

  3. Randomized study of granulocyte colony stimulating factor for childhood B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma: a report from the Japanese pediatric leukemia/lymphoma study group B-NHL03 study.

    PubMed

    Tsurusawa, Masahito; Watanabe, Tomoyuki; Gosho, Masahiko; Mori, Tetsuya; Mitsui, Tetsuo; Sunami, Shosuke; Kobayashi, Ryoji; Fukano, Reiji; Tanaka, Fumiko; Fujita, Naoto; Inada, Hiroko; Sekimizu, Masahiro; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Kosaka, Yoshiyuki; Komada, Yoshihiro; Saito, Akiko M; Nakazawa, Atsuko; Horibe, Keizo

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the impact of the primary prophylaxis of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in the management of childhood B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL). Patients with advanced-stage mature B-NHL were randomized to receive prophylactic G-CSF (G-CSF+) or not receive G-CSF (G-CSF-) based on protocols of the B-NHL03 study. The G-CSF group received 5 μg/kg/d Lenograstim from day 2 after each course of six chemotherapy courses. Fifty-eight patients were assessable, 29 G-CSF + and 29 G-CSF-. G-CSF + patients showed a positive impact on the meantime to neutrophil recovery and hospital stay. On the other hand, they had no impact in the incidences of febrile neutropenia, serious infections, stomatitis and total cost. Our study showed that administration of prophylactic G-CSF through all six chemotherapy courses for childhood B-NHL showed no clinical and economic benefits for the management of childhood B-NHL treatment.

  4. Sustained receptor activation and hyperproliferation in response to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in mice with a severe congenital neutropenia/acute myeloid leukemia-derived mutation in the G-CSF receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Hermans, M H; Antonissen, C; Ward, A C; Mayen, A E; Ploemacher, R E; Touw, I P

    1999-02-15

    In approximately 20% of cases of severe congenital neutropenia (SCN), mutations are found in the gene encoding the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor (G-CSF-R). These mutations introduce premature stop codons, which result in truncation of 82-98 COOH-terminal amino acids of the receptor. SCN patients who develop secondary myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia almost invariably acquired a GCSFR mutation, suggesting that this genetic alteration represents a key step in leukemogenesis. Here we show that an equivalent mutation targeted in mice (gcsfr-Delta715) results in the selective expansion of the G-CSF- responsive progenitor (G-CFC) compartment in the bone marrow. In addition, in vivo treatment of gcsfr-Delta715 mice with G-CSF results in increased production of neutrophils leading to a sustained neutrophilia. This hyperproliferative response to G-CSF is accompanied by prolonged activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) complexes and extended cell surface expression of mutant receptors due to defective internalization. In view of the continuous G-CSF treatment of SCN patients, these data provide insight into why progenitor cells expressing truncated receptors clonally expand in vivo, and why these cells may be targets for additional genetic events leading to leukemia. PMID:9989983

  5. Sustained Receptor Activation and Hyperproliferation in Response to Granulocyte Colony-stimulating Factor (G-CSF) in Mice with a Severe Congenital Neutropenia/Acute Myeloid Leukemia–derived Mutation in the G-CSF Receptor Gene

    PubMed Central

    Hermans, Mirjam H.A.; Antonissen, Claudia; Ward, Alister C.; Mayen, Angelique E.M.; Ploemacher, Rob E.; Touw, Ivo P.

    1999-01-01

    In approximately 20% of cases of severe congenital neutropenia (SCN), mutations are found in the gene encoding the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor (G-CSF–R). These mutations introduce premature stop codons, which result in truncation of 82–98 COOH-terminal amino acids of the receptor. SCN patients who develop secondary myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia almost invariably acquired a GCSFR mutation, suggesting that this genetic alteration represents a key step in leukemogenesis. Here we show that an equivalent mutation targeted in mice (gcsfr-Δ715) results in the selective expansion of the G-CSF– responsive progenitor (G-CFC) compartment in the bone marrow. In addition, in vivo treatment of gcsfr-Δ715 mice with G-CSF results in increased production of neutrophils leading to a sustained neutrophilia. This hyperproliferative response to G-CSF is accompanied by prolonged activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) complexes and extended cell surface expression of mutant receptors due to defective internalization. In view of the continuous G-CSF treatment of SCN patients, these data provide insight into why progenitor cells expressing truncated receptors clonally expand in vivo, and why these cells may be targets for additional genetic events leading to leukemia. PMID:9989983

  6. Sustained receptor activation and hyperproliferation in response to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in mice with a severe congenital neutropenia/acute myeloid leukemia-derived mutation in the G-CSF receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Hermans, M H; Antonissen, C; Ward, A C; Mayen, A E; Ploemacher, R E; Touw, I P

    1999-02-15

    In approximately 20% of cases of severe congenital neutropenia (SCN), mutations are found in the gene encoding the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor (G-CSF-R). These mutations introduce premature stop codons, which result in truncation of 82-98 COOH-terminal amino acids of the receptor. SCN patients who develop secondary myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia almost invariably acquired a GCSFR mutation, suggesting that this genetic alteration represents a key step in leukemogenesis. Here we show that an equivalent mutation targeted in mice (gcsfr-Delta715) results in the selective expansion of the G-CSF- responsive progenitor (G-CFC) compartment in the bone marrow. In addition, in vivo treatment of gcsfr-Delta715 mice with G-CSF results in increased production of neutrophils leading to a sustained neutrophilia. This hyperproliferative response to G-CSF is accompanied by prolonged activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) complexes and extended cell surface expression of mutant receptors due to defective internalization. In view of the continuous G-CSF treatment of SCN patients, these data provide insight into why progenitor cells expressing truncated receptors clonally expand in vivo, and why these cells may be targets for additional genetic events leading to leukemia.

  7. The intramuscular administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor as an adjunct to chemotherapy in pretreated ovarian cancer patients: an Italian Trials in Medical Oncology (ITMO) Group pilot study.

    PubMed Central

    Di Leo, A.; Bajetta, E.; Nolè, F.; Biganzoli, L.; Ferrari, L.; Oriana, S.; Riboldi, G.; Bohm, S.; Spatti, G.; Raspagliesi, F.

    1994-01-01

    No published data are available concerning the activity and tolerability of intramuscularly administered granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in humans. To fill this gap, 19 patients with advanced ovarian cancer previously treated with at least one first-line chemotherapy cycle received the following myelosuppressive regimen: mitoxantrone (DHAD) 12 mg m-2 i.v. on day 1; ifosfamide (IFO) 4 g m-2 i.v. on days 1 and 2; mesna 800 mg m-2 i.v. t.i.d. on days 1 and 2. G-CSF (Filgrastim) was given at a dose of 5 micrograms/kg/day i.m. from day 6 to day 19, its pharmacokinetics being assessed in five patients. The neutrophil nadir was observed after a mean period of 8 days, and the neutrophil count was < 1.0 x 10(3) mm-3 for a mean of 6 days during the cycle of chemotherapy. The neutrophil count fell after the withdrawal of G-CSF on the 19th day of treatment. The difference in absolute neutrophil count between day 19 and day 21 was statistically significant (P = 0.0001); nevertheless, at day 21 no WHO grade 3-4 neutropenia was reported. DHAD and IFO were respectively given at 95% and 93% of the planned dose. The pharmacokinetics of G-CSF i.m. seems to be similar to that of the drug given subcutaneously. No evidence of cumulative myelosuppression was observed. G-CSF was well tolerated and no complications were observed at the injection sites. In conclusion, if the results obtained in this pilot study regarding the activity of i.m. G-CSF are confirmed by a randomised trial, the intramuscular administration of G-CSF could become a valid alternative for patients who dislike the subcutaneous route and who are being treated with chemotherapy that does not induce profound thrombocytopenia. PMID:7514030

  8. Graft monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cell content predicts the risk of acute graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic transplantation of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized peripheral blood stem cells.

    PubMed

    Vendramin, Antonio; Gimondi, Silvia; Bermema, Anisa; Longoni, Paolo; Rizzitano, Sara; Corradini, Paolo; Carniti, Cristiana

    2014-12-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are powerful immunomodulatory cells that in mice play a role in infectious and inflammatory disorders, including acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Their relevance in clinical acute GVHD is poorly known. We analyzed whether granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) administration, used to mobilize hematopoietic stem cells, affected the frequency of MDSCs in the peripheral blood stem cell grafts of 60 unrelated donors. In addition, we evaluated whether the MDSC content in the peripheral blood stem cell grafts affected the occurrence of acute GVHD in patients undergoing unrelated donor allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Systemic treatment with G-CSF induces an expansion of myeloid cells displaying the phenotype of monocytic MDSCs (Lin(low/neg)HLA-DR(-)CD11b(+)CD33(+)CD14(+)) with the ability to suppress alloreactive T cells in vitro, therefore meeting the definition of MDSCs. Monocytic MDSC dose was the only graft parameter to predict acute GVHD. The cumulative incidence of acute GVHD at 180 days after transplantation for recipients receiving monocytic MDSC doses below and above the median was 63% and 22%, respectively (P = .02). The number of monocytic MDSCs infused did not impact the relapse rate or the transplant-related mortality rate (P > .05). Although further prospective studies involving larger sample size are needed to validate the exact monocytic MDSC graft dose that protects from acute GVHD, our results strongly suggest the modulation of G-CSF might be used to affect monocytic MDSCs graft cell doses for prevention of acute GVHD.

  9. Improved Outcome of Refractory/Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia after Post-Transplantation Cyclophosphamide-Based Haploidentical Transplantation with Myeloablative Conditioning and Early Prophylactic Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor-Mobilized Donor Lymphocyte Infusions.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Sarita Rani; Zaman, Shamsuz; Chakrabarti, Aditi; Sen, Subrata; Mukherjee, Shashwata; Bhargava, Sneh; Ray, Kunal; O'Donnell, Paul V; Chakrabarti, Suparno

    2016-10-01

    We carried out post-transplantation cyclophosphamide (PTCy)-based haploidentical peripheral blood stem cell transplantation in 51 patients with refractory/relapsed acute myeloid leukemia not in remission. The first 10 patients received nonmyeloablative conditioning followed by planned granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-mobilized donor lymphocyte infusions (DLIs) on days 35, 60, and 90. No patient developed graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), but 90% had disease progression between 3 and 6 months. A subsequent 41 patients received myeloablative conditioning (MAC); the first 20 patients did not receive DLIs (MAC group) and the next 21 patients received G-CSF-mobilized DLIs (G-DLI) on days 21, 35, and 60 (MAC-DLI group). The incidence of disease progression and progression-free survival at 18 months were 66% and 25% in the MAC group compared with 21.4% and 61.9% in the MAC-DLI group (P = .01). Chronic GVHD but not acute GVHD was increased in the MAC-DLI group (41.2% versus 11%, P = .05). Natural killer cell alloreactive donor was associated with lower incidence of disease progression in the MAC but not in MAC-DLI group. The only factor favorably influencing disease progression and progression-free survival was administration of G-DLI after myeloablative conditioning. Our study shows that early administration of G-DLI is feasible after PTCy-based haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for refractory/relapsed acute myeloid leukemia and might be associated with improved survival after MAC. PMID:27470289

  10. Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor (GCSF) Alters the Phenotype of Neuroblastoma Cells: Implications for disease free survival of high-risk patients

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Andre N.; Chang, Shirong; Rutland, Lindsey; Yu, Ling; Byeseda, Sarah; Naik-Mathuria, Bindi; Cass, Darrell L.; Russell, Heidi; Olutoye, Oluyinka O.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction GCSF is commonly employed for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. Despite high-dose intensive chemotherapy for advanced stage neuroblastoma, the survival rate remains poor. GCSF therapy is quite common in these children, thus we questioned its effect on neuroblastoma cells. We hypothesized that exogenous GCSF stimulates the proliferation and invasive character of neuroblastoma cells. Methods Expression of a GCSF receptor in five different neuroblastoma cell lines was determined by PCR. In addition, we determined the effect of increasing doses of GCSF (0, 1 ng/ml, 10 ng/ml, 1 µg/ml, 10 µg/ml) on DNA synthesis (BrdU assay), invasiveness (Matrigel invasion chambers) and cell proliferation. Results We tested five neuroblastoma cell lines; all expressed the GCSF receptor. GCSF treatment resulted in significantly increased proliferation of SK-N-SH, SK-N-AS and SHSY-5Y cells. Likewise, increased invasiveness of SK-N-SH cells was observed with GCSF treatment. Conclusions Our results indicate that neuroblastoma cell lines express the GCSF receptor and respond to exogenous GCSF by increased proliferation and invasiveness. These findings suggest that GCSF may stimulate the growth of neuroblastoma cells in patients undergoing high-dose chemotherapy with GCSF rescue and could have a significant impact on the ability to eradicate these tumors. PMID:18485949

  11. cAMP suppresses p21ras and Raf-1 responses but not the Erk-1 response to granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor: possible Raf-1-independent activation of Erk-1.

    PubMed Central

    Csar, X F; Ward, A C; Hoffmann, B W; Guy, G G; Hamilton, J A

    1997-01-01

    The cAMP analogue 8-bromo-cAMP (8BrcAMP) inhibits granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-stimulated DNA synthesis in myeloid NFS-60 cells. We examined the effect of 8BrcAMP addition on the G-CSF-stimulated extracellular signal-related protein kinase 1 (Erk-1), p21ras and Raf-1 activation. The Erk-1 activity was not down-regulated by the increase in intracellular cAMP levels, whereas p21ras and Raf-1 activities were, suggesting that Erk-1 activity might not be dependent on upstream p21ras and/or Raf-1 activity in this system. To explore this possibility further, we sought to determine whether there were downstream substrates of Raf-1 that were distinguishable from those of Erk-1 by using two-dimensional SDS/PAGE analysis of the protein phosphorylation patterns of NFS-60 cell cytosolic extracts treated with exogenous Raf-1 or Erk-1 in the presence of [gamma-32P]ATP. The two phosphorylation patterns were found to have many differences. To gain further insights into the possible relevance of these phosphorylation patterns and as an approach to exploring in more detail the inhibitory effect of 8BrcAMP, two-dimensional SDS/PAGE analysis was performed on the cytosolic extracts of 32P-labelled NFS-60 cells treated with G-CSF, in the absence or presence of 8BrcAMP. It was found that the phosphorylated proteins whose appearance was specific to the action of exogenous Raf-1 were sensitive to the action of 8BrcAMP in vivo, whereas those whose appearance was specific to the action of exogenous Erk-1 alone, or common to the actions of Raf-1 and Erk-1, were 8BrcAMP-insensitive. The results are consistent with a Raf-1-independent pathway for Erk-1 activation in G-CSF treated myeloid cells, and a number of potential downstream substrates of these kinases have been identified for further characterization. PMID:9078246

  12. cAMP suppresses p21ras and Raf-1 responses but not the Erk-1 response to granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor: possible Raf-1-independent activation of Erk-1.

    PubMed

    Csar, X F; Ward, A C; Hoffmann, B W; Guy, G G; Hamilton, J A

    1997-02-15

    The cAMP analogue 8-bromo-cAMP (8BrcAMP) inhibits granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-stimulated DNA synthesis in myeloid NFS-60 cells. We examined the effect of 8BrcAMP addition on the G-CSF-stimulated extracellular signal-related protein kinase 1 (Erk-1), p21ras and Raf-1 activation. The Erk-1 activity was not down-regulated by the increase in intracellular cAMP levels, whereas p21ras and Raf-1 activities were, suggesting that Erk-1 activity might not be dependent on upstream p21ras and/or Raf-1 activity in this system. To explore this possibility further, we sought to determine whether there were downstream substrates of Raf-1 that were distinguishable from those of Erk-1 by using two-dimensional SDS/PAGE analysis of the protein phosphorylation patterns of NFS-60 cell cytosolic extracts treated with exogenous Raf-1 or Erk-1 in the presence of [gamma-32P]ATP. The two phosphorylation patterns were found to have many differences. To gain further insights into the possible relevance of these phosphorylation patterns and as an approach to exploring in more detail the inhibitory effect of 8BrcAMP, two-dimensional SDS/PAGE analysis was performed on the cytosolic extracts of 32P-labelled NFS-60 cells treated with G-CSF, in the absence or presence of 8BrcAMP. It was found that the phosphorylated proteins whose appearance was specific to the action of exogenous Raf-1 were sensitive to the action of 8BrcAMP in vivo, whereas those whose appearance was specific to the action of exogenous Erk-1 alone, or common to the actions of Raf-1 and Erk-1, were 8BrcAMP-insensitive. The results are consistent with a Raf-1-independent pathway for Erk-1 activation in G-CSF treated myeloid cells, and a number of potential downstream substrates of these kinases have been identified for further characterization.

  13. Influence of preharvest tumor cell contamination in bone marrow or blood does not predict resultant tumor cell contamination of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor mobilized stem cells.

    PubMed

    Krüger, W; Kröger, N; Tögel, F; Badbaran, A; Renges, H; Gieseking, F; Gutensohn, K; Jänicke, F; Zander, A R

    2001-04-01

    Tumor cell contamination of stem cell collections harvested from breast cancer patients is a common phenomenon described by several investigators but with findings that vary among reports. Although so-called co-mobilization of these cells has been hypothesized, the origin of tumor cell contamination in stem cells is still unknown. A total of 47 G-CSF mobilized stem cell grafts from patients with nodal-positive (n = 30), chemosensitive metastatic (n = 11), and 5 women with inflammatory breast cancer were evaluated for cancer cells by immunocytochemistry. Additionally, 40 bone marrow aspirations and 23 peripheral blood samples collected prior to apheresis and after one to two cycles of conventional chemotherapy were available for examination. Tumor cell contamination of leukapheresis correlated best with preharvest blood state. This was valid when the nominal (positive/negative) presence of tumor cells in blood was compared to the nominal presence of tumor cells in apheresis samples and when the it was correlated to the tumor cell load of apheresis samples (TCL = tumor cells per 10(6) nucleated cells investigated). The correlation between blood and stem cells was better (nominal and quantitative) than that between marrow and stem cells, despite the larger sample size of marrow aspirations. The presence or absence of cancer cells in apheresis samples could not be safely predicted by the presence or absence of tumor cells in marrow or blood alone. Diagnostic specificity seems to improve from a combination of results from marrow and blood analysis. No correlation was found in quantitative analysis of tumor cell contamination between marrow and blood. In conclusion, the results suggest that blood and bone marrow represent different compartments for epithelial cancer cells and that contaminating tumor cells in stem cell harvests may be derived from the blood and/or marrow compartment. The tumor cell contamination of a stem cell harvest cannot be safely predicted by a

  14. Early applications of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) can stabilize the blood–optic-nerve barrier and ameliorate inflammation in a rat model of anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (rAION)

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Yao-Tseng; Huang, Tzu-Lun; Huang, Sung-Ping; Chang, Chung-Hsing

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) was reported to have a neuroprotective effect in a rat model of anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (rAION model). However, the therapeutic window and anti-inflammatory effects of G-CSF in a rAION model have yet to be elucidated. Thus, this study aimed to determine the therapeutic window of G-CSF and investigate the mechanisms of G-CSF via regulation of optic nerve (ON) inflammation in a rAION model. Rats were treated with G-CSF on day 0, 1, 2 or 7 post-rAION induction for 5 consecutive days, and a control group were treated with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Visual function was assessed by flash visual evoked potentials at 4 weeks post-rAION induction. The survival rate and apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells were determined by FluoroGold labeling and TUNEL assay, respectively. ON inflammation was evaluated by staining of ED1 and Iba1, and ON vascular permeability was determined by Evans Blue extravasation. The type of macrophage polarization was evaluated using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). The protein levels of TNF-α and IL-1β were analyzed by western blotting. A therapeutic window during which G-CSF could rescue visual function and retinal ganglion cell survival was demonstrated at day 0 and day 1 post-infarct. Macrophage infiltration was reduced by 3.1- and 1.6-fold by G-CSF treatment starting on day 0 and 1 post-rAION induction, respectively, compared with the PBS-treated group (P<0.05). This was compatible with 3.3- and 1.7-fold reductions in ON vascular permeability after G-CSF treatment compared with PBS treatment (P<0.05). Microglial activation was increased by 3.8- and 3.2-fold in the early (beginning treatment at day 0 or 1) G-CSF-treated group compared with the PBS-treated group (P<0.05). Immediate (within 30 mins of infarct) treatment with G-CSF also induced M2 microglia/macrophage activation. The cytokine levels were lower in the group that received immediate G-CSF treatment

  15. Comparison of neurological and functional outcomes after administration of granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor in motor-complete versus motor-incomplete postrehabilitated, chronic spinal cord injuries: a phase I/II study.

    PubMed

    Saberi, Hooshang; Derakhshanrad, Nazi; Yekaninejad, Mir Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a major growth factor in the activation and differentiation of granulocytes. This cytokine has been widely and safely employed in different disease conditions over many years. The administration of the growth factors in spinal cord injury (SCI) has been reported elsewhere; here we have tried to see the effect of SCI severity on the neurological outcomes after neuroprotective treatment for SCI with G-CSF. Seventy-four consecutive patients with SCI of at least 6 months' duration, with stable neurological status in the last 3 months, having informed consent for the treatment were included in the study. All the patients had undergone at least 3 months of standard rehabilitation. Patients were assessed by the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) scale, Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM) III, and International Association of Neurorestoratology-Spinal Cord Injury Functional Rating Scale (IANR-SCIFRS) just before intervention and periodically until 6 months after subcutaneous administration of 5 µg/kg per day of G-CSF for 7 consecutive days. Multiple linear regression models were performed for statistical evaluation of lesion completeness and level of injury on changes in ASIA motor, light touch, pinprick, IANR-SCIFRS, and SCIM III scores, as a phase I/II comparative study. The study consisted of 52 motor-complete and 22 motor-incomplete SCI patients. There was no significant difference regarding age and sex, chronicity, and level of SCI between the two groups. Motor-incomplete patients had significantly more improvement in ASIA motor score compared to the motor-complete patients (7.68 scores, p < 0.001); also they had significant improvement in light touch (6.42 scores, p = 0.003) and pinprick sensory scores (4.89 scores, p = 0.011). Therefore, G-CSF administration in motor-incomplete SCIs is associated with significantly higher motor improvement, and also the higher the initial ASIA Impairment Scale

  16. Prophylactic Administration of Vector-Encoded Porcine Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor Reduces Salmonella Shedding, Tonsil Colonization, and Microbiota Alterations of the Gastrointestinal Tract in Salmonella-Challenged Swine

    PubMed Central

    Bearson, Shawn M. D.; Bearson, Bradley L.; Loving, Crystal L.; Allen, Heather K.; Lee, InSoo; Madson, Darin; Kehrli, Marcus E.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella colonization of food animals is a concern for animal health and public health as a food safety risk. Various obstacles impede the effort to reduce asymptomatic Salmonella carriage in food animals, including the existence of numerous serovars and the ubiquitous nature of Salmonella. To develop an intervention strategy that is non-specific yet effective against diverse Salmonella serovars, we explored the prophylactic use of a cytokine to decrease Salmonella in swine by boosting the host’s innate immune system. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is the major cytokine regulating the production, differentiation, function, and survival of neutrophils. Neutrophils play a critical role in the response to Salmonella; therefore, we evaluated the vectored-delivery of porcine G-CSF as a prophylactic to reduce Salmonella in pigs. Crossbred pigs, 5 weeks of age, were intramuscularly injected with a replication-defective human adenovirus (Ad5) engineered to express porcine G-CSF (Ad5-G-CSF, n = 9). Control pigs received the same Ad5 vector lacking the gene encoding G-CSF (Ad5-empty, n = 7). Four days later, all pigs (n = 16) were intranasally inoculated with 1 × 107 colony forming unit (CFU) of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium UK1. At 2 and 3 days post-challenge with Salmonella, Ad5-G-CSF-treated pigs shed significantly less Salmonella (~103 CFU/g) in their feces than Ad5-empty-treated pigs (~104–105 CFU/g; P < 0.05). A significant 4-log reduction in tonsil colonization was also observed in the Ad5-G-CSF-treated pigs at 7 days post-challenge (P < 0.05). In the gastrointestinal tract, the Peyer’s patch region of the ileum exhibited a significant 0.5-log reduction in colonization in the Ad5-G-CSF-treated pigs (P < 0.05). The microbiota of all challenged pigs was assessed by sequencing and analyzing the V1–V3 region of the 16S rRNA gene from fecal DNA samples. The microbial community structure of

  17. Prophylactic Administration of Vector-Encoded Porcine Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor Reduces Salmonella Shedding, Tonsil Colonization, and Microbiota Alterations of the Gastrointestinal Tract in Salmonella-Challenged Swine

    PubMed Central

    Bearson, Shawn M. D.; Bearson, Bradley L.; Loving, Crystal L.; Allen, Heather K.; Lee, InSoo; Madson, Darin; Kehrli, Marcus E.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella colonization of food animals is a concern for animal health and public health as a food safety risk. Various obstacles impede the effort to reduce asymptomatic Salmonella carriage in food animals, including the existence of numerous serovars and the ubiquitous nature of Salmonella. To develop an intervention strategy that is non-specific yet effective against diverse Salmonella serovars, we explored the prophylactic use of a cytokine to decrease Salmonella in swine by boosting the host’s innate immune system. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is the major cytokine regulating the production, differentiation, function, and survival of neutrophils. Neutrophils play a critical role in the response to Salmonella; therefore, we evaluated the vectored-delivery of porcine G-CSF as a prophylactic to reduce Salmonella in pigs. Crossbred pigs, 5 weeks of age, were intramuscularly injected with a replication-defective human adenovirus (Ad5) engineered to express porcine G-CSF (Ad5-G-CSF, n = 9). Control pigs received the same Ad5 vector lacking the gene encoding G-CSF (Ad5-empty, n = 7). Four days later, all pigs (n = 16) were intranasally inoculated with 1 × 107 colony forming unit (CFU) of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium UK1. At 2 and 3 days post-challenge with Salmonella, Ad5-G-CSF-treated pigs shed significantly less Salmonella (~103 CFU/g) in their feces than Ad5-empty-treated pigs (~104–105 CFU/g; P < 0.05). A significant 4-log reduction in tonsil colonization was also observed in the Ad5-G-CSF-treated pigs at 7 days post-challenge (P < 0.05). In the gastrointestinal tract, the Peyer’s patch region of the ileum exhibited a significant 0.5-log reduction in colonization in the Ad5-G-CSF-treated pigs (P < 0.05). The microbiota of all challenged pigs was assessed by sequencing and analyzing the V1–V3 region of the 16S rRNA gene from fecal DNA samples. The microbial community structure of

  18. Prophylactic Administration of Vector-Encoded Porcine Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor Reduces Salmonella Shedding, Tonsil Colonization, and Microbiota Alterations of the Gastrointestinal Tract in Salmonella-Challenged Swine.

    PubMed

    Bearson, Shawn M D; Bearson, Bradley L; Loving, Crystal L; Allen, Heather K; Lee, InSoo; Madson, Darin; Kehrli, Marcus E

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella colonization of food animals is a concern for animal health and public health as a food safety risk. Various obstacles impede the effort to reduce asymptomatic Salmonella carriage in food animals, including the existence of numerous serovars and the ubiquitous nature of Salmonella. To develop an intervention strategy that is non-specific yet effective against diverse Salmonella serovars, we explored the prophylactic use of a cytokine to decrease Salmonella in swine by boosting the host's innate immune system. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is the major cytokine regulating the production, differentiation, function, and survival of neutrophils. Neutrophils play a critical role in the response to Salmonella; therefore, we evaluated the vectored-delivery of porcine G-CSF as a prophylactic to reduce Salmonella in pigs. Crossbred pigs, 5 weeks of age, were intramuscularly injected with a replication-defective human adenovirus (Ad5) engineered to express porcine G-CSF (Ad5-G-CSF, n = 9). Control pigs received the same Ad5 vector lacking the gene encoding G-CSF (Ad5-empty, n = 7). Four days later, all pigs (n = 16) were intranasally inoculated with 1 × 10(7) colony forming unit (CFU) of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium UK1. At 2 and 3 days post-challenge with Salmonella, Ad5-G-CSF-treated pigs shed significantly less Salmonella (~10(3) CFU/g) in their feces than Ad5-empty-treated pigs (~10(4)-10(5) CFU/g; P < 0.05). A significant 4-log reduction in tonsil colonization was also observed in the Ad5-G-CSF-treated pigs at 7 days post-challenge (P < 0.05). In the gastrointestinal tract, the Peyer's patch region of the ileum exhibited a significant 0.5-log reduction in colonization in the Ad5-G-CSF-treated pigs (P < 0.05). The microbiota of all challenged pigs was assessed by sequencing and analyzing the V1-V3 region of the 16S rRNA gene from fecal DNA samples. The microbial community structure of

  19. A 3,387 bp 5'-flanking sequence of the goat alpha-S1-casein gene provides correct tissue-specific expression of human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF) in the mammary gland of transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Serova, Irina A; Dvoryanchikov, Gennady A; Andreeva, Ludmila E; Burkov, Ivan A; Dias, Luciene P B; Battulin, Nariman R; Smirnov, Alexander V; Serov, Oleg L

    2012-06-01

    A new expression vector containing the 1,944 bp 5'-flanking regulatory region together with exon 1 and intron 1 of the goat alpha-S1-casein gene (CSN1S1), the full-sized human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor gene (hGCSF) and the 3'-flanking sequence of the bovine CSN1S1, was created. The vector DNA was used for generation of four mouse transgenic lines. The transgene was integrated into chromosomes 8 and 12 of two founders as 2 and 5 copies, respectively. Tissue-specific secretion of hG-CSF into the milk of transgenic mice was in the range of 19-40 μg/ml. RT-PCR analysis of various tissues of the transgenic mice demonstrated that expression of hGCSF was detected in only the mammary gland in the progeny of all founders. Moreover, cells were shown to be positive for hG-CSF by immunofluorescent analysis in the mammary glands but not in any other tissues. There were no signs of mosaic expression in the mammary gland. Trace amounts of hG-CSF were detected in the serum of females of two transgenic lines during lactation only. However, no transgenic mice showed any changes in hematopoiesis based on the number of granulocytes in blood. Immunoblotting of hG-CSF in the milk of transgenic mice revealed two forms, presumably the glycosylated and non-glycosylated forms. The hematopoietic activity of hG-CSF in the milk of transgenic females is comparable to that of recombinant G-CSF. In general, the data obtained in this study show that the new expression vector is able to provide correct tissue-specific expression of hG-CSF with high biological activity in transgenic mice.

  20. Salvage chemotherapy followed by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-primed donor leukocyte infusion with graft-vs.-host disease control for minimal residual disease in acute leukemia/myelodysplastic syndrome after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: prognostic factors and clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Mo, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Xu, Lan-Ping; Wang, Yu; Yan, Chen-Hua; Chen, Huan; Chen, Yu-Hong; Han, Wei; Wang, Feng-Rong; Wang, Jing-Zhi; Liu, Kai-Yan; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2016-03-01

    This study investigated the prognostic factors and clinical outcomes of preemptive chemotherapy followed by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-primed donor leukocyte infusion (Chemo-DLI) according to minimal residual disease (MRD) status in patients with acute leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes who received allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) (n = 101). Patients received immunosuppressive drugs to prevent graft-vs.-host disease (GVHD) after Chemo-DLI. The 3-yr cumulative incidences of relapse, non-relapse mortality, and disease-free survival (DFS) after HSCT were 39.5%, 9.6%, and 51.7%, respectively. The cumulative incidences of relapse and DFS were significantly poorer in patients who exhibited early-onset MRD. Forty-four patients turned MRD negative 1 month after Chemo-DLI; their cumulative incidences of relapse and DFS were significantly better than those with persistent MRD 1 month after preemptive Chemo-DLI (relapse: 19.8% vs. 46.8%, P = 0.001; DFS: 69.6% vs. 46.4%, P = 0.004). The cumulative incidences of relapse and DFS after HSCT were significantly better in patients with chronic GVHD (cGVHD) than those without cGVHD (relapse: 19.6% vs. 63.7%, P < 0.001; DFS: 74.4% vs. 23.8%, P < 0.001). Early-onset MRD, persistent MRD after Chemo-DLI, and non-cGVHD after Chemo-DLI, which were associated with increased relapse and impaired DFS, suggest unsatisfactory response to preemptive Chemo-DLI.

  1. Isolated abdominal aortitis following administration of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF).

    PubMed

    Miller, Edward B; Grosu, Roy; Landau, Zvi

    2016-06-01

    G-CSF is a myeloid growth factor produced by monocytes, macrophages, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells. Clinical uses of G-CSF includes mobilization of peripheral blood progenitor cells from healthy donors before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, acceleration of neutrophil recovery following chemotherapy, and in the management of neutropenia due to other causes including AIDS and genetic disorders of granulocyte production. G-CSF is well tolerated and reports to be safe in healthy donors, although follow-up studies are limited in duration (D'Souza et al. in Transfus Med Rev 22(4):280-290, 2008).Isolated abdominal aortitis (IAA) is a rare disorder most commonly caused by the large-vessel vasculitides giant cell arteritis (GCA) and Takayasu arteritis, although it may also be associated with several other rheumatologic diseases and infections (Gornik and Creager in Circulation 117:3039-3051, 2008). To our knowledge, there only two cases have been published of IAA occurring in patients who had received G-CSF therapy (Dariea et al. in Rev Med Interne 25(3):225-229, 2004; Adiga et al. in Clin Drug Investig 29:821-825, 2009).We describe a case of a 55-year-old male, with peripheral vascular disease who after receiving Neupogen (G-CSF) developed a latent case of IAA. After further investigation and exclusion of other possible causative factors, we conclude that the most probable etiology is induction by G-CSF.

  2. Human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) produced in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Kraševec, Nada; Milunović, Tatjana; Lasnik, Marija Anžur; Lukančič, Irena; Komel, Radovan; Porekar, Vladka Gaberc

    2014-01-01

    For the first time, a fungal production system is described for expression and secretion of the medically important human protein G-CSF, in Aspergillus niger. A reliable strategy was chosen with in-frame fusion of G-CSF behind a KEX2 cleavage site downstream of the coding region of the highly secreted homologous glucoamylase. This provided secretion levels of 5-10 mg/l culture medium of correctly processed G-CSF, although the majority of the protein (>90%) was biologically inactive. Following denaturation/ concentration and chromatographic separation/ renaturation, the G-CSF proliferation activity increased considerably, and analytical immobilised metal affinity chromatography confirmed the monomeric and correctly folded protein. These data suggest that this human secretory protein secreted into the medium of A. niger was not correctly folded, and that it escaped the endoplasmic reticulum folding control systems. This is compared to the folding of G-CSF produced in bacteria and yeast. PMID:25551710

  3. Isolated abdominal aortitis following administration of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF).

    PubMed

    Miller, Edward B; Grosu, Roy; Landau, Zvi

    2016-06-01

    G-CSF is a myeloid growth factor produced by monocytes, macrophages, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells. Clinical uses of G-CSF includes mobilization of peripheral blood progenitor cells from healthy donors before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, acceleration of neutrophil recovery following chemotherapy, and in the management of neutropenia due to other causes including AIDS and genetic disorders of granulocyte production. G-CSF is well tolerated and reports to be safe in healthy donors, although follow-up studies are limited in duration (D'Souza et al. in Transfus Med Rev 22(4):280-290, 2008).Isolated abdominal aortitis (IAA) is a rare disorder most commonly caused by the large-vessel vasculitides giant cell arteritis (GCA) and Takayasu arteritis, although it may also be associated with several other rheumatologic diseases and infections (Gornik and Creager in Circulation 117:3039-3051, 2008). To our knowledge, there only two cases have been published of IAA occurring in patients who had received G-CSF therapy (Dariea et al. in Rev Med Interne 25(3):225-229, 2004; Adiga et al. in Clin Drug Investig 29:821-825, 2009).We describe a case of a 55-year-old male, with peripheral vascular disease who after receiving Neupogen (G-CSF) developed a latent case of IAA. After further investigation and exclusion of other possible causative factors, we conclude that the most probable etiology is induction by G-CSF. PMID:27094941

  4. Reduced salmonella fecal shedding in swine administered porcine granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella colonization of food animals is a concern for animal health, food safety and public health. Key objectives of pre-harvest food safety programs are to detect asymptomatic Salmonella carriage in food animals, reduce colonization, and prevent transmission of Salmonella to other animals and ...

  5. Recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor pre-screening and screening of stabilizing carbohydrates and polyols.

    PubMed

    Pavisić, Renata; Hock, Karlo; Mijić, Ivana; Horvatić, Anita; Gecan, Martina; Sedić, Mirela; Krajacić, Mirjana Bukvić; Cindrić, Mario

    2010-03-15

    Protein stabilization by solvent additives is frequently used concept in formulation development, although new technologies implemented over the past decade can improve protein biophysical as well as clinical properties by protein structural design (e.g. PEGylation, acylation, hesylation). The scope of this work was to evaluate the effect of chosen carbohydrate or polyol stabilizer in the formulation; firstly on linear peptide sequences on instable model of rHuG-CSF cleaved macromolecule by novel method named protein and peptide stabilizer pre-screening PPSP (formulated tryptic digest mixture stability evaluation in 54 h) and on overall stability of rHuG-CSF macromolecule by quantifying all relevant degradation parameters. Comprehensive protein stabilizing screening study included conformational analysis of formulated rHuG-CSF protein to obtain information on its secondary structure conformational stability. Protein aggregation induced by modulating conditions in solution (e.g. thermal stress and agitation) was monitored over discrete time periods. Oxidation and deamidation, as well as truncation or hydrolysis were accurately quantified. Together with pre-screening data, obtained by fast and resourceful amino acid sequence degradation analysis by LC-MS, statistical data evaluation of stabilizing contribution of substances selected from group of carbohydrates and polyols was performed. According to the statistical interpretation of obtained results the stabilizers were ranked in the following order: turanose, D-trehalose, lactitol, acetate buffer (non-stabilized sample), xylitol, cellobiitol, sorbitol, D-lyxose, leucrose, sorbitol without polysorbate, cellobiose.

  6. Phase I study of the combination of losoxantrone and cyclophosphamide in patients with refractory solid tumours

    PubMed Central

    Goh, B C; Vokes, E E; Joshi, A; Ratain, M J

    2002-01-01

    Losoxantrone is a DNA intercalator that was developed with the potential to replace anthracyclines. The recommended single agent dose of losoxantrone is 50 mg m−2 every 3 weeks. We conducted a phase I study of losoxantrone and a fixed dose of cyclophosphamide on a q3 weekly schedule. Forty-nine patients were enrolled, of which 46 were evaluable for toxicity. The dose-limiting toxicity was neutropenia at the maximum tolerable losoxantrone dose of 45 mg m−2. With granulocyte colony-stimulating factor support, significant further dose escalation of losoxantrone was achieved. Cardiotoxicity was seen with cumulative dosing. Pharmacokinetics of losoxantrone revealed linear kinetics and triphasic clearance, with significant interpatient variability. No objective responses were seen in this study. Neutropenia was dose-limiting in this combination with or without granulocyte colony-stimulating factor support. The recommended dose for further testing is cyclophosphamide 500 mg m−2 followed by losoxantrone 95 mg m−2 with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor support. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 86, 534–539. DOI: 10.1038/sj/bjc/6600123 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:11870533

  7. Mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells with granulocyte colony stimulating factors for autologous transplant in hematologic malignancies: a single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Gabús, Raul; Borelli, Gabriel; Ferrando, Martín; Bódega, Enrique; Citrín, Estela; Jiménez, Constanza Olivera; Álvarez, Ramón

    2011-01-01

    Background In 2006 the Hematology Service of Hospital Maciel published its experience with peripheral blood progenitor cell harvesting for autologous stem cell transplantation using Filgen JP (Clausen Filgrastim). After mobilization with a mean filgrastim dose of 78 mcg/Kg, 4.7 x 106 CD34+ cells/Kg were obtained by apheresis. Age above 50, multiple myeloma as underlying disease and a malignancy that was not in remission were identified as frequent characteristics among patients showing complex mobilization. Objective The aim of this study was to compare stem cell mobilization using different brands of filgrastim. Methods One hundred and fifty-seven mobilizations performed between 1997 and 2006 were analyzed. This retrospective analysis comparative two groups of patients: those mobilized with different brands of filgrastim (Group A) and those who received Filgen JP (Clausen Filgrastim) as mobilizing agent (Group B). A cluster analysis technique was used to identify four clusters of individuals with different behaviors differentiated by age, total dose of filgrastim required, number of apheresis and harvested CD34+ cells. Results The mean total dose of filgrastim administered was 105 mcg/Kg, the median number of apheresis was 2 procedures and the mean number of harvested stem cells was 4.98 x 106 CD34+ cells/Kg. No significant differences were observed between Groups A and B regarding the number of apheresis, harvested CD34+ cells and number of mobilization failures, however the total dose of filgrastim was significantly lower in Group B. Conclusions Among other factors, the origin of the cytokine used as mobilizing agent is an element to be considered when evaluating CD34+ cell mobilization results. PMID:23049356

  8. [Recombinant granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (filgrastim): optimization of conditions of isolation and purification from inclusion body].

    PubMed

    Kononova, N V; Iakovlev, A V; Zhuravko, A M; Pankeev, N N; Minaev, S V; Bobruskin, A I; Mart'ianov, V A

    2014-01-01

    We developed a unified process platform for two recombinant human GCSF medicines--one with the non-prolonged and the other with prolonged action. This unified technology led to a simpler and cheaper production while introduction of the additional pegylation stage to the technological line eased obtaining of the medicines with different action and allowed to standardize technological process documenting according to GMP requirements.

  9. Late Onset Agranulocytosis with Clozapine Associated with HLA DR4 Responding to Treatment with Granulocyte Colony-stimulating Factor: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Aakanksha; Grover, Sandeep; Malhotra, Pankaj; Varma, Subhash C.

    2016-01-01

    Agranulocytosis as a side effect of clozapine has been reported to be associated with initial phases of treatment, i.e., first six months. Agranulocytosis with clozapine during the initial phases of treatment has been linked to genetic vulnerability in the form of variations in the human leukocyte-antigen haplotypes. However, there is limited literature on late onset agranulocytosis with clozapine and this has very rarely been linked to human leukocyte-antigen haplotypes vulnerability. In this report we review the existing data on late onset agranulocytosis with clozapine and describe the case of a young man, who developed agranulocytosis with clozapine after 35 months of treatment and was found to have genetic vulnerability in form of being positive for HLA DR4. This case highlights underlying autoimmune immune mechanism in clozapine-induced agranulocytosis and the need for frequent blood count monitoring on clozapine even after the initial 6 months of starting treatment especially in patients with genetic vulnerability to develop this condition. PMID:27121434

  10. High-dose paclitaxel with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in patients with advanced breast cancer refractory to anthracycline therapy: a European Cancer Center trial.

    PubMed

    Vermorken, J B; ten Bokkel Huinink, W W; Mandjes, I A; Postma, T J; Huizing, M T; Heimans, J J; Beijnen, J H; Bierhorst, F; Winograd, B; Pinedo, H M

    1995-08-01

    Paclitaxel (Taxol; Bristol-Myers Squibb Company, Princeton, NJ) is a novel cytostatic agent that has shown interesting antitumor activity in patients with advanced breast cancer. Depending on variable patient characteristics and amount and type of prior therapy, as well as the applied dose and schedule of paclitaxel, response rates have varied from 13% to 62%. However, optimal dose and schedule are still unknown. We studied a high-dose (250 to 300 mg/m2) 3-hour paclitaxel infusion schedule in a poor prognostic group of breast cancer patients who progressed or relapsed while taking anthracyclines. This regimen was given every 3 weeks. Twenty-one of the 36 patients studied had increased liver enzymes and 18 had documented liver metastases. The objective response rate was only 6%, but response rate by disease site indicated that soft tissue lesions responded in 30% of cases. For a better comparison with other reported data a uniform definition of "anthracycline refractory" is needed. Neuropathy, which was found to be dose limiting, and arthralgia/myalgia syndrome were the most frequently occurring toxicities. Both severe myelosuppression (and infections) and severe diarrhea and mucositis were reported more frequently in patients with liver dysfunction. As higher peak levels, increased areas under the concentration time curves, and longer times during which plasma concentrations were above the threshold level of 0.1 mumol/L were found in patients with elevated liver enzymes, a correlation with the observed toxicities is assumed. Further pharmacodynamic studies in such patients receiving a 3-hour infusion seem warranted.

  11. Recovery of pulmonary structure and exercise capacity by treatment with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) in a mouse model of emphysema.

    PubMed

    Fortunato, Gustavo; Vidal, Daniel T A; Klein, Wilfried; Neto, Alberto; Angrizani, André; Vasconcelos, Juliana F; Kaneto, Carla; Souza, Bruno Solano de Freitas; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ricardo; Soares, Milena B P; Macambira, Simone G

    2014-04-01

    Emphysema is a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease characterized abnormal dilatation of alveolar spaces, which impairs alveolar gas exchange, compromising the physical capacity of a patient due to airflow limitations. Here we tested the effects of G-CSF administration in pulmonary tissue and exercise capacity in emphysematous mice. C57Bl/6 female mice were treated with elastase intratracheally to induce emphysema. Their exercise capacities were evaluated in a treadmill. Lung histological sections were prepared to evaluate mean linear intercept measurement. Emphysematous mice were treated with G-CSF (3 cycles of 200 μg/kg/day for 5 consecutive days, with 7-day intervals) or saline and submitted to a third evaluation 8 weeks after treatment. Values of run distance and linear intercept measurement were expressed as mean ± SD and compared applying a paired t-test. Effects of treatment on these parameters were analyzed applying a Repeated Measures ANOVA, followed by Tukey's post hoc analysis. p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Twenty eight days later, animals ran significantly less in a treadmill compared to normal mice (549.7 ± 181.2 m and 821.7 ± 131.3 m, respectively; p < 0.01). Treatment with G-CSF significantly increased the exercise capacity of emphysematous mice (719.6 ± 200.5 m), whereas saline treatment had no effect on distance run (595.8 ± 178.5 m). The PCR cytokines genes analysis did not detect difference between experimental groups. Morphometric analyses in the lung showed that saline-treated mice had a mean linear intercept significantly higher (p < 0.01) when compared to mice treated with G-CSF, which did not significantly differ from that of normal mice. Treatment with G-CSF promoted the recovery of exercise capacity and regeneration of alveolar structural alterations in emphysematous mice.

  12. Efficacy of delayed administration of post-chemotherapy granulocyte colony-stimulating factor: evidence from murine studies of bone marrow cell kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Yankelevich, Maxim; Goodell, Margaret A.; Kaplan, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    The optimal schedule of post-chemotherapy G-CSF administration has not been determined. G-CSF is customarily started 24 hours after chemotherapy; however, clinical data demonstrated that delaying the G-CSF until 5 days after completion of chemotherapy has not resulted in a longer duration of neutropenia. Here, we examined the optimal timing of post-chemotherapy G-CSF administration in a mouse model, to show that delayed administration does not postpone the appearance of mature granulocytes in the peripheral blood. We also investigated the mechanism of decreased efficacy of the early G-CSF application after chemotherapy by characterizing the changes in bone marrow cellular composition. To our knowledge, we demonstrate for the first time, that early after chemotherapy, the bone marrow is predominantly composed of mature residual granulocytes and very few progenitors and precursors, on which G-CSF would act to generate granulocytes. The point when immature progenitors reappear does not occur in murine bone marrow until 48 hours after a single dose of cyclophosphamide. Our results indicate that the bone marrow cellular composition early after discontinuation of chemotherapy is not optimal for G-CSF action on acceleration of myeloid recovery. Given the high cost of G-CSF prophylaxis, its delayed administration may potentially result in substantial economic benefits. PMID:17949891

  13. Establishment of the first international standard for PEGylated granulocyte colony stimulating factor (PEG-G-CSF): Report of an international collaborative study

    PubMed Central

    Wadhwa, Meenu; Bird, Chris; Dougall, Thomas; Rigsby, Peter; Bristow, Adrian; Thorpe, Robin

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the feasibility of developing a suitable international reference standard for determination of in vitro biological activity of human sequence recombinant PEG-G-CSF products with a 20 kD linear PEG linked to the N-terminal methionyl residue of G-CSF (INN Filgrastim), produced using a conjugation process and coupling chemistry similar to that employed for the lead PEGfilgrastim product. Based on initial data which showed that the current WHO 2nd international standard, IS for G-CSF (09/136) or alternatively, a PEG-G-CSF standard with a unitage traceable to the G-CSF IS may potentially serve as the IS for PEG-G-CSF products, two candidate preparations of PEG-G-CSF were formulated and lyophilized at NIBSC. These preparations were tested by 23 laboratories using in vitro bioassays in a multi-centre collaborative study. Results indicated that on the basis of parallelism, the current WHO 2nd IS for G-CSF or any of the PEG-G-CSF samples could be used as the international standard for PEG-G-CSF preparations. However, because of the variability in potency estimates seen when PEG-G-CSF preparations were compared with the current WHO 2nd IS for G-CSF, a candidate PEG-G-CSF was suitable as the WHO IS. The preparation 12/188 was judged suitable to serve as the WHO IS based on in vitro biological activity data. Therefore, the preparation coded 12/188 was established by the WHO Expert Committee on Biological Standardization (ECBS) in 2013 as the WHO 1st IS for human PEGylated G-CSF with an assigned in vitro bioactivity of 10,000 IU per ampoule. PMID:25450254

  14. History of chronic comorbidity and risk of chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma not receiving granulocyte colony-stimulating factor prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Chao, Chun; Rodriguez, Roberto; Page, John H; Yang, Su-Jau; Huynh, Julie; Chia, Victoria M

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a cohort study to examine the association between a wide variety of chronic comorbidities and risk of febrile neutropenia (FN) in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) from 2000 to 2009 treated with chemotherapy at Kaiser Permanente Southern California. History of comorbidities and FN events were identified using electronic medical records. Cox model adjusting for propensity score was used to determine the association between a comorbid condition and FN. Models that additionally adjusted for cancer stage, baseline absolute neutrophil count, chemotherapy regimen and dose reduction were also evaluated. A total of 2480 patients with NHL were included, and 60% received CHOP/R-CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone, with or without rituximab). In total, 236 (9.5%) patients developed FN in the first chemotherapy cycle. Anemia (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 1.6, 95% confidence interval [1.2-2.2]), HIV infection (HR = 3.8 [2.0-6.7]) and rheumatoid diseases (HR = 2.4 [1.3-4.0]) were associated with significantly increased risk of FN. These results provide evidence that chronic comorbidity increases the risk of FN. PMID:24684228

  15. Case Report. Prevention of Clozapine-Induced Granulocytopenia/Agranulocytosis with Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) in an Intellectually Disabled Patient with Schizophrenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rajagopal, G.; Graham, J. G.; Haut, F. F. A.

    2007-01-01

    Background: While clozapine is an effective treatment for refractory schizophrenia, its use is limited by haematological side effects. Treatment options that allow continued prescription of clozapine by tackling these side effects will greatly aid patients for whom this medication is all too often their only hope of recovery. Method: In this case…

  16. Enhancement of innate immunity with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor did not mitigate disease in pigs infected with a highly pathogenic Chinese PRRSV strain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is responsible for one of the most economically important diseases in swine worldwide. It causes reproductive failure in sows and pneumonia in pigs that predisposes them to secondary bacterial infections. Methods to control PRRSV and/or lim...

  17. The role of biosimilar granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF) Zarzio for progenitor cell mobilization and the treatment of therapy-induced neutropenia in adult hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Severson, Cherie C

    2015-01-01

    Originator GCSF (Neupogen) has been used to mobilize progenitor stem cells and treat therapy-induced neutropenia in Canadian stem cell transplant settings for years. Although its benefit is not in question, viable alternatives are available. Biosimilar GCSF (Zarzio) is widely in use in Europe since 2009 and was recently approved in the U.S.for the same five indications as Neupogen. Zarzio is reported as safe, equally efficacious, more accessible and cost effective without negatively impacting patient outcomes. This paper summarizes the supporting evidence. PMID:26897866

  18. Modulation of colony stimulating factor release and apoptosis in human colon cancer cells by anticancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    Calatayud, S; Warner, T D; Mitchell, J A

    2002-01-01

    Modulation of the immune response against tumour cells is emerging as a valuable approach for cancer treatment. Some experimental studies have shown that secretion of colony stimulating factors by cancer cells reduces their tumorigenicity and increases their immunogenicity probably by promoting the cytolitic and antigen presenting activities of leukocytes. We have observed that human colon cancer cells (HT-29) are able to secrete granulocyte-macrophage-colony stimulating factor, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor and macrophage-colony stimulating factor when stimulated with cytokines (IL-1β and TNF-α). In this study we assessed, for the first time, the effects of several anticancer drugs on colony stimulating factor release or apoptosis in HT-29 cells. Cytokine-induced release of granulocyte-macrophage-colony stimulating factor, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor and macrophage-colony stimulating factor was significantly increased by cisplatin and 6-mercaptopurine. Taxol only increased macrophage-colony stimulating factor release while reduced that of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor. No changes in colony stimulating factor secretion were observed after treatment with methotrexate. Only cisplatin and taxol induced apoptosis in these cells. Secretion of colony stimulating factors by colon cancer cells may contribute to the immune host response against them. Anticancer drugs such as cisplatin and 6-mercaptopurine increase colony stimulating factor secretion by cytokine stimulated cancer cells probably through mechanisms different to those leading to cell apoptosis, an effect that may contribute to their anti-neoplasic action. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 86, 1316–1321. DOI: 10.1038/sj/bjc/6600240 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:11953891

  19. It takes two: noninvasive brain stimulation combined with neurorehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Page, Stephen J; Cunningham, David A; Plow, Ela; Blazak, Brittani

    2015-04-01

    The goal of postacute neurorehabilitation is to maximize patient function, ideally by using surviving brain and central nervous system tissue when possible. However, the structures incorporated into neurorehabilitative approaches often differ from this target, which may explain why the efficacy of conventional clinical treatments targeting neurologic impairment varies widely. Noninvasive brain stimulation (eg, transcranial magnetic stimulation [TMS], transcranial direct current stimulation [tDCS]) offers the possibility of directly targeting brain structures to facilitate or inhibit their activity to steer neural plasticity in recovery and measure neuronal output and interactions for evaluating progress. The latest advances as stereotactic navigation and electric field modeling are enabling more precise targeting of patient's residual structures in diagnosis and therapy. Given its promise, this supplement illustrates the wide-ranging significance of TMS and tDCS in neurorehabilitation, including in stroke, pediatrics, traumatic brain injury, focal hand dystonia, neuropathic pain, and spinal cord injury. TMS and tDCS are still not widely used and remain poorly understood in neurorehabilitation. Therefore, the present supplement includes articles that highlight ready clinical application of these technologies, including their comparative diagnostic capabilities relative to neuroimaging, their therapeutic benefit, their optimal delivery, the stratification of likely responders, and the variable benefits associated with their clinical use because of interactions between pathophysiology and the innate reorganization of the patient's brain. Overall, the supplement concludes that whether provided in isolation or in combination, noninvasive brain stimulation and neurorehabilitation are synergistic in the potential to transform clinical practice.

