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Sample records for combined oral contraception

  1. Combined oral contraceptives: acceptability and effective use.

    PubMed

    Kubba, A; Guillebaud, J

    1993-01-01

    With over 60 million users of 'the pill' worldwide, safety and efficacy remain the two most relevant issues to both the consumer and the research scientist. Safety of combined oral contraception (COC) has advanced appreciably. Lessons learned from cohort and case-control studies have been applied to the practical management of oral contraception use, based on screening, selection and regular monitoring of users. Most health risks of COCs appear to be dependent on the dose and potency (or biological impact) of the constituent steroids. While many of the non-contraceptive benefits of COCs are maintained when modern low dose preparations are used, most, if not all, of the adverse effects have been reduced progressively. Moreover the range of modern hormonal contraceptives has widened with the introduction of a new generation of 'selective' progestogens (Desogestrel, Norgestimate and Gestodene), which have minimal androgenicity. User failure of COCs is still high in many countries. The cause is a combination of poor compliance and anxiety about perceived adverse effects. Compliance can be enhanced by improving the quality of instruction in pill use. Fears of adverse effects of COCs may be allayed through education of users and providers, and sympathetic management of side effects.

  2. Combined oral contraceptives: do we know all of their effects?

    PubMed

    Hannaford, P C

    1995-06-01

    Combined oral contraceptives are undoubtedly popular. By the end of the 1980's, an estimated 63 million married women around the world were using this method of contraception. In Britain, perhaps 95% of all sexually active women have used the pill at some time before their 30th birthday. Commensurate with such widespread usage, huge amounts of money have been spent during the past 35 years investigating the health effects of this method of contraception. Since it appears that all of the potential risks and benefits have now been identified, can we divert resources from pill-related research into new areas of activity. While this proposition may be attractive to funding bodies, and other researchers competing for increasingly scarce resources, it ignores the fact that several major uncertainties remain concerning the safety of combined oral contraceptives. PMID:7554970

  3. Influence of combined oral contraceptives on the periodontal condition

    PubMed Central

    DOMINGUES, Roberta Santos; FERRAZ, Bruna Fidêncio Rahal; GREGHI, Sebastião Luiz Aguiar; de REZENDE, Maria Lúcia Rubo; PASSANEZI, Euloir; SANT'ANA, Adriana Campos Passanezi

    2012-01-01

    Most studies investigating the impact of oral contraceptives have been performed some years ago, when the level of sexual hormones was greater than the actual formulations. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of current combined oral contraceptives (COC) on periodontal tissues, correlating the clinical parameters examined with the total duration of continuous oral contraceptive intake. Material and methods Twenty-five women (19-35 years old) taking combined oral contraceptives for at least 1 year were included in the test group. The control group was composed by 25 patients at the same age range reporting no use of hormone-based contraceptive methods. Clinical parameters investigated included pocket probing depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), sulcular bleeding index (SBI) and plaque index (Pl.I). Data were statistically evaluated by unpaired t test, Pearson's correlation test and Spearman's correlation test. Results The test group showed increased PD (2.228±0.011 x 2.154±0.012; p<0.0001) and SBI (0.229±0.006 x 0.148±0.005, p<0.0001) than controls. No significant differences between groups were found in CAL (0.435±0.01 x 0.412±0.01; p=0.11). The control group showed greater Pl.I than the test group (0.206±0.007 x 0.303±0.008; p<0.0001). No correlation between the duration of oral contraceptive intake, age and periodontal parameters was observed. Conclusions These findings suggest that the use of currently available combined oral contraceptives can influence the periodontal conditions of the patients, independently of the level of plaque accumulation or total duration of medication intake, resulting in increased gingival inflammation. PMID:22666846

  4. [Oral contraception].

    PubMed

    Guillat, J C

    1980-04-20

    OC (oral contraception) includes the combined and sequential methods, postcoital and progestin only contraception, mini pills, and macro pills. The mechanism of action of OC modifies the hypothalamo-hypophysary secretion, the uterine mucosa, and the cervical mucus. Effectiveness of OC is nearly 100%; prescription of OC requires a complete clinical and biological evaluation of the patient. Contraindications to OC are any form of cancer, hypertension, vascular or thrombotic antecedents, obesity, tabagism, diabetes. OC users must be checked at least every 6 months, and treatment can last, if there are no evident signs of side effects, until about age 40. The most commonly known side effects of OC are menstruation disorders, cardio- and cerebrovascular effects, hepatic and metabolic effects; there is no evidence that OC can cause carcinogenic effects, but it can increase teratogenic risk. The association of OC with such drugs as Rifampicine, anticonvulsants and/or tranquillizers, can nullify contraceptive effectiveness. PMID:6900393

  5. Headache induced by the use of combined oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Allais, Gianni; Gabellari, Ilaria Castagnoli; Airola, Gisella; Borgogno, Paola; Schiapparelli, Paola; Benedetto, Chiara

    2009-05-01

    Although combined oral contraceptives (COCs) are a safe and highly effective method of birth control, they may also give rise to problems of clinical tolerability in migraine patients. Indeed, headache is among the most common side effects reported with the use of COCs, frequently leading to their being discontinued. The latest International Classification of Headache Disorders identified at least two entities evidently related to the use of COCs, i.e., exogenous hormone-induced headache and estrogen-withdrawal headache. As to the former, the newest formulations of COCs are generally well tolerated by migraine without aura patients, but can worsen headache in migraine with aura patients. Headache associated with COCs, generally, tends to improve as their use continues. However, although it is not yet clear if there is an association between headache and the composition of COCs (both in the type and amount of hormones), it has been observed that the incidence of headache during COC use seems greater if migraine is associated with menstrual trigger. The estrogen-withdrawal headache is a headache that generally appears within the first 5 days after cessation of estrogen use and resolves within 3 days, even if in some cases it may appear on the sixth or seventh day after pill suspension and lasts more than 3 days.

  6. Oral Contraceptives and Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... oral contraceptives are available in the United States today? How could oral contraceptives influence cancer risk? How ... oral contraceptives are available in the United States today? Two types of oral contraceptives (birth control pills) ...

  7. Oral contraceptives and dysmenorrhea.

    PubMed

    Cholst, I N; Carlon, A T

    1987-01-01

    This artical examines the risks and benefits associated with use of the oral contraceptive pill (OCP) by adolescents and the various alternatives and methods of prescribing OCPs. Any adolescent who is either sexually active or contemplating sexual activity should be offered a contraceptive method that is appropriate to her individual needs. The contraceptive needs to be highly effective, safe and within the means and desires of the adolescent. For the majority of teenagers, the contraceptive of choice will be the OCP. The IUD should almost never be prescribed to the adolescent. Most OCPs marketed today are combination pills containing both an estrogen and a progestin in each pill. A variety of contraceptive actions combines to create a contraceptive method that is 99.3-99.9% effective. OCPs provide some protection against the development of pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). Oral contraceptives also decrease the incidence of anemia by decreasing the amount and duration of menstrual flow. Ovarian cysts do not form in the ovaries of the OCP user. On the other hand, a serious risk of the use of OCPs is the increased danger of thromboembolic events including deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolus, and myocardial infarction. The increased risk of myocardial infarction in OCP users is additive with other risk factors including hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, cigarette smoking, obesity, diabetes mellitus, and age. OCP use seems to provide some protection against development of endometrial or ovarian cancer. Oral contraceptives are associated with the development of benign hepatocellular adenomas. A variety of metabolic and hormonal alterations also occur in pill users. Most appropriate for the adolescent is a formulation containing a low dose of estrogen because of the decreased risk of thromboembolic complications. Dysmenorrhea effects more than 1/2 of female adolescents, and can best be treated with ibuprofen.

  8. New contraceptive eligibility checklists for provision of combined oral contraceptives and depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate in community-based programmes.

    PubMed Central

    Stang, A.; Schwingl, P.; Rivera, R.

    2000-01-01

    Community-based services (CBS) have long used checklists to determine eligibility for contraceptive method use, in particular for combined oral contraceptives (COCs) and the 3-month injectable contraceptive depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA). As safety information changes, however, checklists can quickly become outdated. Inconsistent checklists and eligibility criteria often cause uneven access to contraceptives. In 1996, WHO produced updated eligibility criteria for the use of all contraceptive methods. Based on these criteria, new checklists for COCs and DMPA were developed. This article describes the new checklists and their development. Several rounds of expert review produced checklists that were correct, comprehensible and consistent with the eligibility requirements. Nevertheless, field-testing of the checklists revealed that approximately half (48%) of the respondents felt that one or more questions still needed greater comprehensibility. These findings indicated the need for a checklist guide. In March 2000, WHO convened a meeting of experts to review the medical eligibility criteria for contraceptive use. The article reflects also the resulting updated checklist. PMID:10994285

  9. [DVT and combined oral contraceptives: update of the pluridisciplinary CNGOF-FNCGM-GEHT-SFMV group].

    PubMed

    Chabbert-Buffet, N; Guigues, B; Trillot, N; Biron, C; Morange, P; Pernod, G; Scheffler, M; Brugere, S; Hedon, B

    2013-06-01

    Thrombotic risk among combined oral contraceptives (COC) users has recently been debated following a court action initiated by a patient. Recent epidemiological data, as well as accumulating biological data underlying these data, have led French Health authorities to modify COC prescription and reimbursement modalities. A short synthesis is proposed by a multidisciplinary group of experts from four French societies (CGOF, FNCGM, GHT, and SFMV).

  10. Oral Contraceptive Pill and PCOS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Gynecology Medical Conditions Nutrition & Fitness Emotional Health PCOS: The Oral Contraceptive Pill Posted under Health Guides . ... of oral contraceptive pills for young women with PCOS? Regular and Lighter Periods: Oral contraceptive pills can ...

  11. History of oral contraception.

    PubMed

    Dhont, Marc

    2010-12-01

    On the 50th birthday of the pill, it is appropriate to recall the milestones which have led to its development and evolution during the last five decades. The main contraceptive effect of the pill being inhibition of ovulation, it may be called a small miracle that this drug was developed long before the complex regulation of ovulation and the menstrual cycle was elucidated. Another stumbling block on its way was the hostile climate with regard to contraception that prevailed at the time. Animal experiments on the effect of sex steroids on ovulation, and the synthesis of sex steroids and orally active analogues were the necessary preliminaries. We owe the development of oral contraceptives to a handful of persons: two determined feminists, Margaret Sanger and Katherine McCormick; a biologist, Gregory Pincus; and a gynaecologist, John Rock. Soon after the introduction of the first pills, some nasty and life-threatening side effects emerged, which were due to the high doses of sex steroids. This led to the development of new preparations with reduced oestrogen content, progestins with more specific action, and alternative administration routes. Almost every decade we have witnessed a breakthrough in oral contraception. Social and moral objections to birth control have gradually disappeared and, notwithstanding some pill scares, oral contraceptives are now one of the most used methods of contraception. Finally, all's well that ends well: recent reports have substantiated the multiple noncontraceptive health benefits paving the way for a bright future for this 50-year-old product. PMID:21091163

  12. History of oral contraception.

    PubMed

    Dhont, Marc

    2010-12-01

    On the 50th birthday of the pill, it is appropriate to recall the milestones which have led to its development and evolution during the last five decades. The main contraceptive effect of the pill being inhibition of ovulation, it may be called a small miracle that this drug was developed long before the complex regulation of ovulation and the menstrual cycle was elucidated. Another stumbling block on its way was the hostile climate with regard to contraception that prevailed at the time. Animal experiments on the effect of sex steroids on ovulation, and the synthesis of sex steroids and orally active analogues were the necessary preliminaries. We owe the development of oral contraceptives to a handful of persons: two determined feminists, Margaret Sanger and Katherine McCormick; a biologist, Gregory Pincus; and a gynaecologist, John Rock. Soon after the introduction of the first pills, some nasty and life-threatening side effects emerged, which were due to the high doses of sex steroids. This led to the development of new preparations with reduced oestrogen content, progestins with more specific action, and alternative administration routes. Almost every decade we have witnessed a breakthrough in oral contraception. Social and moral objections to birth control have gradually disappeared and, notwithstanding some pill scares, oral contraceptives are now one of the most used methods of contraception. Finally, all's well that ends well: recent reports have substantiated the multiple noncontraceptive health benefits paving the way for a bright future for this 50-year-old product.

  13. Extended regimen combined oral contraception: A review of evolving concepts and acceptance by women and clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Nappi, Rossella E.; Kaunitz, Andrew M.; Bitzer, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: The clinical utility of extended regimen combined oral contraceptives (COCs) is increasingly being recognised. Our objective was to understand the attitudes of women and clinicians about the use of these regimens. We present the rationale for extended regimen COCs from a historical perspective, and trace their evolution and growing popularity in light of their clinical benefits. We conclude by offering potential strategies for counselling women about extended regimen COC options. Methods: We conducted a MEDLINE search to identify and summarise studies of extended regimen COCs, focusing on attitudes of women and clinicians regarding efficacy, safety/tolerability and fewer scheduled bleeding episodes and other potential benefits. Results: The body of contemporary literature on extended regimen COCs suggests that their contraceptive efficacy is comparable to that of conventional 28-day (i.e., 21/7) regimens. For women seeking contraception that allows infrequent scheduled bleeding episodes, particularly those who suffer from hormone withdrawal symptoms and cyclical symptoms (e.g., headache, mood changes, dysmenorrhoea, heavy menstrual bleeding), extended regimen COCs are an effective and safe option. Although satisfaction with extended regimen COCs in clinical trials is high, misperceptions about continuous hormone use may still limit the widespread acceptance of this approach. Conclusions: Despite the widespread acceptance among clinicians of extended regimen COCs as an effective and safe contraceptive option, these regimens are underused, likely due to a lack of awareness about their availability and utility among women. Improved patient education and counselling regarding the safety and benefits of extended regimen COCs may help women make more informed contraceptive choices. PMID:26572318

  14. Cancers in Australia in 2010 attributable to and prevented by the use of combined oral contraceptives

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Susan J; Wilson, Louise F; Nagle, Christina M; Green, Adele C; Olsen, Catherine M; Bain, Christopher J; Pandeya, Nirmala; Whiteman, David C; Webb, Penelope M

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the proportion and number of cancers occurring in Australia in 2010 attributable to combined oral contraceptive pill (OCP) use. Methods We estimated the population attributable fraction (PAF) for cancers causally associated with combined OCP use (breast, cervix), and the proportion of endometrial and ovarian cancers prevented (prevented fraction [PF]). We used standard formulae incorporating prevalence of combined OCP use in the Australian population, relative risks of cancer associated with this exposure and cancer incidence. Results An estimated 105 breast and 52 cervical cancers (0.7% and 6.4% of each cancer, respectively) in Australia in 2010 were attributable to current use of combined OCP. Past combined OCP use was estimated to have prevented 1,032 endometrial and 308 ovarian cancers in 2010, reducing the number of cancers that would otherwise have occurred by 31% and 19%, respectively. Conclusions A small proportion of breast and cervical cancers is attributable to combined OCP use; OCP use is likely to have prevented larger numbers of endometrial and ovarian cancers. Implications Women seeking contraceptive advice should be told of potential adverse effects, but should also be told that – along with reproductive health benefits – combined OCP use can reduce long-term risks of ovarian and endometrial cancers. PMID:26437729

  15. Cardiovascular risk and combined oral contraceptives: clinical decisions in settings of uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Beller, Jennifer P; McCartney, Christopher R

    2013-01-01

    Although generally safe, combined oral contraceptives (COCs) are associated with risks, including an estimated 2-fold increased relative risk of cardiovascular events. For most women taking COCs for contraception, absolute cardiovascular risks are very low, and the overall risks of COCs are outweighed by the risks of unwanted pregnancy. Nonetheless, risks of COCs may be excessive in some women, and both the American College of Obstetricians (ACOG) and the World Health Organization (WHO) have offered contraindications for COC use. Complicating this issue, COCs are commonly used for reasons other than contraception (eg, polycystic ovary syndrome, which is associated with subfertility and cardiovascular risk factors). Thus, in some clinical scenarios, ACOG and WHO guidelines may offer incomplete guidance regarding whether COC use would be associated with an unacceptable risk-benefit ratio. We propose that cardiovascular risk calculators may be helpful in some patients, as an adjunct to ACOG and WHO guidelines, by allowing physicians to estimate the attributable risk of COC-related cardiovascular events.

  16. Knowledge and attitudes of Latin American gynecologists regarding unplanned pregnancy and use of combined oral contraceptives

    PubMed Central

    Bahamondes, Luis; Lira-Plascencia, Josefina; Martin, Ricardo; Marin, Victor; Makuch, Maria Y

    2015-01-01

    Background Unintended pregnancy is a public health problem and unmet medical need worldwide. It is estimated that in the year 2012, almost 213 million pregnancies occurred, and the global pregnancy rate decreased only slightly from 2008 to 2012. It was also estimated that 85 million pregnancies (40% of all pregnancies) were unintended and that 38% ended in an unintended birth. Objectives To assess knowledge and attitudes of Latin American (LA) obstetricians and gynecologists (OBGYNs) regarding unintended pregnancies and aspects of combined oral contraceptive (COC) use. Methods A survey was conducted during a scientific meeting about contraception in 2014, in which OBGYNs from 12 LA countries who provide attention in contraception were invited to respond to a multiple-choice questionnaire to assess their knowledge and attitudes regarding unplanned pregnancy and some aspects regarding COC use. Results A total of 210 OBGYNs participated in the study. Their knowledge regarding COC failure was low. The participants reported they believed that their patients habitually forgot to take a pill and that their patients did not know what to do in these situations. They were aware of the benefits of COC use; however, they were less prone to prescribe COCs for the purpose of protecting against ovarian and endometrial cancer, and one-quarter of them had doubts about the association between COC use and cancer risk. Conclusion The interviewed LA OBGYNs showed some flaws in terms of knowledge of COC failure rates and the non-contraceptive benefits and risks of COCs. To adequately counsel their patients regarding COC intake, OBGYNs must be updated regarding all aspects of COC use. PMID:25999766

  17. A combined oral contraceptive affects mucosal SHIV susceptibility factors in a pigtail macaque model

    PubMed Central

    Ostergaard, Sharon Dietz; Butler, Katherine; Ritter, Jana M.; Johnson, Ryan; Sanders, Jeanine; Powell, Nathaniel; Lathrop, George; Zaki, Sherif R.; McNicholl, Janet M.; Kersh, Ellen N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Injectable hormonal contraception may increase women’s risk of HIV acquisition, and can affect biological risk factors in animal models of HIV. We established, for the first time, a model to investigate whether combined oral contraceptives (COC) alter SHIV susceptibility in macaques. Methods Seven pigtail macaques were administered a monophasic levonorgestrel (LNG)/ethinyl estradiol (EE) COC at 33% or 66% of the human dose for 60 days. Menstrual cycling, vaginal epithelial thickness and other SHIV susceptibility factors were monitored for a mean of 18 weeks. Results Mean vaginal epithelial thicknesses was 290.8 μm at baseline and 186.2 μm during COC (p=0.0141, Mann Whitney test). Vaginal pH decreased from 8.5 during to 6.5 post- treatment (0.0176 two-tailed t-test). Measured microflora was unchanged. Conclusions COC caused thinning of the vaginal epithelium and vaginal pH changes, which may increase SHIV susceptibility. 0.033 mg LNG + 0.0066 mg EE appeared effective in suppressing ovulation. PMID:25536296

  18. [Gynecological use of a phlebokinetic drug with special reference to its combination with oral contraceptives].

    PubMed

    Cazzola, D

    1975-09-30

    Controlled experiments confirmed the therapeutic usefulness in gynecology of a phlebokinetic drug, in which EPL (polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholine) was combined with escine and rutine. The drug is particularly recommended for the prophylaxis and treatment of vein disorders caused by oral contraceptives. A total of 75 patients were treated with the drug (Essaven), in addition to the usual treatment (such as anticoagulants), while 75 controls received the usual treatment only. Results were excellent in cases of varicose veins, where the symptoms were eliminated in almost all cases. In cases of phlebitis and thrombophlebitis, the response was less univocal, but a definite improvement was evident in a good number of cases treated with Essaven; the drug also favored the return to normal conditions after thrombophlebitis attacks, reducing the duration of their painful aftereffects. The drug can be used daily for very long periods without side effects. It can also be used safely during pregnancy, without adverse effects on the fetus and on delivery. It is regarded as ideal to avoid the side effects of contraceptives on the venous system.

  19. A randomized double-blind trial of two low dose combined oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Bounds, W; Vessey, M; Wiggins, P

    1979-04-01

    Fifty-five women using Loestrin-20 (20 microgram ethinyl oestradiol and 1 mg norethisterone acetate) as an oral contraceptive have been compared with a like number using Microgynon-30 (30 microgram ethinyl oestradiol and 150 microgram levonorgestrel) in a randomized, double-blind trial. Despite the small sample size, the main finding in the trial is clear-cut; Loestrin-20 provides poor cycle control and is thus less acceptable as an oral contraceptive than Microgynon-30. Although there is also a suggestion that Loestrin-20 may be less effective than Microgynon-30, the difference in the accidental pregnancy rates is not statistically significant.

  20. Evaluation of the coagulation profile among oral and vaginal combined hormonal contraceptive users using sonoclot coagulation analyzer.

    PubMed

    Brandy, Kyle R; Meyer, Rachel M; Luo, Xianghua; Rao, Gundu H; Datta, Yvonne H; Divani, Afshin A

    2012-11-01

    Combined hormonal contraceptives possess an inherent risk of thrombus-related events. The purpose of this study is to elucidate alterations in the coagulation profile among young women using combined oral contraceptive (COC) or combined vaginal contraceptive (CVC) compared to a normal, healthy, female control group using the Sonoclot coagulation analyzer. We enrolled 159 participants (64 control individuals, 51 COC users, and 44 CVC users). Each participant completed a survey of medical history, family medical history, and lifestyle choices. Citrated venous whole blood was collected and analyzed using the Sonoclot coagulation analyzer. After adjusting for age, race, alcohol consumption, sleeping habits, and family history of cardiovascular disease, and stroke, we observed COC and CVC users had mostly similar coagulation profiles except when compared to the control, and COC and CVC users had an elevated glass bead peak signal while COC users had a shorter peak time.

  1. Lack of Pharmacokinetic Interactions Between Macitentan and a Combined Oral Contraceptive in Healthy Female Subjects.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Noémie; Pellek, Matthias; Dingemanse, Jasper; Sidharta, Patricia N

    2016-06-01

    Macitentan, a dual endothelin receptor antagonist used in pulmonary arterial hypertension, induces cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A at supratherapeutic concentrations in vitro. Most combined oral hormonal contraceptives (OCs) are CYP3A substrates and their efficacy can be affected by CYP3A inducers. This randomized crossover study assessed possible pharmacokinetic (PK) interactions between macitentan and an OC containing ethinyl estradiol and norethindrone (or norethisterone). Twenty-six healthy women received a single oral dose of OC alone (reference) and concomitantly with 10 mg macitentan at steady state (test). No PK interaction was concluded if the 90% confidence intervals (CIs) of geometric mean ratios (GMRs; test/reference) of the peak plasma concentration (Cmax ) and the exposure from 0 to infinity (AUC0 - ∞ ) to the OC components were within the equivalence limits of 0.8 to 1.25. Cmax and AUC0-∞ of the OC were within the equivalence limits. For ethinyl estradiol, GMRs (90%CIs) of Cmax and AUC0-∞ were 0.92 (0.85-0.99) and 0.95 (0.90-0.99). For norethindrone, these values were 1.02 (0.95-1.09) and 1.04 (0.98-1.09), respectively. Overall, study treatments were well tolerated. No major changes from baseline in safety parameters were reported in either treatment. Macitentan does not affect the PK of OCs.

  2. Estrogen and Progestin (Oral Contraceptives)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of serious side effects from oral contraceptives, including heart attacks, blood clots, and strokes. This risk is higher for women over 35 years of age and heavy smokers (15 or more cigarettes per day). If you take oral contraceptives, you should not smoke.

  3. Efficacy and safety of combined ethinyl estradiol/drospirenone oral contraceptives in the treatment of acne

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Jerry KL; Ediriweera, Chemanthi

    2010-01-01

    Acne is a common disorder affecting the majority of adolescents and often extends into adulthood. The central pathophysiological feature of acne is increased androgenic stimulation and/or end-organ sensitivity of pilosebaceous units leading to sebum hypersecretion and infundibular hyperkeratinization. These events lead to Propionibacterium acnes proliferation and subsequent inflammation. Hormonal therapy, including combined oral contraceptives (OCs), can attenuate the proximate androgenic trigger of this sequence. For many women, hormonal therapy is a rational option for acne treatment as it may be useful across the spectrum of severity. Drospirenone (DRSP) is a unique progestin structurally related to spironolactone with progestogenic, antimineralocorticoid, and antiandrogenic properties. It is available in 2 combined OC preparations (30 μg EE/3 mg DRSP; Yasmin® in a 21/7 regimen; and 20 μg EE/3 mg DRSP; Yaz® in a 24/4 regimen). These preparations are bereft of the fluid retentional side effects typical of other progestins and their safety has been demonstrated in large epidemiological studies in which no increased risk of vascular thromboembolic disease or arrhythmias was observed. In acne, the efficacy of DRSP-containing OCs has been shown in placebo-controlled superiority trials and in active-comparator non-inferiority trials. PMID:21072290

  4. Effects of combination oral contraceptives on strength development in women athletes.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Andrew W; Hetzler, Ronald K; Villanueva, Richard J; Stickley, Christopher D; Kimura, Iris F

    2008-09-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of combination oral contraceptive agents (OCAs) on strength and torque production in collegiate women softball and water polo athletes who participated in a 12-week strength development program. A double-blind research design was used to mask subjects to the main outcome of interest. Thirty-one women collegiate softball and water polo players were divided into experimental (OCA users, n = 13), and control (non-OCA users, n = 18) groups. All subjects participated in the same supervised 12-week preseason strength development program. One-repetition maximum bench press (1RMBP), 10-repetition maximum leg extension (10RMLE), isokinetic peak torque bench press (IKBP), and isokinetic peak torque leg extension (IKLE) data were collected at weeks 0 (pre-test), 4, 8, and 12 (post-test). Significant increases in strength and torque production over time were identified regardless of group for 1RMBP, 10RMLE, and IKLE. No significant differences in IKBP torque production occurred during the 12-week strength training program. No significant differences in 1RMBP, 10RMLE, IKBP, or IKLE occurred between the OCA users and the non-OCA users groups. It was concluded that, within the limitations of the study, the use of combination OCAs did not provide sufficient androgenic effect to increase strength gains beyond the stimulus of the training protocol.

  5. Pharmacokinetic interaction study between riociguat and the combined oral contraceptives levonorgestrel and ethinylestradiol in healthy postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Unger, Sigrun; van der Mey, Dorina; Becker, Corina; Saleh, Soundos; Wensing, Georg; Mück, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Female patients requiring treatment for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) are advised to avoid pregnancy because of the high associated mortality rate. Oral contraception is one of the main methods of preventing pregnancy in this context, mandating pharmacokinetic and safety studies for new agents in this setting. Riociguat is a soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator approved for treatment of PAH and inoperable and persistent or recurrent chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. This single-center, randomized, nonblinded study involving healthy postmenopausal women investigated the effect of riociguat on plasma concentrations of levonorgestrel (0.15 mg) and ethinylestradiol (0.03 mg) in a combined oral contraceptive. Treatment A was a single oral tablet of levonorgestrel-ethinylestradiol. In treatment B, subjects received 2.5 mg riociguat 3 times daily for 12 days. On the eighth day, they also received a single oral tablet of levonorgestrel-ethinylestradiol. Subjects received both regimens in a crossover design. There was no change in area under the plasma concentration–time curves of levonorgestrel or ethinylestradiol or maximum concentration in plasma (Cmax) of levonorgestrel during combined administration versus levonorgestrel-ethinylestradiol alone. A 20% increase in the Cmax of ethinylestradiol was noted during coadministration; this is not anticipated to adversely impact the contraceptive efficacy or to require any dose adjustment for ethinylestradiol. Plasma concentrations and exposures of riociguat were within the expected range and were not influenced by coadministration with levonorgestrel-ethinylestradiol. Combined treatment was safe and well tolerated. In conclusion, riociguat did not change the exposure to levonorgestrel or ethinylestradiol relative to oral contraceptive administered alone. PMID:27162633

  6. Pharmacokinetic interaction study between riociguat and the combined oral contraceptives levonorgestrel and ethinylestradiol in healthy postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Frey, Reiner; Unger, Sigrun; van der Mey, Dorina; Becker, Corina; Saleh, Soundos; Wensing, Georg; Mück, Wolfgang

    2016-03-01

    Female patients requiring treatment for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) are advised to avoid pregnancy because of the high associated mortality rate. Oral contraception is one of the main methods of preventing pregnancy in this context, mandating pharmacokinetic and safety studies for new agents in this setting. Riociguat is a soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator approved for treatment of PAH and inoperable and persistent or recurrent chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. This single-center, randomized, nonblinded study involving healthy postmenopausal women investigated the effect of riociguat on plasma concentrations of levonorgestrel (0.15 mg) and ethinylestradiol (0.03 mg) in a combined oral contraceptive. Treatment A was a single oral tablet of levonorgestrel-ethinylestradiol. In treatment B, subjects received 2.5 mg riociguat 3 times daily for 12 days. On the eighth day, they also received a single oral tablet of levonorgestrel-ethinylestradiol. Subjects received both regimens in a crossover design. There was no change in area under the plasma concentration-time curves of levonorgestrel or ethinylestradiol or maximum concentration in plasma (C max) of levonorgestrel during combined administration versus levonorgestrel-ethinylestradiol alone. A 20% increase in the C max of ethinylestradiol was noted during coadministration; this is not anticipated to adversely impact the contraceptive efficacy or to require any dose adjustment for ethinylestradiol. Plasma concentrations and exposures of riociguat were within the expected range and were not influenced by coadministration with levonorgestrel-ethinylestradiol. Combined treatment was safe and well tolerated. In conclusion, riociguat did not change the exposure to levonorgestrel or ethinylestradiol relative to oral contraceptive administered alone.

  7. The combined oral contraceptive pill and the assumed 28-day cycle.

    PubMed

    Dowse, M St Leger; Gunby, A; Moncad, R; Fife, C; Smerdon, G; Bryson, P

    2007-07-01

    Some studies involving women taking the combined oral contraceptive pill (COCP) have on occasion assumed the COCP group to have a rigid 28-day pharmaceutically driven cycle. Anecdotal evidence suggests otherwise, with many women adjusting their COCP usage to alter the time between break-through bleeds for sporting and social reasons. A prospective field study involving 533 scuba diving females allowed all menstrual cycle lengths (COCP and non-COCP) to be observed for up to three consecutive years (St Leger Dowse et al. 2006). A total of 29% of women were COCP users who reported 3,241 cycles. Of these cycles, only 42% had a rigid 28-day cycle, with the remainder varying in length from 21 to 60 days. When performing studies involving the menstrual cycle, it should not be assumed that COCP users have a rigid confirmed 28-day cycle and careful consideration should be given to data collection and analysis. The effects of differing data interpretations are shown.

  8. Clinical Trial of a Combination of Lynestrenol and Mestranol (Lyndiol) as an Oral Contraceptive Agent

    PubMed Central

    Rice-Wray, Edris; Becerra, Carmen; Esquivel, Julio; Maqueo, Manuel

    1966-01-01

    Contraception with lynestrenol-mestranol (Lyndiol) was studied in 332 Mexican women during a period of two and one-half years. Side effects were minimal or transient. No pregnancies occurred in those who took the medication according to instructions. The women were followed with yearly pelvic examinations and Papanicolaou smears, serial endometrial biopsies and extensive studies of blood, liver and glandular function. Complete ophthalmological studies were done on 30 patients. No clinical or laboratory evidence of harmful effects could be demonstrated. Return to ovulation (using pregnanediol excretion and endometrial biopsies as parameters) occurred in all of 22 women studied in the first three post-treatment cycles. Eight posttreatment pregnancies and the resulting offspring were normal. The first post-treatment cycle, as with other oral contraceptives, was unpredictable and tended to be prolonged. It varied in length from 22 to 60 days. ImagesFig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:5332557

  9. Use of Simulated Patients to Evaluate Combined Oral Contraceptive Dispensing Practices of Community Pharmacists

    PubMed Central

    Obreli-Neto, Paulo Roque; Pereira, Leonardo Régis Leira; Guidoni, Camilo Molino; Baldoni, André de Oliveira; Marusic, Srecko; de Lyra-Júnior, Divaldo Pereira; de Almeida, Kelsen Luis; Pazete, Ana Claudia Montolezi; do Nascimento, Janaina Dutra; Kos, Mitja; Girotto, Edmarlon; Cuman, Roberto Kenji Nakamura

    2013-01-01

    Background Combined oral contraceptive (COC) use is the most commonly used reversible method of birth control. The incorrect use of COCs is frequent and one of the most common causes of unintended pregnancies. Community pharmacists (CPs) are in a strategic position to improve COC use because they are the last health professional to interact with patients before drug use. Objective To evaluate the COC dispensing practices of CPs in a developing country. Method A cross-sectional study was conducted in community pharmacies of Assis and Ourinhos microregions, Brazil, between June 1, 2012, and October 30, 2012. Four simulated patients (SPs) (with counseled audio recording) visited community pharmacies with a prescription for Ciclo 21® (a COC containing ethinyl estradiol 30 mcg + levonorgestrel 15 mcg). The audio recording of every SP visit was listened to independently by 3 researchers to evaluate the COC dispensing practice. The percentage of CPs who performed a screening for safe use of COCs (i.e., taking of patients’ medical and family history, and measuring of blood pressure) and provided counseling, as well as the quality of the screening and counseling, were evaluated. Results Of the 185 CPs contacted, 41 (22.2%) agreed to participate in the study and finished the study protocol. Only 3 CPs asked the SP a question (1 question asked by each professional), and all of the questions were closed-ended, viz., “do you smoke?” (n = 2) and “what is your age?” (n = 1). None of the CPs measured the patient’s blood pressure. Six CPs provided counseling when dispensing COCs (drug dosing, 5 CPs; possible adverse effects, 2 CPs), and one CP provided counseling regarding both aspects. Conclusion The CPs evaluated did not dispense COC appropriately and could influence in the occurrence of negatives therapeutic outcomes such as adverse effects and treatment failure. PMID:24324584

  10. The Combined Influence of Oral Contraceptives and Human Papillomavirus Virus on Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Efird, Jimmy T.; Toland, Amanda E.; Lea, C. Suzanne; Phillips, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    The vast majority of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC) will occur in those with fair complexion, tendency to burn, and high ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure. Organ transplant recipients also are an important population at great risk for CSCC. An association has been reported between oral contraceptive (OC) use, human papillomavirus virus (HPV) and cervical cancer, and there could be a similar association for CSCC. The cutaneous HPV β-E6 protein, a close cousin of the transformative E6 protein underlying anogenital cancers, has been shown to inhibit apoptosis in response to UVR damage and stimulate morphologic transformation in rodent fibroblast cell lines. Furthermore, OC use has been shown to enhance HPV transcription and may contribute to CSCC risk through this pathway. PMID:21499554

  11. Oral contraceptives in polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Helvaci, N; Yildiz, B O

    2014-09-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine disorder of women of reproductive age and combined oral contraceptives (OCs) are often the first-line treatment of the syndrome by improving hyperandrogenism and regulating menstrual cycles. Oral contraceptives have some cardiovascular and metabolic effects that varies among different formulations depending upon the dose and type of the both estrogen and progestin components. These cardiometabolic effects of OCs raise some concerns about their long-term use in PCOS, but available data suggest that the benefits outweigh the risks. More studies are needed to clarify the safety of long-term use of OCs in PCOS.

  12. The future of oral contraceptives: research priorities.

    PubMed

    Spitzer, W O

    1996-04-01

    The author believes that currently-marketed oral contraceptives are among the most safe and effective methods of fertility control. The data on oral contraceptives and myocardial infarction are consistent with a protective, death-sparing role for third-generation oral contraceptives. Moreover, the benefit-risk profile of second-generation pills is evaluated and approved by national and international regulatory bodies. Researchers, however, should still keep working to try to provide women with the best possible contraceptive methods. Specifically, the search for safer oral contraceptives should continue, clinical research should address unanswered questions about better oral contraceptive fits for women with distinctive clinical requirements, more research is needed into the benefits of oral contraceptive use, epidemiologists and biostatisticians must develop and improve methods which permit disentangling the effect from bias in observational research, and World Health Organization and Transnational European Project data on oral contraceptives and myocardial infarction need to be meta-analyzed.

  13. Progestin-Only Oral Contraceptives

    MedlinePlus

    ... on another day, use a backup method of birth control (such as a condom and/or a spermicide) for the next 48 hours. If you have had a miscarriage or an abortion, you can start taking progestin-only oral contraceptives ...

  14. The metabolic impact of oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Krauss, R M; Burkman, R T

    1992-10-01

    The hormonal components of oral contraceptives exert major effects on plasma lipoprotein metabolism. Estrogens may increase production of plasma triglycerides, leading to increased levels of very low-density lipoproteins, but they may also reduce levels of cholesterol-enriched and potentially atherogenic intermediate- and low-density lipoproteins. Furthermore, estrogens increase levels of high-density lipoproteins (HDLs), particularly the HDL2 subspecies, an effect linked to reduced mortality rates from cardiovascular disease in postmenopausal women receiving hormone replacement therapy. All combination oral contraceptives in use in the United States tend to raise levels of plasma triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein, and HDL3 to varying degrees. In contrast, changes in HDL and HDL2 reflect the combined effects of estrogen dose and relative androgenicity of the progestin component. Although in general, the lipoprotein changes are greater in magnitude with higher dose oral contraceptive preparations, they can be significant in lower dose preparations as well. Oral contraceptives also affect carbohydrate metabolism, primarily through the activity of progestin. Studies have demonstrated insulin resistance, rises in plasma insulin, and relative glucose intolerance by means of curve analysis of glucose tolerance tests. These effects are far less pronounced with lower dose preparations and with formulations using the newer progestins.

  15. Human cervical mucus. V. Oral contraceptives and mucus rheologic properties.

    PubMed

    Wolf, D P; Blasco, L; Khan, M A; Litt, M

    1979-08-01

    Mucus viscoelasticity on individual samples obtained from patients using combination oral contraceptives was quantitated by microrheometry. These results, in conjunction with mucus chemical characterization, indicate that combination oral contraceptive use eliminates the cyclic variations in mucus chemical, physicochemical, and rheologic properties associated with the ovulatory menstrual cycle. A correlation was demonstrated between the mucus elastic modulus and mucus nondialyzable dry weight, and the mucins produced during oral contraceptive therapy were shown to be similar to those recovered from ovulatory donors. Differences in mucus properties were noted when donors using estrogenic contraceptives were contrasted with those using androgenic contraceptives. On the basis of established relationships between sperm penetrability and mucus solids content, it was concluded that the use of contraceptives, as examined in this study, provided a secondary degree of fertility control at the cervical level.

  16. Cardiovascular risk in Egyptian healthy consumers of different types of combined oral contraceptives pills: A comparative study.

    PubMed

    El-Haggar, Sahar M; Mostafa, Tarek M

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the associated cardiovascular risk in Egyptian healthy consumers of different types of combined oral contraceptives pills (COCPs) via determination of lipids profiles, Castelli index I, leptin, adiponectin, and resistin concentrations as cardiovascular risk factors. In this cross-sectional study, the study groups consisted of control group that represented by 30 healthy married women who were not on any contraceptive mean or any hormonal therapy and had normal menstrual cycles, group two consisted of 30 women who were users of Levonorgesterl 0.15 mg plus Ethinylestradiol 0.03 mg as 21 days cycle, group three consisted of 30 women who were users of Gestodene 0.075 mg plus Ethinylestradiol 0.03 mg as 21 days cycle, and group four consisted of 30 women who were users of Drospirenone 3 mg plus Ethinylestradiol 0.03 mg as 21 days cycle. One-way analysis of variance followed by LSD post hoc test was used for comparison of variables. P value <0.05 was considered to be significant. The comparison of the studied groups revealed that COCPs containing levonorgestrel plus ethinylestradiol resulted in significantly lower adiponectin level, and significantly higher leptin and resistin levels with more atherogenic lipid profile presented by significantly higher LDL-C, significantly lower HDL-C concentrations, and significantly higher atherogenic index. Formulation containing ethinylestradiol combined with gestodene neither altered adipose tissue function nor showed deleterious effect on lipid panel. Formulation containing ethinylestradiol combined with drospirenone resulted in significantly higher HDL-C and adiponectin concentrations. In conclusion, the uptake of COCPs containing levonorgestrel plus ethinylestradiol is associated with high cardiovascular risk since this formulation showed significantly lower adiponectin concentration, significantly higher leptin, resistin, and atherogenic index as compared to other studied groups. By contrast, the

  17. Cardiovascular risk in Egyptian healthy consumers of different types of combined oral contraceptives pills: A comparative study.

    PubMed

    El-Haggar, Sahar M; Mostafa, Tarek M

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the associated cardiovascular risk in Egyptian healthy consumers of different types of combined oral contraceptives pills (COCPs) via determination of lipids profiles, Castelli index I, leptin, adiponectin, and resistin concentrations as cardiovascular risk factors. In this cross-sectional study, the study groups consisted of control group that represented by 30 healthy married women who were not on any contraceptive mean or any hormonal therapy and had normal menstrual cycles, group two consisted of 30 women who were users of Levonorgesterl 0.15 mg plus Ethinylestradiol 0.03 mg as 21 days cycle, group three consisted of 30 women who were users of Gestodene 0.075 mg plus Ethinylestradiol 0.03 mg as 21 days cycle, and group four consisted of 30 women who were users of Drospirenone 3 mg plus Ethinylestradiol 0.03 mg as 21 days cycle. One-way analysis of variance followed by LSD post hoc test was used for comparison of variables. P value <0.05 was considered to be significant. The comparison of the studied groups revealed that COCPs containing levonorgestrel plus ethinylestradiol resulted in significantly lower adiponectin level, and significantly higher leptin and resistin levels with more atherogenic lipid profile presented by significantly higher LDL-C, significantly lower HDL-C concentrations, and significantly higher atherogenic index. Formulation containing ethinylestradiol combined with gestodene neither altered adipose tissue function nor showed deleterious effect on lipid panel. Formulation containing ethinylestradiol combined with drospirenone resulted in significantly higher HDL-C and adiponectin concentrations. In conclusion, the uptake of COCPs containing levonorgestrel plus ethinylestradiol is associated with high cardiovascular risk since this formulation showed significantly lower adiponectin concentration, significantly higher leptin, resistin, and atherogenic index as compared to other studied groups. By contrast, the

  18. Risk factors for venous thromboembolism in women under combined oral contraceptive. The PILl Genetic RIsk Monitoring (PILGRIM) Study.

    PubMed

    Suchon, Pierre; Al Frouh, Fadi; Henneuse, Agathe; Ibrahim, Manal; Brunet, Dominique; Barthet, Marie-Christine; Aillaud, Marie-Françoise; Venton, Geoffroy; Alessi, Marie-Christine; Trégouët, David-Alexandre; Morange, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Identifying women at risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a major public health issue. The objective of this study was to identify environmental and genetic determinants of VTE risk in a large sample of women under combined oral contraceptives (COC). A total of 968 women who had had one event of VTE during COC use were compared to 874 women under COC but with no personal history of VTE. Clinical data were collected and a systematic thrombophilia screening was performed together with ABO blood group assessment. After adjusting for age, family history, and type and duration of COC use, main environmental determinants of VTE were smoking (odds ratio [OR] =1.65, 95% confidence interval [1.30-2.10]) and a body mass index higher than 35 kg.m⁻² (OR=3.46 [1.81-7.03]). In addition, severe inherited thrombophilia (OR=2.13 [1.32-3.51]) and non-O blood groups (OR=1.98 [1.57-2.49]) were strong genetic risk factors for VTE. Family history poorly predicted thrombophilia as its prevalence was similar in patients with or without first degree family history of VTE (29.3% vs 23.9%, p=0.09). In conclusion, this study confirms the influence of smoking and obesity and shows for the first time the impact of ABO blood group on the risk of VTE in women under COC. It also confirms the inaccuracy of the family history of VTE to detect inherited thrombophilia.

  19. Efficacy of Acupuncture versus Combined Oral Contraceptive Pill in Treatment of Moderate-to-Severe Dysmenorrhea: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sriprasert, Intira; Suerungruang, Suparerk; Athilarp, Porntip; Matanasarawoot, Anuchart; Teekachunhatean, Supanimit

    2015-01-01

    This open-label randomized controlled trial was designed to compare the efficacy of acupuncture and combined oral contraceptive (COC) pill in treating moderate-to-severe primary dysmenorrhea. Fifty-two participants were randomly assigned to receive either acupuncture (n = 27) or COC (n = 25) for three menstrual cycles. Mefenamic acid was prescribed as a recue analgesic drug with both groups. The statistical approach used for efficacy and safety assessments was intention-to-treat analysis. By the end of the study, both treatments had resulted in significant improvement over baselines in all outcomes, that is, maximal dysmenorrhea pain scores, days suffering from dysmenorrhea, amount of rescue analgesic used, and quality of life assessed by SF-36 questionnaire. Over the three treatment cycles, COC caused greater reduction in maximal pain scores than acupuncture, while improvements in the remaining outcomes were comparable. Responders were defined as participants whose maximal dysmenorrhea pain scores decreased at least 33% below their baseline. Response rates following both interventions at the end of the study were not statistically different. Acupuncture commonly caused minimal local side effects but did not cause any hormone-related side effects as did COC. In conclusion, acupuncture is an alternative option for relieving dysmenorrhea, especially when COC is not a favorable choice. PMID:26346199

  20. The effect of combination oral contraceptives on smoking-related symptomatology during short-term smoking abstinence.

    PubMed

    Hinderaker, Katie; Allen, Alicia M; Tosun, Nicole; al'Absi, Mustafa; Hatsukami, Dorothy; Allen, Sharon S

    2015-02-01

    Although an estimated 25% of premenopausal smokers report using oral contraceptives (OC), little is known about how OC use may influence smoking cessation. The purpose of this study was to examine the difference in smoking-related symptomatology during acute smoking abstinence between women on a standardized combination OC (Tri-Sprintec(™)) compared to women not on OCs (no-OC). Participants were women aged 18-40 who smoked ≥5 cigarettes/day and reported regular menstrual cycles. Using a controlled cross-over design, participants completed two six-day testing weeks: Low Progesterone Week (LPW; Follicular (F) phase in no-OC or 1st week of pills in OC) and High Progesterone Week (HPW; Luteal (L) phase in no-OC or 3rd week of pills in OC). Each testing week included daily assessment of symptomatology and biochemical confirmation of smoking status. During smoking abstinence, the OC group (n=14) reported significantly lower levels of positive affect (21.56±7.12 vs. 24.57±6.46; β=3.63, p=0.0323) than the no-OC group (n=28). Further significant interactions between group and testing week were observed as follows: Smoking satisfaction was higher during LPW in the OC group (LPW: 4.29±1.30 vs. HPW: 4.10±1.37) but higher during HPW in the no-OC group (LPW: 3.91±1.30 vs. HPW: 4.23±1.30; β=-0.5499, p<0.0001). Similar interactions were noted in negative affect and psychological reward of smoking. These results suggest that women on OCs may have different patterns of smoking-related symptomatology during short-term smoking abstinence as compared to women not on OCs. Additional work is needed to examine how this may affect smoking cessation efforts.

  1. The effect of combination oral contraceptives on smoking-related symptomatology during short-term smoking abstinence.

    PubMed

    Hinderaker, Katie; Allen, Alicia M; Tosun, Nicole; al'Absi, Mustafa; Hatsukami, Dorothy; Allen, Sharon S

    2015-02-01

    Although an estimated 25% of premenopausal smokers report using oral contraceptives (OC), little is known about how OC use may influence smoking cessation. The purpose of this study was to examine the difference in smoking-related symptomatology during acute smoking abstinence between women on a standardized combination OC (Tri-Sprintec(™)) compared to women not on OCs (no-OC). Participants were women aged 18-40 who smoked ≥5 cigarettes/day and reported regular menstrual cycles. Using a controlled cross-over design, participants completed two six-day testing weeks: Low Progesterone Week (LPW; Follicular (F) phase in no-OC or 1st week of pills in OC) and High Progesterone Week (HPW; Luteal (L) phase in no-OC or 3rd week of pills in OC). Each testing week included daily assessment of symptomatology and biochemical confirmation of smoking status. During smoking abstinence, the OC group (n=14) reported significantly lower levels of positive affect (21.56±7.12 vs. 24.57±6.46; β=3.63, p=0.0323) than the no-OC group (n=28). Further significant interactions between group and testing week were observed as follows: Smoking satisfaction was higher during LPW in the OC group (LPW: 4.29±1.30 vs. HPW: 4.10±1.37) but higher during HPW in the no-OC group (LPW: 3.91±1.30 vs. HPW: 4.23±1.30; β=-0.5499, p<0.0001). Similar interactions were noted in negative affect and psychological reward of smoking. These results suggest that women on OCs may have different patterns of smoking-related symptomatology during short-term smoking abstinence as compared to women not on OCs. Additional work is needed to examine how this may affect smoking cessation efforts. PMID:25452059

  2. Association of Combined Tobacco Smoking and Oral Contraceptive Use With Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia 2 or 3 in Korean Women

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Hea Young; Kim, Mi Kyung; Seo, Sang-Soo; Lee, Jae-Kwan

    2016-01-01

    Background Cigarette smoking and oral contraceptive (OC) use have been associated with cervical neoplasia, and the combination of smoking and OC use could influence cervical carcinogenesis. We aimed to assess the joint effect of smoking and OC use on the risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). Methods From a cohort of human papillomavirus-positive subjects recruited from 6 hospitals in Korea from March 2006 to November 2012, a total of 678 subjects (411 control, 133 CIN 1, and 134 CIN 2 or 3 cases) were selected for this study (mean age, 43 years). The risk of CIN associated with smoking and OC use on additive and multiplicative scales was estimated via multinomial logistic regression after adjustment for potential confounding factors. The relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI) and the synergy index (S) were used to evaluate the additive interaction. Results OC users (odds ratio [OR] 1.98; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.07–3.69) and long-term OC use (≥20 months; OR 2.71; 95% CI, 1.11–6.59) had a higher risk of CIN 2/3, but had no association with CIN 1, compared to non-OC users. Smokers and heavy smoking (≥8 cigarettes/day) were not associated with any CIN grade. Combined smoking and OC use (OR 4.91; 95% CI, 1.68–14.4; RERI/S, 3.77/27.4; P for multiplicative interaction = 0.003) and combined heavy smoking and long-term OC use (OR 11.5; 95% CI, 1.88–70.4; RERI/S, 9.93/18.8; P for multiplicative interaction = 0.009) had a higher risk of CIN 2/3 but had no association with CIN 1 compared to combined non-smoking and non-OC use. Conclusions OC use and smoking acted synergistically to increase the risk of CIN 2 or 3 in Korean women. PMID:26441210

  3. Alternatives to oral regimens of contraception.

    PubMed

    Simon, M; Shulman, L P

    2007-06-01

    Alternatives to oral contraceptives are an integral part of contraception used worldwide. In order to empower women to correctly use contraception for as long as they choose not to become pregnant, healthcare practitioners and their patients must be educated about these methods as well as the full spectrum of available birth control options. Effective counseling is a key factor in helping a woman effectively chose a method that is appropriate for her. In order for contraceptive counseling to be effective, information should be accurate and provided in an unbiased manner. This review will help provide healthcare practitioners with current information regarding the use of nonoral contraceptives so as to facilitate the counseling of women and allow them to make informed and appropriate contraceptive decisions.

  4. [Selected aspects of oral contraception side effects].

    PubMed

    Wolski, Hubert

    2014-12-01

    The first hormonal pill was approved in the 60s of the twentieth century Since that time, oral contraception has been used worldwide by dozens of women due to its high availability as well as relative ease and safety of taking. The main side effects of oral contraception include elevated risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE). Estrogens increase the probability of VTE development, depending on the dose in medication, and third-generation progestins increase the risk of VTE development more than older-generation progestins. Also, the coexistence of hereditary thrombophilia increases the risk of VTE development in women using oral contraceptives. Other side effects include changes in the carbohydrate and lipid economy Progestins in oral contraceptives decrease HDL cholesterol levels but increase LDL cholesterol and total cholesterol levels. Additionally estrogens are a recognized mitogenic factor for the epithelium of the mammary gland, acting proliferative on the glandular tissue and in the same way influence on the increased risk of breast cancer development. Patients sometimes complain about some subjective side symptoms such as headache, mood changes, nausea, back pain, breast pain and swelling, as well as decreased libido. Some patients discontinue oral contraception due to fear of side effects or temporary ailments before con- sulting their doctor what may result in unintended pregnancy The aim of the following paper was to present most frequent side effects of oral contraception, ways of their moni- toring and diagnosis. PMID:25669065

  5. Comparison of efficacy of metformin and oral contraceptive combination of ethinyl estradiol and drospirenone in polycystic ovary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Suvarna, Yashasvi; Maity, Nivedita; Kalra, Pramila; Shivamurthy, MC

    2016-01-01

    Objective The 2013 Endocrine Society guidelines state that hormonal contraceptives should be used for treating both menstrual irregularity and hirsutism in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Metformin should be reserved for the treatment of women presenting with only menstrual irregularity because it has limited benefits in treating hyperandrogenism associated with PCOS. A high prevalence of insulin resistance is noted among the South Asians, and these guidelines may not hold good for this population. Thus, this study was conducted to investigate and compare the effects of metformin and an oral contraceptive containing drospirenone on menstrual pattern, body mass index, serum testosterone levels, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) levels at baseline to 6 months of therapy in the treatment groups. Material and Methods This was a prospective observational study that was conducted over a year in patients visiting the Endocrinology outpatient department at a tertiary care center in a south Indian city. Forty-six subjects diagnosed with PCOS as per the Rotterdam criteria were included. They received either metformin twice daily or an oral contraceptive containing drospirenone once daily as a monthly regimen for 6 months. Results Metformin regularized menstrual cycles in 72% of patients who were followed up at 6 months. No significant difference was observed between the two treatment groups with respect to decreasing the body mass index, serum testosterone levels, and DHEAS levels (p=0.40, p=0.65, and p=0.22, respectively). Conclusion Metformin is effective in regularizing menstrual cycles, decreasing body mass index, and treating hyperandrogenism in Indian women diagnosed with PCOS. PMID:27026772

  6. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic drug interactions between antiretrovirals and oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Tittle, Victoria; Bull, Lauren; Boffito, Marta; Nwokolo, Nneka

    2015-01-01

    More than 50 % of women living with HIV in low- and middle-income countries are of reproductive age, but there are limitations to the administration of oral contraception for HIV-infected women receiving antiretroviral therapy due to drug-drug interactions caused by metabolism via the cytochrome P450 isoenzymes and glucuronidation. However, with the development of newer antiretrovirals that use alternative metabolic pathways, options for contraception in HIV-positive women are increasing. This paper aims to review the literature on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of oral hormonal contraceptives when given with antiretroviral agents, including those currently used in developed countries, older ones that might still be used in salvage regimens, or those used in resource-limited settings, as well as newer drugs. Nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), the usual backbone to most combined antiretroviral treatments (cARTs) are characterised by a low potential for drug-drug interactions with oral contraceptives. On the other hand non-NRTIs (NNRTIs) and protease inhibitors (PIs) may interact with oral contraceptives. Of the NNRTIs, efavirenz and nevirapine have been demonstrated to cause drug-drug interactions; however, etravirine and rilpivirine appear safe to use without dose adjustment. PIs boosted with ritonavir are not recommended to be used with oral contraceptives, with the exception of boosted atazanavir which should be used with doses of at least 35 µg of estrogen. Maraviroc, an entry inhibitor, is safe for co-administration with oral contraceptives, as are the integrase inhibitors (INIs) raltegravir and dolutegravir. However, the INI elvitegravir, which is given in combination with cobicistat, requires a dose of estrogen of at least 30 µg. Despite the growing evidence in this field, data are still lacking in terms of large cohort studies, randomised trials and correlations to real clinical outcomes, such as pregnancy rates, in women

  7. Oral contraceptives and birth defects.

    PubMed

    Smithells, R W

    1981-06-01

    Although OCs (oral contraceptives) are not designed to be taken during pregnancy, in Europe and the U.S. they are taken by 2-5% of women in early pregnancy and by 1/4-1/3 of women 3-4 months prior to conception. The effects of OCs on folic acid and other vitamin metabolism are well known and provide a theoretical basis for possible teratogenicity, even when stopped prior to conception. Both hormone support therapy for threatened abortions and hormonal pregnancy tests have been abandoned in recent years, the first because it proved inefficacious, the second because there are better alternatives available. In neither of these cases were sex hormones shown to be teratogenic. Most cohort (prospective) and many case-control (retrospective) studies have shown no association between OC use and birth defects. Case-control methodology can be criticized because of recall bias and because of the difficulty of choosing entirely matched controls. Several studies have shown OC users to have characteristics slightly different from the general population, e.g., they are younger, more often unmarried, and are more likely to smoke during pregnancy. Any of these characteristics might influence the occurrence of teratogenicity. It is impossible to prove that OCs constitute a low-level teratogen. The author considers them nonteratogenic.

  8. Depo medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) and combined oral contraceptives and cervical carcinoma in-situ in women aged 50 years and under.

    PubMed

    Hoyo, C; Cousins, D S; Bisgrove, E Z; Gaines, M M; Schwingl, P J; Fortney, J A

    2004-12-01

    Most low-resource settings depend on hormonal contraceptives for their family planning programmes and cervical cancer occurs in higher frequency in these populations. To determine whether hormonal contraception use increases cervical carcinoma in-situ (CIS) risk, a case-control study was conducted in the Kingston and St Andrew Corporate area of Jamaica, using 119 cases from the Jamaica Tumour Registry and 304 population controls matched on year of Papanicolaou (Pap) smear and clinic where Pap smear was obtained. While CIS cases were more likely to have 'ever used' combined oral contraceptives (COC) (OR = 1.4, 95% CI: 0.8, 2.5), depo-medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) use was similar. Compared to women who never used hormonal contraceptives, the risk of CIS was elevated in: women who had used COCs five years or more (OR = 2.1, 95% CI: 1.0, 4.6), women who first used COC for less than 10 years prior to the interview (OR = 1.8, 95% CI: 0.9, 3.7) and women who were 18 to 24 years old when they first used COCs (OR = 1.8, 95% CI: 0.9, 3.4). Similarly, compared to women who never used DMPA, the risk of CIS was elevated in: women using DMPA five years or more (OR = 1.9, 95% CI: 0.7, 4.8), women reporting use within a year prior to interview (OR = 2.8, 95% CI: 0.7, 10.7) and women who initiated use of DMPA when they were 20 and 24 years old (OR = 1.4, 95% CI: 0.7, 3.1). These results suggest that if hormonal contraceptive use confers any risk of CIS, it is confined to long-term users. Increased risk in some groups, however, warrant further study. PMID:15816269

  9. Depo medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) and combined oral contraceptives and cervical carcinoma in-situ in women aged 50 years and under.

    PubMed

    Hoyo, C; Cousins, D S; Bisgrove, E Z; Gaines, M M; Schwingl, P J; Fortney, J A

    2004-12-01

    Most low-resource settings depend on hormonal contraceptives for their family planning programmes and cervical cancer occurs in higher frequency in these populations. To determine whether hormonal contraception use increases cervical carcinoma in-situ (CIS) risk, a case-control study was conducted in the Kingston and St Andrew Corporate area of Jamaica, using 119 cases from the Jamaica Tumour Registry and 304 population controls matched on year of Papanicolaou (Pap) smear and clinic where Pap smear was obtained. While CIS cases were more likely to have 'ever used' combined oral contraceptives (COC) (OR = 1.4, 95% CI: 0.8, 2.5), depo-medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) use was similar. Compared to women who never used hormonal contraceptives, the risk of CIS was elevated in: women who had used COCs five years or more (OR = 2.1, 95% CI: 1.0, 4.6), women who first used COC for less than 10 years prior to the interview (OR = 1.8, 95% CI: 0.9, 3.7) and women who were 18 to 24 years old when they first used COCs (OR = 1.8, 95% CI: 0.9, 3.4). Similarly, compared to women who never used DMPA, the risk of CIS was elevated in: women using DMPA five years or more (OR = 1.9, 95% CI: 0.7, 4.8), women reporting use within a year prior to interview (OR = 2.8, 95% CI: 0.7, 10.7) and women who initiated use of DMPA when they were 20 and 24 years old (OR = 1.4, 95% CI: 0.7, 3.1). These results suggest that if hormonal contraceptive use confers any risk of CIS, it is confined to long-term users. Increased risk in some groups, however, warrant further study.

  10. The effect of combined oral contraception on testosterone levels in healthy women: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Y.; Eijkemans, M.J.C.; Coelingh Bennink, H.J.T.; Blankenstein, M.A.; Fauser, B.C.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Combined oral contraceptives (COCs) reduce levels of androgen, especially testosterone (T), by inhibiting ovarian and adrenal androgen synthesis and by increasing levels of sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG). Although this suppressive effect has been investigated by numerous studies over many years, to our knowledge no systematic review concerning this issue had been performed. This systematic review and meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the effect of COCs on concentrations of total T, free T and SHBG in healthy women and to evaluate differences between the various types of COCs (e.g. estrogen dose, type of progestin) and the assays used to assess total T and free T. METHODS A review of the literature was performed using database searches (MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Central Register of Clinical Trials) and all publications (from inception date until July 2012) investigating the effect of COCs on androgen levels in healthy women were considered eligible for selection. Three reviewers were involved in study selection, data extraction and critical appraisal. For the meta-analysis, data on total T, free T and SHBG were extracted and combined using random effects analysis. Additional subgroup analyses were performed to evaluate differences between the various types of COCs (e.g. estrogen dose, type of progestin) and the assays used to assess total T or free T. RESULTS A total of 151 records were identified by systematic review and 42 studies with a total of 1495 healthy young women (age range: 18–40 years) were included in the meta-analysis. All included studies were experimental studies and 21 were non-comparative. Pooling of the results derived from all the included papers showed that total T levels significantly decreased during COC use [mean difference (MD) (95% confidence interval, CI) −0.49 nmol/l (−0.55, −0.42); P < 0.001]. Significantly lower levels of free T were also found [relative change (95% CI) 0.39 (0.35, 0.43); P < 0

  11. The influence of oral contraceptives on the metabolism of methaqualone in man.

    PubMed

    Oram, M; Wilson, K; Burnett, D

    1982-09-01

    1 Oral contraceptives were shown to suppress the mid-cycle increase in methaqualone metabolism observed in premenopausal women not receiving oral contraceptive therapy. No women were identified in whom this suppression was not observed. 2 Combined oestrogen-progestogen contraceptives produced the effect in all nine women studied. The effect was also observed in one woman who was receiving progestogen-only contraceptives. 3 The effect of the combined contraceptives was observed within one month of the commencement of the contraceptive therapy. 4 The results emphasise the need to monitor the effect of the menstrual cycle in women not receiving oral contraceptive therapy when the effects of such therapy is studied. 5 These effects are more likely to be the consequence of an inhibition of hormonal control of hepatic metabolic activity by the synthetic steroids than they are to simple inhibition of hepatic metabolism.

  12. An Oral Contraceptive Drug Interaction Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradstreet, Thomas E.; Panebianco, Deborah L.

    2004-01-01

    This article focuses on a two treatment, two period, two treatment sequence crossover drug interaction study of a new drug and a standard oral contraceptive therapy. Both normal theory and distribution-free statistical analyses are provided along with a notable amount of graphical insight into the dataset. For one of the variables, the decision on…

  13. Oral contraceptives and the prothrombin time.

    PubMed

    Pangrazzi, J; Roncaglioni, M C; Donati, M B

    1980-02-01

    Dr. De Teresa and others reported that mean prothrombin time ratio of 12 patients on long-term anticoagulation with warfarin was significantly higher when they were also taking oral contraceptives (OCs). A study of prothrombin complex activity was recently conducted in female rats treated with an estrogen-progestogen combination (lynestrenol 5 mg; mestranol 0.3 mg/kg body weight) which resulted in a 100% infertility in this species. After 1 treatment for only 1 estral cycle, OC-treated rats had a significantly longer Normotest clotting time (37.7+ or-0.5 sec) than control rats (31.0+or-0.4); the difference was even more notable after 10 cycles. Although this finding has not been reported in women on OCs, it may be that the estrogen-induced "lability" of the prothrombin complex occurs in humans only in special conditions, such as anticoagulation. Alternatively, liver dysfunction occurring among women on OCs may be responsible for reduced metabolism of warfarin, contributing to the effectiveness of the anticoagulation. Further pharmacology studies should be done to clarify the interaction between OCs and oral anticoagulants.

  14. Oral contraceptives in the etiology of isolated hypospadias.

    PubMed

    Källén, B; Mastroiacovo, P; Lancaster, P A; Mutchinick, O; Kringelbach, M; Martínez-Frías, M L; Robert, E; Castilla, E E

    1991-08-01

    With the objective of identifying whether hypospadias in infants is associated with maternal use of oral contraceptives before pregnancy or in early pregnancy, 846 case-control pairs were collected from eight different malformation monitoring programs around the world and mothers were interviewed using structured questionnaires administered after the birth of the infants. There was no difference in the preconceptional use of oral contraceptives between cases and controls, neither with respect to the number of years of oral contraceptive usage nor the time between stopping oral contraceptives and the present pregnancy. To this material was added data on oral contraceptive usage in early pregnancy from two other sources: an ongoing case-control study in Spain (725 infants with hypospadias) and a population-based study in Sweden (631 infants with hypospadias). There was no statistically significant difference in oral contraceptive exposure in early pregnancy between cases and controls. There is no demonstrable association between oral contraceptive use and infant hypospadias.

  15. [Current trends in the development of oral contraception].

    PubMed

    Korkhov, V V

    1985-01-01

    After a brief review of worldwide trends in the development and application of oral contraceptives (OCs), some of the results obtained in the laboratory of the Institute of Obstetrics and Gynecology in Leningrad, USSR, are presented. Experimental and clinical studies of modified synthetic steroids resulted in the development of Mezigepron, an original preparation that combines a strong contraceptive effect with a therapeutic action on certain gynecological disorders. Analysis of gestagenic and contraceptive properties of new progesterone derivatives revealed some highly active gestagenic agents, e.g., mepregenol diacetate. The Laboratory is studying the biological activity of 8-isoestradiol and other modified analogs of steroidal estrogens. These synthetic estrogens show a strong contraceptive effect with no significant uterotropic action. Such properties are important to the development of OCs which are free of any side effects. A new research program is studying the pharmacological properties of some synthetic analogs of luliberin. It is shown that short amino acid sequences produce a paradoxical antifertile effect which can be used for the development of new contraceptives. The biological activity of approximately 20 plant preparations was also studied. The greatest contraceptive activity was found in a combination of triterpenic glycosides.

  16. Low dose oestrogen combined oral contraception and risk of pulmonary embolism, stroke, and myocardial infarction in five million French women: cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Dalichampt, Marie; Raguideau, Fanny; Ricordeau, Philippe; Blotière, Pierre-Olivier; Rudant, Jérémie; Alla, François; Zureik, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the risk of pulmonary embolism, ischaemic stroke, and myocardial infarction associated with combined oral contraceptives according to dose of oestrogen (ethinylestradiol) and progestogen. Design Observational cohort study. Setting Data from the French national health insurance database linked with data from the French national hospital discharge database. Participants 4 945 088 women aged 15-49 years, living in France, with at least one reimbursement for oral contraceptives and no previous hospital admission for cancer, pulmonary embolism, ischaemic stroke, or myocardial infarction, between July 2010 and September 2012. Main outcome measures Relative and absolute risks of first pulmonary embolism, ischaemic stroke, and myocardial infarction. Results The cohort generated 5 443 916 women years of oral contraceptive use, and 3253 events were observed: 1800 pulmonary embolisms (33 per 100 000 women years), 1046 ischaemic strokes (19 per 100 000 women years), and 407 myocardial infarctions (7 per 100 000 women years). After adjustment for progestogen and risk factors, the relative risks for women using low dose oestrogen (20 µg v 30-40 µg) were 0.75 (95% confidence interval 0.67 to 0.85) for pulmonary embolism, 0.82 (0.70 to 0.96) for ischaemic stroke, and 0.56 (0.39 to 0.79) for myocardial infarction. After adjustment for oestrogen dose and risk factors, desogestrel and gestodene were associated with statistically significantly higher relative risks for pulmonary embolism (2.16, 1.93 to 2.41 and 1.63, 1.34 to 1.97, respectively) compared with levonorgestrel. Levonorgestrel combined with 20 µg oestrogen was associated with a statistically significantly lower risk than levonorgestrel with 30-40 µg oestrogen for each of the three serious adverse events. Conclusions For the same dose of oestrogen, desogestrel and gestodene were associated with statistically significantly higher risks of pulmonary embolism but not arterial

  17. [Individualization of low-dose oral contraceptives. Pharmacological principles and practical indications for oral contraceptives].

    PubMed

    Cianci, A; De Leo, V

    2007-08-01

    water retention, weight gain and arterial hypertension often associated with oral contraceptive use. Recent comparative studies recorded weight loss that stabilized after 6 months of treatment with drospirenone/EE. Overweight women may therefore benefit from the formulation with 20 microg EE, whereas the formulation with at least 30 microg EE should be more appropriate for underweight women. Women with slight to moderate acne, the formulation with 30 microg EE has been found to be as effective as 2 mg cyproterone acetate combined with 35 micrig EE (Diane). Menstrual cycle characteristics, however, remain the main factor determining the choice of formulation. Randomised control studies comparing the new formulation with others containing second or third generation progesterones have found similar efficacy in cycle control and incidence of spotting. From this point of view, it is not advisable to prescribe more than 30 microg EE (Yasmin or Yasminelle) for women with normal menstrual cycles, whereas in cases of hypomenorrhea and/or amenorrhea at least this dose of EE plus drospirenone may be used. Women with hypermenorrhea run the risk of spotting if an inappropriate drug is chosen. A solution is to use 30 microg EE/drospirenone from day 5 of the cycle. To control so-called minor side-effects, the dose of EE must be appropriate. In women with premenstrual tension a dose of at least 30 microg EE associated with drospirenone reduces or even prevents symptoms. On the other hand, in cases of chronic headache or headache as a side-effect of oral contraceptive use, a lower dose of estrogen is beneficial, and doses below 20 microg may be used. Although the progesterone component is not considered to affect headache, good results have been obtained with drospirenone, the antimineralcorticoid effects of which reduce blood pressure and improve symptoms. Formulations with 20 microg EE and drospirenone are particularly indicated in women with pre-existing mastodynia, fibrocystic

  18. Comparison of Rates of and Charges from Pregnancy Complications in Users of Extended and Cyclic Combined Oral Contraceptive (COC) Regimens: A Brief Report

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Brandon; Trussell, James; Grubb, ElizaBeth; Lage, Maureen J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Evaluate pregnancy complication rates and related charges in users of 84/7, 21/7, and 24/4 combined oral contraceptives (COCs). Study Design Data were obtained from the i3 InVision Data Mart™ retrospective claims database. Subjects were aged 15–40 years; first prescribed a COC between 1/1/2006 and 4/1/2011; and continuously insured for ≥1 year. 84/7 users were matched 1:1 to 21/7 and 24/4 users. Results Pregnancy-related complication rates and associated charges were significantly lower with 84/7 vs. 21/7 and 24/4 regimens. Conclusion Preliminary data suggest 84/7 regimens may be associated with fewer pregnancy complications and lower related charges. PMID:24457060

  19. Combined administration of low-dose gossypol acetic acid with desogestrel/mini-dose ethinylestradiol/testosterone undecanoate as an oral contraceptive for men.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhan-Jun; Ye, Wei-San; Cui, Guang-Hui; Guo, Yan; Xue, She-Pu

    2004-09-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of a new regimen of low-dose gossypol acetic acid (GA) combined with desogestrel/ethinylestradiol and testosterone undecanoate (DSG/E/TU) as a male contraceptive, adult male rats were fed orally with GA (12.5 mg/kg/day) and DSG (0.125 mg/kg)/E (0.025 mg/kg)/TU (100 mg/kg) daily for 8 weeks as loading dose until infertility, and a similar low dose of GA alone for infertility maintenance. Control animals were administered a single low dose of GA (12.5 mg/kg/day) or DSG (0.125 mg/kg)/E (0.025 mg/kg)/TU (100 mg/kg), and vehicle, respectively. Results demonstrated that the combined dosage regimen could damage epididymal sperm motility and density, and induce infertility within 8 weeks in rats; the infertility could be consistently sustained by giving single GA (12.5 mg/kg/day), and was reversible in about 8 weeks following withdrawal of gossypol. The regimen rendered treated male rats with spermiation failure within a period of 6-20 weeks of treatment. Also, the serum luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone and testicular interstitial fluid testosterone levels showed a transient decrease at the end of 6 or 8 weeks, which returned to control levels after 8 weeks of recovery phase. No hypokalemia or other adverse effects in viscera were observed. These results provide a promising approach to using the new regimen for the development of an effective and reversible oral male contraceptive. PMID:15325889

  20. [Emergency oral contraception policy: the Peruvian experience].

