Science.gov

Sample records for combined ir-microwave satellite

  1. CRRES: Combined release and radiation effects satellite program summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Layman, Laura D.; Miller, George P.

    1993-01-01

    The experiments that comprise the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite Program (CRRES) (Apr. 1990 - Jul. 1992) are presented. The experiments are as follows: PEGSAT; El Coqui; the Kwajalein Campaign; and experiments G1 - G14.

  2. Satellite co-locations for combined GNSS and SLR analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaller, Daniela; Dach, Rolf; Seitz, Manuela; Jäggi, Adrian; Beutler, Gerhard; Mareyen, Maria; Richter, Bernd

    2010-05-01

    The combination of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) and Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) data is done commonly by using the connection at co-located GNSS-SLR sites (station coordinates together with local ties) and by common Earth rotation parameters (ERP). Co-location of GNSS and SLR on ground is in general taken into account, co-location at the satellites is, however, generally ignored. Using satellite co-location implies that one common set of orbit parameters is estimated based on GNSS microwave and SLR observations together (apart from other common parameters, e.g., ERP, geocenter coordinates). Thus, satellite co-locations provide a very strong link between both techniques. When speaking of satellite co-locations for combining GNSS and SLR, there are in principle two different types of co-locations, namely, the one due to GNSS satellites equipped with laser retroreflector arrays (LRA) and the one due to Low Earth Orbiting (LEO) satellites equipped with GNSS antennas and an LRA. We will show that satellite co-locations are not only an additional connection to that provided by the ground stations, but that they offer even an adequate alternative to ground-based co-locations. Such an alternative is of special interest because the problems related to the local ties and their discrepancies with the coordinate differences at co-located sites are well known although the reasons are still not fully understood. Furthermore, the estimation of common orbit parameters allows it to transfer the scale directly from SLR to GNSS. Due to uncertainties in the phase center modeling for the GNSS antennas, GNSS alone cannot provide the absolute scale information, and it is often assumed that the necessity to estimate range biases may reduce the potential of SLR to deliver the scale. However, we intend to demonstrate that the SLR-derived scale does not suffer from estimating range biases. Therefore, a combined GNSS-SLR analysis using satellite co-locations at GNSS satellites

  3. Solar Power Satellite (SPS) solid-state antenna power combiner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A low loss power-combining microstrip antenna suitable for solid state solar power satellite (SPS) application was developed. A unique approach for performing both the combining and radiating function in a single cavity-type circuit was verified, representing substantial refinements over previous demonstration models in terms of detailed geometry to obtain good matching and adequate bandwidth at the design frequency. The combiner circuit was designed, built, and tested and the overall results support the view that the solid state power-combining antenna approach is a viable candidate for a solid state SPS antenna building block.

  4. Combined Global Navigation Satellite Systems in the Space Service Volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Force, Dale A.; Miller, James J.

    2013-01-01

    Besides providing position, velocity, and timing (PVT) for terrestrial users, the Global Positioning System (GPS) is also being used to provide PVT information for earth orbiting satellites. In 2006, F. H. Bauer, et. al., defined the Space Service Volume in the paper GPS in the Space Service Volume , presented at ION s 19th international Technical Meeting of the Satellite Division, and looked at GPS coverage for orbiting satellites. With GLONASS already operational, and the first satellites of the Galileo and Beidou/COMPASS constellations already in orbit, it is time to look at the use of the new Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) coming into service to provide PVT information for earth orbiting satellites. This presentation extends GPS in the Space Service Volume by examining the coverage capability of combinations of the new constellations with GPS GPS was first explored as a system for refining the position, velocity, and timing of other spacecraft equipped with GPS receivers in the early eighties. Because of this, a new GPS utility developed beyond the original purpose of providing position, velocity, and timing services for land, maritime, and aerial applications. GPS signals are now received and processed by spacecraft both above and below the GPS constellation, including signals that spill over the limb of the earth. Support of GPS space applications is now part of the system plan for GPS, and support of the Space Service Volume by other GNSS providers has been proposed to the UN International Committee on GNSS (ICG). GPS has been demonstrated to provide decimeter level position accuracy in real-time for satellites in low Earth orbit (centimeter level in non-real-time applications). GPS has been proven useful for satellites in geosynchronous orbit, and also for satellites in highly elliptical orbits. Depending on how many satellites are in view, one can keep time locked to the GNSS standard, and through that to Universal Time as long as at least one

  5. Combined Space-Based Observations of Geostationary Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, R.; Bernard, K.; Thorsteinson, S.

    2016-09-01

    One of the Space Situational Awareness (SSA) science experiments of the NEOSSat mission is to learn the practicalities of combining space-based metric observations with the Sapphire system. To answer this question, an experiment was performed observing clustered Canadian geostationary satellites using both Sapphire and NEOSSat in early 2016. Space-based tracking data was collected during tracking intervals where both NEOSSat and Sapphire had visibility on the geostationary objects enabling astrometric (orbit determination) and photometric (object characterization) observations to be performed. We describe the orbit determination accuracies using live data collected from orbit for different collection cases; a) NEOSSat alone, b) Sapphire alone, and c) Combined observations from both platforms. We then discuss the practicalities of using space-based sensors to reduce risk of orbital collisions of Canadian geostationary satellites by proactively tasking space based sensors in response to conjunction data warnings in GEO.

  6. High resolution gravity models combining terrestrial and satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, Richard H.; Pavlis, Nikolaos K.; Wang, Yan M.

    1992-01-01

    Spherical harmonic expansions to degree 360 have been developed that combine satellite potential coefficient information, terrestrial gravity data, satellite altimeter information as a direct tracking data type and topographic information. These models define improved representations of the Earth's gravitational potential beyond that available from just satellite or terrestrial data. The development of the degree 360 models, however, does not imply a uniform accuracy in the determination of the gravity field as numerous geographic areas are devoid of terrestrial data or the resolution of such data is limited to, for example, 100 km. This paper will consider theoretical and numerical questions related to the combination of the various data types. Various models of the combination process are discussed with a discussion of various correction terms for the different models. Various sources of gravity data will be described. The new OSU91 360 model will be discussed with comparisons made to previous 360 models and to other potential coefficient models that are complete to degree 50. Future directions in high degree potential coefficient models will be discussed.

  7. A web-based tool that combines satellite and weather station observations to support irrigation scheduling

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Abstract: The Satellite Irrigation Management Support (SIMS) project combines NASA's Terrestrial Observation and Prediction System (TOPS), Landsat and MODIS satellite imagery, and reference evapotranspiration from surface weather station networks to map daily crop irrigation demand in California in ...

  8. Satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, J.A.; Matthews, M.S.

    1986-01-01

    The present work is based on a conference: Natural Satellites, Colloquium 77 of the IAU, held at Cornell University from July 5 to 9, 1983. Attention is given to the background and origins of satellites, protosatellite swarms, the tectonics of icy satellites, the physical characteristics of satellite surfaces, and the interactions of planetary magnetospheres with icy satellite surfaces. Other topics include the surface composition of natural satellites, the cratering of planetary satellites, the moon, Io, and Europa. Consideration is also given to Ganymede and Callisto, the satellites of Saturn, small satellites, satellites of Uranus and Neptune, and the Pluto-Charon system.

  9. Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) experiments data collection, analysis, and publication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Terry N.; Alzmann, Melanie O.

    1992-01-01

    The Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) program experiments data collection, analysis, and publication activities are described. These activities were associated with both the satellite chemical release and a planned Puerto Rico sounding rocket campaign. To coordinate these activities, a working group meeting was organized and conducted.

  10. Combining satellite imagery and machine learning to predict poverty.

    PubMed

    Jean, Neal; Burke, Marshall; Xie, Michael; Davis, W Matthew; Lobell, David B; Ermon, Stefano

    2016-08-19

    Reliable data on economic livelihoods remain scarce in the developing world, hampering efforts to study these outcomes and to design policies that improve them. Here we demonstrate an accurate, inexpensive, and scalable method for estimating consumption expenditure and asset wealth from high-resolution satellite imagery. Using survey and satellite data from five African countries--Nigeria, Tanzania, Uganda, Malawi, and Rwanda--we show how a convolutional neural network can be trained to identify image features that can explain up to 75% of the variation in local-level economic outcomes. Our method, which requires only publicly available data, could transform efforts to track and target poverty in developing countries. It also demonstrates how powerful machine learning techniques can be applied in a setting with limited training data, suggesting broad potential application across many scientific domains.

  11. Combined Satellite - and ULS-Derived Sea-Ice Flux in the Weddell Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drinkwater, M.; Liu, X.; Harms, S.

    2000-01-01

    Several years of daily microwave satellite ice-drift are combined with moored Upward Looking Sonar (ULS) ice-drafts into an ice volume flux record at points along a flux gate across the Weddell Sea, Antarctica.

  12. Combined adjustment of multi-resolution satellite imagery for improved geo-positioning accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Shengjun; Wu, Bo; Zhu, Qing

    2016-04-01

    Due to the widespread availability of satellite imagery nowadays, it is common for regions to be covered by satellite imagery from multiple sources with multiple resolutions. This paper presents a combined adjustment approach to integrate multi-source multi-resolution satellite imagery for improved geo-positioning accuracy without the use of ground control points (GCPs). Instead of using all the rational polynomial coefficients (RPCs) of images for processing, only those dominating the geo-positioning accuracy are used in the combined adjustment. They, together with tie points identified in the images, are used as observations in the adjustment model. Proper weights are determined for each observation, and ridge parameters are determined for better convergence of the adjustment solution. The outputs from the combined adjustment are the improved dominating RPCs of images, from which improved geo-positioning accuracy can be obtained. Experiments using ZY-3, SPOT-7 and Pleiades-1 imagery in Hong Kong, and Cartosat-1 and Worldview-1 imagery in Catalonia, Spain demonstrate that the proposed method is able to effectively improve the geo-positioning accuracy of satellite images. The combined adjustment approach offers an alternative method to improve geo-positioning accuracy of satellite images. The approach enables the integration of multi-source and multi-resolution satellite imagery for generating more precise and consistent 3D spatial information, which permits the comparative and synergistic use of multi-resolution satellite images from multiple sources.

  13. Combined Global Navigation Satellite Systems in the Space Service Volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Force, Dale A.; Miller, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Besides providing position, navigation, and timing (PNT) services to traditional terrestrial and airborne users, GPS is also being increasingly used as a tool to enable precision orbit determination, precise time synchronization, real-time spacecraft navigation, and three-axis attitude control of Earth orbiting satellites. With additional Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) constellations being replenished and coming into service (GLONASS, Beidou, and Galileo), it will become possible to benefit from greater signal availability and robustness by using evolving multi-constellation receivers. The paper, "GPS in the Space Service Volume," presented at the ION GNSS 19th International Technical Meeting in 2006 (Ref. 1), defined the Space Service Volume, and analyzed the performance of GPS out to seventy thousand kilometers. This paper will report a similar analysis of the signal coverage of GPS in the space domain; however, the analyses will also consider signal coverage from each of the additional GNSS constellations noted earlier to specifically demonstrate the expected benefits to be derived from using GPS in conjunction with other foreign systems. The Space Service Volume is formally defined as the volume of space between three thousand kilometers altitude and geosynchronous altitude circa 36,000 km, as compared with the Terrestrial Service Volume between 3,000 km and the surface of the Earth. In the Terrestrial Service Volume, GNSS performance is the same as on or near the Earth's surface due to satellite vehicle availability and geometry similarities. The core GPS system has thereby established signal requirements for the Space Service Volume as part of technical Capability Development Documentation (CDD) that specifies system performance. Besides the technical discussion, we also present diplomatic efforts to extend the GPS Space Service Volume concept to other PNT service providers in an effort to assure that all space users will benefit from the enhanced

  14. Combined analysis of GNSS and SLR observations for the GIOVE satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaller, D.; Steinbach, A.; Dach, R.

    2009-04-01

    The GGSP (Galileo Geodetic Service Provider) is responsible to provide the geodetic basement of the future European GNSS, the Galileo system. The AIUB is one partner of the consortium of seven institutions. In the context of this project, the data of 13 GESS (Galileo Experimental Sensor Stations) are processed together with the GPS data of about 120 IGS sites. Apart from the station coordinates also the satellite orbits, ERPs, and clock corrections are computed. Since the 13 GESS do not only provide GPS data but also track the two first Galileo satellites (i.e., GIOVE-A and GIOVE-B), a combined processing of the GPS and Galileo data using microwave data is possible. Due to the sparse network of GESS the GPS data highly support the Galileo related products (the orbits and satellite clock corrections). Nevertheless, the quality of the GIOVE orbits is limited to about 20 cm. As both GIOVE are equipped with retro-reflector arrays, the satellites are tracked by satellite laser ranging (SLR), as it is already done for some GLONASS satellites and those two GPS satellites equipped with retro-reflectors. The availability of SLR data allows a validation of the satellite orbits determined from GNSS observations. The range residuals show whether there is any systematic difference between the GNSS and SLR system and, thus, may help to improve the orbit modeling for the GIOVE satellites. Furthermore, we will include the SLR tracking data into the orbit determination in order to derive a combined GNSS+SLR orbit. It will be studied whether the inclusion of SLR data shows any significant improvement for the combined orbit compared to the GNSS-only orbit. This study can be seen as a further step toward the combined processing of GNSS and SLR observations for a fully integrated multi-technique data analysis.

  15. CRRES combined radiation and release effects satellite program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, B. L. (Compiler); Mccook, M. A. (Compiler); Mccook, M. W. (Compiler); Miller, G. P. (Compiler)

    1995-01-01

    The various regions of the magnetosphere-ionosphere system are coupled by flows of charged particle beams and electromagnetic waves. This coupling gives rise to processes that affect both technical and non-technical aspects of life on Earth. The CRRES Program sponsored experiments which were designed to produce controlled and known input to the space environment and the effects were measured with arrays of diagnostic instruments. Large amounts of material were used to modify and perturb the environment in a controlled manner, and response to this was studied. The CRRES and PEGSAT satellites were dual-mission spacecraft with a NASA mission to perform active chemical-release experiments, grouped into categories of tracer, modification, and simulation experiments. Two sounding rocket chemical release campaigns completed the study.

  16. Results from the direct combination of satellite and gravimetric data. [orbit analysis and gravity anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, R. H.

    1974-01-01

    Results have been obtained for the solution of 184 15-deg equal-area blocks directly from the analysis of satellite orbits, and from a combination of the satellite results with terrestrial gravity material. This test computation, made to verify the method, used 17,632 optical observations from ten satellites in 29 arcs averaging in length seven days. Analysis of the satellite results were made by comparing the solved for anomalies with the terrestrial anomaly set, and by developing the solved for anomalies into potential coefficients which were compared to the GEM 3 set of potential coefficients to degree 12. These comparisons indicated improvement in each solution as more arcs were added. The programs used in this solution can easily be used to solve for smaller size blocks and handle additional data types. The only limitation will be computer core availability and computer time.

  17. Results from the direct combination of satellite and gravimetric data. [orbit analysis and gravity anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, R. H.

    1974-01-01

    Results have been obtained for the solution of 184 15-deg equal-area blocks directly from the analysis of satellite orbits, and from a combination of the satellite results with terrestrial gravity material. This test computation, made to verify the method, used 17,632 optical observations from ten satellites in 29 arcs averaging in length seven days. Analysis of the satellite results were made by comparing the solved for anomalies with the terrestrial anomaly set, and by developing the solved for anomalies into potential coefficients which were compared to the GEM 3 set of potential coefficients to degree 12. These comparisons indicated improvement in each solution as more arcs were added. The programs used in this solution can easily be used to solve for smaller size blocks and handle additional data types. The only limitation will be computer core availability and computer time.

  18. Combining Satellite and in Situ Data with Models to Support Climate Data Records in Ocean Biology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Watson

    2011-01-01

    The satellite ocean color data record spans multiple decades and, like most long-term satellite observations of the Earth, comes from many sensors. Unfortunately, global and regional chlorophyll estimates from the overlapping missions show substantial biases, limiting their use in combination to construct consistent data records. SeaWiFS and MODIS-Aqua differed by 13% globally in overlapping time segments, 2003-2007. For perspective, the maximum change in annual means over the entire Sea WiFS mission era was about 3%, and this included an El NinoLa Nina transition. These discrepancies lead to different estimates of trends depending upon whether one uses SeaWiFS alone for the 1998-2007 (no significant change), or whether MODIS is substituted for the 2003-2007 period (18% decline, P less than 0.05). Understanding the effects of climate change on the global oceans is difficult if different satellite data sets cannot be brought into conformity. The differences arise from two causes: 1) different sensors see chlorophyll differently, and 2) different sensors see different chlorophyll. In the first case, differences in sensor band locations, bandwidths, sensitivity, and time of observation lead to different estimates of chlorophyll even from the same location and day. In the second, differences in orbit and sensitivities to aerosols lead to sampling differences. A new approach to ocean color using in situ data from the public archives forces different satellite data to agree to within interannual variability. The global difference between Sea WiFS and MODIS is 0.6% for 2003-2007 using this approach. It also produces a trend using the combination of SeaWiFS and MODIS that agrees with SeaWiFS alone for 1998-2007. This is a major step to reducing errors produced by the first cause, sensor-related discrepancies. For differences that arise from sampling, data assimilation is applied. The underlying geographically complete fields derived from a free-running model is unaffected

  19. Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) Experiment: Educational planning and coordination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, William W.; Alzmann, Melanie

    1991-01-01

    The efforts conducted to provide educational planning and development support for the Combined Release and Radiation Satellite (CRRES) Experiment are summarized. Activities regarding the scientific working group and workshop development are presented including the preparation of descriptive information on the CRRES Project.

  20. Storm diagnostic/predictive images derived from a combination of lightning and satellite imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Steven J.; Buechler, Dennis E.; Meyer, Paul J.

    1988-01-01

    A technique is presented for generating trend or convective tendency images using a combination of GOES satellite imagery and cloud-to-ground lightning observations. The convective tendency images can be used for short term forecasting of storm development. A conceptual model of cloud electrical development and an example of the methodology used to generate lightning/satellite convective tendency imagery are given. Successive convective tendency images can be looped or animated to show the previous growth or decay of thunderstorms and their associated lighting activity. It is suggested that the convective tendency image may also be used to indicate potential microburst producing storms.

  1. Radiation-induced insulator discharge pulses in the CRRES Internal Discharge Monitor satellite experiment. [Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederickson, A. R.; Mullen, E. G.; Brautigam, D. H.; Kerns, K. J.; Robinson, P. A., Jr.; Holman, E. G.

    1991-01-01

    The Internal Discharge Monitor (IDM) is designed to observe electrical pulses from common electrical insulators in space service. The IDM is flying on the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES). The sixteen insulator samples include G10 circuit boards, FR4 and PTFE fiberglass circuit boards, FEP Teflon, alumina, and wires with common insulations. The samples are fully enclosed, mutually isolated, and space radiation penetrates 0.02 cm of aluminum before striking the samples. The IDM results indicate the rate at which insulator pulses occur. Pulsing began on the seventh orbit. The maximum pulse rate occurred near orbit 600 when over 50 pulses occurred. The average pulse rate is approximately two per orbit, but nearly half of the first 600 orbits experienced no pulses. The pulse rate per unit flux of high energy electrons has not changed dramatically over the first ten months in space. These pulse rates are in agreement with laboratory experience on shorter time scales. Several of the samples have never pulsed. IDM pulses are the seeds of larger satellite electrical anomalies. The pulse rates are compared with space radiation intensities, L shell location, and spectral distributions from the radiation spectrometers on CRRES.

  2. De-correlated combination of two low-low Satellite-to-Satellite tracking pairs according to temporal aliasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murböck, Michael; Pail, Roland

    2014-05-01

    The monitoring of the temporal changes in the Earth's gravity field is of great scientific and societal importance. Within several days a homogeneous global coverage of gravity observations can be obtained with satellite missions. Temporal aliasing of background model errors into global gravity field models will be one of the largest restrictions in future satellite temporal gravity recovery. The largest errors are due to high-frequent tidal and non-tidal atmospheric and oceanic mass variations. Having a double pair low-low Satellite-to-Satellite tracking (SST) scenario on different inclined orbits reduces temporal aliasing errors significantly. In general temporal aliasing effects for a single (-pair) mission strongly depend on the basic orbital rates (Murböck et al. 2013). These are the rates of the argument of the latitude and of the longitude of the ascending node. This means that the revolution time and the length of one nodal day determine how large the temporal aliasing error effects are for each SH order. The combination of two low-low SST missions based on normal equations requires an adequate weighting of the two components. This weighting shall ensure the full de-correlation of each of the two parts. Therefore it is necessary to take the temporal aliasing errors into account. In this study it is analyzed how this can be done based on the resonance orders of the two orbits. Different levels of approximation are applied to the de-correlation approach. The results of several numerical closed-loop simulations are shown including stochastic modeling of realistic future instrument noise. It is shown that this de-correlation approach is important for maximizing the benefit of a double-pair low-low SST mission for temporal gravity recovery. Murböck M, Pail R, Daras I and Gruber T (2013) Optimal orbits for temporal gravity recovery regarding temporal aliasing. Journal of Geodesy, Springer Berlin Heidelberg, ISSN 0949-7714, DOI 10.1007/s00190-013-0671-y

  3. The Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) program: A unique series of scientific experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reasoner, David L.; McCook, Morgan W.; Vaughan, William W.

    The Defense Department and NASA have joined in a program to study the space environment which surrounds the earth and the effects of space radiation on modern satellite electronic systems. The Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) will carry an array of active experiments including chemical releases and a complement of sophisticated scientific instruments to accomplish these objectives. Other chemical release active experiments will be performed with sub-orbital rocket probes. The chemical releases will 'paint' the magnetic and electric fields of earthspace with clouds of glowing ions. Earthspace will be a laboratory, and the releases will be studied with an extensive network of ground-, aircraft-, and satellite-based diagnostic instruments. Some of the topics discussed include the following: the effects of earthspace; the need for active experiments; types of chemical releases; the CRRES program schedule; international support and coordinated studies; photographing chemical releases; information on locating chemical releases for observation by the amateur; and CRRES as a program.

  4. The Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) program: A unique series of scientific experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reasoner, David L.; Mccook, Morgan W. (Editor); Vaughan, William W. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The Defense Department and NASA have joined in a program to study the space environment which surrounds the earth and the effects of space radiation on modern satellite electronic systems. The Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) will carry an array of active experiments including chemical releases and a complement of sophisticated scientific instruments to accomplish these objectives. Other chemical release active experiments will be performed with sub-orbital rocket probes. The chemical releases will 'paint' the magnetic and electric fields of earthspace with clouds of glowing ions. Earthspace will be a laboratory, and the releases will be studied with an extensive network of ground-, aircraft-, and satellite-based diagnostic instruments. Some of the topics discussed include the following: the effects of earthspace; the need for active experiments; types of chemical releases; the CRRES program schedule; international support and coordinated studies; photographing chemical releases; information on locating chemical releases for observation by the amateur; and CRRES as a program.

  5. Combining Satellite and Ground Magnetic Measurements to Improve Estimates of Electromagnetic Induction Transfer Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasis, G.; Egbert, G. D.

    2005-12-01

    Electromagnetic (EM) induction studies using satellite and ground-based magnetic data may ultimately provide critical new constraints on the electrical conductivity of Earth's mantle. Unlike ground-based observatories, which leave large areas of the Earth (especially the ocean basins) unsampled, satellites have the potential for nearly complete global coverage. However, because the number of operating satellites is limited, spatially complex (especially non-zonal) external current sources are sampled relatively poorly by satellites at any fixed time. The comparatively much larger number of ground-based observatories provides more complete synoptic sampling of external source structure. By combining data from both satellites and observatories models of external sources can be improved, leading to more reliable global mapping of Earth conductivity. For example, estimates of EM induction transfer functions estimated from night-side CHAMP data have been previously shown to have biases which depend systematically on local time (LT). This pattern of biases suggests that a purely zonal model does not adequately describe magnetospheric sources. As a first step toward improved modeling of spatial complexity in sources, we have applied empirical orthogonal function (EOF) methods to exploratory analysis of night-side observatory data. After subtraction of the predictions of the CM4 comprehensive model, which includes a zonally symmetric storm-time correction based on Dst, we find significant non-axisymmetric, but large scale coherent variability in the mid-latitude night-side observatory residuals. Over the restricted range of local times (18:00-6:00) and latitudes (50°S to 50°N) considered, the dominant spatial mode of variability is reasonably approximated by a q21 quadrupole spherical harmonic. Temporal variability of this leading EOF mode is well correlated with Dst. Strategies for moving beyond this initial exploratory EOF analysis to combine observatory data with

  6. Combining Rain Gages With Satellite Measurements for Optimal Estimates of Area-Time Averaged Rain Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    North, Gerald R.; Shen, Samuel S. P.; Upson, Robert B.

    1991-10-01

    The problem of optimally combining data from an array of point rain gages with those from a low Earth-orbiting satellite to obtain space-time averaged rain rates is considered. The mean square error due to sampling gaps in space-time can be expressed as an integral of a filter multiplied by the space-time spectral density of the rain rate field. It is shown that for large numbers of gages or large numbers of overpasses the two estimates can be regarded as orthogonal in the sense that the optimal weighting is the same as for independent estimators, i.e., the weights are inversely proportional to the error variances that would occur in the single-component case. The result involving point gages and satellite overpasses appears to hold under quite general conditions. The result is interesting since most other design combinations do not exhibit the orthogonality property.

  7. Atmospheric Profiling Combining the Features of GPS ro & Mls: Satellite to Satellite Occultations Near Water & Ozone Absorption Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kursinski, E. R.; Ward, D.; Otarola, A. C.; McGhee, J.; Reed, H.; Erickson, D.

    2015-12-01

    Assessing climate models & their predictions requires observations that determine the state of the real climate system precisely and unambiguously, independently from models. For this purpose, we have been developing a new orbiting remote sensing system called the Active Temperature, Ozone & Moisture Microwave Spectrometer (ATOMMS) which is a cross between GPS RO and the Microwave Limb Sounder. ATOMMS actively probes water vapor, ozone & other absorption lines at cm & mm wavelengths in a satellite to satellite occultation geometry to simultaneously profile temperature, pressure, water vapor and ozone as well as other important constituents. Individual profiles of water vapor, temperature & pressure heights will extend from near the surface into the mesosphere with ~1%, 0.4K and 10 m precision respectively and still better accuracy, with 100 m vertical resolution. Ozone profiles will extend upward from the upper troposphere. Line of sight wind profiles will extend upwards from the mid-stratosphere. ATOMMS is a doubly differential absorption system which eliminates drift and both sees clouds and sees thru them, to deliver performance in clouds within a factor of 2 of the performance in clear skies. This all-weather sampling combined with insensitivity to surface emissivity avoids sampling biases that limit most existing satellite records. ATOMMS will profile slant liquid water in clouds & rain and as well as turbulence via scintillations ("twinkling of a star"). Using prototype ATOMMS instrumentation that we developed with funding from NSF, several ATOMMS ground field campaigns precisely measured water vapor, cloud amount, rainfall, turbulence and absorption line spectroscopy. ATOMMS's dynamic range was demonstrated as water vapor was derived to 1% precision in optical depths up to 17. We are developing high altitude aircraft to aircraft instrumentation to further demonstrate ATOMMS performance, refine spectroscopy & support future field campaigns. Our vision is a

  8. Solar power satellite rectenna design study: Directional receiving elements and parallel-series combining analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutmann, R. J.; Borrego, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    Rectenna conversion efficiencies (RF to dc) approximating 85 percent were demonstrated on a small scale, clearly indicating the feasibility and potential of efficiency of microwave power to dc. The overall cost estimates of the solar power satellite indicate that the baseline rectenna subsystem will be between 25 to 40 percent of the system cost. The directional receiving elements and element extensions were studied, along with power combining evaluation and evaluation extensions.

  9. Analysis of BeiDou Satellite Measurements with Code Multipath and Geometry-Free Ionosphere-Free Combinations.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qile; Wang, Guangxing; Liu, Zhizhao; Hu, Zhigang; Dai, Zhiqiang; Liu, Jingnan

    2016-01-20

    Using GNSS observable from some stations in the Asia-Pacific area, the carrier-to-noise ratio (CNR) and multipath combinations of BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS), as well as their variations with time and/or elevation were investigated and compared with those of GPS and Galileo. Provided the same elevation, the CNR of B1 observables is the lowest among the three BDS frequencies, while B3 is the highest. The code multipath combinations of BDS inclined geosynchronous orbit (IGSO) and medium Earth orbit (MEO) satellites are remarkably correlated with elevation, and the systematic "V" shape trends could be eliminated through between-station-differencing or modeling correction. Daily periodicity was found in the geometry-free ionosphere-free (GFIF) combinations of both BDS geostationary Earth orbit (GEO) and IGSO satellites. The variation range of carrier phase GFIF combinations of GEO satellites is -2.0 to 2.0 cm. The periodicity of carrier phase GFIF combination could be significantly mitigated through between-station differencing. Carrier phase GFIF combinations of BDS GEO and IGSO satellites might also contain delays related to satellites. Cross-correlation suggests that the GFIF combinations' time series of some GEO satellites might vary according to their relative geometries with the sun.

  10. Combined FDMA-TDMA - A cost effective technique for digital satellite communication networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabbari, B.

    Satellite transponder channelization is discussed along with the concept of combined FDMA-TDMA. The economic impact of the number of carriers employed in the transponder which may be time shared by a group of earth stations is demonstrated. In particular, it is shown that the lack of transponder TWT back off in fully TDMA system is not as effective in minimizing the network cost as the decrease in the transmitter power in combined FDMA-TDMA operation. It is also emphasized that for low traffic requirements the earth station antenna size of about 4m is the most appropriate.

  11. Analysis of BeiDou Satellite Measurements with Code Multipath and Geometry-Free Ionosphere-Free Combinations

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qile; Wang, Guangxing; Liu, Zhizhao; Hu, Zhigang; Dai, Zhiqiang; Liu, Jingnan

    2016-01-01

    Using GNSS observable from some stations in the Asia-Pacific area, the carrier-to-noise ratio (CNR) and multipath combinations of BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS), as well as their variations with time and/or elevation were investigated and compared with those of GPS and Galileo. Provided the same elevation, the CNR of B1 observables is the lowest among the three BDS frequencies, while B3 is the highest. The code multipath combinations of BDS inclined geosynchronous orbit (IGSO) and medium Earth orbit (MEO) satellites are remarkably correlated with elevation, and the systematic “V” shape trends could be eliminated through between-station-differencing or modeling correction. Daily periodicity was found in the geometry-free ionosphere-free (GFIF) combinations of both BDS geostationary Earth orbit (GEO) and IGSO satellites. The variation range of carrier phase GFIF combinations of GEO satellites is −2.0 to 2.0 cm. The periodicity of carrier phase GFIF combination could be significantly mitigated through between-station differencing. Carrier phase GFIF combinations of BDS GEO and IGSO satellites might also contain delays related to satellites. Cross-correlation suggests that the GFIF combinations’ time series of some GEO satellites might vary according to their relative geometries with the sun. PMID:26805831

  12. Combining satellite, aerial and ground measurements to assess forest carbon stocks in Democratic Republic of Congo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaumont, Benjamin; Bouvy, Alban; Stephenne, Nathalie; Mathoux, Pierre; Bastin, Jean-François; Baudot, Yves; Akkermans, Tom

    2015-04-01

    Monitoring tropical forest carbon stocks changes has been a rising topic in the recent years as a result of REDD+ mechanisms negotiations. Such monitoring will be mandatory for each project/country willing to benefit from these financial incentives in the future. Aerial and satellite remote sensing technologies offer cost advantages in implementing large scale forest inventories. Despite the recent progress made in the use of airborne LiDAR for carbon stocks estimation, no widely operational and cost effective method has yet been delivered for central Africa forest monitoring. Within the Maï Ndombe region of Democratic Republic of Congo, the EO4REDD project develops a method combining satellite, aerial and ground measurements. This combination is done in three steps: [1] mapping and quantifying forest cover changes using an object-based semi-automatic change detection (deforestation and forest degradation) methodology based on very high resolution satellite imagery (RapidEye), [2] developing an allometric linear model for above ground biomass measurements based on dendrometric parameters (tree crown areas and heights) extracted from airborne stereoscopic image pairs and calibrated using ground measurements of individual trees on a data set of 18 one hectare plots and [3] relating these two products to assess carbon stocks changes at a regional scale. Given the high accuracies obtained in [1] (> 80% for deforestation and 77% for forest degradation) and the suitable, but still to be improved with a larger calibrating sample, model (R² of 0.7) obtained in [2], EO4REDD products can be seen as a valid and replicable option for carbon stocks monitoring in tropical forests. Further improvements are planned to strengthen the cost effectiveness value and the REDD+ suitability in the second phase of EO4REDD. This second phase will include [A] specific model developments per forest type; [B] measurements of afforestation, reforestation and natural regeneration processes and

  13. Advanced snow cover classification by combining terrestrial photography and satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Härer, S.; Bernhardt, M.; Schulz, K.

    2013-12-01

    Terrestrial photography combined with the recently presented Photo Rectification And ClassificaTIon SoftwarE (PRACTISE V.1.0) has proven to be a valuable source to derive temporal and spatial high-resolution snow cover maps in mountain regions. However, the integrated automatic snow classification algorithm is restricted to images on equally illuminated terrain and the areal coverage of digital photographs is strongly limited. Here, we present PRACTISE V.1.1 which automatically classifies sunny and shaded areas in the photograph separately, eliminating disturbing shadow effects in the classification. The software also calculates the Normalized-Difference Snow Index (NDSI) for a simultaneously captured satellite image. Until now, it was found to be difficult to set the NDSI threshold for snow accurately even though it is critical for a correct classification. Our new method automatically optimizes the threshold value using the camera-derived snow cover map as a cost-effective technique for in-situ ground-truthing. Eventually, the satellite image is classified. The improved software was successfully tested for photographs of a single lens reflex camera and corresponding satellite images of the Landsat series in the Zugspitze massif (Germany). The results have shown that the combination of terrestrial photography and satellite imagery extends the mapping area enormously, keeping the quality of the snow cover maps high. The enlarged areal coverage enhances the potential use of this technique for validating spatially distributed snow hydrological models, even for larger catchments. The presented approach furthermore indicates that it is largely independent of the used sensor systems as well as the investigated surface variable which allows an application in other research disciplines.

  14. The earth's gravitational field from the combination of satellite and terrestrial data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, R. H.

    1973-01-01

    This paper reviews techniques and results in the combination of gravimetric and satellite data. The estimation of mean anomalies for use in combination studies is discussed with the location of current gravity material being described. Specific techniques for combination solutions are discussed for various models. These models include those where the gravitational field is represented by a set of potential coefficients, or by a set of discrete blocks distributed on the earth. The potential coefficient solutions compared are those of the SAO Standard Earth II and III, the Goddard Earth Model 4, and a solution by the author. These solutions are compared in terms of coefficients, undulation and anomaly differences, and implied anomaly degree variances. In addition, comparisons were made through terrestrial anomaly comparisons, astrogeodetic undulation comparisons, and orbit fitting tests.

  15. The earth's gravitational field from the combination of satellite and terrestrial data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, R. H.

    1973-01-01

    This paper reviews techniques and results in the combination of gravimetric and satellite data. The estimation of mean anomalies for use in combination studies is discussed with the location of current gravity material being described. Specific techniques for combination solutions are discussed for various models. These models include those where the gravitational field is represented by a set of potential coefficients, or by a set of discrete blocks distributed on the earth. The potential coefficient solutions compared are those of the SAO Standard Earth II and III, the Goddard Earth Model 4, and a solution by the author. These solutions are compared in terms of coefficients, undulation and anomaly differences, and implied anomaly degree variances. In addition, comparisons were made through terrestrial anomaly comparisons, astrogeodetic undulation comparisons, and orbit fitting tests.

  16. Large-Scale Ionospheric Conductance from Combined Satellite and Ground-Based Electromagnetic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, D. L.; Waters, C. L.; Korth, H.; Anderson, B. J.; Ridley, A. J.; Barnes, R. J.

    2006-12-01

    The spatial and temporal distribution of ionospheric conductance is a critical parameter for magnetosphere- ionosphere coupling. At present, global ionospheric conductance estimates with high time resolution (< 1 hour) are only available by combining optical satellite data with models of precipitating particle interaction with the neutral atmosphere. The alternative approach presented here extends previous methods that estimate ionospheric conductance using electromagnetic data. Since it is not possible to have complete knowledge of the horizontal ionospheric current (ěc{J}\\perp) based solely on observations from the Earth's surface, previous applications of Ohm's law to the height-integrated ionosphere have required an assumed Hall to Pedersen conductance ratio (α=Σ_H/Σ_P). Recently available magnetic field observations from the Iridium satellite constellation are here combined with ground-based magnetometer data to estimate the complete horizontal ionospheric current, ěc{J}\\perp. This result, combined with electric field information obtained from the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network, allows the Hall and Pedersen conductances to be independently calculated without assuming a value for α. Initial conductance results are presented for an event with 1 hour integration time and favorable data coverage.

  17. Global Carbon Monoxide Products from Combined AIRS, TES and MLS Measurements on A-Train Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Juying X.; Yang, R.; Wei, Z.; Carminati, F.; Tangborn, A.; Sun, Z.; Lahoz, W.; Attie, J. L.; El Amraoui, L.; Duncan, B.

    2014-01-01

    This study tests a novel methodology to add value to satellite data sets. This methodology, data fusion, is similar to data assimilation, except that the background modelbased field is replaced by a satellite data set, in this case AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder) carbon monoxide (CO) measurements. The observational information comes from CO measurements with lower spatial coverage than AIRS, namely, from TES (Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer) and MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder). We show that combining these data sets with data fusion uses the higher spectral resolution of TES to extend AIRS CO observational sensitivity to the lower troposphere, a region especially important for air quality studies. We also show that combined CO measurements from AIRS and MLS provide enhanced information in the UTLS (upper troposphere/lower stratosphere) region compared to each product individually. The combined AIRS-TES and AIRS-MLS CO products are validated against DACOM (differential absorption mid-IR diode laser spectrometer) in situ CO measurements from the INTEX-B (Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment: MILAGRO and Pacific phases) field campaign and in situ data from HIPPO (HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations) flights. The data fusion results show improved sensitivities in the lower and upper troposphere (20-30% and above 20%, respectively) as compared with AIRS-only version 5 CO retrievals, and improved daily coverage compared with TES and MLS CO data.

  18. Global carbon monoxide products from combined AIRS, TES and MLS measurements on A-train satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, J. X.; Yang, R.; Wei, Z.; Carminati, F.; Tangborn, A.; Sun, Z.; Lahoz, W.; Attié, J.-L.; El Amraoui, L.; Duncan, B.

    2013-06-01

    This study tests a novel methodology to add value to satellite datasets. This methodology, data fusion, is similar to data assimilation, except that the background model-based field is replaced by a satellite dataset, in this case AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder) carbon monoxide (CO) measurements. The observational information comes from CO measurements with lower spatial coverage than AIRS, namely, from TES (Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer) and MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder). We show that combining these datasets with data fusion uses the higher spectral resolution of TES to extend AIRS CO observational sensitivity to the lower troposphere, a region especially important for air quality studies. We also show that combined CO measurements from AIRS and MLS provide enhanced information in the UTLS (upper troposphere/lower stratosphere) region compared to each product individually. The combined AIRS/TES and AIRS/MLS CO products are validated against DACOM (differential absorption mid-IR diode laser spectrometer) in situ CO measurements from the INTEX-B (Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment: MILAGRO and Pacific phases) field campaign and in situ data from HIPPO (HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations) flights. The data fusion results show improved sensitivities in the lower and upper troposphere (20-30% and above 20%, respectively) as compared with AIRS-only retrievals, and improved coverage compared with TES and MLS CO data.

  19. Global carbon monoxide products from combined AIRS, TES and MLS measurements on A-train satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, J. X.; Yang, R.; Wei, Z.; Carminati, F.; Tangborn, A.; Sun, Z.; Lahoz, W.; Attié, J.-L.; El Amraoui, L.; Duncan, B.

    2014-01-01

    This study tests a novel methodology to add value to satellite data sets. This methodology, data fusion, is similar to data assimilation, except that the background model-based field is replaced by a satellite data set, in this case AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder) carbon monoxide (CO) measurements. The observational information comes from CO measurements with lower spatial coverage than AIRS, namely, from TES (Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer) and MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder). We show that combining these data sets with data fusion uses the higher spectral resolution of TES to extend AIRS CO observational sensitivity to the lower troposphere, a region especially important for air quality studies. We also show that combined CO measurements from AIRS and MLS provide enhanced information in the UTLS (upper troposphere/lower stratosphere) region compared to each product individually. The combined AIRS-TES and AIRS-MLS CO products are validated against DACOM (differential absorption mid-IR diode laser spectrometer) in situ CO measurements from the INTEX-B (Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment: MILAGRO and Pacific phases) field campaign and in situ data from HIPPO (HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations) flights. The data fusion results show improved sensitivities in the lower and upper troposphere (20-30% and above 20%, respectively) as compared with AIRS-only version 5 CO retrievals, and improved daily coverage compared with TES and MLS CO data.

  20. A first experiment on local combination of EGM2008 data and GOCE grids at satellite altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatti, A.; Pavlis, N. K.; Reguzzoni, M.; Sanso, F.

    2012-12-01

    The GOCE satellite of the European Space Agency (ESA), thanks to a low orbit and a very sophisticated gradiometer, is observing the Earth gravitational field with the highest level of accuracy and resolution ever reached by any geodetic missions. Although lower than other satellites, the GOCE orbit altitude of about 250 km inevitably limits the maximum achievable resolution of the estimated gravitational field; to overcome this limitations a combination with other sources of data is then necessary. One of the most informative and accurate spherical harmonic global models of the Earth gravitational field is EGM2008. It has been developed by a least squares combination between of the ITG-GRACE03S model (with its associated error covariance matrix) and a 5'x5' grid of free-air gravity anomalies. Therefore this model seems to be suitable for a combination with the newer GOCE data. The classical approach to merge these two types of information is a direct combination of the spherical harmonic coefficients coming from the satellite-only model and EGM2008. The possible drawbacks of this approach are the following: 1. Every GOCE-only spherical harmonic global model need a certain level of regularization (e.g. to deal with polar gaps) acting on a subset of coefficients but more or less affecting the estimated field all over the world. 2. The EGM2008 error description is based on publicly available coefficient variances or, at most, on a block diagonal covariance matrix when coefficients are sorted order by order; this implies that the corresponding geographical error is latitude dependent, which is an approximation far from reality. The main goal of this work is to try to overcome these limitations by computing local grids at ground level from GOCE data and EGM2008 grids. With this approach the GOCE information used is not yet regularized to produce a global model and EGM2008 could be weighted taking into account the actual geographic distribution of the error (e.g. the

  1. Combining Satellite Microwave Radiometer and Radar Observations to Estimate Atmospheric Latent Heating Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grecu, Mircea; Olson, William S.; Shie, Chung-Lin; L'Ecuyer, Tristan S.; Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2009-01-01

    In this study, satellite passive microwave sensor observations from the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) are utilized to make estimates of latent + eddy sensible heating rates (Q1-QR) in regions of precipitation. The TMI heating algorithm (TRAIN) is calibrated, or "trained" using relatively accurate estimates of heating based upon spaceborne Precipitation Radar (PR) observations collocated with the TMI observations over a one-month period. The heating estimation technique is based upon a previously described Bayesian methodology, but with improvements in supporting cloud-resolving model simulations, an adjustment of precipitation echo tops to compensate for model biases, and a separate scaling of convective and stratiform heating components that leads to an approximate balance between estimated vertically-integrated condensation and surface precipitation. Estimates of Q1-QR from TMI compare favorably with the PR training estimates and show only modest sensitivity to the cloud-resolving model simulations of heating used to construct the training data. Moreover, the net condensation in the corresponding annual mean satellite latent heating profile is within a few percent of the annual mean surface precipitation rate over the tropical and subtropical oceans where the algorithm is applied. Comparisons of Q1 produced by combining TMI Q1-QR with independently derived estimates of QR show reasonable agreement with rawinsonde-based analyses of Q1 from two field campaigns, although the satellite estimates exhibit heating profile structure with sharper and more intense heating peaks than the rawinsonde estimates. 2

  2. Combining satellite data with ancillary data to produce a refined land-use/land-cover map

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, J.S.

    1998-01-01

    As part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program in the Western Lake Michigan Drainages Study Unit, a current map of land use and land cover is needed to gain a better understanding of how land use and land cover may influence water quality. Satellite data from the Landsat Thematic Mapper provides a means to map and measure the type and amount of various land-cover types across the Study Unit and can be easily updated as changes occur in the landscape or in water quality. Translating these land cover categories to land use, however, requires the use of other thematic maps or ancillary data layers, such as wetland inventories, population data, or road networks. This report describes a process of (1) using satellite imagery to produce a land-cover map for the Fox/Wolf River basin, a portion of the Western Lake Michigan Drainages NAWQA Study Unit and (2) improving the satellite-derived land-cover map by using other thematic maps. The multiple data layers are processed in a geographic information system (GIS), and the combination provides more information than individual sources alone.

  3. Optimization of Satellite Combination in Kinematic Positioning Mode with the Aid of Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinuandee, Panithan; Satirapod, Chalermchon; Ogaja, Clement; Lee, Hung-Kyu

    2012-01-01

    The basis of high precision relative positioning is the use of carrier phase measurements. Data differencing techniques are one of the keys to achieving high precision positioning results as they can significantly reduce a variety of errors or biases in the observations and models. Since GPS observations are usually contaminated by many errors such as the atmospheric biases, the receiver clock bias, the satellite clock bias, and so on, it is impossible to model all systematic errors in the functional model. Although the data differencing techniques are widely used for constructing the functional model, some un-modeled systematic biases still remain in the GPS observations following such differencing. Another key to achieving high precision positioning results is to fix the initial carrier phase ambiguities to their theoretical integer values. To obtain a high percentage of successful ambiguity-fixed rates, noisy GPS satellites have to be identified and removed from the data processing step. This paper introduces a new method using genetic algorithm (GA) to optimize the best combination of GPS satellites which yields the highest number of successful ambiguity-fixed solutions in kinematic positioning mode. The results indicate that the use of GA can produce higher number of ambiguity-fixed solutions than the standard data processing technique.

  4. Mass balance of Greenland from combined GRACE and satellite altimetry inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsberg, R.; Sandberg Sørensen, L.; Nilsson, J.; Simonsen, S. B.

    2014-12-01

    With 12 years of GRACE satellite data now available, the ice mass loss trend of Greenland are clearly demonstrating ice mass loss in marginal zones of the ice sheets, and increasing mass loss trends in some regions such as the north west marginal zones. Although the GRACE release-5 products have provided a significant increase in resolution, the detailed space-based detection of where the ice sheet is loosing mass needs to come from other sources, notably satellite altimetry from EnviSat, IceSat and CryoSat, which point out the detailed location of areas of change, and - when combined with firn compaction and density models - also can be used to infer mass changes. In the paper we outline results of a novel direct inversion method, where all satellite data can be utilized in a general inverse estimation scheme, and the leakage from neighbouring ice caps minimized. We demonstrate overall mass change results from Greenland and Eastern Canadian Ice Caps 2003-14, highlighting the increasing melt in the marginal zones both in NW and NE Greenland. Most of the used data used are provided by the ESA Ice Sheets CCI project 2012-14, which makes available long term Essential Climate Variables such as Surface Elevation Changes, Ice Velocity and Calving Front Locations for the Greenland ice sheet. In the upcoming 2nd phase of the CCI project, Gravimetric Mass Balance from GRACE will be included as a ECV time series, and a similar CCI project started for Antarctica.

  5. Mass balance of Greenland from combined GRACE and satellite altimetry inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsberg, Rene; Sandberg Sørensen, Louise; Nilsson, Johan; Simonsen, Sebastian

    2015-04-01

    With 12 years of GRACE satellite data now available, the ice mass loss trend of Greenland are clearly demonstrating ice mass loss in marginal zones of the ice sheets, and increasing mass loss trends in some regions such as the north west marginal zones. Although the GRACE release-5 products have provided a significant increase in resolution, the detailed space-based detection of where the ice sheet is loosing mass needs to come from other sources, notably satellite altimetry from EnviSat, IceSat and CryoSat, which point out the detailed location of areas of change, and - when combined with firn compaction and density models - also can be used to infer mass changes. In the paper we outline results of a novel direct inversion method, where all satellite data can be utilized in a general inverse estimation scheme, and the leakage from neighbouring ice caps minimized. We demonstrate overall mass change results from Greenland and Eastern Canadian Ice Caps 2003-14, highlighting the increasing melt in the marginal zones both in NW and NE Greenland, and highlighting the dynamic nature of the Greenland ice sheet mass loss through the 2012 record melt event, and the 2013 mass gain anomaly. The used data for the Greenland Ice Sheet are provided partly through the ESA Ice Sheets CCI project 2012-17, which will make available long term Essential Climate Variables such as Surface Elevation Changes, Ice Velocity, Mass Balance and Calving Front Locations.

  6. Combining satellite photographs and raster lidar data for channel connectivity in tidal marshes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi; Hodges, Ben

    2017-04-01

    High resolution airborne lidar is capable of providing topographic detail down to the 1 x 1 m scale or finer over large tidal marshes of a river delta. Such data sets can be challenging to develop and ground-truth due to the inherent complexities of the environment, the relatively small changes in elevation throughout a marsh, and practical difficulties in accessing the variety of flooded, dry, and muddy regions. Standard lidar point-cloud processing techniques (as typically applied in large lidar data collection program) have a tendency to mis-identify narrow channels and water connectivity in a marsh, which makes it difficult to directly use such data for modeling marsh flows. Unfortunately, it is not always practical, or even possible, to access the point cloud and re-analyze the raw lidar data when discrepancies have been found in a raster work product. Faced with this problem in preparing a model of the Trinity River delta (Texas, USA), we developed an approach to integrating analysis of a lidar-based raster with satellite images. Our primary goal was to identify the clear land/water boundaries needed to identify channelization in the available rasterized lidar data. The channel extraction method uses pixelized satellite photographs that are stretched/distorted with image-processing techniques to match identifiable control features in both lidar and photographic data sets. A kmeans clustering algorithm was applied cluster pixels based on their colors, which is effective in separating land and water in a satellite photograph. The clustered image was matched to the lidar data such that the combination shows the channel network. In effect, we are able to use the fact that the satellite photograph is higher resolution than the lidar data, and thus provides connectivity in the clustering at a finer scale. The principal limitation of the method is the where the satellite image and lidar suffer from similar problems For example, vegetation overhanging a narrow

  7. Monitoring an air pollution episode in Shenzhen by combining MODIS satellite images and the HYSPLIT model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lili; Liu, Yihong; Wang, Yunpeng

    2017-07-01

    Urban air pollution is influenced not only by local emission sources including industry and vehicles, but also greatly by regional atmospheric pollutant transportation from the surrounding areas, especially in developed city clusters, like the Pearl River Delta (PRD). Taking an air pollution episode in Shenzhen as an example, this paper investigates the occurrence and evolution of the pollution episode and identifies the transport pathways of air pollutants in Shenzhen by combining MODIS satellite images and HYSPLIT back trajectory analysis. Results show that this pollution episode is mainly caused by the local emission of pollutants in PRD and oceanic air masses under specific weather conditions.

  8. The combination of satellite and topographic/isostatic potential models for mean anomaly determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, Richard H.; Pavlis, Nikolaos

    A method is presented for the estimation of a global gravity anomaly field using the combination of satellite-derived potential coefficient models and the coefficients implied by the Airy-Heiskanen topographic/isostatic potential (Rummel et al., 1988) from topographic models with a 30-km depth of compensation. Gravity anomalies calculated with this method are compared with a terrestrial 1 x 1 degree anomaly file where the anomaly standard deviations were less than 10 mgals. Using the GEM T1 model (Marsh et al., 1988) to degree 36, the rms anomaly discrepency was + or - 19 mgals, while the rms values for the terrestrial anomalies was + or - 28 mgals.

  9. The combination of satellite and topographic/isostatic potential models for mean anomaly determinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, Richard H.; Pavlis, Nikolaos

    1989-01-01

    A method is presented for the estimation of a global gravity anomaly field using the combination of satellite-derived potential coefficient models and the coefficients implied by the Airy-Heiskanen topographic/isostatic potential (Rummel et al., 1988) from topographic models with a 30-km depth of compensation. Gravity anomalies calculated with this method are compared with a terrestrial 1 x 1 degree anomaly file where the anomaly standard deviations were less than 10 mgals. Using the GEM T1 model (Marsh et al., 1988) to degree 36, the rms anomaly discrepency was + or - 19 mgals, while the rms values for the terrestrial anomalies was + or - 28 mgals.

  10. Improved Cloud and Surface Properties By Combining Conventional and L-1 Satellite Imager Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minnis, P.; Doelling, D.; Nguyen, L.; Palikonda, R.; Spangenberg, D. A.; Hong, G.; Yi, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Imagers on geostationary (GEOSat) and low-earth orbiting (LEOSat) satellites are often used to derive information about clouds and the surface, but are limited in their angular coverage of a given scene by their particular orbits. A GEOSat views an area through its entire diurnal cycle covering the full range of solar zenith angles (SZAs) while viewing from a constant viewing zenith angle (VZA) and varying relative azimuth angle (RAA). Most polar-orbiting satellites are sun-synchronous and view a given area at one time of day from various VZAs and RAAs, but a over a small SZA range. A few imagers such as MISR or AATSR are on LEOSats and can provide views over a greater range of RAA and VZA, but are still constrained by SZA. The Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) will orbit at the L-1 position in a near backscatter angle (~168°) relative to the Earth and sun. It carries an imager, EPIC, that has several UV, visible, and near-infrared channels measuring radiances at a nadir 10-km resolution. Because it views most of the sunlit Earth at high frequency, it can provide unprecedented coverage of the daylight portion of the diurnal cycle for a given area at over the full range of SZAs and VZAs at a nearly constant RAA. Because of this coverage, pixels from the EPIC can be matched with those from any other satellite passing over the sunlit hemisphere. Although cloud information such as cloud amount, optical depth, and height can be derived from the EPIC channels, the combination of EPIC data with that from higher resolution GEOSats and LEOSats will be more useful than either by itself. Because of its low resolution and lack of infrared data, broken and scattered and cirrus cloud fields are likely to be misinterpreted using the EPIC data alone. Matching the more conventional satellite data and associated cloud products with the EPIC data will enhance the information from the EPIC as its field of view increases as 1/cos(VZA). The cloud heights derived from oxygen A and

  11. The Orbits of Saturn's Small Satellites Derived from Combined Historic and Cassini Imaging Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitale, J. N.; Jacobson, R. A.; Porco, C. C.; Owen, W. M., Jr.

    2006-08-01

    We report on the orbits of the small, inner Saturnian satellites, either recovered or newly discovered in recent Cassini imaging observations. The orbits presented here reflect improvements over our previously published values in that the time base of Cassini observations has been extended, and numerical orbital integrations have been performed in those cases in which simple precessing elliptical, inclined orbit solutions were found to be inadequate. Using combined Cassini and Voyager observations, we obtain an eccentricity for Pan 7 times smaller than previously reported because of the predominance of higher quality Cassini data in the fit. The orbit of the small satellite (S/2005 S1 [Daphnis]) discovered by Cassini in the Keeler gap in the outer A ring appears to be circular and coplanar; no external perturbations are apparent. Refined orbits of Atlas, Prometheus, Pandora, Janus, and Epimetheus are based on Cassini , Voyager, Hubble Space Telescope, and Earth-based data and a numerical integration perturbed by all the massive satellites and each other. Atlas is significantly perturbed by Prometheus, and to a lesser extent by Pandora, through high-wavenumber mean-motion resonances. Orbital integrations involving Atlas yield a mass of GMAtlas=(0.44+/-0.04)×10-3 km3 s -2, 3 times larger than reported previously (GM is the product of the Newtonian constant of gravitation G and the satellite mass M). Orbital integrations show that Methone is perturbed by Mimas, Pallene is perturbed by Enceladus, and Polydeuces librates around Dione's L5 point with a period of about 791 days. We report on the nature and orbits of bodies sighted in the F ring, two of which may have persisted for a year or more.

  12. A New Glocal Mean Gravity Field Model From The Combination Of Satellite Mission And Altimetry/Gravimetry Surface Gravity Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothacher, M.; Reigber, C.; Schmidt, R.; Foerste, C.; Koenig, R.; Flechtner, F.; Meyer, U.; Stubenvoll, R.; Barthelmes, F.; Neumayer, K. H.; Biancale, R.; Bruinsma, S.; Lemoine, J.

    2005-12-01

    High-resolution global mean gravity field models can be derived from the combination of satellite tracking and surface data. With the CHAMP and GRACE satellite missions, a new generation of such global gravity field models became available. Here the latest results of the processing of GRACE, CHAMP and SLR satellite tracking are presented and compared with outcomes of former analyses. The gravity field parameters obtained are the result of a substantial satellite data reprocessing, based on recently improved processing standards and models. On the other hand, surface gravity data derived from altimetry and gravimetry are globally available, providing a higher resolution than pure satellite data but lacking the high precision in the long-wavelength part. In an optimal approach the satellite-based data are combined with latest, partially newly processed surface gravity data sets to derive a global high-resolution gravity field model combining the high precision and homogeneity in the long- to medium-wavelength part from the satellite data with the short-wavelength resolution of the surface data. The obtained Earth gravity field model is an update of former EIGEN models of a resolution corresponding to a wavelength of 100 km and degree/order 360, respectively.

  13. Statistical Evaluation of Combined Daily Gauge Observations and Rainfall Satellite Estimations over Continental South America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vila, Daniel; deGoncalves, Luis Gustavo; Toll, David L.; Rozante, Jose Roberto

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a comprehensive assessment of a new high-resolution, high-quality gauge-satellite based analysis of daily precipitation over continental South America during 2004. This methodology is based on a combination of additive and multiplicative bias correction schemes in order to get the lowest bias when compared with the observed values. Inter-comparisons and cross-validations tests have been carried out for the control algorithm (TMPA real-time algorithm) and different merging schemes: additive bias correction (ADD), ratio bias correction (RAT) and TMPA research version, for different months belonging to different seasons and for different network densities. All compared merging schemes produce better results than the control algorithm, but when finer temporal (daily) and spatial scale (regional networks) gauge datasets is included in the analysis, the improvement is remarkable. The Combined Scheme (CoSch) presents consistently the best performance among the five techniques. This is also true when a degraded daily gauge network is used instead of full dataset. This technique appears a suitable tool to produce real-time, high-resolution, high-quality gauge-satellite based analyses of daily precipitation over land in regional domains.

  14. The combination of satellite observation techniques for sequential ionosphere VTEC modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdogan, Eren; Limberger, Marco; Schmidt, Michael; Seitz, Florian; Dettmering, Denise; Börger, Klaus; Brandert, Sylvia; Görres, Barbara; Kersten, Wilhelm F.; Bothmer, Volker; Hinrichs, Johannes; Venzmer, Malte; Mrotzek, Niclas

    2016-04-01

    The project OPTIMAP is a joint initiative by the Bundeswehr GeoInformation Centre (BGIC), the German Space Situational Awareness Centre (GSSAC), the German Geodetic Research Institute of the Technical University of Munich (DGFI-TUM) and the Institute for Astrophysics at the University of Göttingen (IAG). The main goal is to develop an operational tool for ionospheric mapping and prediction (OPTIMAP). A key feature of the project is the combination of different satellite observation techniques to improve the spatio-temporal data coverage and the sensitivity for selected target parameters. In the current status, information about the vertical total electron content (VTEC) is derived from the dual frequency signal processing of four techniques: (1) Terrestrial observations of GPS and GLONASS ensure the high-resolution coverage of continental regions, (2) the satellite altimetry mission Jason-2 is taken into account to provide VTEC in nadir direction along the satellite tracks over the oceans, (3) GPS radio occultations to Formosat-3/COSMIC are exploited for the retrieval of electron density profiles that are integrated to obtain VTEC and (4) Jason-2 carrier-phase observations tracked by the on-board DORIS receiver are processed to determine the relative VTEC. All measurements are sequentially pre-processed in hourly batches serving as input data of a Kalman filter (KF) for modeling the global VTEC distribution. The KF runs in a predictor-corrector mode allowing for the sequential processing of the measurements where update steps are performed with one-minute sampling in the current configuration. The spatial VTEC distribution is represented by B-spline series expansions, i.e., the corresponding B-spline series coefficients together with additional technique-dependent unknowns such as Differential Code Biases and Intersystem Biases are estimated by the KF. As a preliminary solution, the prediction model to propagate the filter state through time is defined by a random

  15. Aerosol Impacts on Cirrus Clouds and High-Power Laser Transmission: A Combined Satellite Observation and Modeling Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-28

    Subject: Final Report for AFOSR Grant FA9550-09-1-0386, “Aerosol Impacts on Cirrus Clouds and High-Power Laser Transmission: A Combined Satellite...of the Weather Research Forecast (WRF) model for cirrus cloud simulation and prediction in conjunction with satellite observations to support the...features, the Fu-Liou-Gu scheme is now an ideal tool for the simulation of radiative transfer associated with cirrus clouds in weather and climate

  16. Detecting Disaster Damage from 2015 Typhoon Etau by the Combined Use of Different SAR Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Kenichi; Fujihira, Kei; Asada, Norichika; Fukushima, Ayumi; Mushiake, Naruo

    2016-06-01

    In this study, focusing on the flood damages in Joso City in Ibaraki Prefecture, we estimated the extent of inundation using multiple SAR satellites and examined their varied results depending on observational bands. We further examined the potential utilization of combined different SAR data for initial responses to disasters. For classification of the inundated areas, a binary classification was used with a threshold of backscatter coefficient and the difference in backscatter coefficient between the usual condition and the situation after the breach. In the extraction of inundation after the breach of the levee, COSMO-SkyMed showed the accuracy of 72.6%, while ALOS-2 PALSAR-2 indicated the accuracy of 66.1%. The extent of inundation were extracted by difference of backscatter coefficient using the data taken by Sentinel-1 and ALOS-2 PALSAR-2 before the breach of the levee, and the comparison analysis results showed that the extent of inundation expanded after the breach of the levee. From the above results, we graded the characteristics of the satellites by their observational bands and spatial resolution.