  20. It takes two: noninvasive brain stimulation combined with neurorehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Page, Stephen J; Cunningham, David A; Plow, Ela; Blazak, Brittani

    2015-04-01

    The goal of postacute neurorehabilitation is to maximize patient function, ideally by using surviving brain and central nervous system tissue when possible. However, the structures incorporated into neurorehabilitative approaches often differ from this target, which may explain why the efficacy of conventional clinical treatments targeting neurologic impairment varies widely. Noninvasive brain stimulation (eg, transcranial magnetic stimulation [TMS], transcranial direct current stimulation [tDCS]) offers the possibility of directly targeting brain structures to facilitate or inhibit their activity to steer neural plasticity in recovery and measure neuronal output and interactions for evaluating progress. The latest advances as stereotactic navigation and electric field modeling are enabling more precise targeting of patient's residual structures in diagnosis and therapy. Given its promise, this supplement illustrates the wide-ranging significance of TMS and tDCS in neurorehabilitation, including in stroke, pediatrics, traumatic brain injury, focal hand dystonia, neuropathic pain, and spinal cord injury. TMS and tDCS are still not widely used and remain poorly understood in neurorehabilitation. Therefore, the present supplement includes articles that highlight ready clinical application of these technologies, including their comparative diagnostic capabilities relative to neuroimaging, their therapeutic benefit, their optimal delivery, the stratification of likely responders, and the variable benefits associated with their clinical use because of interactions between pathophysiology and the innate reorganization of the patient's brain. Overall, the supplement concludes that whether provided in isolation or in combination, noninvasive brain stimulation and neurorehabilitation are synergistic in the potential to transform clinical practice. PMID:25813373

  1. Exploring Erythropoietin and G-CSF Combination Therapy in Chronic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Yoon-Kyum; Cho, Sung-Rae

    2016-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) are known to have neuroprotective actions. Based on previous reports showing the synergistic effects of EPO+G-CSF combination therapy in experimental models, we investigated the safety of EPO+G-CSF combination therapy in patients with chronic stroke. In a pilot study, 3 patients were treated with EPO and G-CSF for 5 consecutive days, with follow-up on day 30. In an exploratory double-blind study, 6 patients were allocated to treatment with either EPO+G-CSF or placebo. Treatment was applied once a day for 5 days per month over 3 months. Participants were followed up for 6 months. To substantiate safety, vital signs, adverse events, and hematological values were measured on days 0, 5, and 30 in each cycle and on day 180. Functional outcomes were determined on day 0 and 180. In the laboratory measurements, EPO+G-CSF combination therapy significantly elevated erythropoietin, CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells, white blood cells, and neutrophils on day 5 of each cycle. There were no observations of serious adverse events. In the functional outcomes, the grip power of the dominant hand was increased in the EPO+G-CSF treatment group. In conclusion, this exploratory study suggests a novel strategy of EPO+G-CSF combination therapy for stroke patients. PMID:27043535

  2. Exploring Erythropoietin and G-CSF Combination Therapy in Chronic Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yoon-Kyum; Cho, Sung-Rae

    2016-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) are known to have neuroprotective actions. Based on previous reports showing the synergistic effects of EPO+G-CSF combination therapy in experimental models, we investigated the safety of EPO+G-CSF combination therapy in patients with chronic stroke. In a pilot study, 3 patients were treated with EPO and G-CSF for 5 consecutive days, with follow-up on day 30. In an exploratory double-blind study, 6 patients were allocated to treatment with either EPO+G-CSF or placebo. Treatment was applied once a day for 5 days per month over 3 months. Participants were followed up for 6 months. To substantiate safety, vital signs, adverse events, and hematological values were measured on days 0, 5, and 30 in each cycle and on day 180. Functional outcomes were determined on day 0 and 180. In the laboratory measurements, EPO+G-CSF combination therapy significantly elevated erythropoietin, CD34⁺ hematopoietic stem cells, white blood cells, and neutrophils on day 5 of each cycle. There were no observations of serious adverse events. In the functional outcomes, the grip power of the dominant hand was increased in the EPO+G-CSF treatment group. In conclusion, this exploratory study suggests a novel strategy of EPO+G-CSF combination therapy for stroke patients. PMID:27043535

  3. Combined transcranial alternating current stimulation and continuous theta burst stimulation: a novel approach for neuroplasticity induction.

    PubMed

    Goldsworthy, Mitchell R; Vallence, Ann-Maree; Yang, Ruiting; Pitcher, Julia B; Ridding, Michael C

    2016-02-01

    Non-invasive brain stimulation can induce functionally relevant plasticity in the human cortex, making it potentially useful as a therapeutic tool. However, the induced changes are highly variable between individuals, potentially limiting research and clinical utility. One factor that might contribute to this variability is the level of cortical inhibition at the time of stimulation. The alpha rhythm (~ 8-13 Hz) recorded with electroencephalography (EEG) is thought to reflect pulsatile cortical inhibition; therefore, targeting non-invasive brain stimulation to particular phases of the alpha rhythm may provide an approach to enhance plasticity induction. Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) has been shown to entrain cortical oscillations in a frequency-specific manner. We investigated whether the neuroplastic response to continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS) was enhanced by timing bursts of stimuli to the peak or the trough of a tACS-imposed alpha rhythm. While motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were unaffected when cTBS was applied in-phase with the peak of the tACS-imposed oscillation, MEP depression was enhanced when cTBS was applied in-phase with the trough. This enhanced MEP depression was dependent on the individual peak frequency of the endogenous alpha rhythm recorded with EEG prior to stimulation, and was strongest in those participants classified as non-responders to standard cTBS. These findings suggest that tACS may be used in combination with cTBS to enhance the plasticity response. Furthermore, the peak frequency of endogenous alpha, as measured with EEG, may be used as a simple marker to pre-select those individuals likely to benefit from this approach. PMID:26663460

  4. Combined Spinal Cord Stimulation and Peripheral Nerve Stimulation for Brachial Plexopathy: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji Hye; Choi, Shu Chung; Kim, Dong Kyu; Sung, Choon Ho; Chon, Jin Young; Hong, Sung Jin; Lee, Ji Young; Moon, Ho Sik

    2016-03-01

    Brachial plexopathy usually results from an iatrogenic brachial plexus injury and can sometimes cause severe chronic pain and disability. There are a number of possible treatments for this condition, including medication, physical therapy, nerve blocks, and neuromodulation, but they are not always successful. Recently, combined spinal cord stimulation (SCS) and peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) have been tried for various chronic pain diseases because of their different mechanisms of action.Here, we describe the case of a 54-year-old man who was diagnosed with brachial plexopathy 8 years ago. He underwent video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery to remove a superior mediastinal mass. However, his brachial plexus was damaged during the surgery. Although he had received various treatments, the pain did not improve. For the management of intractable severe pain, he underwent SCS 2 years ago, which initially reduced his pain from numeric rating scale (NRS) 10/10 to NRS 4 - 5/10, but the pain then gradually increased, reaching NRS 8/10, 6 months ago. At that time, he was refractory to other treatments, and we therefore applied PNS in combination with SCS. The PNS electrode was positioned on the radial nerve under ultrasound guidance. After combined PNS and SCS, his background pain disappeared, although a breakthrough pain (NRS 3 - 4/10) was caused intermittently by light touch. Furthermore, the patient's need for analgesics decreased, and he was satisfied with the outcome of this combined treatment. We concluded that combined SCS and PNS is a very useful treatment modality, which can stimulate the target nerve both directly and indirectly, and hence, relieve pain from brachial plexopathy. PMID:27008302

  5. Efficacy and toxicity of decitabine versus CHG regimen (low-dose cytarabine, homoharringtonine and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor) in patients with higher risk myelodysplastic syndrome: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lingyun; Li, Xiao; Chang, Chunkang; Xu, Feng; He, Qi; Wu, Dong; Zhang, Zheng; Su, Jiying; Zhou, Liyu; Song, Luxi; Chao, Xiao; Zhao, Youshan

    2016-01-01

    Decitabine and CHG regimen (low-dose cytarabine and homoharringtonine with G-CSF) have been used for treating higher risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). In this study, we retrospectively compared the efficacy and toxicity of the two regimens in 132 MDS patients. Complete remission (CR) was not significantly different between the groups (27.1% with decitabine vs. 30.6% with CHG, p = 0.657). The CR rate with decitabine (58.8%) was significantly higher than that with CHG (7.7%) (p = 0.007) among the patients with poor karyotypes. Five of 23 (21.7%) patients who failed to respond to decitabine achieved CR with CHG, while one of two patients achieved CR with decitabine after failure with CHG. Overall and relapse-free survival were not different between the groups. In conclusion, both decitabine and CHG regimen are effective for higher risk MDS; there is no cross resistance between the regimens. Decitabine might be a better choice for patients with poor karyotypes.

  6. Prophylactic administration of vector-encoded porcine granulocyte-colony stimulating factor reduces Salmonella shedding,tonsil colonization,& microbiota alterations of the gastrointestinal tract in Salmonella-challenged swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella colonization of food animals is a concern for animal health and public health as a food safety risk. Various obstacles impede the effort to reduce asymptomatic Salmonella carriage in food animals, including the existence of numerous serovars and the ubiquitous nature of Salmonella. To d...

  7. Race and ethnicity influences collection of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized peripheral blood progenitor cells from unrelated donors, a Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research analysis.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jack W; Wingard, John R; Logan, Brent R; Chitphakdithai, Pintip; Akpek, Gorgun; Anderlini, Paolo; Artz, Andrew S; Bredeson, Chris; Goldstein, Steven; Hale, Gregory; Hematti, Peiman; Joshi, Sarita; Kamble, Rammurti T; Lazarus, Hillard M; O'Donnell, Paul V; Pulsipher, Michael A; Savani, Bipin N; Schears, Raquel M; Shaw, Bronwen E; Confer, Dennis L

    2015-01-01

    Little information exists on the effect of race and ethnicity on collection of peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) for allogeneic transplantation. We studied 10,776 donors from the National Marrow Donor Program who underwent PBSC collection from 2006 to 2012. Self-reported donor race/ethnic information included Caucasian, Hispanic, Black/African American (AA), Asian/Pacific Islander (API), and Native American (NA). All donors were mobilized with subcutaneous filgrastim at an approximate dose of 10 μg/kg/day for 5 days. Overall, AA donors had the highest median yields of mononuclear cells per liter and CD34(+) cells per liter of blood processed (3.1 × 10(9) and 44 × 10(6), respectively), whereas Caucasians had the lowest median yields at 2.8 × 10(9) and 33.7 × 10(6), respectively. Multivariate analysis of CD34(+) per liter mobilization yields using Caucasians as the comparator and controlling for age, gender, body mass index, and year of apheresis revealed increased yields in overweight and obese AA and API donors. In Hispanic donors, only male obese donors had higher CD34(+) per liter mobilization yields compared with Caucasian donors. No differences in CD34(+) per liter yields were seen between Caucasian and NA donors. Characterization of these differences may allow optimization of mobilization regimens to allow enhancement of mobilization yields without compromising donor safety.

  8. Characterization of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor expression by FT-IR spectroscopy: Studies on thermal induction and media formulation on the stability of the protein secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Vemula, Sandeep; Vemula, Sushma; Dedaniya, Akshay; Kante, Rajesh Kumar; Ronda, Srinivasa Reddy

    2016-08-17

    The Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic approach has been employed to understand the recombinant human G-CSF (rhG-CSF) protein accumulation, secondary structure, and thermal stability in Escherichia coli grown under a temperature shift strategy (37 and 28°C) in various media formulations. The choline + sodium pyruvate (37°C) and sodium pyruvate (28°C) formulations have shown the highest inclusion body (IB) accumulation of 0.41 and 0.46 mg/mL, respectively. Furthermore, insights on the structure of the rhG-CSF within IBs and intact cells have been investigated through secondary structure analysis. Thermal stability experiments were also carried out to explain the pattern of the second derivative structure of rhG-CSF. The studies showed that choline + sodium pyruvate formulation has preserved the protein secondary structure even at 82°C. Overall, the FT-IR spectroscopic technique can also be adopted to accelerate the characterization of other recombinant therapeutic proteins of E. coli origin.

  9. Pharmacokinetic studies of intravenous glycosylated recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in various hematological disorders: inverse correlation between the half-life and bone marrow myeloid cell pool.

    PubMed

    Watari, K; Ozawa, K; Takahashi, S; Tojo, A; Tani, K; Kamachi, S; Asano, S

    1997-07-01

    The pharmacokinetics of an intravenous bolus dose of glycosylated recombinant human G-CSF (rhG-CSF) was examined in 15 patients with various hematological disorders and 3 normal volunteers. The elimination half-life of rhG-CSF varied with the disorder. The half-life of an initial dose of rhG-CSF (2 micrograms/weight kg) was significantly prolonged in patients with aplastic anemia (2.7 +/- 0.3 h, n = 3) and myelodysplastic syndrome-refractory anemia (2.0 +/- 0.3 h, n = 3) when compared with those in normal controls (0.9 +/- 0.5 h, n = 3). In contrast, in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia which was overt leukemia from myelodysplastic syndrome-refractory anemia with excess of blasts in transformation, the half-life was shortened after chemotherapy (0.2 +/- 0.1 h, n = 3). The half-life of rhG-CSF in 2 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in complete remission was prolonged (2.0 and 2.7 h) at the time of marrow-suppression after chemotherapy and then shortened (0.5, 1.0 h, respectively) in the recovery phase. The half-life of rhG-CSF was very weakly, inversely correlated with absolute neutrophil count in blood (n = 24, r2 = 0.32, P < 0.01), and was inversely correlated with the absolute count of bone-marrow myeloid cells (nucleated cell count in bone-marrow aspirates x the percentage of myeloid cells/100) of patients with aplastic anemia and myelodysplastic syndrome-refractory anemia (n = 12, r2 = 0.63, P = 0.002). These results suggest that the half-life of intravenously administered rhG-CSF (2 micrograms/kg) reflects the size of the myeloid cell compartment in vivo, and support the hypothesis that receptor-mediated consumption mainly accounts for the clearance of exogenous G-CSF.

  10. [Examination of the safety of docetaxel/cyclophosphamide combination therapy for advanced recurrent breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, Kimiyasu; Koshida, Yoshitomo; Toriumi, Fumiki; Murayama, Takaya; Toeda, Hiroyuki; Imazu, Yoshihiro; Motegi, Katsuhiko; Akamatsu, Hidetoshi; Ohyama, Renpei

    2006-10-01

    In the treatment of recurrent breast cancer in patients previously treated with anthracycline drugs, taxane drugs are generally used. This time, we retrospectively studied the safety of docetaxel/cyclophosphamide combination therapy (hereinafter referred to as TC therapy). Ten patients (mean age: 52.8 years old) were included in the study. Metastatic/recurrent sites included 3 skin, 2 each of contralateral breast, lung and bone, and 1 each of liver, carcinomatous pleurisy and supraclavicular lymph node. Seven patients had a history of anthracycline treatment. The patients received TC at doses of 60 mg/m(2) and 500 mg/m(2), respectively, every 3 weeks. With regard to adverse events, non-hematotoxic events included alopecia in all the patients, generalized malaise in 5, and abnormal nail in 1. Hematotoxic events were grades 2 and 3 decreased neutrophil count in 5 patients. One patient had grade 4 pyrexia associated with oral candida. The patient was admitted and treated with fluid replacement and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). There were no other patients in whom the treatment was prolonged or dosage was reduced due to adverse reactions. TC therapy is considered to be a beneficial treatment method in terms of safety since it can be instituted on an outpatient basis. PMID:17033252

  11. Two is More Than One: How to Combine Brain Stimulation Rehabilitative Training for Functional Recovery?

    PubMed Central

    Koganemaru, Satoko; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Mima, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    A number of studies have shown that non-invasive brain stimulation has an additional effect in combination with rehabilitative therapy to enhance functional recovery than either therapy alone. The combination enhances use-dependent plasticity induced by repetitive training. The neurophysiological mechanism of the effects of this combination is based on associative plasticity. However, these effects were not reported in all cases. We propose a list of possible strategies to achieve an effective association between rehabilitative training with brain stimulation for plasticity: (1) control of temporal aspect between stimulation and task execution; (2) the use of a shaped task for the combination; (3) the appropriate stimulation of neuronal circuits where use-dependent plastic changes occur; and (4) phase synchronization between rhythmically patterned brain stimulation and task-related patterned activities of neurons. To better utilize brain stimulation in neuro-rehabilitation, it is important to develop more effective techniques to combine them. PMID:26617497

  12. Combination therapy that targets secondary pulmonary changes after abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Davis, K A; Fabian, T C; Ragsdale, D N; Trenthem, L L; Croce, M A; Proctor, K G

    2001-06-01

    After abdominal trauma, the lung is susceptible to secondary injury caused by acute neutrophil (PMN) sequestration and alveolar capillary membrane disruption. Adenosine is an endogenous anti-inflammatory metabolite that decreases PMN activation. AICAR ([5-amino-1-[beta-D-ribofuranosyl]imidazole-4-carboxamide]riboside) is the prototype of a novel class of anti-inflammatory drugs that increase endogenous adenosine. After trauma, AICAR administration has been shown to decrease secondary lung injury in models of hemorrhagic shock with delayed lipopolysaccharide challenge and pulmonary contusion. However, early suppression of PMN activation could worsen outcomes after penetrating abdominal trauma. We hypothesized that, after penetrating abdominal trauma, the ideal resuscitation strategy would involve early, short-lived suppression of PMN activation to minimize secondary lung injury, followed by later enhancement of PMN chemotaxis and phagocytosis [using granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)] to lessen late septic complications. G-CSF has not been shown to potentiate PMN mediated pulmonary reperfusion injury. Swine were subjected to cecal ligation/incision and hemorrhagic shock (trauma), followed by resuscitation with shed blood, crystalloid, and either G-CSF, a combination of G-CSF and AICAR, or 0.9% normal saline. At 72 h, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) leukocyte counts and protein concentration were determined, and lung tissue analysed for myeloperoxidase (MPO, a measure of PMN infiltration) and microscopic pathology. Analysis of BALs revealed a significant increase protein concentrations and in white blood cell and PMN infiltration (P< 0.05) following trauma. These acute changes were not exacerbated by G-CSF, but were reversed by combined AICAR + G-CSF, which implicates a physiologic role for adenosine. This suggests that combination therapy may have beneficial effects on the lung after trauma.

  13. Combining Stimulants and Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors: A Reexamination of the Literature and a Report of a New Treatment Combination

    PubMed Central

    Israel, Joshua A.

    2015-01-01

    This report reviews the medical literature on combining stimulants with monoamine oxidase inhibitors. A case is also presented documenting successful treatment of major depressive disorder and comorbid attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder using the previously undocumented combination of transdermal selegiline and lisdexamfetamine. This combination should be used cautiously and with ongoing monitoring of heart rate and blood pressure. PMID:27057401

  14. Synergistic combination of near-infrared irradiation and targeted gold nanoheaters for enhanced photothermal neural stimulation.

    PubMed

    Eom, Kyungsik; Im, Changkyun; Hwang, Seoyoung; Eom, Seyoung; Kim, Tae-Seong; Jeong, Hae Sun; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Byun, Kyung Min; Jun, Sang Beom; Kim, Sung June

    2016-04-01

    Despite a potential of infrared neural stimulation (INS) for modulating neural activities, INS suffers from limited light confinement and bulk tissue heating. Here, a novel methodology for an advanced optical stimulation is proposed by combining near-infrared (NIR) stimulation with gold nanorods (GNRs) targeted to neuronal cell membrane. We confirmed experimentally that in vitro and in vivo neural activation is associated with a local heat generation based on NIR stimulation and GNRs. Compared with the case of NIR stimulation without an aid of GNRs, combination with cell-targeted GNRs allows photothermal stimulation with faster neural response, lower delivered energy, higher stimulation efficiency and stronger behavior change. Since the suggested method can reduce a requisite radiant exposure level and alleviate a concern of tissue damage, it is expected to open up new possibilities for applications to optical neuromodulations for diverse excitable tissues and treatments of neurological disorders. PMID:27446678

  15. Synergistic combination of near-infrared irradiation and targeted gold nanoheaters for enhanced photothermal neural stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Eom, Kyungsik; Im, Changkyun; Hwang, Seoyoung; Eom, Seyoung; Kim, Tae-Seong; Jeong, Hae Sun; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Byun, Kyung Min; Jun, Sang Beom; Kim, Sung June

    2016-01-01

    Despite a potential of infrared neural stimulation (INS) for modulating neural activities, INS suffers from limited light confinement and bulk tissue heating. Here, a novel methodology for an advanced optical stimulation is proposed by combining near-infrared (NIR) stimulation with gold nanorods (GNRs) targeted to neuronal cell membrane. We confirmed experimentally that in vitro and in vivo neural activation is associated with a local heat generation based on NIR stimulation and GNRs. Compared with the case of NIR stimulation without an aid of GNRs, combination with cell-targeted GNRs allows photothermal stimulation with faster neural response, lower delivered energy, higher stimulation efficiency and stronger behavior change. Since the suggested method can reduce a requisite radiant exposure level and alleviate a concern of tissue damage, it is expected to open up new possibilities for applications to optical neuromodulations for diverse excitable tissues and treatments of neurological disorders. PMID:27446678

  16. Stimulants

    MedlinePlus

    Stimulants are drugs that increase your heart rate, breathing rate, and brain function. Some stimulants affect only a specific organ, such as the heart, lungs, brain, or nervous system. Epinephrine is a stimulant. It ...

  17. Combining TMS-EEG with transcranial direct current stimulation language treatment in aphasia.

    PubMed

    Cipollari, Susanna; Veniero, Domenica; Razzano, Carmela; Caltagirone, Carlo; Koch, Giacomo; Marangolo, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Despite the fact that different studies have been performed using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in aphasia, so far, to what extent the stimulation of a cerebral region may affect the activity of anatomically connected regions remains unclear. The authors used a combination of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and electroencephalography (EEG) to explore brain areas' excitability modulation before and after active and sham tDCS. Six chronic aphasics underwent 3 weeks of language training coupled with tDCS over the right inferior frontal gyrus. To measure the changes induced by tDCS, TMS-EEG closed to the area stimulated with tDCS were calculated. A significant improvement after tDCS stimulation was found which was accompained by a modification of the EEG over the stimulated region.

  18. Combining TMS-EEG with transcranial direct current stimulation language treatment in aphasia.

    PubMed

    Cipollari, Susanna; Veniero, Domenica; Razzano, Carmela; Caltagirone, Carlo; Koch, Giacomo; Marangolo, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Despite the fact that different studies have been performed using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in aphasia, so far, to what extent the stimulation of a cerebral region may affect the activity of anatomically connected regions remains unclear. The authors used a combination of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and electroencephalography (EEG) to explore brain areas' excitability modulation before and after active and sham tDCS. Six chronic aphasics underwent 3 weeks of language training coupled with tDCS over the right inferior frontal gyrus. To measure the changes induced by tDCS, TMS-EEG closed to the area stimulated with tDCS were calculated. A significant improvement after tDCS stimulation was found which was accompained by a modification of the EEG over the stimulated region. PMID:26109229

  19. Effects of combined mechanical stimulation on the proliferation and differentiation of pre-osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Kyung Shin; Lee, Seung-Jae; Lee, Haksue; Moon, Wonkyu

    2011-01-01

    We observed how combined mechanical stimuli affect the proliferation and differentiation of pre-osteoblasts. For this research, a bioreactor system was developed that can simultaneously stimulate cells with cyclic strain and ultrasound, each of which is known to effectively stimulate bone tissue regeneration. MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts were chosen for bone tissue engineering due to their osteoblast-like characteristics. 3-D scaffolds were fabricated with polycaprolactone and poly-L-lactic acid using the salt leaching method. The cells were stimulated by the bioreactor with cyclic strain and ultrasound. The bioreactor was set at a frequency of 1.0 Hz and 10% strain for cyclic strain and 1.0 MHz and 30 mW/cm2 for ultrasound. Three experimental groups (ultrasound, cyclic strain, and combined stimulation) and a control group were examined. Each group was stimulated for 20 min/day. Mechanical stimuli did not affect MC3T3-E1 cell proliferation significantly up to 10 days when measured with the cell counting kit-8. However, gene expression analysis of collagen type-I, osteocalcin, RUNX2, and osterix revealed that the combined mechanical stimulation accelerated the matrix maturation of MC3T3-E1 cells. These results indicate that the combined mechanical stimulation can enhance the differentiation of pre-osteoblasts more efficiently than simple stimuli, in spite of no effect on cell proliferation. PMID:21532314

  20. Combined application of neuromuscular electrical stimulation and voluntary muscular contractions.

    PubMed

    Paillard, Thierry

    2008-01-01

    Electromyostimulation (EMS) and voluntary muscle contraction (VC) constitute different modes of muscle activation and induce different acute physiological effects on the neuromuscular system. Long-term application of each mode of muscle activation can produce different muscle adaptations. It seems theoretically possible to completely or partially cumulate the muscle adaptations induced by each mode of muscle activation applied separately. This work consisted of examining the literature concerning the muscle adaptations induced by long-term application of the combined technique (CT) [i.e. EMS is combined with VC - non-simultaneously] compared with VC and/or EMS alone in healthy subjects and/or athletes and in post-operative knee-injured subjects. In general, CT induced greater muscular adaptations than VC whether in sports training or rehabilitation. This efficiency would be due to the fact that CT can facilitate cumulative effects of training completely or partially induced by VC and EMS practiced alone. CT also provides a greater improvement of the performance of complex dynamic movements than VC. However, EMS cannot improve coordination between different agonistic and antagonistic muscles and thus does not facilitate learning the specific coordination of complex movements. Hence, EMS should be combined with specific sport training to generate neuromuscular adaptations, but also allow the adjustment of motor control during a voluntary movement. Likewise, in a therapeutic context, CT was particularly efficient to accelerate recovery of muscle contractility during a rehabilitation programme. Strength loss and atrophy inherent in a traumatism and/or a surgical operation would be more efficiently compensated with CT than with VC. Furthermore, CT also restored more functional abilities than VC. Finally, in a rehabilitation context, EMS is complementary to voluntary exercise because in the early phase of rehabilitation it elicits a strength increase, which is necessary

  1. Contributions to muscle force and EMG by combined neural excitation and electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crago, Patrick E.; Makowski, Nathaniel S.; Cole, Natalie M.

    2014-10-01

    Objective. Stimulation of muscle for research or clinical interventions is often superimposed on ongoing physiological activity without a quantitative understanding of the impact of the stimulation on the net muscle activity and the physiological response. Experimental studies show that total force during stimulation is less than the sum of the isolated voluntary and stimulated forces, but the occlusion mechanism is not understood. Approach. We develop a model of efferent motor activity elicited by superimposing stimulation during a physiologically activated contraction. The model combines action potential interactions due to collision block, source resetting, and refractory periods with previously published models of physiological motor unit recruitment, rate modulation, force production, and EMG generation in human first dorsal interosseous muscle to investigate the mechanisms and effectiveness of stimulation on the net muscle force and EMG. Main results. Stimulation during a physiological contraction demonstrates partial occlusion of force and the neural component of the EMG, due to action potential interactions in motor units activated by both sources. Depending on neural and stimulation firing rates as well as on force-frequency properties, individual motor unit forces can be greater, smaller, or unchanged by the stimulation. In contrast, voluntary motor unit EMG potentials in simultaneously stimulated motor units show progressive occlusion with increasing stimulus rate. The simulations predict that occlusion would be decreased by a reverse stimulation recruitment order. Significance. The results are consistent with and provide a mechanistic interpretation of previously published experimental evidence of force occlusion. The models also predict two effects that have not been reported previously—voluntary EMG occlusion and the advantages of a proximal stimulation site. This study provides a basis for the rational design of both future experiments and clinical

  2. Mandarin Speech Perception in Combined Electric and Acoustic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongxin; Zhang, Guoping; Galvin, John J.; Fu, Qian-Jie

    2014-01-01

    For deaf individuals with residual low-frequency acoustic hearing, combined use of a cochlear implant (CI) and hearing aid (HA) typically provides better speech understanding than with either device alone. Because of coarse spectral resolution, CIs do not provide fundamental frequency (F0) information that contributes to understanding of tonal languages such as Mandarin Chinese. The HA can provide good representation of F0 and, depending on the range of aided acoustic hearing, first and second formant (F1 and F2) information. In this study, Mandarin tone, vowel, and consonant recognition in quiet and noise was measured in 12 adult Mandarin-speaking bimodal listeners with the CI-only and with the CI+HA. Tone recognition was significantly better with the CI+HA in noise, but not in quiet. Vowel recognition was significantly better with the CI+HA in quiet, but not in noise. There was no significant difference in consonant recognition between the CI-only and the CI+HA in quiet or in noise. There was a wide range in bimodal benefit, with improvements often greater than 20 percentage points in some tests and conditions. The bimodal benefit was compared to CI subjects’ HA-aided pure-tone average (PTA) thresholds between 250 and 2000 Hz; subjects were divided into two groups: “better” PTA (<50 dB HL) or “poorer” PTA (>50 dB HL). The bimodal benefit differed significantly between groups only for consonant recognition. The bimodal benefit for tone recognition in quiet was significantly correlated with CI experience, suggesting that bimodal CI users learn to better combine low-frequency spectro-temporal information from acoustic hearing with temporal envelope information from electric hearing. Given the small number of subjects in this study (n = 12), further research with Chinese bimodal listeners may provide more information regarding the contribution of acoustic and electric hearing to tonal language perception. PMID:25386962

  3. Colony-Stimulating Factors for Febrile Neutropenia during Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Charles L.; Djulbegovic, Benjamin; Norris, LeAnn B.; Armitage, James O.

    2014-01-01

    A 55-year-old, previously healthy woman received a diagnosis of diffuse large-B-cell lymphoma after the evaluation of an enlarged left axillary lymph node obtained on biopsy. She had been asymptomatic except for the presence of enlarged axillary lymph nodes, which she had found while bathing. She was referred to an oncologist, who performed a staging evaluation. A complete blood count and test results for liver and renal function and serum lactate dehydrogenase were normal. Positron-emission tomography and computed tomography (PET–CT) identified enlarged lymph nodes with abnormal uptake in the left axilla, mediastinum, and retroperitoneum. Results on bone marrow biopsy were normal. The patient’s oncologist recommends treatment with six cycles of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone with rituximab (CHOP-R) at 21-day intervals. Is the administration of prophylactic granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) with the first cycle of chemotherapy indicated? PMID:23514290

  4. 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol-induced differentiation of myelomonocytic leukemic cells unresponsive to colony stimulating factors and phorbol esters

    SciTech Connect

    Bettens, F.; Schlick, E.; Farrar, W.; Ruscetti, F.

    1986-12-01

    The murine myelomonocytic leukemia cell line WEHI-3B D/sup +/, which differentiates in response to granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), can also be induced to differentiate into monocyte-macrophages by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) treatment, whereas the WEHI-3B D/sup -/ subline, which is unresponsive to G-CSF and PMA, can be induced to differentiate to granulocytes as well as monocytes by 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol (1,25-(OH)/sub 2/ D3), the biologically active metabolite of vitamin D3. A newly developed variant of the WEHI-3B D/sup +/ line, named WEHI-3B D/sup +/G, which was responsive to G-CSF but not to PMA, was also differentiated to granulocytes by 1,25-(OH)/sub 2/ D3. Although vitamin D3 has been reported to induce macrophage differentiation in responsive tumor cells, this is the first demonstration that 1,25-(OH)/sub 2/ D3 can induce granulocyte differentiation. In both differentiation pathways, cessation of cellular proliferation accompanies changes in morphologic and cytochemical properties of the cells. This suggests that leukemic cell lines unresponsive to differentiation agents acting at the cell surface retain their ability to differentiate in response to agents that do not act via the plasma membrane such as 1,25-(OH)/sub 2/ D3, which has cytosolic/nuclear receptors. These results suggest that low doses of 1,25-(OH)/sub 2/ D3 may be useful in combination with hemopoietic growth factors (CSFs) as therapeutic agent to induce leukemic cell differentiation in vivo.

  5. In vitro and in vivo activation of endothelial cells by colony-stimulating factors.

    PubMed Central

    Bussolino, F; Ziche, M; Wang, J M; Alessi, D; Morbidelli, L; Cremona, O; Bosia, A; Marchisio, P C; Mantovani, A

    1991-01-01

    This study was designed to identify the set of functions activated in cultured endothelial cells by the hematopoietic growth factors, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and to compare them with those elicited by prototypic cytokines active on these cells. Moreover, indications as to the in vivo relevance of in vitro effects were obtained. G-CSF and GM-CSF induced endothelial cells to proliferate and migrate. In contrast, unlike appropriate reference cytokines (IL-1 and tumor necrosis factor, IFN-gamma), G-CSF and GM-CSF did not modulate endothelial cell functions related to hemostasis-thrombosis (production of procoagulant activity and of platelet activating factor), inflammation (expression of leukocyte adhesion molecule-1 and production of platelet activating factor), and accessory function (expression of class II antigens of MHC). Other colony-stimulating factors (IL-3 and macrophage-colony-stimulating factor) were inactive on all functions tested. In comparison to basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), G-CSF and GM-CSF induced lower maximal proliferation of endothelial cells, whereas migration was of the same order of magnitude. G-CSF and GM-CSF stimulated repair of mechanically wounded endothelial monolayers. Exposure to both cytokines induced shape changes and cytoskeletal reorganization consistent with a migratory phenotype. To explore the in vivo relevance of the in vitro effects of these cytokines on endothelium, we studied the angiogenic activity of human G-CSF in the rabbit cornea. G-CSF, but not the heat-inactivated molecule, had definite angiogenic activity, without any sign of inflammatory reactions. G-CSF was less active than bFGF. However, the combination of a nonangiogenic dose of bFGF with G-CSF resulted in an angiogenic response higher than that elicited by either individual cytokines. Thus, G-CSF and GM-CSF induce endothelial cells to express an activation

  6. Combining non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation with neuroimaging and electrophysiology: Current approaches and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Til Ole; Karabanov, Anke; Hartwigsen, Gesa; Thielscher, Axel; Siebner, Hartwig Roman

    2016-10-15

    Non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation (NTBS) techniques such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial current stimulation (TCS) are important tools in human systems and cognitive neuroscience because they are able to reveal the relevance of certain brain structures or neuronal activity patterns for a given brain function. It is nowadays feasible to combine NTBS, either consecutively or concurrently, with a variety of neuroimaging and electrophysiological techniques. Here we discuss what kind of information can be gained from combined approaches, which often are technically demanding. We argue that the benefit from this combination is twofold. Firstly, neuroimaging and electrophysiology can inform subsequent NTBS, providing the required information to optimize where, when, and how to stimulate the brain. Information can be achieved both before and during the NTBS experiment, requiring consecutive and concurrent applications, respectively. Secondly, neuroimaging and electrophysiology can provide the readout for neural changes induced by NTBS. Again, using either concurrent or consecutive applications, both "online" NTBS effects immediately following the stimulation and "offline" NTBS effects outlasting plasticity-inducing NTBS protocols can be assessed. Finally, both strategies can be combined to close the loop between measuring and modulating brain activity by means of closed-loop brain state-dependent NTBS. In this paper, we will provide a conceptual framework, emphasizing principal strategies and highlighting promising future directions to exploit the benefits of combining NTBS with neuroimaging or electrophysiology. PMID:26883069

  7. Combining non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation with neuroimaging and electrophysiology: Current approaches and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Til Ole; Karabanov, Anke; Hartwigsen, Gesa; Thielscher, Axel; Siebner, Hartwig Roman

    2016-10-15

    Non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation (NTBS) techniques such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial current stimulation (TCS) are important tools in human systems and cognitive neuroscience because they are able to reveal the relevance of certain brain structures or neuronal activity patterns for a given brain function. It is nowadays feasible to combine NTBS, either consecutively or concurrently, with a variety of neuroimaging and electrophysiological techniques. Here we discuss what kind of information can be gained from combined approaches, which often are technically demanding. We argue that the benefit from this combination is twofold. Firstly, neuroimaging and electrophysiology can inform subsequent NTBS, providing the required information to optimize where, when, and how to stimulate the brain. Information can be achieved both before and during the NTBS experiment, requiring consecutive and concurrent applications, respectively. Secondly, neuroimaging and electrophysiology can provide the readout for neural changes induced by NTBS. Again, using either concurrent or consecutive applications, both "online" NTBS effects immediately following the stimulation and "offline" NTBS effects outlasting plasticity-inducing NTBS protocols can be assessed. Finally, both strategies can be combined to close the loop between measuring and modulating brain activity by means of closed-loop brain state-dependent NTBS. In this paper, we will provide a conceptual framework, emphasizing principal strategies and highlighting promising future directions to exploit the benefits of combining NTBS with neuroimaging or electrophysiology.

  8. Combining transcranial direct current stimulation and neuroimaging: novel insights in understanding neuroplasticity

    PubMed Central

    Sandrini, Marco

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, noninvasive brain stimulation techniques like transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) have gained immense popularity owing to their effects on modulating cortical activity and consequently motor and cognitive performance. However, the neurophysiology underlying such neuroplastic changes is less understood. This article critically evaluates the contemporary approach of combined tDCS and neuroimaging as a means to provide novel insights in understanding the neurophysiological and neuroplastic processes modulated by this brain stimulation technique. We end by briefly suggesting further lines of inquiry. PMID:21832036

  9. Complete inhibition of food-stimulated gastric acid secretion by combined application of pirenzepine and ranitidine.

    PubMed Central

    Londong, W; Londong, V; Ruthe, C; Weizert, P

    1981-01-01

    In a double-blind, placebo controlled and randomised secretory study the effectiveness of pirenzepine, ranitidine, and their combination was compared intraindividually in eight healthy subjects receiving intravenous bolus injections. Pirenzepine (0.15 mg/kg) plus ranitidine (0.6 mg/kg) suppressed peptone-stimulated gastric acid secretion from 69 +/- 11 to 2 +/- 0.4 mmol H+/3 h; the mean percentage inhibition was 97%. Postprandial gastrin was unaffected. There were only minor side-effects in a few experiments (reduction of salivation, brief blurring of vision), but no prolactin stimulation after ranitidine or ranitidine plus pirenzepine. The combined application of ranitidine and pirenzepine inhibited meal-stimulated acid secretion more effectively and produced fewer side-effects than the combination of cimetidine plus pirenzepine studied previously. PMID:6114900

  10. Antitumor effects of combining tumor radiation with the antivascular action of ultrasound stimulated microbubbles

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yanlei; Han, Zhen; Shao, Limei; Zhao, Yuehuan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: More and more evidence indicates tumor vasculature plays an important role in tumor radiation response. In this study, we investigated ultrasound stimulated microbubbles to enhance the effects of radiation. Methods: Human bladder cancer HT-1376 xenografts in severe combined immuno-deficient mice were used. High-frequency (25 MHz) ultrasound was used to image tumor responses caused by ultrasound-stimulated microbubbles in combination with radiation. Human bladder xenografts grown in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice were treated using microbubbles stimulated with ultrasound at 250, 570, or 750 kPa, and exposed to 0, 2, or 8 Gy of radiation. Tumors were imaged prior to treatment and 24 hours after treatment. Spectral analysis of images acquired from treated tumors revealed overall increases in ultrasound backscatter intensity and the spectral intercept parameter. Results: There existed a synergistic effect in vivo with combined single treatments of ultrasound-stimulated microbubble vascular perturbation and radiation inducing an over 10-fold greater cell kill with combined treatments. We further demonstrate that induction of ceramide-related endothelial cell apoptosis, leading to vascular disruption, is a causative mechanism. In vivo experiments with ultrasound and bubbles permit radiation doses to be decreased significantly for comparable effect. Conclusion: We envisage this unique combined ultrasound-based vascular perturbation and radiation treatment method being used to enhance the effects of radiation in a tumor, leading to greater tumor eradication. PMID:26617705

  11. Reduced Intensity Conditioning, Combined Transplantation of Haploidentical Hematopoietic Stem Cells and Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Patients with Severe Aplastic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Hong; Gao, Chun-Ji; Da, Wan-Ming; Cao, Yong-Bin; Wang, Zhi-Hong; Xu, Li-Xin; Wu, Ya-Mei; Liu, Bei; Liu, Zhou-Yang; Yan, Bei; Li, Song-Wei; Yang, Xue-Liang; Wu, Xiao-Xiong; Han, Zhong-Chao

    2014-01-01

    We examined if transplantation of combined haploidentical hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) affected graft failure and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in patients with severe aplastic anemia (SAA). Patients with SAA-I (N = 17) received haploidentical HSCT plus MSC infusion. Stem cell grafts used a combination of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-primed bone marrow and G-CSF-mobilized peripheral blood stem cells of haploidentical donors and the culture-expanded third-party donor-derived umbilical cord MSCs (UC-MSCs), respectively. Reduced intensity conditioning consisted of fludarabine (30 mg/m2·d)+cyclosphamide (500 mg/m2·d)+anti-human thymocyte IgG. Transplant recipients also received cyclosporin A, mycophenolatemofetil, and CD25 monoclonal antibody. A total of 16 patients achieved hematopoietic reconstitution. The median mononuclear cell and CD34 count was 9.3×108/kg and 4.5×106/kg. Median time to ANC was >0.5×109/L and PLT count >20×109/L were 12 and 14 days, respectively. Grade III-IV acute GVHD was seen in 23.5% of the cases, while moderate and severe chronic GVHD were seen in 14.2% of the cases. The 3-month and 6-month survival rates for all patients were 88.2% and 76.5%, respectively; mean survival time was 56.5 months. Combined transplantation of haploidentical HSCs and MSCs on SAA without an HLA-identical sibling donor was safe, effectively reduced the incidence of severe GVHD, and improved patient survival. PMID:24594618

  12. Time-dependent changes in motor cortical excitability by electrical stimulation combined with voluntary drive.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Kenichi; Yamaguchi, Tomofumi; Tanabe, Shigeo; Suzuki, Tomotaka; Saito, Kei; Higashi, Toshio

    2014-04-16

    Prolonged changes in primary motor cortex excitability in response to combined neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) and voluntary contraction with motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were investigated by transcranial magnetic stimulation and recorded by mechanomyography. Participants included 22 healthy individuals. NMES was applied to the extensor carpi radialis (ECR) by voluntary ECR contraction with 20% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) of wrist extension. MEPs were recorded from the flexor carpi radialis (FCR) and ECR at rest with NMES, at 20% MVC with NMES (combined), and at 20% MVC alone. Significant conditional effects were revealed in ECR and FCR. In the combined condition, MEPs showed gradual enhancement, and those in FCR were more inhibited than those in the control condition. Voluntary contraction with NMES increased primary motor cortex excitability in the agonist muscle, whereas the antagonist muscle might affect reciprocal modulation in the combined condition. PMID:24356108

  13. Effortful swallowing training combined with electrical stimulation in post-stroke dysphagia: a randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Woo; Kim, Youngsun; Oh, Jong-Chi; Lee, Ho-Jun

    2012-12-01

    We tested the effect of effortful swallow combined with surface electrical stimulation used as a form of resistance training in post-stroke patients with dysphagia. Twenty post-stroke dysphagic patients were randomly divided into two groups: those who underwent effortful swallow with infrahyoid motor electrical stimulation (experimental group, n = 10) and effortful swallow with infrahyoid sensory electrical stimulation (control group, n = 10). In the experimental group, electrical stimulation was applied to the skin above the infrahyoid muscle with the current was adjusted until muscle contraction occurred and the hyoid bone was depressed. In the control group, the stimulation intensity was applied just above the sensory threshold. The patients in both groups were then asked to swallow effortfully in order to elevate their hyolaryngeal complex when the stimulation began. A total of 12 sessions of 20 min of training for 4 weeks were performed. Blinded biomechanical measurements of the extent of hyolaryngeal excursion, the maximal width of the upper esophageal sphincter (UES) opening, and the penetration-aspiration scale before and after training were performed. In the experimental group, the maximal vertical displacement of the larynx was increased significantly after the intervention (p < 0.05). The maximal vertical displacement of the hyoid bone and the maximal width of the UES opening increased but the increase was not found to be significant (p = 0.066). There was no increase in the control group. Effortful swallow training combined with electrical stimulation increased the extent of laryngeal excursion. This intervention can be used as a new treatment method in post-stroke patients with dysphagia. PMID:22447240

  14. Effect of tactile stimulation on primary motor cortex excitability during action observation combined with motor imagery.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Megumi; Kubota, Shinji; Onmyoji, Yusuke; Hirano, Masato; Uehara, Kazumasa; Morishita, Takuya; Funase, Kozo

    2015-07-23

    We aimed to investigate the effects of the tactile stimulation to an observer's fingertips at the moment that they saw an object being pinched by another person on the excitability of observer's primary motor cortex (M1) using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). In addition, the above effects were also examined during action observation combined with the motor imagery. Motor evoked potentials (MEP) were evoked from the subjects' right first dorsal interosseous (FDI) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscles. Electrical stimulation (ES) inducing tactile sensation was delivered to the subjects' first and second fingertips at the moment of pinching action performed by another person. Although neither the ES nor action observation alone had significant effects on the MEP amplitude of the FDI or ADM, the FDI MEP amplitude which acts as the prime mover during pinching was reduced when ES and action observation were combined; however, no such changes were seen in the ADM. Conversely, that reduced FDI MEP amplitude was increased during the motor imagery. These results indicated that the M1 excitability during the action observation of pinching action combined with motor imagery could be enhanced by the tactile stimulation delivered to the observer's fingertips at the moment corresponding to the pinching being observed.

  15. A model-based analysis of the "combined-stimulation advantage".

    PubMed

    Seldran, Fabien; Micheyl, Christophe; Truy, Eric; Berger-Vachon, Christian; Thai-Van, Hung; Gallego, Stéphane

    2011-12-01

    Improvements in speech-recognition performance resulting from the addition of low-frequency information to electric (or vocoded) signals have attracted considerable interest in recent years. An important question is whether these improvements reflect a form of constructive perceptual interaction-whereby acoustic cues enhance the perception of electric or vocoded signals-or whether they can be explained without assuming any interaction. To address this question, speech-recognition performance was measured in 24 normal-hearing listeners using lowpass-filtered, vocoded, and "combined" (lowpass + vocoded) words presented either in quiet or in a realistic background (cafeteria noise), for different signal-to-noise ratios, different lowpass-filter cutoff frequencies, and different numbers of vocoder bands. The results of these measures were then compared to the predictions of three models of cue combination, including a "probability-summation" model and two Gaussian signal detection theory (SDT) models-one (the "independent-noises" model) involving pre-combination noises, and the other (the "late-noise" model) involving post-combination noise. Consistent with previous findings, speech-recognition performance with combined stimulation was significantly higher than performance with vocoded or lowpass stimuli alone, and it was also higher than predicted by the probability-summation model. The two Gaussian-SDT models could account quantitatively for the data. Moreover, a Bayesian model-comparison procedure demonstrated that, given the data, these two models were far more likely than the probability-summation model. Since these models do not involve any constructive-interaction mechanism, this demonstrates that constructive interactions are not needed to explain the combined-stimulation benefits measured in this study. It will be important for future studies to investigate whether this conclusion generalizes to other test conditions, including real EAS, and to further test

  16. Combined Fruit and Vegetable Intake Is Correlated with Improved Inflammatory and Oxidant Status from a Cross-Sectional Study in a Community Setting

    PubMed Central

    Root, Martin M.; McGinn, Megan C.; Nieman, David C.; Henson, Dru A.; Heinz, Serena A.; Shanely, R. Andrew; Knab, Amy M.; Jin, Fuxia

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have examined the relationship between specific nutrient and food intakes with limited markers of either inflammation or oxidant status. The objective of this study was to determine if an increase in combined self-reported fruit and vegetable (F&V) intake in a community setting was associated with improved multiple markers of inflammatory and oxidant status. A community group (N = 1000, age 18–85 years, 61% female) gave two fasted blood samples separated by 12 weeks. Blood inflammatory biomarkers included total leukocytes (WBC), plasma C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-10, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and granulocyte colony stimulating factor. Measured oxidant status markers were ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP), oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) and plasma F2-isoprostanes. The relation of markers across categories of F&V intake was examined. In analyses controlling for other important dietary and lifestyle factors, IL-6 and TNF-α were significantly lower across categories of increasing F&V intakes (p < 0.008). FRAP and ORAC were significantly higher (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.047 respectively) while F2-isoprostanes was significantly lower (p < 0.0001) across F&V categories. In a community study, several markers of both inflammation and oxidant status were associated in a putatively salutary direction by higher intake of combined F&V, supporting current guidelines suggesting increased F&V consumption for the prevention of chronic diseases. PMID:22347616

  17. Machine learning approach to optimizing combined stimulation and medication therapies for Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Shamir, Reuben R.; Dolber, Trygve; Noecker, Angela M.; Walter, Benjamin L.; McIntyre, Cameron C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic region is an established therapy for advanced Parkinson’s disease (PD). However, patients often require time-intensive postoperative management to balance their coupled stimulation and medication treatments. Given the large and complex parameter space associated with this task, we propose that clinical decision support systems (CDSS) based on machine learning algorithms could assist in treatment optimization. Objective Develop a proof-of-concept implementation of a CDSS that incorporates patient-specific details on both stimulation and medication. Methods Clinical data from 10 patients, and 89 post-DBS surgery visits, were used to create a prototype CDSS. The system was designed to provide three key functions: 1) information retrieval; 2) visualization of treatment, and; 3) recommendation on expected effective stimulation and drug dosages, based on three machine learning methods that included support vector machines, Naïve Bayes, and random forest. Results Measures of medication dosages, time factors, and symptom-specific preoperative response to levodopa were significantly correlated with postoperative outcomes (p<0.05) and their effect on outcomes was of similar magnitude to that of DBS. Using those results, the combined machine learning algorithms were able to accurately predict 86% (12/14) of the motor improvement scores at one year after surgery. Conclusions Using patient-specific details, an appropriately parameterized CDSS could help select theoretically optimal DBS parameter settings and medication dosages that have potential to improve the clinical management of PD patients. PMID:26140956

  18. Functional Improvement after Photothrombotic Stroke in Rats Is Associated with Different Patterns of Dendritic Plasticity after G-CSF Treatment and G-CSF Treatment Combined with Concomitant or Sequential Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy.

    PubMed

    Frauenknecht, Katrin; Diederich, Kai; Leukel, Petra; Bauer, Henrike; Schäbitz, Wolf-Rüdiger; Sommer, Clemens J; Minnerup, Jens

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown that granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) treatment alone, or in combination with constraint movement therapy (CIMT) either sequentially or concomitantly, results in significantly improved sensorimotor recovery after photothrombotic stroke in rats in comparison to untreated control animals. CIMT alone did not result in any significant differences compared to the control group (Diederich et al., Stroke, 2012;43:185-192). Using a subset of rat brains from this former experiment the present study was designed to evaluate whether dendritic plasticity would parallel improved functional outcomes. Five treatment groups were analyzed (n = 6 each) (i) ischemic control (saline); (ii) CIMT (CIMT between post-stroke days 2 and 11); (iii) G-CSF (10 μg/kg G-CSF daily between post-stroke days 2 and 11); (iv) combined concurrent group (CIMT plus G-CSF) and (v) combined sequential group (CIMT between post-stroke days 2 and 11; 10 μg/kg G-CSF daily between post-stroke days 12 and 21, respectively). After impregnation of rat brains with a modified Golgi-Cox protocol layer V pyramidal neurons in the peri-infarct cortex as well as the corresponding contralateral cortex were analyzed. Surprisingly, animals with a similar degree of behavioral recovery exhibited quite different patterns of dendritic plasticity in both peri-lesional and contralesional areas. The cause for these patterns is not easily to explain but puts the simple assumption that increased dendritic complexity after stroke necessarily results in increased functional outcome into perspective.

  19. Targeting Neuronal Networks with Combined Drug and Stimulation Paradigms Guided by Neuroimaging to Treat Brain Disorders.

    PubMed

    Faingold, Carl L; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2015-10-01

    Improved therapy of brain disorders can be achieved by focusing on neuronal networks, utilizing combined pharmacological and stimulation paradigms guided by neuroimaging. Neuronal networks that mediate normal brain functions, such as hearing, interact with other networks, which is important but commonly neglected. Network interaction changes often underlie brain disorders, including epilepsy. "Conditional multireceptive" (CMR) brain areas (e.g., brainstem reticular formation and amygdala) are critical in mediating neuroplastic changes that facilitate network interactions. CMR neurons receive multiple inputs but exhibit extensive response variability due to milieu and behavioral state changes and are exquisitely sensitive to agents that increase or inhibit GABA-mediated inhibition. Enhanced CMR neuronal responsiveness leads to expression of emergent properties--nonlinear events--resulting from network self-organization. Determining brain disorder mechanisms requires animals that model behaviors and neuroanatomical substrates of human disorders identified by neuroimaging. However, not all sites activated during network operation are requisite for that operation. Other active sites are ancillary, because their blockade does not alter network function. Requisite network sites exhibit emergent properties that are critical targets for pharmacological and stimulation therapies. Improved treatment of brain disorders should involve combined pharmacological and stimulation therapies, guided by neuroimaging, to correct network malfunctions by targeting specific network neurons.

  20. Artistic creation as stimulated by superimposed versus combined-composite visual images.

    PubMed

    Rothenberg, A

    1986-02-01

    The creative role of homospatial thinking in visual art was assessed in an experiment with 39 highly talented young artists. In order to compare the creative effects of visual elements occupying the same space with identical elements arrayed in a combined foreground and background organization, superimposed slide images were presented to a randomly selected portion of the subject group, and the other portion of the subject group viewed the same slide images constructed into a figure-ground composite. Both groups produced three drawings stimulated by the slide stimuli, and these drawings were independently judged by three art experts. Results were that drawings produced by the group exposed to the superimposed images were rated higher in creative potential than those stimulated by the figure-ground controls. These results extend previous experimental findings of a tendency toward homospatial thinking in creative individuals in literature and visual art.

  1. [Stimulation of microsomal lipid peroxidation as the effect of combined action of xylene and ethanol].

    PubMed

    Jajte, J; Wiśniewska-Knypl, J M; Wrońska-Nofer, T

    1990-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate if in the case of combined exposure of rats to xylene and ethanol stimulation of lipid peroxidation in the liver microsomes (an index of interaction with lipids and derangements of integrity/fluidity of membranes) might occur. Experiments were carried out on male Wistar rats in the conditions of prolonged, inhalatory preexposure to m-xylene at concentration of 4000 mg/m3 for 6 and 12 weeks, and next joint 5-fold treatment with ethanol (2.5 g/kg oral doses in 12 hours intervals for 3 days). The degree of lipid peroxidation was assessed both in vivo and in vitro under chemical stimulation: enzymatically (NADPH, Fe2+) and nonenzymatically (ascorbic acid, Fe2+). The chemical stimulation permits to measure multiplied biological effects of chemicals acting in vivo. As a results of performed studies it was found that the highest increase of lipid peroxidation appeared in the case of prolonged, 12 weeks exposure to m-xylene (4000 mg/m3) and successively under subacute ethanol treatment and 6-week m-xylene exposure. Thus, it was evidenced that stimulation of lipid peroxidation depends on the duration of exposure to m-xylene. Stimulation of lipid peroxidation, revealed here, may arise from the processes of biotransformation of xylene in cyt. P-450 monooxygenase system where generated oxygen free radicals may attack the lipid components of microsomal membrane as well as from the mechanisms leading to decrease of antioxidant ability of the organism (decrease of glutathione-SH and vitamins E and C levels).