    PubMed

    Pretell-Zárate, Eduardo A

    2013-07-01

    Emergency oral contraception is part of the sexual and reproductive rights of women. In 2001, this health policy was incorporated into the Rules of the National Family Planning Program of the Ministry of Health, primarily to prevent unwanted pregnancy and its serious consequences, induced abortion and the high associated maternal mortality rate, which are major public health problems. Scientific research has confirmed that the main mechanism of action of levonorgestrel, component of emergency oral contraception (EOC) is to inhibit or delay ovulation, preventing fertilization of the egg; additionally, it increases the thickening of the cervical mucus, making the sperm migration more difficult. No study has found endometrial abnormalities that may interfere with the implantation of the fertilized egg or embryo development of an implanted egg. However, despite the support of medical science and legal backing, the EOC is available only to users with economic resources, but its use has not been fully implemented in public sector services, due to obstacles created by groups opposed to contraception under claim of an alleged abortive effect that has already been ruled out scientifically. This article describes the administrative experience and legal confrontations between groups of power that prevent the proper implementation of an emergency contraception policy in Peru.

  1. Effect of Oral and Vaginal Hormonal Contraceptives on Inflammatory Blood Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Divani, Afshin A.; Luo, Xianghua; Datta, Yvonne H.; Flaherty, James D.; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela

    2015-01-01

    The use of combined hormonal contraceptives has been reported to increase the level of C-reactive protein (CRP). We assessed the effect of hormonal contraceptive use on inflammatory cytokines including CRP, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, soluble tumor necrosis factor (sTNF), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and soluble CD40 ligand. We used 79 female subjects (19 to 30 years old) who were combined oral contraceptives users (n = 29), combined vaginal contraceptive users (n = 20), and nonusers (n = 30) with CRP values of ≤1 (n = 46) or ≥3 (n = 33). Information on medical history, physical activities, and dietary and sleeping habits were collected. Both oral and vaginal contraceptive users had higher levels of CRP (P < 0.0001), compared to nonusers. Only oral contraceptive users exhibited elevated sCD40L (P < 0.01). When comparing the groups with CRP ≤ 1 and CRP ≥ 3, levels of IL-6 and sTNF-RI were positively correlated with CRP among oral contraceptive users. We did not observe the same elevation for other inflammatory biomarkers for the CRP ≥ 3 group among vaginal contraceptive users. The clear cause of elevation in CRP level due to the use of different hormonal contraceptive formulations and methods is not well understood. Longitudinal studies with larger sample size are required to better assess the true cause of CRP elevation among hormonal contraceptive users. PMID:25861161

  2. [Contraceptives].

    PubMed

    Jimenez Vargas, J

    1974-01-01

    Contraceptives are defined as any means of avoiding pregnancy and not as therapy. Importance is generally placed on the mechanism of action and efficiency when selection is made. Anovulatory and postcoital contraceptives (morning-after pill) are said to be linked with abortion, as are all contraceptives since a transition from using contraceptives to having abortions has often been noted in countries allowing the latter. The author in fact ascribes a general depreciation for human life to increased use of contraceptives. Detailed explanations of the female reproductive cycle and the effects of oral contraceptives on it and on the woman in general are included. Fetal development is also traced.

  3. Communication about Contraception and Knowledge of Oral Contraceptives amongst Norwegian High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Thomas; Skjeldestad, Finn Egil

    2003-01-01

    Examines communication about contraception and specific knowledge of oral contraceptives (OCs) in a sample of Norwegian high school students. More females than males discussed contraception at least monthly. Discussions were predominantly held with peers and not adults. Females were far more knowledgeable about OCs than males. The most significant…

  4. The Current Status of Oral Contraceptives: Progress and Recent Innovations.

    PubMed

    Golobof, Alexandra; Kiley, Jessica

    2016-05-01

    Millions of women in the United States and abroad use oral contraceptive pills. These popular contraceptives are the most common reversible birth control method in the United States, and a wide variety of pills are available for prescription. Oral contraceptives provide safe and effective protection against pregnancy and offer several noncontraceptive benefits. Over the years, advances in the laboratory and knowledge gained through epidemiologic data promoted the development of new contraceptive preparations. Generations of oral contraceptives emerged over time, containing lower doses of estrogens and new and novel progestins. The current review discusses the clinical characteristics of oral contraceptives, with emphasis on basic pharmacology and the evolution of various contraceptive formulations and regimens. PMID:26960906

  5. Efficacy and safety of metformin or oral contraceptives, or both in polycystic ovary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Young-Mo; Choi, Eun Joo

    2015-01-01

    Background Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is an endocrinopathy that affects approximately 10% of reproductive-aged women throughout their lives. Women with PCOS present with heterogeneous symptoms including ovulatory dysfunction, hyperandrogenism, and polycystic ovaries. Therefore, lifelong individualized management should be considered. Pharmacological agents commonly used to manage the symptoms are metformin and oral contraceptive pills. Although these medications have been beneficial in treating PCOS symptoms, their efficacy and safety are still not entirely elucidated. This study aimed to report the efficacy and safety of metformin, oral contraceptives, or their combination in the treatment of PCOS and to define their specific individual roles. Methods A literature search of original studies published in PubMed and Scopus was conducted to identify studies comparing metformin with oral contraceptives or evaluating the combination of both in PCOS. Results Eight clinical trials involving 313 patients were examined in the review. The intervention dosage of metformin ranged from 1,000 to 2,000 mg/d and that of oral contraceptives was ethinylestradiol 35 µg and cyproterone acetate 2 mg. Lower body mass index was observed with regimens including metformin, but increased body mass index was observed in monotherapy with oral contraceptives. Administration of metformin or oral contraceptives, especially as monotherapy, had a negative effect on lipid profiles. In addition, there are still uncertainties surrounding the effects of metformin or oral contraceptives in the management of insulin level, although they improved total testosterone and sex hormone-binding globulin levels. In the included studies, significant side effects due to metformin or oral contraceptives were not reported. Conclusion The clinical trials suggest that metformin or oral contraceptives are at least patient convenient, efficacious, and safe for the treatment of PCOS. However, well

  6. Effects of Administration of Fostamatinib on Blood Concentrations of an Oral Contraceptive in Healthy Female Subjects

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-02-17

    Scientific Terminology Rheumatoid Arthritis, Healthy Female Volunteers, Pharmacokinetics, Oral Contraceptive, Drug-drug Interaction; Laymen Terminology Level of Oral Contraceptive in Blood, Oral Contraceptive, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Drug -Drug Interaction

  7. Extended and continuous combined contraceptive regimens for menstrual suppression.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Janet C; Likis, Frances E; Murphy, Patricia Aikins

    2012-01-01

    Many women have medical indications for menstrual suppression or a personal preference to reduce or eliminate monthly bleeding, which can be achieved with extended and continuous regimens of combined estrogen and progestin contraceptives. Combined contraceptives are traditionally administered in a 28-day cycle, with 21 days of a contraceptive pill, vaginal ring, or transdermal patch followed by a hormone-free interval that is usually 7 days. During the hormone-free interval, women either take a placebo pill or do not use their combined contraceptive method. Hormone-related symptoms are significantly worse during the hormone-free interval than the days when the contraceptive is used. Alterations of the standard 28-day cyclic regimen for menstrual suppression include decreasing the frequency of the hormone-free interval, thus extending the time between withdrawal bleeding episodes (extended use), and eliminating the hormone-free interval altogether (continuous use). This article reviews menstrual suppression indications and physiology. Research demonstrating that the effectiveness, safety, and side effects of oral, vaginal, and transdermal extended and continuous regimens are comparable to cyclic regimens is summarized. Findings from studies of women's and health care providers' attitudes toward menstrual suppression also are reviewed. Important topics to include in evidence-based counseling for extended and continuous combined contraceptive use are presented.

  8. [Inefficacy of oral contraception during use of minocycline].

    PubMed

    de Groot, A C; Eshuis, H; Stricker, B H

    1990-06-23

    A healthy woman aged 21 years who used the oral contraceptive Trigynon became pregnant while being treated with Minocin (minocycline; 100 mg per day) for acne conglobata. While the risk of use of antibiotics such as this one reducing the efficacy of oral contraceptives is small, patients should nevertheless be informed that the risk exists.

  9. Affective and Physical Changes Associated with Oral Contraceptive Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiener, Alane L.; And Others

    Although investigations of the physiological effects of oral contraceptives suggest that affective changes may accompany their use, empirical documentation of these effects has not been consistent. This study examined physiological and affective changes accompanying use of a low-dosage oral contraceptive while controlling for possible expectancy…

  10. Relative risks of oral contraceptive usage.

    PubMed

    Kirkham, C; Reid, R L

    1987-04-01

    Women seeking safe, reliable contraception must weigh the risks associated with such methods with their benefits. To make this assessment process more meaningful, the authors have prepared a chart that sets forth the risks of oral contraceptive (OC) use by different user factors (e.g., age, cigarette smoking) in proportion to the risks inherent in a variety of sporting activities and types of accidents. Mortality rates reported for OC use include those due to the method and those due to pregnancies resulting from method failure. Scrutiny of this chart reveals that the risk of death associated with swimming, boating, and automobile use exceeds the risk of death for nonsmokers who use OCs up to 34 years of age (1.6 deaths/100,000 population). OC use by women 15-24 years of age who smoke carries a lower mortality risk (3.0/1000) than scuba diving or falling, while OC users 25-34 years old who smoke are more likely to die as a result of homicide, suicide, or automobile accidents than they are as a result of their use of OCs (mortality rate, 10.2/1000). On the other hand, OC use by smokers 35-44 years of age is associated with a mortality rate of 84.5/1000, which is a higher risk than that associated with the sport of hang-gliding.

  11. Oral contraceptives, human papillomavirus and cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    La Vecchia, Carlo; Boccia, Stefania

    2014-03-01

    Oncogenic human papillomavirus is the key determinant of cervical cancer, but other risk factors interact with it to define individual risk. Among these, there is oral contraceptive (OC) use. A quantitative review of the link between OCs and cervical cancer was performed. Long-term (>5 year) current or recent OC use has been related to an about two-fold excess risk of cervical cancer. Such an excess risk, however, levels off after stopping use, and approaches unity 10 or more years after stopping. The public health implications of OC use for cervical cancer are limited. In any case, such implications are greater in middle-income and low-income countries, as well as in central and eastern Europe and Latin America, where cervical cancer screening and control remain inadequate.

  12. Pharmacological profile of estrogens in oral contraception.

    PubMed

    Bitzer, J

    2011-06-01

    The synthetic estrogen ethinylestradiol (EE)given by mouth is stable and yields satisfactory results in terms of ovulation inhibition and effects on the endometrium. It increases however the risk especially for venous thrombotic events and to a lesser degree also arterial thrombosis. Therefore research focused on diminuition of the EE dosage and the development of a different estrogen component in oral contraceptives, specifically an estrogen occurring during physiological processes in the female body. Two estrogens emerge: 17ß Estradiol is the most potent natural estrogen and it is the major estrogen secreted by the ovaries. Estetrol is a human sex steroid (15 alpha hydroxyestriol) which is only produced during pregnancy by the fetal liver. The pharmacolokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of these estrogens are compared to those of EE (absorption, metabolization, bioavailability etc.) and the clinical profile is described as far it is known from a limited number of studies. PMID:21654614

  13. Unique effects on hepatic function, lipid metabolism, bone and growth endocrine parameters of estetrol in combined oral contraceptives

    PubMed Central

    Mawet, Marie; Maillard, Catherine; Klipping, Christine; Zimmerman, Yvette; Foidart, Jean-Michel; Coelingh Bennink, Herjan J.T.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objectives Estetrol (E4) is a natural estrogen produced by the human fetal liver. In combination with drospirenone (DRSP) or levonorgestrel (LNG), E4 blocks ovulation and has less effect on haemostatic biomarkers in comparison with ethinylestradiol (EE) combined with DRSP. This study evaluates the impact of several doses of E4/DRSP and E4/LNG on safety parameters such as liver function, lipid metabolism, bone markers and growth endocrine parameters. Methods This was a dose-finding, single-centre, controlled study performed in healthy women aged 18 to 35 years with a documented pretreatment ovulatory cycle. Participants received 5 mg or 10 mg E4/3 mg DRSP; 5 mg, 10 mg or 20 mg E4/150 μg LNG; or 20 μg EE/3 mg DRSP as a comparator for three consecutive cycles in a 24/4-day regimen. Changes from baseline to end of treatment in liver parameters, lipid metabolism, bone markers and growth endocrinology were evaluated. Results A total of 109 women were included in the study. Carrier proteins were minimally affected in the E4/DRSP and E4/LNG groups, in comparison with the EE/DRSP group, where a significant increase in sex hormone-binding globulin was observed. Similarly, minor effects on lipoproteins were observed in the E4 groups, and the effects on triglycerides elicited by the E4 groups were significantly lower than those in the EE/DRSP group. No imbalances in bone markers were observed in any groups. No alterations in insulin-like growth factor were observed in the E4 groups. Conclusions E4-containing combinations have a limited effect on liver function, lipid metabolism, and bone and growth endocrine parameters. Chinese Abstract 摘要 目的 雌四醇(E4)是来源于人胎儿肝脏的天然雌激素。雌四醇与屈螺酮(DRSP)或左炔诺孕酮(LNG)配伍的复方口服避孕药制剂,能够抑制排卵,同时相较于炔雌醇(EE)与屈螺酮配伍制剂,它对凝血功能的各项指标影响较小。本研究的目的是为了评估不同

  14. Novel oral contraceptive for heavy menstrual bleeding: estradiol valerate and dienogest

    PubMed Central

    Rafie, Sally; Borgelt, Laura; Koepf, Erin R; Temple-Cooper, Mary E; Lehman, K Joy

    2013-01-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) is associated with significant direct medical costs and impacts both society and the quality of life for individual women. Heavy menstrual bleeding, a subset of AUB, also referred to as menorrhagia, is defined as menstrual blood loss greater than 80 mL or the patient’s perception of excessive blood loss. The newest treatment option available is a novel combination oral contraceptive product containing estradiol valerate (E2V) and dienogest (DNG). As with other combination oral contraceptives, E2V/DNG works primarily by preventing ovulation. However, in contrast with other combination oral contraceptives, it is the progestin component of E2V/DNG that is responsible for endometrial stabilization. Use of E2V/DNG for six months has led to significant reductions in heavy menstrual bleeding with an average 65% reduction in mean blood loss. Approximately half of the women with heavy menstrual bleeding who received E2V/DNG for six months demonstrated an 80% reduction in mean blood loss. Additionally, significant improvements in hematologic indicators (ie, ferritin, hemoglobin, and hematocrit) have been shown. Based on its chemical properties, E2V/DNG may have fewer adverse effects on lipid and glucose metabolism and reduced risk of thromboembolic complications compared with other combination oral contraceptives. This has not yet been shown in clinical trials and until then it should be assumed that E2V/DNG has a safety profile similar to other combination oral contraceptives containing 35 μg or less of ethinyl estradiol. E2V/DNG has been compared with another combination oral contraceptive in healthy women without heavy menstrual bleeding and demonstrated improved bleeding patterns. E2V/DNG has not been compared with the levonorgestrel intrauterine device or other treatments for heavy menstrual bleeding. When compared with some other treatment options for AUB, E2V/DNG provides the added advantage of effective contraception. PMID:23788843

  15. [Social psychological and sexological aspects of oral contraception (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Van Keep, P A

    1976-01-01

    An inventory is made on the hindrances to the acceptance of contraception in general and oral contraception in particular. They are grouped as hindrances related to the social and psychological significance of "making children", hindrances related to the social and psychological significance of "having children" hindrances, related to the method of oral contraception itself, to be divided in social hindrances, psychological hindrances and medical hindrances and finally hindrances related to the provision of the pill to the individual user. Each of these is amply discussed, the author expresses the hope that by identification of these hindrances, lessons may be learned for the future, when other methods of contreception become available.

  16. [Treatment of diminished sexual response associated with the use of oral contraceptives (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Fucs, G B; Coutinho, E M

    1975-01-01

    Loss of libido associated with the use of oral contraceptives has been studied in 113 women of reproductive age who had taken a combined pill for periods ranging from 1 to 3 years. The patients were divided in four groups. In the first group (I) of 24 women oral contraceptive treatment was discontinued and all women received in intra-uterine contraceptive device (IUCD). The second group (II) of 36 patients, the brand of oral contraceptive was changed. Women in group (III) had their oral contraceptive maintained receiving in addition a mixture of an androgen and an estrogen (methyltestosterone 4 mg and ethynilestradiol 0.002 mg) daily. To women of group (IV) the oral contraceptive was discontinued but the androgen-estrogen mixture was given. All women in this group received an IUCD. Evaluation of the psyco-sexual parameters included changes in libido, time to reach an orgasm, duration and intensity or orgasms. Frequency of intercourse and response to autostimulation was also investigated. Libido was restored in 94.2% of patients in group II, in 97.3% of group III and in 92.8% of group IV. In group I only 55.6% of patients had libido fully restored. In view of the prompt restoration of libido in all groups except in patients discontinuing oral contraceptive therapy, it is suggested that loss of libido in oral contraceptive users has an important physological component which can be overcome probably by psychotherapy. Short term treatment with a mixture of methyltestosterone and ethynilestradiol seems to be highly effective in restoring libido in all patients.

  17. [Oral contraception and induced depressive states].

    PubMed

    Richou, H; Hug, R

    1974-06-01

    Cultural, psychological, and biochemical explanations for depression in users of oral contraceptives are discussed. The suppression of taboos against sexuality cannot be expected to bring about instant psychological adjustment, as shown by the large numbers of women who are afraid to take the pill or who develop psychosomatic disorders and depression. Incidence of depression as reported in the literature ranges from 5% to 45%. Some authors attribute psychogenic causes for depression associated with the pill, such as temporary castration, instant sexual liberation, or womens' undeniable maternal instinct. Others present evidence for biochemical causes of depression. General explanations for pill-related depression include imbalance of hypothalamic amines and consequently of releasing factor, prolactin-inhibiting factor, decreased brain serotonin due to inhibition of tryptophan hydroxylase by progestagens, or diminished brain biogenic amines because of lowered pyridoxal levels. From clinical work with neuroleptic drugs it is known that drugs, stress, or anxiety can disturb the biochemical balance and result in amenorrhea. High progestin levels may be responsible for premenstrual anxiety and headaches.

  18. Contraception.

    PubMed

    Lane, C; Barnes, A B

    1981-03-01

    The number of women using contraception is increasing. There are today several methods of contraception available. Behavioral methods of contraception include coitus interruptus, not ideal for psychological reasons, the rhythm method, and the cervical mucus method; they all involve periodic sexual abstinence and need extended patient education. Barrier methods include the condom, the vaginal diaphragm, the cervical cap, and all types of spermicidal agents used locally; barrier contraception can be 97% effective when properly used. Effectiveness of the IUD is 90-99%; many women experience excessive bleeding and/or expulsion of the device. IUDs are not indicated for women with vaginal infections and must be removed if pregnancy occurrs. IUDs are indicated in multiparous, healthy women. Oral contraception is the most effective way to control fertility despite the well documented side effects. Contraceptive pills contain different doses of estrogen and progesterone, and must be prescribed only after careful medical examination. Postcoital contraception can be obtained either with ethinyl estradiol and norgestrel or with diethylstilbestrol; side effects are numerous. In 1976, sexual sterilization was the 3rd most frequent surgical procedure in the U.S. The procedure must be considered a permanent one despite the increasing number of reversal successes; psychological side effects are possible but rare. Induced abortion is used as contraception and is safest when performed during the earlier stages of pregnancy. Risk of maternal death is about the same as for delivery, or 12/100,100. Methods of abortion vary according to the length of gestation. It has been suggested that barrier methods of birth control and using abortion for failures is currently the safest approach to contraception. The choice of the best contraceptive method must be made by a doctor in accordance with the clinical history and the life style of the patient, and especially taking into consideration age

  19. Use of Oral Contraceptives for Management of Acne Vulgaris: Practical Considerations in Real World Practice.

    PubMed

    Harper, Julie C

    2016-04-01

    Acne vulgaris may be effectively treated with combination oral contraceptive pills (COCs) in women. COCs may be useful in any woman with acne in the absence of known contraindications. When prescribing a COC to a woman who also desires contraception, the risks of the COC are compared with the risks associated with pregnancy. When prescribing a COC to a woman who does not desire contraception, the risks of the COC must be weighed against the risks associated with acne. COCs may take 3 cycles of use to show an effect in acne lesion count reductions.

  20. Estrogen-free oral hormonal contraception: benefits of the progestin-only pill.

    PubMed

    de Melo, Nilson Roberto

    2010-09-01

    Although combined oral contraceptives (COCs) are commonly used and highly effective in preventing pregnancy, they may not be suitable for some women. COC use is associated with increased rates of cardiovascular events and is not recommended in nonbreastfeeding women in the immediate postpartum period or in breastfeeding women during the initial 6 months of breastfeeding. Moreover, estrogen-related adverse effects, such as headache, are common. Estrogen-free progestin-only pills (POPs) are a valuable option in women who prefer to take an oral hormonal contraceptive, but are ineligible for, or choose not to use, COCs. Although some POPs have been associated with lower contraceptive effectiveness than COCs, the POP containing desogestrel has shown similar contraceptive effectiveness to COCs. The most commonly reported complaints in women using all POPs are bleeding problems. Counseling women interested in using POPs about the variable bleeding patterns associated with this method may improve compliance and acceptance. PMID:21080791

  1. Oral contraceptives as anti-androgenic treatment of acne.

    PubMed

    Lemay, André; Poulin, Yves

    2002-07-01

    Although acne is seldom associated with high serum levels of androgens, it has been shown that female acne patients have definite increases in ovarian and adrenal androgen levels when compared to appropriate controls. As shown in several pilot and in multiple open and comparative studies, oral contraceptives (OCs) are effective in causing a significant regression of mild to moderate acne. These results have been confirmed by multicentre randomized trials where low-dose OCs did not cause side effects different from those of the placebo-controlled group. The beneficial effect of OCs is related to a decrease in ovarian and adrenal androgen precursors; to an increase in sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), which limits free testosterone; and to a decrease in 3a-androstenediol glucuronide conjugate, the catabolite of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) formed in peripheral tissues. The estrogen-progestin combination containing cyproterone acetate (CPA) is particularly effective in treating acne, since this progestin also has a direct peripheral anti-androgenic action in blocking the androgen receptor. Only two open studies and one randomized study on small numbers of patients have reported some efficacy of spironolactone used alone or in combination with an OC in the treatment of acne. The new non-steroidal anti-androgens flutamide and finasteride are being evaluated for the treatment of hirsutism. Oral antibiotics are prescribed to patients with inflammatory lesions, where they are effective in decreasing the activity of microbes, the activity of microbial enzymes, and leukocyte chemotaxis. Concomitant intake of an OC and an antibiotic usually prescribed for acne does not impair the contraceptive efficacy of the OC. A second effective contraceptive method should be used whenever there would be decreased absorption or efficacy of the OC (digestive problems, breakthrough bleeding), lack of compliance and use of a type or dose of antibiotic different from that usually prescribed

  2. Interactions between oral contraceptives and malaria infections in rhesus monkeys*

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, G. P.; Puri, S. K.; Kamboj, K. K.; Srivastava, S. K.; Kamboj, V. P.

    1984-01-01

    The interaction of oral contraceptives with malaria infection (Plasmodium cynomolgi B and P. coatneyi) in adult female rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) was studied. The oral contraceptives (Norinyl and Ovral-28) were administered for 12 consecutive menstrual cycles, from day 5 to 25 of each cycle, at either ⅓ of the human dose of Norinyl (norethisterone 0.33 mg + ethinylestradiol 0.012 mg) or ⅙ of the human dose of Ovral-28 (norgestrel 0.083 mg + ethinylestradiol 0.008 mg). The animals were divided into three groups for each infection (control, Norinyl and Ovral-28 treated) with 10 monkeys in each group for P. cynomolgi B infection and 12 in each group for P. coatneyi infection. The animals were infected after 6 cycles of oral contraceptive administration, and the course of infection was studied during the 7th and 8th cycles. This was followed by radical cure during the 9th and 10th cycles and rechallenge in the 11th and 12th cycles. The present study showed that (1) the contraceptive-treated animals maintained a slightly increased cumulative parasite load; (2) the contraceptives did not interfere with the radical curative action of chloroquine; (3) the contraceptive-treated animals showed no significant change in the course of parasitaemia on rechallenge or in the malaria indirect fluorescent antibody levels; (4) the liver function tests were not altered significantly by the administration of contraceptives and subsequent infection; and (5) the haematological changes observed in the contraceptive-treated animals were similar to those observed in the control group. PMID:6335851

  3. Vitamin nutritional status of women using oral contraceptive pills.

    PubMed

    Murthy, N K; Vijaya, S

    1980-03-01

    A comparative study was conducted to assess the biochemical effects of a low-estrogen combined OC (oral contraceptive). The focus of the study was on possible biochemical effects indicative of altered nutritional status. Both low and high income women on pills were compared with others not on pills. The groups were further divided according to the duration of OC usage. Blood hemoglobin, serum Vitamin A, plasma ascorbic acid, folic acid, riboflavin, and aspartate transaminase levels were measured. Higher income women had better measures on all the indices than the low income women, indicating a better initial nutritional status. Deficiencies increased with duration of use. Results of the study show that OCs reduce the vitamin nutritional level in women. For poor women on OCs, special nutrition intervention programs should be instituted.

  4. Treating acne with oral contraceptives: use of lower doses.

    PubMed

    Huber, Johannes; Walch, Katharina

    2006-01-01

    Oral contraceptives (OCs) have been shown to effectively treat acne. Clinical trials of various doses of ethinyl estradiol (EE) combined with progestins such as levonorgestrel, desogestrel, norgestimate, gestodene, cyproterone acetate and drospirenone in monophasic, triphasic and combiphasic formulations used to treat acne in women are reviewed here. Open-label and comparative studies beginning in the 1980s were the first to demonstrate objective and subjective reductions in the incidence of acne, severity of existing acne and seborrhea. Placebo-controlled trials have corroborated these findings with a trend toward effective acne treatment with declining doses of EE. Significant reductions in total, inflammatory and noninflammatory lesions compared with placebo have been demonstrated with an OC containing the low dose of 20 microg of EE. Collectively, these findings support the use of low-dose OCs for the treatment of acne. PMID:16371290

  5. Oral Contraceptives and Multiple Sclerosis/Clinically Isolated Syndrome Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Hellwig, Kerstin; Chen, Lie H.; Stancyzk, Frank Z.; Langer-Gould, Annette M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The incidence of multiple sclerosis (MS) is rising in women. Objective To determine whether the use of combined oral contraceptives (COCs) are associated with MS risk and whether this varies by progestin content. Methods We conducted a nested case-control study of females ages 14–48 years with incident MS or clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) 2008–2011 from the membership of Kaiser Permanente Southern California. Controls were matched on age, race/ethnicity and membership characteristics. COC use up to ten years prior to symptom onset was obtained from the complete electronic health record. Results We identified 400 women with incident MS/CIS and 3904 matched controls. Forty- percent of cases and 32% of controls had used COCs prior to symptom onset. The use of COCs was associated with a slightly increased risk of MS/CIS (adjusted OR = 1.52, 95%CI = 1.21–1.91; p<0.001). This risk did not vary by duration of COC use. The association varied by progestin content being more pronounced for levenorgestrol (adjusted OR = 1.75, 95%CI = 1.29–2.37; p<0.001) than norethindrone (adjusted OR = 1.57, 95%CI = 1.16–2.12; p = 0.003) and absent for the newest progestin, drospirenone (p = 0.95). Conclusions Our findings should be interpreted cautiously. While the use of some combination oral contraceptives may contribute to the rising incidence of MS in women, an unmeasured confounder associated with the modern woman’s lifestyle is a more likely explanation for this weak association. PMID:26950301

  6. Gonadotropin and estradiol secretion during the week of placebo therapy in oral contraceptive pill users.

    PubMed

    van der Spuy, Z M; Sohnius, U; Pienaar, C A; Schall, R

    1990-12-01

    The changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis during the placebo week in oral contraceptive pill users were assessed. Fifteen women using the combined oral contraceptive pill were studied for eight hours at the start and at the end of the placebo week and gonadotropin secretion and estradiol concentrations were compared with those in control women in the follicular phase of an unmedicated menstrual cycle. Both gonadotropin and estradiol concentrations were suppressed at the start of the placebo week. By day 7 of placebo, gonadotropin concentrations and pulse patterns were indistinguishable from those of the control subjects although estradiol concentrations were still significantly lower.

  7. Effects of the Menstrual Cycle and Oral Contraception on Singers' Pitch Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    La, Filipa M. B.; Sundberg, Johan; Howard, David M.; Sa-Couto, Pedro; Freitas, Adelaide

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Difficulties with intonation and vibrato control during the menstrual cycle have been reported by singers; however, this phenomenon has not yet been systematically investigated. Method: A double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial assessing effects of the menstrual cycle and use of a combined oral contraceptive pill (OCP) on pitch…

  8. Emergency contraception.

    PubMed

    2012-12-01

    Despite significant declines over the past 2 decades, the United States continues to have teen birth rates that are significantly higher than other industrialized nations. Use of emergency contraception can reduce the risk of pregnancy if used up to 120 hours after unprotected intercourse or contraceptive failure and is most effective if used in the first 24 hours. Indications for the use of emergency contraception include sexual assault, unprotected intercourse, condom breakage or slippage, and missed or late doses of hormonal contraceptives, including the oral contraceptive pill, contraceptive patch, contraceptive ring (ie, improper placement or loss/expulsion), and injectable contraception. Adolescents younger than 17 years must obtain a prescription from a physician to access emergency contraception in most states. In all states, both males and females 17 years or older can obtain emergency contraception without a prescription. Adolescents are more likely to use emergency contraception if it has been prescribed in advance of need. The aim of this updated policy statement is to (1) educate pediatricians and other physicians on available emergency contraceptive methods; (2) provide current data on safety, efficacy, and use of emergency contraception in teenagers; and (3) encourage routine counseling and advance emergency-contraception prescription as 1 part of a public health strategy to reduce teen pregnancy. This policy focuses on pharmacologic methods of emergency contraception used within 120 hours of unprotected or underprotected coitus for the prevention of unintended pregnancy. Emergency contraceptive medications include products labeled and dedicated for use as emergency contraception by the US Food and Drug Administration (levonorgestrel and ulipristal) and the "off-label" use of combination oral contraceptives.

  9. Laryngeal Aerodynamics Associated with Oral Contraceptive Use: Preliminary Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorham-Rowan, Mary; Fowler, Linda

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine possible differences in laryngeal aerodynamic measures during connected speech associated with oral contraceptive (OC) use. Eight women taking an OC, and eight others not taking an OC, participated in the study. Three trials of syllable /p[subscript alpha] /repetitions were obtained using a…

  10. Oral contraceptives and breast cancer: a national study.

    PubMed Central

    Paul, C; Skegg, D C; Spears, G F; Kaldor, J M

    1986-01-01

    In a population based case-control study 433 New Zealand women aged 25-54 with newly diagnosed breast cancer were compared with 897 women selected at random from the electoral rolls. The relative risk of breast cancer in women who had ever used oral contraceptives was 0.94 (95% confidence interval 0.70 to 1.25). The relative risk in women aged 25-34 at diagnosis was estimated to be 2.2 (95% confidence interval 0.47 to 9.9) and in older women less than 1. Analyses of risk by duration of use of oral contraceptives, age at first use, and time since first use showed no adverse effect of the pill. In particular, there was no increased risk in women who had used oral contraceptives before the age of 25 or before their first pregnancy, even for prolonged periods. Given the high prevalence of use in New Zealand, this study provides strong evidence against the hypothesis that use of oral contraceptives at young ages increases the risk of breast cancer. PMID:3094626

  11. Conscience clauses and oral contraceptives: conscientious objection or calculated obstruction?

    PubMed

    Collins, Mary K

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the ethical and legal implications of conscience clauses, which allow pharmacists to refuse to fill prescriptions for oral contraceptives due to their belief that they may constitute abortifacients. The author provides an informative background on contraception and the history of how abortion has been viewed in this country, then takes a critical look at some of the conscience laws already in existence, using a bioethical framework to examine them. She concludes by providing suggestions to reduce the negative ethical implications resulting from the enactment of conscience clauses.

  12. Pulmonary embolus, oral contraceptives, and a clinical search.

    PubMed

    Maharry, J M

    1970-01-01

    At the Presbyterian Intercommunity Hospital, Whittier, California, 120 cases of pulmonary emboli occurred from 1959 through 1968. During this time there were 124,000 admissions and more than 20,000 live births. 51 of the pulmonary embolic cases were female; 25 were of childbearing age. 10 of these showed relationship to the use of oral contraceptives. 6 of them received oral contraceptives after pulmonary embolism without apparent aggravation or recurrence of thromboembolic disease. 2 of the 10 were taking birth control pills at the time they underwent hysterectomy. A pulmonary embolus followed each operation. 2 more were taking the pills and experienced pulmonary embolism without evidence of any predisposing cause. Short case summaries of the 10 are given, all of whom are living and well. Improvement of diagnosis by lung scanning shows that pulmonary embolism is more prevalent and less serious than previously believed. As thrombotic disease is considered a recurring disorder, its relationship to steroid contraceptives has not been totally substantiated. It is concluded that a history of such disease does not necessarily contraindicate the use of oral contraceptives. Following discussion, the author quotes an FDA claim that women who take birth control pills develop thrombo-phlebitis 3 times as frequently as women who do not. He notes that, even according to these Food and Drug Administration statistics, a woman could take the pills for 30 years without as much danger from thrombo-phlebitis as from a single pregnancy.

  13. Meta-analysis of the role of oral contraceptive agents in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Godet, P G; May, G R; Sutherland, L R

    1995-11-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies have been performed to determine factors that might contribute to the development of inflammatory bowel disease. Although the role of oral contraceptive agents in Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) have been assessed, most studies were of small sample size and characterised by low statistical precision. A meta-analysis was performed to increase the statistical power and to investigate the association between the use of oral contraceptives and the development of CD and UC. The study was based on a search of a Medline database from 1975 to October 1993 and a review of reference lists from published articles, reviews, symposia proceedings, and abstracts from major gastrointestinal meetings. All studies specifically designed to evaluate this association were selected. The combined results of nine studies--two cohort studies (30,379 unexposed and 30,673 exposed patients) and seven case-control studies (482 CD, 237 UC, and 3198 controls)--which satisfied our selection criteria were evaluated. The pooled relative risk (adjusted for smoking) associated with oral contraceptive use was 1.44 (1.12, 1.86) for CD and 1.29 (0.94, 1.77) for UC. These results suggest modest associations between the use of oral contraceptives and the development of CD and UC. As these associations are weak, non-causal explanations for the findings cannot be eliminated.

  14. Congenital limb reduction deformities and use of oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Kricker, A; Elliott, J W; Forrest, J M; McCredie, J

    1986-11-01

    A study of congenital limb deficiencies in two Australian states indicated that use of an oral contraceptive during pregnancy by the mother was associated with an increased risk of limb defect in the child. The study included mothers of 155 children born with absence or reduction of the major long bones during a 12-year period from 1970 onward; 274 mothers with births of normal infants, matched for date of birth and area of residence, made up the control group. Compared with control infants, the case infants were more likely to have been conceived while the mother was using an oral contraceptive, especially when the deformity was a transverse or amputation type. It is too early in our state of knowledge of teratogenic mechanisms to exclude the possible existence of a biologic mechanism that would explain this statistical association.

  15. Oral contraceptives: effect of folate and vitamin B12 metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Shojania, A. M.

    1982-01-01

    Women who use oral contraceptives have impaired folate metabolism as shown by slightly but significantly lower levels of folate in the serum and the erythrocytes and an increased urinary excretion of formiminoglutamic acid. The vitamin B12 level in their serum is also significantly lower than that of control groups. However, there is no evidence of tissue depletion of vitamin B12 associated with the use of oral contraceptives. The causes and clinical significance of the impairment of folate and vitamin B12 metabolism in these women is discussed in this review of the literature. Clinicians are advised to ensure that women who shop taking "the pill" because they wish to conceive have adequate folate stores before becoming pregnant. PMID:7037144

  16. A current appraisal of side effects of oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Evans, J H

    1976-05-01

    Oral contraception, although offering almost 100 per cent protection against pregnancy, is associated with many side effects which have resulted in much unnecessary adverse publicity. Such side effects, the majority of which are of annoying nature only, are due to the synthetic hormones used, and have resulted in many changes in formulation and in the withdrawal of several preparations. The types of preparations available are discussed and the side effects appraised from both the patient's and the physician's viewpoint.

  17. Increased capillary permeability for plasma proteins in oral contraceptive users.

    PubMed

    Tollan, A; Kvenild, K; Strand, H; Oian, P; Maltau, J M

    1992-05-01

    The transcapillary fluid balance was examined in eleven women before administration of a monophasic oral contraceptive (desogestrel 0.15 mg, ethinylestradiol 0.03 mg), and after three and six months of use. The interstitial colloid osmotic pressure was measured by the "wick" method, and the interstitial hydrostatic pressure by the "wick-in-needle" method in subcutaneous tissue on thorax and leg. During the six-month observation period, the following changes were observed: Plasma colloid osmotic pressure decreased (mean 1.8 mmHg, p = 0.047), as well as serum albumin (mean 5.1 g/l, p = 0.0006), total protein concentration (mean 2.8 g/l, p = 0.0006), hemoglobin (mean 0.5 g/dl, p = 0.014) and hematocrit (mean 1.8%, p = 0.047). Blood pressure and body weight remained unchanged, but foot volume showed a significant increase. The colloid osmotic pressure gradient (plasma-interstitium) was significantly reduced. The results indicate an increase in plasma volume in addition to an increased capillary permeability to plasma proteins during oral contraceptive use. We suggest that the observed changes in transcapillary fluid balance is caused by the estrogen component of the oral contraceptive pill.

  18. Chlamydial salpingitis in female guinea pigs receiving oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Barron, A L; Pasley, J N; Rank, R G; White, H J; Mrak, R E

    1988-01-01

    Female guinea pigs were given daily doses of a combination of oral contraceptive (OC) agents, consisting of mestranol and norethynodrel suspended in sesame oil or distilled H2O, and were infected in the genital tract with the chlamydial agent of guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis (GPIC). Counts of chlamydial inclusions in cells of vaginal smears collected during infection, showed prolongation and enhancement of infection in OC-treated animals as compared with controls. Appearance of IgG and IgA antibodies to GPIC in genital secretions, as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), was also delayed in OC-treated animals as compared with controls. OC-treated infected animals were killed on days 15 and 43, and gross pathological evidence for ascending infection culminating in salpingitis was found in all of five and four of five animals, respectively. On the other hand, among untreated infected controls on each sacrifice day, only one of five animals had any evidence for ascending infection. Chlamydiae were detected by light and electron microscopy in fallopian tube tissue collected on day 15 following OC-treatment but not in tissue from control animals.

  19. A novel male contraceptive pill-patch combination: oral desogestrel and transdermal testosterone in the suppression of spermatogenesis in normal men.

    PubMed

    Hair, W M; Kitteridge, K; O'Connor, D B; Wu, F C

    2001-11-01

    This study investigated the effect of transdermal T and oral desogestrel on the reproductive axis of healthy men. Twenty-three men were randomized to 1 of 3 treatment groups and received a daily transdermal T patch plus oral desogestrel at a dose of 75, 150, or 300 microg/d for 24 wk. Baseline blood and semen samples were obtained and then every 4 wk thereafter for 32 wk. The outcome measures were sperm density and plasma levels of FSH, LH, total and free T. The results show a dose-dependent suppression of spermatogenesis and gonadotropins. Seven of the 17 subjects became azoospermic. Desogestrel (300 microg daily) in combination with 5 mg daily transdermal T was the most effective (57% azoospermic), whereas a dose of 75 microg was ineffective (0% azoospermic). Total and free plasma T were reduced by approximately 30%. High density lipoprotein cholesterol was significantly reduced. No serious side-effects were encountered. We conclude that daily self-administered desogestrel with transdermal T is capable of suppressing the male reproductive axis, although the efficacy was less marked and less consistent than injectable regimens. The lower efficacy is likely to be due to failure of the transdermal T system to maintain circulating T levels consistently in the required range.

  20. The risks of oral contraceptives and estrogen replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Coe, F L; Parks, J H

    1989-01-01

    The benefits and risks of both oral contraceptives and estrogen replacement therapy (ERT) are evaluated by summarizing briefly the results of the most evidential studies on breast, ovarian, endometrial, and hepatobiliary cancer, heart attack, stroke and venous thromboembolism. The methods used to estimate risk ratios, prospective random-allocation, double-blind trials, and retrospective case- controlled studies, are explained briefly. The ERT used today resemble sequential oral contraceptives, except that only 10-20 mcg ethinyl estradiol is taken for 25 days, and progestins are used on the last 10 days. Breast cancer risk is not different in pill users from nonusers, based on the U.K. General PRactitioner, Oxford Family Planning, Harvard nurses or U.S. SEER National Cancer Institute studies. Studies on ERT and breast cancer are mixed, but only injected estrogens raised the risks. Ovarian cancer is prevented by pill use in proportion to length of use. No studies were reported for ERT. The risk of hepatic cancer is 3.8 to 7.8 higher in pill users, but the number of cases is so rare that this should not affect prescriptions. Neither pill nor ERT raise the risk of myocardial infarction, and after premature surgical menopause, ERT lowers the risk. Based on studies done in the 1970s, oral contraceptives raise the risk of thrombotic stroke while women are taking them, from 10-13/100,000 to 41/100,000. ERT has no clear association with stroke. Similarly, orals increase the risk of venous thromboembolism, 8-fold in the Oxford Family Planning study published in 1986, although the absolute numbers are very small. ERT had no effects no risk of thromboembolism according to the lipid Research, Framingham and Nachtigall studies.

  1. Estradiol Valerate Pretreatment in Short Protocol GnRH-Agonist Cycles versus Combined Pretreatment with Oral Contraceptive Pills in Long Protocol GnRH-Agonist Cycles: A Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kunicki, Michal; Kuczynski, Waldemar; Pastuszek, Ewa; Jakiel, Grzegorz; Plociennik, Lukasz; Zielinski, Krzysztof; Zabielska, Judyta

    2015-01-01

    The strategy of in vitro fertilization (IVF) procedures relies on the increasing pregnancy rate and decreasing the risk of premature ovulation and ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. They are also designed to avoid weekend oocyte retrievals. Combined oral contraceptive (OC) pills are among the medicines used to accomplish these objectives. Alternatively, estradiol can be used instead of OC to obtain similar results. The aim of our study was to compare the differences in pregnancy rates (PRs), implantation rates, and miscarriage rates between a short agonist protocol with estradiol priming and a long protocol with combined OC. Of the 298 women who participated in this study, 134 achieved clinical pregnancies (45.0%). A higher PR (58.4%, n = 80, compared to 40.3%, n = 54) was achieved in the long protocol after OC pretreatment group. The implantation rate was also higher for this group (37.8% versus 28.0%; P = 0.03). The miscarriage rate was 15.0% (n = 12) for the long protocol after OC pretreatment group and 20.4% (n = 11) for the short agonist group (P = 0.81). The short agonist protocol required a 5.7% lower human menopausal gonadotropin (hMG) dosage than the long protocol but surprisingly the number of oocytes retrieved was also smaller. PMID:25922838

  2. Safety, efficacy and patient satisfaction with continuous daily administration of levonorgestrel/ethinylestradiol oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Benagiano, Giuseppe; Carrara, Sabina; Filippi, Valentina

    2009-01-01

    The progestational steroid norgestrel was synthesized and tested between 1960 and 1965 through an international cooperation between Wyeth, USA and Schering, Berlin. It is a mixture of two "enantiomers," with only one form (designated as levonorgestrel) biologically active. When taken orally, it is rapidly absorbed, not subjected to a "first-pass" effect and is approximately 90% bioavailable, with a circulating half-life around 15 hours. Its contraceptive action is exerted at the central (hypothalamic) and peripheral (cervical mucus and endometrium) levels. Levonorgestrel (LNG), alone or in combination with ethinyl estradiol (EE), is the most widely employed contraceptive progestin: it is used in combined oral contraceptives, progestogen-only pills, long-acting contraceptive implants, intrauterine contraceptive systems and in emergency contraception. It is also the steroid of choice for new oral contraceptive regimens aimed at reducing the frequency of bleeding episodes. This novel approach, already tried more than 30 years ago, gained interest around the year 2000 when surveys of women's attitudes toward monthly menstrual bleeding started to show a major change: more and more women declared that they would welcome a hormonal contraceptive method that reduced bleeding episodes to 4, 2 or even 1 per year. At this point, while the debate on the significance and "usefulness" of menstruation went on, attention focused on new regimens. The first new modality consisted of changing the 7-day medication-free interval, either shortening it to fewer than 7 days, or by the administration of low-dose estrogens during the interval between packages. Then, continuous administration regimens started to be investigated. This, however, did not happen suddenly, since, in specific situations, doctors had for years empirically utilized various continuous administration regimens. The first extended-cycle oral contraceptive regimen introduced in clinical practice is an 84-day regimen that

  3. [Specificities of the epileptic women (oral contraceptives, pregnancy)].

    PubMed

    Dupont, Sophie

    2011-03-01

    The enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs such as carbamazepine, phenytoin, barbiturates, oxcarbazepine do not allow oral contraceptives. The pregnancy must be planned. Every patient in childbearing age should be informed by her practitioner. The rule is to optimize the antiepileptic treatment before the pregnancy: less drugs, less dosages. This optimization will depend on the epileptic syndrome and the nature of the treatment. Valproate of sodium should be avoided, if possible, during pregnancy. Preconceptional supplementation by folic acid should be considered. Antiepileptic drugs monitoring is required during pregnancy. Natural delivery with peridural anaesthesiology is mandatory. The breast feeding must be considered individually. PMID:21216127

  4. A case of panic disorder induced by oral contraceptive.

    PubMed

    Ushiroyama, T; Okamoto, Y; Toyoda, K; Sugimoto, O

    1992-01-01

    A 27-year-old woman experienced feelings of unreality and fear after taking an oral contraceptive in the form of birth control pills. She subsequently experienced a panic attack just after she had stopped taking the pills. This was characterized by palpitation, general fatigue, trembling of the whole body, and dyspnea. The panic disorder experienced by the patient could have been due to the drug's potentiating of the sympathoadrenal response to simple physiological stimuli, or possibly to a disorder in psychological functioning caused by an anxiotropic effect of rapid endocrinological change. PMID:1315108

  5. Mesenteric venous thrombosis associated with oral contraceptives: a case report.

    PubMed

    Milne, P Y; Thomas, R J

    1976-05-01

    Small-bowel infarction resulting from mesenteric venous thrombosis is a rare but life-threatening complication to which young women taking oral contraceptives are liable. The patient characteristically presents with an "acute abdomen" after a variable prodromal period of vague abdominal pain. The correct diagnosis can be made from the macroscopic appearance at laparotomy, provided the surgeon is alert to the condition. An accurate diagnosis is important, as anticoagulation measures must be instituted early to counter the commonly associated thromboembolic phenomena. PMID:1067070

  6. Proteomic analysis of testis biopsies in men treated with injectable testosterone undecanoate alone or in combination with oral levonorgestrel as potential male contraceptive.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yugui; Zhu, Hui; Zhu, Yefei; Guo, Xuejiang; Huo, Ran; Wang, Xinghai; Tong, Jiansun; Qian, Lixin; Zhou, Zuomin; Jia, Yue; Lue, Yan-He; Hikim, Amiya Sinha; Wang, Christina; Swerdloff, Ronald S; Sha, Jiahao

    2008-09-01

    Treatment with injectable testosterone undecanoate (TU) alone or in combination with oral levonorgestrel (LNG) resulted in marked decreases in sperm concentrations. In this study, we used proteomic analyses to examine the cellular/molecular events occurring in the human testis after TU or TU + LNG treatment. We conducted a global proteomic analysis of the human testicular biopsies before and at 2 weeks after TU alone or TU + LNG treatment. Proteins showing significant changes in expression were identified and analyzed. As a result, 17 and 46 protein spots were found with significant differential expression after the treatment with TU alone and TU + LNG, respectively. TU treatment changed the expression of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K), proteasome inhibitor PI31 subunit (PSMF1), and superoxide dismutase [Mn] mitochondrial precursor (SOD2). These proteins inhibit "assembly", induce cell death, and promote compensatory "cell survival" in the testis. After TU + LNG treatment, "proliferation/cell survival" and "apoptosis/death" were the predominant responses in the testis. TU + LNG treatment inhibited the expression of Prolyl 4-hydroxylase beta subunit (P4HB) and Annexin A2 (Annexin II). These proteins are involved in apoptosis and cell proliferation, respectively. TU + LNG treatment also enhanced the expression of SOD2 and Parvalbumin alpha (Pvalb). These two proteins may protect testicular cells against apoptosis/death and promote cell survival. In conclusion, TU and TU + LNG treatments suppress spermatogenesis through different pathways by changing the expression of different proteins. hnRNP K, PSMF1, SOD2, P4HB, Annexin II, and Pvalb, are key proteins that may be early molecular targets responsible for spermatogenesis suppression induced by hormone treatment. PMID:18702538

  7. [The role of age, smoking habits, and oral contraceptives in the frequency of myocardial infarction in young women (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Goldzieher, J W

    1980-01-01

    Owing to the discussion aroused by different papers which have appeared in the last few years on the possible side-effects of oral contraceptives, an examination is made in this paper of the methods used in some of these studies, trying to elucidate to what extent we can trust the conclusions obtained, in order to decide whether oral contraceptives, by themselves, are a real and considerable risk to women's health, and analysing the role of oral contraceptives associated with other risk factors which can influence the frequency of myocardial infarction in young women. It is concluded that the use of oral contraceptives does not represent a statistically significant risk and, therefore, a causal inference cannot be attributed to them; but there exist other risk factors which prove to be of statistically demonstrable danger for myocardial infarction, such as smoking and obesity. Also, it seems evident that the combined effect of smoking and oral contraceptive use is synergistic. However, even though these two factors associated can increase the risk of myocardial infarction, we must not dismiss the possibility of this increment being influenced by other, equally logical circumstances.

  8. Plasma fibrinogen in women: relationships with oral contraception, the menopause and hormone replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, A J; Lowe, G D; Smith, W C; Tunstall-Pedoe, H

    1993-04-01

    Plasma fibrinogen was measured in 4837 women aged 25-64 years as part of the Scottish Heart Health Study and Scottish MONICA population surveys. The relationships of oral contraceptive use, the menopause and hormone replacement therapy were examined. Univariate analyses found that women with a history of oral contraceptive use, premenopausal women and those on hormone replacement therapy all had significantly lower fibrinogen levels than women who had never used oral contraceptives, postmenopausal women and non-hormone replacement users respectively. These differences persisted after age standardization. On multivariate analysis, menopausal status and hormone replacement therapy had independent effects on fibrinogen levels. Together with the common risk factors, 9.9% of the total variation in plasma fibrinogen levels was explained. However, less than 1% of this was from the combined menopausal and hormonal factors. These results confirm a postmenopausal rise in fibrinogen level which may be relevant to an increased risk of coronary heart disease. In addition, a protective effect with hormone replacement therapy is noted, although this was probably due to selection bias.

  9. Cardiovascular disease and use of oral contraceptives. WHO Collaborative Study.

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Considerable evidence from the United Kingdom and North America has shown that oral contraceptive use is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. However, since little is known about the link between the two in other parts of the world, WHO initiated a hospital-based case-control study in three centres in Mexico, Hong Kong, and the German Democratic Republic. Both cases and controls were asked about their past and current use of contraception as well as details on a number of potential confounding factors. Three main diagnostic categories were studied: venous thromboembolism (VTE) and pulmonary embolism (PE), ischaemic heart disease (IHD), and stroke. An overall relative risk of 2.9 (95% confidence limits, 1.4-6.1) for VTE/PE was found among recent or current users of oral contraceptives. Although this elevated risk is consistent with the results of other studies, the possibility of detection bias cannot be ruled out. The small number of cases (8) of IHD identified in the course of this study greatly limited the conclusions that could be drawn for this disease. Similarly with stroke, the small number of cases limited the conclusions that could be drawn, particularly since it was not possible to distinguish between thrombotic and haemorrhagic stroke. In addition to suggesting an increased risk of VTE/PE, the study pointed out the importance of ensuring an adequate sample size based on newly-diagnosed cases, the need for a coordinating centre to monitor the study closely in each centre and to provide a central review of each case, and the necessity of more specific diagnoses for meaningful interpretation of the data. PMID:2805219

  10. Combined hormonal contraceptives: prescribing patterns, compliance, and benefits versus risks

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Combined hormonal contraceptives [combined oral contraceptives (COCs)] have been available for over 50 years and the impact of this invention may not be overestimated. Today over 100 million women are current users and in Western Europe and the United States approximately 80% of women of fertile ages can be considered as ever-users. Over the years several drawbacks have been identified and media alarms on risks are frequently presented, resulting in suboptimal compliance and low compliance and continuation rates. Poor compliance and discontinuation is a big problem and is not generally identified by prescribers. During ideal use COCs offer very good protection against unwanted pregnancies, however there is a big problem with compliance and continuation and thus the ‘real-life’ efficacy is much lower. Reasons for poor compliance include side effects and fear of side effects and it is crucial that the prescriber gives the individual woman thorough and balanced information on the benefits and risks. Most well known is the increased risk of venous thromboembolism, but also an elevated risk of arterial thrombosis and several types of cancer has been reported. The risk estimates are low but according to the large number of users a substantial number of extra cases will occur. However, use of COCs also offers several additional health benefits with significant impact on morbidity and quality of life. COC use is associated with a substantial decrease in the risk of ovarian cancer, endometrial cancer and colorectal cancer. Moreover, COCs are a major option of treatment for women suffering from heavy menstrual bleeding and dysmenorrhea as well as hirsutism and acne vulgaris. The net effect of the additional health effects of COC- use may very well be positive, i.e. a slight increase in life expectancy. PMID:25360241

  11. [ORAL CONTRACEPTIVES AND MOOD/SEXUAL DISORDERS IN WOMEN].

    PubMed

    Sirakov, M; Tomova, E

    2015-01-01

    Oral contraceptives are used since more than 50 years and are very popular due to offering more than 99% confidence in preventing pregnancy. Over 100 million women worldwide use oral contraceptives. In the UK 27% of women between 16 and 49 y. use pills. In the United States they are about 30%, in Germany - 40%, and in The Netherlands - 60%. According to a study by B. Pehlivanov, 2008, in Bulgaria only 4% of women use OC. (1) Despite the convenience and security, in the U.S.A. 29% of women taking OC interrupt prematurely their use (2), while the percentage of adolescents appears to be higher (3) Earlier studies of the reasons for refusal of OC focus on their influence on the menstrual cycle, as well as on some physical side effects such as the appearance of hair growth, weight gain, bloating etc. They paid very little attention to their impact on mood and sexual behavior of women (4). Newer studies suggest that the side effects associated with mood and sexual behavior proved more powerful factor leading to early termination of the use of OC (5). This paper is a review of the literature and evaluation of the facts presented in studies from different countries. They found a high incidence of symptoms such as anxiety, susceptibility to stress, mood changes, incl. depression, anxiety, increased irritability and affection of sexual desire of women. (6) There are many indications that OC-users are at increased risk of suicide and mental illnesses. (9). PMID:26411194

  12. Inherited thrombophilia and stratification of ischaemic stroke risk among users of oral contraceptives

    PubMed Central

    Pezzini, A; Grassi, M; Iacoviello, L; Del Zotto, E; Archetti, S; Giossi, A; Padovani, A

    2007-01-01

    Background Whether use of oral contraceptives is a risk factor for arterial ischaemic stroke is controversial. In particular, few data are available on what criteria should be adopted to establish an individual profile of risk before the start of oral contraceptives. Patients and methods The effects of oral contraceptives and their interaction with the G1691A polymorphisms of the factor V gene, the G20210A polymorphisms of the prothrombin gene and the C677T polymorphisms of the MTHFR gene on the risk of cerebral ischaemia were determined in a series of 108 consecutive women aged <45 years with ischaemic stroke and 216 controls, in a hospital‐based case–control study design. Results Use of oral contraceptives was associated with an increased risk of cerebral ischaemia (odds ratio (OR) 3.95; 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.29 to 6.78). ORs for stroke were 2.25 (95% CI 1.15 to 4.40), 3.94 (95% CI 2.28 to 6.81) and 8.87 (95% CI 3.72 to 21.1) for non‐oral contraceptive users with the TT MTHFR genotype, oral contraceptive users without the TT MTHFR genotype and oral contraceptive users with the TT MTHFR genotype, respectively, when compared with non‐oral contraceptive users without the TT MTHFR genotype, with a multiplicative independent effect. Compared with non‐oral contraceptive users, ORs for stroke were 2.65 (95% CI 1.46 to 4.81) for oral contraceptive users with none of the studied polymorphisms and 22.8 (95% CI 4.46 to 116.00) for oral contraceptive users with at least one of the studied polymorphisms, with a synergistic effect. Conclusions Exposure to the effects of oral contraceptives may increase the risk of ischaemic stroke in women with an inherited prothrombotic background. Testing for these genetic variants may allow more accurate stratification of the population at risk before long‐term use of oral contraceptives is prescribed. PMID:17098841

  13. New contraceptive choices across reproductive life.

    PubMed

    Foran, Therese M

    2003-06-16

    The range of contraceptive options and consumer awareness of new contraceptive methods have both increased significantly over the past 10 years. New methods available in Australia include lower-dose oral contraceptive pills, new oral progestogens, progestogen implants, a progestogen-bearing intrauterine device and polyurethane female condoms. Contraceptive options which may soon be introduced in Australia include novel methods of administering combined (oestrogen-progestogen) contraception, such as dermal patches and vaginal rings.

  14. [Pharmacological aspects of oral contraceptives: part 2 (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Weil-levy, C; Soubrie, C; Simon, P

    1980-05-01

    This article is a long list of the known side effects of OC (oral contraception). Less serious side effects include skin alterations, genito-urinary infections, anemia, headaches, psychological problems of various kinds, cholestasis and/or jaundice, menstruation disorders, and metabolic perturbations. Very serious side effects include all cardiovascular, cerebrovascular and blood coagulation problems; carcinogenic effects are to be included among serious ones, even if not totally proven. Factors increasing the risk of severe disorders are tabagism, obesity, age, hypertension, and family antecedents of thrombotic accidents. Sex hormones are suspected to induce malformation in the fetus. OC must be carefully chosen according to the clinical and biological characteristics of the users; the lowest dosage is always recommended when effectiveness is equal. PMID:12261834

  15. A randomized double blind study of two oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Sanhueza, H; Sivin, I; Kumar, S; Kessler, M; Carrasco, A; Yee, J

    1979-07-01

    To study the question of whether one brand of oral contraceptives may be as acceptable as another for use of publicly-assisted family planning programs, a double blind study of two well-known brands, Ovral and Norinyl, was undertaken in Costa Rica and Trinidad. The pills were randomly assigned to 1,200 women. Common side effects - nausea, dizziness, vomiting, headaches - were associated with both Norinyl and Ovral. Differences in event rates for these conditions were much more marked by country than by the pill used. Ovral was associated with increases in skin problems, notably chloasma, in Cost Rica. A higher percentage of women using Norinyl reported intermenstrual bleeding and spotting in both countries. In Costa Rica continuation rates for Norinyl were adversely affected by this. With these exceptions there appear to be no important differences between the brands that would affect their use in family planning programs. PMID:477315

  16. Oral contraceptive use and female genital arousal: methodological considerations.

    PubMed

    Seal, Brooke N; Brotto, Lori A; Gorzalka, Boris B

    2005-08-01

    This study explored effects of oral contraceptive pill (OCP) use on physiological sexual arousal as measured by a vaginal photoplethysmograph. Sixteen women aged 18-29 viewed audiovisual neutral and erotic stimuli before and an average of 6 weeks following the onset of OCP use. Although subjective measures of sexual arousal, including perceptions of genital arousal, significantly increased in response to erotic stimuli both before and after OCP onset, physiological sexual arousal only increased before OCP use. A comparison of individual responses before and after OCP onset reveals a much higher degree of intrasubject variability after OCP onset. We discuss these findings as they relate to OCP use as a confounding methodological variable to consider in future investigations employing vaginal photoplethysmography. PMID:19817038

  17. Pharmacist conscience clauses and access to oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Flynn, D P

    2008-07-01

    The introduction of conscience clauses after the 1973 US Supreme Court decision in Roe v. Wade allowed physicians and nurses to opt out of medical procedures, particularly abortions, to which they were morally opposed. In recent years pharmacists have requested the same consideration with regard to dispensing some medicines. This paper examines the pharmacists' role and their professional and moral obligations to patients in the light of recent refusals by pharmacists to dispense oral contraceptives. A review of John Rawls's concepts of the "original position" and the "veil of ignorance", along with consideration of the concept of compartmentalisation, are used to assess pharmacists' requests and the moral and legal rights of patients to have their prescriptive needs met.

  18. Oral contraceptives after myomectomy: a short term trial.

    PubMed

    Luisi, Stefano; Ciani, Valentina; Gabbanini, Massimo; Sollazzi, Sofia; Torricelli, Michela; Calonaci, Francesco; Petraglia, Felice

    2009-01-01

    Following myomectomy the rate of fertility is restored and pregnancy may be attempted with a good outcome. In the present study a 3 month treatment with OCs in a group of women after a myomectomy was evaluated. The drug compliance and side effects, the benefits of OC in order to reduce symptoms, to increase post-surgical hemoglobin levels and to avoid an early pregnancy after myomectomy were analyzed. A group of women (n = 55) each with myoma >/=5 cm was recruited: they presented menorrhagia, pelvic pain, dyspareunia and dysmenorrhae. After laparotomic myomectomy the women were divided into 3 groups. Group 1: women (n = 16) treated with pill A (15 mcg of ethynilestradiol + 60 mcg of gestodene); group 2: women (n = 23) treated with pill B (20 mcg of ethynilestradiol + 100 mcg of levonorgestrel); group 3: women (n = 16) treated with a placebo (oral calcium). After three months from myomectomy and treatment patients in each group reported a reduced menorrhagia, dismenorrhea and pelvic pain. Serum haemoglobin levels increased in all women (P < .05). No pregnancy occurred in any group and the compliance was good. A post surgery treatment by using oral contraceptives guarentees pregnancy prevention, associated with reduction of pain, and improvement of haematologic conditions.

  19. Oral Contraceptives after Myomectomy: A Short Term Trial

    PubMed Central

    Luisi, Stefano; Ciani, Valentina; Gabbanini, Massimo; Sollazzi, Sofia; Torricelli, Michela; Calonaci, Francesco; Petraglia, Felice

    2009-01-01

    Following myomectomy the rate of fertility is restored and pregnancy may be attempted with a good outcome. In the present study a 3 month treatment with OCs in a group of women after a myomectomy was evaluated. The drug compliance and side effects, the benefits of OC in order to reduce symptoms, to increase post-surgical hemoglobin levels and to avoid an early pregnancy after myomectomy were analyzed. A group of women (n = 55) each with myoma ≥5 cm was recruited: they presented menorrhagia, pelvic pain, dyspareunia and dysmenorrhae. After laparotomic myomectomy the women were divided into 3 groups. Group 1: women (n = 16) treated with pill A (15 mcg of ethynilestradiol + 60 mcg of gestodene); group 2: women (n = 23) treated with pill B (20 mcg of ethynilestradiol + 100 mcg of levonorgestrel); group 3: women (n = 16) treated with a placebo (oral calcium). After three months from myomectomy and treatment patients in each group reported a reduced menorrhagia, dismenorrhea and pelvic pain. Serum haemoglobin levels increased in all women (P < .05). No pregnancy occurred in any group and the compliance was good. A post surgery treatment by using oral contraceptives guarentees pregnancy prevention, associated with reduction of pain, and improvement of haematologic conditions. PMID:19946429

  20. The relationship of self-concept and autonomy to oral contraceptive compliance among adolescent females.

    PubMed

    Neel, E U; Jay, S; Litt, I F

    1985-11-01

    Self-concept and autonomy are typically negotiated during adolescence, a time when many females also become sexually active. Nonuse and discontinuation of contraceptives by teenagers place them at high risk for pregnancy. The present study explores the relationship between these psychological factors and contraceptive noncompliance during adolescence. Fifty-five adolescent females beginning a contraceptive regimen were entered into the study. Compliance at four months after the initiation of an oral contraceptive was associated with scoring high on the Behavior Subscale of the Piers-Harris Self-Concept Scale and the Autonomy Scale modified from Eysenk.

  1. The relationship of self-concept and autonomy to oral contraceptive compliance among adolescent females.

    PubMed

    Neel, E U; Jay, S; Litt, I F

    1985-11-01

    Self-concept and autonomy are typically negotiated during adolescence, a time when many females also become sexually active. Nonuse and discontinuation of contraceptives by teenagers place them at high risk for pregnancy. The present study explores the relationship between these psychological factors and contraceptive noncompliance during adolescence. Fifty-five adolescent females beginning a contraceptive regimen were entered into the study. Compliance at four months after the initiation of an oral contraceptive was associated with scoring high on the Behavior Subscale of the Piers-Harris Self-Concept Scale and the Autonomy Scale modified from Eysenk. PMID:4055464

  2. Efficacy of a combined contraceptive regimen consisting of condoms and emergency contraception pills

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To evaluate and compare the effectiveness of the combined regimen (consisting of condoms and emergency contraception pills (ECP)) and using condoms only for the purpose of preventing pregnancy. Methods One-thousand-five-hundred-and-sixty-two (1,562) couples as volunteers enrolled at nine centers in Shanghai. Eight-hundred-and-twelve (812) were randomized to use male condoms and ECP (i.e., Levonorgestrel) as a back-up to condoms (the intervention group) and 750 to use male condoms only(the control group), according to their working unit. Participants were visited at admission and at the end of 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. The cumulative life table rates were calculated for pregnancy and other reasons for discontinuation. Result The gross cumulative life table rates showed that the cumulative discontinuation rates for all reasons during the year of follow-up in the condoms plus emergency contraception group and the condoms only group were 7.76 ± 0.94 and 6.61 ± 0.91, respectively, per 100 women (χ2 = 0.41, p = 0.5227). The cumulative gross pregnancy rate of the condoms plus emergency contraception group and the condoms only group were 2.17 ± 0.52 and 1.25 ± 0.41, respectively, per 100 women (χ2 = 1.93, p = 0.1645). The Pearl Index in the condoms plus emergency contraception group and the condoms only group were 2.21% and 1.26%, respectively. Conclusion Male condoms remain a highly effective contraceptive method for a period of one year while consistently and correctly used. In addition, the lowest pregnancy rate followed from perfect use condom. PMID:24725355

  3. The effects of oral contraceptives on plasma lipids and lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Krauss, R M

    1988-01-01

    It has been well documented that low-density lipoproteins and intermediate-density lipoproteins play a role in the development of atherosclerosis. Data also indicate that high-density lipoproteins (HDLs), have potentially antiatherogenic effects. The individual estrogen and progestogen components of oral contraceptives (OCs) have been shown to affect plasma lipoproteins in both cross-sectional and longitudinal studies. This effect depends on both the type of steroid used and the dose of each of the OC components. Estrogen and progestogen have opposing effects on lipoprotein physiology. Estrogens raise the level of HDL cholesterol, while progestogens tend to lower HDL levels. Thus, in OC formulations, as the ratio of estrogen to progestogen increases in favor of estrogen, there is a greater increase in HDL cholesterol--a potentially beneficial effect. Although there is no direct evidence that favorable lipoprotein changes produced by OCs are cardioprotective, the physician prescribing an OC should minimize adverse lipoprotein effects by prescribing a balanced low-dose, low-impact formulation.

  4. Clinical utility of folate-containing oral contraceptives

    PubMed Central

    Lassi, Zohra S; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2012-01-01

    Folate is a generic term for a water-soluble B-complex vitamin which plays an important role in protein synthesis and metabolism and other processes related to cell multiplication and tissue growth. Pregnant and lactating women are at increased risk of folic acid deficiency because generally their dietary folate is insufficient to meet their physiological requirements and the metabolic demands of the growing fetus. The evidence pertaining to the reduction of the risk of neural tube defects (NTDs) due to folate is so compelling that supplementation with 400 μg of folic acid to all women trying to conceive until 12 weeks of pregnancy has been recommended by every relevant authority. A recent Cochrane review has also found protective effects of folate supplementation in occurrence and reoccurrence of NTDs. Despite food fortification and targeted public health campaigns promoting folic acid supplementation, 4,300,000 new cases occur each year worldwide resulting in an estimated 41,000 deaths and 2.3 million disability-adjusted life years (DALYS). This article will review the burden and risk factors of NTDS, and the role of folate in preventing NTDs. It will also describe different modes of supplementing folate and the newer evidence of the effectiveness of adding folate in oral contraceptives for raising serum and red blood cell folate levels. PMID:22570577

  5. Inconsistent use of oral contraceptives in rural Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Khan, M Asaduzzaman; Trottier, Dorace A; Islam, M Ataharul

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore predictors of inconsistent use of oral contraceptives (OCs) in rural Bangladesh. A total of 801 rural OC users were included in the study, about half of them (49%) missed one or more active pill(s) during the 6 months before the survey.Multivariate analysis revealed that Muslim women were 60% more likely to be inconsistent OC users compared to their non-Muslim counterparts. Women who lacked knowledge about contraindications were 60% more likely to take the pill inconsistently than were women who had the knowledge. Women who were not visited by family planning workers or did not have access to mass media were 40% more likely to be inconsistent OC users.OC users need increased information about correct OC use, which could be provided via improved access to mass media with specific messages on how to use OCs properly. Better access to the community clinics could improve the pill-taking behaviors of rural Bangladeshi women.

  6. Comparison of Drospirenone- with Cyproterone Acetate-Containing Oral Contraceptives, Combined with Metformin and Lifestyle Modifications in Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome and Metabolic Disorders: A Prospective Randomized Control Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiu-Yi; Song, Yong; Huang, Wei; Xiao, Li; Wang, Qiu-Shi; Feng, Gui-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Background: While combined oral contraceptives (COCs) are commonly used to treat polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), comparative data regarding metabolic effects of different progestogens on this patient population are missing. This study aimed to compare the different effects of drospirenone (DRP)-containing COCs with cyproterone acetate (CPA)-containing COCs, combined with metformin and lifestyle modifications in women with PCOS and metabolic disorders. Methods: Ninety-nine women with PCOS and a metabolic disorder between January 2011 and January 2013 were enrolled into this prospective randomized clinical trial. Participants were randomized into two groups such as DRP-containing COCs, and CPA-containing COCs. Participants took COCs cyclically for 6 months, combined with metformin administration (1.5 g/d) and lifestyle modifications (diet and exercise). Clinical measures and biochemical and hormone profiles were compared. Comparisons for continuous variables were evaluated with paired and unpaired Student's t-tests. The Wilcoxon signed rank test was used when the data were not normally distributed. Analysis of covariance was used to control for age, body mass index (BMI), and baseline data of each analyzed parameter when compared between the two groups. Results: A total of 68 patients have completed the study. The combination regimen of COCs, metformin, and lifestyle modifications in these patients resulted in a significant decrease in BMI, acne, and hirsutism scores when compared to baseline levels in both groups (P < 0.05). Blood pressure (BP) was significantly different in the CPA group when compared to baseline (75.14 ± 6.77 mmHg vs. 80.70 ± 5.60 mmHg, P < 0.01), and after 6 months of treatment, only the change in systolic BP was significantly different between the two groups (4.00 [–6.00, 13.00] mmHg vs. –3.50 [–13.00, 9.00] mmHg, P = 0.009). Fasting glucose, fasting insulin, and homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance decreased significantly

  7. Follow-up of adolescent oral contraceptive users.

    PubMed

    Delmore, T; Kalagian, W F; Loewen, I R

    1991-01-01

    Clients in birth control centers (St. Catharines, Niagara Falls, and Welland) in Ontario, Canada were profiled in 1989; factors affecting compliance with the use of oral contraceptives (OCs) were investigated. Compliance was assessed for those 16 years and after 3 months of OC use. A control group and 2 study groups were randomly formed. 1 group was told about a follow up telephone call if the 3-month checkup appointment was not kept and the other not told. Compliance was determined by keeping the follow-up appointment and taking the pill as directed. Self-administered questionnaires were obtained at the 1st appointment and the 2nd study group was interviewed at the 3-month appointment time. Of the 334 intake interviews, 28.4% were adolescents 16 years old. Information on birth control came most frequently from friends (78.7%; then high school classmates, 61.4% grade school classmates, 61.4%; and family, 38.0%). 94.3% had a boyfriend, primarily a steady one. 82.4% were sexually active before the Center visit. 21.3% had had sex when 15 years old. 9.2% of those sexually active had never used birth control. 85.2% of those using contraception had used a condom at least once, and 33.9% used withdrawal. In the preceding month, birth control was used 60% of the time. 46% of mothers and 25% of fathers were considered supportive of birth control. 228 16 years participated in the compliance study. The 2 study groups and the control group were not significantly different in their compliance. The only statistically significant predictor of compliance (from the intake interview) was the previous use of the condom. Those more likely to be compliant were the 10.9% sexually active who had never used a condom. Continuing with the family doctor, not sexually active, advice to stop, side effects concerns, and remembering to take the pill were the most common reasons for noncompliance. The implication for health and sex education is that emphasis needs to the placed on the risks taken

  8. Reproductive Health Outcomes of Insured Women Who Access Oral Levonorgestrel Emergency Contraception

    PubMed Central

    Raine-Bennett, Tina; Merchant, Maqdooda; Sinclair, Fiona; Lee, Justine W.; Goler, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess the level of risk for women who seek emergency contraception through various clinical routes and the opportunities for improved care provision. Methods This study looked at a retrospective cohort to assess contraception and other reproductive health outcomes among women aged 15-44 who accessed oral levonorgestrel emergency contraception through an office visit or the call center at Kaiser Permanente Northern California from 2010 to 2011. Results Of 21,421 prescriptions, 14,531(67.8%) were accessed through the call center. In the subsequent 12 months, 12,127(56.6%) women had short-acting contraception (pills, patches, rings, depot medroxyprogesterone) dispensed and 2,264(10.6%) initiated very effective contraception (intrauterine contraception, implants, sterilization). Initiation of very effective contraception was similar for women who accessed it through the call center -1,569(10.8%) and office visits – 695(10.1%) (adjusted OR 1.02 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.93-1.13). In the subsequent 6 months, 2,056(9.6%) women became pregnant. Women who accessed emergency contraception through the call center were less likely to become pregnant within 3 months of accessing emergency contraception than woman who accessed it through office visits (adjusted OR 0.82 95% CI 0.72-0.94); however they were more likely to become pregnant within 4-6 months (adjusted OR 1.37 95%CI 1.16-1.60). Among women who were tested for chlamydia and gonorrhea, 689(7.8%) and 928(7.9%) were positive in the 12 months before and after accessing emergency contraception, respectively. Conclusions Protocols to routinely address unmet need for contraception at every call for emergency contraception and all office visits including visits with primary care providers should be investigated. PMID:25751211

  9. Greater Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Mediated Vasodilation in Women Using Oral Contraceptives

    PubMed Central

    Limberg, Jacqueline K.; Peltonen, Garrett L.; Johansson, Rebecca E.; Harrell, John W.; Kellawan, Jeremy M.; Eldridge, Marlowe W.; Sebranek, Joshua J.; Walker, Benjamin J.; Schrage, William G.