  17. Satellite image fusion by using a combination of IHS and HPM methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sojasi, Saeed; Maldague, Xavier

    2017-05-01

    There are numerous image fusion techniques such as intensity-hue-saturation (IHS) transform and principal component analysis (PCA). These methods are offering promising performance but the drawback with them is that they are not necessarily optimal in newer applications such as Ikonos and QuickBird. Color distortion is of vital importance in fusion image processing. The main result of this paper is the development of a fast HPM-enhanced version of the IHS method for application in fusion image processing in high-resolution satellite images. Combining these two methods makes it possible to benefit from the advantages of both methods. To evaluate the HPM-enhanced version of IHS method we used QuickBird data. The HPM-enhanced version of IHS and HPM-enhanced IHS are used interchangeably. The simulation results of this method show that it is capable of providing a significant improvement in preserving spectral and spatial information.

  18. The combined release and radiation effects satellite, a joint NASA/DOD program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berrier, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    The Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) program is a two-phase joint USAF/NASA program consisting of a low Earth orbit (LEO) phase and a geosynchronous transfer orbit (GTO) phase. The mission has been carefully planned to help clarify the geospace environment picture and its effects on space hardware, communications, and man. CRRES instruments were selected for synergism, accuracy, and applicability, and will be cross-calibrated for consistency. They will provide data to fill the gaps in geospace modeling data already obtained, and will update and correct existing models. The chemical release experiments and low altitude instruments will clarify the character of the ionosphere in low Earth orbit and the high altitude chemical release experiments will improve knowledge of how trapped particle populations behave out as far as synchronous altitudes. The ionospheric studies will lead to significantly improved Earth-space intercommunications.

  19. GNSS-based SSH observations from ships combined with satellite altimetry and tide gauge readings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roggenbuck, Ole; Reinking, Jörg

    2017-04-01

    Geoscientists and many parts of society rely on precise information of the sea surface height (SSH) and its temporal behavior. Satellite altimetry and tide gauges are the standard source for SSH measurement data. Different studies demonstrated how ships can be used to gather additional SSH observations. These three techniques have their individual pros and cons in case of e.g. spatial and temporal resolution. It is most likely that combined solution, using all available sensors can improve the quality of models. Four ships will be used for measuring the SSH within a project at the Jade University in Oldenburg. The ships, two ferries and two research vessels, are operated in the German Bight of the North Sea. The resulting measurements will be integrated into a multi-technique model that will combine all three data types. The tidal parameters will be estimated for a grid while coastlines and islands are taken into account during grid generation. Since the number of unknowns is related to the number of grid knots, the normal equation system is usually underestimated. Hence auxiliary constraints have to be introduced to ensure the resolvability of the normal equation system. In this contribution the necessary processing steps - from GNSS observations aboard a ship to an instantaneous SSH - will be shown. A first approach for the combination method will be explain and first results of this multi-technique model will be presented.

  20. Evaluation of Rainfall Satellite Estimates Combined by Hourly Gauge Observations for High Spatial Resolution Over South Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, R. C.; Herdies, D. L.; Vila, D. A.; Souza, D.; Rozante, J. R.; Biscaro, T.; Vendrasco, E. P.; Beneti, C.

    2016-12-01

    The use of rainfall satellite estimates is widely used in hydrology, for application of water resources and monitoring of natural disasters. The rainfall satellite estimate data is generally applied in large basins as used in the simulations of stream flow. In addition to greater spatial coverage, satellites have less data interruptions when compared to rain gauges and radar, as an alternative to the continuous real-time monitoring even smaller basins. The goal of this work is evaluate different kind of products of satellite rainfall estimate combined with surface observations using the combined scheme technique (CoSch). The results with the current methodology using CMORPH, 3B42RT and GPM data were compared. The area of study covers the west of Southern Brazil and part of Paraguay, using on about 200 telemetric stations and three kinds of rainfall satellite estimation aforementioned. Currently, there are many products and methodologies which does this combination, but most of these products are combined daily. Using the telemetric stations is possible to get the accumulated precipitation in periods from half hour, allowing a really high temporal resolution in the area of study. This new product is able to validate the precipitation in the early hours of the atmospheric model, nowcasting and hydrology. The results show the important advantage in the quality of the final corrected products, which is necessary for hydrological monitoring of the South of Brazil.

  1. Combined use of car based and satellite observations for the characterisation and quantification of large emission source like megacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaiganfar, R.; Ibrahim, O.; Beirle, S.; Wagner, T.

    2009-04-01

    Megacities are localized, heterogeneous and variable sources of various air pollutants, having impact on air quality and ultimately on climate. Within the European project MEGAPOLI we will characterise and quantify these emissions using spectroscopic observations using satellite instruments and ground based instruments mounted on cars. The car observations are conducted on circles around localised emission sources or even whole cities. From these observations, together with meteorological information, the total emissions of trace gases like NO2, HCHO, and Glyoxal can be quantified. The car measurements are also used for validation of the satellite observations. Satellites provide long time series with global cover, which is an important advantage to study the satellite measurements. From the satellite observations the link from local to regional and global scales can be made. Especially the impact of important sources like megacities on the surrounding areas and also over longer distances can be studied. The combination with the car measurements adds valuable information on the diurnal cycles, which is not well captured from satellite observations. Here we present first results from car-based Multi-Axis-DOAS (MAX-DOAS) observations of NO2 and relate them to the results from satellite observations. For selected megacities, we analyzed temporal patterns like annual or weekly cycles and trends, as well as spatial patterns. We provide an overview on our future activities within the MEGAPOLI project.

  2. Combining CHAMP and Swarm Satellite Data to Invert the Lithospheric Magnetic Field in the Tibetan Plateau.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yaodong; Wang, Zhengtao; Jiang, Weiping; Zhang, Bingbing; Li, Fupeng; Guo, Fei

    2017-01-26

    CHAMP and Swarm satellite magnetic data are combined to establish the lithospheric magnetic field over the Tibetan Plateau at satellite altitude by using zonal revised spherical cap harmonic analysis (R-SCHA). These data are integrated with geological structures data to analyze the relationship between magnetic anomaly signals and large-scale geological tectonic over the Tibetan Plateau and to explore the active tectonic region based on the angle of the magnetic anomaly. Results show that the model fitting error is small for a layer 250-500 km high, and the RMSE of the horizontal and radial geomagnetic components is better than 0.3 nT. The proposed model can accurately describe medium- to long-scale lithospheric magnetic anomalies. Analysis indicates that a negative magnetic anomaly in the Tibetan Plateau significantly differs with a positive magnetic anomaly in the surrounding area, and the boundary of the positive and negative regions is generally consistent with the geological tectonic boundary in the plateau region. Significant differences exist between the basement structures of the hinterland of the plateau and the surrounding area. The magnetic anomaly in the Central and Western Tibetan Plateau shows an east-west trend, which is identical to the direction of the geological structures. The magnetic anomaly in the eastern part is arc-shaped and extends along the northeast direction. Its direction is significantly different from the trend of the geological structures. The strongest negative anomaly is located in the Himalaya block, with a central strength of up to -9 nT at a height of 300 km. The presence of a strong negative anomaly implies that the Curie isotherm in this area is relatively shallow and deep geological tectonic activity may exist.

  3. Combining CHAMP and Swarm Satellite Data to Invert the Lithospheric Magnetic Field in the Tibetan Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yaodong; Wang, Zhengtao; Jiang, Weiping; Zhang, Bingbing; Li, Fupeng; Guo, Fei

    2017-01-01

    CHAMP and Swarm satellite magnetic data are combined to establish the lithospheric magnetic field over the Tibetan Plateau at satellite altitude by using zonal revised spherical cap harmonic analysis (R-SCHA). These data are integrated with geological structures data to analyze the relationship between magnetic anomaly signals and large-scale geological tectonic over the Tibetan Plateau and to explore the active tectonic region based on the angle of the magnetic anomaly. Results show that the model fitting error is small for a layer 250–500 km high, and the RMSE of the horizontal and radial geomagnetic components is better than 0.3 nT. The proposed model can accurately describe medium- to long-scale lithospheric magnetic anomalies. Analysis indicates that a negative magnetic anomaly in the Tibetan Plateau significantly differs with a positive magnetic anomaly in the surrounding area, and the boundary of the positive and negative regions is generally consistent with the geological tectonic boundary in the plateau region. Significant differences exist between the basement structures of the hinterland of the plateau and the surrounding area. The magnetic anomaly in the Central and Western Tibetan Plateau shows an east–west trend, which is identical to the direction of the geological structures. The magnetic anomaly in the eastern part is arc-shaped and extends along the northeast direction. Its direction is significantly different from the trend of the geological structures. The strongest negative anomaly is located in the Himalaya block, with a central strength of up to −9 nT at a height of 300 km. The presence of a strong negative anomaly implies that the Curie isotherm in this area is relatively shallow and deep geological tectonic activity may exist. PMID:28134755

  4. Combination of Landsat TM and ERS-1 satellite data to discriminate forest cover types in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffer, Roger M.; Soares, Vicente P.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the synergy between optical (Landsat TM) and microwave (ERS-1 satellite SAR) data sets, used singly and in combination, to discriminate and identify Eucalyptus stands and other cover types. The study site of interest is located in the vale do Rio Doce, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil. Reference data used in this study included detailed map and stand information (forest inventory data and management records). From the individual stand records, critical information such as cutting and planting dates were determined which show the age of the stands at the time both Landsat TM and ERS-1 radar data were obtained. The data sets were geometrically corrected, registered, and resampled to a 30 meter grid using cubic convolution interpolation. A maximum likelihood classifier was used in this study. The evaluation of the classifications was both qualitative and quantitative. Results indicated that the Landsat TM used alone was the most effective sensor system to classify Eucalyptus stands (accuracy of 94.8%), followed by the combined data set (accuracy of 85.9%). The combination of TM and ERS-1 data was generally not as effective as the use of Landsat alone, but did enable areas under clouds to be classified. The ERS-1 C-band radar data alone did not provide satisfactory results, with a classification accuracy of only 35.7%. This low accuracy was due, in part, to topographic effects. The use of ERS-1 SAR data appears to be severely limited in areas of rolling terrain, due to the variations in backscatter caused by the topographic effects.

  5. Multi-technique combination of space geodesy observations: Impact of the Jason-2 satellite on the GPS satellite orbits estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoulida, Myriam; Pollet, Arnaud; Coulot, David; Perosanz, Félix; Loyer, Sylvain; Biancale, Richard; Rebischung, Paul

    2016-10-01

    In order to improve the Precise Orbit Determination (POD) of the GPS constellation and the Jason-2 Low Earth Orbiter (LEO), we carry out a simultaneous estimation of GPS satellite orbits along with Jason-2 orbits, using GINS software. Along with GPS station observations, we use Jason-2 GPS, SLR and DORIS observations, over a data span of 6 months (28/05/2011-03/12/2011). We use the Geophysical Data Records-D (GDR-D) orbit estimation standards for the Jason-2 satellite. A GPS-only solution is computed as well, where only the GPS station observations are used. It appears that adding the LEO GPS observations results in an increase of about 0.7% of ambiguities fixed, with respect to the GPS-only solution. The resulting GPS orbits from both solutions are of equivalent quality, agreeing with each other at about 7 mm on Root Mean Square (RMS). Comparisons of the resulting GPS orbits to the International GNSS Service (IGS) final orbits show the same level of agreement for both the GPS-only orbits, at 1.38 cm in RMS, and the GPS + Jason2 orbits at 1.33 cm in RMS. We also compare the resulting Jason-2 orbits with the 3-technique Segment Sol multi-missions d'ALTimétrie, d'orbitographie et de localisation précise (SSALTO) POD products. The orbits show good agreement, with 2.02 cm of orbit differences global RMS, and 0.98 cm of orbit differences RMS on the radial component.

  6. CRRES (Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite) SPACERAD plasma wave experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Roger R.; Gurnett, Donald A.

    1988-10-01

    This document discusses the Main Electronics Package, two Electric Field Preamps and Search Coil Magnetometer for the AFGL 701 SPACERAD instrumentation on the CRRES (Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite) project. This document discusses the scientific objectives and the importance of the Plasma Wave Experiment in the CRRES SPACERAD mission and describes the instrument design rational and the instrument development philosophy. This document also discusses the testing and operations of the experiment and contains a schematic drawing of the instrumentation electronics and lists of the schematics, drawings, and wiring diagrams that describe the as-built configuration of the Plasma Wave Experiment instrumentation. Problems encountered during the construction and testing of the instrument and their resolutions are discussed. Test results from already completed environmental and EMC/RFI tests have already been submitted to AFGL and to the Air Force Headquarters Space Division Space Test Program. The recertification of the calibration of the instrument is recommended in the near future under a new contract covering the re-delivery (necessitated due to the removal during the launch-delay storage period), pre-launch, and launch operations.

  7. Improving The Retrieval Of Atmospheric Stability Indices By Combining Ground-based And Satellite Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loehnert, U.; Ebell, K.; Orlandi, E.

    2015-12-01

    A new generation of high-resolution (~1km) weather forecast models now becoming operational over Europe promises to revolutionize predictions of severe weather, specifically by explicitly resolving convection. For this, a dense observing network is required, focusing especially on the lowest few km of the atmosphere, so that forecast models have the most realistic state of the atmosphere for initialization, continuous assimilation and verification. In this context, the current European COST action TOPROF (ES1303) deals with operational networking of three existing but so far under-exploited, ground-based remote sensing instruments throughout Europe: i) Several hundreds of ceilometers, ii) more than 20 Doppler lidars, and iii) About 30 microwave profilers (MWP) giving profiles of temperature and humidity in the lowest few km every 10 minutes. Specifically, MWP are highly suited for continuously monitoring the temporal development of atmospheric stability (i.e. Cimini et al. 2015, AMT) before the initiation of deep convection. However, the vertical resolution of MWP temperature profiles is best in the lowest kilometer above the surface, decreasing rapidly with increasing height. In addition, humidity profile retrievals typically cannot be resolved with more than two degrees of freedom for signal, resulting in a rather poor vertical resolution throughout the troposphere. Typical stability indices (i.e. K-index, Lifted Index, Showalter Index, CAPE,..) rely on temperature and humidity values not only in the region of the boundary layer (850 hPa) but also at 700 hPa, 500 hPa, in between these levels or even higher above. In this study, for clear sky cases, satellite remote sensing (i.e. SEVIRI radiances from the geostationary METEOSAT ) is used to complement the ground-based MWP information. The theoretical basis of the combined retrieval is highlighted, error reductions resulting from the sensor synergy are discussed and applications to real data are shown. The study

  8. On the spectral combination of satellite gravity model, terrestrial and airborne gravity data for local gravimetric geoid computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Tao; Wang, Yan Ming

    2016-12-01

    One of the challenges for geoid determination is the combination of heterogeneous gravity data. Because of the distinctive spectral content of different data sets, spectral combination is a suitable candidate for its solution. The key to have a successful combination is to determine the proper spectral weights, or the error degree variances of each data set. In this paper, the error degree variances of terrestrial and airborne gravity data at low degrees are estimated by the aid of a satellite gravity model using harmonic analysis. For higher degrees, the error covariances are estimated from local gravity data first, and then used to compute the error degree variances. The white and colored noise models are also used to estimate the error degree variances of local gravity data for comparisons. Based on the error degree variances, the spectral weights of satellite gravity models, terrestrial and airborne gravity data are determined and applied for geoid computation in Texas area. The computed gravimetric geoid models are tested against an independent, highly accurate geoid profile of the Geoid Slope Validation Survey 2011 (GSVS11). The geoid computed by combining satellite gravity model GOCO03S and terrestrial (land and DTU13 altimetric) gravity data agrees with GSVS11 to ±1.1 cm in terms of standard deviation along a line of 325 km. After incorporating the airborne gravity data collected at 11 km altitude, the standard deviation is reduced to ±0.8 cm. Numerical tests demonstrate the feasibility of spectral combination in geoid computation and the contribution of airborne gravity in an area of high quality terrestrial gravity data. Using the GSVS11 data and the spectral combination, the degree of correctness of the error spectra and the quality of satellite gravity models can also be revealed.

  9. The Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite program (CRRES): A unique series of scientific experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    CRRES is a program to study the space environment which surrounds Earth and the effects of space radiation on modern satellite electronic systems. The satellite will carry an array of active experiments including chemical releases and a complement of sophisticated scientific instruments to accomplish these objectives. Other chemical release active experiments will be performed with suborbital rocket probes. These chemical releases will paint the magnetic and electric fields in Earthspace with clouds of glowing ions. Earthspace will be a laboratory, and the releases will be studied with an extensive network of ground-, aircraft-, and satellite-based diagnostic instruments.

  10. Estimation of Sea Ice Thickness Distributions through the Combination of Snow Depth and Satellite Laser Altimetry Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, Nathan T.; Markus, Thorsten; Cavalieri, Donald J.; Sparling, Lynn C.; Krabill, William B.; Gasiewski, Albin J.; Sonntag, John G.

    2009-01-01

    Combinations of sea ice freeboard and snow depth measurements from satellite data have the potential to provide a means to derive global sea ice thickness values. However, large differences in spatial coverage and resolution between the measurements lead to uncertainties when combining the data. High resolution airborne laser altimeter retrievals of snow-ice freeboard and passive microwave retrievals of snow depth taken in March 2006 provide insight into the spatial variability of these quantities as well as optimal methods for combining high resolution satellite altimeter measurements with low resolution snow depth data. The aircraft measurements show a relationship between freeboard and snow depth for thin ice allowing the development of a method for estimating sea ice thickness from satellite laser altimetry data at their full spatial resolution. This method is used to estimate snow and ice thicknesses for the Arctic basin through the combination of freeboard data from ICESat, snow depth data over first-year ice from AMSR-E, and snow depth over multiyear ice from climatological data. Due to the non-linear dependence of heat flux on ice thickness, the impact on heat flux calculations when maintaining the full resolution of the ICESat data for ice thickness estimates is explored for typical winter conditions. Calculations of the basin-wide mean heat flux and ice growth rate using snow and ice thickness values at the 70 m spatial resolution of ICESat are found to be approximately one-third higher than those calculated from 25 km mean ice thickness values.

  11. Combining Suborbital Measurements of Aerosol Optical Depth and Columnar Water Vapor for Satellite Sensor Validations in the CLAMS (Chesapeake Lighthouse and Aircraft Measurements for Satellites) Experiment, 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redemann, J.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J. M.; Russell, P. B.; Eilers, J. A.; Hobbs, P. V.; Kahn, R.; Smith, W. L.; Holben, B. N.; Rutledge, C. K.; Pitts, M. C.; Mishchenko, M. I.; Chowdhary, J.; Martins, J. V.; Plana-Fattori, A.; Charlock, T. P.

    2002-05-01

    As part of the Chesapeake Lighthouse and Aircraft Measurements for Satellites (CLAMS) experiment, July 10 - August 2, 2001, the 14-channel NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14) was operated successfully aboard the University of Washington Convair-580 during 10 research flights (~45 flight hours). The CLAMS campaign was a clear sky, shortwave (SW) closure campaign that entailed measurements from the Chesapeake Lighthouse research platform, several land sites, 6 research aircraft and the Terra satellite. CLAMS research goals included validation of satellite-based retrievals of aerosol properties, vertical profiles of radiative fluxes, temperature and water vapor. Suborbital measurements of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and columnar water vapor (CWV) were carried out at several AERONET sites and aboard five of the six airborne platforms using a variety of techniques. AATS-14 measures the direct solar beam transmission at 14 discrete wavelengths (354-1558 nm), yielding aerosol optical depth spectra and columnar water vapor. During coordinated flights of the UW Convair-580, AATS-14 measured full column aerosol optical depth spectra at exact Terra overpass time on at least 7 occasions. For five of these opportunities, AOD at 499nm was at or below 0.1. During Terra overpass on July 17, 2001, AATS-14 measured the largest AOD encountered during the entire experiment (~0.48 at 499nm), including a horizontal gradient in AOD of more than 0.1 over a distance of ~80 kilometers. We will illustrate how the spatially resolved measurements by AATS-14 and the temporally resolved AERONET measurements can be usefully combined for satellite validation purposes by constraining the small-scale aerosol variability off the US East coast. While the first part of this paper is focused on AATS-14 measurements, in the remainder of this paper we will show comparisons to other suborbital measurements obtained using (i) the AERONET sun/sky radiometer at the Chesapeake Lighthouse, (ii

  12. Tropical Rainfall Distributions Determined Using TRMM Combined with other Satellite and Raingauge Information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, Robert F.; Huffman, George J.; Bolvin, David T.; Curtis, Scott; Nelkin, Eric J.

    1999-01-01

    Abstract A technique is described to use Tropical Rain Measuring Mission (TRMM) combined radar/radiometer information to adjust geosynchronous infrared satellite data (the TRMM Adjusted GOES Precipitation Index, or TRMM AGPI). The AGPI is then merged with rain gauge information (mostly over land; the TRMM merged product) to provide fine- scale (1 deg latitude/longitude) pentad and monthly analyses, respectively. The TRMM merged estimates are 10% higher than those from the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) when integrated over the tropical oceans (37 deg N-S) for 1998, with 20% differences noted in the most heavily raining areas. In the dry subtropics the TRMM values are smaller than the GPCP estimates. The TRMM merged-product tropical-mean estimates for 1998 are 3.3 mm/ day over ocean and 3.1 mm/ day over land and ocean combined. Regional differences are noted between the western and eastern Pacific Ocean maxima when TRMM and GPCP are compared. In the eastern Pacific rain maximum the TRMM and GPCP mean values are nearly equal, very different from the other tropical rainy areas where TRMM merged-product estimates are higher. This regional difference may indicate that TRMM is better at taking in to account the vertical structure of the rain systems and the difference in structure between the western and eastern (shallower) Pacific convection. Comparisons of these TRMM merged analysis estimates with surface data sets shows varied results; the bias is near zero when compared to western Pacific Ocean atoll raingauge data, but significantly positive compared to Kwajalein radar estimates (adjusted by rain gauges). Over land the TRMM estimates also show a significant positive bias. The inclusion of gauge information in the final merged product significantly reduces the bias over land, as expected. The monthly precipitation patterns produced by the TRMM merged data process clearly show the evolution of the ENSO tropical precipitation pattern from early 1998

  13. Mitigating hazards to aircraft from drifting volcanic clouds by comparing and combining IR satellite data with forward transport models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matiella Novak, M. Alexandra

    Volcanic ash clouds in the upper atmosphere (>10km) present a significant hazard to the aviation community and in some cases cause near-disastrous situations for aircraft that inadvertently encounter them. The two most commonly used techniques for mitigating hazards to aircraft from drifting volcanic clouds are (1) using data from satellite observations and (2) the forecasting of dispersion and trajectories with numerical models. This dissertation aims to aid in the mitigation of this hazard by using Moderate Infrared Resolution Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) infrared (IR) satellite data to quantitatively analyze and constrain the uncertainties in the PUFF volcanic ash transport model. Furthermore, this dissertation has experimented with the viability of combining IR data with the PUFF model to increase the model's reliability. Comparing IR satellite data with forward transport models provides valuable information concerning the uncertainty and sensitivity of the transport models. A study analyzing the viability of combining satellite-based information with the PUFF model was also done. Factors controlling the cloud-shape evolution, such as the horizontal dispersion coefficient, vertical distribution of particles, the height of the cloud, and the location of the cloud were all updated based on observations from satellite data in an attempt to increase the reliability of the simulations. Comparing center of mass locations--calculated from satellite data--to HYSPLIT trajectory simulations provides insight into the vertical distribution of the cloud. A case study of the May 10, 2003 Anatahan Volcano eruption was undertaken to assess methods of calculating errors in PUFF simulations with respect to the transport and dispersion of the erupted cloud. An analysis of the factors controlling the cloud-shape evolution of the cloud in the model was also completed and compared to the shape evolution of the cloud observed in the

  14. Tropical forest monitoring, combining satellite and social data, to inform management and livelihood implications: Case studies from Indonesian West Timor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Rohan

    2012-06-01

    Deforestation in the world's tropics is an urgent international issue. One response has been the development of satellite based monitoring initiatives largely focused on the carbon rich forests of western Indonesia. In contrast this study focuses on one eastern Indonesian district, Kabupaten Kupang, which has some of the largest and least studied tracts of remaining forest in West Timor. A combination of remote sensing, GIS and social science methods were used to describe the state of forests in Kabupaten Kupang, how and why they are changing. Using satellite imagery, case studies and on-ground interviews, this study explores the proposition that transdisciplinary local social, cultural and biophysical knowledge is important for effectively using remotely sensed data as a tool to inform local management policies. When compared to some other parts of Indonesia, the rate and extent of deforestation in West Timor was found to be relatively small and a satellite based assessment alone could conclude that it is not a critical issue. However this study showed that when on-ground social data are coupled with (such) satellite-based data a more complex picture emerges, related to key livelihood issues. The causes of forest cover change were found to be multivariate and location specific, requiring management approaches tailored to local social issues. This study suggests that integrative research can maximise the utility of satellite data for understanding causation and thus informing management strategies. In addition, the satellite based assessment found that at the time of the study less than 4% of forested land was within national parks and nature reserves and less than a third of the protected catchment forest zone was forested. These data suggest considerable scope for upland re-forestation activities or the redrawing of protected forest boundaries.

  15. Bayesian Estimation of Precipitation from Satellite Passive Microwave Observations Using Combined Radar-Radiometer Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grecu, Mircea; Olson, William S.

    2006-01-01

    Precipitation estimation from satellite passive microwave radiometer observations is a problem that does not have a unique solution that is insensitive to errors in the input data. Traditionally, to make this problem well posed, a priori information derived from physical models or independent, high-quality observations is incorporated into the solution. In the present study, a database of precipitation profiles and associated brightness temperatures is constructed to serve as a priori information in a passive microwave radiometer algorithm. The precipitation profiles are derived from a Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) combined radar radiometer algorithm, and the brightness temperatures are TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) observed. Because the observed brightness temperatures are consistent with those derived from a radiative transfer model embedded in the combined algorithm, the precipitation brightness temperature database is considered to be physically consistent. The database examined here is derived from the analysis of a month-long record of TRMM data that yields more than a million profiles of precipitation and associated brightness temperatures. These profiles are clustered into a tractable number of classes based on the local sea surface temperature, a radiometer-based estimate of the echo-top height (the height beyond which the reflectivity drops below 17 dBZ), and brightness temperature principal components. For each class, the mean precipitation profile, brightness temperature principal components, and probability of occurrence are determined. The precipitation brightness temperature database supports a radiometer-only algorithm that incorporates a Bayesian estimation methodology. In the Bayesian framework, precipitation estimates are weighted averages of the mean precipitation values corresponding to the classes in the database, with the weights being determined according to the similarity between the observed brightness temperature principal

  16. Bayesian Estimation of Precipitation from Satellite Passive Microwave Observations Using Combined Radar-Radiometer Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grecu, Mircea; Olson, William S.

    2006-01-01

    Precipitation estimation from satellite passive microwave radiometer observations is a problem that does not have a unique solution that is insensitive to errors in the input data. Traditionally, to make this problem well posed, a priori information derived from physical models or independent, high-quality observations is incorporated into the solution. In the present study, a database of precipitation profiles and associated brightness temperatures is constructed to serve as a priori information in a passive microwave radiometer algorithm. The precipitation profiles are derived from a Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) combined radar radiometer algorithm, and the brightness temperatures are TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) observed. Because the observed brightness temperatures are consistent with those derived from a radiative transfer model embedded in the combined algorithm, the precipitation brightness temperature database is considered to be physically consistent. The database examined here is derived from the analysis of a month-long record of TRMM data that yields more than a million profiles of precipitation and associated brightness temperatures. These profiles are clustered into a tractable number of classes based on the local sea surface temperature, a radiometer-based estimate of the echo-top height (the height beyond which the reflectivity drops below 17 dBZ), and brightness temperature principal components. For each class, the mean precipitation profile, brightness temperature principal components, and probability of occurrence are determined. The precipitation brightness temperature database supports a radiometer-only algorithm that incorporates a Bayesian estimation methodology. In the Bayesian framework, precipitation estimates are weighted averages of the mean precipitation values corresponding to the classes in the database, with the weights being determined according to the similarity between the observed brightness temperature principal

  17. Refinements in the Combined Adjustment of Satellite Altimetry and Gravity Anomaly Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-07-12

    of the areas covered by the GEOS-3 satellite when compared with the earlier reported results of the AFGL computer program SARRA ^(Short Arc Reduc...in the partial derivatives may be illustrated as follows. A small set of satellite altimetry data was adjusted by the AFGL program SARRA (Short Arc...1 l+2^(a/rf 2^(C cos mX + S sin mX)P ( sine ) n^2v m=0 nm nm nm i + h u>2r0r 3 co326/(kM) , (4.1) which yields dr (r0/r oo n )^n(a

  18. Numerical reconstruction of tsunami source using combined seismic, satellite and DART data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivorotko, Olga; Kabanikhin, Sergey; Marinin, Igor

    2014-05-01

    Recent tsunamis, for instance, in Japan (2011), in Sumatra (2004), and at the Indian coast (2004) showed that a system of producing exact and timely information about tsunamis is of a vital importance. Numerical simulation is an effective instrument for providing such information. Bottom relief characteristics and the initial perturbation data (a tsunami source) are required for the direct simulation of tsunamis. The seismic data about the source are usually obtained in a few tens of minutes after an event has occurred (the seismic waves velocity being about five hundred kilometres per minute, while the velocity of tsunami waves is less than twelve kilometres per minute). A difference in the arrival times of seismic and tsunami waves can be used when operationally refining the tsunami source parameters and modelling expected tsunami wave height on the shore. The most suitable physical models related to the tsunamis simulation are based on the shallow water equations. The problem of identification parameters of a tsunami source using additional measurements of a passing wave is called inverse tsunami problem. We investigate three different inverse problems of determining a tsunami source using three different additional data: Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis (DART) measurements, satellite wave-form images and seismic data. These problems are severely ill-posed. We apply regularization techniques to control the degree of ill-posedness such as Fourier expansion, truncated singular value decomposition, numerical regularization. The algorithm of selecting the truncated number of singular values of an inverse problem operator which is agreed with the error level in measured data is described and analyzed. In numerical experiment we used gradient methods (Landweber iteration and conjugate gradient method) for solving inverse tsunami problems. Gradient methods are based on minimizing the corresponding misfit function. To calculate the gradient of the misfit

  19. Environmental monitoring of El Hierro Island submarine volcano, by combining low and high resolution satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eugenio, F.; Martin, J.; Marcello, J.; Fraile-Nuez, E.

    2014-06-01

    El Hierro Island, located at the Canary Islands Archipelago in the Atlantic coast of North Africa, has been rocked by thousands of tremors and earthquakes since July 2011. Finally, an underwater volcanic eruption started 300 m below sea level on October 10, 2011. Since then, regular multidisciplinary monitoring has been carried out in order to quantify the environmental impacts caused by the submarine eruption. Thanks to this natural tracer release, multisensorial satellite imagery obtained from MODIS and MERIS sensors have been processed to monitor the volcano activity and to provide information on the concentration of biological, chemical and physical marine parameters. Specifically, low resolution satellite estimations of optimal diffuse attenuation coefficient (Kd) and chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) concentration under these abnormal conditions have been assessed. These remote sensing data have played a fundamental role during field campaigns guiding the oceanographic vessel to the appropriate sampling areas. In addition, to analyze El Hierro submarine volcano area, WorldView-2 high resolution satellite spectral bands were atmospherically and deglinted processed prior to obtain a high-resolution optimal diffuse attenuation coefficient model. This novel algorithm was developed using a matchup data set with MERIS and MODIS data, in situ transmittances measurements and a seawater radiative transfer model. Multisensor and multitemporal imagery processed from satellite remote sensing sensors have demonstrated to be a powerful tool for monitoring the submarine volcanic activities, such as discolored seawater, floating material and volcanic plume, having shown the capabilities to improve the understanding of submarine volcanic processes.

  20. Evaluation of the effect of static magnetic fields combined with human hepatocyte growth factor on human satellite cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Birk, Richard; Sommer, Ulrich; Faber, Anne; Aderhold, Christoph; Schulz, Johannes D; Hörmann, Karl; Goessler, Ulrich Reinhart; Stern-Straeter, Jens

    2014-06-01

    Tissue engineering is a promising research field, which aims to create new functional muscle tissue in vitro, by utilizing the myogenic differentiation potential of human stem cells. The objective of the present study was to determine the effect of static magnetic fields (SMF), combined with the use of the myogenic differentiation enhancing hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), on human satellite cell cultures, which are one of the preferred stem cell sources in skeletal muscle tissue engineering. We performed almarBlue® proliferation assays and semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for the following myogenic markers: desmin (DES), myogenic factor 5 (MYF5), myogenic differentiation antigen 1 (MYOD1), myogenin (MYOG), myosin heavy chain (MYH) and α1 actin (ACTA1) to detect the effects on myogenic maturation. Additionally, immunohistochemical staining (ICC) and fusion index (FI) determination as independent markers of differentiation were performed on satellite cell cultures stimulated with HGF and HGF + SMF with an intensity of 80 mT. ICC verified the muscle phenotype at all time points. SMF enhanced the proliferation of satellite cell cultures treated with HGF. RT-PCR analysis, ICC and FI calculation revealed the effects of HGF/SMF on the investigated differentiation markers and stimulation with HGF and SMF verified the continuing maturation, however no significant increase in analysed markers could be detected when compared with control cultures treated with serum cessation. In conclusion, HGF or HGF + SMF stimulation of human satellite cell cultures did not lead to the desired enhancement of myogenic maturation of human satellite cell cultures compared with cell cultures stimulated with growth factor reduction.

  1. Combining Satellite Ocean Color and Hydrodynamic Model Uncertainties in Bio-Optical Forecasts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-03

    approach has limitations. Due to cloud cover in the satellite imagery, and the expense and spatial/ temporal coverage limitations associated with in situ...Fig. 2), as well as temporal averages over the 2-year period for the climatology. For the most part, the ensemble mean and the minimum/ maximum...a)]. Both the ensemble and original nLw values are significantly lower than the clima - tological values at 412 nm, but the mean and standard

  2. Gridded sunshine duration climate data record for Germany based on combined satellite and in situ observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walawender, Jakub; Kothe, Steffen; Trentmann, Jörg; Pfeifroth, Uwe; Cremer, Roswitha

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to create a 1 km2 gridded daily sunshine duration data record for Germany covering the period from 1983 to 2015 (33 years) based on satellite estimates of direct normalised surface solar radiation and in situ sunshine duration observations using a geostatistical approach. The CM SAF SARAH direct normalized irradiance (DNI) satellite climate data record and in situ observations of sunshine duration from 121 weather stations operated by DWD are used as input datasets. The selected period of 33 years is associated with the availability of satellite data. The number of ground stations is limited to 121 as there are only time series with less than 10% of missing observations over the selected period included to keep the long-term consistency of the output sunshine duration data record. In the first step, DNI data record is used to derive sunshine hours by applying WMO threshold of 120 W/m2 (SDU = DNI ≥ 120 W/m2) and weighting of sunny slots to correct the sunshine length between two instantaneous image data due to cloud movement. In the second step, linear regression between SDU and in situ sunshine duration is calculated to adjust the satellite product to the ground observations and the output regression coefficients are applied to create a regression grid. In the last step regression residuals are interpolated with ordinary kriging and added to the regression grid. A comprehensive accuracy assessment of the gridded sunshine duration data record is performed by calculating prediction errors (cross-validation routine). "R" is used for data processing. A short analysis of the spatial distribution and temporal variability of sunshine duration over Germany based on the created dataset will be presented. The gridded sunshine duration data are useful for applications in various climate-related studies, agriculture and solar energy potential calculations.

  3. Simultaneous hierarchical segmentation and vectorization of satellite images through combined data sampling and anisotropic triangulation

    SciTech Connect

    Grazzini, Jacopo; Prasad, Lakshman; Dillard, Scott

    2010-10-21

    The automatic detection, recognition , and segmentation of object classes in remote sensed images is of crucial importance for scene interpretation and understanding. However, it is a difficult task because of the high variability of satellite data. Indeed, the observed scenes usually exhibit a high degree of complexity, where complexity refers to the large variety of pictorial representations of objects with the same semantic meaning and also to the extensive amount of available det.ails. Therefore, there is still a strong demand for robust techniques for automatic information extraction and interpretation of satellite images. In parallel, there is a growing interest in techniques that can extract vector features directly from such imagery. In this paper, we investigate the problem of automatic hierarchical segmentation and vectorization of multispectral satellite images. We propose a new algorithm composed of the following steps: (i) a non-uniform sampling scheme extracting most salient pixels in the image, (ii) an anisotropic triangulation constrained by the sampled pixels taking into account both strength and directionality of local structures present in the image, (iii) a polygonal grouping scheme merging, through techniques based on perceptual information , the obtained segments to a smaller quantity of superior vectorial objects. Besides its computational efficiency, this approach provides a meaningful polygonal representation for subsequent image analysis and/or interpretation.

  4. Combined assimilation of streamflow and satellite soil moisture with the particle filter and geostatistical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hongxiang; Moradkhani, Hamid

    2016-08-01

    Assimilation of satellite soil moisture and streamflow data into a distributed hydrologic model has received increasing attention over the past few years. This study provides a detailed analysis of the joint and separate assimilation of streamflow and Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) surface soil moisture into a distributed Sacramento Soil Moisture Accounting (SAC-SMA) model, with the use of recently developed particle filter-Markov chain Monte Carlo (PF-MCMC) method. Performance is assessed over the Salt River Watershed in Arizona, which is one of the watersheds without anthropogenic effects in Model Parameter Estimation Experiment (MOPEX). A total of five data assimilation (DA) scenarios are designed and the effects of the locations of streamflow gauges and the ASCAT soil moisture on the predictions of soil moisture and streamflow are assessed. In addition, a geostatistical model is introduced to overcome the significantly biased satellite soil moisture and also discontinuity issue. The results indicate that: (1) solely assimilating outlet streamflow can lead to biased soil moisture estimation; (2) when the study area can only be partially covered by the satellite data, the geostatistical approach can estimate the soil moisture for those uncovered grid cells; (3) joint assimilation of streamflow and soil moisture from geostatistical modeling can further improve the surface soil moisture prediction. This study recommends that the geostatistical model is a helpful tool to aid the remote sensing technique and the hydrologic DA study.

  5. Combining Meteorological Stations and Satellite data to Evaluate the Offshore Wind Power Resource of Southeastern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimenta, F. M.; Kempton, W.; Garvine, R. W.

    2007-12-01

    Wind is strong and steady over the ocean, but on-site marine meteorological data are sparse. Here we draw on meteorological station, satellite data (QuikSCAT), and both theoretical and practical measures of wind turbine performance. The meteorological stations give high time resolution direct measurements at a few points and provide validation and adjustment of the satellite data. The satellite data provide near-complete area coverage at lower time resolution. For the southern coast of Brazil, we use both data sets to evaluate the location, timing, and availability of the resource. Then, using bathymetry and the properties of current wind-electric technology, we develop maps of wind speed, wind power density, and practical turbine output in power units (GW). In the shallower waters of south Brazil, along only one coastal area situated between 28°S and 33°S we find a total resource of 102 GW average electrical production. The potential electrical output of this one coastal region based on current technology is near today's average electric demand for the country.

  6. Towards Improving Ash Monitoring; Combining and Comparing IR Satellite Data and Forward Trajectory Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matiella Novak, A.; Watson, M.; Rose, W. I.; Dean, K.

    2007-05-01

    Techniques used to observe and monitor volcanic ash in order to mitigate aviation hazard require testing to determine their reliability and limitations. Currently, the most used techniques rely on satellite remote sensing and trajectory modeling. Infrared data from such sensors as the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), and the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) are used to determine the location and abundance of ash within eruptive clouds in as close to real-time as is possible. The other technique that has been developed uses a volcanic ash dispersion model (e.g. PUFF, HYSPLIT) to predict potential areas of high ash content based on wind fields, settling velocities and an initial location in three dimensional space. Used jointly, these two techniques could further improve ash detection by allowing us to compare the reliability of infrared data when applied to the detection of ash clouds. Using eruptions from various volcanoes, we can compare the location of the clouds based on satellite data to the location of the cloud based on PUFF simulation models quantitatively. In most cases where discrepancies do exist, they are attributed to ash cloud - atmosphere interaction. Ash clouds that are erupted into wetter atmospheric environments (latitude <40) are more difficult to monitor using satellite IR data due to the presence of water vapor in the atmosphere. An appropriate example of this phenomenon occurred with the May 10, 2003 eruption of Anatahan Volcano in the Mariana Islands (16.35 North). Satellite IR observations of this eruption show limited agreement with PUFF dispersion models of this eruption and this may be due to the presence of water vapor in the atmosphere which either 1.) masks the negative "split-window" signal indicative of ash in the atmosphere or 2.) causes the aggregation and faster fallout rate of ash than what is modeled. Further analysis of this eruption cloud and other eruption clouds in various atmospheric

  7. Global Estimates of Fine Particulate Matter Using a Combined Geophysical-Statistical Method with Information from Satellites, Models, and Monitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Donkelaar, Aaron; Martin, Randall V.; Brauer, Michael; Hsu, N. Christina; Kahn, Ralph A.; Levy, Robert C.; Lyapustin, Alexei; Sayer, Andrew M.; Winker, David M.

    2016-01-01

    We estimated global fine particulate matter (PM(sub 2.5)) concentrations using information from satellite-, simulation- and monitor-based sources by applying a Geographically Weighted Regression (GWR) to global geophysically-based satellite-derived PM(sub 2.5) estimates. Aerosol optical depth from multiple satellite products (MISR, MODIS Dark Target, MODIS and SeaWiFS Deep Blue, and MODIS MAIAC) was combined with simulation (GEOS-Chem) based upon their relative uncertainties as determined using ground-based sun photometer (AERONET) observations for 1998-2014. The GWR predictors included simulated aerosol composition and land use information. The resultant PM(sub 2.5) estimates were highly consistent (R(sup 2) equals 0.81) with out-of-sample cross-validated PM(sub 2.5) concentrations from monitors. The global population-weighted annual average PM(sub 2.5) concentrations were 3-fold higher than the 10 micrograms per cubic meter WHO guideline, driven by exposures in Asian and African regions. Estimates in regions with high contributions from mineral dust were associated with higher uncertainty, resulting from both sparse ground-based monitoring, and challenging conditions for retrieval and simulation. This approach demonstrates that the addition of even sparse ground-based measurements to more globally continuous PM(sub 2.5) data sources can yield valuable improvements to PM(sub 2.5) characterization on a global scale.

  8. Global Estimates of Fine Particulate Matter using a Combined Geophysical-Statistical Method with Information from Satellites, Models, and Monitors.

    PubMed

    van Donkelaar, Aaron; Martin, Randall V; Brauer, Michael; Hsu, N Christina; Kahn, Ralph A; Levy, Robert C; Lyapustin, Alexei; Sayer, Andrew M; Winker, David M

    2016-04-05

    We estimated global fine particulate matter (PM2.5) concentrations using information from satellite-, simulation- and monitor-based sources by applying a Geographically Weighted Regression (GWR) to global geophysically based satellite-derived PM2.5 estimates. Aerosol optical depth from multiple satellite products (MISR, MODIS Dark Target, MODIS and SeaWiFS Deep Blue, and MODIS MAIAC) was combined with simulation (GEOS-Chem) based upon their relative uncertainties as determined using ground-based sun photometer (AERONET) observations for 1998-2014. The GWR predictors included simulated aerosol composition and land use information. The resultant PM2.5 estimates were highly consistent (R(2) = 0.81) with out-of-sample cross-validated PM2.5 concentrations from monitors. The global population-weighted annual average PM2.5 concentrations were 3-fold higher than the 10 μg/m(3) WHO guideline, driven by exposures in Asian and African regions. Estimates in regions with high contributions from mineral dust were associated with higher uncertainty, resulting from both sparse ground-based monitoring, and challenging conditions for retrieval and simulation. This approach demonstrates that the addition of even sparse ground-based measurements to more globally continuous PM2.5 data sources can yield valuable improvements to PM2.5 characterization on a global scale.

  9. Global Estimates of Fine Particulate Matter Using a Combined Geophysical-Statistical Method with Information from Satellites, Models, and Monitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Donkelaar, Aaron; Martin, Randall V.; Brauer, Michael; Hsu, N. Christina; Kahn, Ralph A.; Levy, Robert C.; Lyapustin, Alexei; Sayer, Andrew M.; Winker, David M.

    2016-01-01

    We estimated global fine particulate matter (PM(sub 2.5)) concentrations using information from satellite-, simulation- and monitor-based sources by applying a Geographically Weighted Regression (GWR) to global geophysically-based satellite-derived PM(sub 2.5) estimates. Aerosol optical depth from multiple satellite products (MISR, MODIS Dark Target, MODIS and SeaWiFS Deep Blue, and MODIS MAIAC) was combined with simulation (GEOS-Chem) based upon their relative uncertainties as determined using ground-based sun photometer (AERONET) observations for 1998-2014. The GWR predictors included simulated aerosol composition and land use information. The resultant PM(sub 2.5) estimates were highly consistent (R(sup 2) equals 0.81) with out-of-sample cross-validated PM(sub 2.5) concentrations from monitors. The global population-weighted annual average PM(sub 2.5) concentrations were 3-fold higher than the 10 micrograms per cubic meter WHO guideline, driven by exposures in Asian and African regions. Estimates in regions with high contributions from mineral dust were associated with higher uncertainty, resulting from both sparse ground-based monitoring, and challenging conditions for retrieval and simulation. This approach demonstrates that the addition of even sparse ground-based measurements to more globally continuous PM(sub 2.5) data sources can yield valuable improvements to PM(sub 2.5) characterization on a global scale.

  10. Combined effects of adjacent channel, intersymbol and CW interference in MSK and OQPSK hard-limited satellite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayamanne, Nympha; Mori, Shinsaku; Oka, Ikuo

    A new analytical method for evaluating the bit error probability performance of minimum shift keying and offset quadrature phase shift keying signals transmitted over hard limited satellite channels subject to the combined effects of adjacent channel, intersymbol interference, uplink and downlink noise, and a continuous wave interference in the downlink is presented. Introducing an equivalent model, the bit error probability is obtained with the aid of Gram-Charlier expansion. The effects of the interference on the bit error probability are demonstrated with numerical results and the results are compared with the linear channel case.

  11. Assessing regional crop water demand using a satellite-based combination equation with a land surface temperature component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyano, Maria Carmen; Garcia, Monica; Tornos, Lucia; Recuero, Laura; Palacios-Orueta, Alicia; Juana, Luis

    2015-04-01

    Quantification of daily evapotranspiration at regional levels is fundamental for improving agricultural and hydrological management, especially in water-scarce and climatic change vulnerable regions, like the Mediterranean basin. Regional estimates of daily crop evapotranspiration (ET) have been historically based on combination equations, such as Penman-Monteith or Priestley-Taylor, forced with weather-data inputs. However, the requirements for long term in-situ data, limit the application of such traditional approaches and algorithms using satellite-data without field calibrations bridge this gap by estimating long-term ET at the pixel level from local to global scales. Land surface temperature is a key variable tracking land surface moisture status. However, it has not been included in satellite ET approaches based on combination equations. In this study, a land surface temperature component was used to estimate soil surface conductance based on an apparent thermal inertia index. A process-based model was applied to estimate surface energy fluxes including daily ET based on a modified version of the Priestley-Taylor Jet Propulsion Laboratory (PT-JPL) model at 1km pixel resolution during a chrono-sequence spanning for more than a decade (2002-2013). The thermal-PT-JPL model was forced with vegetation, albedo, reflectance and temperature products from the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) from both Aqua and Terra satellites. The study region, B-XII Irrigation District of the Lower Guadalquivir, is one of the largest irrigated areas in Spain but it has scarce in-situ micrometeorological or eddy covariance data. The final aim of this study is to evaluate the thermal version of PT-JPL model versus a lumped hydrological model to assess crop evapotranspiration deficits and long-term water consumption trends in the area. The results showed that the thermal-PT-JPL model is a suitable and simple tool requiring only air temperature and incoming solar

  12. Combining Satellite Observations of Fire Activity and Numerical Weather Prediction to Improve the Prediction of Smoke Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, D. A.; Wang, J.; Hyer, E. J.; Ichoku, C. M.

    2012-12-01

    Smoke emissions estimates used in air quality and visibility forecasting applications are currently limited by the information content of satellite fire observations, and the lack of a skillful short-term forecast of changes in fire activity. This study explores the potential benefits of a recently developed sub-pixel-based calculation of fire radiative power (FRPf) from the MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), which provides more precise estimates of the radiant energy (over the retrieved fire area) that in turn, improves estimates of the thermal buoyancy of smoke plumes and may be helpful characterizing the meteorological effects on fire activity for large fire events. Results show that unlike the current FRP product, the incorporation of FRPf produces a statistically significant correlation (R = 0.42) with smoke plume height data provided by the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) and several meteorological variables, such as surface wind speed and temperature, which may be useful for discerning cases where smoke was injected above the boundary layer. Drawing from recent advances in numerical weather prediction (NWP), this study also examines the meteorological conditions characteristic of fire ignition, growth, decay, and extinction, which are used to develop an automated, 24-hour prediction of satellite fire activity. Satellite fire observations from MODIS and geostationary sensors show that the fire prediction model is an improvement (RMSE reduction of 13 - 20%) over the forecast of persistence commonly used by near-real-time fire emission inventories. The ultimate goal is to combine NWP data and satellite fire observations to improve both analysis and prediction of biomass-burning emissions, through improved understanding of the interactions between fire activity and weather at scales appropriate for operational modeling. This is a critical step toward producing a global fire prediction model and improving operational forecasts of

  13. Air Quality over Urban Areas Using Combined Satellite and Ground Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, P.

    2005-12-01

    Study of urban air quality and anthropogenic aerosols have gained significant attention of scientist, government and environmental agencies over the last few years due to its adverse effects on human health, global biota, climate and economy. Anthropogenic particulate matter (PM or aerosols), one of the major pollutants affecting the air quality in urban areas of the world, vary in chemical composition in different parts of the world. New generation remote sensing satellites have demonstrated capabilities for monitoring global pollution with very high spatial and temporal resolutions. However, further studies are needed to provide a comprehensive picture of aerosols and their effects. Present knowledge on chemical composition of aerosols is not sufficient to estimate their effects on health and climate change. In this study, relationship between satellite measured aerosol properties and mass of different types of aerosols measured from ground based instruments is explored. Aerosol properties from MODIS (MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) on board Terra and Aqua satellites and chemical composition of aerosols from ground based IMPROVE network are used. This study will be conducted over several IMPROVE stations in United States and broad classification of aerosol types based on their chemical composition will be performed. Primary results from a case study conducted over a IMPROVE station in the Alabama, USA shows that more than 90% of aerosol optical thickness is due to sub micron size particles. The chemical composition information from ground based measurements well match with aerosol models used in MODIS retrievals. Overall sulfate aerosols are found most dominant with almost 50% contribution in total aerosols followed by organic carbon, nitrates, and dust aerosols.

  14. Combining satellite observations to develop a global soil moisture product for near-real-time applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enenkel, Markus; Reimer, Christoph; Dorigo, Wouter; Wagner, Wolfgang; Pfeil, Isabella; Parinussa, Robert; De Jeu, Richard

    2016-10-01

    The soil moisture dataset that is generated via the Climate Change Initiative (CCI) of the European Space Agency (ESA) (ESA CCI SM) is a popular research product. It is composed of observations from 10 different satellites and aims to exploit the individual strengths of active (radar) and passive (radiometer) sensors, thereby providing surface soil moisture estimates at a spatial resolution of 0.25°. However, the annual updating cycle limits the use of the ESA CCI SM dataset for operational applications. Therefore, this study proposes an adaptation of the ESA CCI product for daily global updates via satellite-derived near-real-time (NRT) soil moisture observations. In order to extend the ESA CCI SM dataset from 1978 to present we use NRT observations from the Advanced Scatterometer on-board the two MetOp satellites and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 on-board GCOM-W. Since these NRT observations do not incorporate the latest algorithmic updates, parameter databases and intercalibration efforts, by nature they offer a lower quality than reprocessed offline datasets. In addition to adaptations of the ESA CCI SM processing chain for NRT datasets, the quality of the NRT datasets is a main source of uncertainty. Our findings indicate that, despite issues in arid regions, the new CCI NRT dataset shows a good correlation with ESA CCI SM. The average global correlation coefficient between CCI NRT and ESA CCI SM (Pearson's R) is 0.80. An initial validation with 40 in situ observations in France, Spain, Senegal and Kenya yields an average R of 0.58 and 0.49 for ESA CCI SM and CCI NRT, respectively. In summary, the CCI NRT product is nearly as accurate as the existing ESA CCI SM product and, therefore, of significant value for operational applications such as drought and flood forecasting, agricultural index insurance or weather forecasting.

  15. A Satellite and Numerical Model Combined Approach to Study Extreme Rain Events over the Mediterranean Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laviola, S.; Moscatello, A.; Miglietta, M. M.; Cattani, E.; Levizzani, V.

    2012-04-01

    The Mediterranean extreme rainfall events often develop at the end of the warm season when the sea surface temperature is higher than 15°C and the environmental conditions allow for the deepening of convection up to the formation of intense isolated cells and multicellular systems. Although the genesis of these phenomena are connected to the cold fronts in the westerlies with lifting of the oceanic systems operated by the Atlas mountains, the variation of a few local meteorological variables contributes to differentiate the developing stage of such systems. A study is proposed in which two heavy rain events over Mediterranean basin are analysed (Laviola et al., 2011). The investigation of cloud and precipitation properties are first assessed using a geostationary multifrequency satellite method for the identification of cloud type, hydrometeor phase, and cloud vertical extension. Then the study is carried out by means of a triple approach: (1) surface rain gauges, (2) satellite data, and (3) numerical model simulations. The satellite retrieval method 183-WSL (Laviola and Levizzani, 2009; 2011) is used to retrieve precipitation amount and classify precipitation type in terms of stratiform and convective rain. Furthermore, starting from two case studies, almost ten years of autumnal rain events over the Mediterranean are studied using a new method to identify the cloud type on the basis of the perturbation of the nominal signal in the microwave due to the presence of clouds. This technique exploits the properties of the three water vapour channels in the band at 183 GHz on board the NOAA-AMSU-B/MHS satellites. Due to the vertical development of the different cloud types, the typical extinction of radiation in clear sky conditions is perturbed as a function of cloud type and cloud top height. Stratified thin clouds, for example, usually impact less over the water vapour channels peaking at lower altitudes and often appear transparent or completely masked by the

  16. Surface vegetative biomass modelling from combined AVHRR and Landsat satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, T. L.; Strahler, A. H.

    1984-01-01

    A methodology for the estimation of regional biomass on the basis of Landsat and Polar Orbiter Satellite Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) imagery has been developed by the present study, which concentrated on the Sierra Nevada-Cascade Mountains ecological province of California. The Landsat data are only used initially, to calibrate the AVHRR-based biomass data. The essential element of the present approach is a 'pixel proportions' model. An integer block of Landsat pixels corresponds to each AVHRR pixel. The Landsat pixels are converted into biomass pixels using species biomass expression equations available in the literature.

  17. Global assessment of ocean carbon export by combining satellite observations and food-web models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, D. A.; Buesseler, K. O.; Doney, S. C.; Sailley, S. F.; Behrenfeld, M. J.; Boyd, P. W.

    2014-03-01

    The export of organic carbon from the surface ocean by sinking particles is an important, yet highly uncertain, component of the global carbon cycle. Here we introduce a mechanistic assessment of the global ocean carbon export using satellite observations, including determinations of net primary production and the slope of the particle size spectrum, to drive a food-web model that estimates the production of sinking zooplankton feces and algal aggregates comprising the sinking particle flux at the base of the euphotic zone. The synthesis of observations and models reveals fundamentally different and ecologically consistent regional-scale patterns in export and export efficiency not found in previous global carbon export assessments. The model reproduces regional-scale particle export field observations and predicts a climatological mean global carbon export from the euphotic zone of 6 Pg C yr-1. Global export estimates show small variation (typically < 10%) to factor of 2 changes in model parameter values. The model is also robust to the choices of the satellite data products used and enables interannual changes to be quantified. The present synthesis of observations and models provides a path for quantifying the ocean's biological pump.

  18. Combined Use of Satellite Timing Information and Rain Gauge Measurements for Enhanced Intensity-Duration-Frequency Curves Estimation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmi, V.; Libertino, A.; Sharma, A.; Claps, P.

    2016-12-01

    We propose a new methodology to overcome the limits of the classical rainfall frequency analysis techniques, based on the assimilation of data from different sources, taking into account the morphoclimatic aspects influencing the genesis of super-events. This method allows one to spatially analyze the local information on super-event hazards by properly accounting for all the available data. To achieve this target, satellite products are used to identify the timing of extreme rainfall and characterize rainfall systems also in areas where ground network is lacking or inefficient.We have developed a framework aimed at combining the local gauge information, discontinuous in space and time and often affected by lack of data, with data from TRMM and GPM satellites and climatic regional information, in order to enhance Intensity-Duration-Frequency curves estimation. This combined approach can complement local information, allowing the simulation of design rainfall extremes in sites where historical evidence of that hazard is lacking. The use of satellite data allows working at the global scale, with a significant positive impact on the flood risk estimation in the poorest regions of the world with lack of in-situ observations.We conduct a preliminary test of the methodology using a comprehensive case study in the North-Westhern Italy. The area is characterized by a complex orography and a significant climatic variability, that have led to the most intense rainfall events that have occurred in Italy. Using a cross-validation framework we can denote a significant improvement in the reliability of the obtained Intensity-Duration-Frequency curves especially for the higher intensities.

  19. Investigation of height combination schemes for sea surface topography determination in the presence of satellite gravimetry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergos, G. S.; Tziavos, I. N.

    2009-04-01

    With the advent of the recent and forthcoming gravity-field dedicated satellite missions the determination of the quasi-stationary part of the sea surface topography (QSST) has gained significant importance for both geodetic and oceanographic applications. The improved accuracy in geoid determination envisaged by these new missions allows for a more rigorous estimation of the QSST and its separation from altimetric observations towards marine geoid and ocean circulation determination. In geodetic applications, the QSST is needed to reduce altimetric observations from the sea surface to the geoid, while in oceanographic research it is used to derive the velocities of geostrophic currents. Optimal height combination employing all available input data with proper variance covariance propagation can lead in an improved estimation of both geoid heights and the QSST. This work focuses on the presentation of a detailed least squares collocation combination scheme for QSST determination, based on available satellite altimetry sea surface heights, shipborne free-air gravity anomalies, GPS ellipsoidal heights, and GOCE-type observables of the potential and its second order derivatives. Analytic equations for the input and output signals auto- and cross-covariance functions are derived while the necessary theoretical background for variance component estimation is outlined as well. Finally, the equations for the output signal estimation are given in detail along with a possible extension of the method to time-dependent oceanographic signals like the time-varying sea surface topography.

  20. Mapping Sub-Antarctic Cushion Plants Using Random Forests to Combine Very High Resolution Satellite Imagery and Terrain Modelling

    PubMed Central

    Bricher, Phillippa K.; Lucieer, Arko; Shaw, Justine; Terauds, Aleks; Bergstrom, Dana M.

