Science.gov

Sample records for combined punching shear

  1. Behavior of reinforced concrete slabs subjected to combined punching shear and biaxial tension

    SciTech Connect

    Jau, W.C.; White, R.N.; Gergely, P.

    1982-09-01

    This investigation was a continuing study of peripheral (punching) shear strength of precracked, biaxially tensioned, orthogonally reinforced concrete slabs. This research was motivated by the need to determie the strength of a reinforced concrete containment vessel wall when subjected to combined internal pressure and punching shear loads normal to the wall. The study served to determine the effect of three major variables (shear span, size of loaded area, and reinforcing steel ratio) on punching shear strength of slabs that were precracked in biaxial tension and then held at one of the two tension levels (0 or 0.8f/sub y/) during shear load application.

  2. Strength of Footing with Punching Shear Preventers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Sup; Moon, Jiho; Park, Keum-Sung; Bae, Kyu-Woong

    2014-01-01

    The punching shear failure often governs the strength of the footing-to-column connection. The punching shear failure is an undesirable failure mode, since it results in a brittle failure of the footing. In this study, a new method to increase the strength and ductility of the footing was proposed by inserting the punching shear preventers (PSPs) into the footing. The validation and effectiveness of PSP were verified through a series of experimental studies. The nonlinear finite element analysis was then performed to demonstrate the failure mechanism of the footing with PSPs in depth and to investigate the key parameters that affect the behavior of the footing with PSPs. Finally, the design recommendations for the footing with PSPs were suggested. PMID:25401141

  3. 3. INTERIOR VIEW LOOKING SOUTH SHOWING PUNCH AND SHEAR MACHINE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. INTERIOR VIEW LOOKING SOUTH SHOWING PUNCH AND SHEAR MACHINE (manufactured by Cleveland Punch and Shear Works Company, USA) - Cambria & Indiana Railroad, Blacksmith Shop, .25 miles northwest of Colver, Colver, Cambria County, PA

  4. 23. NORTHEAST TO CIRCA 1875 POWER SHEAR, PUNCH, AND RIVETING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. NORTHEAST TO CIRCA 1875 POWER SHEAR, PUNCH, AND RIVETING MACHINE SET UP TO DEMONSTRATE USE IN RIVETING COMPONENTS OF WHEEL ARMS FOR ELI WINDMILLS. HISTORIC DEBRIS FROM PUNCHING WORK IS VISIBLE BENEATH THE MACHINE IN THE OPERATOR'S PIT.' ON THE LEFT IS A U-SHAPED LOVEJOY FIELD PUNCH FOR USE IN INSTALLING STEEL WINDMILL/TOWER COMPONENTS. - Kregel Windmill Company Factory, 1416 Central Avenue, Nebraska City, Otoe County, NE

  5. Study of punching shear in arctic offshore structures

    SciTech Connect

    McLean, D.I.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental and analytical studies of punching shear in reinforced and prestressed concrete slabs and shells were performed to gain an increased understanding of the mechanism of punching shear failures in offshore structures for the Arctic. The test specimens of this project were 1/6-scale models of sections of typical perimeter walls with flat and curved configurations. Shear reinforcement was provided in the specimens with headed shear bars. The main variables investigated in the program were: the amount of shear reinforcement, curvature, prestressing, and span-continuity condition. The addition of shear reinforcement resulted in significant increases in punching shear strengths, particularly in the plate specimens. The presence of curvature in the shell specimens produced large increases in punching shear strength. An apparent upper limit on punching shear strength was reached in the shell specimens with shear reinforcement whereby the concrete rather than the reinforcement controlled the failure mechanism. Effects of prestressing in the specimens were inconclusive. The single-span plate specimen was stronger than the similar three-span plate specimen.

  6. Development and Validation of a Shear Punch Test Fixture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    Current DRDC Defence Research and Development Canada FSP Friction Stir Processing LVDT Linear Variable Displacement Transducer MMC Metal Matrix...properties of metallic materials. The shear punch tester uses very small, thin specimens to evaluate shear behaviour of materials, the results of which...composites (MMC) manufactured by friction stir processing (FSP) that are being developed as part of a Technology Investment Fund (TIF) project, as the

  7. Correlation between shear punch and tensile data for neutron-irradiated aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, M.L.; Edwards, D.J.; Toloczko, M.B.

    1995-04-01

    This work was performed to determine whether shear punch and tensile data obtained on neutron irradiated aluminum alloys exhibited the same type of relationship as had been seen in other work and to assess the validity of extrapolating the results to proton-irradiated alloys. This work was also meant to be the first of a series of similar test matrices designed to determine whether the shear punch/tensile relationship varied or was the same for different alloy classes.

  8. Validation of the shear punch-tensile correlation technique using irradiated materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hankin, G.L.; Faulkner, R.G.; Toloczko, M.B.; Hamilton, M.L.

    1998-03-01

    It was recently demonstrated that tensile data could be successfully related to shear punch data obtained on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) discs for a variety of irradiated alloys exhibiting yield strengths that ranged from 100 to 800 MPa. This implies that the shear punch test might be a viable alternative for obtaining tensile properties using a TEM disk, which is much smaller than even the smallest miniature tensile specimens, especially when irradiated specimens are not available or when they are too radioactive to handle easily. The majority of the earlier tensile-shear punch correlation work was done using a wide variety of unirradiated materials. The current work extends this correlation effort to irradiated materials and demonstrates that the same relationships that related shear punch tests remain valid for irradiated materials. Shear punch tests were performed on two sets of specimens. In the first group, three simple alloys from the {sup 59}Ni isotopic doping series in the solution annealed and cold worked conditions were irradiated at temperatures ranging from 365 to 495 C in the Fast Flux Test Facility. The corresponding tensile data already existed for tensile specimens fabricated from the same raw materials and irradiated side-by-side with the disks. In the second group, three variants of 316 stainless steel were irradiated in FFTF at 5 temperatures between 400 and 730 C to doses ranging from 12.5 to 88 dpa. The specimens were in the form of both TEM and miniature tensile specimens and were irradiated side-by-side.

  9. 29 CFR 570.59 - Occupations involved in the operation of power-driven metal forming, punching, and shearing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Occupations involved in the operation of power-driven metal... in the operation of power-driven metal forming, punching, and shearing machines (Order 8). (a... following power-driven metal forming, punching, and shearing machines: (i) All rolling machines, such...

  10. 29 CFR 570.59 - Occupations involved in the operation of power-driven metal forming, punching, and shearing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Occupations involved in the operation of power-driven metal... in the operation of power-driven metal forming, punching, and shearing machines (Order 8). (a... following power-driven metal forming, punching, and shearing machines: (i) All rolling machines, such...

  11. 29 CFR 570.59 - Occupations involved in the operation of power-driven metal forming, punching, and shearing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Occupations involved in the operation of power-driven metal... in the operation of power-driven metal forming, punching, and shearing machines (Order 8). (a... following power-driven metal forming, punching, and shearing machines: (i) All rolling machines, such...

  12. 29 CFR 570.59 - Occupations involved in the operation of power-driven metal forming, punching, and shearing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Occupations involved in the operation of power-driven metal... in the operation of power-driven metal forming, punching, and shearing machines (Order 8). (a... following power-driven metal forming, punching, and shearing machines: (i) All rolling machines, such...

  13. The development of a tensile-shear punch correlation for yield properties of model austenitic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Hankin, G.L.; Faulkner, R.G.; Hamilton, M.L.; Garner, F.A.

    1997-08-01

    The effective shear yield and maximum strengths of a set of neutron-irradiated, isotopically tailored austentic alloys were evaluated using the shear punch test. The dependence on composition and neutron dose showed the same trends as were observed in the corresponding miniature tensile specimen study conducted earlier. A single tensile-shear punch correlation was developed for the three alloys in which the maximum shear stress or Tresca criterion was successfully applied to predict the slope. The correlation will predict the tensile yield strength of the three different austenitic alloys tested to within {+-}53 MPa. The accuracy of the correlation improves with increasing material strength, to within {+-} MPa for predicting tensile yield strengths in the range of 400-800 MPa.

  14. Correlation Between Shear Punch and Tensile Strength for Low-Carbon Steel and Stainless Steel Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmudi, R.; Sadeghi, M.

    2013-02-01

    The deformation behavior of AISI 1015 low-carbon steel, and AISI 304 stainless steel sheets was investigated by uniaxial tension and the shear punch test (SPT). Both materials were cold rolled to an 80% thickness reduction and subsequently annealed in the temperature range 25-850 °C to produce a wide range of yield and ultimate strength levels. The correlations between shear punch and tensile yield and ultimate stresses were established empirically. Different linear relationships having different slopes and intercepts were found for the low-carbon and stainless steel sheets, and the possible parameters affecting the correlation were discussed. It was shown that, within limits, yield and tensile strength of thin steel sheets can be predicted from the shear data obtained by the easy-to-perform SPT.

  15. Effects of thermal fatigue on shear punch strength of tooth-colored restoratives

    PubMed Central

    Melody, Fam Mei Shi; U-Jin, Yap Adrian; Natalie, Tan Wei Min; Elizabeth, Tay Wan Ling; Chien, Jessica Yeo Siu

    2016-01-01

    Aims: This study investigated the effect of thermal fatigue on the shear strength of a range of tooth-colored restorative materials including giomers, zirconia-reinforced glass ionomer cement (GIC), nano-particle resin-modified GIC, highly viscous GICs, and composite resin. Materials and Methods: Twenty specimens of each material were fabricated in standardized washers (17 mm outer diameter, 9 mm internal diameter, 1 mm thick). The specimens were cured, stored in 100% humidity at 37.5°C for 24 h, and randomly divided into two groups of 10. Group A specimens were nonthermocycled (NT) and stored in distilled water at 37°C for 168 h. Group B specimens were thermocycled (TC) for 10,000 cycles (168 h) with baths X, Y, and Z adjusted to 35°C, 15°C, and 45°C, respectively. Each cycle had dwell times of 28 s in X, and 2s in Y/Z in the order XYXZ. Specimens then underwent shear punch testing at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min with a 2 kN load cell. Statistical analysis of shear strength was done using t-test and two-way ANOVA/Scheffe's post hoc test at significance level P < 0.05. Results: The effect of thermal fatigue on shear strength was material dependent. Except for the “sculptable” giomer (Beautifil II) and a highly viscous GIC (Fuji IX GP Fast), no significant differences in shear strength were generally observed between the NT and TC groups. For both groups, the composite resin (Filtek Z250XT) had the highest shear strength while the zirconia-reinforced (zirconomer) and a highly viscous GIC (Ketac Molar Quick) had the lowest. Conclusions: The effect of thermocycling on shear strength was material dependent. Thermal fatigue, however, did not significantly influence the shear strength of most materials assessed. The “sculptable” composite and giomer were significantly stronger than the other materials evaluated. Shear strength of the “flowable” injectable hybrid giomer was intermediate between the composite and GICs. PMID:27563182

  16. Shear punch strength evaluation of nanocomposite and compomer, post-conditioning in dietary solvents – An in-vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Harsimran; Singh, Harpreet; Vinod, K.S.; Singh, Baldeep; Arora, Rachita; Chatopaddhya, Sayan

    2014-01-01

    Background Perpetual research in esthetic dentistry has stupendously contributed in improving the mechanical and esthetic properties of restorative materials. Recently introduced nanocomposite claim to possess higher optimized esthetic and mechanical properties superior to other esthetic restorative materials in clinical use. It has been highlighted in many studies that intraoral degradation of composites is a consequence of both mechanical factors and chemical degradation. Thus, this in-vitro study was conducted to determine the strength of commonly used esthetic restorative materials after conditioning them in dietary solvents, thereby, simulating the intraoral environment. Aim Evaluation of shear punch strength of nanocomposite and compomer, post-conditioning in dietary solvents. Materials and methods Two test groups mentioned above, each containing sixty preconditioned samples, divided into four subgroups of fifteen samples each and conditioned in different dietary solvents, were subjected to shear punch test in custom designed shear punch apparatus in Universal Testing Machine. Results Among the dietary solvents, citric acid caused maximum decrease in the strength while conditioning in heptane showed increase in strength of the test restorative materials. Conclusion Nanocomposite revealed to have higher strength, thereby indicating its better application universally. PMID:25737916

  17. Criteria for initiation of delamination in quasi-static punch-shear tests of a carbon-fiber composite material.

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Eric Brian; English, Shawn Allen; Briggs, Timothy

    2015-09-01

    V arious phenomenological delamination initiation criteria are analyzed in quasi - static punch - shear tests conducted on six different geometries. These six geometries are modeled and analyzed using elastic, large - deformation finite element analysis. Analysis output is post - processed to assess different delamination initiation criteria, and their applicability to each of the geometries. These criteria are compared to test results to assess whether or not they are appropriate based on what occurred in testing. Further, examinations of CT scans and ultrasonic images o f test specimens are conducted in the appendix to determine the sequence of failure in each test geometry.

  18. Studies on Punching Shear Resistance of Two Way Slab Specimens with Partial Replacement of Cement by GGBS with Different Edge Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemani, Ravi Dakshina Murthy; Rao, M. V. S.; Grandhe, Veera Venkata Satya Naranyana

    2016-09-01

    The present work is an effort to quantify the punching shear load resistance effect on two way simply supported slab specimens with replacement of cement by Ground Granulated Blast Furnace Slag (GGBS) with different edge conditions at various replacement levels and evaluate its efficiency. GGBS replacement has emerged as a major alternative to conventional concrete and has rapidly drawn the concrete industry attention due to its cement savings, cost savings, environmental and socio-economic benefits. The two way slab specimens were subjected to punching shear load by in house fabricated apparatus. The slab specimens were cast using M30 grade concrete with HYSD bars. The cement was partially replaced with GGBS at different percentages i.e., 0 to 30 % at regular intervals of 10 %. The test results indicate that the two way slab specimens with partial replacement of cement by GGBS exhibit high resistance against punching shear when compared with conventional concretes slab specimens.

  19. 29 CFR 570.59 - Occupations involved in the operations of power-driven metal forming, punching, and shearing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... punch presses except those provided with full automatic feed and ejection and with a fixed barrier guard... presses; and plate punches. (iii) All bending machines, such as apron brakes and press brakes. (iv)...

  20. Influence of punch face angle and reduction on flow mode in backward and combined radial backward extrusion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Jeong-hoon; Hwang, Beong Bok; Lee, Ho Yong

    2015-11-01

    This paper is concerned with the analysis on the flow mode which determines lubrication limit such as stiction onto or sliding over punch face. The main goal of this study is to examine the influence of geometrical parameters such as punch face angle, reduction in area, and the gap height in radial direction in backward and combined radial-backward extrusion process on the flow mode and surface stresses such as sliding velocity, sliding distance and surface expansion. Annealed steel 17Cr3 was selected as a model material, a rigid-plastic material, for simulation, which was conducted using a commercially available FEA tool, Deform 2-D, programmed in a rigid plasticity theory. Change of flow mode during deformation was also investigated to find under which conditions of process parameter adopted the flow mode changes from stiction to transition or transition to sliding. In this paper, sliding velocities were quantitatively analyzed to determine the flow mode.

  1. Shear punch testing of {sup 59}Ni isotopically-doped model austenitic alloys after irradiation in FFTF at different He/dpa ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Hankin, G.L.; Faulkner, R.G.; Hamilton, M.L.; Garner, F.A.

    1998-03-01

    A series of three model alloys, Fe-15Cr-25Ni, Fe-15Cr-25Ni-0.04P and Fe-15Cr45Ni were irradiated side-by-side in FFTF-MOTA in both the annealed and the cold worked condition in each of two variants, one using naturally occurring isotopic mixtures, and another doped with {sup 59}Ni to generate relatively high helium-to-dpa ratios. Previous papers in this series have addressed the influence of helium on radiation-induced evolution of microstructure, dimensional stability and mechanical properties, the latter using miniature-tensile specimens. In the final paper of this experimental series, three sets of irradiations conducted at different temperatures and displacement rates were examined by shear punch testing of standard microscopy disks. The results were used to determine the influence of helium generation rate, alloy starting condition, irradiation temperature and total neutron exposure. The results were also compared with the miniature tensile data obtained earlier. In general, all alloys approached saturation levels of strength and ductility that were relatively independent of He/dpa ratio and starting condition, but were sensitive to the irradiation temperature and total exposure. Some small influence of helium/dpa ratio on the shear strength is visible in the two series that ran at {approximately}490 C, but is not evident at 365 C.

  2. Punch Card Programmable Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Korir, George; Prakash, Manu

    2015-01-01

    Small volume fluid handling in single and multiphase microfluidics provides a promising strategy for efficient bio-chemical assays, low-cost point-of-care diagnostics and new approaches to scientific discoveries. However multiple barriers exist towards low-cost field deployment of programmable microfluidics. Incorporating multiple pumps, mixers and discrete valve based control of nanoliter fluids and droplets in an integrated, programmable manner without additional required external components has remained elusive. Combining the idea of punch card programming with arbitrary fluid control, here we describe a self-contained, hand-crank powered, multiplex and robust programmable microfluidic platform. A paper tape encodes information as a series of punched holes. A mechanical reader/actuator reads these paper tapes and correspondingly executes operations onto a microfluidic chip coupled to the platform in a plug-and-play fashion. Enabled by the complexity of codes that can be represented by a series of holes in punched paper tapes, we demonstrate independent control of 15 on-chip pumps with enhanced mixing, normally-closed valves and a novel on-demand impact-based droplet generator. We demonstrate robustness of operation by encoding a string of characters representing the word “PUNCHCARD MICROFLUIDICS” using the droplet generator. Multiplexing is demonstrated by implementing an example colorimetric water quality assays for pH, ammonia, nitrite and nitrate content in different water samples. With its portable and robust design, low cost and ease-of-use, we envision punch card programmable microfluidics will bring complex control of microfluidic chips into field-based applications in low-resource settings and in the hands of children around the world. PMID:25738834

  3. Punch card programmable microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Korir, George; Prakash, Manu

    2015-01-01

    Small volume fluid handling in single and multiphase microfluidics provides a promising strategy for efficient bio-chemical assays, low-cost point-of-care diagnostics and new approaches to scientific discoveries. However multiple barriers exist towards low-cost field deployment of programmable microfluidics. Incorporating multiple pumps, mixers and discrete valve based control of nanoliter fluids and droplets in an integrated, programmable manner without additional required external components has remained elusive. Combining the idea of punch card programming with arbitrary fluid control, here we describe a self-contained, hand-crank powered, multiplex and robust programmable microfluidic platform. A paper tape encodes information as a series of punched holes. A mechanical reader/actuator reads these paper tapes and correspondingly executes operations onto a microfluidic chip coupled to the platform in a plug-and-play fashion. Enabled by the complexity of codes that can be represented by a series of holes in punched paper tapes, we demonstrate independent control of 15 on-chip pumps with enhanced mixing, normally-closed valves and a novel on-demand impact-based droplet generator. We demonstrate robustness of operation by encoding a string of characters representing the word "PUNCHCARD MICROFLUIDICS" using the droplet generator. Multiplexing is demonstrated by implementing an example colorimetric water quality assays for pH, ammonia, nitrite and nitrate content in different water samples. With its portable and robust design, low cost and ease-of-use, we envision punch card programmable microfluidics will bring complex control of microfluidic chips into field-based applications in low-resource settings and in the hands of children around the world.

  4. Efficacy of Punch Elevation Combined with Fractional Carbon Dioxide Laser Resurfacing in Facial Atrophic Acne Scarring: A Randomized Split-face Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Faghihi, Gita; Nouraei, Saeid; Asilian, Ali; Keyvan, Shima; Abtahi-Naeini, Bahareh; Rakhshanpour, Mehrdad; Nilforoushzadeh, Mohammad Ali; Hosseini, Sayed Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Background: A number of treatments for reducing the appearance of acne scars are available, but general guidelines for optimizing acne scar treatment do not exist. The aim of this study was to compare the clinical effectiveness and side effects of fractional carbon dioxide (CO2) laser resurfacing combined with punch elevation with fractional CO2 laser resurfacing alone in the treatment of atrophic acne scars. Materials and Methods: Forty-two Iranian subjects (age range 18–55) with Fitzpatrick skin types III to IV and moderate to severe atrophic acne scars on both cheeks received randomized split-face treatments: One side received fractional CO2 laser treatment and the other received one session of punch elevation combined with two sessions of laser fractional CO2 laser treatment, separated by an interval of 1 month. Two dermatologists independently evaluated improvement in acne scars 4 and 16 weeks after the last treatment. Side effects were also recorded after each treatment. Results: The mean ± SD age of patients was 23.4 ± 2.6 years. Clinical improvement of facial acne scarring was assessed by two dermatologists blinded to treatment conditions. No significant difference in evaluation was observed 1 month after treatment (P = 0.56). Their evaluation found that fractional CO2 laser treatment combined with punch elevation had greater efficacy than that with fractional CO2 laser treatment alone, assessed 4 months after treatment (P = 0.02). Among all side effects, coagulated crust formation and pruritus at day 3 after fractional CO2 laser treatment was significant on both treatment sides (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Concurrent use of fractional laser skin resurfacing with punch elevation offers a safe and effective approach for the treatment of acne scarring. PMID:26538695

  5. Combined Pressure-Shear Ignition Sensitivity Test

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    anrCIDB* propellant showing that sensitivity increase ( from TNT to Comp B to CMDB . The maximum pressure an~d shear velocity were around 1.0 GPa and 60...shear velocity required for ignition. * CMDB is an acronyin for Composite Modified Double Base. S IA I S i-A2 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page LIST OF FIGURES...Reaction ...................... 15 IOA.CMDB slid against CKDB. No reaction ....................... 17 10B.CMDB slid againbt CMDB . Reaction

  6. Aerospace Threaded Fastener Strength in Combined Shear and Tension Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steeve, B. E.; Wingate, R. J.

    2012-01-01

    A test program was initiated by Marshall Space Flight Center and sponsored by the NASA Engineering and Safety Center to characterize the failure behavior of a typical high-strength aerospace threaded fastener under a range of shear to tension loading ratios for both a nut and an insert configuration where the shear plane passes through the body and threads, respectively. The testing was performed with a customized test fixture designed to test a bolt with a single shear plane at a discrete range of loading angles. The results provide data to compare against existing combined loading failure criteria and to quantify the bolt strength when the shear plane passes through the threads.

  7. Influence of Clearance and Punch Velocity on the Quality of Pure Thin Copper Sheets Blanked Parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakariya Lubis, Didin; Mahardika, Muslim

    2016-11-01

    Research on the influence of clearance and punch velocity to determine the quality of the punched edge were conducted. This study uses pure copper sheet material with the clearance variation of 2.5, 5, 7.5 and 10%. Punch velocity is based on the ability of about Micro Punch CNC machine which is 100 and 2600 mm/min. At highest speed with a clearance of 2.5%, sheared zone is of about 395 pm or 79% of the material thickness. It can be concluded that the punch velocity gives positive influence on the sheared zone in copper. Basically the ideal outcome of the sheared edge of punching result is having rollover and small burr and contain at least 75% of the shear zone. This can be achieved with a clearance of 2.5%.

  8. High resolution weak lensing mass mapping combining shear and flexion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanusse, F.; Starck, J.-L.; Leonard, A.; Pires, S.

    2016-06-01

    Aims: We propose a new mass mapping algorithm, specifically designed to recover small-scale information from a combination of gravitational shear and flexion. Including flexion allows us to supplement the shear on small scales in order to increase the sensitivity to substructures and the overall resolution of the convergence map without relying on strong lensing constraints. Methods: To preserve all available small scale information, we avoid any binning of the irregularly sampled input shear and flexion fields and treat the mass mapping problem as a general ill-posed inverse problem, which is regularised using a robust multi-scale wavelet sparsity prior. The resulting algorithm incorporates redshift, reduced shear, and reduced flexion measurements for individual galaxies and is made highly efficient by the use of fast Fourier estimators. Results: We tested our reconstruction method on a set of realistic weak lensing simulations corresponding to typical HST/ACS cluster observations and demonstrate our ability to recover substructures with the inclusion of flexion, which are otherwise lost if only shear information is used. In particular, we can detect substructures on the 15'' scale well outside of the critical region of the clusters. In addition, flexion also helps to constrain the shape of the central regions of the main dark matter halos. Our mass mapping software, called Glimpse2D, is made freely available at http://www.cosmostat.org/software/glimpse

  9. Sun Packs Double Punch

    NASA Video Gallery

    On August 3, the sun packed a double punch, emitting a M6.0-class flare at 9:43 am EDT. This video is of the second, slightly stronger M9.3-class flare at 11:41 pm EDT. Both flares had significant ...