    2016-01-01

    Background: β-adrenergic receptors play an important role in mitigating the pressor effects of sympathetic nervous system activity in young women. Based on recent data showing oral contraceptive use in women abolishes the relationship between muscle sympathetic nervous system activity and blood pressure, we hypothesized forearm blood flow responses to a β-adrenergic receptor agonist would be greater in young women currently using oral contraceptives (OC+, n = 13) when compared to those not using oral contraceptives (OC–, n = 10). Methods: Women (18–35 years) were studied during the early follicular phase of the menstrual cycle (days 1–5) or placebo phase of oral contraceptive use. Forearm blood flow (FBF, Doppler ultrasound) and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP, brachial arterial catheter) were measured at baseline and during graded brachial artery infusion of the β-adrenergic receptor agonist, Isoproterenol (ISO), as well as Acetylcholine (ACH, endothelium-dependent vasodilation) and Nitroprusside (NTP, endothelium-independent vasodilation). Forearm vascular conductance was calculated (FVC = FBF/MAP, ml/min/100 mmHg) and the rise in FVC from baseline during infusion quantified vasodilation (ΔFVC = FVCinfusion − FVCbaseline). Results: ISO increased FVC in both groups (p < 0.01) and ISO-mediated ΔFVC was greater in OC+ compared to OC– (Main effect of group, p = 0.02). Expressing data as FVC and FBF resulted in similar conclusions. FVC responses to both ACH and NTP were also greater in OC+ compared to OC–. Conclusions: These data are the first to demonstrate greater β-adrenergic receptor-mediated vasodilation in the forearm of women currently using oral contraceptives (placebo phase) when compared to those not using oral contraceptives (early follicular phase), and suggest oral contraceptive use influences neurovascular control. PMID:27375493

  10. A review of "once-a-month" combined injectable contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Newton, J R; D'arcangues, C; Hall, P E

    1994-01-01

    The once-a-month combined progestogen and estrogen injectables were developed to overcome menstrual irregularity, a major reason for discontinuation of progestogen-only contraceptives. About 2 million women have already used the combined once-a-month injectables, particularly in Latin America and China. The currently available once-a-month combined injectable contraceptives are Chinese Injectable No. 1 (17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone caproate, estradiol valerate), another formulation marketed under various brand names in Latin America (dihydroxyprogesterone acetophenide, estradiol enanthate), Cyclofem (medroxyprogesterone acetate [MPA], estradiol cypionate), Mesigyna (norethisterone enanthate, estradiol valerate), and Mego-E (megestrol acetate, 17 beta-estradiol). Cyclofem and Mesigyna are very effective at preventing pregnancy (1-year rate, 99.8-99.6%). The rate for the dihydroxyprogesterone acetophenide/estradiol enanthate formulation is 100%, while that for Chinese Injectable No. 1 is 94%. Even though menstrual disturbances occur less often in once-a-month injectable users, they are the leading medical reason for discontinuation. At 1 year of use, about 70% of Cyclofem and Mesigyna users have regular bleeding patterns compared to 8% of Depo-Provera users. None of the Cyclofem and Mesigyna studies have found them to induce any adverse or clinically relevant metabolic changes. Once-a-month combined estrogen and progestogen injectables do not cause any significant delay in return to ovulation, but researchers should collect more data on conception rates for women who discontinue for planned pregnancy and those who discontinue for bleeding disorders and amenorrhea. Research into service delivery of these injectables is needed to assess managerial requirements or adaptations that would be required should there be more wide scale introduction of a contraceptive into both public and private sectors. Age, contraceptive history, learning about injectables and husbands

  11. Effect of injectable and oral contraceptives on serum lipids

    PubMed Central

    Berenson, Abbey B.; Rahman, Mahbubur; Wilkinson, Gregg

    2010-01-01

    Objective To estimate the effects of using depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) or oral contraceptives (OC) containing 20 micrograms ethinyl estradiol and 0.15 mg desogestrel on serum lipid levels. Methods Serum lipids were measured at baseline and every 6 months thereafter for 3 years on 703 white, black, and Hispanic women using DMPA, OC, or nonhormonal (NH) birth control. DMPA discontinuers were followed for up to 2 additional years. Participants completed questionnaires containing demographic and behavioral measures every 6 months and underwent 24 hour dietary recalls annually. Mixed model regression analyses and general estimating equations procedures were used to estimate changes over time in lipids by method, along with their predictors. Results OC users experienced significantly greater increases in levels of triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), very low density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL-C), and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) than NH users (P<.001). However, no difference was noted in the LDL-C to HDL-C ratio between OC and NH users. Among DMPA users, HDL-C levels initially decreased for 6 months, but then returned to baseline. The LDL-C to HDL-C ratio rose during the first 6 months of DMPA use, but then dropped back to baseline over the next 24 months. After DMPA was discontinued, women who used OC increased their TG, TC, VLDL-C, and HDL-C levels significantly more than those who chose NH (P< .05). Conclusion Use of very low dose OC containing desogestrel can elevate lipid levels. DMPA users were at increased risk of developing an abnormally low HDL-C level as well as an abnormally high LDL level and an increase in the LDL to HDL cholesterol ratio, although these effects appeared to be temporary. PMID:19888036

  12. The in vitro effect of aspirin on increased whole blood platelet aggregation in oral contraceptive users.

    PubMed

    Norris, L A; Bonnar, J

    1994-05-01

    The effects of triphasic oral contraceptives on whole blood platelet aggregation in 36 Italian women are reported here. Aspirin's effects on platelet aggregation were also studied. 18 women took a triphasic oral contraceptive; 10 women took Trinordiol, while 8 took Trinovum for at least 90 days. The remaining 18 women took nothing and served as controls. The study was aligned with each woman's birth control pill cycle. Blood was taken daily on days 15-21 of their cycle. Either saline solution or acetylsalicylic acid was added to the blood samples and compared. All data was statistically analyzed using unpaired student's t-test. Effects of 3 aggregating agents, ADP, PAF, and EDTA, on platelet aggregation were studied. Arachidonic acid and adrenalin bitartrate were also studied in this manner. An increase in platelet aggregation was observed in women taking oral contraceptives. No difference was found between patients taking Trinordiol and those taking Trinovum. The results of this study indicate an increase in whole blood platelet sensitivity to collagen, adrenalin, and arachidonic acid when using oral contraceptives. Aspirin, at low doses, may have a role in preventing early thrombus formation in women taking oral contraceptives. PMID:8042198

  13. Comparing the effects of the second-and third-generation oral contraceptives on sexual functioning

    PubMed Central

    Shahnazi, Mahnaz; Bayatipayan, Somaye; Khalili, Azizeh Farshbaf; Kochaksaraei, Fatemeh Ranjbar; Jafarabadi, Mohammad Asghari; Banoi, Kamala Gaza; Nahaee, Jila

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to compare the effects of the second- and third-generation oral contraceptives on women's reproductive sexual function. Materials and Methods: This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted on 82 married women of reproductive age in Tehran. Samples were randomized into the groups receiving second- and third-generation oral contraceptive pills. Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) tool was used before the intervention and 2 and 4 months after the intervention. Data analysis was carried out using analysis of variance (ANOVA) within repeated measures and P < 0.05 were considered significant. Results: There was a statistically significant difference in the positive and negative moods between the experimental and control groups before the intervention in the second and fourth months. The second-generation pills caused a decrease in sexual function in the second month and an increase in sexual function in the fourth month, but the third-generation pills led to an increase in sexual function in the second and fourth months. The increase in sexual function that resulted from using the third-generation pills was significantly higher than that resulted on using the second-generation pills. Conclusions: According to the results of this study, sexual functioning decreased in the second month of using the second-generation pills and sexual performance was significantly more on using the third-generation pills compared to second-generation pills. The most common type of oral contraceptive used in Iran is the second-generation oral contraceptive LD™ (low-dose estrogen), which is freely distributed in health centers. Therefore, it is necessary for women who wish to use these contraceptive methods to be educated and consulted before they start using them. The third-generation contraceptive pills can be recommended to women who wish to use oral contraceptives. PMID:25709690

  14. Cycle-Related Changes in Mood, Sexual Desire, and Sexual Activity in Oral Contraception-Using and Nonhormonal-Contraception-Using Couples.

    PubMed

    Elaut, Els; Buysse, Ann; De Sutter, Petra; Gerris, Jan; De Cuypere, Griet; T'Sjoen, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Findings on women's sexuality across the menstrual cycle are inconsistent. One relatively consistent finding is a midcycle and premenstrual peak in sexual desire in freely cycling women. Results on the cycle-related effects on sexual behavior are less clear. Large proportions of reproductive-aged women use combined oral contraception (COC), but studies on potential cycle-related shifts in sexual desire and behavior are sparse. A prospective diary study assessed sexual desire, sexual behavior, and mood in 89 heterosexual couples. Women were using one of four contraceptive methods: (1) nonhormonal contraception, (2) low-dose COC containing 20 mcg ethinylestradiol and 75 mcg gestoden or desogestrel, (3) COC containing 35 mcg ethinylestradiol and 2 mg cyproteronacetate, and (4) COC containing 30 mcg ethinylestradiol and 3 mg drospirenone. No cycle effects of sexual desire were established in the COC group, but frequency of sexual intercourse declined in the last days of active pill taking. These results were similar in both female and male partners. Negative affect did not covary with sexual desire.

  15. Early Impact Of The Affordable Care Act On Oral Contraceptive Cost Sharing, Discontinuation, And Nonadherence.

    PubMed

    Pace, Lydia E; Dusetzina, Stacie B; Keating, Nancy L

    2016-09-01

    The oral contraceptive pill is the contraceptive method most commonly used by US women, but inconsistent use of the pill is a contributor to high rates of unintended pregnancy. The relationship between consumer cost sharing and consistent use of the pill is not well understood, and the impact of the elimination of cost sharing for oral contraceptive pills in a mandate in the Affordable Care Act (ACA) is not yet known. We analyzed insurance claims for 635,075 women with employer-sponsored insurance who were initiating use of the pill, to examine rates of discontinuation and nonadherence, their relationship with cost sharing, and trends before and during the first year after implementation of the ACA mandate. We found that cost sharing for oral contraceptives decreased markedly following implementation, more significantly for generic than for brand-name versions. Higher copays were associated with greater discontinuation of and nonadherence to generic pills than was the case with zero copayments. Discontinuation of the use of generic or brand-name pills decreased slightly but significantly following ACA implementation, as did nonadherence to brand-name pills. Our findings suggest a modest early impact of the ACA on improving consistent use of oral contraceptives among women initiating their use.

  16. Early Impact Of The Affordable Care Act On Oral Contraceptive Cost Sharing, Discontinuation, And Nonadherence.

    PubMed

    Pace, Lydia E; Dusetzina, Stacie B; Keating, Nancy L

    2016-09-01

    The oral contraceptive pill is the contraceptive method most commonly used by US women, but inconsistent use of the pill is a contributor to high rates of unintended pregnancy. The relationship between consumer cost sharing and consistent use of the pill is not well understood, and the impact of the elimination of cost sharing for oral contraceptive pills in a mandate in the Affordable Care Act (ACA) is not yet known. We analyzed insurance claims for 635,075 women with employer-sponsored insurance who were initiating use of the pill, to examine rates of discontinuation and nonadherence, their relationship with cost sharing, and trends before and during the first year after implementation of the ACA mandate. We found that cost sharing for oral contraceptives decreased markedly following implementation, more significantly for generic than for brand-name versions. Higher copays were associated with greater discontinuation of and nonadherence to generic pills than was the case with zero copayments. Discontinuation of the use of generic or brand-name pills decreased slightly but significantly following ACA implementation, as did nonadherence to brand-name pills. Our findings suggest a modest early impact of the ACA on improving consistent use of oral contraceptives among women initiating their use. PMID:27605641

  17. Partner choice, relationship satisfaction, and oral contraception: the congruency hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Roberts, S Craig; Little, Anthony C; Burriss, Robert P; Cobey, Kelly D; Klapilová, Kateřina; Havlíček, Jan; Jones, Benedict C; DeBruine, Lisa; Petrie, Marion

    2014-07-01

    Hormonal fluctuation across the menstrual cycle explains temporal variation in women's judgment of the attractiveness of members of the opposite sex. Use of hormonal contraceptives could therefore influence both initial partner choice and, if contraceptive use subsequently changes, intrapair dynamics. Associations between hormonal contraceptive use and relationship satisfaction may thus be best understood by considering whether current use is congruent with use when relationships formed, rather than by considering current use alone. In the study reported here, we tested this congruency hypothesis in a survey of 365 couples. Controlling for potential confounds (including relationship duration, age, parenthood, and income), we found that congruency in current and previous hormonal contraceptive use, but not current use alone, predicted women's sexual satisfaction with their partners. Congruency was not associated with women's nonsexual satisfaction or with the satisfaction of their male partners. Our results provide empirical support for the congruency hypothesis and suggest that women's sexual satisfaction is influenced by changes in partner preference associated with change in hormonal contraceptive use.

  18. Lack of effect of oral contraceptive use on the pharmacokinetics of quinine.

    PubMed Central

    Wanwimolruk, S; Kaewvichit, S; Tanthayaphinant, O; Suwannarach, C; Oranratnachai, A

    1991-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of quinine after a single 600 mg oral dose of quinine sulphate were studied in seven female subjects who used oral contraceptives and in seven age-matched female controls who did not. There were no significant differences (P greater than 0.05) in the maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) and the time of peak concentration (tmax) between the subjects who used oral contraceptives (Cmax = 5.3 +/- 1.0 (s.d.) mg l-1; tmax = 1.4 +/- 0.7 h) and the control subjects (Cmax = 5.6 +/- 0.9 mg l-1; tmax = 2.1 +/- 0.9 h). The mean elimination half-life of quinine in the oral contraceptives user group (12.5 +/- 1.9 h) was similar (P greater than 0.05) to that in the control group (11.8 +/- 2.7 h). The oral clearance of quinine in the oral contraceptive user group was 0.133 +/- 0.055 l h-1 kg-1 (range 0.073-0.233) and was not significantly different (P greater than 0.05) from that observed in the control group (0.125 +/- 0.025 l h-1 kg-1, range 0.075-0.148). PMID:2049234

  19. A refractory fixed drug reaction to a dye used in an oral contraceptive.

    PubMed

    Ritter, Steven E; Meffert, Jeffrey

    2004-10-01

    A young woman presented with a classic fixed drug eruption (FDE) after taking the inactive green pills of her oral contraceptives (OCs). The patient's history was unique in that the FDE did not occur every time she took the inactive pills but was refractory, occurring every third month within hours after she took the green pills. After discontinuing the green pills but continuing the active oral contraceptive pills, the patient has not experienced a recurrence of the rash in more than 2 years. This case report reviews the unusual phenomenon of refractory periods in FDEs and highlights the importance of understanding this phenomenon in the diagnosis of drug eruptions. PMID:15551717

  20. [Vascular risk of oral contraceptive agents: realities and mechanisms. I. Risk evaluation].

    PubMed

    Beaumont, V; Beaumont, J L

    1989-06-17

    The suspected risk of oral contraception was confirmed when large scale epidemiological studies became available. The present work recalls the methodology of a good evaluation, the pros and cons of retrospective and prospective studies, the different appreciations provided by measuring "relative risk" or "attributable risk". In terms of public health, the data obtained supported the necessity to include mortality related to oral contraception in an evaluation of reproductive mortality. This work compares the incidence of vascular complications evaluated through different studies, according to the criteria selected and the type of vascular disease. The advantage of lowering estrogen content is considered. PMID:2525761

  1. Forgettable contraception.

    PubMed

    Grimes, David A

    2009-12-01

    The term "forgettable contraception" has received less attention in family planning than has "long-acting reversible contraception." Defined here as a method requiring attention no more often than every 3 years, forgettable contraception includes sterilization (female or male), intrauterine devices, and implants. Five principal factors determine contraceptive effectiveness: efficacy, compliance, continuation, fecundity, and the timing of coitus. Of these, compliance and continuation dominate; the key determinants of contraceptive effectiveness are human, not pharmacological. Human nature undermines methods with high theoretical efficacy, such as oral contraceptives and injectable contraceptives. By obviating the need to think about contraception for long intervals, forgettable contraception can help overcome our human fallibility. As a result, all forgettable contraception methods provide first-tier effectiveness (contraceptives today with exclusively first-tier effectiveness is the one that can be started -- and then forgotten for years.

  2. Decreased maximal aerobic capacity with use of a triphasic oral contraceptive in highly active women: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Lebrun, C; Petit, M; McKenzie, D; Taunton, J; Prior, J

    2003-01-01

    Background: Oral contraceptives are commonly used by women athletes. However, their effect on athletic performance is unclear. Objectives: To examine the effects of a moderate dose, triphasic oral contraceptive on measures of athletic performance in highly trained women athletes. Methods: This is a double blind, placebo controlled trial in 14 women with ovulatory menstrual cycles and maximal aerobic capacity (VO2MAX) ≥50 ml/kg/min. Four measures of athletic performance were tested: VO2MAX, anaerobic capacity (anaerobic speed test), aerobic endurance (time to fatigue at 90% of VO2MAX), and isokinetic strength (Cybex II dynamometer). Height, weight, and six skinfold measurements were also recorded. All these observational tests were completed during both the follicular and mid-luteal phases of an ovulatory menstrual cycle. Cycle phases were confirmed by assaying plasma oestradiol and progesterone. Participants were subsequently randomly assigned to either a tricyclic oral contraceptive or placebo and retested in identical fashion (oral contraceptive phase). Results: Absolute and relative changes in VO2MAX from follicular to oral contraceptive phase decreased in the oral contraceptive group by 4.7%, whereas the placebo group showed a slight increase (+1.5%) over the same time period. Two of the women taking oral contraceptive had decreases of 4 and 9 ml/kg/min. In contrast, most women in the placebo group improved or maintained VO2MAX. There was also a significant increase in the sum of skinfolds in women taking oral contraceptive compared with those taking placebo (p<0.01). There were no significant changes in other physiological variables (maximum ventilation, heart rate, respiratory exchange ratio, packed cell volume) or measures of performance (anaerobic speed test, aerobic endurance, isokinetic strength) as a function of oral contraceptive treatment. Conclusions: The decrease in VO2MAX that occurs when oral contraceptive is taken may influence elite sporting

  3. Factor V Leiden: should we screen oral contraceptive users and pregnant women?

    PubMed Central

    Vandenbroucke, J. P.; van der Meer, F. J.; Helmerhorst, F. M.; Rosendaal, F. R.

    1996-01-01

    The factor V Leiden mutation is the most common genetic risk factor for deep vein thrombosis: it is present in about 5% of the white population. The risk of deep vein thrombosis among women who use oral contraceptives is greatly increased by the presence of the mutation. The same seems to be true of the risk of postpartum thrombosis. Several authors have called for all women to be screened before prescription of oral contraceptives and during pregnancy. Such a policy might deny effective contraception to a substantial number of women while preventing only a small number of deaths due to pulmonary emboli. Moreover, in pregnancy the ensuing use of oral anticoagulation prophylaxis might carry a penalty of fatal bleeding that is equal to or exceeds the risk of death due to postpartum thrombosis. It might pay, however, to take a personal and family history of deep vein thrombosis when prescribing oral contraceptives or at a first antenatal visit to detect women from families with a tendency to multiple thrombosis. Images p1129-a PMID:8916702

  4. 21 CFR 310.501 - Patient package inserts for oral contraceptives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... 310.501 Section 310.501 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... concerning the increased risks associated with cigarette smoking and oral contraceptive use. (5) A discussion..., Division of Reproductive and Urologic Products, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire...

  5. 21 CFR 310.501 - Patient package inserts for oral contraceptives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... 310.501 Section 310.501 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... concerning the increased risks associated with cigarette smoking and oral contraceptive use. (5) A discussion..., Division of Reproductive and Urologic Products, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire...

  6. 21 CFR 310.501 - Patient package inserts for oral contraceptives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... 310.501 Section 310.501 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... concerning the increased risks associated with cigarette smoking and oral contraceptive use. (5) A discussion..., Division of Reproductive and Urologic Products, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire...

  7. 21 CFR 310.501 - Patient package inserts for oral contraceptives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... 310.501 Section 310.501 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... concerning the increased risks associated with cigarette smoking and oral contraceptive use. (5) A discussion..., Division of Reproductive and Urologic Products, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire...

  8. Factor V Leiden: should we screen oral contraceptive users and pregnant women?

    PubMed

    Vandenbroucke, J P; van der Meer, F J; Helmerhorst, F M; Rosendaal, F R

    1996-11-01

    The factor V Leiden mutation is the most common genetic risk factor for deep vein thrombosis: it is present in about 5% of the white population. The risk of deep vein thrombosis among women who use oral contraceptives is greatly increased by the presence of the mutation. The same seems to be true of the risk of postpartum thrombosis. Several authors have called for all women to be screened before prescription of oral contraceptives and during pregnancy. Such a policy might deny effective contraception to a substantial number of women while preventing only a small number of deaths due to pulmonary emboli. Moreover, in pregnancy the ensuing use of oral anticoagulation prophylaxis might carry a penalty of fatal bleeding that is equal to or exceeds the risk of death due to postpartum thrombosis. It might pay, however, to take a personal and family history of deep vein thrombosis when prescribing oral contraceptives or at a first antenatal visit to detect women from families with a tendency to multiple thrombosis.

  9. The link between oral contraceptive use and prevalence in autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Strifert, Kim

    2014-12-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a group of developmental disabilities that include full syndrome autism, Asperger's syndrome, and other pervasive developmental disorders. The identified prevalence of ASD has increased in a short time period across multiple studies causing some to conclude that it has reached epidemic proportions in the U.S. Many possible explanations for the rise in numbers of individuals diagnosed with ASD have been offered and yet, causes and contributing factors for ASD are inadequately understood. Current evidence suggests that both genetics and environment play a part in causing ASD. One possible risk factor for the increase in prevalence has been profoundly overlooked in the existing biomedical and epidemiologic literature. As the prevalence of ASD has risen in the last sixty years, so has the prevalence of the usage of the oral contraceptives and other modern hormonal delivery methods. In 1960 about one million American women were using oral contraceptives, today close to 11 million women in the U.S. use oral contraceptives. Eighty-two percent of sexually active women in the U.S. have used oral contraceptives at some point during their reproductive years. Thus, the growth in use of progesterone/estrogen-based contraceptives in the United State has reached near-ubiquitous levels among women in the child-bearing age range. The suppression of ovulation produced by estrogen-progesterone is an indisputable abnormality. It is logical to consider the outcome of the ovum that would have been normally released from the ovary during ovulation. To date there is no comprehensive research into the potential neurodevelopmental effects of oral contraceptive use on progeny. The issue has been only sparsely considered in the biomedical literature. This article hypothesizes that the compounds, estrogen and progesterone, used in oral contraceptives modify the condition of the oocyte and give rise to a potent risk factor that helps explain the recent increase

  10. [The statement of Polish Gynecological Society experts on oral use of contraceptive 75 microg desogestrel minipill in different clinical cases--state of art in 2008].

    PubMed

    Debski, Romuald; Kotarski, Jan; Paszkowski, Tomasz; Pawelczyk, Leszek; Skrzypulec, Violetta; Tomaszewski, Jacek

    2009-01-01

    Recent epidemiologic studies indicate that use of combined oral contraception is associated with a increase in the incidence of cardiovascular disease (venous thromboembolism, pulmonary embolism, myocardial infarction and stroke). The risk of cardiovascular disease is strongly related to estrogen dose, progestogen type and other factors for example thrombogenic mutations and cigarette smoking among female over age 35. The progestogen only contraception is safe alternative to combined hormonal contraception. Progestogen only pill (POP) has different levels of action (local and/or central) which may vary from one drug to another. As for the cardiovascular disease risk, progestogens are not considered to be risk factors. Desogestrel containing POP is advised in the following cases: bad tolerance of exogenous oestrogens; in order to counteract an endogenous hyperoestrogenosis; medical, metabolic or cardiovascular contraindications to estroprogestogen contraception. Lastly, POP should be used as a prime contraception in some particular situations (breast feeding, endometriosis, adenomyosis, cigarette smoking, contraception for older women). These recommendations present the actual system of care in that population of women in Poland.

  11. Contraceptive Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troen, Philip; And Others

    This report provides an overview of research activities and needs in the area of contraceptive development. In a review of the present state, discussions are offered on the effectiveness and drawbacks of oral contraceptives, intrauterine devices, barrier methods, natural family planning, and sterilization. Methods of contraception that are in the…

  12. Contraceptive knowledge and attitudes of Austrian adolescents after mass media reports linking third-generation oral contraceptives with an increased risk of venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Egarter, C; Strohmer, H; Lehner, R; Földy, M; Leitich, H; Berghammer, P

    1997-09-01

    We performed a representative survey to determine the level of knowledge of 1,010 Austrian adolescents aged 14 to 24 years about selected facts relating to the recent massive news coverage of the increase in the risk of venous thromboembolism in users of third-generation oral contraceptives and to assess the contraceptive behavior of this population. The overall use rate of oral contraceptives and condoms had increased significantly between 1991 and 1996. Sixty-six percent of the adolescents surveyed stated not having heard or read any media reports on oral contraceptives. Only 8% of those who had knew that most reports focused on the pill as a possible cause of venous thromboembolism, whereas the majority of respondents indicated that the media conveyed doubts regarding the health safety of oral contraceptives in general. Nearly half of adolescents were unable to define what a thrombosis was. Thus, although the mass media play an important role in transmitting medical information, the dissemination of practical, accurate advice on the risks of a drug and competent patient counseling is reserved for the health care professionals. PMID:9347204

  13. Oral contraceptive use, muscle sympathetic nerve activity, and systemic hemodynamics in young women

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Ronee E.; Hart, Emma C.; Charkoudian, Nisha; Curry, Timothy B.; Carter, Jason R.; Fu, Qi; Minson, Christopher T.; Joyner, Michael J.; Barnes, Jill N.

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous female sex hormones influence muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), a regulator of arterial blood pressure and important factor in hypertension development. While nearly 80% of American women report using hormonal contraceptives sometime during their life, the influence of combined oral contraceptives (OCs) on MSNA and systemic hemodynamics remains equivocal. The goal of this study was to determine if women taking OCs have altered MSNA and hemodynamics (cardiac output and total peripheral resistance) at rest during the placebo phase of OC use compared to women with natural menstrual cycles during the early follicular phase. We retrospectively analyzed data from studies in which healthy, premenopausal women (ages 18–35 years old) participated. We collected MSNA values at rest and hemodynamic measurements in women taking OCs (n=53, 25±4 yr) and women with natural menstrual cycles (n=74, 25±4 yr). Blood pressure was higher in women taking OCs versus those with natural menstrual cycles (mean arterial pressure: 89±1 vs. 85±1 mmHg, respectively; p=0.01), although MSNA was similar in both groups (MSNA burst incidence: 16±1 vs. 18±1 bursts/100 heartbeats, respectively, p=0.19). In a subset of women in which detailed hemodynamic data were available, those taking OCs (n=33) had similar cardiac output (4.9±0.2 vs. 4.7±0.2 L/min, respectively; p=0.47) and total peripheral resistance (19.2±0.8 vs. 20.0±0.9 units, respectively; p=0.51) as women with natural menstrual cycles (n=22). In conclusion, women taking OCs have higher resting blood pressure and similar MSNA and hemodynamics during the placebo phase of OC use compared to naturally menstruating women in the early follicular phase. PMID:26101348

  14. Oral Contraceptive Use, Muscle Sympathetic Nerve Activity, and Systemic Hemodynamics in Young Women.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Ronee E; Hart, Emma C; Charkoudian, Nisha; Curry, Timothy B; Carter, Jason R; Fu, Qi; Minson, Christopher T; Joyner, Michael J; Barnes, Jill N

    2015-09-01

    Endogenous female sex hormones influence muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), a regulator of arterial blood pressure and important factor in hypertension development. Although ≈80% of American women report using hormonal contraceptives sometime during their life, the influence of combined oral contraceptives (OCs) on MSNA and systemic hemodynamics remains equivocal. The goal of this study was to determine whether women taking OCs have altered MSNA and hemodynamics (cardiac output and total peripheral resistance) at rest during the placebo phase of OC use compared with women with natural menstrual cycles during the early follicular phase. We retrospectively analyzed data from studies in which healthy, premenopausal women (aged 18-35 years) participated. We collected MSNA values at rest and hemodynamic measurements in women taking OCs (n=53; 25±4 years) and women with natural menstrual cycles (n=74; 25±4 years). Blood pressure was higher in women taking OCs versus those with natural menstrual cycles (mean arterial pressure, 89±1 versus 85±1 mm Hg, respectively; P=0.01), although MSNA was similar in both groups (MSNA burst incidence, 16±1 versus 18±1 bursts/100 heartbeats, respectively; P=0.19). In a subset of women in which detailed hemodynamic data were available, those taking OCs (n=33) had similar cardiac output (4.9±0.2 versus 4.7±0.2 L/min, respectively; P=0.47) and total peripheral resistance (19.2±0.8 versus 20.0±0.9 U, respectively; P=0.51) as women with natural menstrual cycles (n=22). In conclusion, women taking OCs have higher resting blood pressure and similar MSNA and hemodynamics during the placebo phase of OC use when compared with naturally menstruating women in the early follicular phase. PMID:26101348

  15. [Contraception and adolescence].

    PubMed

    Amate, P; Luton, D; Davitian, C

    2013-06-01

    The mean age of first sexual intercourse is still around 17 in France, but a lot of teenagers are concerned by contraception before, with approximately 25% of sexually active 15-year-old girls. The contraceptive method must take into consideration some typical features of this population, as sporadic and non-planned sexual activity, with several sexual partners in a short period of time. In 2004, the "Haute Autorité de santé" has recommended, as first-line method, combined oral contraceptive (COC) pills, in association with male condoms. Copper-containing intrauterine contraceptive devices (IUCD) and etonogestrel-containing subcutaneous implant have been suggested but not recommended. However, oral contraceptive pill, as a user-based method, carries an important typical-use failure rate, because remembering taking a daily pill, and dealing with stop periods, may be challenging. Some easier-to-use method should be kept in mind, as 28-day COC packs, transdermal contraceptive patches, and vaginal contraceptive rings. Moreover, American studies have shown that long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARC), i.e. IUCD and implant, have many advantages for teenagers: very effective, safe, invisible. They seem well-fitted for this population, with high satisfaction and continuation rates, as long as side effects are well explained. Thus, LARC methods should be proposed more widely to teenagers. Anyway, before prescribing a contraceptive method, it is important to determine the specific situation of every teenager, to let them choose the method that they consider as appropriate in their own case, and to think about the availability of the chosen method. It is necessary to explain how to handle mistakes or misses with user-based contraceptive methods, and emergency contraception can be anticipated and prescribed in advanced provision. The use of male condoms should be encouraged for adolescents, with another effective contraceptive method, in order to reduce the high risk

  16. Oral contraceptives, hormone replacement therapy, thrombophilias and risk of venous thromboembolism: a systematic review. The Thrombosis: Risk and Economic Assessment of Thrombophilia Screening (TREATS) Study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Olivia; Robertson, Lindsay; Langhorne, Peter; Twaddle, Sara; Lowe, Gordon D O; Clark, Peter; Greaves, Mike; Walker, Isobel D; Brenkel, Ivan; Regan, Lesley; Greer, Ian A

    2005-07-01

    Combined oral contraceptives, oral hormone replacement therapy and thrombophilias are recognised risk factors for venous thromboembolism in women. The objective of this study was to assess the risk of thromboembolism among women with thrombophilia who are taking oral contraceptives or hormone replacement therapy, conducting a systematic review and metaanalysis. Of 201 studies identified, only nine met the inclusion criteria. Seven studies included pre-menopausal women on oral contraceptives and two studies included peri-menopausal women on hormone replacement therapy. For oral contraceptive use, significant associations of the risk of venous thromboembolism were found in women with factor V Leiden (OR 15.62; 95%CI 8.66 to 28.15); deficiencies of antithrombin (OR 12.60; 95%CI 1.37 to 115.79), protein C (OR 6.33; 95%CI 1.68 to 23.87), or protein S (OR 4.88; 95%CI 1.39 to 17.10), elevated levels of factor VIIIc (OR 8.80; 95%CI 4.13 to 18.75); and factor V Leiden and prothrombin G20210A (OR 7.85; 95%CI 1.65 to 37.41). For hormone replacement therapy, a significant association was found in women with factor V Leiden (OR 13.16; 95%CI 4.28 to 40.47). Although limited by the small number of studies, the findings of this study support the presence of interaction between thrombophilia and venous thromboembolism among women taking oral contraceptives. However, further studies are required to establish with greater confidence the associations of these, and other, thrombophilias with venous thromboembolism among hormone users.

  17. MHC-correlated odour preferences in humans and the use of oral contraceptives

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, S. Craig; Gosling, L. Morris; Carter, Vaughan; Petrie, Marion

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies in animals and humans show that genes in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) influence individual odours and that females often prefer odour of MHC-dissimilar males, perhaps to increase offspring heterozygosity or reduce inbreeding. Women using oral hormonal contraceptives have been reported to have the opposite preference, raising the possibility that oral contraceptives alter female preference towards MHC similarity, with possible fertility costs. Here we test directly whether contraceptive pill use alters odour preferences using a longitudinal design in which women were tested before and after initiating pill use; a control group of non-users were tested with a comparable interval between test sessions. In contrast to some previous studies, there was no significant difference in ratings between odours of MHC-dissimilar and MHC-similar men among women during the follicular cycle phase. However, single women preferred odours of MHC-similar men, while women in relationships preferred odours of MHC-dissimilar men, a result consistent with studies in other species, suggesting that paired females may seek to improve offspring quality through extra-pair partnerships. Across tests, we found a significant preference shift towards MHC similarity associated with pill use, which was not evident in the control group. If odour plays a role in human mate choice, our results suggest that contraceptive pill use could disrupt disassortative mate preferences. PMID:18700206

  18. Massive postoperative pulmonary embolism in a young woman using oral contraceptives: the value of a preoperative anesthetic consult.

    PubMed

    Amar, S; Van Boven, M; Rooijakkers, H; Momeni, M

    2014-01-01

    We describe the case of a woman with a history of active tabagism and on the oral contraceptive Yasmin, presenting in the Post-Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU) with a cardiac arrest due to massive pulmonary embolism following transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion surgery. The patient had preoperatively several risk factors for deep venous thrombosis. This case-report emphasizes the value of a preoperative anesthetic visit and eventual temporary cessation of certain oral contraceptives in specific cases. PMID:25223166

  19. Homozygous patients with APC resistance may remain paucisymptomatic or asymptomatic during oral contraception.

    PubMed

    Girolami, A; Simioni, P; Girolami, B; Radossi, P

    1996-09-01

    The effect of oral contraceptive therapy was studied in five patients with homozygous activated protein C resistance. Patients with this congenital abnormality, in contrast to those with antithrombin, protein C or protein S deficiencies, showed only a mild thrombotic tendency. In fact, only two of six observations (one patient took the pill on two separate occasions many years apart) showed deep vein thrombosis. No patient had pulmonary embolism. Two additional patients had a superficial vein thrombosis of the legs. In two instances, a superficial vein thrombosis and a deep vein thrombosis, concomitant risk factors were present (immobilization and surgery for an ovarian cyst, respectively). However, compared with heterozygous for the same abnormality, the symptomatic homozygous patients with APC resistance appeared to develop thrombosis after a shorter period of oral contraception.

  20. Encephalopathy in renovascular hypertension associated with the use of oral contraceptives.

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, J. R.; Reynolds, J.; Williams, P. F.; Appleton, D. S.

    1986-01-01

    Two female patients aged 19 years and 27 years presented with hypertensive encephalopathy and were subsequently found to have renal artery stenosis due to fibromuscular dysplasia. Both patients had had normal blood pressures recorded within the previous 6 months whilst taking the oral contraceptive pill. Their neurological state returned to normal with hypertensive control and in one case the hypertension was cured by dilatation of the renal artery stenosis by balloon angioplasty. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:3114727

  1. Maternal folate deficiency and pregnancy wastage. IV. Effects of folic acid supplements, anticonvulsants, and oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, J A; Scott, D E; Whalley, P J

    1971-02-01

    A group of studies on indigent hospital patients were conducted on the role of folate supplements, pregnancy and oral contraceptives in megaloblastic anemia. First 25 pregnant women, given 500 mg iron dextran and 30 mg folic acid for 2-3 months, had 12.4% hemoglogin at delivery, compared with 49 women given only iron who had 12.5% hemoglobin, and 49 untreated women who had 11.3% hemoglobin. Second, plasma folate levels in groups of pregnant women were compared: mean folate was 4.7 ng/ml in 82 normal women, 3.1 in 21 treated epileptics, and about 1.2 in 31 women with megaloblastic anemia. In 77 pregnancies in 43 epileptic women there were no reasons to blame low folate levels for pregnancy wastage since no abruptio placentae or bleeding occurred; and incidence of low birth weight, perinatal death, and prematurity was lower than in the general population. Third, the effect of oral contraceptives on folate levels was observed. Mean plasma folate levels were 8.1 ng/ml in 55 control women, 8.0 in 57 women using the pill, 4.7 in normal women in late pregnancy, and about 1.1 in pregnant women with megaloblastic anemia. Fourth, mean hemoglobin levels rose from 7.6 to 13.4 9m/100 ml within a few weeks in 5 women with gestational megaloblastic anemia after treatment with normal diet, without supplement, and oral contraceptives. One woman with puerperal megaloblastic anemia failed to respond to a regular diet while taking Ovulen, 6 tablets daily. The results suggest that plasma folate levels were neither lower in oral contracepting women nor did the pill prevent the increase in folate in megaloblastic anemia patients treated with diet. Thus the authors concluded that folate supplement is not needed for pill users. PMID:5549181

  2. Contraception in the perimenopause.

    PubMed

    Sparrow, M

    1992-12-01

    Most clinicians advise women to continue using contraception for 12 months after menstruation has ceased. Some recommend that women less than 45 years old continue contraception for 2 years after menstruation has ceased. A fertility specialist says that women can stop taking nonhormonal methods after 6 months of amenorrhea if women experience hot flushes. If there are no classic menopausal symptoms, however, they should wait for 12 months before stopping contraception use. Hormonal methods may mask menopausal signs. If a woman has no contraindications, she can use them safely until age 50, however. Women should still use contraception after menopause because irregular ovulation may occur. In older women, the most useful measure of ovarian history is perhaps a good menstrual history rather than a high level of follicle stimulating hormone. A woman needs to consider her age, health status, menstrual history, sexuality, risk of sexually transmitted diseases, past contraception use, lifestyle, obstetric history, and attitude toward abortion when choosing a contraceptive method during the perimenopausal years. Options may include male or female sterilization, combined oral contraceptives, the progestogen-only pill, Depo-Provera, IUD, female barrier methods (diaphragm, cervical cap, contraceptive sponge, and female condom), condoms, spermicides, and postcoital contraception. Assuming the mucus signs can be reliably determined, natural family planning is an alternative for some older women. Depending on coitus interruptus can be stressful for older women because it is not easy to distinguish between a possible pregnancy and an irregular menses.

  3. Resting state alpha frequency is associated with menstrual cycle phase, estradiol and use of oral contraceptives

    PubMed Central

    Brötzner, Christina P.; Klimesch, Wolfgang; Doppelmayr, Michael; Zauner, Andrea; Kerschbaum, Hubert H.

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing intrinsic brain activity in resting, but awake humans is dominated by alpha oscillations. In human, individual alpha frequency (IAF) is associated with cognitive performance. Noticeable, performance in cognitive and emotional tasks in women is associated with menstrual cycle phase and sex hormone levels, respectively. In the present study, we correlated frequency of alpha oscillation in resting women with menstrual cycle phase, sex hormone level, or use of oral contraceptives. Electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded from 57 women (aged 24.07±3.67 years) having a natural menstrual cycle as well as from 57 women (aged 22.37±2.20 years) using oral contraceptives while they sat in an armchair with eyes closed. Alpha frequency was related to the menstrual cycle phase. Luteal women showed highest and late follicular women showed lowest IAF or center frequency. Furthermore, IAF as well as center frequency correlated negatively with endogenous estradiol level, but did not reveal an association with endogenous progesterone. Women using oral contraceptives showed an alpha frequency similar to women in the early follicular phase. We suggest that endogenous estradiol modulate resting alpha frequency. PMID:25010817

  4. Relative impact of smoking and oral contraceptive use on women in the US

    SciTech Connect

    Goldbaum, G.M.; Kendrick, J.S.; Hogelin, G.C.; Gentry, E.M.

    1987-09-11

    Women who smoke and use oral contraceptives (OCs) are at increased risk for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease. To study the prevalence of smoking and OC use and of other behaviors affecting health, 28 states and the District of Columbia conducted telephone surveys during 1981 through 1983. More than 22,000 US adults were interviewed, of whom 5779 women aged 18 to 44 years were studied. Data were weighted to represent the US population. Overall, 7.4% of US women aged 18 to 44 years reported smoking and using OCs' 1.1% reported smoking 25 or more cigarettes per day while using OCs. Although women aged 18 to 24 years were most likely to smoke and use OCs, combined smoking and OC use contributed substantially to the number of excess cases of myocardial infarctions occurring among US women aged 35 to 44 years. However, regardless of OC use, smoking accounted for most of the excess cases. Therefore, health care providers need to intensity their efforts to reduce smoking among their patients.

  5. Toward a new concept of "natural balance" in oral estroprogestin contraception.

    PubMed

    Chabbert-Buffet, Nathalie; Gerris, Jan; Jamin, Christian; Lello, Stefano; Lete, Inaki; Lobo, Paloma; Nappi, Rossella E; Pintiaux, Axelle

    2013-10-01

    The Pill has undergone many changes since its first appearance some 50 years ago. Key developments included the reduction of ethinylestradiol doses and the synthesis of new progestins in order to increase safety, compliance and efficiency. Low-dose combined oral contraceptives (COCs) are currently the preferred option for millions of women. Due to this widespread use, it has been argued that the safety of COCs should be even better, raising the threshold for excellence. Yet in spite of major improvements, there is still an associated risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). The next step in COCs' evolution should take total estrogenicity and hepatic estro-androgenic balance into account. The focus on the estrogen component--which has not changed in 50 years--has yielded a new class of natural estrogen pills. Following the introduction of a first quadriphasic pill, a monophasic estradiol pill based on the concept of "natural balance" was subsequently made available. These recent achievements could represent a step forward in the evolution of COCs and pave the way for better safety.

  6. Design Features of Drug-Drug Interaction Trials Between Antivirals and Oral Contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Ruben C; Arya, Vikram; Younis, Islam R

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this work was to explore the major design features of drug-drug interaction trials between antiviral medications (AVs) and oral contraceptives (OCs). Information on these trials (n = 27) was collected from approved drug labels and clinical pharmacology reviews conducted by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The primary objective of all trials was to evaluate changes in OC exposure following the coadministration of AVs. In addition, an evaluation of potential pharmacodynamic interaction was performed in 10 of these trials. Twenty-two trials were open label with a fixed-sequence design, and 5 trials used a double-blind crossover design. The trials were conducted using one, two, or three 28-day ovulatory cycles in 10, 8, and 9 trials, respectively. Only 1 trial enrolled HIV-infected women. The median number of women in a trial was 20 (range, 12 to 52). Norethindrone/ethinyl estradiol (EE) combination was the most commonly used OC (n = 16, 59%) followed by norgestimate/EE (n = 9, 33%). Labeling recommendations were based on exposure changes in 25 cases and on safety observations in the trial in 2 cases. In conclusion, a wide variety of trial designs was used, and there is no preferred design. The answer to the exposure question can be achieved using multiple designs.

  7. Why Iranian married women use withdrawal instead of oral contraceptives? A qualitative study from Iran

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Withdrawal as a method of birth control is still used in Iran. The aim of this study was to explore married women's perspectives and attitudes on withdrawal use instead of oral contraceptive (OC) in Tehran, Iran. Methods This was a qualitative study. Participants were 50 married women, not currently pregnant, not desiring pregnancy and who had been using withdrawal for contraception. Face-to face interviews were conducted to collect data. Content analysis was performed to analyze the data. Results Four major themes were extracted from the interviews: advantages, disadvantages, barriers for OC use, and husband-related factors. Advantages of withdrawal use were identified as: easy to use, convenient, ease of access, natural. Even those participants who had experienced unwanted pregnancy while using withdrawal, relied on withdrawal as their contraceptive method. Disadvantages of OC included concerns about side effects. Barriers related to use of OC included the need for medical advice, vaginal examination and daily use. Husband-related factors included: the husband wanted to be the primary decision maker on the number of children and that he preferred withdrawal. Conclusion Health providers should address misunderstandings that exist about OC and highlight the non-contraceptive health benefits of OC to balance the information provided for women. We suggest that not only women but also their spouses be advised in family planning programs. PMID:20509885

  8. Contraception choices in women with underlying medical conditions.

    PubMed

    Bonnema, Rachel A; McNamara, Megan C; Spencer, Abby L

    2010-09-15

    Primary care physicians often prescribe contraceptives to women of reproductive age with comorbidities. Novel delivery systems (e.g., contraceptive patch, contraceptive ring, single-rod implantable device) may change traditional risk and benefit profiles in women with comorbidities. Effective contraceptive counseling requires an understanding of a woman's preferences and medical history, as well as the risks, benefits, adverse effects, and contraindications of each method. Noncontraceptive benefits of combined hormonal contraceptives, such as oral contraceptive pills, include regulated menses, decreased dysmenorrhea, and diminished premenstrual dysphoric disorder. Oral contraceptive pills may be used safely in women with a range of medical conditions, including well-controlled hypertension, uncomplicated diabetes mellitus, depression, and uncomplicated valvular heart disease. However, women older than 35 years who smoke should avoid oral contraceptive pills. Contraceptives containing estrogen, which can increase thrombotic risk, should be avoided in women with a history of venous thromboembolism, stroke, cardiovascular disease, or peripheral vascular disease. Progestin-only contraceptives are recommended for women with contraindications to estrogen. Depo-Provera, a long-acting injectable contraceptive, may be preferred in women with sickle cell disease because it reduces the frequency of painful crises. Because of the interaction between antiepileptics and oral contraceptive pills, Depo-Provera may also be considered in women with epilepsy. Implanon, the single-rod implantable contraceptive device, may reduce symptoms of dysmenorrhea. Mirena, the levonorgestrel-containing intrauterine contraceptive system, is an option for women with menorrhagia, endometriosis, or chronic pelvic pain. PMID:20842989

  9. Contraception choices in women with underlying medical conditions.

    PubMed

    Bonnema, Rachel A; McNamara, Megan C; Spencer, Abby L

    2010-09-15

    Primary care physicians often prescribe contraceptives to women of reproductive age with comorbidities. Novel delivery systems (e.g., contraceptive patch, contraceptive ring, single-rod implantable device) may change traditional risk and benefit profiles in women with comorbidities. Effective contraceptive counseling requires an understanding of a woman's preferences and medical history, as well as the risks, benefits, adverse effects, and contraindications of each method. Noncontraceptive benefits of combined hormonal contraceptives, such as oral contraceptive pills, include regulated menses, decreased dysmenorrhea, and diminished premenstrual dysphoric disorder. Oral contraceptive pills may be used safely in women with a range of medical conditions, including well-controlled hypertension, uncomplicated diabetes mellitus, depression, and uncomplicated valvular heart disease. However, women older than 35 years who smoke should avoid oral contraceptive pills. Contraceptives containing estrogen, which can increase thrombotic risk, should be avoided in women with a history of venous thromboembolism, stroke, cardiovascular disease, or peripheral vascular disease. Progestin-only contraceptives are recommended for women with contraindications to estrogen. Depo-Provera, a long-acting injectable contraceptive, may be preferred in women with sickle cell disease because it reduces the frequency of painful crises. Because of the interaction between antiepileptics and oral contraceptive pills, Depo-Provera may also be considered in women with epilepsy. Implanon, the single-rod implantable contraceptive device, may reduce symptoms of dysmenorrhea. Mirena, the levonorgestrel-containing intrauterine contraceptive system, is an option for women with menorrhagia, endometriosis, or chronic pelvic pain.

  10. Effect of Oral Contraceptive Pills on the Blood Serum Enzymes and DNA Damage in Lymphocytes Among Users.

    PubMed

    Naz, Falaq; Jyoti, Smita; Rahul; Akhtar, Nishat; Siddique, Yasir Hasan

    2016-07-01

    The continuous use of synthetic hormones as contraceptive pill or hormonal replacement therapy among women is increasing day by day. The widespread use of different formulations as oral contraceptives by women throughout their reproductive cycle has given rise to a serious concern for studying the effects of oral contraceptives on enzymatic profile and DNA damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes among users. The present study was carried out on women taking oral contraceptives. The study was based on the questionnaire having the information of reproductive history, fasting, age, health, nature of menstrual cycle, bleeding and other disease. The profile of the blood serum enzymes i.e. alkaline phosphatase (ALP), gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), aminotransferases (SGOT and SGPT), serum proteins (albumin and globulin) and DNA damage in lymphocytes was studied among users and non-users. The results of the present study suggest that OCs not only effects enzymatic activity but also results in DNA damage that may vary with the duration of using oral contraceptives. A significant increase in LDH, GGT, SGPT, SGOT, globulin and decrease in ALP as well as albumin was found among users as compared to non-users. The observed DNA damage was more in users as compared to non-users. Hormonal contraceptives seem to exert DNA damage and also have significant effects on blood serum enzymes. PMID:27382200

  11. Contraception and headache.

    PubMed

    MacGregor, E Anne

    2013-02-01

    Most women have used at least 1 method of contraception during their reproductive years, with the majority favoring combined oral contraceptives. Women are often concerned about the safety of their method of choice and also ask about likely effects on their pre-existing headache or migraine and restrictions on using their headache medication. While there should be no restriction to the use of combined hormonal contraceptives by women with migraine without aura, the balance of risks vs benefits for women with aura are debatable. Migraine with aura, but not migraine without aura, is associated with a twofold increased risk of ischemic stroke, although the absolute risk is very low in healthy, nonsmoking women. Although ethinylestradiol has been associated with increased risk of ischemic stroke, the risk is dose-dependent. Low-dose pills currently used are considerably safer than pills containing higher doses of ethinylestradiol but they are not risk-free. This review examines the evidence available regarding the effect that different methods of contraception have on headache and migraine and identifies strategies available to minimize risk and to manage specific triggers such as estrogen "withdrawal" headache and migraine associated with combined hormonal contraceptives. The independent risks of ischemic stroke associated with migraine and with hormonal contraceptives are reviewed, and guidelines for use of contraception by women with migraine are discussed in light of the current evidence. PMID:23432442

  12. Effects of menstrual cycle phase and oral contraceptives on alertness, cognitive performance, and circadian rhythms during sleep deprivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, K. P. Jr; Badia, P.; Czeisler, C. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The influence of menstrual cycle phase and oral contraceptive use on neurobehavioral function and circadian rhythms were studied in healthy young women (n = 25) using a modified constant routine procedure during 24 h of sleep deprivation. Alertness and performance worsened across sleep deprivation and also varied with circadian phase. Entrained circadian rhythms of melatonin and body temperature were evident in women regardless of menstrual phase or oral contraceptive use. No significant difference in melatonin levels, duration, or phase was observed between women in the luteal and follicular phases, whereas oral contraceptives appeared to increase melatonin levels. Temperature levels were higher in the luteal phase and in oral contraceptive users compared to women in the follicular phase. Alertness on the maintenance of wakefulness test and some tests of cognitive performance were poorest for women in the follicular phase especially near the circadian trough of body temperature. These observations suggest that hormonal changes associated with the menstrual cycle and the use of oral contraceptives contribute to changes in nighttime waking neurobehavioral function and temperature level whereas these factors do not appear to affect circadian phase.

  13. How does Intimate Partner Violence Affect Condom and Oral Contraceptive Use in the United States? A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Bergmann, Julie N.; Stockman, Jamila K.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Intimate partner violence (IPV) is estimated to affect 25% of adult women in the US alone. IPV directly impacts women’s ability to use contraception, resulting in many of unintended pregnancies and STIs. This review examines the relationship between IPV and condom and oral contraceptive use within the United States at two levels: the female victim’s perspective on barriers to condom and oral contraceptive use, in conjunction with experiencing IPV (Aim 1) and the male perpetrator’s perspective regarding condom and oral contraceptive use (Aim 2). STUDY DESIGN We systematically reviewed and synthesized all publications meeting the study criteria published since 1997. We aimed to categorize the results by emerging themes related to each study aim. RESULTS We identified 42 studies that met our inclusion criteria. We found 37 studies that addressed Aim 1. Within this we identified three themes: violence resulting in reduced condom or oral contraceptive use (n=15); condom or oral contraceptive use negotiation (n=15); which we further categorized as IPV due to condom or oral contraceptive request, perceived violence (or fear) of IPV resulting in decreased condom or oral contraceptive use, and sexual relationship power imbalances decreasing the ability to use condoms or oral contraceptives; and reproductive coercion (n=7). We found 5 studies that addressed Aim 2. Most studies were cross-sectional, limiting the ability to determine causality between IPV and condom or oral contraceptive use; however, most studies did find a positive relationship between IPV and decreased condom or oral contraceptive use. CONCLUSIONS Quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods research has demonstrated the linkages between female IPV victimization/male IPV perpetration and condom or oral contraceptive use. However, additional qualitative and longitudinal research is needed to improve the understanding of dynamics in relationships with IPV and determine causality between IPV

  14. Endometrial Hyperplasia Risk in Relation to Recent Use of Oral Contraceptives and Hormone Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Epplein, Meira; Reed, Susan D.; Voigt, Lynda F.; Newton, Katherine M.; Holt, Victoria L.; Weiss, Noel S.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Examine the relationship between recent use of oral contraceptives and hormone therapy and endometrial hyperplasia (EH) risk. Methods Cases comprised women diagnosed with complex EH (n=289) or atypical EH (n=173) between 1985-2003. One age-matched control was selected for each case; excluded were women with a prior hysterectomy or diagnosis of EH or endometrial cancer. Hormone use in the six months prior to the date of the case’s first symptoms was ascertained using a pharmacy database and medical records. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. Results Three (1.1%) cases had used oral contraceptives, compared to sixteen (6.0%) controls (OR = 0.2, 95% CI: 0.0–0.6). Fifty-one (16.8%) cases had taken estrogen-only hormone therapy, in contrast to two (0.7%) controls (OR = 37.6, 95% CI: 8.8–160.0). The risk of EH among estrogen plus progestin hormone users did not differ from that of non-users (OR = 0.7, 95% CI: 0.4–1.1). Conclusions This study suggests that previous findings of the association of estrogen-only hormone therapy with increased risk of EH and the lack of an association between estrogen plus progestin hormone therapy and EH risk are likely to apply to both complex EH and atypical EH. Further examination of the association between oral contraceptives and EH, with greater numbers of OC users, is warranted. PMID:19064186

  15. Use of a monophasic, low-dose oral contraceptive in relation to mental functioning.

    PubMed

    Deijen, J B; Duyn, K J; Jansen, W A; Klitsie, J W

    1992-10-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of Minulet, a new low-dose oral contraceptive on mood in two groups and to compare the effect with a control group of women not taking oral contraceptives (OC). The women participating were between 16 and 45 years of age. They completed the Amsterdam Mood Questionnaire (AMQ) and the Sickness Impact Profile (SIP) three times. They were filled in before treatment started, after taking Minulet for one month and then again after three months. The questionnaires were filled in by a group of 200 women who had not taken OC before (starters), and by a second group of 370 women who were already taking OC (switchers). A group of 140 women who did not use any OC during the study served as a control group. These women also filled in the same questionnaires, both at the start, and after one and three months. As far as the AMQ was concerned, the switchers appeared in the initial measurement to have significantly higher scores (that is to say, a worse mood) for "tiredness", "depression", "moodiness", "anxiety" and "anger", than those of the starters and the control group. Moreover, the switchers had reduced scores (that is to say, an improved mood) on the AMQ-scales during their use of Minulet compared to their initial use of oral contraceptives. The scores of the starters and the control group on the AMQ-scales remained unchanged on all three measurements. It can be concluded from this that these groups felt as well as they did before.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. The effect of oral contraceptives in malaria infections in rhesus monkeys*

    PubMed Central

    Collins, William E.; Campbell, Carlos C.; Barber, Ann; Skinner, Jimmie C.; Huong, Alan Y.

    1984-01-01

    Rhesus monkeys, Macaca mulatta, were treated with the oral contraceptives Brevicon (norethisterone with ethinylestradiol) and Ovral (norgestrel with ethinylestradiol), and subsequently inoculated with the simian malaria parasites Plasmodium cynomologi bastianellii or P. coatneyi. Parasitological, serological, and serum biochemical studies indicated that although there were some significant differences, in general the patterns of response to infection in both treated and control animals were similar. During the primary infection, however, Brevicon resulted in increased levels of parasitaemia, whereas Ovral resulted in decreased parasitaemias, as compared with the untreated control animals. There were no differences in the responses following secondary parasite infection. PMID:6333297

  17. Relationship satisfaction and outcome in women who meet their partner while using oral contraception.

    PubMed

    Roberts, S Craig; Klapilová, Katerina; Little, Anthony C; Burriss, Robert P; Jones, Benedict C; DeBruine, Lisa M; Petrie, Marion; Havlícek, Jan

    2012-04-01

    Hormonal variation over the menstrual cycle alters women's preferences for phenotypic indicators of men's genetic or parental quality. Hormonal contraceptives suppress these shifts, inducing different mate preference patterns among users and non-users. This raises the possibility that women using oral contraception (OC) choose different partners than they would do otherwise but, to date, we know neither whether these laboratory-measured effects are sufficient to exert real-world consequences, nor what these consequences would be. Here, we test for differences in relationship quality and survival between women who were using or not using OC when they chose the partner who fathered their first child. Women who used OC scored lower on measures of sexual satisfaction and partner attraction, experienced increasing sexual dissatisfaction during the relationship, and were more likely to be the one to initiate an eventual separation if it occurred. However, the same women were more satisfied with their partner's paternal provision, and thus had longer relationships and were less likely to separate. These effects are congruent with evolutionary predictions based on cyclical preference shifts. Our results demonstrate that widespread use of hormonal contraception may contribute to relationship outcome, with implications for human reproductive behaviour, family cohesion and quality of life.

  18. Relationship satisfaction and outcome in women who meet their partner while using oral contraception

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, S. Craig; Klapilová, Kateřina; Little, Anthony C.; Burriss, Robert P.; Jones, Benedict C.; DeBruine, Lisa M.; Petrie, Marion; Havlíček, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Hormonal variation over the menstrual cycle alters women's preferences for phenotypic indicators of men's genetic or parental quality. Hormonal contraceptives suppress these shifts, inducing different mate preference patterns among users and non-users. This raises the possibility that women using oral contraception (OC) choose different partners than they would do otherwise but, to date, we know neither whether these laboratory-measured effects are sufficient to exert real-world consequences, nor what these consequences would be. Here, we test for differences in relationship quality and survival between women who were using or not using OC when they chose the partner who fathered their first child. Women who used OC scored lower on measures of sexual satisfaction and partner attraction, experienced increasing sexual dissatisfaction during the relationship, and were more likely to be the one to initiate an eventual separation if it occurred. However, the same women were more satisfied with their partner's paternal provision, and thus had longer relationships and were less likely to separate. These effects are congruent with evolutionary predictions based on cyclical preference shifts. Our results demonstrate that widespread use of hormonal contraception may contribute to relationship outcome, with implications for human reproductive behaviour, family cohesion and quality of life. PMID:21993500

  19. [Angiodysplasia of moya-moya type disclosed by choreic unvoluntary abnormal movements during oral contraception. Apropos of 2 cases].

    PubMed

    Pelletier, J; Cabanot, C; Lévrier, O; Thuillier, J N; Chérif, A A

    1997-07-01

    Two seventeen year-old women, developed acute onset left choreic movements following two months and two weeks use of oral contraceptives. Left hemiparesia appeared a few days later, while involuntary movements discontinued. Cranial CT scan and MRI showed bilateral ischemic lesion in the frontal region for the first case and isolated lesion in the right centrum ovale for the second. Angiography showed nearly complete obstruction of the terminal portion of the internal carotid artery with an outline Moya-Moya network. After discontinuing oral contraceptives, there has been no relapse of neurologic dysfunction for more than three years for the first case and twelve months for the second one. The role of perfusion insufficiency in limb-shaking carotid transient ischemic attack is discussed and the possible relations between oral contraceptives, chorea and angiographic features resembling Moya-Moya disease are evaluated. PMID:9684005

  20. The underrated benefits of oral contraception: consequences of pregnancy and induced abortion in teenagers.

    PubMed

    Dreyfus, R

    1992-01-01

    If complications occur within a pregnancy planned and brought to term, they often can be dealt with and accepted. They are even more traumatic when they occur in an unwanted pregnancy that could have been prevented through contraception. Teenagers, because of their physical and psychological immaturity and also because of their social environment, seem to suffer with undue frequency from the complications of induced abortion. Its result, for the teenager, is a handicapped future in comparison to other women. Hence, access to contraception is important for all women, and especially for teenagers, in order to avoid such prejudicial situations. It is important, then, to prescribe oral contraception for its efficacy and its short- and long-term innocuousness. Because of her immaturity, the pregnant teenager is at risk: of spontaneous abortion, pre-eclampsia, anemia, hemorrhage, and prematurity. She is also at risk because of the social difficulties she will be facing. This is particularly true in families from developing countries. From birth, the child is also at risk: of low birth weight for the term, mortality in the first year of life, and all risks linked to abandonment, or education by a third party. In a proportion of 13 to 30% in western countries and in a proportion of 3% in East Asia or in Northwest Africa (Maghreb), induced abortions are a reflection of the following: early sexual activity without contraception even if fertility is still low in very young teenagers, absence of social protection or social independence, refusal of forced marriage, and presence or absence of liberal legislation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Oral contraception does not alter single dose saquinavir pharmacokinetics in women

    PubMed Central

    Fröhlich, Margit; Burhenne, Jürgen; Martin-Facklam, Meret; Weiss, Johanna; von Wolff, Michael; Strowitzki, Thomas; Walter-Sack, Ingeborg; Haefeli, Walter E

    2004-01-01

    Aims Women experience more adverse drug reactions (ADR) to antiretroviral therapy than men. This may be attributed to higher plasma concentrations of protease inhibitors due to pharmacokinetic interactions with hormonal preparations. Thus, in the present study we aimed to investigate the influence of oral contraceptives (OC) on the pharmacokinetics of the protease inhibitor saquinavir. Methods Saquinavir was administered in a hard gelatin capsule formulation (Invirase®) to rule out confounding by pharmaceutical aids of the more frequently used soft gelatin capsule. After an overnight fast, eight healthy female participants ingested a single oral dose of 600 mg saquinavir immediately before and after the 19th dose of a combined, low dose OC (0.03 mg ethinylestradiol, 0.075 mg gestodene) in a prospective, fixed sequence study design. The first saquinavir application was scheduled on day 1, 2, or 3 of the individual menstrual cycle. Plasma concentrations of saquinavir and relative concentrations of its M2&M3-hydroxy metabolites were determined by LC/MS/MS for 48 h. Results Intake of OC resulted in a significant decrease in morning serum concentrations (before intake of OC, compared to day 19 of OC therapy) of 17β-estradiol by −23.4 pg ml−1 (57%, 95%CI: −76% to −37.4%); progesterone by −0.25 ng ml−1 (33%, 95%CI: −45.3% to −21.5%); follicle-stimulating hormone by −4.06 U l−1 (82%, 95%CI: −96.5% to −67.7%); and luteinizing hormone by −3.49 U l−1 (74%, 95%CI: −93 to −54.6%). Conversely, sexual hormone binding globulin serum concentrations increased by 83.6 nmol l−1 (205%, 95%CI: 32.2% to 377%). Pharmacokinetic parameters of saquinavir (AUC, Cmax, tmax, t1/2, CLR) were not affected by OC, nor was the relative metabolic ratio of saquinavir/M2&M3-hydroxy saquinavir. Furthermore, there was no association of serum hormone concentrations or MDR1-polymorphisms (C3435T and G2677T) with pharmacokinetic parameters of saquinavir. Conclusions There

  2. A double-blind, placebo-controlled evaluation of the effect of oral doses of rizatriptan 10 mg on oral contraceptive pharmacokinetics in healthy female volunteers.

    PubMed

    Shadle, C R; Liu, G; Goldberg, M R

    2000-03-01

    Rizatriptan (MAXALT), a potent, oral 5-HT1B/1D agonist with a rapid onset of action, is available now for the acute treatment of migraine. This study examined the pharmacokinetic and clinical interaction between rizatriptan 10 mg and the components (ethinyl estradiol [EE] 35 micrograms and norethindrone [NET] 1.0 mg) of a well-established oral contraceptive combination product, ORTHO-NOVUM 1/35. Levels of sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), a protein increased by EE to which NET binds, were also examined. In this two-period crossover study, 20 healthy young female subjects received a coadministration of 8 days of rizatriptan treatment (6 days of single-dose 10 mg rizatriptan and 2 days of multiple-dose rizatriptan, 10 mg q 4 hours for three doses, giving a total daily dose of 30 mg on Days 7 and 8) or matching placebo along with their daily dose (one tablet) of ORTHO-NOVUM 1/35 within their oral contraceptive cycle. Plasma was sampled for EE, NET, and SHBG concentrations. Safety evaluations included routine laboratory safety studies, physical examinations, and monitoring for ECG, vital signs, and adverse events. There were no statistically significant differences in any of the pharmacokinetic parameters of EE or NET between the rizatriptan and placebo treatment periods, thus indicating that rizatriptan had no meaningful effect on the disposition of either the EE or the NET component of ORTHO-NOVUM 1/35. The SHBG concentration did not change throughout the entire study. Clinically, coadministration of rizatriptan with ORTHO-NOVUM 1/35 was well tolerated. Blood pressure, heart rate, and temperature showed no consistent trend or clinically important changes. Adverse events following coadministration of rizatriptan with ORTHO-NOVUM 1/35 were similar to those reported when placebo was given with ORTHO-NOVUM 1/35. The findings of this study indicate that there is little potential for dosages as high as 30 mg/day, the maximum recommended dosing schedule, of rizatriptan

  3. Acute effects of bright light and caffeine on nighttime melatonin and temperature levels in women taking and not taking oral contraceptives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, K. P. Jr; Myers, B. L.; Plenzler, S. C.; Drake, C. L.; Badia, P.; Czeisler, C. A. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Caffeine and bright light effects on nighttime melatonin and temperature levels in women were tested during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle (n=30) or the pseudo luteal phase for oral contraceptive users (n=32). Participants were randomly assigned to receive either bright (5000 lux) or dim room light (<88 lux) between 20:00 and 08:00 h under a modified constant routine protocol. Half the subjects in each lighting condition were administered either caffeine (100 mg) or placebo in a double-blind manner at 20:00, 23:00, 02:00 and 05:00 h. Results showed that the combination of bright light and caffeine enhanced nighttime temperature levels to a greater extent than did either caffeine or bright light alone. Both of the latter groups had higher temperature levels relative to the dim light placebo condition and the two groups did not differ. Temperature levels in the bright light caffeine condition were maintained at near peak circadian levels the entire night in the luteal and pseudo luteal phase. Melatonin levels were reduced throughout the duration of bright light exposure for all women. Caffeine reduced the onset of melatonin levels for women in the luteal phase, but it had little effect on melatonin levels for oral contraceptive users. The results for women in the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle are consistent with our previous findings in men. The results also suggest that oral contraceptives may alter the effects of caffeine on nighttime melatonin levels.

  4. Association Between Long-term Oral Contraceptive Use and Risk of Crohn’s Disease Complications in a Nationwide Study

    PubMed Central

    Khalili, Hamed; Granath, Fredrik; Smedby, Karin E.; Ekbom, Anders; Neovius, Martin; Chan, Andrew T.; Olen, Ola

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Use of exogenous hormones, in the form of oral contraceptives (OCs), has been linked consistently to risk of Crohn’s disease (CD). Nonetheless, it is not clear how OCs might contribute to the progression of CD. METHODS We conducted a prospective study of female patients with CD (age, 16–51 y), identified from the inpatient and outpatient care components of the Swedish National Patient Register from January 2002 through December 2013. Information on current OC use was obtained from the Prescribed Drug Register starting in July of 2005 and updated until December of 2013. Primary outcomes were defined as first CD-related surgery and first steroid prescription. We used Cox proportional hazard modeling with time-varying covariates to estimate multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (MV-adjusted HRs). RESULTS We identified 482 incident cases of surgery among 4036 patients with CD, with a median follow-up period of 58 months. Compared with nonusers, the MV-adjusted HRs for surgery were 1.14 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.80–1.63) for past users and 1.30 (95% CI, 0.89–1.92) for current users. The risk of surgery increased with longer duration of use (Ptrend = .036) and higher prescribed daily dose (Ptrend = .016). Specifically, for women with more than 3 years of OC use, the MV-adjusted HR for surgery was 1.68 (95% CI, 1.06–2.67). The association was confined to the combination type of OC. We estimated that for every 83 patients with CD receiving the combination type of oral contraceptives for at least 1 year, 1 extra surgery is required. The rate of steroid prescriptions did not appear to increase with past or current use of OCs, compared with patients who have not taken OCs (all Pcomparisons > .20). CONCLUSIONS In a nationwide analysis of patients in Sweden, long-term use of OCs, particularly the combination type, was associated with an increased risk of surgery among women with established CD. Clinicians carefully should evaluate and monitor

  5. The effects of short-term jump training on bone metabolism in females using oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Reiger, Jamie; Yingling, Vanessa R

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of oral contraceptive use on bone serum markers following a 3-week jumping protocol. Twenty-three females (18-25 years) were grouped as oral contraceptive users (OC+) or non-users (OC-). Following a 3-week observation period, participants completed a 3-week (15-day) jump protocol. Jump sessions consisting of ten 42 cm drop jumps with a 30 s rest interval between jumps were completed each day, 5 days per week. Peak vertical ground reaction force and loading rate were measured and the osteogenic index was calculated. Serum markers for bone formation, bone alkaline phosphatase (BAP) and bone resorption, C-terminal telopeptides of type I collagen (CTX) were measured at three time points (pre-, mid-, post-jump). BAP and CTX increased significantly (P = 0.0017, 0.0488) in both groups post-jump; however, bone metabolic markers were not different between the OC+ and OC- groups. Osteogenic index, ground reaction force and vertical jump height were similar between groups. Correlations between markers of bone metabolism and participants' age at menarche, weight, loading rate and years on OC were not significant. A 3-week jumping protocol was found to be effective in stimulating bone metabolism in both OC+ and OC- groups. PMID:26008875

  6. [Effect of levonorgestrel in the ovulation, endometrium, and spermatozoa for emergency oral contraception].