  2. Combined treatment with dabrafenib and trametinib with immune-stimulating antibodies for BRAF mutant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Homet Moreno, Blanca; Mok, Stephen; Comin-Anduix, Begonya; Hu-Lieskovan, Siwen; Ribas, Antoni

    2016-07-01

    The combination of targeted therapy with BRAF and MEK inhibitors has become the standard of care in patients with BRAF (V600E) mutant melanoma, but responses are not durable. In addition, the impressive clinical benefits with anti-PD-1 and anti-PD-L1 antibodies (Ab) in patients with heavily pretreated metastatic melanoma and the synergistic effect of dabrafenib, trametinib and anti-PD-1 compared with single therapy alone groups support the idea that combining dabrafenib, trametinib and immunotherapy based on PD-1 blockade could be an interesting approach in the treatment of metastatic melanoma. With our mouse model of syngeneic BRAF (V600E) driven melanoma (SM1), we tested whether the addition of an immunostimulatory Ab targeting CD137 (4-1BB) and/or CD134 (OX40) would enhance the antitumor effect of dabrafenib, trametinib and anti-PD-1 or anti-PD-L1 therapy. In vitro studies showed that the combination group of dabrafenib, trametinib and anti-PD-1 increases CD8(+) tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs), as well as CD4(+) T cells and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). An upregulation of PD-L1 was observed in the combination of dabrafenib, trametinib and anti-PD-1 therapy. Combination of dabrafenib, trametinib and anti-PD-1, with either anti-CD137 or anti-CD134, showed a superior antitumor effect, but the five-agent combination was not superior to the four-agent combinations. In conclusion, the combination of dabrafenib, trametinib, anti-PD1 or anti-PD-L1 therapy results in robust antitumor activity, which is further improved by adding the immune-stimulating Ab anti-CD137 or anti-CD134. Our findings support the testing of these combinations in patients with BRAF (V600E) mutant metastatic melanoma.

  3. Combined treatment with dabrafenib and trametinib with immune-stimulating antibodies for BRAF mutant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Homet Moreno, Blanca; Mok, Stephen; Comin-Anduix, Begonya; Hu-Lieskovan, Siwen; Ribas, Antoni

    2016-07-01

    The combination of targeted therapy with BRAF and MEK inhibitors has become the standard of care in patients with BRAF (V600E) mutant melanoma, but responses are not durable. In addition, the impressive clinical benefits with anti-PD-1 and anti-PD-L1 antibodies (Ab) in patients with heavily pretreated metastatic melanoma and the synergistic effect of dabrafenib, trametinib and anti-PD-1 compared with single therapy alone groups support the idea that combining dabrafenib, trametinib and immunotherapy based on PD-1 blockade could be an interesting approach in the treatment of metastatic melanoma. With our mouse model of syngeneic BRAF (V600E) driven melanoma (SM1), we tested whether the addition of an immunostimulatory Ab targeting CD137 (4-1BB) and/or CD134 (OX40) would enhance the antitumor effect of dabrafenib, trametinib and anti-PD-1 or anti-PD-L1 therapy. In vitro studies showed that the combination group of dabrafenib, trametinib and anti-PD-1 increases CD8(+) tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs), as well as CD4(+) T cells and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). An upregulation of PD-L1 was observed in the combination of dabrafenib, trametinib and anti-PD-1 therapy. Combination of dabrafenib, trametinib and anti-PD-1, with either anti-CD137 or anti-CD134, showed a superior antitumor effect, but the five-agent combination was not superior to the four-agent combinations. In conclusion, the combination of dabrafenib, trametinib, anti-PD1 or anti-PD-L1 therapy results in robust antitumor activity, which is further improved by adding the immune-stimulating Ab anti-CD137 or anti-CD134. Our findings support the testing of these combinations in patients with BRAF (V600E) mutant metastatic melanoma. PMID:27622011

  4. Combined treatment with dabrafenib and trametinib with immune-stimulating antibodies for BRAF mutant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Homet Moreno, Blanca; Mok, Stephen; Comin-Anduix, Begonya; Hu-Lieskovan, Siwen; Ribas, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    The combination of targeted therapy with BRAF and MEK inhibitors has become the standard of care in patients with BRAFV600E mutant melanoma, but responses are not durable. In addition, the impressive clinical benefits with anti-PD-1 and anti-PD-L1 antibodies (Ab) in patients with heavily pretreated metastatic melanoma and the synergistic effect of dabrafenib, trametinib and anti-PD-1 compared with single therapy alone groups support the idea that combining dabrafenib, trametinib and immunotherapy based on PD-1 blockade could be an interesting approach in the treatment of metastatic melanoma. With our mouse model of syngeneic BRAFV600E driven melanoma (SM1), we tested whether the addition of an immunostimulatory Ab targeting CD137 (4-1BB) and/or CD134 (OX40) would enhance the antitumor effect of dabrafenib, trametinib and anti-PD-1 or anti-PD-L1 therapy. In vitro studies showed that the combination group of dabrafenib, trametinib and anti-PD-1 increases CD8+ tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs), as well as CD4+ T cells and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). An upregulation of PD-L1 was observed in the combination of dabrafenib, trametinib and anti-PD-1 therapy. Combination of dabrafenib, trametinib and anti-PD-1, with either anti-CD137 or anti-CD134, showed a superior antitumor effect, but the five-agent combination was not superior to the four-agent combinations. In conclusion, the combination of dabrafenib, trametinib, anti-PD1 or anti-PD-L1 therapy results in robust antitumor activity, which is further improved by adding the immune-stimulating Ab anti-CD137 or anti-CD134. Our findings support the testing of these combinations in patients with BRAFV600E mutant metastatic melanoma. PMID:27622011

  5. Robust Stimulation of W1282X-CFTR Channel Activity by a Combination of Allosteric Modulators.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Hong, Jeong S; Rab, Andras; Sorscher, Eric J; Kirk, Kevin L

    2016-01-01

    W1282X is a common nonsense mutation among cystic fibrosis patients that results in the production of a truncated Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) channel. Here we show that the channel activity of the W1282X-CFTR polypeptide is exceptionally low in excised membrane patches at normally saturating doses of ATP and PKA (single channel open probability (PO) < 0.01). However, W1282X-CFTR channels were stimulated by two CFTR modulators, the FDA-approved VX-770 and the dietary compound curcumin. Each of these compounds is an allosteric modulator of CFTR gating that promotes channel activity in the absence of the native ligand, ATP. Although W1282X-CFTR channels were stimulated by VX-770 in the absence of ATP their activities remained dependent on PKA phosphorylation. Thus, activated W1282X-CFTR channels should remain under physiologic control by cyclic nucleotide signaling pathways in vivo. VX-770 and curcumin exerted additive effects on W1282X-CFTR channel gating (opening/closing) in excised patches such that the Po of the truncated channel approached unity (> 0.9) when treated with both modulators. VX-770 and curcumin also additively stimulated W1282X-CFTR mediated currents in polarized FRT epithelial monolayers. In this setting, however, the stimulated W1282X-CFTR currents were smaller than those mediated by wild type CFTR (3-5%) due presumably to lower expression levels or cell surface targeting of the truncated protein. Combining allosteric modulators of different mechanistic classes is worth considering as a treatment option for W1282X CF patients perhaps when coupled with maneuvers to increase expression of the truncated protein. PMID:27007499

  6. Robust Stimulation of W1282X-CFTR Channel Activity by a Combination of Allosteric Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Hong, Jeong S.; Rab, Andras; Sorscher, Eric J.; Kirk, Kevin L.

    2016-01-01

    W1282X is a common nonsense mutation among cystic fibrosis patients that results in the production of a truncated Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) channel. Here we show that the channel activity of the W1282X-CFTR polypeptide is exceptionally low in excised membrane patches at normally saturating doses of ATP and PKA (single channel open probability (PO) < 0.01). However, W1282X-CFTR channels were stimulated by two CFTR modulators, the FDA-approved VX-770 and the dietary compound curcumin. Each of these compounds is an allosteric modulator of CFTR gating that promotes channel activity in the absence of the native ligand, ATP. Although W1282X-CFTR channels were stimulated by VX-770 in the absence of ATP their activities remained dependent on PKA phosphorylation. Thus, activated W1282X-CFTR channels should remain under physiologic control by cyclic nucleotide signaling pathways in vivo. VX-770 and curcumin exerted additive effects on W1282X-CFTR channel gating (opening/closing) in excised patches such that the Po of the truncated channel approached unity (> 0.9) when treated with both modulators. VX-770 and curcumin also additively stimulated W1282X-CFTR mediated currents in polarized FRT epithelial monolayers. In this setting, however, the stimulated W1282X-CFTR currents were smaller than those mediated by wild type CFTR (3–5%) due presumably to lower expression levels or cell surface targeting of the truncated protein. Combining allosteric modulators of different mechanistic classes is worth considering as a treatment option for W1282X CF patients perhaps when coupled with maneuvers to increase expression of the truncated protein. PMID:27007499

  7. Enhanced thrombopoietin but not G-CSF receptor stimulation induces self-renewing hematopoietic stem cell divisions in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kovtonyuk, Larisa V; Manz, Markus G; Takizawa, Hitoshi

    2016-06-23

    In steady-state adult hematopoiesis, most hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are in the resting phase of the cell cycle. Upon enhanced hematopoietic demand, HSCs can be induced to divide and self-renew or differentiate. However, the cell-extrinsic signals inducing HSC cycling remain to be elucidated. Using in vivo high-resolution single HSC divisional tracking, we directly demonstrate that clinically applied thrombopoietin receptor but not granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) receptor agonists drive HSCs into self-renewing divisions leading to quantitative expansion of functional HSC as defined by their in vivo serial multilineage and long-term repopulating potential. These results suggest that thrombopoietin mimetics might be applicable to expand HSCs in vivo and to sensitize thrombopoietin receptor-expressing HSCs to cell cycle-dependent cytotoxic agents. PMID:27146433

  8. [Therapeutic effect of rmIL-12 combined with G-CSF on acute radiation sickness produced by γ-ray irradiation in mice].

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Zhai, Rui-Ren; Pang, Zhao-Xia; Zhang, Chao; Yu, Chang-Lin

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study is to observe the therapeutic effect of recombinant murine interleukin 12 (rmIL-12) combining with granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) on mice irradiated by γ-rays. 56 BALB/c mice were totally irradiated by 6.0 Gy of (60)Co γ-ray and randomly divided into irradiation control group, rmIL-12 treatment group, G-CSF treatment group and combination therapy (rmIL-12 plus G-CSF) group. rmIL-12 20 µg/kg was administrated intraperitoneally at 1 h following irradiation, and was administrated every 3 days after irradiation for 4 times in rmIL-12 treatment group. G-CSF 100 µg/kg was administrated subcutaneously the 2 h following irradiation for 14 d in G-CSF treatment group. The dose and method of rmIL-12 and G-CSF in combination therapy group were same as in rmIL-12 group and G-CSF group. The general status of mice were observed twice a day, the changes in body weight, peripheral blood cell (WBC and Plt) counts were examined once every three days, bone marrow cells were collected to perform colony cultivation on day 14 and 28 after irradiation. The results showed that WBC count recovery time in combination therapy group was significantly earlier than that of the control group (7 d vs 11 d), WBC count recovery velocity in the combination therapy group was no significant different from that of the G-CSF treatment group. Combined therapy significantly promoted Plt count recovery, resulting in less profound nadirs (16.5% vs 8.1%, P < 0.01) and rapid recovery to normal levels (11 d vs 14 d), Plt count recovery velocity in the combination therapy group was no significant different from that of the rmIL-12 treatment group. Culture of bone marrow cells in semi-solid medium also demonstrated that combination of rmIL-12 and G-CSF could stimulate bone marrow cells to form more CFU-GM and CFU-Mix than those of the irradiation control group in vitro on day 14 and 28 after irradiation (P < 0.05). It is concluded that the combination of rmIL-12 and G

  9. Combined neuromodulatory interventions in acute experimental pain: assessment of melatonin and non-invasive brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Nádia Regina Jardim; Laste, Gabriela; Deitos, Alícia; Stefani, Luciana Cadore; Cambraia-Canto, Gustavo; Torres, Iraci L. S.; Brunoni, Andre R.; Fregni, Felipe; Caumo, Wolnei

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and melatonin can effectively treat pain. Given their potentially complementary mechanisms of action, their combination could have a synergistic effect. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that compared to the control condition and melatonin alone, tDCS combined with melatonin would have a greater effect on pain modulatory effect, as assessed by quantitative sensory testing (QST) and by the pain level during the Conditioned Pain Modulation (CPM)-task. Furthermore, the combined treatment would have a greater cortical excitability effect as indicated by the transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and on the serum BDNF level. Healthy males (n = 20), (aged 18–40 years), in a blinded, placebo-controlled, crossover, clinical trial, were randomized into three groups: sublingual melatonin (0.25 mg/kg) + a-tDCS, melatonin (0.25 mg/kg) + sham-(s)-tDCS, or sublingual placebo+sham-(s)-tDCS. Anodal stimulation (2 mA, 20 min) was applied over the primary motor cortex. There was a significant difference in the heat pain threshold (°C) for melatonin+a-tDCS vs. placebo+s-tDCS (mean difference: 4.86, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.9 to 8.63) and melatonin+s-tDCS vs. placebo+s-tDCS (mean: 5.16, 95% CI: 0.84 to 8.36). There was no difference between melatonin+s-tDCS and melatonin+a-tDCS (mean difference: 0.29, 95% CI: −3.72 to 4.23). The mean change from the baseline on amplitude of motor evocate potential (MEP) was significantly higher in the melatonin+a-tDCS (−19.96% ± 5.2) compared with melatonin+s-tDCS group (−1.36% ± 5.35) and with placebo+s-tDCS group (3.61% ± 10.48), respectively (p < 0.05 for both comparisons). While melatonin alone or combined with a-tDCS did not significantly affect CPM task result, and serum BDNF level. The melatonin effectively reduced pain; however, its association with a-tDCS did not present an additional modulatory effect on acute induced pain. PMID:25873871

  10. The combination of radiotherapy and immunotherapy using glycated chitosan as an immunological stimulant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chun-Yuan; Leu, Jyh-Der; Wang, Chung-Yi; Chen, Wei R.; Lee, Yi-Jang

    2015-03-01

    Immunotherapy has been reported to effectively treat various cancers. In addition, scientists are dedicated in finding whether the combination of radiotherapy and immunotherapy can efficiently suppress cancer progression and recurrence. Although radiotherapy has been widely used for breast cancer, better strategies to overcome the latestage breast cancer remains explored. The glycated chitosan (GC), a novel immunological stimulant, was demonstrated to trigger local immune response facilitating the enhancement of radiosensitivity. Our previous study also revealed that the cell mortality and invasive ability were decreased under GC treatment, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we used 4T1-3R-L, a derived murine breast cancer cell line from the spontaneous metastasized liver lesion. We combined ionizing radiation with GC to treat 4T1-3R-L and found the expression of DNA damage-related genes such as gamma-H2AX was more than radiation alone In addition, the cell cycle distribution and colony forming assay showed an increased sub-G1 population and decreased cell survival rate after IR combined GC treatment. Taken together, we sought to elucidate the underlying mechanism by the investigation of DNA damage repair process when IR combined with GC, and to explore another advantage of GC to aid other cancer treatments. Based on our most updated results, the GC treatment is able to effectively increase the radiosensitivity through an immune-responsive signaling transduction, indicating that GC could be a valuable therapeutic strategy for treating against advanced breast cancers.

  11. Efficacy of Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation Combined with Biofeedback Therapy in Patients with Functional Constipation

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Bing Yan; Ma, Hong Mei; Zang, Xiao Ying; Wang, Si Yuan; Zhang, Yi; Jiang, Nan; Zhang, Xi Peng; Zhao, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims A large number of studies have shown that function constipation (FC) has an extremely high incidence of mental and psychological disorders. Cranial electrotherapy stimulation (CES) was applied to the treatment of psychological disorders such as anxiety and depression. We explored the effects of CES combined with biofeedback therapy (BFT) on the psychological state, clinical symptoms, and anorectal function in patients with FC. Methods A total of 74 patients with FC were randomly divided into 2 groups. The control group received BFT. CES combined with BFT was carried out in the experiment group. All patients were assessed using the self-rating anxiety scale (SAS), self-rating depression scale (SDS), and Wexner constipation score at baseline and the end of each course. Anorectal manometry and balloon expulsion tests were performed before and after treatment. Results After treatment, the participants in the experiment group had significantly lower score SAS, SDS, and Wexner constipation scores than the control group (all P < 0.05). The number of successful expulsion in the experiment group was larger than the control group (P = 0.016). Conclusions CES combined with BFT was effective in improving the psychological status of anxiety, depression, and bowel symptoms in patients with FC. PMID:26932836

  12. [Neuromuscular effects of superimposed and combined transcutaneous electrical stimulation with voluntary activity: a review].

    PubMed

    Paillard, T; Noé, F; Edeline, O

    2005-04-01

    With voluntary muscular contraction (VOL), small motor units (MUs) are recruited before large MUs are (a submaximal muscular contraction recruits only small MUs), whereas electrical stimulation (ES) tends to reverse the recruitment order. On the basis of this observation, some authors have tested the physiological effects of ES superimposed simultaneously with VOL (superimposed technique [ST]) or separately (combined technique [CT]). With healthy subjects, ST does not recruit more MUs than VOL, except with eccentric contractions. After health subjects undergo training programs, ST appears to be as efficient as VOL in enhancing subjects' neuromuscular qualities. Nevertheless, the use of CT seems more effective than VOL. In postsurgical rehabilitation, both ST and CT are more effective than VOL. Actually, following knee surgery, ST and CT compensate for volume and muscle strength deficits with more efficiency than does VOL.

  13. Best of both worlds: promise of combining brain stimulation and brain connectome

    PubMed Central

    Luft, Caroline Di Bernardi; Pereda, Ernesto; Banissy, Michael J.; Bhattacharya, Joydeep

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial current brain stimulation (tCS) is becoming increasingly popular as a non-pharmacological non-invasive neuromodulatory method that alters cortical excitability by applying weak electrical currents to the scalp via a pair of electrodes. Most applications of this technique have focused on enhancing motor and learning skills, as well as a therapeutic agent in neurological and psychiatric disorders. In these applications, similarly to lesion studies, tCS was used to provide a causal link between a function or behavior and a specific brain region (e.g., primary motor cortex). Nonetheless, complex cognitive functions are known to rely on functionally connected multitude of brain regions with dynamically changing patterns of information flow rather than on isolated areas, which are most commonly targeted in typical tCS experiments. In this review article, we argue in favor of combining tCS method with other neuroimaging techniques (e.g., fMRI, EEG) and by employing state-of-the-art connectivity data analysis techniques (e.g., graph theory) to obtain a deeper understanding of the underlying spatiotemporal dynamics of functional connectivity patterns and cognitive performance. Finally, we discuss the possibilities of using these combined techniques to investigate the neural correlates of human creativity and to enhance creativity. PMID:25126060

  14. The combined effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and stretching on muscle hardness and pressure pain threshold

    PubMed Central

    Karasuno, Hiroshi; Ogihara, Hisayoshi; Morishita, Katsuyuki; Yokoi, Yuka; Fujiwara, Takayuki; Ogoma, Yoshiro; Abe, Koji

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to clarify the immediate effects of a combined transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and stretching protocol. [Subjects] Fifteen healthy young males volunteered to participate in this study. The inclusion criterion was a straight leg raising range of motion of less than 70 degrees. [Methods] Subjects performed two protocols: 1) stretching (S group) of the medial hamstrings, and 2) tanscutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (100 Hz) with stretching (TS group). The TS group included a 20-minute electrical stimulation period followed by 10 minutes of stretching. The S group performed 10 minutes of stretching. Muscle hardness, pressure pain threshold, and straight leg raising range of motion were analyzed to evaluate the effects. The data were collected before transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (T1), before stretching (T2), immediately after stretching (T3), and 10 minutes after stretching (T4). [Results] Combined transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and stretching had significantly beneficial effects on muscle hardness, pressure pain threshold, and straight leg raising range of motion at T2, T3, and T4 compared with T1. [Conclusion] These results support the belief that transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation combined with stretching is effective in reducing pain and decreasing muscle hardness, thus increasing range of motion. PMID:27190439

  15. The combined effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and stretching on muscle hardness and pressure pain threshold.

    PubMed

    Karasuno, Hiroshi; Ogihara, Hisayoshi; Morishita, Katsuyuki; Yokoi, Yuka; Fujiwara, Takayuki; Ogoma, Yoshiro; Abe, Koji

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to clarify the immediate effects of a combined transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and stretching protocol. [Subjects] Fifteen healthy young males volunteered to participate in this study. The inclusion criterion was a straight leg raising range of motion of less than 70 degrees. [Methods] Subjects performed two protocols: 1) stretching (S group) of the medial hamstrings, and 2) tanscutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (100 Hz) with stretching (TS group). The TS group included a 20-minute electrical stimulation period followed by 10 minutes of stretching. The S group performed 10 minutes of stretching. Muscle hardness, pressure pain threshold, and straight leg raising range of motion were analyzed to evaluate the effects. The data were collected before transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (T1), before stretching (T2), immediately after stretching (T3), and 10 minutes after stretching (T4). [Results] Combined transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and stretching had significantly beneficial effects on muscle hardness, pressure pain threshold, and straight leg raising range of motion at T2, T3, and T4 compared with T1. [Conclusion] These results support the belief that transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation combined with stretching is effective in reducing pain and decreasing muscle hardness, thus increasing range of motion. PMID:27190439

  16. The combined effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and stretching on muscle hardness and pressure pain threshold.

    PubMed

    Karasuno, Hiroshi; Ogihara, Hisayoshi; Morishita, Katsuyuki; Yokoi, Yuka; Fujiwara, Takayuki; Ogoma, Yoshiro; Abe, Koji

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to clarify the immediate effects of a combined transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and stretching protocol. [Subjects] Fifteen healthy young males volunteered to participate in this study. The inclusion criterion was a straight leg raising range of motion of less than 70 degrees. [Methods] Subjects performed two protocols: 1) stretching (S group) of the medial hamstrings, and 2) tanscutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (100 Hz) with stretching (TS group). The TS group included a 20-minute electrical stimulation period followed by 10 minutes of stretching. The S group performed 10 minutes of stretching. Muscle hardness, pressure pain threshold, and straight leg raising range of motion were analyzed to evaluate the effects. The data were collected before transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (T1), before stretching (T2), immediately after stretching (T3), and 10 minutes after stretching (T4). [Results] Combined transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and stretching had significantly beneficial effects on muscle hardness, pressure pain threshold, and straight leg raising range of motion at T2, T3, and T4 compared with T1. [Conclusion] These results support the belief that transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation combined with stretching is effective in reducing pain and decreasing muscle hardness, thus increasing range of motion.

  17. Stimulation of artemisinin synthesis by combined cerebroside and nitric oxide elicitation in Artemisia annua hairy roots.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian Wen; Zheng, Li Ping; Zhang, Ben; Zou, Ting

    2009-11-01

    This work examined the accumulation of artemisinin and related secondary metabolism pathways in hairy root cultures of Artemisia annua L. induced by a fungal-derived cerebroside (2S,2'R,3R,3'E,4E,8E)-1-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-2-N-(2'-hydroxy-3'-octadecenoyl)-3-hydroxy-9-methyl-4,8-sphingadienine. The presence of the cerebroside induced nitric oxide (NO) burst and artemisinin biosynthesis in the hairy roots. The endogenous NO generation was examined to be involved in the cerebroside-induced biosynthesis of artemisinin by using NO inhibitors, N (omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester and 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide. The gene expression and activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase and 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase were stimulated by the cerebroside, but more strongly by the potentiation of NO. While the mevalonate pathway inhibitor, mevinolin, only partially inhibited the induced artemisinin accumulation, the plastidic 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate pathway inhibitor, fosmidomycin, nearly arrested artemisinin accumulation induced by cerebroside and the combination elicitation with an NO donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP). With the potentiation by SNP at 10 microM, the cerebroside elicitor stimulated artemisinin production in 20-day-old hairy root cultures up to 22.4 mg/l, a 2.3-fold increase over the control. These results suggest that cerebroside plays as a novel elicitor and the involvement of NO in the signaling pathway of the elicitor activity for artemisinin biosynthesis.

  18. Bioreactor for modulation of cardiac microtissue phenotype by combined static stretch and electrical stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Miklas, Jason W; Nunes, Sara S; Sofla, Aarash; Reis, Lewis A; Pahnke, Aric; Xiao, Yun; Laschinger, Carol; Radisic, Milica

    2014-01-01

    We describe here a bioreactor capable of simultaneously applying mechanical and electrical field stimulation in conjunction with static strain and on-line force of contraction measurements. It consisted of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) tissue chamber and a pneumatically driven stretch platform. The chamber contained eight tissue microwells (8.05 mm in length and 2.5 mm in width) with a pair of posts (2.78 mm in height and 0.8 mm in diameter) in each well to serve as fixation points and for measurements of contraction force. Carbon rods, stimulating electrodes, were placed into the PDMS chamber such that one pair stimulated four microwells. For feasibility studies, neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were seeded in collagen gels into the microwells. Following three days of gel compaction, electrical field stimulation at 3–4 V/cm and 1Hz, mechanical stimulation of 5% static strain or electromechanical stimulation (field stimulation at 3–4 V/cm, 1Hz and 5% static strain) were applied for 3 days. Cardiac microtissues subjected to electromechanical stimulation exhibited elevated amplitude of contraction and improved sarcomere structure as evidenced by sarcomeric α-actinin, actin and troponin T staining compared to microtissues subjected to electrical or mechanical stimulation alone or non-stimulated controls. The expression of atrial natriuretic factor and brain natriuretic peptide was also elevated in the electromechanically stimulated group. PMID:24876342

  19. Iron 'ElectriRx' man: Overground stepping in an exoskeleton combined with noninvasive spinal cord stimulation after paralysis.

    PubMed

    Gad, Parag N; Gerasimenko, Yury P; Zdunowski, Sharon; Sayenko, Dimitry; Haakana, Piia; Turner, Amanda; Lu, Daniel; Roy, Roland R; Edgerton, V Reggie

    2015-08-01

    We asked whether coordinated voluntary movement of the lower limbs could be regained in an individual having been completely paralyzed (>4 yr) and completely absent of vision (>15 yr) using a novel strategy - transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation at selected sites over the spinal vertebrae with just one week of training. We also asked whether this stimulation strategy could facilitate stepping assisted by an exoskeleton (EKSO, EKSO Bionics) that is designed so that the subject can voluntarily complement the work being performed by the exoskeleton. We found that spinal cord stimulation enhanced the level of effort that the subject could generate while stepping in the exoskeleton. In addition, stimulation improved the coordination patterns of the lower limb muscles resulting in a more continuous, smooth stepping motion in the exoskeleton. These stepping sessions in the presence of stimulation were accompanied by greater cardiac responses and sweating than could be attained without the stimulation. Based on the data from this case study it appears that there is considerable potential for positive synergistic effects after complete paralysis by combining the overground stepping in an exoskeleton, a novel transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation paradigm, and daily training.

  20. Iron 'ElectriRx' man: Overground stepping in an exoskeleton combined with noninvasive spinal cord stimulation after paralysis.

    PubMed

    Gad, Parag N; Gerasimenko, Yury P; Zdunowski, Sharon; Sayenko, Dimitry; Haakana, Piia; Turner, Amanda; Lu, Daniel; Roy, Roland R; Edgerton, V Reggie

    2015-08-01

    We asked whether coordinated voluntary movement of the lower limbs could be regained in an individual having been completely paralyzed (>4 yr) and completely absent of vision (>15 yr) using a novel strategy - transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation at selected sites over the spinal vertebrae with just one week of training. We also asked whether this stimulation strategy could facilitate stepping assisted by an exoskeleton (EKSO, EKSO Bionics) that is designed so that the subject can voluntarily complement the work being performed by the exoskeleton. We found that spinal cord stimulation enhanced the level of effort that the subject could generate while stepping in the exoskeleton. In addition, stimulation improved the coordination patterns of the lower limb muscles resulting in a more continuous, smooth stepping motion in the exoskeleton. These stepping sessions in the presence of stimulation were accompanied by greater cardiac responses and sweating than could be attained without the stimulation. Based on the data from this case study it appears that there is considerable potential for positive synergistic effects after complete paralysis by combining the overground stepping in an exoskeleton, a novel transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation paradigm, and daily training. PMID:26736463

  1. Combination of Eccentric Exercise and Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation to Improve Quadriceps Function Post-ACL Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lepley, Lindsey K.; Wojtys, Edward M.; Palmieri-Smith, Riann M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) has been shown to reduce quadriceps activation failure (QAF), and eccentric exercise has been shown lessen muscle atrophy post-ACL reconstruction. Given that these are two critical components of quadriceps strength, intervention combining these therapies may be effective at reinstituting quadriceps function post-anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness of a combined NMES and eccentric exercise intervention to improve the recovery of quadriceps activation and strength post-reconstruction. Design Parallel longitudinal design. Setting Laboratory. Participants Thirty-six individuals post-injury were placed into four treatment groups (N&E, NMES and eccentrics; E-only, eccentrics only; N-only, NMES-only; STND, standard of care) and ten healthy controls participated. Intervention N&E and N-only received the NMES protocol 2x per week for the first six weeks post-reconstruction. N&E and E-only received the eccentric exercise protocol 2x per week beginning six weeks post-reconstruction. Main outcome measure Quadriceps activation was assessed via the superimposed burst technique and quantified via the central activation ratio. Quadriceps strength was assessed via maximal voluntary isomeric contractions (Nm/kg). Data was gathered on three occasions: pre-operative, 12-weeks-post-surgery and at return-to-play. Results No differences in pre-operative measures existed (P>0.05). E-only recovered quadriceps activation better than N-only or STND (P<0.05). N&E and E-only recovered strength better than N-only or the STND (P<0.05) and had strength values that were similar to healthy individuals at return-to-play (P>0.05). Conclusion Eccentric exercise was capable of restoring levels of quadriceps activation and strength that were similar to those of healthy adults and better than NMES alone. PMID:25819154

  2. Combined effect of relativistic and ponderomotive filamentation on coexisting stimulated Raman and Brillouin scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, Ashish Singh, Ram Kishor; Sharma, R. P.

    2014-11-15

    This paper presents a model to study the interplay between the stimulated Raman (SRS) and Brillouin scattering (SBS) along with the combined effect of relativistic and ponderomotive nonlinearities, at relativistic laser power. As the intense non-uniform laser beam propagates through the plasma, both the non-linearities are operative and modify the plasma refractive index in such a manner that one enhances the self-focusing (of the pump beam) caused by the other non-linearity. The interplay between the scattering processes (SRS and SBS) affects the pump filamentation process because of pump depletion and at the same time these scattering processes get modified due to this filamentation process. An impact of the filamentation process and coexistence of the scattering processes (SRS and SBS) on the back-reflectivity of scattered beams (SRS and SBS) has been explored and found that the back-reflectivity gets modified significantly. Results are also compared with the three wave interaction case (isolated SRS or SBS case)

  3. Combining near-infrared spectroscopy with electroencephalography and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Näsi, Tiina; Kotilahti, Kalle; Mäki, Hanna; Nissilä, Ilkka; Meriläinen, Pekka

    2009-07-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the usability of a near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) device in multimodal measurements. We combined NIRS with electroencephalography (EEG) to record hemodynamic responses and evoked potentials simultaneously, and with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to investigate hemodynamic responses to repetitive TMS (rTMS). Hemodynamic responses and visual evoked potentials (VEPs) to 3, 6, and 12 s stimuli consisting of pattern-reversing checkerboards were successfully recorded in the NIRS/EEG measurement, and ipsi- and contralateral hemodynamic responses to 0.5, 1, and 2 Hz rTMS in the NIRS/TMS measurement. In the NIRS/EEG measurements, the amplitudes of the hemodynamic responses increased from 3- to 6-s stimulus, but not from 6- to 12-s stimulus, and the VEPs showed peaks N75, P100, and N135. In the NIRS/TMS measurements, the 2-Hz stimulus produced the strongest hemodynamic responses compared to the 0.5- and 1-Hz stimuli. In two subjects oxyhemoglobin concentration decreased and in one increased as a consequence of the 2-Hz rTMS. To locate the origin of the measured NIRS responses, methods have to be developed to investigate TMS-induced scalp muscle contractions. In the future, multimodal measurements may prove useful in monitoring or treating diseases such as stroke or Alzheimer's disease.

  4. Characterizing and Modulating Brain Circuitry through Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Combined with Electroencephalography

    PubMed Central

    Farzan, Faranak; Vernet, Marine; Shafi, Mouhsin M. D.; Rotenberg, Alexander; Daskalakis, Zafiris J.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2016-01-01

    The concurrent combination of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) with electroencephalography (TMS-EEG) is a powerful technology for characterizing and modulating brain networks across developmental, behavioral, and disease states. Given the global initiatives in mapping the human brain, recognition of the utility of this technique is growing across neuroscience disciplines. Importantly, TMS-EEG offers translational biomarkers that can be applied in health and disease, across the lifespan, and in humans and animals, bridging the gap between animal models and human studies. However, to utilize the full potential of TMS-EEG methodology, standardization of TMS-EEG study protocols is needed. In this article, we review the principles of TMS-EEG methodology, factors impacting TMS-EEG outcome measures, and the techniques for preventing and correcting artifacts in TMS-EEG data. To promote the standardization of this technique, we provide comprehensive guides for designing TMS-EEG studies and conducting TMS-EEG experiments. We conclude by reviewing the application of TMS-EEG in basic, cognitive and clinical neurosciences, and evaluate the potential of this emerging technology in brain research. PMID:27713691

  5. Assessing consciousness in coma and related states using transcranial magnetic stimulation combined with electroencephalography.

    PubMed

    Gosseries, O; Thibaut, A; Boly, M; Rosanova, M; Massimini, M; Laureys, S

    2014-02-01

    Thanks to advances in medical care, an increased number of patients recover from coma. However, some remain in vegetative/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome or in a minimally conscious state. Detection of awareness in severely brain-injured patients is challenging because it relies on behavioral assessments, which can be affected by motor, sensory and cognitive impairments of the patients. Other means of evaluation are needed to improve the accuracy of the diagnosis in this challenging population. We will here review the different altered states of consciousness occurring after severe brain damage, and explain the difficulties associated with behavioral assessment of consciousness. We will then describe a non-invasive technique, transcranial magnetic stimulation combined with high-density electroencephalography (TMS-EEG), which has allowed us to detect the presence or absence of consciousness in different physiological, pathological and pharmacological states. Some potential underlying mechanisms of the loss of consciousness will then be discussed. In conclusion, TMS-EEG is highly promising in identifying markers of consciousness at the individual level and might be of great value for clinicians in the assessment of consciousness. PMID:24393302

  6. Psychophysics, fitting, and signal processing for combined hearing aid and cochlear implant stimulation.

    PubMed

    Francart, Tom; McDermott, Hugh J

    2013-01-01

    The addition of acoustic stimulation to electric stimulation via a cochlear implant has been shown to be advantageous for speech perception in noise, sound quality, music perception, and sound source localization. However, the signal processing and fitting procedures of current cochlear implants and hearing aids were developed independently, precluding several potential advantages of bimodal stimulation, such as improved sound source localization and binaural unmasking of speech in noise. While there is a large and increasing population of implantees who use a hearing aid, there are currently no generally accepted fitting methods for this configuration. It is not practical to fit current commercial devices to achieve optimal binaural loudness balance or optimal binaural cue transmission for arbitrary signals and levels. There are several promising experimental signal processing systems specifically designed for bimodal stimulation. In this article, basic psychophysical studies with electric acoustic stimulation are reviewed, along with the current state of the art in fitting, and experimental signal processing techniques for electric acoustic stimulation.

  7. Inhibition of bladder overactivity by duloxetine in combination with foot stimulation or WAY-100635 treatment in cats.

    PubMed

    Schwen, Zeyad; Matsuta, Yosuke; Shen, Bing; Wang, Jicheng; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2013-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether duloxetine [a serotonin (5-HT)-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor] combined with transcutaneous foot stimulation or WAY-100635 (a 5-HT1A antagonist) can enhance inhibition of bladder overactivity in cats. Cystometrograms were performed on eight cats under α-chloralose anesthesia by infusing saline and then 0.25% acetic acid (AA) to induce bladder overactivity. To inhibit bladder overactivity, foot stimulation (5 Hz) was applied via transcutaneous pad electrodes to the right hindfoot at two and four times the threshold intensity for inducing a toe twitch. Duloxetine (0.003-3 mg/kg) was administered intravenously to determine the effect of combination treatment. After the 3 mg/kg dose of duloxetine, WAY-100635 (0.5 mg/kg) was given intravenously. AA irritation significantly (P < 0.0001) reduced bladder capacity to 42.7 ± 7.4% of the saline control capacity. Foot stimulation alone at both two and four times the threshold intensity significantly (P < 0.0001) inhibited bladder overactivity and increased bladder capacity to 66.7 ± 6.3% and 85.7 ± 6.5% of the saline control, respectively. Duloxetine alone dose dependently inhibited bladder overactivity and completely restored bladder capacity to the saline control (109 ± 15.5%) at 3 mg/kg. Although duloxetine combined with foot stimulation did not further enhance inhibition, WAY-100635 (0.5 mg/kg) given after 3 mg/kg duloxetine further increased (P = 0.008) bladder capacity to 162.2 ± 22.5% of the saline control. Although duloxetine and foot stimulation independently inhibited bladder overactivity, combined treatment did not enhance inhibition. Duloxetine combined with WAY-100635, however, synergistically enhanced bladder inhibition, indicating a potential novel treatment for overactive bladder if duloxetine is combined with a 5-HT1A receptor antagonist drug. PMID:24154699

  8. The Combined Use of Hypnosis and Sensory and Motor Stimulation in Assisting Children with Developmental Learning Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jampolsky, Gerald G.

    Hypnosis was combined with sensory and motor stimulation to remediate reversal problems in five children (6 1/2- 9-years-old). Under hypnosis Ss were given the suggestion that they learn their numbers through feel and then given 1 hour of structured instruction daily for 10 days. Instruction stressed conditioning, vibratory memory, touch memory,…

  9. Ultrafiltered pig leukocyte extract (IMUNOR) decreases nitric oxide formation and hematopoiesis-stimulating cytokine production in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Michal; Vacek, Antonín; Lojek, Antonín; Holá, Jirina; Streitová, Denisa

    2007-10-01

    A low-molecular-weight (<12 kDa) ultrafiltered pig leukocyte extract, IMUNOR, was tested in experiments in vitro on non-stimulated and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated murine RAW 264.7 macrophages in order to assess modulation of nitric oxide (NO) production (measured indirectly as the concentration of nitrites), hematopoiesis-stimulating activity of the supernatant of the macrophage cells (ascertained by counting cell colonies growing from progenitor cells for granulocytes and macrophages (GM-CFC) in vitro), and the release of hematopoiesis-stimulating cytokines. No hematopoiesis-stimulating activity and cytokine or NO production were found in the supernatant of non-stimulated macrophages. It was found that IMUNOR does not influence this status. Supernatant of LPS-stimulated macrophages was characterized by hematopoiesis-stimulating activity, as well as by the presence of nitrites, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). A key role in the hematopoiesis-stimulating activity of the supernatant of LPS-stimulated macrophages could be ascribed to G-CSF since the formation of the colonies could be abrogated nearly completely by monoclonal antibodies against G-CSF. IMUNOR was found to suppress all the mentioned manifestations of the LPS-activated macrophages. When considering these results together with those from our previous in vivo study revealing stimulatory effects of IMUNOR on radiation-suppressed hematopoiesis, a hypothesis may be formulated which postulates a homeostatic role of IMUNOR, consisting in stimulation of impaired immune and hematopoietic systems but also in cutting back the production of proinflammatory mediators in cases of overstimulation which threats with undesirable consequences.

  10. Combined sub-threshold dosages of phenobarbital and low-frequency stimulation effectively reduce seizures in amygdala-kindled rats.

    PubMed

    Asgari, Azam; Semnanian, Saeed; Atapour, Nafiseh; Shojaei, Amir; Moradi, Homeira; Mirnajafi-Zadeh, Javad

    2014-08-01

    Low-frequency stimulation (LFS) is a potential therapy utilized in patients who do not achieve satisfactory control of seizures with pharmacological treatments. Here, we investigated the interaction between anticonvulsant effects of LFS and phenobarbital (a commonly used medicine) on amygdala-kindled seizures in rats. Animals were kindled by electrical stimulation of basolateral amygdala in a rapid manner (12 stimulations/day). Fully kindled animals randomly received one of the three treatment choices: phenobarbital (1, 2, 3, 4 and 8 mg/kg; i.p.; 30 min before kindling stimulation), LFS (one or 4 packages contained 100 or 200 monophasic square wave pulses, 0.1-ms pulse duration at 1 Hz, immediately before kindling stimulation) or a combination of both (phenobarbital at 3 mg/kg and LFS). Phenobarbital alone at the doses of 1, 2 and 3 mg/kg had no significant effect on the main seizure parameters. LFS application always produced anticonvulsant effects unless applied with the pattern of one package of 100 pulses, which is considered as non-effective. All the seizure parameters were significantly reduced when phenobarbital (3 mg/kg) was administered prior to the application of the non-effective pattern of LFS. Phenobarbital (3 mg/kg) also increased the anticonvulsant actions of the effective LFS pattern. Our results provide an evidence of a positive cumulative anticonvulsant effect of LFS and phenobarbital, suggesting a potential combination therapy at sub-threshold dosages of phenobarbital and LFS to achieve a satisfactory clinical effect.

  11. Detection of dead regions in the cochlea: relevance for combined electric and acoustic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Moore, Brian C J; Glasberg, Brian; Schlueter, Anne

    2010-01-01

    A dead region is a region in the cochlea where the inner hair cells and/or the auditory neurones are functioning very poorly, if at all. People who are being considered for a combination of a cochlear implant and a hearing aid typically have a dead region in the parts of the cochlea that normally respond to medium and high frequencies, but have some functional hearing at lower frequencies. For such people, it may be useful to determine the edge frequency, f(e), of any dead region. This may be relevant to choosing the most appropriate insertion depth of the electrode array, and to the way that frequencies in the input signal are mapped to acoustic and electric stimulation. It may also be helpful in interpreting the results of research studies. This paper reviews methods for diagnosing dead regions and defining the value of f(e). It is argued that the value of f(e) cannot be determined reliably from the audiogram, although a dead region is likely to be present at a given frequency when the hearing loss at that frequency is 70 dB or more. When a sinusoidal signal is reported as sounding highly distorted or noise-like, a dead region may be present at the signal frequency, but again this is not a reliable indicator. The TEN test is a simple clinical method for diagnosis of dead regions. Where this test gives a positive diagnosis, it is recommended that psychophysical tuning curves be measured to define the value of f(e) more precisely. PMID:19955720

  12. Effects of combining mental practice with electromyogram-triggered electrical stimulation for stroke patients with unilateral neglect

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji-Su; Choi, Jong-Bae; Kim, Won-Jin; Jung, Nam-Hae; Chang, Moonyoung

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of mental practice combined with electromyogram-triggered electrical stimulation on neglect and activities of daily living in stroke patients with unilateral neglect. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-three stroke patients with unilateral neglect were recruited from a local university hospital, and were divided into two groups. The experimental group received an intervention consisting of mental practice combined with electromyogram-triggered electrical stimulation on the neglected side, while the control group received cyclic electrical stimulation at the same site. In addition, both groups received an identical intervention of conventional occupational and physical therapy. [Results] After the intervention, the experimental group showed a statistically significant improvement in the line bisection test result, star cancellation test result, and Catherine Bergego Scale scores. The control group showed a significant improvement only in the line bisection test result. [Conclusion] These data suggest that mental practice combined with electromyogram-triggered electrical stimulation is an effective, novel treatment for reducing unilateral neglect in stroke patients. PMID:26696725

  13. Effects of combining mental practice with electromyogram-triggered electrical stimulation for stroke patients with unilateral neglect.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji-Su; Choi, Jong-Bae; Kim, Won-Jin; Jung, Nam-Hae; Chang, Moonyoung

    2015-11-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of mental practice combined with electromyogram-triggered electrical stimulation on neglect and activities of daily living in stroke patients with unilateral neglect. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-three stroke patients with unilateral neglect were recruited from a local university hospital, and were divided into two groups. The experimental group received an intervention consisting of mental practice combined with electromyogram-triggered electrical stimulation on the neglected side, while the control group received cyclic electrical stimulation at the same site. In addition, both groups received an identical intervention of conventional occupational and physical therapy. [Results] After the intervention, the experimental group showed a statistically significant improvement in the line bisection test result, star cancellation test result, and Catherine Bergego Scale scores. The control group showed a significant improvement only in the line bisection test result. [Conclusion] These data suggest that mental practice combined with electromyogram-triggered electrical stimulation is an effective, novel treatment for reducing unilateral neglect in stroke patients.

  14. Effects of electrode geometry and combination on nerve fibre selectivity in spinal cord stimulation.

    PubMed

    Holsheimer, J; Struijk, J J; Tas, N R

    1995-09-01

    The differential effects of the geometry of a rostrocaudal array of electrode contacts on dorsal column fibre and dorsal root fibre activation in spinal cord stimulation are analysed theoretically. 3-D models of the mid-cervical and mid-thoracic vertebral areas are used for the computation of stimulation induced field potentials, whereas a cable model of myelinated nerve fibre is used for the calculation of the excitation thresholds of large dorsal column and dorsal root fibres. The size and spacing of 2-D rectangular electrode contacts are varied while mono-, bi- and tripolar stimulation are applied. The model predicts that the highest preferential stimulation of dorsal root fibres is obtained in monopolar stimulation with a large cathode, whereas dorsal column fibre preference is highest in tripolar stimulation with small contacts and small contact spacings. Fibre type preference is most sensitive to variations of rostrocaudal contact size and least sensitive to variations of lateral contact size. Dorsal root fibre preference is increased and sensitivity to lead geometry is reduced as the distance from contacts to spinal cord is increased.

  15. Psychophysics, fitting, and signal processing for combined hearing aid and cochlear implant stimulation.

    PubMed

    Francart, Tom; McDermott, Hugh J

    2013-01-01

    The addition of acoustic stimulation to electric stimulation via a cochlear implant has been shown to be advantageous for speech perception in noise, sound quality, music perception, and sound source localization. However, the signal processing and fitting procedures of current cochlear implants and hearing aids were developed independently, precluding several potential advantages of bimodal stimulation, such as improved sound source localization and binaural unmasking of speech in noise. While there is a large and increasing population of implantees who use a hearing aid, there are currently no generally accepted fitting methods for this configuration. It is not practical to fit current commercial devices to achieve optimal binaural loudness balance or optimal binaural cue transmission for arbitrary signals and levels. There are several promising experimental signal processing systems specifically designed for bimodal stimulation. In this article, basic psychophysical studies with electric acoustic stimulation are reviewed, along with the current state of the art in fitting, and experimental signal processing techniques for electric acoustic stimulation. PMID:24165299

  16. Effects of withholding feed on thyrotropin-releasing hormone stimulation test results and effects of combined testing on oral sugar test and thyrotropin-releasing hormone stimulation test results in horses.

    PubMed

    Restifo, Melissa M; Frank, Nicholas; Hermida, Pilar; Sanchez-Londoño, Alfredo

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess effects of withholding feed on thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) stimulation test results used in diagnosis of pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction in horses and determine effects of combined testing on results of the TRH stimulation test and the oral sugar test (OST) used in diagnosis of equine metabolic syndrome. ANIMALS 30 adult horses. PROCEDURES All horses underwent TRH stimulation tests under fed and nonfed conditions, an OST alone, and an OST combined with TRH stimulation testing. For TRH stimulation tests, plasma ACTH concentrations were measured before (baseline) and 10 minutes after (poststimulation) IV TRH administration. For the OST, plasma glucose and insulin concentrations were measured before (baseline) and 60 and 90 minutes after oral corn syrup administration. For combined testing, the TRH stimulation test was initiated immediately after 60-minute posttreatment sample collection for the OST. Results were compared among methods by Wilcoxon matched-pairs, signed rank tests, paired t tests, and Bland-Altman analysis. RESULTS Feeding conditions did not affect median ACTH concentrations when TRH stimulation tests were performed alone. Median baseline ACTH concentration did not differ between TRH stimulation tests performed alone (under fed or nonfed conditions) and those combined with OSTs. Median poststimulation ACTH concentration was significantly lower for combined tests than for solitary TRH stimulation tests. Mean 60-minute plasma glucose concentration was significantly lower for solitary OSTs than for combined tests, but this difference could not be attributed to TRH administration. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Combined testing in the manner described impacted ACTH concentrations during TRH stimulation tests and is not recommended at this time. PMID:27347827

  17. G-CSF Stimulates Jak2-Dependent Gab2 Phosphorylation Leading to Erk1/2 Activation and Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lin; Xue, Jia; Zadorozny, Eva V.; Robinson, Lisa J.

    2009-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), the major cytokine regulator of neutrophilic granulopoiesis, stimulates both the proliferation and differentiation of myeloid precursors. A variety of signaling proteins have been identified as mediators of G-CSF signaling, but understanding of their specific interactions and organization into signaling pathways for particular cellular effects is incomplete. The present study examined the role of the scaffolding protein Grb2-associated binding protein-2 (Gab2) in G-CSF signaling. We found that a chemical inhibitor of Janus kinases inhibited G-CSF-stimulated Gab2 phosphorylation. Transfection with Jak2 antisense and dominant negative constructs also inhibited Gab2 phosphorylation in response to G-CSF. In addition, G-CSF enhanced the association of Jak2 with Gab2. In vitro, activated Jak2 directly phosphorylated specific Gab2 tyrosine residues. Mutagenesis studies revealed that Gab2 tyrosine 643 (Y643) was a major target of Jak2 in vitro, and a key residue for Jak2-dependent phosphorylation in intact cells. Mutation of Gab2 Y643 inhibited G-CSF-stimulated Erk1/2 activation and Shp2 binding to Gab2. Loss of Y643 also inhibited Gab2-mediated G-CSF-stimulated cell proliferation. Together, these results identify a novel signaling pathway involving Jak2-dependent Gab2 phosphorylation leading to Erk1/2 activation and cell proliferation in response to G-CSF. PMID:18644434

  18. Human macrophage colony-stimulating factor induces macrophage colonies after L-phenylalanine methylester treatment of human marrow.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, C S; Evans, C; Shadduck, R K

    1990-11-01

    Macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) has well-known effects on murine bone marrow, but its colony stimulating activity for human bone marrow is controversial. After treatment of human bone marrow with L-phenylalanine methylester (PME), macrophage-colonies (CFU-M) were induced by M-CSF in a dose-dependent fashion. The optimal concentration of recombinant human-macrophage colony stimulating factor (rhM-CSF) was 1,000 U/mL. Purified human urine M-CSF had colony stimulating activity similar to rhM-CSF. Further studies were performed to determine the factors responsible for the enhanced CFU-M formation from PME treated marrow. Compared with nylon wool and carbonyl iron monocyte depletion methods, PME eliminated significantly more monocytes and myeloid cells. This observation suggested that these cells may release hematopoietic inhibitory factors for CFU-M. Low concentrations (1%) but not normal (10%) concentrations of blood monocytes were inhibitory (mean inhibition, 48%) to CFU-M. High concentrations of monocytes (50%) augmented CFU-M colonies. HL-60 conditioned media was used to simulate secretory products of early myeloid cells. HL-60 conditioned media (1%) inhibited CFU-M formation but not granulocyte macrophage or granulocyte colonies. We conclude that M-CSF has colony stimulating activity for human marrow that can be recognized after removal of inhibitory cells by PME treatment. PMID:2224128

  19. Hybrid Neuroprosthesis for the Upper Limb: Combining Brain-Controlled Neuromuscular Stimulation with a Multi-Joint Arm Exoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Florian; Walter, Armin; Spüler, Martin; Naros, Georgios; Rosenstiel, Wolfgang; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Brain-machine interface-controlled (BMI) neurofeedback training aims to modulate cortical physiology and is applied during neurorehabilitation to increase the responsiveness of the brain to subsequent physiotherapy. In a parallel line of research, robotic exoskeletons are used in goal-oriented rehabilitation exercises for patients with severe motor impairment to extend their range of motion (ROM) and the intensity of training. Furthermore, neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) is applied in neurologically impaired patients to restore muscle strength by closing the sensorimotor loop. In this proof-of-principle study, we explored an integrated approach for providing assistance as needed to amplify the task-related ROM and the movement-related brain modulation during rehabilitation exercises of severely impaired patients. For this purpose, we combined these three approaches (BMI, NMES, and exoskeleton) in an integrated neuroprosthesis and studied the feasibility of this device in seven severely affected chronic stroke patients who performed wrist flexion and extension exercises while receiving feedback via a virtual environment. They were assisted by a gravity-compensating, seven degree-of-freedom exoskeleton which was attached to the paretic arm. NMES was applied to the wrist extensor and flexor muscles during the exercises and was controlled by a hybrid BMI based on both sensorimotor cortical desynchronization (ERD) and electromyography (EMG) activity. The stimulation intensity was individualized for each targeted muscle and remained subthreshold, i.e., induced no overt support. The hybrid BMI controlled the stimulation significantly better than the offline analyzed ERD (p = 0.028) or EMG (p = 0.021) modality alone. Neuromuscular stimulation could be well integrated into the exoskeleton-based training and amplified both the task-related ROM (p = 0.009) and the movement-related brain modulation (p = 0.019). Combining a hybrid BMI with neuromuscular stimulation

  20. Hybrid Neuroprosthesis for the Upper Limb: Combining Brain-Controlled Neuromuscular Stimulation with a Multi-Joint Arm Exoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Florian; Walter, Armin; Spüler, Martin; Naros, Georgios; Rosenstiel, Wolfgang; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Brain-machine interface-controlled (BMI) neurofeedback training aims to modulate cortical physiology and is applied during neurorehabilitation to increase the responsiveness of the brain to subsequent physiotherapy. In a parallel line of research, robotic exoskeletons are used in goal-oriented rehabilitation exercises for patients with severe motor impairment to extend their range of motion (ROM) and the intensity of training. Furthermore, neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) is applied in neurologically impaired patients to restore muscle strength by closing the sensorimotor loop. In this proof-of-principle study, we explored an integrated approach for providing assistance as needed to amplify the task-related ROM and the movement-related brain modulation during rehabilitation exercises of severely impaired patients. For this purpose, we combined these three approaches (BMI, NMES, and exoskeleton) in an integrated neuroprosthesis and studied the feasibility of this device in seven severely affected chronic stroke patients who performed wrist flexion and extension exercises while receiving feedback via a virtual environment. They were assisted by a gravity-compensating, seven degree-of-freedom exoskeleton which was attached to the paretic arm. NMES was applied to the wrist extensor and flexor muscles during the exercises and was controlled by a hybrid BMI based on both sensorimotor cortical desynchronization (ERD) and electromyography (EMG) activity. The stimulation intensity was individualized for each targeted muscle and remained subthreshold, i.e., induced no overt support. The hybrid BMI controlled the stimulation significantly better than the offline analyzed ERD (p = 0.028) or EMG (p = 0.021) modality alone. Neuromuscular stimulation could be well integrated into the exoskeleton-based training and amplified both the task-related ROM (p = 0.009) and the movement-related brain modulation (p = 0.019). Combining a hybrid BMI with neuromuscular stimulation

  1. Hybrid Neuroprosthesis for the Upper Limb: Combining Brain-Controlled Neuromuscular Stimulation with a Multi-Joint Arm Exoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Florian; Walter, Armin; Spüler, Martin; Naros, Georgios; Rosenstiel, Wolfgang; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Brain-machine interface-controlled (BMI) neurofeedback training aims to modulate cortical physiology and is applied during neurorehabilitation to increase the responsiveness of the brain to subsequent physiotherapy. In a parallel line of research, robotic exoskeletons are used in goal-oriented rehabilitation exercises for patients with severe motor impairment to extend their range of motion (ROM) and the intensity of training. Furthermore, neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) is applied in neurologically impaired patients to restore muscle strength by closing the sensorimotor loop. In this proof-of-principle study, we explored an integrated approach for providing assistance as needed to amplify the task-related ROM and the movement-related brain modulation during rehabilitation exercises of severely impaired patients. For this purpose, we combined these three approaches (BMI, NMES, and exoskeleton) in an integrated neuroprosthesis and studied the feasibility of this device in seven severely affected chronic stroke patients who performed wrist flexion and extension exercises while receiving feedback via a virtual environment. They were assisted by a gravity-compensating, seven degree-of-freedom exoskeleton which was attached to the paretic arm. NMES was applied to the wrist extensor and flexor muscles during the exercises and was controlled by a hybrid BMI based on both sensorimotor cortical desynchronization (ERD) and electromyography (EMG) activity. The stimulation intensity was individualized for each targeted muscle and remained subthreshold, i.e., induced no overt support. The hybrid BMI controlled the stimulation significantly better than the offline analyzed ERD (p = 0.028) or EMG (p = 0.021) modality alone. Neuromuscular stimulation could be well integrated into the exoskeleton-based training and amplified both the task-related ROM (p = 0.009) and the movement-related brain modulation (p = 0.019). Combining a hybrid BMI with neuromuscular stimulation

  2. Increased proliferation and differentiation of pre-osteoblasts MC3T3-E1 cells on nanostructured polypyrrole membrane under combined electrical and mechanical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lizhen; Li, Ping; Zhou, Gang; Wang, Menghang; Jia, Xiaoling; Liu, Meili; Niu, Xufeng; Song, Wei; Liu, Haifeng; Fan, Yubo

    2013-09-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy), as an electrical conductive polymer, has been widely investigated in biomedical fields. In this study, PPy membrane at nanoscale was electrically deposited on indium-tin oxide glass slide with sodium p-toluenesulfonate as supporting electrolyte. Electropolymerization of PPy was performed under a constant 800 mV voltage for 10 seconds. Chemical compositions and morphology were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that the nanoscaled PPy particles distributed uniformly and the average diameter of PPy particles was 62 nm. Since bone cells can respond to both electrical and mechanical stimulation in vivo, pre-osteoblasts MC3T3-E1 cells were cultured ort nanostructured PPy membrane under the combined electrical and mechanical stimulation. The nano-PPy membrane was conducive to transferring uniform electrical stimulation and applying steady mechanical stimulation. It is suggested that the combined stimulation did not affect cells morphologies significantly. However, cell proliferation tested by MTT, alkaline phosphatase activities, and gene expression of Collagen-I indicated that combined stimulation can enhance the proliferation and differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells more efficiently than single electrical stimulation or single mechanical stimulation. The combined stimulation through a nano-PPy membrane may provide a highly potential stimulated method in bone tissue engineering.