  10. Frictional slip of a rigid punch on an elastic half-plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, George G.

    2016-07-01

    If a rigid punch is perfectly bonded to an elastic half-plane, the stress state possesses a well-known oscillating singularity. Because the shear and normal stresses are out of phase with each other, the application of a frictional slip model is expected to result in a slip zone at each of the corners. A solution exists in the literature if the punch is subjected to a normal load. It was shown that the extent of the slip zone is an eigenvalue which depends upon Poisson's ratio and the coefficient of friction, but is independent of the magnitude of the applied load. In this investigation, the extent of the slip zone as well as the slip displacement is determined from the perfect bond solution. The analysis is valid if the length of the slip zone is small compared with the punch width. However, the results are shown to be in excellent agreement with the solution in the literature even when the total length of the slip zones is equal to half of the punch width. A solution is then obtained for combined normal and tangential loading. This work, and its extensions, is expected to be applicable in the study of the mechanics of fretting.

  11. Biomechanics of the head for Olympic boxer punches to the face

    PubMed Central

    Walilko, T; Viano, D; Bir, C

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The biomechanics of the head for punches to the jaw and the risk of head injury from translational and rotational acceleration were studied. Results: Punch force averaged 3427 (standard deviation (SD) 811) N, hand velocity 9.14 (SD 2.06) m/s, and effective punch mass 2.9 (SD 2.0) kg. Punch force was higher for the heavier weight classes, due primarily to a higher effective mass of the punch. Jaw load was 876 (SD 288) N. The peak translational acceleration was 58 (SD 13) g, rotational acceleration was 6343 (SD 1789) rad/s2, and neck shear was 994 (SD 318) N. Conclusions: Olympic boxers deliver straight punches with high impact velocity and energy transfer. The severity of the punch increases with weight class. PMID:16183766

  12. Mechanical Response and Shear Initiation of Double-Base Propellants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    dynamic shear punch test using a modified split- Hopkinson bar. Varying the striker bar’s velocity and length controls the shear rate and duration. Shear...for double-base propellants and computational results of the shear punch test . For the simulations, the viscoSCRAM constitutive model was used to...initiation is determined based on their ability to predict the observed response from the dynamic shear punch test . 15. SUBJECT TERMS insensitive

  13. Portable punch and die jig

    DOEpatents

    Lewandowski, Edward F.; Anderson, Petrus A.

    1978-01-01

    A portable punch and die jig includes a U-shaped jig of predetermined width having a slot of predetermined width in the base thereof extending completely across the width of the jig adapted to fit over the walls of rectangular tubes and a punch and die assembly disposed in a hole extending through the base of the jig communicating with the slot in the base of the jig for punching a hole in the walls of the rectangular tubes at precisely determined locations.

  14. 21 CFR 882.4750 - Skull punch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Skull punch. 882.4750 Section 882.4750 Food and... NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4750 Skull punch. (a) Identification. A skull punch is a device used to punch holes through a patient's skull to allow fixation of cranioplasty plates...

  15. 21 CFR 882.4750 - Skull punch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Skull punch. 882.4750 Section 882.4750 Food and... NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4750 Skull punch. (a) Identification. A skull punch is a device used to punch holes through a patient's skull to allow fixation of cranioplasty plates...

  16. 21 CFR 882.4750 - Skull punch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Skull punch. 882.4750 Section 882.4750 Food and... NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4750 Skull punch. (a) Identification. A skull punch is a device used to punch holes through a patient's skull to allow fixation of cranioplasty plates...

  17. 21 CFR 882.4750 - Skull punch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Skull punch. 882.4750 Section 882.4750 Food and... NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4750 Skull punch. (a) Identification. A skull punch is a device used to punch holes through a patient's skull to allow fixation of cranioplasty plates...

  18. 21 CFR 882.4750 - Skull punch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Skull punch. 882.4750 Section 882.4750 Food and... NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4750 Skull punch. (a) Identification. A skull punch is a device used to punch holes through a patient's skull to allow fixation of cranioplasty plates...

  19. Deformation field heterogeneity in punch indentation

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, Tejas G.; Saldana, Christopher; Hudspeth, Matthew; M'Saoubi, Rachid

    2014-01-01

    Plastic heterogeneity in indentation is fundamental for understanding mechanics of hardness testing and impression-based deformation processing methods. The heterogeneous deformation underlying plane-strain indentation was investigated in plastic loading of copper by a flat punch. Deformation parameters were measured, in situ, by tracking the motion of asperities in high-speed optical imaging. These measurements were coupled with multi-scale analyses of strength, microstructure and crystallographic texture in the vicinity of the indentation. Self-consistency is demonstrated in description of the deformation field using the in situ mechanics-based measurements and post-mortem materials characterization. Salient features of the punch indentation process elucidated include, among others, the presence of a dead-metal zone underneath the indenter, regions of intense strain rate (e.g. slip lines) and extent of the plastic flow field. Perhaps more intriguing are the transitions between shear-type and compression-type deformation modes over the indentation region that were quantified by the high-resolution crystallographic texture measurements. The evolution of the field concomitant to the progress of indentation is discussed and primary differences between the mechanics of indentation for a rigid perfectly plastic material and a strain-hardening material are described. PMID:24910521

  20. Critical combinations of shear and direct axial stress for curved rectangular panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schildcrout, Murry; Stein, Manuel

    1949-01-01

    A solution is presented for the problem of the buckling of curved rectangular panels subjected to combined shear and direct axial stress. Charts giving theoretical critical combinations of shear and direct axial stress are presented for panels having five different length-width ratios. Because the actual critical compressive stress of rectangular panels having substantial curvature is known to be much lower than the theoretical value, a semiempirical method of analysis of curved panels subjected to combined shear and direct axial stress is presented for use in design. (author

  1. Combined ideal and kinetic effects on reversed shear Alfven eigenmodes

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelenkov, N. N.; Kramer, G. J.; Nazikian, R.

    2011-10-15

    A reversed shear Alfven eigenmodes (RSAEs) theory has been developed for reversed magnetic field shear plasmas when the safety factor minimum, q{sub min}, is at or above a rational value. The modes we study are known sometimes as either the bottom of the frequency sweep or the down sweeping RSAEs. We show that, strictly speaking, the ideal MHD theory is not compatible with the eigenmode solution in the reversed shear plasma with q{sub min} above integer values. Corrected by a special analytic finite Larmor radius (FLR) condition, MHD dispersion of these modes nevertheless can be developed. Numerically, MHD structure can serve as a good approximation for the RSAEs.The large radial scale part of the analytic RSAE solution can be obtained from ideal MHD and expressed in terms of the Legendre functions. The kinetic equation with FLR effects for the eigenmode is solved numerically and agrees with the analytic solutions. Properties of RSAEs and their potential implications for plasma diagnostics are discussed.

  2. Injury tolerance and moment response of the knee joint to combined valgus bending and shear loading.

    PubMed

    Bose, Dipan; Bhalla, Kavi S; Untaroiu, Costin D; Ivarsson, B Johan; Crandall, Jeff R; Hurwitz, Shepard

    2008-06-01

    Valgus bending and shearing of the knee have been identified as primary mechanisms of injuries in a lateral loading environment applicable to pedestrian-car collisions. Previous studies have reported on the structural response of the knee joint to pure valgus bending and lateral shearing, as well as the estimated injury thresholds for the knee bending angle and shear displacement based on experimental tests. However, epidemiological studies indicate that most knee injuries are due to the combined effects of bending and shear loading. Therefore, characterization of knee stiffness for combined loading and the associated injury tolerances is necessary for developing vehicle countermeasures to mitigate pedestrian injuries. Isolated knee joint specimens (n=40) from postmortem human subjects were tested in valgus bending at a loading rate representative of a pedestrian-car impact. The effect of lateral shear force combined with the bending moment on the stiffness response and the injury tolerances of the knee was concurrently evaluated. In addition to the knee moment-angle response, the bending angle and shear displacement corresponding to the first instance of primary ligament failure were determined in each test. The failure displacements were subsequently used to estimate an injury threshold function based on a simplified analytical model of the knee. The validity of the determined injury threshold function was subsequently verified using a finite element model. Post-test necropsy of the knees indicated medial collateral ligament injury consistent with the clinical injuries observed in pedestrian victims. The moment-angle response in valgus bending was determined at quasistatic and dynamic loading rates and compared to previously published test data. The peak bending moment values scaled to an average adult male showed no significant change with variation in the superimposed shear load. An injury threshold function for the knee in terms of bending angle and shear

  3. Science in mid-Victorian Punch.

    PubMed

    Noakes, Richard

    2002-09-01

    This article examines the scientific content of the most famous comic journal of the Victorian period: Punch. Concentrating on the first three decades of the periodical (1841-1871), I show that Punch usually engaged with science that was highly topical, of consequence to the lives of its bourgeois readers, and suitable for comic interpretation. But Punch's satire of scientific topics was highly complex. It often contained allusions to non-scientific topics, and its engagement with science ranged from the utterly comic to the sharply critical. Punch prompted readers to think as well as laugh about science, and probably shaped their scientific education more than we think.

  4. Airborne Wind Shear Detection and Warning Systems: First Combined Manufacturers' and Technologists' Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spady, Amos A., Jr. (Compiler); Bowles, Roland L. (Compiler); Schlickenmaier, Herbert (Compiler)

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of the meeting was to transfer significant, ongoing results gained during the first year of the joint NASA/FAA Airborne Wind Shear Program to the technical industry and to pose problems of current concern to the combined group. It also provided a forum for manufacturers to review forward-looking technology concepts and for technologists to gain an understanding of FAA certification requirements and the problems encountered by the manufacturers during the development of airborne equipment.

  5. A combined theory for magnetohydrodynamic equilibria with anisotropic pressure and magnetic shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgson, J. D. B.; Neukirch, T.

    2017-03-01

    We present a new approach to the theory of magnetohydrodynamic equilibria with anisotropic pressure, magnetic shear and translational/rotational invariance. This approach involves combining two existing formalisms in order to eliminate their individual weaknesses. The theoretical aspects of the method are explored in detail along with numerical solutions which make use of the method. Eventually, this method could be applied to model various plasma systems, such as planetary magnetospheres.

  6. Choices enhance punching performance of competitive kickboxers.

    PubMed

    Halperin, Israel; Chapman, Dale W; Martin, David T; Lewthwaite, Rebecca; Wulf, Gabriele

    2016-07-27

    While self-controlled practice has been shown to enhance motor learning with various populations and novel tasks, it remains unclear if such effects would be found with athletes completing familiar tasks. Study 1 used a single case-study design with a world-champion kickboxer. We investigated whether giving the athlete a choice over the order of punches would affect punching velocity and impact force. Separated by 1 min of rest, the athlete completed 2 rounds of 12 single, maximal effort punches (lead straight, rear straight, lead hook and rear hook) delivered to a punching integrator in a counterbalanced order over six testing days. In one round the punches were delivered in a predetermined order while in the second round the order was self-selected by the athlete. In the choice condition, the world champion punched with greater velocities (6-11 %) and impact forces (5-10 %). In Study 2, the same testing procedures were repeated with 13 amateur male kickboxers over 2 testing days. Similar to Study 1, the athletes punched with significantly greater velocities (6 %, p < 0.05) and normalised impact forces (2 %, p < 0.05) in the choice condition. These findings complement research on autonomy support in motor learning by demonstrating immediate advantages in force production and velocity with experienced athletes.

  7. Airborne Wind Shear Detection and Warning Systems. Second Combined Manufacturers' and Technologists' Conference, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spady, Amos A., Jr. (Compiler); Bowles, Roland L. (Compiler); Schlickenmaier, Herbert (Compiler)

    1990-01-01

    The Second Combined Manufacturers' and Technologists' Conference hosted jointly by NASA Langley (LaRC) and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) was held in Williamsburg, Virginia, on October 18 to 20, 1988. The purpose of the meeting was to transfer significant, ongoing results gained during the second year of the joint NASA/FAA Airborne Wind Shear Program to the technical industry and to pose problems of current concern to the combined group. It also provided a forum for manufacturers to review forward-look technology concepts and for technologists to gain an understanding of the problems encountered by the manufacturers during the development of airborne equipment and the FAA certification requirements.

  8. Airborne Wind Shear Detection and Warning Systems: Third Combined Manufacturers' and Technologists' Conference, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicroy, Dan D. (Compiler); Bowles, Roland L. (Compiler); Schlickenmaier, Herbert (Compiler)

    1991-01-01

    The Third Combined Manufacturers' and Technologists' Conference was held in Hampton, Va., on October 16-18, 1990. The purpose of the meeting was to transfer significant on-going results of the NASA/FAA joint Airborne Wind Shear Program to the technical industry and to pose problems of current concern to the combined group. It also provided a forum for manufacturers to review forward-look technology concepts and for technologists to gain an understanding of the problems encountered by the manufacturers during the development of airborne equipment and the FAA certification requirements.

  9. Higher Himalayan Shear Zone, Sutlej section: structural geology and extrusion mechanism by various combinations of simple shear, pure shear and channel flow in shifting modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Soumyajit; Koyi, Hemin A.

    2010-09-01

    The Higher Himalayan Shear Zone (HHSZ) in the Sutlej section reveals (1) top-to-SW ductile shearing, (2) top-to-NE ductile shearing in the upper- and the lower strands of the South Tibetan Detachment System (STDSU, STDSL), and (3) top-to-SW brittle shearing corroborated by trapezoid-shaped minerals in micro-scale. In the proposed extrusion model of the HHSZ, the E1-phase during 25-19 Ma is marked by simple shearing of the upper sub-channel defined by the upper strand of the Main Central Thrust (MCTU) and the top of STDSU as the lower- and the upper boundaries, respectively. Subsequently, the E2a-pulse during 15-14 Ma was characterized by simple shear, pure shear, and channel flow of the entire HHSZ. Finally, the E2b-pulse during 14-12 Ma observed simple shearing and channel flow of the lower sub-channel defined by the lower strand of the Main Central Thrust (MCTL) and the top of the STDSL as the lower- and the upper boundaries, respectively. The model explains the constraints of thicknesses of the STDSU and the STDSL along with spatially variable extrusion rate and the inverted metamorphism of the HHSZ. The model predicts (1) shear strain after ductile extrusion to be maximum at the boundaries of the HHSZ, which crudely matches with the existing data. The other speculations that cannot be checked are (2) uniform shear strain from the MCTU to the top of the HHSZ in the E1-phase; (3) fastest rates of extrusion of the lower boundaries of the STDSU and the STDSL during the E2a- and E2b-pulses, respectively; and (4) variable thickness of the STDSL and rare absence of the STDSU. Non-parabolic shear fabrics of the HHSZ possibly indicate heterogeneous strain. The top-to-SW brittle shearing around 12 Ma augmented the ductile extruded rocks to arrive a shallower depth. The brittle-ductile extension leading to boudinage possibly did not enhance the extrusion.

  10. Combined Resistivity and Shear Wave Velocity Soil-type Estimation Beneath a Coastal Protection Levee.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzo, J. M.; Goff, D.; Hayashi, K.

    2015-12-01

    Unconsolidated Holocene deltaic sediments comprise levee foundation soils in New Orleans, USA. Whereas geotechnical tests at point locations are indispensable for evaluating soil stability, the highly variable sedimentary facies of the Mississippi delta create difficulties to predict soil conditions between test locations. Combined electrical resistivity and seismic shear wave studies, calibrated to geotechnical data, may provide an efficient methodology to predict soil types between geotechnical sites at shallow depths (0- 10 m). The London Avenue Canal levee flank of New Orleans, which failed in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, 2005, presents a suitable site in which to pioneer these geophysical relationships. Preliminary cross-plots show electrically resistive, high-shear-wave velocity areas interpreted as low-permeability, resistive silt. In brackish coastal environments, low-resistivity and low-shear-wave-velocity areas may indicate both saturated, unconsolidated sands and low-rigidity clays. Via a polynomial approximation, soil sub-types of sand, silt and clay can be estimated by a cross-plot of S-wave velocity and resistivity. We confirm that existent boring log data fit reasonably well with the polynomial approximation where 2/3 of soil samples fall within their respective bounds—this approach represents a new classification system that could be used for other mid-latitude, fine-grained deltas.

  11. Airborne Wind Shear Detection and Warning Systems: Fourth Combined Manufacturers' and Technologists' Conference, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicroy, Dan D. (Compiler); Bowles, Roland L. (Compiler); Passman, Robert H. (Compiler)

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the meeting was to transfer significant ongoing results of the NASA/FAA joint Airborne Wind Shear Program to the technical industry and to pose problems of current concern to the combined group. It also provided a forum for manufacturers to review forward-look technology concepts and for technologists to gain an understanding of the problems encountered by the manufacturers during the development of airborne equipment and the FAA certification requirements. The present document was compiled to record the essence of the technology updates and discussions which follow each.

  12. Endothelial cell alignment as a result of anisotropic strain and flow induced shear stress combinations.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Ravi; Le Gac, Séverine; Verdonschot, Nico; van den Berg, Albert; Koopman, Bart; Rouwkema, Jeroen

    2016-07-12

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are continuously exposed in vivo to cyclic strain and shear stress from pulsatile blood flow. When these stimuli are applied in vitro, ECs adopt an appearance resembling their in vivo state, most apparent in their alignment (perpendicular to uniaxial strain and along the flow). Uniaxial strain and flow perpendicular to the strain, used in most in vitro studies, only represent the in vivo conditions in straight parts of vessels. The conditions present over large fractions of the vasculature can be better represented by anisotropic biaxial strains at various orientations to flow. To emulate these biological complexities in vitro, we have developed a medium-throughput device to screen for the effects on cells of variously oriented anisotropic biaxial strains and flow combinations. Upon the application of only strains for 24 h, ECs (HUVECs) aligned perpendicular to the maximum principal strain and the alignment was stronger for a higher maximum:minimum principal strain ratio. A 0.55 Pa shear stress, when applied alone or with strain for 24 h, caused cells to align along the flow. Studying EC response to such combined physiological mechanical stimuli was not possible with existing platforms and to our best knowledge, has not been reported before.

  13. Endothelial cell alignment as a result of anisotropic strain and flow induced shear stress combinations

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Ravi; Le Gac, Séverine; Verdonschot, Nico; van den Berg, Albert; Koopman, Bart; Rouwkema, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are continuously exposed in vivo to cyclic strain and shear stress from pulsatile blood flow. When these stimuli are applied in vitro, ECs adopt an appearance resembling their in vivo state, most apparent in their alignment (perpendicular to uniaxial strain and along the flow). Uniaxial strain and flow perpendicular to the strain, used in most in vitro studies, only represent the in vivo conditions in straight parts of vessels. The conditions present over large fractions of the vasculature can be better represented by anisotropic biaxial strains at various orientations to flow. To emulate these biological complexities in vitro, we have developed a medium-throughput device to screen for the effects on cells of variously oriented anisotropic biaxial strains and flow combinations. Upon the application of only strains for 24 h, ECs (HUVECs) aligned perpendicular to the maximum principal strain and the alignment was stronger for a higher maximum:minimum principal strain ratio. A 0.55 Pa shear stress, when applied alone or with strain for 24 h, caused cells to align along the flow. Studying EC response to such combined physiological mechanical stimuli was not possible with existing platforms and to our best knowledge, has not been reported before. PMID:27404382

  14. Airborne Wind Shear Detection and Warning Systems. Second Combined Manufacturers' and Technologists' Conference, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spady, Amos A., Jr. (Compiler); Bowles, Roland L. (Compiler); Schlickenmaier, Herbert (Compiler)

    1990-01-01

    The Second Combined Manufacturers' and Technologists' Conference was hosted jointly by NASA Langley (LaRC) and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) in Williamsburg, Virginia, on October 18 to 20, 1988. The meeting was co-chaired by Dr. Roland Bowles of LaRC and Herbrt Schlickenmaier of the FAA. The purpose of the meeting was to transfer significant, ongoing results gained during the second year of the joint NASA/FAA Airborne Wind Shear Program to the technical industry and to pose problems of current concern to the combined group. It also provided a forum for manufacturers to review forward-look technology concepts and for technologists to gain an understanding of the problems encountered by the manufacturers during the development of airborne equipment and the FAA certification requirements.

  15. Airborne Wind Shear Detection and Warning Systems. Fourth Combined Manufacturers' and Technologists' Conference, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicroy, Dan D. (Compiler); Bowles, Roland L. (Compiler); Passman, Robert H. (Compiler)

    1992-01-01

    The Fourth Combined Manufacturers' and Technologists' Conference was hosted jointly by NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) in Williamsburg, Virginia, on April 14-16, 1992. The meeting was co-chaired by Dr. Roland Bowles of LaRC and Bob Passman of the FAA. The purpose of the meeting was to transfer significant ongoing results of the NASA/FAA Joint Airborne Wind Shear Program to the technical industry and to pose problems of current concern to the combined group. It also provided a forum for manufacturers to review forward-look technology concepts and for technologists to gain an understanding of the problems encountered by the manufacturers during the development of airborne equipment and the FAA certification requirements. The present document has been compiled to record the essence of the technology updates and discussions which follow each.

  16. A Computational Analysis of a Shear Punch Test

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    were 1.27cm diameter 350- maraging steel . The incident and output bars were 150cm in length, while the striker bar was available in 25, 50, and...yield [MPa] En [MPa] Maraging steel 199 0.33 2242 0.00 Stainless steel 200 0.33 1170 100 (b) Johnson-Cook Model A [MPa] B [MPa...pulse. The specimen holder was made from 17- 4 PH stainless steel and consisted of three pieces held together with six high- strength bolts. In

  17. An Introduction to PunchScan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popoveniuc, Stefan; Hosp, Ben

    PunchScan is a precinct-read optical-scan balloting system that allows voters to take their ballot with them after scanning. This does not violate the secret ballot principle because the ballots cannot be read without secret information held by the distributed authority in charge of the election. In fact, this election authority will publish the ballots for everyone to see, allowing voters whose ballots were incorrectly omitted to complain. PunchScan vote-counting is performed in private by the election authority - who uses their secret information to decode the ballots - but is verified in public by an auditor.In this paper we describe how and why PunchScan works. We have kept most of the description at an outline level so that it may be used as a straw model of a cryptographic voting system.

  18. Requirements for Auxiliary Stiffeners Attached to Panels Under Combined Compression and Shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Merit; Weber, Robert L

    1943-01-01

    Panels of aluminum alloy sheets, framed by side and end stiffeners, were subjected to combined loading by means of offset knife edges applying loads to top and bottom end plates with reacting forces against the end plates supplied by laterally acting rollers. The test specimens were 17S-T aluminum alloy shoots 0.040 inch thick in panels of 10-inch width and three different lengths (approximately 10, 26, and 30 inch). Data were obtained for the bowing of transverse and longitudinal ribs of rectangular cross section and varying depths mounted on one side of the sheet only, for several ratios of compression to shear loads. Limiting values of the moments of inertia were calculated from these measurements. The experimental values exceed the theoretical values given by Timoshenko for the case of simply supported sheets with uniformly distributed boundary stresses. The work reported includes measurements of the effective shear moduli of the nine test panels with and without ribs. These data are compared with values published by Lahdo and Wagner.

  19. Load estimation from photoelastic fringe patterns under combined normal and shear forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, V. N.; Grewal, G. S.

    2009-08-01

    Recently there has been some spurt of interests to use photoelastic materials for sensing applications. This has been successfully applied for designing a number of signal-based sensors, however, there have been limited efforts to design image-based sensors on photoelasticity which can have wider applications in term of actual loading and visualisation. The main difficulty in achieving this is the infinite loading conditions that may generate same image on the material surface. This, however, can be useful for known loading situations as this can provide dynamic and actual conditions of loading in real time. This is particularly useful for separating components of forces in and out of the loading plane. One such application is the separation of normal and shear forces acting on the plantar surface of foot of diabetic patients for predicting ulceration. In our earlier work we have used neural networks to extract normal force information from the fringe patterns using image intensity. This paper considers geometric and various other statistical parameters in addition to the image intensity to extract normal as well as shear force information from the fringe pattern in a controlled experimental environment. The results of neural network output with the above parameters and their combinations are compared and discussed. The aim is to generalise the technique for a range of loading conditions that can be exploited for whole-field load visualisation and sensing applications in biomedical field.