    PubMed

    Suárez, Víctor J; Zavala, Renzo; Ureta, Juan Manuel; Hijar, Gisely; Lucero, Jorge; Pachas, Paul

    2010-06-01

    There is wide controversy about the mechanism of action of the levonorgestrel used for emergency oral contraception, and many organizations, both scientific as well as from the civil society, show their discrepancy with its use, due to its possible action as an abortion- inducer. In order to evaluate the scientific evidence available on the mechanisms of action of the levonorgestrel used for emergency oral contraception (EOC), a systematic revision was performed in the Medline and Cochrane library databases. We found 444 articles. After reviewing the abstracts, we selected 22 articles, whose complete texts were evaluated. We found that the main mechanism of action of the levonorgestrel, given at the doses recommended for EOC, is the inhibition or retardation of the ovulation, it doesn't affect the spermatozoa in their migration or egg-penetration capacities. No morphological or molecular alterations in the endometrium that could interfere with the implantation of the fertilized egg have been demonstrated. There is no actual scientific evidence available supporting that the use of levonorgestrel for EOC is abortive.

  7. Exogenous Hormone Use: Oral Contraceptives, Postmenopausal Hormone Therapy, and Health Outcomes in the Nurses’ Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Grodstein, Francine; Stampfer, Meir J.; Willett, Walter C.; Hu, Frank B.; Manson, JoAnn E.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To review the contribution of the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) to our understanding of the complex relationship between exogenous hormones and health outcomes in women. Methods. We performed a narrative review of the publications of the NHS and NHS II from 1976 to 2016. Results. Oral contraceptive and postmenopausal hormone use were studied in relation to major health outcomes, including cardiovascular disease and cancer. Current or recent oral contraceptive use is associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease (mainly among smokers), melanoma, and breast cancer, and a lower risk of colorectal and ovarian cancer. Although hormone therapy is not indicated primarily for chronic disease prevention, findings from the NHS and a recent analysis of the Women’s Health Initiative indicate that younger women who are closer to menopause onset have a more favorable risk–benefit profile than do older women from use of hormone therapy for relief of vasomotor symptoms. Conclusions. With updated information on hormone use, lifestyle factors, and other variables, the NHS and NHS II continue to contribute to our understanding of the complex relationship between exogenous hormones and health outcomes in women. PMID:27459451

  8. Adiponectin and bone metabolism markers in female rowers: eumenorrheic and oral contraceptive users.

    PubMed

    Jürimäe, J; Vaiksaar, S; Mäestu, J; Purge, P; Jürimäe, T

    2011-12-01

    This study investigated whether adiponectin, bone formation (osteocalcin) and bone resorption [type I carboxyterminal telopeptide (ICTP)] values are influenced by menstrual cycle phase and oral contraceptive use in female rowers. Twenty-four rowers divided into normally cycling athletes (NOC; no.=15) and athletes taking oral contraceptive pills (OC; no.=9) participated in this study. Fasting blood samples, body composition and aerobic capacity measurements were taken during the follicular (FP) and the luteal (LP) phases of the menstrual cycle. Adiponectin, insulin, glucose, insulin resistance, body composition and aerobic capacity did not fluctuate significantly during menstrual cycle in both groups. Osteocalcin and ICTP were lower (p<0.05) in OC compared with NOC, but did not change significantly across menstrual cycle phases in both groups. Estradiol and progesterone were not related to adiponectin, osteocalcin or ICTP (r<0.147; p>0.05). Adiponectin was correlated (p<0.05) with osteocalcin (r=0.452) and fat free mass (r=0.428), and osteocalcin was related (p<0.05) to insulin (r=-0.413), glucose (r=-0.486) and insulin resistance (r=-0.528). In conclusion, adiponectin was not affected by menstrual cycle phase and OC use in female rowers, while bone metabolism markers were lower in OC compared to NOC groups. Adiponectin and osteocalcin were interrelated and may characterise energy homeostasis in female athletes. PMID:21169728

  9. Effects of the oral contraceptive pill cycle on physiological responses to hypoxic exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandoval, Darleen A.; Matt, Kathleen S.

    2003-01-01

    To test whether the oral contraceptive pill cycle affects endocrine and metabolic responses to hypoxic (fraction of inspired oxygen = 13%, P(IO2): 95 mmHg; H) versus normoxic (P(IO2):153 mmHg; N) exercise, we examined eight women (28 +/- 1.2 yr) during the third (PILL) and placebo (PLA) weeks of their monthly oral contraceptive pill cycle. Cardiopulmonary, metabolic, and neuroendocrine measurements were taken before, during, and after three 5-min consecutive workloads at 30%, 45%, and 60% of normoxic V(O2peak) in H and N trials. Heart rate response to exercise was greater in H versus N, but was not different between PILL and PLA. Lactate levels were significantly greater during exercise, and both lactate and glucose levels were significantly greater for 30 min after exercise in H versus N (p < 0.0001). When expressed relative to baseline, lactate levels were lower in PILL versus PLA, but glucose was greater in PILL versus PLA (p < 0.001). Cortisol levels were also significantly greater in PILL versus PLA (p < 0.001). Norepinephrine levels were significantly increased during exercise (p < 0.0001) and in H versus N (p < 0.0001). However, epinephrine levels were not different over time or with trial. Thus, the presence of circulating estradiol and progesterone during the PILL phase reduces glucose and lactate responses to hypoxic exercise.

  10. Oral contraceptive use among female elite athletes and age-matched controls and its relation to low back pain.

    PubMed

    Brynhildsen, J; Lennartsson, H; Klemetz, M; Dahlquist, P; Hedin, B; Hammar, M

    1997-10-01

    Exogenous and endogenous female sex steroids may influence the risk of low back pain. The fact that back pain is a very common symptom during pregnancy supports this theory. Back pain is also more common among female than male athletes. Oral contraceptives have been suggested to increase the risk of low back pain. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the prevalence of low back pain is higher among oral contraceptive users than non-users and if it differs between women taking part in different sports. A questionnaire was sent to female elite athletes in volleyball (n = 205), basketball (n = 150), and soccer (n = 361) as well as to age-matched controls (n = 113). The questionnaire comprised questions about age, constitution, occupation, parity, and use of contraceptive method as well as previous and current back pain and possible consequences of the back problems. The response rate was 85%. Between 42% and 52% of the women in the different groups used oral contraceptives. The groups were similar in most background variables, except that the volleyball and basketball players were taller. The prevalence of current low back pain was between 21% and 34% in the different athlete groups, with an average of 30%, whereas only 18% of the controls suffered from low back pain (p 0.01). The prevalence of low back pain within each group--athletes as well as controls--was similar in women who used and did not use oral contraceptives. This study does not support the theory that low back pain is affected by the use of oral contraceptives. Instead, constitutional factors and mechanical stress during intense physical activity are probably more important.

  11. Contraceptive pills and thrombosis: effects of the French crisis on prescriptions and consequences for medicine agencies.

    PubMed

    Emmerich, J; Thomassin, C; Zureik, M

    2014-09-01

    The higher risk of venous thromboembolism with 3rd and 4th- generations combined oral contraceptives compared to 2nd generation triggered a media crisis in France. Exposure to 3rd or 4th-generation combined oral contraceptives led to an annual excess of around 100 premature deaths in Europe. In the absence of any demonstrated additional benefit of these combined oral contraceptives, measures were taken to decrease exposure of women to this illegitimate excess of risk. As a consequence, this crisis saw a 45% decrease in the prescription of 3rd and 4th-generations combined oral contraceptives, without adverse consequences.

  12. Nomegestrol acetate/estradiol hormonal oral contraceptive and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Del Pup, Lino; Berretta, Massimiliano; Di Francia, Raffaele; Cavaliere, Carla; Di Napoli, Marilena; Facchini, Gaetano; Fiorica, Francesco; Mileto, Mario; Schindler, Adolf E

    2014-08-01

    Combined hormonal contraceptives (CHCs) contain estrogen and progestin, which can stimulate estrogen-sensitive and/or progesterone-sensitive breast cancer growth. Until recently, ethinylestradiol had been almost the only estrogen used for decades, and its dose has been greatly reduced over time. The first generations of birth control pills contained approximately five times more estrogen and four times more progestin than the latest contraceptives. Newer CHCs also contain steroids that more closely mimic the physiological estradiol (E2) and progesterone effects. The newer CHC formulations are thus expected to have less influence on the breast, although it is very difficult to demonstrate any difference among the recent available preparations in human studies. Recently, nomegestrol acetate (NOMAC), a neutral, nonandrogenic, progesterone-like profile progestin, has become available in combination with the 'natural' estrogen, E2. According to the literature, NOMAC/E2 is expected to have either a lesser stimulating effect or a neutral effect on estrogen-sensitive breast cancers. We performed an analysis of the available studies and a bibliographical review. The endocrine and metabolic effects of NOMAC/E2 formulation might lead to a lesser breast tissue stimulation. The data reported, confirmed through clinical studies, should be considered when choosing a hormonal contraceptive, especially when breast stimulation is a concern.

  13. Contraception: traditional and religious attitudes.

    PubMed

    Schenker, J G; Rabenou, V

    1993-04-01

    Humans have tried to control fertility for centuries. Primitive, preliterate societies practiced infanticide and abortion. When primitive women understood the advantages of conception control, they tried, when possible, to use contraception. In the 4th century B.C., Plato and Aristotle advocated a one-child family. Greek medical literature reported a hollow tube inserted through the cervix into the uterus and a potion as contraceptives. Islamic physicians had much knowledge about conception control. The attitudes toward contraception. In the 5th century B.C., Saint Augustine condemned contraception, even among married couples. The condom emerged in the early modern period. Yet, they were usually worn to protect against disease, e.g., bilharzia in Egypt and syphilis in Europe. The cervical cap and the diaphragm are examples of occlusive pessaries. By 1880, contraceptives and spermicides were advertised. In 1928, the IUD joined the existing contraceptives. Today we have combined oral contraceptives. Judaic law requires husbands to fulfill their wives sexual needs, separate from their duty to procreate. It also calls men, not women, to procreate and forbids men from masturbating, thus Judaic law does not forbid women from practicing contraception. The Roman Catholic church forbids contraceptive use because it is a sin against nature. Some Protestant denominations have allowed contraceptive use. Islamic law states that children are gifts from Allah. Some Moslems believe that they must have many children, but Allah and the Prophet state that children have rights to education and future security. These rights allow couples to prevent pregnancy. Neither Hinduism nor Buddhism prohibit contraceptive use. Differences in husband-wife communication, sex roles, access to contraceptives, and traditional family values will have more of an effect on contraceptive use and fertility than theological barriers or the social class of religious groups.

  14. Oral contraception following abortion: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Che, Yan; Liu, Xiaoting; Zhang, Bin; Cheng, Linan

    2016-07-01

    Oral contraceptives (OCs) following induced abortion offer a reliable method to avoid repeated abortion. However, limited data exist supporting the effective use of OCs postabortion. We conducted this systematic review and meta-analysis in the present study reported immediate administration of OCs or combined OCs postabortion may reduce vaginal bleeding time and amount, shorten the menstruation recovery period, increase endometrial thickness 2 to 3 weeks after abortion, and reduce the risk of complications and unintended pregnancies.A total of 8 major authorized Chinese and English databases were screened from January 1960 to November 2014. Randomized controlled trials in which patients had undergone medical or surgical abortions were included. Chinese studies that met the inclusion criteria were divided into 3 groups: administration of OC postmedical abortion (group I; n = 1712), administration of OC postsurgical abortion (group II; n = 8788), and administration of OC in combination with traditional Chinese medicine postsurgical abortion (group III; n = 19,707).In total, 119 of 6160 publications were included in this analysis. Significant difference was observed in group I for vaginal bleeding time (P = 0.0001), the amount of vaginal bleeding (P = 0.03), and menstruation recovery period (P < 0.00001) compared with the control groups. Group II demonstrated a significant difference in vaginal bleeding time (P < 0.00001), the amount of vaginal bleeding (P = 0.0002), menstruation recovery period (P < 0.00001), and endometrial thickness at 2 (P = 0.003) and 3 (P < 0.00001) weeks postabortion compared with the control group. Similarly, a significant difference was observed in group III for reducing vaginal bleeding time (P < 0.00001) and the amount of vaginal bleeding (P < 0.00001), shortening the menstruation recovery period (P < 0.00001), and increasing endometrial thickness 2 and 3 weeks after surgical abortion (P < 0.00001, all

  15. [Test your knowledge: contraceptives].

    PubMed

    1998-06-01

    A brief self-administered quiz on contraceptive knowledge is presented. The 7 questions ask the reader to explain the mechanism of action of combined oral contraceptives, and why estrogens are used with progestins, and to indicate the main secondary effects of Depo-Provera and implants and the dosage of the "morning-after pill." A multiple-choice question concerns absolute contraindications to combined OC use. One clinical case involves selection of OCs for a woman with a family history of breast cancer and the other requires development of a strategy for reducing high-risk pregnancies and risk of AIDS.

  16. Bone Mineral Density in Adolescent Females Using Injectable or Oral Contraceptives: A 24 Month Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Cromer, Barbara A.; Bonny, Andrea E.; Stager, Margaret; Lazebnik, Rina; Rome, Ellen; Ziegler, Julie; Camlin-Shingler, Kelly; Secic, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    Study Objective To determine whether bone mineral density (BMD) is lower in hormonal contraceptive users than that in an untreated, comparison group. Design Observational, prospective cohort; duration: 24 months. Setting Adolescent clinics in a midwestern, metropolitan setting. Patients 433 postmenarcheal girls, aged 12–18 years, on depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) [n=58], oral contraceptives (OC) [n=187], or untreated (n=188). Intervention DMPA and OC containing 100 mcg levonorgestrel and 20 mcg ethinyl estradiol. Main Outcome Measure BMD measurements at spine and femoral neck were obtained with dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) at baseline and 6-month intervals. Results Over 24 months, mean percent change in spine BMD was: DMPA −1.5%, OC +4.2%, and untreated +6.3%. Mean percent change in femoral neck BMD was: DMPA −5.2%, OC +3.0%, untreated +3.8%. Statistical significance was found between the DMPA group and other two groups (p<.001). In the DMPA group, mean percent change in spine BMD over the first 12 months was −1.4%; the rate of change slowed to −0.1% over the second 12 months. No bone density loss reached the level of osteopenia. Conclusions Adolescent girls receiving DMPA had significant loss in BMD compared with bone gain in the OC and untreated group. However, its clinical significance is mitigated by slowed loss after the first year of DMPA use and general maintenance of bone density values within the normal range. PMID:18222431

  17. A case-control study of the possible association between oral contraceptives and malignant melanoma.

    PubMed Central

    Adam, S. A.; Sheaves, J. K.; Wright, N. H.; Mosser, G.; Harris, R. W.; Vessey, M. P.

    1981-01-01

    In a case-control study, we investigated 169 women aged 15-49 years with malignant melanoma notified to the Oxford and South Western cancer registries during the years 1971-1976, together with 507 matched controls. Data about medical, reproductive, drug and smoking histories were obtained both by reviewing general practitioner (GP) records and from the women themselves by postal questionnaires. There was no significant evidence of any overall increase in the risk of melanoma in oral contraceptive (OC) users (data from GP records-ever use vs never use, relative risk (RR) 1.34, 95% confidence limits 0.92-1.96; corresponding data from postal questionnaires-RR 1.13, limits 0.73-1.75). However, although not significant, the risk estimated from data in the postal questionnaires was higher in women who had used OCs for 5 years or more (use greater than or equal to 5 years vs never use, RR 1.57, limits 0.83-3.03). Previously demonstrated risk factors for melanoma, such as fair skin, blond or red hair and Celtic origin were found to be commoner in the cases than in the controls. Data from the Oxford/Family Planning Association contraceptive study were also examined. Unexpectedly there was a strong suggestion of a negative association between OC use and melanoma risk, but the analysis was based on only 12 women with the disease. PMID:7259960

  18. Evaluation of body composition during low-dose estrogen oral contraceptives treatment.

    PubMed

    Franchini, M; Caruso, C; Nigrelli, S; Poggiali, C

    1995-01-01

    The effect of two low-dose oral contraceptives (OCs) on weight and body composition was evaluated in 80 family planning clinic outpatients 18-43 years of age. These women were randomly assigned to receive OCs containing either 20 mcg ethinyl estradiol and 150 mcg desogestrel or 30 mcg ethinyl estradiol and 75 mcg gestodene. 20 IUD users served as controls. Anthropometric measurements and body composition (estimated by Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis) were assessed at baseline and after 6 and 12 months of OC use. In all three groups, body weight, body mass index, total body water, and body cellular mass remained unchanged during the 12-month study period. These findings confirm that the new low-dose OCs have no significant effects on body weight or composition.

  19. Programmed oocyte retrieval: clinical and biological effects of oral contraceptives administered before in vitro fertilization.

    PubMed

    Mashiach, S; Dor, J; Goldenberg, M; Shalev, J; Levran, D; Rudak, E; Nebel, L; Goldman, B; Blankstein, J; Ben-Rafael, Z

    1989-06-01

    We have prospectively compared two regimens of suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis by oral contraceptives (OCs) for 15 or 30 days and two ovarian stimulation protocols. The latent phase, which represents a period of ovarian insensitivity, was prolonged and directly correlated to the duration of suppression. Thirty days' suppression, compared with 15 days', resulted in the cancellation of more cycles and a lower fertilization and pregnancy percentage. No significant increase in either serum progesterone or luteinizing hormone was noted in suppressed cycles. It is concluded that if programming is desired, OCs should be used for the shortest period possible. The variation in the length of the follicular phase indicates that there is a different 'fixed' day for retrieval for each suppression-stimulation protocol and this day should be established prospectively.

  20. Influence of menstrual cycle, parity and oral contraceptive use on steroid hormone receptors in normal breast.

    PubMed Central

    Battersby, S.; Robertson, B. J.; Anderson, T. J.; King, R. J.; McPherson, K.

    1992-01-01

    Steroid receptor was assessed immunohistochemically in 158 samples of normal breast for variation through the menstrual cycle. Patterns and intensity of reaction were used in a semi-quantitative scoring system to examine the influence of cycle phase, cycle type, parity and age. The changes in oestrogen receptor for natural cycle and oral contraceptive (OC) cycles indicated down-regulation by progestins. Progesterone receptor did not vary significantly in natural cycles, but increased steadily through OC cycles. This study provides strong evidence that both oestrogen and progesterone influence breast epithelium, but dissimilarities from the endometrium are apparent. The interval since pregnancy had a significant negative effect on frequency and score of oestrogen receptor and score of progesterone receptor. Multivariate analysis established the phase of cycle and OC use as independent significant influences on oestrogen receptor. The interval since pregnancy was an independent significant factor for both oestrogen and progesterone receptor presence. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1562470

  1. Are oral contraceptives a significant contributor to the estrogenicity of drinking water?

    PubMed

    Wise, Amber; O'Brien, Kacie; Woodruff, Tracey

    2011-01-01

    Recent observed feminization of aquatic animals has raised concerns about estrogenic compounds in water supplies and the potential for these chemicals to reach drinking water. Public perception frequently attributes this feminization to oral contraceptives (OCs) in wastewater and raises concerns that exposure to OCs in drinking water may contribute to the recent rise in human reproductive problems. This paper reviews the literature regarding various sources of estrogens, in surface, source and drinking water, with an emphasis on the active molecule that comes from OCs. It includes discussion of the various agricultural, industrial, and municipal sources and outlines the contributions of estrogenic chemicals to the estrogenicity of waterways and estimates that the risk of exposure to synthetic estrogens in drinking water on human health is negligible. This paper also provides recommendations for strategies to better understand all the potential sources of estrogenic compounds in the environment and possibilities to reduce the levels of estrogenic chemicals in the water supply.

  2. [Male contraception].

    PubMed

    Demoulin, A

    1984-04-01

    Among the reasons why male hormonal contraception has lagged behind female methods are the necessity of preserving virility, the fact that spermatogenesis is a continuous process, the need to control secondary effects and toxicity, and the requirement that modes of administration be acceptable to both partners. Among currently available reversible mehtods, withdrawal is undoubtedly the most ancient. It is still widespread but cannot be recommended because of its limited effectiveness. The condom is used by about 10% of couples worldwide as a principal or temporary method, but its inter-ference with sensation has limited its acceptance. Condoms are nevertheless highly effective when used with a spermicide. Various androgens are currently under investigation. High doses of testosterone can induce azoospermia without affecting libido but their side effects may be serious. The use of combinations of steroids permits doses to be reduced and offers promise for the future. The combination of oral medroxyprogesterone acetate and percutaneous testosterone is one of the better approaches; the combination is effective and nontoxic but has the disadvantage of percutaneous administration. Gossypol, a pigment extracted from the cotton plant, has been used as a contraceptive in China with a reported efficacy of 99.89%, recovery of fertility within 3 months, and no effect on future fertility. However, its toxicity appears to be significant in the animal and its reversibility is uncertain. A search is on for analogs which would preserve the contraceptive effects while eliminating toxic effects. Several gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) analogs under investigation for their interference with spermatogenesis have given promising results. Several chemicals tested for contraceptive effects have had unacceptably high toxicity. Chinese investigators have reported good results with various physical methods of interfering with sperm production, but their reversibility and innocuity

  3. Dolutegravir Has No Effect on the Pharmacokinetics of Oral Contraceptives With Norgestimate and Ethinyl Estradiol

    PubMed Central

    Borland, Julie; Chen, Shuguang; Wajima, Toshihiro; Peppercorn, Amanda F.; Piscitelli, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dolutegravir (DTG; Tivicay; ViiV Healthcare, Research Triangle Park, NC) is an HIV-1-unboosted integrase inhibitor with no cytochrome P450 or uridine 5′diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase inhibition or induction. As DTG is administered to HIV-1–infected women receiving oral contraceptives, assessing the potential for drug interactions was warranted. Objective: To determine the impact of DTG on the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of a common oral contraceptive, norgestimate/ethinyl estradiol (NGM/EE; Ortho-Cyclen; Ortho-McNeil-Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc, Raritan, NJ). Methods: This randomized, 2-period, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted within 1 menstrual cycle at 1 clinical center in the United States; 16 women were enrolled. Participants received NGM 0.25 mg/EE 0.035 mg throughout the study. During days 1 to 10, they were randomized to receive twice-daily DTG 50 mg or matching placebo with food and switched to the other treatment during days 12 to 21. Results: Ratios of area under the concentration-time curve from time 0 until end of the dosage interval (AUC0-τ), maximum plasma concentration, and concentration at the end of the dosage interval of norelgestromin with DTG treatment to the same PK parameters with placebo treatment were 0.975, 0.890, and 0.932, respectively; for EE, ratios were 1.03, 0.99, and 1.02, respectively. No significant differences in luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, and progesterone were detected on days 1, 10, 11, 21, and 22. DTG steady-state AUC0-τ was similar to historical data. No severe or grade 3/4 adverse events occurred. Conclusions: DTG had no effect on NGM/EE PK or PD. NGM/EE can be administered with DTG without dose adjustment. PMID:25862012

  4. Auxiliary midwife prescription of oral contraceptives. An experimental project in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Rosenfield, A G; Limcharoen, C

    1972-12-01

    In 1969, the Thai Ministry of Public Health initiated a study in which auxiliary midwives in 4 rural provinces were allowed to prescribe oral contraceptives without a physician examination. In rural areas in Thailand there is approximately 1 physician per 110,000 people. However, there is a relative abundance of auxiliary midwives. These women have 10 years basic education and receive an 18 month midwife and public health course. There is 1 such auxiliary midwife per 8000 rural inhabitants. In prescribing oral contraceptives, the auxiliary midwives used a simple checklist to rule out contraindications, and no pelvic examinations were performed. In addition to the 4 rural provinces studied, 13 control provinces were observed;y There was a 4 fold increase in the number of pill acceptors in the 4 study provinces in the 6 months following the initiation of the study in 1969 compared to the 6 months before. There was no increase noted in the incidence of side effects or complications. There was a larger number of pill acceptors and a higher percentage of the eligible female population who accepted the pill in the 4 study provinces than in the 13 control provinces. The continuation rates were higher for pills prescribed by midwives than for those prescribed by physicians. At the end of 1 year of study, the Minstry of Public Health ruled that the more than 3000 auxiliary midwives throughout the country who had received basic family planning training could prescribe the pill, with a resultant 3-fold increase in the number of pill acceptors nationwide, from approximately 8800 in April 1970 to almost 31,000 in December 1971. It is emphasized that the increased utilization of nursing and paramedical personnel is an absolute necessity in many parts of the world.

  5. Hypertensive Crisis and Left Ventricular Thrombi after an Upper Respiratory Infection during the Long-term Use of Oral Contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Natsuko; Suzuki, Keisuke; Mizuno, Tomofumi; Kato, Yukari; Suga, Norihiro; Yoshino, Masabumi; Miura, Naoto; Banno, Shogo; Imai, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    A 34-year-old woman who had been using oral contraceptives for 10 years developed hypertensive crisis with papilloedema after an upper respiratory infection. Laboratory data showed hyperreninemic hyperaldosteronism and elevated levels of fibrinogen, fibrin, and fibrinogen degradation products. Echocardiography demonstrated two masses (18 mm) in the left ventricle. On the fourth hospital day, cerebral infarction, renal infarction, and upper mesenteric artery occlusion suddenly occurred despite the blood pressure being well-controlled using anti-hypertensive drugs. Echocardiography revealed the disappearance of the left ventricular masses, which suggested left ventricular thrombi. Cessation of the contraceptives and administration of heparin, warfarin, and anti-platelets drugs improved her general condition.

  6. Improvement in quality-of-life questionnaire measures in obese adolescent females with polycystic ovary syndrome treated with lifestyle changes and oral contraceptives, with or without metformin.

    PubMed

    Harris-Glocker, Miranda; Davidson, Kristin; Kochman, Lynda; Guzick, David; Hoeger, Kathleen

    2010-02-01

    We studied the effect of metformin or placebo in a lifestyle modification program combined with oral contraceptives (OC) on quality-of-life parameters measured by the polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) questionnaire in obese adolescent women with validated PCOS. The quality-of-life indicators were measured at baseline and conclusion for five domains on the PCOS questionnaire, with equal improvement in scores in both placebo and metformin groups, suggesting that the addition of metformin does not add improvement to quality-of-life measures above those observed with lifestyle modification and OC treatment.

  7. Contraception technology: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Sitruk-Ware, Regine; Nath, Anita; Mishell, Daniel R

    2013-03-01

    Steady progress in contraception research has been achieved over the past 50 years. Hormonal and nonhormonal modern contraceptives have improved women's lives by reducing different health conditions that contributed to considerable morbidity. However, the contraceptives available today are not suitable to all users, and the need to expand contraceptive choices still exists. Novel products such as new implants, contraceptive vaginal rings, transdermal patches and newer combinations of oral contraceptives have recently been introduced in family planning programs, and hormonal contraception is widely used for spacing and limiting births. Concerns over the adverse effects of hormonal contraceptives have led to research and development of new combinations with improved metabolic profile. Recent developments include use of natural compounds such as estradiol and estradiol valerate with the hope to decrease thrombotic risk, in combination with newer progestins derived from the progesterone structure or from spirolactone, in order to avoid the androgenic effects. Progesterone antagonists and progesterone receptor modulators are highly effective in blocking ovulation and preventing follicular rupture and are undergoing investigations in the form of oral pills and in semi-long-acting delivery systems. Future developments also include the combination of a contraceptive with an antiretroviral agent for dual contraception and protection against sexually transmitted diseases, to be used before intercourse or on demand, as well as for continuous use in dual-protection rings. Although clinical trials of male contraception have reflected promising results, limited involvement of industry in that area of research has decreased the likelihood of having a male method available in the current decade. Development of nonhormonal methods is still at an early stage of research, with the identification of specific targets within the reproductive system in ovaries and testes, as well as

  8. HelpDesk answers: do hormonal contraceptives lead to weight gain?

    PubMed

    Albright, Maria; Rani, Saira; Gavagan, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    It depends. Weight doesn't appear to increase with combined oral contraception (OC) compared with nonhormonal contraception, but percent body fat may increase slightly. Depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate injection (DMPA) users experience weight gain compared with OC and nonhormonal contraception (NH) users.

  9. Refractory thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura associated with oral contraceptives and factor V Leiden: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Tsirakis, George; Mantadakis, Elpis; Xylouri, Irini; Foudoulakis, Andreas; Vardaki, Eleftheria; Katsipi, Irene; Daphnis, Eugene; Samonis, George

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Thrombotic microangiopathies constitute a heterogeneous group of diseases characterised by microangiopathic haemolytic anaemia and thrombocytopaenia associated with platelet aggregation in the microcirculation responsible for ischaemic manifestations. Classically, thrombotic microangiopathies are described as encompassing two main syndromes: thrombotic thrombocytopaenic purpura and the haemolytic-uraemic syndrome Many cases of idiopathic thrombotic thrombocytopaenic purpura have, to date, been associated with severe ADAMTS13 metalloprotease deficiency while haemolytic uraemic syndrome usually occurs in the context of normal protease activity. Oestrogens and factor V Leiden have rarely been implicated in the pathogenesis of thrombotic microangiopathy. Case presentation We describe the case of a 17-year-old female with refractory thrombotic thrombocytopaenic purpura. The patient was receiving a new generation of oral contraceptives for dysmenorrhoea and had factor V Leiden. After undergoing prolonged and intense plasma exchange therapy for 40 days and high dose oral corticosteroids therapy for 90 days, our patient recovered fully. Conclusion Patients with refractory thrombotic thrombocytopaenic purpura should likely be evaluated for congenital thrombophilic disorders and for ingestion of drugs that have been associated with this rare form of thrombotic microangiopathy. Identification of these and as yet other unknown genetic and/or acquired risk factors may lead to more judicious treatment approaches. PMID:19829833

  10. Emergency contraception.

    PubMed

    Grimes, David A; Raymond, Elizabeth G

    2002-08-01

    Emergency contraception is used to prevent pregnancy after a coital act not adequately protected by a regular method of contraception. In contrast to early medical abortion, emergency contraception prevents a pregnancy from starting and does not disrupt an established pregnancy. The most commonly used approaches consist of two oral doses of contraceptive steroids. The levonorgestrel-only regimen (levonorgestrel, 0.75 mg, repeated in 12 hours) appears to be more effective and better tolerated than the Yuzpe regimen (ethinyl estradiol, 100 microg, and levonorgestrel, 0.5 mg, repeated in 12 hours). In the largest randomized, controlled trial to date, levonorgestrel prevented about 85% of pregnancies that would have occurred without its use. Hormonal emergency contraception has no known medical contraindications, although it is not indicated for suspected or confirmed pregnancy. However, if hormonal emergency contraception is inadvertently taken in early pregnancy, neither the woman nor the fetus will be harmed. Nausea and vomiting associated with the Yuzpe regimen can be reduced by prophylactic use of meclizine. A strong medical and legal case exists for making hormonal emergency contraception available over the counter, as has happened in countries other than the United States. Easier access to and wider use of emergency contraception could dramatically lower the high rates of unintended pregnancy and induced abortion in the United States. PMID:12160366

  11. Pre-gravid oral contraceptive use in relation to birth weight: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Hatch, Elizabeth E; Hahn, Kristen A; Mikkelsen, Ellen M; Riis, Anders H; Sorensen, Henrik Toft; Rothman, Kenneth J; Wise, Lauren A

    2015-11-01

    Few studies have evaluated the association between pregravid oral contraceptive (OC) use and birth weight, and findings have been conflicting. We conducted a prospective cohort study of 5921 pregnancy planners in Denmark to evaluate recency, duration, and type of OC used before conception in relation to infant birth weight. Participants completed online questionnaires and reported detailed information on contraceptive history and covariates at baseline. Participants completed bimonthly follow-up questionnaires to update their pregnancy status for up to 12 months or until conception occurred. Birth weight data were ascertained from the Danish Medical Birth Registry for 4046 live births delivered by study participants between 2008 and 2010. We used multivariable linear and log-binomial regression analyses to control for confounding. Mean birth weight was higher among women who had used OCs within 0-1 months (mean difference = 97 g, CI 26, 168) or 2-6 months (mean difference = 40 g, CI -5, 85) before conception, compared with more than 12 months before conception. Mean birth weight was lower among women who had used OCs for long durations (mean difference comparing ≥12 with <4 years of OC use = -85 g, CI -158, -11). Our findings indicate that pregravid OC use within 6 months of conception may be associated with a small increase in birth weight, but that long duration of use may have the opposite effect. Results were stronger among male infants, among 2nd and 4th generation OC users, and among users of OCs with a higher estrogen dose.

  12. Intrauterine devices and other forms of contraception: thinking outside the pack.

    PubMed

    Allen, Caitlin; Kolehmainen, Christine

    2015-05-01

    A variety of contraception options are available in addition to traditional combined oral contraceptive pills. Newer long-acting reversible contraceptive (LARC) methods such as intrauterine devices and subcutaneous implants are preferred because they do not depend on patient compliance. They are highly effective and appropriate for most women. Female and male sterilization are other effective but they are irreversible and require counseling to minimize regret. The contraceptive injection, patch, and ring do not require daily administration, but their typical efficacy rates are lower than LARC methods and similar to those for combined oral contraceptive pills.

  13. Effects of oral contraceptives, or lanosterol, on ADP-induced aggregation and binding of /sup 125/I-fibrinogen to rat platelets

    SciTech Connect

    McGregor, L.; Toor, B.; McGregor, J.L.; Renaud, S.; Clemetson, K.J.

    1984-03-01

    The aggregation to ADP and the binding of /sup 125/I-fibrinogen to platelets from rats treated with oral contraceptives or normal platelets treated in vitro with lanosterol were compared to their respective controls. Both types of platelets showed a significant increase in ADP-induced aggregation and in binding of fibrinogen, indicating that the effect of oral contraceptives could be partly due to increased levels of lanosterol in platelet membrane.

  14. Safety, efficacy and patient acceptability of the combined estrogen and progestin transdermal contraceptive patch: a review

    PubMed Central

    Graziottin, Alessandra

    2008-01-01

    The worldwide introduction of the first, unique patch for hormonal contraception (ethinyl estradiol/norelgestromin, EE/NGMN patch) was widely recognized as a significant event in the development of drug delivery systems. This innovation offers a number of advantages over the oral route, and extensive clinical trials have proved its safety, efficacy, effectiveness, and tolerability. The weekly administration and ease of use/simplicity of the EE/NGMN patch contribute to its acceptability, and help to resolve the two main problems of non-adherence, namely early discontinuation and inconsistent use. The patch offers additional benefits to adolescents (improvement of dysmenorrhea and acne), adults (improvement in emotional and physical well-being, premenstrual syndrome, and menstrual irregularities), and perimenopausal women (correction of hormonal imbalance, modulation of premenopausal symptoms), thus providing high satisfaction rates (in nearly 90% of users). Since its introduction, the transdermal contraceptive patch has proved to be a useful choice for women who seek a convenient formulation which is easy to use, with additional, non-contraceptive tailored benefits for all the ages. PMID:19920983

  15. Oral contraceptives did not affect biochemical folate indexes and homocysteine concentrations in adolescent females.

    PubMed

    Green, T J; Houghton, L A; Donovan, U; Gibson, R S; O'Connor, D L

    1998-01-01

    The impact of oral contraceptive (OC) use, smoking, and alcohol drinking on biochemical indexes of folate and vitamin B-12 was investigated in 229 adolescents 14-20 years old recruited from advertisements in Ontario, Canada. Subjects completed a life-style questionnaire and a 3-day, weighed food record, followed by overnight fasting and the collection of blood samples. Of the 48 participants (21%) who were OC users, 30 had used the pill for more than 12 months. Only 37 adolescents (16%) smoked, but 94 (60%) had consumed alcohol in the month preceding the study. Median daily intake of folate and vitamin B-12 (including intake from supplements) was 215 mcg and 1.9 mcg, respectively. OC use, smoking, and alcohol consumption were not significantly associated with lower serum or red blood cell folate levels, after controlling for folate intake. Serum homocysteine levels were not correlated with smoking or OC use, but were 13% higher among alcohol drinkers than nondrinkers. Finally, although smoking and alcohol use were not associated with serum B-12 levels, OC use was linked with an estimated 33% lower serum B-12 level than was nonuse. These findings fail to validate concerns that OC use has a negative impact on the folate status of adolescent females, but suggest a need to improve the dietary folate intake of young women who smoke.

  16. Sex steroids, sexual behavior, and selection attention for erotic stimuli in women using oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Alexander, G M; Sherwin, B B

    1993-01-01

    The relationship between sex steroids and sexual behavior was examined in 19 oral contraceptive users. Retrospective assessment of sexual attitudes were obtained and women completed daily ratings of sexual behavior and well-being for 28 days. Plasma levels of free testosterone (T), estradiol, and progesterone were measured at weekly intervals. In addition, women performed a novel selective attention task designed to measure the strength of the tendency to be distracted by sexual stimuli. Multiple regression analyses using average sexual behavior variables as dependent variables, and hormone levels sexual attitudes and well-being as predictor variables, showed that free T was strongly and positively associated with sexual desire, sexual thoughts, and anticipation of sexual activity. A role for T in attention to sexual stimuli was also supported by the positive correlation between free T and the bias for sexual stimuli in a subgroup of women. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that T may enhance cognitive aspects of women's sexual behavior. PMID:8493300

  17. A prospective treatment study of premenstrual symptoms using a triphasic oral contraceptive.

    PubMed

    Graham, C A; Sherwin, B B

    1992-04-01

    Eighty-two women with complaints of moderate to severe premenstrual symptoms were recruited for a double-blind, controlled trial of a triphasic oral contraceptive (o.c.). Subjects made daily ratings of symptoms for at least one baseline cycle and were then randomly assigned to receive either placebo or o.c. for three months. Twenty-three women dropped out of the study (18 o.c., 5 placebo), 13 failed to show prospective confirmation of moderate to severe premenstrual symptoms, and one placebo subject had an anovulatory cycle. Forty-five women with prospectively-confirmed premenstrual changes (20 o.c., 25 placebo) completed the study. Premenstrual breast pain and bloating were significantly reduced with active treatment compared to placebo (p less than 0.03) but there were no beneficial effects of the o.c. over placebo for any of the mood symptoms. Women who received o.c.s reported decreased sexual interest after starting treatment and this effect was independent of any adverse influence on mood. PMID:1564678

  18. Diminished nap effects on memory consolidation are seen under oral contraceptive use.

    PubMed

    Genzel, Lisa; Bäurle, Anna; Potyka, Alina; Wehrle, Renate; Adamczyk, Marek; Friess, Elisabeth; Steiger, Axel; Dresler, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Many young females take exogenous hormones as oral contraceptive (OC), a condition rarely controlled for in studies on sleep and memory consolidation even though sex hormones influence consolidation. This study investigated the effects of OCs on sleep-related consolidation of a motor and declarative task, utilizing a daytime nap protocol. Fifteen healthy, young females taking OCs came to the sleep lab for three different conditions: nap with previous learning, wake with previous learning and nap without learning. They underwent each condition twice, once during the "pill-active" weeks and once during the "pill-free" week, resulting in 6 visits. In all conditions, participants showed a significant off-line consolidation effect, independent of pill week or nap/wake condition. There were no significant differences in sleep stage duration, spindle activity or spectral EEG frequency bands between naps with or without the learning condition. The present data showed a significant off-line enhancement in memory irrespective of potential beneficial effects of a nap. In comparison to previous studies, this may suggest that the use of OCs may enhance off-line memory consolidation in motor and verbal tasks per se. These results stress the importance to control for the use of OCs in studies focusing on memory performance. PMID:25720656

  19. Oral Contraceptive Use and the ECG: Evidence of an Adverse QT Effect on Corrected QT Interval

    PubMed Central

    Sedlak, Tara; Shufelt, Chrisandra; Iribarren, Carlos; Lyon, Liisa L; Merz, C. Noel Bairey

    2013-01-01

    Background A prolonged corrected QT (QTc) interval is a marker for an increased risk of sudden cardiac death. We evaluated the relationship between oral contraceptive (OC) use, type of OC, and QTc interval. Methods We identified 410,782 ECGs performed at Northern California Kaiser Permanente on female patients between 15–53 years from January, 1995 to June, 2008. QT was corrected for heart rate using log-linear regression. OC generation (first, second and third) was classified by increasing progestin androgenic potency, while the fourth generation was classified as anti-androgenic. Results Among 410,782 women, 8.4% were on OC. In multivariate analysis after correction for comorbidities, there was an independent shortening effect of OCs overall (slope = −0.5ms; SE = 0.12, p<0.0002). Users of first and second generation progestins had a significantly shorter QTc than non-users (p<0.0001), while users of fourth generation had a significantly longer QTc than non-users (slope = 3.6ms, SE = 0.35, p<0.0001). Conclusion Overall, OC use has a shortening effect on the QTc. Shorter QTc is seen with first and second generation OC while fourth generation OC use has a lengthening effect on the QTc. Careful examination of adverse event rates in fourth generation OC users is needed. PMID:23879279

  20. Duration of oral contraceptive use predicts women's initial and subsequent subjective responses to sexual stimuli.

    PubMed

    Renfro, Kaytlin J; Rupp, Heather; Wallen, Kim

    2015-09-01

    Recent work suggests that a woman's hormonal state when first exposed to visual sexual stimuli (VSS) modulates her initial and subsequent responses to VSS. The present study investigated whether women's initial hormonal state was related to their subjective ratings of VSS, and whether this relationship differed with VSS content. We reanalyzed previously collected data from 14 naturally cycling (NC) women and 14 women taking oral contraceptives (OCs), who subjectively rated VSS at three hormonal time-points. NC women's ratings of 216 unique sexual images were collected during the menstrual, periovulatory, and luteal phases of their menstrual cycles, and OC women's ratings were collected at comparable time-points across their pill-cycles. NC women's initial hormonal state was not related to their ratings of VSS. OC women's initial hormonal state predicted their ratings of VSS with minimal contextual information and of images depicting female-to-male oral sex. Specifically, women who entered the study in the third week of their pill-cycle (OC-3 women) rated such images as less attractive at all testing sessions than did all other women. OC-3 women were also the only women to rate decontextualized VSS as unattractive at all testing sessions. These results corroborate previous studies in which women's initial hormonal state was found to predict subsequent interest in sexual stimuli. Future work, with larger samples, should more directly investigate whether OC-3 women's negative assessment of specific types of VSS reflects a reaction to the laboratory environment or a broader mechanism, wherein OC women's sexual interests decrease late in their pill-cycle.

  1. Contraceptives for teenagers.

    PubMed

    Bullough, B; Bullough, V

    1991-01-01

    The contraceptive options suitable for teenagers are presented and discussed. Condoms have the advantage of preventing the spread of sexually transmitted diseases, and oral contraceptives are probably the most effective in preventing pregnancy. Other options include the barrier contraceptives available to women, spermicides, sponges, intrauterine devices, periodic abstinence, and the morning after pill.

  2. Emerging Options for Emergency Contraception

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Atsuko; Hagopian, Laura; Linden, Judith

    2013-01-01

    Emergency post-coital contraception (EC) is an effective method of preventing pregnancy when used appropriately. EC has been available since the 1970s, and its availability and use have become widespread. Options for EC are broad and include the copper intrauterine device (IUD) and emergency contraceptive pills such as levonorgestrel, ulipristal acetate, combined oral contraceptive pills (Yuzpe method), and less commonly, mifepristone. Some options are available over-the-counter, while others require provider prescription or placement. There are no absolute contraindications to the use of emergency contraceptive pills, with the exception of ulipristal acetate and mifepristone. This article reviews the mechanisms of action, efficacy, safety, side effects, clinical considerations, and patient preferences with respect to EC usage. The decision of which regimen to use is influenced by local availability, cost, and patient preference. PMID:24453516

  3. The mechanism of action of hormonal contraceptives and intrauterine contraceptive devices.

    PubMed

    Rivera, R; Yacobson, I; Grimes, D

    1999-11-01

    Modern hormonal contraceptives and intrauterine contraceptive devices have multiple biologic effects. Some of them may be the primary mechanism of contraceptive action, whereas others are secondary. For combined oral contraceptives and progestin-only methods, the main mechanisms are ovulation inhibition and changes in the cervical mucus that inhibit sperm penetration. The hormonal methods, particularly the low-dose progestin-only products and emergency contraceptive pills, have effects on the endometrium that, theoretically, could affect implantation. However, no scientific evidence indicates that prevention of implantation actually results from the use of these methods. Once pregnancy begins, none of these methods has an abortifacient action. The precise mechanism of intrauterine contraceptive devices is unclear. Current evidence indicates they exert their primary effect before fertilization, reducing the opportunity of sperm to fertilize an ovum.

  4. [Advances in hormonal contraception].

    PubMed

    Villanueva Egan, Luis Alberto; Pichardo Cuevas, Mauricio

    2007-01-01

    This review provides an update regarding newer options in hormonal contraception that include the progestin-releasing intrauterine system, the contraceptive patch and ring, the single rod progestin-releasing implant, extended and emergency oral contraception and recent advances in hormonal male contraception. These methods represent a major advancement in this field, allowing for the development of more acceptable, safety and effective birth control regimens.

  5. Review of newer contraceptive agents.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, M; Attaran, M

    1999-06-01

    Advances in contraceptive technology have made birth control more effective, convenient, and safe. We review the newer products and some under development, including the latest oral contraceptives, injectable progesterone, subdermal progestin implants, progesterone-releasing IUDs, emergency contraception, and male contraception.

  6. The 1998 Canadian Contraception Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, William A.; Boroditsky, Richard; Bridges, Martha L.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the 1998 Canadian Contraception Study, a mailed survey which asked women about contraceptive practices past, present, and future (including use of oral contraceptives, condoms, and sterilization); familiarity with and opinion about different contraception methods; and general sexual and reproductive health. The paper also examines…

  7. Cycle scheduling for in vitro fertilization with oral contraceptive pills versus oral estradiol valerate: a randomized, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Both oral contraceptive pills (OCPs) and estradiol (E2) valerate have been used to schedule gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles and, consequently, laboratory activities. However, there are no studies comparing treatment outcomes directly between these two pretreatment methods. This randomized controlled trial was aimed at finding differences in ongoing pregnancy rates between GnRH antagonist IVF cycles scheduled with OCPs or E2 valerate. Methods Between January and May 2012, one hundred consecutive patients (nonobese, regularly cycling women 18–38 years with normal day 3 hormone levels and <3 previous IVF/ICSI attempts) undergoing IVF with the GnRH antagonist protocol were randomized to either the OCP or E2 pretreatment arms, with no restrictions such as blocking or stratification. Authors involved in data collection and analysis were blinded to group assignment. Fifty patients received OCP (30 μg ethinyl E2/150 μg levonorgestrel) for 12–16 days from day 1 or 2, and stimulation was started 5 days after stopping OCP. Similarly, 50 patients received 4 mg/day oral E2 valerate from day 20 for 5–12 days, until the day before starting stimulation. Results Pretreatment with OCP (mean±SD, 14.5±1.7 days) was significantly longer than with E2 (7.8±1.9 days). Stimulation and embryological characteristics were similar. Ongoing pregnancy rates (46.0% vs. 44.0%; risk difference, –2.0% [95% CI –21.2% to 17.3%]), as well as implantation (43.5% vs. 47.4%), clinical pregnancy (50.0% vs. 48.0%), clinical miscarriage (7.1% vs. 7.7%), and live birth (42.0% vs. 40.0%) rates were comparable between groups. Conclusions This is the first study to directly compare these two methods of cycle scheduling in GnRH antagonist cycles. Our results fail to show statistically significant differences in ongoing pregnancy rates between pretreatment with OCP and E2 for IVF with the GnRH antagonist protocol. Although the

  8. Effects of oral contraceptive and estrogen administration on plasma calcitonin in pre- and postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Hurley, D L; Tiegs, R D; Barta, J; Laakso, K; Heath, H

    1989-02-01

    Estrogen (E) therapy and administration of oral contraceptives (OC) reportedly increase plasma calcitonin (CT) concentrations in women, effects said to mediate in part the beneficial actions of E on bone. To further examine this theory, we tested the effects of three cycles of OC therapy in 12 young women, comparing them to 10 healthy women before and after three normal menstrual cycles. We also determined the effects of 3 months of E therapy (ethinyl estradiol, 20 micrograms/day, 25 of 30 days) in 14 healthy postmenopausal women, using a crossover design (studied after 3 months with and 3 months without E). We determined CT by radioimmunoassay (antiserum G-1701) in whole plasma (iCT) and silica cartridge extracts of plasma (exCT) after overnight fasting, after calcium (Ca) infusion (2 mg Ca/kg over 5 minutes), and during a normal day at 0800, 1200, 1700, and 2000 h. In no control study was there a significant diurnal change in iCT or exCT, and neither OC nor E therapy altered this. Similarly, OC administration did not affect basal CT levels or the normal iCT and exCT responses to Ca infusion. E therapy induced expected changes in serum Ca, phosphorus, and alkaline phosphatase and urinary Ca and cAMP excretion; basal and diurnal plasma exCT levels were decreased significantly, consonant with the decrement in serum Ca. E did not alter normal iCT and exCT responses to Ca infusion. Thus, administration of either OC or E has no stimulatory effect on CT secretion, which suggests that the beneficial actions of E on bone are not mediated through CT-induced inhibition of bone resorption.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Oral Contraceptive Use and Colorectal Cancer in the Nurses’ Health Study I and II

    PubMed Central

    Charlton, Brittany M.; Wu, Kana; Zhang, Xuehong; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Fuchs, Charles S.; Missmer, Stacey A.; Rosner, Bernard; Hankinson, Susan E.; Willett, Walter C.; Michels, Karin B.

    2015-01-01

    Background It remains unclear if oral contraceptive (OC) use is associated with the incidence of colorectal cancer. Few studies have examined this association by duration of OC use, time since last OC use, and different cancer subsites. Methods Among 88,691 participants of the Nurses’ Health Study I (NHSI) and 93,080 participants of the Nurses’ Health Study II (NHSII), we assessed OC use every 2 years between 1976-2010 and categorized it as ever use, duration of use, and time since last use. We included incident colorectal cancer cases through 2010 (NHSI: age at diagnosis=36-88, N=1,764, NHSII: age at diagnosis=33-64, N=206). Multivariable hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals [HR (95% CIs)] were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression models. Results Ever OC use was not associated with colorectal cancer in NHSI [1.01 (0.91, 1.12)] nor NHSII [1.03 (0.69, 1.53)]. In NHSII, when compared to never-users, longer durations (5+ years) of OC use were inversely associated with the risk of colon cancers (test for trend p=0.02) but the number of endpoints was limited. No other colorectal cancer subsites were associated with OC durations or times since last OC use in either cohort. Conclusions In two large prospective cohorts, we found little evidence that OC use may be protective for colorectal cancer, except potentially with longer durations of use among younger women. Impact Our results do not support the previous initial studies that reported an inverse association of recent OC use with colorectal cancer but instead support newer, larger studies demonstrating no such association. PMID:26063479

  10. Oral contraceptive cycle phase does not affect 200-m swim time trial performance.

    PubMed

    Rechichi, Claire; Dawson, Brian

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether swimming performance was affected by acute hormonal fluctuation within a monophasic oral contraceptive (OC) cycle. Six competitive swimmers and water polo players completed a 200-m time trial at 3 time points of a single OC cycle: during the consumption phase (CONS), early (WITH1), and late in the withdrawal phase (WITH2). Split times and stroke rate were recorded during the time trial, and heart rate, blood lactate, glucose, and pH were measured after each performance test. Resting endogenous serum estradiol and progesterone concentrations were also assessed. No significant differences were observed between phases for body composition, 200-m swim time, mean stroke rate, peak heart rate, or blood glucose (p > 0.05). The mean peak blood lactate was significantly lower during WITH2 (9.9 ± 3.0 mmol·L(-1)) compared with that of CONS (12.5 ± 3.0 mmol·L(-1)) and mean pH higher during WITH2 (7.183 ± 0.111) compared with that of CONS (7.144 ± 0.092). Serum estradiol levels were significantly greater during WITH2 compared with that during WITH1 and CONS, but there was no difference in serum progesterone levels. These results demonstrate that for monophasic OC users, cycle phase does not impact the 200-m swimming performance. There was a reduction in blood lactate and an increase in pH during the withdrawal phase, possibly because of an increase in fluid retention, plasma volume, and cellular alkalosis. Therefore, female 200-m swimmers taking a monophasic OC need not be concerned by the phase of their cycle with regard to competition and optimizing performance. However, coaches and scientists should exercise caution when interpreting blood lactate results obtained from swimming tests and consider controlling for cycle phase for athletes taking an OC. PMID:22446669

  11. Heart rate variability across the menstrual cycle in young women taking oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, André L; Ramos, Plínio S; Vianna, Lauro C; Ricardo, Djalma R

    2015-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that resting heart rate variability (HRV) is modified by different phases of the menstrual cycle in nonusers of oral contraceptive pills (OCP); however, the effect of OCP on autonomic control of the heart remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate HRV during the low hormone (LH-not taking OCP) and during the high hormone (HH-active OCP use) phases of the menstrual cycle in young women. Seventeen healthy women (19-31 years) taking OCP for at least 6 consecutive months were enrolled in this study. Plasma estradiol and progesterone were verified at each visit. HRV was assessed by using one-lead electrocardiography in time and frequency domains, in which participants rested in the supine position for a 20-min period with a breathing rate of 15 cycles/min. In addition, resting heart rate, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure were obtained. Both plasma estradiol (LH: 19.8 ± 4.2 pg/mL vs. HH: 12.4 ± 1.5 pg/mL; p > .05) and progesterone (LH: 0.247 ± 0.58 ng/mL vs. HH: 0.371 ± 0.08 ng/mL; p > .05) (mean ± SE) levels were similar in both phases. No significant difference was obtained for any component of HRV, heart rate, or blood pressure between the LH and HH phases (p > .05). These results provide preliminary evidence that use of OCP does not affect HRV during the menstrual cycle in healthy women.

  12. Mood changes as reported by women taking the oral contraceptive pill.

    PubMed

    Chang, A M; Chick, P; Milburn, S

    1982-05-01

    In an effort to clarify the nature of emotional side effects frequently reported by women using oral contraceptives (OCs), an exploratory study was undertaken of the verbal descriptions of side effects provided by a sample of young, healthy, sexually active women attending the Family Planning Association of Queensland clinics in Brisbane; they had been using OCs for at least 6 months. The adjectives used in unstructured interviews by 20 women happy with pills and 20 complaining of side effects formed the basis for a questionnaire comparing occurrence of emotions before and after pill use. 3 consecutive sets of adjectives were tested using Principle Factor Analysis and orthogonal rotation. The final questionnaire along with questions concerning social variables were given to 100 women and the scores from different subgroups were compared using the t test. 4 distinct, specific, and uncorrelated factors containing 53 adjectives were identified, of which "annoyed" and "tiredness" suggest negative emotional effects and "passionate" and "reassured" suggest positive effects. The distribution of factor scores in subgroups with statistically significant differences indicate that increases in "annoyed" and "tiredness" scores are found mainly in women who complain of emotional side effects, who were bothered by remembering to take the pill, worried about pill-related dangers, and gained excessive weight. Increases in "passionate" scores were found in noncohabiting women with steady sexual relationships, and increases in "reassured" were universal. The results demonstrate the multidimensional nature of reported emotional side effects from the pill and indicate that highly specific and unique mood changes which do not fit into existing notions of depression or anxiety are reported by women taking the pill.

  13. Oral contraceptive-induced menstrual migraine. Clinical aspects and response to frovatriptan.

    PubMed

    Allais, Gianni; Bussone, Gennaro; Airola, Gisella; Borgogno, Paola; Gabellari, Ilaria Castagnoli; De Lorenzo, Cristina; Pavia, Elena; Benedetto, Chiara

    2008-05-01

    Oral contraceptive-induced menstrual migraine (OCMM) is a poorly defined migraine subtype mainly triggered by the cyclic pill suspension. In this pilot, open-label trial we describe its clinical features and evaluate the efficacy of frovatriptan in the treatment of its acute attack. During the first 3 months of the study 20 women (mean age 32.2+/-7.0, range 22-46) with a 6-month history of pure OCMM recorded, in monthly diary cards, clinical information about their migraine. During the 4th menstrual cycle they treated an OCMM attack with frovatriptan 2.5 mg. The majority of attacks were moderate/severe and lasted 25-72 h or more, in the presence of usual treatment. Generally an OCMM attack appeared within the first 5 days after the pill suspension, but in 15% of cases it started later. After frovatriptan administration, headache intensity progressively decreased (2.4 at onset, 1.6 after 2 h, 1.1 after 4 h and 0.8 after 24 h; p=0.0001). In 55% of patients pain relief was reported after 2 h. Ten percent of subjects were pain-free subjects after 2 h, 35% after 4 h and 60% after 24 h (p=0.003 for trend); 36% relapsed within 24 h. Rescue medication was needed by 35% of patients; 50% of frovatriptan-treated required a second dose. Concomitant nausea and/or vomiting, photophobia and phonophobia decreased significantly after drug intake. OCMM is a severe form of migraine; actually its clinical features are not always exactly identified by the ICHD-II classification. However, treatment with frovatriptan 2.5 mg might be effective in its management.

  14. Long-term effects of oral contraceptives on ovarian cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Bosetti, Cristina; Negri, Eva; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Franceschi, Silvia; Beral, Valerie; Tzonou, Anastasia; Parazzini, Fabio; Greggi, Stefano; La Vecchia, Carlo

    2002-11-20

    Several epidemiologic studies have reported a protective effect of oral contraceptives (OCs) on ovarian cancer. However, there remain open issues, including better quantification of time-related factors such as time since last use, age at first use and time since first use. We performed a collaborative reanalysis of 6 case-control studies conducted between 1978 and 1999 in the United Kingdom, Greece and Italy, including a total of 2,768 incident, histologically confirmed cases of epithelial ovarian cancer and 6,274 hospital controls under age 70 years. A reduced risk of ovarian cancer was found for ever- compared to never-users [odds ratio (OR) = 0.66, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.56-0.79], and a stronger reduction was observed for women who had used OCs for > or =5 years (OR = 0.50, 95% CI 0.33-0.76) compared to those who had used them for <5 years. The protective effect of OCs on ovarian cancer was consistent across strata of age, parity, menopausal status and family history of breast or ovarian cancer. After allowance for duration of use, no other time factor was related to ovarian cancer risk: the reduced risk was similar for women who stopped OC use > or =20 years before compared to <10 years; likewise, no significant modification of risk reduction was observed for age at first OC use and time since first OC use. The present analysis indicates that, after taking into account duration of OC use, the OC protection from ovarian cancer persists for a long time after stopping use. PMID:12397647

  15. Effect of oral contraceptives on the rat brain and pituitary beta-endorphin.

    PubMed

    Tejwani, G A; Vaswani, K K; Barbacci, J C; Richard, C W; Bianchine, J R

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of oral administration of progesterone (15 micrograms norethindrone, NE) in presence and absence of estradiol (1 microgram ethinyl estradiol, EE2) on the CNS levels of beta-endorphin like immunoreactivity (beta-EI) in female rats. In acute study (5 days), NE alone did not change beta-EI significantly in pituitary. NE and EE2 together decreased beta-EI by 37% (47% at 10X dose). In chronic study (7 weeks), 2NE had no significant effect on pituitary beta-EI, however, NE and EE2 together at 10X dose decreased it by 14%. In the hypothalamus, NE alone or in presence of EE2 had no significant effect on beta-EI, but 10X dose of NE+ EE2 caused 50 and 76% decrease in beta-EI in acute and chronic study. Striatum was the only tissue where NE alone caused a decrease of 82% in beta-EI when given acutely and 52% when given chronically. EE2 had some protective effect on this decrease since when given together (NE+EE2) the decrease in beta-EI was 21% in acute and 43% in chronic study. Thus our results, along with other studies on the regulation of gonadotropin levels by opioids, suggest that oral contraceptives alter the level of beta-EI and in turn may regulate the release of gonadotropins. Morphine and endogenous opioids have been shown to decrease gonadotropin secretion in various species including humans, apparently by suppressing the release of LH-RH from the hypothalamus (1-5). The opiate antagonist naloxone not only causes up to 10-fold increase in the secretion of gonadotropins (1,3, 6-9) but also opposes the negative feedback effect of steroids on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadotropin axis (8), suggesting a regulatory interaction between the endogenous opioids, gonadotropins and gonadal steroids. Like ACTH, the secretion of beta-endorphin is inhibited by glucocorticoids (10). Naloxone induced release of LH is facilitated by estradiol in humans (11) suggesting an antagonistic effect of estradiol on the endogenous

  16. Venous thromboembolism in women taking hormonal contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Molina, Angeles; Monreal, Manuel

    2010-02-01

    Hormonal contraceptives are a popular method of contraception, but their use has been associated with an increased risk for venous thromboembolism. In order to reduce such risk, these compounds have been changed in their dosage, chemical composition and route of administration. The absolute risk of death from pulmonary embolism in contraceptive users has been estimated to be 10.5 (95% CI: 6.2-16.6) per million woman-years. The safest option is an oral contraceptive containing levonorgestrel combined with a low dose of estrogen. Identifying women at increased risk for venous thromboembolism is difficult, and greater use of thromboprophylaxis during immobility or minor surgery should be warranted. Several authors have called for all women to be screened for thrombophilia before prescription of hormonal contraceptives, but its cost-effectiveness remains uncertain.

  17. Comparison of Postprandial Lipemia between Women who are on Oral Contraceptive Methods and Those who are not

    PubMed Central

    Petto, Jefferson; Vasques, Leila Monique Reis; Pinheiro, Renata Leão; Giesta, Beatriz de Almeida; dos Santos, Alan Carlos Nery; Gomes Neto, Mansueto; Ladeia, Ana Marice Teixeira

    2014-01-01

    Background: Postprandial Lipemia (PPL) is a physiological process that reflects the ability of the body to metabolize lipids. Even though the influence of oral contraceptives (OC) on PPL is not known, it is a known fact that their use increases fasting lipid values. Objective: To compare the PPL between women who are on OC and those who are not. Methods: A prospective analytical study which assessed eutrophic women, aged between 18 and 28 years old, who were irregularly active and with fasting triglycerides ≤150 mg/dL. They were divided into two groups: oral contraceptive group (COG) and non-oral contraceptive group (NCOG). Volunteers were submitted to the PPL test, in which blood samples were collected in time 0 (12-hour fasting) and after the intake of lipids in times 180 and 240 minutes. In order to compare the triglyceride deltas, which reflect PPL, the two-tailed Mann-Whitney test was used for independent samples between fasting collections and 180 minutes (∆1) and between fasting and 240 minutes (∆2). Results: Forty women were assessed and equally divided between groups. In the fasting lipid profile, it was observed that HDL did not present significant differences and that triglycerides in COG were twice as high in comparison to NCOG. Medians of ∆1 and ∆2 presented significant differences in both comparisons (p ≤0.05). Conclusion: The results point out that women who are irregularly active and use OC present more PPL in relation to those who do not use OC, which suggests that in this population, its chronic use increases the risk of heart conditions. PMID:25317941

  18. Sex of offspring of women using oral contraceptives, rhythm, and other methods of birth control around the time of conception.

    PubMed

    Shiono, P H; Harlap, S; Ramcharan, S

    1982-03-01

    Sex ratios were studied in a cohort of 33,205 newborns whose mothers had been questioned in early pregnancy about contraceptive use around the time of conception., The proportion of males was 0.517 (95% confidence limits [CL], 0.512 to 0.522). In the 9279 offspring of women who had used oral contraceptives (OC) in the 5 months prior to conception the sex ratio was 0.517 (0.507 to 0.527). There are sufficient numbers available for study for us to be 95% certain that OC causes no shift in sex ratio of 1% or more. Women who conceived within 2 months of stopping the pill had a small excess of males (0.528; 95% CL, 0.510 to 0.546), but this excess was probably due to chance. OC failures were followed by a raised sex ratio in the offspring (0.543; 95% CL, 0.509 to 0.577), and this excess of males was observed consistently in subgroups of maternal age, parity, race, and education. Failures of rhythm contraception were also associated with a consistent excess of male births (0.567; 95% CL, 0.514 to 0.620). No changes were observed after failures of IUDs, barrier, or chemical methods.

  19. Advances in Male Contraception

    PubMed Central

    Page, Stephanie T.; Amory, John K.; Bremner, William J.

    2008-01-01

    Despite significant advances in contraceptive options for women over the last 50 yr, world population continues to grow rapidly. Scientists and activists alike point to the devastating environmental impacts that population pressures have caused, including global warming from the developed world and hunger and disease in less developed areas. Moreover, almost half of all pregnancies are still unwanted or unplanned. Clearly, there is a need for expanded, reversible, contraceptive options. Multicultural surveys demonstrate the willingness of men to participate in contraception and their female partners to trust them to do so. Notwithstanding their paucity of options, male methods including vasectomy and condoms account for almost one third of contraceptive use in the United States and other countries. Recent international clinical research efforts have demonstrated high efficacy rates (90–95%) for hormonally based male contraceptives. Current barriers to expanded use include limited delivery methods and perceived regulatory obstacles, which stymie introduction to the marketplace. However, advances in oral and injectable androgen delivery are cause for optimism that these hurdles may be overcome. Nonhormonal methods, such as compounds that target sperm motility, are attractive in their theoretical promise of specificity for the reproductive tract. Gene and protein array technologies continue to identify potential targets for this approach. Such nonhormonal agents will likely reach clinical trials in the near future. Great strides have been made in understanding male reproductive physiology; the combined efforts of scientists, clinicians, industry and governmental funding agencies could make an effective, reversible, male contraceptive an option for family planning over the next decade. PMID:18436704

  20. Contraceptive strategies for young women in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Ruusuvaara, L; Johansson, E D

    1999-12-01

    Safe, effective and affordable contraceptives have been available for a few decades, yet, in many countries, the struggle for reproductive rights continues. Children, still, are forced to give birth to children in many nations. In most industrialized countries, where contraceptive counselling and abortions have been options, fertility rates have reached all time lows. Effective contraception improves health and well-being as well and may be used for conditions other than birth control. Young girls often initially take oral contraceptives primarily to reduce menstrual pain and blood loss; they also welcome a contraceptive that eliminates menstrual bleeding. Women using oral contraceptives and Norplant experience about 50% reduction in menstrual blood; 90% reduction in blood loss is achieved with the levonorgestrel intrauterine system (Mirena). Teenagers and their parents are often misinformed about the side-effects of oral contraceptives and birth control in general, which may adversely affect compliance. Adequate, user-friendly and supportive information about contraception is necessary to ensure proper use of the pill and other birth control methods. In addition, emergency contraceptives should be easily accessible. The mortality and morbidity of young women would be dramatically reduced by the global use of medical abortion as well. Only a combined effort by policy makers, educators, parents and health-care providers can enhance the reproductive (and future!) health of both young females and males.

  1. Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome prevention strategies: oral contraceptive pills-dual gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist suppression with step-down gonadotropin protocols.

    PubMed

    Damario, Mark A

    2010-11-01

    The identification of patients at high risk for excessive responses to ovarian stimulation for in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer is essential in the tailoring of safe and effective treatment strategies. Known factors associated with increased sensitivity to gonadotropins include polycystic ovary syndrome, young age, prior ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS), high baseline antral follicle count, and high baseline ovarian volume. Although several treatment strategies have been proposed for these patients, this report describes the experience using the dual suppression with gonadotropin step-down protocol. This protocol uses oral contraceptive pretreatment in combination with a long gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist followed by a programmed step-down in gonadotropin dosing. Hormonal characteristics of dual suppression include an improved luteinizing hormone-to-follicle-stimulating hormone ratio and lower serum androgens, particularly dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate. Clinical characteristics of the protocol include a lower cancellation rate and favorable clinical and ongoing pregnancy rates per initiated cycle while mitigating the risk of OHSS.

  2. Impact of obesity on oral contraceptive pharmacokinetics and hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian activity

    PubMed Central

    Edelman, Alison B; Carlson, Nichole E; Cherala, Ganesh; Munar, Myrna Y.; Stouffer, Richard L; Cameron, Judy L; Stanczyk, Frank Z.; Jensen, Jeffrey T

    2009-01-01

    Objective This study was conducted to determine whether increased body mass index (BMI) affects oral contraceptive (OC) pharmacokinetics and suppression of hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian (HPO) axis activity. Study design Ovulatory reproductive-age women of normal (< 25 kg/m2; n = 10) and obese (> 30 kg/m2; n = 10) BMI received OCs for two cycles (prospective cohort). Subjects were admitted for two 48-h inpatient stays at the beginning and end of the hormone-free interval. Ethinyl estradiol (EE) and levonorgestrel (LNG) levels were evaluated during both inpatient stays. Gonadotropin pulsatility (FSH and LH) was measured during the second inpatient stay. Estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P) were measured daily during inpatient stays and twice per week in Cycle 2. Results BMI was greater in the obese, compared to the normal BMI group [37.3 kg/m2 (SD 6.0) versus 21.9 kg/m2 (SD 1.6); p < 0.05]. The LNG half-life was significantly longer in the obese group (52.1 ± 29.4 h versus 25.6 ± 9.3 h, p < 0.05) which correlated with a lower maximum LNG concentration on Cycle 2, Day 1 [1.9 ng/mL (SD 0.5) versus 2.5 ng/mL (SD 0.7)] and a longer time to reach steady-state (10 versus 5 days), in obese women. There were no significant differences in volume of distribution between groups. LH pulse parameters did not differ statistically between groups but trended towards greater HPO activity in the obese group. Additionally, more obese (6/10 versus 3/10 normal BMI, p > 0.05) women exhibited E2 levels consistent with development of a dominant follicle, and P levels consistent with ovulation (2/10 versus 1/10) during Cycle 2. Conclusions Compared to women of normal BMI, obese women exhibit differences in OC pharmacokinetics that are associated with greater HPO activity. PMID:19631786

  3. [Frequency and reasons for switching/stopping use of oral contraceptives. Results of the German Cohort Study on Women Health].

    PubMed

    Heinemann, L A; Thiel, C; Assmann, A; Möhner, S

    2001-10-01

    Frequency and reasons for switching/stopping use of oral contraceptives. Results of the German Cohort Study on Women Health. Use of oral contraceptives is the safest and most commonly used method of contraception. The frequency of use underscores the importance of research on benefits, risks, and acceptability of long-term use. - An interim analysis of the German Cohort Study on Women's Health (aged 15-65 years) was performed to analyse frequency and reason of switching or stop of OC-use. We got for this analysis over 10 000 women with almost 100 000 years of observation from first to last (or current) OC use. - The prevalence of ever use of OCs was 85.5 % in our cohort. Switching or stop of OC use was observed in 93 % of the women. The frequency of switching increased with age and duration of use. Social parameter such as education, employment status, and living in the old or the new Federal States were not materially associated with the frequency of switching or stopping OC use. Satisfaction with general health, psychic stability, and sexual life was slightly associated with the frequency of switching: The better satisfaction the lower frequency of switching, but the sequence of cause and consequence is unclear. The most frequent categories of reasons for switching were observed side effects and personal reasons. Desire to get pregnant was the number one single reason, followed by headache/migraine, and bleeding problems. The frequency of more than 50 single reasons is listed. - The frequency and the knowledge of reason for switching or stopping OC use underlines the need for a good collaboration between physician and treated woman. However, also research on long-term compliance is required and the development of OCs with even less side effects. PMID:11753811

  4. Maternal use of oral contraceptives and risk of hypospadias - a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Wogelius, Pia; Horváth-Puhó, Erzsébet; Pedersen, Lars; Nørgaard, Mette; Czeizel, Andrew E; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this population-based case-control study was to examine the risk of isolated hypospadias in boys born to mothers who have used oral contraceptives in early pregnancy. The study was based on data from the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital Abnormalities from 1980 to 1996, and included 3,038 boys with hypospadias (cases), 24,799 boys without congenital abnormalities (CA-free controls), and 11,881 boys with abnormalities other than hypospadias. We used unconditional logistic regression to adjust for birth order, maternal age, maternal employment status, maternal diabetes, and pre-eclampsia. When comparing cases with CA-free controls the OR for maternal use of OC was 1.21 (95% CI: 0.67-2.17). When comparing cases with boys with other abnormalities, the OR for maternal use of OC was 0.83 (95% CI: 0.46-1.50). Our data showed that self-reported maternal use of oral contraceptives during pregnancy was not associated with an increased risk of hypospadias in the offspring.