  3. Combined use of transcranial magnetic stimulation and metal electrode implants: a theoretical assessment of safety considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golestanirad, Laleh; Rouhani, Hossein; Elahi, Behzad; Shahim, Kamal; Chen, Robert; Mosig, Juan R.; Pollo, Claudio; Graham, Simon J.

    2012-12-01

    This paper provides a theoretical assessment of the safety considerations encountered in the simultaneous use of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and neurological interventions involving implanted metallic electrodes, such as electrocorticography. Metal implants are subject to magnetic forces due to fast alternating magnetic fields produced by the TMS coil. The question of whether the mechanical movement of the implants leads to irreversible damage of brain tissue is addressed by an electromagnetic simulation which quantifies the magnitude of imposed magnetic forces. The assessment is followed by a careful mechanical analysis determining the maximum tolerable force which does not cause irreversible tissue damage. Results of this investigation provide useful information on the range of TMS stimulator output powers which can be safely used in patients having metallic implants. It is shown that conventional TMS applications can be considered safe when applied on patients with typical electrode implants as the induced stress in the brain tissue remains well below the limit of tissue damage.

  4. Colony-stimulating factors for the management of neutropenia in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Dale, David C

    2002-01-01

    Neutropenia and its subsequent infectious complications represent the most common dose-limiting toxicity of cancer chemotherapy. Febrile neutropenia (FN) occurs with common chemotherapy regimens in 25 to 40% of treatment-naive patients, and its severity depends on the dose intensity of the chemotherapy regimen, the patient's prior history of either radiation therapy or use of cytotoxic treatment, and comorbidities. The occurrence of FN often causes subsequent chemotherapy delays or dose reductions. It may also lengthen hospital stay, increase monitoring, diagnostic and treatment costs, and reduce patient quality of life. A decade after their introduction, colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) such as granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) are now an integral part of the prevention of potentially life-threatening FN; however, only G-CSF has US Food and Drug Administration approval for use in chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. These adjunctive agents accelerate formation of neutrophils from committed progenitors, thereby reducing the duration and severity of neutropenia. Important uses of CSFs in oncology are prevention of FN after chemotherapy, treatment of febrile neutropenic episodes and support following bone marrow transplantation, and collection of CSF-mobilised peripheral blood progenitor cells. G-CSF is used more frequently than GM-CSF for all of these indications because of fewer associated adverse effects. Clinical trials to date have not demonstrated a significant effect on overall survival or disease-free survival, which is most likely to be due to small sample size and lack of power to prove effect. However, they have demonstrated clinical utility in allowing the delivery of planned chemotherapy dose on schedule, an important clinical goal especially in curative tumour settings. The high cost of these agents limits their widespread use. Current American Society of Clinical Oncology

  5. Effects of combining 2 weeks of passive sensory stimulation with active hand motor training in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Ladda, Aija Marie; Pfannmoeller, Joerg Peter; Kalisch, Tobias; Roschka, Sybille; Platz, Thomas; Dinse, Hubert R; Lotze, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The gold standard to acquire motor skills is through intensive training and practicing. Recent studies have demonstrated that behavioral gains can also be acquired by mere exposure to repetitive sensory stimulation to drive the plasticity processes. Single application of repetitive electric stimulation (rES) of the fingers has been shown to improve tactile perception in young adults as well as sensorimotor performance in healthy elderly individuals. The combination of repetitive motor training with a preceding rES has not been reported yet. In addition, the impact of such a training on somatosensory tactile and spatial sensitivity as well as on somatosensory cortical activation remains elusive. Therefore, we tested 15 right-handed participants who underwent repetitive electric stimulation of all finger tips of the left hand for 20 minutes prior to one hour of motor training of the left hand over the period of two weeks. Overall, participants substantially improved the motor performance of the left trained hand by 34%, but also showed a relevant transfer to the untrained right hand by 24%. Baseline ipsilateral activation fMRI-magnitude in BA 1 to sensory index finger stimulation predicted training outcome for somatosensory guided movements: those who showed higher ipsilateral activation were those who did profit less from training. Improvement of spatial tactile discrimination was positively associated with gains in pinch grip velocity. Overall, a combination of priming rES and repetitive motor training is capable to induce motor and somatosensory performance increase and representation changes in BA1 in healthy young subjects. PMID:24416229

  6. [Combined use of an antihypoxic agent and a B-cell stimulator].

    PubMed

    Nezhinskaia, G I; Nazarov, P G; Petrova, N N; Sapronov, N S

    2003-01-01

    Evaluation of the effect of poviargol on the B cells of mice showed that the drug activity is retained for 21 h upon single injection. An analysis of the refractory period between the B-cell stimulant introduction and the administration of various antihypoxants showed that the most effective treatment is provided by poviargol injection 14 days before and antihypoxant (IEM-1875 preparation) 30 min before the hypoxia model induction. This regime, ensuring the best protection of experimental animals from hypoxia, can be of great importance and value in the prophylaxis of hypoxia in various pathological conditions. PMID:14743710

  7. Acid and reduction stimulated logic "and"-type combinational release mode achieved in DOX-loaded superparamagnetic nanogel.

    PubMed

    Song, Meifang; Xue, Yanan; Chen, Lidi; Xia, Xiaoyang; Zhou, Yang; Liu, Lei; Yu, Bo; Long, Sihui; Huang, Shiwen; Yu, Faquan

    2016-08-01

    A superparamagnetic nanogel featured with a logic "and"-type pH/reduction combinational stimulated release mode was fabricated as a drug delivery system by virtue of parallel crosslinking. The disulfide bond and electrostatic interaction between thiolated alginate (SA-SH) and thiolated/aminated iron oxide nanoparticles (SH-MION-NH2) were employed to achieve the mechanism. The obtained DOX-loaded magnetic nanogel is 122.7±20.3nm in size with superparamagnetism. The combinational conditions of pH5.0/10mM glutathione (GSH) stimulated a significantly high accumulative release. However, either pH7.4/10mM (GSH) or pH5.0 alone induced much low release. This verified the typical logic "and"-type combinationally stimulated release mode. In vitro cytotoxicity tests clearly illustrated the effective selectivity of killing the human cervical cancer cells (HeLa) with IC50 of 1.01μg/mL and the human hepatoma cells (HepG2) with IC50 of 1.57μg/mL but significantly low cytotoxicity to the cercopithecus aethiops kidney cells (Vero). CLSM presented the internationalization of the nanogel into cytoplasm and nuclei with time. In vivo investigation revealed that the selective intratumoral accumulation and antitumor efficacy were considerably advantageous over free DOX whereas low systemic toxicity exhibited up-regulated security as compared to free DOX. Overall, the DOX-loaded magnetic nanogel with enhanced antitumor efficacy and down-regulated adverse effect was a promising nanoplatform for the clinical chemotherapy of malignancy. PMID:27157762

  8. Vestibular contributions to a right-hemisphere network for bodily awareness: combining galvanic vestibular stimulation and the "Rubber Hand Illusion".

    PubMed

    Ferrè, Elisa Raffaella; Berlot, Eva; Haggard, Patrick

    2015-03-01

    An altered sense of one's own body is a common consequence of vestibular damage, and also of damage to vestibular networks in the right hemisphere. However, few experimental studies have investigated whether vestibular signals contribute to bodily awareness. We addressed this issue by combining an established experimental model of bodily awareness (Rubber Hand Illusion -RHI) with galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) in healthy participants. Brief left anodal and right cathodal GVS (which predominantly activates vestibular networks in the right hemisphere), or right anodal and left cathodal GVS, or sham stimulation were delivered at random, while participants experienced either synchronous or asynchronous visuo-tactile stimulation of a rubber hand and their own hand. The drift in the perceived position of the participant's hand towards the rubber hand was used as a proxy measure of the resulting multisensory illusion of body ownership. GVS induced strong polarity-dependent effects on this measure of RHI: left anodal and right cathodal GVS produced significantly lower proprioceptive drift than right anodal and left cathodal GVS. We suggest that vestibular inputs influence the multisensory weighting functions that underlie bodily awareness: the right hemisphere vestibular projections activated by the left anodal and right cathodal GVS increased the weight of intrinsic proprioceptive signals about hand position, and decreased the weight of visual information responsible for visual capture during the RHI.

  9. Combination therapy with monoamine oxidase inhibitors and other antidepressants or stimulants: strategies for the management of treatment-resistant depression.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Samantha J; Shin, Mirae; McInnis, Melvin G; Bostwick, Jolene R

    2015-04-01

    Treatment-resistant depression (TRD) is a major health concern. More than 40% of patients treated for major depressive disorder with an appropriate antidepressant dose for an adequate duration fail to respond. Further, approximately half of adults with major depressive disorder fail to achieve sustained remission despite various medication trials. The utilization of monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) for the treatment of depression in clinical practice today is low due to their widely known adverse effects, some of which may be life threatening, and the risk for dietary and drug interactions. For these reasons, MAOIs are not recommended to be prescribed along with other antidepressants or certain prescription or nonprescription drugs. Pharmacologic options are limited for individuals with TRD, however, and there is a paucity of data on the efficacy of MAOIs in combination with other antidepressants for the management of TRD. We performed a search of the PubMed database (inception through January 25, 2015) to identify cases that illustrate the potential utility, as well as risks, of combination treatment with MAOIs and other antidepressants for the management of TRD; 18 articles met the criteria for our search. In addition, we performed a retrospective case series by reviewing the medical records of 29 adults treated for depression with an MAOI plus another psychotropic agent (an antidepressant or stimulant medication) between 2003 and 2012 at a large Midwestern teaching hospital. We compared the findings of the published experience with our local experience to allow for more informed decisions regarding pharmacotherapy in patients with TRD. We separated the local experience into two groups: 15 cases with the selective MAO type B inhibitor selegiline combined with medications presumed to increase the risk of serotonin syndrome and 14 cases with nonselective MAOIs (phenelzine and tranylcypromine) combined with other contraindicated medications. Although risks of

  10. Combination therapy with monoamine oxidase inhibitors and other antidepressants or stimulants: strategies for the management of treatment-resistant depression.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Samantha J; Shin, Mirae; McInnis, Melvin G; Bostwick, Jolene R

    2015-04-01

    Treatment-resistant depression (TRD) is a major health concern. More than 40% of patients treated for major depressive disorder with an appropriate antidepressant dose for an adequate duration fail to respond. Further, approximately half of adults with major depressive disorder fail to achieve sustained remission despite various medication trials. The utilization of monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) for the treatment of depression in clinical practice today is low due to their widely known adverse effects, some of which may be life threatening, and the risk for dietary and drug interactions. For these reasons, MAOIs are not recommended to be prescribed along with other antidepressants or certain prescription or nonprescription drugs. Pharmacologic options are limited for individuals with TRD, however, and there is a paucity of data on the efficacy of MAOIs in combination with other antidepressants for the management of TRD. We performed a search of the PubMed database (inception through January 25, 2015) to identify cases that illustrate the potential utility, as well as risks, of combination treatment with MAOIs and other antidepressants for the management of TRD; 18 articles met the criteria for our search. In addition, we performed a retrospective case series by reviewing the medical records of 29 adults treated for depression with an MAOI plus another psychotropic agent (an antidepressant or stimulant medication) between 2003 and 2012 at a large Midwestern teaching hospital. We compared the findings of the published experience with our local experience to allow for more informed decisions regarding pharmacotherapy in patients with TRD. We separated the local experience into two groups: 15 cases with the selective MAO type B inhibitor selegiline combined with medications presumed to increase the risk of serotonin syndrome and 14 cases with nonselective MAOIs (phenelzine and tranylcypromine) combined with other contraindicated medications. Although risks of

  11. Alpha interferon combined with ribavirin potentiates proliferative suppression but not cytokine production in mitogenically stimulated human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Shiffman, M L; Verbeke, S B; Kimball, P M

    2000-11-01

    The improved clinical outcome observed among patients with hepatitis C treated with the combination of alpha interferon (IFN) and ribavirin (RBV) is presumed to result from immunomodulation and viral inhibition. However, the impact of the drug combination upon lymphocyte activity is unknown. The present study evaluated the effects of IFN and RBV, singly and in combination, upon proliferation, cell cycle sensitivity and cytokine elaboration following PHA stimulation of lymphocytes. Two formulations of IFN, interferon-a-2b (IFN-2b) and interferon-a-con-1 (CIFN), were included. Titration of each drug over a wide range of concentrations showed dose dependent proliferative suppression without cytotoxicity. Proliferation was suppressed 57-99% (P<0.001) by IFN-2b (10(5)-10(7) IU/ml), 41-74% (P<0.001) by CIFN (1.5-150 ng/ml), and 10-94% (P<0.001) by RBV (0.5-50 microg/ml). Isobologram analysis showed that the interaction between IFN-2b and RBV on proliferative suppression was additive. In contrast, the interaction between CIFN and RBV was weakly antagonistic. Proliferative suppression by both the IFNs was cell cycle restricted. IFN-2b and CIFN added at the onset of PHA stimulation (G0/G1) versus 24 h later (S phase) inhibited proliferation by 50 versus 5%, respectively (P<0.05). The onset of IFN resistance correlated with a 50% reduction (P<0.05) in IFN receptors on the cell surface. In contrast, RBV caused equivalent proliferative suppression (P=NS) when added at any time during PHA activation. Cytokine secretion after 24 h of PHA stimulation showed that IFN-2b versus CIFN increased the secretion of IL2, TNF and gamma IFN by 4.5-, 4.1- and 8.3-fold (P<0.005) versus 1-, 1.9- and 1.9-fold (P<0.05), respectively, above control levels. Neither IFN affected IL10 secretion. RBV, singly and in combination with IFN, had no impact on cytokine expression (P=NS). This study identifies several potential mechanisms by which the combination of IFN and RBV may exert a more potent effect

  12. Combination of immune stimulating adjuvants with poly(lactide-co-glycolide) microspheres enhances the immune response of vaccines.

    PubMed

    Salvador, Aiala; Igartua, Manoli; Hernández, Rosa M; Pedraz, José Luis

    2012-01-11

    The development of vaccines that generate mixed humoral and cellular immune responses is a challenge in vaccinology. Poly(lactide-co-glycolide) microspheres are vaccine adjuvants which possess the advantage of allowing the coencapsulation of other adjuvants in addition to the antigen. Thus, we can stimulate the immune system from different ways and resemble the effects of a natural infection. In this study, we have coencapsulated BSA with monophosphoryl lipid A, polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid, α-galactosylceramide and alginate into PLGA microspheres. All the microspheres have developed a higher humoral immune response, in terms of release of total IgG, in comparison to the administration of soluble antigen. In addition, they triggered a more balanced IgG1/IgG2a response. The combination of MPLA and α-galactosylceramide within the microspheres developed the higher cellular response, confirming that combination of adjuvants with different action mechanisms is a good strategy to increase vaccines' immunogenicity.

  13. Rejection of metastatic 4T1 breast cancer by attenuation of Treg cells in combination with immune stimulation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Huang, Tian-Gui; Meseck, Marcia; Mandeli, John; Fallon, John; Woo, Savio L C

    2007-12-01

    4T1 breast carcinoma is a highly malignant and poorly immunogenic murine tumor model that resembles advanced breast cancer in humans, and is refractory to most immune stimulation-based treatments. We hypothesize that the ineffectiveness of immune stimulatory treatment is mediated by the suppressive effects of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells, which can be attenuated by engaging the glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor family-related protein with its natural ligand (GITRL); further, combination treatment with existing immune stimulation regimens will augment anti-tumor immunity and eradicate metastatic 4T1 tumors in mice.A soluble homodimeric form of mouse GITRL (mIg-mGITRLs) was molecularly constructed and used to treat orthotopic 4T1 tumors established in immune-competent, syngeneic Balb/c mice. When applied in combination with adenovirus-mediated intratumoral murine granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-12 (IL-12) gene delivery plus systemic 4-1BB activation, mIg-mGITRLs attenuated the immune-suppressive function of splenic Treg cells, which led to elevated interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) production, tumor-specific cytolytic T-cell activities, tumor rejection and long-term survival in 65% of the animals without apparent toxicities. The results demonstrate that addition of mIg-mGITRLs to an immune-stimulatory treatment regimen significantly improved long-term survival without apparent toxicity, and could potentially be clinically translated into an effective and safe treatment modality for metastatic breast cancer in patients. PMID:17968355

  14. Combining Robotic Training and Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation in Severe Upper Limb-Impaired Chronic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Capone, Fioravante; Di Pino, Giovanni; Pellegrino, Giovanni; Florio, Lucia; Zollo, Loredana; Simonetti, Davide; Ranieri, Federico; Brunelli, Nicoletta; Corbetto, Marzia; Miccinilli, Sandra; Bravi, Marco; Milighetti, Stefano; Guglielmelli, Eugenio; Sterzi, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies suggested that both robot-assisted rehabilitation and non-invasive brain stimulation can produce a slight improvement in severe chronic stroke patients. It is still unknown whether their combination can produce synergistic and more consistent improvements. Safety and efficacy of this combination has been assessed within a proof-of-principle, double-blinded, semi-randomized, sham-controlled trial. Inhibitory continuous Theta Burst Stimulation (cTBS) was delivered on the affected hemisphere, in order to improve the response to the following robot-assisted therapy via a homeostatic increase of learning capacity. Twenty severe upper limb-impaired chronic stroke patients were randomized to robot-assisted therapy associated with real or sham cTBS, delivered for 10 working days. Eight real and nine sham patients completed the study. Change in Fugl-Meyer was chosen as primary outcome, while changes in several quantitative indicators of motor performance extracted by the robot as secondary outcomes. The treatment was well-tolerated by the patients and there were no adverse events. All patients achieved a small, but significant, Fugl-Meyer improvement (about 5%). The difference between the real and the sham cTBS groups was not significant. Among several secondary end points, only the Success Rate (percentage of targets reached by the patient) improved more in the real than in the sham cTBS group. This study shows that a short intensive robot-assisted rehabilitation produces a slight improvement in severe upper-limb impaired, even years after the stroke. The association with homeostatic metaplasticity-promoting non-invasive brain stimulation does not augment the clinical gain in patients with severe stroke. PMID:27013950

  15. Modulating the Behaviors of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Via the Combination of High-Frequency Vibratory Stimulations and Fibrous Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Zhixiang; Duncan, Randall L.

    2013-01-01

    We are interested in the in vitro engineering of artificial vocal fold tissues via the strategic combination of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), physiologically relevant mechanical stimulations, and biomimetic artificial matrices. We have constructed a vocal fold bioreactor that is capable of imposing vibratory stimulations on the cultured cells at human phonation frequencies. Separately, fibrous poly (ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds emulating the ligamentous structure of the vocal fold were prepared by electrospinning, were incorporated in the vocal fold bioreactor, and were driven into a wave-like motion in an axisymmetrical fashion by the oscillating air. MSC-laden PCL scaffolds were subjected to vibrations at 200 Hz with a normal center displacement of ∼40 μm for a total of 7 days. A continuous (CT) or a 1 h-on-1 h-off (OF) regime with a total dynamic culture time of 12 h per day was applied. The dynamic loading did not cause any physiological trauma to the cells. Immunohistotochemical staining revealed the reinforcement of the actin filament and the enhancement of α5β1 integrin expression under selected dynamic culture conditions. Cellular expression of essential vocal fold extracellular matrix components, such as elastin, hyaluronic acid, and matrix metalloproteinase-1, was significantly elevated as compared with the static controls, and the OF regime is more conducive to matrix production than the CT vibration mode. Analyses of genes of typical fibroblast hallmarks (tenascin-C, collagen III, and procollagen I) as well as markers for MSC differentiation into nonfibroblastic lineages confirmed MSCs' adaptation of fibroblastic behaviors. Overall, the high-frequency vibratory stimulation, when combined with a synthetic fibrous scaffold, serves as a potent modulator of MSC functions. The novel bioreactor system presented here, as a versatile, yet well-controlled model, offers an in vitro platform for understanding vibration

  16. A proof-of-concept study on the combination of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and relaxation techniques in chronic tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Kreuzer, Peter M; Poeppl, Timm B; Bulla, Jan; Schlee, Winfried; Lehner, Astrid; Langguth, Berthold; Schecklmann, Martin

    2016-10-01

    Interference of ongoing neuronal activity and brain stimulation motivated this study to combine repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and relaxation techniques in tinnitus patients. Forty-two patients were enrolled in this one-arm proof-of-concept study to receive ten sessions of rTMS applied to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and temporo-parietal cortex. During stimulation, patients listened to five different kinds of relaxation audios. Variables of interest were tinnitus questionnaires, tinnitus numeric rating scales, depressivity, and quality of life. Results were compared to results of historical control groups having received the same rTMS protocol (active control) and sham treatment (placebo) without relaxation techniques. Thirty-eight patients completed the treatment, drop-out rates and adverse events were low. Responder rates (reduction in tinnitus questionnaire (TQ) score ≥5 points 10 weeks after treatment) were 44.7 % in the study, 27.8 % in the active control group, and 21.7 % in the placebo group, differing between groups on a near significant level. For the tinnitus handicap inventory (THI), the main effect of group was not significant. However, linear mixed model analyses showed that the relaxation/rTMS group differed significantly from the active control group showing steeper negative THI trend for the relaxation/rTMS group indicating better amelioration over the course of the trial. Deepness of relaxation during rTMS and selection of active relaxation vs. passive listening to music predicted larger TQ. All remaining secondary outcomes turned out non-significant. This combined treatment proved to be a safe, feasible and promising approach to enhance rTMS treatment effects in chronic tinnitus. PMID:27315823

  17. Development of a loudness normalisation strategy for combined cochlear implant and acoustic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Francart, Tom; McDermott, Hugh J

    2012-12-01

    Users of a cochlear implant together with a hearing aid in the non-implanted ear currently use devices that were developed separately and are often fitted separately. This results in very different growth of loudness with level in the two ears, potentially leading to decreased wearing comfort and suboptimal perception of interaural level differences. A loudness equalisation strategy, named 'SCORE bimodal', is proposed. It equalises loudness growth for the two modalities using existing models of loudness for acoustic and electric stimulation, and is suitable for implementation in wearable devices. Loudness balancing experiments were performed with six bimodal listeners to validate the strategy. In a first set of experiments, the function of each loudness model used was validated by balancing the loudness of four harmonic complexes of different bandwidths, ranging from 200 Hz to 1000 Hz, separately for each ear. Both the electric and acoustic loudness models predicted the data well. In a second set of experiments, binaural balancing was done for the same stimuli. It was found that SCORE significantly improved binaural balance.

  18. Anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of a combination of cannabidiol and moringin in LPS-stimulated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Thangavelu Soundara; Giacoppo, Sabrina; Iori, Renato; De Nicola, Gina Rosalinda; Grassi, Gianpaolo; Pollastro, Federica; Bramanti, Placido; Mazzon, Emanuela

    2016-07-01

    Inflammatory response plays an important role in the activation and progress of many debilitating diseases. Natural products, like cannabidiol, a constituent of Cannabis sativa, and moringin, an isothiocyanate obtained from myrosinase-mediated hydrolysis of the glucosinolate precursor glucomoringin present in Moringa oleifera seeds, are well known antioxidants also endowed with anti-inflammatory activity. This is due to a covalent-based mechanism for ITC, while non-covalent interactions underlie the activity of CBD. Since these two mechanisms are distinct, and the molecular endpoints are potentially complementary, we investigated in a comparative way the protective effect of these compounds alone or in combination on lipopolysaccharide-stimulated murine macrophages. Our results show that the cannabidiol (5μM) and moringin (5μM) combination outperformed the single constituents that, at this dosage had only a moderate efficacy on inflammatory (Tumor necrosis factor-α, Interleukin-10) and oxidative markers (inducible nitric oxide synthase, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2, nitrotyrosine). Significant upregulation of Bcl-2 and downregulation of Bax and cleaved caspase-3 was observed in cells treated with cannabidiol-moringin combination. Treatment with the transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor 1 antagonist was detrimental for the efficacy of cannabidiol, while no effect was elicited by cannabinoid receptor 1 and cannabinoid receptor 2 antagonists. None of these receptors was involved in the activity of moringin. Taken together, our in vitro results testify the anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, and anti-apoptotic effects of the combination of cannabidiol and moringin. PMID:27215129

  19. Nerve Conduction Block Using Combined Thermoelectric Cooling and High Frequency Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, D. Michael; Foldes, Emily L.; Bhadra, Niloy; Kilgore, Kevin L.

    2010-01-01

    Conduction block of peripheral nerves is an important technique for many basic and applied neurophysiology studies. To date, there has not been a technique which provides a quickly initiated and reversible “on-demand” conduction block which is both sustainable for long periods of time and does not generate activity in the nerve at the onset of the conduction block. In this study we evaluated the feasibility of a combined method of nerve block which utilizes two well established nerve blocking techniques in a rat and cat model: nerve cooling and electrical block using high frequency alternating currents (HFAC). This combined method effectively makes use of the contrasting features of both nerve cooling and electrical block using HFAC. The conduction block was initiated using nerve cooling, a technique which does not produce nerve “onset response” firing, a prohibitive drawback of HFAC electrical block. The conduction block was then readily transitioned into an electrical block. A long-term electrical block is likely preferential to a long-term nerve cooling block because nerve cooling block generates large amounts of exhaust heat, does not allow for fiber diameter selectivity and is known to be unsafe for prolonged delivery. PMID:20705099

  20. Nerve conduction block using combined thermoelectric cooling and high frequency electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, D Michael; Foldes, Emily L; Bhadra, Niloy; Kilgore, Kevin L

    2010-10-30

    Conduction block of peripheral nerves is an important technique for many basic and applied neurophysiology studies. To date, there has not been a technique which provides a quickly initiated and reversible "on-demand" conduction block which is both sustainable for long periods of time and does not generate activity in the nerve at the onset of the conduction block. In this study we evaluated the feasibility of a combined method of nerve block which utilizes two well established nerve blocking techniques in a rat and cat model: nerve cooling and electrical block using high frequency alternating currents (HFAC). This combined method effectively makes use of the contrasting features of both nerve cooling and electrical block using HFAC. The conduction block was initiated using nerve cooling, a technique which does not produce nerve "onset response" firing, a prohibitive drawback of HFAC electrical block. The conduction block was then readily transitioned into an electrical block. A long-term electrical block is likely preferential to a long-term nerve cooling block because nerve cooling block generates large amounts of exhaust heat, does not allow for fiber diameter selectivity and is known to be unsafe for prolonged delivery.

  1. Enhancement of reverse transfection efficiency by combining stimulated DNA surface desorption and electroporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creasey, Rhiannon; Hook, Andrew; Thissen, Helmut; Voelcker, Nicolas H.

    2007-12-01

    Transfection cell microarrays (TCMs) are a high-throughput, miniaturised cell-culture system utilising reverse transfection, in which cells are seeded onto a DNA array resulting in localised regions of transfected cells. TCMs are useful for the analysis of gene expression, and can be used to identify genes involved in many cellular processes. This is of significant interest in fields such as tissue engineering, diagnostic screening, and drug testing [1, 2]. Low transfection efficiency has so far limited the application and utility of this technique. Recently, the transfection efficiency of TCMs was improved by an application of a high voltage for a short period of time to the DNA array resulting in the electroporation of cells attached to the surface [3, 4]. Furthermore, application of a low voltage for a longer period of time to the DNA array was shown to improve the transfection efficiency by stimulating the desorption of attached DNA, increasing the concentration of DNA available for cellular uptake [5]. In the present study, the optimisation of the uptake of adsorbed DNA vectors by adherent cells, utilising a voltage bias without compromising cell viability was investigated. This was achieved by depositing negatively charged DNA plasmids onto a positively charged allylamine plasma polymer (ALAPP) layer deposited on highly doped p-type silicon wafers either using a pipettor or a microarray contact printer. Surface-dependant human embryonic kidney (HEK 293 line) cells were cultured onto the DNA vector loaded ALAPP spots and the plasmid transfection events were detected by fluorescence microscopy. Cell viability assays, including fluorescein diacetate (FDA) / Hoechst DNA labelling, were carried out to determine the number of live adherent cells before and after application of a voltage. A protocol was developed to screen for voltage biases and exposure times in order to optimise transfection efficiency and cell viability. Cross-contamination between the microarray

  2. Combining functional neuroimaging with off-line brain stimulation: modulation of task-related activity in language areas.

    PubMed

    Andoh, Jamila; Paus, Tomás

    2011-02-01

    Repetitive TMS (rTMS) provides a noninvasive tool for modulating neural activity in the human brain. In healthy participants, rTMS applied over the language-related areas in the left hemisphere, including the left posterior temporal area of Wernicke (LTMP) and inferior frontal area of Broca, have been shown to affect performance on word recognition tasks. To investigate the neural substrate of these behavioral effects, off-line rTMS was combined with fMRI acquired during the performance of a word recognition task. Twenty right-handed healthy men underwent fMRI scans before and after a session of 10-Hz rTMS applied outside the magnetic resonance scanner. Functional magnetic resonance images were acquired during the performance of a word recognition task that used English or foreign-language words. rTMS was applied over the LTMP in one group of 10 participants (LTMP group), whereas the homologue region in the right hemisphere was stimulated in another group of 10 participants (RTMP group). Changes in task-related fMRI response (English minus foreign languages) and task performances (response time and accuracy) were measured in both groups and compared between pre-rTMS and post-rTMS. Our results showed that rTMS increased task-related fMRI response in the homologue areas contralateral to the stimulated sites. We also found an effect of rTMS on response time for the LTMP group only. These findings provide insights into changes in neural activity in cortical regions connected to the stimulated site and are consistent with a hypothesis raised in a previous review about the role of the homologue areas in the contralateral hemisphere for preserving behavior after neural interference.

  3. Combined Shuttle-Box Training with Electrophysiological Cortex Recording and Stimulation as a Tool to Study Perception and Learning.

    PubMed

    Happel, Max F K; Deliano, Matthias; Ohl, Frank W

    2015-10-22

    Shuttle-box avoidance learning is a well-established method in behavioral neuroscience and experimental setups were traditionally custom-made; the necessary equipment is now available by several commercial companies. This protocol provides a detailed description of a two-way shuttle-box avoidance learning paradigm in rodents (here Mongolian gerbils; Meriones unguiculatus) in combination with site-specific electrical intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) and simultaneous chronical electrophysiological in vivo recordings. The detailed protocol is applicable to study multiple aspects of learning behavior and perception in different rodent species. Site-specific ICMS of auditory cortical circuits as conditioned stimuli here is used as a tool to test the perceptual relevance of specific afferent, efferent and intracortical connections. Distinct activation patterns can be evoked by using different stimulation electrode arrays for local, layer-dependent ICMS or distant ICMS sites. Utilizing behavioral signal detection analysis it can be determined which stimulation strategy is most effective for eliciting a behaviorally detectable and salient signal. Further, parallel multichannel-recordings using different electrode designs (surface electrodes, depth electrodes, etc.) allow for investigating neuronal observables over the time course of such learning processes. It will be discussed how changes of the behavioral design can increase the cognitive complexity (e.g. detection, discrimination, reversal learning).

  4. Analyses of chondrogenic induction of adipose mesenchymal stem cells by combined co-stimulation mediated by adenoviral gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) have the potential to differentiate into cartilage under stimulation with some reported growth and transcriptional factors, which may constitute an alternative for cartilage replacement approaches. In this study, we analyzed the in vitro chondrogenesis of ASCs transduced with adenoviral vectors encoding insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-β1), fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), and sex-determining region Y-box 9 (SOX9) either alone or in combinations. Methods Aggregate cultures of characterized ovine ASCs were transduced with 100 multiplicity of infections of Ad.IGF-1, Ad.TGF-β1, Ad.FGF-2, and Ad.SOX9 alone or in combination. These were harvested at various time points for detection of cartilage-specific genes expression by quantitative real-time PCR or after 14 and 28 days for histologic and biochemical analyses detecting proteoglycans, collagens (II, I and X), and total sulfated glycosaminoglycan and collagen content, respectively. Results Expression analyses showed that co-expression of IGF-1 and FGF-2 resulted in higher significant expression levels of aggrecan, biglycan, cartilage matrix, proteoglycan, and collagen II (all P ≤0.001 at 28 days). Aggregates co-transduced with Ad.IGF-1/Ad.FGF-2 showed a selective expression of proteoglycans and collagen II, with limited expression of collagens I and × demonstrated by histological analyses, and had significantly greater glycosaminoglycan and collagen production than the positive control (P ≤0.001). Western blot analyses for this combination also demonstrated increased expression of collagen II, while expression of collagens I and × was undetectable and limited, respectively. Conclusion Combined overexpression of IGF-1/FGF-2 within ASCs enhances their chondrogenic differentiation inducing the expression of chondrogenic markers, suggesting that this combination is more beneficial than the other factors tested for the

  5. Combining optogenetic stimulation and fMRI to validate a multivariate dynamical systems model for estimating causal brain interactions

    PubMed Central

    Ryali, Srikanth; Ian Shih, Yen-Yu; Chen, Tianwen; Kochalka, John; Albaugh, Daniel; Fang, Zhongnan; Supekar, Kaustubh; Lee, Jin Hyung; Menon, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    State-space multivariate dynamical systems (MDS) (Ryali et al., 2011) and other causal estimation models are being increasingly used to identify directed functional interactions between brain regions. However, the validity and accuracy of such methods is poorly understood. Performance evaluation based on computer simulations of small artificial causal networks can address this problem to some extent, but they often involve simplifying assumptions that reduce biological validity of the resulting data. Here, we use a novel approach taking advantage of recently developed optogenetic fMRI (ofMRI) techniques to selectively stimulate brain regions while simultaneously recording high-resolution whole-brain fMRI data. ofMRI allows for a more direct investigation of causal influences from the stimulated site to brain regions activated downstream and is therefore ideal for evaluating causal estimation methods in vivo. We used ofMRI to investigate whether MDS models for fMRI can accurately estimate causal functional interactions between brain regions. Two cohorts of ofMRI data were acquired, one at Stanford University and the University of California Los Angeles (Cohort 1) and the other at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill (Cohort 2). In each cohort optical stimulation was delivered to the right primary motor cortex (M1). General linear model analysis revealed prominent downstream thalamic activation in Cohort 1, and caudate-putamen (CPu) activation in Cohort 2. MDS accurately estimated causal interactions from M1 to thalamus and from M1 to CPu in Cohort 1 and Cohort 2, respectively. As predicted, no causal influences were found in the reverse direction. Additional control analyses demonstrated the specificity of causal interactions between stimulated and target sites. Our findings suggest that MDS state-space models can accurately and reliably estimate causal interactions in ofMRI data and further validate their use for estimating causal interactions in fMRI. More

  6. Continuous theta-burst stimulation combined with occupational therapy for upper limb hemiparesis after stroke: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Naoki; Kakuda, Wataru; Kondo, Takahiro; Shimizu, Masato; Sageshima, Masashi; Mitani, Sugao; Abo, Masahiro

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the safety, feasibility and efficacy of continuous theta-burst stimulation (cTBS) combined with intensive occupational therapy (OT) for upper limb hemiparesis after stroke. Ten patients with history of stroke and upper limb hemiparesis (age 62.0 ± 11.1 years, time since stroke 95.7 ± 70.2 months, mean ± SD) were studied. Each patient received 13 sessions, each comprising 160 s of cTBS applied to the skull on the area of the non-lesional hemisphere (using a 70-mm figure-8 coil, three pulse bursts at 50 Hz, repeated every 200 ms, i.e., 5 Hz, with total stimulation of 2,400 pulses), followed by intensive OT (comprising 120-min one-to-one training and 120-min self-training) during 15-day hospitalization. The motor function of the affected upper limb was evaluated by Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) and Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT) on the days of admission and discharge. All patients completed the 15-day protocol without any adverse effects. Treatment significantly increased the FMA score (from 46.6 ± 8.7 to 51.6 ± 8.2 points, p < 0.01) and shortened the log performance time of WMFT (from 2.5 ± 1.1 to 2.2 ± 1.2 s, p < 0.01). The 15-day protocol of cTBS combined with intensive OT is a safe and potentially useful therapeutic modality for upper limb hemiparesis after stroke.

  7. The Gottingen Minipig Is a Model of the Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome: G-Colony Stimulating Factor Stimulates Hematopoiesis and Enhances Survival From Lethal Total-Body γ-Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Moroni, Maria; Ngudiankama, Barbara F.; Christensen, Christine; Olsen, Cara H.; Owens, Rossitsa; Lombardini, Eric D.; Holt, Rebecca K.; Whitnall, Mark H.

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: We are characterizing the Gottingen minipig as an additional large animal model for advanced drug testing for the acute radiation syndrome (ARS) to enhance the discovery and development of novel radiation countermeasures. Among the advantages provided by this model, the similarities to human hematologic parameters and dynamics of cell loss/recovery after irradiation provide a convenient means to compare the efficacy of drugs known to affect bone marrow cellularity and hematopoiesis. Methods and Materials: Male Gottingen minipigs, 4 to 5 months old and weighing 9 to 11 kg, were used for this study. We tested the standard off-label treatment for ARS, rhG-CSF (Neupogen, 10 μg/kg/day for 17 days), at the estimated LD70/30 total-body γ-irradiation (TBI) radiation dose for the hematopoietic syndrome, starting 24 hours after irradiation. Results: The results indicated that granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) enhanced survival, stimulated recovery from neutropenia, and induced mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells. In addition, the administration of G-CSF resulted in maturation of monocytes/macrophages. Conclusions: These results support continuing efforts toward validation of the minipig as a large animal model for advanced testing of radiation countermeasures and characterization of the pathophysiology of ARS, and they suggest that the efficacy of G-CSF in improving survival after total body irradiation may involve mechanisms other than increasing the numbers of circulating granulocytes.

  8. Lactoferrin Combined with Retinoic Acid Stimulates B1 Cells to Express IgA Isotype and Gut-homing Molecules.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seong-Ho; Jin, Bo-Ra; Kim, Hyeon-Jin; Seo, Goo-Young; Jang, Young-Saeng; Kim, Sun-Jin; An, Sun-Jin; Park, Seok-Rae; Kim, Woan-Sub; Kim, Pyeung-Hyeun

    2015-02-01

    It is well established that TGF-β1 and retinoic acid (RA) cause IgA isotype switching in mice. We recently found that lactoferrin (LF) also has an activity of IgA isotype switching in spleen B cells. The present study explored the effect of LF on the Ig production by mouse peritoneal B cells. LF, like TGF-β1, substantially increased IgA production in peritoneal B1 cells but little in peritoneal B2 cells. In contrast, LF increased IgG2b production in peritoneal B2 cells much more strongly than in peritoneal B1 cells. LF in combination with RA further enhanced the IgA production and, interestingly, this enhancement was restricted to IgA isotype and B1 cells. Similarly, the combination of the two molecules also led to expression of gut homing molecules α4β7 and CCR9 on peritoneal B1 cells, but not on peritoneal B2 cells. Thus, these results indicate that LF and RA can contribute to gut IgA response through stimulating IgA isotype switching and expression of gut-homing molecules in peritoneal B1 cells.

  9. Combining brain stimulation and video game to promote long-term transfer of learning and cognitive enhancement.

    PubMed

    Looi, Chung Yen; Duta, Mihaela; Brem, Anna-Katharine; Huber, Stefan; Nuerk, Hans-Christoph; Cohen Kadosh, Roi

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive training offers the potential for individualised learning, prevention of cognitive decline, and rehabilitation. However, key research challenges include ecological validity (training design), transfer of learning and long-term effects. Given that cognitive training and neuromodulation affect neuroplasticity, their combination could promote greater, synergistic effects. We investigated whether combining transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) with cognitive training could further enhance cognitive performance compared to training alone, and promote transfer within a short period of time. Healthy adults received real or sham tDCS over their dorsolateral prefrontal cortices during two 30-minute mathematics training sessions involving body movements. To examine the role of training, an active control group received tDCS during a non-mathematical task. Those who received real tDCS performed significantly better in the game than the sham group, and showed transfer effects to working memory, a related but non-numerical cognitive domain. This transfer effect was absent in active and sham control groups. Furthermore, training gains were more pronounced amongst those with lower baseline cognitive abilities, suggesting the potential for reducing cognitive inequalities. All effects associated with real tDCS remained 2 months post-training. Our study demonstrates the potential benefit of this approach for long-term enhancement of human learning and cognition. PMID:26902664

  10. Combining brain stimulation and video game to promote long-term transfer of learning and cognitive enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Looi, Chung Yen; Duta, Mihaela; Brem, Anna-Katharine; Huber, Stefan; Nuerk, Hans-Christoph; Cohen Kadosh, Roi

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive training offers the potential for individualised learning, prevention of cognitive decline, and rehabilitation. However, key research challenges include ecological validity (training design), transfer of learning and long-term effects. Given that cognitive training and neuromodulation affect neuroplasticity, their combination could promote greater, synergistic effects. We investigated whether combining transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) with cognitive training could further enhance cognitive performance compared to training alone, and promote transfer within a short period of time. Healthy adults received real or sham tDCS over their dorsolateral prefrontal cortices during two 30-minute mathematics training sessions involving body movements. To examine the role of training, an active control group received tDCS during a non-mathematical task. Those who received real tDCS performed significantly better in the game than the sham group, and showed transfer effects to working memory, a related but non-numerical cognitive domain. This transfer effect was absent in active and sham control groups. Furthermore, training gains were more pronounced amongst those with lower baseline cognitive abilities, suggesting the potential for reducing cognitive inequalities. All effects associated with real tDCS remained 2 months post-training. Our study demonstrates the potential benefit of this approach for long-term enhancement of human learning and cognition. PMID:26902664

  11. Growth of human hemopoietic colonies in response to recombinant gibbon interleukin 3: comparison with human recombinant granulocyte and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    SciTech Connect

    Messner, H.A.; Yamasaki, K.; Jamal, N.; Minden, M.M.; Yang, Y.C.; Wong, G.G.; Clark, S.C.

    1987-10-01

    Supernatants of COS-1 cells transfected with gibbon cDNA encoding interleukin 3 (IL-3) with homology to sequences for human IL-3 were tested for ability to promote growth of various human hemopoietic progenitors. The effect of these supernatants as a source of recombinant IL-3 was compared to that of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) as well as to that of medium conditioned by phytohemagglutinin-stimulated leukocytes. The frequency of multilineage colonies, erythroid bursts, and megakaryocyte colonies in cultures containing the COS-1 cell supernatant was equivalent to the frequency observed in the controls and significantly higher than found in cultures plated with recombinant GM-CSF. G-CSF did not support the formation of multilineage colonies, erythroid bursts, and megakaryocyte colonies. In contrast, growth of granulocyte-macrophage colonies was best supported with GM-CSF, while recombinant IL-3 yielded colonies at lower or at best equivalent frequency. The simultaneous addition of higher concentrations of GM-CSF to cultures containing IL-3 in optimal amounts did not enhance the formation of multilineage colonies, erythroid bursts, and megakaryocyte colonies. However, the frequency of such colonies and bursts increased with GM-CSF when cultures were plated with suboptimal concentrations of IL-3. Growth of colonies within the granulocyte-macrophage lineage is optimally supported by GM-CSF and does not increase with further addition of IL-3.

  12. Spinal electro-magnetic stimulation combined with transgene delivery of neurotrophin NT-3 and exercise: novel combination therapy for spinal contusion injury.

    PubMed

    Petrosyan, Hayk A; Alessi, Valentina; Hunanyan, Arsen S; Sisto, Sue A; Arvanian, Victor L

    2015-11-01

    Our recent terminal experiments revealed that administration of a single train of repetitive spinal electromagnetic stimulation (sEMS; 35 min) enhanced synaptic plasticity in spinal circuitry following lateral hemisection spinal cord injury. In the current study, we have examined effects of repetitive sEMS applied as a single train and chronically (5 wk, every other day) following thoracic T10 contusion. Chronic studies involved examination of systematic sEMS administration alone and combined with exercise training and transgene delivery of neurotrophin [adeno-associated virus 10-neurotrophin 3 (AAV10-NT3)]. Electrophysiological intracellular/extracellular recordings, immunohistochemistry, behavioral testing, and anatomical tracing were performed to assess effects of treatments. We found that administration of a single sEMS train induced transient facilitation of transmission through preserved lateral white matter to motoneurons and hindlimb muscles in chronically contused rats with effects lasting for at least 2 h. These physiological changes associated with increased immunoreactivity of GluR1 and GluR2/3 glutamate receptors in lumbar neurons. Systematic administration of sEMS alone for 5 wk, however, was unable to induce cumulative improvements of transmission in spinomuscular circuitry or improve impaired motor function following thoracic contusion. Encouragingly, chronic administration of sEMS, followed by exercise training (running in an exercise ball and swimming), induced the following: 1) sustained strengthening of transmission to lumbar motoneurons and hindlimb muscles, 2) better retrograde transport of anatomical tracer, and 3) improved locomotor function. Greatest improvements were seen in the group that received exercise combined with sEMS and AAV-NT3. PMID:26424579

  13. Spinal electro-magnetic stimulation combined with transgene delivery of neurotrophin NT-3 and exercise: novel combination therapy for spinal contusion injury.

    PubMed

    Petrosyan, Hayk A; Alessi, Valentina; Hunanyan, Arsen S; Sisto, Sue A; Arvanian, Victor L

    2015-11-01

    Our recent terminal experiments revealed that administration of a single train of repetitive spinal electromagnetic stimulation (sEMS; 35 min) enhanced synaptic plasticity in spinal circuitry following lateral hemisection spinal cord injury. In the current study, we have examined effects of repetitive sEMS applied as a single train and chronically (5 wk, every other day) following thoracic T10 contusion. Chronic studies involved examination of systematic sEMS administration alone and combined with exercise training and transgene delivery of neurotrophin [adeno-associated virus 10-neurotrophin 3 (AAV10-NT3)]. Electrophysiological intracellular/extracellular recordings, immunohistochemistry, behavioral testing, and anatomical tracing were performed to assess effects of treatments. We found that administration of a single sEMS train induced transient facilitation of transmission through preserved lateral white matter to motoneurons and hindlimb muscles in chronically contused rats with effects lasting for at least 2 h. These physiological changes associated with increased immunoreactivity of GluR1 and GluR2/3 glutamate receptors in lumbar neurons. Systematic administration of sEMS alone for 5 wk, however, was unable to induce cumulative improvements of transmission in spinomuscular circuitry or improve impaired motor function following thoracic contusion. Encouragingly, chronic administration of sEMS, followed by exercise training (running in an exercise ball and swimming), induced the following: 1) sustained strengthening of transmission to lumbar motoneurons and hindlimb muscles, 2) better retrograde transport of anatomical tracer, and 3) improved locomotor function. Greatest improvements were seen in the group that received exercise combined with sEMS and AAV-NT3.

  14. Long-term results of a clinical trial comparing isolated vaginal stimulation with combined treatment for women with stress incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Fürst, Maria Cláudia Bicudo; de Mendonça, Rafaela Rosalba; Rodrigues, Alexandre Oliveira; de Matos, Leandro Luongo; Pompeo, Antônio Carlos Lima; Bezerra, Carlos Alberto

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To determine the efficacy of stress urinary incontinence treatments adding pelvic floor muscle training to vaginal electrical stimulation. Methods Forty-eight women with stress urinary incontinence were randomized into 2 groups: 24 underwent isolated vaginal electrical stimulation, and 24 vaginal electrical stimulation plus pelvic floor muscle training. History, physical examination, voiding diary, perineum strength test, and urodynamic study were assessed. Comparisons were made for adherence to treatment, muscle strength improvement, urinary symptoms, and degree of satisfaction immediately, 12 and 96 months after treatment. Results Patients' degree of satisfaction on vaginal electrical stimulation, and on vaginal electrical stimulation plus pelvic floor muscle training immediately, 12 and 96 months post treatment, were, respectively: 88.2% versus 88.9% 64.7% versus 61.1% and 42.9% versus 28.6% (p>0.05). Conclusion Vaginal electrical stimulation associated to pelvic floor muscle training did not show better results than vaginal electrical stimulation alone. PMID:25003921

  15. Influence of extremely low frequency, low energy electromagnetic fields and combined mechanical stimulation on chondrocytes in 3-D constructs for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Hilz, Florian M; Ahrens, Philipp; Grad, Sibylle; Stoddart, Martin J; Dahmani, Chiheb; Wilken, Frauke L; Sauerschnig, Martin; Niemeyer, Philipp; Zwingmann, Jörn; Burgkart, Rainer; von Eisenhart-Rothe, Rüdiger; Südkamp, Norbert P; Weyh, Thomas; Imhoff, Andreas B; Alini, Mauro; Salzmann, Gian M

    2014-02-01

    Articular cartilage, once damaged, has very low regenerative potential. Various experimental approaches have been conducted to enhance chondrogenesis and cartilage maturation. Among those, non-invasive electromagnetic fields have shown their beneficial influence for cartilage regeneration and are widely used for the treatment of non-unions, fractures, avascular necrosis and osteoarthritis. One very well accepted way to promote cartilage maturation is physical stimulation through bioreactors. The aim of this study was the investigation of combined mechanical and electromagnetic stress affecting cartilage cells in vitro. Primary articular chondrocytes from bovine fetlock joints were seeded into three-dimensional (3-D) polyurethane scaffolds and distributed into seven stimulated experimental groups. They either underwent mechanical or electromagnetic stimulation (sinusoidal electromagnetic field of 1 mT, 2 mT, or 3 mT; 60 Hz) or both within a joint-specific bioreactor and a coil system. The scaffold-cell constructs were analyzed for glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and DNA content, histology, and gene expression of collagen-1, collagen-2, aggrecan, cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), Sox9, proteoglycan-4 (PRG-4), and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-3 and -13). There were statistically significant differences in GAG/DNA content between the stimulated versus the control group with highest levels in the combined stimulation group. Gene expression was significantly higher for combined stimulation groups versus static control for collagen 2/collagen 1 ratio and lower for MMP-13. Amongst other genes, a more chondrogenic phenotype was noticed in expression patterns for the stimulated groups. To conclude, there is an effect of electromagnetic and mechanical stimulation on chondrocytes seeded in a 3-D scaffold, resulting in improved extracellular matrix production.

  16. Profile of follitropin alpha/lutropin alpha combination for the stimulation of follicular development in women with severe luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, Leonardo; Selman, Helmy

    2016-01-01

    A severe gonadotropin deficiency together with chronic estradiol deficiency leading to amenorrhea characterizes patients suffering from hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Administration of both follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) to these patients has been shown to be essential in achieving successful stimulation of follicular development, ovulation, and rescue of fertility. In recent years, the availability of both recombinant FSH (rFSH) and recombinant LH (rLH) has provided a new therapeutic option for the stimulation of follicular growth in hypopituitary–hypogonadotropic women (World Health Organization Group I). In this article, we review the data reported in the literature to highlight the role and the efficacy of using recombinant gonadotropins, rFSH and rLH, in the treatment of women with severe LH/FSH deficiency. Although the studies on this issue are limited and the experiences available in the literature are few due to the small number of such patients, it is clearly evident that the recombinant gonadotropins rFSH and rLH are efficient in treating patients affected by hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. The results observed in the studies reported in this review suggest that recombinant gonadotropins are able to induce proper follicular growth, oocyte maturation, and eventually pregnancy in this group of women. Moreover, the clinical use of recombinant gonadotropins in this type of patients has given more insight into some endocrinological aspects of ovarian function that have not yet been fully understood. PMID:27307766

  17. Bihemispheric repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation combined with intensive occupational therapy for upper limb hemiparesis after stroke: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Naoki; Kakuda, Wataru; Kondo, Takahiro; Shimizu, Masato; Mitani, Sugao; Abo, Masahiro

    2013-12-01

    We investigated the safety, feasibility, and efficacy of the combination of bihemispheric repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and intensive occupational therapy (OT) for upper limb hemiparesis in poststroke patients. The study participants were eight poststroke patients with upper limb hemiparesis (age at intervention: 62.8±4.9 years, time after stroke: 84.3±87.2 months, mean±SD). During 15 days of hospitalization, each patient received 10 sessions of 40-min bihemispheric rTMS and 240-min intensive OT (120-min one-to-one training and 120-min self-training). One session of bihemispheric rTMS comprised the application of both 1 and 10 Hz rTMS (2000 stimuli for each hemisphere). The Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Wolf Motor Function Test, and the Modified Ashworth Scale were administered on the day of admission and at discharge. All patients completed the treatment without any adverse effects. Motor function of the affected upper limb improved significantly, on the basis of changes in Fugl-Meyer Assessment and Wolf Motor Function Test (P<0.05, each). A significant decrease in the Modified Ashworth Scale score was noted in the elbow, wrist, and finger flexors of the affected upper limb (P<0.05, each). The combination of bihemispheric rTMS and intensive OT was safe and feasible therapy for poststroke hemiparetic patients, and improved motor function of the hemiparetic upper limb in poststroke patients. The findings provide a new avenue for the treatment of patients with poststroke hemiparesis.