  20. Mechanically fastened composite laminates subjected to combined bearing-bypass and shear loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madenci, Erdogan

    1993-01-01

    Bolts and rivets provide a means of load transfer in the construction of aircraft. However, they give rise to stress concentrations and are often the source and location of static and fatigue failures. Furthermore, fastener holes are prone to cracks during take-off and landing. These cracks present the most common origin of structural failures in aircraft. Therefore, accurate determination of the contact stresses associated with such loaded holes in mechanically fastened joints is essential to reliable strength evaluation and failure prediction. As the laminate is subjected to loading, the contact region, whose extent is not known, develops between the fastener and the hole boundary through this contact region, which consists of slip and no-slip zones due to friction. The presence of the unknown contact stress distribution over the contact region between the pin and the composite laminate, material anisotropy, friction between the pin and the laminate, pin-hole clearance, combined bearing-bypass and shear loading, and finite geometry of the laminate result in a complex non-linear problem. In the case of bearing-bypass loading in compression, this non-linear problem is further complicated by the presence of dual contact regions. Previous research concerning the analysis of mechanical joints subjected to combined bearing-bypass and shear loading is non-existent. In the case of bearing-bypass loading only, except for the study conducted by Naik and Crews (1991), others employed the concept of superposition which is not valid for this non-linear problem. Naik and Crews applied a linear finite element analysis with conditions along the pin-hole contact region specified as displacement constraint equations. The major shortcoming of this method is that the variation of the contract region as a function of the applied load should be known a priori. Also, their analysis is limited to symmetric geometry and material systems, and frictionless boundary conditions. Since the

  1. Wiring harnesses documented by punched-card technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, W. W.; Kloezeman, W. G.

    1970-01-01

    Cards representing a connector are punched, sorted, and then used to printout wiring documentation for that connector. When wiring changes are made, new cards are punched and the wiring documentation is reprinted to reflect the latest configuration.

  2. Tissue-Specific and Complex Complementation Patterns in the Punch Locus of DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    PubMed Central

    Mackay, William J.; Reynolds, Elaine R.; O'Donnell, Janis M.

    1985-01-01

    Mutations in the Punch locus result in loss of GTP cyclohydrolase activity, but all mutations do not affect the enzyme in the same way. There are at least three classes of Punch mutations. One class results in a dominant eye color, recessive lethal phenotype. A second class of mutations also causes a recessive lethal phenotype, but heterozygous mutants have normal eye color. They show loss of GTP cyclohydrolase function in all tissues where activity can be measured. Alleles comprising a third class are recessive eye color mutations that are homozygous viable. Individuals with this third type of mutation show loss of enzyme activity in the eye, but show normal or near-normal activity elsewhere. In order to examine the organization and function of this locus further, we have performed interallelic complementation tests on 25 Punch mutations, monitoring viability and enzyme activity in prepupae and adults. Most allele combinations are lethal. Those that complement do so in ways that are tissue-or stage-specific and unpredictable. Tests of mutants with tissue-specific phenotypes and of individuals mutant for complementing Punch lethal alleles lead us to conclude that Punch is a complex locus, both with respect to its organization and to its products. PMID:3934035

  3. The optimal combination of substrate chemistry with physiological fluid shear stress.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Luo, Yanfeng; Xie, Zhao; Xing, Juan; Lin, Manping; Yang, Li; Wang, Yuanliang; Huang, Ke

    2013-12-01

    Osteoblasts on implanted biomaterials sense both substrate chemistry and mechanical stimulus. The effects of substrate chemistry alone and mechanical stimulus alone on osteoblasts have been widely studied. This study investigates the optimal combination of substrate chemistry and 12dyn/cm(2) physiological flow shear stress (FSS) by examining their influences on primary rat osteoblasts (ROBs), including the releases of ATP, nitric oxide (NO), and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on glass slides with -OH, -CH3, and -NH2 were employed to provide various substrate chemistries, whereas a parallel-plate fluid flow system produced the physiological FSS. Substrate chemistry alone exerted no observable effects on the releases of ATP, NO, and PGE2. Nevertheless, when ROBs were exposed to both substrate chemistry and FSS, the ATP releases of NH2 were upregulated about 12-fold compared to substrate chemistry alone, while the ATP releases of CH3 and OH was similarly increased 7-fold at the peak. Similar trends were observed for the releases of NO and PGE2. The expressions of ATP, NO, and PGE2 followed the pattern of NH2-FSS>Glass-FSS>CH3-FSS≈OH-FSS. ROBs on NH2 produced the optimal combination of substrate chemistry with the physiological FSS. The F-actin organization and focal adhesion (FA) formation of ROBs on various SAMs without FSS were examined. NH2 produced the best results whereas CH3 and OH produced the worst ones. Inhibition of FAs and/or disruption of F-actin significantly decreased the releases of FSS-induced PGE2, NO, and/or ATP. Consequently, a mechanism was proposed that the best F-actin organization and FA formation of ROBs on NH2 lead to the optimal combination of substrate chemistry with the 12dyn/cm(2) physiological FSS. This mechanism gives guidance for the design of implanted biomaterials and bioreactors for bone tissue engineering.

  4. Targeted Cryotherapy Using Disposable Biopsy Punches

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Avitus John Raakesh

    2014-01-01

    Cryotherapy is a commonly used office procedure that causes destruction of tissue by cryonecrosis due to rapid freezing and thawing of cells. The limitation in treating plantar warts and deeper dermal lesions is that the freeze time should be longer to penetrate deeper, which results in collateral damage to normal skin surrounding the lesion. This results in unwanted side effects of prolonged pain, blistering and haemorrhage and increased healing time. The cone spray technique was used to reduce collateral damage, but deeper penetration is difficult to achieve. An innovative technique using disposable biopsy punches is described that ensures deeper freezing as compared to the plastic cone. The metal cutting edge of the punch enters deeper into the lesions as the liquid nitrogen is passed, sparing damage to surrounding skin. PMID:25136216

  5. Dynamic flow localization in porous rocks under combined pressure and shear loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarushina, Viktoriya; Podladchikov, Yuri; Simon, Nina

    2015-04-01

    Flow localization occurs in deforming porous fluid saturated rocks. It exhibits itself as veins, pockmarks on the ocean floor or gas chimneys visible on seismic images from several chalk fields of the Central North Sea and from the Utsira formation at Sleipner in the Norwegian North Sea, which is one of the best documented CO2 storage sites. Porosity waves were repeatedly shown to be a viable mechanism of flow self-localization that does not require the pre-existence of a connected fracture network. Porosity waves result from an instability of the Darcy flow that occurs in porous rocks with time-dependent viscous or viscoelastoplastic rheology. Local fluid overpressure generated by fluid injection or chemical reactions aided by buoyancy force drives upward fluid migration. Viscous deformation delays pressure diffusion thus maintaining local overpressure for considerable periods of time. Development of an under-pressured region just below the over-pressured domain leads to separation of the fluid-filled high-porosity blob from the source and the background flow. The instability organizes the flow into separate vertical channels. Pressure distribution, shape and scaling of these channels are highly sensitive to the rheology of the porous rock. In this contribution, based on a micromechanical approach, we consider the complex rheology of brittle, ductile and transitional regimes of deformation of porous rocks in the presence of combined pressure and shear loading. Accurate description of transitional brittle-ductile deformation is a challenging task due to a large number of microscopic processes involved. We use elastoplastic and viscoplastic analytical solutions for the non-hydrostatic deformation of a singular cavity in the representative volume element in order to deduce expected behavior of the porous rock. The model provides micro-mechanisms for various failure modes (localized and homogeneous) and dilatancy onset. In particular, the model predicts that dilatancy

  6. Athletic fashion, "Punch," and the creation of the new woman.

    PubMed

    Collins, Tracy J R

    2010-01-01

    Between 1885-1900 "Punch" satirized the personality of the New Woman. However, virtually single-handedly it also gave a body and emancipated culture to this otherwise socially abstract personality. Using illustrations from "Punch," this essay argues that using sport specific clothing and equipment in its cartoons, "Punch" completely unintentionally created a liberating picture of women while simultaneously using its captions and border texts to make the New Woman's body signify the anxieties patriarchal culture had about her social personality and politics.

  7. Elastic clearance change in axisymmetric shearing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Yoshinori

    2016-10-01

    An axisymmetric shearing experiment is conducted for a sheet of low carbon steel and stainless steel. Elastic change in the clearance between punch and die is measured. The increase of the clearance in shearing is confirmed and the influence of sheared material's flow stress on the clearance change is shown. Finite element analysis (FEA) of shearing with Gurson-Tvergaard-Needlman model (GTN model) is conducted for shearing of the carbon steels with rigid tools as a numerical experiment. Burr height is predicted in the FEA and the result is compared with the experimental result. In addition, the influence of the clearance on stress state in the material is investigated.

  8. Shear Wave Velocity Estimates through Combined Use of Passive Techniques in a Tectonically Active Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Rajib; Baruah, Saurabh

    2016-12-01

    We made an attempt to assess the shear wave velocity values VSand, to a lesser extent, the VP values from ambient noise recordings in an array configuration. Five array sites were situated in the close proximity to borehole sites. Shear wave velocity profiles were modeled at these five array sites with the aid of two computational techniques, viz. spatial autocorrelation (SPAC) and H/V ellipticity. Out of these five array sites, velocity estimates could be reliably inferred at three locations. The shear wave velocities estimated by these methods are found to be quite consistent with each other. The computed VS values up to 30 m depth are in the range from 275 to 375 m/s in most of the sites, which implies prevalence of a low velocity zone at some pocket areas. The results were corroborated by evidence of site geology as well as geotechnical information.

  9. Normal mode solutions for seismo-acoustic propagation resulting from shear and combined wave point sources.

    PubMed

    Nealy, Jennifer L; Collis, Jon M; Frank, Scott D

    2016-04-01

    Normal mode solutions to range-independent seismo-acoustic problems are benchmarked against elastic parabolic equation solutions and then used to benchmark the shear elastic parabolic equation self-starter [Frank, Odom, and Collis, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 133, 1358-1367 (2013)]. The Pekeris waveguide with an elastic seafloor is considered for a point source located in the ocean emitting compressional waves, or in the seafloor, emitting both compressional and shear waves. Accurate solutions are obtained when the source is in the seafloor, and when the source is at the interface between the fluid and elastic layers.

  10. Urban shear-wave reflection seismics: Reconstruction support by combined shallow seismic and engineering geology investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polom, U.; Guenther, A.; Arsyad, I.; Wiyono, P.; Krawczyk, C. M.

    2009-12-01

    After the big 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, the massive reconstruction activities in the Aceh province (Northern Sumatra) were promoted by the Republic of Indonesia and the Federal Ministry of Economic Cooperation and Development. The aims of the project MANGEONAD (Management of Georisk Nanggroe Aceh Darussalam). are to establish geoscientific on the ground support for a sustainable development and management of save building constructions, lifelines, infrastructure and also natural resources. Therefore, shallow shear-wave reflection seismics was applied in close combination to engineering geology investigations in the period between 2005-2009 since depth and internal structure of the Krueng Aceh River delta (mainly young alluvial sediments) were widely unknown. Due to the requirements in the densely populated Banda Aceh region, lacking also traffic infrastructure, a small and lightweight engineering seismic setup of high mobility and high subsurface resolution capability was chosen. The S-wave land streamer system with 48 channels was applied successfully together with the ELVIS vibratory source using S- and P-waves on paved roads within the city of Banda Aceh. The performance of the S-wave system enabled the detailed seismic investigation of the shallow subsurface down to 50-150 m depth generating shaking frequencies between 20 Hz to 200 Hz. This also provides depth information extending the maximum depths of boreholes and Standard Penetrometer Testings (SPT), which could only be applied to max. 20 m depth. To integrate the results gained from all three methods, and further to provide a fast statistical analysis tool for engineering use, the Information System Engineering Geology (ISEG, BGR) was developed. This geospatial information tool includes the seismic data, all borehole information, geotechnical SPT and laboratory results from samples available in the investigation area. Thereby, the geotechnical 3D analysis of the subsurface units is enabled. The

  11. Fundamental studies on a novel die concept for round-point shear-clinching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hörhold, Réjane; Müller, Martin; Merklein, Marion; Meschut, Gerson

    2016-10-01

    A newly-developed round-point shear-clinching technology could increase the use of different materials like well formable aluminium and hardly formable ultra-high-strength steels (UHSS). This innovative technology joins in a single-stage process without any pilot-hole, surface pre-treatment or auxiliary joining part. The combination of an inner and outer punch realises an indirect cutting operation of the die-sided material, whereas the punch-sided material remains unharmed. The current die-sided tool set acts as a cutting die and enables a radial extrusion of the punch-sided material after being drawn though the created hole in the UHSS. The die has a fixed die depth. After ejecting the joined components, the slug has to be removed from the top of the spring-loaded anvil. The novel die concept investigated in this paper offers the possibility to push the slug continuously through the die in the joining direction. The removed slugs remain inside the die, so manual removal is unnecessary. The one-parted tool is supposed to be more robust than the multi-parted one that is currently used. This paper represents the task to evaluate the geometry of a useful shear-clinching die concept. To reduce the experimental effort, FEM should assist the development of the most promising approach. To quantify the success, conventional shear-clinching with opening die acts as a reference. The results show the high potential and the raison d'être of shear-clinching technologies as a mechanical joining technology for future multimaterial applications especially for UHSS.

  12. Airborne Wind Shear Detection and Warning Systems: Third Combined Manufacturers' and Technologists' Conference, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicroy, Dan D. (Compiler); Bowles, Roland L. (Compiler); Schlickenmaier, Herbert (Compiler)

    1991-01-01

    Papers presented at the conference on airborne wind shear detection and warning systems are compiled. The following subject areas are covered: terms of reference; case study; flight management; sensor fusion and flight evaluation; Terminal Doppler Weather Radar data link/display; heavy rain aerodynamics; and second generation reactive systems.

  13. Combined effects of flow-induced shear stress and electromagnetic field on neural differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Mascotte-Cruz, Juan Uriel; Ríos, Amelia; Escalante, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into neural phenotype has been induced by either flow-induced shear stress (FSS) or electromagnetic fields (EMF). However, procedures are still expensive and time consuming. In the present work, induction for 1 h with the combination of both forces showed the presence of the neural precursor nestin as early as 9 h in culture after treatment and this result lasted for the following 6 d. In conclusion, the use of a combination of FSS and EMF for a short-time renders in neurite-like cells, although further investigation is required to analyze cell functionality.

  14. Punch geometry and formulation considerations in reducing tablet friability and their effect on in vitro dissolution.

    PubMed

    Chowhan, Z T; Amaro, A A; Ong, J T

    1992-03-01

    The tablet friability resulting from formulation variations was studied under controlled granulation moisture content and tablet crushing strength. Tablets made with lactose were more friable than tablets made with microcrystalline cellulose. Replacement of 0.5% magnesium stearate with 0.5% stearic acid in the formula reduced tablet friability, whereas the combination of 0.5% stearic acid and up to 0.25% magnesium stearate did not increase tablet friability, decrease drug dissolution rate, or increase tablet-to-tablet variability in dissolution. Tablets compressed with extra deep concave punches resulted in lower friability compared with tablets compressed with standard concave or deep concave punches. The friabilities of the standard convex and deep convex tablets were similar, indicating that a critical level of punch tip curvature was important in reducing tablet friability. The dissolution rate was not affected by the punch tip geometry, but the tablet-to-tablet dissolution variability at the 0.5% stearic acid level for the extra deep convex tablets was higher compared with the standard convex tablets.

  15. Identification of the Hereditary Kernels of Isotropic Linear Viscoelastic Materials in Combined Stress state. 1. Superposition of Shear and Bulk creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golub, V. P.; Maslov, B. P.; Fernati, P. V.

    2016-03-01

    Relations between the shear and bulk creep kernels of an isotropic linear viscoelastic material in combined stress state and the longitudinal and shear creep kernels constructed from data of creep tests under uniaxial tension and pure torsion are formulated. The constitutive equations of viscoelasticity for the combined stress state are chosen in the form of a superposition of the equation for shear strains and the equation for bulk strains. The hereditary kernels are described by Rabotnov's fractional-exponential functions. The creep strains of thin-walled pipes under a combination of tension and torsion or tension and internal pressure are calculated

  16. Die and telescoping punch form convolutions in thin diaphragm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Die and punch set forms convolutions in thin dished metal diaphragm without stretching the metal too thin at sharp curvatures. The die corresponds to the metal shape to be formed, and the punch consists of elements that progressively slide against one another under the restraint of a compressed-air cushion to mate with the die.

  17. Tester automatically checks paper tape punch and reader after maintenance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazer, L.; Mc Murchy, D. D.

    1967-01-01

    Device automatically bench tests paper tape punches and readers in a simulated operating environment following routine maintenance. The reader and punch operate back-to-back and the paper tape output feeds the reader. The tape leader is prepunched with an arbitrary pattern that is continuously reproduced during the check.

  18. Applying a punch with microridges in multistage deep drawing processes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Bor-Tsuen; Yang, Cheng-Yu

    2016-01-01

    The developers of high aspect ratio components aim to minimize the processing stages in deep drawing processes. This study elucidates the application of microridge punches in multistage deep drawing processes. A microridge punch improves drawing performance, thereby reducing the number of stages required in deep forming processes. As an example, the original eight-stage deep forming process for a copper cylindrical cup with a high aspect ratio was analyzed by finite element simulation. Microridge punch designs were introduced in Stages 4 and 7 to replace the original punches. In addition, Stages 3 and 6 were eliminated. Finally, these changes were verified through experiments. The results showed that the microridge punches reduced the number of deep drawing stages yielding similar thickness difference percentages. Further, the numerical and experimental results demonstrated good consistency in the thickness distribution.

  19. Insights into the movements of landslides from combinations of field monitoring and novel direct shear testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petley, D. N.; Carey, J.; Massey, C. I.; Brain, M.

    2015-12-01

    The mechanisms of pre- and post-failure movement of translational landslides remain surprisingly poorly investigated. Previous approaches have focussed on field monitoring, for example through high resolution automated surveying and/or GPS measurements, or from modelling using dedicated codes. There has been some experimental work too, most notably using ring shear devices, although there are limitations as to the type of analyses that can be completed in these devices. In recent years the author has been involved in a series of studies that have sought to understand pre- and post-failure behaviour in translational landslides using both high precision monitoring and experimental investigation using novel apparatus. The latter approach has involved the use of the back pressured shear box, a direct shear machine that allows near-infinite variation of the normal and shear stress state, and measurement and control of the pore water pressure. More recently, a more advanced version of this machine has been developed that allows dynamic loading of both direct and normal shear stresses. This paper presents key lessons learnt about the behaviour of translational landslides from these approaches. The data highlight a number of key elements: The important differences in pre-failure behaviour for materials that show a brittle response compared with those that are ductile. In particular, some aspects of behaviour (e.g. the hyperbolic acceleration to failure) can only be replicated in materials that show brittle cracking processes; In the post-failure domain, all materials show a high level of sensitivity to small changes in pore water pressure when the Factor of Safety is close to unity; Rates of strain are not simply related to pore water pressure / stress state. In particular, some materials show a different deformation response during phases of increasing pore water pressure to that during periods of pore water pressure reduction. The reasons for this require further study

  20. Interspecies diversity of erythrocyte mechanical stability at various combinations in magnitude and duration of shear stress, and osmolality.

    PubMed

    Nemeth, Norbert; Sogor, Viktoria; Kiss, Ferenc; Ulker, Pinar

    2016-10-05

    We hypothesized that the results of red blood cell mechanical stability test show interspecies differences. The comparative investigations were performed on blood samples obtained from rats, beagle dogs, pigs and healthy volunteers. Mechanical stress was applied in nine combinations: 30, 60 or 100 Pa shear stress for 100, 200 or 300 seconds. Generally, rat erythrocytes showed the highest capability of resistance. With the applied combinations of mechanical stress pig erythrocytes were the most sensitive. On human erythrocytes 60 Pa for 200 s was the minimum combination to result significant deformability deterioration. By increasing the magnitude and duration of the applied mechanical stress we experienced escalating deformability impairment in all species. 100 Pa shear stress for 300 seconds on human erythrocytes showed the largest deformability impairment. The mechanical stability test results were also dependent on osmolality. At hypoosmolar range (200 mOsmol/kg) the mechanical stress improved EI data mostly in rat and porcine blood. At higher osmolality (500 mOsmol/kg), the test did not show detectable difference, while in 250-300 mOsmol/kg range the differences were well observable. In summary, erythrocytes' capability of resistance against mechanical stress shows interspecies differences depending on the magnitude and duration of the applied stress, and on the osmolality.

  1. Joint punching and frequency effects on practical magnetic characteristics of electrical steels for high-speed machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedous-Lebouc, A.; Messal, O.; Youmssi, A.

    2017-03-01

    Mechanical punching of electrical steels causes a degradation of their magnetic characteristics which can extend several millimeters from the cut edge. So, in the field of industrial applications, particularly that of small electrical machines, the stator core made of rigid and thin teeth would be subject to more losses. Thus, this topic of the effect of punching has to be submitted to further deep characterization and development in order to give some insight into the different mechanisms. In this framework, this paper evaluates the combined effect of punching and frequency on the magnetization curve and iron losses in thin SiFe and CoFe soft magnetic sheets. These alloys are typically suitable for the manufacture of high-speed electrical machines used in on board applications (aircraft power generators, automotive, etc). Two SiFe alloys and a CoFe alloy have been investigated. First, different rectangular samples of variable width (15, 10, 5, 3 mm) have been industrially punched. Then, a dedicated magnetic characterization has been made, using basically a mini-Epstein frame. Measurements have been performed from 50 Hz to 1 kHz and from 0.3 T to near saturation. Both rolling and transverse directions have been considered. Finally, a first attempt to predict the degradation due to the punching is presented. A useful description of the magnetic permeability as a function of B and f is given and the degradation parameters are estimated based on the knowledge of the reference permeability.

  2. Enzymatic hydrolysis combined with mechanical shearing and high-pressure homogenization for nanoscale cellulose fibrils and strong gels.

    PubMed

    Pääkkö, M; Ankerfors, M; Kosonen, H; Nykänen, A; Ahola, S; Osterberg, M; Ruokolainen, J; Laine, J; Larsson, P T; Ikkala, O; Lindström, T

    2007-06-01

    Toward exploiting the attractive mechanical properties of cellulose I nanoelements, a novel route is demonstrated, which combines enzymatic hydrolysis and mechanical shearing. Previously, an aggressive acid hydrolysis and sonication of cellulose I containing fibers was shown to lead to a network of weakly hydrogen-bonded rodlike cellulose elements typically with a low aspect ratio. On the other hand, high mechanical shearing resulted in longer and entangled nanoscale cellulose elements leading to stronger networks and gels. Nevertheless, a widespread use of the latter concept has been hindered because of lack of feasible methods of preparation, suggesting a combination of mild hydrolysis and shearing to disintegrate cellulose I containing fibers into high aspect ratio cellulose I nanoscale elements. In this work, mild enzymatic hydrolysis has been introduced and combined with mechanical shearing and a high-pressure homogenization, leading to a controlled fibrillation down to nanoscale and a network of long and highly entangled cellulose I elements. The resulting strong aqueous gels exhibit more than 5 orders of magnitude tunable storage modulus G' upon changing the concentration. Cryotransmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and cross-polarization/magic-angle spinning (CP/MAS) 13C NMR suggest that the cellulose I structural elements obtained are dominated by two fractions, one with lateral dimension of 5-6 nm and one with lateral dimensions of about 10-20 nm. The thicker diameter regions may act as the junction zones for the networks. The resulting material will herein be referred to as MFC (microfibrillated cellulose). Dynamical rheology showed that the aqueous suspensions behaved as gels in the whole investigated concentration range 0.125-5.9% w/w, G' ranging from 1.5 Pa to 105 Pa. The maximum G' was high, about 2 orders of magnitude larger than typically observed for the corresponding nonentangled low aspect ratio cellulose I gels, and G' scales

  3. Reconciling species-level vs plastic responses of evergreen leaf structure to light gradients: shade leaves punch above their weight.