    2013-01-01

    Monitoring changes in the distribution and density of plant species often requires accurate and high-resolution baseline maps of those species. Detecting such change at the landscape scale is often problematic, particularly in remote areas. We examine a new technique to improve accuracy and objectivity in mapping vegetation, combining species distribution modelling and satellite image classification on a remote sub-Antarctic island. In this study, we combine spectral data from very high resolution WorldView-2 satellite imagery and terrain variables from a high resolution digital elevation model to improve mapping accuracy, in both pixel- and object-based classifications. Random forest classification was used to explore the effectiveness of these approaches on mapping the distribution of the critically endangered cushion plant Azorellamacquariensis Orchard (Apiaceae) on sub-Antarctic Macquarie Island. Both pixel- and object-based classifications of the distribution of Azorella achieved very high overall validation accuracies (91.6–96.3%, κ = 0.849–0.924). Both two-class and three-class classifications were able to accurately and consistently identify the areas where Azorella was absent, indicating that these maps provide a suitable baseline for monitoring expected change in the distribution of the cushion plants. Detecting such change is critical given the threats this species is currently facing under altering environmental conditions. The method presented here has applications to monitoring a range of species, particularly in remote and isolated environments. PMID:23940805

  1. Mapping sub-antarctic cushion plants using random forests to combine very high resolution satellite imagery and terrain modelling.

    PubMed

    Bricher, Phillippa K; Lucieer, Arko; Shaw, Justine; Terauds, Aleks; Bergstrom, Dana M

    2013-01-01

    Monitoring changes in the distribution and density of plant species often requires accurate and high-resolution baseline maps of those species. Detecting such change at the landscape scale is often problematic, particularly in remote areas. We examine a new technique to improve accuracy and objectivity in mapping vegetation, combining species distribution modelling and satellite image classification on a remote sub-Antarctic island. In this study, we combine spectral data from very high resolution WorldView-2 satellite imagery and terrain variables from a high resolution digital elevation model to improve mapping accuracy, in both pixel- and object-based classifications. Random forest classification was used to explore the effectiveness of these approaches on mapping the distribution of the critically endangered cushion plant Azorella macquariensis Orchard (Apiaceae) on sub-Antarctic Macquarie Island. Both pixel- and object-based classifications of the distribution of Azorella achieved very high overall validation accuracies (91.6-96.3%, κ = 0.849-0.924). Both two-class and three-class classifications were able to accurately and consistently identify the areas where Azorella was absent, indicating that these maps provide a suitable baseline for monitoring expected change in the distribution of the cushion plants. Detecting such change is critical given the threats this species is currently facing under altering environmental conditions. The method presented here has applications to monitoring a range of species, particularly in remote and isolated environments.

  2. Combined evaluation of optical and microwave satellite dataset for soil moisture deficit estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Prashant K.; Han, Dawei; Islam, Tanvir; Singh, Sudhir Kumar; Gupta, Manika; Gupta, Dileep Kumar; Kumar, Pradeep

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture is a key variable responsible for water and energy exchanges from land surface to the atmosphere (Srivastava et al., 2014). On the other hand, Soil Moisture Deficit (or SMD) can help regulating the proper use of water at specified time to avoid any agricultural losses (Srivastava et al., 2013b) and could help in preventing natural disasters, e.g. flood and drought (Srivastava et al., 2013a). In this study, evaluation of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Land Surface Temperature (LST) and soil moisture from Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellites are attempted for prediction of Soil Moisture Deficit (SMD). Sophisticated algorithm like Adaptive Neuro Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) is used for prediction of SMD using the MODIS and SMOS dataset. The benchmark SMD estimated from Probability Distributed Model (PDM) over the Brue catchment, Southwest of England, U.K. is used for all the validation. The performances are assessed in terms of Nash Sutcliffe Efficiency, Root Mean Square Error and the percentage of bias between ANFIS simulated SMD and the benchmark. The performance statistics revealed a good agreement between benchmark and the ANFIS estimated SMD using the MODIS dataset. The assessment of the products with respect to this peculiar evidence is an important step for successful development of hydro-meteorological model and forecasting system. The analysis of the satellite products (viz. SMOS soil moisture and MODIS LST) towards SMD prediction is a crucial step for successful hydrological modelling, agriculture and water resource management, and can provide important assistance in policy and decision making. Keywords: Land Surface Temperature, MODIS, SMOS, Soil Moisture Deficit, Fuzzy Logic System References: Srivastava, P.K., Han, D., Ramirez, M.A., Islam, T., 2013a. Appraisal of SMOS soil moisture at a catchment scale in a temperate maritime climate. Journal of Hydrology 498, 292-304. Srivastava, P.K., Han, D., Rico

  3. Combining In-situ Measurements, Passive Satellite Imagery, and Active Radar Retrievals for the Detection of High Ice Water Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yost, C. R.; Minnis, P.; Bedka, K. M.; Nguyen, L.; Palikonda, R.; Spangenberg, D.; Strapp, J. W.; Delanoë, J.; Protat, A.

    2016-12-01

    At least one hundred jet engine power loss events since the 1990s have been attributed to the phenomenon known as ice crystal icing (ICI). Ingestion of high concentrations of ice particles into aircraft engines is thought to cause these events, but it is clear that the use of current on-board weather radar systems alone is insufficient for detecting conditions that might cause ICI. Passive radiometers in geostationary orbit are valuable for monitoring systems that produce high ice water content (HIWC) and will play an important role in nowcasting, but are incapable of making vertically resolved measurements of ice particle concentration, i.e., ice water content (IWC). Combined radar, lidar, and in-situ measurements are essential for developing a skilled satellite-based HIWC nowcasting technique. The High Altitude Ice Crystals - High Ice Water Content (HAIC-HIWC) field campaigns in Darwin, Australia, and Cayenne, French Guiana, have produced a valuable dataset of in-situ total water content (TWC) measurements with which to study conditions that produce HIWC. The NASA Langley Satellite ClOud and Radiative Property retrieval System (SatCORPS) was used to derive cloud physical and optical properties such cloud top height, temperature, optical depth, and ice water path from multi-spectral satellite imagery acquired throughout the HAIC-HIWC campaigns. These cloud properties were collocated with the in-situ TWC measurements in order to characterize cloud properties in the vicinity of HIWC. Additionally, a database of satellite-derived overshooting cloud top (OT) detections was used to identify TWC measurements in close proximity to convective cores likely producing large concentrations of ice crystals. Certain cloud properties show some sensitivity to increasing TWC and a multivariate probabilistic indicator of HIWC was developed from these datasets. This paper describes the algorithm development and demonstrates the HIWC indicator with imagery from the HAIC

  4. Reduced Toxicity Fuel Satellite Propulsion System Including Axial Thruster and ACS Thruster Combination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A reduced toxicity fuel satellite propulsion system including a reduced toxicity propellant supply for consumption in an axial class thruster and an ACS class thruster. The system includes suitable valves and conduits for supplying the reduced toxicity propellant to the ACS decomposing element of an ACS thruster. The ACS decomposing element is operative to decompose the reduced toxicity propellant into hot propulsive gases. In addition the system includes suitable valves and conduits for supplying the reduced toxicity propellant to an axial decomposing element of the axial thruster. The axial decomposing element is operative to decompose the reduced toxicity propellant into hot gases. The system further includes suitable valves and conduits for supplying a second propellant to a combustion chamber of the axial thruster, whereby the hot gases and the second propellant auto-ignite and begin the combustion process for producing thrust.

  5. Combining satellite and seismic images to analyse the shallow structure of the Dead Sea Transform near the DESERT transect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesten, D.; Weber, M.; Haberland, Ch.; Janssen, Ch.; Agnon, A.; Bartov, Y.; Rabba, I.

    2008-02-01

    The left-lateral Dead Sea Transform (DST) in the Middle East is one of the largest continental strike-slip faults of the world. The southern segment of the DST in the Arava/Araba Valley between the Dead Sea and the Red Sea, called Arava/Araba Fault (AF), has been studied in detail in the multidisciplinary DESERT (DEad SEa Rift Transect) project. Based on these results, here, the interpretations of multi-spectral (ASTER) satellite images and seismic reflection studies have been combined to analyse geologic structures. Whereas satellite images reveal neotectonic activity in shallow young sediments, reflection seismic image deep faults that are possibly inactive at present. The combination of the two methods allows putting some age constraint on the activity of individual fault strands. Although the AF is clearly the main active fault segment of the southern DST, we propose that it has accommodated only a limited (up to 60 km) part of the overall 105 km of sinistral plate motion since Miocene times. There is evidence for sinistral displacement along other faults, based on geological studies, including satellite image interpretation. Furthermore, a subsurface fault is revealed ≈4 km west of the AF on two ≈E-W running seismic reflection profiles. Whereas these seismic data show a flower structure typical for strike-slip faults, on the satellite image this fault is not expressed in the post-Miocene sediments, implying that it has been inactive for the last few million years. About 1 km to the east of the AF another, now buried fault, was detected in seismic, magnetotelluric and gravity studies of DESERT. Taking together various evidences, we suggest that at the beginning of transform motion deformation occurred in a rather wide belt, possibly with the reactivation of older ≈N-S striking structures. Later, deformation became concentrated in the region of today’s Arava Valley. Till ≈5 Ma ago there might have been other, now inactive fault traces in the vicinity

  6. Multiple-Symbol combined differential detection for satellite-based AIS Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Jingsong; Ma, Shexiang; Wang, Junfeng; Meng, Xin

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, a multiple-symbol combined differential Viterbi decoding algorithm which is insensitive to frequency offset is proposed. According to the theories of multiple-symbol differential detection and maximum-likelihood detection, we combine the multiple-order differential information with the Viterbi algorithm. The phase shift caused by the frequency offset is estimated and compensated from the above information in the process of decoding. The simulation results show that the bit error rate (BER) of 2 bits combined differential Viterbi algorithm is below 10-3 when the normalized signal-to-noise ratio (NSNR) is 11 dB, and the decoding performances approach those of the coherent detection as the length of the combined differential symbols increases. The proposed method is simple and its performance remains stable under different frequency offsets.

  7. Constraining methane emissions from the Indo-Gangetic Plains and South Asia using combined surface and satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, A.; Lunt, M. F.; Rigby, M. L.; Chatterjee, A.; Boesch, H.; Parker, R.; Prinn, R. G.; van der Schoot, M. V.; Krummel, P. B.; Tiwari, Y. K.; Mukai, H.; Machida, T.; Terao, Y.; Nomura, S.; Patra, P. K.

    2015-12-01

    We present an analysis of the regional methane (CH4) budget from South Asia, using new measurements and new modelling techniques. South Asia contains some of the largest anthropogenic CH4 sources in the world, mainly from rice agriculture and ruminants. However, emissions from this region have been highly uncertain largely due to insufficient constraints from atmospheric measurements. Compared to parts of the developed world, which have well-developed monitoring networks, South Asia is very under-sampled, particularly given its importance to the global CH4 budget. Over the past few years, data have been collected from a variety of surface sites around the region, ranging from in situ to flask-based sampling. We have used these data, in conjunction with column methane data from the GOSAT satellite, to quantify emissions at a regional scale. Using the Met Office's Lagrangian NAME model, we calculated sensitivities to surface fluxes at 12 km resolution, allowing us to simulate the high-resolution impacts of emissions on concentrations. In addition, we used a newly developed hierarchical Bayesian inverse estimation scheme to estimate regional fluxes over the period of 2012-2014 in addition to ancillary "hyper-parameters" that characterize uncertainties in the system. Through this novel approach, we have characterized the effect of "aggregation" errors, model uncertainties as well as the effects of correlated errors when using regional measurement networks. We have also assessed the effects of biases on the GOSAT CH4 retrievals, which has been made possible for the first time for this region through the expanded surface measurements. In this talk, we will discuss a) regional CH4 fluxes from South Asia, with a particular focus on the densely populated Indo-Gangetic Plains b) derived model uncertainties, including the effects of correlated errors c) the impacts of combining surface and satellite data for emissions estimation in regions where poor satellite validation

  8. Comprehensive Spectral Signal Investigation of a Larch Forest Combining - and Satellite-Based Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landmann, J. M.; Rutzinger, M.; Bremer, M.; chmidtner, K.

    2016-06-01

    Collecting comprehensive knowledge about spectral signals in areas composed by complex structured objects is a challenging task in remote sensing. In the case of vegetation, shadow effects on reflectance are especially difficult to determine. This work analyzes a larch forest stand (Larix decidua MILL.) in Pinnis Valley (Tyrol, Austria). The main goal is extracting the larch spectral signal on Landsat 8 (LS8) Operational Land Imager (OLI) images using ground measurements with the Cropscan Multispectral Radiometer with five bands (MSR5) simultaneously to satellite overpasses in summer 2015. First, the relationship between field spectrometer and OLI data on a cultivated grassland area next to the forest stand is investigated. Median ground measurements for each of the grassland parcels serve for calculation of the mean difference between the two sensors. Differences are used as "bias correction" for field spectrometer values. In the main step, spectral unmixing of the OLI images is applied to the larch forest, specifying the larch tree spectral signal based on corrected field spectrometer measurements of the larch understory. In order to determine larch tree and shadow fractions on OLI pixels, a representative 3D tree shape is used to construct a digital forest. Benefits of this approach are the computational savings compared to a radiative transfer modeling. Remaining shortcomings are the limited capability to consider exact tree shapes and nonlinear processes. Different methods to implement shadows are tested and spectral vegetation indices like the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Greenness Index (GI) can be computed even without considering shadows.

  9. Spectral assessment of isostatic gravity models against CHAMP, GRACE, GOCE satellite-only and combined gravity models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoulis, Dimitrios; Patlakis, Konstantinos

    2014-08-01

    The availability of digital elevation databases representing the topographic and bathymetric relief with global homogeneous coverage and increasing resolution permits the computation of crust-related Earth gravity models, the so-called topographic/isostatic Earth gravity models (henceforth T/I models). Although expressing the spherical harmonic content of the topographic masses, the interpretation purpose of T/I models has not been given the attention it deserves, apart from the fact that they express some degree of compensation to the observed spectrum of the topographic heights, depending on the kind of the applied compensation mechanism. The present contribution attempts to improve the interpretation aspects of T/I Earth gravity models. To this end, a rigorous spectral assessment is performed to a standard Airy/Heiskanen T/I model against different CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP), Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), Gravity field and steadystate Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite-only, and combined gravity models. Different correlation bandwidths emerge for these four groups of satellite-based gravity models. The band-limited forward computation of the models using these bandwidths reproduces nicely the main features of the applied T/I model.

  10. Combining Satellite Data, Trajectory Modeling and Surface Insolation Measurements to Deduce the Direct Radiative Effect of Smoke Aerosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stackhouse, Paul W., Jr.; Pierce, R. Bradley; Baum, Bryan A.; DiPasquale, Robert C.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we have introduced a method of inferring the radiative effect of smoke aerosols using a technique that combines satellite remote sensing with trajectory modeling. The results shown here clearly show large flux biases between theoretical and measured radiative fluxes correlate with the arrival of smoke aerosol to the area. Further analysis is required to convincingly demonstrate that the reason for these differences is the radiative effect of the smoke aerosols. To do this, the estimated fluxes taken from the ERA-15 will be recomputed every 3 hours using International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) data set entitled DX gridded to a 1o equal angle resolution (see paper 7B.2 for details). Surface radiometric and ancillary data for several more Canadian surface sites are being obtained at minute temporal resolution. The ultimate purpose of this research is to derive aerosol smoke maps for fire events such as this to be included in an aerosol climatology and be incorporated in the computation of the earth's surface radiation budget to better understand the radiative effect of aerosols.

  11. Addressing challenges in combining GOES and LEO satellite products of the CONUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, R. A.; Dworak, R.

    2012-12-01

    The challenges of transforming data from the next generation of satellites into information and products for the weather and science purposes presents a major challenge to both the research and applications communities. This will be especially difficult over land, where the process of integrating observations from multiple instruments and platforms in real time is complicated by the influence of the land surface on the observations themselves. In addition, effective merging of the mixture of time-continuous GEO and less frequent but higher spectral resolution LEO observations with other new surface-based observations will be essential and require new product processing strategies. The material shown in this presentation will begin to address some of these issues. It will describe results of efforts to inter-calibrate moisture products derived from existing GEO and LEO data sets over land designed 1) to identify and remove biases from the GOES moisture retrievals, 2) to determine the seasonally varying information content of the GOES relative to NWP model 'first guess' fields, 3) to determine the similarities and differences in error structures between GOES and AIRS retrievals, and 4) to determine the vertical structure of the errors in both systems. For example, comparisons have been made between GOES Total Precipitable Water (TPW) using the Li retrieval system (GOES-Li) and data from Raman Lidar (RL), Microwave Radiometer (MWR) and surface-based GPS-Met systems at the ARM CART site. The test showed for using one year of derived TPW products, the NWP model first guess (GFS) and GOES-Li products are wetter, however the GOES-Li beats the GFS in the warm season, especially in August when the NWP precipitation skill is least. During the warm season GOES-Li is noticeably better than GFS (which was too wet) during daytime. In addition, the GPS-Met data are best during the daytime, while the Ramon Lidar performs best at night. AIRS products were also evaluated for several

  12. Development of a Biomass Burning Emissions Inventory by Combining Satellite and Ground-based Information

    EPA Science Inventory

    A 2005 biomass burning (wildfire, prescribed, and agricultural) emission inventory has been developed for the contiguous United States using a newly developed simplified method of combining information from multiple sources for use in the US EPA’s national Emission Inventory (NEI...

  13. Development of a Biomass Burning Emissions Inventory by Combining Satellite and Ground-based Information

    EPA Science Inventory

    A 2005 biomass burning (wildfire, prescribed, and agricultural) emission inventory has been developed for the contiguous United States using a newly developed simplified method of combining information from multiple sources for use in the US EPA’s national Emission Inventory (NEI...

  14. Combined system for the compensation of the solar pressure-induced disturbing torque for geostationary satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmatov, S. I.; Mordvinkin, A. S.

    2014-12-01

    The problem is considered of determining the shape and dimensions of the passive component in a combined system for offsetting the solar pressure-induced disturbing torque for geostationary spacecraft with asymmetrical solar arrays. The problem statement, numerical solution algorithm, and calculated results are presented. The resulting shape, the study suggests, not only has the required compensation properties but is also the most efficient from the standpoint of manufacture and functional reliability.

  15. Global precipitation estimates based on a technique for combining satellite-based estimates, rain gauge analysis, and NWP model precipitation information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffman, George J.; Adler, Robert F.; Rudolf, Bruno; Schneider, Udo; Keehn, Peter R.

    1995-01-01

    The 'satellite-gauge model' (SGM) technique is described for combining precipitation estimates from microwave satellite data, infrared satellite data, rain gauge analyses, and numerical weather prediction models into improved estimates of global precipitation. Throughout, monthly estimates on a 2.5 degrees x 2.5 degrees lat-long grid are employed. First, a multisatellite product is developed using a combination of low-orbit microwave and geosynchronous-orbit infrared data in the latitude range 40 degrees N - 40 degrees S (the adjusted geosynchronous precipitation index) and low-orbit microwave data alone at higher latitudes. Then the rain gauge analysis is brougth in, weighting each field by its inverse relative error variance to produce a nearly global, observationally based precipitation estimate. To produce a complete global estimate, the numerical model results are used to fill data voids in the combined satellite-gauge estimate. Our sequential approach to combining estimates allows a user to select the multisatellite estimate, the satellite-gauge estimate, or the full SGM estimate (observationally based estimates plus the model information). The primary limitation in the method is imperfections in the estimation of relative error for the individual fields. The SGM results for one year of data (July 1987 to June 1988) show important differences from the individual estimates, including model estimates as well as climatological estimates. In general, the SGM results are drier in the subtropics than the model and climatological results, reflecting the relatively dry microwave estimates that dominate the SGM in oceanic regions.

  16. Global precipitation estimates based on a technique for combining satellite-based estimates, rain gauge analysis, and NWP model precipitation information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffman, George J.; Adler, Robert F.; Rudolf, Bruno; Schneider, Udo; Keehn, Peter R.

    1995-01-01

    The 'satellite-gauge model' (SGM) technique is described for combining precipitation estimates from microwave satellite data, infrared satellite data, rain gauge analyses, and numerical weather prediction models into improved estimates of global precipitation. Throughout, monthly estimates on a 2.5 degrees x 2.5 degrees lat-long grid are employed. First, a multisatellite product is developed using a combination of low-orbit microwave and geosynchronous-orbit infrared data in the latitude range 40 degrees N - 40 degrees S (the adjusted geosynchronous precipitation index) and low-orbit microwave data alone at higher latitudes. Then the rain gauge analysis is brougth in, weighting each field by its inverse relative error variance to produce a nearly global, observationally based precipitation estimate. To produce a complete global estimate, the numerical model results are used to fill data voids in the combined satellite-gauge estimate. Our sequential approach to combining estimates allows a user to select the multisatellite estimate, the satellite-gauge estimate, or the full SGM estimate (observationally based estimates plus the model information). The primary limitation in the method is imperfections in the estimation of relative error for the individual fields. The SGM results for one year of data (July 1987 to June 1988) show important differences from the individual estimates, including model estimates as well as climatological estimates. In general, the SGM results are drier in the subtropics than the model and climatological results, reflecting the relatively dry microwave estimates that dominate the SGM in oceanic regions.

  17. Improving Global Surface Mass Variation Estimates With Multi-Satellite Data Combination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, X.; Blom, R. G.; Dong, D.; Ivins, E. R.; Owen, S. E.; Oyafuso, F. A.

    2006-05-01

    The GRACE gravity mission is an important milestone toward global high resolution and accurate monitoring of surface mass variations. The spherical harmonic spectra of the variations, however, are not complete without the degree-1 (or equivalently geocenter motion) terms. Also, SLR geocenter motion solutions severely under- sample the center-of-figure of the solid Earth surface due to its small tracking network. To validate and complement gravity data, we compare and combine them with GPS crustal deformation measurements and a TOPEX/JASON data-assimilated ocean bottom pressure (OBP) model to solve for surface mass variations up to degree and order 50, with reduced aid of a priori information. The solutions include geocenter motion estimates with < 0.5 mm annual precision. To further reduce a priori model dependency and improve surface mass variation accuracy, the supplemented GRACE data (plus degree-1 terms) are combined with OBP and GPS data without a priori model. The resulting average oceanic and Antarctic mass variation estimates show nearly a factor of 2 improvements over those derived from the supplemented GRACE solution alone.

  18. On the combined use of high temporal resolution, optical satellite data for flood monitoring and mapping: a possible contribution from the RST approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faruolo, M.; Coviello, I.; Lacava, T.; Pergola, N.; Tramutoli, V.

    2009-04-01

    Among natural disasters, floods are ones of those more common and devastating, often causing high environmental, economical and social costs. When a flooding event occurs, timely information about precise location, extent, dynamic evolution, etc., is highly required in order to effectively support civil protection activities aimed at managing the emergency. Satellite remote sensing may represent a supplementary information source, providing mapping and continuous monitoring of flooding extent as well as a quick damage assessment. Such purposes need frequently updated satellite images as well as suitable image processing techniques, able to identify flooded areas with reliability and timeliness. Recently, an innovative satellite data analysis approach (named RST, Robust Satellite Technique) has been applied to NOAA-AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) satellite data in order to dynamically map flooded areas. Thanks to a multi-temporal analysis of co-located satellite records and an automatic change detection scheme, such an approach allows to overcome major drawbacks related to the previously proposed methods (mostly not automatic and based on empirically chosen thresholds, often affected by false identifications). In this paper, RST approach has been for the first time applied to both AVHRR and EOS/MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) data, in order to assess its potential - in flooded area mapping and monitoring - on different satellite packages characterized by different spectral and spatial resolutions. As a study case, the flooding event which hit the Europe in August 2002 has been selected. Preliminary results shown in this study seem to confirm the potential of such an approach in providing reliable and timely information, useful for near real time flood hazard assessment and monitoring, using both MODIS and AVHRR data. Moreover, the combined use of information coming from both satellite packages (easily achievable thanks to the

  19. Global All-sky Shortwave Direct Radiative Forcing of Anthropogenic Aerosols from Combined Satellite Observations and GOCART Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, W.; Loeb, N. G.; Schuster, G. L.; Chin, M.; Rose, F. G.

    2013-05-01

    Estimation of aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF) from satellite measurements is challenging because current satellite sensors do not have the capability of discriminating between anthropogenic and natural aerosols. We combine 3-hourly cloud properties from satellite retrievals with two aerosol data sets to calculate the all-sky aerosol direct radiative effect (DRE), which is the mean radiative perturbation due to the presence of both natural and anthropogenic aerosols. The first aerosol data set is based upon MODIS and MATCH assimilation model and is largely constrained by MODIS aerosol optical depth, but it does not distinguish between anthropogenic and natural aerosols. The other aerosol data set is based upon the GOCART model, which does not assimilate aerosol observations but predicts the anthropogenic and natural components of aerosols. Thus, we can calculate the aerosol DRF using GOCART classifications of anthropogenic and natural aerosols and the ratio of DRF to DRE. We then apply this ratio to DRE calculated using MODIS/MATCH aerosols to partition it into DRF (MODIS/MATCH DRF), by assuming that the anthropogenic fractions from GOCART are representative. The global (60oN ˜60oS) mean all-sky MODIS/MATCH DRF is -0.51 Wm-2 at the TOA, 2.51 Wm-2 within the atmosphere, and -3.02 Wm-2 at the surface. The GOCART all-sky DRF is -0.17 Wm-2 at the TOA, 2.02 Wm-2 within the atmosphere, and -2.19 Wm-2 at the surface. The differences between MODIS/MATCH DRF and GOCART DRF are solely due to the differences in aerosol properties, since both computations use the same cloud properties and surface albedo, and the same proportion of anthropogenic contributions to aerosol DRE. Aerosol optical depths simulated by the GOCART model are smaller than those in MODIS/MATCH, and aerosols in the GOCART model are more absorbing than those in MODIS/MATCH. Large difference in all-sky TOA DRF from these two aerosol data sets highlights the complexity in determining the all-sky DRF

  20. Global all-sky shortwave direct radiative forcing of anthropogenic aerosols from combined satellite observations and GOCART simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Wenying; Loeb, Norman G.; Schuster, Gregory L.; Chin, Mian; Rose, Fred G.

    2013-01-01

    Estimation of aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF) from satellite measurements is challenging because current satellite sensors do not have the capability of discriminating between anthropogenic and natural aerosols. We combine 3-hourly cloud properties from satellite retrievals with two aerosol data sets to calculate the all-sky aerosol direct radiative effect (DRE), which is the mean radiative perturbation due to the presence of both natural and anthropogenic aerosols. The first aerosol data set is based upon Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Model for Atmospheric Transport and Chemistry (MATCH) assimilation model and is largely constrained by MODIS aerosol optical depth, but it does not distinguish between anthropogenic and natural aerosols. The other aerosol data set is based upon the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model, which does not assimilate aerosol observations but predicts the anthropogenic and natural components of aerosols. Thus, we can calculate the aerosol DRF using GOCART classifications of anthropogenic and natural aerosols and the ratio of DRF to DRE. We then apply this ratio to DRE calculated using MODIS/MATCH aerosols to partition it into DRF (MODIS/MATCH DRF) by assuming that the anthropogenic fractions from GOCART are representative. The global (60°N~60°S) mean all-sky MODIS/MATCH DRF is -0.51 Wm-2 at the top of the atmosphere (TOA), 2.51 Wm-2 within the atmosphere, and -3.02 Wm-2 at the surface. The GOCART all-sky DRF is -0.17 Wm-2 at the TOA, 2.02 Wm-2 within the atmosphere, and -2.19 Wm-2 at the surface. The differences between MODIS/MATCH DRF and GOCART DRF are solely due to the differences in aerosol properties, since both computations use the same cloud properties and surface albedo and the same proportion of anthropogenic contributions to aerosol DRE. Aerosol optical depths simulated by the GOCART model are smaller than those in MODIS/MATCH, and aerosols in the GOCART model are

  1. An upper tropospheric and stratospheric water vapor data set produced by combining records from multiple satellite platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenlof, K. H.; Davis, S. M.; Anderson, J.; Hurst, D. F.; Oltmans, S. J.

    2010-12-01

    Vertical profiles of humidity from the upper troposphere to stratosphere have been retrieved from several different limb sounding and solar occultation satellite instruments since the 1980’s. Instruments retrieving water vapor include the SAGE and POAM instruments, UARS MLS, UARS HALOE, and more recently, ACE-FTS and Aura MLS. Here, we present ongoing work aimed at combining these measurements into a geographically gridded data set that can be used for quantifying variability and long-term changes in water vapor, and also for assessing the radiative impact of changes in upper tropospheric and stratospheric humidity. At the present time, we have combined the newest V20 HALOE retrieval and the MLS version 2 retrieval and have compared tropical water with that inferred from the newest NCEP reanalysis, the Climate Forecast System Reanalysis. Results from that comparison, comparisons with the Boulder water vapor sonde data set, and discussion of the radiative and climate impact of trends and decadal variability in UTLS water vapor will be presented.

  2. Combining Satellite Altimetry, Tide Gauge Observations and an Oceanographic Model to Derive the Baltic Sea Mean Sea Surface Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novotny, K.; Liebsch, G.; Lehmann, A.; Dietrich, R.

    2006-07-01

    Sea-level variability the Baltic Sea is dominated by meteorologically forced fluctuations with large seasonal and interannual variations. In addition to the observations of satellite altimeters, a high-resolution oceanographic model of the Baltic Sea provides sea level heights that largely reflect the high-frequency sea surface variations. This different information can be combined in such a way that the variance of the altimetric sea level heights can be substantially reduced. The resulting reduced altim eter time series form the basis for the estimation of mean sea surface heights. The application of a geoid model yields the mean sea surface topography (MSSTop). A high spatial resolution of the resulting MSSTop is achieved by the combination of different altimetric missions. Observations of ERS-2 and GFO are tied to the observations of TOPEX by minimizing the crossover point differences. This also provides information about the relative biases between the different altimeter missions. The final MSSTop can be estimated with an accuracy of 3 to 5 cm.

  3. Global aerosol typing from a combination of A-Train satellite observations in clear-sky and above clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacenelenbogen, M. S.; Russell, P. B.; Vaughan, M.; Redemann, J.; Shinozuka, Y.; Livingston, J. M.; Zhang, Q.

    2014-12-01

    According to the 5th Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the model estimates of Radiative Forcing due to aerosol-radiation interactions (RFari) for individual aerosol types are less certain than the total RFari [Boucher et al., 2013]. For example, the RFari specific to Black Carbon (BC) is uncertain due to an underestimation of its mass concentration near source regions [Koch et al., 2009]. Several recent studies have evaluated chemical transport model (CTM) predictions using observations of aerosol optical properties such as Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) or Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) from satellite or ground-based instruments (e.g., Huneeus et al., [2010]). However, most passive remote sensing instruments fail to provide a comprehensive assessment of the particle type without further analysis and combination of measurements. To improve the predictions of aerosol composition in CTMs, we have developed an aerosol classification algorithm (called Specified Clustering and Mahalanobis Classification, SCMC) that assigns an aerosol type to multi-parameter retrievals by spaceborne, airborne or ground based passive remote sensing instruments [Russell et al., 2014]. The aerosol types identified by our scheme are pure dust, polluted dust, urban-industrial/developed economy, urban-industrial/developing economy, dark biomass smoke, light biomass smoke and pure marine. First, we apply the SCMC method to five years of clear-sky space-borne POLDER observations over Greece. We then use the aerosol extinction and SSA spectra retrieved from a combination of MODIS, OMI and CALIOP clear-sky observations to infer the aerosol type over the globe in 2007. Finally, we will extend the spaceborne aerosol classification from clear-sky to above low opaque water clouds using a combination of CALIOP AOD and backscatter observations and OMI absorption AOD values from near-by clear-sky pixels.

  4. The efficacy of combining satellite water storage and soil moisture observations as constraints on water balance estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Siyuan; van Dijk, Albert; Renzullo, Luigi; Tregoning, Paul; Walker, Jeffrey; Pauwels, Valentijn

    2016-04-01

    The ability to accurately estimate terrestrial water storage (TWS) and its components (e.g. soil moisture, groundwater, surface water and snow) is of considerable value to water resources assessment. Due to the imperfection of both model predictions and observations, data assimilation methods have been widely applied to hydrological problems for optimal combination of model and observations. Recent studies on the assimilation of TWS data have shown its capability to improve simulated groundwater storages, but the assimilation of TWS only does not guarantee accurate estimation of surface soil moisture (SSM). We investigated the efficiency of data assimilation combining TWS change estimates, derived from temporal changes in Earth's gravity field measured by the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), with SSM, retrieved from emitted microwave radiation at L-band observed by the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite. The global World Wide Water (W3) water balance model was used. The specific satellite data products used were the SMOS CATDS level 3 daily SSM product and the JPL mascon monthly GRACE product. Both the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) and smoother (EnKS) were implemented to determine the best option for the assimilation of SSM observations only and the joint assimilation of SSM and TWS. The observation models, which map model states into observation space, are the top-layer soil relative wetness and monthly average TWS (i.e. aggregated daily top-, shallow-, deep-layer soil water storage, ground- and surface water storages). Three assimilation experiments were conducted with each method: a) assimilation of SSM data only; b) assimilation of TWS data only; c) joint assimilation of SSM and TWS data. Results were compared against in-situ soil moisture and groundwater observations, and the performance assessed with respect to open-loop results. Results for the Murray-Darling Basin in Australia demonstrate that the assimilation of SSM data only

  5. Aerosol Impacts on Cirrus Clouds and High-Power Laser Transmission: A Combined Satellite Observation and Modeling Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-22

    satellite data to understand the relationship between dust and cirrus in specific regions, an uncharted research area in the atmospheric sciences...are our specific accomplishments. Satellite data analysis to investigation dust -cirrus interaction We conducted a study of the aerosol indirect effect...satellites. We examined MODIS data covering regions of frequent dust outbreaks in East Asia, Middle East, and West Africa, and identified a number of

  6. Combining Meteosat-10 satellite image data with GPS tropospheric path delays to estimate regional integrated water vapor (IWV) distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leontiev, Anton; Reuveni, Yuval

    2017-02-01

    Using GPS satellites signals, we can study different processes and coupling mechanisms that can help us understand the physical conditions in the lower atmosphere, which might lead or act as proxies for severe weather events such as extreme storms and flooding. GPS signals received by ground stations are multi-purpose and can also provide estimates of tropospheric zenith delays, which can be converted into accurate integrated water vapor (IWV) observations using collocated pressure and temperature measurements on the ground. Here, we present for the first time the use of Israel's dense regional GPS network for extracting tropospheric zenith path delays combined with near-real-time Meteosat-10 water vapor (WV) and surface temperature pixel intensity values (7.3 and 10.8 µm channels, respectively) in order to assess whether it is possible to obtain absolute IWV (kg m-2) distribution. The results show good agreement between the absolute values obtained from our triangulation strategy based solely on GPS zenith total delays (ZTD) and Meteosat-10 surface temperature data compared with available radiosonde IWV absolute values. The presented strategy can provide high temporal and special IWV resolution, which is needed as part of the accurate and comprehensive observation data integrated in modern data assimilation systems and is required for increasing the accuracy of regional numerical weather prediction systems forecast.

  7. Combining Ground-based and Satellite Observations to Reconstruct Changes in the Functioning of the Terrestrial Biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, P. M.; Groenendijk, M.

    2014-12-01

    Vegetation links the planet's water and carbon cycles. Stomata on plant leaves are the pores through which CO2 is fixed during photosynthesis, and also the pores through which water is returned to the atmosphere as the transpiration flux. Stomata therefore exert considerable control over both the water and carbon cycles. Unfortunately, the long-term responses of stomata to rising CO2 and changes in climate are still rather uncertain, despite their significance for future climate. In contrast, Plant Water Use Efficiency (WUE) which is the ratio of the carbon assimilated through photosynthesis to the water lost through transpiration, is a robust diagnostic of the functioning of the land biosphere that is not directly dependent on the uncertain long-term responses of stomata. We have recently shown that it is possible to get constrained estimates of fractional changes in WUE based purely on changes in atmospheric CO2 and near surface temperature and humidity. This is achieved by calibrating against eddy covariance flux measurements (that constrain the response of WUE to humidity deficit), and also d13C records from tree-rings (that constrain the CO2-sensitivity of WUE). This talk will show how these ground-based measurements imply very significant changes in WUE, both globally and regionally, from 1900 onwards. Furthermore, we will show how the combination of our reconstructed changes in WUE with satellite-based estimates of Gross Primary Productivity, enable recent changes in plant transpiration to be estimated.

  8. IMPROVING THE ACCURACY OF HISTORIC SATELLITE IMAGE CLASSIFICATION BY COMBINING LOW-RESOLUTION MULTISPECTRAL DATA WITH HIGH-RESOLUTION PANCHROMATIC DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Getman, Daniel J

    2008-01-01

    Many attempts to observe changes in terrestrial systems over time would be significantly enhanced if it were possible to improve the accuracy of classifications of low-resolution historic satellite data. In an effort to examine improving the accuracy of historic satellite image classification by combining satellite and air photo data, two experiments were undertaken in which low-resolution multispectral data and high-resolution panchromatic data were combined and then classified using the ECHO spectral-spatial image classification algorithm and the Maximum Likelihood technique. The multispectral data consisted of 6 multispectral channels (30-meter pixel resolution) from Landsat 7. These data were augmented with panchromatic data (15m pixel resolution) from Landsat 7 in the first experiment, and with a mosaic of digital aerial photography (1m pixel resolution) in the second. The addition of the Landsat 7 panchromatic data provided a significant improvement in the accuracy of classifications made using the ECHO algorithm. Although the inclusion of aerial photography provided an improvement in accuracy, this improvement was only statistically significant at a 40-60% level. These results suggest that once error levels associated with combining aerial photography and multispectral satellite data are reduced, this approach has the potential to significantly enhance the precision and accuracy of classifications made using historic remotely sensed data, as a way to extend the time range of efforts to track temporal changes in terrestrial systems.

  9. Global Electric Circuit Implications of Combined Aircraft Storm Electric Current Measurements and Satellite-Based Diurnal Lightning Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mach, D. M.; Blakeslee, R.; Bateman, M. G.

    2010-12-01

    Using rotating vane electric field mills and Gerdien capacitors, we measured the electric field profile and conductivity during 850 overflights of thunderstorms and electrified shower clouds (ESCs) spanning regions including the Southeastern United States, the Western Atlantic Ocean, the Gulf of Mexico, Central America and adjacent oceans, Central Brazil, and the South Pacific. The overflights include storms over land and ocean, and with positive and negative fields above the storms. Over three-quarters (78%) of the land storms had detectable lightning, while less than half (43%) of the oceanic storms had lightning. Integrating our electric field and conductivity data, we determined total conduction currents and flash rates for each overpass. With knowledge of the storm location (land or ocean) and type (with or without lightning), we determine the mean currents by location and type. The mean current for ocean thunderstorms is 1.7 A while the mean current for land thunderstorms is 1.0 A. The mean current for ocean ESCs 0.41 A and the mean current for land ESCs is 0.13 A. We did not find any significant regional or latitudinal based patterns in our total conduction currents. By combining the aircraft derived storm currents and flash rates with diurnal flash rate statistics derived from the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) and Optical Transient Detector (OTD) low Earth orbiting satellites, we reproduce the diurnal variation in the global electric circuit (i.e., the Carnegie curve) to within 4% for all but two short periods of time. The agreement with the Carnegie curve was obtained without any tuning or adjustment of the satellite or aircraft data. Given our data and assumptions, mean contributions to the global electric circuit are 1.1 kA (land) and 0.7 kA (ocean) from thunderstorms, and 0.22 kA (ocean) and 0.04 (land) from ESCs, resulting in a mean total conduction current estimate for the global electric circuit of 2.0 kA. Mean storm counts are 1100 for land

  10. Global Electric Circuit Implications of Combined Aircraft Storm Electric Current Measurements and Satellite-Based Diurnal Lightning Statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mach, Douglas M.; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Bateman, Monte G.

    2011-01-01

    Using rotating vane electric field mills and Gerdien capacitors, we measured the electric field profile and conductivity during 850 overflights of thunderstorms and electrified shower clouds (ESCs) spanning regions including the Southeastern United States, the Western Atlantic Ocean, the Gulf of Mexico, Central America and adjacent oceans, Central Brazil, and the South Pacific. The overflights include storms over land and ocean, and with positive and negative fields above the storms. Over three-quarters (78%) of the land storms had detectable lightning, while less than half (43%) of the oceanic storms had lightning. Integrating our electric field and conductivity data, we determined total conduction currents and flash rates for each overpass. With knowledge of the storm location (land or ocean) and type (with or without lightning), we determine the mean currents by location and type. The mean current for ocean thunderstorms is 1.7 A while the mean current for land thunderstorms is 1.0 A. The mean current for ocean ESCs 0.41 A and the mean current for land ESCs is 0.13 A. We did not find any significant regional or latitudinal based patterns in our total conduction currents. By combining the aircraft derived storm currents and flash rates with diurnal flash rate statistics derived from the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) and Optical Transient Detector (OTD) low Earth orbiting satellites, we reproduce the diurnal variation in the global electric circuit (i.e., the Carnegie curve) to within 4% for all but two short periods of time. The agreement with the Carnegie curve was obtained without any tuning or adjustment of the satellite or aircraft data. Given our data and assumptions, mean contributions to the global electric circuit are 1.1 kA (land) and 0.7 kA (ocean) from thunderstorms, and 0.22 kA (ocean) and 0.04 (land) from ESCs, resulting in a mean total conduction current estimate for the global electric circuit of 2.0 kA. Mean storm counts are 1100 for land

  11. The homogeneous/ Heterogeneous data weighting method of LEO combined orbit determination based on BI-satellite positioning system with its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, D. Y.; Pan, X. G.; Wang, J. Q.; Wang, Z. M.

    2008-01-01

    Aiming at combined orbit determination (COD) multi-source data fusion for low earth orbit (LEO) based on bi-satellite positioning system (BPS), an improved variance component estimation (VCE) optimal weighting method of homogeneous data is established with two-step system errors correction. And then an integrated optimal weighting method based on model structure characteristics analysis and VCE estimation of heterogeneous data is put forward by analyzing the essence of multi-source fusion measure model which is a multi-structural, multi-parametric, non-linear regression model. Then the algorithm of optimal weighting and COD parameters estimation is designed, and two kinds of COD simulation experiments are carried out by processing homogeneous data of bi-satellite range sum and its back-up satellite data, heterogeneous data of bi-satellite range sum data and star sensor angle data. Theoretical analysis and simulation computations show that improved VCE method based on two-step system errors correction can gain higher precision than that of traditional experience weighting method for COD of homogeneous data weighting. At the same time, by introducing weighting factor which denotes model structure characteristics and proves the designed optimal weighting algorithm, the amelioration of COD precision of LEO and bi-satellite gain to some extent is feasible from practical application.

  12. A practical small satellite variable-speed control moment gyroscope for combined energy storage and attitude control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richie, David J.; Lappas, Vaios J.; Prassinos, George

    2009-12-01

    A recent effort to develop single-gimbal variable-speed control moment gyroscopes (VSCMGs) for a combined energy storage and attitude control subsystem (ESACS) on small satellites has culminated in laboratory validation of the concept. A single actuator prototype comprised of a cutting-edge Carbon Fiber rotor and COTS motor/generator components has been developed, balanced, bench tested, and integrated onto a spherical air-bearing structure. This structure is used to demonstrate the primary capability of a VSCMG to act as a dynamo whilst simultaneously changing a spacecraft's orientation in a controlled fashion. As originally predicted, the actuator's flywheel spins up when energy is supplied (supported via a direct energy transfer power architecture), then spins down when the energy source is removed, porting the energy released to run a resistive load. The work presented gives an overview of the governing principles of the technology, addresses the underlying mission and design requirements, and presents the prototype design. Then, effectiveness of the prototype integrated on a three-axis test article is presented along with its associated test data. Finally, discussion of these results and identification of future research concludes the work. The benefits of this technology for future space missions are that system consolidation permits mass reduction, higher instantaneous peak power is available as compared to conventional secondary battery systems, state-of-charge measurement is readily available from wheel speed feedback, and torque amplification through gimballing permits efficient actuator control. The technology demonstrated is exciting and leaves the door open for future development via inclusion of magnetic levitation.

  13. Mineral dust impact on snow radiative properties in the European Alps combining ground, UAV, and satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Mauro, B.; Fava, F.; Ferrero, L.; Garzonio, R.; Baccolo, G.; Delmonte, B.; Colombo, R.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we evaluate the impact of mineral dust (MD) on snow radiative properties in the European Alps at ground, aerial, and satellite scale. A field survey was conducted to acquire snow spectral reflectance measurements with an Analytical Spectral Device (ASD) Field Spec Pro spectroradiometer. Surface snow samples were analyzed to determine the concentration and size distribution of MD in each sample. An overflight of a four-rotor Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) equipped with an RGB digital camera sensor was carried out during the field operations. Finally, Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) data covering the central European Alps were analyzed. Observed reflectance evidenced that MD strongly reduced the spectral reflectance of snow, in particular, from 350 to 600 nm. Reflectance was compared with that simulated by parameterizing the Snow, Ice, and Aerosol Radiation radiative transfer model. We defined a novel spectral index, the Snow Darkening Index (SDI), that combines different wavelengths showing nonlinear correlation with measured MD concentrations (R2 = 0.87, root-mean-square error = 0.037). We also estimated a positive instantaneous radiative forcing that reaches values up to 153 W/m2 for the most concentrated sampling area. SDI maps at local scale were produced using the UAV data, while regional SDI maps were generated with OLI data. These maps show the spatial distribution of MD in snow after a natural deposition from the Saharan desert. Such postdepositional experimental data are fundamental for validating radiative transfer models and global climate models that simulate the impact of MD on snow radiative properties.

  14. AN ACTIVE-PASSIVE COMBINED ALGORITHM FOR HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION RETRIEVAL OF SOIL MOISTURE FROM SATELLITE SENSORS (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmi, V.; Mladenova, I. E.; Narayan, U.

    2009-12-01

    Soil moisture is known to be an essential factor in controlling the partitioning of rainfall into surface runoff and infiltration and solar energy into latent and sensible heat fluxes. Remote sensing has long proven its capability to obtain soil moisture in near real-time. However, at the present time we have the Advanced Scanning Microwave Radiometer (AMSR-E) on board NASA’s AQUA platform is the only satellite sensor that supplies a soil moisture product. AMSR-E coarse spatial resolution (~ 50 km at 6.9 GHz) strongly limits its applicability for small scale studies. A very promising technique for spatial disaggregation by combining radar and radiometer observations has been demonstrated by the authors using a methodology is based on the assumption that any change in measured brightness temperature and backscatter from one to the next time step is due primarily to change in soil wetness. The approach uses radiometric estimates of soil moisture at a lower resolution to compute the sensitivity of radar to soil moisture at the lower resolution. This estimate of sensitivity is then disaggregated using vegetation water content, vegetation type and soil texture information, which are the variables on which determine the radar sensitivity to soil moisture and are generally available at a scale of radar observation. This change detection algorithm is applied to several locations. We have used aircraft observed active and passive data over Walnut Creek watershed in Central Iowa in 2002; the Little Washita Watershed in Oklahoma in 2003 and the Murrumbidgee Catchment in southeastern Australia for 2006. All of these locations have different soils and land cover conditions which leads to a rigorous test of the disaggregation algorithm. Furthermore, we compare the derived high spatial resolution soil moisture to in-situ sampling and ground observation networks

  15. Limits to dark matter annihilation cross-section from a combined analysis of MAGIC and Fermi-LAT observations of dwarf satellite galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    MAGIC Collaboration

    2016-02-01

    We present the first joint analysis of gamma-ray data from the MAGIC Cherenkov telescopes and the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) to search for gamma-ray signals from dark matter annihilation in dwarf satellite galaxies. We combine 158 hours of Segue 1 observations with MAGIC with 6-year observations of 15 dwarf satellite galaxies by the Fermi-LAT. We obtain limits on the annihilation cross-section for dark matter particle masses between 10 GeV and 100 TeV—the widest mass range ever explored by a single gamma-ray analysis. These limits improve on previously published Fermi-LAT and MAGIC results by up to a factor of two at certain masses. Our new inclusive analysis approach is completely generic and can be used to perform a global, sensitivity-optimized dark matter search by combining data from present and future gamma-ray and neutrino detectors.

  16. Combination of satellite based thermal remote sensing and in situ radon measurements and field observations to detect (submarine) groundwater discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallast, U.; Schubert, M.; Schmidt, A.; Knoeller, K.; Stollberg, R.; Siebert, C.; Merz, R.

    2012-12-01

    Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) is an important factor in the understanding and sustainable management of coastal freshwater aquifers in many highly populated coastal areas worldwide. This is not only due to the fact that SGD represents (i) a significant pathway for transfer of matter between land and sea as it supplies nutrients and trace metals to coastal oceans and (ii) a contamination threat to the near-shore marine environment resulting from land-based activities. It means also that potentially significant freshwater quantities are lost to the sea in e.g. arid areas, where groundwater is the main water resource (IAEA, 2007). The quantitative estimation of SGD is complicated due to its large temporal and spatial variability. Several studies attempted to quantify SGD rates using seepage meters, piezometers or geochemical tracers (Taniguchi et al., 2002). In most of these studies the actual SGD locations were known. In cases of unknown discharge locations airborne- and recently spaceborne-thermal remote sensing were used for detection (Roxburgh, 1985; Wilson and Rocha, 2012). Presented approaches applied only single images that represent only a temporal snapshot and hence possibly a non-representative picture of the discharge behavior (e.g. stormdriven or dry periods). Due to the continuous satellite image recording (Landsat TM/ETM+), numerous images exist that can be exploited against the background of temperature contrasts between discharging groundwater and ocean water. Hence, integrating multiple images recorded at different times does not only account for the intermittent character of groundwater discharge but enables to derive representative SGD information. We will present a satellite-based multi-thermal image method which exploits the fact that continuously discharging groundwater stabilizes the temperature at the discharge location and hence displays small temperature variability. In contrast, ambient unaffected areas clearly follow the seasonal

  17. Combined Aircraft and Satellite-Derived Storm Electric Current and Lightning Rates Measurements and Implications for the Global Electric Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mach, Douglas M.; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Bateman, Monte G.

    2010-01-01

    Using rotating vane electric field mills and Gerdien capacitors, we measured the electric field profile and conductivity during 850 overflights of electrified shower clouds and thunderstorms spanning regions including the Southeastern United States, the Western Atlantic Ocean, the Gulf of Mexico, Central America and adjacent oceans, Central Brazil, and the South Pacific. The overflights include storms over land and ocean, with and without lightning, and with positive and negative fields above the storms. The measurements were made with the NASA ER-2 and the Altus-II high altitude aircrafts. Peak electric fields, with lightning transients removed, ranged from -1.0 kV/m to 16 kV/m, with a mean value of 0.9 kV/m. The median peak field was 0.29 kV/m. Integrating our electric field and conductivity data, we determined total conduction currents and flash rates for each overpass. With knowledge of the storm location (land or ocean) and type (with or without lightning), we determine the mean currents by location and type. The mean current for ocean storms with lightning is 1.6 A while the mean current for land storms with lightning is 1.0 A. The mean current for oceanic storms without lightning (i.e., electrified shower clouds) is 0.39 A and the mean current for land storms without lightning is 0.13 A. Thus, on average, land storms with or without lightning have about half the mean current as their corresponding oceanic storm counterparts. Over three-quarters (78%) of the land storms had detectable lightning, while less than half (43%) of the oceanic storms had lightning. We did not find any significant regional or latitudinal based patterns in our total conduction currents. By combining the aircraft derived storm currents and flash rates with diurnal lightning statistics derived from the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) and Optical Transient Detector (OTD) low Earth orbiting satellites, we reproduce the diurnal variation in the global electric circuit (i.e., the Carnegie

  18. Subjective evaluation of the combined influence of satellite temperature sounding data and increased model resolution on numerical weather forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atlas, R.; Halem, M.; Ghil, M.

    1979-01-01

    The present evaluation is concerned with (1) the significance of prognostic differences resulting from the inclusion of satellite-derived temperature soundings, (2) how specific differences between the SAT and NOSAT prognoses evolve, and (3) comparison of two experiments using the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheric Sciences general circulation model. The subjective evaluation indicates that the beneficial impact of sounding data is enhanced with increased resolution. It is suggested that satellite sounding data posses valuable information content which at times can correct gross analysis errors in data sparse regions.

  19. Subjective evaluation of the combined influence of satellite temperature sounding data and increased model resolution on numerical weather forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atlas, R.; Halem, M.; Ghil, M.

    1979-01-01

    The present evaluation is concerned with (1) the significance of prognostic differences resulting from the inclusion of satellite-derived temperature soundings, (2) how specific differences between the SAT and NOSAT prognoses evolve, and (3) comparison of two experiments using the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheric Sciences general circulation model. The subjective evaluation indicates that the beneficial impact of sounding data is enhanced with increased resolution. It is suggested that satellite sounding data posses valuable information content which at times can correct gross analysis errors in data sparse regions.

  20. Combining New Satellite Tools and Models to Examine Role of Mesoscale Interactions in Formation and Intensification of Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Joanne; Pierce, H.; Ritchie, L.; Liu, T.; Brueske, K.; Velden, C.; Halverson, J.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this research is to start filling the mesoscale gap to improve understanding and probability forecasts of formation and intensity variations of tropical cyclones. Sampling by aircraft equipped to measure mesoscale processes is expensive, thus confined in place and time. Hence we turn to satellite products. This paper reports preliminary results of a tropical cyclone genesis and early intensification study. We explore the role of mesoscale processes using a combination of products from TRMM, QuikSCAT, AMSU, also SSM/I, geosynchronous and model output. Major emphasis is on the role of merging mesoscale vortices. These initially form in midlevel stratiform cloud. When they form in regions of lowered Rossby radius of deformation (strong background vorticity) the mesoscale vortices can last long enough to interact and merge, with the weaker vortex losing vorticity to the stronger, which can then extend down to the surface. In an earlier cyclongenesis case (Oliver 1993) off Australia, intense deep convection occurred when the stronger vortex reached the surface; this vortex became the storm center while the weaker vortex was sheared out as the major rainband. In our study of Atlantic tropical cyclones originating from African waves, we use QuikSCAT to examine surface winds in the African monsoon trough and in the vortices which move westward off the coast, which may or may not undergo genesis (defined by NHC as reaching TD, or tropical depression, with a west wind to the south of the surface low). We use AMSU mainly to examine development of warm cores. TRMM passive microwave TMI is used with SSM/I to look at the rain structure, which often indicates eye formation, and to look at the ice scattering signatures of deep convection. The TRMM precipitation radar, PR, when available, gives precipitation cross sections. So far we have detailed studies of two African-origin cyclones, one which became severe hurricane Floyd 1999, and the other reached TD2 in June

  1. Combining New Satellite Tools and Models to Examine Role of Mesoscale Interactions in Formation and Intensification of Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Joanne; Pierce, H.; Ritchie, L.; Liu, T.; Brueske, K.; Velden, C.; Halverson, J.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this research is to start filling the mesoscale gap to improve understanding and probability forecasts of formation and intensity variations of tropical cyclones. Sampling by aircraft equipped to measure mesoscale processes is expensive, thus confined in place and time. Hence we turn to satellite products. This paper reports preliminary results of a tropical cyclone genesis and early intensification study. We explore the role of mesoscale processes using a combination of products from TRMM, QuikSCAT, AMSU, also SSM/I, geosynchronous and model output. Major emphasis is on the role of merging mesoscale vortices. These initially form in midlevel stratiform cloud. When they form in regions of lowered Rossby radius of deformation (strong background vorticity) the mesoscale vortices can last long enough to interact and merge, with the weaker vortex losing vorticity to the stronger, which can then extend down to the surface. In an earlier cyclongenesis case (Oliver 1993) off Australia, intense deep convection occurred when the stronger vortex reached the surface; this vortex became the storm center while the weaker vortex was sheared out as the major rainband. In our study of Atlantic tropical cyclones originating from African waves, we use QuikSCAT to examine surface winds in the African monsoon trough and in the vortices which move westward off the coast, which may or may not undergo genesis (defined by NHC as reaching TD, or tropical depression, with a west wind to the south of the surface low). We use AMSU mainly to examine development of warm cores. TRMM passive microwave TMI is used with SSM/I to look at the rain structure, which often indicates eye formation, and to look at the ice scattering signatures of deep convection. The TRMM precipitation radar, PR, when available, gives precipitation cross sections. So far we have detailed studies of two African-origin cyclones, one which became severe hurricane Floyd 1999, and the other reached TD2 in June

  2. Combining a two-sourcepatch model with satellite data to monitor daily evapotranspiration at a regional scale

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In this work, we present a micro-meteorological approach for estimating surface energy fluxes that can be operationally used together with satellite images to monitor surface energy fluxes at a regional scale. In particular we will focus on the retrieval of daily evapotranspiration. The feasibility ...

  3. Combining forest inventory, satellite remote sensing, and geospatial data for mapping forest attributes of the conterminous United States

    Treesearch

    Mark Nelson; Greg Liknes; Charles H. Perry

    2009-01-01

    Analysis and display of forest composition, structure, and pattern provides information for a variety of assessments and management decision support. The objective of this study was to produce geospatial datasets and maps of conterminous United States forest land ownership, forest site productivity, timberland, and reserved forest land. Satellite image-based maps of...

  4. Combining satellite imagery with forest inventory data to assess damage severity following a major blowdown event in northern Minnesota, USA

    Treesearch

    Mark D. Nelson; Sean P. Healey; W. Keith Moser; Mark H. Hansen

    2009-01-01

    Effects of a catastrophic blowdown event in northern Minnesota, USA were assessed using field inventory data, aerial sketch maps and satellite image data processed through the North American Forest Dynamics programme. Estimates were produced for forest area and net volume per unit area of live trees pre- and post-disturbance, and for changes in volume per unit area and...

  5. Determination of Atmospheric Temperature Profiles from a Statistical Combination of Ground-Based Profiler and Operational NOAA 6/7 Satellite Retrievals.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westwater, E. R.; Sweezy, W. B.; McMillin, L. M.; Dean, Charles

    1984-05-01

    Radiometric soundings from the Wave Propagation Laboratory's ground-based Profiler, the NOAA 6/7 satellites, and the combination of the two, were compared in their ability to derive temperature and moisture profiles. Radiosonde data for the period December 1981-December 1982, taken by the National Weather Service at Stapleton International Airport, Denver, Colorado, were used as `ground-truth' for the comparison; in all, 460 soundings were analyzed. The set of soundings contained 216 clear, 173 partly cloudy and 71 cloudy cases. Comparisons show that Profiler retrievals were more accurate than those of the satellite in the lowest 500 mb of the atmosphere, with the converse being true above that level. The combined temperature retrievals were more accurate, in the rms sense, than either of the separate retrievals at every level from the surface to 10 mb. Below 50 mb, the maximum rms difference of the combined system from radiosondes was 2.7 K; below 300 mb, it was 2.0 K. Geopotential heights and pressure thicknesses were also derived from the combined system with an accuracy approaching that of a radiosonde.

  6. Analysis of tropical-like cyclones over the Mediterranean Sea through a combined modeling and satellite approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miglietta, M. M.; Laviola, S.; Malvaldi, A.; Conte, D.; Levizzani, V.; Price, C.

    2013-05-01

    Several Mediterranean vortices with characteristics similar to tropical cyclones are analyzed by means of numerical simulations, satellite products and lightning data. Numerical analysis suggests that the broad tropical-like cyclone category includes in reality a set of different cyclones, ranging from very small and weak vortices to larger and stronger cyclones. One case displays a much longer persistence of tropical features than the other events. The analysis of the tracks identifies two preferred areas of occurrence: the Ionian sea and the Balearic Islands. The satellite analysis of cloud top height and retrieved rainfall indicates that the stage characterized by the most intense convective activity and rainfall anticipates the mature phase, when the cyclone is more intense and characterized by tropical features, during which convection is shallower and rainfall weaker. This result is confirmed by a preliminary analysis of the lightning activity.

  7. Combining Satellite Ocean Color Imagery and Circulation Modeling to Forecast Bio-Optical Properties: Comparison of Models and Advection Schemes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    Remote sensing of ocean color provides synoptic surface ocean bio -optical properties but is limited to real-time or climatological applications. Many...this, we couple satellite imagery with numerical circulation models to provide short-term (24-48 hr) forecasts of bio -optical properties. These are...physical processes control the bio -optical distribution patterns. We compare optical forecast results from three Navy models and two advection

  8. The combined use of the RST-FIRES algorithm and geostationary satellite data to timely detect fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filizzola, Carolina; Corrado, Rosita; Marchese, Francesco; Mazzeo, Giuseppe; Paciello, Rossana; Pergola, Nicola; Tramutoli, Valerio

    2017-04-01

    Timely detection of fires may enable a rapid contrast action before they become uncontrolled and wipe out entire forests. Remote sensing, especially based on geostationary satellite data, can be successfully used to this aim. Differently from sensors onboard polar orbiting platforms, instruments on geostationary satellites guarantee a very high temporal resolution (from 30 to 2,5 minutes) which may be usefully employed to carry out a "continuous" monitoring over large areas as well as to timely detect fires at their early stages. Together with adequate satellite data, an appropriate fire detection algorithm should be used. Over the last years, many fire detection algorithms have been just adapted from polar to geostationary sensors and, consequently, the very high temporal resolution of geostationary sensors is not exploited at all in tests for fire identification. In addition, even when specifically designed for geostationary satellite sensors, fire detection algorithms are frequently based on fixed thresholds tests which are generally set up in the most conservative way to avoid false alarm proliferation. The result is a low algorithm sensitivity which generally means that only large and/or extremely intense events are detected. This work describes the Robust Satellite Techniques for FIRES detection and monitoring (RST-FIRES) which is a multi-temporal change-detection technique trying to overcome the above mentioned issues. Its performance in terms of reliability and sensitivity was verified using data acquired by the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) sensor onboard the Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) geostationary platform. More than 20,000 SEVIRI images, collected during a four-year-collaboration with the Regional Civil Protection Departments and Local Authorities of two Italian regions, were used. About 950 near real-time ground and aerial checks of the RST-FIRES detections were performed. This study also demonstrates the added value of

  9. Push-Broom-Type Very High-Resolution Satellite Sensor Data Correction Using Combined Wavelet-Fourier and Multiscale Non-Local Means Filtering.