  5. Controversies in contraception for women with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sanjeev V

    2015-01-01

    Contraception is an important choice that offers autonomy to women with regard to prevention of unintended pregnancies. There is wide variation in the contraceptive practices between continents, countries, and societies. The medical eligibility for contraception for sexually active women with epilepsy (WWE) is determined by the type of anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) that they use. Enzyme inducing AEDs such as phenobarbitone, phenytoin, carbamazepine, and oxcarbazepine increase the metabolism of orally administered estrogen (and progesterone to a lesser extent). Estrogen can increase the metabolism of certain AEDs, such as lamotrigine, leading to cyclical variation in its blood level with resultant adverse effect profile or seizure dyscontrol. AEDs and sex hormones can increase the risk of osteoporosis and fracture in WWE. The potential interactions between AEDs and hormonal contraception need to be discussed with all women in reproductive age-group. The alternate options of oral contraception such as intrauterine copper device, intrauterine levonorgestrel release system, and supplementary protection with barriers need to be presented to them. World Health Organization has recommended to avoid combination contraceptive pills containing estrogen and progesteron in women who desire contraception and in breastfeeding mothers. Care providers need to consider the option of non-enzyme-inducing AEDs while initiating long-term treatment in adolescent and young WWE. PMID:26425002

  6. Controversies in contraception for women with epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Sanjeev V.

    2015-01-01

    Contraception is an important choice that offers autonomy to women with regard to prevention of unintended pregnancies. There is wide variation in the contraceptive practices between continents, countries, and societies. The medical eligibility for contraception for sexually active women with epilepsy (WWE) is determined by the type of anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) that they use. Enzyme inducing AEDs such as phenobarbitone, phenytoin, carbamazepine, and oxcarbazepine increase the metabolism of orally administered estrogen (and progesterone to a lesser extent). Estrogen can increase the metabolism of certain AEDs, such as lamotrigine, leading to cyclical variation in its blood level with resultant adverse effect profile or seizure dyscontrol. AEDs and sex hormones can increase the risk of osteoporosis and fracture in WWE. The potential interactions between AEDs and hormonal contraception need to be discussed with all women in reproductive age-group. The alternate options of oral contraception such as intrauterine copper device, intrauterine levonorgestrel release system, and supplementary protection with barriers need to be presented to them. World Health Organization has recommended to avoid combination contraceptive pills containing estrogen and progesteron in women who desire contraception and in breastfeeding mothers. Care providers need to consider the option of non-enzyme-inducing AEDs while initiating long-term treatment in adolescent and young WWE. PMID:26425002

  7. Mesigyna once-a-month combined injectable contraceptive: experience in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Bassol, S; Cravioto, M C; Durand, M; Bailon, R; Carranza, S; Fugarolas, J; Gaona, R; Parada, L M; Celis, C; Santoyo, S; Garza-Flores, J; Vazquez, L; Lopez, C; Gurucharri, C; Novelli, J; Carneiro de Oliveira, H; Mendez, J; de Andrade, M E; de Mello, N R; de Melo, K; Chada, E; Yassle, M E; Castañeda, A; Gomez, P; Arboleda, C; Trujillo, L; Bucheli, R; Hidalgo, I; Olavide, R; Parejarios, J; Succar, J; Reyes-Marquez, R; Albrecht, G

    2000-05-01

    A phase III clinical study was carried out among 534 fertile Latin American women to evaluate cycle control, side effects, and contraceptive efficacy of a once-a-month combined injectable, Mesigyna, consisting of 50 mg norethisterone enanthate and 5 mg estradiol valerate. The pregnancy rate at 1 year was 0 per 100 woman-years for a total experience of 4688 woman-months. The overall discontinuation rate at one year was 17.9%. Discontinuation rate for bleeding problems was 5.1%. The Colombian women had a significant increase (p <0.001) in bleeding problems compared to other countries. The discontinuation rate for amenorrhea was 1.1%. There were no significant differences between the groups regarding discontinuation for other medical or non-medical reasons. Mean weight gain after one year of use was 1.02 kg. Mesigyna is an appropiate once-a-month injectable contraceptive for Latin American women since it is highly effective and its perception of normal menstrual bleeding is of importance in the Latin American population.

  8. [Contraception in immigrant women: influence of sociocultural aspects on the choice of contraceptive method].

    PubMed

    Paraíso Torras, B; Maldonado Del Valle, M D; López Muñoz, A; Cañete Palomo, M L

    2013-01-01

    There are currently 6 million immigrants living in Spain. Half of them are women, the majority of whom are of childbearing age. These women, who suffer high rates of induced abortion, form a special group who require a special approach to their reproductive health. In order to study the use of contraceptive methods in this population, a review was made of 1100 clinical histories from our Sexual Health and Reproduction Clinic. Latin American women were the most prevalent group who came to seek information about contraception, followed by Eastern Europeans and Moroccans. Fewer Asian and Sub-Saharan women sought these services. The contraceptives most frequently used were the intrauterine device (used mostly by Latin American and Eastern European women), and combined oral contraception, most used by Moroccan women. It is important to advise the immigrant women about contraceptive methods, taking into account their preferences, in order to improve adherence to the method. PMID:23583187

  9. [Contraception in immigrant women: influence of sociocultural aspects on the choice of contraceptive method].

    PubMed

    Paraíso Torras, B; Maldonado Del Valle, M D; López Muñoz, A; Cañete Palomo, M L

    2013-01-01

    There are currently 6 million immigrants living in Spain. Half of them are women, the majority of whom are of childbearing age. These women, who suffer high rates of induced abortion, form a special group who require a special approach to their reproductive health. In order to study the use of contraceptive methods in this population, a review was made of 1100 clinical histories from our Sexual Health and Reproduction Clinic. Latin American women were the most prevalent group who came to seek information about contraception, followed by Eastern Europeans and Moroccans. Fewer Asian and Sub-Saharan women sought these services. The contraceptives most frequently used were the intrauterine device (used mostly by Latin American and Eastern European women), and combined oral contraception, most used by Moroccan women. It is important to advise the immigrant women about contraceptive methods, taking into account their preferences, in order to improve adherence to the method.

  10. Emergency contraception with a Copper IUD or oral levonorgestrel: an observational study of 1-year pregnancy rates

    PubMed Central

    Turok, David K.; Jacobson, Janet C.; Dermish, Amna I.; Simonsen, Sara E.; Gurtcheff, Shawn; McFadden, Molly; Murphy, Patricia A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective We investigated the one-year pregnancy rates for emergency contraception (EC) users who selected the copper T380 IUD or oral levonorgestrel (LNG) for EC. Study Design This prospective study followed women for 1 year after choosing either the copper T380 IUD or oral LNG for EC. The study was powered to detect a 6% difference in pregnancy rates within the year after presenting for EC. Results Of the 542 women who presented for EC, agreed to participate in the trial, and meet inclusion criteria, 215 (40%) chose the copper IUD and 327 (60%) chose oral LNG. In the IUD group, 127 (59%) were nulligravid. IUD insertion failed in 42 women (19%). The 1-year follow-up rate was 443/542 (82%); 64% of IUD users contacted at 1 year still had their IUDs in place. The 1-year cumulative pregnancy rate in women choosing the IUD was 6.5% vs. 12.2% in those choosing oral LNG (HR= 0.53, 95% CI: 0.29–0.97, p=0.041). By type of EC method actually received, corresponding values were 5.2% for copper IUD users vs. 12.3% for oral LNG users, HR 0.42 (95% CI: 0.20–0.85, p= 0.017). A multivariable logistic regression model controlling for demographic variables demonstrates that women who chose the IUD for EC had fewer pregnancies in the following year than those who chose oral LNG (HR 0.50, 95% CI: 0.26–0.96, p=0.037). Conclusion One year after presenting for EC women choosing the copper IUD for EC were half as likely to have a pregnancy compared to those choosing oral LNG. PMID:24332433

  11. Well-being, sleep, exercise patterns, and the menstrual cycle: a comparison of natural hormones, oral contraceptives and depo-provera.

    PubMed

    Brown, Susan G; Morrison, Lynn A; Larkspur, Louona M; Marsh, Ariel L; Nicolaisen, Nicola

    2008-01-01

    Overall well-being, sleep and exercise patterns were investigated in women between the ages of 18 and 36 years with natural hormone profiles (n = 12), and women using oral contraceptives (n = 12) or Depo-Provera (n = 12) from January 18, 2005 to December 7, 2005. Daily questionnaires on the above variables were obtained across 3 menstrual cycles (108 cycles). Women using hormonal contraception reported more overall negative well-being than women with natural hormone profiles (p = .038). Positive well-being at mid-cycle was positively correlated with increased sleep by the natural hormone (p < .05) and oral contraception groups (p < .05) but not by the Depo-Provera group. Women with natural hormone profiles walked more when they reported decreased well-being. Our findings indicate that the use of Depo-Provera interferes with the natural relations between sleep, cycle phase and well-being.

  12. Contraception and Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Afsana, Faria

    2016-09-01

    Contraception for women with diabetes mellitus is an important issue mainly as the pregnancy outcome depends on glycaemic control before conception among women with diabetes. Type of diabetes as type 1 or type 2 Diabetes, women with history of gestational diabetes and breast feeding diabetic mothers may be a consideration in selecting a contraceptive .On the other hand presence of diabetic complications is a significant determinant. Different methods of contraception as oral, injectable, implant, intrauterine devices are available. Patient\\'s choice and health issues both should be considered while prescribing a contraceptive to a woman with diabetes. Emergency contraception is sometimes required in situations where there is chance of contraceptive failure. This review article highlights different contraceptive methods, their use and limitations and will guide to make a rational choice for a woman with diabetes. PMID:27582166

  13. CONTRACEPTION TECHNOLOGY: PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE

    PubMed Central

    Sitruk-Ware, Regine; Nath, Anita; Mishell, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    Steady progress in contraception research has been achieved over the past 50 years. Hormonal and non-hormonal modern contraceptives have improved women’s lives by reducing different health conditions that contributed to considerable morbidity. However the contraceptives available today are not suitable to all users and the need to expand contraceptive choices still exists. Novel products such as new implants, contraceptive vaginal rings, transdermal patches and newer combinations of oral contraceptives have recently been introduced in family planning programs and hormonal contraception is widely used for spacing and limiting births. Concerns over the adverse effects of hormonal contraceptives have led to research and development of new combinations with improved metabolic profile. Recent developments include use of natural compounds such as estradiol (E2) and estradiol valerate (E2V) with the hope to decrease thrombotic risk, in combination with newer progestins derived from the progesterone structure or from spirolactone, in order to avoid the androgenic effects. Progesterone antagonists and progesterone receptor modulators are highly effective in blocking ovulation and preventing follicular rupture and are undergoing investigations in the form of oral pills and in semi long-acting delivery systems. Future developments also include the combination of a contraceptive with an antiretroviral agent for dual contraception and protection against sexually transmitted diseases, to be used before intercourse or on demand, as well as for continuous use in dual-protection rings. Alhough clinical trials of male contraception have reflected promising results, limited involvement of industry in that area of research has decreased the likelihood of having a male method available in the current decade. Development of non-hormonal methods are still at an early stage of research, with the identification of specific targets within the reproductive system in ovaries and testes, as

  14. Oral contraceptive use after conception in relation to the risk of congenital urinary tract anomalies.

    PubMed

    Li, D K; Daling, J R; Mueller, B A; Hickok, D E; Fantel, A G; Weiss, N S

    1995-01-01

    The authors conducted a case-control study of the relation of OC use after conception to the occurrence of congenital urinary tract anomalies (CUTAs). Singleton CUTA cases with no known chromosomal abnormality from seven counties in western Washington State born during the period January 1, 1990-December 31, 1991 were identified through the Washington State Birth Defect Registry. Controls without birth defects were randomly selected from singleton births that occurred in the same year as the cases in five large hospitals in King County. Mothers of the 118 cases and 369 controls were interviewed to obtain their contraceptive history as well as other information. Mothers of nine cases (7.6%) and eight controls (2.2%) had taken OCs at some time during the pregnancy. After adjustment for birth year and county of maternal residence, OC use after conception was associated with an almost five-fold increased risk of having a baby with a CUTA [odds ratio (OR) = 4.8, 95 percent confidence interval (CI), 1.6-14.1] relative to no contraception at or after conception. Use of other contraceptive methods after conception was not related to the risk of CUTAs. OC use during the 3 or 6 months prior to the conception also was not associated with the risk of CUTAs. Further adjustment for sociodemographic factors, reproductive history, perinatal exposure to exogenous agents, and past OC use did not change the results, nor did restricting the analysis to residents of King County.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Emergency Contraception.

    PubMed

    Batur, Pelin; Kransdorf, Lisa N; Casey, Petra M

    2016-06-01

    Emergency contraception (EC) may help prevent pregnancy in various circumstances, such as contraceptive method failure, unprotected sexual intercourse, or sexual assault, yet it remains underused. There are 4 approved EC options in the United States. Although ulipristal acetate requires a provider's prescription, oral levonorgestrel (LNG) is available over the counter for women of all ages. The most effective method of EC is the copper intrauterine device, which can be left in place for up to 10 years for efficacious, cost-effective, hormone-free, and convenient long-term primary contraception. Ulipristal acetate tends to be more efficacious in pregnancy prevention than is LNG, especially when taken later than 72 hours postcoitus. The mechanism of action of oral EC is delay of ovulation, and current evidence reveals that it is ineffective postovulation. Women who weigh more than 75 kg or have a body mass index greater than 25 kg/m(2) may have a higher risk of unintended pregnancy when using oral LNG EC; therefore, ulipristal acetate or copper intrauterine devices are preferable in this setting. Providers are often unaware of the range of EC options or are unsure of how to counsel patients regarding the access and use of EC. This article critically reviews current EC literature, summarizes recommendations, and provides guidance for counseling women about EC. Useful tips for health care providers are provided, with a focus on special populations, including breast-feeding women and those transitioning to long-term contraception after EC use. When treating women of reproductive age, clinicians should be prepared to counsel them about EC options, provide EC appropriately, and, if needed, refer for EC in a timely manner. PMID:27261868

  16. Recent advances in hormonal contraception

    PubMed Central

    Li, HW Raymond

    2010-01-01

    This report reviews some of the new studies regarding new hormonal contraceptive formulations (e.g., Yaz, Qlaira®, extended-cycle or continuous combined contraceptives, subcutaneous depot medroxyprogesterone acetate, and ulipristal acetate as an emergency contraceptive). Recent data on the relationship between hormonal contraceptive use and bone health are also reviewed. PMID:21173872

  17. Lack of a clinically important pharmacokinetic interaction between sofosbuvir or ledipasvir and hormonal oral contraceptives norgestimate/ethinyl estradiol in HCV-uninfected female subjects.

    PubMed

    German, P; Moorehead, L; Pang, Phillip; Vimal, M; Mathias, A

    2014-11-01

    This study evaluated the potential for a drug-drug interaction between HCV direct-acting antivirals sofosbuvir or ledipasvir and oral hormonal contraceptive (OC) norgestimate/ethinyl estradiol (norgestimate 0.18/0.215/0.25 mg with ethinyl estradiol 25 μg). This was a 112-day, open-label, fixed-sequence pharmacokinetic (PK) study in healthy female subjects that included a lead-in cycle (OC only; N = 21), cycle 1 (OC only; N = 15), cycle 2 (OC + sofosbuvir; N = 15), and cycle 3 (OC + ledipasvir; N = 15). Administration of sofosbuvir with OC did not alter PK of norelgestromin (primary norgestimate metabolite) or ethinyl estradiol. Small increases in norgestrel (secondary norgestimate metabolite) AUC(tau) (19%) and C(tau) (23%) with sofosbuvir were noted. Ledipasvir did not impact PK of norelgestromin or norgestrel but modestly increased ethinyl estradiol C(max) (40%). Sofosbuvir, GS- 331007 (predominant circulating metabolite of SOF), and ledipasvir PK were similar to historical data. Pharmacodynamic markers luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, and progesterone values were generally comparable in all cycles. No loss in contraceptive efficacy is expected upon administration of sofosbuvir or ledipasvir/sofosbuvir with oral contraceptives containing norgestimate and ethinyl estradiol. The use of sofosbuvir or ledipasvir/sofosbuvir FDC with oral contraceptives is permitted.

  18. [Choosing contraception].

    PubMed

    Gonzalez Velez, A C

    1998-06-01

    The development of contraception has allowed women to think about and experience motherhood not as their destiny but as an option. Humans have always been interested in controlling their fertility. Writings unearthed in the 18th century demonstrated the interest of the ancient Egyptians and Greeks in fertility control. The oral contraceptive (OC) pill, developed in the 1950s by Pincus and Rock, has allowed millions of women to avoid unwanted pregnancy. Since 1960, when the oral contraceptive Enovid was first marketed in the US, over 200 million women throughout the world have used OCs. Modern formulations have low hormone doses, which has minimized side effects. OCs now have an effectiveness of 98%. The method is controlled by the woman, permitting autonomous decisions about pregnancy. Currently, in Colombia, 12.9% of women in union use OCs, 25.7% are sterilized, 11.1% each use IUDs and traditional methods, 4.3% use condoms, 2.5% use injectables, 1.4% use vaginal tablets, 0.7% each use Norplant and vasectomy, and 1.8% use other methods. 27.8% use no method. OCs can be used as an emergency method in case of rape, an unexpected sexual encounter, or failure of another method. When used as a postcoital method, OCs must be taken within 72 hours of unprotected sexual intercourse.

  19. [Electronmicroscopical aspects of endometrial distrophy induced by oral contraceptives (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Gómez, F; Merchan, J; Caballero-Peregrin, P; Aldama Magnet, J

    1975-01-01

    An electron-optical study on the endometrium of 5 controls and 25 patients subjected during 3-12 months to 0.25 mg norgestrel + 0.05 mg etinil-estradiol association treatment is performed. The most prominent electronmicroscopical features of endometrial changes are described, such as the asynchronical maturation of the epithelium and the stroma, the shorthening of the proliferative and secretory phases and the epithelial involution towards the last days of the cycle. Special emphasis is placed on the zonal distribution of these changes. An increase of the nostocitosis phenomena is reported and its significance as a complementary contraceptive mechanism is discussed.

  20. Contraception and Breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    Pieh Holder, Kelly Lynne

    2015-12-01

    Postpartum contraception is important to lengthening birth intervals and improving the health of women and children. For breastfeeding women the choice and timing of contraception may influence breastfeeding and infant growth patterns. Nonhormonal methods of contraception are the preferred choice for breastfeeding women. Progestin-only methods comprise a viable next option. Combined hormonal methods of contraception containing estrogen and progestin may be considered as a third option for birth control in breastfeeding women. The objective of this chapter is to review the current literature and recommendations for the use of hormonal and nonhormonal methods of contraception while breastfeeding.

  1. Single, Escalating Dose Pharmacokinetics, Safety and Food Effects of a New Oral Androgen Dimethandrolone Undecanoate in Man: A prototype oral male hormonal contraceptive

    PubMed Central

    Swerdloff, Ronald S.; Nya-Ngatchou, Jean Jacques; Liu, Peter Y.; Amory, John K.; Leung, Andrew; Hull, Laura; Blithe, Diana L.; Woo, Jason; Bremner, William J.; Wang, Christina

    2014-01-01

    The novel androgen, dimethandrolone (DMA) has both androgenic and progestational activities, properties that may maximize gonadotropin suppression. We assessed the pharmacokinetics of dimethandrolone undecanoate (DMAU), an orally bioavailable, longer-acting ester of DMA, for male contraceptive development. Our objective was to examine the safety and pharmacokinetics of single, escalating doses of DMAU (powder in capsule formulation) administered orally with or without food in healthy men. We conducted a randomized, double-blind Phase 1 study. For each dose of DMAU (25 to 800 mg), ten male volunteers received DMAU and two received placebo at two academic medical centers. DMAU was administered both fasting and after a high fat meal (200–800 mg doses). Serial serum samples were collected over 24h following each dose. DMAU was well tolerated without significant effects on vital signs, safety laboratory tests or electrocardiograms. When administered while fasting, serum DMA (active compound) was detectable in only 4/10 participants after the 800mg dose. When administered with a 50% fat meal, serum DMA was detectable in all participants given 200mg DMAU and showed a dose-incremental increase up to 800mg, with peak levels 4 to 8h after taking the dose. Serum gonadotropins and sex hormone concentrations were significantly suppressed 12h after DMAU administration with food at doses above 200mg. This first-in-man study demonstrated that a single, oral dose of DMAU up to 800 mg is safe. A high-fat meal markedly improved DMAU/DMA pharmacokinetics. PMID:24789057

  2. Putting a finger on potential predictors of oral contraceptive side effects: 2D:4D and middle-phalangeal hair.

    PubMed

    Oinonen, Kirsten A

    2009-06-01

    Many women experience emotional or physical side effects when taking oral contraceptives (OCs). Despite the potential impact on women's health and well-being, there are no valid methods to screen women for their risk of OC side effects. The present paper presents the results of two studies where anthropometric indicators of androgen exposure, 2D:4D and middle-phalangeal hair, were examined for their potential as predictors of OC side effects. In study 1, 2D:4D was associated with women's reports of a history of: (a) negative mood side effects; (b) discontinuation due to negative mood side effects; (c) specific mood side effects (i.e., crying, sadness, and altered trust in one's partners) and (d) specific physical side effects (i.e., headaches, fatigue, and decreased sex drive). In study 2, 2D:4D and/or middle-phalangeal hair was/were associated with a reported history of: (a) discontinuation due to negative mood side effects; (b) specific mood-related side effects (i.e., negative mood, disrupted sleep, increased aggression, and altered trust in one's partner) and (c) specific physical side effects (i.e., headaches, decreased menstrual cramps, and increased sex drive/arousal). The general pattern was that adverse OC side effects were experienced by women with lower 2D:4D and fewer middle-phalangeal hairs. Almost all relationships remained significant when response bias was controlled. These results suggest a possible role for prenatal testosterone exposure and both androgen action and sensitivity in women's experience of OC side effects. Furthermore, these two digit measures may be useful predictors of hormonal contraceptive side effects in women. PMID:19131172

  3. Establishing an educational programme for nurses to supply emergency hormonal contraception (combined method) to protocol.

    PubMed

    Brittain, D

    1999-10-01

    This paper gives an account of an innovative educational programme developed by the Department of Midwifery Studies at the University of Central Lancashire (UCLAN) in 1995. The North West Regional Health Authority (NWRHA) approached the Department of Midwifery Studies to develop an educational programme for family planning nurses to supply the combined method of emergency hormonal contraception (EHC) under protocol when a doctor was not present. The purpose was to increase the availability and accessibility of EHC for young people in the North West region. The 3-day programme was designed to complement previous ENB 901/900 training, and also to provide the nurses with the specific skills and knowledge required to undertake this new role. One hundred and thirty-nine nurses from the North West area attended the programme between 1995-1998. Students were assessed both theoretically and clinically. Extending the role of family planning nurses to supply EHC gives purchasers and providers of sexual health care the potential to offer a wider range of accessible services. The recently published interim Crown Report1 on the supply and administration of medicines under group protocols states that protocols should specify clear arrangements for professional responsibility and accountability. Appropriate training is essential to ensure that the extended role of the nurse in family planning is fully understood.

  4. The role of drugs, particularly oral contraceptives, in triggering thrombosis in congenital defects of coagulation inhibitors: a study of six patients.

    PubMed

    Girolami, A; Simioni, P; Girolami, B; Zanardi, S

    1991-10-01

    It is well established that pregnancy and puerperium, surgery and trauma may often trigger thrombotic events even in the normal population. On the other hand, patients with congenital deficiency of clotting inhibitors may develop spontaneous thrombotic episodes, although they become often symptomatic when one of the above-mentioned triggering factors is present. We found this to be true in 40 out of 81 symptomatic patients with congenital defects of coagulation inhibitors. In six (15%) of these cases medications (mainly oral contraceptives) triggered the thrombotic event. The incidence of pharmacological factors as a cause of thrombosis is commonly maintained to be low. This study indicates that this is not so and underlines the potential importance of drugs, particularly oral contraceptives, in the pathogenesis of thrombotic events in patients with congenital defects of clotting inhibitors.

  5. Hormonal contraception and HIV acquisition: reanalysis using marginal structural modeling.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Charles S; Chen, Pai-Lien; Kwok, Cynthia; Richardson, Barbra A; Chipato, Tsungai; Mugerwa, Roy; Byamugisha, Josaphat; Padian, Nancy; Celentano, David D; Salata, Robert A

    2010-07-17

    Hormonal contraceptives are used widely worldwide; their effect on HIV acquisition remains unresolved. We reanalyzed data from the Hormonal Contraception and HIV Study using marginal structural modeling to reduce selection bias due to time-dependent confounding. Replicating our original analysis closely, we found that depo-medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) but not combined oral contraceptive (COC) was associated with increased HIV acquisition. Also, young (18-24 years) but not older women who used DMPA and COCs were at increased HIV risk. PMID:20588106

  6. Emergency contraception

    MedlinePlus

    Morning-after pill; Postcoital contraception; Birth control - emergency; Plan B; Family planning - emergency contraception ... Emergency contraception most likely prevents pregnancy in the same way as regular birth control pills: By preventing or delaying ...

  7. Emergency Contraception

    MedlinePlus

    ... contraception are available: emergency contraceptive pills and the copper-containing intrauterine device (IUD). Emergency contraceptive pills include ... for emergency use, talk to your doctor. The copper-containing IUD (brand name: Paragard) is a small, ...

  8. Emergency Contraception

    MedlinePlus

    f AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ114 CONTRACEPTION Emergency Contraception • What is emergency contraception (EC)? • How does EC work? • What are the different types of EC? • What is the most ...

  9. Intrinsic clotting factors in dependency of age, sex, body mass index, and oral contraceptives: definition and risk of elevated clotting factor levels.

    PubMed

    Luxembourg, Beate; Schmitt, Joern; Humpich, Marek; Glowatzki, Matthias; Seifried, Erhard; Lindhoff-Last, Edelgard

    2009-10-01

    Elevated clotting factors have been demonstrated to be a risk factor for venous thromboembolism (VTE). The aim of our study was to investigate the impact of age, sex, body mass index, and oral contraceptives on the clotting factor activities of factors VIII, IX, XI, and XII and their impact on the cutoff definition and risk of VTE associated with elevated clotting factors. Factor VIII, IX, XI, and XII activities were measured in 499 blood donors and 286 patients with VTE. Age and body mass index predicted significantly and independently the clotting factor activities of factors VIII, IX, and XI, whereas use of oral contraceptives predicted factor IX, XI, and XII levels. Percentiles of clotting factor activities, which are often used for the cutoff definition of elevated clotting factors, varied due to the effect of age, body mass index, and oral contraceptives. The adjusted odds ratios for VTE were 10.3 [95% confidence interval (CI) 5.1-20.7], 6.1 (95% CI 3.1-12.0), and 3.3 (95% CI 1.9-5.8) for elevated factors VIII, IX, and XI, respectively. Furthermore, our study demonstrates for the first time that elevated factor XII is associated with an increased risk of VTE (adjusted odds ratio 2.9, 95% CI 1.6-5.3).

  10. Male contraception

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Vivek; Bantwal, Ganapathi

    2012-01-01

    Contraception is an accepted route for the control of population explosion in the world. Traditionally hormonal contraceptive methods have focused on women. Male contraception by means of hormonal and non hormonal methods is an attractive alternative. Hormonal methods of contraception using testosterone have shown good results. Non hormonal reversible methods of male contraception like reversible inhibition of sperm under guidanceare very promising. In this article we have reviewed the current available options for male contraception. PMID:23226635

  11. 21 CFR 310.501 - Patient package inserts for oral contraceptives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE NEW DRUGS Requirements for Specific New Drugs or Devices § 310.501..., Division of Reproductive and Urologic Products, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Ave... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Patient package inserts for oral...

  12. Combined oral corticosteroid-methotrexate therapy in Eales' disease.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Sandeep

    2009-01-01

    The efficacy of combined oral corticosteroid and low-dose oral methotrexate pulsed therapy in Eales' disease was evaluated prospectively, based on weighted visual morbidity scale for disease activity and visual acuity grading in 36 consecutive cases. Oral corticosteroids in a weekly tapering dose for 4 weeks and 12.5 mg methotrexate as a single oral dose, once per week for 12 weeks, were administered simultaneously. We concluded that this combined oral therapy is clinically effective with an acceptable safety profile. PMID:19845224

  13. The influence of endogenous and exogenous sex hormones in adolescents with attention to oral contraceptives and anabolic steroids.

    PubMed

    Lane, J R; Connor, J D

    1994-12-01

    The endogenous sex hormones produce dispositional changes in the developing child as well as imparting unique male and female dispositional patterns. Age-related changes have been observed for digoxin disposition and caffeine and theophylline metabolism. These age-related dispositional changes have led to age-dependent dosing recommendations. Studies with caffeine and antipyrine indicate that this change in drug disposition occurs over a short period of time, is seen earlier in girls than in boys, and is related to pubertal (Tanner) stage and the "growth spurt". Significant changes in endogenous sex hormone concentrations occur during the menstrual cycle and during pregnancy, leading to alterations in drug binding, distribution, and clearance. Oral contraceptives (OCs) inhibit the metabolism of certain drugs resulting in toxicity or lack of efficacy. Rifampin induces the OC metabolism, resulting in decreased clinical effectiveness. Most studies did not examine these kinetic and dynamic interactions between adult and adolescent users. It is estimated that there are over 45 anabolic steroid compounds available for abuse by athletes, and their use is increasing among male and female adolescents. Although the adolescent is at increased risk of developing adverse effects from these agents, a systematic evaluation of the long-term effects of anabolic steroid abuse has not been undertaken in this population. Further research is needed regarding the influence of endogenous and exogenous hormones on adolescent drug kinetics and dynamics. Because of their frequency of use among adolescents, OCs and anabolic steroids require particular emphasis.

  14. Effects of prior oral contraceptive use and soy isoflavonoids on estrogen-metabolizing cytochrome P450 enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Scott, LM; Durant, P; Leone-Kabler, S; Wood, CE; Register, TC; Townsend, A; Cline, JM

    2009-01-01

    Estrogen exposure and metabolism may play an important role in the development of estrogen-sensitive cancers in postmenopausal women. In this study we investigated whether past oral contraceptive (OC) administration or current dietary isoflavonoids (IF) affected expression and/or activity of steroid hormone-metabolizing cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes using complementary primate and cell culture models. One-hundred-eighty-one female cynomolgus macaques were randomized to receive OC or nothing for 26 months premenopausally, then ovariectomized and randomized to one of three diets for 36 months: an IF-depleted soy protein isolate (Soy−) diet, a Soy diet with IF (Soy+), or a Soy− diet supplemented with conjugated equine estrogens (CEE). Prior OC-treatment significantly reduced CYP gene expression in the mammary gland (≤60% of OC−). Dietary IFs had no effect on CYP expression, while CEE-treatment decreased CYP1A1 and increased CYP3A4 mRNA in a tissue-specific manner. For in vitro studies, we measured effects of the isoflavonoids genistein, daidzein and equol on CYP activity using intact V79 cells stably transfected to express CYP1A1, CYP1B1, or CYP3A4. All three IFs significantly altered CYP activity in a dose-dependent and isoform-specific manner (20–95% inhibition vs. controls). These results suggest potential mechanisms for prior OC and dietary IF effects on cancer risk in estrogen-responsive tissues. PMID:18955142

  15. Risk of Inflammatory Bowel Disease with Oral Contraceptives and Menopausal Hormone Therapy: Current Evidence and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Khalili, Hamed

    2016-03-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), collectively known as inflammatory bowel diseases, are archetypical inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract with rising incidence worldwide. Although the role of genetic factors in disease development has been highlighted by genome-wide association studies, environmental risk factors likely play a pivotal role in development of CD and UC. Prior observational studies have suggested a link between exogenous hormone use and risk of CD and UC. Specifically, studies have shown an association between oral contraceptive use and risk of CD and menopausal hormone therapy and risk of UC. Although the exact mechanism of these associations is largely unknown, a number of hypotheses have been proposed. First, oral estrogen has been shown to modify intestinal permeability, a critical step in the pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel disease. Second, exogenous hormone use through its effect on endogenous levels of hormones may enhance the development of Th1- and Th2-mediated inflammatory diseases. Lastly, recent data have linked modification in the gut microbiome to endogenous levels of androgens, which are also known to be altered with exogenous hormone use and influence the development of autoimmune diseases. This supports the intriguing hypothesis that the gut microbiome lies at the crossroads of pathways linking exogenous hormone use with innate and adaptive immunity. Future studies should therefore focus on bridging these epidemiologic findings to disease pathogenesis through comprehensive understanding of the complex interaction between exogenous hormone use, sex steroid biomarkers, genetic risk loci, and alterations in the intestinal microbial environment in the etiology of CD and UC.

  16. New and emerging contraceptives: a state-of-the-art review

    PubMed Central

    Bahamondes, Luis; Bahamondes, M Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Background The first hormonal contraceptive was introduced onto the market in several countries 50 years ago; however, the portfolio of contraceptive methods remains restricted with regards to their steroid composition, their cost, and their ability to satisfy the requirements of millions of women/couples in accordance with their different reproductive intentions, behaviors, cultures, and settings. Methods A literature review was conducted using Medline, Embase, and Current Contents databases, up to September 1, 2013 to identify publications reporting new contraceptives in development using combinations of the search terms: contraception, contraceptives, oral contraceptives, patch, vaginal ring, implants, intrauterine contraceptives, and emergency contraception (EC). Also, several experts in the field were also consulted to document ongoing projects on contraception development. Additionally, the Clinicaltrial.gov website was searched for ongoing studies on existing contraceptive methods and new and emerging female contraceptives developed over the past 5 years. Information was also obtained from the pharmaceutical industry. Results Early sexual debut and late menopause means that women may require contraception for up to 30 years. Although oral, injectable, vaginal, transdermal, subdermal, and intrauterine contraceptives are already available, new contraceptives have been developed in an attempt to reduce side effects and avoid early discontinuation, and to fulfill women’s different requirements. Research efforts are focused on replacing ethinyl-estradiol with natural estradiol to reduce thrombotic events. In addition, new, less androgenic progestins are being introduced and selective progesterone receptor modulators and new delivery systems are being used. In addition, research is being conducted into methods that offer dual protection (contraception and protection against human immunodeficiency virus transmission), and contraceptives for use “on demand

  17. Users of withdrawal method in the Islamic Republic of Iran: are they intending to use oral contraceptives? Applying the theory of planned behaviour.

    PubMed

    Rahnama, P; Hidarnia, A; Shokravi, F A; Kazemnejad, A; Montazeri, A; Najorkolaei, F R; Saburi, A

    2013-09-01

    Many couples in the Islamic Republic of Iran rely on coital withdrawal for contraception. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to use the theory of planned behaviour to explore factors that influence withdrawal users' intent to switch to oral contraception (OC). Participants were 336 sexually active, married women, who were current users of withdrawal and were recruited from 5 public family planning clinics in Tehran. A questionnair included measures of the theory of planned behaviour: attitude (behavioural beliefs, outcome evaluations), subjective norms (normative beliefs, motivation to comply), perceived behaviour control, past behaviour and behavioural intention. Linear regression analyses showed that past behaviour, perceived behaviour control, attitude and subjective norms accounted for the highest percentage of total variance observed for intention to use OC (36%). Beliefs-based family planning education and counsellingshould to be designed for users of the withdrawal method.

  18. Users of withdrawal method in the Islamic Republic of Iran: are they intending to use oral contraceptives? Applying the theory of planned behaviour.

    PubMed

    Rahnama, P; Hidarnia, A; Shokravi, F A; Kazemnejad, A; Montazeri, A; Najorkolaei, F R; Saburi, A

    2013-09-01

    Many couples in the Islamic Republic of Iran rely on coital withdrawal for contraception. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to use the theory of planned behaviour to explore factors that influence withdrawal users' intent to switch to oral contraception (OC). Participants were 336 sexually active, married women, who were current users of withdrawal and were recruited from 5 public family planning clinics in Tehran. A questionnair included measures of the theory of planned behaviour: attitude (behavioural beliefs, outcome evaluations), subjective norms (normative beliefs, motivation to comply), perceived behaviour control, past behaviour and behavioural intention. Linear regression analyses showed that past behaviour, perceived behaviour control, attitude and subjective norms accounted for the highest percentage of total variance observed for intention to use OC (36%). Beliefs-based family planning education and counsellingshould to be designed for users of the withdrawal method. PMID:24313039

  19. [Post-abortion contraception: effects of contraception services and reproductive intention].

    PubMed

    Borges, Ana Luiza Vilela

    2016-02-01

    Contraceptive counseling and the supply of contraceptive methods are part of post-abortion care and positively influence the subsequent use of contraceptive methods. Studies showing such evidence have been conducted predominantly in countries with no legal restrictions on abortion and with adequate care for women that terminate a pregnancy. However, little is known about contraceptive practices in contexts where abortion is illegal, as in Brazil, in which post-abortion contraceptive care is inadequate. The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of contraceptive care on male condom use and oral and injectable contraceptives in the six months post-abortion, considering reproductive intention. The results showed that contraceptive care only has a positive effect on the use of oral contraceptives in the first six months post-abortion, as long as the woman had a medical consultation in the same month in which she received information on contraception. One or the other intervention alone had no significant impact.

  20. MDM2 polymorphism associated with the development of cervical lesions in women infected with Human papillomavirus and using of oral contraceptives

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The MDM2 gene is the major negative regulator of p53, a tumor suppressor protein. Single nucleotide polymorphism in promoter region of MDM2 gene leads to increased expression resulting in higher levels of MDM2 protein. This event increases the attenuation of the p53 pathway. Polymorphisms in this gene can interfere in the regulation of cellular proliferation. We evaluated whether MDM2 SNP309 (rs2278744) associated or not with the use of oral contraceptive can heighten susceptibility to development of cervical lesions in women HPV infected. Methods MDM2 SNP309 (rs2278744) was genotyped in a total of 287 patients using the PCR-RFLP technique. The results were analyzed by UNPHASED v.3.121 and SNPStats programs. Results The three groups (SIL, LSIL and HSIL) showed no significant differences in either genotype or allelic frequencies for MDM2 polymorphisms, except when HSIL was compared with LSIL (p = 0.037; OR = 1.81). Furthermore, in the analysis of contraceptives, a significant association was found between the use of contraceptives and the MDM2 variant in the development of high-grade cervical lesions for the TG genotype (p = 0.019; OR = 2.21) when HSIL was compared with control. When HSIL was compared with LSIL (p = 0.006; OR = 2.27). Conclusion The results of this study suggest that MDM2 SNP309 might be a good marker for assessing the progression of LSIL to HSIL. In addition, they also show that oral contraceptives alone, did not have any effect on the progression or development of cervical lesions. However, they may act synergistically with MDM2 SNP309 (rs2278744) and HPV infection in the development of cervical lesions. PMID:25075210

  1. Aesthetic and incentive salience of cute infant faces: studies of observer sex, oral contraception and menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Sprengelmeyer, Reiner; Lewis, Jennifer; Hahn, Amanda; Perrett, David I

    2013-01-01

    Infant cuteness can influence adult-infant interaction and has been shown to activate reward centres in the brain. In a previous study, we found men and women to be differentially sensitive to small differences in infant facial cuteness, with reproductive hormone status as the potential underlying cause. It is unclear, however, whether reproductive hormone status impacts on the aesthetic and incentive salience of infant faces. To address this question, we conducted two interlinked studies. We used static images of the same smiling and neutral-looking infant faces in both a rating task, in which participants had to rate the cuteness of infant faces (aesthetic salience - 'liking'), and a key-press task, in which participants could prolong or shorten viewing time of infant faces by rapid alternating key-presses (incentive salience - 'wanting'). In a first study, we compared the performance of men, women who are taking oral contraceptives, and regularly cycling women. In this study, we found a significant correlation between cuteness ratings within and between groups, which implies that participants had the same concept of cuteness. Cuteness ratings and effort to look at faces was linked regardless of sex and reproductive hormone status, in that cute faces were looked at for longer than less cute faces. A happy facial expression contributed only marginally to the incentive salience of the face. To explore the potential impact of reproductive hormone status in more detail, we followed a subset of regularly cycling women during the menstrual, follicular and luteal phases of their cycle. The aesthetic and incentive salience of infant faces did not change across the menstrual cycle. Our findings suggest that reproductive hormone status does not modulate the aesthetic and incentive value of infant faces.

  2. Timing within the menstrual cycle, sex, and the use of oral contraceptives determine adrenergic suppression of NK cell activity

    PubMed Central

    Shakhar, K; Shakhar, G; Rosenne, E; Ben-Eliyahu, S

    2000-01-01

    Physiological responses that involve adrenergic mechanisms, such as stress-induced changes in cardiovascular indices, were reported to fluctuate along the menstrual cycle. Metastatic development following surgery was also reported to vary according to the menstrual phase during which a primary breast tumour was removed. Natural killer (NK) cells are believed to play an important role in controlling metastases. Our recent studies in rats demonstrated that adrenergic suppression of NK activity and of resistance to metastasis is more profound during oestrous phases characterized by high levels of oestradiol. In the current study in humans, we examined the in vitro impact of a β-adrenergic agonist, metaproterenol (MP), on NK activity, comparing blood drawn from (a) women tested at 3–4 different phases of their menstrual cycle (n = 10), (b) women using oral contraceptives (OC) (n = 10), and (c) men (n = 7). NK activity in each blood sample was assessed in the presence of 5 different concentrations of MP (10–8M to 10–6M), and in its absence (baseline). The results indicated marked group differences in the magnitude of NK suppression by MP: EC 50 was 2.6-fold lower in the luteal phase compared to the follicular phase, and 1.8-fold lower in OC users compared to men, who were least susceptible to the effects of MP. No significant group differences or menstrual effects in baseline levels of NK activity were evident. These findings provide the first empirical evidence for menstrual regulation of adrenergic impact on cellular immune competence. Relevance of these findings to the relation between the timing of breast cancer excision within the menstrual cycle and survival rates is discussed. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11104557

  3. Past Oral Contraceptive Use and Current Dietary Soy Isoflavones Influence Estrogen Metabolism in Postmenopausal Monkeys (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Latanya M.; Xu, Xia; Veenstra, Timothy D.; Tooze, Janet A.; Wood, Charles E.; Register, Thomas C.; Kock, Nancy D.; Cline, J. Mark

    2009-01-01

    Estrogen metabolism may play an important role in mammary carcinogenesis in postmenopausal women. We evaluated the effects of prior oral contraceptive (OC) treatment and current soy isoflavone consumption on endogenous estrogen metabolite concentration and biomarkers of tissue estrogen exposure in a monkey model. One hundred eighty-one female cynomolgus macaques were randomized to receive OC or placebo for 26 months premenopausally, then ovariectomized and randomized to one of three diets for 36 months: an isoflavone-depleted soy protein isolate (Soy−) diet, a diet containing soy protein isolate with a human equivalent of 129 mg isoflavone/d (Soy+), or a Soy− diet supplemented with conjugated equine estrogens (CEE+) at a human equivalent dose of 0.625 mg/d. Reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography directly coupled with tandem mass spectrometry was used to measure the concentrations of estrogen species in urine samples. Generally, prior OC treatment was associated with significantly reduced urinary estrogen metabolites (25–55% reduction; P < 0.05 for each versus OC−). Animals that consumed isoflavones postmenopausally had increased urinary 2-hydroxyestrone and 16α-hydroxyestrone (50% and 56% increases, respectively), but reduced levels of 2-hydroxyestradiol, 2-methoxyestradiol, and 17-epiestriol (92%, 63%, and 66%, respectively), compared with animals fed a Soy− diet. Isoflavones did not have widespread effects on uterine or mammary proliferation biomarkers, whereas prior OC significantly reduced two of three proliferation end points in the endometrium. Premenopausal OCs may have long-term systemic effects on response to estrogen and its metabolism whereas postmenopausal dietary isoflavones may alter endogenous estrogen metabolism in a modest but selective manner. PMID:18843000

  4. Effects of ovarian hormones and oral contraceptive pills on cardiac vagal withdrawal at the onset of dynamic exercise.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, André L; Ramos, Plinio S; Vianna, Lauro C; Ricardo, Djalma R

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the ovarian hormones and the use of oral contraceptive pills (OCP) on cardiac vagal withdrawal at the onset of dynamic exercise. Thirty physically active women aged 19-32 years were divided into two groups: OCP users (n = 17) and non-OCP users (n = 13). Participants were studied randomly at three different phases of the menstrual cycle: early follicular (day 3.6 ± 1.2; range 1-5), ovulatory (day 14.3 ± 0.8; range 13-16) and midluteal (day 21.3 ± 0.8; range 20-24), according to endogenous (in non-OCP users) or exogenous (in OCP users) estradiol and progesterone variations. The cardiac vagal withdrawal was represented by the cardiac vagal index (CVI), which was obtained by the 4-s exercise test. Additionally, resting heart rate, systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were obtained. The CVI was not significantly different between the three phases of the menstrual cycle in either the non-OCP users (early follicular: 1.58 ± 0.1; ovulatory: 1.56 ± 0.1; midluteal: 1.58 ± 0.1, P > 0.05) or OCP users (early follicular: 1.47 ± 0.1; ovulatory: 1.49 ± 0.1; midluteal: 1.47 ± 0.1, P > 0.05) (mean ± SEM). Resting cardiovascular responses were not affected by hormonal phase or OCP use, except that the SBP was higher in the OCP users than non-OCP users in all phases of the cycle (P < 0.05). In summary, our results demonstrate that cardiac vagal withdrawal at the onset of dynamic exercise was not impacted by the menstrual cycle or OCP use in physically active women.

  5. Impact of oral contraceptive use and menstrual phases on patellar tendon morphology, biochemical composition, and biomechanical properties in female athletes.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Mette; Couppe, Christian; Hansen, Christina S E; Skovgaard, Dorthe; Kovanen, Vuokko; Larsen, Jytte O; Aagaard, Per; Magnusson, S Peter; Kjaer, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Sex differences exist with regards to ligament and tendon injuries. Lower collagen synthesis has been observed in exercising women vs. men, and in users of oral contraceptives (OC) vs. nonusers, but it is unknown if OC will influence tendon biomechanics of women undergoing regular training. Thirty female athletes (handball players, 18-30 yr) were recruited: 15 long-term users of OC (7.0 ± 0.6 yr) and 15 nonusers (>5 yr). Synchronized values of patellar tendon elongation (obtained by ultrasonography) and tendon force were sampled during ramped isometric knee extensor maximum voluntary contraction to estimate mechanical tendon properties. Furthermore, tendon cross-sectional area and length were measured from MRI images, and tendon biopsies were obtained for analysis of tendon fibril characteristics and collagen cross-linking. Overall, no difference in tendon biomechanical properties, tendon fibril characteristics, or collagen cross-linking was observed between the OC users and nonusers, or between the different phases of the menstrual cycle. In athletes, tendon cross-sectional area in the preferred jumping leg tended to be larger than that in the contralateral leg (P = 0.09), and a greater absolute (P = 0.01) and normalized tendon stiffness (P = 0.02), as well as a lower strain (P = 0.04), were observed in the jumping leg compared with the contralateral leg. The results indicate that long-term OC use or menstrual phases does not influence structure or mechanical properties of the patellar tendon in female team handball athletes. PMID:23429870

  6. Safety of Hormonal Replacement Therapy and Oral Contraceptives in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana; Torres-Gonzalez, July-Vianneth; Ruiz-Sternberg, Ángela-María

    2014-01-01

    Background There is conflicting data regarding exogenous sex hormones [oral contraceptives (OC) and hormonal replacement therapy (HRT)] exposure and different outcomes on Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). The aim of this work is to determine, through a systematic review and meta-analysis the risks associated with estrogen use for women with SLE as well as the association of estrogen with developing SLE. Methods and Findings MEDLINE, EMBASE, SciElo, BIREME and the Cochrane library (1982 to July 2012), were databases from which were selected and reviewed (PRISMA guidelines) randomized controlled trials, cross-sectional, case-control and prospective or retrospective nonrandomized, comparative studies without language restrictions. Those were evaluated by two investigators who extracted information on study characteristics, outcomes of interest, risk of bias and summarized strength of evidence. A total of 6,879 articles were identified; 20 full-text articles were included. Thirty-two meta-analyses were developed. A significant association between HRT exposure (Random model) and an increased risk of developing SLE was found (Rate Ratio: 1.96; 95%-CI: 1.51–2.56; P-value<0.001). One of eleven meta-analyses evaluating the risk for SLE associated with OC exposure had a marginally significant result. There were no associations between HRT or OC exposure and specific outcomes of SLE. It was not always possible to Meta-analyze all the available data. There was a wide heterogeneity of SLE outcome measurements and estrogen therapy administration. Conclusion An association between HRT exposure and SLE causality was observed. No association was found when analyzing the risk for SLE among OC users, however since women with high disease activity/Thromboses or antiphospholipid-antibodies were excluded from most of the studies, caution should be exercised in interpreting the present results. To identify risk factors that predispose healthy individuals to the development of SLE who

  7. Effects of Ovarian Hormones and Oral Contraceptive Pills on Cardiac Vagal Withdrawal at the Onset of Dynamic Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, André L.; Ramos, Plinio S.; Vianna, Lauro C.; Ricardo, Djalma R.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the ovarian hormones and the use of oral contraceptive pills (OCP) on cardiac vagal withdrawal at the onset of dynamic exercise. Thirty physically active women aged 19–32 years were divided into two groups: OCP users (n = 17) and non-OCP users (n = 13). Participants were studied randomly at three different phases of the menstrual cycle: early follicular (day 3.6 ± 1.2; range 1–5), ovulatory (day 14.3 ± 0.8; range 13–16) and midluteal (day 21.3 ± 0.8; range 20–24), according to endogenous (in non-OCP users) or exogenous (in OCP users) estradiol and progesterone variations. The cardiac vagal withdrawal was represented by the cardiac vagal index (CVI), which was obtained by the 4-s exercise test. Additionally, resting heart rate, systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were obtained. The CVI was not significantly different between the three phases of the menstrual cycle in either the non-OCP users (early follicular: 1.58 ± 0.1; ovulatory: 1.56 ± 0.1; midluteal: 1.58 ± 0.1, P > 0.05) or OCP users (early follicular: 1.47 ± 0.1; ovulatory: 1.49 ± 0.1; midluteal: 1.47 ± 0.1, P > 0.05) (mean ± SEM). Resting cardiovascular responses were not affected by hormonal phase or OCP use, except that the SBP was higher in the OCP users than non-OCP users in all phases of the cycle (P < 0.05). In summary, our results demonstrate that cardiac vagal withdrawal at the onset of dynamic exercise was not impacted by the menstrual cycle or OCP use in physically active women. PMID:25785599

  8. Glutathione peroxidase activity in a healthy Canadian population. Effects of age, smoking and drinking habits, exercise and oral contraceptive use.

    PubMed

    L'abbe, M R; Collins, M W; Trick, K D; Laffey, P J

    1992-01-01

    The activity of the enzyme glutathione peroxidase (SeGSHPx) has been suggested as an indicator of selenium status. The purpose of this study was to measure the activity of this enzyme in a large sample of healthy, free-living Canadians to determine normal distributions and the effects of age, smoking, and drinking habits, exercise, and the use of oral contraceptives (OCs) or estrogen replacement therapy. The population consisted of 386 self-selected subjects between the ages of 24 and 75. Erythrocyte SeGSHPx activity was 21.5 +or- 7 (Mean +or- SD) and 33.6 +or- 8U/g Hb and plasma activity was 226 +or- 31 and 214 +or- 38 U/L for males (n=239) and females (n=147), respectively. Erythrocyte activity was significantly higher in females and males (p0.01). The Se form of GSHPx accounted for 76% and 54% of total activity in plasma and erythrocytes, respectively. No differences due to age were seen in males, although plasma SeGSHPx, non-SeGSHPx, and total GSHPx activities were elevated in females 65 years of age and older. Cigarette smoking significantly elevated erythrocyte SeGSHPx and total activity in male subjects. This elevation did not vary with the amount smoked and was not seen in ex-smokers. Drinking elevated erythrocyte non-SeGSHPx and total activity in male subjects with the highest activity seen in drinkers who also smoked. No significant differences were seen with level of exercise except for a slight elevation with vigorous exercise. Estrogen use significantly elevated erythrocyte SeGSHPx, non-SeGSHPx, and total activities in both pre- and postmenopausal women. These data suggest that some lifestyle factors can have small but significant effects of GSHPx activity and must be controlled for when population-based surveys are being conducted.

  9. Intractable Coronary Spastic Angina Improvement after Continuous Combined Estrogen-progestin Hormonal Contraception Use in a Premenopausal Woman.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Yusuke; Ikeda, Nahoko; Sakakura, Kenichi; Netsu, Sachiho; Ibe, Tatsuro; Wada, Hiroshi; Momomura, Shin-Ichi; Fujita, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    A 44-year-old woman, who had been previously diagnosed with coronary spastic angina and treated with standard medical therapy including calcium channel blockers, was admitted to our hospital due to chest pain at rest. Her chest pain attacks were concentrated just before and during menstruation. Despite the administration of an intravenous infusion of nitroglycerin and nicorandil, strong heart attacks with ST elevation occurred frequently after this admission. However, following continuous combined estrogen-progestin hormonal contraception use (estradiol plus dienogest), her attacks disappeared completely. Reduced estrogen levels before and during menstruation were speculated to be associated with her angina attacks. PMID:27629960

  10. Early post implantation contraceptive effects of a purified fraction of neem (Azadirachta indica) seeds, given orally in rats: possible mechanisms involved.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, S; Garg, S; Talwar, G P

    1999-11-30

    Neem seed and leaf extracts have immunomodulators that induce cellular immune reactions. These aspects of neem were exploited in earlier studies, where the oral administration of the neem seed extracts in rodents and primates could completely abrogate pregnancy at an early post implantation stage. Complete restoration of fertility was observed in the animals treated in the subsequent cycles. For the purpose of using neem as a long term contraceptive, an activity guided fractionation, followed by identification and characterization of the biologically active fraction from neem seeds was carried out. Sequentially extracted fractions of neem seeds were tested orally at an early post implantation stage in rats. The hexane extract of the neem seeds was found to be biologically active and was the precursor for the final active fraction. The active fraction, identified as a mixture of six components, could completely abrogate pregnancy in rodents up to a concentration of 10%. No apparent toxic effects could be seen following treatment with the fraction. The treatment with the active fraction caused a specific activation of T lymphocyte cells of CD8+ subtype as well as phagocytic cells followed by elevation in cytokines gamma-interferon and TNF. The results of the present study show that a pure active fraction of neem seeds could be obtained for the purpose of early post implantation contraception when given orally, and its mechanism of action seems to be by activating cell mediated immune reactions. PMID:10617063

  11. Effects of oral contraceptives on diurnal profiles of insulin, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1, growth hormone and cortisol in endurance athletes with menstrual disturbance

    PubMed Central

    Rickenlund, A.; Thorén, M.; Nybacka, Å.; Frystyk, J.; Hirschberg, A. Lindén

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Menstrual disturbances in female athletes are often explained as a consequence of energy deficiency. Oral contraceptive (OC) treatment may have favorable metabolic effects. We evaluated effects of OCs on diurnal secretions of insulin, insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1 (IGFBP-1), growth hormone (GH) and cortisol in relation to changes in body composition in athletes with menstrual disturbance compared with regularly menstruating athletes and controls. METHODS Age- and BMI-matched groups of endurance athletes with menstrual disturbance (OAM, n = 9) and regularly cycling athletes (RM, n = 8) and sedentary controls (CTRL, n = 8) were examined, and hormone levels measured, before and after 8 months of treatment with a low-dose combined OC (30 µg ethinyl estradiol + 150 µg levonorgestrel). RESULTS Before OC treatment, the diurnal profile of insulin was lower (P < 0.01) and levels of IGFBP-1 (P < 0.05) and cortisol (P < 0.05) were higher in OAM athletes than in CTRL, whereas GH secretion was higher than in RM athletes (P < 0.05). After treatment, diurnal secretions of these hormones were similar between groups with an increase of IGFBP-1 in the regularly menstruating subjects only (P < 0.001). OC treatment increased body fat mass in OAM athletes (P < 0.01 versus baseline). The change in total fat mass correlated positively with pretreatment diurnal levels of GH (rs = 0.67, P < 0.01) and cortisol (rs = 0.64, P < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS OC treatment in endurance athletes with menstrual disturbance increases body fat mass and results in diurnal levels of insulin, IGFBP-1, GH and cortisol that are comparable to those in regularly menstruating subjects. These results suggest that OCs improve metabolic balance in OAM athletes. PMID:19840988

  12. What's wrong with contraception?

    PubMed

    Rice, L; Rice, B

    1994-01-01

    A "reader's exchange" question solicited information on how readers respond when asked what is wrong with contraception. One correspondent couple wrote that their response is dependent upon their assessment of the questioner's perspective. Responses they use are 1) that the Catholic Church teaches that contraception is wrong and it is okay to accept this teaching in faith; 2) the Church teaches that every act of sexual intercourse must be open to life; 3) the God-given gift of intercourse involves pleasure and procreation, it is wrong to accept only part of the gift; 4) oral contraceptives have abortifacient properties; and 5) natural family planning involves temperance whereas contraception allows behavior which is similar to gluttony. A second correspondent wrote that the use of contraception makes humans behave like animals and allows them to be "takers" rather than "givers." A third letter-writer maintained that the use of contraception prohibits true love, total commitment, and complete acceptance on the part of a married couple. Contraception attempts to create a utopia and obviates the pain and suffering which are necessary in order to find true love and true happiness.

  13. The Effect of Combined Antenatal and Postnatal Counselling on Postpartum Modern Contraceptive Use: Prospective Case-Control Study in Kocaeli, Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Vural, Birol; Cakiroglu, Yigit

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The integration of family planning education into obstetric care has been suggested to increase postpartum contraception use. However, ideal time and type of counseling is controversial. There is no prospective study about combining prenatal and postnatal education on the postpartum modern contraceptive use (PPMC). Aim This study was aimed to explore the effects of the addition of postpartum contraceptive counselling to antenatal education on PPMC. Materials and Methods Family planning counselling was given to all participating patients throughout antenatal care (ANC) via brief communications. After delivery, the women were categorised into two age-matched groups with a 1:1 allocation ratio in the order of the birth date. No further intervention was performed for Group I (n: 98). Women in Group II (n: 102) received further contraceptive education at six weeks after hospital discharge. Six months after delivery, PPMC was compared between the two groups. Results PPMC was similar between Group I and II (p>0.05). Previous contraceptive experiences, obstetric care service intensity and partner’s support were the factors related to postnatal contraceptive use. Logistic regression analysis showed that PPMC was independent of confounding factors in each group. Conclusion The addition of postnatal counseling to antenatal one did not further increase PPMC. The results of this study suggested that family planning counseling should be provided antenatally. PMID:27190896

  14. Hormonal contraceptive use in Ireland: trends and co-prescribing practices.

    PubMed

    O'Mahony, Laura; Liddy, Anne-Marie; Barry, Michael; Bennett, Kathleen

    2015-12-01

    Hormonal contraceptives are highly prevalent. Currently, little is known about Irish hormonal contraceptive trends to date since the 1995 British media contraceptive controversy. The aim of this study was to examine recent trends in contraceptive use in Ireland and to determine the frequency of co-prescriptions with important interacting medications. Approximately 40% of the Irish population are prescribed 70% of total medicines under the Irish GMS scheme. Medicines were identified using the WHO Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classification system. Regression analysis was used to examine trends over time. Of all contraceptives dispensed in 2013, oral contraceptives were used the most (74%) and long acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs) the least (7.5%). Fourth generation combined oral contraceptives (COCs) predominated, although a slight significant decline was shown (P < 0.0001). Second and third generation COCs were significantly increasing and decreasing, respectively (P < 0.0001). Progestin-only pills were significantly increasing (P < 0.0001 across age groups). Low rates of contraceptive co-prescribing with important interacting drugs are shown. However, 93.6% of those on enzyme-inducing anti-epileptic medications were co-prescribed ineffective contraception containing <50 μg oestrogen.Irish prescribing trends of second and third generation COCs have remained consistent since 1995. The slow decline in fourth generation COC uptake follows new evidence of an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) reported in 2011. The low, but increasing, uptake of LARCs is consistent with other countries. Co-prescribing practices involving hormonal contraceptives requires continued vigilance. This study emphasizes the need to optimize co-prescribing practices involving hormonal contraceptives and anti-epileptic medications and highlights the need to address the barriers to the currently low uptake of LARC methods in Ireland. PMID:26503402

  15. Depot medroxyprogesterone acetate contraception in women with medical problems.

    PubMed

    Frederiksen, M C

    1996-05-01

    Since few clinical trials of contraceptive agents are conducted on women with medical problems, use of these agents in these populations is often based more upon theoretical considerations than clinical data. Clinicians must distinguish the risk of estrogen in the combined oral contraceptive from the risk of the progestin-only contraceptive methods. This review compares the risks of pregnancy with the risks of contraceptive methods for patients with chronic hypertension, cardiac disease, thrombotic disorders, diabetes, epilepsy, lupus erythematosus and other medical disorders. For women with certain medical problems, estrogen, but not progestogen, may be contraindicated. For these women, a long-acting progestogen, such as depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA), may offer distinct advantages.

  16. A 13-month multicenter clinical experience of a low-dose monophasic oral contraceptive containing 20 microg ethinylestradiol and 75 microg gestodene in Latin American women.

    PubMed

    Bassol, Susana; Alvarado, Gloria; Arreola, Ranferi Gaona; Celis-Gonzalez, Cuauhtemoc; Peña, Efrain Perez; Flores, Josue Garza; Ahued, Jose R; Ricalde, Roger Lara; Lopez, Carlos R; Prieto, Gustavo; Gurucharri, Carlos; Heredia, Monica G; Ortiz, Oscar Contreras; Percossi, Gabriela; Figueroa Casas, Pedro R; Botto, Elida; Tozzini, Roberto Italo; Botti, Gustavo; Nuñez de Pierro, Anibal; Fernandez, Mirta; Lastreto, Enrique; Nañez, Monica; Carneiro de Oliveira, Hildoberto; Diogenes Holanda Yazlle, Martha E; Silva, Jaime; Salazar, German; Gomez, Jorge; Penagos, Gloria; Cifuentes, Rodrigo; Torres, Luz A; Reyes-Marquez, Roberto; Albrecht, Gerhard

    2003-05-01

    This prospective, multicenter study was conducted to evaluate the contraceptive reliability, cycle control and tolerability of a 21-day oral contraceptive regimen containing 20 microg ethinylestradiol and 75 microg gestodene in four Latin American countries (Mexico, Argentina, Brazil and Colombia). Participants took trial medication daily for 21 days. Contraceptive efficacy, cycle control and tolerability were evaluated over a period of 13 cycles. Efficacy data gathered from 5,109 treatment cycles were obtained from 393 participants. The trial medication proved to be an effective contraceptive and provided good cycle control. One pregnancy because of poor compliance was recorded. This resulted in a study Pearl index of 0.25. Forty-six percent of Latin American women reported one intracyclic spotting bleeding episode and 37.6% reported one intracyclic breakthrough bleeding (medium/excessive bleeding) episode during cycles 2-4 (primary target). Overall, intracyclic bleeding was reported in 41%. Overall, there was a trend towards a lower incidence of spotting in all the countries and this difference had statistical significance between Argentina and the others three countries (p < 0.05) during cycles 2-4. This trend was also apparent with respect to breakthrough bleeding, but again the difference did not achieve statistical significance. The discontinuation rate because of adverse events was low (3%); no serious adverse events were reported. More than 78% of the women in the four countries maintained constant body weight or lost weight (2 kg) during the study. The treatment effect on blood pressure was negligible. There were no appreciable changes in mean laboratory values over the course of the study. PMID:12742559

  17. Latin America's contributions to contraceptive development.

    PubMed

    Coutinho, E M

    1993-08-01

    The contributions of Latin Americans to contraceptive research began in 1951 when the Mexican chemist, Miramontes, invented norethisterone (norethindrone). Early studies on the use of this drug with ethinyl estradiol in an oral contraceptive (OC) pill were conducted in Puerto Rico. Publication of these studies was the second milestone in contraceptive development. While the leaders of this work, Pincus and Rock, were widely acknowledged, the many doctors who carried out the trials and reported their observations have been forgotten. The next milestone was the introduction of the estrogen-free OC by Martinez-Manautou and his collaborators in 1966. That same year Coutinho, de Souza, and Csapo reported on the contraceptive effect of medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) based on work done in Brazil. Also from Brazil came the proposal to use MPA in combination with estrogen in a monthly contraceptive injectable. The development of Depo-Provera and other injectables also took place mostly in Latin America. The first norgestrel-containing pill was also developed in Brazil, and successful efforts to reduce the dosage to a half tablet prefigured the development of low-dose OCs. Norplant was developed in Brazil, with the first clinical trails taking place in Chile. Other proposals followed during the late 1970s, including efforts to develop a male contraceptive. The first clinical trials with gossypol outside of China took place in Brazil. A Latino, Zipper, also proposed the use of copper in IUDs which increased the acceptability of this method. In addition to the researchers cited here, many others have contributed decisively to contraceptive development. The fact that they are not receiving the recognition they deserve is disappointing since the only real reward for their dedicated work would be recognition of their results.

  18. Male hormonal contraception.

    PubMed

    Nieschlag, E

    2010-01-01

    The principle of hormonal male contraception based on suppression of gonadotropins and spermatogenesis has been established over the last three decades. All hormonal male contraceptives use testosterone, but only in East Asian men can testosterone alone suppress spermatogenesis to a level compatible with contraceptive protection. In Caucasians, additional agents are required of which progestins are favored. Current clinical trials concentrate on testosterone combined with norethisterone, desogestrel, etonogestrel, DMPA, or nestorone. The first randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial performed by the pharmaceutical industry demonstrated the effectiveness of a combination of testosterone undecanoate and etonogestrel in suppressing spermatogenesis in volunteers. PMID:20839093

  19. Age at first oral contraceptive use as a major determinant of vertebral bone mass in female endurance athletes.

    PubMed

    Hartard, Manfred; Kleinmond, Christine; Kirchbichler, Alexander; Jeschke, Dieter; Wiseman, Michael; Weissenbacher, Ernst Rainer; Felsenberg, Dieter; Erben, Reinhold G

    2004-10-01

    It was the aim of this retrospective analysis to examine the influence of low-dose monophasic oral contraceptives (OCs) on bone mineral density (BMD) of the femoral neck and of the spine in young female endurance athletes. Data on training intensity, dietary intake, menarche, menstrual cycle disorders, years of OC use, and age at first OC use were determined by a self-report questionnaire. Only athletes performing regular endurance exercise for more than 3 years with more than 3 h of exercise per week were included in this study and underwent a clinical assessment including measurement of weight, height, spine, and hip BMD by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and collection of a blood sample. The data from 75 regularly exercising endurance athletes aged 18-35 years (26.5 +/- 4.8 years) were initially included in this analysis. Six athletes were later excluded due to oligo-/amenorrhea. Subjects were allocated into the OC group when they reported OC use for more than 3 years in women younger than 22 years of age, or when they reported OC use for more than 50% of the time after menarche in women aged 22-35 years. There were no differences in age, weight, height, body mass index (BMI), body fat, menarche, training intensity, age at start of training, or any serum parameters between OC users (n = 31) and control subjects (n = 38). However, OC users had 7.9% lower spine BMD and 8.8% lower proximal femur BMD (P < 0.01 for both sites). When the relationship between BMD of the spine and OC use was further analyzed by a stepwise model of multiple regression analysis using OC years, age at OC initiation, BMI, and menarche as independent variables, age at first OC use was found to be the best predictor of vertebral BMD, while the only significant predictor of femoral neck BMD was BMI. We conclude that OC use is associated with decreased BMD of the spine and the femoral neck in female endurance athletes, and that early age at initiation of OC use may be an important risk factor

  20. [Contraception in the future].

    PubMed

    Hamzaoui, R; Boukhris, M

    1994-02-01

    In the last decade, global use of contraceptive methods has increased. About 50% of couples of childbearing age use a modern contraceptive method. This evolution and a positive change in attitude towards male contraception has encouraged research in fertility regulation to enlarge and to improve acceptance of the contraceptive mix. Current injectable contraceptives interfere with the menstrual cycle. Research is exploring ways to minimize such secondary effects by reducing the total hormone dose and by changing the way the active product is delivered (e.g., microspheres). An injectable prototype is an analogue of levonorgestrel (HRP 002). A new IUD is made of leather suspended by a nylon suture which has been inserted into the uterine muscle. RU-486, often used to interrupt early pregnancy, is being tested as an oral contraceptive (OC). It inhibits secretion of gonadotropins and ovulation. It holds promise as an OC with no estrogen component. Since it also inhibits endometrial development and thus prevents implantation, it may someday be used for emergency contraception (i.e., postcoital contraception). New contraceptive implants under study include Norplant RII (2 rods of levonorgestrel lasting for 3 years), Implanon (desogestrel), and Capranor (biodegradable implant lasting 2 years). The female condom consists of a flexible polyurethane sheath with a flexible ring at each end. It has the potential to protect against sexually transmitted diseases since it covers the labial lips and is impermeable to HIV. France and Switzerland have both approved its use. It will enter the UK market at the end of the year. Approval for marketing has been sought in the US.

  1. Effect of emergency oral contraceptive use on condom utilization and sexual risk taking behaviours among university students, Northwest Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Young people between the ages of 15 and 24 years are both the most at risk of HIV and the greatest hope for turning the tide against HIV/AIDS. Although various surveys have been done on sexual behaviour of youth in Ethiopia, studies assessing the effect of emergency oral contraceptives on condom utilization of university students are lacking. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in two major universities of Ethiopia from January to May 2011 using structured self administered questionnaire with the aim to assess the effect of introducing oral emergency contraceptive pills on condom utilization and sexual risk taking behaviours among female university students. Study participants were selected by simple random sampling using the list from the associate registrars of each University. Data were entered, cleaned and analyzed using SPSS version 17.0. Bivariate and multiple logistic regression analyses were used to determine factors associated with condom utilization. Results a total of 623 students out of 660 were included giving response rate of 94.4%. A total of 103(16.5%) had history of sexual intercourse and nearly half (45.6%) of them had sex before the age of 20 years. Forty (6.4%) students had history of sexually transmitted infections (STI). Sixty seven percent of students had heard about emergency oral contraceptives. One hundred and ninety one (45.7%) of students believe that EOC is effective in preventing pregnancy. Believing that EOC is effective in preventing pregnancy (adjusted Odds ratio, AOR = 0.22 95% CI 0.06, 0.87), condom prevents STI (AOR = 10.37, 95% CI 1.73, 62.24) and younger age below 20 years (AOR = 11.68 95% CI 1.25, 109.19) were statistically significantly associated with condom use. Conclusion a significant number of students had history of sexual intercourse and used emergency contraception. The belief in the effectiveness of EOC negatively affects condom use. The preference for the pill may make

  2. Deep vein thrombosis and changes in coagulation and fibrinolysis after gynaecological operations in Chinese: the effect of oral contraceptives and malignant disease.

    PubMed

    Tso, S C; Wong, V; Chan, V; Chan, T K; Ma, H K; Todd, D

    1980-12-01

    Of 154 Chinese patients who underwent gynaecological operations, four showed a positive 125I fibrinogen leg scan for venous thrombosis, and overall incidence of 2 . 6%. In those who were on oral contraceptives and had major pelvic surgery for benign conditions, the incidence was 10 . 5%; in those who had Wertheim hysterectomy for carcinoma of cervix, it was 6 . 7%. This confirms the rarity of post-operative thromboembolism in the Chinese. Fragment E showed a biphasic rise after major operation due to tissue injury and venous thrombosis. In patients with malignancy, the postoperative 'fibrinolytic shutdown', represented by decreased plasminogen activator together with increased alpha 1 antitrypsin and C1- inhibitor levels, was more marked. In addition, alpha 2 macroglobulin level was lower and fell significantly after operation. In patients on oral contraceptives, fragment E levels were higher after surgery and there was no decrease in plasminogen activator levels. Antithrombin III levels did not fall except in three of the four patients with venous thrombosis. A marked increase in fragment E level and a decrease in antithrombin III level might be useful diagnostic markers for postoperative venous thrombosis.

  3. Postpartum contraception.

    PubMed

    Sober, Stephanie; Schreiber, Courtney A

    2014-12-01

    As birth spacing has demonstrated health benefits for a woman and her children, contraception after childbirth is recognized as an important health issue. The potential risk of pregnancy soon after delivery underscores the importance of initiating postpartum contraception in a timely manner. The contraceptive method initiated in the postpartum period depends upon a number of factors including medical history, anatomic and hormonal factors, patient preference, and whether or not the woman is breastfeeding. When electing a contraceptive method, informed choice is paramount. The availability of long-acting reversible contraceptive methods immediately postpartum provides a strategy to achieve reductions in unintended pregnancy. PMID:25264698

  4. [FIRST CONSULTATION IN TEENAGERS FOR CONTRACEPTION PRESCRIPTION].

    PubMed

    Béliard, A

    2016-01-01

    Adequate contraception prescription is mandatory for teenagers to avoid any unwanted pregnancy. Counselling and description of side effect improve compliance. Use of condom is important to avoid sexually transmitted infections. Combined estroprogestin contraception has multiple non-contraceptive benefits, e.g. dysmenorrhea improvement. Familial and personal history is needed before contraception prescription. Further consultation 3 months later has to be planned to evaluate compliance, side effects and to adapt contraception if needed.

  5. [Community marketing of contraceptives].

    PubMed

    Urrutia, J M

    1987-09-01

    The 5-year-old community contraceptive distribution program developed by PROFAMILIA, Colombia's private family planning organization, has given excellent results, but several cost-effectiveness comparisons with social marketing programs have suggested that commercial distribution programs are superior. The community contraceptive distribution program has a high content of information and education activities, which produced significant increases in knowledge and use of contraception in the communities covered. It has been a fundamental support for the social marketing program, creating much of the demand for contraceptive products that the social marketing program has filled. The social marketing program has given good results in terms of volume of sales and in cost-effectiveness since 1976, prompting calls for replacement of the community contraceptive distribution program by the social marketing program in those sectors where knowledge and use of contraception have achieved acceptable levels. An experiment in the Department of Santander in 1984 and 1985 gave very favorable results, suggesting that community contraceptive distribution programs should be replaced by social marketing programs in all more developed markets. But economic problems in 1985 and the decision of manufacturers to decrease the profit margin for PROFAMILIA jeopardized the social marketing program. The community distribution program covered about 20% of the market. Reduced profits in the social marketing program threatened its continued expansion, at the same time that potential demand was growing because of increases in the fertile aged population and increased use of contraception. To meet the need, PROFAMILIA combined the community contraceptive distribution and social marketing programs into a new entity to be called community marketing. The strategy of the community marketing program will be to maintain PROFAMILIA's participation in the market and aid the growth of demand for

  6. Contraceptive options for adolescents.

    PubMed

    Moriarty, A L

    1997-01-01

    Data on national trends of sex behavior indicate that adolescents in the US are initiating sexual activity at younger ages than in the past several decades. The 1996 Centers for Disease Control Youth Behavior Survey found that 36.9% of 9th graders and 66.4% of 12th graders had been sexually active. Of those, 37.9% were sexually active within the 3 months preceding the survey. 12.7% of the sexually active boys and 4.9% of the sexually active girls reported beginning sexual activity before age 13 years. 72% of individuals aged 15-17 years and 84% of those aged 18-19 report using some form of contraception. However, many use contraception inconsistently. The most popular and effective methods of contraception chosen by adolescents are condoms, oral contraception, and depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA). These methods are discussed. Before either oral contraceptive pill or DMPA use is initiated, a detailed health history should be taken and a complete physical examination conducted which includes a pelvic examination.