    PubMed

    Lusk, Christopher H; Onoda, Yusuke; Kooyman, Robert; Gutiérrez-Girón, Alba

    2010-04-01

    *When grown in a common light environment, the leaves of shade-tolerant evergreen trees have a larger leaf mass per unit area (LMA) than their light-demanding counterparts, associated with differences in lifespan. Yet plastic responses of LMA run counter to this pattern: shade leaves have smaller LMA than sun leaves, despite often living longer. *We measured LMA and cell wall content, and conducted punch and shear tests, on sun and shade leaves of 13 rainforest evergreens of differing shade tolerance, in order to understand adaptation vs plastic responses of leaf structure and biomechanics to shade. *Species shade tolerance and leaf mechanical properties correlated better with cell wall mass per unit area than with LMA. Growth light environment had less effect on leaf mechanics than on LMA: shade leaves had, on average, 40% lower LMA than sun leaves, but differences in work-to-shear, and especially force-to-punch, were smaller. This was associated with a slightly larger cell wall fraction in shade leaves. *The persistence of shade leaves might reflect unattractiveness to herbivores because they yield smaller benefits (cell contents per area) per unit fracture force than sun leaves. In forest trees, cell wall fraction and force-to-punch are more robust correlates of species light requirements than LMA.

  4. Punch-magnet delay eliminated by modification of circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohn, C. E.

    1969-01-01

    Reduction of retardation by diode-resistor networks of the current-decay time of a punch magnet by connection of a Zener diode in series with the damping network increases the reliability of data on paper tape.

  5. Plastic deformation of a wedge by a sliding punch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nepershin, R. I.

    2016-11-01

    We present a self-similar solution of the problem of deformation of an ideally plastic wedge by a sliding punch with regard to contact friction; such a solution generalizes the well-known solutions of the problem of wedge penetration into a plastic half-space and of compression of an ideally plastic wedge by a plane punch. The problem is of interest for modeling the processes of plastic deformation of rough surfaces of metal pieces by a rigid tool.

  6. Onset of failure in finitely strained layered composites subjected to combined normal and shear loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestorović, M. D.; Triantafyllidis, N.

    2004-04-01

    A limiting factor in the design of fiber-reinforced composites is their failure under axial compression along the fiber direction. These critical axial stresses are significantly reduced in the presence of shear stresses. This investigation is motivated by the desire to study the onset of failure in fiber-reinforced composites under arbitrary multi-axial loading and in the absence of the experimentally inevitable imperfections and finite boundaries. By using a finite strain continuum mechanics formulation for the bifurcation (buckling) problem of a rate-independent, perfectly periodic (layered) solid of infinite extent, we are able to study the influence of load orientation, material properties and fiber volume fraction on the onset of instability in fiber-reinforced composites. Two applications of the general theory are presented in detail, one for a finitely strained elastic rubber composite and another for a graphite-epoxy composite, whose constitutive properties have been determined experimentally. For the latter case, extensive comparisons are made between the predictions of our general theory and the available experimental results as well as to the existing approximate structural theories. It is found that the load orientation, material properties and fiber volume fraction have substantial effects on the onset of failure stresses as well as on the type of the corresponding mode (local or global).

  7. Combined Visualization of Wall Thickness and Wall Shear Stress for the Evaluation of Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Glaßer, Sylvia; Lawonn, Kai; Hoffmann, Thomas; Skalej, Martin; Preim, Bernhard

    2014-12-01

    For an individual rupture risk assessment of aneurysms, the aneurysm's wall morphology and hemodynamics provide valuable information. Hemodynamic information is usually extracted via computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulation on a previously extracted 3D aneurysm surface mesh or directly measured with 4D phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging. In contrast, a noninvasive imaging technique that depicts the aneurysm wall in vivo is still not available. Our approach comprises an experiment, where intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) is employed to probe a dissected saccular aneurysm phantom, which we modeled from a porcine kidney artery. Then, we extracted a 3D surface mesh to gain the vessel wall thickness and hemodynamic information from a CFD simulation. Building on this, we developed a framework that depicts the inner and outer aneurysm wall with dedicated information about local thickness via distance ribbons. For both walls, a shading is adapted such that the inner wall as well as its distance to the outer wall is always perceivable. The exploration of the wall is further improved by combining it with hemodynamic information from the CFD simulation. Hence, the visual analysis comprises a brushing and linking concept for individual highlighting of pathologic areas. Also, a surface clustering is integrated to provide an automatic division of different aneurysm parts combined with a risk score depending on wall thickness and hemodynamic information. In general, our approach can be employed for vessel visualization purposes where an inner and outer wall has to be adequately represented.

  8. Punch injury self-harm in young people.

    PubMed

    Oxley, Cristal; Roberts, Jane E; Kraemer, Sebastian; Armstrong, Giles

    2017-04-01

    Punch injuries are a form of self-harm characterised by the intentional act of striking an object with a closed fist. We aimed to describe the characteristics and trends in young people presenting with injuries sustained via the punch mechanism. A comprehensive retrospective review of medical records was completed of all young people aged 10-18 years presenting to our Central London Emergency Department over a 12-month period. A subset of the total group was identified as the punch injury subgroup. A total of 78 punch injury presentations were identified. In this subgroup, the male:female ratio is 4.57:1; 37.18% of presentations were associated with a fracture ( n = 29) and 35.90% ( n = 28) of patients re-presented following another punch injury, as a victim of violence, or by other psychiatric presentation. In conclusion, a male preponderance was observed, with frequent re-presentations, often in high-risk circumstances. An opportunity for screening, including mental health, social and substance misuse, was identified. Further research is needed to enable targeted effective interventions in this group.

  9. Analysis of direct punch velocity in professional defence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapkova, Dora; Adamek, Milan

    2016-06-01

    This paper is focused on analysis of a direct punch. Nowadays, professional defence is basic part of effective protection of people and property. There are many striking techniques and the goal of this research was to analyze the direct punch. The analysis is aimed to measure the velocity with help of high speed camera Olympus i-Speed 2 and then find the dependences of this velocity on input parameters. For data analysis two pieces of software were used - i-Speed Control Software and MINITAB. 111 participants took part in this experiment. The results are presented in this paper - especially dependence of mean velocity on time and difference in velocity between genders.

  10. Punch from a patient led to correct diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Hall, Charlotte Lara

    2016-08-24

    During a recent placement on an older people's ward, I was punched in the face by a patient. It was during visiting time, and the patient - who I will call Jim - had come out of his room and was trying to enter another patient's room.

  11. Configurational phases in elastic foams under lengthscale-free punching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabuwala, Tapan; Dai, Xiangyu; Gioia, Gustavo

    2016-08-01

    We carry out experiments with brick-like specimens of elastic open-cell (EOC) foams of three relative densities. Individual specimens may be "tall" (height = width = depth) or "short" (2 height = width = depth). We place each specimen on a supporting plate and use a lengthscale-free (wedge-shaped or conical) punch to apply forces downward along the specimen's height. Regardless of the type of specimen, the force-penetration curves remain linear, for the wedge-shaped punch, or quadratic, for the conical punch, up to a sizable penetration commensurate with the smallest lengthscale of the specimen. After that there is an abrupt, all-but-discontinuous change in stiffness: if the specimen is tall, the stiffness drops; if the specimen is short, the stiffness shoots up. To analyze these curious experimental results, we posit that EOC foams can be found in either of two configurational phases, here termed the low-strain phase and the high-strain phase, which share a two-dimensional interface (a surface of strain discontinuity). The analysis may be outlined as follows. In the first part of an experiment, there obtains a "similarity regime" in which the penetration of the punch and the radius of the interface are the only prevailing lengthscales (because the punch is lengthscale free). In this case, it is possible to show that the force-penetration curve must be linear, or quadratic, depending on whether the punch be wedge-shaped or conical, respectively. This prediction of the analysis is consistent with the experiments. In time, the similarity regime breaks down when the interface reaches one of the specimen's boundaries distal to the tip of the punch. If the specimen is tall, the soft, stress-free lateral boundary is reached first, and the stiffness must drop; if the specimen is short, the hard boundary in contact with the supporting plate is reached first, and the stiffness must shoot up. These predictions too are consistent with the experiments. To provide direct

  12. Stress response of bovine artery and rat brain tissue due to combined translational shear and fixed unconfined compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy, Lauren

    During trauma resulting from impacts and blast waves, sinusoidal waves permeate the brain and cranial arterial tissue, both non-homogeneous biological tissues with high fluid contents. The experimental shear stress response to sinusoidal translational shear deformation at 1 Hz and 25% strain amplitude and either 0% or 33% compression is compared for rat brain tissue and bovine aortic tissue. Both tissues exhibit Mullins effect in shear. Harmonic wavelet decomposition, a novel application to the mechanical response of these tissues, shows significant 1 Hz and 3 Hz components. The 3 Hz component magnitude in brain tissue, which is much larger than in aortic tissue, may correlate to interstitial fluid induced drag forces that decrease on subsequent cycles perhaps because of damage resulting in easier fluid movement. The fluid may cause the quasiperiodic, viscoelastic behavior of brain tissue. The mechanical response differences under impact may cause shear damage between arterial and brain connections.

  13. Cloud formation by combined instabilities in galactic gas layers - Evidence for a Q threshold in the fragmentation of shearing wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmegreen, Bruce G.

    1991-09-01

    The growth of shearing wavelets in thick galactic gas disks is studied, including the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability perpendicular to the plane, various degrees of thermal instability, and the gravitational instability. Growth rates are calculated numerically for a wide range of parameter values, giving an effective dispersion relation and mass distribution function, and an approximate dispersion relation is derived analytically for the epoch of peak growth. An extensive coverage of parameter space illustrates the relative insensitivity of the gaseous shear instability to the axisymmetric stability parameter Q. The fragmentation of shearing wavelets by self-gravitational collapse parallel to the wave crest is also considered. Such fragmentation is sensitive to Q, requiring Q equal to or less than 1-2 for the growth of parallel perturbations to overcome shear inside the wavelet. Fragmentation instabilities may provide the link between shear instabilities and the formation of individual clouds. They are much more sensitive to Q than shear instabilities, and may regulate star formation so that Q approximately equals 1.

  14. Combined Effect of Load Waviness and Auxeticity on the Shear Deformation in a Class of Rectangular Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Teik-Cheng

    2016-11-01

    Auxetic materials are solids that exhibit negative Poisson's ratio. Due to its uniqueness, it is expected that auxetic solids and structures manifest certain mechanical responses that are distinct from conventional materials. So far classical plate theory (CPT) has been used to investigate the behavior of thin auxetic plates and, for thick auxetic plates, the first-order shear deformation theory (FSDT) has been recently employed. The third-order shear deformation theory (TSDT) is adopted herein as it employs a realistic transverse shear stress and strain distribution across the plate cross section, and therefore removes the need for a correction factor. The results obtained herein reveal that as a plate material's Poisson's ratio becomes more negative, the plate deflection characteristic mimics that of (a) reduced plate thickness, (b) reduced plate aspect ratio, and (c) reduced load waviness. The results of this investigation support (i) the use of auxetic materials in applications where there is a need to reduce the extent of transverse shear deformation, and (ii) the use of the simpler CPT instead of any shear deformation plate theory if the Poisson's ratio of the plate material is sufficiently negative.

  15. Cleaveage domains control the orientation of mylonitic shear zones at the brittle-viscous transition (Cap de Creus, NE Spain) - a combined field and numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulet, T.; Fusseis, F.; Regenauer-Lieb, K.

    2009-04-01

    Propagation of greenschist-facies shear zones is often preceded by the formation of fractures in their tip process zones. These fractures tend to have a tensile nature and are generally considered as having triggered the formation of mylonites by focusing fluid flow and locally accelerating strain softening. The often-observed parallelism between the tensile fractures and the mylonitic shear zones indicates that the fractures not only control the position but also the orientation of the shear zones. The mechanical antagonism in this parallelism is usually resolved with a reorientation of the stress field between fracture formation and mylonitic shearing. Where fractures were clearly shown to form parallel to the shear zone in the same deformation, this might be due to the influence of mechanical anisotropies in the host rock. In our combined numerical and field study, we test the potential of a foliation to influence the orientation of a microfracture. We designed a numerical experiment using the finite element code Abaqus® (Hibbit et al. 2003) to simulate strain localization in metapelitic and metapsammitic rocks at greenschist-facies conditions. The experimental setup comprises a 2D parametric model with two rheological phases (‘cleavage domains' and ‘microlithons' consisting of muscovite and quartz respectively). The geometry of the model is described in terms of probability distributions which allow us to quickly generate different realizations of 2D sections with prescribed muscovite content, cleavage domains size, orientation and distribution. We consider the specific heat, thermal expansion and thermal conductivity of both materials, as well as anisotropic elastic properties for the muscovite. The plasticity flow laws used consider the temperature, pressure and strain rate dependencies. Our models are deformed under simple shear applied with velocity boundary conditions on a thin buffer zone surrounding the sample, at 450°C and under a confining

  16. Variable temperature thin film indentation with a flat punch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Graham L. W.; O; ²Connell, Barry S.; Pethica, John B.; Rowland, Harry; King, William P.

    2008-01-01

    We present modifications to conventional nanoindentation that realize variable temperature, flat punch indentation of ultrathin films. The technique provides generation of large strain, thin film extrusion of precise geometries that idealize the essential flows of nanoimprint lithography, and approximate constant area squeeze flow rheometry performed on thin, macroscopic soft matter samples. Punch radii as small as 185nm have been realized in ten-to-one confinement ratio testing of 36nm thick polymer films controllably squeezed in the melt state to a gap width of a few nanometers. Self-consistent, compressive stress versus strain measurements of a wide variety of mechanical testing conditions are provided by using a single die-sample system with temperatures ranging from 20to125°C and loading rates spanning two decades. Low roughness, well aligned flat punch dies with large contact areas provide precise detection of soft surfaces with standard nanoindenter stiffness sensitivity. Independent heating and thermometry with heaters and thermocouples attached to the die and sample allow introduction of a novel directional heat flux measurement method to ensure isothermal contact conditions. This is a crucial requirement for interpreting the mechanical response in temperature sensitive soft matter systems. Instrumented imprint is a new nanomechanics material testing platform that enables measurements of polymer and soft matter properties during large strains in confined, thin film geometries and extends materials testing capabilities of nanoindentation into low modulus, low strength glassy, and viscoelastic materials.

  17. Buckling loads of stiffened panels subjected to combined longitudinal compression and shear: Results obtained with PASCO, EAL, and STAGS computer programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroud, W. J.; Greene, W. H.; Anderson, M. S.

    1984-01-01

    Buckling analyses used in PASCO are summarized with emphasis placed on the shear buckling analyses. The PASCO buckling analyses include the basic VIPASA analysis, which is essentially exact for longitudinal and transverse loads, and a smeared stiffener solution, which treats a stiffened panel as an orthotropic plate. Buckling results are then presented for seven stiffened panels loaded by combinations of longitudinal compression and shear. The buckling results were obtained with the PASCO, EAL, and STAGS computer programs. The EAL and STAGS solutions were obtained with a fine finite element mesh and are very accurate. These finite element solutions together with the PASCO results for pure longitudinal compression provide benchmark calculations to evaluate other analysis procedures.

  18. Triclinic Transpression in brittle shear zones evaluated via combined numerical and analogue modeling: the case of The Torcal de Antequera Massif, SE Spain.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcos, Leticia; Díaz-Azpiroz, Manuel; Faccenna, Claudio; Balanyá, Juan Carlos; Expósito, Inmaculada; Giménez-Bonilla, Alejandro

    2013-04-01

    Numerical kinematic models have been widely used to understand the parameters controlling the generation and evolution of ductile transpression zones. However, these models are based on continuum mechanics and therefore, are not as useful to analyse deformation partitioning and strain within brittle-ductile transpression zones. The combination of numerical and analogue models will potentially provide an effective approach for a better understanding of these processes and, to a broader extent, of high strain zones in general. In the present work, we follow a combined numerical and analogue approach to analyse a brittle dextral transpressive shear zone. The Torcal de Antequera Massif (TAM) is part of a roughly E-W oriented shear zone at the NE end of the Western Gibraltar Arc (Betic Cordillera). This shear zone presents, according to their structural and kinematic features, two types of domains i) Domain type 1 is located at both TAM margins, and is characterized by strike-slip structures subparallel to the main TAM boundaries (E-W). ii) Domain type 2 corresponds to the TAM inner part, and it presents SE-vergent open folds and reverse shear zones, as well as normal faults accommodating fold axis parallel extension. Both domains have been studied separately applying a model of triclinic transpression with inclined extrusion. The kinematic parameters obtained in this study (?, ? and Wk) allows us to constrain geometrical transpression parameters. As such, the angle of oblique convergence (α, the horizontal angle between the displacement vector and the strike of the shear zone) ranges between 10-17° (simple shear dominated) for domain type 1 and between 31-35° (coaxial dominated) for domain type 2. According to the results obtained from the numerical model and in order to validate its possible utility in brittle shear zones we develop two analogue models with α values representative of both domains defined in the TAM: 15° for type 1 and 30° for type 2. In the

  19. Post-buckling of geometrically imperfect shear-deformable flat panels under combined thermal and compressive edge loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Librescu, L.; Souza, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    The static post-buckling of simply-supported flat panels exposed to a stationary nonuniform temperature field and subjected to a system of subcritical in-plane compressive edge loads is investigated. The study is performed within a refined theory of composite laminated plates incorporating the effect of transverse shear and the geometric nonlinearities. The influence played by a number of effects, among them transverse shear deformation, initial geometric imperfections, the character of the in-plane boundary conditions and thickness ratio are studied and a series of conclusions are outlined. The influence played by the complete temperature field (i.e., the uniform through thickness and thickness-wise gradient) as compared to the one induced by only the uniform one, is discussed and the peculiarities of the resulting post-buckling behaviors are enlightened.

  20. A New Sheet Metal Forming System Based on Incremental Punching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yuanxin

    Stamping is one of the most commonly used manufacturing processes. Everyday, millions of parts are formed by this process. The conventional stamping is to form a part in one or several operations with a press machine and a set/sets of dies. It is very efficient but is not cost effective for small batch production parts and prototypes as the dies are expensive and time consuming to make. Recently, with the increasing demands for low-volume and customer-made products, a die-less forming method, Incremental Sheet Metal Forming (ISMF), has become one of the leading R&D topics in the industry. ISMF uses a small generic tool to apply a sequence of operations along the given path to deform the sheet incrementally. These small deformations accumulate to form the final shape of the part. As a result, different parts can be made by the same setup. Despite of some 30 years of research and development, however, ISMF technology is still premature for industrial applications due to the following reasons: The accuracy of the part is limited; the surface roughness is poor; and the productivity is low. This motivates the presented research. In this research, a new incremental forming system based on incremental punching is designed and built. The system consists of a 3-axes CNC platform, a high speed hydraulic cylinder with a hemispherical forming tool, and a PC-based CNC control system. The hydraulic system provides the forming force to deform the sheet metal with constant stokes, while the CNC system positions the part. When forming a part, the forming tool punches the sheet metal along the given contour of the part punch by punch; when one layer of the part is completed, the forming tool moves down to the next layer; and the process is finished till all layers are completed. The CNC control system works with standard NC code, and hence, is easy to use. In order to ensure the desirable performance of the machine, dynamic analysis of the machine is necessary. The analysis is

  1. Punch valve development testing: Low and high velocity test results

    SciTech Connect

    Replogle, W.C.; Brandon, S.L.

    1996-09-01

    This is a report on the use of quasi-static tests to predict fundamental parameters for punch valve development. This report summarizes the results from low and high velocity tests performed with 0.63 and 0.38 cm diameter plungers, 5 cm long penetrating aluminium and composite targets. The low velocity tests, 0.025 m/s, were performed to understand the effects and interactions of plunger diameter plunger tip shape, target material, and target support on penetration energy and plunger functionality. High velocity tests, 75 m/s, were compared to low velocity results.

  2. EVOLUTION AND EVALUATION OF AUTOLOGOUS MINI PUNCH GRAFTING IN VITILIGO

    PubMed Central

    Lahiri, Koushik

    2009-01-01

    Vitiligo is a result of disrupted epidermal melanization with an undecided etiology and incompletely understood pathogenesis. Various treatment options have resulted in various degrees of success. Various surgical modalities and transplantation techniques have evolved during the last few decades. Of them, miniature punch grafting (PG) has established its place as the easiest, fastest, and least expensive method. Various aspects of this particular procedure have been discussed here. The historical perspective, the instruments, evolution of mini grafting down the ages, and the methodology, advantages, and disadvantages have been discussed. A detailed discussion on the topic along with a review of relevant literature has been provided in this article. PMID:20101312

  3. Undrained shear strength of partially saturated combined coal refuse. First annual report: Strength and consolidation characteristics of coal refuse for design and construction of disposal facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Y.H.; Li, J.

    1986-09-01

    This report summarizes the results of a study on the undrained shear strength of partially saturated combined refuse. The study is part of a research project entitled 'Strength and Consolidation Characteristics of Coal Refuse for Design and Construction of Disposal Facilities supported by the Office of Surface Mining, Department of the Interior. Information presented in the report will be used for the design and construction of disposal facilities. Coal refuse, the waste product from coal washing, is separated in the coal preparation plant into two fractions (coarse and fine). The fine refuse, in the form of either a slurry or a filter cake, is unstable and difficult to handle.

  4. Ductile fracture model in the shearing process of zircaloy sheet for nuclear fuel spacer grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jaeyoon; Kim, Naksoo; Lee, Hyungyil

    2012-04-01

    Features of sheared edges are predicted based on material properties of Zircaloy obtained from the tensile test and ductile fracture model such as the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) and Johnson-Cook models. The sheared edges formations are numerically analyzed in each ductile model. An appropriate ductile fracture model is selected to study the relative depth of sheared edges with respect to process parameters. The tendency of failure parameters that are affected by sheared edges and fracture duration is investigated. We applied changes on parameters of failure models to show that the punch force curve and the ratio of characteristic lengths could be coincided, which led us to conclude that the GTN and Johnson-Cook models are equivalent. In the Johnson-Cook model, however, the characteristic length of the sheared edges does not change as each failure parameter reaches a critical value. Hence, the FE prediction model for forming defects is developed using the GTN failure model. Finally, the characteristic length of sheared edges have been measured using the FE prediction model for shearing process parameters such as punch velocities, clearance, and tool wear. Our results showed that the punch-die clearance is the most significant factor that affects forming defects when compared to other factors.

  5. Micromechanical and in situ shear testing of Al–SiC nanolaminate composites in a transmission electron microscope (TEM)

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, Carl; Li, Nan; Mara, Nathan Allan; Chawla, Nikhilesh

    2014-11-07

    Nanolaminate composites show promise as high strength and toughness materials. Still, due to the limited volume of these materials, micron scale mechanical testing methods must be used to determine the properties of these films. To this end, a novel approach combining a double notch shear testing geometry and compression with a flat punch in a nanoindenter was developed to determine the mechanical properties of these films under shear loading. To further elucidate the failure mechanisms under shear loading, in situ TEM experiments were performed using a double notch geometry cut into the TEM foil. Aluminum layer thicknesses of 50nm and 100nm were used to show the effect of constraint on the deformation. Higher shear strength was observed in the 50 nm sample (690±54 MPa) compared to the 100 nm sample (423±28.7 MPa). Additionally, failure occurred along the Al-SiC interface in the 50 nm sample as opposed to failure within the Al layer in the 100 nm sample.

  6. Micromechanical and in situ shear testing of Al–SiC nanolaminate composites in a transmission electron microscope (TEM)

    DOE PAGES

    Mayer, Carl; Li, Nan; Mara, Nathan Allan; ...

    2014-11-07

    Nanolaminate composites show promise as high strength and toughness materials. Still, due to the limited volume of these materials, micron scale mechanical testing methods must be used to determine the properties of these films. To this end, a novel approach combining a double notch shear testing geometry and compression with a flat punch in a nanoindenter was developed to determine the mechanical properties of these films under shear loading. To further elucidate the failure mechanisms under shear loading, in situ TEM experiments were performed using a double notch geometry cut into the TEM foil. Aluminum layer thicknesses of 50nm andmore » 100nm were used to show the effect of constraint on the deformation. Higher shear strength was observed in the 50 nm sample (690±54 MPa) compared to the 100 nm sample (423±28.7 MPa). Additionally, failure occurred along the Al-SiC interface in the 50 nm sample as opposed to failure within the Al layer in the 100 nm sample.« less

  7. John Punch, Scotist Holy War, and the Irish Catholic Revolutionary Tradition in the Seventeenth Century.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Ian W

    2016-07-01

    During the 1640s, the Irish Franciscan theologian John Punch taught his theology students in Rome that war against Protestants was made just by their religion alone. Jesuits like Luis de Molina identified the holy war tradition in which Punch stood as a Scotist one, and insisted that the Scotists had confused the natural and supernatural spheres. Among Irishmen, Punch was unusual. The main Irish Catholic revolutionary tradition employed Jesuit and Thomist theory. They argued that the Stuarts had lost the right to rule Ireland for natural reasons, not supernatural ones; because the Stuarts were tyrants, not because they were Protestants.