    PubMed

    Kang, Wonseok; Yu, Soohwan; Seo, Doochun; Jeong, Jaeheon; Paik, Joonki

    2015-09-10

    In very high-resolution (VHR) push-broom-type satellite sensor data, both destriping and denoising methods have become chronic problems and attracted major research advances in the remote sensing fields. Since the estimation of the original image from a noisy input is an ill-posed problem, a simple noise removal algorithm cannot preserve the radiometric integrity of satellite data. To solve these problems, we present a novel method to correct VHR data acquired by a push-broom-type sensor by combining wavelet-Fourier and multiscale non-local means (NLM) filters. After the wavelet-Fourier filter separates the stripe noise from the mixed noise in the wavelet low- and selected high-frequency sub-bands, random noise is removed using the multiscale NLM filter in both low- and high-frequency sub-bands without loss of image detail. The performance of the proposed method is compared to various existing methods on a set of push-broom-type sensor data acquired by Korean Multi-Purpose Satellite 3 (KOMPSAT-3) with severe stripe and random noise, and the results of the proposed method show significantly improved enhancement results over existing state-of-the-art methods in terms of both qualitative and quantitative assessments.

  10. Push-Broom-Type Very High-Resolution Satellite Sensor Data Correction Using Combined Wavelet-Fourier and Multiscale Non-Local Means Filtering

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Wonseok; Yu, Soohwan; Seo, Doochun; Jeong, Jaeheon; Paik, Joonki

    2015-01-01

    In very high-resolution (VHR) push-broom-type satellite sensor data, both destriping and denoising methods have become chronic problems and attracted major research advances in the remote sensing fields. Since the estimation of the original image from a noisy input is an ill-posed problem, a simple noise removal algorithm cannot preserve the radiometric integrity of satellite data. To solve these problems, we present a novel method to correct VHR data acquired by a push-broom-type sensor by combining wavelet-Fourier and multiscale non-local means (NLM) filters. After the wavelet-Fourier filter separates the stripe noise from the mixed noise in the wavelet low- and selected high-frequency sub-bands, random noise is removed using the multiscale NLM filter in both low- and high-frequency sub-bands without loss of image detail. The performance of the proposed method is compared to various existing methods on a set of push-broom-type sensor data acquired by Korean Multi-Purpose Satellite 3 (KOMPSAT-3) with severe stripe and random noise, and the results of the proposed method show significantly improved enhancement results over existing state-of-the-art methods in terms of both qualitative and quantitative assessments. PMID:26378532

  11. Combining satellite observations to develop a daily global soil moisture product for a wide range of applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enenkel, M.; Reimer, C.; Dorigo, W.; Wagner, W.; Pfeil, I.; Parinussa, R.; De Jeu, R.

    2015-11-01

    The soil moisture dataset that is generated via the Climate Change Initiative (CCI) of the European Space Agency (ESA) (ESA CCI SM) is a popular research product. It is composed of observations from nine different satellites and aims to exploit the individual strengths of active (radar) and passive (radiometer) sensors, thereby providing surface soil moisture estimates at a spatial resolution of 0.25°. However, the annual updating cycle limits the use of the ESA CCI SM dataset for operational applications. Therefore, this study proposes an adaptation of the ESA CCI processing chain for daily global updates via satellite-derived near real-time (NRT) soil moisture observations. In order to extend the ESA CCI SM dataset from 1978 to present we use NRT observations from the Advanced SCATterometer on-board the MetOp satellites and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 on-board GCOM-W. Since these NRT observations do not incorporate the latest algorithmic updates, parameter databases, and intercalibration efforts, by nature they offer a lower quality than reprocessed offline datasets. Our findings indicate that, despite issues in arid regions, the new "CCI NRT" dataset shows a good correlation with ESA CCI SM. The average global correlation coefficient between CCI NRT and ESA CCI SM (Pearson's R) is 0.8. An initial validation with 40 in-situ observations in France, Kenya, Senegal and Kenya yields an average R of 0.58 and 0.49 for ESA CCI SM and CCI NRT respectively. In summary, the CCI NRT dataset is getting ready for operational use, supporting applications such as drought and flood monitoring, weather forecasting or agricultural applications.

  12. Characterizing Surface Energy Budget Components in Urban Regions Using Combination of Flux Tower Observations and Satellite Remote Sensing Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norouzi, H.; Vant-hull, B.; Ramamurthy, P.; Blake, R.; Prakash, D. S.

    2016-12-01

    Urban and built regions because of their lack of surface moisture and their surface impermeability significantly perform differently in surface energy budget than natural and non-urban regions. Characterizing the effect and the response of each surface type in the cities can help to increase our understanding of climate, anthropogenic heat, and urban heat islands. Both ground observations and remote sensing observations are important when the extent of the heat energy balance components in big cities is targeted. This is study aims to provide a novel approach to use ground observations and map the maxima and minima air temperature in New York City using satellite measurements. Complete energy balance stations are installed over distinct materials such as concrete, asphalt, and rooftops. The footprint of these stations is restricted to the individual materials. The energy balance stations monitor the sensible and latent heat fluxes through eddy covariance method. To account for the incoming and outgoing radiation, a 4-component radiometer is used that can observe both incoming and outgoing longwave and shortwave radiation. Moreover, satellite observations from Landsat 8 are utilized to classify the city surfaces to distinct defined surfaces where ground observations were performed. The mapped temperatures will be linked to MODIS surface temperatures to develop a model that can downscale MODIS skin temperatures to fine resolution air temperature over urban regions. The results are compared with ground observations, which they reveal a great potential of using synergetic use of flux tower observations and satellite measurement to study urban surface energy budget. The results of this study can enhance our understanding about urban heat islands as well as climate studies and their effects on the environment.

  13. Evaluation and development of satellite inferences of convective storm intensity using combined case study analysis and thunderstorm model simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotton, W. R.; Tripoli, G. J.

    1980-01-01

    Major research accomplishments which were achieved during the first year of the grant are summarized. The research concentrated in the following areas: (1) an examination of observational requirements for predicting convective storm development and intensity as suggested by recent numerical experiments; (2) interpretation of recent 3D numerical experiments with regard to the relationship between overshooting tops and surface wind gusts; (3) the development of software for emulating satellite-inferred cloud properties using 3D cloud model predicted data; and (4) the development of a conceptual/semi-quantitative model of eastward propagating, mesoscale convective complexes forming to the lee of the Rocky Mountains.

  14. Evaluation and development of satellite inferences of convective storm intensity using combined case study and thunderstorm model simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotton, W. R.; Tripoli, G. J.

    1982-01-01

    Observational requirements for predicting convective storm development and intensity as suggested by recent numerical experiments are examined. Recent 3D numerical experiments are interpreted with regard to the relationship between overshooting tops and surface wind gusts. The development of software for emulating satellite inferred cloud properties using 3D cloud model predicted data and the simulation of Heymsfield (1981) Northern Illinois storm are described as well as the development of a conceptual/semi-quantitative model of eastward propagating, mesoscale convective complexes forming to the lee of the Rocky Mountains.

  15. Constraining dark matter models from a combined analysis of Milky Way satellites with the Fermi Large Area Telescope.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; Albert, A; Atwood, W B; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bregeon, J; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Burnett, T H; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Cañadas, B; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Cecchi, C; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Conrad, J; Cutini, S; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Dermer, C D; Digel, S W; do Couto e Silva, E; Drell, P S; Drlica-Wagner, A; Falletti, L; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Ferrara, E C; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Guiriec, S; Gustafsson, M; Hadasch, D; Hayashida, M; Hays, E; Hughes, R E; Jeltema, T E; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, R P; Johnson, A S; Kamae, T; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Knödlseder, J; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Latronico, L; Lionetto, A M; Llena Garde, M; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; Mehault, J; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Naumann-Godo, M; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Okumura, A; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Ozaki, M; Paneque, D; Parent, D; Pesce-Rollins, M; Pierbattista, M; Piron, F; Pivato, G; Porter, T A; Profumo, S; Rainò, S; Razzano, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Ritz, S; Roth, M; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sbarra, C; Scargle, J D; Schalk, T L; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Strigari, L; Suson, D J; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J G; Thayer, J B; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Tinivella, M; Torres, D F; Troja, E; Uchiyama, Y; Vandenbroucke, J; Vasileiou, V; Vianello, G; Vitale, V; Waite, A P; Wang, P; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Wood, M; Yang, Z; Zimmer, S; Kaplinghat, M; Martinez, G D

    2011-12-09

    Satellite galaxies of the Milky Way are among the most promising targets for dark matter searches in gamma rays. We present a search for dark matter consisting of weakly interacting massive particles, applying a joint likelihood analysis to 10 satellite galaxies with 24 months of data of the Fermi Large Area Telescope. No dark matter signal is detected. Including the uncertainty in the dark matter distribution, robust upper limits are placed on dark matter annihilation cross sections. The 95% confidence level upper limits range from about 10(-26)  cm3  s(-1) at 5 GeV to about 5×10(-23)   cm3  s(-1) at 1 TeV, depending on the dark matter annihilation final state. For the first time, using gamma rays, we are able to rule out models with the most generic cross section (∼3×10(-26)  cm3  s(-1) for a purely s-wave cross section), without assuming additional boost factors.

  16. Constraining Dark Matter Models from a Combined Analysis of Milky Way Satellites with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; hide

    2011-01-01

    Satellite galaxies of the Milky Way are among the most promising targets for dark matter searches in gamma rays. We present a search for dark matter consisting of weakly interacting massive particles, applying a joint likelihood analysis to 10 satellite galaxies with 24 months of data of the Fermi Large Area Telescope. No dark matter signal is detected. Including the uncertainty in the dark matter distribution, robust upper limits are placed on dark matter annihilation cross sections. The 95% confidence level upper limits range from about 10(exp -26) cm(exp 3) / s at 5 GeV to about 5 X 10(exp -23) cm(exp 3)/ s at 1 TeV, depending on the dark matter annihilation final state. For the first time, using gamma rays, we are able to rule out models with the most generic cross section (approx 3 X 10(exp -26) cm(exp 3)/s for a purely s-wave cross section), without assuming additional boost factors.

  17. Constraining Dark Matter Models from a Combined Analysis of Milky Way Satellites with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Atwood, W.B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R.D.; Bloom, E.D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A.W.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Burnett, T.H.; Buson, S.; /more authors..

    2012-09-14

    Satellite galaxies of the Milky Way are among the most promising targets for dark matter searches in gamma rays. We present a search for dark matter consisting of weakly interacting massive particles, applying a joint likelihood analysis to 10 satellite galaxies with 24 months of data of the Fermi Large Area Telescope. No dark matter signal is detected. Including the uncertainty in the dark matter distribution, robust upper limits are placed on dark matter annihilation cross sections. The 95% confidence level upper limits range from about 10{sup -26} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} at 5 GeV to about 5 x 10{sup -23} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} at 1 TeV, depending on the dark matter annihilation final state. For the first time, using gamma rays, we are able to rule out models with the most generic cross section ({approx}3 x 10{sup -26} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} for a purely s-wave cross section), without assuming additional boost factors.

  18. Constraining Dark Matter Models from a Combined Analysis of Milky Way Satellites with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, M.

    2011-12-01

    Satellite galaxies of the Milky Way are among the most promising targets for dark matter searches in gamma rays. We present a search for dark matter consisting of weakly interacting massive particles, applying a joint likelihood analysis to 10 satellite galaxies with 24 months of data of the Fermi Large Area Telescope. No dark matter signal is detected. Including the uncertainty in the dark matter distribution, robust upper limits are placed on dark matter annihilation cross sections. The 95% con dence level upper limits range from about 10-26 cm3s-1 at 5 GeV to about 5 X10-23 cm3s-1 at 1 TeV, depending on the dark matter annihilation nal state. For the rst time, using gamma rays, we are able to rule out models with the most generic cross section (~ 3 X 10-26 cm3s-1 for a purely s-wave cross section), without assuming additional boost factors.

  19. Constraining Dark Matter Models from a Combined Analysis of Milky Way Satellites with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    DOE PAGES

    Ackermann, M.

    2011-12-01

    Satellite galaxies of the Milky Way are among the most promising targets for dark matter searches in gamma rays. We present a search for dark matter consisting of weakly interacting massive particles, applying a joint likelihood analysis to 10 satellite galaxies with 24 months of data of the Fermi Large Area Telescope. No dark matter signal is detected. Including the uncertainty in the dark matter distribution, robust upper limits are placed on dark matter annihilation cross sections. The 95% con dence level upper limits range from about 10-26 cm3s-1 at 5 GeV to about 5 X10-23 cm3s-1 at 1 TeV,more » depending on the dark matter annihilation nal state. For the rst time, using gamma rays, we are able to rule out models with the most generic cross section (~ 3 X 10-26 cm3s-1 for a purely s-wave cross section), without assuming additional boost factors.« less

  20. Constraining Dark Matter Models from a Combined Analysis of Milky Way Satellites with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Burnett, T. H.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Cañadas, B.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Digel, S. W.; Do Couto E Silva, E.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Falletti, L.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Guiriec, S.; Gustafsson, M.; Hadasch, D.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hughes, R. E.; Jeltema, T. E.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, R. P.; Johnson, A. S.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Knödlseder, J.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Latronico, L.; Lionetto, A. M.; Llena Garde, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Mehault, J.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paneque, D.; Parent, D.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Pierbattista, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Profumo, S.; Rainò, S.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Ritz, S.; Roth, M.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sbarra, C.; Scargle, J. D.; Schalk, T. L.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Strigari, L.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tinivella, M.; Torres, D. F.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Wang, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Yang, Z.; Zimmer, S.; Kaplinghat, M.; Martinez, G. D.

    2011-12-01

    Satellite galaxies of the Milky Way are among the most promising targets for dark matter searches in gamma rays. We present a search for dark matter consisting of weakly interacting massive particles, applying a joint likelihood analysis to 10 satellite galaxies with 24 months of data of the Fermi Large Area Telescope. No dark matter signal is detected. Including the uncertainty in the dark matter distribution, robust upper limits are placed on dark matter annihilation cross sections. The 95% confidence level upper limits range from about 10-26cm3s-1 at 5 GeV to about 5×10-23cm3s-1 at 1 TeV, depending on the dark matter annihilation final state. For the first time, using gamma rays, we are able to rule out models with the most generic cross section (˜3×10-26cm3s-1 for a purely s-wave cross section), without assuming additional boost factors.

  1. Methodology for evaluating lateral boundary conditions in the regional chemical transport model MATCH (v5.5.0) using combined satellite and ground-based observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, E.; Kahnert, M.; Devasthale, A.

    2015-11-01

    Hemispheric transport of air pollutants can have a significant impact on regional air quality, as well as on the effect of air pollutants on regional climate. An accurate representation of hemispheric transport in regional chemical transport models (CTMs) depends on the specification of the lateral boundary conditions (LBCs). This study focuses on the methodology for evaluating LBCs of two moderately long-lived trace gases, carbon monoxide (CO) and ozone (O3), for the European model domain and over a 7-year period, 2006-2012. The method is based on combining the use of satellite observations at the lateral boundary with the use of both satellite and in situ ground observations within the model domain. The LBCs are generated by the global European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme Meteorological Synthesizing Centre - West (EMEP MSC-W) model; they are evaluated at the lateral boundaries by comparison with satellite observations of the Terra-MOPITT (Measurements Of Pollution In The Troposphere) sensor (CO) and the Aura-OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument) sensor (O3). The LBCs from the global model lie well within the satellite uncertainties for both CO and O3. The biases increase below 700 hPa for both species. However, the satellite retrievals below this height are strongly influenced by the a priori data; hence, they are less reliable than at, e.g. 500 hPa. CO is, on average, underestimated by the global model, while O3 tends to be overestimated during winter, and underestimated during summer. A regional CTM is run with (a) the validated monthly climatological LBCs from the global model; (b) dynamical LBCs from the global model; and (c) constant LBCs based on in situ ground observations near the domain boundary. The results are validated against independent satellite retrievals from the Aqua-AIRS (Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder) sensor at 500 hPa, and against in situ ground observations from the Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW) network. It is found that (i) the use of

  2. Limits to dark matter annihilation cross-section from a combined analysis of MAGIC and Fermi-LAT observations of dwarf satellite galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Ahnen, M. L.

    2016-02-16

    Here, we present the first joint analysis of gamma-ray data from the MAGIC Cherenkov telescopes and the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) to search for gamma-ray signals from dark matter annihilation in dwarf satellite galaxies. We combine 158 hours of Segue 1 observations with MAGIC with 6-year observations of 15 dwarf satellite galaxies by the Fermi-LAT. We obtain limits on the annihilation cross-section for dark matter particle masses between 10 GeV and 100 TeV - the widest mass range ever explored by a single gamma-ray analysis. These limits improve on previously published Fermi-LAT and MAGIC results by up to a factor of two at certain masses. Our new inclusive analysis approach is completely generic and can be used to perform a global, sensitivity-optimized dark matter search by combining data from present and future gamma-ray and neutrino detectors.

  3. Limits to dark matter annihilation cross-section from a combined analysis of MAGIC and Fermi-LAT observations of dwarf satellite galaxies

    DOE PAGES

    Ahnen, M. L.

    2016-02-16

    Here, we present the first joint analysis of gamma-ray data from the MAGIC Cherenkov telescopes and the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) to search for gamma-ray signals from dark matter annihilation in dwarf satellite galaxies. We combine 158 hours of Segue 1 observations with MAGIC with 6-year observations of 15 dwarf satellite galaxies by the Fermi-LAT. We obtain limits on the annihilation cross-section for dark matter particle masses between 10 GeV and 100 TeV - the widest mass range ever explored by a single gamma-ray analysis. These limits improve on previously published Fermi-LAT and MAGIC results by up to amore » factor of two at certain masses. Our new inclusive analysis approach is completely generic and can be used to perform a global, sensitivity-optimized dark matter search by combining data from present and future gamma-ray and neutrino detectors.« less

  4. Evaluation of sensible heat flux, latent heat flux, and effective aerodynamic roughness at the land surface from a combination of satellite and in-situ data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diak, George R.

    1990-01-01

    A simple method is presented for using the daytime rise of the PBL height, combined with coincident satellite skin temperature measurements, to evaluate sensible heating and the effective surface roughness for heat transfer at synoptic locations. Multiple runs of a combination surface layer-mixed layer model are made in the central U.S., varying the values of surface moisture and roughness length around climatological means, and initializing the model with a set of atmospheric conditions from the synoptic report. The results, shown in figures and tables, are quite reasonable and spatially coherent, and depict well the sharp change in surface moisture and roughness which is known to take place across the central U.S.

  5. Combined Use of Satellite Observations with Urban Surface Characteristics to Estimate PM Concentrations by Employing Mixed-Effects Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beloconi, Anton; Benas, Nikolaos; Chrysoulakis, Nektarios; Kamarianakis, Yiannis

    2015-11-01

    Linear mixed effects models were developed for the estimation of the average daily Particulate Matter (PM) concentration spatial distribution over the area of Greater London (UK). Both fine (PM2.5) and coarse (PM10) concentrations were predicted for the 2002- 2012 time period, based on satellite data. The latter included Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) at 3×3 km spatial resolution, as well as the Surface Relative Humidity, Surface Temperature and K-Index derived from MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) sensor. For a meaningful interpretation of the association among these variables, all data were homogenized with regard to spatial support and geographic projection, thus addressing the change of support problem and leading to a valid statistical inference. To this end, spatial (2D) and spatio- temporal (3D) kriging techniques were applied to in-situ particulate matter concentrations and the leave-one- station-out cross-validation was performed on a daily level to gauge the quality of the predictions. Satellite- derived covariates displayed clear seasonal patterns; in order to work with data which is stationary in mean, for each covariate, deviations from its estimated annual profiles were computed using nonlinear least squares and nonlinear absolute deviations. High-resolution land- cover and morphology static datasets were additionally incorporated in the analysis in order to catch the effects of nearby emission sources and sequestration sites. For pairwise comparisons of the particulate matter concentration means at distinct land-cover classes, the pairwise comparisons method for unequal sample sizes, known as Tukey's method, was performed. The use of satellite-derived products allowed better assessment of space-time interactions of PM, since these daily spatial measurements were able to capture differences in PM concentrations between grid cells, while the use of high- resolution land-cover and morphology static datasets allowed accounting for

  6. HelioFTH: combining cloud index principles and aggregated rating for cloud masking using infrared observations from geostationary satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dürr, B.; Schröder, M.; Stöckli, R.; Posselt, R.

    2013-08-01

    In this paper a cloud mask and cloud fractional coverage (CFC) retrieval scheme called HelioFTH is presented. The algorithm is self-calibrating and relies on infrared (IR) window-channel observations only. It needs no input from numerical weather prediction (NWP) or radiative transfer models, nor from other satellite platforms. The scheme is applicable to the full temporal and spatial resolution of the Meteosat Visible and InfraRed Imager (MVIRI) and the Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) sensors. The main focus is laid on the separation of middle- and high-level cloud coverage (HCC) from low-level clouds based on an internal cloud-top pressure (CTP) product. CFC retrieval employs a IR-only cloud mask based on an aggregated rating scheme. CTP retrieval is based on a Heliosat-like cloud index for the MVIRI IR channel. CFC from HelioFTH, the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) DX and the Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring (CM SAF) were validated with CFC from the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) and the Alpine Surface Radiation Budget (ASRB) network. HelioFTH CFC differs by not more than 5-10% from CM SAF CFC but it is higher than ISCCP-DX CFC. In particular the conditional probability to detect cloud-free pixels with HelioFTH is raised by about 35% compared to ISCCP-DX. The HelioFTH CFC is able to reproduce the day-to-day variability observed at the surface. Also, the HelioFTH HCC was inter-compared to CM SAF and ISCCP-DX over different regions and stations. The probability of false detection of cloud-free HCC pixels is in the same order as ISCCP-DX compared to the CM SAF HCC product over the full-disk area. HelioFTH could be used for generating an independent climate data record of cloud physical properties once its consistency and homogeneity is validated for the full Meteosat time series.

  7. Determination of Large-Scale Cloud Ice Water Concentration by Combining Surface Radar and Satellite Data in Support of ARM SCM Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guosheng

    2013-03-15

    Single-column modeling (SCM) is one of the key elements of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) research initiatives for the development and testing of various physical parameterizations to be used in general circulation models (GCMs). The data required for use with an SCM include observed vertical profiles of temperature, water vapor, and condensed water, as well as the large-scale vertical motion and tendencies of temperature, water vapor, and condensed water due to horizontal advection. Surface-based measurements operated at ARM sites and upper-air sounding networks supply most of the required variables for model inputs, but do not provide the horizontal advection term of condensed water. Since surface cloud radar and microwave radiometer observations at ARM sites are single-point measurements, they can provide the amount of condensed water at the location of observation sites, but not a horizontal distribution of condensed water contents. Consequently, observational data for the large-scale advection tendencies of condensed water have not been available to the ARM cloud modeling community based on surface observations alone. This lack of advection data of water condensate could cause large uncertainties in SCM simulations. Additionally, to evaluate GCMs cloud physical parameterization, we need to compare GCM results with observed cloud water amounts over a scale that is large enough to be comparable to what a GCM grid represents. To this end, the point-measurements at ARM surface sites are again not adequate. Therefore, cloud water observations over a large area are needed. The main goal of this project is to retrieve ice water contents over an area of 10 x 10 deg. surrounding the ARM sites by combining surface and satellite observations. Built on the progress made during previous ARM research, we have conducted the retrievals of 3-dimensional ice water content by combining surface radar/radiometer and satellite measurements, and have produced 3-D cloud ice

  8. Satellite Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technology Teacher, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Presents a discussion of communication satellites: explains the principles of satellite communication, describes examples of how governments and industries are currently applying communication satellites, analyzes issues confronting satellite communication, links mathematics and science to the study of satellite communication, and applies…

  9. Satellite Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technology Teacher, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Presents a discussion of communication satellites: explains the principles of satellite communication, describes examples of how governments and industries are currently applying communication satellites, analyzes issues confronting satellite communication, links mathematics and science to the study of satellite communication, and applies…

  10. The Impact of Satellite Time Group Delay and Inter-Frequency Differential Code Bias Corrections on Multi-GNSS Combined Positioning

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Yulong; Zhou, Feng; Sun, Baoqi; Wang, Shengli; Shi, Bo

    2017-01-01

    We present quad-constellation (namely, GPS, GLONASS, BeiDou and Galileo) time group delay (TGD) and differential code bias (DCB) correction models to fully exploit the code observations of all the four global navigation satellite systems (GNSSs) for navigation and positioning. The relationship between TGDs and DCBs for multi-GNSS is clearly figured out, and the equivalence of TGD and DCB correction models combining theory with practice is demonstrated. Meanwhile, the TGD/DCB correction models have been extended to various standard point positioning (SPP) and precise point positioning (PPP) scenarios in a multi-GNSS and multi-frequency context. To evaluate the effectiveness and practicability of broadcast TGDs in the navigation message and DCBs provided by the Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX), both single-frequency GNSS ionosphere-corrected SPP and dual-frequency GNSS ionosphere-free SPP/PPP tests are carried out with quad-constellation signals. Furthermore, the author investigates the influence of differential code biases on GNSS positioning estimates. The experiments show that multi-constellation combination SPP performs better after DCB/TGD correction, for example, for GPS-only b1-based SPP, the positioning accuracies can be improved by 25.0%, 30.6% and 26.7%, respectively, in the N, E, and U components, after the differential code biases correction, while GPS/GLONASS/BDS b1-based SPP can be improved by 16.1%, 26.1% and 9.9%. For GPS/BDS/Galileo the 3rd frequency based SPP, the positioning accuracies are improved by 2.0%, 2.0% and 0.4%, respectively, in the N, E, and U components, after Galileo satellites DCB correction. The accuracy of Galileo-only b1-based SPP are improved about 48.6%, 34.7% and 40.6% with DCB correction, respectively, in the N, E, and U components. The estimates of multi-constellation PPP are subject to different degrees of influence. For multi-constellation combination SPP, the accuracy of single-frequency is slightly better than that of dual

  11. The Impact of Satellite Time Group Delay and Inter-Frequency Differential Code Bias Corrections on Multi-GNSS Combined Positioning.

    PubMed

    Ge, Yulong; Zhou, Feng; Sun, Baoqi; Wang, Shengli; Shi, Bo

    2017-03-16

    We present quad-constellation (namely, GPS, GLONASS, BeiDou and Galileo) time group delay (TGD) and differential code bias (DCB) correction models to fully exploit the code observations of all the four global navigation satellite systems (GNSSs) for navigation and positioning. The relationship between TGDs and DCBs for multi-GNSS is clearly figured out, and the equivalence of TGD and DCB correction models combining theory with practice is demonstrated. Meanwhile, the TGD/DCB correction models have been extended to various standard point positioning (SPP) and precise point positioning (PPP) scenarios in a multi-GNSS and multi-frequency context. To evaluate the effectiveness and practicability of broadcast TGDs in the navigation message and DCBs provided by the Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX), both single-frequency GNSS ionosphere-corrected SPP and dual-frequency GNSS ionosphere-free SPP/PPP tests are carried out with quad-constellation signals. Furthermore, the author investigates the influence of differential code biases on GNSS positioning estimates. The experiments show that multi-constellation combination SPP performs better after DCB/TGD correction, for example, for GPS-only b1-based SPP, the positioning accuracies can be improved by 25.0%, 30.6% and 26.7%, respectively, in the N, E, and U components, after the differential code biases correction, while GPS/GLONASS/BDS b1-based SPP can be improved by 16.1%, 26.1% and 9.9%. For GPS/BDS/Galileo the 3rd frequency based SPP, the positioning accuracies are improved by 2.0%, 2.0% and 0.4%, respectively, in the N, E, and U components, after Galileo satellites DCB correction. The accuracy of Galileo-only b1-based SPP are improved about 48.6%, 34.7% and 40.6% with DCB correction, respectively, in the N, E, and U components. The estimates of multi-constellation PPP are subject to different degrees of influence. For multi-constellation combination SPP, the accuracy of single-frequency is slightly better than that of dual

  12. Interactive access to LP DAAC satellite data archives through a combination of open-source and custom middleware web services

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, Brian N.; Werpy, Jason; Friesz, Aaron M.; Impecoven, Kevin; Quenzer, Robert; Maiersperger, Tom; Meyer, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Current methods of searching for and retrieving data from satellite land remote sensing archives do not allow for interactive information extraction. Instead, Earth science data users are required to download files over low-bandwidth networks to local workstations and process data before science questions can be addressed. New methods of extracting information from data archives need to become more interactive to meet user demands for deriving increasingly complex information from rapidly expanding archives. Moving the tools required for processing data to computer systems of data providers, and away from systems of the data consumer, can improve turnaround times for data processing workflows. The implementation of middleware services was used to provide interactive access to archive data. The goal of this middleware services development is to enable Earth science data users to access remote sensing archives for immediate answers to science questions instead of links to large volumes of data to download and process. Exposing data and metadata to web-based services enables machine-driven queries and data interaction. Also, product quality information can be integrated to enable additional filtering and sub-setting. Only the reduced content required to complete an analysis is then transferred to the user.

  13. Combining satellite observations and reanalysis energy transports to estimate global net surface energy fluxes 1985-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chunlei; Allan, Richard P.; Berrisford, Paul; Mayer, Michael; Hyder, Patrick; Loeb, Norman; Smith, Doug; Vidale, Pier-Luigi; Edwards, John M.

    2015-09-01

    Two methods are developed to estimate net surface energy fluxes based upon satellite-derived reconstructions of radiative fluxes at the top of atmosphere and the atmospheric energy tendencies and transports from the ERA-Interim reanalysis. Method 1 applies the mass-adjusted energy divergence from ERA-Interim, while method 2 estimates energy divergence based upon the net energy difference at the top of atmosphere and the surface from ERA-Interim. To optimize the surface flux and its variability over ocean, the divergences over land are constrained to match the monthly area mean surface net energy flux variability derived from a simple relationship between the surface net energy flux and the surface temperature change. The energy divergences over the oceans are then adjusted to remove an unphysical residual global mean atmospheric energy divergence. The estimated net surface energy fluxes are compared with other data sets from reanalysis and atmospheric model simulations. The spatial correlation coefficients of multiannual means between the estimations made here and other data sets are all around 0.9. There are good agreements in area mean anomaly variability over the global ocean, but discrepancies in the trend over the eastern Pacific are apparent.

  14. Combining Satellite Data and Models to Assess the Impacts of Urbanization on the Continental US Surface Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bounoua, L.; Zhang, P.; Imhoff, M.; Santanello, J.; Kumar, S.; Shepherd, M.; Quattrochi, D.; Silva, J.; Rosenzweigh, C.; Gaffin, S.; hide

    2013-01-01

    Urbanization is one of the most important and long lasting forms of land transformation. Urbanization affects the surface climate in different ways: (1) by reduction of the vegetation fraction causing subsequent reduction in photosynthesis and plant s water transpiration, (2) by alternation of surface runoff and infiltration and their impacts on soil moisture and the water table, (3) by change in the surface albedo and surface energy partitioning, and (4) by transformation of the surface roughness length and modification of surface fluxes. Land cover and land use change maps including urban areas have been developed and will be used in a suite of land surface models of different complexity to assess the impacts of urbanization on the continental US surface climate. These maps and datasets based on a full range of available satellite data and ground observations will be used to characterize distant-past (pre-urban), recent-past (2001), present (2010), and near future (2020) land cover and land use changes. The main objective of the project is to assess the impacts of these land transformation on past, current and near-future climate and the potential feedbacks from these changes on the atmospheric, hydrologic, biological, and socio-economic properties beyond the immediate metropolitan regions of cities and their near suburbs. The WRF modeling system will be used to explore the nature and the magnitude of the two-way interactions between urban lands and the atmosphere and assess the overall regional dynamic effect of urban expansion on the northeastern US weather and climate

  15. The export and fate of organic matter in the ocean: New constraints from combining satellite and oceanographic tracer observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVries, Tim; Weber, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    The ocean's biological pump transfers carbon from the surface euphotic zone into the deep ocean, reducing the atmospheric CO2 concentration. Despite its climatic importance, there are large uncertainties in basic metrics of the biological pump. Previous estimates of the strength of the biological pump, as measured by the amount of organic carbon exported from the euphotic zone, range from about 4 to 12 Pg C yr-1. The fate of exported carbon, in terms of how efficiently it is transferred into the deep ocean, is even more uncertain. Here we present a new model of the biological pump that assimilates satellite and oceanographic tracer observations to constrain rates and patterns of organic matter production, export, and remineralization in the ocean. The data-assimilated model predicts a global particulate organic carbon (POC) flux out of the euphotic zone of ˜9 Pg C yr-1. The particle export ratio (the ratio of POC export to net primary production) is highest at high latitudes and lowest at low latitudes, but low-latitude export is greater than predicted by previous models, in better agreement with observed patterns of long-term carbon export. Particle transfer efficiency (Teff) through the mesopelagic zone is controlled by temperature and oxygen, with highest Teff for high-latitude regions and oxygen minimum zones. In contrast, Teff in the deep ocean (below 1000 m) is controlled by particle sinking speed, with highest deep ocean Teff below the subtropical gyres. These results emphasize the utility of both remote sensing and oceanographic tracer observations for constraining the operation of the biological pump.

  16. The Export and Fate of Organic Matter in the Ocean: New Constraints from Combining Satellite and Oceanographic Tracer Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVries, T. J.; Weber, T. S.

    2016-12-01

    The ocean's biological pump transfers carbon from the sunlit surface into the ocean's deeper layers, where it is shielded from the atmosphere for months to millennia, reducing the atmospheric CO2 concentration. Despite it's climatic importance, there are large uncertainties in our understanding of the magnitude and mechanisms of the biological pump. Estimates of the strength of the biological pump, as measured by the amount of organic matter exported from the euphotic zone, range from about 4-12 Pg C/yr. The fate of exported organic matter, in terms of how efficiently it is transferred into the deep ocean before being remineralized, is even less well known. There is currently no consensus spatial patterns of transfer efficiency, and the processes that drive variability in organic matter remineralization depth are similarly uncertain. Here we present a new model of the biological pump that assimilates both satellite and oceanographic tracer observations to constrain rates and patterns of organic matter production, export and remineralization in the ocean. The model predicts about 9 PgC/yr of particulate carbon export, with higher particle export ratios in subtropical gyres than predicted by previous empirical models. Particle transfer efficiencies through the mesopelagic layer are highest in high-latitudes, and lowest in subtropical gyres, in agreement with results from arrays of neutrally buoyant sediments traps. Temperature and oxygen concentration are the dominant controls on particle transfer efficiency in the mesopelagic layer, while particle transfer efficiencies in the deep ocean are primarily controlled by spatial variations in particle size and/or ballast mineral content.

  17. Simulation of whistler waves excited in the presence of a cold plasma cloud - Implications for the CRRES mission. [Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchett, P. L.; Schriver, D.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.

    1991-01-01

    A one-dimensional electromagnetic particle simulation model is constructed to study the excitation of whistler waves in the presence of a cold plasma cloud for conditions representative of those after the release of lithium in the inner plasma sheet during the Combined Release and Radiation Effect Satellite mission. The results indicate that a standing-wave pattern with discrete wave frequencies is formed within the cloud. The magnetic wave amplitude inside the cloud, which is limited by quasi-linear diffusion, is of the order of several nanoteslas. Assuming a magnetospheric loss cone of 5 deg, the observed pitch angle diffusion produced by the whistler waves is sufficient to put the electrons on strong diffusion.

  18. Simulation of whistler waves excited in the presence of a cold plasma cloud - Implications for the CRRES mission. [Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchett, P. L.; Schriver, D.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.

    1991-01-01

    A one-dimensional electromagnetic particle simulation model is constructed to study the excitation of whistler waves in the presence of a cold plasma cloud for conditions representative of those after the release of lithium in the inner plasma sheet during the Combined Release and Radiation Effect Satellite mission. The results indicate that a standing-wave pattern with discrete wave frequencies is formed within the cloud. The magnetic wave amplitude inside the cloud, which is limited by quasi-linear diffusion, is of the order of several nanoteslas. Assuming a magnetospheric loss cone of 5 deg, the observed pitch angle diffusion produced by the whistler waves is sufficient to put the electrons on strong diffusion.

  19. Calculating Freshwater Input from Iceberg Melt in Greenlandic Fjords by Combining In Situ Observations of Iceberg Movement with High Resolution Satellite Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulak, D. J.; Sutherland, D.; Stearns, L. A.; Hamilton, G. S.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding fjord circulation in Greenland's outlet glacial fjords is crucial to explaining recent temporal and spatial variability in glacier dynamics, as well as freshwater transport on the continental shelf. The fjords are commonly assumed to exhibit a plume driven circulation that draws in warmer and saltier Atlantic-origin water toward the glacier at depth. Freshwater input at glacier termini directly drives this circulation and significantly influences water column stratification, which indirectly feeds back on the plume driven circulation. Previous work has focused on freshwater inputs from surface runoff and submarine melting, but the contribution from iceberg melt, a potentially important freshwater source, has not been quantified. Here, we develop a new technique combining in situ observations of movement from iceberg-mounted GPS units with multispectral satellite imagery from Landsat 8. The combination of datasets allows us to examine the details of iceberg movement and quantify mean residence times in a given fjord. We then use common melt rate parameterizations to estimate freshwater input for a given iceberg, utilizing novel satellite-derived iceberg distributions to scale up to a fjord-wide freshwater contribution. We apply this technique to Rink Isbræ and Kangerlussuup Sermia in west Greenland, and Helheim Glacier in southeast Greenland. The analysis can be rapidly expanded to look at other systems as well as seasonal and interannual changes in how icebergs affect the circulation and stratification of Greenland's outlet glacial fjords. Ultimately, this work will lead to a more complete understanding of the wide range of factors that control the observed regional variability in Greenland's glaciers.

  20. Tactical satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, F. H.

    1993-02-01

    The concept of a Tactical Space System (TACSAT) is a means to provide a rapid, on demand, augmentation of the backbone U.S. military space systems. Such augmentation would be valuable to temporarily replace lost capability or in times of crisis, to accommodate surge demands. Because augmentation needs are not always known a-priori, it would be desirable to be able to rapidly constitute the appropriate payload-satellite bus combination to accommodate the need for a specific space capability. To do this, one can envision a standard bus capable of accepting a variety of payloads, or better yet, a single spacecraft designed to perform several different missions. Both options are considered. A number of potential missions exist in the areas of surveillance, navigation, environmental sensing, and communications. Of these, two are presented as strawman concepts: surveillance and communication. For surveillance, an electro-optical payload is described that could be used for missile surveillance, theater targeting, or weather data using the same optics, focal plane, and processor. The satellite orbit selected dictates which mission is performed. For communication, both SHF and EHF payloads are defined to provide theater coverage for the tactical user. The advantages and penalties that accrue to the use of a common bus are also explored. In addition, launch options are identified and a comparison made between 'launch-on-demand' and 'launch-on-schedule' strategies. Potential timelines for rapid launch are shown based on parallel processing and checkout of spacecraft and launcher. This technique is compared with launching satellites on a routine basis and storing them in orbit. Energy requirements for repositioning these stored satellites after they are activated in time of need are defined.

  1. Simulating estimation of California fossil fuel and biosphere carbon dioxide exchanges combining in situ tower and satellite column observations

    DOE PAGES

    Fischer, Marc L.; Parazoo, Nicholas; Brophy, Kieran; ...

    2017-03-09

    Here, we report simulation experiments estimating the uncertainties in California regional fossil fuel and biosphere CO2 exchanges that might be obtained by using an atmospheric inverse modeling system driven by the combination of ground-based observations of radiocarbon and total CO2, together with column-mean CO2 observations from NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO-2). The work includes an initial examination of statistical uncertainties in prior models for CO2 exchange, in radiocarbon-based fossil fuel CO2 measurements, in OCO-2 measurements, and in a regional atmospheric transport modeling system. Using these nominal assumptions for measurement and model uncertainties, we find that flask measurements of radiocarbon andmore » total CO2 at 10 towers can be used to distinguish between different fossil fuel emission data products for major urban regions of California. We then show that the combination of flask and OCO-2 observations yields posterior uncertainties in monthly-mean fossil fuel emissions of ~5–10%, levels likely useful for policy relevant evaluation of bottom-up fossil fuel emission estimates. Similarly, we find that inversions yield uncertainties in monthly biosphere CO2 exchange of ~6%–12%, depending on season, providing useful information on net carbon uptake in California's forests and agricultural lands. Finally, initial sensitivity analysis suggests that obtaining the above results requires control of systematic biases below approximately 0.5 ppm, placing requirements on accuracy of the atmospheric measurements, background subtraction, and atmospheric transport modeling.« less

  2. Simulating estimation of California fossil fuel and biosphere carbon dioxide exchanges combining in situ tower and satellite column observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Marc L.; Parazoo, Nicholas; Brophy, Kieran; Cui, Xinguang; Jeong, Seongeun; Liu, Junjie; Keeling, Ralph; Taylor, Thomas E.; Gurney, Kevin; Oda, Tomohiro; Graven, Heather

    2017-03-01

    We report simulation experiments estimating the uncertainties in California regional fossil fuel and biosphere CO2 exchanges that might be obtained by using an atmospheric inverse modeling system driven by the combination of ground-based observations of radiocarbon and total CO2, together with column-mean CO2 observations from NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO-2). The work includes an initial examination of statistical uncertainties in prior models for CO2 exchange, in radiocarbon-based fossil fuel CO2 measurements, in OCO-2 measurements, and in a regional atmospheric transport modeling system. Using these nominal assumptions for measurement and model uncertainties, we find that flask measurements of radiocarbon and total CO2 at 10 towers can be used to distinguish between different fossil fuel emission data products for major urban regions of California. We then show that the combination of flask and OCO-2 observations yields posterior uncertainties in monthly-mean fossil fuel emissions of 5-10%, levels likely useful for policy relevant evaluation of bottom-up fossil fuel emission estimates. Similarly, we find that inversions yield uncertainties in monthly biosphere CO2 exchange of 6%-12%, depending on season, providing useful information on net carbon uptake in California's forests and agricultural lands. Finally, initial sensitivity analysis suggests that obtaining the above results requires control of systematic biases below approximately 0.5 ppm, placing requirements on accuracy of the atmospheric measurements, background subtraction, and atmospheric transport modeling.

  3. Towards high temporal and moderate spatial resolutions in the remote sensing retrieval of evapotranspiration by combining geostationary and polar orbit satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrios, José Miguel; Ghilain, Nicolas; Arboleda, Alirio; Gellens-Meulenberghs, Françoise

    2014-05-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is the water flux going from the surface into the atmosphere as result of soil and surface water evaporation and plant transpiration. It constitutes a key component of the water cycle and its quantification is of crucial importance for a number of applications like water management, climatic modelling, agriculture monitoring and planning, etc. Estimating ET is not an easy task; specially if large areas are envisaged and various spatio-temporal patterns of ET are present as result of heterogeneity in land cover, land use and climatic conditions. In this respect, spaceborne remote sensing (RS) provides the only alternative to continuously measure surface parameters related to ET over large areas. The Royal Meteorological Institute (RMI) of Belgium, in the framework of EUMETSAT's "Land Surface Analysis-Satellite Application Facility" (LSA-SAF), has developed a model for the estimation of ET. The model is forced by RS data, numerical weather predictions and land cover information. The RS forcing is derived from measurements by the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) onboard the Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellite. This ET model is operational and delivers ET estimations over the whole field of view of the MSG satellite (Europe, Africa and Eastern South America) (http://landsaf.meteo.pt) every 30 minutes. The spatial resolution of MSG is 3 x 3 km at subsatellite point and about 4 x 5 km in continental Europe. The spatial resolution of this product may constrain its full exploitation as the interest of potential users (farmers and natural resources scientists) may lie on smaller spatial units. This study aimed at testing methodological alternatives to combine RS imagery (geostationary and polar orbit satellites) for the estimation of ET such that the spatial resolution of the final product is improved. In particular, the study consisted in the implementation of two approaches for combining the current ET estimations with

  4. Lithospheric structure and geodynamic evolution of the northern Molucca Sea area constrained by 3-D gravity field inversion of a combined sea-surface and satellite gravity dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widiwijayanti, C.; Tiberi, C.; Diament, M.; Deplus, C.; Mikhailov, V.; Louat, R.; Tikhotsky, S.; Gvishiani, A.

    2003-04-01

    The Molucca Sea extending from northeastern Indonesia to southern Philippines islands, is a zone of oceanic basin closure between two opposite-facing subduction zones. This convergence results in the collision of two subduction zones, which style evolves from the southern to the northern parts of the Molucca Sea. In order to provide new insights into the present-day lithospheric structures in the Molucca Sea area, we inverted satellite and sea-surface gravity data into an iterative scheme including a priori seismological data. The seismological data were collected from two networks of Ocean Bottom Seismometer (OBS). These data allowed us to locate local seismic events and to build 3D tomographic images. We relate these results to the different stages of collision. The gravity data consists of combined sea-surface and satellite derived gravity. We used Kolmogorov-Wiener optimal (mean-square) filter to extract the gravity signal associated with lithospheric structures, then analyzed it to determine main regional features of lithospheric structure. For this purpose we employed a selection of Euler solutions based on a new clustering technique. To identify the geometry and nature of lithospheric structures, we also performed a 3-D gravity inversion for the northern Molucca Sea data, introducing our tomographic model as an independent constraint. The combination of both methods permits us to obtain a coherent image of the lithospheric structure. The results of this study illustrate the heterogeneity of lithospheric units in the northern Molucca Sea, which results from the collision between the Sangihe margin and lithospheric fragments from the Phillipine plate such as the Snellius plateau or the Halmahera volcanic arc. Three phenomena can explain the observed lithospheric structure: 1) the rupture of the Molucca Sea plate, accompanied by the appearance at the surface of slices of oceanic crust, favoring the development of suture zones as the collision evolves, 2) the

  5. Three-dimensional, two-species magnetohydrodynamic studies of the early time behaviors of the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite G2 barium release

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Lianghai Li, Lei; Wang, Jingdong; Zhang, Yiteng

    2014-04-15

    We present a three-dimensional, two-species (Ba{sup +} and H{sup +}) MHD model to study the early time behaviors of a barium release at about 1 R{sub E} like Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite G2, with emphasis placed on the three-dimensional evolution of the barium cloud and its effects on the ambient plasma environment. We find that the perturbations caused by the cloud are the combined results of the initial injection, the radial expansion, and the diamagnetic effect and propagate as fast MHD waves in the magnetosphere. In return, the transverse expansion and the cross-B motion of barium ions are constrained by the magnetic force, which lead to a field-aligned striation of ions and the decoupling of these ions from the neutrals. Our simulation shows the formation and collapse of the diamagnetic cavity in the barium cloud. The estimated time scale for the cavity evolution might be much shorter if photoionization time scale and field aligned expansion of barium ions are considered. In addition, our two species MHD simulation also finds the snowplow effect resulting from the momentum coupling between barium ions and background H{sup +}, which creates density hole and bumps in the background H{sup +} when barium ions expanding along the magnetic field lines.

  6. Combining data sets of satellite-retrieved products for basin-scale water balance study: 2. Evaluation on the Mississippi Basin and closure correction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munier, Simon; Aires, Filipe; Schlaffer, Stefan; Prigent, Catherine; Papa, Fabrice; Maisongrande, Philippe; Pan, Ming

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we applied the integration methodology developed in the companion paper by Aires (2014) by using real satellite observations over the Mississippi Basin. The methodology provides basin-scale estimates of the four water budget components (precipitation P, evapotranspiration E, water storage change ΔS, and runoff R) in a two-step process: the Simple Weighting (SW) integration and a Postprocessing Filtering (PF) that imposes the water budget closure. A comparison with in situ observations of P and E demonstrated that PF improved the estimation of both components. A Closure Correction Model (CCM) has been derived from the integrated product (SW+PF) that allows to correct each observation data set independently, unlike the SW+PF method which requires simultaneous estimates of the four components. The CCM allows to standardize the various data sets for each component and highly decrease the budget residual (P - E - ΔS - R). As a direct application, the CCM was combined with the water budget equation to reconstruct missing values in any component. Results of a Monte Carlo experiment with synthetic gaps demonstrated the good performances of the method, except for the runoff data that has a variability of the same order of magnitude as the budget residual. Similarly, we proposed a reconstruction of ΔS between 1990 and 2002 where no Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment data are available. Unlike most of the studies dealing with the water budget closure at the basin scale, only satellite observations and in situ runoff measurements are used. Consequently, the integrated data sets are model independent and can be used for model calibration or validation.

  7. Combination of historical maps and satellite images of the Banat region—Re-appearance of an old wetland area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timár, Gábor; Székely, Balázs; Molnár, Gábor; Ferencz, Csaba; Kern, Anikó; Galambos, Csilla; Gercsák, Gábor; Zentai, László

    2008-05-01

    The area of Banat, a historical region shared by Romania and Serbia, has been hit by a centennial flood event in spring 2005. The Temes (Tamiš/Timiş) River flooded several hundred km 2, with many settlements. The extent of the flood was partly unexpected, especially in positional sense. In order to achieve a better understanding of the phenomenon, we analysed the SRTM digital elevation model as well as historical maps. Several historical maps, dating back to the 16th century, indicate marshland or even a large lake in the area, not existing today but almost exactly coinciding with the extent of the 2005 flood. The historical and archive maps document the water regulation measures taken since the early 19th century. The actual flood is found to be a sort of a restoration of the original natural conditions. Via the analysis of the DEM and historical maps the unexpected extent of the flood scenario can be explained and understood. We suggest that an analysis of historical and archive maps, combined (geo-referenced) with high-resolution DEMS in other flood-endangered areas, should be used in order to be better prepared for decadal or centennial flood events induced by climatic change.

  8. Global mean sea surface computation based upon a combination of SEASAT and GEOS-3 satellite altimeter data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, J. G.; Koblinsky, C. J.; Brenner, A.; Beckley, B.; Martin, T.

    1985-01-01

    A mean sea surface map was computed for the global ocean areas between 70 deg N latitude and 62 deg S latitude based upon the 70 day SEASAT and 3.5 year GEOS-3 altimeter data sets. The mean sea surface is presented in the form of a global contour map and a 0.25 deg x 0.25 deg grid. A combination of regional adjustments based upon crossover techniques and the subsequent adjustment of the regional solutions into a global reference system was employed in order to minimize the effects of radial orbit error. A global map of the crossover residuals after the crossover adjustments are made is in good agreement with earlier mesoscale variability contour maps based upon the last month of SEASAT collinear data. This high level of agreement provides good evidence that relative orbit error was removed to the decimeter level on a regional basis. This represents a significant improvement over our previous maps which contained patterns, particularly in the central Pacific, which were due to radial orbit error. Long wavelength, basin scale errors are still present with a submeter amplitude due to errors in the PGS-S4 gravity model. Such errors can only be removed through the improvement of the Earth's gravity model and associated geodetic parameters.

  9. Combining satellite-based fire observations and ground-based lightning detections to identify lightning fires across the conterminous USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bar-Massada, A.; Hawbaker, T.J.; Stewart, S.I.; Radeloff, V.C.

    2012-01-01

    Lightning fires are a common natural disturbance in North America, and account for the largest proportion of the area burned by wildfires each year. Yet, the spatiotemporal patterns of lightning fires in the conterminous US are not well understood due to limitations of existing fire databases. Our goal here was to develop and test an algorithm that combined MODIS fire detections with lightning detections from the National Lightning Detection Network to identify lightning fires across the conterminous US from 2000 to 2008. The algorithm searches for spatiotemporal conjunctions of MODIS fire clusters and NLDN detected lightning strikes, given a spatiotemporal lag between lightning strike and fire ignition. The algorithm revealed distinctive spatial patterns of lightning fires in the conterminous US While a sensitivity analysis revealed that the algorithm is highly sensitive to the two thresholds that are used to determine conjunction, the density of fires it detected was moderately correlated with ground based fire records. When only fires larger than 0.4 km2 were considered, correlations were higher and the root-mean-square error between datasets was less than five fires per 625 km2 for the entire study period. Our algorithm is thus suitable for detecting broad scale spatial patterns of lightning fire occurrence, and especially lightning fire hotspots, but has limited detection capability of smaller fires because these cannot be consistently detected by MODIS. These results may enhance our understanding of large scale patterns of lightning fire activity, and can be used to identify the broad scale factors controlling fire occurrence.

  10. Potential of multispectral synergism for observing tropospheric ozone by combining IR and UV measurements from incoming LEO (EPS-SG) and GEO (MTG) satellite sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costantino, Lorenzo; Cuesta, Juan; Emili, Emanuele; Coman, Adriana; Foret, Gilles; Dufour, Gaëlle; Eremenko, Maxim; Chailleux, Yohann; Beekmann, Matthias; Flaud, Jean-Marie

    2017-04-01

    Satellite observations offer a great potential for monitoring air quality on daily and global basis. However, measurements from currently in orbit sensors do not allow to probe surface concentrations of gaseous pollutants such as tropospheric ozone (Liu et al., 2010). Using single-band approaches based on spaceborne measurements of either thermal infrared radiance (TIR, Eremenko et al., 2008) or ultraviolet reflectance (UV, Liu et al., 2010) only ozone down to the lower troposphere (3 km) may be observed. A recent multispectral method (referred to as IASI+GOME-2) combining the information of IASI and GOME-2 (both onboard MetOp satellites) spectra, respectively from the TIR and UV, has shown enhanced sensitivity for probing ozone at the lowermost troposphere (LMT, below 3 km of altitude) with maximum sensitivity down to 2.20 km a.s.l. over land, while sensitivity for IASI or GOME-2 only peaks at 3 to 4 km at lowest (Cuesta et al., 2013). Future spatial missions will be launched in the upcoming years on both low and geostationary orbits, such as EPS-SG (EUMETSAT Polar System Second Generation) and MTG (Meteosat Third Generation), carrying respectively IASI-NG (for IR) and UVNS (for UV), and IRS (for IR) and UVN (Sentinel 4, for UV). This new-generation sensors will enhance the capacity to observe ozone pollution and particularly by synergism of multispectral measurements. In this work we develop a pseudo-observation simulator and evaluate the potential of future EPS-SG and MTG satellite observations, through IASI-NG+UVNS and IRS+UVN multispectral methods to observe near-surface O3. The pseudo-real state of atmosphere (nature run) is provided by MOCAGE (MOdèle de Chimie Atmosphérique à Grande Échelle) chemical transport model. Simulations are calibrated by careful comparisons with real data, to ensure the best coherence between pseudo-reality and reality, as well as between the pseudo-observation simulator and existing satellite products. We perform full and

  11. Combining forces--the use of Landsat TM satellite imagery, soil parameter information, and multiplex PCR to detect Coccidioides immitis growth sites in Kern County, California.

    PubMed

    Lauer, Antje; Talamantes, Jorge; Castañón Olivares, Laura Rosío; Medina, Luis Jaime; Baal, Joe Daryl Hugo; Casimiro, Kayla; Shroff, Natasha; Emery, Kirt W

    2014-01-01

    Coccidioidomycosis is a fungal disease acquired through the inhalation of spores of Coccidioides spp., which afflicts primarily humans and other mammals. It is endemic to areas in the southwestern United States, including the San Joaquin Valley portion of Kern County, California, our region of interest (ROI). Recently, incidence of coccidioidomycosis, also known as valley fever, has increased significantly, and several factors including climate change have been suggested as possible drivers for this observation. Up to date details about the ecological niche of C. immitis have escaped full characterization. In our project, we chose a three-step approach to investigate this niche: 1) We examined Landsat-5-Thematic-Mapper multispectral images of our ROI by using training pixels at a 750 m × 750 m section of Sharktooth Hill, a site confirmed to be a C. immitis growth site, to implement a Maximum Likelihood Classification scheme to map out the locations that could be suitable to support the growth of the pathogen; 2) We used the websoilsurvey database of the US Department of Agriculture to obtain soil parameter data; and 3) We investigated soil samples from 23 sites around Bakersfield, California using a multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) based method to detect the pathogen. Our results indicated that a combination of satellite imagery, soil type information, and multiplex PCR are powerful tools to predict and identify growth sites of C. immitis. This approach can be used as a basis for systematic sampling and investigation of soils to detect Coccidioides spp.

  12. Combining Forces - The Use of Landsat TM Satellite Imagery, Soil Parameter Information, and Multiplex PCR to Detect Coccidioides immitis Growth Sites in Kern County, California

    PubMed Central

    Lauer, Antje; Talamantes, Jorge; Castañón Olivares, Laura Rosío; Medina, Luis Jaime; Baal, Joe Daryl Hugo; Casimiro, Kayla; Shroff, Natasha; Emery, Kirt W.

    2014-01-01

    Coccidioidomycosis is a fungal disease acquired through the inhalation of spores of Coccidioides spp., which afflicts primarily humans and other mammals. It is endemic to areas in the southwestern United States, including the San Joaquin Valley portion of Kern County, California, our region of interest (ROI). Recently, incidence of coccidioidomycosis, also known as valley fever, has increased significantly, and several factors including climate change have been suggested as possible drivers for this observation. Up to date details about the ecological niche of C. immitis have escaped full characterization. In our project, we chose a three-step approach to investigate this niche: 1) We examined Landsat-5-Thematic-Mapper multispectral images of our ROI by using training pixels at a 750 m×750 m section of Sharktooth Hill, a site confirmed to be a C. immitis growth site, to implement a Maximum Likelihood Classification scheme to map out the locations that could be suitable to support the growth of the pathogen; 2) We used the websoilsurvey database of the US Department of Agriculture to obtain soil parameter data; and 3) We investigated soil samples from 23 sites around Bakersfield, California using a multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) based method to detect the pathogen. Our results indicated that a combination of satellite imagery, soil type information, and multiplex PCR are powerful tools to predict and identify growth sites of C. immitis. This approach can be used as a basis for systematic sampling and investigation of soils to detect Coccidioides spp. PMID:25380290

  13. Supporting FIRE-suppression strategies combining fire spread MODelling and SATellite data in an operational context in Portugal: the FIRE-MODSAT project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sá, Ana C. L.; Benali, Akli; Pinto, Renata M. S.; Pereira, José M. C.; Trigo, Ricardo M.; DaCamara, Carlos C.

    2014-05-01

    Large wildfires are infrequent but account for the most severe environmental, ecological and socio-economic impacts. In recent years Portugal has suffered the impact of major heat waves that fuelled records of burnt area exceeding 400.000ha and 300.000ha in 2003 and 2005, respectively. According to the latest IPCC reports, the frequency and amplitude of summer heat waves over Iberia will very likely increase in the future. Therefore, most climate change studies point to an increase in the number and extent of wildfires. Thus, an increase in both wildfire impacts and fire suppression difficulties is expected. The spread of large wildfires results from a complex interaction between topography, meteorology and fuel properties. Wildfire spread models (e.g. FARSITE) are commonly used to simulate fire growth and behaviour and are an essential tool to understand their main drivers. Additionally, satellite active-fire data have been used to monitor the occurrence, extent, and spread of wildfires. Both satellite data and fire spread models provide different types of information about the spatial and temporal distribution of large wildfires and can potentially be used to support strategic decisions regarding fire suppression resource allocation. However, they have not been combined in a manner that fully exploits their potential and minimizes their limitations. A knowledge gap still exists in understanding how to minimize the impacts of large wildfires, leading to the following research question: What can we learn from past large wildfires in order to mitigate future fire impacts? FIRE-MODSAT is a one-year funded project by the Portuguese Foundation for the Science and Technology (FCT) that is founded on this research question, with the main goal of improving our understanding on the interactions between fire spread and its environmental drivers, to support fire management decisions in an operational context and generate valuable information to improve the efficiency of the

  14. Combining Satellite and Ground-Based Radar Interferometry Data to Measure Surface Deformation Associated with EGS Pumping Activities at Newberry Crater, OR Geothermal Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, P.; Cladouhos, T. T.; Schultz, A.; Rose, K.; Urquhart, S.