  7. A possible mechanism of action of danazol and an ethinylestradiol/norgestrel combination used as postcoital contraceptive agents.

    PubMed

    Rowlands, S; Kubba, A A; Guillebaud, J; Bounds, W

    1986-06-01

    Twenty-seven women requesting postcoital contraception were randomly allocated to take an ethinylestradiol/dl-norgestrel combination or danazol. Urine specimens were assayed for luteinising hormone (LH) and pregnanediol-3-glucuronide (P3G) levels from the day of the postcoital treatment to the next period. In addition, the urine samples of these recruits and 12 additional women were assayed for the Beta-subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin (B-hCG). A consistent pattern of alteration in urinary steroids was lacking, indicating a heterogeneous effect on ovarian function. There was no evidence of early pregnancy in successfully treated cases. We suggest that the main mechanism of action of these drugs is at the endometrial level. PMID:3533419

  8. Fertility and Contraception in Women With Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Jason; Kane, Sunanda V.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) carries a high burden in women during their reproductive years, and family planning issues are often a significant cause of concern. Fertility is normal in women with nonsurgically treated ulcerative colitis and similar or slightly reduced in women with Crohn’s disease. Women who undergo ileal pouch anastomosis have reduced fertility. Fertility is likely worsened by disease activity but unaffected by medications used to treat IBD. Infertile patients with IBD respond as well as non-IBD patients to in vitro fertilization (IVF). Despite normal fertility, patients with IBD have fewer children due to concerns regarding infertility, disease inheritance, congenital abnormalities, and disease-related sexual dysfunction. Patients rarely discuss these issues with a physician. When discussion does occur, it may lead to changes in decision-making. Contraceptives are an important part of family planning, particularly during times of high disease activity. All forms of contraceptives are acceptable in patients with IBD, although there are specific considerations. The risks of combined oral contraceptives outweigh the benefits in patients with active disease and patients with prior or high risk for thromboembolism. Oral contraceptives and IBD are independently associated with an increased risk for thromboembolism, although it is not known whether this effect is compounding. Depot medroxyprogesterone acetate injection should be avoided in patients with or at risk for osteopenia. Intrauterine devices and implants are the most effective form of contraception and should be a first-line recommendation. The use of oral contraceptives is associated with the development of IBD, although there is no increased risk of disease relapse with the use of any form of contraceptive. PMID:27182211

  9. Trends of contraception among ladies of local population in Pakistan; why, how, when and what?

    PubMed Central

    Atif, Khaula; Afsheen, Afeera; Naqvi, Syed Abid Hassan; Niazi, Saleem Asif; Ullah Khan, Habib

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To analyze trends of use of methods of contraception along with study of impact of various demographic and social factors on contraception in Peshawar, Pakistan. Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study with random purposive sampling was conducted at Combined Military Hospital Peshawar, from Mar 2015-Nov 2015. Self-designed questionnaire with demographic details and questions pertinent to contraceptive practices was utilized as study instrument. Females reporting to concerned hospital for contraceptive advice and prescription were distributed with questionnaire and written informed consent form. Formal approval was taken from ethical committee of hospital. Data was analyzed via descriptive analysis (SPSS-21), qualitative data was expressed as frequencies and percentages; quantitative as mean±standard deviation (SD). Main outcome variable i-e contraceptive device used; was cross-tabulated with independent variables. Results: Response rate was 53.2% (n-426). Usage of contraceptive device was as follows; 51.2% Nil, 9.4% barriers, 22.3% oral/injectable hormones, 13.4% IUCDs, 3.8% sterilization. There was a strong relationship between type of contraceptives used and age (p<0.001), client’s education (p<0.001), husband’s education (p<0.001), number of children (p<0.001), religion (p0.013), socioeconomic class (p<0.001), and religious beliefs about use of contraceptives (p<0.001). More Muslims considered contraception irreligious than non-Muslims (p 0.02). There was no significant impact of husbands’ pressure to not to use contraceptives on type of contraception practised (p 0.114). Conclusion: Contraceptive devices are under-utilized in the study participants. Multidisciplinary approach should be applied to enhance client education, awareness and counseling to utilize these devices more appropriately and regularly. PMID:27375727

  10. Male contraception: a clinically-oriented review.

    PubMed

    Kanakis, George A; Goulis, Dimitrios G

    2015-01-01

    Despite the variety of available female contraceptive methods, many pregnancies (~50%) are still undesired. Many men (>60%) want to participate equally with their partner in family planning; however, male contraceptive methods (MCMs) account for only 14% of those used worldwide and no pharmaceutical MCM is available so far. The only two MCMs currently available are condoms, which despite protecting against sexually transmitted diseases have high failure rates (~19%), and vasectomy, which though very efficient (99%) is poorly reversible (<50%). Among MCMs under investigation, male hormonal contraceptives (MHCs) are those that have come closest to commercialization. The action of MHCs relies on the disruption of spermatogenesis that exogenous androgen administration evokes by suppressing the hypophyseal-gonadal axis. Various regimens of androgens as monotherapy or in combination with progestins have been tested in clinical trials achieving a Pearl Index <1.0 (equal to that of the female oral contraceptive pill); however, concerns regarding the variable response rates observed (non-responders: 5-20%), the impracticality of parenteral administration and long-term prostate-associated or cardiovascular morbidity have deflected the interest of the pharmaceutical industry from further research. Non-hormonal contraception methods may be, at least theoretically, more specific by selectively disrupting spermatogenesis and sperm transport or fertilizing ability. Nevertheless, only a few have been tested in clinical trials (Reversible Inhibition of Sperm Under Guidance, RISUG, and Intra Vas Plugs); most of them are still in pre-clinical development or have been abandoned due to toxicity (gossypol). Consequently, until a reliable, safe and practical MCM is developed, women will continue to bear most of the contraception burden. PMID:26732151

  11. Non-prescription dispensing of emergency oral contraceptives: Recommendations from the German Federal Chamber of Pharmacists [Bundesapothekerkammer

    PubMed Central

    Goebel, Ralf; Zagermann-Muncke, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Emergency hormonal contraceptives (EHC) are contraceptives used to prevent unintended pregnancy following unprotected sexual intercourse (USI) or contraceptive failure. The EHCs available without a prescription include medicines containing levonorgestrel (LNG) in more than 80 countries and, recently, based on an EU-switch ellaOne®, which contains ulipristal acetate (UPA). EHCs work by stopping or delaying ovulation. Those containing LNG can be used up to 72 hours after USI or contraceptive failure, while UPA can be used up to 120 hours. In the context of the UPA implementation process, Germany switched LNG to non-prescription status as well. Objectives: To develop recommendations, a protocol, and a continuing education program for pharmacists to assure quality when giving advice and dispensing EHCs in community pharmacies without a medical prescription. Methods: The recommendations were developed by an iterative process of drafting, recognizing, and discussing comments and proposals for amendments as well a seeking agreement with a number of stakeholders such as the Federal Ministry of Health (BMG), Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices (BfArM), Federal Chamber of Physicians (BÄK), Drug Commission of German Physicians (AkdÄ), professional organizations/associations of gynaecologists, pharmaceutical OTC-industry as well as government-controlled, private, and church-based organizations and centres providing advice on sex education and family planning. Results: The recommendations were eventually endorsed by the BMG in consultation with the BfArM. Conclusions: The recommendations were made public, published in the professional journal and used in an uncounted number of continuing education programs based on the curriculum and provided by the State Chambers of Pharmacists. PMID:27785169

  12. Injectable contraception.

    PubMed

    Kaunitz, A M

    1989-06-01

    The most effective, convenient, reversible method of birth control is considered to be long-acting progestogen injections. Used by over 90 countries, Depot medroxy-progesterone acetate (DMPA, Depo-Provera, Upjohn) has yet to be approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The reluctance of the FDA to approve DMPA and much of the controversy surrounding this method revolve around the results of testing done on animals who were given large doses of the progestogen over a long period of time and developed tumors. However, the large body of research and records on this method that have been compiled over the past 30 years is positive. The injectable method works like oral contraceptives, inhibiting ovulation. Changes in menstruation have been the chief complaint of women who use this method; however, the duration and frequency of spotting and bleeding diminish over time. Other side effects of DMPA and Norethindrone enanthate (NET EN, Noristerat, Schering) are discussed. Also discussed is the history of development and testing for the 2 methods and subdermal implants, specifically Norplant.

  13. A survey of contraception in five west European countries.

    PubMed

    Riphagen, F E; Lehert, P

    1989-01-01

    In 1984 and 1985, a survey was conducted of 7696 women aged 15-44 living in Italy, France, Great Britain, Spain and the Federal Republic of Germany. The aim of the study was to examine the use of contraceptive methods, the differences in contraceptive use, knowledge of fertility, communication about contraception, motives for choice and the perceptions held by women regarding contraceptive methods, particularly oral contraception. The results show important differences between the countries studied.

  14. A prospective comparison of bone density in adolescent girls receiving depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (Depo-Provera), levonorgestrel (Norplant), or oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Cromer, B A; Blair, J M; Mahan, J D; Zibners, L; Naumovski, Z

    1996-11-01

    In Ohio, data on 31 postmenarcheal women, 12-21 years old and using hormonal contraception (Norplant = 7, Depo Provera = 15, and oral contraceptives [OCs] = 9) were compared with data on 17 controls of similar age to prospectively examine lumbar bone density in girls before and after 1 and 2 years of hormonal contraceptive use and to compare the results with young women not using hormonal contraceptives. The subjects attended a general adolescent clinic at Children's Hospital in Columbus. There was an insufficient number of OC users at 2 years, so they were not included in second year analyses. Initial height and weight were significantly associated with bone density values (p 0.05). Weight accounted for the most variance both at baseline (p 0.001) and after 1 year of treatment (p 0.01). At baseline and 1 year, bone density values between patient groups were not significantly different. At 2 years, however, Norplant users had higher bone density than Depo- Provera users and controls (1.308 vs. 1.004 and 1.087, respectively; p 0.01). After 1 year, Depo-Provera users experienced a decrease (1.53%) in bone density while Norplant users, OC users, and controls experienced an increase in bone density (2.46%, 1.52%, and 2.85%, respectively). The change in bone density between Depo-Provera users and controls was significant (p 0.02). At 2 years, Depo Provera users experienced a decrease in bone density while Norplant users and controls experienced an increase (-3.12% vs. 9.33% and 9.49%, respectively; p 0.0001). This study is important because 50% of adult bone mass is accrued during adolescence. In fact, bone mass peaks during adolescence. It is not known whether bone loss during Depo Provera use is reversible after treatment discontinuation. These findings show that Depo Provera inhibits skeletal bone mineralization in adolescents, at least temporarily, while Norplant and OCs appear to increase bone density.

  15. Contraceptive Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hulka, Barbara S.; And Others

    The objective of research in contraceptive evaluation is to improve the ability of individuals to choose contraceptive methods best suited to their needs and circumstances and to provide information that will lead to the development of safer and more effective methods. There are usually three considerations in judging the importance of a method of…

  16. Intrauterine contraception.

    PubMed

    Whaley, Natalie S; Burke, Anne E

    2015-11-01

    Intrauterine devices (IUDs) are effective, reversible forms of contraception with high patient satisfaction and continuation. IUDs can be safely used by most women and should be considered the first-line method of contraception for all women. This descriptive review will discuss the clinical issues associated with IUDs - including management of side effects, noncontraceptive uses and insertion and removal. When the burdens of cost are removed, women are more likely to select and IUDs. Health policy changes that increase insurance coverage for contraception will improve access to IUDs. IUDs remain an underutilized form of contraception in USA and efforts to improve availability and access to long-acting reversible contraception methods is needed to optimize their use.

  17. Contraceptive Equity

    PubMed Central

    Temkin, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    The Equity in Prescription Insurance and Contraceptive Coverage Act, introduced in Congress in 1997 and still unpassed, seeks to redress health insurers’ failure to pay for birth control as they pay for other prescription drugs, most paradoxically Viagra. In 1936 the International Workers Order (IWO), a fraternal society, became the first insurer to include contraception in its benefits package. A forerunner in the movement for prepaid medical care, the IWO offered its members primary care and contraceptive services for annual flat fees. Founded at a time when the legal status of contraception was in flux, the IWO’s Birth Control Center was the only such clinic to operate on an insurance system. Recent state laws and judicial actions have revived the IWO’s groundbreaking view of contraception as a basic preventive service deserving of insurance coverage. PMID:17761562

  18. The contraception needs of the perimenopausal woman.

    PubMed

    Hardman, Sarah M R; Gebbie, Ailsa E

    2014-08-01

    Perimenopausal women have low fertility but must still be advised to use contraception until natural sterility is reached if they are sexually active. Patterns of contraceptive use vary in different countries worldwide. Long-acting reversible contraceptive methods offer reliable contraception that may be an alternative to sterilisation. Hormonal methods confer significant non-contraceptive benefits, and each individual woman should weigh up the benefits and risks of a particular method. No method of contraception is contraindicated by age alone, although combined hormonal contraception and injectable progestogens are not recommended for women over the age of 50 years. The intrauterine system has particular advantages as a low-dose method of effective hormonal contraception, which also offers control of menstrual dysfunction and endometrial protection in women requiring oestrogen replacement. Condoms are recommended for personal protection against sexually transmitted infections in new relationships. Standard hormone replacement therapy is not a method of contraception.

  19. Contraceptive implants.

    PubMed

    McDonald-Mosley, Raegan; Burke, Anne E

    2010-03-01

    Implantable contraception has been extensively used worldwide. Implants are one of the most effective and reversible methods of contraception available. These devices may be particularly appropriate for certain populations of women, including women who cannot use estrogen-containing contraception. Implants are safe for use by women with many chronic medical problems. The newest implant, Implanon (Organon International, Oss, The Netherlands), is the only device currently available in the United States and was approved in 2006. It is registered for 3 years of pregnancy prevention. Contraceptive implants have failure rates similar to tubal ligation, and yet they are readily reversible with a return to fertility within days of removal. Moreover, these contraceptive devices can be safely placed in the immediate postpartum period, ensuring good contraceptive coverage for women who may be at risk for an unintended pregnancy. Irregular bleeding is a common side effect for all progestin-only contraceptive implants. Preinsertion counseling should address possible side effects, and treatment may be offered to women who experience prolonged or frequent bleeding.

  20. Development of dimethandrolone 17beta-undecanoate (DMAU) as an oral male hormonal contraceptive: induction of infertility and recovery of fertility in adult male rabbits.

    PubMed

    Attardi, Barbara J; Engbring, Jean A; Gropp, David; Hild, Sheri Ann

    2011-01-01

    Dimethandrolone undecanoate (DMAU: 7α,11β-dimethyl-19-nortestosterone 17β-undecanoate) is a potent orally active androgen with progestational activity that is in development for therapeutic uses in men. We hypothesized that because of its dual activity, DMAU might have potential as a single-agent oral hormonal contraceptive. To test this possibility, adult male rabbits (5/group) of proven fertility were treated orally with vehicle or DMAU at 1.0, 2.5, 5.0, or 10.0 mg/kg/d for 12 or 13 weeks. Semen and blood samples were collected every other week through week 30. Sperm were decreased (P < .05) in semen samples from DMAU-treated rabbits at 2.5 and 5.0 mg/kg/d at weeks 12, 14, 16, 18, and 20 compared to week 0 (prior to treatment). The percentage of forward progressive motile sperm in those rabbits that still had measurable sperm was also reduced by DMAU treatment at 2.5 mg/kg/d at weeks 14, 16, 18, and 20 and at 5.0 mg/kg/d at week 18 (P < .05). At 1.0 mg/kg/d only 1 rabbit had reduced sperm numbers and motility. A mating trial was performed at week 15. The number of bred males that were fertile was 4 of 4 in the vehicle-treated group and 4 of 5, 0 of 4, and 2 of 5 in the 1.0, 2.5, and 5.0 mg/kg/d DMAU treatment groups. By week 22, sperm numbers and forward progressive motility increased, and they returned to pretreatment levels in all DMAU-treated rabbits by week 30. All bred males were fertile at week 31. Serum levels of testosterone, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), and luteinizing hormone (LH) were significantly suppressed in DMAU (1.0, 2.5, or 5.0 mg/kg/d)-treated rabbits during the 12-week dosing interval, but were comparable to pretreatment levels after cessation of dosing. These data indicate that DMAU suppressed the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, resulting in severe oligospermia in the majority of rabbits in the 2.5 and 5.0 mg/kg/d dosing groups. Infertility was observed when sperm numbers decreased to about 10% of pretreatment levels. In

  1. Development of dimethandrolone 17beta-undecanoate (DMAU) as an oral male hormonal contraceptive: induction of infertility and recovery of fertility in adult male rabbits.

    PubMed

    Attardi, Barbara J; Engbring, Jean A; Gropp, David; Hild, Sheri Ann

    2011-01-01

    Dimethandrolone undecanoate (DMAU: 7α,11β-dimethyl-19-nortestosterone 17β-undecanoate) is a potent orally active androgen with progestational activity that is in development for therapeutic uses in men. We hypothesized that because of its dual activity, DMAU might have potential as a single-agent oral hormonal contraceptive. To test this possibility, adult male rabbits (5/group) of proven fertility were treated orally with vehicle or DMAU at 1.0, 2.5, 5.0, or 10.0 mg/kg/d for 12 or 13 weeks. Semen and blood samples were collected every other week through week 30. Sperm were decreased (P < .05) in semen samples from DMAU-treated rabbits at 2.5 and 5.0 mg/kg/d at weeks 12, 14, 16, 18, and 20 compared to week 0 (prior to treatment). The percentage of forward progressive motile sperm in those rabbits that still had measurable sperm was also reduced by DMAU treatment at 2.5 mg/kg/d at weeks 14, 16, 18, and 20 and at 5.0 mg/kg/d at week 18 (P < .05). At 1.0 mg/kg/d only 1 rabbit had reduced sperm numbers and motility. A mating trial was performed at week 15. The number of bred males that were fertile was 4 of 4 in the vehicle-treated group and 4 of 5, 0 of 4, and 2 of 5 in the 1.0, 2.5, and 5.0 mg/kg/d DMAU treatment groups. By week 22, sperm numbers and forward progressive motility increased, and they returned to pretreatment levels in all DMAU-treated rabbits by week 30. All bred males were fertile at week 31. Serum levels of testosterone, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), and luteinizing hormone (LH) were significantly suppressed in DMAU (1.0, 2.5, or 5.0 mg/kg/d)-treated rabbits during the 12-week dosing interval, but were comparable to pretreatment levels after cessation of dosing. These data indicate that DMAU suppressed the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, resulting in severe oligospermia in the majority of rabbits in the 2.5 and 5.0 mg/kg/d dosing groups. Infertility was observed when sperm numbers decreased to about 10% of pretreatment levels. In

  2. Massive pulmonary embolism associated with Factor V Leiden, prothrombin, and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene mutations in a young patient on oral contraceptive pills: a case report.

    PubMed

    Charafeddine, Khalil M; Mahfouz, Rami A; Ibrahim, Georges Y; Taher, Ali T; Hoballah, Jamal J; Taha, Assad M

    2010-10-01

    Factor V Leiden (Factor V G1691A), prothrombin gene mutation G20210A, and homozygous C677T mutation in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene are known to predispose venous thromboembolism (VTE). We present herein a rare case of a young woman heterozygous for these mutations and taking oral contraceptive pills for less than 2 months, diagnosed to have massive deep venous thrombosis and bilateral pulmonary embolism. The patient was managed for 10 days in the hospital and discharged home on oral anticoagulants. This case suggests that screening for these factors in people with family history of thrombosis and in relatives of patients with these mutations is highly recommended to prevent fatal consequences. In addition, a new guideline for treatment and prophylaxis with anticoagulant for these patients and others who are at risk of developing VTE (American College of Chest Physicians [ACCP] guidelines-Chest 2008) has been published recently. Our recommendation is to promote for the internationally published algorithms through their application, where necessary, to prevent any future thrombotic morbidity or mortality incidents. PMID:19520679

  3. Contraception-21.

    PubMed

    Fathalla, M F

    1999-12-01

    A Contraception-21 strategy was adopted by the Rockefeller Foundation in 1993. The objective of the strategy is to mobilize and lift up the whole field of contraceptive research, to develop novel contraceptive approaches for the next century. The premise of the strategy is that, in spite of technological advances in the past few decades, current contraceptive choices are still inadequate to meet present and rapidly expanding future needs, particularly in developing countries. The central theme of the strategy is that it should be driven by the unmet needs of women, and not by a demographic imperative or by scientific opportunity alone. Two essential requirements are: mobilization of the science, particularly the new advances in cell and molecular biology, to provide the needed tools; and mobilization of industry to provide the needed resources.

  4. Is oral contraceptive-induced headache dependent on patent foramen ovale? Clinical dynamics, evidence-based hypothesis and possible patient-oriented management.

    PubMed

    Chiofalo, Benito; Laganà, Antonio Simone; Imbesi, Giovanna; Vitale, Salvatore Giovanni; Catena, Ursula; Campolo, Federica; Lanzo, Gabriele; Centini, Gabriele; Triolo, Onofrio

    2016-09-01

    Secondary headache is one of the most common side effect during oral contraceptive (OC) treatment and it leads many patients to stop the therapy. Patent foramen ovale (PFO) is an interatrial communication that spontaneously closes at birth in about 75% of the population. However, in the rest of adults PFO maintains a direct communication between the right and left side of circulation. In these patients PFO is a tunnel-like structure that could allow a blood clot to pass from the right to the left side of circulation, thus can cause paradoxical embolization. Although an increased frequency of PFO in patients with migraine was already reported, the relationship between PFO and migraine remains uncertain. In patients with migraine, the prevalence of moderate or large PFO is 35% and seems not associated with the presence of aura or the frequency of headache. Basing on these assumptions, we hypothesize that asymptomatic PFO could play a role in secondary headache due to OC. The procoagulant effect of OC improves the production of microemboli that through the POF could pass from the right to the left atrium and than to the brain, where they could be responsible of secondary headache. If our hypothesis would be confirmed in future studies, it would be possible to identify high-risk patients for developing OC-induced headache and other cerebrovascular major diseases through transcranial Doppler and transesophageal echocardiography. This scenario may radically change the management of reproductive-age woman who have to undergo OC therapy for contraception or other medical conditions. PMID:27515209

  5. Initial dual oral combination therapy in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sitbon, Olivier; Sattler, Caroline; Bertoletti, Laurent; Savale, Laurent; Cottin, Vincent; Jaïs, Xavier; De Groote, Pascal; Chaouat, Ari; Chabannes, Céline; Bergot, Emmanuel; Bouvaist, Hélène; Dauphin, Claire; Bourdin, Arnaud; Bauer, Fabrice; Montani, David; Humbert, Marc; Simonneau, Gérald

    2016-06-01

    Treatment for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) has been underpinned by single-agent therapy to which concomitant drugs are added sequentially when pre-defined treatment goals are not met.This retrospective analysis of real-world clinical data in 97 patients with newly diagnosed PAH (86% in New York Heart Association functional class III-IV) explored initial dual oral combination treatment with bosentan plus sildenafil (n=61), bosentan plus tadalafil (n=17), ambrisentan plus tadalafil (n=11) or ambrisentan plus sildenafil (n=8).All regimens were associated with significant improvements in functional class, exercise capacity, dyspnoea and haemodynamic indices after 4 months of therapy. Over a median follow-up period of 30 months, 75 (82%) patients were still alive, 53 (71%) of whom received only dual oral combination therapy. Overall survival rates were 97%, 94% and 83% at 1, 2 and 3 years, respectively, and 96%, 94% and 84%, respectively, for the patients with idiopathic PAH, heritable PAH and anorexigen-induced PAH. Expected survival rates calculated from the French equation for the latter were 86%, 75% and 66% at 1, 2 and 3 years, respectively.Initial combination of oral PAH-targeted medications may offer clinical benefits, especially in PAH patients with severe haemodynamic impairment. PMID:26989105

  6. [Chorea and the use of contraceptives].

    PubMed

    Despland, P A; Dufresne, J J; Regli, F

    1976-08-01

    A 20-year-old nullipara without previous history of chorea or rheumatic fever developed unilateral chorea 11 months after first taking oral contraceptives. All laboratory findings were normal except for considerable elevation of the triglycerides. Complete remission of the extrapyramidal disorder occurred within 4 months of discontinuing the contraceptive preparation. It is suggested that the contraceptive steroids may influence some metabolic events which produce vascular changes. PMID:1006233

  7. Australian scientists develop male contraceptive.

    PubMed

    1974-05-20

    The Australian Information Service in Canberra reports that Australian scientists have formulated a contraceptive pill to temporarily stop spermatogenesis in man, thus producing infertility. The research was done by a team consisting of Dr. Henry Burger, director of the Medical Reserach Center at Prince Henry's Hospital in Melbourne, Dr. Bryan Hudson, Principal Research Fellow at the Howard Florey Institute of Experimental Medicine at the Univeristy of Melbourne, and Dr. David de Kretser, senior lecturer in Monash University's Department of Medicine at Prince Henry's Hospital. The contraceptive pill consists of progestagen (d-norgestrel) with androgen (methyltestosterone), a combination that suppresses the production of the sperm but conserves libido and potency. The testing program has yet to be undertaken in human volunteers. There will be three phases to the drug trial: pretreatment, during which the health of the volunteers and the safety of the drug will be established; the treatment phase, lasting six months, during which the volunteers will be given daily oral dose of the drugs; and the recovery phase, lasting at least three months, during which the restoration of normal spermatogenesis will be observed. PMID:12333267

  8. Drug insight: Recent advances in male hormonal contraception.

    PubMed

    Amory, John K; Page, Stephanie T; Bremner, William J

    2006-01-01

    As there are limitations to current methods of male contraception, research has been undertaken to develop hormonal contraceptives for men, analogous to the methods for women based on estrogen and progestogens. When testosterone is administered to a man, it functions as a contraceptive by suppressing the secretion of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) from the pituitary gland. Since these hormones are the main stimulatory signals for spermatogenesis, low levels of LH and FSH markedly impair sperm production. After 3-4 months of testosterone treatment, 60-70% of men no longer have sperm in their ejaculate, and most other men exhibit markedly diminished sperm counts. Male hormonal contraception is well tolerated, free of serious adverse side effects, and 95% effective in the prevention of pregnancy. Importantly, male hormonal contraception is reversible, with sperm counts usually recovering within 4 months of the discontinuation of hormone treatment. Because exogenous testosterone administration alone does not completely suppress sperm production in all men, researchers have combined testosterone with second agents, such as progestogens or gonadotropin-releasing-hormone antagonists, to further suppress secretion of LH and FSH and improve suppression of spermatogenesis. Recent trials have used combinations of long-acting injectable or implantable forms of testosterone with progestogens, which can be administered orally, by injection or by a long-acting implant. Such combinations suppress spermatogenesis to zero without severe side effects in 80-90% of men, with near-complete suppression in the remainder of individuals. One of these testosterone and progestogen combination regimens might soon bring the promise of male hormonal contraception to fruition. PMID:16932251

  9. Regulation of female fertility and identification of future contraceptive targets.

    PubMed

    Chengalvala, Murty V; Meade, Edwin H; Cottom, Joshua E; Hoffman, William H; Shanno, Linda K; Wu, May M; Kopf, Gregory S; Shen, Emily S

    2006-01-01

    Mammalian reproduction is a complex physiological process involving a tightly regulated hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and the integration of a diverse array of molecular signals. Oral contraceptives (OCs) were introduced over 40 years ago and have evolved over the years through the discovery of new estrogens and progestins, the development of progestin-only pills and the reduction of the estrogen content in combined OCs. Despite the developments that improved the safety profile of current OCs, adverse metabolic and vascular effects caused by the estrogen component and possible neoplastic effects of OCs remain and, thus, necessitate efforts to develop newer, possibly non-steroidal and non-hormonal, contraceptives. Recent advances in our understanding of ovarian endocrinology, coupled with molecular biology and transgenic technology, have enabled identification of several factors that are functionally critical in the regulation of female fertility. Progress in the area of female reproduction is showing great promise for identifying new contraceptive drug targets. In this article, the authors review the field of female contraception with emphasis on novel targets involved in reproductive function and identified through genomics and proteomics. In addition, the usefulness of these targets for contraception purposes will be discussed.

  10. Male contraception.

    PubMed

    Chao, Jing; Page, Stephanie T; Anderson, Richard A

    2014-08-01

    Clear evidence shows that many men and women would welcome new male methods of contraception, but none have become available. The hormonal approach is based on suppression of gonadotropins and thus of testicular function and spermatogenesis, and has been investigated for several decades. This approach can achieve sufficient suppression of spermatogenesis for effective contraception in most men, but not all; the basis for these men responding insufficiently is unclear. Alternatively, the non-hormonal approach is based on identifying specific processes in sperm development, maturation and function. A range of targets has been identified in animal models, and targeted effectively. This approach, however, remains in the pre-clinical domain at present. There are, therefore, grounds for considering that safe, effective and reversible methods of contraception for men can be developed. PMID:24947599

  11. Male contraception

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Jing; Page, Stephanie T.; Anderson, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Clear evidence shows that many men and women would welcome new male methods of contraception, but none have become available. The hormonal approach is based on suppression of gonadotropins and thus of testicular function and spermatogenesis, and has been investigated for several decades. This approach can achieve sufficient suppression of spermatogenesis for effective contraception in most men, but not all; the basis for these men responding insufficiently is unclear. Alternatively, the nonhormonal approach is based on identifying specific processes in sperm development, maturation and function. A range of targets has been identified in animal models, and targeted effectively. This approach, however, remains in the pre-clinical domain at present. There are, therefore, grounds for considering that safe, effective and reversible methods of contraception for men can be developed. PMID:24947599

  12. Contraceptive use, amenorrhea, and breastfeeding in postpartum women.

    PubMed

    Laukaran, V H; Winikoff, B

    1985-01-01

    Data from a 1981-1982 survey of infant feeding practices in four developing countries are used to analyze the relationship of amenorrhea, lactation, and time since childbirth with contraceptive use. The relationship was first explored using contingency table analysis. Logistic regression analysis was then performed to control for the effects of background variables. Models were tested separately for oral contraceptive users and users of other methods. Analysis showed a strong, independent, and consistent negative relationship between amenorrhea and contraceptive use. Women who were less than four months postpartum were also less likely to use contraceptives. The strength of the association with amenorrhea outweighed all other variables, including demographic correlates of contraceptive use. A negative relationship between breastfeeding and contraceptive use was found only for users of oral contraceptives. It is possible that women in the immediate postpartum period, especially those who are lactating and amenorrheic, are not as highly motivated to use contraception as had been supposed.

  13. [Primary combined oral antidiabetic therapy in type-2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Winkler, Gábor; Baranyi, Eva

    2002-10-27

    New target values of the metabolic control and recent directions in the therapeutic strategies of type 2 diabetes mellitus are overviewed. Attention is called to the atherogenic effect of blood glucose elevations exceeding physiological level, even when only post-prandial and with short duration. The significance of early phase prandial insulin secretion in the metabolic state is underlined, and the related new therapeutic possibilities are discussed. Practical guidelines are given to the introduction of oral antidiabetic therapy, and the importance of the early, aggressive, combined treatment with a complex mechanism of action is emphasized.

  14. The 'nonmenstrual woman' in the new millennium? Discourses on menstrual suppression in the first decade of extended cycle oral contraception use in Canada.

    PubMed

    Granzow, Kara

    2014-06-01

    In the early-twenty-first century, extended cycle oral contraception (ECOC) became available by physician prescription in North America. Researchers speculate that this drug, with its capacity to reduce or eliminate menstrual bleeding, may shift not only women's biological processes but also their experiences of menstruation. In this paper, I discuss women's experiences of menstrual suppression drawing on findings from a qualitative study conducted before ECOC was available, and examine these findings against recently published research on menstrual suppression in an ECOC era. Findings suggest that the body as a natural entity figures strongly in women's discourses on suppression. They further suggest that suppression is a contingent, paradoxical and practical achievement, not a securely or fully realised embodied state. This paper reads women's accounts of menstrual suppression prior to ECOC as a challenge to the modern artifice of a mind/body split, and questions whether this challenge is perhaps made less discernible in an ECOC era, where attention may no longer be paid to the daily practices of menstrual suppression. Hence, a case is made for the varied political effects of ongoing non-menstruation versus event-specific practices of non-menstruation.

  15. WWOX CNV-67048 Functions as a Risk Factor for Epithelial Ovarian Cancer in Chinese Women by Negatively Interacting with Oral Contraceptive Use

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yongxiu; Tan, Xiaochang; Ding, Yongli; Mai, Bi; Huang, Xiaowen; Hu, Guiying

    2016-01-01

    Copy number variations (CNVs) have attracted increasing evidences to represent their roles as cancer susceptibility regulators. However, little is known about the role of CNV in epithelia ovarian cancer (EOC). Recently, the CNV-67048 of WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) was reported to alter cancer risks. Considering that WWOX also plays a role in EOC, we hypothesized that the CNV-67048 was associated with EOC risk. In a case-control study of 549 EOC patients and 571 age (±5 years) matched cancer-free controls, we found that the low copy number of CNV-67048 (1-copy and 0-copy) conferred a significantly increased risk of EOC (OR = 1.346, 95% CI = 1.037–1.747) and it determined the risk by means of copy number-dependent dosage effect (P = 0.009). Data from TCGA also confirmed the abovementioned association as the frequency of low copies in EOC group was 3.68 times more than that in healthy group (P = 0.023). The CNV also negatively interacted with oral contraceptive use on EOC risk (P = 0.042). Functional analyses further showed a lower mRNA level of WWOX in tissues with the 0-copy or 1-copy than that in those with the 2-copy (P = 0.045). Our data suggested the CNV-67048 to be a risk factor of EOC in Chinese women. PMID:27190995

  16. Oral contraceptive pretreatment does not improve outcome in microdose gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonist protocol among poor responder intracytoplasmic sperm injection patients

    PubMed Central

    Berker, Bulent; Turhan, Nilgun Ozturk; Satiroglu, Hakan

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To compare oral contraceptive (OC) pretreatment plus microdose GnRH-a in flare-up protocol and non-OC microdose GnRH-a in flare-up protocol among poor responder ICSI patients. Methods A retrospective analysis of poor responder ICSI patients. Patients were divided into two groups according to used microdose protocol. Precycle treatment with OC followed by follicular phase administration of 40 μg sc leuprolide acetate (LA) every 12 h beginning on after 2 day pill-free period and rFSH administration was begun on the third day of LA administration (OC-Group, n = 26). Alternatively on day 2 after menses, patients were administered similar stimulation regime (non-OC Group, n = 27). Results There were no significant differences between groups in the number of oocytes, peak estradiol levels, endometrial thickness, fertilization rates and embryo quality. Implantations and pregnancy rates per embryo transfer were similar. Conclusion OC pretreatment plus microdose GnRHa in flare-up protocol does not offer advantages over non-OC microdose GnRHa in flare-up protocol among poor responder ICSI patients. PMID:18253823

  17. Young women's attitudes toward continuous use of oral contraceptives: the effect of priming positive attitudes toward menstruation on women's willingness to suppress menstruation.

    PubMed

    Rose, Jennifer Gorman; Chrisler, Joan C; Couture, Samantha

    2008-08-01

    The present study investigated American women's attitudes toward menstrual suppression and the effect of priming attitudes toward menstruation on women's willingness to suppress menstruation. One hundred college women randomly were assigned to either a positive priming group or a negative priming group. The positive priming group first completed the menstrual joy questionnaire (MJQ) followed by a willingness to suppress menstruation (WSM) questionnaire, the beliefs and attitudes toward menstruation (BATM) questionnaire, the menstrual distress questionnaire (MDQ), and a demographic questionnaire. The negative priming group completed, in the following order: the MDQ, WSM, BATM, MJQ, and demographics. Priming affected women's reports of positive cycle-related changes on the MDQ, but not women's willingness to suppress menstruation. Higher scores on the MJQ, positive attitudes toward menstrual suppression, and previous oral contraceptive (OC) use were predictors of women's willingness to suppress menstruation. Women's primary source of information about menstrual suppression was "media," and their primary concern was "safety." Thus, researchers should continue to investigate the long-term effects of continuous OC use and to analyze information about menstrual suppression in the popular press.

  18. Effects of oral contraceptive use on the salivary testosterone and cortisol responses to training sessions and competitions in elite women athletes.

    PubMed

    Crewther, Blair T; Hamilton, Dave; Casto, Kathleen; Kilduff, Liam P; Cook, Christian J

    2015-08-01

    This study examined the salivary testosterone (T) and cortisol (C) responses of elite women hockey players across 4 activities (light and heavy training, club and International competitions). The players formed an oral contraceptive (OC) group (n=10) and a Non-OC (n=19) group for analysis. The Non-OC group had higher T levels (by 31-52%) across all activities, whilst the OC group showed signs of reduced T and C reactivity when data were pooled. As a squad, positive T and C changes occurred with heavy training (45%, 46%), club competitions (62%, 80%) and International competitions (40%, 27%), respectively. Our results confirm that OC use lowers T levels in women athletes whilst reducing the T and C responses to training and competition activities within the sporting environment. Differences in the physical and/or psychological demands of the sporting activity could be contributing factors to the observed hormone responses. These factors require consideration when applying theoretical models in sport, with broader implications for women around exercising behaviours and stress physiology.

  19. Effects of oral contraceptive use on the salivary testosterone and cortisol responses to training sessions and competitions in elite women athletes.

    PubMed

    Crewther, Blair T; Hamilton, Dave; Casto, Kathleen; Kilduff, Liam P; Cook, Christian J

    2015-08-01

    This study examined the salivary testosterone (T) and cortisol (C) responses of elite women hockey players across 4 activities (light and heavy training, club and International competitions). The players formed an oral contraceptive (OC) group (n=10) and a Non-OC (n=19) group for analysis. The Non-OC group had higher T levels (by 31-52%) across all activities, whilst the OC group showed signs of reduced T and C reactivity when data were pooled. As a squad, positive T and C changes occurred with heavy training (45%, 46%), club competitions (62%, 80%) and International competitions (40%, 27%), respectively. Our results confirm that OC use lowers T levels in women athletes whilst reducing the T and C responses to training and competition activities within the sporting environment. Differences in the physical and/or psychological demands of the sporting activity could be contributing factors to the observed hormone responses. These factors require consideration when applying theoretical models in sport, with broader implications for women around exercising behaviours and stress physiology. PMID:25866255

  20. Prospective multicenter randomized intermediate biomarker study of oral contraceptive versus depo-provera for prevention of endometrial cancer in women with Lynch syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lu, Karen H; Loose, David S; Yates, Melinda S; Nogueras-Gonzalez, Graciela M; Munsell, Mark F; Chen, Lee-May; Lynch, Henry; Cornelison, Terri; Boyd-Rogers, Stephanie; Rubin, Mary; Daniels, Molly S; Conrad, Peggy; Milbourne, Andrea; Gershenson, David M; Broaddus, Russell R

    2013-08-01

    Women with Lynch syndrome have a 40% to 60% lifetime risk for developing endometrial cancer, a cancer associated with estrogen imbalance. The molecular basis for endometrial-specific tumorigenesis is unclear. Progestins inhibit estrogen-driven proliferation, and epidemiologic studies have shown that progestin-containing oral contraceptives (OCP) reduce the risk of endometrial cancer by 50% in women at general population risk. It is unknown whether they are effective in women with Lynch syndrome. Asymptomatic women ages 25 to 50 with Lynch syndrome were randomized to receive the progestin compounds Depo-Provera (depo-MPA) or OCP for three months. An endometrial biopsy and transvaginal ultrasound were conducted before and after treatment. Endometrial proliferation was evaluated as the primary endpoint. Histology and a panel of surrogate endpoint biomarkers were evaluated for each endometrial biopsy as secondary endpoints. A total of 51 women were enrolled, and 46 completed treatment. Two of the 51 women had complex hyperplasia with atypia at the baseline endometrial biopsy and were excluded from the study. Overall, both depo-MPA and OCP induced a dramatic decrease in endometrial epithelial proliferation and microscopic changes in the endometrium characteristic of progestin action. Transvaginal ultrasound measurement of endometrial stripe was not a useful measure of endometrial response or baseline hyperplasia. These results show that women with Lynch syndrome do show an endometrial response to short-term exogenous progestins, suggesting that OCP and depo-MPA may be reasonable chemopreventive agents in this high-risk patient population.

  1. Effect of oral contraceptive use on the incidence of dry socket in females following impacted mandibular third molar extraction: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, J-L; Sun, L; Liu, C; Sun, Z-H; Min, X; Xia, R

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this comprehensive meta-analysis was to provide evidence-based data to test whether oral contraceptive (OC) use can promote the incidence of dry socket (DS) in females following impacted mandibular third molar extraction. PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and Elsevier Science Direct databases were searched. The pooled risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) was calculated using fixed-effects or random-effects model analysis. Heterogeneity among studies was evaluated with the Cochran test and I(2) statistic. Study quality was assessed with the Newcastle-Ottawa scale. Of 70 articles identified in the search, 12 reporting 16 clinical controlled trials were included in this study. The incidence of DS was significantly greater in the OC groups than in the control groups (RR 1.80, 95% CI 1.33-2.43). Subgroup analyses showed that the unit assessed (tooth or patient), the region in which the study was conducted, and the intervention were not related to the incidence of DS in females taking OC after impacted mandibular third molar extraction. The sensitivity analysis showed no significant change when any one study was excluded. Publication bias was also not detected. This study suggests that OC use may promote the incidence of DS in females following impacted mandibular third molar extraction.

  2. Intrauterine Contraception.

    PubMed

    Hsia, Jennifer K; Creinin, Mitchell D

    2016-05-01

    Currently, there are only two basic types of intrauterine devices (IUDs): copper and hormonal. However, other types of IUDs are under development, some of which are in clinical trials around the world. Continued development has focused on increasing efficacy, longer duration of use, and noncontraceptive benefits. This review discusses currently available intrauterine contraceptives, such as the Cu380A IUD and levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine systems; novel intrauterine contraceptives that are available in select parts of the world including the intrauterine ball, low-dose copper products, frameless devices, and intrauterine delivery systems impregnated with noncontraceptive medication; and novel products currently in development. PMID:26947701

  3. Introduction of postabortion contraception, prioritizing long-acting reversible contraceptives, in the principal maternity hospital of Gabon.

    PubMed

    Mayi-Tsonga, Sosthène; Obiang, Pamphile Assoumou; Minkobame, Ulysse; Ngouafo, Doris; Ambounda, Nathalie; de Souza, Maria Helena

    2014-07-01

    A prospective, descriptive, analytic study was conducted at the Centre Hospitalier de Libreville in Gabon between February and September 2013 to evaluate acceptance of long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARC) and depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) following abortion. Women received counseling on the combined oral pill, DMPA, copper intrauterine devices (IUDs), and implants. The association between sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, knowledge of contraceptives, and acceptance was analyzed. Of the 383 women admitted with abortion complications, 206 (53.7%) knew of no systemic contraceptives. The best-known method was the oral pill (42.0%). Only 14 women (3.6%) knew of a LARC method (IUD or implants) and only 2 (0.5%) said the injectable was their best-known method. Over 90% accepted a modern contraceptive method after abortion. Two-thirds (66.8%) chose the pill, 14.6% DMPA, and 9.3% a LARC method. Only 9.1% of the women refused to initiate use of any method.

  4. Emergency contraception - Potential for women's health

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Suneeta

    2014-01-01

    Emergency contraception (EC) is a safe and effective method which is used to prevent unwanted pregnancy after unprotected sexual intercourse. Many of the unwanted pregnancies end in unsafe abortions. The search for an ideal contraceptive, which does not interfere with spontaneity or pleasure of the sexual act, yet effectively controls the fertility, is still continuing. Numerous contraceptive techniques are available, yet contraceptive coverage continues to be poor in India. Thus, even when not planning for a pregnancy, exposure to unprotected sex takes place often, necessitating the use of emergency contraception. This need may also arise due to failure of contraceptive method being used (condom rupture, diaphragm slippage, forgotten oral pills) or following sexual assault. Emergency contraception is an intervention that can prevent a large number of unwanted pregnancies resulting from failure of regular contraception or unplanned sexual activity, which in turn helps in reducing the maternal mortality and morbidity due to unsafe abortions. However, a concern has been expressed regarding repeated and indiscriminate usage of e-pill, currently the rational use of emergency contraception is being promoted as it is expected to make a significant dent in reducing the number of unwanted pregnancies and unsafe abortions. In fact, since the introduction of emergency contraception, the contribution of unsafe abortion towards maternal mortality has declined from 13 to 8 per cent. PMID:25673542

  5. Emergency contraception - potential for women's health.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Suneeta

    2014-11-01

    Emergency contraception (EC) is a safe and effective method which is used to prevent unwanted pregnancy after unprotected sexual intercourse. Many of the unwanted pregnancies end in unsafe abortions. The search for an ideal contraceptive, which does not interfere with spontaneity or pleasure of the sexual act, yet effectively controls the fertility, is still continuing. Numerous contraceptive techniques are available, yet contraceptive coverage continues to be poor in India. Thus, even when not planning for a pregnancy, exposure to unprotected sex takes place often, necessitating the use of emergency contraception. This need may also arise due to failure of contraceptive method being used (condom rupture, diaphragm slippage, forgotten oral pills) or following sexual assault. Emergency contraception is an intervention that can prevent a large number of unwanted pregnancies resulting from failure of regular contraception or unplanned sexual activity, which in turn helps in reducing the maternal mortality and morbidity due to unsafe abortions. However, a concern has been expressed regarding repeated and indiscriminate usage of e-pill, currently the rational use of emergency contraception is being promoted as it is expected to make a significant dent in reducing the number of unwanted pregnancies and unsafe abortions. In fact, since the introduction of emergency contraception, the contribution of unsafe abortion towards maternal mortality has declined from 13 to 8 per cent. PMID:25673542

  6. [Pregnancy contraception (Current Care Guideline)].

    PubMed

    Halttunen-Nieminen, Mervi; Piltonen, Terhi; Alenius, Heidi; Apukka, Laura; Kosunen, Elise; Pietilä, Kirsi; Sihvo, Sinikka; Vuorela, Piia; Väänänen, Eija; Yli-Kivistö, Tiina

    2016-01-01

    There are no age limits for the start or use of contraception. Prior gynecological examination or cervical smear is not needed. Condom is the only method that protects from sexually transmitted diseases. An increase in the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is associated only with combined contraceptives. However, the risk is remarkably higher with pregnancy, puerperium or with smoking. The most effective reversible methods are intrauterine devices (IUD) and implants, as these do not depend on daily memory. Natural family planning methods are not reliable, and effective contraception should be easily available for all at all times. PMID:27382829

  7. Combined Use of Self-Efficacy Scale for Oral Health Behaviour and Oral Health Questionnaire: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soutome, Sakiko; Kajiwara, Kazumi; Oho, Takahiko

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether the combined use of a task-specific self-efficacy scale for oral health behaviour (SEOH) and an oral health questionnaire (OHQ) would be useful for evaluating subjects' behaviours and cognitions. Design: Questionnaires. Methods: One hundred and eighty-five students completed the SEOH and OHQ. The 30-item OHQ uses a…

  8. Male contraceptives under trial.

    PubMed

    1975-02-01

    The International Planned Parenthood Federation held its 4th biological workshop in New Delhi on October 17-19, 1974. The topic of this meeting was "Agents affecting fertility in the male." 10 internationally known experts in the field of male reproductive physiology attended and each presented an up-to-the-minute account of their work in the field, followed by a full discussion. Much basic work was described, and the results of the latest human trials of male contraceptives were reported. Dr. F. Neumann of the Schering Company, Berlin, reported on clinical trials of the drug cyproterone acetate. This drug has been in the news for some time as a possible male contraceptive. It is found that small doses prevent sperm from maturing in the epididymis. This drug is already on the British market as Androcur. In large doses it is useful for curbing libido, and in this format it is used to control "sexual offenders." In the small doses at which it is useful as a contraceptive, the effects on libido are negligible, and the drug is at present undergoing human trials as a contraceptive agent. However, much work has still be done on, for example, long-term side effects. Another approach described by Dr. J. Frick from Innsbruck, Austria, is that of giving men a progestagen combined with testosterone. Whereas the progestagen has the effect of inhibiting sperm production in the testis, the testosterone compensates for androgen loss and maintains libido and male characteristics. Dr. Frick reported studies using 15 progestagen combinations, including a new drug provisionally titled R2323. The overall conclusion of the meeting was that there are still many problems to be solved, and it will be some years before a male contraceptive will be commercially available. PMID:12333962

  9. Depo-Provera: an injectable contraceptive.

    PubMed

    Wigington, S

    The contraceptive effect of Depo-Provera or medroxyprogesterone acetate, a long-acting injectable progestogen, has been mainly attributed to its ability to prevent ovulation through its action on the hypothalamic pituitary axis, reducing the levels of plasma gonadotropin, progesterone, and estradiol, and suppressing the midcycle surge of luteinizing hormone. Its other contraceptive effects are thickening of the cervical mucus, causing a barrier to spermatozoa, alteration in tubal ovum transport, and atrophy of the endometrium. A standard dose of 150 mg injected every 3 months is as effective as the combined oral pill and more effective than the progestogen-only pill or IUD. Contraindications to use are thrombophlebitis, liver dysfunctions, suspected breast or genital malignancy, and abnormal uterine bleeding. Reported discontinuation rates range from 7-80%. The World Health Organization (1977) reported a gross cumulative discontinuation rate of 23.4/100 women years in 8 centers. Depo-Provera has a long list of short-term (menstrual disorders, fluid retention, nausea, hair loss, and others) and long-term (delayed fertility return, congenital abnormalities, cancer others) disorders. Its advantages include: 1) convenience, 2) effectiveness, 3) no risk of infection or other side effects of the coil, 4) none of proven side effects or long-term hazards of estrogen, and 5) no inhibition of lactation. The safety of Depo-Provera has been a controversial issue which led to its banning in the U.S. Its carcinogenic potential has been reported in clinical trials with animals. Its greatest disadvantage is that it takes control of a woman's fertility firmly out of her hands into those of the doctor. Depo-Provera should not be used except as an absolute last resort. It should not be used as a long-term contraceptive in this country, and research monies should instead be channeled into the development of a safe, reliable contraceptive with no systemic side effects.

  10. Oral Contraceptive Use, Micronutrient Deficiency, and Obesity among Premenopausal Females in Korea: The Necessity of Dietary Supplements and Food Intake Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Park, Boyoung; Kim, Jeongseon

    2016-01-01

    This study addressed the associations between oral contraceptive (OC) use and obesity as measured by recording the body mass index (BMI) of premenopausal females, and possible interactions with micronutrient intake were considered. A group of 39,189 premenopausal females aged 35–59 were included in the analysis; they were in the Health Examinee cohort. Participant BMIs were calculated from anthropometric measurements, and females with a BMI≥25kg/m2 were considered obese. Individual OC use, age at first OC use, duration of OC use, nutrient intake, and other covariates were measured with a structured questionnaire. A multivariate logistic regression with an interaction term was applied to identify the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) between OC use and obesity along with consideration of micronutrient intake interactions. OC use is associated with an increased risk of obesity (OR = 1.12, 95% CI = 1.04–1.20), and females who used OCs for more than 6 months over their lifetimes were more likely to be obese (OR = 1.15, 95% CI = 1.01–1.32) compared with those who used OCs for <6 months. There were interaction effects between phosphorus, potassium, vitamin A, vitamin B1, vitamin B2, niacin, vitamin C intake and total duration of OC use on being obesity (P-value<0.05). When stratified by micronutrient intake, the associations between total OC use duration and obesity were present only among those with calcium, phosphorus, potassium, vitamin A, B1, B2, C, niacin, and folate intakes below the recommended levels. Efforts to estimate nutrient intake and prevent micronutrient depletion with supplements or food should be considered by clinicians for females who take OC for a long period. PMID:27348598

  11. Long-term effects of oral contraceptives on the prevalence of diabetes in post-menopausal women: 2007-2012 KNHANES.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Woo; Jeon, Jae-Han; Lee, Won-Kee; Lee, Sungwoo; Kim, Jung-Guk; Lee, In-Kyu; Park, Keun-Gyu

    2016-09-01

    There is little information on whether past use of oral contraceptives (OCs) at child-bearing age influences the incidences of diabetes and insulin resistance (IR) after menopause. This study aimed to evaluate the association of past use of OCs with the development of diabetes and IR in post-menopausal women. This cross-sectional study was based on data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey carried out from 2007 to 2012. Of the 50405 participants, 6554 post-menopausal women were included in the analysis. The associations of OC use with the prevalence of diabetes in post-menopausal women were examined using multivariate logistic analysis. In addition, fasting glucose and insulin levels were measured in 3338 nondiabetic post-menopausal women, and the association between IR and OCs was examined by the analysis of covariance. The prevalence of diabetes was significantly higher in post-menopausal participants who had taken OCs for more than 6 months than in those who had never taken OCs. The association remained significant after adjusting for multiple confounding factors (odd ratio 1.379; 95 % CI 1.115-1.707; P = 0.003). The duration of OC use was also positively associated with the prevalence of diabetes. Furthermore, taking OCs for more than 6 months led to a significant increase in fasting insulin levels and HOMA-IR in nondiabetic participants. Past use of OCs for more than 6 months led to a significant increase in the prevalence of diabetes in post-menopausal women, and increased IR in nondiabetic participants. These results suggested that the prolonged use of OCs at reproductive age may be an important risk factor for developing diabetes in post-menopausal women.

  12. Emergency contraception

    PubMed Central

    Langille, Donald B.; Allen, Michael; Whelan, Anne Marie

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine the extent to which Nova Scotian FPs prescribe and provide emergency contraceptive pills (ECPs) and to explore their knowledge of and attitudes toward ECPs. Design Survey of Nova Scotian FPs using a modified Dillman method. Setting All regions of Nova Scotia. Participants Family physicians registered with Dalhousie University’s Division of Continuing Medical Education. Main outcome measures Sex differences in the provision of ECPs and knowledge and attitudes about the ECP Plan B. Results Of 913 eligible FPs, 155 (17.0%) participated in the survey. Respondents resembled the sampling frame closely. Most physicians (64.0%) had prescribed ECPs in the previous year (mean number of prescriptions, 4.92); only 12.9% provided ECPs in advance of need. Knowledge about Plan B was quite good, except for knowledge of the time frame for potential effectiveness; only 29.2% of respondents answered that question correctly. Respondents generally supported nonprescription availability of ECPs, but 25.0% of FPs were concerned that this could lead to less use of more effective methods of contraception, and 39.2% believed that it would encourage repeat use. Younger FPs provided ECPs more often than their older colleagues, while female respondents had better knowledge about Plan B. In multivariate analysis being younger than 40 years was marginally associated with prescribing Plan B and with prescribing any form of ECP. Conclusion Most Nova Scotian FPs provided ECPs and had generally good knowledge about and attitudes toward providing such contraception without prescription. However, FPs were poorly informed about the length of time that Plan B can be effective, which could potentially affect use when patients consult several days after unprotected sex. There were some concerns about nonprescription availability of ECPs, which could have implications for recommending it to patients. Rarely were ECPs prescribed for advance use, which might represent a lost

  13. Contraceptive practices.

    PubMed

    Morgenthau, J E; Rao, P S

    1976-08-01

    A family life education program (FLEP) providing contraceptive services within a comprehensive health care organization for low-income, inner-city adolescents is described. Each female patient attending in the July 1-September 30, 1974, period was included in a study undertaken to identify and serve the unmet needs of the teen-age population in the community of East Harlem. Of the 334 females interviewed, almost 1/2 were black, 37% were Hispanic, 12% were white, and 2% were Oriental, totals representative of the surrounding community. The questionnaire included information on demographic and social background, sexual history, reproductive history, and contraceptive experience. Comparisons are made on the answers between groups. Personal contacts and school outreach were the 2 main sources of referral to the clinic. Sexual history was found to be associated with social background rather than physiological factors. More than 1/2 the teen-agers had never used contraception prior to their 1st clinic visit and another 1/4 of the girls were using unreliable methods. The study indicated that teen-agers will use good programs which are designed to meet their needs. For teen-agers, a free-standing clinic offering comprehensive health care is the ideal situation. PMID:1066531

  14. Emergency Contraception Website

    MedlinePlus

    Text Only Full media Version Get Emergency Contraception NOW INFO about Emergency Contraception Q&A about Emergency Contraception Español | Arabic Find a Morning After Pill Provider Near You This website is ...

  15. Knowledge and Beliefs about Reproductive Anatomy and Physiology among Mexican-Origin Women in the U.S.A: Implications for Effective Oral Contraceptive Use

    PubMed Central

    Amastae, Jon; Potter, Joseph E.; Hopkins, Kristine; Grossman, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Inherent in many reproductive health and family planning programmes is the problematic assumption that the body, its processes, and modifications to it are universally experienced in the same way. This paper addresses contraceptive knowledge and beliefs among Mexican-origin women, based upon data gathered by the qualitative component of the Border Contraceptive Access Study. Open-ended interviews explored the perceived mechanism of action of the pill, side effects, non-contraceptive benefits, and general knowledge of contraception. Findings revealed complex connections between traditional and scientific information. Use of medical terms (“hormone”) illustrated attempts to integrate new information with existing knowledge and belief systems. Conclusions address concerns that existing information and services may not be sufficient if population-specific knowledge and beliefs are not assessed and addressed. Findings can contribute to the development of effective education, screening, and reproductive health services. PMID:23464742

  16. "Pregnancy and labour cause more deaths than oral contraceptives": The debate on the pill in the Spanish press in the 1960s and 1970s.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Gómez, Teresa; Ignaciuk, Agata

    2015-08-01

    From 1941 to 1978, Franco's regime in Spain banned all contraceptive methods. The pill started circulating in Spain from the 1960s, officially as a drug used in gynaecological therapy. However, in the following decade it was also increasingly used and prescribed as a contraceptive. This paper analyses debates about the contraceptive pill in the Spanish daily newspaper ABC and in two magazines, Blanco y Negro and Triunfo, in the 1960s and 1970s. It concludes that the debate on this contraceptive method was much more heterogeneous than might be expected given the Catholic-conservative character of the dictatorship. The daily press focused on the adverse effects of the drug and magazines concentrated on the ethical and religious aspects of the pill and discussed it in a generally positive light. Male doctors and Catholic authors dominated the debate.

  17. [Historical survey of modern reversible contraceptive methods].

    PubMed

    Mbabajende, V

    1986-04-01

    Because of contraception, pregnancy need not be viewed by women as punishment for sexual activity but as a planned and desired event. Most of the contraceptive methods used in developing countries at present were introduced during the 1960s, but use of contraception has a long history and some methods date back to antiquity. Contraceptive pills were already used around 2000 BC in the form of mercury and arsenic tablets. Their effectiveness was questionable. The role of hormones in human reproduction began to be understood only in the early 1900s. The discovery of progesterone in a Mexican iguana in the 1940s permitted production of progesterone on a large scale. Estrogens had been identified around 1930. Human trials of a contraceptive pill beginning in 1956 in Puerto Rico demonstrated that progestins could prevent pregnancy by suppressing ovulation. Later on, estrogen was added to reduce menstrual irregularities. The 1st generation of combined oral contraceptives contained very high levels of hormones associated with high rates of side effects. Numerous formulations with lower hormonal contents became available beginning around 1970 and constitute the principal formulations in use today. A number of long acting hormonal methods based on progestins have been developed, including injectables, some IUDs and vaginal rings, and implants. The 1st commercially available injectable, norethisterone enanthate, did not acquire the wide distribution of medroxyprogesterone acetate, sold as Depo Provera and used to treat various pathological conditions as well as for contraception. The 1st true IUDs were small stones placed within the uteri of camels by nomads to prevent pregnancy during long caravans. An IUD was developed in 1909 by Richter, and the 2 most widely used models before 1960 were the Grafenberg and Ota silver rings. Use of the 2 rings became rare for medical reasons after 1935 despite their efficacy. Safe plastic IUDs which appeared beginning in the early 1960s

  18. Ampicillin Oral

    MedlinePlus

    ... capsule, liquid, and pediatric drops to take by mouth. It is usually taken every 6 hours (four ... blood thinners') such as warfarin (Coumadin), atenolol (Tenormin), oral contraceptives, probenecid (Benemid), rifampin, sulfasalazine, and vitamins.tell ...

  19. Pharmacologic development of male hormonal contraceptive agents.

    PubMed

    Roth, M Y; Amory, J K

    2011-01-01

    The world population continues to increase dramatically despite the existence of contraceptive technology. The use of male hormonal contraception may help in preventing un intended pregnancies and managing future population growth. Male hormonal contraception relies on the administration of exogenous hormones to suppress spermatogenesis. Clinical trials have tested several regimens using testosterone, alone or in combination with a progestin. These regimens were shown to be >90% effective in preventing conception and were not associated with serious adverse events.

  20. Prescription contraceptives: countering the risks.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, R J

    1985-09-01

    Drug companies have been at work throughout the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s trying to reduce the steroid content of their oral contraceptives (OCs). Researchers have been successful in reducing steroid content while maintaining effectiveness, thereby making OCs safer. In the 1st half of the natural menstrual cycle, a woman secretes estrogen as the dominant steroid product. In the 2nd half, estrogen is the principal reproductive hormone. Estrogens inhibit ovulation, possibly by inhibiting implantation, altering ovum transplant, or in some way preventing corpus luteum function, which is necessary to maintain early pregnancies and the endometrium. There are still only 2 estrogens and 6 progestins on the market today. They are probably the most thoroughly studied chemical ever seen in the history of pharmacy or medicine. 1 of the estrogens, mestranol, is really a drug of the past. In the body, mestranol is converted to ethinyl estradiol, the other estrogen on the market. Consequently, there is no reason to use mestranol itself. Within the dose range of 50-100 mcg, there's little difference in contraceptive effect. Progestins are the other active ingredient in the combination OC. Their principal action is the thickening of the cervical mucus, which prevents sperm penetration. Also, with sufficient progesterone, ovulation is inhibited, but this happens in only 40% of those patients taking, for instance, the "mini-pill" (which consists of progesterone only). The progestins and the estrogens work in concert to make OCs a highly effective contraceptive method. Recent surveys conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and National Cancer Institute looked into the relative effectiveness of OCs. Nordette had a use effectiveness failure rate of 3.5; Ovral, 3.6. Loestrin 1/20 -- norethindrone acetate, 1 mg, and estinyl estradiol, 20 mcg -- shows a failure rate of 4.5. This indicates that the threshold for an effective dose of estinyl estradiol in OCs is 30 mcg. For 1 mini

  1. [A beam of dawn light of study on gossypol as a safe, effective, and reversible male antifertility contraceptive--evaluation of the studies by using low dose gossypol combined with steroid hormone for male contraception].

    PubMed

    Xue, S

    2000-06-01

    The present paper is an evaluation of the studies of two articles published in this issue of the journal which adopted a new regimen of low dose gossypol(12 mg.kg-1.d-1) combined with steroid hormones (methyltestosterone 20 mg.kg-1.d-1 and ethinyl estradiol 100 micrograms.kg-1.d-1) for 6 weeks as initial dose, and a similar low dose gossypol alone for 12 weeks as maintenance dose. Results showed that the dosage regimen could damage the epididymal sperms and onset of antifertility within 6 weeks in male rats, and prevent the incidence of the side effect of irreversible azoospermia. There was no adverse effect in viscera tissues, and the infertility could be reversible in about 6 weeks following withdrawal of gossypol. Male volunteers taking low dose gossypol (15 mg/d) could induce antifertility within 12 weeks, then followed by a maintenance dose of gossypol(10 mg/d) for 44 weeks. All of them remained infertile, and without developing hypokalemia and irreversible azoospermia. The fertility and the inducing abnormal histone-to-protamine replacement reaction as well as alteration of nuclear basic proteins could be recovered 10 weeks after withdrawal of drug treatment. These results provide a new approach for using the new regimen in clinical trial and a new prospect of gossypol as a potential male contraceptive. PMID:12903461

  2. Contraception and clean needles: feasibility of combining mobile reproductive health and needle exchange services for female exotic dancers.

    PubMed

    Moore, Eva; Han, Jennifer; Serio-Chapman, Christine; Mobley, Cynthia; Watson, Catherine; Terplan, Mishka

    2012-10-01

    Young women engaged in exotic dancing have a higher need for reproductive health services than women not in this profession, and many also use drugs or exchange sex for money or drugs. Few report receiving reproductive health services. We describe a public health, academic, and community partnership that provided reproductive health services on needle exchange mobile vans in the "red light district" in downtown Baltimore, Maryland. Women made 220 visits to the vans in the first 21 months of the program's operation, and 65% of these visits involved provision of contraception. Programmatic costs were feasible. Joint provision of needle exchange and reproductive health services targeting exotic dancers has the potential to reduce unintended pregnancies and link pregnant, substance-abusing women to reproductive care, and such programs should be implemented more widely.

  3. Environmental exposure assessment of ethinyl estradiol (EE) from a combined hormonal vaginal contraceptive ring after disposal; leaching from landfills.

    PubMed

    Geurts, M G J; de Boer, W; de Graaf, J S; van Ginkel, C G

    2007-05-15

    In this study an environmental exposure assessment and experiments were carried out to identify the leaching potential of ethinyl estradiol (EE) present in a vaginal contraceptive (NuvaRing) when disposed of in landfills. Landfill material and a sandy soil were used to investigate the mobility of EE. Log K(oc) values determined in the range of 3 to 4 indicate that EE does not have a high mobility in landfills and soils. Column experiments were used to estimate that it takes approximately 40 years before EE leaches from a column of 1 m of landfill material or sandy soil. This column experiment, which was performed with an EE concentration based on worst-case assumptions, demonstrates that the emission of EE from landfills is negligible. Sandy soils below landfills also act as a strong sorbent of EE, thereby further reducing the potential for groundwater contamination.

  4. Contraceptive counseling for adolescents.

    PubMed

    Potter, Julia; Santelli, John S

    2015-11-01

    The majority of adolescents become sexually active during their teenage years, making contraceptive counseling an important aspect of routine adolescent healthcare. However, many healthcare providers express discomfort when it comes to counseling adolescents about contraceptive options. This Special Report highlights the evidence supporting age-appropriate contraceptive counseling for adolescents and focuses on best practices for addressing adolescents' questions and concerns about contraceptive methods.

  5. Combined hysteroscopy-laparoscopy approach for excision of pelvic nitinol fragment from Essure contraceptive device: Role of intraoperative fluoroscopy for uterine conservation

    PubMed Central

    Palermo, Gianpiero D.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the successful removal of a pelvic contraceptive coil in a symptomatic 46-year-old patient who had Essure devices for four years, using a combined hysteroscopy-laparoscopy-fluoroscopy approach. Following normal hysteroscopy, at laparoscopy the right Essure implant was disrupted and its outer nitinol coil had perforated the fallopian tube. However, the inner rod (containing polyethylene terephthalate) had migrated to an extrapelvic location, near the proximal colon. In contrast, the left implant was situated within the corresponding tube. Intraoperative fluoroscopy was used to confirm complete removal of the device, which was further verified by postoperative computed tomography. The patient's condition improved after surgery and she continues to do well. This is the first report to describe this technique in managing Essure complications remote from time of insertion. Our case highlights the value and limitations of preoperative and intraoperative imaging to map Essure fragment location before surgery. PMID:27462605

  6. Underage contraception.

    PubMed

    Southgate, L

    1985-12-01

    This article discusses the ethical and legal dilemmas confronting general practitioners in regard to contraceptive advice for adolescents. When a teenage girl comes to a physician for advice, she alone is the patient and the physician has an obligation to her. However, this obligation must be reconociled with the obligation to her parents. A UK parent, Victoria Gillick, sought declarations in the High Court against a National Health Service Notice concerning family planning services for adolescents. She argued: 1) that physicians who give family planning advice to girls under 16 years of age witout parental consent are guilty of causing or encouraging unlawful sexual intercourse; and 2) the doctor's actions interfere with the rights of the child's parents and undermine their ability to carry out their duties of supervising the physical and moral welfare of their children. If Gillick's position is adopted by society, no minor will be able to consult a physician without the parent being present. In practice, many physicians consulted by teenagers under 16 attempt to determine whether the girl has reached a stage in her development where she is capable of behaving as an autonomous agent, with the rights and responsibilities this entails. In the US, the concept of the mature minor doctrine has been developed. This approach recognizes that some teenagers mature more rapidly than others, and leaves it to the judgment of the physician to determine whether a given adolescent has reached a stage at which she can be considered competent to make decisions about her health care. Moreover, it is noted that when young teenagers ask for contraception, they are likely to be already sexually active and at risk for pregnancy. Given the difficult issues involved, physicians who want to respect an adolescent's autonomy yet consider her parents' feelings must be clear about the ethical basis on which they practice.

  7. A combined regimen of gossypol plus methyltestosterone and ethinylestradiol as a contraceptive induces germ cell apoptosis and expression of its related genes in rats.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guang-Hui; Xu, Zeng-Lu; Yang, Zhan-Jun; Xu, Yuan-Yuan; Xue, She-Pu

    2004-10-01

    Attempts to develop gossypol and steroidal hormones alone as a male contraceptive have been tested for many years; however, both caused undesirable side effects that have prevented their acceptance. In this study, we formulated a regimen of combined gossypol at a low dose of 12 mg/kg or a high dose of 50 mg/kg plus methyltestosterone 20 mg/kg and ethinylestradiol 100 g/kg daily (12 mg G+H and 50 mg G+H) administered for 6 weeks in adult rats. The possible roles of germ cell apoptosis and related genes expression were studied by techniques of TdT-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL), agarose gel electrophoresis of low-molecular-weight DNA, in situ hybridization and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction detection. Results showed that germ cell apoptosis and related genes expression were significantly induced after combined drug administration. The apoptosis index increased 3.86- and 9.65-fold in the 12-mg and 50-mg G+H-treated groups, respectively, as compared to the control group. DNA ladder formation on the agarose gel further validated the findings of TUNEL-stained apoptotic cells. The apoptosis-related genes fas mRNA expression levels increased 0.44- and 1.39-fold, bax mRNA 0.74- and 2.56-fold, caspase-3 mRNA 0.60- and 1.29-fold, and caspase-9 mRNA 2.50- and 4.08-fold, respectively, in the 12-mg and 50-mg G+H-treated groups vs. the control group. These results indicated that our drug regimen applied as a contraceptive could induce rat germ cell apoptosis. The apoptotic process involved fas system, bax and caspase family genes and the apoptotic extent and cell types were gossypol dose-dependent.

  8. New approaches to male non-hormonal contraception.

    PubMed

    Nya-Ngatchou, Jean-Jacques; Amory, John K

    2013-03-01

    A non-hormonal male contraceptive is a contraceptive that does not involve the administration of hormones or hormone blockers. This review will focus on the use of lonidamine derivatives and inhibitors of retinoic acid biosynthesis and function as approaches to male non-hormonal contraception. Two current lonidamine derivatives, adjudin and H2-gamendazole, are in development as male contraceptives. These potent anti-spermatogenic compounds impair the integrity of the apical ectoplasmic specialization, resulting in premature spermiation and infertility. Another approach to male contraceptive development is the inhibition of retinoic acid in the testes, as retinoic acid signaling is necessary for spermatogenesis. The administration of the retinoic acid receptor antagonist BMS-189453 reversibly inhibits spermatogenesis in mice. Similarly, oral dosing of WIN 18,446, which inhibits testicular retinoic acid biosynthesis, effectively contracepts rabbits. Hopefully, one of these approaches to non-hormonal male contraception will prove to be safe and effective in future clinical trials.

  9. Contraception and irregular menses.

    PubMed

    Hopayian, K; Houston, A; Cooke, I

    1989-03-22

    A fictitious patient with obesity, hirsutism and polycystic ovary syndrome is discussed by 3 British general practitioners to illuminate management of this type of case. The patient is 24 years old, expects to marry next year, has irregular menses averaging 6 weeks apart, and is requesting an explanation for her irregular periods as well as oral contraception. The 1st physician would exclude hypothyroidism, then evaluate polycystic ovary syndrome by assaying testosterone, LH, FSH and prolactin, next find out the significance of the patient's questions in her mind and finally prescribe a triphasic pill. The 2nd doctor would withhold the pill on the grounds that it might compromise future fertility if she has a primary endocrine imbalance. She would check rubella status, assay progesterone, LH, FSH, prolactin and testosterone on Day 19 of the cycle, and probably prescribe Marvelon oral contraceptives. The 3rd doctor would use a hirsutism score, investigate the polycystic ovary syndrome by ultrasound and an essay of sex hormone binding globulin and the LH:FSH and prolactin, next find out the significance of the patient's questions in her mind and finally prescribe a triphasic pill. The 2nd doctor would withhold the pill on the ground that it might compromise future fertility if she has a primary endocrine imbalance. She would check rubella status, assay progesterone, LH, FSH, prolactin and testosterone on Day 19 of the cycle, and probably prescribe Marvelon oral contraceptives. The 3rd doctor would use a hirsutism score, investigate the polycystic ovary syndrome by ultrasound and an assay of sex hormone binding globulin and the LH:FSH ration between Days 2-6 of the cycle, and rule out congenital adrenal hyperplasia with an assay for 17-alpha-OH-progesterone. Since the patient might be anovulatory because of obesity, major long-term weight lose is a priority. Prescription of pills would depend on family history, smoking, and the degree of hirsutism and endocrine status

  10. [Disease and contraception. Recent aspects].