  8. Demonstration of the self-magnetic-pinch diode as an X-ray source for flash core-punch radiography.

    SciTech Connect

    Cordova, Steve Ray; Rovang, Dean Curtis; Portillo, Salvador; Oliver, Bryan Velten; Bruner, Nichelle Lee; Ziska, Derek Raymond

    2007-10-01

    Minimization of the radiographic spot size and maximization of the radiation dose is a continuing long-range goal for development of electron beam driven X-ray radiography sources. In collaboration with members of the Atomic Weapons Establishment(AWE), Aldermaston UK, the Advanced Radiographic Technologies Dept. 1645 is conducting research on the development of X-ray sources for flash core-punch radiography. The Hydrodynamics Dept. at AWE has defined a near term radiographic source requirement for scaled core-punch experiments to be 250 rads{at}m with a 2.75 mm source spot-size. As part of this collaborative effort, Dept. 1645 is investigating the potential of the Self-Magnetic-Pinched (SMP) diode as a source for core-punch radiography. Recent experiments conducted on the RITS-6 accelerator [1,2] demonstrated the potential of the SMP diode by meeting and exceeding the near term radiographic requirements established by AWE. During the demonstration experiments, RITS-6 was configured with a low-impedance (40 {Omega}) Magnetically Insulated Transmission Line (MITL), which provided a 75-ns, 180-kA, 7.5-MeV forward going electrical pulse to the diode. The use of a low-impedance MITL enabled greater power coupling to the SMP diode and thus allowed for increased radiation output. In addition to reconfiguring the driver (accelerator), geometric changes to the diode were also performed which allowed for an increase in dose production without sacrificing the time integrated spot characteristics. The combination of changes to both the pulsed power driver and the diode significantly increased the source x-ray intensity.

  9. Kinematics of syn- and post-exhumational shear zones at Lago di Cignana (Western Alps, Italy): constraints on the exhumation of Zermatt-Saas (ultra)high-pressure rocks and deformation along the Combin Fault and Dent Blanche Basal Thrust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirst, Frederik; Leiss, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    Kinematic analyses of shear zones at Lago di Cignana in the Italian Western Alps were used to constrain the structural evolution of units from the Piemont-Ligurian oceanic realm (Zermatt-Saas and Combin zones) and the Adriatic continental margin (Dent Blanche nappe) during Palaeogene syn- and post-exhumational deformation. Exhumation of Zermatt-Saas (U)HP rocks to approximately lower crustal levels at ca. 39 Ma occurred during normal-sense top-(S)E shearing under epidote-amphibolite-facies conditions. Juxtaposition with the overlying Combin zone along the Combin Fault at mid-crustal levels occurred during greenschist-facies normal-sense top-SE shearing at ca. 38 Ma. The scarcity of top-SE kinematic indicators in the hanging wall of the Combin Fault probably resulted from strain localization along the uppermost Zermatt-Saas zone and obliteration by subsequent deformation. A phase of dominant pure shear deformation around 35 Ma affected units in the direct footwall and hanging wall of the Combin Fault. It is interpreted to reflect NW-SE crustal elongation during updoming of the nappe stack as a result of underthrusting of European continental margin units and the onset of continental collision. This phase was partly accompanied and followed by ductile bulk top-NW shearing, especially at higher structural levels, which transitioned into semi-ductile to brittle normal-sense top-NW deformation due to Vanzone phase folding from ca. 32 Ma onwards. Our structural observations suggest that syn-exhumational deformation is partly preserved within units and shear zones exposed at Lago di Cignana but also that the Combin Fault and Dent Blanche Basal Thrust experienced significant post-exhumational deformation reworking and overprinting earlier structures.

  10. Shear bands in concentrated bacterial suspensions under oscillatory shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xiang; Samanta, Devranjan; Xu, Xinliang

    2016-11-01

    Bacterial suspensions show interesting rheological behaviors such as a remarkable "superfluidic" state with vanishing viscosity. Although the bulk rheology of bacterial suspensions has been experimentally studied, shear profiles within bacterial suspensions have not been systematically explored so far. Here, by combining confocal rheometry with PIV, we investigated the flow behaviors of concentrated E. coli suspensions under planar oscillatory shear. We found that concentrated bacterial suspensions exhibit strong non-homogeneous flow profiles at low shear rates, where shear rates vanish away from the moving shear plate. We characterized the shape of the nonlinear shear profiles at different applied shear rates and bacterial concentrations and activities. The shear profiles follow a simple scaling relation with the applied shear rates and the enstrophy of suspensions, unexpected from the current hydrodynamic models of active fluids. We demonstrated that this scaling relation can be quantitatively understood by considering the power output of bacteria at different orientations with respect to shear flows. Our experiments reveal a profound influence of shear flows on the locomotion of bacteria and provide new insights into the dynamics of active fluids. The research is funded by ACS Petroleum Research Fund (54168-DNI9) and by the David & Lucile Packard Foundation. X. X. acknowledges support by the National Natural Science Foundation of China No. 11575020.

  11. Shear Lag in a Plywood Sheet-stringer Combination Used for the Chord Member of a Box Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borsari, Palamede; Yu, Ai-Ting

    1948-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations were made of the distribution of strains in a plywood sheet-stringer combination used as the chord member of a box beam acted upon by bending loads. The theoretical solution was obtained with the help of the principle of minimum potential energy and certain simplifying assumptions. Strain measurements were made on a build-up box beam by means of electrical-resistance strain gages connected with strain indicators. A very satisfactory agreement between the theoretical and experimental strains was obtained.

  12. Micro-punching process based on spallation delamination induced by laser driven-flyer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di, Jianke; Zhou, Ming; Li, Jian; Li, Chen; Zhang, Wei; Amoako, George

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we proposed a micro-punching process for microstructure on films based on laser driven-flyer induced spallation delamination phenomenon at the interface between a film and its substrate. To validate such a micro-punching process, a series of experiments were carried out for fabrication of microstructures on Au films coated on K9 glass substrates and polyimide substrate. Results show that through such a punching process, the microstructure on Au films can be fabricated efficiently and the spatial resolution is able to reach micron level. Moreover, we found that this method was more suitable for films coated on soft substrates rather than that coated on brittle substrates due to the additional destruction of the brittle substrate. This micro-punching process has a wide range of potential application in microfluidic devices, biodevices and other MEMS devices.

  13. A Manual Retrieval System Using Computer Punch Cards for Qualitative Historical Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Robert S.

    1973-01-01

    Detailed examples illustrate one of the possible applications for using the computer punch card for information retrieval in qualitative historical research, suggesting a time-saving method of organization for research data. (SM)

  14. Combined plate motion and density driven flow in the asthenosphere beneath Saudi Arabia: Evidence from shear-wave splitting and seismic anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, S; Schwartz, S

    2006-02-08

    A comprehensive study of mantle anisotropy along the Red Sea and across Saudi Arabia was performed by analyzing shear-wave splitting recorded by stations from three different seismic networks: the largest, most widely distributed array of stations examined across Saudi Arabia to date. Stations near the Gulf of Aqaba display fast orientations that are aligned parallel to the Dead Sea Transform Fault, most likely related to the strike-slip motion between Africa and Arabia. However, most of our observations across Saudi Arabia are statistically the same, showing a consistent pattern of north-south oriented fast directions with delay times averaging about 1.4 s. Fossilized anisotropy related to the Proterozoic assembly of the Arabian Shield may contribute to the pattern but is not sufficient to fully explain the observations. We feel that the uniform anisotropic signature across Saudi Arabia is best explained by a combination of plate and density driven flow in the asthenosphere. By combining the northeast oriented flow associated with absolute plate motion with the northwest oriented flow associated with the channelized Afar plume along the Red Sea, we obtain a north-south oriented resultant that matches our splitting observations and supports models of active rifting processes. This explains why the north-south orientation of the fast polarization direction is so pervasive across the vast Arabian Plate.

  15. The JKR-type adhesive contact problems for power-law shaped axisymmetric punches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodich, Feodor M.; Galanov, Boris A.; Suarez-Alvarez, Maria M.

    2014-08-01

    The JKR (Johnson, Kendall, and Roberts) and Boussinesq-Kendall models describe adhesive frictionless contact between two isotropic elastic spheres, and between a flat-ended axisymmetric punch and an elastic half-space respectively. However, the shapes of contacting solids may be more general than spherical or flat ones. In addition, the derivation of the main formulae of these models is based on the assumption that the material points within the contact region can move along the punch surface without any friction. However, it is more natural to assume that a material point that came to contact with the punch sticks to its surface, i.e. to assume that the non-slipping boundary conditions are valid. It is shown that the frictionless JKR model may be generalized to arbitrary convex, blunt axisymmetric body, in particular to the case of the punch shape being described by monomial (power-law) punches of an arbitrary degree d≥1. The JKR and Boussinesq-Kendall models are particular cases of the problems for monomial punches, when the degree of the punch d is equal to two or it goes to infinity respectively. The generalized problems for monomial punches are studied under both frictionless and non-slipping (or no-slip) boundary conditions. It is shown that regardless of the boundary conditions, the solution to the problems is reduced to the same dimensionless relations among the actual force, displacements and contact radius. The explicit expressions are derived for the values of the pull-off force and for the corresponding critical contact radius. Connections of the results obtained for problems of nanoindentation in the case of the indenter shape near the tip has some deviation from its nominal shape and the shape function can be approximated by a monomial function of radius, are discussed.

  16. An analysis of follicular punches, mechanics, and dynamics in follicular unit extraction.

    PubMed

    Cole, John P

    2013-08-01

    Success in follicular unit extraction requires an understanding of forces, fluid dynamics, instrumentation, and individual patient variation. Sharp punches require a lower axial and tangential force to dissect follicular groups. The angle of hair emergence and the size of a punch influence the wound size and the depth of an incision. A procedure must be individualized based on surface follicular group characteristics; hair splay; and strength of attachment between the outer root sheath, inner root sheath, and adipose with regard to hair follicles.

  17. Punch resection alaplasty technique in dogs and cats with stenotic nares: 14 cases.

    PubMed

    Trostel, C Todd; Frankel, Daniel J

    2010-01-01

    Punch resection alaplasty is a previously unreported surgical technique for the management of stenotic nares. Nine dogs underwent the procedure in conjunction with soft palate resection and/or laryngeal sacculectomy. Three dogs and two cats were treated with the novel punch resection alaplasty technique alone. Symmetrical resection was achieved, providing excellent cosmesis. Good to excellent results were achieved in all cases, with owners feeling that their pet's overall well being was improved following surgery.

  18. Performance Assessment of Hard Rock TBM and Rock Boreability Using Punch Penetration Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Ho-Young; Cho, Jung-Woo; Jeon, Seokwon; Rostami, Jamal

    2016-04-01

    Rock indentation tests are often called punch penetration tests and are known to be related to penetration rates of drilling equipment and hard rock tunnel boring machines (TBMs). Various indices determined from analysis of the force-penetration plot generated from indentation tests have been used to represent the drillability, boreability, and brittleness of rocks. However, no standard for the punch penetration test procedure or method for calculating the related indices has been suggested or adopted in the rock mechanics community. This paper introduces new indices based on the punch test to predict the performance of hard rock TBMs. A series of punch tests was performed on rock specimens representing six rock formations in Korea with different dimensions, i.e., the core specimens had different lengths and diameters. Of the indices obtained from the punch tests, the peak load index and mean load index showed good correlations with the cutting forces measured in full-scale linear cutting machine tests on the same rock types. The indices also showed good linear correlations with the ratio of uniaxial strength to Brazilian tensile strength, which indicates the brittleness of rock. The scale effect of using core specimens was investigated, and a preferred dimension for the punch test specimens is proposed. This paper also discusses the results of the punch test and full-scale rock cutting tests using LCM. The results of this study confirm that the proposed indices from the punch tests can be used to provide a reliable prediction of the cutting forces that act on a disc cutter. The estimated cutting forces can then be used for optimization of cutter-head design and performance prediction of hard rock TBMs.

  19. Is effective mass in combat sports punching above its weight?

    PubMed

    Lenetsky, Seth; Nates, Roy J; Brughelli, Matt; Harris, Nigel K

    2015-04-01

    The segmental and muscular complexity of the human body can result in challenges when examining the kinetics of impacts. To better understand this complexity, combat sports literature has selected effective mass as a measure of an athlete's inertial contribution to the momentum transfer during the impact of strikes. This measure helps to clarify the analysis of striking kinetics in combat sports. This paper will review: (1) effective mass as a concept and its usage as a measure of impact intensity in combat sports, (2) the neuromuscular pattern known as "double peak muscle activation" which has been theorized to help enhance initial hand velocity upon impact and joint stiffening during impact, (3) the methods and equations used to calculate effective mass, and (4) practitioner recommendations based on the literature. We will argue in this manuscript that the act of punching presents unique challenges to the current understanding of effective mass due to additional force application during impact. This review will improve the understanding of effective mass and its roles in effective striking serving to underpin future research into performance enhancement in striking based combat sports.

  20. The effects of attentional focus instructions on punching velocity and impact forces among trained combat athletes.

    PubMed

    Halperin, Israel; Chapman, Dale W; Martin, David T; Abbiss, Chris

    2017-03-01

    Research indicates that instructing athlete's to focus on bodily movements (internal focus of attention [IFA]) may hinder performance, whereas instructing them to focus on the movement outcome (external focus of attention [EFA]) often enhances performance. Despite the importance of instructions in striking combat sports, limited research has examined the influence of IFA and EFA on performance in well-trained combat athletes. This study investigated the effects of different instructional cues on punching velocity (m · s(-1)) and normalised impact forces (N · kg(-1)) among intermediate (n = 8) and expert (n = 7) competitive boxers and kickboxers. Athletes completed three rounds of 12 maximal effort punches delivered to a punching integrator on three separate days. Day one was a familiarisation session with only control instructions provided. In the following two days athletes randomly received IFA, EFA or control instructions prior to each of the three rounds. Athletes punching with EFA were 4% faster and 5% more forceful than IFA (P < 0.05), and 2% faster and 3% more forceful than control (P < 0.05). Furthermore, experts punched 11% faster and with 13% greater force compared with intermediate athletes (P < 0.05). EFA led to a positive effect on punching performance and should be favoured over IFA and control instructions.

  1. Compaction properties of powders: the relationship between compression cycle hysteresis areas and maximally applied punch pressures.

    PubMed

    Khossravi, D

    1999-08-01

    The consolidation behaviors of various pharmaceutical solids were characterized by investigating the relationship between the calculated hysteresis areas and the maximally applied punch pressures. An Instron universal testing apparatus and an instrumented die were used to generate compression cycle profiles at various maximally applied punch pressures for the materials studied. Based on the profiles obtained, hysteresis areas were calculated for the materials studied as a function of maximally applied punch pressures. Furthermore, model profiles describing the plastic and brittle fracture processes were utilized to derive mathematical relationships between the calculated hysteresis cycle areas and the maximally applied punch pressures. The mathematical relationships derived indicate that a linear relationship between hysteresis areas and maximally applied punch pressures exists for plastic materials, whereas for brittle materials the hysteresis areas are related to the square of the maximally applied punch pressures. Experimental data obtained support the mathematical relationships derived. The goodness of fit to the models derived is used to rank order the consolidation mechanism of various drugs and pharmaceutical excipients.

  2. Combined surface pressure-interfacial shear rheology studies of the interaction of proteins with spread phospholipid monolayers at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Simon A; Kellaway, Ian W; Taylor, Kevin M G; Warburton, Brian; Peters, Kevin

    2005-08-26

    The adsorption of two model proteins, catalase and lysozyme, to phospholipid monolayers spread at the air-water interface has been studied using a combined surface pressure-interfacial shear rheology technique. Monolayers of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC), 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-[phospho-rac-(1-glycerol)] (DPPG) and DPPC:DPPG (7:3) were spread on a phosphate buffer air-water interface at pH 7.4. Protein solutions were introduced to the subphase and the resultant changes in surface pressure and interfacial storage and loss moduli were recorded with time. The results show that catalase readily adsorbs to all the phospholipid monolayers investigated, inducing a transition from liquid-like to gel-like rheological behaviour in the process. The changes in surface rheology as a result of the adsorption of catalase increase in the order DPPC

  3. Lip biopsy for the diagnosis of Sjögren's syndrome: beware of the punch.

    PubMed

    Varela-Centelles, P; Sanchez-Sanchez, M; Seoane, J

    2014-01-01

    A pilot study was performed to examine the presence of nerve fibres in minor salivary gland tissue samples obtained by two procedures: punch and linear incisional techniques. The study was undertaken on a convenience sample of five cryopreserved corpses (mean age 74 ± 3.5 years; three males and two females). Biopsies were performed on the buccal side of the lower lip, between the mid-line and the corner of the mouth. Each corpse had one side of the lower lip biopsied by punch and the contralateral side using a linear incision. All punch samples (100%) displayed severed nerve fibres, whereas no nerve fibres (0%) could be identified in the samples obtained by means of the linear incision technique. While the linear incision approach permitted retrieval of at least five glands, punch biopsies did not provide enough material for the diagnosis of Sjögren's syndrome. Within the limitations of the study, our results strongly discourage the punch technique for minor salivary gland lip biopsy and provide information on the superiority of the linear incisional biopsy in terms of neural damage. These results may also promote the undertaking of clinical trials on patients in whom Sjögren's syndrome is suspected, comparing the morbidity associated with the linear incisional technique vs. minimally invasive biopsies.

  4. Shear fatigue crack growth - A literature survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H. W.

    1985-01-01

    Recent studies of shear crack growth are reviewed, emphasizing test methods and data analyses. The combined mode I and mode II elastic crack tip stress fields are considered. The development and design of the compact shear specimen are described, and the results of fatigue crack growth tests using compact shear specimens are reviewed. The fatigue crack growth tests are discussed and the results of inclined cracks in tensile panels, center cracks in plates under biaxial loading, cracked beam specimens with combined bending and shear loading, center-cracked panels and double edge-cracked plates under cyclic shear loading are examined and analyzed in detail.

  5. Assessment of mechanical properties of the martensitic steel EUROFER97 by means of punch tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Y.; Spätig, P.; Victoria, M.

    2002-12-01

    The ball punch test technique was used to evaluate the conventional tensile and impact properties of the tempered martensitic steel EUROFER97 from room temperature down to liquid nitrogen temperature. The testing was carried out on unirradiated material only with small disks, 3 mm in diameter and 0.25 mm in thickness. For comparison, tensile tests were also performed over the same temperature range. Correlations between the load at the plastic bending initiation and the maximum load of the punch tests with the yield stress and the ultimate tensile stress of the tension tests could be established. The temperature dependence of the specific fracture energy of the punch test was used to define a ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and to correlate this with the DBTT measured from impact Charpy on KLST specimens. The results are compared with other available correlations done in the past on other ferritic steels.

  6. Comparison of aerogrids and punched plates for smoothing flow from short annular diffusers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumpf, R. L.; Shippen, W. B.

    1972-01-01

    Scale model tests were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of aerogrids and punched plates in producing flat velocity profiles downstream of short diffusers as would be used between the compressor and combustor of advanced aircraft engines. The diffuser had an area ratio of 4.17 and a length-to-inlet-height ratio of 2.07. The aerogrids tested were plates containing 1123 contoured venturis in parallel with geometric blockages of 83, 74, and 61 percent, respectively. The punched plates contained 1123 sharp-edged orifices with blockages of 58 and 30 percent. The results show that aerogrids, with higher effective blockage for the same pressure loss, are more effective flow-smoothing devices than the punched plates. Also, the overall pressure loss decreases and the exit velocity profile becomes flatter as either type of grid is moved closer to the diffuser exit plane.

  7. Punched card programming and recording techniques employed in the automation of the WGTA1

    PubMed Central

    Polidora, V. J.; Main, Willett T.

    1963-01-01

    A system of punched card programming and recording of primate discrimination learning experiments is described to illustrate the application of these techniques to the automation of the discrete trial learning situation, allowing for punched card recording and subsequent digital computer data analyses without intermediate data reduction. The system was also designed to control several potential sources of variability inherent in the conventional WGTA testing mode, including 1) the subject's (S's) motivation to test on each trial, 2) S's attention to the stimuli, and 3) the rate of trial presentation so as to be more under S's control. Reliable techniques of punched card programming and recording are detailed. ImagesFig. 4.Fig. 5. PMID:14055959

  8. Development of a new superficial punch for Descemet's Membrane Endothelial Keratoplasty donor tissue preparation.

    PubMed

    Ruzza, Alessandro; Parekh, Mohit; Salvalaio, Gianni; Ferrari, Stefano; Ponzin, Diego

    2016-04-01

    Endothelial Keratoplasty (EK) is a corneal surgical procedure that allows a selective transplantation of the posterior layer of the cornea. Descemet's Membrane Endothelial Keratoplasty (DMEK) is one of the EK procedures in which the diseased Descemet's Membrane and the endothelium are replaced with a healthy donor tissue. To achieve this, the donor cornea is cut superficially from the endothelial side and the tissue can be separated using specific instruments like Pierse Notched, Acute or Fogla forceps. However, the pressure required to punch the superficial layer has always been a challenge and therefore a calibrated device to punch and excise the required superficial layer has been designed. This new model of punch will help to identify the peripheral edge of the DMEK lenticule which in turn helps to excise the tissue exclusively, further reducing the donor tissue wastage, as seen with the current tissue preparation methods.

  9. Heat Transfer Enhancement in Solar Air Heater Duct Fitted With Punched Hole Delta Winglets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warrier, Hithesh. U.; Kotebavi, Vinod. M.

    2016-09-01

    This paper investigates the thermal performance of solar air heater fitted with delta winglet type vortex generators with holes punched on it by experimental and numerical analysis. Delta winglet type vortex generators having holes punched onto it are fitted in a duct of size 400*300*30mm.it is placed in duct in 3 different configurations, as an array having 5 pair in one row. Delta winglet pair has an attack angle of 30degree, with height of winglet equal to half of duct height. The study is done for Reynolds's no in the range of 9000 to 25000. Thermal performance is evaluated by analyzing both friction factor and Nussult's number using Webb's correlation for surface roughness. Numerical simulation is done using Ansys fluent. Experimental and numerical results are then compared. Results shows that heat transfer enhancement of about 20-150% can be achieved by using punched hole delta winglet.

  10. Determination of the toughness of in-service steam turbine disks using small punch testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foulds, J.; Viswanathan, R.

    2001-10-01

    Knowledge of the material toughness is crucial in assessing the integrity of heavy section steel components. Conventional tests to determine the toughness involve extraction of large blocks of materials and therefore are not practical on in-service components. On the other hand, conservative assumptions regarding toughness without regard to actual data can lead to expensive and premature replacement of the components. Previous EPRI studies have demonstrated the use of a relatively nondestructive technique termed the "small punch test" to estimate the fracture appearance transition temperature (FATT) and fracture toughness ( K Ic ) of high-temperature turbine rotor steels and nuclear reactor pressure vessel steels. This paper summarizes the results of research into the feasibility of extending the small punch test to characterize the toughness of the 3 to 3.5% NiCrMoV (3-3.5NiCrMoV) low alloy steel used for fossil and nuclear power plant low-pressure (LP) steam turbine disks. Results of the present study show that the small punch transition temperature, T sp , is linearly correlated with FATT, so that measurement of T sp permits estimation of the standard Charpy FATT through empirical use of the correlation. The statistical confidence prediction uncertainty bands for the correlation were found to be narrow enough to make the small punch- based FATT estimation practical for this alloy. Additionally, independent K Ic measurements made by PowerGen, UK, on some of the same test materials were in excellent agreement with measurements made here, indicating that the small punch K Ic measurement can be reproducible across laboratories. Limited testing for fracture initiation toughness showed, as has been demonstrated for other materials, that the small punch test-based initiation fracture toughness ( K Ic ) determination was within ±25% of the ASTM standard measurement of K Ic , suggesting that the test method can be used for direct determination of fracture initiation

  11. Investigating the effect of tablet thickness and punch curvature on density distribution using finite elements method.