    2013-12-01

    TerraSAR-X (TSX) satellite data are combined with data collected using a ground-based real aperture radar interferometer (GAMMA Remote Sensing AG Portable Radar Interferometer-2, GPRI2) to remotely image surface deformation arising from enhanced geothermal system (EGS) pumping activity at the geothermal site located off the western flank of Newberry Crater, OR. Due to the heavily forested area impeding the utility of interferometric measurements at X-band (TSX) and Ku-band (GPRI2) wavelengths, 100 aluminum radar corner reflectors (CRs) were fabricated and installed in pairs approximately 5-8 meters above the ground in 50 large trees for optimal visibility and wind stability. One CR in each pair was aimed up at the ascending orbit track look direction for TSX, and the other was simultaneously aimed at the descending orbit track look direction for TSX and to Paulina Peak 6 km to the southwest for line-of-sight to the GPRI2 antenna position. The combination of 11-day repeat orbit acquisitions from a near vertical look direction from TSX with on-demand (up to daily) acquisitions from a near horizontal look direction from the GPRI2 instrument allows for full 3D displacement vector determination for each target imaged. Standard and point-target processing techniques are used to maximize the utility of the data collected and the transient nature of the pumping activities and resulting surface deformation signals demand this high level of spatial-temporal sampling. Preliminary data quality and deformation signal results will be presented and put in context with well-log data such as pressure, volume and flow rate, as well as data from microseismic array, MT, and gravity surveys.

  15. Multi-scale model of the ionosphere from the combination of modern space-geodetic satellite techniques - project status and first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, M.; Hugentobler, U.; Jakowski, N.; Dettmering, D.; Liang, W.; Limberger, M.; Wilken, V.; Gerzen, T.; Hoque, M.; Berdermann, J.

    2012-04-01

    Near real-time high resolution and high precision ionosphere models are needed for a large number of applications, e.g. in navigation, positioning, telecommunications or astronautics. Today these ionosphere models are mostly empirical, i.e., based purely on mathematical approaches. In the DFG project 'Multi-scale model of the ionosphere from the combination of modern space-geodetic satellite techniques (MuSIK)' the complex phenomena within the ionosphere are described vertically by combining the Chapman electron density profile with a plasmasphere layer. In order to consider the horizontal and temporal behaviour the fundamental target parameters of this physics-motivated approach are modelled by series expansions in terms of tensor products of localizing B-spline functions depending on longitude, latitude and time. For testing the procedure the model will be applied to an appropriate region in South America, which covers relevant ionospheric processes and phenomena such as the Equatorial Anomaly. The project connects the expertise of the three project partners, namely Deutsches Geodätisches Forschungsinstitut (DGFI) Munich, the Institute of Astronomical and Physical Geodesy (IAPG) of the Technical University Munich (TUM) and the German Aerospace Center (DLR), Neustrelitz. In this presentation we focus on the current status of the project. In the first year of the project we studied the behaviour of the ionosphere in the test region, we setup appropriate test periods covering high and low solar activity as well as winter and summer and started the data collection, analysis, pre-processing and archiving. We developed partly the mathematical-physical modelling approach and performed first computations based on simulated input data. Here we present information on the data coverage for the area and the time periods of our investigations and we outline challenges of the multi-dimensional mathematical-physical modelling approach. We show first results, discuss problems

  16. Satellite (IRLS) tracking of elk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buechner, H. K.

    1972-01-01

    The practicability of tracking free roaming animals in natural environments by satellite systems is reported. Satellite systems combine continuous tracking with simultaneous monitoring of physiological and environmental parameters through a combination of radio tracking and biotelemetric ground systems that lead to a better understanding of animal behavior and migration patterns.

  17. Potential of multispectral synergism for observing ozone pollution by combining IASI-NG and UVNS measurements from the EPS-SG satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costantino, Lorenzo; Cuesta, Juan; Emili, Emanuele; Coman, Adriana; Foret, Gilles; Dufour, Gaëlle; Eremenko, Maxim; Chailleux, Yohann; Beekmann, Matthias; Flaud, Jean-Marie

    2017-04-01

    Present and future satellite observations offer great potential for monitoring air quality on a daily and global basis. However, measurements from currently orbiting satellites do not allow a single sensor to accurately probe surface concentrations of gaseous pollutants such as tropospheric ozone. Combining information from IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer) and GOME-2 (Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2) respectively in the TIR and UV spectra, a recent multispectral method (referred to as IASI+GOME-2) has shown enhanced sensitivity for probing ozone in the lowermost troposphere (LMT, below 3 km altitude) with maximum sensitivity down to 2.20 km a.s.l. over land, while sensitivity for IASI or GOME-2 alone only peaks at 3 to 4 km at the lowest.In this work we develop a pseudo-observation simulator and evaluate the potential of future EPS-SG (EUMETSAT Polar System - Second Generation) satellite observations, from new-generation sensors IASI-NG (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer - New Generation) and UVNS (Ultraviolet Visible Near-infrared Shortwave-infrared), to observe near-surface O3 through the IASI-NG+UVNS multispectral method. The pseudo-real state of the atmosphere is provided by the MOCAGE (MOdèle de Chimie Atmosphérique à Grande Échelle) chemical transport model. We perform full and accurate forward and inverse radiative transfer calculations for a period of 4 days (8-11 July 2010) over Europe.In the LMT, there is a remarkable agreement in the geographical distribution of O3 partial columns between IASI-NG+UVNS pseudo-observations and the corresponding MOCAGE pseudo-reality. With respect to synthetic IASI+GOME-2 products, IASI-NG+UVNS shows a higher correlation between pseudo-observations and pseudo-reality, which is enhanced by about 12 %. The bias on high ozone retrieval is reduced and the average accuracy increases by 22 %. The sensitivity to LMT ozone is also enhanced. On average, the degree of freedom for signal is

  18. Assessing the Impacts of Fire on Water-Use Efficiency in Grasslands in Eastern Kansas Combining Satellite and Eddy Covariance Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Oliveira, G.; Brunsell, N. A.

    2016-12-01

    Burning is a land management practice commonly used on grasslands and plays an important role in these ecosystems by increasing production, determining community composition, and controlling the invasion of woody species. Without fire, many trees and shrubs species invade North American prairies, shrinking the area of the grassland. It specially occurs in the eastern tallgrass prairie where environmental conditions are more favorable for trees than in more arid west. Although the use of fire has benefits in relation to the maintenance of the structure of these ecosystems, the effects of this practice on carbon and water exchanges in grasslands are not well understood. The present study aimed to compare, using MODIS remote sensing data combined with flux tower observations, the magnitude and temporal dynamics of water-use efficiency (WUE) in four watersheds in eastern Kansas, USA. Two watersheds are located in the Konza Prairie Biological Station (KPBS), in Manhattan. The other two are located, respectively, in Lawrence, in a tallgrass prairie and deciduous forest ecotone, and in Salina, over an unburned, perennial agricultural site. These watersheds represent different grassland ecosystems, which are subjected to particular burning regimes. Eddy covariance data related, among others, to ecosystem respiration and latent heat flux, were acquired from three AmeriFlux towers located within each watershed. The MODIS products used were MOD17 (gross primary productivity) (GPP) and MOD16 (evapotranspiration) (ET). The integration of ground and satellite data was a useful proposition to analyze GPP, ET and WUE at canopy and watershed scales. It was possible to examine the variability of these parameters among grassland types and fire treatments, which may contribute to a better understanding of the direct effects of burning on the coupling between the terrestrial carbon and water cycles in grasslands of the Great Plains, as well as the role of fire on enhancing productivity

  19. Combining structure-from-motion derived point clouds from satellites and unmanned aircraft systems images with ground-truth data to create high-resolution digital elevation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaseanu, M.; Thatcher, C.; Danielson, J.; Gesch, D. B.; Poppenga, S.; Kottermair, M.; Jalandoni, A.; Carlson, E.

    2016-12-01

    Coastal topographic and bathymetric (topobathymetric) data with high spatial resolution (1-meter or better) and high vertical accuracy are needed to assess the vulnerability of Pacific Islands to climate change impacts, including sea level rise. According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change reports, low-lying atolls in the Pacific Ocean are extremely vulnerable to king tide events, storm surge, tsunamis, and sea-level rise. The lack of coastal topobathymetric data has been identified as a critical data gap for climate vulnerability and adaptation efforts in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI). For Majuro Atoll, home to the largest city of RMI, the only elevation dataset currently available is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission data which has a 30-meter spatial resolution and 16-meter vertical accuracy (expressed as linear error at 90%). To generate high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) in the RMI, elevation information and photographic imagery have been collected from field surveys using GNSS/total station and unmanned aerial vehicles for Structure-from-Motion (SfM) point cloud generation. Digital Globe WorldView II imagery was processed to create SfM point clouds to fill in gaps in the point cloud derived from the higher resolution UAS photos. The combined point cloud data is filtered and classified to bare-earth and georeferenced using the GNSS data acquired on roads and along survey transects perpendicular to the coast. A total station was used to collect elevation data under tree canopies where heavy vegetation cover blocked the view of GNSS satellites. A subset of the GPS / total station data was set aside for error assessment of the resulting DEM.

  20. Characterisation of a stratospheric sulphate plume from the Nabro volcano using a combination of passive satellite measurements in nadir and limb geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penning de Vries, M. J. M.; Dörner, S.; Puķīte, J.; Hörmann, C.; Fromm, M. D.; Wagner, T.

    2014-03-01

    The eruption of the Nabro volcano (Eritrea), which started on 12 June 2011, caused the introduction of large quantities of SO2 into the lower stratosphere. The subsequently formed sulphate aerosols could be detected for several months following the eruption. It is generally assumed that the formation of sulphate aerosols in the stratosphere takes about a month, but in plumes from explosive eruptions significant amounts of aerosols have been seen to form within a few hours. We show that sulphate aerosols were present in the lower stratosphere within hours of the onset of the eruption of Nabro. Evidence comes from nadir UV Aerosol Index (UVAI) and SO2 measurements by SCIAMACHY, GOME-2 and OMI, and limb aerosol measurements by SCIAMACHY. The sulphate plume displays negative UVAI in the western part of OMI's swath and positive UVAI in the eastern part - an effect that is due to the strong viewing angle dependence of UVAI and can only be caused by a high-altitude (>11 km), non-absorbing (single-scattering albedo >0.97) aerosol plume. For the retrieval of the aerosol profile from limb measurements, the horizontal dimensions and the position of the aerosol plume need to be taken into account, otherwise both extinction and layer height may be underestimated appreciably. By combining nadir SO2 column density and UVAI with limb aerosol profiles, a stratospheric plume from Nabro could be tracked from 13 to 17 June, before the plumes from later, lower-altitude explosions started interfering with the signal. Our findings are in agreement with ground-based lidar and sun-photometer data from an MPLNET/AERONET station in Israel and with data from the satellite-borne CALIOP lidar.

  1. Characterisation of a stratospheric sulfate plume from the Nabro volcano using a combination of passive satellite measurements in nadir and limb geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penning de Vries, M. J. M.; Dörner, S.; Puķīıte, J.; Hörmann, C.; Fromm, M. D.; Wagner, T.

    2014-08-01

    The eruption of the Nabro volcano (Eritrea), which started on 12 June 2011, caused the introduction of large quantities of SO2 into the lower stratosphere. The subsequently formed sulfate aerosols could be detected for several months following the eruption. It is generally assumed that the formation of sulfate aerosols in the stratosphere is a relatively slow process, but in plumes from explosive eruptions significant amounts of aerosols have been seen to form within a few hours. We show that sulfate aerosols were present in the lower stratosphere within hours of the onset of the eruption of Nabro. Evidence comes from nadir UV Aerosol Index (UVAI) and SO2 measurements by SCIAMACHY, GOME-2 and OMI, and limb aerosol measurements by SCIAMACHY. The sulfate plume displays negative UVAI in the western part of OMI's swath and positive UVAI in the eastern part - an effect that is due to the strong viewing angle dependence of UVAI and can only be caused by a high-altitude (>11 km), non-absorbing (single-scattering albedo >0.97) aerosol plume. For the retrieval of the aerosol profile from limb measurements, the horizontal dimensions and the position of the aerosol plume need to be taken into account, otherwise both extinction and layer height may be underestimated appreciably. By combining nadir SO2 column density and UVAI with limb aerosol profiles, a stratospheric plume from Nabro could be tracked from 13 to 17 June, before the plumes from later, lower-altitude explosions started interfering with the signal. Our findings are in agreement with ground-based lidar and sun-photometer data from an MPLNET/AERONET station in Israel and with data from the satellite-borne CALIOP lidar.

  2. A combined deficit index for regional agricultural drought assessment over semi-arid tract of India using geostationary meteorological satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyas, Swapnil S.; Bhattacharya, Bimal K.; Nigam, Rahul; Guhathakurta, Pulak; Ghosh, Kripan; Chattopadhyay, N.; Gairola, R. M.

    2015-07-01

    The untimely onset and uneven distribution of south-west monsoon rainfall lead to agricultural drought causing reduction in food-grain production with high vulnerability over semi-arid tract (SAT) of India. A combined deficit index (CDI) has been developed from tri-monthly sum of deficit in antecedent rainfall and deficit in monthly vegetation vigor with a lag period of one month between the two. The formulation of CDI used a core biophysical (e.g., NDVI) and a hydro-meteorological (e.g., rainfall) variables derived using observation from Indian geostationary satellites. The CDI was tested and evaluated in two drought years (2009 and 2012) within a span of five years (2009-2013) over SAT. The index was found to have good correlation (0.49-0.68) with standardized precipitation index (SPI) computed from rain-gauge measurements but showed lower correlation with anomaly in monthly land surface temperature (LST). Significant correlations were found between CDI and reduction in agricultural carbon productivity (0.67-0.83), evapotranspiration (0.64-0.73), agricultural grain yield (0.70-0.85). Inconsistent correlation between CDI and ET reduction was noticed in 2012 in contrast to consistent correlation between CDI and reduction in carbon productivity both in 2009 and 2012. The comparison of CDI-based drought-affected area with those from existing operational approach showed 75% overlapping regions though class-to-class matching was only 40-45%. The results demonstrated that CDI is a potential indicator for assessment of late-season regional agricultural drought based on lag-response between water supply and crop vigor.

  3. Satellite RNAs and Satellite Viruses.

    PubMed

    Palukaitis, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Satellite RNAs and satellite viruses are extraviral components that can affect either the pathogenicity, the accumulation, or both of their associated viruses while themselves being dependent on the associated viruses as helper viruses for their infection. Most of these satellite RNAs are noncoding RNAs, and in many cases, have been shown to alter the interaction of their helper viruses with their hosts. In only a few cases have the functions of these satellite RNAs in such interactions been studied in detail. In particular, work on the satellite RNAs of Cucumber mosaic virus and Turnip crinkle virus have provided novel insights into RNAs functioning as noncoding RNAs. These effects are described and potential roles for satellite RNAs in the processes involved in symptom intensification or attenuation are discussed. In most cases, models describing these roles involve some aspect of RNA silencing or its suppression, either directly or indirectly involving the particular satellite RNA.

  4. CO emission and export from Asia: an analysis combining complementary satellite measurements (MOPITT, SCIAMACHY and ACE-FTS) with global modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turquety, S.; Clerbaux, C.; Law, K.; Coheur, P.-F.; Cozic, A.; Szopa, S.; Hauglustaine, D. A.; Hadji-Lazaro, J.; Gloudemans, A. M. S.; Schrijver, H.; Boone, C. D.; Bernath, P. F.; Edwards, D. P.

    2008-09-01

    This study presents the complementary picture of the pollution outflow provided by several satellite observations of carbon monoxide (CO), based on different observation techniques. This is illustrated by an analysis of the Asian outflow during the spring of 2005, through comparisons with simulations by the LMDz-INCA global chemistry transport model. The CO observations from the MOPITT and SCIAMACHY nadir sounders, which provide vertically integrated information with excellent horizontal sampling, and from the ACE-FTS solar occultation instrument, which has limited spatial coverage but allows the retrieval of vertical profiles, are used. Combining observations from MOPITT (mainly sensitive to the free troposphere) and SCIAMACHY (sensitive to the full column) allows a qualitative evaluation of the boundary layer CO. The model tends to underestimate this residual compared to the observations, suggesting underestimated emissions, especially in eastern Asia. However, a better understanding of the consistency and possible biases between the MOPITT and SCIAMACHY CO is necessary for a quantitative evaluation. Underestimated emissions, and possibly too low lofting and underestimated chemical production in the model, lead to an underestimate of the export to the free troposphere, as highlighted by comparisons with MOPITT and ACE-FTS. Both instruments observe large trans-Pacific transport extending from ~20° N to ~60° N, with high upper tropospheric CO observed by ACE-FTS above the eastern Pacific (with values of up to 300 ppbv around 50° N at 500 hPa and up to ~200 ppbv around 30° N at 300 hPa). The low vertical and horizontal resolutions of the global model do not allow the simulation of the strong enhancements in the observed plumes. However, the transport patterns are well captured, and are mainly attributed to export from eastern Asia, with increasing contributions from South Asia and Indonesia towards the tropics. Additional measurements of C2H2, C2H6 and HCN by

  5. Application of spectral analysis techniques to the intercomparison of aerosol data - Part 4: Combined maximum covariance analysis to bridge the gap between multi-sensor satellite retrievals and ground-based measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Carlson, B. E.; Lacis, A. A.

    2014-04-01

    The development of remote sensing techniques has greatly advanced our knowledge of atmospheric aerosols. Various satellite sensors and the associated retrieval algorithms all add to the information of global aerosol variability, while well-designed surface networks provide time series of highly accurate measurements at specific locations. In studying the variability of aerosol properties, aerosol climate effects, and constraining aerosol fields in climate models, it is essential to make the best use of all of the available information. In the previous three parts of this series, we demonstrated the usefulness of several spectral decomposition techniques in the analysis and comparison of temporal and spatial variability of aerosol optical depth using satellite and ground-based measurements. Specifically, Principal Component Analysis (PCA) successfully captures and isolates seasonal and interannual variability from different aerosol source regions, Maximum Covariance Analysis (MCA) provides a means to verify the variability in one satellite dataset against Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data, and Combined Principal Component Analysis (CPCA) realized parallel comparison among multi-satellite, multi-sensor datasets. As the final part of the study, this paper introduces a novel technique that integrates both multi-sensor datasets and ground observations, and thus effectively bridges the gap between these two types of measurements. The Combined Maximum Covariance Analysis (CMCA) decomposes the cross covariance matrix between the combined multi-sensor satellite data field and AERONET station data. We show that this new method not only confirms the seasonal and interannual variability of aerosol optical depth, aerosol source regions and events represented by different satellite datasets, but also identifies the strengths and weaknesses of each dataset in capturing the variability associated with sources, events or aerosol types. Furthermore, by examining the spread of

  6. Application of spectral analysis techniques to the intercomparison of aerosol data - Part 4: Synthesized analysis of multisensor satellite and ground-based AOD measurements using combined maximum covariance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Carlson, B. E.; Lacis, A. A.

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we introduce the usage of a newly developed spectral decomposition technique - combined maximum covariance analysis (CMCA) - in the spatiotemporal comparison of four satellite data sets and ground-based observations of aerosol optical depth (AOD). This technique is based on commonly used principal component analysis (PCA) and maximum covariance analysis (MCA). By decomposing the cross-covariance matrix between the joint satellite data field and Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) station data, both parallel comparison across different satellite data sets and the evaluation of the satellite data against the AERONET measurements are simultaneously realized. We show that this new method not only confirms the seasonal and interannual variability of aerosol optical depth, aerosol-source regions and events represented by different satellite data sets, but also identifies the strengths and weaknesses of each data set in capturing the variability associated with sources, events or aerosol types. Furthermore, by examining the spread of the spatial modes of different satellite fields, regions with the largest uncertainties in aerosol observation are identified. We also present two regional case studies that respectively demonstrate the capability of the CMCA technique in assessing the representation of an extreme event in different data sets, and in evaluating the performance of different data sets on seasonal and interannual timescales. Global results indicate that different data sets agree qualitatively for major aerosol-source regions. Discrepancies are mostly found over the Sahel, India, eastern and southeastern Asia. Results for eastern Europe suggest that the intense wildfire event in Russia during summer 2010 was less well-represented by SeaWiFS (Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor) and OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument), which might be due to misclassification of smoke plumes as clouds. Analysis for the Indian subcontinent shows that here SeaWiFS agrees

  7. Cloudsat and MTSAT Satellites Observer Atsani

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This Aug. 19 image combines cloud imagery from Japan's MTSAT satellite and NASA's CloudSat satellite. Areas of pink and red designate larger amounts of liquid and ice. Light blue indicate smaller c...

  8. Satellite theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozai, Y.

    1981-04-01

    The dynamical characteristics of the natural satellite of Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune are analyzed on the basis of the solar tidal perturbation factor and the oblateness factor of the primary planet for each satellite. For the inner satellites, for which the value of the solar tidal factor is much smaller than the planetary oblateness factor, it is shown that the eccentricity and inclination of satellite orbits are generally very small and almost constant; several pairs of inner satellites are also found to exhibit commensurable mean motions, or secular accelerations in mean longitude. In the case of the outer satellites, for which solar perturbations are dominant, secular perturbations and long-period perturbations may be derived by the solution of equations of motion reduced to one degree of freedom. The existence of a few satellites, termed intermediary satellites, for which the solar tidal perturbation is on the order of the planetary oblateness factor, is also observed, and the pole of the orbital plane of the satellite is noted to execute a complex motion around the pole of the planet or the orbital plane of the planet.

  9. Satellite oceanography - The instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    It is pointed out that no instrument is sensitive to only one oceanographic variable; rather, each responds to a combination of atmospheric and oceanic phenomena. This complicates data interpretation and usually requires that a number of observations, each sensitive to somewhat different phenomena, be combined to provide unambiguous information. The distinction between active and passive instruments is described. A block diagram illustrating the steps necessary to convert data from satellite instruments into oceanographic information is included, as is a diagram illustrating the operation of a radio-frequency radiometer. Attention is also given to the satellites that carry the various oceanographic instruments.

  10. Combining Landsat TM multispectral satellite imagery and different modelling approaches for mapping post-fire erosion changes in a Mediterranean site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petropoulos, George P.; Kairis, Orestis; Karamesouti, Mina; Papanikolaou, Ioannis D.; Kosmas, Constantinos

    2013-04-01

    South European countries are naturally vulnerable to wildfires. Their natural resources such as soil, vegetation and water may be severely affected by wildfires, causing an imminent environmental deterioration due to the complex interdependence among biophysical components. Soil surface water erosion is a natural process essential for soil formation that is affected by such interdependences. Accelerated erosion due to wildfires, constitutes a major restrictive factor for ecosystem sustainability. In 2007, South European countries were severely affected by wildfires, with more than 500,000 hectares of land burnt in that year alone, well above the average of the last 30 years. The present work examines the changes in spatial variability of soil erosion rates as a result of a wildfire event that took place in Greece in 2007, one of the most devastating years in terms of wildfire hazards. Regional estimates of soil erosion rates before and after the fire outbreak were derived from the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE, Renard et al. 1991) and the Pan-European Soil Erosion Risk Assessment model (PESERA, Kirkby, 1999; Kirkby et al., 2000). Inputs for both models included climatic, land-use, soil type, topography and land use management data. Where appropriate, both models were also fed with input data derived from the analysis of LANDSAT TM satellite imagery available in our study area, acquired before and shortly after the fire suppression. Our study was compiled and performed in a GIS environment. In overall, the loss of vegetation from the fire outbreak caused a substantial increase of soil erosion rates in the affected area, particularly towards the steep slopes. Both tested models were compared to each other and noticeable differences were observed in the soil erosion predictions before and after the fire event. These are attributed to the different parameterization requirements of the 2 models. This quantification of sediment supply through the river

  11. Satellite Broadcasting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chayes, Abram; And Others

    This report of the 1970 International Broadcast Institute (IBI) surveyed legal and communicational experts in France, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States on the general topic of satellite broadcasting. The responses covered technical data (satellite and ground systems), legal information (international law and the International…

  12. Satellite Vulnerabilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-18

    per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and...allies. 8  Satellites and Intelligence , Surveillance, and Reconnaissance We have become dependent also on our satellite surveillance assets...uninterrupted ISR”, with “space intelligence , surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) systems…fundamental to air power—especially to the execution

  13. Meteorological satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, L. J. (Editor); Schnapf, A.; Diesen, B. C., III; Martin, P. S.; Schwalb, A.; Bandeen, W. R.

    1980-01-01

    An overview is presented of the meteorological satellite programs that have been evolving from 1958 to the present, and plans for the future meteorological and environmental satellite systems that are scheduled to be placed into service in the early 1980's are reviewed. The development of the TIROS family of weather satellites, including TIROS, ESSA, ITOS/NOAA, and the present TIROS-N (the third generation operational system) is summarized. The contribution of the Nimbus and ATS technology satellites to the development of the operational-orbiting and geostationary satellites is discussed. Included are descriptions of both the TIROS-N and the DMSP payloads currently under development to assure a continued and orderly growth of these systems into the 1980's.

  14. THE ONE ROOM SATELLITE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DREYFUS, LEE S.

    A WISCONSIN HIGH SCHOOL FRENCH CLASS AND A GROUP OF STUDENTS IN AN ENGLISH CALSS AT THE LYCEE HENRI IV OF PARIS, FRANCE, PARTICIPATED IN A COMBINED CLASS SESSION IN THE FIRST INTERNATIONAL TV CLASSROOM EXCHANGE. THE TV SIGNALS WERE EXCHANGED BY MEANS OF THE EARLY BIRD SATELLITE AND PERMITTED THE STUDENTS TO EXCHANGE MESSAGES. DURING THE TELECAST…

  15. Outer Planet Icy Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buratti, B.

    1994-01-01

    An outer planet icy satellite is any one of the celestial bodies in orbit around Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, or Pluto. They range from large, planet-like geologically active worlds with significant atmospheres to tiny irregular objects tens of kilometers in diameter. These bodies are all believed to have some type of frozen volatile, existing alone or in combination with other volatiles.

  16. Satellite Videoconferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    NASA is helping thousands of teachers to learn more about aerospace matters, improve their classroom skills, and expand significantly the content of their aerospace education curricula by means of live educational satellite videoconferences. The 1 1/2 hour 'Update for Teachers' programs originate at Oklahoma State University (OSU) Telecommunications Center. The television signals are transmitted to the WESTAR IV communications satellite, which remits them to participating schools across the U.S. and in parts of Mexico and Canada. The schools are equipped with small home style satellite reception dishes. Education Satellite Videoconference programs are conducted four times yearly, covering a variety of aerospace subjects. Teachers can call toll-free and have questions answered after the speaker's presentations. Information about NASA educational resources and how to obtain them will be provided.

  17. Satellite (Natural)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    In its most general sense, any celestial object in orbit around a similar larger object. Thus, for example, the Magellanic Clouds are satellite galaxies of our own Milky Way galaxy. Without qualification, the term is used to mean a body in orbit around a planet; an alternative term is moon. The term natural satellite distinguishes these bodies from artificial satellites—spacecraft placed in orbi...

  18. Reconstruction of the West Spitsbergen Current in 2000-2013 Using In Situ Observations Combined with Satellite Altimetry and Ocean Numerical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulczak, Anna Izabela

    2016-08-01

    The inflow of Atlantic Water (AW) into the Nordic Seas is of fundamental importance for the Arctic, European and global climate. The West Spitsbergen Current (WSC) is a main source of heat for the Arctic, greatly affecting its sea ice conditions and air temperatures. The aim of this study is to analyse the vertical structure of the current and reconstruct it along its path in 2000- 2013 using a synergy of data: i) in situ measurements collected along the WSC by the Institute Oceanology of Polish Academy of Sciences (IOPAS) regularly every July in 2000-2013, ii) satellite altimetry, and iii) an information about the WSC vertical structure simulated in the NEMO (1/12°) numerical model in the same time period. The preliminary results are presented based on the in situ mooring measurements and geostrophic currents calculated using satellite altimetry.

  19. Statistical considerations in creating water vapor data records from combinations of satellite and other observation types, including in situ and ground-based remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykema, J. A.; Anderson, J. G.

    2014-12-01

    Measuring water vapor at the highest spatial and temporal at all vertical levels and at arbitrary times requires strategic utilization of disparate observations from satellites, ground-based remote sensing, and in situ measurements. These different measurement types have different response times and very different spatial averaging properties, both horizontally and vertically. Accounting for these different measurement properties and explicit propagation of associated uncertainties is necessary to test particular scientific hypotheses, especially in cases of detection of weak signals in the presence of natural fluctuations, and for process studies with small ensembles. This is also true where ancillary data from meteorological analyses are required, which have their own sampling limitations and uncertainties. This study will review two investigations pertaining to measurements of water vapor in the mid-troposphere and lower stratosphere that mix satellite observations with observations from other sources. The focus of the mid-troposphere analysis is to obtain improved estimates of water vapor at the instant of a sounding satellite overpass. The lower stratosphere work examines the uncertainty inherent in a small ensemble of anomalously elevated lower stratospheric water vapor observations when meteorological analysis products and aircraft in situ observations are required for interpretation.

  20. Real-Time Estimation of Volcanic ASH/SO2 Cloud Height from Combined Uv/ir Satellite Observations and Numerical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicente, Gilberto A.

    An efficient iterative method has been developed to estimate the vertical profile of SO2 and ash clouds from volcanic eruptions by comparing near real-time satellite observations with numerical modeling outputs. The approach uses UV based SO2 concentration and IR based ash cloud images, the volcanic ash transport model PUFF and wind speed, height and directional information to find the best match between the simulated and the observed displays. The method is computationally fast and is being implemented for operational use at the NOAA Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAACs) in Washington, DC, USA, to support the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) effort to detect, track and measure volcanic ash cloud heights for air traffic safety and management. The presentation will show the methodology, results, statistical analysis and SO2 and Aerosol Index input products derived from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) onboard the NASA EOS/Aura research satellite and from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2) instrument in the MetOp-A. The volcanic ash products are derived from AVHRR instruments in the NOAA POES-16, 17, 18, 19 as well as MetOp-A. The presentation will also show how a VAAC volcanic ash analyst interacts with the system providing initial condition inputs such as location and time of the volcanic eruption, followed by the automatic real-time tracking of all the satellite data available, subsequent activation of the iterative approach and the data/product delivery process in numerical and graphical format for operational applications.

  1. Satellite altitude determination uncertainties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siry, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    Satellite altitude determination uncertainties will be discussed from the standpoint of the GEOS-C satellite, from the longer range viewpoint afforded by the Geopause concept. Data are focused on methods for short-arc tracking which are essentially geometric in nature. One uses combinations of lasers and collocated cameras. The other method relies only on lasers, using three or more to obtain the position fix. Two typical locales are looked at, the Caribbean area, and a region associated with tracking sites at Goddard, Bermuda and Canada which encompasses a portion of the Gulf Stream in which meanders develop.

  2. Galilean satellite mission concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soldner, J. K.; Stancati, M. L.; Feingold, H.

    1982-01-01

    Post-Galileo mission concepts considered possible for satellite-intensive investigations are presented, with consideration given to single and multiple target scenarios using orbiter and lander deployments. Candidate missions that satisfy the selected science objectives are identified, and specific scenario/target combinations which fall within performance constraints are chosen. The concepts are then developed into descriptive mission profiles. Also discussed are target encounter and deployment requirements, payload delivery, and operational considerations. Particular attention is given to Jupiter radiation effects and shielding requirements. A wide range of satellite-intensive missions is thought to be within the performance capabilities of earth-gravity-assisted ballistic trajectories and nuclear electric propulsion technology.

  3. Linked Autonomous Interplanetary Satellite Orbit Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Jeffrey S.; Anderson, Rodney L.; Born, George H.; Leonard, Jason M.; McGranaghan, Ryan M.; Fujimoto, Kohei

    2013-01-01

    A navigation technology known as LiAISON (Linked Autonomous Interplanetary Satellite Orbit Navigation) has been known to produce very impressive navigation results for scenarios involving two or more cooperative satellites near the Moon, such that at least one satellite must be in an orbit significantly perturbed by the Earth, such as a lunar halo orbit. The two (or more) satellites track each other using satellite-to-satellite range and/or range-rate measurements. These relative measurements yield absolute orbit navigation when one of the satellites is in a lunar halo orbit, or the like. The geometry between a lunar halo orbiter and a GEO satellite continuously changes, which dramatically improves the information content of a satellite-to-satellite tracking signal. The geometrical variations include significant out-of-plane shifts, as well as inplane shifts. Further, the GEO satellite is almost continuously in view of a lunar halo orbiter. High-fidelity simulations demonstrate that LiAISON technology improves the navigation of GEO orbiters by an order of magnitude, relative to standard ground tracking. If a GEO satellite is navigated using LiAISON- only tracking measurements, its position is typically known to better than 10 meters. If LiAISON measurements are combined with simple radiometric ground observations, then the satellite s position is typically known to better than 3 meters, which is substantially better than the current state of GEO navigation. There are two features of LiAISON that are novel and advantageous compared with conventional satellite navigation. First, ordinary satellite-to-satellite tracking data only provides relative navigation of each satellite. The novelty is the placement of one navigation satellite in an orbit that is significantly perturbed by both the Earth and the Moon. A navigation satellite can track other satellites elsewhere in the Earth-Moon system and acquire knowledge about both satellites absolute positions and velocities

  4. Satellite Coordination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, R. J.

    2004-06-01

    The Radio Regulations set out complex procedures to ensure that when new systems start to use the frequency bands allocated to them there is minimal disruption to existing systems using the same bands. The process of satellite coordination is described, and the issues for radio astronomy are discussed. In order to be protected by the ITU-R machinery radio telescopes need to be officially registered. The issue of paper satellites highlights the need for early registration to gain priority over incoming systems. Modern developments including the use of complex Monte-Carlo simulations to predict interference levels, and the issue of adjacent band interference, are discussed.

  5. Some background about satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Joseph A.

    1986-01-01

    Four tables of planetary and satellite data are presented which list satellite discoveries, planetary parameters, satellite orbits, and satellite physical properties respectively. A scheme for classifying the satellites is provided and it is noted that most known moons fall into three general classes: regular satellites, collisional shards, and irregular satellites. Satellite processes are outlined with attention given to origins, dynamical and thermal evolution, surface processes, and composition and cratering. Background material is provided for each family of satellites.

  6. Uranus Satellites

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-11-26

    On Jan. 18, 1986, NASA Voyager 2 discoverd three Uranus satellites. All three lie outside the orbits of Uranus nine known rings, the outermost of which, the epsilon ring, is seen at upper right. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00368

  7. Galilean Satellites

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-01-29

    These photos of the four Galilean satellites of Jupiter were taken by NASA Voyager 1 during its approach to the planet in early March 1979. Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto are shown in their correct relative sizes. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00012

  8. Evaluation of Temperature and Material Combinations on Several Lubricants for Use in the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) Mission Filter Wheel Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansen, Mark J.; Jones, William R., Jr.; Predmore, Roamer E.

    2001-01-01

    A bearing test apparatus was used to investigate lubricant degradation rates and elastohydrodynamic transition temperatures for several perfluoropolyether (Krytox) formulations, a pentasilahydrocarbon, and a synthetic hydrocarbon (Pennzane 2001 A) in an MPB 1219 bearing, which is used in the geostationary operational environmental satellite (GOES) mission filter wheel assembly. Test conditions were the following: 1000-hr duration, 75 C, 20 lb axial load, vacuum level less than 1 x 10(exp -6) Torr, and a 600-rpm rotational speed. Baseline tests were performed using unformulated Krytox 143AB, the heritage lubricant. Krytox additive formulations showed small reductions in degradation rate. Krytox GPL-105, a higher viscosity version, yielded the least amount of degradation products. Both the silahydrocarbon and Pennzane 2001A showed no signs of lubricant degradation and had ample amounts of free oil at test conclusion.

  9. Inter-satellite links for satellite autonomous integrity monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Pérez, Irma; García-Serrano, Cristina; Catalán Catalán, Carlos; García, Alvaro Mozo; Tavella, Patrizia; Galleani, Lorenzo; Amarillo, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    A new integrity monitoring mechanisms to be implemented on-board on a GNSS taking advantage of inter-satellite links has been introduced. This is based on accurate range and Doppler measurements not affected neither by atmospheric delays nor ground local degradation (multipath and interference). By a linear combination of the Inter-Satellite Links Observables, appropriate observables for both satellite orbits and clock monitoring are obtained and by the proposed algorithms it is possible to reduce the time-to-alarm and the probability of undetected satellite anomalies.Several test cases have been run to assess the performances of the new orbit and clock monitoring algorithms in front of a complete scenario (satellite-to-satellite and satellite-to-ground links) and in a satellite-only scenario. The results of this experimentation campaign demonstrate that the Orbit Monitoring Algorithm is able to detect orbital feared events when the position error at the worst user location is still under acceptable limits. For instance, an unplanned manoeuvre in the along-track direction is detected (with a probability of false alarm equals to 5 × 10-9) when the position error at the worst user location is 18 cm. The experimentation also reveals that the clock monitoring algorithm is able to detect phase jumps, frequency jumps and instability degradation on the clocks but the latency of detection as well as the detection performances strongly depends on the noise added by the clock measurement system.

  10. Balancing Vanguard Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simkovich, A.; Baumann, Robert C.

    1961-01-01

    The Vanguard satellites and component parts were balanced within the specified limits by using a Gisholt Type-S balancer in combination with a portable International Research and Development vibration analyzer and filter, with low-frequency pickups. Equipment and procedures used for balancing are described; and the determination of residual imbalance is accomplished by two methods: calculation, and graphical interpretation. Between-the-bearings balancing is recommended for future balancing of payloads.

  11. Satellite voice broadcast system study, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horstein, M.

    1985-01-01

    This study investigates the feasibility of providing Voice of America (VOA) broadcasts by satellite relay, rather than via terrestrial relay stations. Satellite voice broadcast systems are described for three different frequency bands: HF (26 MHz), VHF (68 MHz), and L-band (1.5 GHz). The geographical areas of interest at HF and L-band include all major land masses worldwide with the exception of the U.S., Canada, and Australia. Geostationary satellite configurations are considered for both frequency bands. In addition, a system of subsynchronous, circular satellites with an orbit period of 8 hours is developed for the HF band. VHF broadcasts, which are confined to the Soviet Union, are provied by a system of Molniya satellites. Satellites intended for HF or VHF broadcastinbg are extremely large and heavy. Satellite designs presented here are limited in size and weight to the capability of the STS/Centaur launch vehicle combination. Even so, at HF it would take 47 geostationary satellites or 20 satellites in 8-hour orbits to fully satisfy the voice-channel requirements of the broadcast schedule provided by VOA. On the other hand, three Molniya satellites suffice for the geographically restricted schedule at VHF. At L-band, only four geostationary satellites are needed to meet the requirements of the complete broadcast schedule. Moreover, these satellites are comparable in size and weight to current satellites designed for direct broadcast of video program material.

  12. Managing Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Integral Systems, Inc.'s EPOCH 2000 forms the core of NASA's Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) mission's command and control center. EPOCH 2000, which allows ground operators to monitor and control satellites over a wide area network, owes part of its heritage from work completed to support Goddard Space Flight Center. The software automates telemetry processing, commanding, anomaly detection, and archiving collected data. The NEAR spacecraft, launched in February 1996, will rendezvous in early 1999 and orbit the Asteroid Eros for a year. Integral Systems also provided Low Earth Orbit Autonomous Ground Terminals (LEO-Ts) to NASA. The LEO-T is designed to make it easier and less expensive for principal investigators to obtain telemetry, tracking and control services for their science missions. The company products have supported well over 70 satellite missions aimed at scientific research, meteorology, or communications applications.

  13. Inertial storage for satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenhaure, D.

    1984-11-01

    A new system is being developed that performs satellite attitude control, attitude reference, and energy storage utilizing inertia wheels. The baseline approach consists of two counter rotating flywheels suspended in specially designed magnetic bearings, spin axis motor/generators, and a control system. The control system regulates the magnetic bearings and spin axis motor/generators and interacts with other satellite subsystems (photovoltaic array, star trackers, Sun sensors, magnetic torquers, etc.) to perform the three functions. Existing satellites utilize separate subsystems to perform attitude control, provide attitude reference, and store energy. These functions are currently performed using reaction or momentum wheels, gyros, batteries, and devices that provide an absolute reference (Sun sensors and star trackers). A Combined Attitude, Reference, and Energy Storage (CARES) system based on high energy density inertial energy storage wheels (flywheels) has potential advantages over existing technologies. Even when used only for energy storage, this system offers the potential for substantial improvements in life, energy efficiency, and weight over existing battery technologies. Utilizing this same device for both attitude control and attitude reference would result in significant additional savings in overall satellite weight and complexity.

  14. Inertial storage for satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisenhaure, D.

    1984-01-01

    A new system is being developed that performs satellite attitude control, attitude reference, and energy storage utilizing inertia wheels. The baseline approach consists of two counter rotating flywheels suspended in specially designed magnetic bearings, spin axis motor/generators, and a control system. The control system regulates the magnetic bearings and spin axis motor/generators and interacts with other satellite subsystems (photovoltaic array, star trackers, Sun sensors, magnetic torquers, etc.) to perform the three functions. Existing satellites utilize separate subsystems to perform attitude control, provide attitude reference, and store energy. These functions are currently performed using reaction or momentum wheels, gyros, batteries, and devices that provide an absolute reference (Sun sensors and star trackers). A Combined Attitude, Reference, and Energy Storage (CARES) system based on high energy density inertial energy storage wheels (flywheels) has potential advantages over existing technologies. Even when used only for energy storage, this system offers the potential for substantial improvements in life, energy efficiency, and weight over existing battery technologies. Utilizing this same device for both attitude control and attitude reference would result in significant additional savings in overall satellite weight and complexity.

  15. Virtual Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammrs, Stephan R.

    2008-01-01

    Virtual Satellite (VirtualSat) is a computer program that creates an environment that facilitates the development, verification, and validation of flight software for a single spacecraft or for multiple spacecraft flying in formation. In this environment, enhanced functionality and autonomy of navigation, guidance, and control systems of a spacecraft are provided by a virtual satellite that is, a computational model that simulates the dynamic behavior of the spacecraft. Within this environment, it is possible to execute any associated software, the development of which could benefit from knowledge of, and possible interaction (typically, exchange of data) with, the virtual satellite. Examples of associated software include programs for simulating spacecraft power and thermal- management systems. This environment is independent of the flight hardware that will eventually host the flight software, making it possible to develop the software simultaneously with, or even before, the hardware is delivered. Optionally, by use of interfaces included in VirtualSat, hardware can be used instead of simulated. The flight software, coded in the C or C++ programming language, is compilable and loadable into VirtualSat without any special modifications. Thus, VirtualSat can serve as a relatively inexpensive software test-bed for development test, integration, and post-launch maintenance of spacecraft flight software.

  16. Evidence for a slow subsidence of the Tahiti Island from GPS, DORIS, GRACE, and combined satellite altimetry and tide gauge sea level records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadil, A.; Barriot, J.; Sichoix, L.; Ortega, P.; Willis, P.; Serafini, J.

    2010-12-01

    Monitoring vertical land motion is of crucial interest in observations of long-term sea level change and its reconstruction, but is among of the most, yet highly challenging, tasks of space geodesy. The aim of the paper is to compare the vertical velocity estimates of Tahiti Island obtained from six independent geophysical measurements, namely a decade of GPS, DORIS, and GRACE data, 17 years sea level difference (altimeter minus tide gauge (TG)) time series, ICE-5G (VM2 L90) Post-Glacial Rebound (PGR) model predictions, and coral reef stratigraphy. Except The Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA also known as PGR) model, all the techniques are in a good agreement and reveal a very slow subsidence of the Tahiti Island averaged at -0.3 mm/yr which is barely significant. Neverthless, despite of that vertical motion, Tahiti remains an ideal location for the calibration of satellite altimeter measurements.Estimated vertical crustal motions from GPS, DORIS, GRACE, (altimetry - tide-gauge) sea level records, coral reef stratigraphy, and GIA. GG = GAMIT-GLOBK software packageGOA= GIPSY-OASIS II software package

  17. Digging up your dirt. High school students combine small-scale respiration and soil carbon measurements with satellite imagery in hands-on inquiry activities.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemper, K.; Throop, H.

    2015-12-01

    One of the greatest impacts on the global carbon cycle is changes in land use. Making this concept relevant and inquiry-based for high school students is challenging. Many are familiar with reconstructing paleo-climate from ice core data, but few have a connection to current climate research. Many students ask questions like 'What will our area be like in 20 years?' or 'How much does planting trees help?' while few have the scientific language to engage in a discussion to answer these questions. Our work connects students to climate change research in several ways: first, teacher Keska Kemper engaged in field research with Dr. Heather Throop creating a 'teacher in the field' perspective for students in the classroom. Dr. Throop met with Keska Kemper's students several times to develop an inquiry-based field study. Students predicted and then measured rates of respiration between different soil types in an urban park close to their school. Students then could compare their results from Portland, Oregon to Throop's work across a rain gradient in Australia. Discussions about percent tree cover and soil carbon helped students see connections between land use changes and changes in carbon cycling. Last, students examined satellite imagery to determine percent tree cover and numberss of trees to compare to soil carbon in the same region. Students were able to examine imagery over the last 30 years to visualize land use changes in the greater Portland area.

  18. Stereoscopic observations from meteorological satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasler, A. F.; Mack, R.; Negri, A.

    The capability of making stereoscopic observations of clouds from meteorological satellites is a new basic analysis tool with a broad spectrum of applications. Stereoscopic observations from satellites were first made using the early vidicon tube weather satellites (e.g., Ondrejka and Conover [1]). However, the only high quality meteorological stereoscopy from low orbit has been done from Apollo and Skylab, (e.g., Shenk et al. [2] and Black [3], [4]). Stereoscopy from geosynchronous satellites was proposed by Shenk [5] and Bristor and Pichel [6] in 1974 which allowed Minzner et al. [7] to demonstrate the first quantitative cloud height analysis. In 1978 Bryson [8] and desJardins [9] independently developed digital processing techniques to remap stereo images which made possible precision height measurement and spectacular display of stereograms (Hasler et al. [10], and Hasler [11]). In 1980 the Japanese Geosynchronous Satellite (GMS) and the U.S. GOES-West satellite were synchronized to obtain stereo over the central Pacific as described by Fujita and Dodge [12] and in this paper. Recently the authors have remapped images from a Low Earth Orbiter (LEO) to the coordinate system of a Geosynchronous Earth Orbiter (GEO) and obtained stereoscopic cloud height measurements which promise to have quality comparable to previous all GEO stereo. It has also been determined that the north-south imaging scan rate of some GEOs can be slowed or reversed. Therefore the feasibility of obtaining stereoscopic observations world wide from combinations of operational GEO and LEO satellites has been demonstrated. Stereoscopy from satellites has many advantages over infrared techniques for the observation of cloud structure because it depends only on basic geometric relationships. Digital remapping of GEO and LEO satellite images is imperative for precision stereo height measurement and high quality displays because of the curvature of the earth and the large angular separation of the

  19. A study of system requirements for Phobos/Deimos missions. Volume 4: Phase 3 results, combined missions to Mars and its satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Combined missions to Mars and Phobos/Deimos were considered in relation to large scientific returns at a low total cost. A matrix of all feasible major combined mission concepts was compiled. The most promising approach was selected from which a nominal mission profile was developed. A systems analysis was performed to trade off performance, configuration, and cost characteristics of candidate mission concepts. Configuration and subsystem optimization analysis were then conducted from which a baseline and an alternate program were selected. Program schedules and cost estimates were prepared for the recommended and alternate program.

  20. Combining shipboard in situ data with satellite data to estimate daily primary production in a coastal upwelling system: A data mining approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Robert I.; Field, John G.; Shillington, Frank A.; Jarre, Astrid; Potgieter, Anet

    2015-11-01

    This study classifies coastal time-series data according to subsurface phytoplankton vertical distributions to be able to capture the variability of primary production at fine spatial and temporal scales. Our method uses algorithms developed to extract patterns in large datasets of time-sequential data. We use short time-series of QuikSCAT surface winds, MODIS sea surface temperature and surface chlorophyll a associated with each in situ chlorophyll a profile, as well as the season and bottom depth of the in situ station to discover patterns that can be used to classify new data into 12 profile classes. We first fill in missing MODIS data using a conditional random field model so that cloudy days are not excluded. The most likely profile is then predicted using all the available data. We apply our method to the St Helena Bay area, a region within the productive Benguela Current upwelling system. A profile is predicted for each day and each pixel of 4 km resolution satellite image for 16 consecutive months. Each profile is used in a broad-band photosynthesis model to produce a daily three-dimensional estimate of gross primary production. An average production rate of 3.2 g C m-2 day-1 was obtained for the area, which shows very good agreement with other estimates from the region. The results show persistent high productivity near the surface throughout the year with the exception of the winter months. Deeper in the water column productivity is more seasonal. The 16 month time-series highlights the interannual, seasonal and daily variability of the system. By linking physical processes to the distribution of phytoplankton at appropriate spatio-temporal scales, we can now more rigorously investigate bottom-up driven impacts on ecosystems characterised by short-term variability.

  1. Exploring the link between urban form and work related transportation using combined satellite image and census information: Case of the Great lakes region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Guindon, Bert; Sun, Krista

    2016-05-01

    Aspects of urban transportation have significant implications for resource consumption and environmental quality. The level of travel activity, the viability of various modes of transportation and hence the level of transportation-related emissions are influenced by the structure of cities, i.e., their urban forms. While it is widely recognized that satellite remote sensing can provide spatial information on urban land cover and land use, its effective use for understanding impacts of urban form on issues such as transportation requires that this information be integrated with relevant demographic information. A comprehensive bi-national urban database, the Great Lakes Urban Survey (GLUS), comprising all cities with populations in excess of 200,000 has been created from Landsat imagery and national census and transportation survey information from Canada and the United States. A suite of analysis tools are proposed to utilize information sets such as GLUS to investigate the link between urban form and work-related travel. A new indicator, the Employment Deficit Measure (EDM), is proposed to quantify the balance between employment and worker availability at different transit horizons and hence to assess the viability of alternate modes of transportation. It is argued that the high degree of residential and commercial/industrial land uses greatly impact travel to work mode options as well as commute distance. A spatial interaction model is developed and found to accurately predict travel distance aggregated at the census tract level. We argue that this model could also be used to explore the relative levels of travel activity associated with different urban forms.

  2. Global-scale assessment of groundwater depletion and related groundwater abstractions: Combining hydrological modeling with information from well observations and GRACE satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döll, Petra; Müller Schmied, Hannes; Schuh, Carina; Portmann, Felix T.; Eicker, Annette

    2014-07-01

    Groundwater depletion (GWD) compromises crop production in major global agricultural areas and has negative ecological consequences. To derive GWD at the grid cell, country, and global levels, we applied a new version of the global hydrological model WaterGAP that simulates not only net groundwater abstractions and groundwater recharge from soils but also groundwater recharge from surface water bodies in dry regions. A large number of independent estimates of GWD as well as total water storage (TWS) trends determined from GRACE satellite data by three analysis centers were compared to model results. GWD and TWS trends are simulated best assuming that farmers in GWD areas irrigate at 70% of optimal water requirement. India, United States, Iran, Saudi Arabia, and China had the highest GWD rates in the first decade of the 21st century. On the Arabian Peninsula, in Libya, Egypt, Mali, Mozambique, and Mongolia, at least 30% of the abstracted groundwater was taken from nonrenewable groundwater during this time period. The rate of global GWD has likely more than doubled since the period 1960-2000. Estimated GWD of 113 km3/yr during 2000-2009, corresponding to a sea level rise of 0.31 mm/yr, is much smaller than most previous estimates. About 15% of the globally abstracted groundwater was taken from nonrenewable groundwater during this period. To monitor recent temporal dynamics of GWD and related water abstractions, GRACE data are best evaluated with a hydrological model that, like WaterGAP, simulates the impact of abstractions on water storage, but the low spatial resolution of GRACE remains a challenge.

  3. Global changes in dryland vegetation dynamics (1988-2008) assessed by satellite remote sensing: combining a new passive microwave vegetation density record with reflective greenness data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andela, N.; Liu, Y. Y.; van Dijk, A. I. J. M.; de Jeu, R. A. M.; McVicar, T. R.

    2013-05-01

    Drylands, covering nearly 30% of the global land surface, are characterized by high climate variability and sensitivity to land management. Here, two satellite observed vegetation products were used to study the long-term (1988-2008) vegetation changes of global drylands: the widely used reflective-based Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and the recently developed passive-microwave-based Vegetation Optical Depth (VOD). The NDVI is sensitive to the chlorophyll concentrations in the canopy and the canopy cover fraction, while the VOD is sensitive to vegetation water content of both leafy and woody components. Therefore it can be expected that using both products helps to better characterize vegetation dynamics, particularly over regions with mixed herbaceous and woody vegetation. Linear regression analysis was performed between antecedent precipitation and observed NDVI and VOD independently to distinguish the contribution of climatic and non-climatic drivers in vegetation variations. Where possible, the contributions of fire, grazing, agriculture and CO2 level to vegetation trends were assessed. The results suggest that NDVI is more sensitive to fluctuations in herbaceous vegetation, which primarily use shallow soil water whereas VOD is more sensitive to woody vegetation, which additionally can exploit deeper water stores. Globally, evidence is found for woody encroachment over drylands. In the arid drylands, woody encroachment seems to be at the expense of herbaceous vegetation and a global driver is interpreted. Trends in semi-arid drylands vary widely between regions, suggesting that local rather than global drivers caused most of the vegetation response. In savannas, besides precipitation, fire regime plays an important role in shaping trends. Our results demonstrate that NDVI and VOD provide complementary information, bringing new insights on vegetation dynamics.

  4. Combining satellite data and biogeochemical models to estimate global effects of human-induced land cover change on carbon emissions and primary productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defries, R. S.; Field, C. B.; Fung, I.; Collatz, G. J.; Bounoua, L.

    1999-09-01

    This study uses a global terrestrial carbon cycle model (the Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach (CASA) model), a satellite-derived map of existing vegetation, and global maps of natural vegetation to estimate the effects of human-induced land cover change on carbon emissions to the atmosphere and net primary production. We derived two maps approximating global land cover that would exist for current climate in the absence of human disturbance of the landscape, using a procedure that minimizes disagreements between maps of existing and natural vegetation that represent artifacts in the data. Similarly, we simulated monthly fields of the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, required as input to CASA, for the undisturbed land cover case. Model results estimate total carbon losses from human-induced land cover changes of 182 and 199 Pg for the two simulations, compared with an estimate of 124 Pg for total flux between 1850 and 1990 [Houghton, 1999], suggesting that land cover change prior to 1850 accounted for approximately one-third of total carbon emissions from land use change. Estimates of global carbon loss from the two independent methods, the modeling approach used in this paper and the accounting approach of Houghton [1999], are comparable taking into account carbon losses from agricultural expansion prior to 1850 estimated at 48-57 Pg. However, estimates of regional carbon losses vary considerably, notably in temperate midlatitudes where our estimates indicate higher cumulative carbon loss. Overall, land cover changes reduced global annual net primary productivity (NPP) by approximately 5%, with large regional variations. High-input agriculture in North America and Europe display higher annual NPP than the natural vegetation that would exist in the absence of cropland. However, NPP has been depleted in localized areas in South Asia and Africa by up to 90%. These results provide initial crude estimates, limited by the spatial resolution of the data sets used as

  5. Combined MIPAS (airborne/satellite), CALIPSO and in situ study on large potential NAT particles observed in early Arctic winter stratosphere in December 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woiwode, Wolfgang; Höpfner, Michael; Pitts, Michael; Poole, Lamont; Oelhaf, Hermann; Molleker, Sergej; Borrmann, Stephan; Ebersoldt, Andreas; Frey, Wiebke; Gulde, Thomas; Maucher, Guido; Piesch, Christof; Sartorius, Christian; Orphal, Johannes

    2015-04-01

    The understanding of the characteristics of large HNO3-containing particles (potential 'NAT-rocks') involved in vertical redistribution of HNO3 in the polar winter stratosphere is limited due to the difficult accessibility of these particles by observations. While robust polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) classification schemes exist for observations by the space-borne lidar aboard CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) as well as for the passive mid-infrared limb observations by MIPAS (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding), these observations are hardly exploited for the detection of large (diameter >10 μm) NAT particles. This is due to the facts that these particles have low overall number densities, resulting in weak detectable signatures, and that the physical characteristics of these particles (i.e. shape, morphology, HNO3-content and optical characteristics) are uncertain. We investigate collocated and complementary observations of a low-density potential large NAT particle field by the space-borne instruments CALIPSO and MIPAS-ENVISAT as well as the airborne observations by the limb-sounder MIPAS-STR and the in situ particle probe FSSP-100 (Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe 100) aboard the high-altitude aircraft Geophysica. The observations aboard the Geophysica on 11 December 2011 associated to ESSenCe (ESa Sounder Campaign 2011) provided us the unique opportunity to study in detail the lower boundary region of a PSC where large potential NAT particles (>20 μm in diameter) were detected in situ. We analyse the ambient temperatures and gas-phase composition (HNO3 and H2O), the signatures of the observed particles in the CALIPSO and MIPAS observations, the HNO3-content of these particles suggested by the FSSP-100 and MIPAS-STR observations, and focus on the spectral fingerprint of these particles in the MIPAS-STR observations. While the spectral characterisation of the observed particles is subject

  6. Combined uncertainty of hydrological model complexity and satellite-based forcing data evaluated in two data-scarce semi-arid catchments in Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoche, Malte; Fischer, Christian; Pohl, Eric; Krause, Peter; Merz, Ralf

    2014-11-01

    In water resources modeling, meteorological data scarcity can be compensated by various global data sets, but those data sets can differ tremendously. In the literature, hydrological models of differing complexity are proposed for estimating the water resources of semi-arid catchments, and also to evaluate rainfall data sets. The goal of this paper is to provide a joint analysis of modeling uncertainty due to different input data and increasing model complexity. Impacts of mutually concealed uncertainties on model performance and model outputs are exemplified in two data sparse semi-arid catchments in Ethiopia. We applied a semi-distributed and a fully distributed hydrological model, having different levels of complexity. Three different satellite-based rainfall data sets and two temperature products were used as model inputs. The semi-distributed model demonstrated good validation performances, while the fully distributed model was more sensitive to data uncertainties. The application of TRMM version 6 completely failed and the high-resolution CMORPH precipitation estimate outperformed TRMM version 7. In contrast, the use of high-resolution temperature data did not improve the model results. The large differences in remotely sensed input data were buffered inside the hydrological models. Therefore, data set evaluations regarding only the simulated hydrographs were less meaningful. In contrast, the investigation of parameter evolution and distributed outputs' variability appeared to be a valuable tool to uncover the interdependencies of data and model uncertainties. We suggest this procedure to be applied by default in water resources estimations that are affected by data scarcity, but especially when data sets are evaluated using hydrological models. Our case study demonstrates that estimations of groundwater recharge and actual evapotranspiration vary largely, depending on the applied data sets and models. The joint analysis reveals large interdependencies

  7. Small satellite radiometric measurement system

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, P.G.

    1992-01-01

    A critical need for the US Global Change Research Program is to provide continuous, well-calibrated radiometric data for the earth's radiation budget. This paper describes a new, compact, relatively light-weight, adaptable radiometer which will provide both spectrally integrated measurements and data in selected spectral bands. The radiometer design is suitable for use on small satellites, aircraft, or remotely piloted aircraft (RPAs). An example of the implementation of this radiometer on a small satellite is given. Significant benefits derive from simultaneous measurements of specific narrow (in wavelength) spectral features; such data may be obtained by combining LARI with a compact spectrometer on the same platform. Well-chosen satellite orbits allow one to use data from other satellites (e.g. DMSP) to enhance the data product, or to provide superior coverage of specific locations. 23 refs.

  8. Small satellite radiometric measurement system

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, P.G.

    1992-01-01

    A critical need for the US Global Change Research Program is to provide continuous, well-calibrated radiometric data for the earth`s radiation budget. This paper describes a new, compact, relatively light-weight, adaptable radiometer which will provide both spectrally integrated measurements and data in selected spectral bands. The radiometer design is suitable for use on small satellites, aircraft, or remotely piloted aircraft (RPAs). An example of the implementation of this radiometer on a small satellite is given. Significant benefits derive from simultaneous measurements of specific narrow (in wavelength) spectral features; such data may be obtained by combining LARI with a compact spectrometer on the same platform. Well-chosen satellite orbits allow one to use data from other satellites (e.g. DMSP) to enhance the data product, or to provide superior coverage of specific locations. 23 refs.

  9. Multi-mission Satellite Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamilkowski, M. L.; Teter, M. A.; Grant, K. D.; Dougherty, B.; Cochran, S.