    PubMed

    Rozenbaum, H

    1985-01-01

    This article reviews several different articles which have contributed to an understanding of the harmful or beneficial effects of oral contraceptives (OCs) on various diseases. The Royal College of General Practitioners study found that current OC users compared to women who had never used OCs had relative risks of .52 for menorrhagia, .37 for dysmenorrhea, .65 for irregular cycles, .72 for intermenstrual bleeding, and .71 for premenstrual syndrome. Several studies found combined OCs to offer protection against ovarian cysts. Microdose progestin only pills did not ameliorate most menstrual problems and aggravated ovarian cysts. Despite some theoretical grounds for suspecting an association between pituitary prolactinomas and OC use, recent studies have failed to find an increased relative risk for prolactinomas in women using OCs for contraceptive purposes, although 1 study found an increased risk in women using OCs for cycle control. 1 study reported 11 pregnancies in 30 diabetic women in 15 months of IUD use; the high rate was attributed to abnormal patterns of mineral deposit on the IUD surface. The 11 pregnancies occurred with 5 Gravigardes, 5 Saf-T-Coils, and 1 Dalkon Shield. Other studies on the contrary have noted no difference in pregnancy rates among 103 diabetic women using Copper Ts or 118 diabetic women using Lippes loops. Combined OCs appear to reduce the incidence of rheumatoid arthritis by 1/2 among current OC users and to protect former users as well. Combined OCs aggravate lupus erythmatous but synthetic progestins alone are effective without aggravating the condition. It has recently been argued that low dose OCs are not contraindicated in cases of sickle cell disease and may even offer protection against thromboembolic vascular accidents for women with sickle cell anemia. Estimates of relative risk of pelvic infection among IUD users vary from 1.5 to 6.5, with the risk apparently greatest for women under 25. Recent studies have indicated that

  11. Update on contraception: benefits and risks of the new formulations.

    PubMed

    Batur, Pelin; Elder, Julie; Mayer, Mark

    2003-08-01

    Several new contraceptives have become available to women in recent years. These new agents include ultra-low-dose oral contraceptives as well as injectable, vaginal, and patch formulations. We review these, with emphasis on the Yasmin pill (which contains a new progestin), the Lunelle once-a-month injection, the Ortho Evra patch, the NuvaRing vaginal ring, the Mirena intrauterine device, and emergency contraceptive kits. Patient education regarding these options is essential for patient compliance and satisfaction.

  12. Effect of contraceptives on the skin.

    PubMed

    1988-10-01

    Combined oral contraceptives (COCs) affect the skin 3 different ways. They decrease the amount of androgenic hormones produced in the ovaries and adrenal gland. They also limit the quantity of biologically active circulating testosterone. Finally, estrogen markedly decreases oil production in the sebaceous glands. Physicians should prescribe to women with acne a COC that is low in progestogen and high in estrogen. A biphasic pill with no more than 500 mcg norethisterone/day meets these requirements. If a woman is taking systemic antibiotics to treat acne, however, the physician should prescribe a biphasic pill containing 50 mcg ethinyl estradiol. Even though many believe that using COCs causes hair loss, there is little evidence to support it. Nevertheless, if a woman has indeed experienced hair loss, she should take a COC with a high estrogen to progestogen ratio. As in some pregnant women, cholasma may occur in women taking COCs when not protected from sunlight. Physicians need to prescribe the lowest possible dose of hormones in these women and counsel them to shield their face from sunlight. To err on the side of safety, women who have had a malignant melanoma should not use a hormonal contraceptive. In addition, women who have experienced many bouts of skin candidiasis should use an alternative contraceptive. Other skin disorders that they have been found to be more prevalent in women taking COCs include erythema nodosum, accelerated systemic lupus erythematosus, porphyria cutanea tarda, herpes gestationis, spider naevus, and telangiectasia. There also exists an association between dermatitis and barrier methods and spermicides. Some articles have suggested that copper containing IUDs have also cause a variety of skin disorders. PMID:3240155

  13. Combined use of crystalline salt forms and precipitation inhibitors to improve oral absorption of celecoxib from solid oral formulations.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, Héctor R; Tawa, Mark; Zhang, Zhong; Ratanabanangkoon, Pasut; Shaw, Paul; Gardner, Colin R; Chen, Hongming; Moreau, Jean-Pierre; Almarsson, Orn; Remenar, Julius F

    2007-10-01

    Biopharmaceutical evaluation of crystalline celecoxib salts in novel solid formulations, which were designed to simultaneously facilitate dissolution and inhibit precipitation in vitro, showed fast and complete absorption in beagle dogs at doses up to 7.5 mg/kg orally. In contrast, 5 mg/kg celecoxib in the form of Celebrex(R) showed approximately 40% absolute bioavailability in a cross-over experiment. An in vitro-in vivo correlation was observed in dog, and a threshold level of in vitro dissolution needed to maximize in vivo performance was highlighted. Oral bioavailability was limited in the absence of excipient combinations that delayed precipitation of celecoxib free acid as the salt neutralized in the GI fluid. Formulations of crystal forms having high energy (a 'spring'), thus transiently increasing solubility in aqueous solution relative to the free acid, combined with excipients functioning as precipitation inhibitors ('parachutes') were shown to provide both enhanced dissolution and high oral bioavailability.

  14. Combined use of crystalline salt forms and precipitation inhibitors to improve oral absorption of celecoxib from solid oral formulations.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, Héctor R; Tawa, Mark; Zhang, Zhong; Ratanabanangkoon, Pasut; Shaw, Paul; Gardner, Colin R; Chen, Hongming; Moreau, Jean-Pierre; Almarsson, Orn; Remenar, Julius F

    2007-10-01

    Biopharmaceutical evaluation of crystalline celecoxib salts in novel solid formulations, which were designed to simultaneously facilitate dissolution and inhibit precipitation in vitro, showed fast and complete absorption in beagle dogs at doses up to 7.5 mg/kg orally. In contrast, 5 mg/kg celecoxib in the form of Celebrex(R) showed approximately 40% absolute bioavailability in a cross-over experiment. An in vitro-in vivo correlation was observed in dog, and a threshold level of in vitro dissolution needed to maximize in vivo performance was highlighted. Oral bioavailability was limited in the absence of excipient combinations that delayed precipitation of celecoxib free acid as the salt neutralized in the GI fluid. Formulations of crystal forms having high energy (a 'spring'), thus transiently increasing solubility in aqueous solution relative to the free acid, combined with excipients functioning as precipitation inhibitors ('parachutes') were shown to provide both enhanced dissolution and high oral bioavailability. PMID:17518357

  15. [Young men's contraceptive habits].

    PubMed

    Kaiser, A H; Nielsen, B B; Hansen, K; Johansen, J B; Nielsen, M B

    1992-10-01

    A total of 379 men from the greater Copenhagen area were invited to fill out a questionnaire about sexual habits and use of contraception in connection with conscription for military duty. A total of 334 (88%) answered the questionnaire. In the autumn of 1988, a total of 27 men answered the test questionnaire, while in the spring of 1989, when the real study was conducted, 307 men answered it. The median age of 334 participants was 18 years (range of 17-29 years). 33% of the group stated that they had used condoms during first intercourse, while 47% had not. 1 person reported to be exclusively attracted sexually to men, 5 persons were attracted both to men and women, but 97% were exclusively attracted to women. 82% had had intercourse or other sexual experience with women. 1.8% had had intercourse or other sexual experience with men. 8% had no sexual experience, and 8% did not answer the question. Oral contraceptives were used by 60% and the condom by 56%. 10% had used coitus interruptus at one time or another; 15% had used no contraception; 5% used the IUD; and 5% used the diaphragm. Some gave several answers. 1% used spermicidal lotion. 60% thought that it was the responsibility of both men and women to be concerned about contraception, 12% opined that it was exclusively men's duty, and 2% that it was exclusively women's, while 26% did not answer. 68% wanted to use the condom in the future for protection, 24% did not know, but 8% did not want to use it more extensively. 64% did not think that the fear of AIDS would affect their sexual life, but 36% thought it would. Several of the subjects indicated that they would be more careful about choosing a partner, and every 10th suggested that they would use the condom with a new partner. One person (0.3%) was a drug addict, 89% had never injected drugs, but about 11% did not answer about drugs. 97% and 95%, respectively, indicated that the condom provided good protection against pregnancy and venereal diseases.

  16. The adolescent and contraception.

    PubMed

    Bonar, R W; Mcculla, D

    1981-08-01

    Coital activity is often initiated during adolescence, and adolescents, like many adults, do not behave in purely rational ways and frequently fail to protect themselves against undesired pregnancy. Public attention is focused on adolescent pregnancies because of their increasing number and because the consequences are usually catastrophic. Unplanned pregnancies can have physical, psychosocial, and prenatal effects. It is important from both the individual and societal perspective that high priority be given to the task of preventing adolescent pregnancy. The health care provider, to gain the trust of the adolescent, must be open, honest, and willing to consider the young person's feelings and motivations. In addition to historical data and physical examination, the choice of a contraceptive method is based on individual preferences involving personal, familial, religious, and societal beliefs as well as sexual practice. A decision involving birth control for the adolescent can be complicated by parental influence and involvement. The teenage years are frequently a time of embarrassment about the physical maturation and biological functioning of the body. Birth control methods which require a person to touch himself/herself or to be used at the time of sexual intercourse may be unacceptable to the teenager. Fertility awareness techniques, such as basal body temperature, rhythm, and cervical mucus methods are inexpensive but call for a high degree of personal motivation. The use of a diaphragm requires an office visit and a pelvic examination for fitting and prescription. Contraceptive foam, suppositories, and condoms can be easily obtained over-the-counter for a minimal cost, and a moderate degree of personal motivation is needed for their effective use. Though effective, abortions should not be recommended indiscriminately. Permanent contraceptive methods are not recommended for the adolescent. The IUD and oral contraceptives (OCs) are recommended for adolescents

  17. Unintended Pregnancies Observed With Combined Use of the Levonorgestrel Contraceptive Implant and Efavirenz-based Antiretroviral Therapy: A Three-Arm Pharmacokinetic Evaluation Over 48 Weeks

    PubMed Central

    Scarsi, Kimberly K.; Darin, Kristin M.; Nakalema, Shadia; Back, David J.; Byakika-Kibwika, Pauline; Else, Laura J.; Dilly Penchala, Sujan; Buzibye, Allan; Cohn, Susan E.; Merry, Concepta; Lamorde, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Background. Levonorgestrel subdermal implants are preferred contraceptives with an expected failure rate of <1% over 5 years. We assessed the effect of efavirenz- or nevirapine-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) coadministration on levonorgestrel pharmacokinetics. Methods. This nonrandomized, parallel group, pharmacokinetic evaluation was conducted in three groups of human immunodeficiency virus–infected Ugandan women: ART-naive (n = 17), efavirenz-based ART (n = 20), and nevirapine-based ART (n = 20). Levonorgestrel implants were inserted at baseline in all women. Blood was collected at 1, 4, 12, 24, 36, and 48 weeks. The primary endpoint was week 24 levonorgestrel concentrations, compared between the ART-naive group and each ART group by geometric mean ratio (GMR) with 90% confidence interval (CI). Secondary endpoints included week 48 levonorgestrel concentrations and unintended pregnancies. Results. Week 24 geometric mean levonorgestrel concentrations were 528, 280, and 710 pg/mL in the ART-naive, efavirenz, and nevirapine groups, respectively (efavirenz: ART-naive GMR, 0.53; 90% CI, .50, .55 and nevirapine: ART-naive GMR, 1.35; 90% CI, 1.29, 1.43). Week 48 levonorgestrel concentrations were 580, 247, and 664 pg/mL in the ART-naive, efavirenz, and nevirapine groups, respectively (efavirenz: ART-naive GMR, 0.43; 90% CI, .42, .44 and nevirapine: ART-naive GMR, 1.14; 90% CI, 1.14, 1.16). Three pregnancies (3/20, 15%) occurred in the efavirenz group between weeks 36 and 48. No pregnancies occurred in the ART-naive or nevirapine groups. Conclusions. Within 1 year of combined use, levonorgestrel exposure was markedly reduced in participants who received efavirenz-based ART, accompanied by contraceptive failures. In contrast, nevirapine-based ART did not adversely affect levonorgestrel exposure or efficacy. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT01789879. PMID:26646680

  18. Knowledge about missed contraceptive pills among married women at King Abdulaziz University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Iftikhar, Rahila; Aba Al Khail, Bahaa Abdulrahman

    2015-01-01

    Background Oral contraceptive pills (OCPs) are one of the most reliable methods of contraception. However, lack of knowledge about oral contraceptive use and inconsistent pill-taking might result in decreased efficacy. The study reported here aimed to explore women’s knowledge about oral contraceptive use and assess the factors associated with knowledge about OCPs among users. Methods This cross-sectional survey was conducted at King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia between April and June 2014. We included married, non-pregnant women >18 years old who had used a combined 21-day OCP for at least 3 months prior to recruitment. A questionnaire was used to collect the participants’ demographic information. It also assessed their knowledge about OCPs. Data were entered into and analyzed using SPSS software. Results A total of 357 women were recruited. Of these, 57.7% reported they knew what to do after missing one or two pills, but only 18.3% knew exactly what to do after missing more than two pills consecutively. Postgraduate women had a significantly higher knowledge score than illiterate women (P=0.002) and those who had completed at least primary education (P=0.001). Conversely, there was no difference in knowledge scores between Saudi and expatriate women (P=0.2). Monthly incomes (P=0.2) and mode of OCP selection (P=0.2) were also not significantly associated with knowledge scores. Conclusion Women had poor knowledge about OCP use. Appropriate measures should be taken to educate women about proper oral contraceptive use. PMID:25792813

  19. Providing Contraception to Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Raidoo, Shandhini; Kaneshiro, Bliss

    2015-12-01

    Adolescents have high rates of unintended pregnancy and face unique reproductive health challenges. Providing confidential contraceptive services to adolescents is important in reducing the rate of unintended pregnancy. Long-acting contraception such as the intrauterine device and contraceptive implant are recommended as first-line contraceptives for adolescents because they are highly effective with few side effects. The use of barrier methods to prevent sexually transmitted infections should be encouraged. Adolescents have limited knowledge of reproductive health and contraceptive options, and their sources of information are often unreliable. Access to contraception is available through a variety of resources that continue to expand.

  20. Contraception in the prepill era.

    PubMed

    Connell, E B

    1999-01-01

    Although medical history has documented the desire to control fertility since ancient times, safe and effective contraception did not exist until this century and has not been equally available to all people. Strong moral sentiments, economic and social class factors, religious beliefs, familial and gender relations, and political as well as legal constraints have often limited the ability of physicians in favor of contraception to provide advice and methods of birth control to their patients. By the early 1900s, a constellation of factors--in particular, the large influx of poor immigrants, and feminist groups advocating women's rights--helped to move forward a birth-control movement in this country and abroad. In the early 20th century, Margaret Sanger became one of the most avid proponents of contraception in the United States. By 1950, she and Katharine McCormick had contracted with biologist Gregory Pincus to develop an effective birth control pill. A collaborative effort by Pincus and other researchers led to trials of the pill in Puerto Rico, Haiti, and Mexico between 1956 and 1957, which provided the basis for an application to the Food and Drug Administration for approval of the first oral contraceptive.

  1. Adherence to a flexible extended regimen for oral hormonal contraception provided in blister packaging compared with an adherence-supporting digital tablet dispenser: historical comparison of data from two clinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Elliesen, Jörg; Trummer, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    Background The Clyk™ digital pill dispenser helps ensure correct and consistent administration of a flexible extended regimen of the combined oral contraceptive, ethinylestradiol (EE) 20 μg/drospirenone 3 mg (EE/drospirenone ; YAZ® Flex Flex), guiding users through the intake cycle and 4-day pill break and providing visible and acoustic daily reminders when pill intake is due. A study showed that the audible alarm function of the dispenser could help reduce the number of missed pills, but it lacked an appropriate “non-dispenser” group for a meaningful assessment of the impact of the dispenser on adherence. This study indirectly assessed the overall effect of the digital dispenser on adherence by comparing data from a treatment with standard blister packaging. Materials and methods One-year adherence data were compared from two similarly designed, Phase III, open-label, randomized trials of EE/drospirenoneFlex. In study 1, women used diary cards to record adherence with EE/drospirenoneFlex dispensed in blister packs (n=640), and in study 2 the dispenser was used with the alarm activated (n=250) or deactivated (n=248) in addition to using diary cards. Results A mean (±SD) of 4.3 (±4.24) missed pills over 1 year were recorded in diary cards among women who dispensed their pills from the blister packages (study 1) compared with 1.0 (±2.4) recorded by the alarm-activated dispenser (study 2). In study 2, a mean of 1.9 (±4.2) missed pills were reported in the diaries over 1 year compared with 4.4 (±9.1) from automatic recording by the dispenser (both arms of study 2), indicating underreporting of missed pills in diary cards vs the digital dispenser. Adjusting for this rate of underreporting, an estimated mean of ten pills were missed over 1 year by women using EE/drospirenoneFlex in blister packs, or ten times more than with the digital dispenser with activated acoustic alarm. Conclusion The digital dispenser helps reduce the number of missed pills and

  2. [Attitude to be taken with the adolescent requesting contraception].

    PubMed

    Wermelinger, R

    1983-05-01

    A combination of biological factors such as earlier age at puberty and fecundity, and social factors such as the disappearance of the extended family and of rites of passage and the development of a youth culture have encouraged adolescent sexuality at the same time that length of schooling is increasing and adolescents have not yet become socially autonomous. Adolescents employ contraception relatively infrequently and tend to choose less reliable methods. Reasons for this include ignorance of the biology of reproduction and of contraception methods; the fear of secondary effects, encouraged by the mass media; lack of access to family planning facilities or fear that parents will be informed; and the cost of contraceptives. An adolescent requesting contraception should be treated as a adult, taking into account the degree of maturity; the attitude of the medial practitioner will influence motivation and success in using the method. The medical history will indicate cases in which a hormonal contraceptive is contraindicated. The gynecological examination reveals the gynecological age of the patient, which is more important than chronological age. The frequency of sexual realtions should also be considered in the choice. Because motivation of adolescents is less reliable than that of adults, such methods as rhythm and withdrawal are not appropriate. Condoms or diaphragms are disliked because of the necessity of repeated manipulation before each act of intercourse, but may be acceptable to highly motivated individuals. Condoms are indicated when relations are unexpected and infrequent. IUDs are indicated only when hormonal contraceptives cannot be used and when forgetting of pills is likely to occur. Nevertheless, IUD use in adolescents can entail serious problems of expulsion or of infection that may lead to later infertility. Little is known of the effects of oral contraceptive use on sexual maturation and growth of very young adolescents, but because of the growth

  3. Oral azithromycin versus its combination with miltefosine for the treatment of experimental Old World cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Amer, Eglal I; Eissa, Maha M; Mossallam, Shereen F

    2016-06-01

    Leishmaniasis is one of the neglected infectious diseases included in the World Health Organization's list of the top guns of antimicrobial resistance. Miltefosine is the first and the only available oral effective therapy for leishmaniasis. For fear of its potential resistance, identification of alternative, effective and safe drugs is urgently needed. Therefore, in view of azithromycin promising activity against a number of Leishmania species, this work was carried out to evaluate the efficacy of oral azithromycin alone versus its combination with miltefosine against experimental Old World Cutaneous leishmaniasis thus, can provide another alternative oral therapy or for the first time an oral combination therapy for leishmaniasis. The experiment were carried out on Swiss strain albino mice which were treated either with miltefosine for 20 days, Azithromycin for 20 days or both drugs in combination therapy for shorter duration of 10 days. Efficacy of azithromycin mono and combination therapy with miltefosine was evaluated clinically, parasitologically and by examination of the cutaneous lesions by Transmission Electron Microscopy. The current work demonstrated superior activity of oral azithromycin over oral miltefosine in the treatment of experimentally infected mice with Leishmania major (MHOM/IL/81/FEBNI). Unfortunately, oral combination therapy of azithromycin and miltefosine for short duration though, induced dramatic clinical improvement yet, relapse rapidly developed after cessation of therapy. Oral azithromycin could be a promising oral antileishmanial agent. Further research is recommended to investigate its leishmanicidal activity against other Leishmania species thus; another alternative oral therapy for leishmaniasis can be rapidly available. PMID:27413324

  4. Access to modern contraception.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Michael J; Stanback, John; Shelton, James

    2006-06-01

    Access to modern contraception has become a recognized human right, improving the health and well-being of women, families and societies worldwide. However, contraceptive access remains uneven. Irregular contraceptive supply, limited numbers of service delivery points and specific geographic, economic, informational, psychosocial and administrative barriers (including medical barriers) undermine access in many settings. Widening the range of providers enabled to offer contraception can improve contraceptive access, particularly where resources are most scarce. International efforts to remove medical barriers include the World Health Organization's Medical Eligibility Criteria. Based on the best available evidence, these criteria provide guidance for weighing the risks and benefits of contraceptive choice among women with specific clinical conditions. Clinical job aids can also improve access. More research is needed to further elucidate the pathways for expanding contraceptive access. Further progress in removing medical barriers will depend on systems for improving provider education and promoting evidence-based contraceptive service delivery. PMID:16443395

  5. Contraception for adolescents.

    PubMed

    2014-10-01

    Contraception is a pillar in reducing adolescent pregnancy rates. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that pediatricians develop a working knowledge of contraception to help adolescents reduce risks of and negative health consequences related to unintended pregnancy. Over the past 10 years, a number of new contraceptive methods have become available to adolescents, newer guidance has been issued on existing contraceptive methods, and the evidence base for contraception for special populations (adolescents who have disabilities, are obese, are recipients of solid organ transplants, or are HIV infected) has expanded. The Academy has addressed contraception since 1980, and this policy statement updates the 2007 statement on contraception and adolescents. It provides the pediatrician with a description and rationale for best practices in counseling and prescribing contraception for adolescents. It is supported by an accompanying technical report.

  6. Contraception for adolescents.

    PubMed

    Ott, Mary A; Sucato, Gina S

    2014-10-01

    A working knowledge of contraception will assist the pediatrician in both sexual health promotion as well as treatment of common adolescent gynecologic problems. Best practices in adolescent anticipatory guidance and screening include a sexual health history, screening for pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections, counseling, and if indicated, providing access to contraceptives. Pediatricians' long-term relationships with adolescents and families allow them to help promote healthy sexual decision-making, including abstinence and contraceptive use. Additionally, medical indications for contraception, such as acne, dysmenorrhea, and heavy menstrual bleeding, are frequently uncovered during adolescent visits. This technical report provides an evidence base for the accompanying policy statement and addresses key aspects of adolescent contraceptive use, including the following: (1) sexual history taking, confidentiality, and counseling; (2) adolescent data on the use and side effects of newer contraceptive methods; (3) new data on older contraceptive methods; and (4) evidence supporting the use of contraceptives in adolescent patients with complex medical conditions. PMID:25266435

  7. Highly effective contraception and acquisition of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Charles S; Turner, Abigail Norris; Jones, LaShawn B

    2009-04-01

    A key question for clinicians is whether an aetiological association exists between highly effective contraceptive methods and women's risk of acquiring sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The authors searched the peer-reviewed literature for prospective studies published from January 1966 to August 2008 that assessed contraception and STI/HIV risk. The focus was on combined oral contraceptives (OCs), depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA), the T380a copper intra-uterine device (IUD) and the risk of infection with HIV, Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Current data suggest that neither OCs nor DMPA increase HIV risk among women in the general population. Data are equivocal for women in high-risk groups (e.g. sex workers). Current data suggest an increased risk of chlamydial infection associated with OC use, with weaker evidence supporting a harmful effect of DMPA. Reports of OCs and gonococcal infection are inconsistent, and DMPA does not appear to be associated with gonorrhoea acquisition. Data suggest no increased STI/HIV risk among copper IUD users. Prospective data on highly effective contraceptive methods and women's STI/HIV risk are limited, and many studies have important methodological weaknesses. Additional information about the STI/HIV risks associated with these highly effective contraceptive methods is needed.

  8. Contraceptive revolution.

    PubMed

    Segal, S J

    1994-06-01

    Global population will increase by almost 1 billion people in the 1990s, the largest 10-year increase ever recorded. In 1994 alone, population will surpass 5.7 billion. The prospect of double-digit billions of people is worrisome, especially since these numbers may affect global warming, supplies of fresh water, destruction of rain forests, industrial pollution, and sustainable development. Yet, many indicators of quality of life show that people enjoy a better quality of life today than they did 100 years ago. Between India's independence and now, life expectancy increased by 20 years, infant mortality decreased 2-fold, literacy increased, and the food supply stabilized. Even though India's population has almost tripled since 1947, its economy increased rapidly and is 1 of the world's top 10 economies. University enrollment stands at 4.5 million. Agricultural production has exceeded demand. India represents the potential for human achievement through technological advancement and social organization. If the world's first national family planning program had been more successful when it began in 1952 in an India of 350 million people, India's population would be around 500 million instead of the expected 1 billion in 2000. All countries need to achieve a sustainable balance between human numbers and needs and natural resources. Family planning is an essential, cost-effective part of any development strategy. Family planning use has reduced fertility from 6 to 3.6 in developing countries. In 1965, only 8% used contraception, while more than 50% use it now. The most remarkable family planning/fertility reduction successes are Bangladesh, Brazil, Colombia, Indonesia, Mexico, and Thailand. Sufficient investment in family planning is needed if significant declines in fertility are to occur. More than 90% of the developing world's people are in countries with official family planning programs. Cost-effective assistance by donors and developing countries implementing

  9. Contraceptive revolution.

    PubMed

    Segal, S J

    1994-06-01

    Global population will increase by almost 1 billion people in the 1990s, the largest 10-year increase ever recorded. In 1994 alone, population will surpass 5.7 billion. The prospect of double-digit billions of people is worrisome, especially since these numbers may affect global warming, supplies of fresh water, destruction of rain forests, industrial pollution, and sustainable development. Yet, many indicators of quality of life show that people enjoy a better quality of life today than they did 100 years ago. Between India's independence and now, life expectancy increased by 20 years, infant mortality decreased 2-fold, literacy increased, and the food supply stabilized. Even though India's population has almost tripled since 1947, its economy increased rapidly and is 1 of the world's top 10 economies. University enrollment stands at 4.5 million. Agricultural production has exceeded demand. India represents the potential for human achievement through technological advancement and social organization. If the world's first national family planning program had been more successful when it began in 1952 in an India of 350 million people, India's population would be around 500 million instead of the expected 1 billion in 2000. All countries need to achieve a sustainable balance between human numbers and needs and natural resources. Family planning is an essential, cost-effective part of any development strategy. Family planning use has reduced fertility from 6 to 3.6 in developing countries. In 1965, only 8% used contraception, while more than 50% use it now. The most remarkable family planning/fertility reduction successes are Bangladesh, Brazil, Colombia, Indonesia, Mexico, and Thailand. Sufficient investment in family planning is needed if significant declines in fertility are to occur. More than 90% of the developing world's people are in countries with official family planning programs. Cost-effective assistance by donors and developing countries implementing

  10. Permanent contraception for women.

    PubMed

    Micks, Elizabeth A; Jensen, Jeffrey T

    2015-11-01

    Permanent methods of contraception are used by an estimated 220 million couples worldwide, and are often selected due to convenience, ease of use and lack of side effects. A variety of tubal occlusion techniques are available for female permanent contraception, and procedures can be performed using a transcervical or transabdominal approach. This article reviews currently available techniques for female permanent contraception and discusses considerations when helping patients choose a contraceptive method and tubal occlusion technique.

  11. Knowledge and attitudes of Latin American obstetricians and gynecologists regarding intrauterine contraceptives

    PubMed Central

    Bahamondes, Luis; Makuch, Maria Y; Monteiro, Ilza; Marin, Victor; Lynen, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Background Intrauterine contraceptives (IUCs), including the copper intrauterine device and the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS), are among the reversible contraceptive methods with high effectiveness. However, use is low in many settings, including some Latin American countries, mainly due to the influences of myths, fears, and negative attitudes, not only of users and potential users, but also of different cadres of health care professionals. The purpose of this study was to assess the knowledge and attitudes of a group of Latin American obstetricians and gynecologists regarding IUCs. Methods A survey was conducted during a scientific meeting organized in Chile in 2014 to present and discuss updated information about contraception. Obstetricians and gynecologists from 12 Latin American countries, who reported that they provide daily contraception services in both the public and private sectors, participated in the meeting. Participants who agreed to take part in the survey responded to a multiple-choice questionnaire on issues regarding knowledge, use, and attitudes about IUCs. Results Of the 210 obstetricians and gynecologists participating in the meeting, the respondents to each question varied from 168 (80.0%) to 205 (97.6%). Almost 50% recognized that the failure rate of combined oral contraceptives, patches, and vaginal rings is 8%–10%. Furthermore, 10% of the participants did not recognize the high contraceptive effectiveness of long-acting reversible contraceptive methods. Additionally, almost 80% of the respondents answered that they did not offer IUCs to nulligravidas and almost 10% did not offer IUCs to adolescents, albeit almost 90% of the respondents reported that nulligravidas are candidates for an LNG-IUS. Conclusion Some deficiencies and contradictions in terms of knowledge and attitudes were identified from the answers of the Latin American obstetricians and gynecologists who participated in the survey. The knowledge and

  12. A prospective, open-label, single arm, multicentre study to evaluate efficacy, safety and acceptability of pericoital oral contraception using levonorgestrel 1.5 mg

    PubMed Central

    Festin, Mario P.R.; Bahamondes, Luis; Nguyen, Thi My Huong; Habib, Ndema; Thamkhantho, Manopchai; Singh, Kuldip; Gosavi, Arundhati; Bartfai, Gyorgy; Bito, Tamas; Bahamondes, M. Valeria; Kapp, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Will the use of levonorgestrel (LNG) 1.5 mg taken at each day of coitus by women who have relatively infrequent sex be an efficacious, safe and acceptable contraceptive method? SUMMARY ANSWER Typical use of LNG 1.5 mg taken pericoitally, before or within 24 h of sexual intercourse, provides contraceptive efficacy of up to 11.0 pregnancies per 100 women-years (W-Y) in the primary evaluable population and 7.1 pregnancies per 100 W-Y in the evaluable population. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY LNG 1.5 mg is an effective emergency contraception following unprotected intercourse. Some users take it repeatedly, as their means of regular contraception. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION This was a prospective, open-label, single-arm, multicentre Phase III trial study with women who have infrequent coitus (on up to 6 days a month). Each woman had a follow-up visit at 2.5, 4.5 and 6.5 months after admission or until pregnancy occurs if sooner, or she decided to interrupt participation. The study was conducted between 10 January 2012 and 15 November 2014. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS A total of 330 healthy fertile women aged 18–45 years at risk of pregnancy who reported sexual intercourse on up to 6 days a month, were recruited from four university centres located in Bangkok, Thailand; Campinas, Brazil; Singapore and Szeged, Hungary to use LNG 1.5 mg pericoitally (24 h before or after coitus) as their primary method of contraception. The participants were instructed to take one tablet every day she had sex, without taking more than one tablet in any 24-h period, and to maintain a paper diary for recording date and time for every coital act and ingestion of the study tablet, use of other contraceptive methods and vaginal bleeding patterns. Anaemia was assessed by haemoglobin evaluation. Pregnancy tests were performed monthly and pregnancies occurring during product use were assessed by ultrasound. At the 2.5-month and final visit at 6.5 months, acceptability

  13. [Chronic illness and contraception].

    PubMed

    Saarikoski, S

    1987-01-01

    In recent years sterilization that can cause problems of the psyche and marital life has been recommended much less frequently with respect to chronic diseases. As regards heart and hypertensive diseases pregnancy is always contraindicated in case of 3rd and 4th disease categories and sterilization is recommended according to the New York Heart Association. As far as 1st and 2nd category patients are concerned if the load carrying capacity is normal pregnancy could be undertaken. Combination pills are not recommended for contraception because they can cause fluid retention or increase the risk of thrombosis. If the patient has a higher-than-normal risk of developing thrombosis or infection, for instance, those who wear pacemakers only tablets containing progesterone or subdermal capsule implants can be used. In those with blood pressure problems the additional use of the IUD is also advised. Among diseases of neurological and psychic origin the effect of hormonal contraceptives is weakened by antiepileptics, but even in such cases older combination pills of larger doses of active ingredients can be employed. Migraine is exacerbated in 1/3 of patients; here IUDs can be used. Even the contraceptive tablets themselves can induce depression. In psychosis methods requiring regular attention can be easily forgotten, therefore the IUD is the most suitable device. In diabetes progesterone and other progestogens reduce insulin response, harm carbohydrate metabolism; therefore in young people the IUD is preferred an in older women with children even sterilization can be employed. Hormonal tablets must not be used in hyperlipidemia and liver diseases. Caution must be exercised in hyperthyroidism and in endocrine disorders (e.g., Cushing's syndrome); if it is accompanied by blood pressure disorders appropriate treatment is required. In kidney diseases pregnancy is contraindicated if it is accompanied by blood pressure increase or a higher level of creatine. On the other hand

  14. Searching for Ideal Contraceptives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Djerassi, Carl

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the problem of adolescent pregnancy and focuses on improving contraception as a practical solution. Describes the advantages and disadvantages of existing methods (the condom, the pill, and the contraceptive sponge). Predicts that the development of a fundamentally new contraceptive, such as a monthly menses-inducer pill, will not occur…

  15. Hormonal contraception. Current status and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Holinka, C F

    1994-09-30

    Hormonal contraception was pioneered by Gregory Pincus in the 1950s. Today, hormonal contraception is accepted as having a highly favorable benefit/risk profile. There is, however, a need for the development of new contraceptive methods to broaden the range of choices and enhance motivation and compliance in users. With the staggering rate of increase in the world's population, the number of contraceptive users in developing countries is expected to increase from 381 million in 1990 to 567 million in the year 2000. This will require substantial supplies of inexpensive contraceptives and the development of new and improved methods. The use of contraceptives is an asset to women's health, which can be jeopardized by the risks of pregnancy, as well as to the psychological and social well-being of mother and child. Oral contraceptives also have noncontraceptive health benefits such as protecting against endometrial cancer, uterine fibroids, menorrhagia, benign breast disease, anemia, ovarian cancer, functional ovarian cysts, dysmenorrhea, ectopic pregnancy, salpingitis, and bone loss. The new low-dose formulations are considered to be very safe for most healthy, nonsmoking women of reproductive age. Therefore, current research efforts are focused on new delivery methods, such as vaginal rings, rather than on the development of new hormonally active steroids. Nonoral contraceptive methods which avoid first-pass effects on the liver are being developed or improved. These include implants, vaginal rings, vaginally applied pills, and progestogen-containing IUDs. Contraceptive research is also focusing on immunologic interference with the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in both men and women. This may spawn as yet unforseen methods of molecular modulation of sperm-ovum interactions which would result in the inhibition of implantation.

  16. [Resistance and compliance to contraception in adolescents].

    PubMed

    Pichot, F; Dayan-lintzer, M

    1985-10-01

    Although inadequate information on sex and contraception is frequently believed to account for contraceptive failure in adolescents, other factors including resistence to contraception or poor compliance with method requirements have been invoked to explain contraceptive failures in well-informed adolescents. Sexual relations are beginning at ever-younger ages in France; a 1980 survey indicated that 50% had their 1st sexual relations before age 17. Sexual activity is sporadic and irregular but usually occurs with the same partner. At least 50% of 1st sexual relations are unprotected by contraception, and half of adolescent pregnancies occur in the 1st 6th months of sexual activity. 6-12 months pass on average before sexually active adolescents begin to use contraception. Rates of pregnancy and abortion have increased especially among adolescents under 16, and in 1979 almost 20% of all abortions were in women under 20 years old. In 1980, only 20% of adolescents used contraception, with 17.3% using oral contraceptives. Few statistics exist on the complex phenomenon of conscious or subconscious contraceptive resistence in adolescence, and clinical experience serves as a better guide. A frequent attitude among adolescents is that sexual relations should be spontaneous and romantic, traits viewed as incompatible with contraception. "Magical thinking", failure to appreciate the real risk of pregnancy, and dissociation of sex and pregnancy are common. Adolescents who doubt their fecundity may engage in unprotected relations to reassure themselves, while some seeking to assert their femininity may use pills although they have no need for contraception. Guilt and ambivalence may be unconscious motivations for poor contraceptive use. Young girls in cold, uncaring, neglectful, or conflict-ridden homes may seek affection from a sexual partner and wish to have a baby to demonstrate their attachment. Such situations often lead to well-accepted pregnancies and may also

  17. Progress with contraceptives and abortifacients.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, A

    1992-10-01

    In Canada and most other comparatively rich countries, the total fertility rate (TFR) declined from approximately 2.5 in 1970 to 1.6-1.9 in 1990. The reduction was even greater in some countries such as China, Korea, Singapore, Mauritius, Barbados, Cuba, Guadeloupe, and Puerto Rico. TFR, however, has fallen little, if at all, in many poor countries; it remains at 8.1 in Kenya and has increased from already previously high levels in Somalia, Benin, Malawi, and Rwanda. The use of contraception has been instrumental in reducing fertility. An estimated 70% of married women in rich countries use contraceptives, and a larger proportion in Eastern Asia, but only less than 15% in Africa. Education for women generally increases the level of contraceptive use. Rates, however, depend upon the degree of both acceptance and availability. An estimated 20% of births in developing countries are unwanted, so it would seem that greater availability and variety of contraceptives could lead to reductions in fertility. Research into better contraceptive technology is frustrated by paternalism, most organized religions, concern over possible future legal liability, and fear of adverse health side effects, especially in North America. Depo-Provera and RU-486, for example, have yet to be licensed in Canada for use as contraceptive agents. Research nonetheless moves forward. A vaccine against pregnancy is reportedly being developed which may be available before the turn of the century. Clinical trials have been held, and the vaccine has been found to be effective in most women, lacking in side effects, and reversible. The prototype requires a series of injections. Elsewhere, the Alza Corporation of California is working on a transdermal patch to control fertility, while some success has been reported in trials of testosterone, alone or combined with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone, to suppress sperm production in men.

  18. Update on the metabolic effects of steroidal contraceptives and their relationship to cardiovascular disease risk.

    PubMed

    Godsland, I F; Crook, D

    1994-05-01

    Evaluation of metabolic disturbances has had an important role in the modification of oral contraceptive formulations toward estrogen-progestin combinations with reduced adverse metabolic impact. An increasing number of interrelationships between metabolic risk factors for cardiovascular disease are being recognized, and a metabolic syndrome of disturbances has been identified with insulin resistance as a potential underlying factor. The insulin resistance syndrome includes hyperinsulinemia and impaired glucose tolerance, hypertriglyceridemia, reduced high-density lipoprotein concentrations, and hypertension. Increased concentration of a small, dense, low-density lipoprotein subtype may also be important. Depending on steroid type and dose, combined oral contraceptives may induce all the features of the insulin resistance syndrome. Reduction in estrogen dose and modification of progestin content have resulted in formulations with no adverse effect on high-density lipoprotein and blood pressure, but insulin resistance and hypertriglyceridemia remain. These are caused primarily by the estrogen component. Therefore modification of the estrogen content of oral contraceptives might result in "metabolically transparent" formulations that could conceivably afford a degree of cardiovascular protection.

  19. Vaccination of cattle with Mycobacterium bovis BCG by a combination of systemic and oral routes.

    PubMed

    Buddle, Bryce M; Denis, Michel; Aldwell, Frank E; Martin Vordermeier, H; Glyn Hewinson, R; Neil Wedlock, D

    2008-11-01

    Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine delivered to calves by the subcutaneous (s.c.) or by the oral route in a formulated lipid matrix has been previously shown to induce similar levels of protection against bovine tuberculosis. The current study was aimed at determining whether a combination of delivering BCG by s.c. and oral routes would enhance levels of protection, compared to only one route of vaccination. Forty calves were randomly divided into four groups (10/group). Calves were vaccinated with 10(6)colony forming units (CFU) of BCG Pasteur by the s.c. route or orally with 10(9)CFU BCG incorporated into a lipid formulation. One group received a combination of BCG administered by both the s.c. and oral routes and a non-vaccinated group served as a control. The two groups of calves that received s.c. BCG produced strong IFN-gamma responses in whole blood cultures stimulated with bovine purified protein derivative (PPD) 3 weeks after vaccination. Cattle vaccinated just with oral BCG in a lipid matrix produced a strong IFN-gamma response 8 weeks after vaccination, and peaking at 11 weeks after vaccination. All calves were challenged by the intratracheal route with M. bovis 15 weeks after vaccination and were euthanized and necropsied to assess protection at 17 weeks following challenge. BCG given s.c. or orally induced significant and comparable levels of protection against the virulent challenge. Vaccination of cattle by a combination of s.c./oral routes did not enhance protection beyond that achieved by s.c. or oral vaccination alone. We conclude that vaccination of cattle with BCG by a combination of routes has no beneficial additive effects, compared to a single s.c. administration of BCG or BCG given orally in a lipid formulation.

  20. Transdermal delivery of contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Friend, D R

    1990-01-01

    Contraceptive agents are administered to the body through a variety of routes. Research has recently been directed at examining the transdermal route for systemic delivery of contraceptive agents, including estrogens and progestins. The transdermal route has several potential advantages over the other routes of administration: (1) improved compliance, (2) once-weekly administration, (3) delivery is easily terminated, and (4) some side effects can be alleviated based on more constant delivery rates. This article reviews the permeability of skin toward contraceptive steroids and how skin permeability is evaluated. The metabolism of contraceptive steroids is also considered. Transdermal delivery systems used to deliver contraceptives are presented, followed by a detailed discussion of several delivery systems for specific contraceptive agents such as levonorgestrel and estradiol. The potential problem of skin irritation is presented as it relates to transdermal contraceptive delivery systems, all of which will be worn chronically. PMID:2272099

  1. The quest for a herbal contraceptive.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, R R

    1993-01-01

    An oral herbal contraceptive would allow couples control their fertility without consulting a health worker, which in turn would likely markedly increase the number of couples practicing family planning. Other advantages of such a contraceptive would include the familiarity rural people have with herbal medicines, the fewer side effects associated with herbal preparations, their ready availability from local sources, and protection of privacy. There are many references to plants in India with antifertility properties. Since 1966, the Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) has been conducting research to identify a herbal contraceptive, as have other organizations. Plants that have exhibited antifertility activity in clinical trials include Hibiscus rosasinensis (benzene extract of the flower petals suppresses implantation); Rudrapushpaka (extract of the flower petals prevents pregnancy); Embelia ribes (pregnancy prevention); Davcus carota, Butea monosperma, and Sapindus trifoliatis (seeds have an anti-implantation effect); and Mentha arvensis (leaves have anti-implantation effect). The Central Drug Research Institute in Lucknow, India, in collaboration with the US National Institutes of Health, the World Health Organization, and the ICMR confirm anti-implantation activity in Ferula jaeschkeana, Bupleurum marginatum, Lepidium capitatum, Caesalpinia sepiaria, Lonicera japonica, Juniperus communis, Lotus corniculatus, Lamium allum, and Acacia farnesiana. In China, scientists have evaluated the cotton-seed extract gossypol as a male contraceptive. They are now studying the possible antifertility effect on men of the plant Tripterygium wilfordii. From all the aforementioned plants as well as others under investigation, three possible types of contraceptives could be developed: an anti-ovulatory contraceptive; a postcoital contraceptive; and a male contraceptive. Some obstacles to their development include difficulties in obtaining adequate quantities of the herbs, a

  2. Use of progestins in male contraception.

    PubMed

    Nieschlag, Eberhard; Zitzmann, Michael; Kamischke, Axel

    2003-11-01

    Hormonal male contraception aims at suppression of spermatogenesis to azoospermia or at least to severe oligoasthenozoospermia, incompatible with the ability to induce a pregnancy. The general principle of this approach is based on interference with the endocrine regulation of spermatogenesis, i.e. the suppression of gonadotropins. Since both FSH (through the Sertoli cell) and LH (through the Leydig cell and testosterone (T)) are required for normal spermatogenesis, both gonadotropins need to be suppressed as strongly as possible. In East Asian men this can be achieved with T alone (preferably in depot preparations such as T undecanoate) but only two-thirds of Caucasian men respond with adequate sperm suppression. Therefore, in Caucasian men additional substances such as GnRH antagonists or progestins are required to suppress the pituitary. Over the past 30 years many combinations of various T preparations with different progestins have been tested in clinical trials. Since self-applicable steroid combinations (e.g. oral levonorgestrel or desogestrel with transdermal T) showed low effectiveness, currently injections and implants are under clinical development. Long-acting intramuscular T esters (e.g. T undecanoate), T pellets or implants (e.g. MENT) are combined with injections of DMPA or noresthisterone enanthate or with implants containing levonorgestrel or etonogestrel. Acute side-effects of these combinations appear to be minimal and tolerable, long-term effects need to be investigated. PMID:14667989

  3. The current state of male hormonal contraception.

    PubMed

    Chao, Jing H; Page, Stephanie T

    2016-07-01

    World population continues to grow at an unprecedented rate, doubling in a mere 50years to surpass the 7-billion milestone in 2011. This steep population growth exerts enormous pressure on the global environment. Despite the availability of numerous contraceptive choices for women, approximately half of all pregnancies are unintended and at least half of those are unwanted. Such statistics suggest that there is still a gap in contraceptive options for couples, particularly effective reversible contraceptives for men, who have few contraceptive choices. Male hormonal contraception has been an active area of research for almost 50years. The fundamental concept involves the use of exogenous hormones to suppress endogenous production of gonadotropins, testosterone, and downstream spermatogenesis. Testosterone-alone regimens are effective in many men but high dosing requirements and sub-optimal gonadotropin suppression in 10-30% of men limit their use. A number of novel combinations of testosterone and progestins have been shown to be more efficacious but still require further refinement in delivery systems and a clearer understanding of the potential short- and long-term side effects. Recently, synthetic androgens with both androgenic and progestogenic activity have been developed. These agents have the potential to be single-agent male hormonal contraceptives. Early studies of these compounds are encouraging and there is reason for optimism that these may provide safe, reversible, and reliable contraception for men in the near future. PMID:27016468

  4. Contraceptive prevalence in Paraguay.

    PubMed

    Morris, L; Anderson, J E; Monteith, R S; Kriskovich, R; Schoemaker, J; Frutos, O

    1978-01-01

    Contraceptive use, source of contraception, history of abortion, current pregnancy intention, and fertility rates are evaluated for a national sample of women using data from the Paraguay Contraceptive Prevalence Survey, conducted in 1977. The survey found that 15.5 percent of all women aged 15--44 and 23.6 percent of ever-married women were using effective contraceptive methods. The urban/rural difference in contraceptive use paralleled fertility differentials: over 40 percent of ever-married women were using contraception in Greater Asuncion and other urban areas compared with 15 percent in rural areas. Overall, the data indicate that high-parity rural women have the greatest need for family planning services in Paraguay.

  5. Knowledge, attitude and practice of pharmacists and health-care workers regarding oral contraceptives correct usage, side-effects and contraindications.

    PubMed

    Sattari, M; Mokhtari, Z; Jabari, H; Mashayekhi, S O

    2013-06-01

    Despite the success of the Iranian family planning programme, the number of unwanted pregnancies remains high. To investigate whether health workers in Tabriz are providing correct information and counselling about OCP use, the current study was planned to examine the level of knowledge, attitude and practice of OCP providers. A sample of 150 health-care workers in health houses and 150 community/hospital pharmacists answered a questionnaire about knowledge of correct use of OCP, side-effects, contraindications, danger signs/symptoms and non-contraceptive benefits, and whether they counselled patients about these subjects. Knowledge of pharmacists and health workers was not as high as expected and in many topics they were counselling patients even when they had incorrect knowledge and in other areas they were not providing information to patients despite having the correct knowledge. Better continuing education for OCP providers and especially for pharmacists seems necessary. PMID:24975184

  6. Hormonal contraceptives and travel to high altitude.

    PubMed

    Keyes, Linda E

    2015-03-01

    Women frequently ask about the safety and efficacy of using hormonal contraception (HC), either oral contraceptive pills (OC) or other forms, when traveling to high altitude locales. What are the risks and benefits of using HC at high altitude? Does HC affect acclimatization, exercise performance, or occurrence of acute mountain sickness? This article reviews current data regarding the risks and benefits of HC at high altitude, both demonstrated and theoretical, with the aim of helping health care providers to advise women traveling above 2500 meters. Most healthy women can safely use HC when traveling to high altitude, but should be aware of the potential risks and inconveniences.

  7. Hormonal contraceptives and travel to high altitude.

    PubMed

    Keyes, Linda E

    2015-03-01

    Women frequently ask about the safety and efficacy of using hormonal contraception (HC), either oral contraceptive pills (OC) or other forms, when traveling to high altitude locales. What are the risks and benefits of using HC at high altitude? Does HC affect acclimatization, exercise performance, or occurrence of acute mountain sickness? This article reviews current data regarding the risks and benefits of HC at high altitude, both demonstrated and theoretical, with the aim of helping health care providers to advise women traveling above 2500 meters. Most healthy women can safely use HC when traveling to high altitude, but should be aware of the potential risks and inconveniences. PMID:25759908

  8. Acute Oral Toxicity and Histopathological Study of Combination of Endosulfan and Cypermethrin in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Jaya; Mohineesh; Ray, Ruma; Dogra, T. D.; Raina, Anupuma

    2013-01-01

    Background: Endosulfan, a neurotoxic organochlorine insecticide and cypermethrin, a synthetic pyrethroid insecticide used to control pests in domestic, industrial, and agricultural situations. Materials and Methods: The present study was carried out to investigate the acute oral toxicity, behavioral and histopathological changes of combination of endosulfan and cypermethrin in albino rats. According to Miller and Tainter analysis method, at 48 h, LD50 value of combination of endosulfan and cypermethrin (ratio 1:1) in rats was found to be 691.83 mg/kg bw by oral gavage. Results: When combination of both these pesticides was administered orally at concentration of 103.72 mg/kg bw, 172.95 mg/kg bw and 207.50 mg/kg bw, respectively, as a single dose, no significant changes in behavior of rats was observed, neither in dosed nor in control group of rats. Combination of endosulfan- and cypermethrin-treated rats showed mild histopathological changes in liver and kidney in group IV (207.50 mg/kg BW) as compared to the control. However, no significant changes were observed in brain and small intestine at either dose of combination of endosulfan and cypermethrin with respect to control. Conclusion: Thus, the present study, first of its kind in India, demonstrated the oral toxicity, behavioral, and histo-architectual alterations after induction of combination of endosulfan and cypermethrin at acute doses in Wistar rats. PMID:23833440

  9. [Choice of contraception for the diabetic woman].

    PubMed

    Athea, N; Kuttenn, F

    1983-01-01

    The absolute need to limit and program pregnancies in diabetic women demands choice of an adequate contraceptive method. Combined oral contraceptives (OCs) do not seem appropriate because of their diabetogenic effects and the added vascular risks they present to already fragile women. The diabetogenic effects of combined OCs are believed to result from a reduced number and affinity of insulin receptors, augmented secretion of STH, vitamin B6 deficiency, or hepatic effects. Some progestagens have been shown to stimulate deleterious effects of estrogens on OCs. The estrogen component of OCs is associated with elevation of triglyceride levels and stimulation of very low density lipoprotein synthesis. To these vascular risks are added an augmented blood pressure which reaches hypertensive levels in 50% of cases. The effects of synthetic estrogens on coagulation factors and vessel walls have been well deomonstrated. Macrodosed progestagen pills taken in 20-day cycles appear to be an interesting alternative, but those with the most constant antigonadotropic activity are derived from nortestosterone and all have to some degree an anabolizing androgenic effect which may result in weight gain. Derivatives of 17-hydroxyprogesterone appear to be without secondary metabolic effects. Cyproterone acetate should be evaluated as a possible OC for diabetic women. Continuous-dose progestagen micropills are highly recommended for diabetic women because of their excellent metabolic tolerance. The action of this type of pills is essentially peripheral. The pill may cause menstrual irregularity, spotting, or amenorrhea, and an increased rate of ectopic pregnancy. The Pearl index is between .8-2/1009 IUDs are a possibility for diabetic women, but because of their increased vulnerability to infection, such women should be carefully screened for prior adnexial or uterine infection, the device should be inserted in completely aseptic conditions, the woman's hygiene should be impeccable, the

  10. What's wrong with contraception?

    PubMed

    1994-01-01

    A "reader's exchange" question solicited information on how readers respond when asked what is wrong with contraception. One letter-writer maintained that the use of contraception prohibits true love, total commitment, and complete acceptance on the part of a married couple. Contraception attempts to create a utopia and obviates the pain and suffering which are necessary in order to find true love and true happiness.

  11. FPIA helps expand contraceptive services.

    PubMed

    Groot, H

    1984-01-01

    Since the beginning in 1971 of the Planned Parenthood Federation of America's international program, Family Planning International Assistance (FPIA), US$54 million has been contributed in direct financial support for the operation of over 300 family planning programs in 51 countries; over 3000 institutions in 115 countries have been supplied with family planning commodities, including over 600 million condoms, 120 cycles of oral contraceptives, and 4 million IUD; and about 1 million contraceptive clients were served by FPIA funded projects in 1982 aone. Since 1971, however, the world's population has increased from 3.7 billion to around 4.7 billion people. About 85 million people are added to the world each year. There is consensus that without organized family planning programs, today's world population would be even higher. FPIA measures its progress in terms of expanding the availability of contraceptive services in devloping countries. FPIA supported projects have helped make services available in areas previously lacking them, and has helped involve a wide variety of organizations, such as women's groups, youth organizations, and Red Cross Societies, in family planning services. A prime concern of FPIA, which has limited resources, is what happens to projects once FPIA support is terminated. FPIA has been paying attention to local income generation to help projects become more self-supporting and to increas staff members' management skills. The more successful income-generating schemes appear to be directly related to family planning, selling contraceptives and locally produced educational materials, and charging fees for family planning and related medical services and tuition for training courses. FPIA funded to projects use management by objectives (MBO) to help improve management skills. MBO helps grantees improve their ability to set objectives, plan, monitor, report, and do day-to-day project management.

  12. Current contraceptive status among women aged 15-44: United States, 2011-2013.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Kimberly; Daugherty, Jill; Jones, Jo

    2014-12-01

    Nearly all women use contraception at some point in their lifetimes, although at any given time they may not be using contraception for reasons such as seeking pregnancy, being pregnant, or not being sexually active. Using data from the 2011-2013 National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) on contraceptive use in the month of the interview, this report provides a snapshot of current contraceptive status among women aged 15-44 in the United States. In addition to describing use of any method by age, Hispanic origin and race, and educational attainment, patterns of use are described for the four most commonly used contraceptive methods: the oral contraceptive pill, female sterilization, the male condom, and long-acting reversible contraceptives, which include contraceptive implants and intrauterine devices.

  13. The use of contraception for patients after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Ostrowska, Lucyna; Lech, Medard; Stefańska, Ewa; Jastrzębska-Mierzyńska, Marta; Smarkusz, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Obesity in women of reproductive age is a serious concern regarding reproductive health. In many cases of infertility in obese women, reduction of body weight may lead to spontaneous pregnancy, without the need for more specific methods of treatment. Bariatric surgery is safe and is the most effective method for body weight reduction in obese and very obese patients. In practice there are two bariatric techniques; gastric banding, which leads to weight loss through intake restriction, and gastric bypass, leads to weight loss through food malabsorption. Gastric bypass surgery (the more frequently performed procedure), in most cases, leads to changes in eating habits and may result in vomiting, diarrhea and rapid body mass reduction. There are reliable data describing the continuous increase in the number of women who are trying to conceive, or are already pregnant, following bariatric surgery. Most medical specialists advise women to avoid pregnancy within 12-18 months after bariatric surgery. This allows for time to recover sufficiency from the decreased absorption of nutrients caused by the bariatric surgery. During this period there is a need for the use of reliable contraception. As there is a risk for malabsorption of hormones taken orally, the combined and progestogen-only pills are contraindicated, and displaced by non-oral hormonal contraception or non-hormonal methods, including intrauterine devices and condoms. PMID:27629135

  14. Contraception: Efficacy, Risks, Continuation Rates, and Use in High-Risk Women.

    PubMed

    Batur, Pelin; Bowersox, Natalie; McNamara, Megan

    2016-08-01

    The clinical update serves as a brief review of recently published, high-impact, and potentially practice-changing journal articles summarized for our readers. Topics include menopause, sexual dysfunction, breast health, contraception, osteoporosis, and cardiovascular disease. In this clinical update, we selected recent publications relevant to the use of contraceptive methods. We highlight articles on continuation rates of long-acting reversible contraception versus nonlong-acting methods, updated risks of intrauterine devices, use of estrogen-containing contraceptives during anticoagulation for venous thromboembolic events, and the efficacy of oral and emergency contraception in women with elevated body mass index. PMID:27438879

  15. Use of long-acting reversible contraceptives to reduce the rate of teen pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Rome, Ellen

    2015-11-01

    Long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs) are safe for use in adolescents and do not rely on compliance or adherence for effectiveness. Continuation rates are higher and pregnancy rates are lower for adolescent users of LARCs compared with short-acting methods such as oral contraceptives. Similarly, repeat pregnancy rates are lower when LARCs are used compared with other forms of contraception. Myths and misconceptions about LARCs and other contraceptives remain a barrier to their use. Health care providers are in a unique position to provide confidential care to adolescents, and should provide education to them about the various contraceptive options, especially LARCs.

  16. Television and contraception.

    PubMed

    Klein, L

    1986-01-01

    This article consists of excerpts from a speach made on October 19th at the 1986 annual meeting of the Association of Planned Parenthood Professionals by Dr. Luella Klein, President of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) between 1984-85. The speaker described the reaction of US television network to the ACOG's request that the networks air a public service announcement encouraging responsible sexual behavior among the nation's young people. In 1984 the ACOG initiated a public information program aimed at reducing the high number of unwanted births among young people. The ACOG with the help of an advertising agency developed a 27-second public service announcement stressing responsible parenthood and informing young people that they could write or call for further information. A booklet, entitled "Facts," was prepared for distribution to those who inquired. It advised young people to consider postponing sexual intercourse but to use the most effective methods of contraception if they decided to be sexually active. Oral contraceptives for females and condoms for males were recommended as the most effective methods. When the 3 major television networks, i.e., the American Broadcasting Company (ABC), the National Broadcasting Company (NBC), and the Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS), were requested to carry the announcement, all 3 networks claimed the announcement was too controversial to air. These same networks do not hesitate to show blatant, irresponsible sexual behavior repeatedly during their entertainment programming, and commercials with sexual innuendos are routinely accepted for airing by the networks. In July, 1986, the ACOG called a news conference in New York City to inform the news media about the rejection of the announcement by the networks. The conference stimulated considerable interest, and the story was carried by many newspapers and by radio and television news programs. Many of the news accounts of the story contained

  17. Comparison between Fluconazole with Oral Protexin Combination and Fluconazole in the Treatment of Vulvovaginal Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Nouraei, S.; Amir Ali Akbari, S.; Jorjani, M.; Alavi Majd, H.; Afrakhteh, M.; Ghafoorian, A.; Tafazzoli Harandi, H.

    2012-01-01

    Background. According to the limited studies reporting new treatments for vulvovaginal candidiasis, this study was designed to compare the combination of fluconazole and oral protexin with fluconazole in the treatment of vulvovaginal candidiasis. Methods. A double-blind clinical trial was conducted, involving 90 women who were referred to the gynecology clinic. Vulvovaginal candidiasis was diagnosed with itching, cheesy vaginal discharge, and any one of the following: dysuria, pH < 4.5, dyspareunia, vulvar erythema, or vulvar edema and if branched hyphae and Candida buds were visible after addition of KOH 10% in the culture and the result of cultivation in Sabouraud's dextrose agar medium was positive. Patients were randomly classified into two groups Absence of discharge, itching, and negative culture results 5–7 days after completion of treatment indicated treatment success. Data in this study were analyzed using the SPSS version 17.0 software. Results. The combinations, fluconazole-oral protexin and fluconazole-placebo, were equally effective in reduction of complaints and symptoms, but fluconazole-oral protexin combination elicited a better therapeutic response (χ2 = 0.01, P = 6.7). In addition, fluconazole-oral protexin combination treatment demonstrated better recovery time (t = −2.04, P = 0.04). Conclusion. This study demonstrated that complementary treatment with probiotic Lactobacillus increased the efficacy of fluconazole in treatment of vulvovaginal candidiasis. Further research is recommended. PMID:23119175

  18. Male Adolescent Contraceptive Utilization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkel, Madelon Lubin; Finkel, David J.

    1978-01-01

    The contraceptive utilization of a sample of sexually active, urban, high school males (Black, Hispanic, and White) was examined by anonymous questionnaire. Contraceptive use was haphazard, but White males tended to be more effective contraceptors than the other two groups. Reasons for nonuse were also studied. (Author/SJL)

  19. Social marketing of contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Schellstede, W P; Derr, B B

    1986-12-01

    Application of commercial marketing techniques has not only increased awareness, acceptability, and use of modern contraceptives in developing countries, but also overcome logistic problems in service delivery. The ability of contraceptive social marketing to reach large numbers and to treat contraceptives as common consumer products has helped to diminish social and religious constraints associated with family planning. Each contraceptive social marketing program is built around a theme tailored to meet specific cultural, social, and management requirements. The primary target populations are those who cannot afford regular commercial products and those who are not adequately reached by government programs. In countries such as Sri Lanka and Jamaica, profit is not a primary sales objective and retail prices are highly subsidized to make products affordable to low-income people. In contrast, the Colombian and Thai programs use contraceptive social marketing to help offset the operating costs of rural community-based programs and seek profits. The most impressive contraceptive social marketing sales performances have been recorded in Bangladesh, Colombia, Egypt, and Jamaica. The main reason contraceptive social marketing is more cost-efficient than other modes of contraceptive distribution is that the cost of product delivery is assumed by the commercial system. Although there has been some interest in making these programs self-sufficient financially, this step has tended to undermine the purpose of serving lower income groups. PMID:12341233

  20. Contraceptive failure in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Duolao

    2002-09-01

    This study examines patterns and differentials of contraceptive failure rates by method and characteristics of users, using the Chinese Two-per-Thousand Fertility Survey data. The results show that contraceptive failure rates for modern methods including sterilization are some of the highest in the world. The first year failure rates are 4.2% for male sterilization, 0.7% for female sterilization, 10.3% for IUD, 14.5% for pill, and 19.0% for condom. There are also some differentials in contraceptive failure rates by users' sociodemographic and fertility characteristics. Contraceptive failure rate declines with women's age for all reversible methods. Rural women have higher sterilization, IUD, and condom contraceptive failure rates than urban women. Women with two or more children have a higher failure rate for sterilization methods but have lower failure rates for other methods.

  1. Contraception and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W; Cornette, Jerome; Sliwa, Karen; Pieper, Petronella G; Veldtman, Gruschen R; Johnson, Mark R

    2015-07-14

    Contraceptive counselling should begin early in females with heart disease, preferably directly after the start of menstruation. In coming to a decision about the method of contraception, the following issues should be considered: (i) the risk of pregnancy for the mother and the consequences of an unplanned pregnancy; (ii) the risks of the contraceptive method; (iii) failure rates; (iv) the non-contraceptive benefits; (v) the availability; (vi) the individual's preferences; (vii) protection against infection; and (viii) costs. In some women with heart disease, the issues may be complex and require the input of both a cardiologist and an obstetrician (or other feto-maternal expert) to identify the optimal approach. No studies have been performed in women with heart disease to investigate the relative risks and benefits of different contraceptive methods.

  2. Contraceptive product advertising.

    PubMed

    Kastor, A

    1985-07-01

    In the US, all national broadcast networks refuse to accept ads for contraceptive products. About 10 years ago, the National Association of Broadcasters (NAB), a trade association, inserted a ban on contraceptive ads in its advertising code for member stations. The ban was voluntary, but all NAB stations adhered to it. When the NAB dropped its advertising code in 1982, for legal reasons unrelated to contraceptive advertising, individual networks established their own codes. These codes continued the ban on contraceptives along with bans on ads for cigarettes, X-rated movies, sex magazines, and astrology services. In recent years, a few local radio and television stations and cable networks began accepting contraceptive ads. The ads, which are tasteful and straightforward, met with little or no public disapproval. Given that the national television networks through their programming willingly expose viewers to an estimated 9230 sexual acts or references a year, it is hard to understand why they persist in refusing to air contraceptive ads or to allow any references to contraceptive use in their programming. There are some hopeful signs. A number of national organizations are now publicly urging the networks to drop their ban. These organizations include the American College of Nurse-Midwives, the American Jewish Congress, and the Society for Adolescent Medicine. The Center for Population Options recently organized a task force to promote contraceptive advertising. The task force is composed of representatives from a wide range of national organizations, including the American Public Health Association and the National Urban League. The task force developed guidelines for the production and selection of contraceptive ads. The guidelines state that ads must provide accurate and clear information on product effectiveness, present comparisons with other products fairly, advise users to read all instructions, and inform listeners if there is an effectiveness waiting

  3. Enhanced hepatocarcinogenicity by combined inhalation and oral exposures to N,N-dimethylformamide in male rats.

    PubMed

    Ohbayashi, Hisao; Umeda, Yumi; Senoh, Hideki; Kasai, Tatsuya; Kano, Hirokazu; Nagano, Kasuke; Arito, Heihachiro; Fukushima, Shoji

    2009-02-01

    N,N-Dimethylformamide (DMF), a ubiquitous contaminant in living and working environments, enters the human body by inhalation, as well as by oral and dermal routes of exposure. In order to provide bioassay data for carcinogenic risk assessment of humans exposed to DMF by multiple routes of exposure, hepatocarcinogenic effect of combined inhalation and oral exposures of rats to DMF was examined. A group of 50 male F344 rats, 6-week-old, was exposed by inhalation to 0 (clean air), 200, or 400 ppm (v/v) of DMF vapor-containing air for 6 hr/day and 5 days/week during a 104-week period, and each inhalation group was given ad libitum DMF-formulated drinking water at 0, 800 or 1,600 ppm (w/w) for 104 weeks. Incidences of hepatocellular adenomas and carcinomas and their combined incidences were significantly increased in the combined-exposure groups compared with the untreated control group or each of the inhalation-alone and oral-alone groups with matching concentrations. Incidences of hepatocellular adenomas and carcinomas induced by the combined exposures were greater than the sum of the two incidences of the hepatocellular adenomas and carcinomas induced by the single-route exposures through inhalation and ingestion. The combined exposures enhanced tumor malignancy. It was concluded that the combined inhalation and oral exposures markedly enhance the incidences and malignancy of hepatocellular tumors, suggesting that the hepatocarcinogenic effect of the combined exposures is greater than the effect that would be expected under the assumption that the two effects of single-route exposures through inhalation and drinking are additive. PMID:19182435

  4. Contraceptive use and sexual behavior in obese women.

    PubMed

    Kaneshiro, Bliss

    2012-12-01

    Obesity and unintended pregnancy differentially affect women based on sociodemographic factors. Because of the overlap of these factors, obesity and unintended pregnancy have been described as colliding epidemics. Understanding the relationship between obesity and unintended pregnancy, contraceptive use, and sexual behavior is important in improving the reproductive health of women given the increasing weight demographic. A review of the literature reveals contraceptive use versus nonuse does not differ in women of different body weights. Obese women use oral contraceptives less than normal weight women and are more likely to use procedural methods like sterilization. No difference was noted in most types of sexual behavior for women of different body weights.

  5. Debate on the use of hormonal contraceptives during lactation.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, S; Nygren, K G

    1980-04-01

    Contraceptive steroids taken during the lactation period will, in small measure, be transferred to the milk. The side effects from estrogens administered during lactation are enough to contraindicate their use at this time. Low-dose gestagens are sufficient to achieve contraceptive effect. A study of 6-7-year-old children whose mothers took OCs (oral contraceptives) during lactation is being conducted currently to ascertain longterm side effects or possible effects outside the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. However, at this time the minipill of 30 mcg d-norgestrel daily is considered safe for a nursing mother and her baby.

  6. Evidence based contraceptive choices.

    PubMed

    Scott, Alison; Glasier, Anna

    2006-10-01

    People who attend for contraceptive advice have usually formulated an idea of the type of contraceptive that will suit them best. They may wish to use a method that is long, short or medium acting. These are defined as follows: Long-acting method requires renewal no more frequently than every 3 months (e.g. injectable or intrauterine). Short-acting method used daily or with every act of intercourse (e.g. pills, condoms) Medium-acting method requires renewal weekly or monthly (e.g. ring, patch). For men the choice is limited to condoms or vasectomy. Some women do not wish to use hormonal preparations or have an intrauterine device (IUD) or implant inserted. There may also be cultural influences making certain methods of contraception unacceptable. Each of these factors influences the final decision of which method of contraception is decided upon. In addition to taking a full medical and sexual history to identify any risks to the individual's health, which might be increased by a particular contraceptive, time must be spent discussing the options available. It is important to ensure that there is a full understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of each method. The most successful contraceptive method is likely to be the one that the woman (or man) chooses, rather than the one the clinician chooses for them. Access for women to contraception can be improved by having convenient clinic times and service developments such as nurse prescribing and Patient Group Directions.

  7. The effects of contraception on female poverty.

    PubMed

    Browne, Stephanie P; LaLumia, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Poverty rates are particularly high among households headed by single women, and childbirth is often the event preceding these households' poverty spells. This paper examines the relationship between legal access to the birth control pill and female poverty. We rely on exogenous cross-state variation in the year in which oral contraception became legally available to young, single women. Using census data from 1960 to 1990, we find that having legal access to the birth control pill by age 20 significantly reduces the probability that a woman is subsequently in poverty. We estimate that early legal access to oral contraception reduces female poverty by 0.5 percentage points, even when controlling for completed education, employment status, and household composition.

  8. Factors that influence contraceptive use amongst women in Vanga health district, Democratic Republic of Congo

    PubMed Central

    Izale, Kangale; Fina, Jean-Pierre L.; Tumbo, John

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Contraception is often necessary in order to plan for children and without it there is a risk of unplanned pregnancies. In the Democratic Republic of Congo, this often results in abortions by untrained persons with resultant morbidity and mortality. Aim To investigate the factors that influence contraceptive use amongst women of childbearing age in the Vanga health zone. Methods Cross-sectional survey using interviewer-administered questionnaires. Results Of the 384 women recruited, a majority (46.1%) were in the 31–40 year age group; 52% had reached primary school and 88% did not have formal employment. One hundred and forty of the participants reported current use of contraception, with 60% of them using modern methods of contraception; 36.1% of them had begun using contraception before the age of 20; and the most common methods were oral contraceptive pills and injection, each accounting for 22.9%. There was variation in the duration of contraceptive use and the main reason for using contraception was to space children. Of the participants, 20.7% had been using contraception for more than two years. Seventy-seven (31.5%) of the women reported they did not use contraception because of a fear of side effects. Forty-four (18%) reported that they are unable to afford contraception, 38 (15.6%) had husbands who disapproved of contraceptive usage, 26 (10.6%) had a fear of infertility, 18 (7.4%) practised a religion that did not allow them to use contraception and 12 of the women (4.9%) did not use contraception because it was unavailable to them. Conclusion Barriers to contraception in our study were fears of side effects and infertility, cost, male partner's objection, unavailability of contraception and religious beliefs. PMID:26245398

  9. The use of contraception among abortion applicants.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoni, D; Jain, S C

    1985-01-01

    consisted mainly of young women whose parental attitude had deterred them from seeking help with birth control. The 181 women who had used some form of contraception within the last 6 months or earlier but not at the time of conception were mainly over age 17. More than half of them were unmarried. Less than 1/3 had elementary school education, and half had high school or more education. The complaint of side effects caused by the method was the most common reason for non-use among this group. In most instances the method complained about was oral contraception. More than half of the consistent users were married and almost 3/4 had high school or better education. The contraceptive that appears to have had the highest failure rate among the consistent users was the condom. Almost 1/3 of the women claimed that they had depended on the condom. The oral contraceptive, the IUD, and irreversible methods such as tubal ligation and vasectomy had a failure rate of 2% each. PMID:4005776

  10. Effect of Village Midwife Program on Contraceptive Prevalence and Method Choice in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Emily H.; Frankenberg, Elizabeth; Fried, Bruce J.; Thomas, Duncan; Wheeler, Stephanie B.; Paul, John E.