    PubMed

    Diarra, Harona; Mazel, Vincent; Busignies, Virginie; Tchoreloff, Pierre

    2015-09-30

    Finite elements method was used to study the influence of tablet thickness and punch curvature on the density distribution inside convex faced (CF) tablets. The modeling of the process was conducted on 2 pharmaceutical excipients (anhydrous calcium phosphate and microcrystalline cellulose) by using Drucker-Prager Cap model in Abaqus(®) software. The parameters of the model were obtained from experimental tests. Several punch shapes based on industrial standards were used. A flat-faced (FF) punch and 3 convex faced (CF) punches (8R11, 8R8 and 8R6) with a diameter of 8mm were chosen. Different tablet thicknesses were studied at a constant compression force. The simulation of the compaction of CF tablets with increasing thicknesses showed an important change on the density distribution inside the tablet. For smaller thicknesses, low density zones are located toward the center. The density is not uniform inside CF tablets and the center of the 2 faces appears with low density whereas the distribution inside FF tablets is almost independent of the tablet thickness. These results showed that FF and CF tablets, even obtained at the same compression force, do not have the same density at the center of the compact. As a consequence differences in tensile strength, as measured by diametral compression, are expected. This was confirmed by experimental tests.

  12. Randomization of Symbol Repetition of Punch Cards with Superimposed Coding in Information-Search Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirovich, L. Ya

    The article shows the effect of the irregularity of using separate symbols on search noise on punch cards with superimposed symbol coding in information-search system (IPS). A binomial law of random value distribution of repetition of each symbol is established and analyzed. A method of determining the maximum value of symbol repetition is…

  13. Experimental investigation into the deep penetration of soft solids by sharp and blunt punches, with application to the piercing of skin.

    PubMed

    Shergold, Oliver A; Fleck, Norman A

    2005-10-01

    An experimental study has been conducted on the penetration of silicone rubbers and human skin in vivo by sharp-tipped and flat-bottomed cylindrical punches. A penetrometer was developed to measure the penetration of human skin in vivo, while a conventional screw-driven testing machine was used to penetrate the silicone rubbers. The experiments reveal that the penetration mechanism of a soft solid depends upon the punch tip geometry: a sharp tipped punch penetrates by the formation and wedging open of a mode I planar crack, while a flat-bottomed punch penetrates by the growth of a mode II ring crack. The planar crack advances with the punch, and friction along the flanks of the punch leads to a rising load versus displacement response. In contrast, the flat-bottomed punch penetrates by jerky crack advance and the load on the punch is unsteady. The average penetration pressure on the shank cross section of a flat-bottomed punch exceeds that for a sharp-tipped punch of the same diameter In addition, the penetration pressure decreases as the diameter of the sharp-tipped punch increases. These findings are in broad agreement with the predictions of Shergold and Fleck [Proc. R. Soc. London, Ser. A (in press)] who proposed models for the penetration of a soft solid by a sharp-tipped and flat-bottomed punch.

  14. Development of new punch shape to replicate scale-up issues in laboratory tablet press II: a new design of punch head to emulate consolidation and dwell times in commercial tablet press.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Shigeru; Uchiyama, Jumpei; Ito, Manabu

    2014-06-01

    Differences between laboratory and commercial tablet presses are frequently observed during scale-up of tableting process. These scale-up issues result from the differences in total compression time that is the sum of consolidation and dwell times. When a lubricated blend is compressed into tablets, the tablet thickness produced by the commercial tablet press is often thicker than that by a laboratory tablet press. A new punch shape design, designated as shape adjusted for scale-up (SAS), was developed and used to demonstrate the ability to replicate scale-up issues in commercial-scale tableting processes. It was found that the consolidation time can be slightly shortened by changing the vertical curvature of the conventional punch head rim. However, this approach is not enough to replicate the consolidation time. A secondary two-stage SAS punch design and an embossed punch head was designed to replicate the consolidation and dwell times on a laboratory tablet press to match those of a commercial tablet press. The resulting tablet thickness using this second SAS punch on a laboratory tablet press was thicker than when using a conventional punch in the same laboratory tablet press. The secondary SAS punches are more useful tools for replicating and understanding potential scale-up issues. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association J Pharm Sci.

  15. Macroscopic Discontinuous Shear Thickening versus Local Shear Jamming in Cornstarch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fall, A.; Bertrand, F.; Hautemayou, D.; Mezière, C.; Moucheront, P.; Lemaître, A.; Ovarlez, G.

    2015-03-01

    We study the emergence of discontinuous shear thickening (DST) in cornstarch by combining macroscopic rheometry with local magnetic resonance imaging measurements. We bring evidence that macroscopic DST is observed only when the flow separates into a low-density flowing and a high-density jammed region. In the shear-thickened steady state, the local rheology in the flowing region is not DST but, strikingly, is often shear thinning. Our data thus show that the stress jump measured during DST, in cornstarch, does not capture a secondary, high-viscosity branch of the local steady rheology but results from the existence of a shear jamming limit at volume fractions quite significantly below random close packing.

  16. Structural evolution of regenerated silk fibroin under shear: Combined wide- and small-angle x-ray scattering experiments using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rossle, Manfred; Panine, Pierre; Urban, Volker S; Riekel, Christine

    2004-04-01

    The structural evolution of regenerated Bombyx mori silk fibroin during shearing with a Couette cell has been studied in situ by synchrotron radiation small- and wide-angle x-ray scattering techniques. An elongation of fibroin molecules was observed with increasing shear rate, followed by an aggregation phase. The aggregates were found to be amorphous with {beta}-conformation according to infrared spectroscopy. Scanning x-ray microdiffraction with a 5 {micro}m beam on aggregated material, which had solidified in air, showed silk II reflections and a material with equatorial reflections close to the silk I structure reflections, but with strong differences in reflection intensities. This silk I type material shows up to two low-angle peaks suggesting the presence of water molecules that might be intercalated between hydrogen-bonded sheets.

  17. Role of multiwalled carbon nanotube in interlaminar shear strength of epoxy/glass fiber/multi walled carbon nanotube hybrid composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan Chandrasekaran, Vasan Churchill

    2011-12-01

    The motivation of this thesis is to investigate the role of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) in enhancing the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) of hybrid composites. The objective of this thesis is to understand the relationships between processing history, material variability, matrix properties, glass fiber/matrix interface properties and their correlations with interlaminar shear strength of hybrid composites. The interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) of hybrid composites made from glass fiber and multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) modified epoxy is compared with that for unmodified epoxy/glass fiber composites (control). By combining the techniques of high speed mechanical stirring and ultrasonic agitation, 0.5% MWCNT by weight were dispersed in epoxy to prepare a suspension. Composites were manufactured by both injection double vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (IDVARTM) and the flow flooding chamber (FFC) methods. Compression shear tests (CST) were conducted on the manufactured samples to determine the ILSS. The effect of processing history and batch-to-batch variability of materials---glass fiber preform, resin and carbon nanotubes---on the ILSS of samples made by both techniques was investigated. Statistical comparison of the measured ILSS values for hybrid composites with the control specimens clearly show that hybrid composites made by the FFC process resulted in significant ILSS enhancement relative to the control and the IDVARTM specimens. After it was established that the FFC process improved the ILSS, the effect of functionalizing the nanotubes was explored. Multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) were oxidized by acid treatment and heated with triethylene tetra amine (TETA) to obtain amino functionalized MWCNTs (f-MWCNT). Hybrid composites with f-MWCNTs were manufactured using FFC technique and control samples were fabricated using the same E-Glass fiber mat and unmodified epoxy resin subjected to the same processing history. CST results show

  18. Fractal network dimension and viscoelastic powerlaw behavior: I. A modeling approach based on a coarse-graining procedure combined with shear oscillatory rheometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posnansky, Oleg; Guo, Jing; Hirsch, Sebastian; Papazoglou, Sebastian; Braun, Jürgen; Sack, Ingolf

    2012-06-01

    Recent advances in dynamic elastography and biorheology have revealed that the complex shear modulus, G*, of various biological soft tissues obeys a frequency-dependent powerlaw. This viscoelastic powerlaw behavior implies that mechanical properties are communicated in tissue across the continuum of scales from microscopic to macroscopic. For deriving constitutive constants from the dispersion of G* in a biological tissue, a hierarchical fractal model is introduced that accounts for multiscale networks. Effective-media powerlaw constants are derived by a constitutive law based on cross-linked viscoelastic clusters embedded in a rigid environment. The spatial variation of G* is considered at each level of hierarchy by an iterative coarse-graining procedure. The establishment of cross-links in this model network is associated with an increasing fractal dimension and an increasing viscoelastic powerlaw exponent. This fundamental relationship between shear modulus dynamics and fractal dimension of the mechanical network in tissue is experimentally reproduced in phantoms by applying shear oscillatory rheometry to layers of tangled paper strips embedded in agarose gel. Both model and experiments demonstrate the sensitivity of G* to the density of the mechanical network in tissue, corroborating disease-related alterations of the viscoelastic powerlaw exponent in human parenchyma demonstrated by in vivo elastography.

  19. Effect of blood contamination on shear bond strength of brackets bonded with a self-etching primer combined with a resin-modified glass ionomer.

    PubMed

    Cacciafesta, Vittorio; Sfondrini, Maria Francesca; Scribante, Andrea; De Angelis, Marco; Klersy, Catherine

    2004-12-01

    This study assessed the effect of blood contamination on the shear bond strength and bond failure site of a resin-modified glass ionomer (Fuji Ortho LC, GC Europe, Leuven, Belgium) used with 3 enamel conditioners (10% polyacrylic acid, 37% phosphoric acid, and self-etching primer). One hundred twenty bovine permanent mandibular incisors were randomly divided into 8 groups; each group consisted of 15 specimens. Two enamel surface conditions were studied: dry and contaminated with blood. One hundred twenty stainless steel brackets were bonded with the resin-modified glass ionomer. After bonding, all samples were stored in distilled water for 24 hours and then tested in shear mode on a testing machine. The groups conditioned with self-etching primer and 37% phosphoric acid had the highest bond strengths for both dry and blood-contaminated enamel. The groups conditioned with 10% polyacrylic acid showed significantly lower shear bond strength value, and the unconditioned groups had the lowest bond strengths. For each enamel conditioner, no significant difference was reported between dry and blood-contaminated groups. Significant differences in debond locations were found among the groups bonded with the different conditioners. Blood contamination of enamel during the bonding procedure of Fuji Ortho LC did not affect its bond strength values, no matter which enamel conditioner was used.

  20. Moon formation: Punch combo or knock-out blow?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Gareth S.

    2017-01-01

    The twin isotopic signatures of the Moon and Earth are difficult to explain by a single giant impact. Impact simulations suggest that making the Moon by a combination of multiple, smaller moonlet-forming impacts may work better.

  1. An analysis of the shear strength of the bond between enamel and porcelain laminate veneers with different etching systems: acid and Er,Cr:YSGG laser separately and combined.

    PubMed

    Dundar, Berivan; Guzel, Kahraman Gündüz

    2011-11-01

    Conditioning of the enamel surface is now an accepted and widely applied technique used to improve retention in porcelain laminate veneer restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate strength of the bond between porcelain laminate veneers and tooth surfaces etched with acid and laser, separately and together. The teeth studied comprised 60 incisors extracted for periodontal reasons. These were divided into four groups according to etching method: group 1, acid etching alone; group 2, acid etching followed by laser etching; group 3, laser etching followed by acid etching; group 4, laser etching alone. The teeth were etched with 37% phosphoric acid and a Er,Cr:YSGG laser system. In addition, 60 IPS Empress II cylindrical blocks 2 mm in height and 5 mm in diameter were also prepared for the etched tooth surface. These blocks were bonded to the teeth with dual cured resin cement and shear tests were then performed. After the shear tests, Scanning electron microscopy images of the tooth surfaces were obtained at a magnification of ×3,800. Etching with acid alone yielded the highest mean value of bond shear strength (15.4±3.8 MPa), while laser etching followed by acid etching gave the lowest mean value (11.5±4.6 MPa). The mean values of the bond shear strength for acid etching followed by laser etching and laser etching alone were 13.8±3.9 MPa and 12.8±4.6 MPa, respectively. Statistical analysis revealed no significant differences between the groups. The results suggest that laser etching is easy to apply and less time-consuming. They further suggest that the order in which the acid and laser are applied in combined treatments is important.

  2. [Possibilities for injuries caused by rubber bullets from the self-defense weapon MR 35 Punch].

    PubMed

    Schyma, C; Schyma, P

    1997-01-01

    Manurhin developed a "non lethal" weapon, the MR 35 Punch, which fires 21 g weighing rubber balls of 35 mm caliber. The black powder cartridges which were used as propellant cause important variations of the projectile's velocity from 120 to 140 m/s. The resulting energies were about 150 to 200 J. The wounding potential was examined by shots on different materials and gelatin. Shots from 2 to 5 m distance caused penetrations of 3 to 8 cm in 10 percent gelatin. Covering the gelatin with skin or thick textiles did not significantly change the penetration. Skin and textiles were penetrated in all experiments. Pieces of flat bone which were embedded in gelatin were fractured by the shots, in part fracture elements were dislocated. The discussion of the wound ballistic results contradict the "non lethal" character of the MR 35 Punch.

  3. Analysis of ancient Indian silver punch-marked coins by external PIXE.

    PubMed

    Rautray, Tapash R; Nayak, Suman S; Tripathy, Bipin B; Das, Saubhagyalaxmi; Das, Manas R; Das, Satya R; Chattopadhyay, Pranab K

    2011-10-01

    Seven silver punch-marked coins were analysed using external particle induced X-ray emission technique. The main group of elements like Ag, Cu, Au, Pb and Fe were estimated along with a number of trace/minor elements such as K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni and Rb in the analysed silver coins. Gold was found in all the coins and varied between 0.7% and 6.2% indicating the better economic condition of that civilisation.

  4. Using Teamcenter engineering software for a successive punching tool lifecycle management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaga, F.; Pele, A.-V.; Stǎnǎşel, I.; Buidoş, T.; Hule, V.

    2015-11-01

    The paper presents studies and researches results of the implementation of Teamcenter (TC) integrated management of a product lifecycle, in a virtual enterprise. The results are able to be implemented also in a real enterprise. The product was considered a successive punching and cutting tool, designed to materialize a metal sheet part. The paper defines the technical documentation flow (flow of information) in the process of constructive computer aided design of the tool. After the design phase is completed a list of parts is generated containing standard or manufactured components (BOM, Bill of Materials). The BOM may be exported to MS Excel (.xls) format and can be transferred to other departments of the company in order to supply the necessary materials and resources to achieve the final product. This paper describes the procedure to modify or change certain dimensions of sheet metal part obtained by punching. After 3D and 2D design, the digital prototype of punching tool moves to following lifecycle phase of the manufacturing process. For each operation of the technological process the corresponding phases are described in detail. Teamcenter enables to describe manufacturing company structure, underlying workstations that carry out various operations of manufacturing process. The paper revealed that the implementation of Teamcenter PDM in a company, improves efficiency of managing product information, eliminating time working with search, verification and correction of documentation, while ensuring the uniqueness and completeness of the product data.

  5. Enhancing shear thickening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madraki, Yasaman; Hormozi, Sarah; Ovarlez, Guillaume; Guazzelli, Élisabeth; Pouliquen, Olivier

    2017-03-01

    A cornstarch suspension is the quintessential particulate system that exhibits shear thickening. By adding large non-Brownian spheres to a cornstarch suspension, we show that shear thickening can be significantly enhanced. More precisely, the shear-thickening transition is found to be increasingly shifted to lower critical shear rates. This influence of the large particles on the discontinuous shear-thickening transition is shown to be more dramatic than that on the viscosity or the yield stress of the suspension.

  6. How Boxers Decide to Punch a Target: Emergent Behaviour in Nonlinear Dynamical Movement Systems

    PubMed Central

    Hristovski, Robert; Davids, Keith; Araújo, Duarte; Button, Chris

    2006-01-01

    Previous research has shown how dynamical systems theory provides a relevant framework for investigating decision-making behavior in sport. The aim of this study was to adopt concepts and tools from nonlinear dynamics in examining effects of boxer-target distance and perceived punching efficiency on emergent decision-making during a typical practice task in boxing. Results revealed the existence of critical values of scaled distances between boxers and targets for first time appearance and disappearance of a diverse range of boxing actions including jabs, hooks and uppercuts. Reasons for the diversity of actions were twofold: i) abrupt (qualitative) changes in the number of the possible punches, i.e. motor solutions to the hitting task; and ii), fine modification of the probabilities of selecting specific striking patterns. Boxers were able to exploit the emerging perception of strikeability, leading to a changing diversity of selected actions and a cascade of abrupt changes in the perceptual-motor work space of the task. Perceived efficiency of a punching action by the participants also changed as a function of the scaled distance to a target and was correlated with the probability of occurrence of specific boxing actions. Accordingly, scaled distance-dependent perceived efficiency seems an important perceptual constraint in the training task of punching a heavy bag in boxers. Key Points During the practicing with static (i.e. non moving) heavy bags novice boxers' perceptual-action system is sensitive to the scaled distance and efficiency informational constraints. These interdependent constraints shape the action behaviour of the novice boxers; During heavy bag practice novice boxers are subject to a kind of discovery learning by exploring the efficiency of their motor repertoire when changing the performer - target distances; The region close to D = 0.6 maximizes the flexibility of switching among different types of punching actions and is optimal for practicing

  7. Himalia and Phoebe: Little moons that punch above their weight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LI, Daohai; Christou, Apostolos

    2016-05-01

    Small bodies in the solar system are usually treated as massless particles. While a sufficient approximation for many purposes, the small but finite mass of some of these (mass ratio μ=10^{-10}-10^{-8} of primary) can have observable consequences on the local population. Numerical experiments have shown this to be true for the orbital neighbourhood of Himalia, a prograde irregular moon of Jupiter (Christou 2005). In a recent demonstration of the same mechanism in a different context, Novaković et al. (2015) showed that the dwarf planet Ceres activates its own secular resonances, causing the long-term diffusion of asteroids in the middle part of the Main Belt.Seeking to better understand the dynamics caused by “internecine” interactions, we have constructed a semi-analytical model of a test particle’s secular evolution in the Sun-Planet-massive moon-particle restricted 4-body problem. By combining the Kozai-Lidov formalism with a model of coorbital motion valid for non-planar & non-circular orbits (Namouni 1999) we have overcome the difficulty in treating the interaction between potentially-crossing neighbouring orbits.We have applied this model to the cases of (a) J6 Himalia, a jovian irregular satellite (μ≃ 2× 10^{-9}) and the largest in a family of five moons, and (b) S9 Phoebe, a retrograde irregular moon of Saturn with μ=1.5× 10^{-8} which, curiously, is not associated with a family (Ćuk et al. 2003). We observe numerous instances of capture into secular resonances where the critical angle is a linear combination of the relative nodes and apses of the particle and the perturber. In particular we are able to reproduce the libration of the differential node found by Christou (2005). We generate fictitious families of test particles around Himalia and Phoebe and find that, while ~8% of local phase space is occupied by these resonances for Himalia, this figure is ~16% for Phoebe. We confirm these results using N-body integrations of the full

  8. Chemical Punch Packed in Venoms Makes Centipedes Excellent Predators*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shilong; Liu, Zhonghua; Xiao, Yao; Li, Yuan; Rong, Mingqiang; Liang, Songping; Zhang, Zhiye; Yu, Haining; King, Glenn F.; Lai, Ren

    2012-01-01

    Centipedes are excellent predatory arthropods that inject venom to kill or immobilize their prey. Although centipedes have long been known to be venomous, their venoms remain largely unexplored. The chemical components responsible for centipede predation and the functional mechanisms are unknown. Twenty-six neurotoxin-like peptides belonging to ten groups were identified from the centipede venoms, Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans L. Koch by peptidomics combined with transcriptome analysis, revealing the diversity of neurotoxins. These neurotoxins each contain two to four intramolecular disulfide bridges, and in most cases the disulfide framework is different from that found in neurotoxins from the venoms of spiders, scorpions, marine cone snails, sea anemones, and snakes (5S animals). Several neurotoxins contain potential insecticidal abilities, and they are found to act on voltage-gated sodium, potassium, and calcium channels, respectively. Although these neurotoxins are functionally similar to the disulfide-rich neurotoxins found in the venoms of 5S animals in that they modulate the activity of voltage-gated ion channels, in almost all cases the primary structures of the centipede venom peptides are unique. This represents an interesting case of convergent evolution in which different venomous animals have evolved different molecular strategies for targeting the same ion channels in prey and predators. Moreover, the high level of biochemical diversity revealed in this study suggests that centipede venoms might be attractive subjects for prospecting and screening for peptide candidates with potential pharmaceutical or agrochemical applications. PMID:22595790

  9. "Triple-punch" strategy for triple negative breast cancer therapy with minimized drug dosage and improved antitumor efficacy.

    PubMed

    Su, Shishuai; Tian, Yanhua; Li, Yiye; Ding, Yanping; Ji, Tianjiao; Wu, Meiyu; Wu, Yan; Nie, Guangjun

    2015-02-24

    Effective therapeutics against triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), which has no standard-of-care therapy, needs to be developed urgently. Here we demonstrated a strategy of integrating indocyanine green (ICG), paclitaxel (PTX), and survivin siRNA into one thermosensitive poly(2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethyl methacrylate-co-oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate)-co-2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate-b-poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (P (MEO2MA-co-OEGMA-co-DMAEMA)-b-PLGA) nanoparticle (NP-IPS) for triple-punch strategy against TNBC. The NP-IPS significantly enhanced the stability of ICG. Controlled release of the PTX in tumor regions was triggered by the hyperthermia produced by laser irradiated ICG. The NP-IPS exhibited remarkable antitumor efficacy (almost complete ablation of the tumor xenografts) due to the combinational effects of chemotherapy, photothermal therapy, and gene therapy with low drug dose (ICG, 0.32 μmol/kg; PTX, 0.54 μmol/kg; siRNA, 1.5 mg/kg) and minimal side effects. Taken together, our current study demonstrates a nanoplatform for triple-therapy, which reveals a promising strategy for TNBC treatment.

  10. Stress analysis of shear/compression test

    SciTech Connect

    Nishijima, S.; Okada, T.; Ueno, S.

    1997-06-01

    Stress analysis has been made on the glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) subjected to the combined shear and compression stresses by means of finite element method. The two types of experimental set up were analyzed, that is parallel and series method where the specimen were compressed by tilted jigs which enable to apply the combined stresses, to the specimen. Modified Tsai-Hill criterion was employed to judge the failure under the combined stresses that is the shear strength under the compressive stress. The different failure envelopes were obtained between the two set ups. In the parallel system the shear strength once increased with compressive stress then decreased. On the contrary in the series system the shear strength decreased monotonicly with compressive stress. The difference is caused by the different stress distribution due to the different constraint conditions. The basic parameters which control the failure under the combined stresses will be discussed.

  11. Reduced shear power spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Dodelson, Scott; Shapiro, Charles; White, Martin J.; /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept. /UC, Berkeley

    2005-08-01

    Measurements of ellipticities of background galaxies are sensitive to the reduced shear, the cosmic shear divided by (1-{kappa}) where {kappa} is the projected density field. They compute the difference between shear and reduced shear both analytically and with simulations. The difference becomes more important an smaller scales, and will impact cosmological parameter estimation from upcoming experiments. A simple recipe is presented to carry out the required correction.

  12. Rotatable shear plate interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Duffus, Richard C.

    1988-01-01

    A rotatable shear plate interferometer comprises a transparent shear plate mounted obliquely in a tubular supporting member at 45.degree. with respect to its horizontal center axis. This tubular supporting member is supported rotatably around its center axis and a collimated laser beam is made incident on the shear plate along this center axis such that defocus in different directions can be easily measured.

  13. Cracking the code: a decode strategy for the international business machines punch cards of Korean war soldiers.

    PubMed

    Mitsunaga, Erin M

    2006-05-01

    During the Korean War, International Business Machines (IBM) punch cards were created for every individual involved in military combat. Each card contained all pertinent personal information about the individual and was utilized to keep track of all soldiers involved. However, at present, all of the information known about these punch cards reveals only their format and their significance; there is little to no information on how these cards were created or how to interpret the information contained without the aid of the computer system used during the war. Today, it is believed there is no one available to explain this computerized system, nor do the original computers exist. This decode strategy is the result of an attempt to decipher the information on these cards through the use of all available medical and dental records for each individual examined. By cross-referencing the relevant personal information with the known format of the cards, a basic guess-and-check method was utilized. After examining hundreds of IBM punch cards, however, it has become clear that the punch card method of recording information was not infallible. In some cases, there are gaps of information on cards where there are data recorded on personal records; in others, information is punched incorrectly onto the cards, perhaps as the result of a transcription error. Taken all together, it is clear that the information contained on each individual's card should be taken solely as another form of personal documentation.