    2015-12-01

    NOAA's next-generation environmental satellite, the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) replaces the current Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES). JPSS satellites carry sensors which collect meteorological, oceanographic, climatological, and solar-geophysical observations of the earth, atmosphere, and space. The first JPSS satellite was launched in 2011 and is currently NOAA's primary operational polar satellite. The JPSS ground system is the Common Ground System (CGS), and provides command, control, and communications (C3) and data processing (DP). A multi-mission system, CGS provides combinations of C3/DP for numerous NASA, NOAA, DoD, and international missions. In preparation for the next JPSS satellite, CGS improved its multi-mission capabilities to enhance mission operations for larger constellations of earth observing satellites with the added benefit of streamlining mission operations for other NOAA missions. CGS's multi-mission capabilities allows management all of assets as a single enterprise, more efficiently using ground resources and personnel and consolidating multiple ground systems into one. Sophisticated scheduling algorithms compare mission priorities and constraints across all ground stations, creating an enterprise schedule optimized to mission needs, which CGS executes to acquire the satellite link, uplink commands, downlink and route data to the operations and data processing facilities, and generate the final products for delivery to downstream users. This paper will illustrate the CGS's ability to manage multiple, enterprise-wide polar orbiting missions by demonstrating resource modeling and tasking, production of enterprise contact schedules for NOAA's Fairbanks ground station (using both standing and ad hoc requests), deconflicting resources due to ground outages, and updating resource allocations through dynamic priority definitions.

  10. The status of environmental satellites and availability of their data products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, C. L.; Campbell, C. E.

    1977-01-01

    The latest available information about the status of unclassified environmental satellite (flown by the United States) and their data products is presented. The type of environmental satellites discussed include unmanned earth resource and meteorological satellites, and manned satellites which can act as a combination platform for instruments. The capabilities and data products of projected satellites are discussed along with those of currently operating systems.

  11. Seventh symposium on EBIS/T and their applications combined with a workshop on ion sources for hadron colliders, a satellite meeting to ICIS'97 (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, R.

    1998-02-01

    The 7th symposium on EBIS and EBIT and their applications has been organized by M. Kleinod and R. Becker in Gelnhausen, Germany the week before ICIS'97. It was combined with a workshop on ion sources for hadron colliders being reported on by J. Alessi. Former EBIS symposia which have taken place are: 1977 at GSI, Darmstadt, Germany; 1981 in Saclay and Orsay, France; 1985 at Cornell University, Ithaca, New York; 1988 at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL), Brookhaven, New York; 1991 at JINR, Dubna, Russia; and 1994 at MSI, Stockholm, Sweden. The next one will be organized in the year 2000 by Krsto Prelec, BNL and Martin Stöckli, Manhattan, Kansas.

  12. Satellite altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheney, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    Since altimetry data are not really old enough to use the term data archaeology, Mr. Cheney referred to the stewardship of these data. He noted that it is very important to document the basis for an altimetry data set as the algorithms and corrections used to arrive at the Geophysical Data Record (GDR) have been improving and are continuing to improve the precision of sea level data derived from altimetry. He noted that the GEOSAT Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) data set has recently been reprocessed by his organization in the National Ocean Service of NOAA and made available to the scientific community on CD/ROM disks by the National Oceanographic Data Center of the U.S. (NODC). The new data set contains a satellite orbit more precise by an order of magnitude together with an improved water vapor correction. A new, comprehensive GDR Handbook has also been prepared.

  13. A core/shell/satellite anticancer platform for 808 NIR light-driven multimodal imaging and combined chemo-/photothermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guixin; Lv, Ruichan; He, Fei; Qu, Fengyu; Gai, Shili; Du, Shaokang; Wei, Zibo; Yang, Piaoping

    2015-08-01

    In this contribution, a novel multifunctional anti-cancer nanoplatform has been firstly constructed by conjugating a photothermal agent (CuS nanoparticles) and a cancer cell target agent (folic acid, FA) onto the surface of mesoporous silica coated core-shell-shell up-conversion nanoparticles (UCNPs). It was found that the doxorubicin (DOX) loaded system exhibits obvious pH and NIR-responsive release behaviour and the drug can be targetedly delivered to the cancer cells by a receptor mediated endocytosis manner. Furthermore, both photothermal therapy (PTT) and chemotherapy can be triggered simultaneously by a single 808 nm near infrared (NIR) light source, thus leading to a synergistic effect. The combined chemo- and NIR photothermal therapy can significantly improve the therapeutic efficacy compared to any single therapy, which has been evidenced by both in vitro and in vivo results. Besides, due to the doped rare earth ions, the platform also exhibits good up-conversion luminescence (UCL), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) properties. Based on the excellent multimodal imaging and anti-tumor properties, the multifunctional nanoplatform should be a promising candidate for imaging-guided anti-cancer therapy.In this contribution, a novel multifunctional anti-cancer nanoplatform has been firstly constructed by conjugating a photothermal agent (CuS nanoparticles) and a cancer cell target agent (folic acid, FA) onto the surface of mesoporous silica coated core-shell-shell up-conversion nanoparticles (UCNPs). It was found that the doxorubicin (DOX) loaded system exhibits obvious pH and NIR-responsive release behaviour and the drug can be targetedly delivered to the cancer cells by a receptor mediated endocytosis manner. Furthermore, both photothermal therapy (PTT) and chemotherapy can be triggered simultaneously by a single 808 nm near infrared (NIR) light source, thus leading to a synergistic effect. The combined chemo- and NIR photothermal

  14. Neptune's small satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, P.

    1992-04-01

    The small satellites of Neptune and other planets discovered during the Voyager 2 mission are discussed in terms of their composition and relationship to the planetary systems. The satellite Proteus is described in terms of its orbit, five other satellites are described, and they are compared to ther small satellites and systems. Neptune's satellites are hypothesized to be related to the ring system, and the satellite Galatea is related to the confinement of the rings.

  15. Combined Satellite and Surface-Based Estimation of the Intracloud/ Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Ratio Over the Continental United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boccippio, D. J.; Cummins, K.; Christian, H. J.; Goodman, S. J.

    1999-01-01

    Four years of observations from the NASA Optical Transient Detector (OTD) and Global Atmospherics National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) are combined to determine the geographic distribution of the intracloud/cloud to ground lightning ratio over the continental United States. The mean ratio over this region is 2.64-2.94, with a standard deviation of 1.1-1.3 and anomalies as low as 1.0 or less over the Rocky and Appalachian mountains and as high as 8-10 in the central-upper midwest. There is some indication that the ratio covaries with ground elevation, although the relationship is nonunique. Little evidence is found to support a latitudinal covariance, despite significant variation in the climatological mean tropopause pressure over the latitudes considered. The dynamic range of local variability is comparable to the range of values cited by previous studies for latitudinal variation from the deep tropics to midlatitudes. Local high anomalies of this ratio in the midwest are coincident with anomalies in the climatological percentage of positive CG occurrence, as well as in the occurrence of large positive CGs characteristic of MCS convective and trailing stratiform regions. This suggests that storm type, morphology and level of organization may dominate over environmental cofactors in the local determination of this ratio.

  16. Pole position studied with artificial earth satellites.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaposchkin, E. M.

    1972-01-01

    Long-arc orbit computation of highest accuracy can provide pole positions. Optical Baker-Nunn and laser range observations of several satellites are combined. The accuracy of the pole position is comparable to that of the mean satellite-tracking station coordinates (plus or minus 5 m) when sufficient tracking data are available. Exploitation of the technique requires more accurate tracking data.

  17. A satellite for demonstration of Panel Extension Satellite (PETSAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugawara, Yoshiki; Sahara, Hironori; Nakasuka, Shinichi; Greenland, Stephen; Morimoto, Takeshi; Koyama, Kanichi; Kobayashi, Chisato; Kikuchi, Hideaki; Okada, Takanori; Tanaka, Hidenori

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents the current status, configuration, architecture, and key technologies of SOHLA-2, the demonstration mission of the PETSAT (Panel ExTension SATellite) concept. The PETSAT proposal is for a modular satellite consisting of any number of unfolding functional panels. These panels are designed around an open architecture and connected through standardized interfaces. The interfaces between panels incorporate a reliable "plug-in" format, such that when combined, the integrated system takes on the intended satellite function in a redundant and distributed manner. By combining the different panel types in any number and configuration, flexibility to mission requirements is achieved. Some panels for performing basic satellite functions will be available as commercial-off-the-shelf components, and others custom developed dependent on the mission. During launch these panels are stowed in a folded low volume configuration, which is then extended on-orbit, realizing a satellite with a large area for the mounting of solar arrays, mission systems, extensible booms, or any other components. SOHLA-2 is both a concept demonstration and a lightning detection mission in the VHF band. It weighs less than 50 kg and consists of six panels: communication, attitude control, propulsion, mission, experiment and bus function. The bus function panel is based on the successful Cubesat XI developed at the University of Tokyo and this acts as the manager of the technology demonstration aspects for the mission. By basing the architecture upon a proven technology, the reliability of the satellite is increased. It is intended that the satellite be launched in early 2008.

  18. From the sprinkler to satellite: Combining fixed and mobile cosmic-ray neutron probes for realtime multiscale monitoring of soil moisture in agricultural systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, T. E.; Avery, W. A.; Finkenbiner, C. E.

    2015-12-01

    Approximately 40% of global food production comes from irrigated agriculture. With the increasing demand for food even greater pressures will be placed on water resources within these systems. In this work we aimed to characterize the spatial and temporal patterns of soil moisture at various scales by combining fixed and roving cosmic-ray neutron probes at four study sites across an East-West precipitation gradient overtopping the High Plains Aquifer (HPA). Each of the four study sites consisted of coarse scale mapping of the entire ~12 by 12 km domain and detailed mapping of 1 quarter section (0.8 by 0.8 km) agricultural field. By using a simplistic data merging technique we are able to produce a statistical daily soil moisture product at a variety of key spatial scales in support of irrigation water management technology: the individual sprinkler (~102 m2) for variable rate irrigation, the individual pie slice (~103 m2) for variable speed irrigation, and the quarter section (0.64 km2) for uniform rate irrigation. In addition, we are able to provide a daily soil moisture product over the 144 km2 study area at a variety of key remote sensing scales 1, 9, and 144 km2. These products can be used to support SMAP/SMOS through calibration, validation, and value addition by statistical downscaling. Future work could include larger scale monitoring in support of GRACE total water storage calculations in the HPA or other key groundwater resource locations by incorporating existing COSMOS sites or establishment of new networks.

  19. Assimilation of Satellite Ozone Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stajner, I.; Winslow, N.; Wargan, K.; Hayashi, H.; Pawson, S.; Rood, R.

    2003-01-01

    This talk will discuss assimilation of ozone data from satellite-borne instruments. Satellite observations of ozone total columns and profiles have been measured by a series of Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS), Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV) instruments, and more recently by the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment. Additional profile data are provided by instruments on NASA's Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite and by occultation instruments on other platforms. Instruments on Envisat' and future EOS Aura satellite will supply even more comprehensive data about the ozone distribution. Satellite data contain a wealth of information, but they do not provide synoptic global maps of ozone fields. These maps can be obtained through assimilation of satellite data into global chemistry and transport models. In the ozone system at NASA's Data Assimilation Office (DAO) any combination of TOMS, SBUV, and Microwave Limb sounder (MLS) data can be assimilated. We found that the addition of MLS to SBUV and TOMS data in the system helps to constrain the ozone distribution, especially in the polar night region and in the tropics. The assimilated ozone distribution in the troposphere and lower stratosphere is sensitive also to finer changes in the SBUV and TOMS data selection and to changes in error covariance models. All results are established by comparisons of assimilated ozone with independent profiles from ozone sondes and occultation instruments.

  20. Satellite Tracking Astrometric Network (STAN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vecchiato, Alberto; Gai, Mario

    2015-08-01

    The possibility of precise orbit tracking and determination of different types of satellites has been explored for at least some 25 years (Arimoto et al., 1990). Proposals in this sense made use mainly of astrometric observations, but multiple tracking techniques combining transfer and laser ranging was also suggested (Guo et al., 2009; Montojo et al., 2011), with different requirements and performances ranging from $\\sim100$~m to tenths of meters.In this work we explore the possible improvements and a novel implementation of a technique relying on large angle, high precision astrometry from ground for the determination of satellite orbits. The concept is based on combined observation of geostationary satellites and other near-Earth space objects from two or more telescopes, applying the triangulation principle over widely separated regions of the sky. An accuracy of a few $10^{-2}$~m can be attained with 1-meter-class telescopes and a field of vied of some arcminutes.We discuss the feasibility of the technique, some of the implementation aspects, and the limitations imposed by atmospheric turbulence. The potential benefits for satellite orbit control and navigation systems are presented, depending on the number and position of the contributing telescopes.We also discuss the possibility that, by reversing the roles of stars and satellites, the same kind of observations can be used for verification and maintenance of astrometric catalogs.

  1. Possible Internal Structures of the Galilean Satellites

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-08-03

    Cutaway views of the possible internal structures of the Galilean satellites. Ganymede at lower left, Callisto at lower right, Io on upper left, and Europa on upper right in a combined biew from NASA Galileo and Voyager spacecraft.

  2. Iodine Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Dankanich, John; Martinez, Andres; Petro, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The Iodine Satellite (iSat) spacecraft will be the first CubeSat to demonstrate high change in velocity from a primary propulsion system by using Hall thruster technology and iodine as a propellant. The mission will demonstrate CubeSat maneuverability, including plane change, altitude change and change in its closest approach to Earth to ensure atmospheric reentry in less than 90 days. The mission is planned for launch in fall 2017. Hall thruster technology is a type of electric propulsion. Electric propulsion uses electricity, typically from solar panels, to accelerate the propellant. Electric propulsion can accelerate propellant to 10 times higher velocities than traditional chemical propulsion systems, which significantly increases fuel efficiency. To enable the success of the propulsion subsystem, iSat will also demonstrate power management and thermal control capabilities well beyond the current state-of-the-art for spacecraft of its size. This technology is a viable primary propulsion system that can be used on small satellites ranging from about 22 pounds (10 kilograms) to more than 1,000 pounds (450 kilograms). iSat's fuel efficiency is ten times greater and its propulsion per volume is 100 times greater than current cold-gas systems and three times better than the same system operating on xenon. iSat's iodine propulsion system consists of a 200 watt (W) Hall thruster, a cathode, a tank to store solid iodine, a power processing unit (PPU) and the feed system to supply the iodine. This propulsion system is based on a 200 W Hall thruster developed by Busek Co. Inc., which was previously flown using xenon as the propellant. Several improvements have been made to the original system to include a compact PPU, targeting greater than 80 percent reduction in mass and volume of conventional PPU designs. The cathode technology is planned to enable heaterless cathode conditioning, significantly increasing total system efficiency. The feed system has been designed to

  3. Tethered Communication Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Tiesenhausen, G.

    1986-01-01

    Report describes concept for placing several communication satellites in geostationary orbit without taking up more space than assigned to single satellite. Proposed scheme eases orbital crowding more economically than space platforms. Concept requires minimal redesign of existing satellites and accommodates many satellites in just one orbital slot. System much lighter in weight than geostationary platform and easier and more economical to transport.

  4. Measurement of Artificial-Satellite Spectra with a Small Telescope

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    context, satellites positions must be frequently reacquired to maintain an accurate knowledge of their orbital parameters . However, acquiring several...positions must be reacquired frequently to maintain an accurate knowledge of their orbital parameters . However, acquiring several satellites in the...continuously combined with rapid variations of satellite orbital parameters . Those orbital characteristic changes account for many missing objects and are

  5. Exploring the Uranian satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Robert Hamilton

    1986-01-01

    Data on the Uranian satellites from the January 25, 1986 flyby of Voyager 2 are presented. Ten new satellites were discovered by Voyager 2; the features and orbits of these ten satellites are examined. The main geological characteristics for Oberon, Umbriel, Titania, Ariel, and Miranda discovered in the Voyager 2 images are described. Possible relationships between the Uranian satellites and Jovian and Saturnian satellites are being researched.

  6. Outer planet satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Schenk, P.M. )

    1991-01-01

    Recent findings on the outer-planet satellites are presented, with special consideration given to data on the rheologic properties of ice on icy satellites, the satellite surfaces and exogenic processes, cratering on dead cratered satellites, volcanism, and the interiors of outer-planet satellites. Particular attention is given to the state of Titan's surface and the properties of Triton, Pluto, and Charon. 210 refs.

  7. Satellite voice broadcase system study. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horstein, M.

    1985-01-01

    The feasibility of providing Voice of America (VOA) broadcasts by satellite relay was investigated. Satellite voice broadcast systems are described for three different frequency bands: HF, FHV, and L-band. Geostationary satellite configurations are considered for both frequency bands. A system of subsynchronous, circular satellites with an orbit period of 8 hours was developed for the HF band. The VHF broadcasts are provided by a system of Molniya satellites. The satellite designs are limited in size and weight to the capability of the STS/Centaur launch vehicle combination. At L-band, only four geostationary satellites are needed to meet the requirements of the complete broadcast schedule. These satellites are comparable in size and weight to current satellites designed for the direct broadcast of video program material.

  8. Iodine Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dankanich, John; Kamhawi, Hani; Szabo, James

    2015-01-01

    This project is a collaborative effort to mature an iodine propulsion system while reducing risk and increasing fidelity of a technology demonstration mission concept. 1 The FY 2014 tasks include investments leveraged throughout NASA, from multiple mission directorates, as a partnership with NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), a NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Technology Investment Project, and an Air Force partnership. Propulsion technology is often a critical enabling technology for space missions. NASA is investing in technologies to enable high value missions with very small and low-cost spacecraft, even CubeSats. However, these small spacecraft currently lack any appreciable propulsion capability. CubeSats are typically deployed and drift without any ability to transfer to higher value orbits, perform orbit maintenance, or deorbit. However, the iodine Hall system can allow the spacecraft to transfer into a higher value science orbit. The iodine satellite (iSAT) will be able to achieve a (Delta)V of >500 m/s with <1 kg of solid iodine propellant, which can be stored in an unpressurized benign state prior to launch. The iSAT propulsion system consists of the 200 W Hall thruster, solid iodine propellant tank, a power processing unit, and the necessary valves and tubing to route the iodine vapor. The propulsion system is led by GRC, with critical hardware provided by the Busek Co. The propellant tank begins with solid iodine unpressurized on the ground and in-flight before operations, which is then heated via tank heaters to a temperature at which solid iodine sublimates to iodine vapor. The vapor is then routed through tubing and custom valves to control mass flow to the thruster and cathode assembly. 2 The thruster then ionizes the vapor and accelerates it via magnetic and electrostatic fields, resulting in thrust with a specific impulse >1,300 s. The iSAT spacecraft, illustrated in figure 1, is currently a 12U CubeSat. The spacecraft chassis will be

  9. Stream Gauges and Satellite Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsdorf, D. E.

    2010-12-01

    within an international river basin (this is also an argument for better diplomacy). Essentially, where gauges exist, satellite measurements allow the spatial extension of in-situ observations, especially when jointly combined in models such as data assimilation methods. The opportunity for new hydrologic science and discovery is enhanced when the strengths of traditional and new measurements are combined.

  10. PHOTOGRAPHIC TRACKING FOR HIGH ALTITUDE SATELLITES,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    TRACKING, *COMMUNICATION SATELLITES, ARTIFICIAL SATELLITES, TRACKING CAMERAS, COMMUNICATION SATELLITES, PHOTOGRAPHY, SATELLITE ATTITUDE, ORBITS, ERRORS, CORRECTIONS, HIGH ALTITUDE , ILLUMINATION, STARS.

  11. Shadow imaging of geosynchronous satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Dennis Michael

    Geosynchronous (GEO) satellites are essential for modern communication networks. If communication to a GEO satellite is lost and a malfunction occurs upon orbit insertion such as a solar panel not deploying there is no direct way to observe it from Earth. Due to the GEO orbit distance of ~36,000 km from Earth's surface, the Rayleigh criteria dictates that a 14 m telescope is required to conventionally image a satellite with spatial resolution down to 1 m using visible light. Furthermore, a telescope larger than 30 m is required under ideal conditions to obtain spatial resolution down to 0.4 m. This dissertation evaluates a method for obtaining high spatial resolution images of GEO satellites from an Earth based system by measuring the irradiance distribution on the ground resulting from the occultation of the satellite passing in front of a star. The representative size of a GEO satellite combined with the orbital distance results in the ground shadow being consistent with a Fresnel diffraction pattern when observed at visible wavelengths. A measurement of the ground shadow irradiance is used as an amplitude constraint in a Gerchberg-Saxton phase retrieval algorithm that produces a reconstruction of the satellite's 2D transmission function which is analogous to a reverse contrast image of the satellite. The advantage of shadow imaging is that a terrestrial based redundant set of linearly distributed inexpensive small telescopes, each coupled to high speed detectors, is a more effective resolved imaging system for GEO satellites than a very large telescope under ideal conditions. Modeling and simulation efforts indicate sub-meter spatial resolution can be readily achieved using collection apertures of less than 1 meter in diameter. A mathematical basis is established for the treatment of the physical phenomena involved in the shadow imaging process. This includes the source star brightness and angular extent, and the diffraction of starlight from the satellite

  12. Weather Satellite Enterprise Information Chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamilkowski, M. L.; Grant, K. D.; Miller, S. W.; Cochran, S.

    2015-12-01

    NOAA & NASA are acquiring the next-generation civilian operational weather satellite: Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS). Contributing the afternoon orbit & ground system (GS) to replace current NOAA POES Satellites, its sensors will collect meteorological, oceanographic & climatological data. The JPSS Common Ground System (CGS), consisting of C3 and IDP segments, is developed by Raytheon. It now flies the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) satellite, transferring data between ground facilities, processing them into environmental products for NOAA weather centers, and expanding to support JPSS-1 in 2017. As a multi-mission system, CGS provides combinations of C3, data processing, and product delivery for numerous NASA, NOAA, DoD and international missions.The CGS provides a wide range of support to a number of missions: Command and control and mission management for the S-NPP mission today, expanding this support to the JPSS-1 satellite mission in 2017 Data acquisition for S-NPP, the JAXA's Global Change Observation Mission - Water (GCOM-W1), POES, and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) and Coriolis/WindSat for the DoD Data routing over a global fiber network for S-NPP, JPSS-1, GCOM-W1, POES, DMSP, Coriolis/WindSat, NASA EOS missions, MetOp for EUMETSAT and the National Science Foundation Environmental data processing and distribution for S-NPP, GCOM-W1 and JPSS-1 The CGS plays a key role in facilitating the movement and value-added enhancement of data all the way from satellite-based sensor data to delivery to the consumers who generate forecasts and produce watches and warnings. This presentation will discuss the information flow from sensors, through data routing and processing, and finally to product delivery. It will highlight how advances in architecture developed through lessons learned from S-NPP and implemented for JPSS-1 will increase data availability and reduce latency for end user applications.

  13. Visualizing Airborne and Satellite Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bierwirth, Victoria A.

    2011-01-01

    Remote sensing is a process able to provide information about Earth to better understand Earth's processes and assist in monitoring Earth's resources. The Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) is one remote sensing instrument dedicated to the cause of collecting data on anthropogenic influences on Earth as well as assisting scientists in understanding land-surface and atmospheric interactions. Landsat is a satellite program dedicated to collecting repetitive coverage of the continental Earth surfaces in seven regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. Combining these two aircraft and satellite remote sensing instruments will provide a detailed and comprehensive data collection able to provide influential information and improve predictions of changes in the future. This project acquired, interpreted, and created composite images from satellite data acquired from Landsat 4-5 Thematic Mapper (TM) and Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+). Landsat images were processed for areas covered by CAR during the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCT AS), Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC), Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment-Phase B (INTEXB), and Southern African Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI) 2000 missions. The acquisition of Landsat data will provide supplemental information to assist in visualizing and interpreting airborne and satellite imagery.

  14. Space Weather, Cosmic Rays, and Satellite Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lev, Dorman

    Results are presented of the Satellite Anomaly Project, which aims to improve the methods of safeguarding satellites in the Earth’s magnetosphere from the negative effects of the space environment. Anomaly data from the USSR and Russian “Kosmos” series satellites in the period 1971-1999 are combined into one database, together with similar information on other spacecraft. This database contains, beyond the anomaly information, various characteristics of space weather: geomagnetic activity indices (Ap, AE and Dst), fluxes and fluencies of electrons and protons at different energies, high energy cosmic ray variations and other solar, interplanetary and solar wind data. A comparative analysis of the distribution of each of these parameters relative to satellite anomalies was carried out for the total number of anomalies (about 6000 events), and separately for high altitude orbit satellites ( 5000 events) and low altitude (about 800 events). No relation was found between low and high altitude satellite anomalies. Daily numbers of satellite anomalies, averaged by a superposed epoch method around sudden storm commencements and proton event onsets for high (>1500 km) and low (<1500 km) altitude orbits revealed a big difference in behavior. Satellites were divided into several groups according to their orbital characteristics (altitude and inclination). The relation of satellite anomalies to the environmental parameters was found to be different for various orbits, and this should be taken into account when developing anomaly frequency models. The preliminary anomaly frequency models are presented.

  15. Small-satellite technology and applications III

    SciTech Connect

    Horais, B.J.

    1993-01-01

    This third conference on small-satellite applications has combined a number of significant and timely presentations on the status, in the US and on the international front, of this emerging industry. Presentations by all of the major Department of Defense activities in this field, including an overview of the ARPA CAMEO multispectral remote sensing satellite program, space activities at the Air Force Phillips Laboratory, and a space systems capabilities overview of the Naval Research Laboratory, are complemented by presentations from several international activities on their accomplishments and progress in the development of remote sensing satellite programs. For example: Spar Aerospace of Canada presented an overview of the progress they have made in establishing a space program through the use of small satellites, and the University of Surrey and Spar Aerospace provided an overview of the application of image compression schemes to imagery obtained from their UoSAT series of satellites. In addition, a number of papers were presented that summarize the state of technology in supporting activities, such as the development of the low-cost composite standardized satellite bus structures, accurate star trackers, and the application of JPEG and MPEG compression capabilities. Small-Satellite Technology and Applications III also addresses the business and cost estimating aspects of the emerging small-satellite industry as a means of increasing the overall awareness of the community in all aspects of developing a small-satellite remote sensing capability. Separate abstracts were prepared for 25 papers in this conference.

  16. Satellite orbit predictor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, Morton l.; Garrett, James, Major

    An analog aid to determine satellite coverage of Emergency Locator Transmitters Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon (ELT/EPIRB) distress incidence is discussed. The satellite orbit predictor is a graphical aid for determining the relationship between the satellite orbit, antenna coverage of the spacecraft and coverage of the Local User Terminal. The predictor allows the user to quickly visualize if a selected position will probably be detected and is composed of a base map and a satellite track overlay for each satellite.A table of equator crossings for each satellite is included.

  17. China's satellite communications discussed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhou, Z.

    1986-04-01

    In 1972, China began to enter the age of satellite comunications, and it was realized that satellites could play a large role in television transmission in China. The experimental broadcasting of satellite television programs was begun in 1978, and satisfactory results were obtained. The success of the television transmission demonstration has led to important decisions regarding development of a domestic satellite communications system. Before specialized communications satellites are launched, the decision was made to lease an international communications satellite transmitter. The responsibility of the ground stations were discussed.

  18. Small satellite product assurance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demontlivault, J.; Cadelec, Jacques

    1993-01-01

    In order to increase the interest in small satellites, their cost must be reduced; reducing product assurance costs induced by quality requirements is a major objective. For a logical approach, small satellites are classified in three main categories: satellites for experimental operations with a short lifetime, operational satellites manufactured in small mass with long lifetime requirements, operational satellites (long lifetime required), of which only a few models are produced. The various requirements as regards the product assurance are examined for each satellite category: general requirements for space approach, reliability, electronic components, materials and processes, quality assurance, documentation, tests, and management. Ideal product assurance system integrates quality teams and engineering teams.

  19. Geostationary satellite log

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, C. H.

    The present listing of current and planned geostationary satellites for the Fixed Satellite Service, Maritime Mobile Satellite Service, Broadcasting Satellite Service, and Space Research Service, are ordered along increasing East longitude orbit position; they update previously published lists through December, 1985. Also given is a key to the frequency bands used by current and planned satellites and replacement satellites; subband locations are designated by an up/down-link frequency column. Service allocations and the applicable ITU region for bands not allocated worldwide are included.

  20. Galileo satellite antenna modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigenberger, Peter; Dach, Rolf; Prange, Lars; Montenbruck, Oliver

    2015-04-01

    The space segment of the European satellite navigation system Galileo currently consists of six satellites. Four of them belong to the first generation of In-Orbit Validation (IOV) satellites whereas the other two are Full Operational Capability (FOC) satellites. High-precision geodetic applications require detailed knowledge about the actual phase center of the satellite and receiver antenna. The deviation of this actual phase center from a well-defined reference point is described by phase center offsets (PCOs) and phase center variations (PCVs). Unfortunately, no public information is available about the Galileo satellite antenna PCOs and PCVs, neither for the IOV, nor the FOC satellites. Therefore, conventional values for the IOV satellite antenna PCOs have been adopted for the Multi-GNSS experiment (MGEX) of the International GNSS Service (IGS). The effect of the PCVs is currently neglected and no PCOs for the FOC satellites are available yet. To overcome this deficiency in GNSS observation modeling, satellite antenna PCOs and PCVs are estimated for the Galileo IOV satellites based on global GNSS tracking data of the MGEX network and additional stations of the legacy IGS network. Two completely independent solutions are computed with the Bernese and Napeos software packages. The PCO and PCV values of the individual satellites are analyzed and the availability of two different solutions allows for an accuracy assessment. The FOC satellites are built by a different manufacturer and are also equipped with another type of antenna panel compared to the IOV satellites. Signal transmission of the first FOC satellite has started in December 2014 and activation of the second satellite is expected for early 2015. Based on the available observations PCO estimates and, optionally PCVs of the FOC satellites will be presented as well. Finally, the impact of the new antenna model on the precision and accuracy of the Galileo orbit determination is analyzed.

  1. Satellite Home Tutorials vs. Satellite Classroom Tutorials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyth-Marom, Ruth; Yafe, Edna; Privman, Meira; Harpaz, Hamutal Razy

    In this study, students who registered for a course at the Open University of Israel could choose the tutorial method they preferred: group face-to-face tutorials with a local tutor in their residential vicinity; tutorials via satellite broadcasting to groups of students around the country; or getting the same satellite tutorial at home on the…

  2. Satellite RNAs and Satellite Viruses of Plants.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chung-Chi; Hsu, Yau-Heiu; Lin, Na-Sheng

    2009-12-01

    The view that satellite RNAs (satRNAs) and satellite viruses are purely molecular parasites of their cognate helper viruses has changed. The molecular mechanisms underlying the synergistic and/or antagonistic interactions among satRNAs/satellite viruses, helper viruses, and host plants are beginning to be comprehended. This review aims to summarize the recent achievements in basic and practical research, with special emphasis on the involvement of RNA silencing mechanisms in the pathogenicity, population dynamics, and, possibly, the origin(s) of these subviral agents. With further research following current trends, the comprehensive understanding of satRNAs and satellite viruses could lead to new insights into the trilateral interactions among host plants, viruses, and satellites.

  3. Satellite RNAs and Satellite Viruses of Plants

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chung-Chi; Hsu, Yau-Heiu; Lin, Na-Sheng

    2009-01-01

    The view that satellite RNAs (satRNAs) and satellite viruses are purely molecular parasites of their cognate helper viruses has changed. The molecular mechanisms underlying the synergistic and/or antagonistic interactions among satRNAs/satellite viruses, helper viruses, and host plants are beginning to be comprehended. This review aims to summarize the recent achievements in basic and practical research, with special emphasis on the involvement of RNA silencing mechanisms in the pathogenicity, population dynamics, and, possibly, the origin(s) of these subviral agents. With further research following current trends, the comprehensive understanding of satRNAs and satellite viruses could lead to new insights into the trilateral interactions among host plants, viruses, and satellites. PMID:21994595

  4. Stereo Measurements from Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, R.

    1982-01-01

    The papers in this presentation include: 1) 'Stereographic Observations from Geosynchronous Satellites: An Important New Tool for the Atmospheric Sciences'; 2) 'Thunderstorm Cloud Top Ascent Rates Determined from Stereoscopic Satellite Observations'; 3) 'Artificial Stereo Presentation of Meteorological Data Fields'.

  5. Solar power satellite system definition study. Part 2, volume 5: Space operations (construction and transportation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, K.; Davis, E. E.

    1977-01-01

    Construction and transportation systems and operations are described for the following combinations: (1) silicon photovoltaic CR=1 satellite constructed primarily in low earth orbit (LEO); (2) silicon photovoltaic CR=1 satellite constructed in geosynchronous earth orbit (GEO); (3) Rankine thermal engine satellite constructed primarily in LEO; and (4) Rankine thermal engine satellite constructed in GEO.

  6. Communications satellite systems operations with the space station, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, K.; Dixon, J.; Weyandt, C.

    1987-01-01

    A financial model was developed which described quantitatively the economics of the space segment of communication satellite systems. The model describes the economics of the space system throughout the lifetime of the satellite. The expected state-of-the-art status of communications satellite systems and operations beginning service in 1995 were assessed and described. New or enhanced space-based activities and associated satellite system designs that have the potential to achieve future communications satellite operations in geostationary orbit with improved economic performance were postulated and defined. Three scenarios using combinations of space-based activities were analyzed: a spin stabilized satellite, a three axis satellite, and assembly at the Space Station and GEO servicing. Functional and technical requirements placed on the Space Station by the scenarios were detailed. Requirements on the satellite were also listed.

  7. [Theme Issue: Communications Satellites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howkins, John, Ed.

    1976-01-01

    One section of this journal is devoted to issues involving broadcast satellites. Separate articles discuss the need for international planning of satellite broadcasting, decisions made at the 1971 World Administrative Radio Conference for Space Telecommunications, potential problems in satellite broadcasting, a series of proposals drawn up by the…

  8. Tracking Weather Satellites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Helen E.

    1996-01-01

    Describes the use of weather satellites in providing an exciting, cohesive framework for students learning Earth and space science and in providing a hands-on approach to technology in the classroom. Discusses the history of weather satellites and classroom satellite tracking. (JRH)

  9. Which satellites were used?

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-12-08

    The three satellites ERBS, NOAA-9, NOAA-10 carrying two ERBE instrument packages (Scanner and NonScanner) were used. The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center built the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) on which ... and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) weather monitoring satellites, NOAA-9 and NOAA-10 in 1984 and 1986, respectively. ...

  10. Geodetic Secor Satellite

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-06-01

    simple, and had low-power lem. 17 14. Satellite Orientation . The satellite was designed to maintain a constant relationship between the antenna...the same satellite orientation . Further considerations were Th oscillations, however, when higher orbital ranges (500-2500 nautical miles) -, 3 a

  11. [Theme Issue: Communications Satellites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howkins, John, Ed.

    1976-01-01

    One section of this journal is devoted to issues involving broadcast satellites. Separate articles discuss the need for international planning of satellite broadcasting, decisions made at the 1971 World Administrative Radio Conference for Space Telecommunications, potential problems in satellite broadcasting, a series of proposals drawn up by the…

  12. Combined Summary Paper: -Current and Future Geodetic Satellite Missions for Global Change Monitoring - On the Capacity of Swarm for Surface Mass Variation Monitoring: Quantitative Assessment Based on Orbit Information from CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE - The Lake Level Variations in China from Satellite Altimetric Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sneeuw, N.; Li, J.; Baur, O.; Cai, J.; Tourian, M. J.; Elmi, O.; Jiang, W.; Chu, Y.; Jin, T.; Wirnsberger, H.; Krauss, S.; Maier, A.

    2014-11-01

    Global change deals with large- and small-scale processes that modify the Earth's atmosphere, land and ocean. Using innovative geodetic space-borne sensor systems, dedicated gravity field and altimeter satellites monitor these processes over a range of spatial and temporal scales. The integrated analysis of these geometric and gravimetric Earth observation data shall improve the knowledge of system processes of the changing Earth. A few case studies elucidate the role of satellite geodesy in Earth system science.

  13. ABC of Satellites for Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Shousan

    1995-01-01

    Introduces the basic concepts and elements of satellite and telecommunications satellites. Identifies the advantages of using the unique characteristics of telecommunications satellites in education. Lists cautions of using telecommunications satellite systems to deliver educational programs. (Author/AEF)

  14. Optimization of satellite constellation reconfiguration maneuvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appel, Leonid; Guelman, Moshe; Mishne, David

    2014-06-01

    Constellation satellites are required to perform orbital transfer maneuvers. Orbital transfer maneuvers, as opposed to orbital correction maneuvers, are seldom performed but require a substantial amount of propellant for each maneuver. The maneuvers are performed in order to obtain the desired constellation configuration that satisfies the coverage requirements. In most cases, the single-satellite position is immaterial; rather the relative position between constellation multiple-satellites is to be controlled. This work deals with the solution to the coupled optimization problem of multiple-satellite orbital transfer. The studied problem involves a coupled formulation of the terminal conditions of the satellites. The solution was achieved using functional optimization techniques by a combined algorithm. The combined algorithm is based on the First Order Gradient and Neighboring-Extremals Algorithms. An orbital transfer optimization tool was developed. This software has the ability to consider multiple satellites with coupled terminal conditions. A solution to the multiple-satellite orbital transfer optimization problem is presented. A comparison of this solution to the uncoupled case is presented in order to review the benefits of using this approach. It is concluded that the coupled transfer maneuver solution approach is more computationally efficient and more accurate. Numerical solutions for a number of representative cases are presented.

  15. A small terminal for satellite communication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiong, Fuqin; Wu, Dong; Jin, Min

    1994-01-01

    A small portable, low-cost satellite communications terminal system incorporating a modulator/demodulator and convolutional-Viterbi coder/decoder is described. Advances in signal processing and error-correction techniques in combination with higher power and higher frequencies aboard satellites allow for more efficient use of the space segment. This makes it possible to design small economical earth stations. The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) was chosen to test the system. ACTS, operating at the Ka band incorporates higher power, higher frequency, frequency and spatial reuse using spot beams and polarization.

  16. Survey: National Environmental Satellite Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The national Environmental Satellite Service (NESS) receives data at periodic intervals from satellites of the Synchronous Meteorological Satellite/Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite series and from the Improved TIROS (Television Infrared Observational Satellite) Operational Satellite. Within the conterminous United States, direct readout and processed products are distributed to users over facsimile networks from a central processing and data distribution facility. In addition, the NESS Satellite Field Stations analyze, interpret, and distribute processed geostationary satellite products to regional weather service activities.

  17. Satellite Attitude from a Raven Class Telescope

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    collection opportunities of the satellite. The combined software tool calculates the satellite orientation required to image the asset location...The software then computes the orientation required to image the asset with only a roll maneuver. This keeps the number of angles for simulation to...1. Introduction   Photometry is the measurement of an object’s apparent brightness, usually measured within a specific calibrated wavelength

  18. Fundamentals of satellite navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiller, A. H.

    The basic operating principles and capabilities of conventional and satellite-based navigation systems for air, sea, and land vehicles are reviewed and illustrated with diagrams. Consideration is given to autonomous onboard systems; systems based on visible or radio beacons; the Transit, Cicada, Navstar-GPS, and Glonass satellite systems; the physical laws and parameters of satellite motion; the definition of time in satellite systems; and the content of the demodulated GPS data signal. The GPS and Glonass data format frames are presented graphically, and tables listing the GPS and Glonass satellites, their technical characteristics, and the (past or scheduled) launch dates are provided.

  19. Three small deployed satellites

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-10-04

    ISS033-E-009282 (4 Oct. 2012) --- Several tiny satellites are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 33 crew member on the International Space Station. The satellites were released outside the Kibo laboratory using a Small Satellite Orbital Deployer attached to the Japanese module’s robotic arm on Oct. 4, 2012. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Aki Hoshide, flight engineer, set up the satellite deployment gear inside the lab and placed it in the Kibo airlock. The Japanese robotic arm then grappled the deployment system and its satellites from the airlock for deployment. Earth’s horizon and the blackness of space provide the backdrop for the scene.

  20. Public service satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    The development of the communications satellite system is discussed, taking into account a suggestion by Clarke in 1945 concerning the significance of geosynchronous satellites, the establishment of Intelsat, reductions in the cost of transatlantic telephone calls as a result of satellite communications service, questions of satellite cost, and the need for larger satellites. It is pointed out that the use of the Space Shuttle will reduce the cost of placing a satellite in orbit from more than half to less than a quarter of the total cost of design, construction, and launch. Attention is given to studies of a personal communications system which involves direct broadcast from a 'wrist watch radio' to a high-capacity, multibeam satellite for retransmission to ground communications centrals.

  1. Geosynchronous satellite collision avoidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, W.

    1985-01-01

    The increases in the number of satellite systems, the growing dependency on these systems, and the potentially hazardous conjunctions in space, dictates careful management of satellite positions. The potential for satellite collision increases as more objects are placed in orbit. At geosynchronous altitudes active satellites maintain fixed longitudinal station-keeping control while inactive satellites and debris generally drift around the globe or oscillate about two geopotential stable points. Portions of the total objects in geosynchronous orbit are tracked by ground stations while a significant number of additional pieces of space debris regularly pass through geosynchronous orbit altitudes. The probability of an operational satellite colliding with another satellite or a piece of space debris will increase in the number of space objects, their sizes, and on-orbit lifetimes.

  2. The Study and Applications of Satellite and Satellite Constellation Autonomous Orbit Determination Using Star Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Q. B.

    2012-07-01

    Autonomous satellite orbit determination is a key technique in autonomous satellite navigation. Many kinds of technologies have been proposed to realize the autonomous satellite navigation, such as the star sensor, the Earth magnetometer, the occultation time survey, and the phase measurement of X-ray pulsar signals. This dissertation studies a method of autonomous satellite orbit determination using star sensor. Moreover, the method is extended to the autonomous navigation of satellite constellation and the space-based surveillance. In chapters 1 and 2, some usual time and reference systems are introduced. Then the principles of several typical autonomous navigation methods, and their merits and shortcomings are analyzed. In chapter 3, the autonomous satellite orbit determination using star sensor and infrared Earth sensor (IRES) is specifically studied, which is based on the status movement simulation, the stellar background observation from star sensor, and the Earth center direction survey from IRES. By simulating the low Earth orbit satellites and pseudo Geostationary Earth orbit (PGEO) satellites, the precision of position and speed with autonomous orbit determination using star sensor is obtained. Besides, the autonomous orbit determination using star sensor with double detectors is studied. According to the observation equation's characters, an optimized type of star sensor and IRES initial assembly model is proposed. In the study of the PGEO autonomous orbit determination, an efficient sampling frequency of measurements is promoted. The simulation results confirm that the autonomous satellite orbit determination using star sensor is feasible for satellites with all kinds of altitudes. In chapter 4, the method of autonomous satellite orbit determination using star sensor is extended to the autonomous navigation of mini-satellite constellation. Combining with the high-accuracy inter satellite links data, the precision of the determined orbit and

  3. Combined Summary Paper: -Current and Future Geodetic Satellite Mission for Global Change Monitoring - On the Capability of Swarm for Surface Mass Variation Monitoring: Quantitative Assessment Based on Orbit Information from CHAMP, GRACE, and GOCE - The Lake Level Variations in China from Satellite Altimetric Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sneeuw, N.; Li, J.; Baur, O.; Cai, J.; Tourian, M. J.; Elmi, O.; Jiang, W.; Chu, Y.; Jin, T.; Wirnsberger, H.; Krauss, S.; Maier, A.

    2014-11-01

    Global change deals with large- and small-scale processes that modify the Earth’s atmosphere, land and ocean. Using innovative geodetic space-borne sensor systems, dedicated gravity field and altimeter satellites monitor these processes over a range of spatial and temporal scales. The integrated analysis of these geometric and gravimetric Earth observation data shall improve the knowledge of system processes of the changing Earth. A few case studies elucidate the role of satellite geodesy in Earth system science. These following two just link to later in the table of contents and don't have actual papers attached to them.

  4. Communication satellite applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelton, Joseph N.

    The status and future of the technologies, numbers and services provided by communications satellites worldwide are explored. The evolution of Intelsat satellites and the associated earth terminals toward high-rate all-digital telephony, data, facsimile, videophone, videoconferencing and DBS capabilities are described. The capabilities, services and usage of the Intersputnik, Eutelsat, Arabsat and Palapa systems are also outlined. Domestic satellite communications by means of the Molniya, ANIK, Olympus, Intelsat and Palapa spacecraft are outlined, noting the fast growth of the market and the growing number of different satellite manufacturers. The technical, economic and service definition issues surrounding DBS systems are discussed, along with presently operating and planned maritime and aeronautical communications and positioning systems. Features of search and rescue and tracking, data, and relay satellite systems are summarized, and services offered or which will be offered by every existing or planned communication satellite worldwide are tabulated.

  5. Satellite Data Communications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-04-01

    emphasized. After a discussion of existing standard tariffed satellite data services and special tariffed data services we list some possible future data...international maritime cammunica- tions satellite (MARISAT) is scheduled for launch early in 1975, and an inter- national aeronautical satellite (AEROSAT...circuit may achieve a data rate of 9600 bits per second under carefully controlled conditions [8]. A 50,000 bits per second data circuit, tariffed

  6. Satellite networks for education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. P.; Morgan, R. P.; Rosenbaum, F. J.

    1972-01-01

    Satellite based educational networking is discussed with particular attention given to the potential uses of communications satellites to help meet educational needs in the United states. Four major subject areas were covered; (1) characteristics and structure of networks, (2) definition of pressures within educational establishment that provide motivation for various types of networks, (3) examination of current educational networking status for educational radio and television, instructional television fixed services, inter- and intra-state educational communication networks, computer networks, and cable television for education, and (4) identification of possible satellite based educational telecommunication services and three alternatives for implementing educational satellite systems.

  7. Methods of satellite oceanography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    The theoretical basis for remote sensing measurements of climate and ocean dynamics is examined. Consideration is given to: the absorption of electromagnetic radiation in the atmosphere; scattering in the atmosphere; and satellite observations using visible light. Consideration is also given to: the theory of radio scatter from the sea; scatter of centimeter waves from the sea; and the theory of operation of synthetic aperture radars. Additional topics include: the coordinate systems of satellite orbits for oceanographic remote sensing applications; the operating features of the major U.S. satellite systems for viewing the ocean; and satellite altimetry.

  8. Satellite communication antenna technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittra, R. (Editor); Imbriale, W. A. (Editor); Maanders, E. J. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    A general overview of current technology in the field of communication satellite antennas is presented. Among the topics discussed are: the design of multiple beam systems; frequency reuse; and polarization control of antenna measurements. Consideration is also given to: contour beam synthesis; dual shaped reflector synthesis; beam shaping; and offset reflector design. The applications of the above technologies to present and future generations of communications satellites is considered, with emphasis given to such systems as: the Intelsats; the Defense Satellite Communications System, (DSCS-III); Satellite Business System (SBS), and Comstar.

  9. Echo 30" Sub Satellite

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-09-07

    James Hansen describes the work on Project Echo s air density experiment known as the Sub-Satellite. Before launch engineers subjected the sub-satellite to many tests. Here, the sub-satellite is shown prior to tests to determine the capacity of the 30-inch Sub-Satellite to withstand the high temperature of direct sunlight in space, Langley researchers subjected it to 450 F heat test. Results indicated that the aluminum-covered Mylar plastic would effectively reflect the dangerous heat. -- Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, NASA SP-4308, p. 168.

  10. Satellite Antenna Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Through the Technology Affiliates Program at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the ACTS antenna system was transferred from experimental testing status to commercial development with KVH Industries, Inc. The ACTS design enables mobile satellite antennas to remain pointed at the satellite, regardless of the motion or vibration on which it is mounted. KVH's first product based on the ACTS design is a land-mobile satellite antenna system that will enable direct broadcast satellite television aboard moving trucks, recreational vehicles, trains, and buses. Future products could include use in broadcasting, emergency medical and military vehicles.

  11. Satellite Tracking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Researchers at the Center for Aerospace Sciences of the University of North Dakota (UND), Grand Forks, used three NASA Computer programs (SANDTRACKS, ODG, NORAD) to develop a Satellite Tracking System for real time utilization of TIROS weather/environment satellite information. SANDTRACKS computes the satellite's position relative to the Earth. ODG allows plotting a view of Earth as seen by the satellite. NORAD computes sight direction, visibility times and maximum elevation angle during each orbit. With the system, UND's Earth System Science Institute will be able to routinely monitor agricultural and environmental conditions of the Northern Plains.

  12. Military use of commercial satellite communications systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaura, Mary A.

    1992-03-01

    Military communications requirements are discussed, and commercial communication is presented as a potential solution for increased satellite capacity. Both the Army's tactical warfighting concept and the evolution of the modern battlefield to a highly sophisticated data environment in which large databases are transferred among echelons of command have caused a need for increased satellite capacity. This need combined with technology advancements in commercial communications (small mobile satellite terminals in conjunction with narrow spot beam technology) has resulted in the potential commercial communications that can meet the increased military requirements. NASA's Advanced Communications Technology Satellite which is intended to provide greater than a gigabit throughput capacity is considered to be one of the most promising wideband systems for military use.

  13. Future satellite systems - Market demand assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiner, P. S.

    1981-01-01

    During 1979-80, a market study was performed regarding the future total demand for communications services, and satellite transmission service at the 4/6 GHz, 12/14 GHz, and 20/30 GHz frequencies. Included in the study were a variety of communications traffic characteristics as well as projections of the cost of C and Ku band satellite systems through the year 2000. In connection with the considered study, a total of 15 major study tasks and subtasks were undertaken and were all interrelated in various ways. The telecommunications service forecasts were concerned with a total of 21 data services, 5 voice services, and 5 video services. The traffic volumes within the U.S. for the three basic services were projected for three time periods. It is found that the fixed frequency allocation for domestic satellites combined with potential interference from adjacent satellites means a near term lack of orbital positions above the U.S.

  14. Future satellite systems - Market demand assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiner, P. S.

    1981-01-01

    During 1979-80, a market study was performed regarding the future total demand for communications services, and satellite transmission service at the 4/6 GHz, 12/14 GHz, and 20/30 GHz frequencies. Included in the study were a variety of communications traffic characteristics as well as projections of the cost of C and Ku band satellite systems through the year 2000. In connection with the considered study, a total of 15 major study tasks and subtasks were undertaken and were all interrelated in various ways. The telecommunications service forecasts were concerned with a total of 21 data services, 5 voice services, and 5 video services. The traffic volumes within the U.S. for the three basic services were projected for three time periods. It is found that the fixed frequency allocation for domestic satellites combined with potential interference from adjacent satellites means a near term lack of orbital positions above the U.S.

  15. Global satellite composites - 20 years of evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohrs, Richard A.; Lazzara, Matthew A.; Robaidek, Jerrold O.; Santek, David A.; Knuth, Shelley L.

    2014-01-01

    For two decades, the University of Wisconsin Space Science and Engineering Center (SSEC) and the Antarctic Meteorological Research Center (AMRC) have been creating global, regional and hemispheric satellite composites. These composites have proven useful in research, operational forecasting, commercial applications and educational outreach. Using the Man computer Interactive Data System (McIDAS) software developed at SSEC, infrared window composites were created by combining Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES), and polar orbiting data from the SSEC Data Center and polar data acquired at McMurdo and Palmer stations, Antarctica. Increased computer processing speed has allowed for more advanced algorithms to address the decision making process for co-located pixels. The algorithms have evolved from a simplistic maximum brightness temperature to those that account for distance from the sub-satellite point, parallax displacement, pixel time and resolution. The composites are the state-of-the-art means for merging/mosaicking satellite imagery.

  16. Processing of satellite imagery at the National Environmental Satellite Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowe, M.

    1977-01-01

    The National Environmental Satellite Service (NESS) image product processing system is described. Other topics discussed include: (1) image processing of polar-orbiter satellite data; (2) image processing of geostationary satellite data; and (3) quality assurance and product monitoring.

  17. Communications technology satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A description of the Communications Technology Satellite (CTS), its planned orbit, its experiments, and associated ground facilities was given. The communication experiments, to be carried out by a variety of groups in both the United States and Canada, include tele-education, tele-medicine, community interaction, data communications and broadcasting. A historical summary of communications satellite development was also included.

  18. Jovian satellite nomenclature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, T.

    1976-01-01

    A brief review of the history of Jovian satellite nomenclature is given to indicate the background for the names proposed for the numbered satellites. The new names are consistent with established tradition and should cause minimal confusion with other named objects in the solar system.

  19. Federal Agency Satellite Requirements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-07-01

    High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) instrument have been established with I Thailand and Malaysia . AID’s Early Warning Program relies on satellite...CE’s mission. a. Environmental and Hydrological Data. High-resolution digi - tal satellite data have great potential for supplying hydro- logic and

  20. Satellites of spiral galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaritsky, Dennis; Smith, Rodney; Frenk, Carlos; White, Simon D. M.

    1993-01-01

    We present a survey of satellites around a homogeneous set of late-type spirals with luminosity similar to that of the Milky Way. On average, we find fewer than 1.5 satellites per primary, but we argue that we can treat the survey as an ensemble and so derive the properties of the halo of a 'typical' isolated spiral. The projected density profile of the ensemble falls off approximately as 1/r. Within 50 kpc the azimuthal distribution of satellites shows some evidence for the 'Holmberg effect', an excess near the minor axis of the primary; however, at larger projected distances, the distribution appears isotropic. There is a weak but significant correlation between the size of a satellite and its distance from its primary, as expected if satellites are tidally truncated. Neither Hubble type nor spectral characteristics correlate with apparent separation. The ensemble of satellites appears to be rotating at about 30 km/s in the same direction as the galactic disk. Satellites on prograde orbits tend to be brighter than those on retrograde orbits. The typical velocity difference between a satellite and its primary shows no clear dependence either on apparent separation, or on the rotation speed of the primary. Thus our survey demonstrates that isolated spiral galaxies have massive halos that extend to many optical radii.

  1. Telecommunications satellite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramat, Pierre

    1992-12-01

    A survey of the telecommunications satellite field is presented. After a review of the historical and regulatory background, the main technical features of satellite networks are analyzed, and existing international and national systems are considered. Particular attention is given to Intelsat, Inmarsat, Eutelsat, and Telecom 1 and 2. Future technical and economic trends are then projected.

  2. Outer planets satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, D.

    1983-01-01

    The present investigation takes into account the published literature on outer planet satellites for 1979-1982. It is pointed out that all but three (the moon and the two Martian satellites) of the known planetary satellites are found in the outer solar system. Most of these are associated with the three regular satellite systems of Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus. The largest satellites are Titan in the Saturn system and Ganymede and Callisto in the Jupiter system. Intermediate in size between Mercury and Mars, each has a diameter of about 5000 km. Presumably each has an internal composition about 60 percent rock and 40 ice, and each is differentiated with a dense core extending out about 75 percent of the distance to the surface, with a mantle of high-pressure ice and a crust of ordinary ice perhaps 100 km thick. Attention is also given to Io, Europa, the icy satellites of Saturn, the satellites of Uranus, the small satellites of Jupiter and Saturn, Triton and the Pluto system, and plans for future studies.

  3. Amateur Radio Satellite Communications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, David P.

    The Amateur Radio Satellite Communications project had, as its goal, the assembly of an amateur radio satellite station in a high school physics classroom. Specific objectives were to provide: (1) a special source of interest as a motivator for attracting students and building public relations; (2) a center of interest as a motivator for the study…

  4. Signals from Communications Satellites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomsen, Volker

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the Doppler effect for relative motion between a source of waves and an observer and the orbital dynamics of communications satellites. Presents preliminary calculations of the satellite's altitude and linear velocity using only the concepts of the Doppler shift and the mechanics of motion in a circular path. (JRH)

  5. Satellite Teleconference Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elgin Community Coll., IL.

    The vocational education satellite teleconference project accomplished two goals: (1) identified, acquired, copied, and distributed to the Illinois Vocational Curriculum Center 100 marketing or training videotapes for staff development and classroom use; and (2) provided from 15-25 variable time (1- to 3-hour) satellite teleconferences in four…

  6. Audio direct broadcast satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    Satellite sound broadcasting is, as the name implies, the use of satellite techniques and technology to broadcast directly from space to low-cost, consumer-quality receivers the types of sound programs commonly received in the AM and FM broadcast bands. It would be a ubiquitous service available to the general public in the home, in the car, and out in the open.

  7. Signals from Communications Satellites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomsen, Volker

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the Doppler effect for relative motion between a source of waves and an observer and the orbital dynamics of communications satellites. Presents preliminary calculations of the satellite's altitude and linear velocity using only the concepts of the Doppler shift and the mechanics of motion in a circular path. (JRH)

  8. Satellites in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, C. I.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the use of satellite data in physics classrooms. Describes the apparatus that can be used to collect and analyze data. Provides examples of how telemetry data transmitted by the satellite UoSAT-2 can be used not only in teaching physics, but also in geography, mathematics, and information technology. (TW)

  9. Interactive Learning by Satellite.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Bruce O.

    1987-01-01

    Describes three systems of interactive satellite instruction for high school credit: German by Satellite, offered by the University of Oklahoma; Accelerated Learning of Spanish, originating in Utah; and the TI-IN network, which broadcasts 14 different high school courses from San Antonio, Texas. (JC)

  10. Communication satellite technology trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuccia, Louis

    1986-01-01

    A chronology of space-Earth interconnectivity is presented. The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) system, Land Mobile Satellite, space-Earth antennas, impact of antenna size on coverage, intersatellite links are outlined. This presentation is represented by graphs and charts only.

  11. Tethered satellite control mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyrias, G. M.

    1983-01-01

    The tethered satellite control mechanisms consist of four major subsystems. The reel drive mechanism stores the tether. It is motor driven and includes a level wind to uniformly feed the tether to the reel. The lower boom mechanism serves two primary functions: (1) it measures tether length and velocity as the tether runs through the mechanism, and (2) it reads the tether tension at the reel. It also provides change the direction for the tether from the reel to the upper boom mechanism. The deployment boom positions the upper boom mechanism with satellite out of the cargo bay. The deployment function places the 500-kg satellite 20 m away from the Space Shuttle (producing a small natural gravity gradient force), impacts an initial velocity to the satellite for deployment, and allows for satellite docking at a safe distance from the body of the Space Shuttle. The upper boom mechanism (UBM) services three functions: (1) it provides tether control to the satellite as the satellite swings in and out of plane; (2) it reads tether tension in the low range during the early deployment and final retrieval parts of the mission; and (3) it produces additional tether tension at the reel when tether tension to the satellite is in the low range.

  12. Communications satellite needs examined

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supharat

    1985-02-01

    Thailand can use a communications satellite to provide various forms of international and domestic telecommunications services such as telephone, teleprinter, telephotograph, television and radio service. This can be done in a manner that is just as efficient as using a microwave radio and underwater and optical fiber cable system. A communications satellite is also superior in terms of flexibility and speed in putting it into operation with no restrictions on distance, routes or geographical characteristics. A ground radio transmitter-receiver station can be built anywhere radio waves from the satellite can be picked up. Costs of launching a satellite into orbit and procedures involved from a regulatory point of view are examined. Initiatives taken to provide Thailand with its own satellites are highlighted.

  13. Satellite networks for education.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. P.; Morgan, R. P.; Rosenbaum, F. J.

    1972-01-01

    Consideration of satellite-based educational networking. The characteristics and structure of networks are reviewed, and pressures within the educational establishment that are providing motivation for various types of networks are discussed. A number of studies are cited in which networking needs for educational sectors and services are defined. The current status of educational networking for educational radio and television, instructional television fixed services, inter- and intrastate educational communication networks, computer networks, cable television for education, and continuing and proposed educational experiments using NASA's Applications Technology Satellites is reviewed. Possible satellite-based educational telecommunication services and three alternatives for implementing educational satellite systems are described. Some remarks are made concerning public policy aspects of future educational satellite system development.

  14. Laser Geodynamics Satellite (LAGEOS)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-05-04

    This 1975 NASA video highlights the development of LAser GEOdynamics Satellite (LAGEOS I) developed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. LAGEOS I is a passive satellite constructed from brass and aluminum and contains 426 individual precision reflectors made from fused silica glass. The mirrored surface of the satellite was designed to reflect laser beams from ground stations for accurate ranging measurements. LAGEOS I was launched on May 4, 1976 from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California. The two-foot diameter, 900-pound satellite orbited the Earth from pole to pole, measuring the movements of the Earth's surface relative to earthquakes, continental drift, and other geophysical phenomena. Scientists at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama came up with the idea for the satellite and built it at the Marshall Center.

  15. Satellite networks for education.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. P.; Morgan, R. P.; Rosenbaum, F. J.

    1972-01-01

    Consideration of satellite-based educational networking. The characteristics and structure of networks are reviewed, and pressures within the educational establishment that are providing motivation for various types of networks are discussed. A number of studies are cited in which networking needs for educational sectors and services are defined. The current status of educational networking for educational radio and television, instructional television fixed services, inter- and intrastate educational communication networks, computer networks, cable television for education, and continuing and proposed educational experiments using NASA's Applications Technology Satellites is reviewed. Possible satellite-based educational telecommunication services and three alternatives for implementing educational satellite systems are described. Some remarks are made concerning public policy aspects of future educational satellite system development.