  18. Pain Reduction in Myofascial Pain Syndrome by Anodal Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Combined with Standard Treatment: A Randomized Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Sakrajai, Piyaraid; Janyacharoen, Taweesak; Jensen, Mark P.; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak; Auvichayapat, Narong; Tunkamnerdthai, Orathai; Keeratitanont, Keattichai; Auvichayapat, Paradee

    2014-01-01

    Background Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) in the shoulder is among the most prevalent pain problems in the middle-aged population worldwide. Evidence suggests that peripheral and central sensitization may play an important role in the development and maintenance of shoulder MPS. Given previous research supporting the potential efficacy of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) for modulating pain-related brain activity in individuals with refractory central pain, we hypothesized that anodal tDCS when applied over the primary motor cortex (M1) combined with standard treatment will be more effective for reducing pain in patients with MPS than standard treatment alone. Method Study participants were randomized to receive either (1) standard treatment with 5-consecutive days of 1 mA anodal tDCS over M1 for 20 min or (2) standard treatment plus sham tDCS. Measures of pain intensity, shoulder passive range of motion, analgesic medication use, and self-reported physical functioning were administered before treatment and again at post-treatment and 1-, 2-, 3-and 4-week follow-up. Results Thirty-one patients with MPS were enrolled. Participants assigned to the active tDCS condition reported significantly more pre- to post-treatment reductions in pain intensity that were maintained at 1-week post-treatment, and significant improvement in shoulder adduction PROM at 1-week follow-up than participants assigned to the sham tDCS condition. Conclusion 5 consecutive days of anodal tDCS over M1 combined with standard treatment appears to reduce pain intensity, and may improve PROM, faster than standard treatment alone. Further tests of the efficacy and duration of effects of tDCS in the treatment of MPS are warranted. PMID:25373724

  19. Combination of Eccentric Exercise and Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation to Improve Biomechanical Limb Symmetry After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lepley, Lindsey K.; Wojtys, Edward M.; Palmieri-Smith, Riann M.

    2015-01-01

    Background We have previously reported that an eccentrically-based rehabilitation protocol post-ACLr induced greater quadriceps activation and strength than a neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) intervention and was just as effective as a combined NMES and eccentric intervention. However, the effect an eccentrically-based intervention has on restoring normal knee mechanics during a single-legged landing task remains unknown. Methods Thirty-six individuals post-injury were placed into four treatment groups: NMES and eccentrics, eccentrics-only, NMES-only, standard of care, and Healthy controls participated. NMES and eccentrics received a combined NMES and eccentric protocol post-reconstruction (each treatment 2x per week for 6 wks), whereas groups NMES-only and eccentric-only received only the NMES or eccentric therapy, respectively. To evaluate knee mechanics limb symmetry, the area under the curve for knee flexion angle and extension moment was derived and then normalized to the contralateral limb. Quadriceps strength was evaluated using the quadriceps index. Findings Compared to Healthy, reduced sagittal plane knee limb symmetry was found for groups NMES-only, ECC-only and standard of care for knee extension moment (P<0.05). No difference was detected between Healthy and NMES and eccentrics (P>0.06). No difference between groups was detected for knee flexion angle limb symmetry (P>0.05). Greater knee flexion angles and moments over stance were related to quadriceps strength. Interpretation The NMES and eccentrics group was found to restore biomechanical limb symmetry that was most closely related to Healthy individuals following ACL reconstruction. Greater knee flexion angles and moments over stance were related to quadriceps strength. PMID:25953255

  20. Magnetic nanocomposite scaffolds combined with static magnetic field in the stimulation of osteoblastic differentiation and bone formation.

    PubMed

    Yun, Hyung-Mun; Ahn, Su-Jin; Park, Kyung-Ran; Kim, Mi-Joo; Kim, Jung-Ju; Jin, Guang-Zhen; Kim, Hae-Won; Kim, Eun-Cheol

    2016-04-01

    Magnetism has recently been implicated to play significant roles in the regulation of cell responses. Allowing cells to experience a magnetic field applied externally or scaffolding them in a material with intrinsic magnetic properties has been a possible way of utilizing magnetism. Here we aim to investigate the combined effects of the external static magnetic field (SMF) with magnetic nanocomposite scaffold made of polycaprolactone/magnetic nanoparticles on the osteoblastic functions and bone formation. The SMF synergized with the magnetic scaffolds in the osteoblastic differentiation of primary mouse calvarium osteoblasts, including the expression of bone-associated genes (Runx2 and Osterix) and alkaline phosphatase activity. The synergism was demonstrated in the activation of integrin signaling pathways, such as focal adhesion kinase, paxillin, RhoA, mitogen-activated protein kinase, and nuclear factor-kappaB, as well as in the up-regulation of bone morphogenetic protein-2 and phosphorylation of Smad1/5/8. Furthermore, the SMF/magnetic scaffold-stimulated osteoblasts promoted the angiogenic responses of endothelial cells, including the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and angiogenin-1 genes and the formation of capillary tubes. When the magnetic scaffolds were implanted in mouse calvarium defects, the application of SMF significantly enhanced the new bone formation at 6 weeks, as revealed by the histological and micro-computed tomographic analyses. Current findings suggest that the combinatory application of external (SMF) and internal (scaffold) magnetism can be a promising tool to regenerative engineering of bone. PMID:26854394

  1. Paired-Pulse Parietal-Motor Stimulation Differentially Modulates Corticospinal Excitability across Hemispheres When Combined with Prism Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Schintu, Selene; Martín-Arévalo, Elisa; Vesia, Michael; Rossetti, Yves; Salemme, Romeo; Pisella, Laure; Farnè, Alessandro; Reilly, Karen T

    2016-01-01

    Rightward prism adaptation ameliorates neglect symptoms while leftward prism adaptation (LPA) induces neglect-like biases in healthy individuals. Similarly, inhibitory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on the right posterior parietal cortex (PPC) induces neglect-like behavior, whereas on the left PPC it ameliorates neglect symptoms and normalizes hyperexcitability of left hemisphere parietal-motor (PPC-M1) connectivity. Based on this analogy we hypothesized that LPA increases PPC-M1 excitability in the left hemisphere and decreases it in the right one. In an attempt to shed some light on the mechanisms underlying LPA's effects on cognition, we investigated this hypothesis in healthy individuals measuring PPC-M1 excitability with dual-site paired-pulse TMS (ppTMS). We found a left hemisphere increase and a right hemisphere decrease in the amplitude of motor evoked potentials elicited by paired as well as single pulses on M1. While this could indicate that LPA biases interhemispheric connectivity, it contradicts previous evidence that M1-only MEPs are unchanged after LPA. A control experiment showed that input-output curves were not affected by LPA per se. We conclude that LPA combined with ppTMS on PPC-M1 differentially alters the excitability of the left and right M1. PMID:27418979

  2. Transcranial direct current stimulation combined with integrative speech therapy in a child with cerebral palsy: A case report.

    PubMed

    Carvalho Lima, Vania L C; Collange Grecco, Luanda A; Marques, Valéria C; Fregni, Felipe; Brandão de Ávila, Clara R

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the results of the first case combining integrative speech therapy with anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over Broca's area in a child with cerebral palsy. The ABFW phonology test was used to analyze speech based on the Percentage of Correct Consonants (PCC) and Percentage of Correct Consonants - Revised (PCC-R). After treatment, increases were found in both PCC (Imitation: 53.63%-78.10%; Nomination: 53.19%-70.21%) and PPC-R (Imitation: 64.54%-83.63%; Nomination: 61.70%-77.65%). Moreover, reductions occurred in distortions, substitutions and improvement was found in oral performance, especially tongue mobility (AMIOFE-mobility before = 4 after = 7). The child demonstrated a clinically important improvement in speech fluency as shown in results of imitation number of correct consonants and phonemes acquire. Based on these promising findings, continuing research in this field should be conducted with controlled clinical trials. PMID:27210840

  3. Paired-Pulse Parietal-Motor Stimulation Differentially Modulates Corticospinal Excitability across Hemispheres When Combined with Prism Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Arévalo, Elisa; Salemme, Romeo; Pisella, Laure; Farnè, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Rightward prism adaptation ameliorates neglect symptoms while leftward prism adaptation (LPA) induces neglect-like biases in healthy individuals. Similarly, inhibitory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on the right posterior parietal cortex (PPC) induces neglect-like behavior, whereas on the left PPC it ameliorates neglect symptoms and normalizes hyperexcitability of left hemisphere parietal-motor (PPC-M1) connectivity. Based on this analogy we hypothesized that LPA increases PPC-M1 excitability in the left hemisphere and decreases it in the right one. In an attempt to shed some light on the mechanisms underlying LPA's effects on cognition, we investigated this hypothesis in healthy individuals measuring PPC-M1 excitability with dual-site paired-pulse TMS (ppTMS). We found a left hemisphere increase and a right hemisphere decrease in the amplitude of motor evoked potentials elicited by paired as well as single pulses on M1. While this could indicate that LPA biases interhemispheric connectivity, it contradicts previous evidence that M1-only MEPs are unchanged after LPA. A control experiment showed that input-output curves were not affected by LPA per se. We conclude that LPA combined with ppTMS on PPC-M1 differentially alters the excitability of the left and right M1. PMID:27418979

  4. Combined CpG and poly I:C stimulation of monocytes results in unique signaling activation not observed with the individual ligands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) bind to components of microbes, activate cellular signal transduction pathways, and stimulate innate immune responses. Previously, we have shown in chicken monocytes that the combination of CpG, the ligand for TLR21 (the chicken equivalent of TLR9), and poly I:C, the liga...

  5. Optimization of lentiviral vector transduction into peripheral blood mononuclear cells in combination with the fibronectin fragment CH-296 stimulation.

    PubMed

    Chono, Hideto; Goto, Yumi; Yamakawa, Satoko; Tanaka, Shinya; Tosaka, Yasuhiro; Nukaya, Ikuei; Mineno, Junichi

    2011-03-01

    Large scale T-cell expansion and efficient gene transduction are required for adoptive T-cell gene therapy. Based on our previous observations, human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) can be expanded efficiently while conserving a naïve phenotype by stimulating with both recombinant human fibronectin fragment (CH-296) and anti-CD3 monoclonal antibodies. In this article, we explored the possibility of using this co-stimulation method to generate engineered T cells using lentiviral vector. Human PBMCs were stimulated with anti-CD3 together with immobilized CH-296 or anti-CD28 antibody as well as anti-CD3/anti-CD28 conjugated beads and transduced with lentiviral vector simultaneously. Co-stimulation with CH-296 gave superior transduction efficiency than with anti-CD28. Next, PBMCs were stimulated and transduced with anti-CD3/CH-296 or with anti-CD3/CD28 beads. T-cell expansion, gene transfer efficiencies and immunophenotypes were analysed. Stimulation with anti-CD3/CH-296 resulted in more than 10-times higher cell expansion and higher gene transfer efficiency with conservation of the naïve phenotype compared with anti-CD3/CD28 stimulation method. Thus, lentiviral transduction with anti-CD3/CH-296 co-stimulation is an efficient way to generate large numbers of genetically modified T cells and may be suitable for many gene therapy protocols that use adoptive T-cell transfer therapy.

  6. Combination of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation and Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation Improves Gait Ability in a Patient in Chronic Stage of Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Satow, Takeshi; Kawase, Tomotaka; Kitamura, Atsushi; Kajitani, Yuki; Yamaguchi, Takuya; Tanabe, Nobuhiko; Otoi, Reiko; Komuro, Taro; Kobayashi, Akira; Nagata, Hirokazu; Mima, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Background Walking ability is important in stroke patients to maintain daily life. Nevertheless, its improvement is limited with conventional physical therapy in chronic stage. We report the case of a chronic stroke patient showing a remarkable improvement in gait function after a new neurorehabilitation protocol using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES). Case Presentation A 62-year-old male with left putaminal hemorrhage suffered from severe right hemiparesis. He could move by himself with a wheelchair 1 year after the ictus. Anodal tDCS at the vertex (2 mA, 20 min) with NMES at the anterior tibialis muscle had been applied for 3 weeks. The Timed Up and Go test and 10-meter walk test improved after the intervention, which had been maintained for at least 1 month. Conclusion This single case suggests the possibility that tDCS with NMES could be a new rehabilitation approach to improve the gait ability in chronic stroke patients. PMID:27293403

  7. Improving motor performance without training: the effect of combining mirror visual feedback with transcranial direct current stimulation.

    PubMed

    von Rein, Erik; Hoff, Maike; Kaminski, Elisabeth; Sehm, Bernhard; Steele, Christopher J; Villringer, Arno; Ragert, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    Mirror visual feedback (MVF) during motor training has been shown to improve motor performance of the untrained hand. Here we thought to determine if MVF-induced performance improvements of the left hand can be augmented by upregulating plasticity in right primary motor cortex (M1) by means of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (a-tDCS) while subjects trained with the right hand. Participants performed a ball-rotation task with either their left (untrained) or right (trained) hand on two consecutive days (days 1 and 2). During training with the right hand, MVF was provided concurrent with two tDCS conditions: group 1 received a-tDCS over right M1 (n = 10), whereas group 2 received sham tDCS (s-tDCS, n = 10). On day 2, performance was reevaluated under the same experimental conditions compared with day 1 but without tDCS. While baseline performance of the left hand (day 1) was not different between groups, a-tDCS exhibited stronger MVF-induced performance improvements compared with s-tDCS. Similar results were observed for day 2 (without tDCS application). A control experiment (n = 8) with a-tDCS over right M1 as outlined above but without MVF revealed that left hand improvement was significantly less pronounced than that induced by combined a-tDCS and MVF. Based on these results, we provide novel evidence that upregulating activity in the untrained M1 by means of a-tDCS is capable of augmenting MVF-induced performance improvements in young normal volunteers. Our findings suggest that concurrent MVF and tDCS might have synergistic and additive effects on motor performance of the untrained hand, a result of relevance for clinical approaches in neurorehabilitation and/or exercise science. PMID:25632079

  8. Combined suicide and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor gene therapy induces complete tumor regression and generates antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Jones, R K; Pope, I M; Kinsella, A R; Watson, A J; Christmas, S E

    2000-12-01

    The use of prodrug-activated ("suicide") gene therapy has been shown to be effective in inducing tumor regression when only a small proportion of tumor cells contains the suicide gene. These experiments were designed to test whether additional therapeutic benefit may be obtained by stimulating the immune response. Murine MC26 colon carcinoma cells, either untransduced or transduced with genes for herpes simplex virus-1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-TK) or human GM-CSF, were injected subcutaneously into syngeneic BALB/c mice in various combinations. Inoculation of equal numbers of untransduced and HSV1-TK-containing cells followed by ganciclovir (GCV) treatment resulted in almost complete tumor regression, but by 7 weeks, tumors had recurred in all mice. A similar initial regression was obtained using equal numbers of cells containing HSV1-TK and GM-CSF genes, but >80% of these mice remained tumor-free after 3 months. Groups of tumor-free mice that had received GM-CSF-containing cells were left for different periods of time and rechallenged with unmodified MC26 cells on the opposite flank. Of the mice rechallenged 14, 28, and 108 days later, 100%, 88%, and 57%, respectively, showed complete resistance to unmodified tumor cells. In mice that showed tumor regrowth, tumor volume was much less than in control mice. Adoptive transfer of spleen cells from resistant mice to naïve syngeneic mice resulted in partial resistance to challenge with unmodified tumor cells. Specific cytotoxicity against MC26 cells was only demonstrable in mice receiving GM-CSF- and HSV1-TK-containing tumor cells. These experiments show that the presence of cells secreting GM-CSF in HSV1-TK-containing, regressing tumor is able to induce complete or partial resistance to tumor rechallenge. This indicates the potential usefulness of GM-CSF in enhancing other antitumor therapies.

  9. Coherent beam combination using self-phase locked stimulated Brillouin scattering phase conjugate mirrors with a rotating wedge for high power laser generation.

    PubMed

    Park, Sangwoo; Cha, Seongwoo; Oh, Jungsuk; Lee, Hwihyeong; Ahn, Heekyung; Churn, Kil Sung; Kong, Hong Jin

    2016-04-18

    The self-phase locking of a stimulated Brillouin scattering-phase conjugate mirror (SBS-PCM) allows a simple and scalable coherent beam combination of existing lasers. We propose a simple optical system composed of a rotating wedge and a concave mirror to overcome the power limit of the SBS-PCM. Its phase locking ability and the usefulness on the beam-combination laser are demonstrated experimentally. A four-beam combination is demonstrated using this SBS-PCM scheme. The relative phases between the beams were measured to be less than λ/24.7. PMID:27137299

  10. Coherent beam combination using self-phase locked stimulated Brillouin scattering phase conjugate mirrors with a rotating wedge for high power laser generation.

    PubMed

    Park, Sangwoo; Cha, Seongwoo; Oh, Jungsuk; Lee, Hwihyeong; Ahn, Heekyung; Churn, Kil Sung; Kong, Hong Jin

    2016-04-18

    The self-phase locking of a stimulated Brillouin scattering-phase conjugate mirror (SBS-PCM) allows a simple and scalable coherent beam combination of existing lasers. We propose a simple optical system composed of a rotating wedge and a concave mirror to overcome the power limit of the SBS-PCM. Its phase locking ability and the usefulness on the beam-combination laser are demonstrated experimentally. A four-beam combination is demonstrated using this SBS-PCM scheme. The relative phases between the beams were measured to be less than λ/24.7.

  11. The role of G-CSF and IL-6 in the granulopoiesis-stimulating activity of murine blood serum induced by perorally administered ultrafiltered pig leukocyte extract, IMUNOR.

    PubMed

    Vacek, Antonín; Hofer, Michal; Holá, Jirina; Weiterová, Lenka; Streitová, Denisa; Svoboda, Jaroslav

    2007-05-01

    IMUNOR, a low-molecular weight (< 12 kD) ultrafiltered pig leukocyte extract, has been previously found to have significant stimulatory effects on murine hematopoiesis supressed by ionizing radiation or cytotoxic drugs. This communication shows data on the mechanisms of these effects. Using ELISA assay, significantly increased levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were observed. On the contrary, no detectable levels of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CFC) and interleukin-3 (IL-3) have been found in blood serum of IMUNOR-treated mice. Incubation of the serum from IMUNOR-treated mice with antibodies against G-CSF caused abrogation of the ability of the sera to stimulate in vitro growth of colonies originating from granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells (GM-CFC). In contrast, incubation of the serum with antibodies against IL-6 did not change its colony-stimulating activity. It may be inferred from these findings that G-CSF is probably the main cytokine responsible for the granulopoiesis-stimulating effects of IMUNOR. When the serum from IMUNOR-treated mice with G-CSF inactivated by anti-G-CSF antibodies (but with elevated IL-6) was added to cultures of bone marrow cells together with a suboptimum concentration of IL-3, a significant increase in the numbers of GM-CFC colonies was found. Moreover, conjoint inactivation of G-CSF and IL-6 significantly decreased the numbers of GM-CFC colonies in comparison with those observed when only G-CSF was inactivated. This observation strongly suggests that though IMUNOR-induced IL-6 is not able to induce the growth of GM-CFC colonies alone, it is able to potentiate the hematopoiesis-stimulating effect of IL-3. These findings represent a new knowledge concerning the hematopoiesis-stimulating action of IMUNOR, a promising immunomodulatory agent.

  12. Closed-Loop Neuroprosthesis for Reach-to-Grasp Assistance: Combining Adaptive Multi-channel Neuromuscular Stimulation with a Multi-joint Arm Exoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Florian; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Stroke patients with severe motor deficits cannot execute task-oriented rehabilitation exercises with their affected upper extremity. Advanced rehabilitation technology may support them in performing such reach-to-grasp movements. The challenge is, however, to provide assistance as needed, while maintaining the participants' commitment during the exercises. In this feasibility study, we introduced a closed-loop neuroprosthesis for reach-to-grasp assistance which combines adaptive multi-channel neuromuscular stimulation with a multi-joint arm exoskeleton. Eighteen severely affected chronic stroke patients were assisted by a gravity-compensating, seven-degree-of-freedom exoskeleton which was attached to the paretic arm for performing reach-to-grasp exercises resembling activities of daily living in a virtual environment. During the exercises, adaptive electrical stimulation was applied to seven different muscles of the upper extremity in a performance-dependent way to enhance the task-oriented movement trajectory. The stimulation intensity was individualized for each targeted muscle and remained subthreshold, i.e., induced no overt support. Closed-loop neuromuscular stimulation could be well integrated into the exoskeleton-based training, and increased the task-related range of motion (p = 0.0004) and movement velocity (p = 0.015), while preserving accuracy. The highest relative stimulation intensity was required to facilitate the grasping function. The facilitated range of motion correlated with the upper extremity Fugl-Meyer Assessment score of the patients (p = 0.028). Combining adaptive multi-channel neuromuscular stimulation with antigravity assistance amplifies the residual motor capabilities of severely affected stroke patients during rehabilitation exercises and may thus provide a customized training environment for patient-tailored support while preserving the participants' engagement. PMID:27445658

  13. Closed-Loop Neuroprosthesis for Reach-to-Grasp Assistance: Combining Adaptive Multi-channel Neuromuscular Stimulation with a Multi-joint Arm Exoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Florian; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Stroke patients with severe motor deficits cannot execute task-oriented rehabilitation exercises with their affected upper extremity. Advanced rehabilitation technology may support them in performing such reach-to-grasp movements. The challenge is, however, to provide assistance as needed, while maintaining the participants' commitment during the exercises. In this feasibility study, we introduced a closed-loop neuroprosthesis for reach-to-grasp assistance which combines adaptive multi-channel neuromuscular stimulation with a multi-joint arm exoskeleton. Eighteen severely affected chronic stroke patients were assisted by a gravity-compensating, seven-degree-of-freedom exoskeleton which was attached to the paretic arm for performing reach-to-grasp exercises resembling activities of daily living in a virtual environment. During the exercises, adaptive electrical stimulation was applied to seven different muscles of the upper extremity in a performance-dependent way to enhance the task-oriented movement trajectory. The stimulation intensity was individualized for each targeted muscle and remained subthreshold, i.e., induced no overt support. Closed-loop neuromuscular stimulation could be well integrated into the exoskeleton-based training, and increased the task-related range of motion (p = 0.0004) and movement velocity (p = 0.015), while preserving accuracy. The highest relative stimulation intensity was required to facilitate the grasping function. The facilitated range of motion correlated with the upper extremity Fugl-Meyer Assessment score of the patients (p = 0.028). Combining adaptive multi-channel neuromuscular stimulation with antigravity assistance amplifies the residual motor capabilities of severely affected stroke patients during rehabilitation exercises and may thus provide a customized training environment for patient-tailored support while preserving the participants' engagement. PMID:27445658

  14. Closed-Loop Neuroprosthesis for Reach-to-Grasp Assistance: Combining Adaptive Multi-channel Neuromuscular Stimulation with a Multi-joint Arm Exoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Florian; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Stroke patients with severe motor deficits cannot execute task-oriented rehabilitation exercises with their affected upper extremity. Advanced rehabilitation technology may support them in performing such reach-to-grasp movements. The challenge is, however, to provide assistance as needed, while maintaining the participants' commitment during the exercises. In this feasibility study, we introduced a closed-loop neuroprosthesis for reach-to-grasp assistance which combines adaptive multi-channel neuromuscular stimulation with a multi-joint arm exoskeleton. Eighteen severely affected chronic stroke patients were assisted by a gravity-compensating, seven-degree-of-freedom exoskeleton which was attached to the paretic arm for performing reach-to-grasp exercises resembling activities of daily living in a virtual environment. During the exercises, adaptive electrical stimulation was applied to seven different muscles of the upper extremity in a performance-dependent way to enhance the task-oriented movement trajectory. The stimulation intensity was individualized for each targeted muscle and remained subthreshold, i.e., induced no overt support. Closed-loop neuromuscular stimulation could be well integrated into the exoskeleton-based training, and increased the task-related range of motion (p = 0.0004) and movement velocity (p = 0.015), while preserving accuracy. The highest relative stimulation intensity was required to facilitate the grasping function. The facilitated range of motion correlated with the upper extremity Fugl-Meyer Assessment score of the patients (p = 0.028). Combining adaptive multi-channel neuromuscular stimulation with antigravity assistance amplifies the residual motor capabilities of severely affected stroke patients during rehabilitation exercises and may thus provide a customized training environment for patient-tailored support while preserving the participants' engagement.

  15. Changes in gain of the vestibulo-ocular reflex induced by combined visual and vestibular stimulation in goldfish.

    PubMed

    Schairer, J O; Bennett, M V

    1986-05-14

    Adaptive changes in the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) of goldfish were produced in a few hours by sinusoidally rotating restrained fish in the horizontal plane inside a vertically striped drum. The drum could also be sinusoidally rotated so that the gain of the VOR (the ratio of eye to head angular velocity) would have to increase to two or decrease to zero in order to maintain a stable retinal image. During 'training' towards two VOR gain measured at the stimulation frequency of 0.125 Hz increased rapidly over 6 h of stimulation to about 1.5 from an initial gain of 0.7. Half of that change occurred in the first 30 min. During training towards zero VOR gain measured at the stimulation frequency decreased to 0.15. About one-third of that change occurred in the first 30 min. Testing at different sinusoidal frequencies after 6 h stimulation showed that increases in VOR gain were generated across a 6-octave range; however, reductions in gain were produced over a narrow frequency range close to the training frequency. Gain reductions occurred more rapidly on a second day of stimulation. In a paradigm simulating reversing prisms, partial reversal of the VOR was observed in some fish. However, these fish also demonstrated spontaneous slow sinusoidal eye movements that may have represented a different means of adjusting eye movements to stabilize the retinal image. Goldfish provide a useful preparation for the study of adaptive gain changes in vertebrate oculomotor systems.

  16. Effects of combined application of progressive resistance training and Russian electrical stimulation on quadriceps femoris muscle strength in elderly women with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Park, Seong Hoon; Hwangbo, Gak

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of combined application of progressive resistance training and Russian electrical stimulation on quadriceps femoris muscle strength in elderly women with osteoarthritis of the knee. [Subjects] Thirty women over 65 years of age diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis participated in the present study. The subjects were randomly assigned to a control group (n=10), a progressive resistance training group (n=10), or a Russian electrical stimulation group (n=10). [Methods] Each group was treated 3 times weekly for 8 weeks, and each session lasted 45 minutes. Muscle strength was assessed by measuring the peak torque of the quadriceps femoris muscle. Outcome measurements were performed at baseline and at the fourth and eighth weeks of the treatment period. [Results] All groups showed significant intragroup differences in the quadriceps femoris muscle peak torque after the treatment intervention. There were significant intergroup differences between the Russian electrical stimulation group and the other groups. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest that combined application of progressive resistance training and Russian electrical stimulation can be effective in strengthening the quadriceps femoris muscle in elderly women with knee osteoarthritis.

  17. Effects of combined application of progressive resistance training and Russian electrical stimulation on quadriceps femoris muscle strength in elderly women with knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seong Hoon; Hwangbo, Gak

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of combined application of progressive resistance training and Russian electrical stimulation on quadriceps femoris muscle strength in elderly women with osteoarthritis of the knee. [Subjects] Thirty women over 65 years of age diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis participated in the present study. The subjects were randomly assigned to a control group (n=10), a progressive resistance training group (n=10), or a Russian electrical stimulation group (n=10). [Methods] Each group was treated 3 times weekly for 8 weeks, and each session lasted 45 minutes. Muscle strength was assessed by measuring the peak torque of the quadriceps femoris muscle. Outcome measurements were performed at baseline and at the fourth and eighth weeks of the treatment period. [Results] All groups showed significant intragroup differences in the quadriceps femoris muscle peak torque after the treatment intervention. There were significant intergroup differences between the Russian electrical stimulation group and the other groups. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest that combined application of progressive resistance training and Russian electrical stimulation can be effective in strengthening the quadriceps femoris muscle in elderly women with knee osteoarthritis. PMID:25931718

  18. A new approach for ovarian stimulation in IVF using Corifollitropin Alfa in combination with GnRH analogues to trigger final oocyte maturation. A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Decleer, W.; Osmanagaoglu, K.; Meganck, G.; Devroey, P.

    2014-01-01

    A pilot study of 10 patients undergoing IVF stimulation, using the new combination of Corifollitropin Alfa with highly purified hMG and GnRH antagonists has been performed, whereas final oocyte maturation was induced by GnRH analogues. The hormonal profiles were analyzed, as well as the clinical outcome. All patients were recruited between March 1st 2013 and June 30th 2013. They were all younger than 38 years, had a normal BMI (between 18,0 and 32,0) and did not have more than three previous IVF stimulations. The combination of long acting FSH with hphMG, and under protection of GnRH antagonists against spontaneous LH-surge, provided a normal hormonal profile for estradiol, progesterone, LH, and FSH. The average oocyte quality and embryo quality were excellent, which resulted in four pregnancies out of ten. We conclude that the described combination is a safe, efficient, and patient friendly alternative for the classical IVF stimulation. PMID:25374659

  19. Effects of Robot-assisted Gait Training Combined with Functional Electrical Stimulation on Recovery of Locomotor Mobility in Chronic Stroke Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Bae, Young-Hyeon; Ko, Young Jun; Chang, Won Hyuk; Lee, Ju Hyeok; Lee, Kyeong Bong; Park, Yoo Jung; Ha, Hyun Geun; Kim, Yun-Hee

    2014-12-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of robot-assisted gait training combined with functional electrical stimulation on locomotor recovery in patients with chronic stroke. [Subjects] The 20 subjects were randomly assigned into either an experimental group (n = 10) that received a combination of robot-assisted gait training and functional electrical stimulation on the ankle dorsiflexor of the affected side or a control group (n = 10) that received robot-assisted gait training only. [Methods] Both groups received the respective therapies for 30 min/day, 3 days/week for 5 weeks. The outcome was measured using the Modified Motor Assessment Scale (MMAS), Timed Up-and-Go Test (TUG), Berg Balance Scale (BBS), and gait parameters through gait analysis (Vicon 370 motion analysis system, Oxford Metrics Ltd., Oxford, UK). All the variables were measured before and after training. [Results] Step length and maximal knee extension were significantly greater than those before training in the experimental group only. Maximal Knee flexion showed a significant difference between the experimental and control groups. The MMAS, BBS, and TUG scores improved significantly after training compared with before training in both groups. [Conclusion] We suggest that the combination of robot-assisted gait training and functional electrical stimulation encourages patients to actively participate in training because it facilitates locomotor recovery without the risk of adverse effects.

  20. The Observation of Manual Grasp Actions Affects the Control of Speech: A Combined Behavioral and Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentilucci, Maurizio; Campione, Giovanna Cristina; Volta, Riccardo Dalla; Bernardis, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Does the mirror system affect the control of speech? This issue was addressed in behavioral and Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) experiments. In behavioral experiment 1, participants pronounced the syllable /da/ while observing (1) a hand grasping large and small objects with power and precision grasps, respectively, (2) a foot interacting…

  1. A New Training for Older Adults Using Combined Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation and Volitional Contraction: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Takano, Yoshio; Matsuse, Hiroo; Tsukada, Yuuya; Omoto, Masayuki; Hashida, Ryuki; Shiba, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    The hybrid training system (HTS) resists the motion of a volitionally contracting agonist muscle using force generated by its electrically stimulated antagonist. We have developed a new training method using the principle of HTS. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of HTS with electrical stimulation on muscle strength and physical function by comparing it against training without electrical stimulation in older adults. 16 subjects were randomly divided into two groups: the squat and single leg lift training (control, CTR) group, and the CTR with HTS training group. Some electrical stimulation was applied to the quadriceps and hamstring muscles in the HTS group. The subjects performed training for 25 min per session 3 times a week for 12 weeks. At points before and after the research maximal isokinetic torque, knee-flexors (KFT) and knee-extensors (KET), a one-leg standing test (OLT), a functional reach test (FRT), a 10-meter maximal gait time (10MGT) and Timed up & go test (TUG) were conducted. None of the subjects had any injuries during the study period. TUG significantly improved after the training period in both the HTS group (7.15 sec to 6.01 sec P = 0.01) and in the CTR. PMID:27237936

  2. Ovarian stimulation for in-vitro fertilization combining administration of gonadotrophins and blockade of the pituitary with D-Trp6-LHRH microcapsules: pilot studies with two protocols.

    PubMed

    Zorn, J R; Barata, M; Brami, C; Epelboin, S; Nathan, C; Papageorgiou, G; Quantin, P; Rolet, F; Savale, M; Boyer, P

    1988-02-01

    In women undergoing in-vitro fertilization and embryo transfer (IVF-ET), a total of 408 IVF cycles were stimulated using human menopausal gonadotrophin (HMG) or pure follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) plus HMG in combination with a single injection of D-Trp6-LHRH microcapsules in order to enhance the ovarian response to gonadotrophins and to avoid spontaneous LH surges. Sixty-seven pregnancies were achieved. Two protocols were employed. In protocol 1 ('blocking protocol', n = 268), the pituitary was first inhibited with a full dose (3.75 mg) of D-Trp6-LHRH in microcapsules and ovarian stimulation was started after the hypogonadotrophic hypogonadal state was ascertained (E2 less than 50 pg/ml). In protocol 2 ('flare-up protocol', n = 140), the treatment with D-Trp6-LHRH microcapsules (half-dose = 1.80 mg) and the ovarian stimulation with gonadotrophins were started at the same time. Higher doses of gonadotrophins were needed (39.5 +/- 11.2 ampoules FSH and/or HMG) in protocol 1, in which the pituitary was blocked prior to and during the stimulation, than in protocol 2 (20 +/- 9 ampoules) where the exogenous gonadotrophin stimulation appeared to be augmented by the initial agonistic effect of the injection of D-Trp6-LHRH microcapsules. In patients with purely tubal infertility, under 38 years old and no male factor, the results obtained with protocols 1 and 2 were similar in terms of pregnancy rate per cycle or per embryo transfer: 22.6 versus 20.5% and 28.3 versus 27.4%, respectively. However, considering the cost benefit, 'flare-up' protocols appeared to be a better choice and could be recommended.

  3. Improving Working Memory in Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: The Separate and Combined Effects of Incentives and Stimulant Medication

    PubMed Central

    Strand, Michael T.; Hawk, Larry W.; Bubnik, Michelle; Shiels, Keri; Pelham, William E.; Waxmonsky, James G.

    2012-01-01

    Working memory (WM) is considered a core deficit in Attention-Deficit/ Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), with numerous studies demonstrating impaired WM among children with ADHD. We tested the degree to which WM in children with ADHD was improved by performance-based incentives, an analog of behavioral intervention. In two studies, WM performance was assessed using a visuo-spatial n-back task. Study 1 compared children (ages 9-12 years) with ADHD–Combined type (n=24) to a group of typically developing (TD) children (n=32). Study 1 replicated WM deficits among children with ADHD. Incentives improved WM, particularly among children with ADHD. The provision of incentives reduced the ADHD-control group difference by approximately half but did not normalize WM. Study 2 examined the separate and combined effects of incentives and stimulant medication among 17 children with ADHD-Combined type. Both incentives and a moderate dose of long-acting methylphenidate (MPH; ~0.3 mg/kg t.i.d. equivalent) robustly improved WM relative to the no-incentive, placebo condition. The combination of incentives and medication improved WM significantly more than either incentives or MPH alone. These studies indicate that contingencies markedly improve WM among children with ADHD–Combined type, with effect sizes comparable to a moderate dose of stimulant medication. More broadly, this work calls attention to the role of motivation in studying cognitive deficits in ADHD and in testing multifactorial models of ADHD. PMID:22477205

  4. G-CSF administration to adult mice stimulates the proliferation of microglia but does not modify the outcome of ischemic injury.

    PubMed

    Bartolini, Alice; Vigliani, Maria-Claudia; Magrassi, Lorenzo; Vercelli, Alessandro; Rossi, Ferdinando

    2011-03-01

    Recent evidence suggests that adult bone marrow stem cells reduce tissue damage and promote repair following CNS ischemic injury. Since granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) mobilizes hematopoietic stem cells to the circulating compartment, here we tested whether administration of this drug modifies the outcome of a permanent occlusion of the middle cerebral artery in adult mice. To elucidate the behavior and fate of blood-borne cells in the ischemic brain, we produced chimeric animals, in which hematopoietic derivatives are genetically tagged. G-CSF administration enhances the proliferation of microglia in the uninjured CNS but has no effect on the amount of hematopoietic cells that infiltrate the ischemic tissue and on the size of the lesion. The blood-borne elements acquire different mesodermal identities but fail to adopt neural phenotypes, even though they occasionally fuse with Purkinje neurons. These results indicate that G-CSF treatment does not exert a significant beneficial effect on the ischemic injury. PMID:21111821

  5. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Combined with Aerobic Exercise to Optimize Analgesic Responses in Fibromyalgia: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mendonca, Mariana E.; Simis, Marcel; Grecco, Luanda C.; Battistella, Linamara R.; Baptista, Abrahão F.; Fregni, Felipe

    2016-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic pain syndrome that is associated with maladaptive plasticity in neural central circuits. One of the neural circuits that are involved in pain in fibromyalgia is the primary motor cortex. We tested a combination intervention that aimed to modulate the motor system: transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of the primary motor cortex (M1) and aerobic exercise (AE). In this phase II, sham-controlled randomized clinical trial, 45 subjects were assigned to 1 of 3 groups: tDCS + AE, AE only, and tDCS only. The following outcomes were assessed: intensity of pain, level of anxiety, quality of life, mood, pressure pain threshold, and cortical plasticity, as indexed by transcranial magnetic stimulation. There was a significant effect for the group-time interaction for intensity of pain, demonstrating that tDCS/AE was superior to AE [F(13, 364) = 2.25, p = 0.007] and tDCS [F(13, 364) = 2.33, p = 0.0056] alone. Post-hoc adjusted analysis showed a difference between tDCS/AE and tDCS group after the first week of stimulation and after 1 month intervention period (p = 0.02 and p = 0.03, respectively). Further, after treatment there was a significant difference between groups in anxiety and mood levels. The combination treatment effected the greatest response. The three groups had no differences regarding responses in motor cortex plasticity, as assessed by TMS. The combination of tDCS with aerobic exercise is superior compared with each individual intervention (cohen's d effect sizes > 0.55). The combination intervention had a significant effect on pain, anxiety and mood. Based on the similar effects on cortical plasticity outcomes, the combination intervention might have affected other neural circuits, such as those that control the affective-emotional aspects of pain. Trial registration: (www.ClinicalTrials.gov), identifier NTC02358902. PMID:27014012

  6. Estimating nerve excitation thresholds to cutaneous electrical stimulation by finite element modeling combined with a stochastic branching nerve fiber model.

    PubMed

    Mørch, Carsten Dahl; Hennings, Kristian; Andersen, Ole Kæseler

    2011-04-01

    Electrical stimulation of cutaneous tissue through surface electrodes is an often used method for evoking experimental pain. However, at painful intensities both non-nociceptive Aβ-fibers and nociceptive Aδ- and C-fibers may be activated by the electrical stimulation. This study proposes a finite element (FE) model of the extracellular potential and stochastic branching fiber model of the afferent fiber excitation thresholds. The FE model described four horizontal layers; stratum corneum, epidermis, dermis, and hypodermal used to estimate the excitation threshold of Aβ-fibers terminating in dermis and Aδ-fibers terminating in epidermis. The perception thresholds of 11 electrodes with diameters ranging from 0.2 to 20 mm were modeled and assessed on the volar forearm of healthy human volunteers by an adaptive two-alternative forced choice algorithm. The model showed that the magnitude of the current density was highest for smaller electrodes and decreased through the skin. The excitation thresholds of the Aδ-fibers were lower than the excitation thresholds of Aβ-fibers when current was applied through small, but not large electrodes. The experimentally assessed perception threshold followed the lowest excitation threshold of the modeled fibers. The model confirms that preferential excitation of Aδ-fibers may be achieved by small electrode stimulation due to higher current density in the dermoepidermal junction. PMID:21207174

  7. Anti-invasive effects of Celastrus Orbiculatus extract on interleukin-1 beta and tumour necrosis factor-alpha combination-stimulated fibroblast-like synoviocytes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Invasion of fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs) is critical in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The metalloproteinases (MMPs) and activator of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) pathway play a critical role in RA-FLS invasion induced by interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). The present study aimed to explore the anti-invasive activity and mechanism of Celastrus orbiculatus extract (COE) on IL-1β and TNF-α combination-stimulated human RA-FLSs. Methods We investigated the effect of COE on IL-1β and TNF-α combination-induced FLS invasion as well as MMP expression and explored upstream signal transduction. Results COE suppressed IL-1β and TNF-α combination-stimulated FLSs invasion by inhibiting MMP-9 expression and activity. Furthermore, our results revealed that COE inhibited the transcriptional activity of MMP-9 by suppression of the binding activity of NF-κB in the MMP-9 promoter, and inhibited IκBα phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of NF-κB. Conclusions COE inhibits IL-1β and TNF-α combination-induced FLSs invasion by suppressing NF-κB-mediated MMP-9 expression. PMID:24552146

  8. Murine Macrophages Secrete Interferon γ upon Combined Stimulation with Interleukin (IL)-12 and IL-18: A Novel Pathway of Autocrine Macrophage Activation

    PubMed Central

    Munder, Markus; Mallo, Moisés; Eichmann, Klaus; Modolell, Manuel

    1998-01-01

    Interferon (IFN)-γ, a key immunoregulatory cytokine, has been thought to be produced solely by activated T cells and natural killer cells. In this study, we show that murine bone marrow– derived macrophages (BMMΦ) secrete large amounts of IFN-γ upon appropriate stimulation. Although interleukin (IL)-12 and IL-18 alone induce low levels of IFN-γ mRNA transcripts, the combined stimulation of BMMΦ with both cytokines leads to the efficient production of IFN-γ protein. The macrophage-derived IFN-γ is biologically active as shown by induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase as well as upregulation of CD40 in macrophages. Our findings uncover a novel pathway of autocrine macrophage activation by demonstrating that the macrophage is not only a key cell type responding to IFN-γ but also a potent IFN-γ–producing cell. PMID:9625771

  9. Effect of Transcranial Direct-Current Stimulation Combined with Treadmill Training on Balance and Functional Performance in Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Natália de Almeida Carvalho; Grecco, Luanda André Collange; Galli, Manuela; Fregni, Felipe; Oliveira, Cláudia Santos

    2014-01-01

    Background Cerebral palsy refers to permanent, mutable motor development disorders stemming from a primary brain lesion, causing secondary musculoskeletal problems and limitations in activities of daily living. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of gait training combined with transcranial direct-current stimulation over the primary motor cortex on balance and functional performance in children with cerebral palsy. Methods A double-blind randomized controlled study was carried out with 24 children aged five to 12 years with cerebral palsy randomly allocated to two intervention groups (blocks of six and stratified based on GMFCS level (levels I-II or level III).The experimental group (12 children) was submitted to treadmill training and anodal stimulation of the primary motor cortex. The control group (12 children) was submitted to treadmill training and placebo transcranial direct-current stimulation. Training was performed in five weekly sessions for 2 weeks. Evaluations consisted of stabilometric analysis as well as the administration of the Pediatric Balance Scale and Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory one week before the intervention, one week after the completion of the intervention and one month after the completion of the intervention. All patients and two examiners were blinded to the allocation of the children to the different groups. Results The experimental group exhibited better results in comparison to the control group with regard to anteroposterior sway (eyes open and closed; p<0.05), mediolateral sway (eyes closed; p<0.05) and the Pediatric Balance Scale both one week and one month after the completion of the protocol. Conclusion Gait training on a treadmill combined with anodal stimulation of the primary motor cortex led to improvements in static balance and functional performance in children with cerebral palsy. Trial Registration Ensaiosclinicos.gov.br/RBR-9B5DH7 PMID:25171216

  10. Effects of Amphetamine-CNS Depressant Combinations and of Other CNS Stimulants in Four-Choice Drug Discriminations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Mi; Wessinger, William D.; McMillan, D. E.

    2005-01-01

    Three pigeons were trained to discriminate among 5 mg/kg pentobarbital, 2 mg/kg amphetamine, a combination of these two drugs at these doses, and saline using a four-choice procedure (amphetamine--pentobarbital group). Three other pigeons were trained to discriminate among 5 mg/kg morphine, 2 mg/kg methamphetamine, a combination of these two drugs…

  11. The combined influence of stretch, mobility and electrical stimulation in the prevention of muscle fiber atrophy caused hypokinesia and hypodynamia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldspink, G.; Goldspink, D.; Loughna, P.

    1984-01-01

    The morphological and biochemical changes which occur in the hind limb muscles of the rat in response to hypokinesia and hypodynamia were investigated. Hind limb cast fixation and suspension techniques were employed to study the musclar atrophy after five days of hypokinesia and hypodynamia induced by suspension, appreciable muscular atrophy was apparent, particularly in the anti-gravity muscles. The effect of passive stretching and electrical stimulation on muscle atrophy was studied. Changes in muscle protein mass were assessed with spectrophotometric and radioactive techniques. Passive stretch is shown to counteract muscle disuse atrophy. The change in the numbers of specific muscle fibers in atrophied muscles is discussed.

  12. The observation of manual grasp actions affects the control of speech: a combined behavioral and Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation study.

    PubMed

    Gentilucci, Maurizio; Campione, Giovanna Cristina; Dalla Volta, Riccardo; Bernardis, Paolo

    2009-12-01

    Does the mirror system affect the control of speech? This issue was addressed in behavioral and Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) experiments. In behavioral experiment 1, participants pronounced the syllable /da/ while observing (1) a hand grasping large and small objects with power and precision grasps, respectively, (2) a foot interacting with large and small objects and (3) differently sized objects presented alone. Voice formant 1 was higher when observing power as compared to precision grasp, whereas it remained unaffected by observation of the different types of foot interaction and objects alone. In TMS experiment 2, we stimulated hand motor cortex, while participants observed the two types of grasp. Motor Evoked Potentials (MEPs) of hand muscles active during the two types of grasp were greater when observing power than precision grasp. In experiments 3-5, TMS was applied to tongue motor cortex of participants silently pronouncing the syllable /da/ and simultaneously observing power and precision grasps, pantomimes of the two types of grasps, and differently sized objects presented alone. Tongue MEPs were greater when observing power than precision grasp either executed or pantomimed. Finally, in TMS experiment 6, the observation of foot interaction with large and small objects did not modulate tongue MEPs. We hypothesized that grasp observation activated motor commands to the mouth as well as to the hand that were congruent with the hand kinematics implemented in the observed type of grasp. The commands to the mouth selectively affected postures of phonation organs and consequently basic features of phonological units.

  13. Low-frequency electrical stimulation combined with a cooling vest improves recovery of elite kayakers following a simulated 1000-m race in a hot environment.

    PubMed

    Borne, R; Hausswirth, C; Costello, J T; Bieuzen, F

    2015-06-01

    This study compared the effects of a low-frequency electrical stimulation (LFES; Veinoplus(®) Sport, Ad Rem Technology, Paris, France), a low-frequency electrical stimulation combined with a cooling vest (LFESCR ) and an active recovery combined with a cooling vest (ACTCR ) as recovery strategies on performance (racing time and pacing strategies), physiologic and perceptual responses between two sprint kayak simulated races, in a hot environment (∼32 wet-bulb-globe temperature). Eight elite male kayakers performed two successive 1000-m kayak time trials (TT1 and TT2), separated by a short-term recovery period, including a 30-min of the respective recovery intervention protocol, in a randomized crossover design. Racing time, power output, and stroke rate were recorded for each time trial. Blood lactate concentration, pH, core, skin and body temperatures were measured before and after both TT1 and TT2 and at mid- and post-recovery intervention. Perceptual ratings of thermal sensation were also collected. LFESCR was associated with a very likely effect in performance restoration compared with ACTCR (99/0/1%) and LFES conditions (98/0/2%). LFESCR induced a significant decrease in body temperature and thermal sensation at post-recovery intervention, which is not observed in ACTCR condition. In conclusion, the combination of LFES and wearing a cooling vest (LFESCR ) improves performance restoration between two 1000-m kayak time trials achieved by elite athletes, in the heat. PMID:25943673

  14. Low-frequency electrical stimulation combined with a cooling vest improves recovery of elite kayakers following a simulated 1000-m race in a hot environment.

    PubMed

    Borne, R; Hausswirth, C; Costello, J T; Bieuzen, F

    2015-06-01

    This study compared the effects of a low-frequency electrical stimulation (LFES; Veinoplus(®) Sport, Ad Rem Technology, Paris, France), a low-frequency electrical stimulation combined with a cooling vest (LFESCR ) and an active recovery combined with a cooling vest (ACTCR ) as recovery strategies on performance (racing time and pacing strategies), physiologic and perceptual responses between two sprint kayak simulated races, in a hot environment (∼32 wet-bulb-globe temperature). Eight elite male kayakers performed two successive 1000-m kayak time trials (TT1 and TT2), separated by a short-term recovery period, including a 30-min of the respective recovery intervention protocol, in a randomized crossover design. Racing time, power output, and stroke rate were recorded for each time trial. Blood lactate concentration, pH, core, skin and body temperatures were measured before and after both TT1 and TT2 and at mid- and post-recovery intervention. Perceptual ratings of thermal sensation were also collected. LFESCR was associated with a very likely effect in performance restoration compared with ACTCR (99/0/1%) and LFES conditions (98/0/2%). LFESCR induced a significant decrease in body temperature and thermal sensation at post-recovery intervention, which is not observed in ACTCR condition. In conclusion, the combination of LFES and wearing a cooling vest (LFESCR ) improves performance restoration between two 1000-m kayak time trials achieved by elite athletes, in the heat.

  15. The advantage of combining MEG and EEG: comparison to fMRI in focally stimulated visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Sharon, Dahlia; Hämäläinen, Matti S; Tootell, Roger B H; Halgren, Eric; Belliveau, John W

    2007-07-15

    To exploit the high (millisecond) temporal resolution of magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG) for measuring neuronal dynamics within well-defined brain regions, it is important to quantitatively assess their localizing ability. Previous modeling studies and empirical data suggest that a combination of MEG and EEG signals should yield the most accurate localization, due to their complementary sensitivities. However, these two modalities have rarely been explicitly combined for source estimation in studies of recorded brain activity, and a quantitative empirical assessment of their abilities, combined and separate, is currently lacking. Here we studied early visual responses to focal Gabor patches flashed during subject fixation. MEG and EEG data were collected simultaneously and were compared with the functional MRI (fMRI) localization produced by identical stimuli in the same subjects. This allowed direct evaluation of the localization accuracy of separate and combined MEG/EEG inverse solutions. We found that the localization accuracy of the combined MEG+EEG solution was consistently better than that of either modality alone, using three different source estimation approaches. Further analysis suggests that this improved localization is due to the different properties of the two imaging modalities rather than simply due to increased total channel number. Thus, combining MEG and EEG data is important for high-resolution spatiotemporal studies of the human brain. PMID:17532230

  16. Encouraging overweight students with intellectual disability to actively perform walking activity using an air mouse combined with preferred stimulation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Jui; Chang, Man-Ling; Shih, Ching-Hsiang

    2016-08-01

    This study continues the research on using an air mouse as a physical activity detector. An air mouse is embedded with a MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical Systems) gyro sensor, which can measure even the slightest movement in the air. The air mouse was strapped to one of each participant's calves to detect walking activity. This study was conducted to evaluate whether four students with intellectual disability who were overweight and disliked exercising could be motivated to engage in walking actively by linking the target response with preferred stimulation. Single-subject research with ABAB design was adopted in this study. The experimental data showed substantial increases in the participants' target responses (i.e. the performance of the activity of walking) during the intervention phases compared to the baseline phases. The practical and developmental implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:27037988

  17. Dystroglycan is involved in laminin-1-stimulated motility of Müller glial cells: combined velocity and directionality analysis.

    PubMed

    Méhes, Elöd; Czirók, András; Hegedüs, Balázs; Szabó, Bálint; Vicsek, Tamás; Satz, Jakob; Campbell, Kevin; Jancsik, Veronika

    2005-03-01

    We investigate the role of dystroglycan, a major laminin-1 receptor and central member of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex, in the laminin-1 induced motility of cultured Muller glial cells. Binding of laminin-1 to dystroglycan was prevented by IIH6, a function-blocking monoclonal antibody against alpha-dystroglycan. As an alternative means of inhibition, we used heparin to mask the dystroglycan binding site of the laminin-1, known to overlap with heparin binding sites. Cell motility was characterized in a two-dimensional motility assay based on computer-controlled videomicroscopy and statistical analysis of cellular trajectories. We obtained data on both the cell velocity and the diffusion index, a measure of direction-changing frequency. Both means of inhibition of dystroglycan function led to a significant decrease in the ability of laminin-1 to stimulate cell migration. At the same time, dystroglycan function does not appear to be involved in laminin-1-dependent increase in process dynamism and direction-changing activity.

  18. Galvanic vestibular stimulation combines with Earth-horizontal rotation in roll to induce the illusion of translation.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Erich; Bartl, Klaus; Glasauer, Stefan

    2009-05-01

    Human head rotation in roll around an earth-horizontal axis constitutes a vestibular stimulus that, by its rotational component, acts on the semicircular canals (SCC) and that, by its tilt of the gravity vector, also acts on the otoliths. Galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) is thought to resemble mainly a rotation in roll. A superposition of sinusoidal GVS with a natural earth-horizontal roll movement was therefore applied in order to cancel the rotation effects and to isolate the otolith activation. By self-adjusting the amplitude and phase of GVS, subjects were able to minimize their sensation of rotation and to generate the perception of a linear translation. The final adjustments are in the range of a model that predicts SCC activation during natural rotations and GVS. This indicates that the tilt-translation ambiguity of the otoliths is resolved by SCC-otolith interaction. It is concluded that GVS might be able to cancel rotations in roll and that the residual tilt of the gravitoinertial force is possibly interpreted as a linear translation.

  19. Combining Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation and Tailor-Made Notched Music Training to Decrease Tinnitus-Related Distress – A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Teismann, Henning; Wollbrink, Andreas; Okamoto, Hidehiko; Schlaug, Gottfried; Rudack, Claudia; Pantev, Christo

    2014-01-01

    The central auditory system has a crucial role in tinnitus generation and maintenance. Curative treatments for tinnitus do not yet exist. However, recent attempts in the therapeutic application of both acoustic stimulation/training procedures and electric/magnetic brain stimulation techniques have yielded promising results. Here, for the first time we combined tailor-made notched music training (TMNMT) with transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in an effort to modulate TMNMT efficacy in the treatment of 32 patients with tonal tinnitus and without severe hearing loss. TMNMT is characterized by regular listening to so-called notched music, which is generated by digitally removing the frequency band of one octave width centered at the individual tinnitus frequency. TMNMT was applied for 10 subsequent days (2.5 hours of daily treatment). During the initial 5 days of treatment and the initial 30 minutes of TMNMT sessions, tDCS (current strength: 2 mA; anodal (N = 10) vs. cathodal (N = 11) vs. sham (N = 11) groups) was applied simultaneously. The active electrode was placed on the head surface over left auditory cortex; the reference electrode was put over right supra-orbital cortex. To evaluate treatment outcome, tinnitus-related distress and perceived tinnitus loudness were assessed using standardized tinnitus questionnaires and a visual analogue scale. The results showed a significant treatment effect reflected in the Tinnitus Handicap Questionnaire that was largest after 5 days of treatment. This effect remained significant at the end of follow-up 31 days after treatment cessation. Crucially, tDCS did not significantly modulate treatment efficacy - it did not make a difference whether anodal, cathodal, or sham tDCS was applied. Possible explanations for the findings and functional modifications of the experimental design for future studies (e.g. the selection of control conditions) are discussed. PMID:24587113

  20. Combined effect of follicle-follicle interactions and declining follicle-stimulating hormone on murine follicle health in vitro.