  14. Paraprofessional Punch.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konkel, Mary S.

    This paper presents an outline for a plan for increasing OCLC cataloging statistics in the monograph cataloging unit of a medium-to-large academic library, along with the evaluation process used to achieve this goal. The focus of the plan was on a group of upper level paraprofessional staff. First, OCLC cooperative cataloging was redefined to…

  15. Punch List

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biemiller, Lawrence

    2008-01-01

    This article features university architect Ron McCoy and describes his work at the Arizona State University (ASU). McCoy, now on his fifth year of overseeing construction on all four Arizona State campuses, came to ASU 14 years ago as a professor and director of the School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. He was thinking seriously about…

  16. Punching Out.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, David

    2000-01-01

    Presents the story of the number one for-profit school in the United States, the Thomas A. Edison Charter Academy. Teachers had a heavier workload, but better pay and perks. Shortly after opening, many teachers were discontent with the long days and calendar, lack of follow through on promised benefits, and other issues. Reactions to this…

  17. "One can't shake off the women": images of sport and gender in Punch, 1901-10.

    PubMed

    Constanzo, Marilyn

    2002-01-01

    Examining the manner in which the popular press portrayed middle-class Edwardian women's activity in sport provides insight into the social liberation of English women. The popular middle-class British journal Punch included thousands of images of sportswomen. Despite the misogynistic satirizing of inept women, Punch's cartoons and articles depict distinct changes in women's behavior and social expectations that are linked to their increasing involvement in sport. By engaging in sport, women unconsciously challenged and permanently altered the pervasive middle-class Victorian ideology. The contents of Punch suggests that middle-class women's participation in sport, though perhaps begun in a conservative manner, completely altered and expanded their social role and changed the traditional image of womanhood.

  18. Influence of shear cutting parameters on the electromagnetic properties of non-oriented electrical steel sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, H. A.; Leuning, N.; Steentjes, S.; Hameyer, K.; Andorfer, T.; Jenner, S.; Volk, W.

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical stress occurring during the manufacturing process of electrical machines detrimentally alters the magnetic properties (iron losses and magnetizability). This affects the efficiency and performance of the machine. Improvement of the manufacturing process in terms of reduced magnetic property deterioration enables the full potential of the magnetic materials to be exploited, and as a result, the performance of the machine to be improved. A high quantity of electrical machine components is needed, with shear cutting (punching, blanking) being the most efficient manufacturing technology. The cutting process leads to residual stresses inside the non-oriented electrical sheet metal, resulting in increased iron losses. This paper studies the residual stresses induced by punching with different shear cutting parameters, taking a qualitative approach using finite element analysis. In order to calibrate the finite element analysis, shear cutting experiments are performed. A single sheet tester analysis of the cut blanks allows the correlation between residual stresses, micro hardness measurements, cutting surface parameters and magnetic properties to be studied.

  19. Assessment of the constitutive law by inverse methodology: Small punch test and hardness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isselin, J.; Iost, A.; Golek, J.; Najjar, D.; Bigerelle, M.

    2006-06-01

    The relevance of small-punch tests and indentation (hardness) tests are compared with regard to the determination of a constitutive law in the case of non active ferrite-bainite steel taken from a French power plant. Firstly, small-punch tests were performed on material samples and the load deflection curves were compared with finite element calculations using the FORGE2 Standard code. As a result the strength coefficient and the strain hardening exponent of Hollomon's constitutive law were determined by an inverse method (Simplex method). Besides, it was shown that a three-parameter constitutive law such as Ludwik Hollomon's leads to an indetermination since its parameters are correlated with each other. Secondly indentation tests were performed with a ball indenter and the parameters of the constitutive law were determined from the analysis of the load-indentation depth curves. Both methods give results in good agreement with the true stress-true strain curve obtained by classical tensile testing, thus proving their applicability to nuclear materials.

  20. Stress concentration in periodically rough Hertzian contact: Hertz to soft-flat-punch transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledesma-Alonso, R.; Raphaël, E.; Léger, L.; Restagno, F.; Poulard, C.

    2016-09-01

    We report on the elastic contact between a spherical lens and a patterned substrate, composed of a hexagonal lattice of cylindrical pillars. The stress field and the size of the contact area are obtained by means of numerical methods: a superposition method of discrete pressure elements and an iterative bisection-like method. For small indentations, a transition from a Hertzian to a soft-flat-punch behaviour is observed when the surface fraction of the substrate that is covered by the pillars is increased. In particular, we present a master curve defined by two dimensionless parameters, which allows one to predict the stress at the centre of the contact region in terms of the surface fraction occupied by pillars. The transition between the limiting contact regimes, Hertzian and soft-flat-punch, is well described by a rational function. Additionally, a simple model to describe the Boussinesq-Cerruti-like contact between the lens and a single elastic pillar, which takes into account the pillar geometry and the elastic properties of the two bodies, is presented.

  1. Effects of sparring load on reaction speed and punch force during the pre-competition and competition periods in boxing.

    PubMed

    Hukkanen, Esa; Häkkinen, Keijo

    2017-03-08

    Seven male national team level boxers (age 20.3±2.7 years, height 1.80±0.06 m, mass 73.8±11.1 kg) participated in this study to investigate effects of sparring on reaction time and punch force of straight punches measured during the pre-competition and competition periods. Heart rate and blood lactate concentrations were also monitored. Sparring load was chosen in accordance with the current rules (AIBA) 3x3 minute bouts with one minute break in between. Reaction time of rear straight lengthened (p<0.01) during the sparring load of the pre-competition period after the third round (to 390 ms) in comparison to the competition period (to 310 ms). Reaction time of lead straight lengthened (p<0.05) between the 1st and 3rd round during the pre-competition with no differences during the competition period. Both rear and lead straight punch forces were greater at all measurement points during the pre-competition compared to the competition period. Punch forces increased for both rear and lead straight between the 1st and 3rd round with the highest forces after 3rd round during the pre- (rear straight 209 kg) and competition period (rear straight 176 kg). Blood lactate levels increased after every round during both periods being at its greatest after the 3rd round (17 mmol·L during the pre-competition and 13 mmol·L during the competition period). The present sparring-induced differences in reaction time and punch forces of straight punches during the pre-competition compared to the competition period may be due to different volume and intensity of training with different goals in boxing-specific and explosive strength training.

  2. Predicting punching acceleration from selected strength and power variables in elite karate athletes: a multiple regression analysis.

    PubMed

    Loturco, Irineu; Artioli, Guilherme Giannini; Kobal, Ronaldo; Gil, Saulo; Franchini, Emerson

    2014-07-01

    This study investigated the relationship between punching acceleration and selected strength and power variables in 19 professional karate athletes from the Brazilian National Team (9 men and 10 women; age, 23 ± 3 years; height, 1.71 ± 0.09 m; and body mass [BM], 67.34 ± 13.44 kg). Punching acceleration was assessed under 4 different conditions in a randomized order: (a) fixed distance aiming to attain maximum speed (FS), (b) fixed distance aiming to attain maximum impact (FI), (c) self-selected distance aiming to attain maximum speed, and (d) self-selected distance aiming to attain maximum impact. The selected strength and power variables were as follows: maximal dynamic strength in bench press and squat-machine, squat and countermovement jump height, mean propulsive power in bench throw and jump squat, and mean propulsive velocity in jump squat with 40% of BM. Upper- and lower-body power and maximal dynamic strength variables were positively correlated to punch acceleration in all conditions. Multiple regression analysis also revealed predictive variables: relative mean propulsive power in squat jump (W·kg-1), and maximal dynamic strength 1 repetition maximum in both bench press and squat-machine exercises. An impact-oriented instruction and a self-selected distance to start the movement seem to be crucial to reach the highest acceleration during punching execution. This investigation, while demonstrating strong correlations between punching acceleration and strength-power variables, also provides important information for coaches, especially for designing better training strategies to improve punching speed.

  3. Shear accommodation in dirty grain boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Upmanyu, M.

    2014-04-01

    The effect of solutes (dirt) on the mechanics of crystalline interfaces remains unexplored. Here, we perform atomic-scale simulations to study the effect of carbon segregation on the shear accommodation at select grain boundaries in the classical α-Fe/C system. For shear velocities larger than the solute diffusion rate, we observe a transition from coupled motion to sliding. Below a critical solute excess, the boundaries break away from the solute cloud and exhibit in a coupled motion. At smaller shear velocities, the extrinsic coupled motion is jerky, occurs at relatively small shear stresses, and is aided by fast convective solute diffusion along the boundary. Our studies underscore the combined effect of energetics and kinetics of solutes in modifying the bicrystallography, temperature and rate dependence of shear accommodation at grain boundaries.

  4. Vortex simulation of reacting shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoniem, Ahmed F.

    Issues involved in the vortex simulation of reacting shear flow are discussed. It is shown that maintaining accuracy in the vortex methods requires the application of elaborate vorticity-updating schemes as vortex elements are moved along particle trajectories when shear or a strong strain field is represented. Solutions using 2D and 3D methods are discussed to illustrate some of the most common instabilities encountered in nonreacting and reacting shear flows and to reveal the mechanisms by which the maturation of these instabilities enhance mixing and hence burning in a reacting flow. The transport element method is developed and its application to compute scalar mixing in a shear layer is reviewed. The method is then combined with the vortex method to solve the problem of nonuniform-density shear flow. The results of incompressible reacting flow models are used to examine reaction extinction due to the formation of localized regions of strong strains as instabilities grow into their nonlinear range.

  5. Shear wavelength estimation based on inverse filtering and multiple-point shear wave generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitazaki, Tomoaki; Kondo, Kengo; Yamakawa, Makoto; Shiina, Tsuyoshi

    2016-07-01

    Elastography provides important diagnostic information because tissue elasticity is related to pathological conditions. For example, in a mammary gland, higher grade malignancies yield harder tumors. Estimating shear wave speed enables the quantification of tissue elasticity imaging using time-of-flight. However, time-of-flight measurement is based on an assumption about the propagation direction of a shear wave which is highly affected by reflection and refraction, and thus might cause an artifact. An alternative elasticity estimation approach based on shear wavelength was proposed and applied to passive configurations. To determine the elasticity of tissue more quickly and more accurately, we proposed a new method for shear wave elasticity imaging that combines the shear wavelength approach and inverse filtering with multiple shear wave sources induced by acoustic radiation force (ARF). The feasibility of the proposed method was verified using an elasticity phantom with a hard inclusion.

  6. Mechanical Behavior of Lithium-Ion Batteries and Fatigue Behavior of Ultrasonic Weld-Bonded Lap-Shear Specimens of Dissimilar Magnesium and Steel Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Wei-Jen

    The mechanical behaviors of LiFePO4 battery cell and module specimens under in-plane constrained compression were investigated for simulations of battery cells, modules and packs under crush conditions. The experimental stress-strain curves were correlated to the deformation patterns of battery cell and module specimens. Analytical solutions were developed to estimate the buckling stresses and to provide a theoretical basis for future design of representative volume element cell and module specimens. A physical kinematics model for formation of kinks and shear bands in battery cells was developed to explain the deformation mechanism for layered battery cells under in-plane constrained compression. A small-scale module constrained punch indentation test was also conducted to benchmark the computational results. The computational results indicate that macro homogenized material models can be used to simulate battery modules under crush conditions. Fatigue behavior and failure modes of ultrasonic spot welds in lap-shear specimens of magnesium and steel sheets with and without adhesive were investigated. For ultrasonic spot welded lap-shear specimens, the failure mode changes from the partial nugget pullout mode under low-cycle loading conditions to the kinked crack failure mode under high-cycle loading conditions. For adhesive-bonded and weld-bonded lap-shear specimens, the test results show the near interface cohesive failure mode and the kinked crack failure mode under low-cycle and high-cycle loading conditions, respectively. Next, the analytical effective stress intensity factor solutions for main cracks in lap-shear specimens of three dissimilar sheets under plane strain conditions were developed and the solutions agreed well with the computational results. The analytical effective stress intensity factor solutions for kinked cracks were compared with the computational results at small kink lengths. The results indicate that the computational results approach to

  7. Shearing stability of lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiba, Y.; Gijyutsu, G.

    1984-01-01

    Shearing stabilities of lubricating oils containing a high mol. wt. polymer as a viscosity index improver were studied by use of ultrasound. The oils were degraded by cavitation and the degradation generally followed first order kinetics with the rate of degradation increasing with the intensity of the ultrasonic irradiation and the cumulative energy applied. The shear stability was mainly affected by the mol. wt. of the polymer additive and could be determined in a short time by mechanical shearing with ultrasound.

  8. Enhancing Shear Thickening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madraki, Fatemeh; Hormozi, Sarah; Ovarlez, Guillaume; Guazzelli, Elisabeth; Pouliquen, Olivier

    2016-11-01

    A cornstarch suspension is the quintessential particulate system that exhibits shear thickening. By adding large non-Brownian spheres to a cornstarch suspension, we show that shear thickening can be significantly enhanced. More precisely, the shear thickening transition is found to be increasingly shifted to lower critical shear rates. This enhancement is found to be mainly controlled by the concentration of the large particles. ANR(ANR-13-IS09-0005-01), ANR(ANR-11-LABX-0092), MIDEX (ANR-11-IDEX-0001-02), NSF (CBET-1554044-CAREER).

  9. Shear Thinning in Xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergm Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.; Yao, Minwu; Zimmerli, Gregory A.

    2009-01-01

    We measured shear thinning, a viscosity decrease ordinarily associated with complex liquids such as molten plastics or ketchup, near the critical point of xenon. The data span a wide range of dimensionless shear rate: the product of the shear rate and the relaxation time of critical fluctuations was greater than 0.001 and was less than 700. As predicted by theory, shear thinning occurred when this product was greater than 1. The measurements were conducted aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia to avoid the density stratification caused by Earth's gravity.

  10. Punch stretching process monitoring using acoustic emission signal analysis. II - Application of frequency domain deconvolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Steven Y.; Dornfeld, David A.; Nickerson, Jackson A.

    1987-01-01

    The coloring effect on the acoustic emission signal due to the frequency response of the data acquisition/processing instrumentation may bias the interpretation of AE signal characteristics. In this paper, a frequency domain deconvolution technique, which involves the identification of the instrumentation transfer functions and multiplication of the AE signal spectrum by the inverse of these system functions, has been carried out. In this way, the change in AE signal characteristics can be better interpreted as the result of the change in only the states of the process. Punch stretching process was used as an example to demonstrate the application of the technique. Results showed that, through the deconvolution, the frequency characteristics of AE signals generated during the stretching became more distinctive and can be more effectively used as tools for process monitoring.

  11. Development of small punch testing technique and its application to evaluation of mechanical properties degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Kameda, J.

    1993-10-01

    The present paper summarizes a small punch (SP) testing technique developed and its application to mechanical properties characterization. It has been clearly shown on ferritic alloys that the SP test was evaluate the intergranular embrittling potency of segregated solute, such as P, Sn and Sb causing temper embrittlement, and the effects of neutron irradiation and post-irradiation annealing, giving rise to changes in the hardness and intergranular solute segregation, on the fracture properties in terms of the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT). A linear relation of the DBTT determined by the SP test to that by Charpy V-notched tests has been theoretically and experimentally established. In Al alloy substrates coated with amorphous and overlaying ceramics, moreover, the global and local fracture properties were well characterized by the SP test together with acoustic emission techniques.

  12. Anisotropic mechanical properties of the MA956 ODS steel characterized by the small punch testing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turba, K.; Hurst, R. C.; Hähner, P.

    2012-09-01

    The small punch testing technique was used to assess both creep and fracture properties of the MA956 oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steel. The anisotropy in mechanical properties was addressed, as well as the alloy's susceptibility to thermal embrittlement. Strong anisotropy was found in the material's creep resistance at 725 °C for longer rupture times. Anisotropic behavior was also observed for the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT). The origin of the anisotropy can be related to the strongly directional microstructure which enables a large amount of intergranular cracking during straining at both high and low temperatures. The DBTT of the alloy is very high, and can be further increased by at least 200 °C after 1000 h of ageing at 475 °C, due to the formation of the Cr-rich α' phase. The particularly high susceptibility of the MA956 to thermal embrittlement is mainly a consequence of its high chromium content.

  13. Routine use of punch biopsy to diagnose small fiber neuropathy in fibromyalgia patients.

    PubMed

    Levine, Todd D; Saperstein, David S

    2015-03-01

    Fibromyalgia is a clinical syndrome that currently does not have any specific pathological finding to aid in diagnosis. Therefore, fibromyalgia is most likely a heterogeneous group of diseases with similar symptoms. Identifying and understanding the pathological basis of fibromyalgia will allow physicians to better categorize patients, increasing prospective treatment options, and improving potential therapeutic endeavors. Recent work has demonstrated that approximately 50% of patients diagnosed with fibromyalgia have damage to their small unmyelinated nerve fibers. A skin punch biopsy is a sensitive and specific diagnostic test for this damage as a reduction in nerve fiber density allows for the diagnosis of small fiber neuropathy. Small fiber neuropathy is a disease with symptoms similar to fibromyalgia, but it often has a definable etiology. Identifying small fiber neuropathy and its underlying cause in fibromyalgia patients provides them with a succinct diagnosis, increases treatment options, and facilitates more specific studies for future therapeutics.

  14. Methanogenic Activity and Structural Characteristics of the Microbial Biofilm On a Needle-Punched Polyester Support

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Martin; Forsberg, Cecil W.; Beveridge, Terry J.; Pos, Jack; Ogilvie, John R.

    1984-01-01

    In a downflow stationary fixed-film anaerobic reactor receiving a swine waste influent, few bacteria were observed to be tightly adherent to the surfaces of the needle-punched polyester support material. However, there was a morphologically complex, dense population of bacteria trapped within the matrix. Frequently large microcolonies of a uniform morphological type of bacteria were observed. These were particularly evident for methanosarcina-like bacteria which grew forming large aggregates of unseparated cells. Leafy deposits of electron-dense, calcium- and phosphorus-enriched material coated the polyester matrix and some cells. As the biofilm matured there was more extensive mineral deposition which completely entrapped cells. The entrapped cells appeared to autolyze, and many were partially degraded. Further impregnation of the matrix with minerals and apparent cell death may eventually have a deleterious effect on the methanogenic activity of the biofilm. Images PMID:16346629

  15. Galenic approaches in troubleshooting of glibenclamide tablet adhesion in compression machine punches

    PubMed Central

    Boniatti, Janine; Pereira Cerqueira, Ana Lúcia; de Souza, Alexandre Carnevale; Drago Hoffmeister, Cristiane Rodrigues; da Costa, Maira Assis; Prado, Livia Deris; Tasso, Leandro; Antunes Rocha, Helvécio Vinícius

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the adhesion of glibenclamide 5 mg tablets to the tools of compression machines. This problem is not commonly reported in the literature, since it is considered as tacit knowledge. The starting point was the implementation of three technical alternatives: changing the parameters of compression, evaluating the humidity of the powder blend and the manufacturer of the lubricant magnesium stearate. The adhesion was directly related to the characteristics of magnesium stearate from different manufacturers, and the feasibility of evaluating powder flow characteristics by different techniques that are not routinely followed in various pharmaceutical companies. In vitro dissolution tests showed that the magnesium stearate manufacturer can influence on the dissolution profile of glibenclamide tablets. This study presented various aspects of tablet adhesion to compression machine punches. Troubleshooting approaches can be, most of times, conducted based on previous experience, or an experimental research needs to be implemented in order to have confident results. PMID:25473333

  16. Shear flexibility for structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stangeland, Maynard L. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    This device comprises a flexible sheet member having cross convolutions oriented 45.degree. to the shear vector with spherical reliefs at the convolution junctions. The spherical reliefs are essential to the shear flexibility by interrupting the principal stress lines that act along the ridges of the convolutions. The spherical reliefs provide convolutions in both directions in the plane of the cross-convolution ridges.

  17. Shear flexibility for structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stangeland, Maynard L. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    This device comprises a flexible sheet member having cross convolutions oriented 45.degree. to the shear vector with spherical reliefs at the convolution junctions. The spherical reliefs are essential to the shear flexibility by interrupting the principal stress lines that act along the ridges of the convolutions. The spherical reliefs provide convolutions in both directions in the plane of the cross-convolution ridges.

  18. Study on the effect of punched holes on flow structure and heat transfer of the plain fin with multi-row delta winglets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Liting; Liu, Bin; Min, Chunhua; Wang, Jin; He, Yaling

    2015-11-01

    Three dimensional numerical simulations are performed to investigate the flow and heat transfer characteristics of the plain fin with multi-row delta winglets punched out from the fin. The Reynolds number based on the tube outside diameter varies from 360 to 1440. The effects of punched holes and their orientations on flow structure and heat transfer are numerically studied. Results show that a down-wash flow is formed through the hole punched at the windward side, which has little influence on the longitudinal vortices in the main flow, and a longitudinal main vortex is formed behind each delta winglet. An up-wash flow is formed through the hole punched at the leeward side, the up-wash flow impinges the longitudinal vortices generated by the delta winglet, and then a counter-rotating pair of main vortices is generated behind each delta winglet. The windward punched holes have little effect on the flow friction and heat transfer of the plain fin with delta winglets, while the leeward punched holes deteriorate the heat transfer and decrease the flow friction of the fin channel, the Nusselt number decreases by 3.5-5.0 % with a corresponding decrease of 3.9-4.8 % in the friction factor. The effect of the punched holes on the heat transfer of the fin can be well explained by the field synergy principle. The overall analysis of the thermal performance is performed for all fin configurations, including the slit fins and the wavy fins with one-row delta winglets, the plain fin with the windward punched delta winglets shows the better thermal performance than one with the leeward punched delta winglets.

  19. Localization in inelastic rate dependent shearing deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsaounis, Theodoros; Lee, Min-Gi; Tzavaras, Athanasios

    2017-01-01

    Metals deformed at high strain rates can exhibit failure through formation of shear bands, a phenomenon often attributed to Hadamard instability and localization of the strain into an emerging coherent structure. We verify formation of shear bands for a nonlinear model exhibiting strain softening and strain rate sensitivity. The effects of strain softening and strain rate sensitivity are first assessed by linearized analysis, indicating that the combined effect leads to Turing instability. For the nonlinear model a class of self-similar solutions is constructed, that depicts a coherent localizing structure and the formation of a shear band. This solution is associated to a heteroclinic orbit of a dynamical system. The orbit is constructed numerically and yields explicit shear localizing solutions.

  20. Fan-structure waves in shear ruptures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Boris

    2016-04-01

    This presentation introduces a recently identified shear rupture mechanism providing a paradoxical feature of hard rocks - the possibility of shear rupture propagation through the highly confined intact rock mass at shear stress levels significantly less than frictional strength. According to the fan-mechanism the shear rupture propagation is associated with consecutive creation of small slabs in the fracture tip which, due to rotation caused by shear displacement of the fracture interfaces, form a fan-structure representing the fracture head. The fan-head combines such unique features as: extremely low shear resistance (below the frictional strength), self-sustaining stress intensification in the rupture tip (providing easy formation of new slabs), and self-unbalancing conditions in the fan-head (making the failure process inevitably spontaneous and violent). An important feature of the fan-mechanism is the fact that for the initial formation of the fan-structure an enhanced local shear stress is required, however, after completion of the fan-structure it can propagate as a dynamic wave through intact rock mass at shear stresses below the frictional strength. Paradoxically low shear strength of pristine rocks provided by the fan-mechanism determines the correspondingly low transient strength of the lithosphere, which favours generation of new earthquake faults in the intact rock mass adjoining pre-existing faults in preference to frictional stick-slip instability along these faults. The new approach reveals an alternative role of pre-existing faults in earthquake activity: they represent local stress concentrates in pristine rock adjoining the fault where special conditions for the fan-mechanism nucleation are created, while further dynamic propagation of the new fault (earthquake) occurs at low field stresses even below the frictional strength.