  16. The Satellite Situation Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teague, M. J.; Sawyer, D. M.; Vette, J. I.

    1982-01-01

    Considerations related to the early planning for the International Magnetospheric Study (IMS) took into account the desirability of an establishment of specific entities for generating and disseminating coordination information for both retrospective and predictive periods. The organizations established include the IMS/Satellite Situation Center (IMS/SSC) operated by NASA. The activities of the SSC are related to the preparation of reports on predicted and actually achieved satellite positions, the response to inquiries, the compilation of information on satellite experiments, and the issue of periodic status summaries. Attention is given to high-altitude satellite services, other correlative satellite services, non-IMS activities of the SSC, a summary of the SSC request activity, and post-IMS and future activities.

  17. Three small deployed satellites

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-10-04

    ISS033-E-009285 (4 Oct. 2012) --- Several tiny satellites are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 33 crew member on the International Space Station. The satellites were released outside the Kibo laboratory using a Small Satellite Orbital Deployer attached to the Japanese module’s robotic arm on Oct. 4, 2012. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Aki Hoshide, flight engineer, set up the satellite deployment gear inside the lab and placed it in the Kibo airlock. The Japanese robotic arm then grappled the deployment system and its satellites from the airlock for deployment. A portion of the station’s solar array panels and a blue and white part of Earth provide the backdrop for the scene.

  18. Three small deployed satellites

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-10-04

    ISS033-E-009286 (4 Oct. 2012) --- Several tiny satellites are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 33 crew member on the International Space Station. The satellites were released outside the Kibo laboratory using a Small Satellite Orbital Deployer attached to the Japanese module’s robotic arm on Oct. 4, 2012. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Aki Hoshide, flight engineer, set up the satellite deployment gear inside the lab and placed it in the Kibo airlock. The Japanese robotic arm then grappled the deployment system and its satellites from the airlock for deployment. A portion of the station’s solar array panels and a blue and white part of Earth provide the backdrop for the scene.

  19. Cassini ISS Satellite Orbit Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitale, J. N.; Jacobson, R. A.; Porco, C. C.; Owen, W. M.; Charnoz, S.; Murray, C. D.; Brahic, A.; Evans, M. W.; Beurle, K.; Cooper, N.; Cassini Imaging

    2004-11-01

    We report on the orbits of several small Saturnian satellites, either recovered or newly-discovered in recent Cassini imaging observations. The mean motions of Pan and Atlas have been corrected based on recent Cassini imaging combined with Voyager observations. Two small satellites, S/2004 S 1 and S/2004 S 2, have been discovered between the orbits of Mimas and Enceladus on orbits that are nearly circular and uninclined. Both bodies were observed for a fraction of one orbit on June 1, 2004 and S/2004 S 1 was subsequently detected in images shuttered three weeks earlier. Those bodies may be recovered in late October in imaging sequences designed for that purpose. A third new object was detected in images from June 21, 2004, orbiting just outside the F ring. However, a search for additional detections revealed something orbiting interior to the F ring near the longitude at which the new object would be expected 5 hours later. A low-residual orbit that crosses the F ring has been found to explain all of the observations, but it is not yet clear whether the two sequences imaged the same object or two different objects that coincidentally were found orbiting at the same longitude but at different orbital semimajor axes. These issues make its nature -- solid satellite or F ring clump -- unclear. The data, fitting procedures, and results will be discussed.

  20. Pastures from Space: What can we learn from satellite images?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Satellites such as the Landsat platform record both visible light and near infrared radiation. These can be combined to produce estimates of standing plant biomass. Satellite estimates of plant production have been widely used in rangelands and forests where large areas are studied. The square Lands...

  1. Transit satellite system timing capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finsod, T. D.

    1978-01-01

    Current time transfer capabilities of the Transit Satellite System are reviewed. Potential improvements in the changes in equipment and operational procedures using operational satellites are discussed.

  2. Satellite Services Workshop, Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Key issues associated with the orbital servicing of satellites are examined including servicing spacecraft and equipment, servicing operations, economics, satellite design, docking and berthing, and fluid management.

  3. Iridium Satellite Signal Exploitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonough, Peter

    2010-03-01

    The Iridium Satellite constellation is unique to satellite communication networks in that it allows for transmission of data between satellites instead of relying on transmission by the bent pipe methodology. As such, this network is far more secure than other satellite communication networks, and forces interception to occur within the locale of the transmission from modem to satellite or within the locale of the downlink from the satellite other modem. The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the security weaknesses within the Iridium protocol, showing that it was possible to track one of these satellites with a high gain antenna, resulting in the ability to anticipate transmission, to acquire the location of that transmission, and to uncover the content of that transmission. This project was completed as part of the summer student program at the Southwest Research Institute. The presentation will demonstrate the thought process used in chronological order, essentially demonstrating how I achieved the result from my point of view as the summer progressed.

  4. Swedish small satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundahl, K.; von Scheele, F.

    2004-11-01

    In 1986 the first Swedish small satellite VIKING was launched on the Ariane 1 rocket together with the French remote sensing satellite SPOT-1. This paper describes the development of Swedish small satellites in an international framework. The satellites have delivered excellent scientific data to a low cost by using e.g. streamlined project organisations, competitive procurement programs and piggy-back launch opportunities. The first micro satellite Astrid-1 was launched in January 1995 and was followed by the launch of Astrid-2 in December 1998. The capable Odin small satellite was launched in February 2001. SSC was also contracted for ESA's SMART-1 probe destined to the Moon. SMART-1, launched in September 2003, is used for both research and as a technology demonstrator for future projects. Future proposed projects include micro and small satellites for climate research as the Atmosphere and Climate Explorer Plus (ACE+), the Stratosphere-Troposphere Exchange And climate Monitor (STEAM) and PRISMA, a technology demonstrator for formation flying, new propulsion system and commercial development methods.

  5. Intra- and Inter-Seasonal Supra-glacial Water Variability over the West Greenland Ice Sheet as Estimated from Combining High Resolution Satellite Optical Data and a Digital Elevation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, M. G.; Tedesco, M.; Smith, L. C.; Rennermalm, A. K.; Yang, K.

    2015-12-01

    The supra-glacial hydrology of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) plays a crucial role on the surface energy and mass balance budgets of the ice sheet as a whole. The surface hydrology network variability of small streams in the ablation zone of Greenland is poorly understood both spatially and temporally. Using satellites that can spatially resolve the presence and associated properties of small streams, the scientific community is now able to be provided with accurate spatial and temporal analysis of surface hydrology on the ice sheet (that could not have been resolved with other sensors such as those on board MODIS or LANDSAT). In this study we report mapped supra-glacial water networks over a region of the West GrIS (approximately 164 km2) derived from high resolution multispectral satellite imagery from the Quickbird and WorldView - 2 satellites in tandem with a 2 meter stereographic SETSM DEM (digital elevation model). The branching complexity of the identified surface streams is computed from the available DEM as well as the intra- and inter seasonal changes observed in the hydrological system. The stream networks created during the melt season (at several different stages of melting) are compared and discussed as well as the networks mapped between consecutive years for proximate dates. Also, depth and volume estimations for the surface water features identified were extracted via band math algorithms, threshold classifications, and morphological operations. Our results indicate that the higher stream orders have the largest amount of stored surface water per km but the lower stream orders, specifically 1st order with widths of ~ 2 meters, hold more stored surface water overall. We also employ and compare runoff data from the numerical model MAR (Modèle Atmosphérique Régional) to the estimations found using imagery and the DEM.

  6. Satellite Operations in Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreller, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    Numerous observational challenges exist across Alaska impacting National Weather Service (NWS) forecast operations and providing decision support services (DSS) to critical core partners and customers. These observational challenges range from limited utility of GOES imagery at higher latitudes, scarcity of observing platforms, to limited radar coverage. Although we are fortunate to receive these valuable and limited data sets, there still remain extensive spatial and temporal data gaps across Alaska. Many forecast challenges in Alaska are similar to those in the CONUS with the detection and monitoring of wildfire conditions, severe thunderstorms, river flooding, and coastal flooding, etc. There are additional unique DSS provided in Alaska including sea ice forecasting, ivu (ice shoves onshore), coastal erosion due to permafrost melt, and extreme hazardous winter conditions (temperatures as low as -80F). In addition to the observational and forecast challenges, the sheer size of the area of responsibility in Alaska is a challenge. NWS operations have always heavily relied on satellite imagery to quickly assess the current weather situation and provide forecast guidance. NWS operations have established several partnerships with the satellite community to help with these challenges. In particular the GOES-R and Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) OCONUS Satellite Proving Ground (PG) Programs have not only improved Alaska's observational challenges, but continue to identify new capabilities with the next generation geostationary and polar-orbiting satellite products.. For example, River ice and flood detection products derived from the Suomi-NPP VIIRS satellite imagery with the support of the JPSS Proving Ground and Risk Reduction Program. This presentation will provide examples of how new satellite capabilities are being used in NWS Alaska forecast operations to support DSS, with emphasis on JPSS satellite products. Future satellite utilization or operational needs

  7. A concept for cost-effective, satellite servicing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madison, Richard W.

    1999-01-01

    Air, land, and sea vehicles are routinely serviced to increase their availability, flexibility, capability, and life span. Servicing could extend the same benefits to satellites, but is rarely employed because current methods are cost effective only for very expensive satellites. This paper presents a concept to minimize the cost of satellite servicing. It combines requirements for a next-generation of serviceable satellites, with an infrastructure whose cost can be amortized over many servicing missions. This should make servicing cost effective for a wider range of spacecraft.

  8. Skeletal muscle satellite cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, E.; McCormick, K. M.

    1994-01-01

    Evidence now suggests that satellite cells constitute a class of myogenic cells that differ distinctly from other embryonic myoblasts. Satellite cells arise from somites and first appear as a distinct myoblast type well before birth. Satellite cells from different muscles cannot be functionally distinguished from one another and are able to provide nuclei to all fibers without regard to phenotype. Thus, it is difficult to ascribe any significant function to establishing or stabilizing fiber type, even during regeneration. Within a muscle, satellite cells exhibit marked heterogeneity with respect to their proliferative behavior. The satellite cell population on a fiber can be partitioned into those that function as stem cells and those which are readily available for fusion. Recent studies have shown that the cells are not simply spindle shaped, but are very diverse in their morphology and have multiple branches emanating from the poles of the cells. This finding is consistent with other studies indicating that the cells have the capacity for extensive migration within, and perhaps between, muscles. Complexity of cell shape usually reflects increased cytoplasmic volume and organelles including a well developed Golgi, and is usually associated with growing postnatal muscle or muscles undergoing some form of induced adaptive change or repair. The appearance of activated satellite cells suggests some function of the cells in the adaptive process through elaboration and secretion of a product. Significant advances have been made in determining the potential secretion products that satellite cells make. The manner in which satellite cell proliferative and fusion behavior is controlled has also been studied. There seems to be little doubt that cellcell coupling is not how satellite cells and myofibers communicate. Rather satellite cell regulation is through a number of potential growth factors that arise from a number of sources. Critical to the understanding of this form

  9. Satellite Multicarrier Demodulation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budinger, James; Kwatra, Subhash C.; Jamale, Mohsin M.; Fernandez, John P.; Eugene, Linus P.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed onboard signal processing system for communications satellites performs real-time conversion of multiple uplink (received) signals in single-channel-per-carrier, frequency-division-multiple-access (SCPC/FDMA) format to downlink (transmitted) signals in time-division-multiplexed (TDM) format. Conversion approach enhances use of allocated spectrum and reduces required effective isotropic radiated power at both transponder (satellite) and Earth stations. Equipment needed to implement scheme less complex and less expensive than time-division-multiple-access (TDMA) formats. More economical future satellite communication systems made possible through use of many small-capacity multiservice Earth terminals.

  10. NPP Satellite Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-10-28

    The Satellite Operations Facility of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is seen here minutes before the launch of the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System Preparatory Project (NPP) on Friday, Oct. 28, 2011 in Suitland, Md. NPP is a joint venture between NASA and NOAA, and is the nation's newest Earth-observing satellite, which will provide data on climate change science, allow for accurate weather forecasts and advance warning for severe weather. NPP was launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  11. NPP Satellite Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-10-28

    Dr. Kathy Sullivan, center, Deputy Administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and former NASA astronaut is interviewed by a local television network at NOAA's Satellite Operations Facility in Suitland, Md. after the successful launch of the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System Preparatory Project (NPP) on Friday, Oct. 28, 2011. NPP is a joint venture between NASA and NOAA, and is the nation's newest Earth-observing satellite, which will provide data on climate change science, allow for accurate weather forecasts and advance warning for severe weather. NPP was launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  12. NPP Satellite Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-10-28

    NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver, left, watches the launch of the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System Preparatory Project (NPP) at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Satellite Operations Center on Friday, Oct. 28, 2011 in Suitland, Md. U.S Congresswoman Donna Edwards, D-Md., is seen next to Garver. NPP is a joint venture between NASA and NOAA, and is the nation's newest Earth-observing satellite, which will provide data on climate change science, allow for accurate weather forecasts and advance warning for severe weather. NPP was launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  13. Probability of satellite collision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarter, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    A method is presented for computing the probability of a collision between a particular artificial earth satellite and any one of the total population of earth satellites. The collision hazard incurred by the proposed modular Space Station is assessed using the technique presented. The results of a parametric study to determine what type of satellite orbits produce the greatest contribution to the total collision probability are presented. Collision probability for the Space Station is given as a function of Space Station altitude and inclination. Collision probability was also parameterized over miss distance and mission duration.

  14. Small Cube Satellite Deploy

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-19

    ISS038-E-003876 (19 Nov. 2013) --- Three nanosatellites, known as Cubesats, are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 38 crew member on the International Space Station. The satellites were released outside the Kibo laboratory using a Small Satellite Orbital Deployer attached to the Japanese module's robotic arm on Nov. 19, 2013. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Koichi Wakata, flight engineer, monitored the satellite deployment while operating the Japanese robotic arm from inside Kibo. The Cubesats were delivered to the International Space Station Aug. 9, aboard Japan’s fourth H-II Transfer Vehicle, Kounotori-4.

  15. Program Assists Satellite Designers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Annapolis, Maryland-based designAmerica Inc., a small aerospace company specializing in the development and delivery of ground control systems for satellites and instrumentation, assisted Goddard Space Flight Center in the development of the ASIST software, a real-time command and control system for spacecraft development, integration, and operations. It was designed to be fully functional across a broad spectrum of satellites and instrumentation, while also being user friendly. The company now has rights to commercial use of the program and is offering it to government and industry satellite designers.

  16. Overview of commercial satellite communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beakley, G. W.

    1984-07-01

    A brief history of communications satellites is presented, taking into account the launching of Sputnik 1 in October 1957, the Explorer 1 in January of 1958, the launch of the Score as the world's first active communications satellite in December 1958, the Communications Satellite Act in 1962, and the launch of 'Early Bird' in 1964. The Intelsat satellites are considered along with maritime satellite communications, the U.S. domestic satellite systems, Alaskan satellite communications, cable television, broadcast TV stations, print media, the hotel/motel industry as a large market for satellite communications terminals, the opening of a minicable and satellite master antenna TV market for TV receive-only systems, and business telecommunications earth terminals. Attention is also given to future directions regarding satellite positions, the concept of 'video-plus', and direct broadcast satellites.

  17. Combined observations of Arctic sea ice with near-coincident colocated X-band, C-band, and L-band SAR satellite remote sensing and helicopter-borne measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, A. M.; King, J. A.; Doulgeris, A. P.; Gerland, S.; Singha, S.; Spreen, G.; Busche, T.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we compare colocated near-coincident X-, C-, and L-band fully polarimetry SAR satellite images with helicopter-borne ice thickness measurements acquired during the Norwegian Young sea ICE 2015 (N-ICE2015) expedition in the region of the Arctic Ocean north of Svalbard in April 2015. The air-borne surveys provide near-coincident snow plus ice thickness, surface roughness data, and photographs. This unique data set allows us to investigate how the different frequencies can complement one another for sea ice studies, but also to raise awareness of limitations. X-band and L-band satellite scenes were shown to be a useful complement to the standard SAR frequency for sea ice monitoring (C-band) for lead ice and newly formed sea ice identification. This may be in part be due to the frequency but also the high spatial resolution of these sensors. We found a relatively low correlation between snow plus ice thickness and surface roughness. Therefore, in our dataset ice thickness cannot directly be observed by SAR which has important implications for operational ice charting based on automatic segmentation.

  18. RADAR "SAIL" satellite concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguttes, Jean Paul; Sombrin, Jacques; Conde, Eric

    1996-11-01

    The Radar SAIL concept is based on the use of a rectangular antenna lying in the dawn-dusk orbital plane with the length (along speed vector) smaller than the height. Such geometry makes it possible to place the solar cells on the back of the antenna, to use gravity gradient stabilisation, and to implement multipath-free GPS interferometric measurement of the antenna deformation thus allowing structural relaxation. Less obviously, the geometry favours the RADAR design too, by allowing grating lobes and therefore a lower density of built-in electronic in the active antenna. The antenna can be thin and packed for launch inside a cylinder-shaped bus having pyrotechnic doors for the antenna deployement and bearing the rest of the payload and the service equipment. With respect to a standard design of performant missions, cost savings come from the bus, whose functions (AOCS, power supply) are simplified, from the launch since the mass budget and the stowing configuration become compatible with medium size rockets (LLV2/3, DELTA-LITE, LM-4.), and from the active antenna built-in electronics. The RADAR SAIL concept is all the more cost effective when the mission requires a large, high and short antenna, i.e. high resolution (<5m), low frequency band (L or S or even P), high revisiting, multiple frequencies. Mission implementation and funding can be favored by the new capability to share the satellite between autonomous regional operators. Combined with ground DBF (digital beam forming) technique, the concept allows extremely simple and low cost missions providing a fixed wide swath (10 to 15 m resolution within 500km to 1000 km swath) for systematic surveillance or monitoring.

  19. Orbit determination accuracies using satellite-to-satellite tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonbun, F. O.; Argentiero, P. D.; Schmid, P. E.

    1977-01-01

    The uncertainty in relay satellite sate is a significant error source which cannot be ignored in the reduction of satellite-to-satellite tracking data. Based on simulations and real data reductions, it is numerically impractical to use simultaneous unconstrained solutions to determine both relay and user satellite epoch states. A Bayesian or least squares estimation technique with an a priori procedure is presented which permits the adjustment of relay satellite epoch state in the reduction of satellite-to-satellite tracking data without the numerical difficulties introduced by an ill-conditioned normal matrix.

  20. Technical comparison of several global mobile satellite communications systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comparetto, Gary M.

    The era of satellite-based mobile satellite communications (MSC) systems started with the first MARISAT satellite which was launched into a geostationary orbit over the Pacific Ocean in 1976 to provide communications between ships and shore stations. The combination of high cost and unacceptably large equipment has kept the space-based MSC systems from appealing to the wider market of personal mobile communications. The progress made over the last ten years, however, in digital voice processing, satellite technology, and component miniaturization has resulted in the viability of satellite-based mobile satellite communications systems to meet the growing market in personal mobile communications using handsets similar to those currently in use with land-based cellular systems. Three of the more mature LEO/MEO satellite systems are addressed in this paper including GLOBALSTAR, Iridium, and Odyssey. The system architectures of each system are presented along with a description of the satellite and user handset designs and the multiaccess techniques employed. It will be shown that, although a number of similarities exist among the system addressed, each system is unique in a variety of significant design areas. It is concluded that the technical feasibility of satellite-based mobile satellite communications systems seems to be secure. It will be challenging, however, for the vendors to actually develop and deploy these systems in a cost effective, timely, and reliable way that meets a continually evolving set of requirements based upon a rapidly changing technology base.

  1. Domestic Communication Satellites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Andrew

    1974-01-01

    A discussion of the Federal Communications Commission's new policy on domestic satellites in light of our 1) military and economic history; 2) corporate interests; 3) citizen surveillance; and 4) media control. (HB)

  2. Biological satellite Kosmos-936

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vedeshin, L. A.

    1978-01-01

    A description is given of physiological experiments performed on the biological satellite Kosmos-936. Other experiments to determine the electrostatic and dielectric responses to the effects of cosmic radiation are discussed.

  3. Trends In Satellite Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poley, William A.; Stevens, Grady H.; Stevenson, Steven M.; Lekan, Jack; Arth, Clifford H.; Hollansworth, James E.; Miller, Edward F.

    1988-01-01

    Report assesses trends in satellite communication from present to year 2010. Examines restrictions imposed by limited spectrum resource and technology needs created by trends. Personal communications, orbiting switchboards, and videophones foreseen.

  4. Satellite positioning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keydel, W.

    The basic physical principles, technology, and capabilities of satellite position-finding systems (SPFSs) are examined in a general overview. Topics discussed include the properties of EM waves as a basis for measurement; two-way (radar) SPFSs with active satellites (to locate passive targets); one-way SPFSs with active satellites (for self-location using a passive receiver); one-way SPFSs with passive satellites and active objects (for emergency search-and-rescue use); radar altimeters, radar scatterometers, and SARs; Doppler methods; and range-difference and pseudorange time-of-flight methods. Consideration is given to problems of precision in time measurements and orbit measurement and prediction, improved precision using differential methods, the predicted accuracy of Navstar GPS, propagation-related limitations, user demands, and political and economic factors influencing future SPFS development.

  5. Virophages or satellite viruses?

    PubMed

    Krupovic, Mart; Cvirkaite-Krupovic, Virginija

    2011-11-01

    It has been argued that the smaller viruses associated with giant DNA viruses are a new biological entity. However, Mart Krupovic and Virginija Cvirkaite-Krupovic argue here that these smaller viruses should be classified with the satellite viruses.

  6. Satellites map the oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hibbs, A. R.; Wilson, W. S.

    1983-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing systems, both operational and planned, for monitoring the ocean winds, temperatures, chlorophyll concentrations, ice flows, and the sea surface and ocean floor topographies are described. Seasat demonstrated the effectiveness of scatterometer measurements for measuring wind velocities and directions, and a new scatterometer may be launched on the U.S. Navy NROSS spacecraft in 1988. The NOAA-7 and -8 satellites carry IR sensors to monitor ocean temperatures, and can thus forewarn of the onset of El Nino. Ocean currents are traced with radar altimeters such as the one planned for the Topex satellite as a follow-on to instrumentation tested during the three-month lifetime of the Seasat satellite. Further analytical development is required, however, to improve the data analyses of the altimeter and scatterometer readings, and to account for errors introduced by the observed features and the interposed atmospheric phenomena.

  7. Meteorological satellite accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, L. J.; Arking, A.; Bandeen, W. R.; Shenk, W. E.; Wexler, R.

    1974-01-01

    The various types of meteorological satellites are enumerated. Vertical sounding, parameter extraction technique, and both macroscale and mesoscale meteorological phenomena are discussed. The heat budget of the earth-atmosphere system is considered, along with ocean surface and hydrology.

  8. Origins of satellites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, D. J.; Harris, A. W.; Lunine, J. I.

    Satellites are an inevitable consequence of most plausible planetary accumulation processes. They can arise from gaseous or particulate circumplanetary disks, continuously fed during accretion of the planet or infrequently created by large impacts. They can also arise from capture, aided by gas drag. Fission (in the Darwinian sense) is highly unlikely. This review seeks to assess critically the alternatives within the context of current ideas of the early solar system, guided by both cosmochemical and dynamical constraints, but unencumbered by prejudices concerning planetary growth. Topics discussed include the dynamics of both gaseous and particulate disks, the role of large impacts in creating satellite source material, the role of capture, and the thermodynamics of satellite accretion. Possible explanations for each of the satellite systems are offered.

  9. Domestic Communication Satellites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Andrew

    1974-01-01

    A discussion of the Federal Communications Commission's new policy on domestic satellites in light of our 1) military and economic history; 2) corporate interests; 3) citizen surveillance; and 4) media control. (HB)

  10. AUSSAT mobile satellite services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowland, Wayne L.; Wagg, Michael; Simpson, Daniel

    1988-01-01

    An overview of AUSSAT's planned mobile satellite system is given. The development program which is being undertaken to achieve the 1992 service date is described. Both business and technical aspects of the development program are addressed.

  11. Satellite in a Can

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-01-21

    NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive SMAP satellite is transported across Vandenberg Air Force Base in California to Space Launch Complex 2, where it will be mated to a Delta II rocket for launch, targeted for Jan. 29.

  12. Weather, land satellite sale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    President Ronald Reagan announced on March 8 plans to sell to private industry the nation's land and meteorological remote-sensing satellites, including the responsibility for any future ocean-observing systems. According to the plan, the private firm successful in its bid to buy the five satellites would sell back to the government the data received by the satellites. The Reagan administration says the sale will save money and will put activities appropriate for commercial ventures into the commercial sector. Response to the announcement from scientists and congressmen has been anything but dulcet; one senator, in fact, charges that the Commerce Department and the corporation most likely to purchase the satellites are engaged in a ‘sweetheart deal.’

  13. Epos TCS Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manunta, Michele; Mandea, Mioara; Fernández-Turiel, José Luis; Stramondo, Salvatore; Wright, Tim; Walter, Thomas; Bally, Philippe; Casu, Francesco; Zeni, Giovanni; Buonanno, Sabatino; Zinno, Ivana; Tizzani, Pietro; Castaldo, Raffaele; Ostanciaux, Emilie; Diament, Michel; Hooper, Andy; Maccaferri, Francesco; Lanari, Riccardo

    2016-04-01

    TCS Satellite Data is devoted to provide Earth Observation (EO) services, transversal with respect to the large EPOS community, suitable to be used in several application scenarios. In particular, the main goal is to contribute with mature services that have already well demonstrated their effectiveness and relevance in investigating the physical processes controlling earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and unrest episodes as well as those driving tectonics and Earth surface dynamics. The TCS Satellite Data will provide two kinds of services: satellite products/services, and Value-added satellite products/services. The satellite products/services are composed of three (EPOSAR, GDM and COMET) well-identified and partly already operational elements for delivering Level 1 products. Such services will be devoted to the generation of SAR interferograms, DTM and ground displacement maps through the exploitation of different advanced EO techniques for InSAR and optical data analysis. The Value-added satellite products/services are composed of 4 elements (EPOSAR, 3D-Def, Mod and COMET) of Level 2 and 3 products. Such services integrate satellite and in situ measurements and observations to retrieve information on source mechanism, such as the geometry (spatial location, depth, volume changes) and the physical parameters of the deformation sources, through the exploitation of modelling approaches. The TCS Satellite Data will provide products in two different processing and delivery modes: 1- surveillance mode - routinely product generation; 2- on demand mode - product generation performed on demand by the user. Concerning the surveillance mode, the goal is providing continuous satellite measurements in areas of particular interest from a geophysical perspective (supersites). The objective is the detection of displacement patterns changing along time and their geophysical explanation. This is a valid approach for inter-seismic movements and volcanic unrest, post-seismic and post

  14. Radio determination satellite service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briskman, Robert D.

    1990-07-01

    The capabilities and measured performance of a geosynchronous satellite-based service called the radio determination satellite service (RDSS), which operates at radio frequencies allocated by the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) and is licensed in the United States by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), are discussed. Plans for both improvement in capability and expansion to nearly global coverage are described. Since RDSS can also provide radio navigation, some comparisons of this service with the Global Positioning System (GPS) are made.

  15. Satellite battery testing status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haag, R.; Hall, S.

    1986-01-01

    Because of the large numbers of satellite cells currently being tested and anticipated at the Naval Weapons Support Center (NAVWPNSUPPCEN) Crane, Indiana, satellite cell testing is being integrated into the Battery Test Automation Project (BTAP). The BTAP, designed to meet the growing needs for battery testing at the NAVWPNSUPPCEN Crane, will consist of several Automated Test Stations (ATSs) which monitor batteries under test. Each ATS will interface with an Automation Network Controller (ANC) which will collect test data for reduction.

  16. Tactical Satellite 3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-01

    TACTICAL SATELLITE 3 THE 4S SYMPOSIUM Thomas M. Davis (1), Stanley D. Straight (2), Dr. Ronald B. Lockwood (3) (1) Air Force Research...Laboratory Science and Technology ( S &T) initiative that explores the capability and technological maturity of small, low-cost satellites. It features a...technology area, these S &T efforts also help mitigate technology risk and establish a potential concept of operations for future acquisitions. The

  17. The Archimedes satellite system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Stuart C.; Shurvinton, William D.

    1992-03-01

    Archimedes is a satellite system conceived by the European Space Agency (ESA) to effectively serve the European market for Mobile Radio Services (MRS). This paper describes the requirements and technical design of the Archimedes satellite system. The underlying assumptions and trade-offs behind the design are detailed and the design is compared and contrasted against alternative design solutions, both technically and economically. A path forward for the development of the system is indicated.

  18. Solar Power Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, C. C., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A satellite based energy concept is described, including the advantages of the basic concept, system characteristics, cost, and environmental considerations. An outline of a plan for the further evaluation and implementation of the system is given. It is concluded that the satellite concept is competitive with other advanced power generation systems when a variety of factors are considered, including technical feasibility, cost, safety, natural resources, environment, baseload capability, location flexibility, land use, and existing industrial base for implementation.

  19. Satellite Communications Industry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    got access to GE’s corporate R&D center as part of the acquisition of GE Aerospace. A recent (5 FEB 93) NASA/National Science Foundation (NSF...million and $175 million. Cost of Products - Satellite Communicatons Services The cost of Satellite Communications Services is going down steadily, and...agreement also covers procurement by Nippon Telegraph and Telephone (NTT) Corporation (Japan’s largest telecom company), and Nippon Hoso Kyokai (NHK

  20. Satellite Applications for Public Service: Project Summaries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauffer, Sandra; And Others

    Summaries of 18 different projects involving the use of satellite communications are presented in this report, including PEACESAT Education and Communication Experiments, USP Network Satellite Communication Project, Project Satellite, Satellite Instructional Television Experiment (SITE), Appalachian Education Satellite Program, Alaska Education…

  1. Satellite formation. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, A. W.

    1978-01-01

    A satellite formation model is extended to include evolution of planetary ring material and elliptic orbital motion. In this model the formation of the moon begins at a later time in the growth of the earth, and a significant fraction of the lunar material is processed through a circumterrestrial debris cloud where volatiles might have been lost. Thus, the chemical differences between the earth and moon are more plausibly accounted for. Satellites of the outer planets probably formed in large numbers throughout the growth of those planets. Because of rapid inward evolution of the orbits of small satellites, the present satellite systems represent only satellites formed in the last few percent of the growths of their primaries. The rings of Saturn and Uranus are most plausibly explained as the debris of satellites disrupted within the Roche limit. Because such a ring would collapse onto the planet in the course of any significant further accretion by the planet, the rings must have formed very near or even after the conclusion of accretion.

  2. The satellites of Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruikshank, D. P.

    1982-01-01

    Observations and the probable natures of the five known satellites of Uranus are reviewed. Photographic, photoelectric and CCD photometry of the satellites since 1961, although in agreement within experimental error, is not as mutually consistent as may be expected, and broadband JHK photometry falls in a portion of the J-H, H-K color diagram difficult to interpret. Spectrophotometry in the range 0.3-1.1 microns taken on two separate occasions is inconsistent, with only the relatively neutral reflectances of Titania and Oberon regarded as well established. Near-infrared spectrophotometry has revealed the presence of water ice or frost on the satellite surfaces, possibly in a very pure state, with spectra most similar to Ganymede. Estimations of the properties of the satellites from their surface geometric albedos, assumed mean densities and dynamics yield radii in the range 160-520 km, albedos on the order of 0.5 and densities of about 1.3 g/cu cm, similar to the icy Saturn satellites. The satellites are also believed to have formed after the event that caused the planet to tilt to its present obliquity.

  3. The satellites of Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruikshank, D. P.

    1982-01-01

    Observations and the probable natures of the five known satellites of Uranus are reviewed. Photographic, photoelectric and CCD photometry of the satellites since 1961, although in agreement within experimental error, is not as mutually consistent as may be expected, and broadband JHK photometry falls in a portion of the J-H, H-K color diagram difficult to interpret. Spectrophotometry in the range 0.3-1.1 microns taken on two separate occasions is inconsistent, with only the relatively neutral reflectances of Titania and Oberon regarded as well established. Near-infrared spectrophotometry has revealed the presence of water ice or frost on the satellite surfaces, possibly in a very pure state, with spectra most similar to Ganymede. Estimations of the properties of the satellites from their surface geometric albedos, assumed mean densities and dynamics yield radii in the range 160-520 km, albedos on the order of 0.5 and densities of about 1.3 g/cu cm, similar to the icy Saturn satellites. The satellites are also believed to have formed after the event that caused the planet to tilt to its present obliquity.

  4. Jupiter: its captured satellites.

    PubMed

    Bailey, J M

    1971-08-27

    Because of the small size and irregular orbits of the seven outer satellites of Jupiter, it is often assumed that they were derived by capture. The conditions whereby Jupiter can capture satellites have therefore been examined. Relationships derived on the basis of the three-body problem for planets in elliptical orbits enable the dimensions of the capture orbits around Jupiter to be calculated. It is found that Jupiter may capture satellites through the inner Lagrangian point when at perihelion or at aphelion. Captures at perihelion should give rise to satellites in direct orbits of 11.48 x 10(6) kilometers and capture at aphelion to retrograde orbits of 21.7 x 10(6) kilometers. The correspondence with the seven outer satellites suggests that Jupiter VI, VIl, and X in direct orbits at 11.47, 11.74, and 11.85 x 10(6) kilometers were captured at Jupiter perihelion, whereas Jupiter VIII, IX, XI, and XII in retrograde orbits of 23.5, 23.7, 22.5, and 21.2 x 10(6) kilometers were captured when Jupiter was at aphelion. Examination of the precapture orbits indicates that the seven outer satellites were derived from the asteroid belt.

  5. Direct Broadcasting Satellites in Japan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maeda, Jiro

    The development and use of broadcasting satellites in Japan are discussed in this paper. The paper describes the medium-scale experimental broadcasting satellite, YURI, launched by NASA in 1978, and reports that experiments with YURI in the areas of basic technologies in the broadcasting satellite system, experiments on satellite control…

  6. Satellite Technologies in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portz, Stephen M.

    1999-01-01

    Focuses on ways of using satellite imagery obtained from the Internet, to enhance classroom learning. Discusses satellite deployment; classroom applications, including infrared imagery, high-resolution photography, and global positioning satellites; and use of satellite data for hands-on activities, including cartography, city and community…

  7. Direct Broadcasting Satellites in Japan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maeda, Jiro

    The development and use of broadcasting satellites in Japan are discussed in this paper. The paper describes the medium-scale experimental broadcasting satellite, YURI, launched by NASA in 1978, and reports that experiments with YURI in the areas of basic technologies in the broadcasting satellite system, experiments on satellite control…

  8. Satellite Technologies in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portz, Stephen M.

    1999-01-01

    Focuses on ways of using satellite imagery obtained from the Internet, to enhance classroom learning. Discusses satellite deployment; classroom applications, including infrared imagery, high-resolution photography, and global positioning satellites; and use of satellite data for hands-on activities, including cartography, city and community…

  9. Satellite APT system for Satellite-earth laser communication modeling, simulation and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Ke; Huang, Yong-mei; Ma, Jia-guang

    2010-10-01

    The satellite-earth laser communication APT (acquisition, pointing and tracking) system's accuracy demand is described and a method of modeling and simulation for error analysis is introduced at the beginning of this paper. Then simulation architecture is given with the satellite APT system function description. Models such as atmosphere turbulence, satellite platform vibration, motor & Gimbals etc are analyzed and established. Integrated simulations are done by assembling all the models and controllers as a real terminal. How the factors such as sampling rate, system delay influence system accuracy and how much the factors such as satellite platform vibration, atmosphere turbulence etc. contribute to the system error are summarized clearly in tables. Some error analyses are done and a good choice of coarse and fine sensor sampling rate is recommended combined with the system accuracy demand in the preliminary design.

  10. Satellite trajectory simulator for inter-satellite laser communication system APT test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jianfeng; Yun, Maojin; Wan, Lingyu; Luan, Zhu; Liu, Liren

    2005-12-01

    The characteristics of the terminals for the inter-satellite laser communication must be tested and verified on ground before flight test. A pair of terminals for inter-satellite laser communications was developed for principle demonstration. A terminal has two main subsystems. The first is one for the laser communications and the second one for acquisition, pointing and tracking (APT). The optical methods and related system test-beds to measure and verify the performance of the terminals in the lab room. In these programs, several novel ideas are proposed. With these ideas, whole programs can be tested on ground in near-contacted field. The dynamic APT performances of an inter-satellite laser communication terminal can be tested and verified by the combination of satellite trajectory simulator and a collimator-like laser communication.

  11. Impact of multiconstellation satellite signal reception on performance of satellite-based navigation under adverse ionospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Ashik; Paul, Krishnendu Sekhar; Das, Aditi

    2017-03-01

    Application of multiconstellation satellites to address the issue of satellite signal outages during periods of equatorial ionospheric scintillations could prove to be an effective tool for maintaining the performance of satellite-based communication and navigation without compromise in accuracy and integrity. A receiver capable of tracking GPS, Global Navigation Satellite System (GLONASS), and Galileo satellites is operational at the Institute of Radio Physics and Electronics, University of Calcutta, Calcutta, India, located near the northern crest of the equatorial ionization anomaly in the Indian longitude sector. The present paper shows increased availability of satellites combining GPS, GLONASS, and Galileo constellations from Calcutta compared to GPS-only scenario and estimates intense scintillation-free (S4 < 0.6) satellite vehicle look angles at different hours of the postsunset period 19:00-01:00 LT during March 2014. A representative case of 1 March 2014 is highlighted in the paper and overall statistics for March 2014 presented to indicate quantitative advantages in terms of scintillation-free satellite vehicle look angles that may be utilized for planning communication and navigation channel spatial distribution under adverse ionospheric conditions. The number of satellites tracked and receiver position deviations has been found to show a good correspondence with the occurrence of intense scintillations and poor user receiver-satellite link geometry. The ground projection of the 350 km subionospheric points corresponding to multiconstellation shows extended spatial coverage during periods of scintillations (0.2 < S4 < 0.6) compared to GPS.

  12. The Inclusion of Raman Scattering Effects in the Combined Ocean-Atmosphere Radiative Transfer Model MOMO to Estimate the Influence of Raman Scattering in Case 1 Waters on Satellite Ocean Remote Sensing Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Bismarck, J.; Fischer, J.

    2011-12-01

    Raman scattering of the solar lightfield, due to energy absorption by vibrational modes of water molecules, may contribute significantly to the signals observed by remote sensing satellites over water. The inelastic fraction of the water-leaving radiance for clear water reaches values of 30% in the red part of the visible spectrum, and still reaches values of several percent in moderately turbid waters. Furthermore, inelastic scattering due to chlorophyll and yellow substance fluorescence adds to this fraction. For these reasons the inclusion of inelastic scattering sources into radiative-transfer models, used in ocean remote sensing applications or atmosphere remote sensing over the ocean, can be important. MOMO is a computer code based on the matrix-operator method designed to calculate the lightfield in the stratified atmosphere-ocean system. It has been developed at the Institute for Space Sciences of the Freie Universität Berlin and provides the full polarization state (in the newest version) and an air-sea interface accounting for radiative effects of the wind roughened water surface. The inclusion of Raman scattering effects is done by a processing module, that starts a primary MOMO program run with a high spectral resolution, to calculate the radiative energy available for inelastic scattering at each model layer boundary. The processing module then calculates the first order Raman source-terms for every observation wavelength at every layer boundary, accounting for the non-isotropicity (including the azimuthal dependence) of the Raman phase-function, the spectral redistribution, and the spectral dependence of the Raman scattering coefficient. These elementary source-terms then serve as input for the second program run, which then calculates the source-terms of all model layers, using the doubling-adding method, and the resulting radiance field. Higher orders of the Raman contribution can be computed with additional program runs. Apart from the Raman

  13. ISDN - The case for satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelton, J. N.; McDougal, P. J.

    1987-05-01

    The role of satellites in the proposed Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) is examined. ISDN is to be a unified global network providing international telecommunication services. The delay time connected with satellite communications is considered. The advantages of using satellites in ISDN are: (1) the digital services available with satellites (time-division multiple access, intermediate data rate, and Intelsat business services); (2) satellite networking features; (3) flexibility; and (4) global interconnectivity. It is noted that with the use of powerful transmitters on satellites, the growth of small earth stations, and developments in band switching and intersatellite links that satellites are applicable to ISDN.

  14. Concept definition study for recovery of tumbling satellites. Volume 2: Supporting research and technology report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cable, D. A.; Derocher, W. L., Jr.; Cathcart, J. A.; Keeley, M. G.; Madayev, L.; Nguyen, T. K.; Preese, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    A number of areas of research and laboratory experiments were identified which could lead to development of a cost efficient remote, disable satellite recovery system. Estimates were planned of disabled satellite motion. A concept is defined as a Tumbling Satellite Recovery kit which includes a modular system, composed of a number of subsystem mechanisms that can be readily integrated into varying combinations. This would enable the user to quickly configure a tailored remote, disabled satellite recovery kit to meet a broad spectrum of potential scenarios. The capability was determined of U.S. Earth based satellite tracking facilities to adequately determine the orientation and motion rates of disabled satellites.

  15. Optical antenna in laser inter-satellite communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Chuanhua; Wang, Chunxia; Li, Yuquan

    2005-02-01

    In the modern world of telecommunications, the concept of wireless global coverage is of the utmost importance. However, real global coverage can only be achieved by satellite systems. Satellites communication is the most important mean of the communication network. The traditional satellites communication and inter-satellites links are built by microwave. In recent years, laser links for inter-satellites communication are becoming more and more important. Laser communication systems operate in a frequency range above the regulated spectrum. Laser provides many advantages for using in point-to-point ISLs (inter-satellites links) such as for links between satellites and spacecraft in deep space. Such advantages include: high speed; high bandwidth; small antenna size; narrow field of view; and narrow antenna beam. These advantages combined with the advantages in fiber optic components (optical preamplifiers, multiplexers, detectors, etc) have made laser attractive for laser links. Now we can bring WDM (wavelength-division multiplexing) to emerging broadband satellite communication systems. By using the common antenna system and ATP (Aiming, Tracking and Pointing) system, the satellites will get more capacity. In the inter-satellites laser communication, the important performances of the systems such as BER and BL both have direct relation with the optical systems. The optical systems have the function of ATP. The optical antenna is the most important component of the optical system. So the optical antenna is an important key technology to the inter-satellites laser communication. In this paper, we mainly study the optical system in the inter-satellites laser communication. we compare with three kinds of optical antennas: refractor and reflector and Catadioptrics of the passive optical system; we also analyze the effect of bandwidth to the WDM communication systems; we use the correlative software, simulate the curves of the performance of the optical antennas. These

  16. Satellite Communications for ATM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shamma, Mohammed A.

    2003-01-01

    This presentation is an overview on Satellite Communication for the Aeronautical Telecommunication Management (ATM) research. Satellite Communications are being considered by the FAA and NASA as a possible alternative to the present and future ground systems supporting Air Traffic Communications. The international Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) have in place Standards and Recommended Practices (SARPS) for the Aeronautical Mobile Satellite Services (AMSS) which is mainly derived from the pre-existing Inmarsat service that has been in service since the 1980s. The Working Group A of the Aeronautical Mobile Communication Panel of ICAO has also been investigating SARPS for what is called the Next Generation Satellite Service (NGSS) which conforms less to the Inmarsat based architecture and explores wider options in terms of satellite architectures. Several designs are being proposed by Firms such as Boeing, ESA, NASA that are geared toward full or secondary usage of satellite communications for ATM. Satellite communications for ATM can serve several purposes ranging from primary usage where ground services would play a minimal backup role, to an integrated solution where it will be used to cover services, or areas that are less likely to be supported by the proposed and existing ground infrastructure. Such Integrated roles can include usage of satellite communications for oceanic and remote land areas for example. It also can include relieving the capacity of the ground network by providing broadcast based services of Traffic Information Services messages (TIS-B), or Flight Information Services (FIS-B) which can take a significant portion of the ground system capacity. Additionally, satellite communication can play a backup role to support any needs for ground replacement, or additional needed capacity even after the new digital systems are in place. The additional bandwidth that can be provided via satellite communications can also open the door for many new

  17. Information transfer satellite concept study. Volume 1: Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergin, P.; Kincade, C.; Kurpiewski, D.; Leinhaupel, F.; Millican, F.; Onstad, R.

    1971-01-01

    A wide range of information transfer demands were identified and analyzed. They were then combined into an appropriate set of requirements for satellite communication services. In this process the demands were ranked and combined into single and multipurpose satellite systems. A detailed analysis was performed on each satellite system to determine: total system cost, including both ground and space segments; sensitivities of the systems to various system tradeoffs; and forcing functions which control the system variations. A listing of candidate missions for detailed study is presented, along with a description of the conceptual system design and an identification of the technology developments required to bring these systems to fruition.

  18. An initial approach to the utilization of VAS satellite sounding data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, Kyung-Sup; Scoggins, James R.

    1984-01-01

    The primary objective is the development of methods to utilize satellite soundings. To achieve that, a more precise understanding of the characteristics of satellite derived soundings is required. The initial approach in the utilization of satellite soundings is to find a way to combine rawinsondes and satellite data into a unified data set. If this can be done in a meaningful way, satellite data could be integrated into existing data and interpretation would be enhanced. In this attempt, both rawinsonde and satellite soundings will be decomposed by the use of the Fourier cosine series. Then, each harmonic will be compared to get a better understanding of the representativeness of the satellite sounding data. Harmonics taken from satellite and rawinsonde soundings will be combined to provide a unified data set that can be used both over data sparse ocean areas as well as over land where rawinsonde data are available.

  19. The Spatial Distribution of Spectroscopically Selected Satellite Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brainerd, Tereasa G.; Agustsson, Ingolfur

    2015-01-01

    We use a mock redshift survey of the first Millennium Run simulation to investigate the spatial locations of spectroscopically selected satellite galaxies. The host-satellite systems were selected using typical redshift space proximity criteria and, therefore, the satellite sample includes a large number of "interlopers" (i.e., false satellites). Fifty percent of the satellites are located outside the virial radii of their host galaxies and 34% are located more than 500 kpc from their host galaxy. The host galaxies reside in relatively isolated regions of space and have stellar masses that span the range 10.3 < log10[M*/Ms] < 11.5. The 3D locations of the satellites are well-fitted by a combination of a Navarro, Frenk & White (NFW) density profile and a power law. At fixed stellar mass, the NFW scale parameter, rs, for the satellites of red hosts exceeds that for the satellites of blue hosts, and in both cases the dependence of rs on host stellar mass is well-fitted by a power law. For the satellites of red hosts, rs ~ (M*/Ms)0.71, while for satellites of blue hosts rs ~ (M*/Ms)0.48. For hosts with large stellar masses (log10[M*/Ms] > 10.8), the satellites of the red hosts are significantly (4σ) less concentrated than is the halo dark matter, while the satellites of blue hosts are marginally (2σ) more concentrated than is the halo dark matter. We perform model fits to the projected locations of the satellites and find that, with the exception of the satellites of the most massive red hosts, the 2D analysis accurately recovers the values of rs that were found using the 3D analysis. Therefore, even in the limit of a large population of "interlopers" in the satellite sample, the 3D distribution of the satellites can be recovered using 2D information alone. However, since the concentration of the satellite distribution differs from that of the dark matter in the case of high mass host galaxies, this calls into question whether spectroscopically selected satellites

  20. Satellite image analysis using neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheldon, Roger A.

    1990-01-01

    The tremendous backlog of unanalyzed satellite data necessitates the development of improved methods for data cataloging and analysis. Ford Aerospace has developed an image analysis system, SIANN (Satellite Image Analysis using Neural Networks) that integrates the technologies necessary to satisfy NASA's science data analysis requirements for the next generation of satellites. SIANN will enable scientists to train a neural network to recognize image data containing scenes of interest and then rapidly search data archives for all such images. The approach combines conventional image processing technology with recent advances in neural networks to provide improved classification capabilities. SIANN allows users to proceed through a four step process of image classification: filtering and enhancement, creation of neural network training data via application of feature extraction algorithms, configuring and training a neural network model, and classification of images by application of the trained neural network. A prototype experimentation testbed was completed and applied to climatological data.

  1. High resolution analysis of satellite gradiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, O. L.

    1989-01-01

    Satellite gravity gradiometry is a technique now under development which, by the middle of the next decade, may be used for the high resolution charting from space of the gravity field of the earth and, afterwards, of other planets. Some data analysis schemes are reviewed for getting detailed gravity maps from gradiometry on both a global and a local basis. It also presents estimates of the likely accuracies of such maps, in terms of normalized spherical harmonics expansions, both using gradiometry alone and in combination with data from a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver carried on the same spacecraft. It compares these accuracies with those of current and future maps obtained from other data (conventional tracking, satellite-satellite tracking, etc.), and also with the spectra of various signals of geophysical interest.

  2. The 'Geostar' radio determination satellite system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oneill, G. K.

    1986-05-01

    The proposed Geostar system which links portable and mobile terminals directly through satellite relays to a ground-based computer is capable of providing the following services in a variety of transportation modes: (1) navigational positioning, (2) terrain warning to pilots and hazard warning to mariners, (3) approach guidance for aircraft and (4) two-way digital message service. Able to operate in a supplementary or advisory mode, the Geostar system combines the existing technologies of orbital satellites, computers and integrated circuits. It consists of the following: (1) a ground station with a computer, two or more satellites at fixed locations in earth orbit, and terminals carried by aircraft, surface vehicles, etc. Geostar's practical implications are discussed as well as the fitting of its necessary radio frequencies in the ITU table of allocations.

  3. Weather Prediction Improvement Using Advanced Satellite Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Einaudi, Franco; Uccellini, L.; Purdom, J.; Rogers, D.; Gelaro, R.; Dodge, J.; Atlas, R.; Lord, S.

    2001-01-01

    We discuss in this paper some of the problems that exist today in the fall utilization of satellite data to improve weather forecasts and we propose specific recommendations to solve them. This discussion can be viewed as an aspect of the general debate on how best to organize the transition from research to operational satellites and how to evaluate the impact of a research instrument on numerical weather predictions. A method for providing this transition is offered by the National Polar-Orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) Preparatory Project (NPP). This mission will bridge the time between the present NOAA and Department of Defense (DOD) polar orbiting missions and the initiation of the converged NPOESS series and will evaluate some of the Earth Observing System (EOS) instruments as appropriate for operational missions. Thus, this mission can be viewed as an effort to meet the operational requirements of NOAA and DOD and the research requirements of NASA. More generally, however, it can be said that the process of going from the conception of new, more advanced instruments to their operational implementation and full utilization by the weather forecast communities is not optimal. Instruments developed for research purposes may have insufficient funding to explore their potential operational capabilities. Furthermore, instrument development programs designed for operational satellites typically have insufficient funding for assimilation algorithms needed to transform the satellite observations into data that can be used by sophisticated global weather forecast models. As a result, years often go by before satellite data are efficiently used for operational forecasts. NASA and NOAA each have unique expertise in the design of satellite instruments, their use for basic and applied research and their utilization in weather and climate research. At a time of limited resources, the two agencies must combine their efforts to work toward common

  4. International communications via satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLucas, J. L.

    The evolution of communications satellite systems is traced in terms of technical capabilities and technological advances. The Communications Act of 1962 led to the establishment of INTELSAT on an international basis in 1964. The original 19 signatory nations has grown to over 100, and over 800 ground relay stations have been built. The INTELSAT system comprises spacecraft over the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans and handles 2/3 of the world's international electronic communications and all transoceanic television. The 1965 Early Bird satellite had a 240 two-way telephone link capacity and weighed 38 kg, while the Intelsat V satellites, of which there will be nine, have increased the capacity to 20,000 voice circuits and Intelsat VI will double the number by 1993. Increasing demand for satellite communications links is driving the design and development of space platforms for multiple missions of communications, meteorological studies, and on-board switching and data processing in excess of current multiple satellite systems.

  5. Satellite power system operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pugh, F. L.; Gordon, A. I.

    1980-01-01

    A projection of the electrical energy demands over the next 30 to 50 years, coupled with reasonable assessments of known or developable energy sources, indicates that a shortage of electrical energy will occur about the turn of the century. Recognizing the criticality of such a shortage, the Department of Energy is currently evaluating alternative power generation concepts. One of these candidate concepts is the Satellite Power System. The power levels considered during the evaluation of the various satellite systems have ranged from 5 to 10 GW. It is apparent that, with this power level, both the satellite and the rectenna must be very large and encompass a large number of complex operational system activities. Major elements of the Satellite Power System (SPS) consist of a power satellite placed in a geosynchronous equatorial orbit, and a dedicated ground receiving station (GRS) located at a selected site within the continental United States. The nominal power output of the SPS is established at 5 gigawatts (5 million kilowatts) although, because of various system constraints or losses, it may actually produce between 4 and 5 gigawatts.

  6. Rotation histories of the natural satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peale, S. J.

    1977-01-01

    Recent advances in the theory of rotation are combined with traditional approaches to study the rotational evolution of the 33 known natural satellites. A calculation similar to that reported by Burns and Safronov (1973) is applied to each satellite to obtain the characteristic time of decay of any wobble motion to smooth rotation about the principal axis of maximum moment of inertia. Stability criteria and capture probabilities are calculated for the 3/2 spin resonance. Results show that only the regular satellites and Iapetus, Hyperion, Triton, and the moon are tidally evolved. Of these, 13 have confirmed synchronous rotation periods; capture probabilities into the 3/2 resonance indicate that none of the remaining 10 should be captured in nonsynchronous, commensurate spin states. For the most part, the irregular satellites retain their original spins except for a relaxation to principal axis rotation. Tidal evolution of the obliquities of the satellites is evaluated in the framework of the generalization of Cassini's laws for the moon. Nearly resonant, forced librations in longitude of 4.8 and 0.5 deg are calculated on the basis of the observed shapes of Phobos and Deimos, respectively.

  7. 3D timelapse analysis of muscle satellite cell motility.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Ashley L; Atchison, Kevin; Fisher, Kevin E; Davis, George E; Cornelison, D D W

    2009-10-01

    Skeletal muscle repair and regeneration requires the activity of satellite cells, a population of myogenic stem cells scattered throughout the tissue and activated to proliferate and differentiate in response to myotrauma or disease. While it seems likely that satellite cells would need to navigate local muscle tissue to reach damaged areas, relatively little data on such motility exist, and most studies have been with immortalized cell lines. We find that primary satellite cells are significantly more motile than myoblast cell lines, and that adhesion to laminin promotes primary cell motility more than fourfold over other substrates. Using timelapse videomicroscopy to assess satellite cell motility on single living myofibers, we have identified a requirement for the laminin-binding integrin alpha 7 beta 1 in satellite cell motility, as well as a role for hepatocyte growth factor in promoting directional persistence. The extensive migratory behavior of satellite cells resident on muscle fibers suggests caution when determining, based on fixed specimens, whether adjacent cells are daughters from the same mother cell. We also observed more persistent long-term contact between individual satellite cells than has been previously supposed, potential cell-cell attractive and repulsive interactions, and migration between host myofibers. Based on such activity, we assayed for expression of "pathfinding" cues, and found that satellite cells express multiple guidance ligands and receptors. Together, these data suggest that satellite cell migration in vivo may be more extensive than currently thought, and could be regulated by combinations of signals, including adhesive haptotaxis, soluble factors, and guidance cues.

  8. ESA's satellite communications programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartholome, P.

    1985-02-01

    The developmental history, current status, and future plans of the ESA satellite-communications programs are discussed in a general survey and illustrated with network diagrams and maps. Consideration is given to the parallel development of national and European direct-broadcast systems and telecommunications networks, the position of the European space and electronics industries in the growing world market, the impact of technological improvements (both in satellite systems and in ground-based networks), and the technological and commercial advantages of integrated space-terrestrial networks. The needs for a European definition of the precise national and international roles of satellite communications, for maximum speed in implementing such decisions (before the technology becomes obsolete), and for increased cooperation and standardization to assure European equipment manufacturers a reasonable share of the market are stressed.

  9. Uranus satellites - Surface properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veverka, J.; Brown, R. H.; Bell, Jeffrey F.

    The post-Voyager knowledge of the photometric, colorimetric, spectral, and thermal properties of the Uranian satellites is reviewed, focusing on such fundamental physical properties as albedo, color, and surface texture. While albedo variations of at least a factor of 2 exist, color differences are almost absent (Miranda) or subdued (Oberon). In the case of Titania, the strong opposition effect reported by ground-based observers was confirmed by Voyager. Voyager did not observe the opposition parts of the phase curves of the other satellites. Voyager thermal observations of Ariel and Miranda suggest that both have highly porous regoliths, thermophysically similar to those of Jupiter's icy satellites. At the time of the flyby (south pole facing the sun), maximum surface temperatures reached or exceeded 85 K, but nighttime polar temperatures are predicted to drop to 20 to 30 K because each pole spends about 40 yr in darkness. Ground-based spectroscopy identified water ice as an important surface constituent.

  10. Uranus satellites - Surface properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veverka, J.; Brown, R. H.; Bell, Jeffrey F.

    1991-01-01

    The post-Voyager knowledge of the photometric, colorimetric, spectral, and thermal properties of the Uranian satellites is reviewed, focusing on such fundamental physical properties as albedo, color, and surface texture. While albedo variations of at least a factor of 2 exist, color differences are almost absent (Miranda) or subdued (Oberon). In the case of Titania, the strong opposition effect reported by ground-based observers was confirmed by Voyager. Voyager did not observe the opposition parts of the phase curves of the other satellites. Voyager thermal observations of Ariel and Miranda suggest that both have highly porous regoliths, thermophysically similar to those of Jupiter's icy satellites. At the time of the flyby (south pole facing the sun), maximum surface temperatures reached or exceeded 85 K, but nighttime polar temperatures are predicted to drop to 20 to 30 K because each pole spends about 40 yr in darkness. Ground-based spectroscopy identified water ice as an important surface constituent.

  11. The Clementine satellite

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The first US satellite to the Moon in more than two decades was launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base (Santa Barbara County), California, on January 25, 1994. The satellite was named Clementine because it carried only enough fuel to complete its mission before it was [open quotes]lost and gone forever.[close quotes] The Clementine satellite tested 23 advanced technologies during its mission for the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization. In fulfilling its scientific goals, Clementine provided a wealth of information relevant to the mineralogy of the lunar surface. Using six on-board cameras designed and built at the Laboratory, Clementine mapped the entire surface of the Moon at resolutions never before attained. Clementine also provided range data that will be used to construct a relief map of the lunar surface.

  12. Soviet early warning satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, G. E.

    1982-02-01

    Satellite orbits and groups for the Cosmos spacecraft are discussed, noting that the orbits are configured to provide full early warning system coverage. The regular crossing of a ground track which includes all the Minuteman bases in the U.S. is noted, as are time constraints for the launch into a suitable orbit without introducing orbital anomalies. Cosmos 1024 was observed to need four corrections in order to reach a point where free libration over a fixed ground station was possible for a year until replacement by the Cosmos 1124 occurred. The current configuration is a total of nine satellites with 40 deg spacing, which yields full coverage, although it is indicated that only three satellites ever operate simultaneously.

  13. Estimation in satellite control.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debra, D. B.

    1971-01-01

    The use of estimators or observers is discussed as applied to satellite attitude control and the control of drag-free satellites. The practical problems of implementation are discussed, and the relative advantages of full and reduced state estimators are compared, particularly in terms of their effectiveness and bandwidth as filters. Three applications are used to illustrate the principles. They are: (1) a reaction wheel control system, (2) a spinning attitude control system, and (3) a drag-free satellite translational control system. Fixed estimator gains are shown to be adequate for these (and many other) applications. Our experience in the hardware realization of estimators has led to categorize the error sources in terms of those that improve with increased estimator gains and those that get worse with increased estimator gains.

  14. Uranus satellites - Surface properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veverka, J.; Brown, R. H.; Bell, Jeffrey F.

    1991-01-01

    The post-Voyager knowledge of the photometric, colorimetric, spectral, and thermal properties of the Uranian satellites is reviewed, focusing on such fundamental physical properties as albedo, color, and surface texture. While albedo variations of at least a factor of 2 exist, color differences are almost absent (Miranda) or subdued (Oberon). In the case of Titania, the strong opposition effect reported by ground-based observers was confirmed by Voyager. Voyager did not observe the opposition parts of the phase curves of the other satellites. Voyager thermal observations of Ariel and Miranda suggest that both have highly porous regoliths, thermophysically similar to those of Jupiter's icy satellites. At the time of the flyby (south pole facing the sun), maximum surface temperatures reached or exceeded 85 K, but nighttime polar temperatures are predicted to drop to 20 to 30 K because each pole spends about 40 yr in darkness. Ground-based spectroscopy identified water ice as an important surface constituent.