    PubMed

    Baker, S J; Srsen, V; Lapping, R; Spears, N

    2001-10-01

    Follicle selection occurs throughout an adult female's reproductive life, with selected, dominant follicle(s) developing to the preovulatory stage whereas the remaining, subordinate follicles within the growing cohort instead undergo atresia and die. To date, most research into follicle dominance has concentrated on its endocrine regulation, although it seems likely that intraovarian mechanisms are also involved in its regulation. We demonstrate here that the response of singly cultured murine follicles to declining concentrations of FSH depends on their developmental stage, with follicles at an earlier stage of development being much more susceptible than mature follicles to a lowering of FSH levels. We then extrapolate this information to follicle cocultures, in which a large dominant follicle was grown with a small subordinate follicle in a manner that maintained a dominant/subordinate relationship, with follicle health assessed by a terminal transferase-mediated 2'-deoxyuracil 5'-triphosphate nick end-labeled reaction on whole-follicle mounts. Our investigations show a combined negative effect of coculture and FSH withdrawal on small subordinate follicles, such that subordinate follicles cocultured with dominant follicles and subjected to a lowering of FSH levels during the culture period exhibit a greatly increased incidence of apoptosis in the granulosa cells (750% increase) compared with that exhibited by the dominant follicles (97% increase). We suggest that a similar interaction between endocrine and intraovarian factors regulates follicular dominance in vivo, such that dominant follicles, in addition to bringing about a fall in FSH levels via the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, exert local, direct effects on subordinate follicles, with both of these influences combining to induce atresia in subordinate follicles.

  1. Task-specific brain reorganization in motor recovery induced by a hybrid-rehabilitation combining training with brain stimulation after stroke.

    PubMed

    Koganemaru, Satoko; Sawamoto, Nobukatsu; Aso, Toshihiko; Sagara, Akiko; Ikkaku, Tomoko; Shimada, Kenji; Kanematsu, Madoka; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Domen, Kazuhisa; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Mima, Tatsuya

    2015-03-01

    Recently, we have developed a new hybrid-rehabilitation combining 5Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and extensor motor training of the paretic upper-limb for stroke patients with flexor hypertonia. We previously showed that the extensor-specific plastic change in M1 was associated with beneficial effects of our protocol (Koganemaru et al., 2010). Here, we investigated whether extensor-specific multiregional brain reorganization occurred after the hybrid-rehabilitation using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Eleven chronic stroke patients were scanned while performing upper-limb extensor movements. Untrained flexor movements were used as a control condition. The scanning and clinical assessments were done before, immediately and 2 weeks after the hybrid-rehabilitation. As a result, during the trained extensor movements, the imaging analysis showed a significant reduction of brain activity in the ipsilesional sensorimotor cortex, the contralesional cingulate motor cortex and the contralesional premotor cortex in association with functional improvements of the paretic hands. The activation change was not found for the control condition. Our results suggested that use-dependent plasticity induced by repetitive motor training with brain stimulation might be related to task-specific multi-regional brain reorganization. It provides a key to understand why repetitive training of the target action is one of the most powerful rehabilitation strategies to help patients.

  2. Combining the single-walled carbon nanotubes with low voltage electrical stimulation to improve accumulation of nanomedicines in tumor for effective cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Pei-Chi; Peng, Cheng-Liang; Shieh, Ming-Jium

    2016-03-10

    Effective delivery of biomolecules or functional nanoparticles into target sites has always been the primary objective for cancer therapy. We demonstrated that by combining single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with low-voltage (LV) electrical stimulation, biomolecule delivery can be effectively enhanced through reversible electroporation (EP). Clear pore formation in the cell membrane is observed due to LV (50V) pulse electrical stimulation amplified by SWNTs. The cell morphology remains intact and high cell viability is retained. This modality of SWNT + LV pulses can effectively transfer both small molecules and macromolecules into cells through reversible EP. The results of animal studies also suggest that treatment with LV pulses alone cannot increase vascular permeability in tumors unless after the injection of SWNTs. The nanoparticles can cross the permeable vasculature, which enhances their accumulation in the tumor tissue. Therefore, in cancer treatment, both SWNT + LV pulse treatment followed by the injection of LIPO-DOX® and SWNT/DOX + LV pulse treatment can increase tumor inhibition and delay tumor growth. This novel treatment modality applied in a human cancer xenograft model can provide a safe and effective therapy using various nanomedicines in cancer treatment. PMID:26812005

  3. Radix Ilicis Pubescentis total flavonoids combined with mobilization of bone marrow stem cells to protect against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Ming-san; Guo, Lin; Li, Rui-qi; Ma, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that Radix Ilicis Pubescentis total flavonoids have a neuroprotective effect, but it remains unclear whether Radix Ilicis Pubescentis total flavonoids have a synergistic effect with the recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor-mobilized bone marrow stem cell transplantation on cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. Rat ischemia models were administered 0.3, 0.15 and 0.075 g/kg Radix Ilicis Pubescentis total flavonoids from 3 days before modeling to 2 days after injury. Results showed that Radix Ilicis Pubescentis total flavonoids could reduce pathological injury in rats with cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. The number of Nissl bodies increased, Bax protein expression decreased, Bcl-2 protein expression increased and the number of CD34-positive cells increased. Therefore, Radix Ilicis Pubescentis total flavonoids can improve the bone marrow stem cell mobilization effect, enhance the anti-apoptotic ability of nerve cells, and have a neuroprotective effect on cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats. PMID:27073381

  4. Combining natural language processing and network analysis to examine how advocacy organizations stimulate conversation on social media

    PubMed Central

    Bail, Christopher Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Social media sites are rapidly becoming one of the most important forums for public deliberation about advocacy issues. However, social scientists have not explained why some advocacy organizations produce social media messages that inspire far-ranging conversation among social media users, whereas the vast majority of them receive little or no attention. I argue that advocacy organizations are more likely to inspire comments from new social media audiences if they create “cultural bridges,” or produce messages that combine conversational themes within an advocacy field that are seldom discussed together. I use natural language processing, network analysis, and a social media application to analyze how cultural bridges shaped public discourse about autism spectrum disorders on Facebook over the course of 1.5 years, controlling for various characteristics of advocacy organizations, their social media audiences, and the broader social context in which they interact. I show that organizations that create substantial cultural bridges provoke 2.52 times more comments about their messages from new social media users than those that do not, controlling for these factors. This study thus offers a theory of cultural messaging and public deliberation and computational techniques for text analysis and application-based survey research. PMID:27694580

  5. Alveolar macrophage phagocytic activity is enhanced with LPS priming, and combined stimulation of LPS and lipoteichoic acid synergistically induce pro-inflammatory cytokines in pigs.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad Ariful; Pröll, Maren; Hölker, Michael; Tholen, Ernst; Tesfaye, Dawit; Looft, Christian; Schellander, Karl; Cinar, Mehmet Ulas

    2013-12-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate LPS and lipoteichoic acid (LTA)-induced TLRs, associated signaling molecules and inflammatory mediators, as well as to compare their combined effect in porcine alveolar macrophages. Macrophages were incubated for 24 h with various concentrations of LPS, LTA, LPS + LTA or control. Multiple concentrations of LPS elicited marked up-regulation in mRNA for TLR2 and TLR4, CD14, MD2, MyD88, IRAK-4 and TRAF6 compared with the control. LTA had no effect on TLR4 and MD2; only higher doses up-regulated TLR2, CD14, MyD88, IRAK-4 and TRAF6 mRNA. LPS-activated cells released IL1-β, IL12-β, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-8, IFN-γ and IL-10 in a dose-dependent manner, while LTA had no effect on IL-1β, IL-6 and IFN-γ. Higher doses of LTA induced IL-12β, TNF-α, IL-8 and IL-10. Combined stimulation augmented TLR2, CD14 and MyD88 mRNA, and subsequently produced elevated levels of IL-6, TNF-α and IL-8 when compared with LPS and LTA alone. Additionally, phagocytosis of macrophages was significantly increased following low concentration of LPS treatment. Only low levels of NO (nitric oxide) were detected in the LPS group. Overall, compared with LPS, LTA was a relatively weak inducer, and co-stimulation accelerated gene and cytokine production associated with pulmonary innate immune function.

  6. Combined stimulation of IL-2 and 4-1BB receptors augments the antitumor activity of E7 DNA vaccines by increasing Ag-specific CTL responses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ha; Kwon, Byungsuk; Sin, Jeong-Im

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is a major cause of cervical cancer. Here, we investigate whether concurrent therapy using HPV E7 DNA vaccines (pE7) plus IL-2 vs. IL-15 cDNA and anti-4-1BB Abs might augment antitumor activity against established tumors. IL-2 cDNA was slightly better than IL-15 cDNA as a pE7 adjuvant. Co-delivery of pE7+IL-2 cDNA increased tumor cure rates from 7% to 27%, whereas co-delivery of pE7+IL-2 cDNA with anti-4-1BB Abs increased tumor cure rates from 27% to 67% and elicited long-term memory responses. This increased activity was concomitant with increased induction of Ag-specific CTL activity and IFN-γ responses, but not with Ag-specific IgG production. Moreover, the combined stimulation of IL-2 and 4-1BB receptors with rIL-2 and anti-4-1BB Abs resulted in enhanced production of IFN-γ from Ag-specific CD8+ T cells. However, this effect was abolished by treatment with anti-IL-2 Abs and 4-1BB-Fc, suggesting that the observed effect was IL-2- and anti-4-1BB Ab-specific. A similar result was also obtained for Ag-specific CTL activity. Thus, these studies demonstrate that combined stimulation through the IL-2 and 4-1BB receptors augments the Ag-specific CD8+ CTL responses induced by pE7, increasing tumor cure rates and long-term antitumor immune memory. These findings may have implications for the design of DNA-based therapeutic vaccines against cancer. PMID:24391824

  7. Mirror therapy combined with biofeedback functional electrical stimulation for motor recovery of upper extremities after stroke: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Hee; Lee, Byoung-Hee

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of mirror therapy in combination with biofeedback functional electrical stimulation (BF-FES) on motor recovery of the upper extremities after stroke. Twenty-nine patients who suffered a stroke > 6 months prior participated in this study and were randomly allocated to three groups. The BF-FES + mirror therapy and FES + mirror therapy groups practiced training for 5 × 30 min sessions over a 4-week period. The control group received a conventional physical therapy program. The following clinical tools were used to assess motor recovery of the upper extremities: electrical muscle tester, electrogoniometer, dual-inclinometer, electrodynamometer, the Box and Block Test (BBT) and Jabsen Taylor Hand Function Test (JHFT), the Functional Independence Measure, the Modified Ashworth Scale, and the Stroke Specific Quality of Life (SSQOL) assessment. The BF-FES + mirror therapy group showed significant improvement in wrist extension as revealed by the Manual Muscle Test and Range of Motion (p < 0.05). The BF-FES + mirror therapy group showed significant improvement in the BBT, JTHT, and SSQOL compared with the FES + mirror therapy group and control group (p < 0.05). We found that BF-FES + mirror therapy induced motor recovery and improved quality of life. These results suggest that mirror therapy, in combination with BF-FES, is feasible and effective for motor recovery of the upper extremities after stroke.

  8. Role of percutaneous posterior tibial nerve stimulation either alone or combined with an anticholinergic agent in treating patients with overactive bladder

    PubMed Central

    Kızılyel, Sadık; Karakeçi, Ahmet; Ozan, Tunç; Ünüş, İhsan; Barut, Osman; Onur, Rahmi

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy of percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS), either alone or combined with an anticholinergic agent, in treating patients with an overactive bladder (OAB) in whom previous conservative treatment failed. Material and methods In this study, we included a total of 30 female patients with OAB in whom all conventional therapies failed between January 2010 and April 2011. Patients were randomly divided into three groups: Group 1, PTNS group; Group 2, patients receiving an anticholinergic agent; and Group 3, patients receiving both PTNS and anticholinergic agent. PTNS treatment continued for 12 weeks with each session lasting 30 min. Results All parameters of the bladder diary significantly improved in all groups (p<0.05). Similarly, all scores measured by questionnaires (UDI-6, IIQ-7, and OABSS) revealed significant improvements in all groups. When the improvements in symptoms were compared among the groups, there was a statistically significantly higher improvement in groups 1 and 3 than in Group 2. Conclusion PTNS is a safe, simple, and minimally invasive treatment modality in patients with OAB, and it may be suggested either alone or in combination with anticholinergics when conventional treatments fail. PMID:26623150

  9. The evaluation of clinical therapy effects of oral western medicine combined with magnetic pulse acupoint stimulation in treating elderly patients with coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xin; Guo, Li; Jiang, Zheng-Ming; Xu, Ai-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Treat the patients suffered from coronary heart disease with oral western medicine, combining with magnetic pulse acupoint stimulation, and observe the therapeutic effects of such combination therapy method. Methods: 56 old people with coronary heart disease are randomly divided into a treatment group and a control group. Both groups of patients are treated by the routine drugs, in addition, the patients of the treatment group are treated by magnetic pulse therapy additionally. Compare clinical symptoms, blood lipid and blood rheological indexes of the patients in the two groups when they are selected and after 30 days’ treatment. Results: after 30 days’ treatment, it is found that clinical symptoms, blood lipid and blood rheological indexes of the patients in the treatment group are significantly improved compared with those when they are selected and those of the control group (P<0.05). Conclusion: patients with coronary heart disease, treated by pulsed magnetic therapy and the conventional drug intervention, had relieved synptom, improve blood lipid and heart blood supply function. PMID:26309664

  10. Bilateral pallidotomy for treatment of Parkinson's disease induced corticobulbar syndrome and psychic akinesia avoidable by globus pallidus lesion combined with contralateral stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Merello, M; Starkstein, S; Nouzeilles, M; Kuzis, G; Leiguarda, R

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Posteroventral pallidotomy (PVP) has proved to be an effective method for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. However, data on bilateral procedures are still limited. To assess the effects of bilateral globus pallidus (GPi) lesion and to compare it with a combination of unilateral GPi lesion plus contralateral GPi stimulation (PVP+PVS), an open blind randomised trial was designed.
METHODS—A prospective series of patients with severe Parkinson's disease refractory to medical treatment, and severe drug induced dyskinesias, were randomised either to simultaneous bilateral PVP or simultaneous PVP+PVS. All patients were assessed with the core assessment programme for intracerebral transplantation (CAPIT), and a comprehensive neuropsychological and neuropsychiatric battery both before surgery and 3 months later.
RESULTS—The severe adverse effects found in the first three patients subjected to bilateral PVP led to discontinuation of the protocol. All three patients developed depression and apathy. Speech, salivation, and swallowing, as well as freezing, walking, and falling, dramatically worsened. By contrast, all three patients undergoing PVP+PVS had a significant motor improvement.
CONCLUSION—Bilateral simultaneous lesions within the GPi may produce severe motor and psychiatric complications. On the other hand, a combination of PVP+ PVS significantly improves parkinsonian symptoms not associated with the side effects elicited by bilateral lesions.

 PMID:11606671

  11. Colony-stimulating factors for the treatment of the hematopoietic component of the acute radiation syndrome (H-ARS): a review.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijay K; Newman, Victoria L; Seed, Thomas M

    2015-01-01

    One of the greatest national security threats to the United States is the detonation of an improvised nuclear device or a radiological dispersal device in a heavily populated area. As such, this type of security threat is considered to be of relatively low risk, but one that would have an extraordinary high impact on health and well-being of the US citizenry. Psychological counseling and medical assessments would be necessary for all those significantly impacted by the nuclear/radiological event. Direct medical interventions would be necessary for all those individuals who had received substantial radiation exposures (e.g., >1 Gy). Although no drugs or products have yet been specifically approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) to treat the effects of acute radiation syndrome (ARS), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and pegylated G-CSF have been used off label for treating radiation accident victims. Recent threats of terrorist attacks using nuclear or radiologic devices makes it imperative that the medical community have up-to-date information and a clear understanding of treatment protocols using therapeutically effective recombinant growth factors and cytokines such as G-CSF and GM-CSF for patients exposed to injurious doses of ionizing radiation. Based on limited human studies with underlying biology, we see that the recombinants, G-CSF and GM-CSF appear to have modest, but significant medicinal value in treating radiation accident victims. In the near future, the US FDA may approve G-CSF and GM-CSF as ‘Emergency Use Authorization’ (EUA) for managing radiation-induced aplasia, an ARS-related pathology. In this article, we review the status of growth factors for the treatment of radiological/nuclear accident victims. PMID:25215458

  12. A single-subject study to evaluate the inhibitory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation combined with traditional dysphagia therapy in patients with post-stroke dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Ghelichi, Leila; Joghataei, Mohammad Taghi; Jalaie, Shohreh; Nakhostin-Ansari, Noureddin; Forogh, Bijan; Mehrpour, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Background: Post-stroke dysphagia is common and is associated with the development of pneumonia. To investigate the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) combined with traditional dysphagia therapy (TDT) on swallowing function in patients with post-stroke dysphagia. Methods: In this single-subject study, four patients with dysphagia post-stroke included. The patients received the rTMS applied to the intact cerebral hemisphere at 1 Hz with train of 1200 for 5 consecutive days combined with TDT 3 days per week for 6 weeks. The main outcome measure was the Mann Assessment of Swallowing Ability (MASA). Measurements were taken before, after the end of 5th, 10th, 15th treatment sessions, and after the end of the treatment (18th session). Results: The MASA scores improved in all patients following treatment. The maximum and minimum change in level between the baseline phase and treatment phase was +84 and +36. The greatest percentage improvement was observed after 5th treatment sessions ranging between 11 and 35%. The treatment trend was upward shown by the directions of the slopes indicated by positive values (+9.1-+20.7). The dysphagia was resolved after 10th treatment session in all participants. The aspiration resolved in two participants after the 5th treatment session and resolved in another 2 participants after the 10th treatment session. Conclusion: The combination therapy of rTMS plus TDT improved swallowing function in patients with post-stroke dysphagia. Further research with a larger sample size is recommended.

  13. Effect of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation, Cold, and a Combination Treatment on Pain, Decreased Range of Motion, and Strength Loss Associated with Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness

    PubMed Central

    Denegar, Craig R.; Perrin, David H.

    1992-01-01

    Athletic trainers have a variety of therapeutic agents at their disposal to treat musculoskeletal pain, but little objective evidence exists of the efficacy of the modalities they use. In this study, delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) served as a model for musculoskeletal injury in order to: (1) compare the changes in perceived pain, elbow extension range of motion, and strength loss in subjects experiencing DOMS in the elbow flexor muscle group following a single treatment with either transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), cold, a combination of TENS and cold, sham TENS, or 20 minutes of rest; (2) compare the effects of combining static stretching with these treatments; and (3) determine if decreased pain is accompanied by a restoration of strength. DOMS was induced in the non-dominant elbow flexor muscle group in 40 females (age = 22.0 ± 4.3 yr) with repeated eccentric contractions. Forty-eight hours following exercise, all subjects presented with pain, decreased elbow extension range of motion, and decreased strength consistent with DOMS. Subjects were randomly assigned to 20-minute treatments followed by static stretching. Cold, TENS, and the combined treatment resulted in significant decreases in perceived pain. Treatments with cold resulted in a significant increase in elbow extension range of motion. Static stretching also significantly reduced perceived pain. Only small, nonsignificant changes in muscle strength were observed following treatment or stretching, regardless of the treatment group. These results suggest that the muscle weakness associated with DOMS is not the result of inhibition caused by pain. The results suggest that these modalities are effective in treating the pain and muscle spasm associated with DOMS, and that decreased pain may not be an accurate indicator of the recovery of muscle strength. PMID:16558162

  14. Combined neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) with fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) and traditional swallowing rehabilitation in the treatment of stroke-related dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shu-Fen; Hsu, Chien-Wei; Lin, Huey-Shyan; Sun, Hsien-Pin; Chang, Ping-Hsin; Hsieh, Wan-Ling; Wang, Jue-Long

    2013-12-01

    Dysphagia is common after stroke. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) and fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) for the treatment of dysphagia have gained in popularity, but the combined application of these promising modalities has rarely been studied. We aimed to evaluate whether combined NMES, FEES, and traditional swallowing rehabilitation can improve swallowing functions in stroke patients with moderate to severe dysphagia. Thirty-two patients with moderate to severe dysphagia poststroke (≥3 weeks) were recruited. Patients received 12 sessions of NMES for 1 h/day, 5 days/week within a period of 2-3 weeks. FEES was done before and after NMES for evaluation and to guide dysphagic therapy. All patients subsequently received 12 sessions of traditional swallowing rehabilitation (50 min/day, 3 days/week) for 4 weeks. Primary outcome measure was the Functional Oral Intake Scale (FOIS). Secondary outcome measures included clinical degree of dysphagia, the patient's self-perception of swallowing ability, and the patient's global satisfaction with therapy. Patients were assessed at baseline, after NMES, at 6-month follow-up, and at 2-year follow-up. Twenty-nine patients completed the study. FOIS, degree of dysphagia, and patient's self-perception of swallowing improved significantly after NMES, at the 6-month follow-up, and at the 2-year follow-up (p < 0.001, each compared with baseline). Most patients reported considerable satisfaction with no serious adverse events. Twenty-three of the 29 (79.3 %) patients maintained oral diet with no pulmonary complications at 2-year follow-up. This preliminary case series demonstrated that combined NMES, FEES, and traditional swallowing rehabilitation showed promise for improving swallowing functions in stroke patients with moderate-to-severe dysphagia. The benefits were maintained for up to 2 years. The results are promising enough to justify further studies.

  15. Combined stimulation of the glycine and polyamine sites of the NMDA receptor attenuates NMDA blockade-induced learning deficits of rats in a 14-unit T-maze.

    PubMed

    Meyer, R C; Knox, J; Purwin, D A; Spangler, E L; Ingram, D K

    1998-02-01

    The present study examined the effects of multi-site activation of the glycine and polyamine sites of the NMDA receptor on memory formation in rats learning a 14-unit T-maze task. The competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, (+/-)-3-(2-carboxypiperazine-4-yl)-propyl-1-phosphonic acid (CPP, 9 mg/kg), was used to impair learning. The objectives were two-fold: (1) to investigate the effects of independent stimulation of the strychnine-insensitive glycine site or the polyamine site; (2) to investigate the effects of simultaneous activation of these two sites. Male, Fischer-344 rats were pretrained to a criterion of 13 out of 15 shock avoidances in a straight runway, and 24 h later were trained in a 14-unit T-maze that also required shock avoidance. Prior to maze training, rats received intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of saline, saline plus CPP, CPP plus the glycine agonist, D-cycloserine (DCS, 30 or 40 mg/kg), CPP plus the polyamine agonist, spermine (SPM, 2.5 or 5 mg/kg), or CPP plus a combination of DCS (7.5 mg/kg) and SPM (0.625 mg/kg). Individual administration of either DCS or SPM attenuated the CPP-induced maze learning impairment in a dose-dependent manner. However, the combined treatment with both DCS and SPM completely reversed the learning deficit at doses five-fold less than either drug given alone. These findings provide additional evidence that the glycine and polyamine modulatory sites of the NMDA receptor are involved in memory formation. Furthermore, the potent synergistic effect resulting from combined activation of the glycine and polyamine sites would suggest a stronger interaction between these two sites than previously considered, and might provide new therapeutic approaches for enhancing glutamatergic function. PMID:9498733

  16. A single-subject study to evaluate the inhibitory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation combined with traditional dysphagia therapy in patients with post-stroke dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Ghelichi, Leila; Joghataei, Mohammad Taghi; Jalaie, Shohreh; Nakhostin-Ansari, Noureddin; Forogh, Bijan; Mehrpour, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Background: Post-stroke dysphagia is common and is associated with the development of pneumonia. To investigate the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) combined with traditional dysphagia therapy (TDT) on swallowing function in patients with post-stroke dysphagia. Methods: In this single-subject study, four patients with dysphagia post-stroke included. The patients received the rTMS applied to the intact cerebral hemisphere at 1 Hz with train of 1200 for 5 consecutive days combined with TDT 3 days per week for 6 weeks. The main outcome measure was the Mann Assessment of Swallowing Ability (MASA). Measurements were taken before, after the end of 5th, 10th, 15th treatment sessions, and after the end of the treatment (18th session). Results: The MASA scores improved in all patients following treatment. The maximum and minimum change in level between the baseline phase and treatment phase was +84 and +36. The greatest percentage improvement was observed after 5th treatment sessions ranging between 11 and 35%. The treatment trend was upward shown by the directions of the slopes indicated by positive values (+9.1-+20.7). The dysphagia was resolved after 10th treatment session in all participants. The aspiration resolved in two participants after the 5th treatment session and resolved in another 2 participants after the 10th treatment session. Conclusion: The combination therapy of rTMS plus TDT improved swallowing function in patients with post-stroke dysphagia. Further research with a larger sample size is recommended. PMID:27648175

  17. Combined application of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound and functional electrical stimulation accelerates bone-tendon junction healing in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianzhong; Qu, Jin; Xu, Daqi; Zhang, Tao; Qin, Ling; Lu, Hongbin

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study was to elucidate the combined use of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and functional electrical stimulation (FES) on patella-patellar tendon (PPT) junction healing using a partial patellectomy model in rabbits. LIPUS was delivered continuously starting day 3 postoperative until week 6. FES was applied on quadriceps muscles to induce tensile force to the repaired PPT junction 5 days per week for 6 weeks since week 7 postoperatively. Forty rabbits with partial patellectomy were randomly divided into four groups: control, LIPUS alone, FES alone, and LIPUS + FES groups. At week 12, the PPT complexes were harvested for histology, radiographs, peripheral quantitative computed tomography, and biomechanical testing. There was better remodeling of newly formed bone and fibrocartilage zone in the three treatment groups compared with the control group. LIPUS and/or FES treatments significantly increased the area and bone mineral content of new bone. The failure load and ultimate strength of PPT complex were also highly improved in the three treatment groups. More new bone formed and higher tensile properties were showed in the LIPUS + FES group compared with the LIPUS or FES alone groups. Early LIPUS treatment and later FES treatment showed the additive effects of accelerating PPT junction healing.

  18. Functional representation of living and nonliving domains across the cerebral hemispheres: a combined event-related potential/transcranial magnetic stimulation study.

    PubMed

    Fuggetta, Giorgio; Rizzo, Silvia; Pobric, Gorana; Lavidor, Michal; Walsh, Vincent

    2009-02-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the left hemisphere has been shown to disrupt semantic processing but, to date, there has been no direct demonstration of the electrophysiological correlates of this interference. To gain insight into the neural basis of semantic systems, and in particular, study the temporal and functional organization of object categorization processing, we combined repetitive TMS (rTMS) and ERPs. Healthy volunteers performed a picture-word matching task in which Snodgrass drawings of natural (e.g., animal) and artifactual (e.g., tool) categories were associated with a word. When short trains of high-frequency rTMS were applied over Wernicke's area (in the region of the CP5 electrode) immediately before the stimulus onset, we observed delayed response times to artifactual items, and thus, an increased dissociation between natural and artifactual domains. This behavioral effect had a direct ERP correlate. In the response period, the stimuli from the natural domain elicited a significant larger late positivity complex than those from the artifactual domain. These differences were significant over the centro-parietal region of the right hemisphere. These findings demonstrate that rTMS interferes with post-perceptual categorization processing of natural and artifactual stimuli that involve separate subsystems in distinct cortical areas. PMID:18510439

  19. Induction of Specific Cellular and Humoral Responses against Renal Cell Carcinoma after Combination Therapy with Cryoablation and Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Archana; Littrup, Peter; Paul, Elyse N.; Adam, Barbara; Heilbrun, Lance K.; Lum, Lawrence G.

    2013-01-01

    Cryotherapy offers a minimally invasive treatment option for the management of both irresectable and localized prostate, liver, pulmonary and renal tumors. The anti-neoplastic effects of cryotherapy are mediated by direct tumor lysis and by indirect effects such as intracellular dehydration, pH changes, and microvascular damage resulting in ischemic necrosis. In this study, we investigated whether percutaneous cryoablation of lung metastasis from renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in combination with aerosolized granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) can induce systemic cellular and humoral immune responses in 6 RCC patients. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were sequentially studied up to 63 days post cryoimmunotherapy (CI). PBMC from pre and post CI were phenotyped for lymphocyte subsets and tested for cytotoxicity and IFNγ Elispots directed at RCC cells. Humoral responses were measured by in vitro antibody synthesis assay directed at RCC cells. The immune monitoring data showed that CI induced tumor specific CTL, specific in vitro anti-tumor antibody responses, and enhanced Th1 cytokine production in 4 out of 6 patients. More importantly, the magnitude of cellular and humoral anti-tumor response appears to be associated with clinical responses. These pilot data show that CI can induce robust and brisk cellular and humoral immune responses in metastatic RCC patients, but requires further evaluation in optimized protocols. PMID:21577139

  20. Effect of a single session of transcranial direct-current stimulation combined with virtual reality training on the balance of children with cerebral palsy: a randomized, controlled, double-blind trial

    PubMed Central

    Lazzari, Roberta Delasta; Politti, Fabiano; Santos, Cibele Alimedia; Dumont, Arislander Jonathan Lopes; Rezende, Fernanda Lobo; Grecco, Luanda André Collange; Braun Ferreira, Luiz Alfredo; Oliveira, Claudia Santos

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of a single session of transcranial direct current stimulation combined with virtual reality training on the balance of children with cerebral palsy. [Subjetcs and Methods] Children with cerebral palsy between four and 12 years of age were randomly allocated to two groups: an experimental group which performed a single session of mobility training with virtual reality combined with active transcranial direct current stimulation; and a control group which performed a single session of mobility training with virtual reality combined with placebo transcranial direct current stimulation. The children were evaluated before and after the training protocols. Static balance (sway area, displacement, velocity and frequency of oscillations of the center of pressure on the anteroposterior and mediolateral axes) was evaluated using a force plate under four conditions (30-second measurements for each condition): feet on the force plate with the eyes open, and with the eyes closed; feet on a foam mat with the eyes open, and with the eyes closed. [Results] An increase in sway velocity was the only significant difference found. [Conclusion] A single session of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation combined with mobility training elicited to lead to an increase in the body sway velocity of children with cerebral palsy. PMID:25931726

  1. Mononuclear cells from the cord blood and granulocytecolony stimulating factor-mobilized peripheral blood: is there a potential for treatment of cerebral palsy?

    PubMed

    Koh, Hani; Hwang, Kyoujung; Lim, Hae-Young; Kim, Yong-Joo; Lee, Young-Ho

    2015-12-01

    To investigate a possible therapeutic mechanism of cell therapy in the field of cerebral palsy using granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF)-mobilized peripheral blood mononuclear cells (mPBMCs), we compared the expression of inflammatory cytokines and neurotrophic factors in PBMCs and mPBMCs from children with cerebral palsy to those from healthy adult donors and to cord blood mononuclear cells donated from healthy newborns. No significant differences in expression of neurotrophic factors were found between PBMCs and mPBMCs. However, in cerebral palsy children, the expression of interleukin-6 was significantly increased in mPBMCs as compared to PBMCs, and the expression of interleukin-3 was significantly decreased in mPBMCs as compared to PBMCs. In healthy adults, the expression levels of both interleukin-1β and interleukin-6 were significantly increased in mPBMCs as compared to PBMCs. The expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factors in mPBMC from cerebral palsy children was significantly higher than that in the cord blood or mPBMCs from healthy adults. The expression of G-CSF in mPBMCs from cerebral palsy children was comparable to that in the cord blood but significantly higher than that in mPBMCs from healthy adults. Lower expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1β, interleukin-3, and -6) and higher expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-8 and interleukin-9) were observed from the cord blood and mPBMCs from cerebral palsy children rather than from healthy adults. These findings indicate that mPBMCs from cerebral palsy and cord blood mononuclear cells from healthy newborns have the potential to become seed cells for treatment of cerebral palsy.

  2. A novel combinational approach of microstimulation and bioluminescence imaging to study the mechanisms of action of cerebral electrical stimulation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Arsenault, Dany; Drouin-Ouellet, Janelle; Saint-Pierre, Martine; Petrou, Petros; Dubois, Marilyn; Kriz, Jasna; Barker, Roger A; Cicchetti, Antonio; Cicchetti, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Key points We have developed a unique prototype to perform brain stimulation in mice. This system presents a number of advantages and new developments: 1) all stimulation parameters can be adjusted, 2) both positive and negative current pulses can be generated, guaranteeing electrically balanced stimulation regimen, 3) which can be produced with both low and high impedance electrodes, 4) the developed electrodes ensure localized stimulation and 5) can be used to stimulate and/or record brain potential and 6) in vivo recording of electric pulses allows the detection of defective electrodes (wire breakage or short circuits). This new micro-stimulator device further allows simultaneous live bioluminescence imaging of the mouse brain, enabling real time assessment of the impact of stimulation on cerebral tissue. The use of this novel tool in various transgenic mouse models of disease opens up a whole new range of possibilities in better understanding brain stimulation. Abstract Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is used to treat a number of neurological conditions and is currently being tested to intervene in neuropsychiatric conditions. However, a better understanding of how it works would ensure that side effects could be minimized and benefits optimized. We have thus developed a unique device to perform brain stimulation (BS) in mice and to address fundamental issues related to this methodology in the pre-clinical setting. This new microstimulator prototype was specifically designed to allow simultaneous live bioluminescence imaging of the mouse brain, allowing real time assessment of the impact of stimulation on cerebral tissue. We validated the authenticity of this tool in vivo by analysing the expression of toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), corresponding to the microglial response, in the stimulated brain regions of TLR2-fluc-GFP transgenic mice, which we further corroborated with post-mortem analyses in these animals as well as in human brains of patients who underwent DBS

  3. A method for the study of the effects of combining multiple pseudorandom fusimotor stimulation on the responses of muscle-spindle primary-ending afferents.

    PubMed

    Hulliger, Manuel; Banks, Robert W

    2009-03-30

    We describe a new method of investigation of the integrative action of fusimotor inputs in mammalian muscle spindles by stimulation of multiple fusimotor axons using independent pseudorandom pulse trains, each of low mean rate with pseudorandomly distributed stimulus intervals. Technically it was feasible only because of the development of (1) a novel, highly efficient approach to functional isolation of fusimotor efferents in ventral-root filaments, which we have called the isodyne strategy; (2) a real-time, microprocessor-based stimulus artefact cancellation device (SACAD); and (3) a highly adjustable, multi-branch stimulation electrode array. The general approach of using multiple, independent, pseudorandom stimulation of several input channels has wider applications in controlled-activation paradigms. PMID:19109995

  4. High-field (11.75T) multimodal MR imaging of exercising hindlimb mouse muscles using a non-invasive combined stimulation and force measurement device.

    PubMed

    Gondin, Julien; Vilmen, Christophe; Cozzone, Patrick J; Bendahan, David; Duhamel, Guillaume

    2014-08-01

    We have designed and constructed an experimental set-up allowing electrical stimulation of hindlimb mouse muscles and the corresponding force measurements at high-field (11.75T). We performed high-resolution multimodal MRI (including T2 -weighted imaging, angiography and diffusion) and analysed the corresponding MRI changes in response to a stimulation protocol. Mice were tested twice over a 1-week period to investigate the reliability of mechanical measurements and T2 changes associated with the stimulation protocol. Additionally, angiographic images were obtained before and immediately after the stimulation protocol. Finally, multislice diffusion imaging was performed before, during and immediately after the stimulation session. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps were calculated on the basis of diffusion weighted images (DWI). Both force production and T2 values were highly reproducible as illustrated by the low coefficient of variation (<8%) and high intraclass correlation coefficient (≥0.75) values. Maximum intensity projection angiographic images clearly showed a strong vascular effect resulting from the stimulation protocol. Although a motion sensitive imaging sequence was used (echo planar imaging) and in spite of the strong muscle contractions, motion artifacts were minimal for DWI recorded under exercising conditions, thereby underlining the robustness of the measurements. Mean ADC values increased under exercising conditions and were higher during the recovery period as compared with the corresponding control values. The proposed experimental approach demonstrates accurate high-field multimodal MRI muscle investigations at a preclinical level which is of interest for monitoring the severity and/or the progression of neuromuscular diseases but also for assessing the efficacy of potential therapeutic interventions.

  5. Effect of transcranial direct current stimulation combined with gait and mobility training on functionality in children with cerebral palsy: study protocol for a double-blind randomized controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The project proposes three innovative intervention techniques (treadmill training, mobility training with virtual reality and transcranial direct current stimulation that can be safely administered to children with cerebral palsy. The combination of transcranial stimulation and physical therapy resources will provide the training of a specific task with multiple rhythmic repetitions of the phases of the gait cycle, providing rich sensory stimuli with a modified excitability threshold of the primary motor cortex to enhance local synaptic efficacy and potentiate motor learning. Methods/design A prospective, double-blind, randomized, controlled, analytical, clinical trial will be carried out.Eligible participants will be children with cerebral palsy classified on levels I, II and III of the Gross Motor Function Classification System between four and ten years of age. The participants will be randomly allocated to four groups: 1) gait training on a treadmill with placebo transcranial stimulation; 2) gait training on a treadmill with active transcranial stimulation; 3) mobility training with virtual reality and placebo transcranial stimulation; 4) mobility training with virtual reality and active transcranial stimulation. Transcranial direct current stimulation will be applied with the anodal electrode positioned in the region of the dominant hemisphere over C3, corresponding to the primary motor cortex, and the cathode positioned in the supraorbital region contralateral to the anode. A 1 mA current will be applied for 20 minutes. Treadmill training and mobility training with virtual reality will be performed in 30-minute sessions five times a week for two weeks (total of 10 sessions). Evaluations will be performed on four occasions: one week prior to the intervention; one week following the intervention; one month after the end of the intervention;and 3 months after the end of the intervention. The evaluations will involve three-dimensional gait analysis

  6. Transcranial electrical stimulation of the occipital cortex during visual perception modifies the magnitude of BOLD activity: A combined tES-fMRI approach.

    PubMed

    Alekseichuk, Ivan; Diers, Kersten; Paulus, Walter; Antal, Andrea

    2016-10-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate if the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) changes in the visual cortex can be used as biomarkers reflecting the online and offline effects of transcranial electrical stimulation (tES). Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and 10Hz transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) were applied for 10min duration over the occipital cortex of healthy adults during the presentation of different visual stimuli, using a crossover, double-blinded design. Control experiments were also performed, in which sham stimulation as well as another electrode montage were used. Anodal tDCS over the visual cortex induced a small but significant further increase in BOLD response evoked by a visual stimulus; however, no aftereffect was observed. Ten hertz of tACS did not result in an online effect, but in a widespread offline BOLD decrease over the occipital, temporal, and frontal areas. These findings demonstrate that tES during visual perception affects the neuronal metabolism, which can be detected with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). PMID:26608246

  7. Transcranial electrical stimulation of the occipital cortex during visual perception modifies the magnitude of BOLD activity: A combined tES-fMRI approach.

    PubMed

    Alekseichuk, Ivan; Diers, Kersten; Paulus, Walter; Antal, Andrea

    2016-10-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate if the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) changes in the visual cortex can be used as biomarkers reflecting the online and offline effects of transcranial electrical stimulation (tES). Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and 10Hz transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) were applied for 10min duration over the occipital cortex of healthy adults during the presentation of different visual stimuli, using a crossover, double-blinded design. Control experiments were also performed, in which sham stimulation as well as another electrode montage were used. Anodal tDCS over the visual cortex induced a small but significant further increase in BOLD response evoked by a visual stimulus; however, no aftereffect was observed. Ten hertz of tACS did not result in an online effect, but in a widespread offline BOLD decrease over the occipital, temporal, and frontal areas. These findings demonstrate that tES during visual perception affects the neuronal metabolism, which can be detected with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).

  8. Identification of CD13+CD36+ cells as a common progenitor for erythroid and myeloid lineages in human bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ling; Gao, Zhigang; Zhu, Jianqiong; Rodgers, Griffin P.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To identify bi-potential precursor cells of erythroid and myeloid development in human bone marrow. Materials and Methods Cells co-expressing CD13 and CD36 (CD13+CD36+) were investigated by analyzing cell surface marker expression during erythroid development (induced with a combination of cytokines plus erythropoietin [EPO]), or myeloid development (induced with the same cocktail of cytokines plus granulocyte-colony stimulating factor [G-CSF]) of bone marrow derived CD133 cells in liquid cultures. CD13+CD36+ subsets were also isolated on the 14th day of cultures and further evaluated for their hematopoietic clonogenic capacity in methylcellulose. Results Colony-forming analysis of sorted CD13+CD36+ cells of committed erythroid and myeloid lineages demonstrated that these cells were able to generate erythroid, granulocyte, and mixed erythroid –granulocyte colonies. In contrast, CD13+CD36− or CD13−CD36+ cells exclusively committed to granulocyte/monocyte or erythroid colonies, respectively, but failed to form mixed erythroid –granulocyte colonies; no colonies were detected in CD13−CD36− cells with lineage-supporting cytokines. In addition, our data confirmed that EPO induced both erythroid and myeloid commitment, while G-CSF only supported the differentiation of the myeloid lineage. Conclusions The present data identify some CD13+CD36+ cells as bi-potential precursors of erythroid and myeloid commitment in normal hematopoiesis. They provide a physiological explanation for the cell identification of myeloid and erythroid lineages observed in hematopoietic diseases. This unique fraction of CD13+CD36+ cells may be useful for further studies on regulating erythroid and myeloid differentiation during normal and malignant hematopoiesis. PMID:17588473

  9. Encouraging obese students with intellectual disabilities to engage in pedaling an exercise bike by using an air mouse combined with preferred environmental stimulation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Man-Ling; Shih, Ching-Hsiang; Lin, Yen-Chung

    2014-12-01

    This study extended research into the application of high-tech products in the field of special education, using a standard air mouse with a newly developed pedal detection program (PDP) software. PDP is a new software program used to turn a standard air mouse into a pedal detector in order to evaluate whether two obese students with intellectual disabilities (ID) would be able to actively perform the activity of pedaling an exercise bike in order to control their preferred environmental stimulation. This study was performed according to an ABAB design. The data showed that both participants had more willingness to engage in the pedaling activity to activate the environmental stimulation in the intervention phases than in the baseline phase. The practical and developmental implications of the findings are discussed.

  10. Development of a modified artificial insemination technique combining penile vibration stimulation and the swim-up method in the common marmoset.

    PubMed

    Takabayashi, Shuji; Suzuki, Yuiko; Katoh, Hideki

    2015-05-01

    The common marmoset, Callithrix jacchus, is used as a New World monkey species in biomedical studies because of its small body size and good reproduction in captivity. A modified artificial insemination technique was developed in this species to encourage breeding of lines carrying interesting genes and traits. Fresh semen was collected by penile vibratory stimulation. Medium containing highly motile sperm was inseminated into the uterus using a catheter. Seven females were inseminated using freshly prepared sperm from different males every day for 3 days including the expected ovulation day. As a result, four females conceived, and three females delivered six offspring in total (two singletons and one quadruplet). The paternity of the newborns was determined using microsatellite markers to accurately pinpoint the timing of insemination and ovulation. It is expected that our artificial insemination protocol can be effectively used to establish marmoset lines and genetically manage marmoset colonies.

  11. The Synergistic (MARATHON) Effect of Combined Methamphetamine with Sexual Stimulant Drugs on Increasing the Likelihood of High-Risk Sexual Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Hosseinifard, Seyed Mehdi; Ahmadian, Alireza; Smaeelifar, Neda

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic drug abuse and sexual dysfunction specifically erectile dysfunction may lead drug abusers to seek over-the-counter or non-prescription medications, out of which Sildenafil citrate, sold as the trade name of Viagra® can be considered as a prime and important treatment. Therefore, the research purpose was to draw a comparison and review the role of methamphetamine abuse and sildenafil use in increasing the likelihood of high-risk sexual behaviors (both concomitant and non-concomitant use). Methods Hence, a total of 40 patients diagnosed with methamphetamine abuse were recruited through the administration of structured clinical interview for DSM-IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition), through purposive sampling and subsequent to being qualified in accordance with the selection criteria by psychologists and general practitioners. All the 40 drug abusers (20 methamphetamine abusers with concomitant use of Aphrodisiac drugs (sexual stimulant pills) and 20 methamphetamine abusers) described their sexual risk behaviors subsequent to the drug use. Findings Supported the between-group difference that is to say that, the group with concomitant methamphetamine abuse differed significantly in all the items when compared with the control group. However, this group scored lower on the item of sexual intercourse with drug addicted prostitutes using condom and both groups demonstrated high pick on this item. Conclusion Overall, the concomitant methamphetamine chronic abuse with sexual stimulant drugs generates Aphrodisiac drugs impulses and is found to be related to higher frequencies of sexual risk behaviors and sexual intercourse with addicted prostitutes. PMID:25984278

  12. Toxic epidermal necrolysis following combination of methotrexate and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole.

    PubMed

    Yang, C H; Yang, L J; Jaing, T H; Chan, H L

    2000-08-01

    urine. Concurrent medication included 6-MP (50 mg) once daily and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (120 mg, 600 mg) twice daily every other day. Plasma MTX levels were 52.36 micromol/L 24 h after MTX infusion, 1.87 micromol/L after 48 h, 0.57 micromol/L after 72 h, and 0.41 micromol/L after 96 h. These indicated delayed MTX plasma clearance. The blood creatinine level was mildly elevated from 0.5 mg/dL to 0.7 mg/dL. Thirty-six hours after the administration of MTX, the patient developed an erythematous painful swelling on the right middle finger. The erythema, with subsequent large bulla formation, progressed to all the fingers, toes, palms, and the soles of the feet. Some erythematous to hemorrhagic papules also appeared on the bilateral elbows. Subsequently, diffuse tender erythema with extensive erosions and focal tiny pustules developed on the back, abdomen, proximal extremities, and face (Fig. 1a,b). A positive Nikolsky's sign was also present. A biopsy specimen of the right dorsal hand lesion revealed parakeratosis, detached acanthotic epidermis with scattered necrotic keratinocytes, dyskeratotic cells and nuclear atypia, neutrophilic exocytosis, and many neutrophils in the papillary dermis (Fig. 2). The skin condition deteriorated rapidly. Toxic epidermal necrolysis-like lesions involved 90% of the total body surface on the fifth day after MTX infusion. Mucositis, diarrhea, involuntary tremor, fever, and chills were noted. The patient was then sent to the burn unit for intensive skin care. Ten days after MTX therapy, profound agranulocytosis and thrombocytopenia (white cell count 100/mm3, platelets 14,000/mm3, and hemoglobin 5.6 g/dL) were found. The patient was then started on granulocyte colony stimulation factor (G-CSF, 5 microg/kg/day), but his general condition deteriorated rapidly and he died 6 days later due to septic shock and multiple organ failure.

  13. Lipopolysaccharide-Induced CXCL10 mRNA Level and Six Stimulant-mRNA Combinations in Whole Blood: Novel Biomarkers for Bortezomib Responses Obtained from a Prospective Multicenter Trial for Patients with Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takashi; Mitsuhashi, Masato; Sagawa, Morihiko; Ri, Masaki; Suzuki, Kenshi; Abe, Masahiro; Ohmachi, Ken; Nakagawa, Yasunori; Nakamura, Shingen; Chosa, Mizuki; Iida, Shinsuke; Kizaki, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    To identify predictive biomarkers for clinical responses to bortezomib treatment, 0.06 mL of each whole blood without any cell separation procedures was stimulated ex vivo using five agents, and eight mRNAs were quantified. In six centers, heparinized peripheral blood was prospectively obtained from 80 previously treated or untreated, symptomatic multiple myeloma (MM) patients with measurable levels of M-proteins. The blood sample was procured prior to treatment as well as 2-3 days and 1-3 weeks after the first dose of bortezomib, which was intravenously administered biweekly or weekly, during the first cycle. Six stimulant-mRNA combinations; that is, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), LPS-CXCL chemokine 10 (CXCL10), LPS-CCL chemokine 4 (CCL4), phytohemagglutinin-CCL4, zymosan A (ZA)-GMCSF and ZA-CCL4 showed significantly higher induction in the complete and very good partial response group than in the stable and progressive disease group, as determined by both parametric (t-test) and non-parametric (unpaired Mann-Whitney test) tests. Moreover, LPS-induced CXCL10 mRNA expression was significantly suppressed 2-3 days after the first dose of bortezomib in all patients, as determined by both parametric (t-test) and non-parametric (paired Wilcoxon test) tests, whereas the complete and very good partial response group showed sustained suppression 1-3 weeks after the first dose. Thus, pretreatment LPS-CXCL10 mRNA and/or the six combinations may serve as potential biomarkers for the response to bortezomib treatment in MM patients.

  14. Combined Insulin Deficiency and Endotoxin Exposure Stimulate Lipid Mobilization and Alter Adipose Tissue Signaling in an Experimental Model of Ketoacidosis in Subjects With Type 1 Diabetes: A Randomized Controlled Crossover Trial.

    PubMed

    Svart, Mads; Kampmann, Ulla; Voss, Thomas; Pedersen, Steen B; Johannsen, Mogens; Rittig, Nikolaj; Poulsen, Per L; Nielsen, Thomas S; Jessen, Niels; Møller, Niels

    2016-05-01

    Most often, diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in adults results from insufficient insulin administration and acute infection. DKA is assumed to release proinflammatory cytokines and stress hormones that stimulate lipolysis and ketogenesis. We tested whether this perception of DKA can be reproduced in an experimental human model by using combined insulin deficiency and acute inflammation and tested which intracellular mediators of lipolysis are affected in adipose tissue. Nine subjects with type 1 diabetes were studied twice: 1) insulin-controlled euglycemia and 2) insulin deprivation and endotoxin administration (KET). During KET, serum tumor necrosis factor-α, cortisol, glucagon, and growth hormone levels increased, and free fatty acids and 3-hydroxybutyrate concentrations and the rate of lipolysis rose markedly. Serum bicarbonate and pH decreased. Adipose tissue mRNA contents of comparative gene identification-58 (CGI-58) increased and G0/G1 switch 2 gene (G0S2) mRNA decreased robustly. Neither protein levels of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) nor phosphorylations of hormone-sensitive lipase were altered. The clinical picture of incipient DKA in adults can be reproduced by combined insulin deficiency and endotoxin-induced acute inflammation. The precipitating steps involve the release of proinflammatory cytokines and stress hormones, increased lipolysis, and decreased G0S2 and increased CGI-58 mRNA contents in adipose tissue, compatible with latent ATGL stimulation. PMID:26884439

  15. Early rehabilitation with weight-bearing standing-shaking-board exercise in combination with electrical muscle stimulation after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kingo; Hayashi, Masamichi; Fujii, Toshihiro; Kawamura, Kenji; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2012-01-01

    The objective of early rehabilitation after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is to increase the muscle strength of the lower extremities. Closed kinetic chain (CKC) exercise induces co-contraction of the agonist and antagonist muscles. The purpose of this study was to compare the postoperative muscle strength/mass of subjects who performed our new CKC exercise (new rehabilitation group:group N) from week 4, and subjects who received traditional rehabilitation alone (traditional rehabilitation group:group T). The subjects stood on the device and maintained balance. Then, low-frequency stimulation waves were applied to 2 points each in the anterior and posterior region of the injured thigh 3 times a week for 3 months. Measurement of muscle strength was performed 4 times (before the start, and then once a month). Muscle mass was evaluated in CT images of the extensor and flexor muscles of 10 knees (10 subjects) in each group. The injured legs of group N showed significant improvement after one month compared to group T. The cross-sectional area of the extensor muscles of the injured legs tended to a show a greater increase at 3 months in group N. This rehabilitation method makes it possible to contract fast-twitch muscles, which may be a useful for improving extensor muscle strength after ACL reconstruction.

  16. Interleukin-10 inhibits burst-forming unit-erythroid growth by suppression of endogenous granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor production from T cells.

    PubMed

    Oehler, L; Kollars, M; Bohle, B; Berer, A; Reiter, E; Lechner, K; Geissler, K

    1999-02-01

    Numerous cytokines released from accessory cells have been shown to exert either stimulatory or inhibitory growth signals on burst-forming unit-erythroid (BFU-E) growth. Because of its cytokine synthesis-inhibiting effects on T cells and monocytes, interleukin-10 (IL-10) may be a potential candidate for indirectly affecting erythropoiesis. We investigated the effects of IL-10 on BFU-E growth from normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) using a clonogenic progenitor cell assay. The addition of recombinant human IL-10 to cultures containing recombinant human erythropoietin suppressed BFU-E growth in a dose-dependent manner (by 55.2%, range 47.3-63.3%, p < 0.01, at 10 ng/mL). In contrast, no inhibitory effect of IL-10 was seen when cultivating highly enriched CD34+ cells. BFU-E growth from PBMC also was markedly suppressed in the presence of a neutralizing anti-granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) antibody (by 48.7%, range 32.9-61.2% inhibition,p < 0.01), but not by neutralizing antibodies against granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and interleukin-3. This suggests a stimulatory role of endogenously released GM-CSF on BFU-E formation. Also, the addition of exogenous GM-CSF completely restored IL-10-induced suppression of BFU-E growth. To determine the cellular source of GM-CSF production, we analyzed GM-CSF levels in suspension cultures containing PBMC that were either depleted of monocytes or T cells. Monocyte-depleted PBMC showed spontaneous production of increasing amounts of GM-CSF on days 3, 5, and 7, respectively, which could be suppressed by IL-10, whereas GM-CSF levels did not increase in cultures containing T-cell-depleted PBMC. Our data indicate that IL-10 inhibits the growth of erythroid progenitor cells in vitro, most likely by suppression of endogenous GM-CSF production from T cells.

  17. Perforant pathway stimulation as a conditioned stimulus for active avoidance learning triggers BOLD responses in various target regions of the hippocampus: a combined fMRI and electrophysiological study.

    PubMed

    Angenstein, Frank; Krautwald, Karla; Wetzel, Wolfram; Scheich, Henning

    2013-07-15

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging and electrophysiology were combined to monitor blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signals in the entire rat brain and neuronal activities in the dentate gyrus during electrical stimulation of the right perforant pathway. In naïve, medetomidine sedated animals, stimulation of the fiber bundle with 15 trains (i.e. 8 bursts of 20 pulses given with 10 ms intervals, one burst per second, pulse width 0.2 ms) generated significant BOLD responses in the right hippocampal formation and the left entorhinal cortex. The stimulation condition also caused changes in the synaptic efficacy of perforant pathway granular cell synapses that lasted for at least one day. Rerun of the same experiment one day later resulted in a significantly increased electrophysiological response in the dentate gyrus and an increase of the BOLD response in the entire hippocampal formation. Consequently, long-lasting changes in synaptic efficacy go along with changes in the generated BOLD response. Additional electrical stimulations of the perforant pathway in the awake animal between the two fMRI experiments caused in the second fMRI measurement an increased BOLD response in the hippocampal formation and an appearance of significant BOLD responses in target regions of the hippocampus, such as the septum, nucleus accumbens (NAcc), and anterior cingulate cortex/medial prefrontal cortex/motor cortex (ACC/mPFC/MC) regions. Consequently, the efficacy of signal processing in and propagation through the hippocampus can be monitored by variations of the BOLD response in target regions of the hippocampus. Using the electrical perforant pathway stimulations as conditioned stimulus for an active avoidance task (shuttle box) caused a further spreading of the BOLD response in the hippocampus formation, septum and ACC/mPFC/MC but not in the NAcc. In addition, the magnitude of the BOLD response in the trained animals was further increased in the right and left hippocampus and

  18. Feedback control of arm movements using Neuro-Muscular Electrical Stimulation (NMES) combined with a lockable, passive exoskeleton for gravity compensation.