    2014-01-01

    Indonesia established its Village Midwife Program in 1989 to combat high rates of maternal mortality. The program’s goals were to address gaps in access to reproductive health care for rural women, increase access to and use of family planning services, and broaden the mix of available contraceptive methods. In this study, we use longitudinal data from the Indonesia Family Life Survey to examine the program’s effect on contraceptive practice. We find that the program did not affect overall contraceptive prevalence but did affect method choice. Over time, for women using contraceptives, midwives were associated with increased odds of injectable contraceptive use and decreased odds of oral contraceptive and implant use. Although the Indonesian government had hoped that the Village Midwife Program would channel women into using longer-lasting methods, the women’s “switching behavior” indicates that the program succeeded in providing additional outlets for and promoting the use of injectable contraceptives. PMID:24323659

  11. Contraception and Birth Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... health, age, frequency of sexual activity, number of sexual partners, desire to have children in the future, and family history of certain diseases. Individuals should consult their health care provider to ... methods of contraception include: Barrier —physically ...

  12. Post abortion contraception.

    PubMed

    Gemzell-Danielsson, Kristina; Kopp, Helena Kallner

    2015-11-01

    A safe induced abortion has no impact on future fertility. Ovulation may resume as early as 8 days after the abortion. There is no difference in return to fertility after medical or surgical abortion. Most women resume sexual activity soon after an abortion. Contraceptive counseling and provision should therefore be an integrated part of the abortion services to help women avoid another unintended pregnancy and risk, in many cases an unsafe, abortion. Long-acting reversible contraceptive methods that includes implants and intrauterine contraception have been shown to be the most effective contraceptive methods to help women prevent unintended pregnancy following an abortion. However, starting any method is better than starting no method at all. This Special Report will give a short guide to available methods and when they can be started after an induced abortion.

  13. Post abortion contraception.

    PubMed

    Gemzell-Danielsson, Kristina; Kopp, Helena Kallner

    2015-11-01

    A safe induced abortion has no impact on future fertility. Ovulation may resume as early as 8 days after the abortion. There is no difference in return to fertility after medical or surgical abortion. Most women resume sexual activity soon after an abortion. Contraceptive counseling and provision should therefore be an integrated part of the abortion services to help women avoid another unintended pregnancy and risk, in many cases an unsafe, abortion. Long-acting reversible contraceptive methods that includes implants and intrauterine contraception have been shown to be the most effective contraceptive methods to help women prevent unintended pregnancy following an abortion. However, starting any method is better than starting no method at all. This Special Report will give a short guide to available methods and when they can be started after an induced abortion. PMID:26619082

  14. Dilemmas of public sector contraceptive development.

    PubMed

    Zeidenstein, G

    1993-02-01

    The International Symposium on Recent Advances in Female Reproductive Health Care was organized in Helsinki, Finland. The symposium focused attention on female reproductive health care as a central element in the provision of services for moderating unwanted fertility. The most relevant aspects to biomedical scientists engaged in developing contraceptives intended primarily for use in publicly financed delivery programs include efficacy, cost and marginal utility, logistics, and abuse. At present the most effective methods are the NORPLANT contraceptive subdermal implant system and the Copper T 380A intrauterine device. NORPLANT has proved to be as effective as sterilization, and the TCu 380A is almost that effective. Researchers have suggested that the additional effectiveness of modern methods influences fertility only marginally as compared with the enormous impact from using any method at all. This translates into 18 births for no contraceptive use; 3 births for abstinence or withdrawal; 2 for condoms; 1 for oral contraceptives (OCs); and none for the IUD. In developing the Copper T IUDs and the NORPLANT system, the Population Council and those who participated in its development of contraceptives were concerned about the ultimate price to the public sector and produced prices of about US $1 for the TCu 380A and US $23 for the NORPLANT system when they are provided to developing country family planning programs. The corresponding private sector prices in the USA are about US $150 for the TCu 380A and US $300 for NORPLANT. The NORPLANT system is viewed by some US officials as a short-cut to solutions of larger social problems. When a woman was convicted of incorrigible child abuse, a judge suggested that she accept the NORPLANT system as an alternative to time in prison. The serious arguments leveled against IUDs, implants, OCs, and injectables have to be considered when trying to provide women with more effective and safer contraceptives.

  15. Adolescent women's contraceptive decision making.

    PubMed

    Weisman, C S; Plichta, S; Nathanson, C A; Chase, G A; Ensminger, M E; Robinson, J C

    1991-06-01

    A modified rational decision model incorporating salient events and social influences (particularly from sexual partners) is used to analyze adolescent women's consistent use of oral contraceptives (OCs) over a six-month period. Data are taken from a panel study of 308 clients of an inner-city family planning clinic. Expected OC use was computed for each subject on the basis of subjective expected utility (SEU) theory, and is found in multivariate analyses to be a significant predictor of actual OC use. In addition, variables representing baseline and follow-up partner influences, the salience of pregnancy for the subject, and positive side effects of OCs during the first months of use are found to predict OC use. Partner's support of OC use during follow-up and positive side effects of OCs are found to predict OC use among subjects for whom OC use was not the expected decision according to baseline SEU. Implications of the findings for models of adolescents' contraceptive behavior and for clinicians are discussed. PMID:1861049

  16. Adolescent women's contraceptive decision making.

    PubMed

    Weisman, C S; Plichta, S; Nathanson, C A; Chase, G A; Ensminger, M E; Robinson, J C

    1991-06-01

    A modified rational decision model incorporating salient events and social influences (particularly from sexual partners) is used to analyze adolescent women's consistent use of oral contraceptives (OCs) over a six-month period. Data are taken from a panel study of 308 clients of an inner-city family planning clinic. Expected OC use was computed for each subject on the basis of subjective expected utility (SEU) theory, and is found in multivariate analyses to be a significant predictor of actual OC use. In addition, variables representing baseline and follow-up partner influences, the salience of pregnancy for the subject, and positive side effects of OCs during the first months of use are found to predict OC use. Partner's support of OC use during follow-up and positive side effects of OCs are found to predict OC use among subjects for whom OC use was not the expected decision according to baseline SEU. Implications of the findings for models of adolescents' contraceptive behavior and for clinicians are discussed.

  17. The safety of modafinil in combination with oral ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol in humans.

    PubMed

    Sugarman, Dawn E; Poling, James; Sofuoglu, Mehmet

    2011-03-01

    Marijuana (cannabis) is the most widely used illicit substance globally, and cannabis use is associated with a range of adverse consequences. Currently, no medications have been proven to be effective for the treatment of cannabis addiction. The goals of this study were to examine the safety and efficacy of a potential treatment medication, modafinil, in combination with oral ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Twelve male and female occasional cannabis users participated in an outpatient double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Across four sessions, participants were randomly assigned to a sequence of four oral treatments: (1) 400 mg modafinil+placebo, (2) 15 mg THC+placebo, (3) 400 mg modafinil+15 mg THC, or (4) placebo+placebo. Outcome measures included heart rate, blood pressure, performance on the Rapid Visual Information Processing (RVIP), and the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test (HVLT), and subjective measures. Oral THC increased heart rate, and produced increased subjective ratings of feeling "high" and "sedated," as well as increased ratings of euphoria. Modafinil alone increased the Profiles of Mood States (POMS) subscales of vigor and tension. These findings support the safety of modafinil in combination with THC. The effects of modafinil in combination with a range of doses of THC need to be determined in future studies. PMID:21176784

  18. Contraceptive Hormone Use and Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shufelt, Chrisandra L.; Noel Bairey Merz, C.

    2009-01-01

    Contraceptive hormones, most commonly prescribed as oral contraceptives (OC), are a widely utilized method to prevent ovulation, implantation and therefore pregnancy. The Women’s Health Initiative demonstrated cardiovascular risk linked to menopausal hormone therapy among women without pre-existing cardiovascular disease, prompting review of the safety, efficacy and side effects of other forms of hormone therapy. A variety of basic science, animal and human data suggest that contraceptive hormones have anti-atheromatous effects, however relatively less is known regarding the impact on atherosclerosis, thrombosis, vasomotion and arrhythmogenesis. Newer generation OC formulations currently in use indicate no increased myocardial infarction (MI) risk for current users, but a persistent increased risk of venous thrombo-embolism (VTE). There are no cardiovascular data available for the newest generation contraceptive hormone formulations, including those that contain newer progestins that lower blood pressure, as well as the non-oral routes (topical and vaginal). Current guidelines indicate that, as with all medication, contraceptive hormones should be selected and initiated by weighing risks and benefits for the individual patient. Women 35 years and older should be assessed for cardiovascular risk factors including hypertension, smoking, diabetes, nephropathy and other vascular diseases including migraines, prior to use. Existing data are mixed with regard to possible protection from OC for atherosclerosis and cardiovascular events; longer-term cardiovascular follow-up of menopausal women with regard to prior OC use, including subgroup information regarding adequacy of ovulatory cycling, the presence of hyperandrogenic conditions, and the presence of prothrombotic genetic disorders is needed to address this important issue. PMID:19147038

  19. Steroid contraceptive use and pregnancy outcome.

    PubMed

    Pardthaisong, T; Gray, R H; McDaniel, E B; Chandacham, A

    1988-07-01

    Contraceptive use in relation to pregnancy outcome was studied in 8,816 births in Chiang Mai, northern Thailand, by examination of newborn infants and interviews with their mothers. Four thousand twenty-three women used no contraception before the index pregnancy, 1,229 used the injectable contraceptive Depo Provera (DMPA), and 3,038 used oral contraceptives prior to or during pregnancy. No differences were observed between these groups with respect to still births, multiple pregnancies, and birthweight. Women who used oral contraceptives had unexpectedly low rates of major defects and may have been affected by self-selection bias, whereas the noncontraceptors had rates similar to other populations. There was a significantly increased association of polysyndactyly among infants of DMPA users relative to the other groups, which was most pronounced in offspring of women under age 30 years, and persisted after exclusion of subjects with a family history or infants with multiple abnormalities. However, in five out of the ten polysyndactyly cases, the last injection of DMPA occurred more than 9 months before conception, and only three cases had definite gestational exposure. The association of chromosomal anomalies was also significantly increased in infants of mothers who used DMPA. The unrelated nature of these defects, the lack of confirmation from other studies, the distant preconceptional exposure to DMPA in many cases, and chance effects due to multiple statistical comparisons make a causal association unlikely. Other birth defects that had been previously reported in some publications to be associated with progestational steroid exposure, such as neural tube defects, heart malformations, and limb reduction defects, were not found in this study.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. International standardization of mechanical contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Mellstam, S

    1983-06-01

    At least 12 countries have regulations for condoms, and because of the complicated regulations relating to condoms the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) was asked to create a committee for contraceptives. Its objective is to promote the development of standards throughout the world to help the international exchange of goods and services. Following discussions between the World Health Organization (WHO) and ISO it was decided in 1974 to establish a technical ISO committee that would deal with international standards for mechanical contraceptives, comprising condoms, diaphragms, and IUDs. It was also decided that spermicides and oral contraceptives (OCs) should be excluded from the ISO effort, but that they should fall within the responsibility of WHO. The committee, entitled ISO/TC 157 Mechanical Contraceptives, was represented by 35 member countries in 1982. The object of standardizing condoms is to obtain a satisfactory quality that can be accepted throughout the world. To achieve that purpose, acceptable test methods and associated limit requirements and values must be determined, along with rules for storage, packaging, and labeling. The most important factors in determining condom quality are the need to reach agreement on an acceptable number of holes in the condom and the ability to establish limit values for the mechanical properties of the condom. Specific requirements regarding dimensions, resistance to storage, packaging, labeling, and appropriate storage are also important. Up to 1982 the work of ISO for condoms resulted in 8 published international standards, of which 6 deal with test methods, 1 with packaging and labeling, and 1 with storage. Agreement has also been reached within the ISO committee on an additional 3 draft standards. Due to the comparatively small use of diaphragms, standardization efforts in this area do not have the highest priority. ISO/TC 157 has formulated 10 drafts which are being prepared for distribution to

  1. Contraceptive product advertising.

    PubMed

    Kastor, A

    1985-07-01

    In the US, all national broadcast networks refuse to accept ads for contraceptive products. About 10 years ago, the National Association of Broadcasters (NAB), a trade association, inserted a ban on contraceptive ads in its advertising code for member stations. The ban was voluntary, but all NAB stations adhered to it. When the NAB dropped its advertising code in 1982, for legal reasons unrelated to contraceptive advertising, individual networks established their own codes. These codes continued the ban on contraceptives along with bans on ads for cigarettes, X-rated movies, sex magazines, and astrology services. In recent years, a few local radio and television stations and cable networks began accepting contraceptive ads. The ads, which are tasteful and straightforward, met with little or no public disapproval. Given that the national television networks through their programming willingly expose viewers to an estimated 9230 sexual acts or references a year, it is hard to understand why they persist in refusing to air contraceptive ads or to allow any references to contraceptive use in their programming. There are some hopeful signs. A number of national organizations are now publicly urging the networks to drop their ban. These organizations include the American College of Nurse-Midwives, the American Jewish Congress, and the Society for Adolescent Medicine. The Center for Population Options recently organized a task force to promote contraceptive advertising. The task force is composed of representatives from a wide range of national organizations, including the American Public Health Association and the National Urban League. The task force developed guidelines for the production and selection of contraceptive ads. The guidelines state that ads must provide accurate and clear information on product effectiveness, present comparisons with other products fairly, advise users to read all instructions, and inform listeners if there is an effectiveness waiting

  2. Male contraception: history and development.

    PubMed

    Kogan, Paul; Wald, Moshe

    2014-02-01

    Although the twentieth century has seen great strides in the development of female contraception, not a single new agent has been introduced as an approved method for common use for male contraception. Condoms (considered uncomfortable by some) and vasectomy (a permanent invasive procedure) are the only options provided to men, leaving an undue burden on women to bear contraceptive responsibility. Significant developments have, however, been made with regard to hormonal and nonhormonal contraception, and minor, reversible, procedural contraception. This article reviews the currently available, soon to be available, and theoretically possible methods of male contraception.

  3. Contraceptive needs of the adolescent.

    PubMed

    Steyn, Petrus S; Goldstuck, Norman D

    2014-08-01

    The provision of contraception to adolescents requires specific attention. Adolescents require contraceptive methods which are safe, effective and simple to use. While long-acting reversible contraceptive methods are preferable, they should have a choice and not be forced or mandated especially in situations where this may compromise safety. After counselling they should have the ability to choose any method of contraception. Under the appropriate circumstances, each method of contraception may have a place. This chapter will be devoted to evaluating the most current scientific rationale for the indication for use of each method of contraception in adolescents.

  4. Effect of a Low-Dose Contraceptive Patch on Efficacy, Bleeding Pattern, and Safety

    PubMed Central

    Wiegratz, Inka; Bassol, Susana; Weisberg, Edith; Mellinger, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    This Phase III, uncontrolled, open-label, multicenter study was conducted to investigate the contraceptive efficacy, bleeding pattern, and cycle control of a novel once-a-week contraceptive patch, delivering low-dose ethinyl estradiol (EE) and gestodene (GSD) at the same systemic exposure seen after oral administration of a combined oral contraceptive containing 0.02 mg EE/0.06 mg GSD. Participants were women aged 18 to 35 years, all of whom received the EE/GSD patch for 13 cycles each of 21 treatment days (one patch per week for 3 weeks) followed by a 7-day, patch-free interval. The primary efficacy variable was the occurrence of unintended pregnancies during the study period as assessed by life table analysis and the Pearl Index. Secondary efficacy variables were days with bleeding during four 90-day reference periods and during 1 treatment year, bleeding pattern, and cycle control. The Kaplan-Meier probability of contraceptive protection after 364 treatment days was 98.8% and the adjusted Pearl Index was 0.81. The percentage of participants with intracyclic bleeding/spotting decreased over time, from 11.4% to 6.8% in cycles 1 and 12, respectively. Almost all participants (range: 90.8%-97.6%) experienced withdrawal bleeding across the study period. Compliance was very high (mean: 97.9%; median: 100%). The most frequent adverse events were headache (9.5%) and application site reaction (8.5%); no clinically significant safety concerns were observed. Results suggest the EE/GSD patch is highly effective in preventing pregnancy. Menstrual bleeding pattern was favorable and within the ranges expected of a healthy female population. The patch was well tolerated and treatment compliance was high. PMID:24784719

  5. Triple Oral Antithrombotic Therapy in Atrial Fibrillation and Coronary Artery Stenting: Searching for the Best Combination.

    PubMed

    Elewa, Hazem; Ahmed, Dina; Barnes, Geoffrey D

    2016-09-01

    Patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) who are treated with oral anticoagulants often have concurrent coronary artery disease. Triple oral antithrombotic therapy (TOAT) is often necessity to prevent stent thrombosis or myocardial infarction associated with percutaneous coronary intervention or acute coronary syndrome in patients with comorbid coronary artery disease and AF. Although the use of TOAT (aspirin, clopidogrel, and warfarin) has excellent efficacy against thrombotic complications, this comes on the expense of increased bleeding risk. This review discusses potential strategies to improve TOAT benefit-risk ratio evidence from the literature. These strategies include: (1) dropping aspirin; (2) reducing the duration of TOAT; (3) switching warfarin to a direct oral anticoagulant (DOAC); (4) the use of DOAC in combination with a single antiplatelet agent; and (5) switching clopidogrel to a novel antiplatelet agent. Although dropping aspirin and reducing TOAT duration should be considered in selected AF patients at low risk of thrombosis, the role of DOACs and novel antiplatelets in TOAT has not been thoroughly studied, and there is limited evidence to support their use currently. Ongoing studies will provide safety and efficacy data to guide clinicians who frequently face the challenge of determining the best TOAT combination for their patients. PMID:27235831

  6. [The obese woman: pregnancy and contraception].

    PubMed

    Seffert, P

    1985-10-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for women in both pregnancy and contraception. Obesity per se does not cause sterility, but problems in gonadotropic function can arise during periods of rapid weight gain in bulimic episodes. Dysovulation is more common in such cases than amenorrhea. In established obesity, anovulation may occur, as demonstrated by the temperature curve and hormonal levels, but it is usually due to other factors such as ovarian polycystic syndrome or Cushing's syndrome. The main problems of obesity during pregnancy are carbohydrate metabolic disorders and hypertension. In 1 study, hypertension was found in 42.4% of pregnancies of obese women vs. 5.84% in controls; 22% of cases were severe, with blood pressure over 160/100. Carbohydrate metabolic difficulties were found in 11.8% of obese subjects vs. 1.2% of controls. The main consequence of maternal obesity on the child is macrosomy; occurring in 21.3% of births vs. 5.8% in controls. 5.1% of births to obese women are postmature vs. .7% in controls. The rate of cesareans for obese women is high. Improved fetal prognosis in pregnancies of obese women requires increased clinical surveillance for signs of hypertension or excessive weight gain and laboratory monitoring of glucose metabolism every month or even every 2 weeks. A sonogram should be done to detect macrosomy. A careful diet of 1200-1500 calories per day is recommended. 40% should be protein and 30% lipid. Rapid-absorption sugars should be excluded. Oral contraceptives appear to cause weight gain because estrogen stimulates the appetite and progestins have an anabolizing action. If weight gain exceeds 3 kg, a low dose pill and a restrictive diet should be recommended. OCs should be terminated if weight gain continues, and anomalies of glucose or lipid metabolism should be ruled out. Obesity constitutes a relative contraindication for use of combined OCs. Combined OCs may aggravate the obesity. Obesity on the other hand is a risk factor for

  7. Recasting image of contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Rimon Jg; Kiragu, K

    1993-03-01

    Even though contraceptives are linked to sex which, along with sensuality and peer acceptance, is used to market consumer goods, contraceptives are promoted in a hygienic, clinical way. Glamorous images which divert from adverse health effects are used to sell unhealthy goods, e.g., alcohol and cigarettes, but technical and intimidating promotion techniques centering on risks are used to promote family planning (FP) products and services which actually save the lives of mothers and children and improve their health. Until recently, only the medical system provided FP products and services so consumers identified them with illness and a help-seeking behavior. The image of contraceptives must be remolded to gain people's attention. To avoid instilling mistrust of a method in consumers, even those who believe in birth spacing, it is important for images to be positive and to reflect accurate information. In Indonesia, the Dualima condom has been linked to responsible fatherhood thereby creating a positive image and removing the negative image of a condom being linked to illicit sex. In the US, condom adds show the user in control, especially in reference to AIDS. Prior to promotion of any contraceptive, complete, clear communication and marketing plans are needed to identify and to focus on consumers' perceived needs. A survey in Egypt shows that the most important attributes of a contraceptive are ease of use, healthiness, and effectiveness and that Egyptians considered IUDs to best fit these attributes. Images of contraceptive users often determine whether potential users do choose to use contraceptives. For example, in Cameroon and the Philippines, female users are considered to be smart, rich, educated, confident and in control of their lives. In the Philippines, male users are perceived to be loving, caring, and considerate husbands. The mass medias can improve providers' public image as was the case in Turkey and Egypt.

  8. Gender Differences in Perception of Contraception Alternatives by Never-Married College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, Robert J.; Gold, Robert S.

    A study examined the perceptions of college students regarding 10 contraceptive methods, including the condom, douche, oral contraceptive, withdrawal, diaphragm, female sterilization, spermicidal foam, rhythm, male sterilization, and intrauterine device. A total of 285 females and 316 males responded to a questionnaire which had students rank each…

  9. Attitude of rural women towards contraceptive and its use.

    PubMed

    Jain, S; Singh, J V; Bhatnagar, M; Garg, S K; Chopra, H; Bajpai, S K

    1999-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the attitudes of rural women towards contraceptive use. 500 participants (each having a child under 2 years of age) were randomly selected from 50 villages. Information was collected through questionnaires. Results revealed that most of the mothers (78.8%) had knowledge of one or more modern methods of contraception. Knowledge levels were highest for condoms (55.6%), followed closely by sterilization methods (55.4%). Knowledge of oral pills and IUDs was found among 36.6% and 33.2% of the participants, respectively. As to current usage, condoms were the most commonly used method (10.8%), followed by IUDs (5.4%), oral pills (4.4%), and sterilization (3.6%). Obstacles to their adoption of contraceptive methods were hesitation (59.6%), nonavailability of a service provider (43.2%), fear of side effects (36.6%), and customs, disbelief, or external pressure (22%). This study revealed that the status of women in Indian villages, as reflected with their problems in adopting contraceptive methods, was quite low . Thus, the Indian government is encouraged to strengthen delivery services for contraceptive methods and to make women more aware of the realities of contraceptive use.

  10. Objections, confusion among pharmacists threaten access to emergency contraception.

    PubMed

    Cohen, S A

    1999-06-01

    Emergency contraception (EC) involves women taking a high dose of regular oral contraceptives very shortly after unprotected intercourse. Specifically, emergency contraceptive pills (ECPs) can prevent pregnancy if taken within 72 hours of intercourse in cases of known or suspected contraception failure or when no contraception was used. Adherence to this approach is now widely accepted as capable of dramatically contributing toward the reduction of unintended pregnancies and subsequent abortions. However, in the media and in political debates, ECPs are often confused with mifepristone (RU-486), which is clearly an abortion-inducing drug. The misconception that EC is a method of abortion must be corrected. For example, in some cases, pharmacists refuse to fill prescriptions for ECPs, presumably because they believe they are facilitating abortion. Wal-Mart, one of the country's largest drug retailers, has decided to not sell ECPs. A concerted public education effort is needed to make more people both aware and properly informed of EC in the US. Educational efforts targeted to physicians and women over the past several years appear to have already resulted in a marked increase in the knowledge and use of EC nationwide. Those efforts were likely bolstered by the 1998 US Food and Drug Administration approval, for the first time, of an oral contraception regimen to be packaged and marketed in the US specifically for postcoital use. PMID:12295186

  11. A simple, rapid and sensitive UFLC-MS/MS method for the quantification of oral contraceptive norgestrel in human plasma and its pharmacokinetic applications.

    PubMed

    Batta, N; Pigili, R K; Pallapothu, L M K; Yejella, R P

    2014-09-01

    A simple, rapid and sensitive ultra flow liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UFLC-MS/MS) assay for the determination of norgestrel in human plasma was developed using levonorgestrel D6 as an internal standard (IS). Norgestrel and IS were extracted from human plasma via liquid-liquid extraction. Chromatographic separation was achieved on a Zorbax XDB-Phenyl column under isocratic conditions. Detection was done by tandem mass spectrometry, operating in positive ion mode. The protonated precursor to product ion transitions monitored for norgestrel and IS were at m/z 313.30→245.40 and 319.00→251.30 respectively. The method was fully validated as per current regulatory guidelines. Anticoagulant counter ion effect was also assessed with K2EDTA and K3EDTA. The method was validated with a linearity range of 304.356-50 807.337 pg/mL having run time of 2.0 min per sample. The method has shown tremendous reproducibility with intra- and inter-day precision (%CV) less than 11.0% and intra- and inter-day accuracy less than 9.0% of nominal values. The validated method was applied to a pharmacokinetic study in human plasma samples generated after administrating a single oral dose of 0.3 mg norgestrel tablets to healthy female volunteers and has proved to be highly reliable for the analysis of clinical samples. PMID:24310360

  12. Introducing new contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Segal, S J; Coutinho, E

    1986-12-01

    At this time, private research efforts to discover new contraceptives are threatened. Drug companies, particularly in the US, have reduced their interest in contraceptive development due to concern over the rising cost of product liability insurance, the cost of lawsuits in defense of liability claims, and the fear of extremely high awards by juries in product liability cases. The current form of private-public collaboration, now threatened by the liability crisis, works under a few simple principles of agreement. Private industry agrees to supply its patented chemical compounds for assessment as contraceptive agents, to be willing to enter into negotiations with public sector organizations to develop the contraceptive drugs if initial tests warrant it, and to release compounds to another company if the patent-holder declines to proceed with contraceptive development. The public-sector program agrees to fund the studies, keep the industry informed, and maintain confidentiality. When the technology is discovered by the public sector and is of potential interest to private industry, the collaboration involves other issues. The public agency agrees to supply manufacturing know-how and all biological and clinical information, to license under applicable patents, and to permit cross reference to regulatory agency filings. Private industry agrees to use its best efforts to bring the product to market, to manufacture the product at reduced cost for public sector use, or to provide know-how for others to do so. It also agrees to assume product liability and to grant the public sector agency licenses to any patented improvement in its product. Contraceptive research both within and outside the US is feeling the effects of the US litigious atmosphere. Companies from abroad now wish to steer clear of contraceptive research, even though these companies would be prepared to meet the requirements of the Food and Drug Administration. Contraceptives, considered to be high risk

  13. An underage teenager who requests contraception.

    PubMed

    Rogers, A; Piegsa, K; Kerrigan, P

    1997-04-01

    A 14-year-old girl, Toni, and her 22-year-old boyfriend of 3 weeks present to the family practitioner seeking a prescription for oral contraception in anticipation of the couple's first act of sexual intercourse. Mike, Toni's first boyfriend, requests the contraception for Toni on her behalf. The physician is a longtime friend of Toni's parents and has known Toni since her birth. Drs. Kerrigan and Piegsa would both provide Toni with oral contraception and maintain physician-patient confidentiality, while Dr. Rogers would deny the request and inform the parents that Toni is at risk. Drs. Kerrigan and Piegsa emphasize the need to garner and maintain Toni's trust and to speak with her alone at subsequent meetings in the near future. That sexual intercourse between the two is technically rape must be explained, and the need to protect against sexually transmitted diseases and HIV must be stressed. Toni should be asked how relations are at home, whether she feels pressured by her partner, and discretely assessed with regard to her level of maturity. PMID:9206286

  14. Combined Oral Administration of Bovine Collagen Peptides with Calcium Citrate Inhibits Bone Loss in Ovariectomized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, JunLi; Wang, YiHu; Song, ShuJun; Wang, XiJie; Qin, YaYa; Si, ShaoYan; Guo, YanChuan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Collagen peptides (CPs) and calcium citrate are commonly used as bone health supplements for treating osteoporosis. However, it remains unknown whether the combination of oral bovine CPs with calcium citrate is more effective than administration of either agent alone. Methods Forty 12-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into five groups (n = 8) for once-daily intragastric administration of different treatments for 3 months at 3 months after ovariectomy (OVX) as follows: sham + vehicle; OVX + vehicle; OVX + 750 mg/kg CP; OVX + CP-calcium citrate (75 mg/kg); OVX + calcium citrate (75 mg/kg). After euthanasia, the femurs were removed and analyzed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry and micro-computed tomography, and serum samples were analyzed for bone metabolic markers. Results OVX rats supplemented with CPs or CP-calcium citrate showed osteoprotective effects, with reductions in the OVX-induced decreases in their femoral bone mineral density. Moreover, CP-calcium citrate prevented trabecular bone loss, improved the microarchitecture of the distal femur, and significantly inhibited bone loss with increased bone volume, connectivity density, and trabecular number compared with OVX control rats. CP or CP-calcium citrate administration significantly increased serum procollagen type I N-terminal propeptide levels and reduced serum bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, and C-telopeptide of type I collagen levels. Conclusions Our data indicate that combined oral administration of bovine CPs with calcium citrate inhibits bone loss in OVX rats. The present findings suggest that combined oral administration of bovine CPs with calcium citrate is a promising alternative for reducing bone loss in osteopenic postmenopausal women. PMID:26258559

  15. [Anti-infectious defense of vagina during use of low-dose monophasic contraceptives].

    PubMed

    Lebedeva, O P; Kalutskiĭ, P V

    2007-01-01

    Increase in incidence of candidal colpitis has been observed during use of contraceptive drugs. Elimination of staphylococci from genital tract after use of contraceptives was detected in 34,7% of patients. Composition of other aerobic microflora did not change. Nonspecific immune reaction was characterized by intensified phagocytosis, increase of results of NBT reduction test and level of proinflammatory cytokines. Conclusion about inappropriateness of using low-dose oral contraceptives in patients with recurrent vulvovaginal candidosis was made. Such contraceptives can be recommended to women with prolonged inflammatory diseases of reproductive system.

  16. Evaluation of tumorigenic risk of tissue-engineered oral mucosal epithelial cells by using combinational examinations.

    PubMed

    Thépot, A; Morel, A P; Justin, V; Desanlis, A; Thivillier, L; Hoffman, E; Till, M; Accardi, R; Tommasino, M; Breton, P; Hainaut, P; Damour, O

    2010-01-01

    Recently, oral mucosal epithelial cells were proposed as a cell source of the autologous cell transplant therapy for corneal trauma or disease. The question addressed is to know if the biological conditions of grafting could induce certain cellular, molecular, and genetic alterations that might increase the risk of mutations and possibly of cellular transformation. Recent progress in cancer research enables us to depict the generation mechanisms and basic characteristics of human cancer cells from molecular, cytological, and biological aspects. The aim of this study is to evaluate the risk of tumorigenicity of the oral mucosal epithelial culture process in order to mitigate that risk, if any, before clinical application. Oral mucosal epithelial cells from three different human donors were investigated by combinational examinations to detect possible tumorigenic transformation. We investigated (i) clonogenic and karyology types, (ii) the validation of proliferation rate, (iii) the epithelial-mesenchymal transition, (iv) anchorage-independent growth potential, and (v) tumorigenicity on nude mice. Results show that the culture process used in this study presents no risk of tumorigenicity. PMID:20977830

  17. Hypoglycemic activity of Ficus racemosa bark in combination with oral hypoglycemic drug in diabetic human.

    PubMed

    Gul-e-Rana; Karim, Sabiha; Khurhsid, Rukhshan; Saeed-ul-Hassan, Syed; Tariq, Imran; Sultana, Misbah; Rashid, Ahmad Junaid; Shah, Syed Haider; Murtaza, Ghulam

    2013-01-01

    Medicinal herbs, used in indigenous medicines in crude forms for the management of diabetes mellitus, contain both the organic and inorganic constituents. The aim of the study was to find out the hypoglycemic effect of Ficus racemosa in a group of diabetic subjects taking oral hypoglycemic drug. Twenty five of each, male and female, diabetic patients, selected from Fatima Jinnah Medical College, Lahore, Pakistan, taking oral hypoglycemic drug were included in this study and were given orally the extract (5 mL) of bark of Ficus racemosa (about 100 mg) two times for 15 days. Blood samples for estimation of blood glucose and parameters of liver and renal functions were estimated. It was observed that after taking the herb in combination with drug, blood glucose level (fasting and after breakfast) was markedly decreased in both male and female but significant difference was only observed in sugar level of males after 1.5 h after breakfast. To rule out herb toxicity, liver and renal functions tests of patients was also performed which were observed to be in normal range. Present investigation established a pharmacological evidence to support the folklore claim that Ficus racemosa is good anti-diabetic agent. PMID:24383328

  18. Developments in male contraception.

    PubMed

    Bialy, G; Alexander, N J

    1992-01-01

    Relevant research efforts in male contraception involve: 1) hormonal approaches to block sperm production by inhibiting the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, 2) disruption of sperm production by drugs that act directly on the testes, 3) interruption of sperm transport, and 4) alteration of secretions of the accessory sex glands and their subsequent effect on the spermatozoa. Both agonistic and antagonistic synthetic analogs of the hypothalamic gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) factor cost too much and lack an effective mode of administration. Recent studies indicate that over 90% of Chinese and Indonesian men can develop complete azoospermia following either a testosterone or a progestin and an androgen combination treatment. Vaccines that utilize GnRH and follicle stimulating hormone as the active antigens have been introduced in clinical studies in the US and India. Drugs such as sulfasalazine, pyrimethamine, nitrofurane, and bis(di-chloracytal) diamines reduce male fertility but side effects make them unacceptable. Dinitropyrroles, halopropanedils, chlorosugars, and indazole carboxylic acids have been tried in laboratory animals. Gossypol rendered men infertile in large-scale clinical studies conducted in China but synthesis of safer analogs has not succeeded. Extracts of another plant, tripterigium wilfordii, are used in China as a popular herbal medicine. Vasectomy has improved with no-scalpel vasectomy and by the novel technique of blocking the vas with cured in situ polymeric plugs. Preliminary data suggest that men prefer condoms made from polyurethane as opposed to latex rubber increasingly used to protect against AIDs and sexually transmitted diseases. The antifungal agents, imidazoles, have spermicidal activity and synthetic variants may reduce undesirable side effects. Research on male-oriented methods has intensified during the last 10-15 years, but a new product is not likely to appear in the next 5-10 years.

  19. [Contraception in adolescents].

    PubMed

    1992-12-01

    The proportion of women aged 15-19 in Colombia who are mothers declined from 14% in 1985 to 10% in 1990, but the actual number of cases increased due to population growth. Some 1,780,000 adolescents who have had children or are pregnant require family planning services. An additional, unknown number of adolescent pregnancies are terminated by abortion. It is estimated that 95% of adolescent pregnancies diagnosed or followed by PROFAMILIA's center for young people were unwanted. Reasons for making family planning services available to adolescents include the ever young age at initiation of sexual activity, the very low rates of contraceptive usage among sexually active adolescents, the lack of information of adolescents concerning reproduction and contraception, and their fear and guilt surrounding their sexual activity and contraceptive usage. Obstetrical services appear reluctant to furnish adolescent mothers with information on contraception, and the pharmacists and their employees who provide such information may not be aware of contraindications for this age group or whether adolescents are adequately instructed in use of the method. The rising age at marriage increases the span of time that adolescents are at risk of unwanted pregnancy. Adolescents who are well informed about sexuality and contraception and trained in decision making, self-esteem, and responsible parenthood are likely to postpone sexual activity. Information on contraception and family planning services needs to be made available to adolescents in a way that will actually motivate use. Information on sex and contraception should be made available at puberty and should include the form of use, contraindications, and advantages and disadvantages of all methods appropriate to adolescents. Orientation and assistance in selecting the best method should be individually tailored and should be provided in schools or other places accessible to young people, in a language they can understand. Rhythm and

  20. Attitudinal and nonattitudinal determinants of contraception: a cross-cultural study.

    PubMed

    Kar, S B; Talbot, J M

    1980-02-01

    Survey data from women in pregnancy risk in Venezuela and Kenya are used to examine the determinants of contraceptive intention, use, and the intention/use consistency. The five ranking determinants of contraceptive use are: intention to contracept, social support, accessibility, conjugal communication, and desire for additional children. All five determinants have direct and additive effects on contraception, but their relative impacts vary significantly between the two cultures. Contraceptive intention and use are highly consistent, while level of consistency varies significantly between the two samples and within each by various combinations of ranking variables and by parity. Major research and policy implications of the results are reviewed.

  1. [Research on bioactive ingredients in rat liver after oral administration of different combinations of Wuji pill].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui-Jie; Chen, Ying; Gong, Zi-Peng; Dong, Yu; Zhang, Hai-Xian; Yang, Qing; Weng, Xiao-Gang; Li, Yu-Jie; Zhu, Xiao-Xin

    2014-05-01

    A L9 (3(4)) orthogonal design table to be used to get nine combinations of extraction of three herbs of Wuji pill: Coptis chinensis, Tetradium ruticarpum and Paeonia lactiflora Pall., and nine extraction of single herbs correspondingly, altogether eighteen combinations. Quantification of five representative bioactive ingredients: berberine, palmatine, evodiamine, rutaecarpine, paeoniflorin in rat liver by ultra high liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry after oral administration at 2 h time point of eighteen combinations. The result shows the bioactive ingredients have different concentrations betweem different combinations and the single herb with the same dosage significantly as well as the same dose combinations. C. chinensis with evodiamine concentration of low and high dose T. ruticarpum was positively correlated. T. ruticarpum with berberine concentration of low dose C. chinensis was negatively correlated and of meddle dose C. chinensis was correlated positively. T. ruticarpum with paeoniflorin concentration of middle dose P. lactiflora was correlated positively. P. lactiflora with palmatine concentration of middle dose C. chinensis was negatively correlated and with evodiamine and rutaecarpine concentration of middle dose T. ruticarpum was negatively correlated. These shows the three single herbs interactions resulted in the differences of each ingredients concentration in rat liver. The orthogonal analysis indicates the combination 12: 6: 6 make the maximum concentration in rat liver. PMID:25095387

  2. Predicting the oral uptake efficiency of chemicals in mammals: Combining the hydrophilic and lipophilic range

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, Isabel A.; Huijbregts, Mark A.J.; Ragas, Ad M.J.; Hendriks, A. Jan

    2013-01-01

    Environmental risk assessment requires models for estimating the bioaccumulation of untested compounds. So far, bioaccumulation models have focused on lipophilic compounds, and only a few have included hydrophilic compounds. Our aim was to extend an existing bioaccumulation model to estimate the oral uptake efficiency of pollutants in mammals for compounds over a wide K{sub ow} range with an emphasis on hydrophilic compounds, i.e. compounds in the lower K{sub ow} range. Usually, most models use octanol as a single surrogate for the membrane and thus neglect the bilayer structure of the membrane. However, compounds with polar groups can have different affinities for the different membrane regions. Therefore, an existing bioaccumulation model was extended by dividing the diffusion resistance through the membrane into an outer and inner membrane resistance, where the solvents octanol and heptane were used as surrogates for these membrane regions, respectively. The model was calibrated with uptake efficiencies of environmental pollutants measured in different mammals during feeding studies combined with human oral uptake efficiencies of pharmaceuticals. The new model estimated the uptake efficiency of neutral (RMSE = 14.6) and dissociating (RMSE = 19.5) compounds with logK{sub ow} ranging from − 10 to + 8. The inclusion of the K{sub hw} improved uptake estimation for 33% of the hydrophilic compounds (logK{sub ow} < 0) (r{sup 2} = 0.51, RMSE = 22.8) compared with the model based on K{sub ow} only (r{sup 2} = 0.05, RMSE = 34.9), while hydrophobic compounds (logK{sub ow} > 0) were estimated equally by both model versions with RMSE = 15.2 (K{sub ow} and K{sub hw}) and RMSE = 15.7 (K{sub ow} only). The model can be used to estimate the oral uptake efficiency for both hydrophilic and hydrophobic compounds. -- Highlights: ► A mechanistic model was developed to estimate oral uptake efficiency. ► Model covers wide logK{sub ow} range (- 10 to + 8) and several mammalian

  3. Reproductive and Contraceptive Knowledge, Contraceptive Self-Efficacy, and Contraceptive Behavior among Teenage Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levinson, Ruth Andrea

    1995-01-01

    Investigates the relationships among teenage women's Contraceptive Self-Efficacy (CSE), reproductive and contraceptive knowledge (RCK), and contraceptive behavior. No significant relationships existed between RCK and behavior. However, CSE explained variance in RCK, while other measures uncovered common areas of misinformation that influence…

  4. Hemolysis after Oral Artemisinin Combination Therapy for Uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Lingscheid, Tilman; Steiner, Florian; Stegemann, Miriam S.; Bélard, Sabine; Menner, Nikolai; Pongratz, Peter; Kim, Johanna; von Bernuth, Horst; Mayer, Beate; Damm, Georg; Seehofer, Daniel; Salama, Abdulgabar; Suttorp, Norbert; Zoller, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Episodes of delayed hemolysis 2–6 weeks after treatment of severe malaria with intravenous artesunate have been described. We performed a prospective observational study of patients with uncomplicated malaria to investigate whether posttreatment hemolysis also occurs after oral artemisinin-based combination therapy. Eight of 20 patients with uncomplicated malaria who were given oral artemisinin-based combination therapy met the definition of posttreatment hemolysis (low haptoglobin level and increased lactate dehydrogenase level on day 14). Five patients had hemolysis persisting for 1 month. Patients with posttreatment hemolysis had a median decrease in hemoglobin level of 1.3 g/dL (interquartile range 0.3–2.0 g/dL) in the posttreatment period, and patients without posttreatment hemolysis had a median increase of 0.3 g/dL (IQR −0.1 to 0.7 g/dL; p = 0.002). These findings indicate a need for increased vigilance for hemolytic events in malaria patients, particularly those with predisposing factors for anemia. PMID:27434054

  5. Contraceptive Beach Ball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Edith B.; Miller, Deborah A.

    2005-01-01

    Abstinence-based sexuality education includes a discussion about the various types of contraception available today. This lesson addresses the knowledge and skills identified in the National Health Education Standards, and can be used with two different audiences-students and teachers. Included in the lesson are step-by-step procedures, a…

  6. Current contraceptive research.

    PubMed

    Benditt, J M

    1980-01-01

    No contraceptive panacea is near or likely. The most exciting prospect, man-made analogs of LHRH (a brain hormone) for both male and female use, could not be available before the late 1980s. Other potential methods in human trials face serious obstacles. PMID:6995149

  7. Pyridoxine supplementation does not alter in vivo kinetics of one-carbon metabolism but modifies patterns of one-carbon and tryptophan metabolites in vitamin B-6–insufficient oral contraceptive users12

    PubMed Central

    Rios-Avila, Luisa; Coats, Bonnie; Ralat, Maria; Chi, Yueh-Yun; Midttun, Øivind; Ueland, Per M; Stacpoole, Peter W; Gregory, Jesse F

    2015-01-01

    Background: Low chronic vitamin B-6 status can occur in a subset of women who use oral contraceptives (OCs) with uncertain metabolic consequences. An insufficiency of cellular pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP), which is the coenzyme form of vitamin B-6, may impair many metabolic processes including one-carbon and tryptophan metabolism. Objective: We investigated the effects of vitamin B-6 supplementation on the in vivo kinetics of one-carbon metabolism and the concentration of one-carbon and tryptophan metabolites in vitamin B-6–deficient OC users. Design: A primed, constant infusion of [13C5]methionine, [3-13C]serine, and [2H3]leucine was performed on 10 OC users (20–40 y old; plasma PLP concentrations <30 nmol/L) before and after 28 d of supplementation with 10 mg pyridoxine hydrochloric acid/d. In vivo fluxes of total homocysteine remethylation, the remethylation of homocysteine from serine, and rates of homocysteine and cystathionine production were assessed. Targeted metabolite profiling was performed, and data were analyzed by using orthogonal partial least-squares–discriminant analysis and paired t tests adjusted for multiple testing. Results: Pyridoxine supplementation increased the mean ± SD plasma PLP concentration from 25.8 ± 3.6 to 143 ± 58 nmol/L (P < 0.001) and decreased the leucine concentration from 103 ± 17 to 90 ± 20 nmol/L (P = 0.007) and glycine concentration from 317 ± 63 to 267 ± 58 nmol/L (P = 0.03). Supplementation did not affect in vivo rates of homocysteine remethylation or the appearance of homocysteine and cystathionine. A multivariate analysis showed a clear overall effect on metabolite profiles resulting from supplementation. Leucine, glycine, choline, cysteine, glutathione, trimethylamine N-oxide, and the ratios glycine:serine, 3-hydroxykynurenine:kynurenine, 3-hydroxykynurenine:3-hydroxyanthranilic acid, and 3-hydroxykynurenine:anthranilic acid were significant discriminating variables. Conclusions: Consistent with previous

  8. Use of Structured and Unstructured Data to Identify Contraceptive Use in Women Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Womack, Julie A.; Scotch, Matthew; Leung, Sylvia N.; Skanderson, Melissa; Bathulapalli, Harini; Haskell, Sally G.; Brandt, Cynthia A.

    2013-01-01

    Contraceptive use among women Veterans may not be adequately captured using administrative and pharmacy codes. Clinical progress notes may provide a useful alternative. The objectives of this study were to validate the use of administrative and pharmacy codes to identify contraceptive use in Veterans Health Administration data, and to determine the feasibility and validity of identifying contraceptive use in clinical progress notes. The study included women Veterans who participated in the Women Veterans Cohort Study, enrolled in the Veterans Affairs Connecticut Health Care System, completed a baseline survey, and had clinical progress notes from one year prior to survey completion. Contraceptive ICD-9-CM codes, V-codes, CPT codes, and pharmacy codes were identified. Progress notes were annotated to identify contraceptive use. Self-reported contraceptive use was identified from a baseline survey of health habits and healthcare practices and utilization. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value were calculated comparing administrative and pharmacy contraceptive codes and progress note–based contraceptive information to self-report survey data. Results showed that administrative and pharmacy codes were specific but not sensitive for identifying contraceptive use. For example, oral contraceptive pill codes were highly specific (1.00) but not sensitive (0.41). Data from clinical progress notes demonstrated greater sensitivity and comparable specificity. For example, for oral contraceptive pills, progress notes were both specific (0.85) and sensitive (0.73). Results suggest that the best approach for identifying contraceptive use, through either administrative codes or progress notes, depends on the research question. PMID:23861675

  9. Hormonal contraceptives, menstrual cycle and brain response to faces

    PubMed Central

    Marečková, Klara; Perrin, Jennifer S.; Nawaz Khan, Irum; Lawrence, Claire; Dickie, Erin; McQuiggan, Doug A.

    2014-01-01

    Both behavioral and neuroimaging evidence support a female advantage in the perception of human faces. Here we explored the possibility that this relationship may be partially mediated by female sex hormones by investigating the relationship between the brain’s response to faces and the use of oral contraceptives, as well as the phase of the menstrual cycle. First, functional magnetic resonance images were acquired in 20 young women [10 freely cycling and 10 taking oral contraception (OC)] during two phases of their cycle: mid-cycle and menstruation. We found stronger neural responses to faces in the right fusiform face area (FFA) in women taking oral contraceptives (vs freely cycling women) and during mid-cycle (vs menstruation) in both groups. Mean blood oxygenation level-dependent response in both left and right FFA increased as function of the duration of OC use. Next, this relationship between the use of OC and FFA response was replicated in an independent sample of 110 adolescent girls. Finally in a parallel behavioral study carried out in another sample of women, we found no evidence of differences in the pattern of eye movements while viewing faces between freely cycling women vs those taking oral contraceptives. The imaging findings might indicate enhanced processing of social cues in women taking OC and women during mid-cycle. PMID:23175677

  10. Hormonal contraceptives, menstrual cycle and brain response to faces.

    PubMed

    Marecková, Klara; Perrin, Jennifer S; Nawaz Khan, Irum; Lawrence, Claire; Dickie, Erin; McQuiggan, Doug A; Paus, Tomás

    2014-02-01

    Both behavioral and neuroimaging evidence support a female advantage in the perception of human faces. Here we explored the possibility that this relationship may be partially mediated by female sex hormones by investigating the relationship between the brain's response to faces and the use of oral contraceptives, as well as the phase of the menstrual cycle. First, functional magnetic resonance images were acquired in 20 young women [10 freely cycling and 10 taking oral contraception (OC)] during two phases of their cycle: mid-cycle and menstruation. We found stronger neural responses to faces in the right fusiform face area (FFA) in women taking oral contraceptives (vs freely cycling women) and during mid-cycle (vs menstruation) in both groups. Mean blood oxygenation level-dependent response in both left and right FFA increased as function of the duration of OC use. Next, this relationship between the use of OC and FFA response was replicated in an independent sample of 110 adolescent girls. Finally in a parallel behavioral study carried out in another sample of women, we found no evidence of differences in the pattern of eye movements while viewing faces between freely cycling women vs those taking oral contraceptives. The imaging findings might indicate enhanced processing of social cues in women taking OC and women during mid-cycle.

  11. Hormonal contraceptives, menstrual cycle and brain response to faces.

    PubMed

    Marecková, Klara; Perrin, Jennifer S; Nawaz Khan, Irum; Lawrence, Claire; Dickie, Erin; McQuiggan, Doug A; Paus, Tomás

    2014-02-01

    Both behavioral and neuroimaging evidence support a female advantage in the perception of human faces. Here we explored the possibility that this relationship may be partially mediated by female sex hormones by investigating the relationship between the brain's response to faces and the use of oral contraceptives, as well as the phase of the menstrual cycle. First, functional magnetic resonance images were acquired in 20 young women [10 freely cycling and 10 taking oral contraception (OC)] during two phases of their cycle: mid-cycle and menstruation. We found stronger neural responses to faces in the right fusiform face area (FFA) in women taking oral contraceptives (vs freely cycling women) and during mid-cycle (vs menstruation) in both groups. Mean blood oxygenation level-dependent response in both left and right FFA increased as function of the duration of OC use. Next, this relationship between the use of OC and FFA response was replicated in an independent sample of 110 adolescent girls. Finally in a parallel behavioral study carried out in another sample of women, we found no evidence of differences in the pattern of eye movements while viewing faces between freely cycling women vs those taking oral contraceptives. The imaging findings might indicate enhanced processing of social cues in women taking OC and women during mid-cycle. PMID:23175677

  12. Effective Contraceptive Use: An Exploration of Theory-Based Influences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peyman, N.; Oakley, D.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore factors that influence oral contraceptive (OC) use among women in Iran using the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) and concept of self-efficacy (SE). The study sample consisted of 360 married OC users, aged 18-49 years recruited at public health centers of Mashhad, 900 km east of Tehran. SE had the strongest…

  13. A Randomized, Controlled Trial to Assess the Efficacy of Arthroscopic Debridement in Combination with Oral Medication Versus Oral Medication in Patients with Gouty Knee Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Wanyan, Pingping; Wang, Jian Min; Tian, Jin Hui; Hu, Long; Shen, Xi Ping; Yang, Ke Hu

    2015-12-01

    Gouty knee arthritis refers to a form of inflammatory diseases caused by deposits of needle-like crystals of uric acid in knee joint. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of arthroscopic debridement in combination with oral medication versus oral medication alone for the treatment of gouty knee arthritis. A total of 60 patients with gouty knee arthritis were randomized to receive either arthroscopic surgery in combination with oral medication or oral medication alone. Efficacy was assessed with the angle of motion, functions, and visual analog scale (VAS). These indices were measured prior to treatment and at 2, 4, 12, 24, and 48 weeks posttreatment. Surgery- and medication-related complications were observed. Significant differences in flexion and extension of the knee joint, lymphoma scores, and VAS were detected between the two groups at 2, 4, and 12 weeks posttreatment (P < 0.05) but not at weeks 24 and 48 posttreatment (P > 0.05) . Significant differences in these indices were detected at different time points in each group (P < 0.05), except between weeks 24 and 48 (P > 0.05). Arthroscopic surgery in combination with oral medication is superior to single oral medication in the flexion and extension of the knee joint, lymphoma scores, and pain relief (VAS) before 24 weeks, although no statistical differences were detected in the efficacy after 24 weeks, and in medication-related safety between the two groups. Although arthroscopic debridement cannot replace systemic uric acid-lowering treatments such as medication and dietary control, it is still an effective approach. PMID:26730077

  14. A Randomized, Controlled Trial to Assess the Efficacy of Arthroscopic Debridement in Combination with Oral Medication Versus Oral Medication in Patients with Gouty Knee Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Wanyan, Pingping; Wang, Jian Min; Tian, Jin Hui; Hu, Long; Shen, Xi Ping; Yang, Ke Hu

    2015-12-01

    Gouty knee arthritis refers to a form of inflammatory diseases caused by deposits of needle-like crystals of uric acid in knee joint. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of arthroscopic debridement in combination with oral medication versus oral medication alone for the treatment of gouty knee arthritis. A total of 60 patients with gouty knee arthritis were randomized to receive either arthroscopic surgery in combination with oral medication or oral medication alone. Efficacy was assessed with the angle of motion, functions, and visual analog scale (VAS). These indices were measured prior to treatment and at 2, 4, 12, 24, and 48 weeks posttreatment. Surgery- and medication-related complications were observed. Significant differences in flexion and extension of the knee joint, lymphoma scores, and VAS were detected between the two groups at 2, 4, and 12 weeks posttreatment (P < 0.05) but not at weeks 24 and 48 posttreatment (P > 0.05) . Significant differences in these indices were detected at different time points in each group (P < 0.05), except between weeks 24 and 48 (P > 0.05). Arthroscopic surgery in combination with oral medication is superior to single oral medication in the flexion and extension of the knee joint, lymphoma scores, and pain relief (VAS) before 24 weeks, although no statistical differences were detected in the efficacy after 24 weeks, and in medication-related safety between the two groups. Although arthroscopic debridement cannot replace systemic uric acid-lowering treatments such as medication and dietary control, it is still an effective approach.

  15. Continuation rates, bleeding profile acceptability, and satisfaction of women using an oral contraceptive pill containing estradiol valerate and dienogest versus a progestogen-only pill after switching from an ethinylestradiol-containing pill in a real-life setting: results of the CONTENT study

    PubMed Central

    Briggs, Paula; Serrani, Marco; Vogtländer, Kai; Parke, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Background Oral contraceptives are still associated with high discontinuation rates, despite their efficacy. There is a wide choice of oral contraceptives available, and the aim of this study was to assess continuation rates, bleeding profile acceptability, and the satisfaction of women in the first year of using a contraceptive pill containing estradiol valerate and dienogest (E2V/DNG) versus a progestogen-only pill (POP) in a real-life setting after discontinuing an ethinylestradiol-containing pill. Methods and results In this prospective, noninterventional, observational study, 3,152 patients were included for the efficacy analyses (n=2,558 women in the E2V/DNG group and n=592 in the POP group (two patients fulfilled the criteria of the efficacy population, but the used product was not known). Women had been taking an ethinylestradiol-containing pill ≥3 months before deciding to switch to the E2V/DNG pill or a POP. Overall, 19.8% (n=506) of E2V/DNG users and 25.8% (n=153) of POP users discontinued their prescribed pill. The median time to discontinuation was 157.0 days and 127.5 days, respectively. Time to discontinuation due to bleeding (P<0.0001) or other reasons (P=0.022) was significantly longer in the E2V/DNG group versus the POP group. The E2V/DNG pill was also associated with shorter (48.7% vs 44.1%), lighter (54% vs 46.1%), and less painful bleeding (91.1% vs 73.7%) and greater user satisfaction (80.7% vs 64.6%) than POP use, within 3–5 months after switch. Conclusion The E2V/DNG pill was associated with higher rates of continuation, bleeding profile acceptability, and user satisfaction than POP use and may be an alternative option for women who are dissatisfied with their current pill. PMID:27695365

  16. Continuation rates, bleeding profile acceptability, and satisfaction of women using an oral contraceptive pill containing estradiol valerate and dienogest versus a progestogen-only pill after switching from an ethinylestradiol-containing pill in a real-life setting: results of the CONTENT study

    PubMed Central

    Briggs, Paula; Serrani, Marco; Vogtländer, Kai; Parke, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Background Oral contraceptives are still associated with high discontinuation rates, despite their efficacy. There is a wide choice of oral contraceptives available, and the aim of this study was to assess continuation rates, bleeding profile acceptability, and the satisfaction of women in the first year of using a contraceptive pill containing estradiol valerate and dienogest (E2V/DNG) versus a progestogen-only pill (POP) in a real-life setting after discontinuing an ethinylestradiol-containing pill. Methods and results In this prospective, noninterventional, observational study, 3,152 patients were included for the efficacy analyses (n=2,558 women in the E2V/DNG group and n=592 in the POP group (two patients fulfilled the criteria of the efficacy population, but the used product was not known). Women had been taking an ethinylestradiol-containing pill ≥3 months before deciding to switch to the E2V/DNG pill or a POP. Overall, 19.8% (n=506) of E2V/DNG users and 25.8% (n=153) of POP users discontinued their prescribed pill. The median time to discontinuation was 157.0 days and 127.5 days, respectively. Time to discontinuation due to bleeding (P<0.0001) or other reasons (P=0.022) was significantly longer in the E2V/DNG group versus the POP group. The E2V/DNG pill was also associated with shorter (48.7% vs 44.1%), lighter (54% vs 46.1%), and less painful bleeding (91.1% vs 73.7%) and greater user satisfaction (80.7% vs 64.6%) than POP use, within 3–5 months after switch. Conclusion The E2V/DNG pill was associated with higher rates of continuation, bleeding profile acceptability, and user satisfaction than POP use and may be an alternative option for women who are dissatisfied with their current pill.

  17. Religiosity and contraceptive method choice: the Jewish population of Israel.

    PubMed

    Okun, B S

    2000-06-01

    The primary purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between religiosity and contraceptive method choice among users of contraception. The authors analyze a representative sample of 1751 married urban Israeli Jewish women interviewed in 1987-88. The authors' findings indicate that the contraceptive choices of religious women are determined largely by considerations unrelated to religious doctrine. A combination of factors, including the suitability of specific methods to fertility control needs, peer influences, and other cultural effects, appear to modify the acceptance and application of a particular religious theology.

  18. [The role of bleomycin combination in radiation therapy of squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity].

    PubMed

    Masaki, N

    1986-04-01

    In an effort to improve tumor control by radiation therapy, a treatment regimen consisting of concurrent combination of bleomycin (90 mg/3 weeks) and radiation (30 Gy/3 weeks) was applied. Between 1972 and 1981, 287 patients with squamous cell carcinoma in the oral cavity were subjected to this bleomycin-radiation combination regimen. All except 4 patients experienced marked response after treatment using the bleomycin-radiation combination alone. One hundred thirty-four patients (47%) obtained CR and 149 (53%) PR. Higher CR rates were obtained in patients with carcinoma of the lower gum (62%), of the upper gum (68%), and of the cheek mucosa (43%), compared to patients with carcinoma of the floor of the mouth (21%), and of the tongue (15%). In each of the tumor sites, small lesions (T1, T2) obtained higher CR rates, compared with large lesions (T3, T4). Of the 134 patients who experienced CR, 83 were observed without any further treatment after bleomycin-radiation combination alone. Local recurrence-free rates of these patients were 72% for T1, T2 lesions and 48% for T3, T4 lesions. Local control rates were increased to 85% and 78%, respectively, with successful salvage treatment involving surgery or interstitial radiotherapy for post-irradiation failures. PMID:2425746

  19. [Contraception--with us and others].

    PubMed

    Hallgren, R

    1986-01-01

    The history of contraception practices back to the ancient Egyptians, Jews, Romans, and Greeks, the evolution of condom use, and the problems inherent in religious and secular attitudes concerning contraception are surveyed. Ancient Egyptians already made use of certain intravaginal pessary and tampon types in combination with douches and incense to prevent pregnancy. Passages in the Bible refer to the practice of "coitus interruptus" as a preventive method, and the Greeks and Romans used sponges immersed in copper salt solution, oil of cedar, and olive oil. Abortion was officially banned in Rome; however, it was still practiced among the upper classes. Various practices used by the Arabs, Africans, and Europeans in the Middle Ages included the utilization of various oils and salts, plant roots, beeswax slices, green soap, and abstinence. The earliest mention of condom use is by Fallopius in the 16th Century; this linen sheath was primarily used against syphilis, as was its more advanced version described by Daniel Turner around 1700. Marquis de Sade recommended its use in combination with an intravaginal sponge. The invention of vulcanized rubber in the 19th Cenury led to its widespread use around the world, and the present threat of AIDS has made its advantages obvious. Secular attitudes about contraception emphasize the impact of urbanization and industrialization and their corrosive effects on the masses caught up in them without the benefit of contraception. Religious views, however, oppose contraception because of the fiats of Buddhist, Islamic, and Christian teachings. The individual's dilemma of trying to reconcile these conflicting attitudes is further explored.

  20. Emergency contraception use up -- new ECP arrives.

    PubMed

    1999-09-01

    The first progestin-only dedicated emergency contraceptive pill (ECP) is about to enter the US market. The arrival of Plan B, a levonorgestrel-only ECP produced by the Women's Capital Corporation (WCC) of Seattle, has been long awaited by providers in the US because of it is more effective and produces fewer side effects than does the combined regimen. The WCC is taking a different marketing and distributing approach to emergency contraception than its competitor, Gynetics, focusing on existing ECP provider/dispensers such as Planned Parenthood affiliates, major Title X programs, and college/university student health centers. The FDA has also approved a change in product labeling for Gynetics¿ ECU Preven. The change, marked by the disappearance of the "Black Box Warning," puts the benefits and risks of emergency contraception in perspective, according to a Gynetics executive. It further eliminates substantial restrictions on the company's ability to communicate directly to the consumer and to the medical professional. The FDA¿s decisions should help to accelerate the process of building awareness of emergency contraception and its availability in the US.

  1. Therapeutic value of oral supplementation with melon superoxide dismutase and wheat gliadin combination.

    PubMed

    Romao, Susana

    2015-03-01

    Dietary antioxidant supplementation has been popular in Western countries. Various supplements have been developed in recent years, and research has been gathered from both animal and clinical research trials. In this review, the therapeutic value of oral administration of a combination of melon superoxide dismutase (SOD) and a vegetable polymer (gliadin) is evaluated. Critical examination of the effects of SOD-gliadin supplementation is carried out, with an emphasis on its impact on oxidative stress levels and on endogenous antioxidant pathways. Overall analysis of peer-reviewed published data suggests that intake of SOD-gliadin might have advantageous health effects. These conclusions are dependent on the condition or pathology under consideration. In general, the authors, who analyzed SOD-gliadin supplementation, support the use of SOD-gliadin supplementation as a complementary treatment rather than a therapeutic treatment. To further clarify the importance of dietary SOD-gliadin administration, additional large-scale clinical trials are recommended.

  2. Behaviour change techniques and contraceptive use in low and middle income countries: a review.

    PubMed

    Phiri, Mwelwa; King, R; Newell, J N

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to identify effective behaviour change techniques to increase modern contraceptive use in low and middle income countries (LMICs). Literature was identified in Global Health, Web of Science, MEDLINE, PsycINFO and Popline, as well as peer reviewed journals. Articles were included if they were written in English, had an outcome evaluation of contraceptive use, modern contraceptive use, contraceptive initiation/uptake, contraceptive adherence or continuation of contraception, were a systematic review or randomised controlled trial, and were conducted in a low or middle income country. We assessed the behaviour change techniques used in each intervention and included a new category of male partner involvement. We identified six studies meeting the inclusion criteria. The most effective interventions were those that involve male partner involvement in the decision to initiate contraceptive use. The findings also suggest that providing access to contraceptives in the community promotes their use. The interventions that had positive effects on contraceptive use used a combination of behaviour change techniques. Performance techniques were not used in any of the interventions. The use of social support techniques, which are meant to improve wider social acceptability, did not appear except in two of the interventions. Our findings suggest that when information and contraceptives are provided, contraceptive use improves. Recommendations include reporting of behaviour change studies to include more details of the intervention and techniques employed. There is also a need for further research to understand which techniques are especially effective. PMID:26519159

  3. Can mass media advetising increase contraceptive use?

    PubMed

    Udry, J R; Clark, L T; Chase, C L; Levy, M

    1972-07-01

    A $330,000 multimedia advertising campaign was undertaken in 4 U.S. cities (Columbus, Ohio; Memphis, Tennessee; Altoona, Pennsylvania; Jackson, Mississippi) November 1970-May 1971 by the Family Planning Evaluation project (University of North Carolina) to evaluate the cost and effectiveness of commercial advertising in increasing contraceptive utilization among active fertile individuals. The ads ran on radio, television, in special editions of Life and Look, and in local daily, ethnic, and community newspapers. The level of complaints was below what had been anticipated, and there was no unacceptable community opposition even in the saturation cases. The level of awareness was higher during the campaign for television and radio advertising but not for newspaper and magazine advertising (interviews). The number of "new" patients to family planning clinics was low (ranging from 24 to 444) and it appears that mass media advertising is not an effective recruitment technique. No differences were found in new prescription sales of oral contraceptives or sales of condoms between the media sites and their controls during the 6-month campaign. Mass media campaigns might be more effective in non-US settings where contraceptive knowledge is not great and usage is not widespread. PMID:5040824

  4. Postabortal and postpartum contraception.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Sharon

    2014-08-01

    Healthcare providers often underestimate a woman' need for immediate effective contraception after an abortion or childbirth. Yet, these are times when women may be highly motivated to avoid or delay another pregnancy. In addition, starting the most effective long-acting reversible methods (i.e. the intrauterine device, intrauterine system or implants) at these times, is safe, with low risk of complications. Good evidence shows that women choosing long-acting reversible contraceptives at the time of an abortion are at significantly lower risk of another abortion, compared with counterparts choosing other methods. Uptake of long-acting reversible methods postpartum can also prevent short inter-pregnancy intervals, which have negative consequences for maternal and child health. It is important, therefore, that providers of abortion and maternity care are trained and funded to be able to provide these methods for women immediately after an abortion or childbirth.

  5. Contraceptive care for the adolescent.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Elizabeth

    2006-06-01

    Despite recent improvements in rates of teen pregnancy, abortion, birth,and contraceptive use, effective contraceptive counseling for adolescents should be a high priority for the primary care provider in the office setting. Adolescent psychosocial risk screening and appropriate counseling about sexual decision-making is necessary. Contraceptive services visits include, relevant history, limited physical examination, provision of information, anticipatory guidance about sexual behaviors, and the provision of contraceptive methods. Teens should always be encouraged to use a male condom during sex to reduce STI risk. A variety of barrier and hormonal contraceptive methods are available for the adolescent population. Education about and provision of EC is effective in reducing the rate of unintended pregnancy and abortion in the United States. Contraceptive care for adolescents is a rewarding experience for primary care providers.

  6. Practical problems which women encounter with available contraception in Australia.

    PubMed

    Weisberg, E

    1994-06-01

    Australian women face major difficulties with contraception because of the limited range of choices, the need for meticulous attention to compliance with most available methods and because of cost limitations for a significant minority of the population. The most commonly used methods are oral contraceptive pills and barrier methods, and each has substantial compliance problems which can be minimized with care and counselling. There is an urgent need for a wider range of options in Australia and for good information and publicity about them. Present progress in this direction gives some hope for the near future. PMID:7848207

  7. Acute mesenteric venous thrombosis with a vaginal contraceptive ring.

    PubMed

    Eilbert, Wesley; Hecht, Benjamin; Zuiderveld, Loren

    2014-07-01

    Mesenteric venous thrombosis is a rare cause of abdominal pain, which if left untreated may result in bowel infarction, peritonitis and death. The majority of patients with this illness have a recognizable, predisposing prothrombotic condition. Oral contraceptives have been identified as a predisposing factor for mesenteric venous thrombosis in reproductive-aged women. In the last fifteen years new methods of hormonal birth control have been introduced, including a transdermal patch and an intravaginal ring. In this report, we describe a case of mesenteric venous thrombosis in a young woman caused by a vaginal contraceptive ring.

  8. The myth about contraceptives and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ibekwe, J

    1993-03-18

    Science and modern medicine accord us many advantages, e.g., contraceptive drugs, but many people still do not use them. Contraceptive drugs include oral contraceptives and injectables. OCs are very effective and are associated with minor side effects (e.g., mood changes, breast tenderness, nausea, and changes in weight, mild headache, and spotting between periods), perhaps explaining why they are one of the most often used contraceptive in essentially every country. Women who smoke; are 35 years old; or either have or have a family history of hypertension, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and use OCs are at higher risk of a cardiovascular episode. On the other hand, OCs protect against ovarian and endometrial cancers. Research does not yet confirm or disprove their effect on breast cancer development. OCs appear not to be linked to breast cancer through age 59. Yet, studies of women 45 years old suggest that OCs increases the breast cancer risk in these women who had their first menses before age 13 and used OCs for a long time before their first pregnancy. OCs may facilitate growth of breast tumors that other causes activated, and therefore, do not likely increase the overall risk. Researchers recognize the death of knowledge about breast cancer development, so they call for more research, including basic molecular, cellular, and biochemical studies. In Nigeria, breast cancer is rare, while deaths due to pregnancy and childbirth are common, indicating that OC use can prevent many female deaths. Prolonged breast feeding; later age at first menses; earlier age at menopause; earlier age at first full-term pregnancy larger families; low fat, high fiber diets; and thinness, all of which are common in developing countries, have a protective effect against breast cancer. Further, women in developing countries begin OC use later than women in developed countries.

  9. Advances in male hormonal contraception.

    PubMed

    Costantino, Antonietta; Gava, Giulia; Berra, Marta; Meriggiola Maria, Cristina

    2014-11-01

    Contraception is a basic human right for its role on health, quality of life and wellbeing of the woman and of the society as a whole. Since the introduction of female hormonal contraception the responsibility of family planning has always been with women. Currently there are only a few contraceptive methods available for men, but recently, men have become more interested in supporting their partners actively. Over the last few decades different trials have been performed providing important advances in the development of a safe and effective hormonal contraceptive for men. This paper summarizes some of the most recent trials. PMID:25673544

  10. Advances in male hormonal contraception

    PubMed Central

    Antonietta, Costantino; Giulia, Gava; Marta, Berra; Cristina, Meriggiola Maria

    2014-01-01

    Contraception is a basic human right for its role on health, quality of life and wellbeing of the woman and of the society as a whole. Since the introduction of female hormonal contraception the responsibility of family planning has always been with women. Currently there are only a few contraceptive methods available for men, but recently, men have become more interested in supporting their partners actively. Over the last few decades different trials have been performed providing important advances in the development of a safe and effective hormonal contraceptive for men. This paper summarizes some of the most recent trials. PMID:25673544

  11. Contraception: a social revolution.

    PubMed

    Benagiano, Giuseppe; Bastianelli, Carlo; Farris, Manuela

    2007-03-01

    Modern contraceptive technology is more than a technical advance: it has brought about a true social revolution, the 'first reproductive revolution' in the history of mankind. This latter was followed in rapid succession by other major changes in human reproductive strategies. In the human species, sexual activity began to lose its exclusive reproductive meaning at an early stage of its evolution. Human beings must have practiced non-conceptive sex from the outset and therefore must have had a need to avoid, rather than to seek conception during intercourse from time immemorial. The search for methods to control fertility went on for millennia, but a valid solution was only found during the twentieth century, when the population explosion had forever changed the shape of humanity: in only one century the total population of the planet had grown from some 1.6 billion to more than 6 billion. That increase will remain unique in the history of Homo sapiens. At the global level, contraception provided a tool to deal with overpopulation and, in only 50 years, went a long way towards its resolution. However, to solve the problem, national and international family planning initiatives were required. For individuals, contraception also meant a revolution. It allowed sexual intercourse without reproduction. Only 25 years later, in vitro fertilisation permitted childbearing without sexual intercourse. Other advances followed and now cloning, that is, reproduction without the two gametes, looms on the horizon. Such a series of rapid, major changes in human reproductive strategies has confused many. For this reason, a constructive dialogue between sociology and biology is mandatory. Contraception is a powerful tool to promote equity between sexes; it improves women's status in the family and in the community. Avoiding pregnancy during the teens increases opportunities for a young woman's education, training and employment. By controlling their fertility, women get a chance to

  12. Comparison of Outcomes of Allogeneic Transplantation for CML with Cyclophosphamide in Combination with Intravenous Busulfan, Oral Busulfan or TBI

    PubMed Central

    Copelan, Edward A.; Avalos, Belinda; Ahn, Kwang Woo; Zhu, Xiaochun; Gale, Robert Peter; Grunwald, Michael R.; Hamadani, Mehdi; Hamilton, Betty K.; Hale, Gregory A.; Marks, David I.; Waller, Edmund K.; Savani, Bipin N.; Costa, Luciano J.; Ramanathan, Muthalagu; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Khoury, H. Jean; Weisdorf, Daniel J.; Inamoto, Yoshihiro; Kamble, Rammurti T.; Schouten, Harry C.; Wirk, Baldeep; Litzow, Mark R.; Aljurf, Mahmoud D.; van Besien, Koen W.; Ustun, Celalettin; Bolwell, Brian J.; Bredeson, Christopher N.; Fasan, Omotayo; Ghosh, Nilanjan; Horowitz, Mary M.; Arora, Mukta; Szer, Jeffrey; Loren, Alison W.; Alyea, Edwin P.; Cortes, Jorge; Maziarz, Richard T.; Kalaycio, Matt E.; Saber, Wael

    2014-01-01

    Cyclophosphamide in combination with busulfan (Bu) or total body irradiation (TBI) are the most commonly used myeloablative conditio