  15. Defense Meteorological Satellite Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, William D.; Mandt, Gregory A.; Gagliardo, John

    The Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) is described, with particular attention given to the DMSP space segment; the command, control, and communications segment; and the user segment. DMSP performs its mission with space-based remote and in situ sensors, reliable spacecraft, and ground systems, which contribute to the efficient use of increasingly scarce military resources. Presently, the DMSP space segment consists of two Block 5D-2 satellites in 833 kilometer circular sun-synchronous polar orbits. In the future, DMSP will develop smaller, more easily deployable tactical terminals to complement the larger Mark IV class terminals.

  16. Oceanography from satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, W. S.

    1981-01-01

    It is pointed out that oceanographers have benefited from the space program mainly through the increased efficiency it has brought to ship operations. For example, the Transit navigation system has enabled oceanographers to compile detailed maps of sea-floor properties and to more accurately locate moored subsurface instrumentation. General descriptions are given of instruments used in satellite observations (altimeter, color scanner, infrared radiometer, microwave radiometer, scatterometer, synthetic aperture radar). It is pointed out that because of the large volume of data that satellite instruments generate, the development of algorithms for converting the data into a form expressed in geophysical units has become especially important.

  17. Satellite Laser Ranging operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, Michael R.

    1994-01-01

    Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) is currently providing precision orbit determination for measurements of: 1) Ocean surface topography from satellite borne radar altimetry, 2) Spatial and temporal variations of the gravity field, 3) Earth and ocean tides, 4) Plate tectonic and regional deformation, 5) Post-glacial uplift and subsidence, 6) Variations in the Earth's center-of-mass, and 7) Variations in Earth rotation. SLR also supports specialized programs in time transfer and classical geodetic positioning, and will soon provide precision ranging to support experiments in relativity.

  18. Mexico's first domestic satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Ruiz, M. E.; Elbert, B. R.

    The principal features of the Morelos communications satellite program, providing Mexico with C-band and Ku-band TV and telephone services beginning in 1985, are reviewed. Two satellites, modified versions of the Hughes HS-376 dual-spin bus, will be launched by STS and controlled from a tracking, telemetery, and command station near Mexico City; the 184-station ground network currently operating with Intelsat-IV will be expanded to about 1000 C-band stations (plus numerous small Ku-band receivers) by 1990. The spacecraft design, communications-subsystem performance, repeater equipment, antennas, and coverage pattern are presented in tables, drawings, diagrams, photographs and maps and discussed.

  19. Public service satellite communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolff, E. A.

    1978-01-01

    It is suggested that the high effective isotropic radiated power provided by high-power satellite transmitters and high-gain antennas could be used in conjunction with economical ground receivers to furnish public services in remote areas of the U.S. Applications to health care, education and public safety are mentioned. A system concept involving a communications satellite operating in the Ku-band (12-GHz down, 14-GHz up) and either 100/30 watt stationary earth terminals with 1-1.8 m antennas or mobile terminals with omnidirectional antennas is presented.

  20. The Geostationary Applications Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlin, Peter

    2004-12-01

    Berlin offers an in-depth look into all the engineering aspects of geostationary satellite design, construction, and launch. Geostationary satellites have opened new doors for the peaceful use of outer space. From vantage points 22,000 miles above the equator, they permit people anywhere on land, at sea, or in the air to communicate with each other, and they provide meteorologists, geologists, and other scientists with photographs of the earth. This book gives equal emphasis to the explanation of launch vehicles, orbital mechanics, the space environment, spacecraft structures, mechanisms, thermal control, telemetry tracking and command, communications technology, meterological payloads, product assurance and testing.

  1. Small Cube Satellite Deploy

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-19

    ISS038-E-003872 (19 Nov. 2013) --- Three nanosatellites, known as Cubesats, are deployed from a Small Satellite Orbital Deployer (SSOD) attached to the Kibo laboratory’s robotic arm at 7:10 a.m. (EST) on Nov. 19, 2013. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Koichi Wakata, Expedition 38 flight engineer, monitored the satellite deployment while operating the Japanese robotic arm from inside Kibo. The Cubesats were delivered to the International Space Station Aug. 9, aboard Japan’s fourth H-II Transfer Vehicle, Kounotori-4.

  2. Small Cube Satellite Deploy

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-19

    ISS038-E-003874 (19 Nov. 2013) --- Three nanosatellites, known as Cubesats, are deployed from a Small Satellite Orbital Deployer (SSOD) attached to the Kibo laboratory's robotic arm at 7:10 a.m. (EST) on Nov. 19, 2013. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Koichi Wakata, Expedition 38 flight engineer, monitored the satellite deployment while operating the Japanese robotic arm from inside Kibo. The Cubesats were delivered to the International Space Station Aug. 9, aboard Japan's fourth H-II Transfer Vehicle, Kounotori-4.

  3. Small Cube Satellite Deploy

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-19

    ISS038-E-003869 (19 Nov. 2013) --- Three nanosatellites, known as Cubesats, are deployed from a Small Satellite Orbital Deployer (SSOD) attached to the Kibo laboratory’s robotic arm at 7:10 a.m. (EST) on Nov. 19, 2013. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Koichi Wakata, Expedition 38 flight engineer, monitored the satellite deployment while operating the Japanese robotic arm from inside Kibo. The Cubesats were delivered to the International Space Station Aug. 9, aboard Japan’s fourth H-II Transfer Vehicle, Kounotori-4.

  4. Small Cube Satellite Deploy

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-19

    ISS038-E-003871 (19 Nov. 2013) --- Three nanosatellites, known as Cubesats, are deployed from a Small Satellite Orbital Deployer (SSOD) attached to the Kibo laboratory’s robotic arm at 7:10 a.m. (EST) on Nov. 19, 2013. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Koichi Wakata, Expedition 38 flight engineer, monitored the satellite deployment while operating the Japanese robotic arm from inside Kibo. The Cubesats were delivered to the International Space Station Aug. 9, aboard Japan’s fourth H-II Transfer Vehicle, Kounotori-4.

  5. Small Cube Satellite Deploy

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-19

    ISS038-E-003870 (19 Nov. 2013) --- Three nanosatellites, known as Cubesats, are deployed from a Small Satellite Orbital Deployer (SSOD) attached to the Kibo laboratory’s robotic arm at 7:10 a.m. (EST) on Nov. 19, 2013. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Koichi Wakata, Expedition 38 flight engineer, monitored the satellite deployment while operating the Japanese robotic arm from inside Kibo. The Cubesats were delivered to the International Space Station Aug. 9, aboard Japan’s fourth H-II Transfer Vehicle, Kounotori-4.

  6. Satellites For Sale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Astronaut Dale A. Gardner, having just completed the major portion of his second extravehicular activity (EVA) period in three days, holds up a 'For Sale' sign refering to the two satellites, Palapa B-2 and Westar 6 that they retrieved from orbit after their Payload Assist Modules (PAM) failed to fire. Astronaut Joseph P. Allen IV, who also participated in the two EVAs, is reflected in Gardner's helmet visor. A portion of each of two recovered satellites is in the lower right corner, with Westar 6 nearer Discovery's aft.

  7. Satellite communications system 'Tyulpan'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchuyan, R. K.; Tarasov, E. V.; Belousov, A. P.; Balyk, V. M.; Kovtunenko, V. M.; Morozov, V. A.; Andreev, V. A.; v'yunenko, K. A.

    1993-10-01

    A concept of the satellite communication system called 'Tyulpan' (because or its tulip-resembling shape) is considered. This conception envisages the use of six satellites-retranslators installed on high-latitude elliptic orbits. Such a system can provide the communication for mean- and high-latitude region of Europe, Asia, and America. For the communication, super small ground stations of 0.4 m in diameter can be used. In the development of system conception, the already existing technical solutions and possibility of conversion or existing installations of military destination were taken into account. Therefore, the system considered can be realized at the earliest possible date.

  8. Declassified intelligence satellite photographs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1998-01-01

    Recently declassified photographs from spy satellites are an important addition to the record of the Earth?s land surface held by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). More than 800,000 high-resolution photos taken between 1959 through 1972 were made available by Executive Order of the President. The collection is held at the USGS EROS Data Center, near Sioux Falls, S. Dak., and are offered for public sale. For some purposes in earth science studies, these photos extend the record of changes in the land surface another decade back in time from the advent of the Landsat earth-observing satellite program.

  9. The assimilation of satellite soundings, winds and satellite products in a mesoscale analysis/forecast system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diak, G. R.; Smith, W. L.

    1985-01-01

    Investigations in FY-85 were centered on three case study days in 1982. Two of these, March 6 and April 24, were Atmospheric Variability Experiment/Verical Atmospheric Sounder (AVE/VAS) days for which high spatial and temporal resolution RAOB and Vertical Atmospheric Sounder (VAS) data sets were available. The third investigation day, April 26, was a day of interesting severe weather. In the last part of FY-84 and early FY-85 we were able to demonstrate most importantly the complimentary nature of satellite soundings and winds in a forecast/analysis system. In our variational analysis scheme, cloud drift and water vapor winds enter into the height field as gradient information. The cloud drift winds especially, have the character of supplying information in cloudy areas where satellite soundings are not possible. In the April 26 experiments, analyses and forecasts using the combination satellite winds and soundings were superior to those using only soundings. Good consistency was shown between independent satellite forecasts from different initialization times run to the same verification time. A significant accomplishment in FY-85 was expanding experiments on April 26 to include quasi-continuous initialization inserting satellite soundings and winds from several different times into an analysis/forecast. Contrary to the first set of experiments on April 26, here forecast initialization fields were not independent, but contained satellite information from two data times.

  10. Resolving Seamounts in Satellite Altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, K. M.; Smith, W. H.

    2006-12-01

    We have examined three factors influencing the use of satellite altimeter data to map seamounts and guyots in the deep ocean: (1) the resolution of seamount and guyot gravity anomalies by altimetry; (2) the non-linearity of the relationship between gravity and bathymetry; and (3) the homogeneity of the mass density within the seamount or guyot. When altimeter data are used to model the marine gravity anomaly field the result may have limited resolution due to noise levels in the altimeter data, track spacing of the satellite profiles, inclination angles of the orbits, and filters used to combine and interpolate the data (Sandwell and Smith, JGR, 1997). We compared the peak-to-trough amplitude of gravity anomalies in Sandwell and Smith`'s version 15.1 field to peak-to-trough amplitudes measured by gravimeters on board ships. The satellite gravity field amplitudes match ship measurements well over seamounts and guyots having volumes exceeding ~2000 km3. Over smaller volume seamounts, where the anomalies have most of their power at quite short wavelengths, the satellite field under-estimates the anomaly amplitude. If less filtering could be done, or a new mission with a lower noise level were flown, more of the anomalies associated with small seamounts might be resolved. Smith and Sandwell (Science, 1997) predicted seafloor topography from altimetric gravity assuming that the density of seafloor topography is nearly constant over ~100 km distances, and that the relationship between gravity and topography may be approximated by a liner filter over those distances. In fact, the true theoretical relationship is non-linear (Parker, Geophys. J. R. astr. Soc, 1972); it can be expressed as an N-th order expansion, with the N=1 term representing a linear filter and the N>1 terms accounting for higher-order corrections. We find that N=2 is a sufficient approximation at both seamounts and guyots. Constant density models of large volume guyots do not fit the observed gravity

  11. The American Satellite Company (ASC) satellite deployed from payload bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The American Satellite Company (ASC) communications satellite is deployed from the payload bay of the Shuttle Discovery. A portion of the cloudy surface of the earth can be seen to the left of the frame.

  12. The American Satellite Company (ASC) satellite deployed from payload bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The American Satellite Company (ASC) communications satellite is deployed from the payload bay of the Shuttle Discovery. A portion of the cloudy surface of the earth can be seen to the left of the frame.

  13. Satellite orbit determination and gravity field recovery from satellite-to-satellite tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakker, K. F.; Ambrosius, B. A. C.; Leenman, H.

    1989-07-01

    Studies on satellite-to-satellite tracking (SST) with POPSAT (a geodetic satellite concept) and a ERS-class (Earth observation) satellite, a Satellite-to-Satellite Tracking (SST) gravity mission, and precise gravity field determination methods and mission requirements are reported. The first two studies primarily address the application of SST between the high altitude POPSAT and an ERS-class or GRM (Geopotential Research Mission) satellite to the orbit determination of the latter two satellites. Activities focussed on the determination of the tracking coverage of the lower altitude satellite by ground based tracking systems and by POPSAT, orbit determination error analysis and the determination of the surface forces acting on GRM. The third study surveys principles of SST, uncertainties of existing drag models, effects of direct luni-solar attraction and tides on orbit and the gravity gradient observable. Detailed ARISTOTELES (which replaced POPSAT) orbit determination error analyses were performed for various ground based tracking networks.

  14. One-Dimensional Hybrid Satellite Track Model for the Dynamics Explorer 2 (DE 2) Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deng, Wei; Killeen, T. L.; Burns, A. G.; Johnson, R. M.; Emery, B. A.; Roble, R. G.; Winningham, J. D.; Gary, J. B.

    1995-01-01

    A one-dimensional hybrid satellite track model has been developed to calculate the high-latitude thermospheric/ionospheric structure below the satellite altitude using Dynamics Explorer 2 (DE 2) satellite measurements and theory. This model is based on Emery et al. satellite track code but also includes elements of Roble et al. global mean thermosphere/ionosphere model. A number of parameterizations and data handling techniques are used to input satellite data from several DE 2 instruments into this model. Profiles of neutral atmospheric densities are determined from the MSIS-90 model and measured neutral temperatures. Measured electron precipitation spectra are used in an auroral model to calculate particle impact ionization rates below the satellite. These rates are combined with a solar ionization rate profile and used to solve the O(+) diffusion equation, with the measured electron density as an upper boundary condition. The calculated O(+) density distribution, as well as the ionization profiles, are then used in a photochemical equilibrium model to calculate the electron and molecular ion densities. The electron temperature is also calculated by solving the electron energy equation with an upper boundary condition determined by the DE 2 measurement. The model enables calculations of altitude profiles of conductivity and Joule beating rate along and below the satellite track. In a first application of the new model, a study is made of thermospheric and ionospheric structure below the DE 2 satellite for a single orbit which occurred on October 25, 1981. The field-aligned Poynting flux, which is independently obtained for this orbit, is compared with the model predictions of the height-integrated energy conversion rate. Good quantitative agreement between these two estimates has been reached. In addition, measurements taken at the incoherent scatter radar site at Chatanika (65.1 deg N, 147.4 deg W) during a DE 2 overflight are compared with the model

  15. JPSS Preparations at the Satellite Proving Ground for Marine, Precipitation, and Satellite Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folmer, M. J.; Berndt, E.; Clark, J.; Orrison, A.; Kibler, J.; Sienkiewicz, J. M.; Nelson, J. A., Jr.; Goldberg, M.

    2016-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Satellite Proving Ground (PG) for Marine, Precipitation, and Satellite Analysis (MPS) has been demonstrating and evaluating Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) products along with other polar-orbiting satellite platforms in preparation for the Joint Polar Satellite System - 1 (JPSS-1) launch in March 2017. The first S-NPP imagery was made available to the MPS PG during the evolution of Hurricane Sandy in October 2012 and has since been popular in operations. Since this event the MPS PG Satellite Liaison has been working with forecasters on ways to integrate single-channel and multispectral imagery from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS), the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), and the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR)into operations to complement numerical weather prediction and geostationary satellite savvy National Weather Service (NWS) National Centers. Additional unique products have been introduced to operations to address specific forecast challenges, including the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA) Layered Precipitable Water, the National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) Snowfall Rate product, NOAA Unique Combined Atmospheric Processing System (NUCAPS) Soundings, ozone products from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), Cross-track Infrared Sounder/Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (CrIS/ATMS), and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI). In addition, new satellite domains have been created to provide forecasters at the NWS Ocean Prediction Center and Weather Prediction Center with better quality imagery at high latitudes. This has led to research projects that are addressing forecast challenges such as tropical to extratropical transition and explosive cyclogenesis. This presentation will provide examples of how the MPS PG has been introducing and integrating

  16. The satellite configuration of satellite-TV navigation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yu-Ping

    2001-02-01

    The positioning accuracy and availability of navigation system are affected directly by the quality of satellite configuration. The possible satellite configurations for satellite-TV navigation system are discussed and estimated in this paper. The results show that a well setted configuration or a resonable integration of satellite-TV navigation system and Chinese Loran-C will improve the positioning accuracy and availability of the system.

  17. Technology for satellite power conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gouker, M. A.; Campbell, D. P.; Gallagher, J. J.

    1987-01-01

    Components were examined that will be needed for high frequency rectenna devices. The majority of the effort was spent on measuring the directivity and efficiency of the half-wave dipole antenna. It is felt that the antenna and diode should be roughly optimized before they are combined into a rectenna structure. An integrated low pass filter had to be added to the antenna structure in order to facilitate the field pattern measurements. A calculation was also made of the power density of the Earth's radiant energy as seen by satellites in Earth orbit. Finally, the feasibility of using a Metal-Oxide-Metal (MOM) diode for rectification of the received power was assessed.

  18. Potential applications of satellite navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaenzer, G.

    The applicability of Navstar GPS to civil air navigation is discussed. The accuracy of current air-navigation systems is reviewed; the basic principle and accuracy of GPS navigation are characterized; the relatively low cost of GPS receiving equipment is pointed out; and particular attention is given to hybrid systems combining GPS with inertial navigation. It is predicted that CAT III landings will be possible using such hybrid systems when the GPS satellites are fully deployed, even without access to the military GPS code. Techniques for GPS-based precision landings, reduced-noise landings, landings on parallel runways, control of taxiing maneuvers, and aircraft-based geodetic measurements are briefly described and illustrated with diagrams.

  19. Satellite camera image navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamel, Ahmed A. (Inventor); Graul, Donald W. (Inventor); Savides, John (Inventor); Hanson, Charles W. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Pixels within a satellite camera (1, 2) image are precisely located in terms of latitude and longitude on a celestial body, such as the earth, being imaged. A computer (60) on the earth generates models (40, 50) of the satellite's orbit and attitude, respectively. The orbit model (40) is generated from measurements of stars and landmarks taken by the camera (1, 2), and by range data. The orbit model (40) is an expression of the satellite's latitude and longitude at the subsatellite point, and of the altitude of the satellite, as a function of time, using as coefficients (K) the six Keplerian elements at epoch. The attitude model (50) is based upon star measurements taken by each camera (1, 2). The attitude model (50) is a set of expressions for the deviations in a set of mutually orthogonal reference optical axes (x, y, z) as a function of time, for each camera (1, 2). Measured data is fit into the models (40, 50) using a walking least squares fit algorithm. A transformation computer (66 ) transforms pixel coordinates as telemetered by the camera (1, 2) into earth latitude and longitude coordinates, using the orbit and attitude models (40, 50).

  20. Satellite Television Demonstration Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska Governor's Office of Telecommunications, Juneau.

    This report describes the status of this pilot satellite television project for the state of Alaska which provides for the distribution of television programming to the RCA Toll Centers in Anchorage, Fairbanks, Juneau, Sitka, and Bethel, as well as to 23 selected rural sites. The historical background is discussed, as well as the process involved…

  1. Building Satellites is Easier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, Phyllis Nimmo

    1996-01-01

    'Building Satellites' is a story about Jim Marsh's recovery from a severe head injury told by his wife Phyllis from the moment she learned of its happening, through the ups and downs of a lengthy rehabilitation, until his return to work and daily living. It continues on, however, and narrates his battle with the more insidious Grave's disease. Told in the first person, 'Building Satellites' vividly portrays Phyllis's thoughts and feelings throughout this experience with scrupulous honestly. This is a story worth reading for many reasons. First of all, Jim was an accomplished scientist, respected by his colleagues both in this country and abroad. Secondly, it narrates the many stages of his recovery from head injury with detailed readable accuracy; it informs us as well as inspires. Finally, 'Building Satellites" also tells us the story of Phyllis Marsh's remarkable creative response to this crisis. It narrates her personal experiences as she progresses through the strange and somewhat bizarre world of medicine and rehabilitation, guided by a few basic beliefs, which she learned as a child in Iowa, that provided her with the strength to endure. 'Building Satellites' seems to reaffirm our unconscious, but settled conviction, that when confornted overnight with adversity, we are somehow given the means for coping, supported by our basic beliefs, strengthened by family and friends, and eventually learning to accept any outcome.

  2. On satellite constellation selection

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1991-05-01

    Analytical estimates can be used to produce and discuss optimal constellations. They are in close agreement with phase-space estimates and exact solutions. They suggest that distributions of inclined orbits could reduce satellite numbers by factors of 2--3 while improving uniformity. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Small satellite radiometric measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, P.G.

    1991-01-01

    A critical need for the Mission to Planet Earth is to provide continuous, well-calibrated radiometric data for the radiation budget. This paper describes a new, compact, flexible radiometer which will provide both spectrally integrated data and data in selected spectral bands. The radiometer design is suitable for use on small satellites, aircraft, or remotely piloted vehicles (RPVs). 12 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Creating Better Satellite Conferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horner, Tommy

    1998-01-01

    Presents four ways to improve broadcasts of company satellite conferences, including creative site selection (using facilities at educational institutions rather than hotel rooms); creative programming (using graphics and other interruptions to break up lectures or speeches); creative crew selection; and creative downlink site activities (to…

  5. Satellite Weather Watch.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summers, R. Joe

    1982-01-01

    Describes an inexpensive (about $1,500) direct-readout ground station for use in secondary school science/mathematics programs. Includes suggested activities including, among others, developing map overlays, operating station equipment, interpreting satellite data, developing weather forecasts, and using microcomputers for data storage, orbit…

  6. Triton - Neptune Largest Satellite

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-25

    Intriguing patterns of unknown origin appeared on the surface of Neptune largest satellite, Triton, in this image returned by NASA Voyager 2 on Aug. 22, 1989. Voyager images showed that Triton is one of the brightest objects in the solar system,

  7. Perception via satellite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinove, Charles J.

    1970-01-01

    The earth resources observation satellite (EROS) program in the Department of the Interior is intended to gather and use data from satellites and aircraft on natural and man-made features of the earth's surface. Earth resources technology satellite will provide the EROS program with data for use in dealing with natural resource problems and understanding the interaction between man and the environment. Applications will include studies of tectonic features, hydrologic problems, location of fish schools, determination of the conditions of range land, mapping land use for urban planning, studies of erosion and change along coastlines and major streams, and inventories of land use and land forms. In addition, the ERTS data may be used for detecting forest and crop diseases and inventorying crops. The ERTS satellite will be in a polar, sun-synchronous orbit so that each point on the earth's surface will be sensed every 17 to 20 days, at the same time of day. Multispectral photography is being investigated for its usefulness in hydrology. Side-looking airborne radar has not yet been widely used in hydrologic studies, although it is an excellent tool for all-weather, day or night, coverage of large areas. Other techniques being investigated include passive microwave radiometry, ultraviolet and visible stimulated luminescence, and absorption spectroscopy.

  8. Data distribution satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, Kent M.; Jorasch, Ronald E.; Wiskerchen, Michael J.

    1991-01-01

    A description is given of a data distribution satellite (DDS) system. The DDS would operate in conjunction with the tracking and data relay satellite system to give ground-based users real time, two-way access to instruments in space and space-gathered data. The scope of work includes the following: (1) user requirements are derived; (2) communication scenarios are synthesized; (3) system design constraints and projected technology availability are identified; (4) DDS communications payload configuration is derived, and the satellite is designed; (5) requirements for earth terminals and network control are given; (6) system costs are estimated, both life cycle costs and user fees; and (7) technology developments are recommended, and a technology development plan is given. The most important results obtained are as follows: (1) a satellite designed for launch in 2007 is feasible and has 10 Gb/s capacity, 5.5 kW power, and 2000 kg mass; (2) DDS features include on-board baseband switching, use of Ku- and Ka-bands, multiple optical intersatellite links; and (3) system user costs are competitive with projected terrestrial communication costs.

  9. Experimental Satellite Quantum Communications.

    PubMed

    Vallone, Giuseppe; Bacco, Davide; Dequal, Daniele; Gaiarin, Simone; Luceri, Vincenza; Bianco, Giuseppe; Villoresi, Paolo

    2015-07-24

    Quantum communication (QC), namely, the faithful transmission of generic quantum states, is a key ingredient of quantum information science. Here we demonstrate QC with polarization encoding from space to ground by exploiting satellite corner cube retroreflectors as quantum transmitters in orbit and the Matera Laser Ranging Observatory of the Italian Space Agency in Matera, Italy, as a quantum receiver. The quantum bit error ratio (QBER) has been kept steadily low to a level suitable for several quantum information protocols, as the violation of Bell inequalities or quantum key distribution (QKD). Indeed, by taking data from different satellites, we demonstrate an average value of QBER=4.6% for a total link duration of 85 s. The mean photon number per pulse μ_{sat} leaving the satellites was estimated to be of the order of one. In addition, we propose a fully operational satellite QKD system by exploiting our communication scheme with orbiting retroreflectors equipped with a modulator, a very compact payload. Our scheme paves the way toward the implementation of a QC worldwide network leveraging existing receivers.

  10. Satellite Weather Watch.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summers, R. Joe

    1982-01-01

    Describes an inexpensive (about $1,500) direct-readout ground station for use in secondary school science/mathematics programs. Includes suggested activities including, among others, developing map overlays, operating station equipment, interpreting satellite data, developing weather forecasts, and using microcomputers for data storage, orbit…

  11. OMV With Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This 1986 artist's concept shows the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) towing a satellite. As envisioned by Marshall Space Flight Center plarners, the OMV would be a remotely-controlled free-flying space tug which would place, rendezvous, dock, and retrieve orbital payloads.

  12. Satellite-Based Videoconferencing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Distance Education Report, 1997

    1997-01-01

    Educators can broadcast videoconferences to students in different parts of the world at an affordable cost using geostationary satellites. Describes the design and presentation of videoconferences and outlines steps in their development: budgeting, scheduling, selecting presenters and moderators, choosing production and telecast facilities,…

  13. Ocean surveillance satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, D.

    Soviet and U.S. programs involving satellites for surveillance of ships and submarines are discussed, considering differences in approaches. The Soviet program began with the Cosmos 198 in 1967 and the latest, the Cosmos 1400 series, 15 m long and weighing 5 tons, carry radar for monitoring ships and a nuclear reactor for a power supply. Other Soviet spacecraft carrying passive microwave sensors and ion drives powered by solar panels have recently been detonated in orbit for unknown reasons. It has also been observed that the Soviet satellites are controlled in pairs, with sequential orbital changes for one following the other, and both satellites then overflying the same points. In contrast, U.S. surveillance satellites have been placed in higher orbits, thus placing greater demands on the capabilities of the on-board radar and camera systems. Project White Cloud and the Clipper Bow program are described, noting the continued operation of the White Cloud spacecraft, which are equipped to intercept radio signals from surface ships. Currently, the integrated tactical surveillance system program has completed its study and a decision is expected soon.

  14. Experimental Satellite Quantum Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallone, Giuseppe; Bacco, Davide; Dequal, Daniele; Gaiarin, Simone; Luceri, Vincenza; Bianco, Giuseppe; Villoresi, Paolo

    2015-07-01

    Quantum communication (QC), namely, the faithful transmission of generic quantum states, is a key ingredient of quantum information science. Here we demonstrate QC with polarization encoding from space to ground by exploiting satellite corner cube retroreflectors as quantum transmitters in orbit and the Matera Laser Ranging Observatory of the Italian Space Agency in Matera, Italy, as a quantum receiver. The quantum bit error ratio (QBER) has been kept steadily low to a level suitable for several quantum information protocols, as the violation of Bell inequalities or quantum key distribution (QKD). Indeed, by taking data from different satellites, we demonstrate an average value of QBER =4.6 % for a total link duration of 85 s. The mean photon number per pulse μsat leaving the satellites was estimated to be of the order of one. In addition, we propose a fully operational satellite QKD system by exploiting our communication scheme with orbiting retroreflectors equipped with a modulator, a very compact payload. Our scheme paves the way toward the implementation of a QC worldwide network leveraging existing receivers.

  15. OMV With Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This 1986 artist's concept shows the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) towing a satellite. As envisioned by Marshall Space Flight Center plarners, the OMV would be a remotely-controlled free-flying space tug which would place, rendezvous, dock, and retrieve orbital payloads.

  16. Domestic Communications Satellites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Network Project Notebook, 1972

    1972-01-01

    The June, 1972 Federal Communications Commission's (FCC) decision allowed an "open skies" policy in regard to domestic communication satellites and raised Liberal opposition to a situation where exclusive and unchecked communications power is now in the hands of private entrepreneurs, primarily the big Defense Department oriented…

  17. Advances in satellite oceanography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, O. B.; Cheney, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    Technical advances and recent applications of active and passive satellite remote sensing techniques to the study of oceanic processes are summarized. The general themes include infrared and visible radiometry, active and passive microwave sensors, and buoy location systems. The surface parameters of sea surface temperature, windstream, sea state, altimetry, color, and ice are treated as applicable under each of the general methods.

  18. Satelliting in the Suburbs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Alice B.

    1970-01-01

    A pilot program for a satellite lunch program (in which food is prepared in a central location and distributed to other schools in the area) is described; the project also involved the conversion of an all-purpose room in an older school to a food service and dining area. (JW)

  19. Satellite Networks for Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, J. P.; And Others

    The paper has four main sections. The first is concerned with the characteristics and structure of satellite networks. The second discusses pressures within education that are causing the development of various types of networks and also identifies studies in which networking needs for educational sectors and services are defined. The third…

  20. Learning Through Satellite Broadcasting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krishnamoorthy, P. V.

    1975-01-01

    SITE is an experimental project which would provide vital inputs in designing and executing a satellite-based instructional television system, particularly in rural areas, to stimulate national development in India with important managerial, economic, technological, and social implications. (Author/BP)

  1. Learning Through Satellite Broadcasting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krishnamoorthy, P. V.

    1975-01-01

    SITE is an experimental project which would provide vital inputs in designing and executing a satellite-based instructional television system, particularly in rural areas, to stimulate national development in India with important managerial, economic, technological, and social implications. (Author/BP)

  2. Satellite-Based Videoconferencing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Distance Education Report, 1997

    1997-01-01

    Educators can broadcast videoconferences to students in different parts of the world at an affordable cost using geostationary satellites. Describes the design and presentation of videoconferences and outlines steps in their development: budgeting, scheduling, selecting presenters and moderators, choosing production and telecast facilities,…

  3. Domestic Communications Satellites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Network Project Notebook, 1972

    1972-01-01

    The June, 1972 Federal Communications Commission's (FCC) decision allowed an "open skies" policy in regard to domestic communication satellites and raised Liberal opposition to a situation where exclusive and unchecked communications power is now in the hands of private entrepreneurs, primarily the big Defense Department oriented…

  4. Mobile satellite ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverberg, E. C.

    1978-01-01

    A brief review of the constraints which have limited satellite ranging hardware and an outline of the steps which are underway to improve the status of the equipment in this area are given. In addition, some suggestions are presented for the utilization of newer instruments and for possible future research and development work in this area.

  5. Mesoscale temperature and moisture fields from satellite infrared soundings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillger, D. W.; Vonderhaar, T. H.

    1976-01-01

    The combined use of radiosonde and satellite infrared soundings can provide mesoscale temperature and moisture fields at the time of satellite coverage. Radiance data from the vertical temperature profile radiometer on NOAA polar-orbiting satellites can be used along with a radiosonde sounding as an initial guess in an iterative retrieval algorithm. The mesoscale temperature and moisture fields at local 9 - 10 a.m., which are produced by retrieving temperature profiles at each scan spot for the BTPR (every 70 km), can be used for analysis or as a forecasting tool for subsequent weather events during the day. The advantage of better horizontal resolution of satellite soundings can be coupled with the radiosonde temperature and moisture profile both as a best initial guess profile and as a means of eliminating problems due to the limited vertical resolution of satellite soundings.

  6. Assessment of Satellite Radiometry in the Visible Domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melin, Frederick; Franz, Bryan A.

    2014-01-01

    Marine reflectance and chlorophyll-a concentration are listed among the Essential Climate Variables by the Global Climate Observing System. To contribute to climate research, the satellite ocean color data records resulting from successive missions need to be consistent and well characterized in terms of uncertainties. This chapter reviews various approaches that can be used for the assessment of satellite ocean color data. Good practices for validating satellite products with in situ data and the current status of validation results are illustrated. Model-based approaches and inter-comparison techniques can also contribute to characterize some components of the uncertainty budget, while time series analysis can detect issues with the instrument radiometric characterization and calibration. Satellite data from different missions should also provide a consistent picture in scales of variability, including seasonal and interannual signals. Eventually, the various assessment approaches should be combined to create a fully characterized climate data record from satellite ocean color.

  7. LISA satellite formation control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bik, J. J. C. M.; Visser, P. N. A. M.; Jennrich, O.

    The joint ESA-NASA Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission consists of a triangular formation of three satellites aiming at detecting gravitational waves. In linear approximation the LISA satellites describe a circle around a reference point, maintaining a fixed position with respect to each other. The reference point, the center of the triangle, orbits the Sun in a circular orbit, trailing the Earth at twenty degrees. In reality the distance between the satellites will vary by about one to two percent and the angle between the arms of the antenna will vary by about 0.5° over the course of one year for the nominal LISA satellite configuration. For measurement accuracy it is desirable that the pointing offset of the telescopes be kept small. This makes it necessary to actuate the telescopes or to control the formation. It was assumed that the LISA satellites are equipped with six μN engines that would allow to keep the two cubical proof masses within each satellite in almost perfect free fall. It was found that control forces up to about 700 μN are required for maintaining the absolute triangular LISA formation, leading to unacceptable excursions of the proof masses from free fall. However, these forces compensate predominantly very low frequency variations of the arm lengths and angles of the triangle, which are then to be compensated by the telescope actuators. The variations are outside the aimed LISA measurement bandwidth (10 -4-0.1 Hz). In addition, the effect of thruster noise, orbit determination errors and orbit injection errors was examined. The effect of these error sources on the arm lengths and orientation angles between the LISA satellites was assessed both in open loop and in closed loop, where the closed loop was based on a proportional-derivative (PD) controller. It was found that orbit determination errors of the order of a few km in position and a few mm/s in velocity lead to negligible closed loop control forces. In addition, orbit

  8. Small satellite space operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiss, Keith

    1994-01-01

    CTA Space Systems has played a premier role in the development of the 'lightsat' programs of the 80's and 90's. The high costs and development times associated with conventional LEO satellite design, fabrication, launch, and operations continue to motivate the development of new methodologies, techniques, and generally low cost and less stringently regulated satellites. These spacecraft employ low power 'lightsat' communications (versus TDRSS for NASA's LEO's) and typically fly missions with payload/experiment suites that can succeed, for example, without heavily redundant backup systems and large infrastructures of personnel and ground support systems. Such small yet adaptable satellites are also typified by their very short contract-to-launch times (often one to two years). This paper reflects several of the methodologies and perspectives of our successful involvement in these innovative programs and suggests how they might relieve NASA's mounting pressures to reduce the cost of both the spacecraft and their companion mission operations. It focuses on the use of adaptable, sufficiently powerful yet inexpensive PC-based ground systems for wide ranging user terminal (UT) applications and master control facilities for mission operations. These systems proved themselves in successfully controlling more than two dozen USAF, USN, and ARPA satellites at CTA/SS. UT versions have linked with both GEO and LEO satellites and functioned autonomously in relay roles often in remote parts of the world. LEO applications particularly illustrate the efficacy of these concepts since a user can easily mount a lightweight antenna, usually an omni or helix with light duty rotors and PC-based drivers. A few feet of coax connected to a small transceiver module (the size of a small PC) and a serial line to an associated PC establishes a communications link and together with the PC constitute a viable ground station. Applications included geomagnetic mapping; spaceborne solid state

  9. Cibola flight experiment satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, P.; Liddle, Doug; Paffett, John; Sweeting, Martin; Curiel, A.; Sun, Wei; Eves, Stuart

    2004-11-01

    In order to achieve an "economy of scale" with respect to payload capacity the major trend in telecommunications satellites is for larger and larger platforms. With these large platforms the level of integration between platform and payload is increasing leading to longer delivery schedules. The typical lifecycle for procurement of these large telecommunications satellites is now 3-6 years depending on the level of non-recurring engineering needed. Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd (SSTL) has designed a low-cost platform aimed at telecommunications and navigation applications. SSTL's Geostationary Minisatellite Platform (GMP) is a new entrant addressing the lower end of the market with payloads up to 250kg requiring less than 1.5 kW power. The British National Space Centre through the MOSAIC Small Satellite Initiative supported the development of GMP. The main design goals for GMP are low-cost for the complete mission including launch and operations and a platform allowing flexible payload accommodation. GMP is specifically designed to allow rapid development and deployment with schedules typically between 1 and 2 years from contract signature to flight readiness. GMP achieves these aims by a modular design where the level of integration between the platform and payload is low. The modular design decomposes the satellite into three major components - the propulsion bay, the avionics bay and the payload module. Both the propulsion and avionics bays are reusable, largely unchanged, and independent of the payload configuration. Such a design means that SSTL or a 3rd party manufacturer can manufacture the payload in parallel to the platform with integration taking place quite late in the schedule. In July 2003 SSTL signed a contract for ESA's first Galileo navigation satellite known as GSTBV2/A. The satellite is based on GMP and ESA plan to launch it into a MEO orbit late in 2005. The second flight of GMP is likely to be in 2006 carrying a geostationary payload

  10. Data Collection Satellite Application in Precision Agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durào, O.

    2002-01-01

    's over Brazilian territory. There were 25 platforms when SCD-1 was launched. However this number is growing rapidly to 400 platforms, at first for measurements of water reservoir levels as well as other hydrology applications (The Brazilian Electricity Regulatory Agency - ANEEL is the customer), and for many other different applications such as meteorology, oceanography, environmental monitoring sciences, and people and animal tracking. The clear feeling is that users are discovering a satellite system whose benefits were not previously well understood when launched and being able to propose and come up with different and useful applications. A new field in the country that has a great potential to benefit from this system is agriculture. Per se, this is a very important sector of the Brazilian economy and its international trade. Combining it with space technology may justify the investment of new and low cost dedicated satellites. This paper describes a new proposal for use of the SCD-1,2,CBERS-1 satellite system for precision agriculture. New PCD's would be developed for measurements of chemical content of the soil, such as, for example, Nitrogen and others, beyond humidity and solar incidence. This can lead to a more efficient fertilization, harvesting and even the spray of chemical defensives, with the consequence of environment protection. The PCD's ground network so established, along with the information network already available, combined with the space segment of such a system may, as previously said, be able to justify the investment in low cost satellites with this sole purpose.

  11. Attitude stability of spinning satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caughey, T. K.

    1980-01-01

    Some problems of attitude stability of spinning satellites are treated in a rigorous manner. With certain restrictions, linearized stability analysis correctly predicts the attitude stability of spinning satellites, even in the critical cases of the Liapunov-Poincare stability theory.

  12. Aqua satellite orbiting the Earth

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This animation shows the Aqua satellite orbiting the Earth on August 27, 2005 by revealing MODIS true-color imagery for that day. This animation is on a cartesian map projection, so the satellite w...

  13. Removing shadows from Google Earth satellite images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jianhong; Gong, Peng; Liang, Lu

    2007-06-01

    June 2005, Google has released its geographic search tool "Google earth", a new application that combines local search with satellite images and maps from around the globe. It is designed to make every person owned a computer easily "fly" to aerial views of many locations on the planet. However, just as ordinary satellite images, there inevitably exist shadows in it, made some ground objects obscure, even unidentifiable. According to the basic thinking of Radiative Transfer Theory, this paper built a image shadow removal model, which using the Radiative Transfer Theory combined with preknowledge to compensate the lost shadow area information. The results shows: shadows in images were successfully removed and the target objects were returned to their original scenes.

  14. The optical communication link outage probability in satellite formation flying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnon, Shlomi; Gill, Eberhard

    2014-02-01

    In recent years, several space systems consisting of multiple satellites flying in close formation have been proposed for various purposes such as interferometric synthetic aperture radar measurement (TerraSAR-X and the TanDEM-X), detecting extra-solar earth-like planets (Terrestrial Planet Finder-TPF and Darwin), and demonstrating distributed space systems (DARPA F6 project). Another important purpose, which is the concern of this paper, is for improving radio frequency communication to mobile terrestrial and maritime subscribers. In this case, radio frequency signals from several satellites coherently combine such that the received/transmit signal strength is increased proportionally with the number of satellites in the formation. This increase in signal strength allows to enhance the communication data rate and/or to reduce energy consumption and the antenna size of terrestrial mobile users' equipment. However, a coherent combination of signals without aligning the phases of the individual communication signals interrupts the communication and outage link between the satellites and the user. The accuracy of the phase estimation is a function of the inter-satellite laser ranging system performance. This paper derives an outage probability model of a coherent combination communication system as a function of the pointing vibration and jitter statistics of an inter-satellite laser ranging system tool. The coherent combination probability model, which could be used to improve the communication to mobile subscribers in air, sea and ground is the main importance of this work.

  15. Towards navigation based on 120 satellites: Analyzing the new signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Grace Xingxin

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) are experiencing a new era. The US Global Positioning System (GPS) now serves over 300 million users in a bewildering breadth of applications. The Russian GLONASS is enjoying a startling renaissance based on the recovery of the Russian economy. In addition, the European Union is developing the Galileo system that promises to place 30 more satellites in medium Earth orbit. If that is not enough, China has started their Compass system project that promises a rich combination of satellites in medium and geostationary earth orbit. All of these satellites will broadcast at least three civil signals in a multiplicity of frequency bands. If all of these new satellites are launched, we will have 120 satellites and over 300 signals in space for global navigation by 2020. So far, two test satellites of the European Galileo and one satellite from the Chinese Compass have been launched. The new satellites and new signals create a great opportunity for GNSS receivers to gain more redundancy and accuracy. On the other hand, the new GNSS signals could interfere with each other since their frequency bands overlap. Moreover, when the satellites were put into orbit, the signal specifications were not available to the public. This mystery made it impossible for GNSS receivers to acquire and track the new satellites. It was also impossible to analyze the interference among GNSS satellites. Thus, there was an urgent and great need for discovering the unknown signal characteristics. The contribution of this work is to design algorithms for deciphering all the new test satellite signals from the Galileo and Compass satellite programs. We reveal the spread spectrum codes for all the signals on the prototype satellites listed above. In addition, we derive the underlying code generators based on a modification of the Berlekamp-Massey algorithm for solving systems of equations over finite fields. Several receiver companies, such as Trimble

  16. Communication Satellites, 1958-1992

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-31

    and Wireless for Asia Satellite Telecommuni- cations The satellite was launched from China, which required ap- proval from the United States Government...Communications Satellite - Westar," EASCON 󈨎 Conven- tronautica. Vol. 8, No. 3 (March 1981). tion Record (October 1974). 19. J. E. D. Ball , "The... Ball and P. Rubin, "Communication Satellites for Pub- ern Union." Paper 80-0566. AIAA 8th Communications Satel- lic Television." IEEE Transactions on

  17. Meteorological measurements from satellite platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suomi, V. E.

    1972-01-01

    Quantitative exploitation of meteorological data from geosynchronous satellites is starting to move from the laboratory to operational practice. Investigations of the data applications portion of the total meteorological satellite system include: (1) tropospheric wind shear and the related severe storm circulations; (2) kinematic properties of the tropical atmosphere as derived from cloud motion vectors; (3) application of a geostationary satellite rake system to measurements of rainfall; and (4) pointing error analysis of geosynchronous satellites.

  18. Satellite probes plasma processes in earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, Andrew B.; Reasoner, David L.

    1992-01-01

    The mission of the DOD/NASA Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) is to deepen understanding of the earth's near-space environment, including the radiation belts and the ionosphere; this will help spacecraft designers protect against radiation-belt particles that affect onboard electronics, solar panel arrays, and crewmembers. Attention is presently given to CRRES's study of ionospheric plasma processes through releases of Ba, Ca, Sr, and Li at altitudes of 400-36,000 km.

  19. Satellites Would Transmit Power By Laser Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. D.; Walker, Gilbert H.; HUMES D. H.; Kwon, J. H.

    1995-01-01

    Arrays of diode lasers concentrate power into narrow beams. Baseline design of system formulated with regard to two particular missions that differ greatly in power requirements, thus showing scalability and attributes of basic system. Satellite system features large-scale array amplifier of high efficiency, injection-locked amplifiers, coherent combination of beams, and use of advanced lithographic technology to fabricate diode lasers in array. Extremely rapid development of applicable technologies make features realizable within decade.

  20. Satellite probes plasma processes in earth orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, A.B.; Reasoner, D.L. NASA, Washington, DC )

    1992-01-01

    The mission of the DOD/NASA Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) is to deepen understanding of the earth's near-space environment, including the radiation belts and the ionosphere; this will help spacecraft designers protect against radiation-belt particles that affect onboard electronics, solar panel arrays, and crewmembers. Attention is presently given to CRRES's study of ionospheric plasma processes through releases of Ba, Ca, Sr, and Li at altitudes of 400-36,000 km. 4 refs.

  1. Nonlinear Symplectic Attitude Estimation for Small Satellites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    accuracy and constants of motion accuracy when applied to standard EKF theory for satellite attitude estimation (symplectic EKF, or SKF 𔄁 ). This...determine the source of the performance difference between the IEKF and the SF, the SF is compared to the symplectic EKF ( SKF ) in Ref 17. The SF is...contrast, the SKF combines a symplectic dynamical model with the standard EKF algorithm. Figure 4 illustrates that, given the same initial conditions

  2. Mobile satellite service for Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sward, David

    1988-05-01

    The Mobile Satellite (MSAT) system and a special program designed to provide interim mobile satellite services (IMSS) during the construction phase of MSAT are described. A mobile satellite system is a key element in extending voice and and data telecommunications to all Canadians.

  3. Mobile satellite service for Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sward, David

    1988-01-01

    The Mobile Satellite (MSAT) system and a special program designed to provide interim mobile satellite services (IMSS) during the construction phase of MSAT are described. A mobile satellite system is a key element in extending voice and and data telecommunications to all Canadians.

  4. Telelibrary: Library Services via Satellite.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Rosa

    1979-01-01

    Investigates the provision of library services via satellite, explains briefly the operation and advantages of communication satellites, and discusses the various telecommunications equipment and services which, when coupled with satellite transmission, will enhance library activities. Demand trend projections for telecommunications services…

  5. Telelibrary: Library Services via Satellite.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Rosa

    1979-01-01

    Investigates the provision of library services via satellite, explains briefly the operation and advantages of communication satellites, and discusses the various telecommunications equipment and services which, when coupled with satellite transmission, will enhance library activities. Demand trend projections for telecommunications services…

  6. Morphology of Dwarf Galaxies in Isolated Satellite Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ann, Hong Bae

    2017-08-01

    The environmental dependence of the morphology of dwarf galaxies in isolated satellite systems is analyzed to understand the origin of the dwarf galaxy morphology using the visually classified morphological types of 5836 local galaxies with z ≲ 0.01. We consider six sub-types of dwarf galaxies, dS0, dE, dE_{bc}, dSph, dE_{blue}, and dI, of which the first four sub-types are considered as early-type and the last two as late-type. The environmental parameters we consider are the projected distance from the host galaxy (r_{p}), local and global background densities, and the host morphology. The spatial distributions of dwarf satellites of early-type galaxies are much different from those of dwarf satellites of late-type galaxies, suggesting the host morphology combined with r_{p} plays a decisive role on the morphology of the dwarf satellite galaxies. The local and global background densities play no significant role on the morphology of dwarfs in the satellite systems hosted by early-type galaxies. However, in the satellite system hosted by late-type galaxies, the global background densities of dE and dSph satellites are significantly different from those of dE_{bc}, dE_{blue}, and dI satellites. The blue-cored dwarf satellites (dE_{bc}) of early-type galaxies are likely to be located at r_{p} > 0.3 Mpc to keep their cold gas from the ram pressure stripping by the hot corona of early-type galaxies. The spatial distribution of dE_{bc} satellites of early-type galaxies and their global background densities suggest that their cold gas is intergalactic material accreted before they fall into the satellite systems.

  7. An enhanced algorithm to estimate BDS satellite's differential code biases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Chuang; Fan, Lei; Li, Min; Liu, Zhizhao; Gu, Shengfeng; Zhong, Shiming; Song, Weiwei

    2016-02-01

    This paper proposes an enhanced algorithm to estimate the differential code biases (DCB) on three frequencies of the BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) satellites. By forming ionospheric observables derived from uncombined precise point positioning and geometry-free linear combination of phase-smoothed range, satellite DCBs are determined together with ionospheric delay that is modeled at each individual station. Specifically, the DCB and ionospheric delay are estimated in a weighted least-squares estimator by considering the precision of ionospheric observables, and a misclosure constraint for different types of satellite DCBs is introduced. This algorithm was tested by GNSS data collected in November and December 2013 from 29 stations of Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX) and BeiDou Experimental Tracking Stations. Results show that the proposed algorithm is able to precisely estimate BDS satellite DCBs, where the mean value of day-to-day scattering is about 0.19 ns and the RMS of the difference with respect to MGEX DCB products is about 0.24 ns. In order to make comparison, an existing algorithm based on IGG: Institute of Geodesy and Geophysics, China (IGGDCB), is also used to process the same dataset. Results show that, the DCB difference between results from the enhanced algorithm and the DCB products from Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE) and MGEX is reduced in average by 46 % for GPS satellites and 14 % for BDS satellites, when compared with DCB difference between the results of IGGDCB algorithm and the DCB products from CODE and MGEX. In addition, we find the day-to-day scattering of BDS IGSO satellites is obviously lower than that of GEO and MEO satellites, and a significant bias exists in daily DCB values of GEO satellites comparing with MGEX DCB product. This proposed algorithm also provides a new approach to estimate the satellite DCBs of multiple GNSS systems.

  8. Satellite-based terrestrial production efficiency modeling

    PubMed Central

    McCallum, Ian; Wagner, Wolfgang; Schmullius, Christiane; Shvidenko, Anatoly; Obersteiner, Michael; Fritz, Steffen; Nilsson, Sten

    2009-01-01

    Production efficiency models (PEMs) are based on the theory of light use efficiency (LUE) which states that a relatively constant relationship exists between photosynthetic carbon uptake and radiation receipt at the canopy level. Challenges remain however in the application of the PEM methodology to global net primary productivity (NPP) monitoring. The objectives of this review are as follows: 1) to describe the general functioning of six PEMs (CASA; GLO-PEM; TURC; C-Fix; MOD17; and BEAMS) identified in the literature; 2) to review each model to determine potential improvements to the general PEM methodology; 3) to review the related literature on satellite-based gross primary productivity (GPP) and NPP modeling for additional possibilities for improvement; and 4) based on this review, propose items for coordinated research. This review noted a number of possibilities for improvement to the general PEM architecture - ranging from LUE to meteorological and satellite-based inputs. Current PEMs tend to treat the globe similarly in terms of physiological and meteorological factors, often ignoring unique regional aspects. Each of the existing PEMs has developed unique methods to estimate NPP and the combination of the most successful of these could lead to improvements. It may be beneficial to develop regional PEMs that can be combined under a global framework. The results of this review suggest the creation of a hybrid PEM could bring about a significant enhancement to the PEM methodology and thus terrestrial carbon flux modeling. Key items topping the PEM research agenda identified in this review include the following: LUE should not be assumed constant, but should vary by plant functional type (PFT) or photosynthetic pathway; evidence is mounting that PEMs should consider incorporating diffuse radiation; continue to pursue relationships between satellite-derived variables and LUE, GPP and autotrophic respiration (Ra); there is an urgent need for satellite

  9. Sampling Errors in Rainfall Estimates by Multiple Satellites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    North, Gerald R.; Shen, Samuel S. P.; Upson, Robert

    1993-02-01

    This paper examines the sampling characteristics of combining data collected by several low-orbiting satellites attempting to estimate the space time average of rain rates. The several satellites can have different orbital and swath-width parameters. The satellite overpasses are allowed to make partial coverage snapshots of the grid box with each overpass. Such partial visits are considered in an approximate way, letting each intersection area fraction of the grid box by a particular satellite swath be a random variable with mean and variance parameters computed from exact orbit calculations. The derivation procedure is based upon the spectral minimum mean-square error formalism introduced by North and Nakamoto. By using a simple parametric form for the space time spectral density, simple formulas are derived for a large number of examples, including the combination of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission with an operational sun-synchronous orbiter. The approximations and results are discussed and directions for future research are summarized.

  10. Sampling errors in rainfall estimates by multiple satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    North, Gerald R.; Shen, Samuel S. P.; Upson, Robert

    1993-01-01

    This paper examines the sampling characteristics of combining data collected by several low-orbiting satellites attempting to estimate the space-time average of rain rates. The several satellites can have different orbital and swath-width parameters. The satellite overpasses are allowed to make partial coverage snapshots of the grid box with each overpass. Such partial visits are considered in an approximate way, letting each intersection area fraction of the grid box by a particular satellite swath be a random variable with mean and variance parameters computed from exact orbit calculations. The derivation procedure is based upon the spectral minimum mean-square error formalism introduced by North and Nakamoto. By using a simple parametric form for the spacetime spectral density, simple formulas are derived for a large number of examples, including the combination of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission with an operational sun-synchronous orbiter. The approximations and results are discussed and directions for future research are summarized.

  11. Teleoperator control for passivation of satellites possessing angular momentum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadkarni, A. A.

    1975-01-01

    Certain space shuttle missions may require the retrieval of passive spinning and processing satellites. One proposed means of retrieval utilizes a free-flying teleoperator launched from the shuttle. The feasibility of nulling the combined spin and precession (passivation) of a typical rigid satellite is first established using a Lagrangian formulation. It is shown that a proposed asymmetric teleoperator cannot be used for passivation in its present form because it would quickly tumble over after being spun-up to synchronize with the angular rates of the satellite. In addition, a dynamic analysis is made of the combined teleoperator-satellite system where an initial misalignment of their respective angular momentum vectors is assumed.

  12. Sampling errors in rainfall estimates by multiple satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    North, Gerald R.; Shen, Samuel S. P.; Upson, Robert

    1993-01-01

    This paper examines the sampling characteristics of combining data collected by several low-orbiting satellites attempting to estimate the space-time average of rain rates. The several satellites can have different orbital and swath-width parameters. The satellite overpasses are allowed to make partial coverage snapshots of the grid box with each overpass. Such partial visits are considered in an approximate way, letting each intersection area fraction of the grid box by a particular satellite swath be a random variable with mean and variance parameters computed from exact orbit calculations. The derivation procedure is based upon the spectral minimum mean-square error formalism introduced by North and Nakamoto. By using a simple parametric form for the spacetime spectral density, simple formulas are derived for a large number of examples, including the combination of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission with an operational sun-synchronous orbiter. The approximations and results are discussed and directions for future research are summarized.

  13. Satellite Aerodynamics and Density Determination from Satellite Dynamic Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, G. R.

    1972-01-01

    The aerodynamic drag and lift properties of a satellite are first expressed as a function of two parameters associated with gas-surface interaction at the satellite surface. The dynamic response of the satellite as it passes through the atmosphere is then expressed as a function of the two gas-surface interaction parameters, the atmospheric density, the satellite velocity, and the satellite orientation to the high speed flow. By proper correlation of the observed dynamic response with the changing angle of attack of the satellite, it is found that the two unknown gas-surface interaction parameters can be determined. Once the gas-surface interaction parameters are known, the aerodynamic properties of the satellite at all angles of attack are also determined.

  14. Model of load distribution for earth observation satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Shumin; Du, Min; Li, Wei

    2017-03-01

    For the system of multiple types of EOS (Earth Observing Satellites), it is a vital issue to assure that each type of payloads carried by the group of EOS can be used efficiently and reasonably for in astronautics fields. Currently, most of researches on configuration of satellite and payloads focus on the scheduling for launched satellites. However, the assignments of payloads for un-launched satellites are bit researched, which are the same crucial as the scheduling of tasks. Moreover, the current models of satellite resources scheduling lack of more general characteristics. Referring the idea about roles-based access control (RBAC) of information system, this paper brings forward a model based on role-mining of RBAC to improve the generality and foresight of the method of assignments of satellite-payload. By this way, the assignment of satellite-payload can be mapped onto the problem of role-mining. A novel method will be introduced, based on the idea of biclique-combination in graph theory and evolutionary algorithm in intelligence computing, to address the role-mining problem of satellite-payload assignments. The simulation experiments are performed to verify the novel method. Finally, the work of this paper is concluded.

  15. Irregular Satellites of the Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewitt, David

    2005-01-01

    This proposal is directed towards the observational exploration of the irregular satellite systems of the planets. Primarily we use large-format CCD cameras on the world's largest telescopes, on Mauna Kea, to discover new irregular satellites and then to monitor their positions in order to ascertain their orbital characteristics. Separate observations are taken to determine the physical properties of the irregular satellites. The big picture science objective is to determine how these satellites were captures, and to use the properties of the satellites and their orbits to place constraints on early solar system (including formation) processes. Work in the first year has focussed on a major investigation of the Saturn irregular satellite system. We secured observing time on the Subaru and Gemini 8-m diameter telescopes in December 2004, January, February and March 2005 for the conduct of a deep, wide-area survey. This has resulted in the detection and orbit determination for 12 new satellites to be announced in the next week or two. Additional satellites were lost, temporarily, due to unusually poor weather conditions on Mauna Kea. These objects will be recovered and their orbits published next year. A separate survey of the Uranus irregular satellites was published (Sheppard, Jewitt and Kleyna 2005). Away from the telescope, we have discovered the amazing result that the four giant planets possess similar numbers of irregular satellites. This flies in the face of the standard gas-drag model for satellite capture, since only two of the giant planets are gas giants and the others (Uranus and Neptune) formed by a different process and in the absence of much gas. The constancy of the satellite number (each giant holds approximately 100 irregular satellites measured down to the kilometer scale) is either a coincidence, with different capture mechanisms at different planets giving by chance the same total numbers of irregular satellites, or indicates that the satellites

  16. Undersea volcano production versus lithospheric strength from satellite altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tapley, B. D.; Sandwell, D. T.

    1986-01-01

    All seamount signatures apparent in the SEASAT altimeter profiles were located and digitized. In addition to locating the seamount signatures, their amplitudes were also estimated. The second phase consisted of determining what basic characteristics of a seamount can be extracted from a single vertical deflection profile. Seven seamounts that had both good bathymetric coverage and good satellite altimeter coverage were used to test a simple flexural model. A method was developed to combine satellite altimeter profiles from several different satellites to construct a detailed and accurate geoid.

  17. Quad-Tree Visual-Calculus Analysis of Satellite Coverage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, Martin W.; Hockney, George; Kwan, Bruce

    2003-01-01

    An improved method of analysis of coverage of areas of the Earth by a constellation of radio-communication or scientific-observation satellites has been developed. This method is intended to supplant an older method in which the global-coverage-analysis problem is solved from a ground-to-satellite perspective. The present method provides for rapid and efficient analysis. This method is derived from a satellite-to-ground perspective and involves a unique combination of two techniques for multiresolution representation of map features on the surface of a sphere.

  18. Satellite masses in the Uranus and Neptune systems

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, R.

    1984-10-01

    Satellite masses are derivation with emphasis on implications for bulk densities and albedos is reviewed. In the Uranian system the inner satellites have lower densities and/or higher albedos than the outer ones. However, uncertainties are great enough that all five satellites may have nearly equal densities. In such a case the albedo would decrease with semimajor axis. A more severe constraint is placed on Miranda's mass, and hence on its density and albedo. The recent radiometric value for Triton's diameter, combined with mass determinations, yields a density greater than 4 gm/cm3.

  19. The use of satellite observations in ice cover simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preller, Ruth H.; Walsh, John E.; Maslanik, James A.

    1992-01-01

    Satellites can furnish observational data on ice cover over greater areas and for longer periods than field observations; a combination of visible or IR fine-resolution satellite imagery and radar altimetry, in conjunction with coarse-resolution data from passive microwave sources, have been used to verify and validate many numerical models of ice cover. Satellite passive microwave data are especially useful in the case of large-scale models used in studies of sea ice interannual variability. A number of remotely-sensed data sources are used by the NOAA's Joint Ice Center to create a qualitative weekly analysis of ice concentrations.

  20. GEO Satellite Solar Array Abnormality's Analysis and Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junyan; Yang, Yujie; Zhu, Weibo; Liu, Jingyong; Xu, Hui

    Solar array, converting sunlight into electricity, is one of the most important components in satellite energy subsystem. It is significant for in-orbit satellite safety that solar array and its subsidiaries work normally. An abnormal phenomenon that the output current of one solar array suddenly decreased happened in a GEO satellite. Combined with the structure of the solar array system and the trends of relevant parameters during the abnormality, the paper analyzed the possible reasons, and detected the root cause, and finally provided an emergency treatment for this kind of abnormality.