    PubMed

    Klauer, Christian; Schauer, Thomas; Reichenfelser, Werner; Karner, Jakob; Zwicker, Sven; Gandolla, Marta; Ambrosini, Emilia; Ferrante, Simona; Hack, Marco; Jedlitschka, Andreas; Duschau-Wicke, Alexander; Gföhler, Margit; Pedrocchi, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Within the European project MUNDUS, an assistive framework was developed for the support of arm and hand functions during daily life activities in severely impaired people. This contribution aims at designing a feedback control system for Neuro-Muscular Electrical Stimulation (NMES) to enable reaching functions in people with no residual voluntary control of the arm and shoulder due to high level spinal cord injury. NMES is applied to the deltoids and the biceps muscles and integrated with a three degrees of freedom (DoFs) passive exoskeleton, which partially compensates gravitational forces and allows to lock each DOF. The user is able to choose the target hand position and to trigger actions using an eyetracker system. The target position is selected by using the eyetracker and determined by a marker-based tracking system using Microsoft Kinect. A central controller, i.e., a finite state machine, issues a sequence of basic movement commands to the real-time arm controller. The NMES control algorithm sequentially controls each joint angle while locking the other DoFs. Daily activities, such as drinking, brushing hair, pushing an alarm button, etc., can be supported by the system. The robust and easily tunable control approach was evaluated with five healthy subjects during a drinking task. Subjects were asked to remain passive and to allow NMES to induce the movements. In all of them, the controller was able to perform the task, and a mean hand positioning error of less than five centimeters was achieved. The average total time duration for moving the hand from a rest position to a drinking cup, for moving the cup to the mouth and back, and for finally returning the arm to the rest position was 71 s.

  19. Feedback control of arm movements using Neuro-Muscular Electrical Stimulation (NMES) combined with a lockable, passive exoskeleton for gravity compensation.

    PubMed

    Klauer, Christian; Schauer, Thomas; Reichenfelser, Werner; Karner, Jakob; Zwicker, Sven; Gandolla, Marta; Ambrosini, Emilia; Ferrante, Simona; Hack, Marco; Jedlitschka, Andreas; Duschau-Wicke, Alexander; Gföhler, Margit; Pedrocchi, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Within the European project MUNDUS, an assistive framework was developed for the support of arm and hand functions during daily life activities in severely impaired people. This contribution aims at designing a feedback control system for Neuro-Muscular Electrical Stimulation (NMES) to enable reaching functions in people with no residual voluntary control of the arm and shoulder due to high level spinal cord injury. NMES is applied to the deltoids and the biceps muscles and integrated with a three degrees of freedom (DoFs) passive exoskeleton, which partially compensates gravitational forces and allows to lock each DOF. The user is able to choose the target hand position and to trigger actions using an eyetracker system. The target position is selected by using the eyetracker and determined by a marker-based tracking system using Microsoft Kinect. A central controller, i.e., a finite state machine, issues a sequence of basic movement commands to the real-time arm controller. The NMES control algorithm sequentially controls each joint angle while locking the other DoFs. Daily activities, such as drinking, brushing hair, pushing an alarm button, etc., can be supported by the system. The robust and easily tunable control approach was evaluated with five healthy subjects during a drinking task. Subjects were asked to remain passive and to allow NMES to induce the movements. In all of them, the controller was able to perform the task, and a mean hand positioning error of less than five centimeters was achieved. The average total time duration for moving the hand from a rest position to a drinking cup, for moving the cup to the mouth and back, and for finally returning the arm to the rest position was 71 s. PMID:25228853

  20. Toxicity Assessment of a Phase III Study Evaluating FEC-Doc and FEC-Doc Combined with Gemcitabine as an Adjuvant Treatment for High-Risk Early Breast Cancer: the SUCCESS-A Trial

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, L.; Rack, B.; Sommer, H.; Koch, J. G.; Weissenbacher, T.; Janni, W.; Schneeweiss, A.; Rezai, M.; Lorenz, R.; Jäger, B.; Schramm, A.; Häberle, L.; Fasching, P. A.; Friedl, T. W. P.; Beckmann, M. W.; Scholz, C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This paper aims to evaluate the toxicity profile of additive gemcitabine to adjuvant taxane-based chemotherapy in breast cancer patients. Methods: Patients enrolled in this open-label randomized controlled Phase III study were treated with 3 cycles of epirubicin-fluorouracil-cyclophosphamide (FEC) chemotherapy followed by 3 cycles of docetaxel with those receiving 3 cycles of FEC followed by 3 cycles of gemcitabine-docetaxel (FEC-DG). 3690 patients were evaluated according to National Cancer Institute (NCI) toxicity criteria (CTCAE). The study medications were assessed by the occurrence of grade 3–4 adverse events, dose reductions, postponements of treatment cycles and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) support. Results: No differences in neutropenia or febrile neutropenia were demonstrated. However, thrombocytopenia was significantly increased with FEC-DG treatment (2.0 vs. 0.5 %, p < 0.001), as was leukopenia (64.1 vs. 58.5 %, p < 0.001). With FEC-DG significantly more G-CSF support in cycles 4 to 6 (FEC-DG: 57.8 %, FEC-D: 36.3 %, p < 0.001) was provided. Transaminase elevation was significantly more common with FEC-DG (SGPT: 6.3 %, SGOT: 2 %), whereas neuropathy (1.2 %), arthralgia (1.6 %) and bone pain (2.6 %) were more common using FEC-D. Dose reductions > 20 % (4 vs. 2.4 %) and postponement of treatment cycles (0.9 vs. 0.4 %) were significantly more frequent in the FEC-DG arm. Eight deaths occurred during treatment in the FEC-DG arm and four in the FEC-D arm. Conclusion: The addition of gemcitabine increased hematological toxicity and was associated with more dose reductions and postponements of treatment cycles. PMID:27239063

  1. Superovulation of mice with human menopausal gonadotropin or pure follicle-stimulating hormone in combination with human chorionic gonadotropin and the effects of oocyte aging on in vitro fertilization.

    PubMed

    Edirisinghe, W R; Law, H Y; NG, S C; Chia, C M; Ratnam, S S

    1986-10-01

    The response of female mice of F1 hybrids (CBA x C57/BL) to superovulatory doses of human menopausal gonadotropin (hMG) or pure follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) in combination with human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) was studied. Furthermore, the effect of oocyte aging in vivo on the subsequent rate of fertilization in vitro was also investigated. The oocytes were collected at 12, 18, and 24 hr after hCG injection and in vitro fertilization (IVF) was carried out in T6 medium. A higher proportion of animals responded to hMG stimulation (32/70) compared to pure FSH (15/66). Furthermore, hMG gave a higher oocyte recovery (454/32) than pure FSH (77/15). Fertilization rates of 57.8, 51.5, and 53.5% were obtained for the 12-, 18-, and 24-hr groups, respectively, after correction for parthenogenetic division of oocytes in the controls. No significant differences in fertilization rates were observed among the three time intervals used in recovering oocytes. However, as the degeneration and parthenogenetic division increased with the delay in collection of oocytes, 12 hr post-hCG injection was the best time to collect oocytes to obtain optimum results in in vitro fertilization.

  2. Chronic sodium salicylate administration enhances population spike long-term potentiation following a combination of theta frequency primed-burst stimulation and the transient application of pentylenetetrazol in rat CA1 hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Gholami, Masoumeh; Moradpour, Farshad; Semnanian, Saeed; Naghdi, Nasser; Fathollahi, Yaghoub

    2015-11-15

    The effect of chronic administration of sodium salicylate (NaSal) on the excitability and synaptic plasticity of the rodent hippocampus was investigated. Repeated systemic treatment with NaSal reliably induced tolerance to the anti-nociceptive effect of NaSal (one i.p. injection per day for 6 consecutive days). Following chronic NaSal or vehicle treatment, a series of electrophysiological experiments on acute hippocampal slices (focusing on the CA1 circuitry) were tested whether tolerance to NaSal would augment pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced long-term potentiation (LTP) and /or epileptic activity, and whether the augmentation was the same after priming activity with a natural stimulus pattern prior to PTZ. We noted an altered synaptic input-to-spike transformation, such that neuronal firing increased after a given synaptic drive. Population spike-LTP (PS-LTP) was increased in the NaSal-tolerant animals, but only when it was induced via a combination of electrical stimulation (theta pattern primed-burst stimulation) and the transient application of PTZ. Identifying and understanding these changes in neuronal excitability and synaptic plasticity following chronic salicylate treatment could prove useful in the clinical diagnosis or treatment of chronic aspirin-induced, or even idiopathic, seizure activity.

  3. Meloxicam, an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase-2, increases the level of serum G-CSF and might be usable as an auxiliary means in G-CSF therapy.

    PubMed

    Hofer, M; Pospísil, M; Znojil, V; Holá, J; Vacek, A; Streitová, D

    2008-01-01

    Hematopoiesis-modulating action of meloxicam, a cyclooxyge-nase-2 inhibitor, has been evaluated in mice. Increased serum level of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) after meloxicam administration has been found in sublethally gamma-irradiated animals. In further experiments hematopoiesis-stimulating effects of meloxicam and G-CSF given alone or in combination have been investigated. Granulocyte/macrophage progenitor cells counts were used to monitor these effects. Meloxicam and exogenous G-CSF did not act synergistically when given in combination, but could be mutually substituted during their repeated administration. The results suggest a promising possibility of using meloxicam as an auxiliary drug reducing the high costs of G-CSF therapy of myelosuppression.

  4. Ursolic acid and rosiglitazone combination improves insulin sensitivity by increasing the skeletal muscle insulin-stimulated IRS-1 tyrosine phosphorylation in high-fat diet-fed C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Sundaresan, Arjunan; Radhiga, Thangaiyan; Pugalendi, Kodukkur Viswanathan

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this present study was to investigate the effect of ursolic acid (UA) and rosiglitazone (RSG) on insulin sensitivity and proximal insulin signaling pathways in high-fat diet (HFD)-fed C57/BL/6J mice. Male C57BL/6J mice were fed either normal diet or HFD for 10 weeks, after which animals in each dietary group were divided into the following six groups (normal diet, normal diet plus UA and RSG, HFD alone, HFD plus UA, HFD plus RSG, and HFD plus UA and RSG) for the next 5 weeks. UA (5 mg/kg BW) and RSG (4 mg/kg BW) were administered as suspensions directly into the stomach using a gastric tube. The HFD diet elevated fasting plasma glucose, insulin, and homeostasis model assessment index. The expression of insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3-kinase), Akt, and glucose transporter (GLUT) 4 were determined by Western blot analyses. The results demonstrated that combination treatment (UA/RSG) ameliorated HFD-induced glucose intolerance and insulin resistance by improving the homeostatic model assessment (HOMA) index. Further, combination treatment (UA/RSG) stimulated the IRS-1, PI3-kinase, Akt, and GLUT 4 translocation. These results strongly suggest that combination treatment (UA/RSG) activates IRS-PI3-kinase-Akt-dependent signaling pathways to induce GLUT 4 translocation and increases the expression of insulin receptor to improve glucose intolerance.

  5. Hybrid use of combined and sequential delivery of growth factors and ultrasound stimulation in porous multilayer composite scaffolds to promote both vascularization and bone formation in bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Yan, Haoran; Liu, Xia; Zhu, Minghua; Luo, Guilin; Sun, Tao; Peng, Qiang; Zeng, Yi; Chen, Taijun; Wang, Yingying; Liu, Keliang; Feng, Bo; Weng, Jie; Wang, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a multilayer coating technology would be adopted to prepare a porous composite scaffold and the growth factor release and ultrasound techniques were introduced into bone tissue engineering to finally solve the problems of vascularization and bone formation in the scaffold whilst the designed multilayer composite with gradient degradation characteristics in the space was used to match the new bone growth process better. The results of animal experiments showed that the use of low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) combined with growth factors demonstrated excellent capabilities and advantages in both vascularization and new bone formation in bone tissue engineering. The degradation of the used scaffold materials could match new bone formation very well. The results also showed that only RGD-promoted cell adhesion was insufficient to satisfy the needs of new bone formation while growth factors and LIPUS stimulation were the key factors in new bone formation.

  6. Felty syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... low white blood cell count. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) may raise the neutrophil count. Some people ... Starkebaum G. Use of colony-stimulating factors in the treatment of ... collagen vascular disease. Curr Opin Hematol . 1997;4(3):196- ...

  7. STRENGTH EXERCISES COMBINED WITH DRY NEEDLING WITH ELECTRICAL STIMULATION IMPROVE PAIN AND FUNCTION IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC ROTATOR CUFF TENDINOPATHY: A RETROSPECTIVE CASE SERIES

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    noted with the intervention protocol. All subjects responded positively to the intervention and reported quality of life was improved for each subject. The results of this case series show promising outcomes for the combination of SE and DN in the treatment of chronic RTCT. Level of Evidence Level 4 PMID:27274427

  8. Stimulated Raman photoacoustic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yakovlev, Vladislav V.; Zhang, Hao F.; Noojin, Gary D.; Denton, Michael L.; Thomas, Robert J.; Scully, Marlan O.

    2010-01-01

    Achieving label-free, molecular-specific imaging with high spatial resolution in deep tissue is often considered the grand challenge of optical imaging. To accomplish this goal, significant optical scattering in tissues has to be overcome while achieving molecular specificity without resorting to extrinsic labeling. We demonstrate the feasibility of developing such an optical imaging modality by combining the molecularly specific stimulated Raman excitation with the photoacoustic detection. By employing two ultrashort excitation laser pulses, separated in frequency by the vibrational frequency of a targeted molecule, only the specific vibrational level of the target molecules in the illuminated tissue volume is excited. This targeted optical absorption generates ultrasonic waves (referred to as stimulated Raman photoacoustic waves) which are detected using a traditional ultrasonic transducer to form an image following the design of the established photoacoustic microscopy. PMID:21059930

  9. Utility of the clinical practice of administering thrombophilic screening and antithrombotic prophylaxis with low-molecular-weight heparin to healthy donors treated with G-CSF for mobilization of peripheral blood stem cells.

    PubMed

    Martino, Massimo; Luise, Francesca; Oriana, Vincenzo; Console, Giuseppe; Moscato, Tiziana; Mammì, Corrado; Messina, Giuseppe; Massara, Elisabetta; Irrera, Giuseppe; Piromalli, Angela; Lombardo, Vincenzo Trapani; Laganà, Carmelo; Iacopino, Pasquale

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to verify the utility of the clinical practice of administering thrombophilic screening and antithrombotic prophylaxis with low-molecular-weight heparin to healthy donors receiving granulocyte colony-stimulating factor to mobilize peripheral blood stem cells. Thrombophilia screening comprised of testing for factor V Leiden G1691A, prothrombin G20210A, the thermolabile variant (C677T) of the methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase gene, protein C, protein S, factor VIII and homocysteine plasmatic levels, antithrombin III activity, and acquired activated protein C resistance. We investigated prospectively 72 white Italian healthy donors, 39 men and 33 women, with a median age of 42 years (range, 18-65). Five donors (6.9%) were heterozygous carriers of Factor V Leiden G1691A; two healthy donors had the heterozygous prothrombin G20210A gene mutation; C677T mutation in the methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase gene was present in 34 (47.2%) donors in heterozygous and in 7 donors (9.7%) in homozygous. Acquired activated protein C resistance was revealed in 8 donors of the study (11.1%). The protein C plasmatic level was decreased in 3 donors (4.2%); the protein S level was decreased in 7 donors (9.7%). An elevated factor VIII dosage was shown in 10 donors (13.9%) and hyperhomocysteinemia in 9 donors (12.5%). Concentration of antithrombin III was in the normal range for all study group donors. The factor V Leiden mutation was combined with the heterozygous prothrombin G20210A in 2 cases and with protein S deficiency in one case; 2 healthy donors presented an associated deficiency of protein C and protein S. Although none of these healthy subjects had a previous history of thrombosis, low-molecular-weight heparin was administered to all donors during granulocyte colony-stimulating factor administration to prevent thrombotic events. No donor experienced short or long-term thrombotic diseases after a median follow-up of 29.2 months. Our data do not

  10. Biochemical assays on plasminogen activators and hormones from kidney sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, Grant H.; Lewis, Marian L.; Morrison, Dennis R.

    1988-01-01

    Investigations were established for the purpose of analyzing the conditioned media from human embryonic kidney cell subpopulations separated in space by electrophoresis. This data is based on the experiments performed on STS-8 on the continuous flow electrophoresis system. The primary biological activity that was analyzed was plasminogen activator activity, but some assays for erythropoeitin and human granulocyte colony stimulating activity were also performed. It is concluded that a battery of assays are required to completely define the plasminogen activator profile of a conditioned media from cell culture. Each type of assay measures different parts of the mixture and are influenced by different parameters. The functional role of each assay is given along with an indication of which combination of assays are required to answer specific questions. With this type of information it is possible by combinations of assays with mathematical analysis to pinpoint a specific component of the system.

  11. Establishment of a retinoic acid-resistant human acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) model in human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) transgenic severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice.

    PubMed Central

    Fukuchi, Y.; Kizaki, M.; Kinjo, K.; Awaya, N.; Muto, A.; Ito, M.; Kawai, Y.; Umezawa, A.; Hata, J.; Ueyama, Y.; Ikeda, Y.

    1998-01-01

    To understand the mechanisms and identify novel approaches to overcoming retinoic acid (RA) resistance in acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL), we established the first human RA-resistant APL model in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. UF-1 cells, an RA-resistant APL cell line established in our laboratory, were transplanted into human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-producing SCID (hGMTg SCID) mice and inoculated cells formed subcutaneous tumours in all hGMTg SCID mice, but not in the non-transgenic control SCID mice. Single-cell suspensions (UF-1/GMTg SCID cells) were similar in morphological, immunological, cytogenetic and molecular genetic features to parental UF-1 cells. All-trans RA did not change the morphological features of cells or their expression of CD11b. RA did not alter the growth curve of cells as determined by MTT assay, suggesting that UF-1/GMTg SCID cells are resistant to RA. These results demonstrate that this is the first RA-resistant APL animal model that may be useful for investigating the biology of this myeloid leukaemia in vivo, as well as for evaluating novel therapeutic approaches including patients with RA-resistant APL. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9764578

  12. Dose escalation of the hypoxic cell sensitizer etanidazole combined with ifosfamide, carboplatin, etoposide, and autologous hematopoietic stem cell support.

    PubMed

    Elias, A D; Wheeler, C; Ayash, L J; Schwartz, G; Ibrahim, J; Mills, L; McCauley, M; Coleman, N; Warren, D; Schnipper, L; Antman, K H; Teicher, B A; Frei, E

    1998-06-01

    Multiple mechanisms of drug resistance contribute to treatment failure. Although high-dose therapy attempts to overwhelm these defenses pharmacologically, this approach is only successful in a fraction of treated patients. Many drug resistance mechanisms are shared between malignant and normal cells, but the expression of various drug resistance mechanisms associated with hypoxia is largely confined to tumor tissue. Thus, reversal of this mechanism is likely to provide a therapeutic advantage to the host. This study was designed to define the dose-limiting toxicities and maximum tolerated dose of etanidazole when it is given concurrently with high-dose ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide (ICE), with hematopoietic stem cell support. The maximum tolerated doses of high-dose ICE were administered concurrently with dose escalations of etanidazole, a hypoxic cell sensitizer. All agents were given by 96-h continuous i.v. infusion beginning on day -7. Mesna uroprotection was provided. Autologous marrow and cytokine mobilized peripheral blood progenitor cells were reinfused on day 0. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor was administered following reinfusion until the granulocytes recovered to > 1000/microliter. Fifty-five adults with advanced malignancies were enrolled in cohorts of five to nine patients. Four dose levels of etanidazole between 3 and 5.5 g/m2/day (12, 16, 20, and 22 g/m2 total doses) and two doses of carboplatin (1600 and 1800 mg/m2 total doses) were evaluated. Seven patients died of organ toxicity (13%); two each from veno-occlusive disease of liver and sepsis; and one each from sudden death, renal failure, and refractory thrombocytopenic hemorrhage. Five deaths occurred at the top dose level. One additional patient suffered a witnessed cardiorespiratory arrest from ventricular fibrillation and was resuscitated. Dose-dependent and largely reversible peripheral neuropathy was observed consisting of two syndromes: severe cramping myalgic/neuralgic pain

  13. New developments in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia: focus on balugrastim.

    PubMed

    Ghidini, Michele; Hahne, Jens Claus; Trevisani, Francesco; Panni, Stefano; Ratti, Margherita; Toppo, Laura; Tomasello, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    Neutropenia and febrile neutropenia are two major complications of chemotherapy. Dose reductions, delays in treatment administration, and the use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factors are equally recommended options to preserve absolute neutrophil count in case of chemotherapy regimens bringing a risk of febrile neutropenia of 20% or higher. Recombinant granulocyte colony-stimulating factors, such as filgrastim and lenograstim, have a short elimination half-life (t1/2) and need to be used daily, while others, like pegfilgrastim and lipegfilgrastim, are characterized by a long t1/2 requiring only a single administration per cycle. Balugrastim is a novel long-acting recombinant granulocyte colony-stimulating factor obtained by means of a genetic fusion between recombinant human serum albumin and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. Albumin binding increases the molecular weight and determines a high plasmatic stability leading to a t1/2 of ~19 days. Balugrastim's efficacy, safety, and tolerability have been assessed in four different clinical trials involving breast cancer patients treated with doxorubicin and docetaxel. Pegfilgrastim was chosen as a comparator. Balugrastim was noninferior to pegfilgrastim with regard to the reduction of mean duration of severe neutropenia during cycle 1. Moreover, both treatments were comparable in terms of efficacy and safety profile. Balugrastim was well tolerated, with the only related adverse event being mild to moderate bone pain. The aim of this review is to summarize the currently available literature data on balugrastim. PMID:27445479

  14. NAMPT is essential for the G-CSF-induced myeloid differentiation via a NAD+-sirtuin-1-dependent pathway

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We identified nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), also known as pre-B cell colony enhancing factor (PBEF), as an essential enzyme mediating granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-triggered granulopoiesis in healthy individuals and in individuals with severe congenital neutropenia....

  15. New developments in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia: focus on balugrastim

    PubMed Central

    Ghidini, Michele; Hahne, Jens Claus; Trevisani, Francesco; Panni, Stefano; Ratti, Margherita; Toppo, Laura; Tomasello, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    Neutropenia and febrile neutropenia are two major complications of chemotherapy. Dose reductions, delays in treatment administration, and the use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factors are equally recommended options to preserve absolute neutrophil count in case of chemotherapy regimens bringing a risk of febrile neutropenia of 20% or higher. Recombinant granulocyte colony-stimulating factors, such as filgrastim and lenograstim, have a short elimination half-life (t1/2) and need to be used daily, while others, like pegfilgrastim and lipegfilgrastim, are characterized by a long t1/2 requiring only a single administration per cycle. Balugrastim is a novel long-acting recombinant granulocyte colony-stimulating factor obtained by means of a genetic fusion between recombinant human serum albumin and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. Albumin binding increases the molecular weight and determines a high plasmatic stability leading to a t1/2 of ~19 days. Balugrastim’s efficacy, safety, and tolerability have been assessed in four different clinical trials involving breast cancer patients treated with doxorubicin and docetaxel. Pegfilgrastim was chosen as a comparator. Balugrastim was noninferior to pegfilgrastim with regard to the reduction of mean duration of severe neutropenia during cycle 1. Moreover, both treatments were comparable in terms of efficacy and safety profile. Balugrastim was well tolerated, with the only related adverse event being mild to moderate bone pain. The aim of this review is to summarize the currently available literature data on balugrastim. PMID:27445479

  16. Effects of increased white blood cell count on endothelin-induced vasoconstriction in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Told, Reinhard; Fuchsjäger-Mayrl, Gabriele; Wolzt, Michael; Schmetterer, Leopold; Garhöfer, Gerhard

    2012-04-01

    It is known that administration of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor is followed by an increase of white blood cell count. There is evidence from other vascular beds that an increase in white blood cell count impairs blood flow regulation especially in the microcirculation. Whether this also holds true for the ocular circulation is unknown. In the following study we investigated whether an increase in white blood cell count alters the endothelin-1 induced vasoconstriction in humans. Neither granulocyte-colony stimulating factor nor endothelin-1 had any consistent effect on blood pressure, pulse rate or intraocular pressure. Administration of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor induced a pronounced increase in retinal white blood cell density (p < 0.01). Administration of endothelin-1 decreased choroidal (p < 0.01) and retinal blood flow (p < 0.01). The change in choroidal blood flow in response to endothelin-1 was not altered by pre-treatment with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor. By contrast, the decrease in retinal blood flow was more pronounced during an increase in white blood cell count (p = 0.02) when compared to placebo. Our data indicates that during pronounced vasoconstriction, as induced by administration of endothelin-1, vascular regulation can be altered by the number of circulating white blood cells. Whether this effect is caused by an interaction of red and white blood cells in the microcirculation or a yet unknown mechanism needs further investigation.

  17. Transient pancytopenia preceding adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia with chromosomal abnormalities including the Philadelphia chromosome: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    LIANG, YUN; DING, LUYIN; LI, XIAN; WANG, WEIQIN; ZHANG, XIAOHONG

    2015-01-01

    A preleukaemic phase, typified by transient pancytopenia, is a rare occurrence that usually affects children and adolescents. The present study reports the case of a 50-year-old woman with transient pancytopenia, which manifested as a fever, cough and severe anemia. Three weeks following treatment of pancytopenia with antibiotics, red blood cell and platelet transfusion, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and human γ globulin, the condition of the patient was improved. However, 3 weeks following discharge from hospital, the patient was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with complex chromosomal abnormalities, including Philadelphia chromosome and P190 breakpoint cluster region-ABL. Complete remission was achieved following one course of combination chemotherapy. In conclusion, adult ALL with pancytopenia as a preceding symptom is rare, difficult to diagnose early and easily misdiagnosed. In addition, the pathogenesis of ALL and the precipitating factors underlying this disease require further investigation. PMID:26788209

  18. [G-CSF treatment].

    PubMed

    Mizuma, Atsushi; Takizawa, Shunya

    2016-04-01

    In acute phase of ischemic stroke, as neuroprotective and neurogenerative role of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor(G-CSF), anti-apoptotic action, anti-inflammatory and anti-immune effect, and brain protective action against excitatory neurotoxicity have been reported. Several clinical trials in ischemic stroke patients using G-CSF have been carried out and reported the safety, improvement of clinical symptom, and reduction of infarct volume. But the efficacy of G-CSF administration in acute ischemic stroke has not been well proved. Further clinical studies with more patients, more uniform infarct size, and similar distributions of stroke subtype, are needed to clarify its effectiveness. Combined therapy with G-CSF and thrombolysis will be also expected as the next step of clinical trials. PMID:27333753

  19. Effects of acute feed restriction combined with targeted use of increasing luteinizing hormone content of follicle-stimulating hormone preparations on ovarian superstimulation, fertilization, and embryo quality in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Bender, R W; Hackbart, K S; Dresch, A R; Carvalho, P D; Vieira, L M; Crump, P M; Guenther, J N; Fricke, P M; Shaver, R D; Combs, D K; Wiltbank, M C

    2014-02-01

    Multiple metabolic and hormonal factors can affect the success of protocols for ovarian superstimulation. In this study, the effect of acute feed restriction and increased LH content in the superstimulatory FSH preparation on numbers of ovulations, fertilization, and embryo quality in lactating dairy cows was evaluated. Two experiments were performed using a Latin square design with treatments arranged as a 2 × 2 factorial: feed restriction (FR; 25% reduction in dry matter intake) compared with ad libitum (AL) feeding, combined with high (H) versus low (L) LH in the last 4 injections of the superstimulatory protocol. As expected, FR decreased circulating insulin concentrations (26.7 vs. 46.0 μU/mL). Two analyses were performed: one that evaluated the complete Latin square in experiment 2 and a second that evaluated only the first periods of experiments 1 and 2. For both analyses, follicle numbers, ovulation rates, and corpora lutea on d 7 were not different. In the first period analysis of experiments 1 and 2, we observed an interaction between feed allowance and amount of LH on fertilization rates, percentage of embryos or oocytes that were quality 1 and 2 embryos, and number of embryos or oocytes that were degenerate. Fertilization rates were greater for the AL-L (89.4%) and FR-H (80.1%) treatments compared with the AL-H (47.9%) and FR-L (59.9%) treatments. Similarly, the proportion of total embryos or oocytes designated as quality 1 and 2 embryos was greater for AL-L (76.7%) and FR-H (73.4%) treatments compared with AL-H (35.6%) and FR-L (47.3%) treatments. In addition, the number of degenerate embryos was decreased for AL-L (1.3) and FR-H (0.4) treatments compared with the AL-H (2.6) and FR-L (2.3) treatments. Thus, cows with either too low (FR-L) or too high (AL-H) insulin and LH stimulation had lesser embryo production after superstimulation because of reduced fertilization rate and increased percentage of degenerate embryos. Therefore, interaction of the

  20. Murine Anti-GD2 Monoclonal Antibody 3F8 Combined With Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor and 13-Cis-Retinoic Acid in High-Risk Patients With Stage 4 Neuroblastoma in First Remission

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.; Cheung, Irene Y.; Kushner, Brian H.; Ostrovnaya, Irina; Chamberlain, Elizabeth; Kramer, Kim; Modak, Shakeel

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Anti-GD2 monoclonal antibody (MoAb) combined with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has shown efficacy against neuroblastoma (NB). Prognostic variables that could influence clinical outcome were explored. Patients and Methods One hundred sixty-nine children diagnosed with stage 4 NB (1988 to 2008) were enrolled onto consecutive anti-GD2 murine MoAb 3F8 ± GM-CSF ± 13-cis-retinoic acid (CRA) protocols after achieving first remission (complete remission/very good partial remission). Patients enrolled in regimen A (n = 43 high-risk [HR] patients) received 3F8 alone; regimen B (n = 41 HR patients), 3F8 + intravenous GM-CSF + CRA, after stem-cell transplantation (SCT); and regimen C (n = 85), 3F8 + subcutaneous GM-CSF + CRA, 46 of 85 after SCT, whereas 28 of 85 required additional induction therapy and were deemed ultra high risk (UHR). Marrow minimal residual disease (MRD) was measured by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Survival probability was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and prognostic variables were analyzed by multivariate Cox regression model. Results At 5 years from the start of immunotherapy, progression-free survival (PFS) improved from 44% for HR patients receiving regimen A to 56% and 62% for those receiving regimens B and C, respectively. Overall survival (OS) was 49%, 61%, and 81%, respectively. PFS and OS of UHR patients were 36% and 75%, respectively. Relapse was mostly at isolated sites. Independent adverse prognostic factors included UHR (PFS) and post–cycle two MRD (PFS and OS), whereas the prognostic factors for improved outcome were missing killer immunoglobulin-like receptor ligand (PFS and OS), human antimouse antibody response (OS), and regimen C (OS). Conclusion Retrospective analysis of consecutive trials from a single center demonstrated that MoAb 3F8 + GM-CSF + CRA is effective against chemotherapy-resistant marrow MRD. Its positive impact on long-term survival can only

  1. Laser stimulation for pain research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Stuart; Dickinson, Mark R.; King, Terence A.; Jones, Anthony; Chen, Andrew; Derbyshire, Stuart; Townsend, D. W.; Kinahan, Paul E.; Mintun, M. A.; Nichols, T.

    1996-01-01

    Pain is a serious medical problem; it inflicts huge economic loss and personal suffering. Pain signals are conducted via small, non- and partially myelinated A-delta and C nerve fibers and lasers are particularly well suited to stimulating these fibers. Large myelinated fibers convey touch and vibration information and these fibers are also discharged when contact thermodes and other touch pain stimuli are used and this would give a more muddled signal for functional imaging experiments. The advantages of lasers over conventional methods of pain stimulation are good temporal resolution, no variable parameters are involved such as contact area and they give very reproducible results. Accurate inter-stimulus changes can be achieved by computer control of the laser pulse duration, pulse height and repetition rate and this flexibility enables complex stimulation paradigms to be realized. We present a flexible carbon dioxide laser system designed to generate these stimuli for the study of human cerebral pain responses. We discuss the advantages within research of this system over other methods of pain stimulation such as thermal, electrical and magnetic. The stimulator is used in conjunction with functional magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography and electrophysiological methods of imaging the brain's activity. This combination is a powerful tool for the study of pain-induced activity in different areas of the brain. An accurate understanding of the brain's response to pain will help in research into the areas of rheumatoid arthritis and chronic back pain.

  2. Optical Stimulation of Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Alexander C.; Stoddart, Paul R.; Jansen, E. Duco

    2014-01-01

    Our capacity to interface with the nervous system remains overwhelmingly reliant on electrical stimulation devices, such as electrode arrays and cuff electrodes that can stimulate both central and peripheral nervous systems. However, electrical stimulation has to deal with multiple challenges, including selectivity, spatial resolution, mechanical stability, implant-induced injury and the subsequent inflammatory response. Optical stimulation techniques may avoid some of these challenges by providing more selective stimulation, higher spatial resolution and reduced invasiveness of the device, while also avoiding the electrical artefacts that complicate recordings of electrically stimulated neuronal activity. This review explores the current status of optical stimulation techniques, including optogenetic methods, photoactive molecule approaches and infrared neural stimulation, together with emerging techniques such as hybrid optical-electrical stimulation, nanoparticle enhanced stimulation and optoelectric methods. Infrared neural stimulation is particularly emphasised, due to the potential for direct activation of neural tissue by infrared light, as opposed to techniques that rely on the introduction of exogenous light responsive materials. However, infrared neural stimulation remains imperfectly understood, and techniques for accurately delivering light are still under development. While the various techniques reviewed here confirm the overall feasibility of optical stimulation, a number of challenges remain to be overcome before they can deliver their full potential. PMID:26322269

  3. EOR by stimulated microflora

    SciTech Connect

    Svarovskaya, L.I.; Altunina, L.K.; Rozhenkova, Z.A.; Bulavin, V.D.

    1995-12-31

    A combined microbiological and physico-chemical method for EOR has been developed for flooded West Siberia oil fields with formation temperature of 45{degrees}-95{degrees}C (318-365K). Formation water includes rich and various biocenoses numbering up to 2 x 10{sup 7} cells per ml. Representatives of genera, i.e, Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Actinomyces, Micrococcus, Mycobacterium, Sarcina, etc. were found to be the most widely distributed microorganisms. The method is based on injection of systems exhibiting high oil displacing capacity and at the same time being an additional nitrous nutrient for endemic populations of microorganisms. Their injection into formation water favors biomass growth by 4-6 orders and promotes syntheses of biosurfactants, biopolymers, acids, etc., and gaseous products. The features of residual oil displacement have been studied on laboratory models using a combined microbiological and physico-chemical method. A curve for the yield of residual oil is presented by two peaks. The first peak is stipulated by the washing action of oil displacement system, and the second one by the effect of metabolites produced at stimulation of biogenic processes. Oil displacement index increases by 15%-30%.

  4. Advances in functional electrical stimulation (FES).

    PubMed

    Popović, Dejan B

    2014-12-01

    This review discusses the advancements that are needed to enhance the effects of electrical stimulation for restoring or assisting movement in humans with an injury/disease of the central nervous system. A complex model of the effects of electrical stimulation of peripheral systems is presented. The model indicates that both the motor and sensory systems are activated by electrical stimulation. We propose that a hierarchical hybrid controller may be suitable for functional electrical stimulation (FES) because this type of controller acts as a structural mimetic of its biological counterpart. Specific attention is given to the neural systems at the periphery with respect to the required electrodes and stimulators. Furthermore, we note that FES with surface electrodes is preferred for the therapy, although there is a definite advantage associated with implantable technology for life-long use. The last section of the review discusses the potential need to combine FES and robotic systems to provide assistance in some cases. PMID:25287528

  5. Atomic oxygen stimulated outgassing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linton, Roger C.; Reynolds, John M.

    1991-01-01

    The passive Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Experiment A0034, Atomic Oxygen Simulated Outgassing, consisted of two identical one-sixth tray modules, exposing selected thermal control coatings to atomic oxygen and the combined space environment on the leading edge and, for reference, to the relative wake environment on the trailing edge. Optical mirrors were included adjacent to the thermal coatings for deposition of outgassing products. Ultraviolet grade windows and metal covers were provided for additional assessment of the effects of the various environmental factors. Preliminary results indicate that orbital atomic oxygen is both a degrading and a optically restorative factor in the thermo-optical properties of selected thermal coatings. There is evidence of more severe optical degradation on collector mirrors adjacent to coatings that were exposed to the RAM-impinging atomic oxygen. This evidence of atomic oxygen stimulated outgassing is discussed in relation to alternative factors that could affect degradation. The general effects of the space environment on the experiment hardware as well as the specimens are discussed.

  6. Peripheral nerve stimulation: definition.

    PubMed

    Abejón, David; Pérez-Cajaraville, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Recently, there has been a tremendous evolution in the field of neurostimulation, both from the technological point of view and from development of the new and different indications. In some areas, such as peripheral nerve stimulation, there has been a boom in recent years due to the variations in the surgical technique and the improved results documented by in multiple published papers. All this makes imperative the need to classify and define the different types of stimulation that are used today. The confusion arises when attempting to describe peripheral nerve stimulation and subcutaneous stimulation. Peripheral nerve stimulation, in its pure definition, involves implanting a lead on a nerve, with the aim to produce paresthesia along the entire trajectory of the stimulated nerve.

  7. Multisensory stimulation in stroke rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Barbro Birgitta

    2012-01-01

    The brain has a large capacity for automatic simultaneous processing and integration of sensory information. Combining information from different sensory modalities facilitates our ability to detect, discriminate, and recognize sensory stimuli, and learning is often optimal in a multisensory environment. Currently used multisensory stimulation methods in stroke rehabilitation include motor imagery, action observation, training with a mirror or in a virtual environment, and various kinds of music therapy. Non-invasive brain stimulation has showed promising preliminary results in aphasia and neglect. Patient heterogeneity and the interaction of age, gender, genes, and environment are discussed. Randomized controlled longitudinal trials starting earlier post-stroke are needed. The advance in brain network science and neuroimaging enabling longitudinal studies of structural and functional networks are likely to have an important impact on patient selection for specific interventions in future stroke rehabilitation. It is proposed that we should pay more attention to age, gender, and laterality in clinical studies.

  8. Multisensory Stimulation in Stroke Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Barbro Birgitta

    2012-01-01

    The brain has a large capacity for automatic simultaneous processing and integration of sensory information. Combining information from different sensory modalities facilitates our ability to detect, discriminate, and recognize sensory stimuli, and learning is often optimal in a multisensory environment. Currently used multisensory stimulation methods in stroke rehabilitation include motor imagery, action observation, training with a mirror or in a virtual environment, and various kinds of music therapy. Non-invasive brain stimulation has showed promising preliminary results in aphasia and neglect. Patient heterogeneity and the interaction of age, gender, genes, and environment are discussed. Randomized controlled longitudinal trials starting earlier post-stroke are needed. The advance in brain network science and neuroimaging enabling longitudinal studies of structural and functional networks are likely to have an important impact on patient selection for specific interventions in future stroke rehabilitation. It is proposed that we should pay more attention to age, gender, and laterality in clinical studies. PMID:22509159

  9. Stimulant Use Disorders.

    PubMed

    Park, Taryn M; Haning, William F

    2016-07-01

    Compared with other illicit substances, stimulants are not commonly used by adolescents; however, they represent a serious concern regarding substance use among youths. This article uses methamphetamine as a model for stimulant use in adolescents; cocaine and prescription stimulants are also mentioned. Methamphetamine use among adolescents and young adults is a serious health concern with potentially long-term physical, cognitive, and psychiatric consequences. Brain development and the effects of misusing stimulants align such that usage in adolescents can more dangerous than during adulthood. It seems helpful to keep in mind the differences between adolescents and young adults when implementing interventions. PMID:27338967

  10. [Electromagnetic urological stimulator].

    PubMed

    Zaslavskiĭ AOi; Markarov, G S; Gelis, Iu S

    1997-01-01

    The paper deals with an electromagnetic urological stimulator which generates a modulated low-frequency electromagnetic field of nonthermal intensity and its brief technical data. It presents a treatment regimen for urolithiasis and recommendations how to use the above therapeutical agent to stimulate urinary function in patients with urolithiasis in order to inoperatively eliminate urinary calculi and sand which form following extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy.

  11. Stimulating your appetite.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, L

    1998-01-01

    A number of legal and illegal drugs can help stimulate appetite and are used for people with HIV to prevent wasting. Stimulating hunger is important because lower calorie intake and poor absorption of nutrients are associated with wasting. The uses and potential drawbacks of marijuana, thalidomide (Synovir), Marinol, and Megace are described. PMID:11365223

  12. Multicolor stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Fa-Ke; Ji, Minbiao; Fu, Dan; Ni, Xiaohui; Freudiger, Christian W.; Holtom, Gary; Xie, X. Sunney

    2012-08-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy has opened up a wide range of biochemical imaging applications by probing a particular Raman-active molecule vibrational mode in the specimen. However, the original implementation with picosecond pulse excitation can only realize rapid chemical mapping with a single Raman band. Here we present a novel SRS microscopic technique using a grating-based pulse shaper for excitation and a grating-based spectrograph for detection to achieve simultaneous multicolor SRS imaging with high sensitivity and high acquisition speeds. In particular, we use a linear combination of the measured CH2 and CH3 stretching signals to map the distributions of protein and lipid contents simultaneously.

  13. Anti-inflammatory effects of egg white combined with chalcanthite in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated BV2 microglia through the inhibition of NF-κB, MAPK and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun A; Park, Hye Young; Yoo, Hwa-Seung; Choi, Yung Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Egg white-chalcanthite (EWCC) is a mixture of egg white and chalcanthite prepared by roasting chalcanthite (which is a natural mineral mainly composed of CuSO4•5H2O) to the point of dehydration, pulverizing the dehydrated chalcanthite and then mixing the pulverized chalcanthite to react with egg white to trigger a reaction. When egg white-chalcanthite is prepared in this manner, the toxicity of chalcanthite is neutralized by the egg white, so that the toxicity is reduced or removed and the pharmaceutical properties are increased. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the pharmacological activity of EWCC remain poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of EWCC on the production of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pro-inflammatory mediators in BV2 microglia. Our data indicated that the EWCC treatment significantly inhibited the excessive production of nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2 in LPS-stimulated BV2 microglia in a concentration-dependent manner without causing cytotoxicity. It also attenuated the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase-2 and pro-inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α. Moreover, EWCC exhibited anti-inflammatory properties by the suppression of nuclear factor‑κB (NF-κB) activation by blocking IκB-α degradation, downregulation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathways. Our results indicate that the inhibitory effects of EWCC on LPS-stimulated inflammatory mediator production in BV2 microglia are associated with the suppression of the NF-κB, MAPK and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. These findings suggest that EWCC may offer a substantial therapeutic potential for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases that are accompanied by microglial activation. PMID:23128312

  14. Ring-shaped backward stimulated Raman scattering driven by stimulated Brillouin scattering.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chengyong; Diels, Jean-Claude; Xu, Xiaozhen; Arissian, Ladan

    2015-06-29

    Backward stimulated Raman scattering is generated in water, pumped by pre-compressed pulses from a single-cell stimulated Brillouin scattering pulse compressor. The maximum energy efficiency of 9% is achieved by employing a circularly-polarized pump pulse at its energy of 50 mJ, around which point the backward stimulated Raman scattering also exhibits a ring-shaped profile. The correlations between spatial and temporal profiles as well as the intensities of the backward stimulated Raman and the stimulated Brillouin scattering generated from Raman cell indicate that the ring-shaped backward stimulated Raman is driven by intense stimulated Brillouin scattering. We demonstrate the latter process to be much more efficient for the backward Raman generation than the conventional process in which the laser itself pumps a backward stimulated Raman beam. It is shown that a further increase in pump energy leads to a drop in efficiency, combined with a break-up of the ring pattern of backward stimulated Raman. These effects are associated with filament generation above a certain threshold.

  15. Effects of Sensory Modality Stimulation on the Dysarthria of Cerebral Palsy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Russel J.

    To explore the efficacy of improving the dysarthria of cerebral palsy under conditions of aural stimulation, visual stimulation, and combined aural-visual stimulation, 22 subjects (aged 7.6 to 19.0 years) received intensive stimulation for word limitation for 22 consecutive school days. The 87 words of the Irwin Integrated Articulation Test were…

  16. COMBINES AND COMBINING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RIDENOUR, HARLAN E.

    THROUGH THE USE OF THIS MANUAL, VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE STUDENTS WITH OCCUPATIONAL INTEREST IN GRAIN FARMING AND CUSTOM COMBINE OPERATION MAY GAIN KNOWLEDGE ABOUT THE BASIC DESIGN AND OPERATION OF COMBINES. DEVELOPMENT BY A STATE CURRICULUM MATERIALS DIRECTOR INCLUDED CONSULTATION WITH ENGINEERS, TRIAL, AND REVISION. OBJECTIVES ARE STATED IN TERMS…

  17. Optogenetic stimulation of MCH neurons increases sleep.

    PubMed

    Konadhode, Roda Rani; Pelluru, Dheeraj; Blanco-Centurion, Carlos; Zayachkivsky, Andrew; Liu, Meng; Uhde, Thomas; Glen, W Bailey; van den Pol, Anthony N; Mulholland, Patrick J; Shiromani, Priyattam J

    2013-06-19

    Melanin concentrating hormone (MCH) is a cyclic neuropeptide present in the hypothalamus of all vertebrates. MCH is implicated in a number of behaviors but direct evidence is lacking. To selectively stimulate the MCH neurons the gene for the light-sensitive cation channel, channelrhodopsin-2, was inserted into the MCH neurons of wild-type mice. Three weeks later MCH neurons were stimulated for 1 min every 5 min for 24 h. A 10 Hz stimulation at the start of the night hastened sleep onset, reduced length of wake bouts by 50%, increased total time in non-REM and REM sleep at night, and increased sleep intensity during the day cycle. Sleep induction at a circadian time when all of the arousal neurons are active indicates that MCH stimulation can powerfully counteract the combined wake-promoting signal of the arousal neurons. This could be potentially useful in treatment of insomnia.

  18. Stimulants for the Control of Hedonic Appetite.

    PubMed

    Poulton, Alison S; Hibbert, Emily J; Champion, Bernard L; Nanan, Ralph K H

    2016-01-01

    The focus of this paper is treatment of obesity in relation to the management of hedonic appetite. Obesity is a complex condition which may be potentiated by excessive reward seeking in combination with executive functioning deficits that impair cognitive control of behavior. Stimulant medications address both reward deficiency and enhance motivation, as well as suppressing appetite. They have long been recognized to be effective for treating obesity. However, stimulants can be abused for their euphoric effect. They induce euphoria via the same neural pathway that underlies their therapeutic effect in obesity. For this reason they have generally not been endorsed for use in obesity. Among the stimulants, only phentermine (either alone or in combination with topiramate) and bupropion (which has stimulant-like properties and is used in combination with naltrexone), are approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for obesity, although dexamphetamine and methylpenidate are approved and widely used for treating attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adults and children. Experience gained over many years in the treatment of ADHD demonstrates that with careful dose titration, stimulants can be used safely. In obesity, improvement in mood and executive functioning could assist with the lifestyle changes necessary for weight control, acting synergistically with appetite suppression. The obesity crisis has reached the stage that strong consideration should be given to adequate utilization of this effective and inexpensive class of drug.

  19. Stimulants for the Control of Hedonic Appetite

    PubMed Central

    Poulton, Alison S.; Hibbert, Emily J.; Champion, Bernard L.; Nanan, Ralph K. H.

    2016-01-01

    The focus of this paper is treatment of obesity in relation to the management of hedonic appetite. Obesity is a complex condition which may be potentiated by excessive reward seeking in combination with executive functioning deficits that impair cognitive control of behavior. Stimulant medications address both reward deficiency and enhance motivation, as well as suppressing appetite. They have long been recognized to be effective for treating obesity. However, stimulants can be abused for their euphoric effect. They induce euphoria via the same neural pathway that underlies their therapeutic effect in obesity. For this reason they have generally not been endorsed for use in obesity. Among the stimulants, only phentermine (either alone or in combination with topiramate) and bupropion (which has stimulant-like properties and is used in combination with naltrexone), are approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for obesity, although dexamphetamine and methylpenidate are approved and widely used for treating attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adults and children. Experience gained over many years in the treatment of ADHD demonstrates that with careful dose titration, stimulants can be used safely. In obesity, improvement in mood and executive functioning could assist with the lifestyle changes necessary for weight control, acting synergistically with appetite suppression. The obesity crisis has reached the stage that strong consideration should be given to adequate utilization of this effective and inexpensive class of drug. PMID:27199749

  20. Stimulants for the Control of Hedonic Appetite.

    PubMed

    Poulton, Alison S; Hibbert, Emily J; Champion, Bernard L; Nanan, Ralph K H

    2016-01-01

    The focus of this paper is treatment of obesity in relation to the management of hedonic appetite. Obesity is a complex condition which may be potentiated by excessive reward seeking in combination with executive functioning deficits that impair cognitive control of behavior. Stimulant medications address both reward deficiency and enhance motivation, as well as suppressing appetite. They have long been recognized to be effective for treating obesity. However, stimulants can be abused for their euphoric effect. They induce euphoria via the same neural pathway that underlies their therapeutic effect in obesity. For this reason they have generally not been endorsed for use in obesity. Among the stimulants, only phentermine (either alone or in combination with topiramate) and bupropion (which has stimulant-like properties and is used in combination with naltrexone), are approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for obesity, although dexamphetamine and methylpenidate are approved and widely used for treating attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adults and children. Experience gained over many years in the treatment of ADHD demonstrates that with careful dose titration, stimulants can be used safely. In obesity, improvement in mood and executive functioning could assist with the lifestyle changes necessary for weight control, acting synergistically with appetite suppression. The obesity crisis has reached the stage that strong consideration should be given to adequate utilization of this effective and inexpensive class of drug. PMID:27199749

  1. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeever, Stephen W. S.

    2001-09-01

    Models and the conceptual framework necessary for an understanding of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) are described. Examples of various OSL readout schemes are described, along with examples of the use of OSL in radiation dosimetry.

  2. Deep brain stimulation

    MedlinePlus

    ... the brain The neurostimulator, which puts out the electric current. The stimulator is similar to a heart pacemaker . It is usually placed under the skin near the collarbone, but may be ... pulses travel from the neurostimulator, along the extension ...

  3. ACTH stimulation test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Groot LJ, de Kretser DM, et al, eds. Endocrinology: Adult and Pediatric . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 102. Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. ACTH stimulation test - diagnostic. In: ... . 13th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap ...

  4. Geothermal Well Stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, D. A.; Morris, C. W.; Sinclair, A. R.; Hanold, R. J.; Vetter, O. J.

    1981-03-01

    The stimulation of geothermal wells presents some new and challenging problems. Formation temperatures in the 300-600 F range can be expected. The behavior of stimulation fluids, frac proppants, and equipment at these temperatures in a hostile brine environment must be carefully evaluated before performance expectations can be determined. In order to avoid possible damage to the producing horizon of the formation, high temperature chemical compatibility between the in situ materials and the stimulation materials must be verified. Perhaps most significant of all, in geothermal wells the required techniques must be capable of bringing about the production of very large amounts of fluid. This necessity for high flow rates represents a significant departure from conventional petroleum well stimulation and demands the creation of very high near-wellbore permeability and/or fractures with very high flow conductivity.

  5. 5-Androstene-3{beta},17{beta}-diol Promotes Recovery of Immature Hematopoietic Cells Following Myelosuppressive Radiation and Synergizes With Thrombopoietin

    SciTech Connect

    Aerts-Kaya, Fatima S.F.; Visser, Trudi P.; Arshad, Shazia; Frincke, James; Stickney, Dwight R.; Reading, Chris L.; Wagemaker, Gerard

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: 5-Androstene-3{beta},17{beta}-diol (5-AED) stimulates recovery of hematopoiesis after exposure to radiation. To elucidate its cellular targets, the effects of 5-AED alone and in combination with (pegylated) granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and thrombopoietin (TPO) on immature hematopoietic progenitor cells were evaluated following total body irradiation. Methods and Materials: BALB/c mice were exposed to radiation delivered as a single or as a fractionated dose, and recovery of bone marrow progenitors and peripheral blood parameters was assessed. Results: BALB/c mice treated with 5-AED displayed accelerated multilineage blood cell recovery and elevated bone marrow (BM) cellularity and numbers of progenitor cells. The spleen colony-forming unit (CFU-S) assay, representing the life-saving short-term repopulating cells in BM of irradiated donor mice revealed that combined treatment with 5-AED plus TPO resulted in a 20.1-fold increase in CFU-S relative to that of placebo controls, and a 3.7 and 3.1-fold increase in comparison to 5-AED and TPO, whereas no effect was seen of Peg-G-CSF with or without 5-AED. Contrary to TPO, 5-AED also stimulated reconstitution of the more immature marrow repopulating (MRA) cells. Conclusions: 5-AED potently counteracts the hematopoietic effects of radiation-induced myelosuppression and promotes multilineage reconstitution by stimulating immature bone marrow cells in a pattern distinct from, but synergistic with TPO.

  6. Vagus Nerve Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Howland, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    The vagus nerve is a major component of the autonomic nervous system, has an important role in the regulation of metabolic homeostasis, and plays a key role in the neuroendocrine-immune axis to maintain homeostasis through its afferent and efferent pathways. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) refers to any technique that stimulates the vagus nerve, including manual or electrical stimulation. Left cervical VNS is an approved therapy for refractory epilepsy and for treatment resistant depression. Right cervical VNS is effective for treating heart failure in preclinical studies and a phase II clinical trial. The effectiveness of various forms of non-invasive transcutaneous VNS for epilepsy, depression, primary headaches, and other conditions has not been investigated beyond small pilot studies. The relationship between depression, inflammation, metabolic syndrome, and heart disease might be mediated by the vagus nerve. VNS deserves further study for its potentially favorable effects on cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, metabolic, and other physiological biomarkers associated with depression morbidity and mortality. PMID:24834378

  7. New York Canyon Stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Raemy, Bernard

    2012-06-21

    The New York Canyon Stimulation Project was to demonstrate the commercial application of Enhanced Geothermal System techniques in Buena Vista Valley area of Pershing County, Nevada. From October 2009 to early 2012, TGP Development Company aggressively implemented Phase I of Pre-Stimulation and Site/Wellbore readiness. This included: geological studies; water studies and analyses and procurement of initial permits for drilling. Oversubscription of water rights and lack of water needed for implementation of EGS were identified and remained primary obstacles. Despite extended efforts to find alternative solutions, the water supply circumstances could not be overcome and led TGP to determine a "No Go" decision and initiate project termination in April 2012.

  8. Muscle Stimulation Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Under a Goddard Space Flight Center contract, Electrologic of America was able to refine the process of densely packing circuitry on personal computer boards, providing significant contributions to the closed-loop systems for the Remote Manipulator System Simulator. The microcircuitry work was then applied to the StimMaster FES Ergometer, an exercise device used to stimulate muscles suffering from paralysis. The electrical stimulation equipment was developed exclusively for V-Care Health Systems, Inc. Product still commercially available as of March 2002.

  9. Two cases of incidental Podostroma cornu-damae poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee Nyung; Do, Han Ho; Seo, Jun Seok; Kim, Hee Young

    2016-01-01

    Podostroma cornu-damae is a rare, deadly fungus. However, it can be easily mistaken for antler Ganoderma lucidum. In this case report, two patients made tea with the fungus and drank it over a 2-week period. Both patients presented with bicytopenia, and one patient had desquamation of the palms and soles. Both were treated with prophylactic antibiotics and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. One patient was admitted to the intensive care unit and received a platelet transfusion. Both patients were discharged without complications. Podostroma cornu-damae infections caused by intoxication were successfully treated using our treatment strategy, which consisted of prophylactic antibiotics, platelet transfusion, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. We believe this report can guide future treatment. PMID:27752639

  10. Brain stimulation and inhibitory control.

    PubMed

    Juan, Chi-Hung; Muggleton, Neil G

    2012-04-01

    Inhibitory control mechanisms are important in a range of behaviours to prevent execution of motor acts which, having been planned, are no longer necessary or appropriate. Examples of this can be seen in a range of sports, such as cricket and baseball, where the choice between execution and inhibition of a bat swing must be made in a very brief time window. Deficits in inhibitory control have been associated with problems in behavioural regulation in impulsive violence as well as a range of clinical disorders. The roles of various areas, including the frontal eye fields (FEF), the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA) and the inferior frontal gyrus, in inhibitory control have been investigated using an inhibitory control task and both transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). Typically effects on response inhibition but no effects on response generation have been seen. The contributions of these areas to performance seem to differ with, for example, pre-SMA being involved when the task is relatively novel whereas this is not the case for FEF. The findings from brain stimulation studies offer both insight into which areas are necessary for effective inhibitory control and recent extension of findings for the role of the inferior frontal gyrus illustrate how the specific functions by which these areas contribute may be further clarified. Future work, including making use of the temporal specificity of TMS and combination of TMS/tDCS with other neuroimaging techniques, may further clarify the nature and functions played by the network of areas involved in inhibitory control. PMID:22494830

  11. Brain stimulation and inhibitory control.

    PubMed

    Juan, Chi-Hung; Muggleton, Neil G

    2012-04-01

    Inhibitory control mechanisms are important in a range of behaviours to prevent execution of motor acts which, having been planned, are no longer necessary or appropriate. Examples of this can be seen in a range of sports, such as cricket and baseball, where the choice between execution and inhibition of a bat swing must be made in a very brief time window. Deficits in inhibitory control have been associated with problems in behavioural regulation in impulsive violence as well as a range of clinical disorders. The roles of various areas, including the frontal eye fields (FEF), the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA) and the inferior frontal gyrus, in inhibitory control have been investigated using an inhibitory control task and both transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). Typically effects on response inhibition but no effects on response generation have been seen. The contributions of these areas to performance seem to differ with, for example, pre-SMA being involved when the task is relatively novel whereas this is not the case for FEF. The findings from brain stimulation studies offer both insight into which areas are necessary for effective inhibitory control and recent extension of findings for the role of the inferior frontal gyrus illustrate how the specific functions by which these areas contribute may be further clarified. Future work, including making use of the temporal specificity of TMS and combination of TMS/tDCS with other neuroimaging techniques, may further clarify the nature and functions played by the network of areas involved in inhibitory control.

  12. RasGRP1 Transgenic Mice Develop Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinomas in Response to Skin Wounding

    PubMed Central

    Diez, Federico R.; Garrido, Ann A.; Sharma, Amrish; Luke, Courtney T.; Stone, James C.; Dower, Nancy A.; Cline, J. Mark; Lorenzo, Patricia S.

    2009-01-01

    Models of epidermal carcinogenesis have demonstrated that Ras is a critical molecule involved in tumor initiation and progression. Previously, we have shown that RasGRP1 increases the susceptibility of mice to skin tumorigenesis when overexpressed in the epidermis by a transgenic approach, related to its ability to activate Ras. Moreover, RasGRP1 transgenic mice develop spontaneous papillomas and cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas, some of which appear to originate in sites of injury, suggesting that RasGRP1 may be responding to signals generated during the wound-healing process. In this study, we examined the response of the RasGRP1 transgenic animals to full-thickness incision wounding of the skin, and demonstrated that they respond by developing tumors along the wounded site. The tumors did not present mutations in the H-ras gene, but Rasgrp1 transgene dosage correlated with tumor susceptibility and size. Analysis of serum cytokines showed increased levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in transgenic animals after wounding. Furthermore, in vitro experiments with primary keratinocytes showed that granulocyte colony-stimulating factor stimulated Ras activation, although RasGRP1 was dispensable for this effect. Since granulocyte colony-stimulating factor has been recently associated with proliferation of skin cancer cells, our results may help in the elucidation of pathways that activate Ras in the epidermis during tumorigenesis in the absence of oncogenic ras mutations. PMID:19497993

  13. Activation of adenosine A(3) receptors potentiates stimulatory effects of IL-3, SCF, and GM-CSF on mouse granulocyte-macrophage hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Hofer, M; Vacek, A; Pospísil, M; Holá, J; Streitová, D; Znojil, V

    2009-01-01

    Adenosine A(3) receptor agonist N(6)-(3-iodobenzyl)adenosine-5'-N-methyluronamide (IB-MECA) has been tested from the point of view of potentiating the effects of hematopoietic growth factors interleukin-3 (IL-3), stem cell factor (SCF), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on the growth of hematopoietic progenitor cells for granulocytes and macrophages (GM-CFC) in suspension of normal mouse bone marrow cells in vitro. IB-MECA alone induced no GM-CFC growth. Significant elevation of numbers of GM-CFC evoked by the combinations of IB-MECA with IL-3, SCF, or GM-CSF as compared with these growth factors alone has been noted. Combination of IB-MECA with G-CSF did not induce significantly higher numbers of GM-CFC in comparison with G-CSF alone. Joint action of three drugs, namely of IB-MECA + IL-3 + GM-CSF, produced significantly higher numbers of GM-CFC in comparison with the combinations of IB-MECA + IL-3, IB-MECA + GM-CSF, or IL-3 + GM-CSF. These results give evidence of a significant role of selective activation of adenosine A(3) receptors in stimulation of the growth of granulocyte/ macrophage hematopoietic progenitor cells.

  14. What does galvanic vestibular stimulation stimulate?

    PubMed

    Wardman, Daniel L; Fitzpatrick, Richard C

    2002-01-01

    The technique of galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) has been used for a long time. The stimulus produces stereotyped automatic postural and ocular responses. The mechanisms underlying these responses are not understood although they are commonly attributed to altered otolith output. Based on animal studies, it seems reasonable to assume that vestibular afferents from the otoliths and semicircular canals are affected similarly by GVS. With this assumption, and anatomical knowledge of the vestibular apparatus, a model is developed to describe the expected responses of vestibular afferents to percutaneous GVS and the physiological implications of this altered sensory signal. Bilateral bipolar GVS, the most commonly used technique, should produce a canal signal consistent with a strong ear-down roll towards the cathodal side, a smaller nose-to-cathode yaw, but no pitch signal. Bilateral bipolar GVS should also produce an otolith signal consistent with tilt towards the cathodal side or a translational acceleration towards the anodal side. The expected responses for other configurations of GVS are also described. The model appears consistent with published data on the ocular and postural responses to GVS, and suggests other testable hypotheses concerning postural, ocular and perceptual responses to GVS.

  15. Transcranial brain stimulation: closing the loop between brain and stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Karabanov, Anke; Thielscher, Axel; Siebner, Hartwig Roman

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review To discuss recent strategies for boosting the efficacy of noninvasive transcranial brain stimulation to improve human brain function. Recent findings Recent research exposed substantial intra- and inter-individual variability in response to plasticity-inducing transcranial brain stimulation. Trait-related and state-related determinants contribute to this variability, challenging the standard approach to apply stimulation in a rigid, one-size-fits-all fashion. Several strategies have been identified to reduce variability and maximize the plasticity-inducing effects of noninvasive transcranial brain stimulation. Priming interventions or paired associative stimulation can be used to ‘standardize’ the brain-state and hereby, homogenize the group response to stimulation. Neuroanatomical and neurochemical profiling based on magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy can capture trait-related and state-related variability. Fluctuations in brain-states can be traced online with functional brain imaging and inform the timing or other settings of transcranial brain stimulation. State-informed open-loop stimulation is aligned to the expression of a predefined brain state, according to prespecified rules. In contrast, adaptive closed-loop stimulation dynamically adjusts stimulation settings based on the occurrence of stimulation-induced state changes. Summary Approaches that take into account trait-related and state-related determinants of stimulation-induced plasticity bear considerable potential to establish noninvasive transcranial brain stimulation as interventional therapeutic tool. PMID:27224087

  16. Local glutamate release in the rat ventral lateral thalamus evoked by high-frequency stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnesi, Filippo; Blaha, Charles D.; Lin, Jessica; Lee, Kendall H.

    2010-04-01

    Thalamic deep brain stimulation (DBS) is proven therapy for essential tremor, Parkinson's disease and Tourette's syndrome. We tested the hypothesis that high-frequency electrical stimulation results in local thalamic glutamate release. Enzyme-linked glutamate amperometric biosensors were implanted in anesthetized rat thalamus adjacent to the stimulating electrode. Electrical stimulation was delivered to investigate the effect of frequency, pulse width, voltage-controlled or current-controlled stimulation, and charge balancing. Monophasic electrical stimulation-induced glutamate release was linearly dependent on stimulation frequency, intensity and pulse width. Prolonged stimulation evoked glutamate release to a plateau that subsequently decayed back to baseline after stimulation. Glutamate release was less pronounced with voltage-controlled stimulation and not present with charge balanced current-controlled stimulation. Using fixed potential amperometry in combination with a glutamate bioprobe and adjacent microstimulating electrode, the present study has shown that monophasic current-controlled stimulation of the thalamus in the anesthetized rat evoked linear increases in local extracellular glutamate concentrations that were dependent on stimulation duration, frequency, intensity and pulse width. However, the efficacy of monophasic voltage-controlled stimulation, in terms of evoking glutamate release in the thalamus, was substantially lower compared to monophasic current-controlled stimulation and entirely absent with biphasic (charge balanced) current-controlled stimulation. It remains to be determined whether similar glutamate release occurs with human DBS electrodes and similar charge balanced stimulation. As such, the present results indicate the importance of evaluating local neurotransmitter dynamics in studying the mechanism of action of DBS.

  17. An implantable neural stimulator for intraspinal microstimulation.

    PubMed

    Troyk, Philip R; Mushahwar, Vivian K; Stein, Richard B; Suh, Sungjae; Everaert, Dirk; Holinski, Brad; Hu, Zhe; DeMichele, Glenn; Kerns, Douglas; Kayvani, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on a wireless stimulator device for use in animal experiments as part of an ongoing investigation into intraspinal stimulation (ISMS) for restoration of walking in humans with spinal cord injury. The principle behind using ISMS is the activation of residual motor-control neural networks within the spinal cord ventral horn below the level of lesion following a spinal cord injury. The attractiveness to this technique is that a small number of electrodes can be used to induce bilateral walking patterns in the lower limbs. In combination with advanced feedback algorithms, ISMS has the potential to restore walking for distances that exceed that produced by other types of functional electrical stimulation. Recent acute animal experiments have demonstrated the feasibility of using ISMS to produce the coordinated walking patterns. Here we described a wireless implantable stimulation system to be used in chronic animal experiments and for providing the basis for a system suitable for use in humans. Electrical operation of the wireless system is described, including a demonstration of reverse telemetry for monitoring the stimulating electrode voltages. PMID:23366038

  18. Electromechanical Nerve Stimulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Ping; Supplee, Frank H., Jr.; Prass, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    Nerve stimulator applies and/or measures precisely controlled force and/or displacement to nerve so response of nerve measured. Consists of three major components connected in tandem: miniature probe with spherical tip; transducer; and actuator. Probe applies force to nerve, transducer measures force and sends feedback signal to control circuitry, and actuator positions force transducer and probe. Separate box houses control circuits and panel. Operator uses panel to select operating mode and parameters. Stimulator used in research to characterize behavior of nerve under various conditions of temperature, anesthesia, ventilation, and prior damage to nerve. Also used clinically to assess damage to nerve from disease or accident and to monitor response of nerve during surgery.

  19. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeever, Stephen W.

    1999-02-01

    Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) dosimetry is attractive to the health physics and dosimetry community due to its all-optical character, fast data acquisition and the avoidance of heating the detector. Until recently there was no luminescent material sensitive enough to radiation, and at the same time suitable for stimulation with visible light, for use in this application. However, anion-deficient aluminum oxide doped with carbon (Al2O3:C) appears to be not only an extremely sensitive thermoluminescence (TL) material, but is also well-suited to OSL applications. Several OSL readout protocols have been suggested, including cw-OSL, pulsed OSL (POSL), and 'delayed' OSL (DOSL). The paper discusses the physical mechanisms that give rise to the OSL signals and the dependence of these signals upon absorbed dose. Example applications of the use of OSL from Al2O3:C in environmental radiation and ultraviolet-B dosimetry are discussed.

  20. Sacral nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Matzel, K E; Stadelmaier, U; Besendörfer, M

    2004-01-01

    The current concept of recruiting residual function of an inadequate pelvic organ by electrostimulation involves stimulation of the sacral spinal nerves at the level of the sacral canal. The rationale for applying SNS to fecal incontinence was based on clinical observations of its effect on bowel habits and anorectal continence function in urologic patients (increased anorectal angulation and anal canal closure pressure) and on anatomic considerations: dissection demonstrated a dual peripheral nerve supply of the striated pelvic floor muscles that govern these functions. Because the sacral spinal nerve site is the most distal common location of this dual nerve supply, stimulating here can elicit both functions. Since the first application of SNS in fecal incontinence in 1994, this technique has been improved, the patient selection process modified, and the spectrum of indications expanded. At present SNS has been applied in more than 1300 patients with fecal incontinence limited.

  1. Cognitive stimulation in brainstorming.

    PubMed

    Dugosh, K L; Paulus, P B; Roland, E J; Yang, H C

    2000-11-01

    Research on group brainstorming has demonstrated that it is less effective for generating large numbers of ideas than individual brainstorming, yet various scholars have presumed that group idea sharing should enhance cognitive stimulation and idea production. Three experiments examined the potential of cognitive stimulation in brainstorming. Experiments 1 and 2 used a paradigm in which individuals were exposed to ideas on audiotape as they were brainstorming, and Experiment 3 used the electronic brainstorming paradigm. Evidence was obtained for enhanced idea generation both during and after idea exposure. The attentional set of the participant and the content of the exposure manipulation (number of ideas, presence of irrelevant information) influenced this effect. These results are consistent with a cognitive perspective on group brainstorming.

  2. Raft River well stimulation experiments: geothermal reservoir well stimulation program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-08-01

    The Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program (GRWSP) performed two field experiments at the Raft River KGRA in 1979. Wells RRGP-4 and RRGP-5 were selected for the hydraulic fracture stimulation treatments. The well selection process, fracture treatment design, field execution, stimulation results, and pre- and post-job evaluations are presented.

  3. Human Tissue Stimulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Neurodyne Corporation Human Tissue Stimulator (HTS) is a totally implantable system used for treatment of chronic pain and involuntary motion disorders by electrical stimulation. It was developed by Pacesetter Systems, Inc. in cooperation with the Applied Physics Laboratory. HTS incorporates a nickel cadmium battery, telemetry and command systems technologies of the same type as those used in NASA's Small Astronomy Satellite-3 in microminiature proportions so that the implantable element is the size of a deck of cards. The stimulator includes a rechargeable battery, an antenna and electronics to receive and process commands and to report on its own condition via telemetry, a wireless process wherein instrument data is converted to electrical signals and sent to a receiver where signals are presented as usable information. The HTS is targeted to nerve centers or to particular areas of the brain to provide relief from intractable pain or arrest involuntary motion. The nickel cadmium battery can be recharged through the skin. The first two HTS units were implanted last year and have been successful. Extensive testing is required before HTS can be made available for general use.

  4. Carbon Nanofiber Nanoelectrodes for Neural Stimulation and Chemical Detection: The Era of Smart Deep Brain Stimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koehne, Jessica E.

    2016-01-01

    A sensor platform based on vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (CNFs) has been developed. Their inherent nanometer scale, high conductivity, wide potential window, good biocompatibility and well-defined surface chemistry make them ideal candidates as biosensor electrodes. Here, we report two studies using vertically aligned CNF nanoelectrodes for biomedical applications. CNF arrays are investigated as neural stimulation and neurotransmitter recording electrodes for application in deep brain stimulation (DBS). Polypyrrole coated CNF nanoelectrodes have shown great promise as stimulating electrodes due to their large surface area, low impedance, biocompatibility and capacity for highly localized stimulation. CNFs embedded in SiO2 have been used as sensing electrodes for neurotransmitter detection. Our approach combines a multiplexed CNF electrode chip, developed at NASA Ames Research Center, with the Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration Sensor (WINCS) system, developed at the Mayo Clinic. Preliminary results indicate that the CNF nanoelectrode arrays are easily integrated with WINCS for neurotransmitter detection in a multiplexed array format. In the future, combining CNF based stimulating and recording electrodes with WINCS may lay the foundation for an implantable "smart" therapeutic system that utilizes neurochemical feedback control while likely resulting in increased DBS application in various neuropsychiatric disorders. In total, our goal is to take advantage of the nanostructure of CNF arrays for biosensing studies requiring ultrahigh sensitivity, high-degree of miniaturization, and selective biofunctionalization.

  5. Stimulated parametric emission microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isobe, Keisuke; Kataoka, Shogo; Murase, Rena; Watanabe, Wataru; Higashi, Tsunehito; Kawakami, Shigeki; Matsunaga, Sachihiro; Fukui, Kiichi; Itoh, Kazuyoshi

    2006-01-01

    We propose a novel microscopy technique based on the four-wave mixing (FWM) process that is enhanced by two-photon electronic resonance induced by a pump pulse along with stimulated emission induced by a dump pulse. A Ti:sapphire laser and an optical parametric oscillator are used as light sources for the pump and dump pulses, respectively. We demonstrate that our proposed FWM technique can be used to obtain a one-dimensional image of ethanol-thinned Coumarin 120 solution sandwiched between a hole-slide glass and a cover slip, and a two-dimensional image of a leaf of Camellia sinensis.

  6. Adenosine potentiates stimulatory effects on granulocyte-macrophage hematopoietic progenitor cells in vitro of IL-3 and SCF, but not those of G-CSF, GM-CSF and IL-11.

    PubMed

    Hofer, M; Vacek, A; Pospísil, M; Weiterová, L; Holá, J; Streitová, D; Znojil, V

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the studies was to ascertain if adenosine is able to co-operate with selected hematopoietic growth factors and cytokines, namely with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), stem cell factor (SCF), interleukin-3 (IL-3), and interleukin-11 (IL-11), in inducing the growth of colonies from hematopoietic progenitor cells for granulocytes and macrophages (GM-CFC) from normal bone marrow cells in vitro. Adenosine was found not to produce any colonies when present in the cultures as the only potential stimulator. All the tested cytokines and growth factors were observed to induce the growth of distinct numbers of GM-CFC colonies, with the exception of IL-11. When suboptimal concentrations of the evaluated cytokines and growth factors were tested in the cultures in which various concentrations of adenosine were concomitantly present, mutually potentiating effects were found in the case of IL-3 and SCF. These results confirm the role of adenosine in regulation of granulopoiesis and predict IL-3 and SCF as candidates for further in vivo studies of their combined administration with adenosine.

  7. Dorsal column stimulator applications

    PubMed Central

    Yampolsky, Claudio; Hem, Santiago; Bendersky, Damián

    2012-01-01

    Background: Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has been used to treat neuropathic pain since 1967. Following that, technological progress, among other advances, helped SCS become an effective tool to reduce pain. Methods: This article is a non-systematic review of the mechanism of action, indications, results, programming parameters, complications, and cost-effectiveness of SCS. Results: In spite of the existence of several studies that try to prove the mechanism of action of SCS, it still remains unknown. The mechanism of action of SCS would be based on the antidromic activation of the dorsal column fibers, which activate the inhibitory interneurons within the dorsal horn. At present, the indications of SCS are being revised constantly, while new applications are being proposed and researched worldwide. Failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS) is the most common indication for SCS, whereas, the complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is the second one. Also, this technique is useful in patients with refractory angina and critical limb ischemia, in whom surgical or endovascular treatment cannot be performed. Further indications may be phantom limb pain, chronic intractable pain located in the head, face, neck, or upper extremities, spinal lumbar stenosis in patients who are not surgical candidates, and others. Conclusion: Spinal cord stimulation is a useful tool for neuromodulation, if an accurate patient selection is carried out prior, which should include a trial period. Undoubtedly, this proper selection and a better knowledge of its underlying mechanisms of action, will allow this cutting edge technique to be more acceptable among pain physicians. PMID:23230533

  8. Central nervous system stimulants.

    PubMed

    George, A J

    2000-03-01

    Three major types of CNS stimulant are currently abused in sport: amphetamine, cocaine and caffeine. Each drug type has its own characteristic mechanism of action on CNS neurones and their associated receptors and nerve terminals. Amphetamine is widely abused in sports requiring intense anaerobic exercise where it prolongs the tolerance to anaerobic metabolism. It is addictive, and chronic abuse causes marked behavioural change and sometimes psychosis. Major sports abusing amphetamine are cycling, American football, ice-hockey and baseball. Cocaine increases tolerance to intense exercise, yet most of its chronic effects on energy metabolism are negative. Its greatest effects seem to be as a central stimulant and the enhancement of short-term anaerobic exercise. It is highly addictive and can cause cerebral and cardiovascular fatalities. Caffeine enhances fatty acid metabolism leading to glucose conservation, which appears to benefit long-distance endurance events such as skiing. Caffeine is also addictive, and chronic abuse can lead to cardiac damage. Social abuse of each of the three drugs is often difficult to distinguish from their abuse in sport.

  9. Aromatase inhibitors in stimulated IVF cycles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Aromatase inhibitors have been introduced as a new treatment modality that could challenge clomiphene citrate as an ovulation induction regiment in patients with PCOS. Although several randomized trials have been conducted regarding their use as ovulation induction agents, only few trials are available regarding their efficacy in IVF stimulated cycles. Current available evidence support that letrozole may have a promising role in stimulated IVF cycles, either when administered during the follicular phase for ovarian stimulation. Especially for women with poor ovarian response, letrozole appears to have the potential to increase clinical pregnancy rates when combined with gonadotropins, whereas at the same time reduces the total gonadotropin dose required for ovarian stimulation. However, given that in all of the trials letrozole has been administered in GnRH antagonist cycles, it is intriguing to test in the future how it may perform when used in GnRH agonist cycles. Finally administration of letrozole during luteal phase in IVF cycles offers another treatment modality for patients at high risk for OHSS taking into account that it drastically reduces estradiol levels PMID:21693033

  10. A linearized current stimulator for deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ding-Lan; Chu, Yu-Jung

    2010-01-01

    This paper develops the front end of the stimulator which is applied in the implantable deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the therapy of Parkinson's disease. This stimulator adopts the low power switched-capacitor DAC accompanying with voltage-to-current transconductance amplifiers to obtain the adjustable output currents. The proposed distortion cancellation technique improves the linearity of the current stimulator. Multiple transconductance amplifiers sharing a single DAC save the circuit area. The biphasic stimulation waveform is generated from the bridge switching technique and the programmable pulse. This stimulation circuit provides the 0 approximately 165 microA current for a typical loading of 10 kΩ, 8 approximately 120 micros pulse width, and 126 approximately 244 Hz frequencies with a 0.35 microm CMOS technology at 3.3 V supply voltage. PMID:21096724

  11. AFRRI (Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute) reports, October, November and December 1987. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-03-01

    Partial contents include: The mast cell granule: A phospholipid source for prostaglandin synthesis; Research issues for radiation protection for man during prolonged spaceflight; Quantification of gut injury with diamine oxidase activity; Development of a fission-neutron RBE and measurements with combined injury in mouse models; Rat monocytes in a model of combined injury express the OX8 antigen; Involvement of histamine H1 and H2 receptors in hypothermia induced by ionizing radiation in guinea pigs; Locomotor behavior in mice following exposure to fission-neutron irradiation and trauma; Alterations in locomotor activity induced by radioprotective doses of 16,16-dimethyl prostaglandin E2; Fetal hypothalamic brain grafts reduce the obesity produced by ventromedial hypothalamic lesions; The rhesus monkey: A primate model for hemopoietic stem cell studies; Interdependence of the radioprotective effects of human recombinant interleukin 1 alpha, tumor necrosis factor alpha, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and murine recombinant granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor; Radiation-induced hematologic and nonspecific immunologic effects in the canine.

  12. The role of rHuEpo in low-risk myelodysplastic syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Rigolin, Gian Matteo; Castoldi, Gianluigi

    2005-06-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are clonal disorders of the haemopoietic stem cell characterized by peripheral cytopenias that are the result of abnormal haemopoietic differentiation and maturation. Approximately 90% of MDS patients present with anemia at the beginning or during the course of the disease and often require transfusions. The rationale for treating anemic MDS patients with recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEpo), alone or in combination with other growth factors, is based on the possibility of overcoming the defective proliferation and maturation of erythroid precursors through the inhibition of bone marrow apoptosis, the enhancement of the differentiation of preleukemic progenitor cells or the stimulation of the growth of residual normal haematopoietic cells. Clinical trails have shown that rHuEpo, alone or in combination with recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, is a useful drug for the treatment of anemia in low-risk MDS patients, and the same trials have identified patients who are more likely to respond to maximize benefits, to minimize adverse effects, and to avoid misuse or abuse. However, further research is required to determine whether this treatment has any real impact on quality of life and on life expectancy, thus allowing recommendations to be made about rHuEpo use in MDS patients with a degree of certainty. PMID:16019526

  13. Engagement Sensitive Visual Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Deepesh; Dutta, Anirban; Das, Abhijit; Lahiri, Uttama

    2016-06-13

    Stroke is one of leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Early detection during golden hour and treatment of individual neurological dysfunction in stroke using easy-to-access biomarkers based on a simple-to-use, cost-effective, clinically-valid screening tool can bring a paradigm shift in healthcare, both urban and rural. In our research we have designed a quantitative automatic home-based oculomotor assessment tool that can play an important complementary role in prognosis of neurological disorders like stroke for the neurologist. Once the patient has been screened for stroke, the next step is to design proper rehabilitation platform to alleviate the disability. In addition to the screening platform, in our research, we work in designing virtual reality based rehabilitation exercise platform that has the potential to deliver visual stimulation and in turn contribute to improving one's performance. PMID:27478569

  14. Stimulated radiative laser cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muys, P.

    2008-04-01

    Building a refrigerator based on the conversion of heat into optical energy is an ongoing engineering challenge. Under well-defined conditions, spontaneous anti-Stokes fluorescence of a dopant material in a host matrix is capable of lowering the host temperature. The fluorescence is conveying away a part of the thermal energy stored in the vibrational oscillations of the host lattice. In particular, applying this principle to the cooling of (solid-state) lasers opens up many potential device applications, especially in the domain of high-power lasers. In this paper, an alternative optical cooling scheme is outlined, leading to the radiative cooling of solid-state lasers. It is based on converting the thermal energy stored in the host into optical energy by means of a stimulated nonlinear process, rather than a spontaneous process. This should lead to better cooling efficiencies and a higher potential of applying the principle for device applications.

  15. Stimulated rotational Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parazzoli, C. G.; Rafanelli, G. L.; Capps, D. M.; Drutman, C.

    1989-03-01

    The effect of Stimulated Rotational Raman Scattering (SRRS) processes on high energy laser directed energy weapon systems was studied. The program had 3 main objectives; achieving an accurate description of the physical processes involved in SRRS; developing a numerical algorithm to confidently evaluate SRRS-induced losses in the propagation of high energy laser beams in the uplink and downlink segments of the optical trains of various strategic defense system scenarios; and discovering possible methods to eliminate, or at least reduce, the deleterious effects of SRRS on the energy deposition on target. The following topics are discussed: the motivation for the accomplishments of the DOE program; the Semiclassical Theory of Non-Resonant SRRS for Diatomic Homonuclear Molecules; and then the following appendices; Calculation of the Dipole Transition Reduced Matrix Element, Guided Tour of Hughes SRRS Code, Running the Hughes SRRS Code, and Hughes SRRS Code Listing.

  16. Myeloperoxidase Stimulates Neutrophil Degranulation.

    PubMed

    Grigorieva, D V; Gorudko, I V; Sokolov, A V; Kostevich, V A; Vasilyev, V B; Cherenkevich, S N; Panasenko, O M

    2016-08-01

    Myeloperoxidase, heme enzyme of azurophilic granules in neutrophils, is released into the extracellular space in the inflammation foci. In neutrophils, it stimulates a dose-dependent release of lactoferrin (a protein of specific granules), lysozyme (a protein of specific and azurophilic granules), and elastase (a protein of azurophilic granules). 4-Aminobenzoic acid hydrazide, a potent inhibitor of peroxidase activity of myeloperoxidase, produced no effect on neutrophil degranulation. Using signal transduction inhibitors (genistein, methoxyverapamil, wortmannin, and NiCl2), we demonstrated that myeloperoxidase-induced degranulation of neutrophils resulted from enzyme interaction with the plasma membrane and depends on activation of tyrosine kinases, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3K), and calcium signaling. Myeloperoxidase modified by oxidative/halogenation stress (chlorinated and monomeric forms of the enzyme) lost the potency to activate neutrophil degranulation. PMID:27597056

  17. Engagement Sensitive Visual Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Deepesh; Dutta, Anirban; Das, Abhijit; Lahiri, Uttama

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is one of leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Early detection during golden hour and treatment of individual neurological dysfunction in stroke using easy-to-access biomarkers based on a simple-to-use, cost-effective, clinically-valid screening tool can bring a paradigm shift in healthcare, both urban and rural. In our research we have designed a quantitative automatic home-based oculomotor assessment tool that can play an important complementary role in prognosis of neurological disorders like stroke for the neurologist. Once the patient has been screened for stroke, the next step is to design proper rehabilitation platform to alleviate the disability. In addition to the screening platform, in our research, we work in designing virtual reality based rehabilitation exercise platform that has the potential to deliver visual stimulation and in turn contribute to improving one’s performance. PMID:27478569

  18. Physical properties of stimulated and unstimulated tears.

    PubMed

    Pandit, J C; Nagyová, B; Bron, A J; Tiffany, J M

    1999-02-01

    It has long been assumed that unstimulated tears are more thoroughly equilibrated with epithelial secretions than stimulated tears, since they are in contact with tarsal, bulbar and corneal surfaces for longer. It was also believed from results with model solutions that soluble mucin is responsible for the observed surface tension and viscosity of tears. If longer contact means more mucin is dissolved in the aqueous tears, then the surface activity (surface tension lowered by mucin) and viscosity (raised by mucin) of tears should therefore be enhanced in unstimulated over stimulated tears. Pools of stimulated and minimally-stimulated tears were collected from a group of healthy adult volunteers by glass capillary. Viscosities were measured in the Contraves Low Shear 30 rheometer over the range of shear rates 0-130 sec-1. Surface tension was measured in the collection capillaries by a micro-technique, before and after refrigerated storage. Both surface tension and viscosity were determined for a variety of tear proteins and mucins. No significant difference was found between the viscosity/shear rate plots of stimulated and unstimulated tear samples. The viscosities of solutions of individual tear proteins were low, except for the combination of lysozyme and secretory IgA. Surface tensions were also similar in both cases, and unchanged by storage at room temperature or refrigeration, indicating no significant loss of surface-active material by adsorption on the capillary walls. Results with model mucin solutions gave a variety of results indicating either little surface activity or losses due to wall adsorption. Tear proteins, individually or in combination, did not lower surface tension to the level of tears. Tear viscosity seems not to depend on the level of dissolved mucins. This suggests either that a constant level of these is picked up even by short-term contact with ocular surfaces, or that viscosity arises from currently unknown materials which vary little

  19. Introduction to the programming of deep brain stimulators.

    PubMed

    Volkmann, Jens; Herzog, Jan; Kopper, Florian; Deuschl, Güntner

    2002-01-01

    The clinical success of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for treating Parkinson's disease, tremor, or dystonia critically depends on the quality of postoperative neurologic management. Movement disorder specialists becoming involved with this therapy need to acquire new skills to optimally adapt stimulation parameters and medication after implantation of a DBS system. In clinical practice, the infinite number of possible parameter settings in DBS can be reduced to few relevant combinations. In this article, the authors describe a general scheme of selecting stimulation parameters in DBS and provide clinical and neurophysiological arguments for such a standardized algorithm. They also describe noninvasive technical trouble shooting by using programming features of the commercially available neurostimulation devices.

  20. Exploring Selective Neural Electrical Stimulation for Upper Limb Function Restoration

    PubMed Central

    Tigra, Wafa; Guiraud, David; Andreu, David; Coulet, Bertrand; Gelis, Anthony; Fattal, Charles; Maciejasz, Pawel; Picq, Chloé; Rossel, Olivier; Teissier, Jacques; Coste, Christine Azevedo

    2016-01-01

    This article introduces a new approach of selective neural electrical stimulation of the upper limb nerves. Median and radial nerves of individuals with tetraplegia are stimulated via a multipolar cuff electrode to elicit movements of wrist and hand in acute conditions during a surgical intervention. Various configurations corresponding to various combinations of a 12-poles cuff electrode contacts are tested. Video recording and electromyographic (EMG) signals recorded via sterile surface electrodes are used to evaluate the selectivity of each stimulation configuration in terms of activated muscles. In this abstract we introduce the protocol and preliminary results will be presented during the conference. PMID:27478571

  1. Spiral scan peripheral nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    King, K F; Schaefer, D J

    2000-07-01

    Time-varying magnetic fields induce electric fields that can cause physiological stimulation. Stimulation has been empirically characterized as a function of dB/dt and duration based on experiments using trapezoidal and sinusoidal gradient waveforms with constant ramp time, amplitude, and direction. For two-dimensional (2D) spiral scans, the readout gradient waveforms are frequency- and amplitude-modulated sinusoids on two orthogonal axes in quadrature. The readout gradient waveform therefore rotates with amplitude and angular velocity that are generally not constant. It does not automatically follow that spiral stimulation thresholds can be predicted using available stimulation models. We scanned 18 normal volunteers with a 2D spiral scan and measured global thresholds for axial, sagittal, and coronal planes. We concluded that the stimulation model evaluated accurately predicts slew rate-limited spiral mean stimulation thresholds, if the effective ramp time is chosen to be the half-period at the end of the spiral readout.

  2. Hydromechanical stimulation of bioluminescent plankton.

    PubMed

    Blaser, Stefan; Kurisu, Futoshi; Satoh, Hiroyasu; Mino, Takashi

    2002-01-01

    The response of the bioluminescent dinoflagellate Pyrocystis fusiformis was investigated for different hydraulic conditions ('hydromechanical stimulation'). Pipe flow and oscillating shear produced luminescence, whereas changes in hydrostatic pressure were not stimulating. More intense fluid motion led to higher intensity, mainly due to a higher probability of cell response. The organism was also able to emit light in a glucose-salt mixture. The experiments suggest that the cells are effectively stimulated if the flow conditions change in time.

  3. A systematic review of electric-acoustic stimulation: device fitting ranges, outcomes, and clinical fitting practices.

    PubMed

    Incerti, Paola V; Ching, Teresa Y C; Cowan, Robert

    2013-03-01

    Cochlear implant systems that combine electric and acoustic stimulation in the same ear are now commercially available and the number of patients using these devices is steadily increasing. In particular, electric-acoustic stimulation is an option for patients with severe, high frequency sensorineural hearing impairment. There have been a range of approaches to combining electric stimulation and acoustic hearing in the same ear. To develop a better understanding of fitting practices for devices that combine electric and acoustic stimulation, we conducted a systematic review addressing three clinical questions: what is the range of acoustic hearing in the implanted ear that can be effectively preserved for an electric-acoustic fitting?; what benefits are provided by combining acoustic stimulation with electric stimulation?; and what clinical fitting practices have been developed for devices that combine electric and acoustic stimulation? A search of the literature was conducted and 27 articles that met the strict evaluation criteria adopted for the review were identified for detailed analysis. The range of auditory thresholds in the implanted ear that can be successfully used for an electric-acoustic application is quite broad. The effectiveness of combined electric and acoustic stimulation as compared with electric stimulation alone was consistently demonstrated, highlighting the potential value of preservation and utilization of low frequency hearing in the implanted ear. However, clinical procedures for best fitting of electric-acoustic devices were varied. This clearly identified a need for further investigation of fitting procedures aimed at maximizing outcomes for recipients of electric-acoustic devices. PMID:23539259

  4. Invasive Cortical Stimulation to Promote Recovery of Function After Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Plow, Ela B.; Carey, James R.; Nudo, Randolph J.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose Residual motor deficits frequently linger after stroke. Search for newer effective strategies to promote functional recovery is ongoing. Brain stimulation, as a means of directing adaptive plasticity, is appealing. Animal studies and Phase I and II trials in humans have indicated safety, feasibility, and efficacy of combining rehabilitation and concurrent invasive cortical stimulation. However, a recent Phase III trial showed no advantage of the combination. We critically review results of various trials and discuss the factors that contributed to the distinctive result. Summary of Review Regarding cortical stimulation, it is important to determine the (1) location of peri-infarct representations by integrating multiple neuroanatomical and physiological techniques; (2) role of other mechanisms of stroke recovery; (3) viability of peri-infarct tissue and descending pathways; (4) lesion geometry to ensure no alteration/displacement of current density; and (5) applicability of lessons generated from noninvasive brain stimulation studies in humans. In terms of combining stimulation with rehabilitation, we should understand (1) the principle of homeostatic plasticity; (2) the effect of ongoing cortical activity and phases of learning; and (3) that subject-specific intervention may be necessary. Conclusions Future cortical stimulation trials should consider the factors that may have contributed to the peculiar results of the Phase III trial and address those in future study designs. PMID:19359643

  5. Low-dose cyclophosphamide improves survival in a murine treatment model of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ian; Bellevue, Oliver; Shawo, Alexandra; Woldesemayat, Hiwot; Lyo, Victoria; Rayikanti, Benjamin; Lee, Michelle; Uzosike, Ezechinyerem D; Kasravi, Shiva; Harris, Hobart W

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a complex medical condition characterized by a systemic inflammatory response in the setting of infection. We hypothesized that combining antibiotics plus an immunosuppressant would protect against the morbidity and mortality of polymicrobial sepsis in mice better than would antibiotics alone. We used a murine cecal-ligation-and-puncture model in which mice were treated either with imipenem plus cyclophosphamide or imipenem alone. Titration to a low cyclophosphamide dose revealed that combination therapy increased survival by 20% compared with imipenem alone (56% vs. 36%, P < 0.001). To investigate the mechanism by which combination therapy did this, we reviewed quantitative and qualitative markers of the systemic immune response, end-organ damage, and the local immune response at the site of injury. Cyclophosphamide treatment was not associated with depletion of peripheral leukocytes or differences in pulmonary damage. However, mice that received combination therapy had higher plasma granulocyte colony-stimulating factor levels than did those treated with antibiotics alone. In addition, mice treated with cyclophosphamide had higher levels of bacterial colonization in intestinal Peyer's patch lymph nodes at 72 h after the septic insult. Intraperitoneal macrophage phenotypes and phagocytosis activity did not differ between groups. We conclude that the inflammatory response plays a significant role in the mortality of polymicrobial sepsis and that the regulation of this element is both feasible and beneficial in this disease model.

  6. Optically stimulated differential impedance spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Maxey, Lonnie C; Parks, II, James E; Lewis, Sr., Samuel A; Partridge, Jr., William P

    2014-02-18

    Methods and apparatuses for evaluating a material are described. Embodiments typically involve use of an impedance measurement sensor to measure the impedance of a sample of the material under at least two different states of illumination. The states of illumination may include (a) substantially no optical stimulation, (b) substantial optical stimulation, (c) optical stimulation at a first wavelength of light, (d) optical stimulation at a second wavelength of light, (e) a first level of light intensity, and (f) a second level of light intensity. Typically a difference in impedance between the impedance of the sample at the two states of illumination is measured to determine a characteristic of the material.

  7. Electrical stimulation: a societal perspective.

    PubMed

    Gater, D R; McDowell, S M; Abbas, J J

    2000-01-01

    Societal perspective on functional electrical stimulation is colored by media influence, popular thought, and political climate as much as by the science that supports it. The purpose of this article is to examine how these influences facilitate or inhibit the application of electrical stimulation in today's world and to describe the challenges facing the use of electrical stimulation in the future. Emphasis will be placed on perceived need, cost, and available resources and how these factors must be addressed to utilize functional electrical stimulation successfully in society.

  8. Stimulation with the Aureobasidium pullulans-produced β-glucan effectively induces interferon stimulated genes in macrophage-like cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Muramatsu, Daisuke; Kawata, Koji; Aoki, Shiho; Uchiyama, Hirofumi; Okabe, Mitsuyasu; Miyazaki, Tadaaki; Kida, Hiroshi; Iwai, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    A β-(1,3),(1,6)-D-glucan produced by A. pullulans (AP-PG) is known to be an immune stimulating agent. In this study, we demonstrate that the stimulation with AP-PG effectively induces the interferon (IFN) stimulated genes (ISGs) in macrophage-like cell lines. The ISGs, Mx1, ISG15, and viperin mRNAs were significantly increased in RAW264.7 cells after stimulation with AP-PG. The stimulation with AP-PG transiently induced IFN-β mRNA. However, the expression of viperin mRNA was also increased after stimulation with AP-PG even when new protein synthesis was completely blocked by treatment with cycloheximide. Further, in IFN-α receptor knockdown RAW264.7 cells, AP-PG stimulation more effectively induced viperin mRNA compared with that of IFN-α stimulation. The phosphorylation of Ser 727 in STAT1 involved in the enhancement of STAT1 activation was immediately increased after stimulation with AP-PG. In addition, viperin mRNA expression induced after stimulation with IFN-α was significantly increased by combined stimulation with AP-PG. These results suggest that stimulation with AP-PG effectively induces the ISGs through the induction of IFN and the enhancement of STAT1-mediated transcriptional activation. PMID:24759061

  9. Subliminal Stimulation: Hoax or Reality?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trank, Douglas M.

    Subliminal stimulation is defined as that which is perceived by an individual below the threshold of awareness or cognizance. This article traces the history of research in subliminal stimulation to illustrate that under certain circumstances and conditions, this behavioral phenomenon does occur. Although subliminal stimuli do affect human…

  10. Stimulating Language: Insights from TMS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devlin, Joseph T.; Watkins, Kate E.

    2007-01-01

    Fifteen years ago, Pascual-Leone and colleagues used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to investigate speech production in pre-surgical epilepsy patients and in doing so, introduced a novel tool into language research. TMS can be used to non-invasively stimulate a specific cortical region and transiently disrupt information processing. These…

  11. Febrile-range hyperthermia augments pulmonary neutrophil recruitment and amplifies pulmonary oxygen toxicity.

    PubMed

    Hasday, Jeffrey D; Garrison, Allen; Singh, Ishwar S; Standiford, Theodore; Ellis, Garrettson S; Rao, Srinivas; He, Ju-Ren; Rice, Penny; Frank, Mariah; Goldblum, Simeon E; Viscardi, Rose M

    2003-06-01

    Febrile-range hyperthermia (FRH) improves survival in experimental infections by accelerating pathogen clearance, but may also increase collateral tissue injury. We hypothesized that FRH would worsen the outcome of inflammation stimulated by a non-replicating agonist and tested this hypothesis in a murine model of pulmonary oxygen toxicity. Using a conscious, temperature-controlled mouse model, we showed that maintaining a core temperature at FRH (39 degrees C to 40 degrees C) rather than at euthermic levels (36.5 degrees C to 37 degrees C) during hyperoxia exposure accelerated lethal pulmonary vascular endothelial injury, reduced the inspired oxygen threshold for lethality, induced expression of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, and expanded the circulating neutrophil pool. In these same mice, FRH augmented pulmonary expression of the ELR(+) CXC chemokines, KC and LPS-induced CXC chemokine, enhanced recruitment of neutrophils, and changed the histological pattern of lung injury to a neutrophilic interstitial pneumonitis. Immunoblockade of CXC receptor-2 abrogated neutrophil recruitment, reduced pulmonary vascular injury, and delayed death. These combined data demonstrate that FRH may enlist distinct mediators and effector cells to profoundly shift the host response to a defined injurious stimulus, in part by augmenting delivery of neutrophils to sites of inflammation, such as may occur in infections. In certain conditions, such as in the hyperoxic lung, this process may be deleterious.

  12. Implantable optical-electrode device for stimulation of spinal motoneurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matveev, M. V.; Erofeev, A. I.; Zakharova, O. A.; Pyatyshev, E. N.; Kazakin, A. N.; Vlasova, O. L.

    2016-08-01

    Recent years, optogenetic method of scientific research has proved its effectiveness in the nerve cell stimulation tasks. In our article we demonstrate an implanted device for the spinal optogenetic motoneurons activation. This work is carried out in the Laboratory of Molecular Neurodegeneration of the Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University, together with Nano and Microsystem Technology Laboratory. The work of the developed device is based on the principle of combining fiber optic light stimulation of genetically modified cells with the microelectrode multichannel recording of neurons biopotentials. The paper presents a part of the electrode implant manufacturing technique, combined with the optical waveguide of ThorLabs (USA).

  13. Spinal cord stimulation with interleaved pulses: a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    North, Richard B; Kidd, David H; Olin, John; Sieracki, Jeffrey M; Boulay, Marc

    2007-10-01

    Objectives.  The development of multicontact electrodes and programmable, implanted pulse generators has increased the therapeutic success of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) by enhancing the ability to capture and maintain pain/paresthesia overlap. This study sought to determine if interleaved stimulation and/or frequency doubling improves pain/paresthesia overlap in patients with failed back surgery syndrome. Methods.  Using a patient-interactive computer system that quantifies SCS performance and presents stimulation settings in randomized, double-blind fashion, we compared the effect on pain/paresthesia overlap of interleaved stimulation (rapidly interleaved pulse trains using two different contact combinations) vs. standard treatment with a single contact combination, controlling for frequency doubling. Stimulation amplitude (charge per phase, as determined by varying pulse voltage or width) was adjusted to a subjectively comfortable intensity (usage amplitude), which was maintained for all trials in each patient. The number of percutaneous spinal electrodes used (one or two) and the phase angle between interleaved pulses were additional study variables. Results.  Multivariate analysis of 266 test results from 15 patients revealed a statistically significant (p ≤ 0.05) association between increased computer-calculated pain/paresthesia overlap and 1) high- and low-frequency interleaved stimulation using two combinations of contacts and 2) frequency doubling using one combination. We found no significant effect for electrode configuration (single or dual), pulse width matching, or phase angle. Conclusions.  The statistically significant advantages we observed for SCS with interleaved stimulation are explained, at least in part, by the effects of frequency doubling. These findings have important implications for the design and adjustment of pulse generators. PMID:22150894

  14. Combination Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Skibinski, David AG; Baudner, Barbara C; Singh, Manmohan; O’Hagan, Derek T

    2011-01-01

    The combination of diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis vaccines into a single product has been central to the protection of the pediatric population over the past 50 years. The addition of inactivated polio, Haemophilus influenzae, and hepatitis B vaccines into the combination has facilitated the introduction of these vaccines into recommended immunization schedules by reducing the number of injections required and has therefore increased immunization compliance. However, the development of these combinations encountered numerous challenges, including the reduced response to Haemophilus influenzae vaccine when given in combination; the need to consolidate the differences in the immunization schedule (hepatitis B); and the need to improve the safety profile of the diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis combination. Here, we review these challenges and also discuss future prospects for combination vaccines. PMID:21572611

  15. Optogenetics and deep brain stimulation neurotechnologies.

    PubMed

    Kondabolu, Krishnakanth; Kowalski, Marek Mateusz; Roberts, Erik Andrew; Han, Xue

    2015-01-01

    Brain neural network is composed of densely packed, intricately wired neurons whose activity patterns ultimately give rise to every behavior, thought, or emotion that we experience. Over the past decade, a novel neurotechnique, optogenetics that combines light and genetic methods to control or monitor neural activity patterns, has proven to be revolutionary in understanding the functional role of specific neural circuits. We here briefly describe recent advance in optogenetics and compare optogenetics with deep brain stimulation technology that holds the promise for treating many neurological and psychiatric disorders.

  16. Power combiner

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, Mobius; Ives, Robert Lawrence

    2006-09-05

    A power combiner for the combining of symmetric and asymmetric traveling wave energy comprises a feed waveguide having an input port and a launching port, a reflector for reflecting launched wave energy, and a final waveguide for the collection and transport of launched wave energy. The power combiner has a launching port for symmetrical waves which comprises a cylindrical section coaxial to the feed waveguide, and a launching port for asymmetric waves which comprises a sawtooth rotated about a central axis.

  17. Simultaneous recording of mouse retinal ganglion cells during epiretinal or subretinal stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Sim, S.L.; Szalewski, R.J.; Johnson, L.J.; Akah, L.E.; Shoemaker, L.E.; Thoreson, W.B.; Margalit, E.

    2015-01-01

    We compared response patterns and electrical receptive fields (ERF) of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) during epiretinal and subretinal electrical stimulation of isolated mouse retina. Retinas were stimulated with an array of 3200 independently controllable electrodes. Four response patterns were observed: a burst of activity immediately after stimulation (Type I cells, Vision Research (2008), 48, 1562–1568), delayed bursts beginning >25 ms after stimulation (Type II), a combination of both (Type III), and inhibition of ongoing spike activity. Type I responses were produced more often by epiretinal than subretinal stimulation whereas delayed and inhibitory responses were evoked more frequently by subretinal stimulation. Response latencies were significantly shorter with epiretinal than subretinal stimulation. These data suggest that subretinal stimulation is more effective at activating intraretinal circuits than epiretinal stimulation. There was no significant difference in charge threshold between subretinal and epiretinal configurations. ERFs were defined by the stimulating array surface area that successfully stimulated spikes in an RGC. ERFs were complex in shape, similar to receptive fields mapped with light. ERF areas were significantly smaller with subretinal than epiretinal stimulation. This may reflect the greater distance between stimulating electrodes and RGCs in the subretinal configuration. ERFs for immediate and delayed responses mapped within the same Type III cells differed in shape and size, consistent with different sites and mechanisms for generating these two response types. PMID:24863584

  18. Caloric vestibular stimulation modulates nociceptive evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Ferrè, Elisa Raffaella; Haggard, Patrick; Bottini, Gabriella; Iannetti, Gian Domenico

    2015-12-01

    Vestibular stimulation has been reported to alleviate central pain. Clinical and physiological studies confirm pervasive interactions between vestibular signals and somatosensory circuits, including nociception. However, the neural mechanisms underlying vestibular-induced analgesia remain unclear, and previous clinical studies cannot rule out explanations based on alternative, non-specific effects such as distraction or placebo. To investigate how vestibular inputs influence nociception, we combined caloric vestibular stimulation (CVS) with psychophysical and electrocortical responses elicited by nociceptive-specific laser stimulation in humans (laser-evoked potentials, LEPs). Cold water CVS applied to the left ear resulted in significantly lower subjective pain intensity for experimental laser pain to the left hand immediately after CVS, relative both to before CVS and to 1 h after CVS. This transient reduction in pain perception was associated with reduced amplitude of all LEP components, including the early N1 wave reflecting the first arrival of nociceptive input to primary somatosensory cortex. We conclude that cold left ear CVS elicits a modulation of both nociceptive processing and pain perception. The analgesic effect induced by CVS could be mediated either by subcortical gating of the ascending nociceptive input, or by direct modulation of the primary somatosensory cortex.

  19. Shared Neural Mechanisms for the Evaluation of Intense Sensory Stimulation and Economic Reward, Dependent on Stimulation-Seeking Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Valton, Vincent; Rees, Geraint; Roiser, Jonathan P.; Husain, Masud

    2016-01-01

    Why are some people strongly motivated by intense sensory experiences? Here we investigated how people encode the value of an intense sensory experience compared with economic reward, and how this varies according to stimulation-seeking preference. Specifically, we used a novel behavioral task in combination with computational modeling to derive the value individuals assigned to the opportunity to experience an intense tactile stimulus (mild electric shock). We then examined functional imaging data recorded during task performance to see how the opportunity to experience the sensory stimulus was encoded in stimulation-seekers versus stimulation-avoiders. We found that for individuals who positively sought out this kind of sensory stimulation, there was common encoding of anticipated economic and sensory rewards in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Conversely, there was robust encoding of the modeled probability of receiving such stimulation in the insula only in stimulation-avoidant individuals. Finally, we found preliminary evidence that sensory prediction error signals may be positively signed for stimulation-seekers, but negatively signed for stimulation-avoiders, in the posterior cingulate cortex. These findings may help explain why high intensity sensory experiences are appetitive for some individuals, but not for others, and may have relevance for the increased vulnerability for some psychopathologies, but perhaps increased resilience for others, in high sensation-seeking individuals. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT People vary in their preference for intense sensory experiences. Here, we investigated how different individuals evaluate the prospect of an unusual sensory experience (electric shock), compared with the opportunity to gain a more traditional reward (money). We found that in a subset of individuals who sought out such unusual sensory stimulation, anticipation of the sensory outcome was encoded in the same way as that of monetary gain, in the ventromedial

  20. Nanomaterial-Enabled Neural Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongchen; Guo, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Neural stimulation is a critical technique in treating neurological diseases and investigating brain functions. Traditional electrical stimulation uses electrodes to directly create intervening electric fields in the immediate vicinity of neural tissues. Second-generation stimulation techniques directly use light, magnetic fields or ultrasound in a non-contact manner. An emerging generation of non- or minimally invasive neural stimulation techniques is enabled by nanotechnology to achieve a high spatial resolution and cell-type specificity. In these techniques, a nanomaterial converts a remotely transmitted primary stimulus such as a light, magnetic or ultrasonic signal to a localized secondary stimulus such as an electric field or heat to stimulate neurons. The ease of surface modification and bio-conjugation of nanomaterials facilitates cell-type-specific targeting, designated placement and highly localized membrane activation. This review focuses on nanomaterial-enabled neural stimulation techniques primarily involving opto-electric, opto-thermal, magneto-electric, magneto-thermal and acousto-electric transduction mechanisms. Stimulation techniques based on other possible transduction schemes and general consideration for these emerging neurotechnologies are also discussed.

  1. Nanomaterial-Enabled Neural Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongchen; Guo, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Neural stimulation is a critical technique in treating neurological diseases and investigating brain functions. Traditional electrical stimulation uses electrodes to directly create intervening electric fields in the immediate vicinity of neural tissues. Second-generation stimulation techniques directly use light, magnetic fields or ultrasound in a non-contact manner. An emerging generation of non- or minimally invasive neural stimulation techniques is enabled by nanotechnology to achieve a high spatial resolution and cell-type specificity. In these techniques, a nanomaterial converts a remotely transmitted primary stimulus such as a light, magnetic or ultrasonic signal to a localized secondary stimulus such as an electric field or heat to stimulate neurons. The ease of surface modification and bio-conjugation of nanomaterials facilitates cell-type-specific targeting, designated placement and highly localized membrane activation. This review focuses on nanomaterial-enabled neural stimulation techniques primarily involving opto-electric, opto-thermal, magneto-electric, magneto-thermal and acousto-electric transduction mechanisms. Stimulation techniques based on other possible transduction schemes and general consideration for these emerging neurotechnologies are also discussed. PMID:27013938

  2. Vagal Nerve Stimulation Therapy: What Is Being Stimulated?

    PubMed Central

    Kember, Guy; Ardell, Jeffrey L.; Armour, John A.; Zamir, Mair

    2014-01-01

    Vagal nerve stimulation in cardiac therapy involves delivering electrical current to the vagal sympathetic complex in patients experiencing heart failure. The therapy has shown promise but the mechanisms by which any benefit accrues is not understood. In this paper we model the response to increased levels of stimulation of individual components of the vagal sympathetic complex as a differential activation of each component in the control of heart rate. The model provides insight beyond what is available in the animal experiment in as much as allowing the simultaneous assessment of neuronal activity throughout the cardiac neural axis. The results indicate that there is sensitivity of the neural network to low level subthreshold