  1. Fighting wind shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A “coherent and sustained program” of improved radar detection of weather, pilot training, and better communication between pilots and air controllers can greatly reduce the risk of wind shear to airplanes landing or taking off, according to a National Research Council (NRC) committee.Wind shear, characterized by winds rapidly changing direction and speed, has caused several serious accidents in recent years; among the most notable is the July 8, 1982, crash of a Pan American World Airlines jetliner at the New Orleans International Airport, which killed 153 persons. Following the accident, Congress directed the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to contract with the NRC to study wind shear.

  2. Probing the shear-band formation in granular media with sound waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khidas, Y.; Jia, X.

    2012-05-01

    We investigate the mechanical responses of dense granular materials, using a direct shear box combined with simultaneous acoustic measurements. Measured shear wave speeds evidence the structural change of the material under shear, from the jammed state to the flowing state. There is a clear acoustic signature when the shear band is formed. Subjected to cyclic shear, both shear stress and wave speed show the strong hysteretic dependence on the shear strain, likely associated with the geometry change in the packing structure. Moreover, the correlation function of configuration-specific multiply scattered waves reveals an intermittent behavior before the failure of material.

  3. Computer simulation of combination extrusion of ENAW1050A aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, P.

    2017-02-01

    Computer simulation of the combination extrusion process for ENAW-1050A aluminum alloy is presented. The tests were carried out for three values of relative strain in forward direction ε1: 0.77, 0.69 and 0.59. For each value of relative strain ε1, three different values of strain in backward direction, ε2, were taken: 0.41, 0.52, 0.64. The effect of the relative strain degree on the development and values of the punch force was determined. It was demonstrated that the punch force increases with the increasing degree of relative strain in both forward and backward directions.

  4. A study on rate sensitivity of elasto-plastic fracture toughness of TRIP steel evaluated by a small punch test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, T.; Hashimoto, S.-ya; Shi, L.

    2012-08-01

    TRIP steel indicates an excellent characteristic in energy absorption because of its high ductility and strength by strain-induced martensitic transformation (SIMT). Recently, some shock absorption members are being used for automotive industries. For good fuel consumption of the automobile, it would realize the weight reduction without decaying performance if TRIP steel can be applied to those members. It can be considered that the fracture toughness is an important factor to evaluate the performance. To evaluate fracture toughness locally at any point of a product of those members, small punch testing method is quite effective. In the present study, first, an impact small punch testing apparatus is established. In addition, elasto-plastic fracture toughness of TRIP steel under impact loading and its rate sensitivity tested at various deflection rates are challenged to evaluate.

  5. A Study on Segmented Multiple-Step Forming of Doubly Curved Thick Plate by Reconfigurable Multi-Punch Dies

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Young Ho; Han, Myoung Soo; Han, Jong Man

    2007-05-17

    Doubly curved thick plate forming in shipbuilding industries is currently performed by a thermal forming process, called as Line Heating by using gas flame torches. Due to the empirical manual work of it, the industries are eager for an alternative way to manufacture curved thick plates for ships. It was envisaged in this study to manufacture doubly curved thick plates by the multi-punch die forming. Experiments and finite element analyses were conducted to evaluate the feasibility of the reconfigurable discrete die forming to the thick plates. Single and segmented multiple step forming procedures were considered from both forming efficiency and accuracy. Configuration of the multi-punch dies suitable for the segmented multiple step forming was also explored. As a result, Segmented multiple step forming with matched dies had a limited formability when the objective shapes become complicate, while a unmatched die configuration provided better possibility to manufacture large curved plates for ships.

  6. Vesicle dynamics in shear and capillary flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi; Gompper, Gerhard

    2005-11-01

    The deformation of vesicles in flow is studied by a mesoscopic simulation technique, which combines multi-particle collision dynamics for the solvent with a dynamically triangulated surface model for the membrane. Shape transitions are investigated both in simple shear flows and in cylindrical capillary flows. We focus on reduced volumes, where the discocyte shape of fluid vesicles is stable, and the prolate shape is metastable. In simple shear flow at low membrane viscosity, the shear induces a transformation from discocyte to prolate with increasing shear rate, while at high membrane viscosity, the shear induces a transformation from prolate to discocyte, or tumbling motion accompanied by oscillations between these two morphologies. In capillary flow, at small flow velocities the symmetry axis of the discocyte is found not to be oriented perpendicular to the cylinder axis. With increasing flow velocity, a transition to a prolate shape occurs for fluid vesicles, while vesicles with shear-elastic membranes (like red blood cells) transform into a coaxial parachute-like shape.

  7. Stability of an accelerated shear layer

    SciTech Connect

    Mjolsness, R.C.; Ruppel, H.M.

    1986-07-01

    A fluid shear layer with free boundary conditions is subject to a Kelvin--Helmholtz-like instability. When the shear layer is accelerated by a difference in applied pressures it is also subject to a Rayleigh--Taylor-like instability. The combined action of these instabilities leads to at most one unstable mode at each wavelength, whose behavior depends in detail on fluid parameters, the fluid acceleration and the perturbation wavelength. Typically, at longest wavelengths the instability is essentially of Rayleigh--Taylor form; its behavior resembles the Kelvin--Helmholtz-like mode at shorter wavelengths, near the thickness of the shear layer, cutting off when the Kelvin--Helmholtz-like mode does. At still shorter wavelengths, the shear layer is subject to a Rayleigh--Taylor-like instability. Careful control of fluid parameters could place the most unstable wavelength for Rayleigh--Taylor instability, calculated from viscous theory, in the range of wavelengths where the accelerated shear layer has no unstable mode. However, this may be difficult to achieve in practice. If this can be realized, the most unstable growth rate may be reduced by about an order of magnitude by the presence of shear.

  8. Universality of the diffusion wake from stopped and punch-through jets in heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betz, Barbara; Noronha, Jorge; Torrieri, Giorgio; Gyulassy, Miklos; Mishustin, Igor; Rischke, Dirk H.

    2009-03-01

    We solve (3+1)-dimensional ideal hydrodynamical equations with source terms that describe punch-through and fully stopped jets to compare their final away-side angular correlations in a static medium. For fully stopped jets, the backreaction of the medium is described by a simple Bethe-Bloch-like model that leads to an explosive burst of energy and momentum (Bragg peak) close to the end of the jet's evolution through the medium. Surprisingly enough, we find that the medium's response and the corresponding away-side angular correlations are largely insensitive to whether the jet punches through or stops inside the medium. This result is also independent of whether momentum deposition is longitudinal (as generally occurs in pQCD energy loss models) or transverse (as the Bethe-Bloch formula implies). The existence of the diffusion wake is therefore shown to be universal to all scenarios where momentum as well as energy is deposited into the medium, which can readily be understood in ideal hydrodynamics through vorticity conservation. The particle yield coming from the strong forward moving diffusion wake that is formed in the wake of both punch-through and stopped jets largely overwhelms their weak Mach cone signal after freeze-out.

  9. Interaction of a rigid punch and a circular plate with a fixed side and a stress-free face

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazarenko, N. A.

    2013-05-01

    The axisymmetric contact problem of a rigid punch indentation into an elastic circular plate with a fixed side and a stress-free face is considered. The problem is solved by a method developed for finite bodies which is based on the properties of a biorthogonal system of vector functions. The problem is reduced to a Volterra integral equation (IE) of the first kind for the contract pressure function and to a system of two Volterra IE of the first kind for functions describing the derivative of the displacement of the plate upper surface outside the punch and the normal (or tangential) stress on the plate lower fixed surface. The last two functions are sought as the sum of a trigonometric series and a power-law function with a root singularity. The obtained ill-conditioned systems of linear algebraic equations are regularized by introducing small parameters and have a stable solution. A method for solving the Volterra IE is given. The contact pressure functions, the normal and tangential stresses on the plate fixed surface, and the dimensionless indentation force are found. Several examples of a plane punch computation are given.

  10. Diagnostic Performance of Shear Wave Elastography Parameters Alone and in Combination with Conventional B-Mode Ultrasound Parameters for the Characterization of Thyroid Nodules: A Prospective, Dual-Center Study.

    PubMed

    Dobruch-Sobczak, Katarzyna; Zalewska, Elwira Bakuła; Gumińska, Anna; Słapa, Rafał Zenon; Mlosek, Krzysztof; Wareluk, Paweł; Jakubowski, Wiesław; Dedecjus, Marek

    2016-12-01

    The aims of our study were to determine whether shear wave elastography (SWE) can improve the conventional B-mode differentiation of thyroid lesions, determine the most accurate SWE parameter for differentiation and assess the influence of microcalcifications and chronic autoimmune thyroiditis on SWE values. We examined 119 patients with 169 thyroid nodules who prospectively underwent B-mode ultrasound and SWE using the same ultrasound machine. The parameters assessed using SWE were: mean elasticity within the entire lesion (SWE-whole) and mean (SWE-mean) and maximum (SWE-max) elasticity for a 2-mm-diameter region of interest in the stiffest portion of the lesion, excluding microcalcifications. The discriminant powers of a generalized estimating equation model including B-mode parameters only and a generalized estimation equation model including both B-mode and SWE parameters were assessed and compared using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, in association with pathologic verification. In total, 50 and 119 malignant and benign lesions were detected. In generalized estimated equation regression, the B-mode parameters associated with higher odds ratios (ORs) for malignant lesions were microcalcifications (OR = 4.3), hypo-echogenicity (OR = 3.13) and irregular margins (OR = 10.82). SWE-max was the only SWE independent parameter in differentiating between malignant and benign tumors (OR = 2.95). The area under the curve for the B-mode model was 0.85, whereas that for the model combining B-mode and SWE parameters was 0.87. There was no significant difference in mean SWE values between patients with and without chronic autoimmune thyroiditis. The results of the present study suggest that SWE is a valuable tool for the characterization of thyroid nodules, with SWE-max being a significant parameter in differentiating benign and malignant lesions, independent of conventional B-mode parameters. The combination of SWE parameters and

  11. Shear strength of metals under uniaxial deformation and pure shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latypov, F. T.; Mayer, A. E.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we investigate the dynamic shear strength of perfect monocrystalline metals using the molecular dynamics simulation. Three types of deformation (single shear, uniaxial compression and tension) are investigated for five metals of different crystallographic systems (fcc, bcc and hcp). A strong dependence of the calculated shear strength on the deformation type is observed. In the case of bcc (iron) and hcp (titanium) metals, the maximal shear strength is achieved at the uniaxial compression, while the minimal shear strength is observed at the uniaxial tension. In the case of fcc metals (aluminum, copper, nickel) the largest strength is achieved at the pure shear, the lowest strength is obtained at the uniaxial compression.

  12. Ultrasonic shear wave couplant

    DOEpatents

    Kupperman, David S.; Lanham, Ronald N.

    1985-01-01

    Ultrasonically testing of an article at high temperatures is accomplished by the use of a compact layer of a dry ceramic powder as a couplant in a method which involves providing an ultrasonic transducer as a probe capable of transmitting shear waves, coupling the probe to the article through a thin compact layer of a dry ceramic powder, propagating a shear wave from the probe through the ceramic powder and into the article to develop echo signals, and analyzing the echo signals to determine at least one physical characteristic of the article.

  13. Shear wave transmissivity measurement by color Doppler shear wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakoshi, Yoshiki; Yamazaki, Mayuko; Kasahara, Toshihiro; Sunaguchi, Naoki; Yuminaka, Yasushi

    2016-07-01

    Shear wave elastography is a useful method for evaluating tissue stiffness. We have proposed a novel shear wave imaging method (color Doppler shear wave imaging: CD SWI), which utilizes a signal processing unit in ultrasound color flow imaging in order to detect the shear wave wavefront in real time. Shear wave velocity is adopted to characterize tissue stiffness; however, it is difficult to measure tissue stiffness with high spatial resolution because of the artifact produced by shear wave diffraction. Spatial average processing in the image reconstruction method also degrades the spatial resolution. In this paper, we propose a novel measurement method for the shear wave transmissivity of a tissue boundary. Shear wave wavefront maps are acquired by changing the displacement amplitude of the shear wave and the transmissivity of the shear wave, which gives the difference in shear wave velocity between two mediums separated by the boundary, is measured from the ratio of two threshold voltages required to form the shear wave wavefronts in the two mediums. From this method, a high-resolution shear wave amplitude imaging method that reconstructs a tissue boundary is proposed.

  14. Shear-flow Effects in Open Traps

    SciTech Connect

    Beklemishev, A. D.

    2008-11-01

    Interaction between shear flows and plasma instabilities and turbulence in open traps can lead to improved confinement both in experiments and in simulations. Shear flows, driven by biasing end-plates and limiters or by off-axis electron heating, in combination with the finite-larmor-radius (FLR) effects are shown to be efficient in confining plasmas even with unstable flute modes. Interpretation of the observed effects as the ''vortex confinement,'' i.e., confinement of the plasma core in the dead-flow zone of the driven vortex, is shown to agree well with simulations.

  15. Small punch test evaluation of intergranular embrittlement of an alloy steel

    SciTech Connect

    Baik, J.M.; Buck, O.; Kameda, J.

    1983-12-01

    The ductile-brittle transition temperature in steel is commonly determined using Charpy V-notch impact specimens as specified by ASTM E23-81. In some specific cases, however, the use of this standardized test specimen may be impractical, if not impossible. For instance, it is well known that ferritic steels show a substantial degradation of the mechanical properties after long time exposure to an irradiation environment. Because of the increase in strength and the reduction in ductility due to neutron irradiation, the Charpy V-notch transition temperature is raised causing concern from a safety point of view. To study these radiation effects, a test specimen much smaller than the standard Charpy V-notch specimen would be extremely desirable for two reasons. First, to study neutron damage small specimens take less space within a reactor. Secondly, the damage achieved in simulation experiments, such as proton or electron accelerators, is limited to small penetration depths. Several efforts on the development of such a small test specimen, similar to that used to determine the ductility of sheet metal, as recommended by ASTM E643-78, have been described in the literature. The paper reports on correlations between small punch (SP) and Charpy V-notch (CVN) test results obtained on temper-embrittled NiCr steel. The ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) with intergranular embrittlement being induced by grain boundary segregation of specific impurities was determined. The relation between test results discussed in terms of the micromechanisms of intergranular cracking. It is suggested that in radiation embrittlement investigations similar correlations may be obtained.

  16. Analyses of Transient and Tertiary Small Punch Creep Deformation of 316LN Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesh Kumar, J.; Ganesan, V.; Laha, K.

    2016-09-01

    Creep deformation behavior of 316LN stainless steel (SS) under small punch creep (SPC) and uniaxial creep test has been assessed and compared at 923 K (650 °C). The transient and tertiary creep deformation behaviors have been analyzed according to the equation proposed for SPC deflection, δ = δ0 + δ_{{T}} \\cdot (1 - {{e}}^{ - κ \\cdot t} ) + dot{δ }_{{s}} t + δ3 {{e}}^{{[ {φ ( {t - t_{{r}} } )} ]}} on the basis of Dobes and Cadek equation for uniaxial creep strain. Trends in the variations of (i) rate of exhaustion of transient creep ( κ) with steady-state deflection rate ( dot{δ }_{{s}} ) (ii) ` κ' with time to attain steady-state deflection rate, and (iii) initial creep deflection rate with steady-state deflection rate implied that transient SPC deformation obeyed first-order reaction rate theory. The rate of exhaustion of transient creep ( r') values that were determined from uniaxial creep tests were correlated with those obtained from SPC tests. Master curves representing transient creep deformation in both SPC and uniaxial creep tests have been derived and their near coincidence brings unique equivalence between both the test techniques. The relationships between (i) rate of acceleration of tertiary creep ( φ) and steady-state deflection rate, (ii) ` φ' and time spent in tertiary stage, and (iii) final creep deflection rate and steady-state deflection rate revealed that first-order reaction rate theory governed SPC deformation throughout the tertiary region also. Interrelationship between the transient, secondary, and tertiary creep parameters indicated that the same mechanism prevailed throughout the SPC deformation.

  17. Measuring the reduced shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun

    2011-11-01

    Neglecting the second order corrections in weak lensing measurements can lead to a few percent uncertainties on cosmic shears, and becomes more important for cluster lensing mass reconstructions. Existing methods which claim to measure the reduced shears are not necessarily accurate to the second order when a point spread function (PSF) is present. We show that the method of Zhang (2008) exactly measures the reduced shears at the second order level in the presence of PSF. A simple theorem is provided for further confirming our calculation, and for judging the accuracy of any shear measurement method at the second order based on its properties at the first order. The method of Zhang (2008) is well defined mathematically. It does not require assumptions on the morphologies of galaxies and the PSF. To reach a sub-percent level accuracy, the CCD pixel size is required to be not larger than 1/3 of the Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) of the PSF, regardless of whether the PSF has a power-law or exponential profile at large distances. Using a large ensemble (gtrsim107) of mock galaxies of unrestricted morphologies, we study the shear recovery accuracy under different noise conditions. We find that contaminations to the shear signals from the noise of background photons can be removed in a well defined way because they are not correlated with the source shapes. The residual shear measurement errors due to background noise are consistent with zero at the sub-percent level even when the amplitude of such noise reaches about 1/10 of the source flux within the half-light radius of the source. This limit can in principle be extended further with a larger galaxy ensemble in our simulations. On the other hand, the source Poisson noise remains to be a cause of systematic errors. For a sub-percent level accuracy, our method requires the amplitude of the source Poisson noise to be less than 1/80 ~ 1/100 of the source flux within the half-light radius of the source, corresponding to

  18. Measuring the reduced shear

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun

    2011-11-01

    Neglecting the second order corrections in weak lensing measurements can lead to a few percent uncertainties on cosmic shears, and becomes more important for cluster lensing mass reconstructions. Existing methods which claim to measure the reduced shears are not necessarily accurate to the second order when a point spread function (PSF) is present. We show that the method of Zhang (2008) exactly measures the reduced shears at the second order level in the presence of PSF. A simple theorem is provided for further confirming our calculation, and for judging the accuracy of any shear measurement method at the second order based on its properties at the first order. The method of Zhang (2008) is well defined mathematically. It does not require assumptions on the morphologies of galaxies and the PSF. To reach a sub-percent level accuracy, the CCD pixel size is required to be not larger than 1/3 of the Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) of the PSF, regardless of whether the PSF has a power-law or exponential profile at large distances. Using a large ensemble (∼>10{sup 7}) of mock galaxies of unrestricted morphologies, we study the shear recovery accuracy under different noise conditions. We find that contaminations to the shear signals from the noise of background photons can be removed in a well defined way because they are not correlated with the source shapes. The residual shear measurement errors due to background noise are consistent with zero at the sub-percent level even when the amplitude of such noise reaches about 1/10 of the source flux within the half-light radius of the source. This limit can in principle be extended further with a larger galaxy ensemble in our simulations. On the other hand, the source Poisson noise remains to be a cause of systematic errors. For a sub-percent level accuracy, our method requires the amplitude of the source Poisson noise to be less than 1/80 ∼ 1/100 of the source flux within the half-light radius of the source

  19. Bioinspired Sensory Systems for Shear Flow Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colvert, Brendan; Chen, Kevin K.; Kanso, Eva

    2017-03-01

    Aquatic organisms such as copepods exhibit remarkable responses to changes in ambient flows, especially shear gradients, when foraging, mating and escaping. To accomplish these tasks, the sensory system of the organism must decode the local sensory measurements to detect the flow properties. Evidence suggests that organisms sense differences in the hydrodynamic signal rather than absolute values of the ambient flow. In this paper, we develop a mathematical framework for shear flow detection using a bioinspired sensory system that measures only differences in velocity. We show that the sensory system is capable of reconstructing the properties of the ambient shear flow under certain conditions on the flow sensors. We discuss these conditions and provide explicit expressions for processing the sensory measurements and extracting the flow properties. These findings suggest that by combining suitable velocity sensors and physics-based methods for decoding sensory measurements, we obtain a powerful approach for understanding and developing underwater sensory systems.

  20. Shear Thinning of Noncolloidal Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez-Quesada, Adolfo; Tanner, Roger I.; Ellero, Marco

    2016-09-01

    Shear thinning—a reduction in suspension viscosity with increasing shear rates—is understood to arise in colloidal systems from a decrease in the relative contribution of entropic forces. The shear-thinning phenomenon has also been often reported in experiments with noncolloidal systems at high volume fractions. However its origin is an open theoretical question and the behavior is difficult to reproduce in numerical simulations where shear thickening is typically observed instead. In this letter we propose a non-Newtonian model of interparticle lubrication forces to explain shear thinning in noncolloidal suspensions. We show that hidden shear-thinning effects of the suspending medium, which occur at shear rates orders of magnitude larger than the range investigated experimentally, lead to significant shear thinning of the overall suspension at much smaller shear rates. At high particle volume fractions the local shear rates experienced by the fluid situated in the narrow gaps between particles are much larger than the averaged shear rate of the whole suspension. This allows the suspending medium to probe its high-shear non-Newtonian regime and it means that the matrix fluid rheology must be considered over a wide range of shear rates.

  1. Particle Distribution in Suspension Shear Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buyevich, Yu A.; Webbon, Bruce W. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    An earlier proposed constitutive relation for normal stresses originated by random particle fluctuations is used to describe a joint effect of thermal and shear-induced fluctuations on concentrational distributions in suspension flow. Averaged products of components of the fluctuation velocity are evaluated on a basis of the rational mechanics approach combined with a simple kinematic consideration. The equation of momentum conservation of the dispersed phase of a suspension closed with this constitutive relation is applied to unidirectional shear flow in the gravity field and to rotational Couette flow. Coupling of the thermal and shear-induced fluctuations results in that the ability of shear flow to suspend particles has a minimum at a certain particle size, all other things being equal. The developed model provides also for a reasonable explanation of particle distributions observed in Couette flow. The approach based on the consideration of momentum balance for the dispersed phase is proved to lead to an effective equation of convective diffusion of the suspended particles. Coefficients of mutual diffusion due to both thermal and shear-induced fluctuations are drastically different from corresponding self-diffusivities as regards both their scaling and their concentrational dependence.

  2. CAT LIDAR wind shear studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goff, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    The studies considered the major meteorological factors producing wind shear, methods to define and classify wind shear in terms significant from an aircraft perturbation standpoint, the significance of sensor location and scan geometry on the detection and measurement of wind shear, and the tradeoffs involved in sensor performance such as range/velocity resolution, update frequency and data averaging interval.

  3. On the appearance of vorticity and gradient shear bands in wormlike micellar solutions of different CPCl/salt systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mütze, Annekathrin Heunemann, Peggy; Fischer, Peter

    2014-11-01

    Wormlike micellar salt/surfactant solutions (X-salicylate, cetylpyridinium chloride) are studied with respect to the applied shear stress, concentration, temperature, and composition of the counterions (X = lithium, sodium, potassium, magnesium, and calcium) of the salicylate salt solute to determine vorticity and gradient shear bands. A combination of rheological measurements, laser technique, video analysis, and rheo-small-angle neutron scattering allow for a detailed exploration of number and types of shear bands. Typical flow curves of the solutions show Newtonian, shear-thinning, and shear-thickening flow behavior. In the shear-thickening regime, the solutions show vorticity and gradient shear bands simultaneously, in which vorticity shear bands dominate the visual effect, while gradient shear bands always coexist and predominate the rheological response. It is shown that gradient shear bands change their phases (turbid, clear) with the same frequency as the shear rate oscillates, whereas vorticity shear bands change their phases with half the frequency of the shear rate. Furthermore, we show that with increasing molecular mass of the counterions the number of gradient shear bands increases, while the number of vorticity shear bands remains constant. The variation of temperature, shear stress, concentration, and counterions results in a predictable change in the rheological behavior and therefore allows adjustment of the number of vorticity shear bands in the shear band regime.

  4. Prediction of Shear-induced Crack Initiation in AHSS Deep Drawing Operation with a Phenomenological Fracture Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Meng; Li, Yaning; Gerlach, Joerg; Wierzbicki, Tomasz

    2010-06-01

    Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) draws enormous attentions in automotive industry because it has great potential in reducing weight and improving fuel efficiency. Nonetheless, their relatively low formability also causes many problems in manufacturing processes, such as shear-induced fracture during deep drawing or stamping. This type of fracture could not be predicted using traditional necking-based Forming Limit Diagram (FLD), which is commonly used by the forming community. In the present paper, a recently developed Modified Mohr-Coulomb (MMC)[1] ductile fracture model is employed to make up the deficiency of FLD. In the limiting case of plane stress, the MMC fracture locus consists of four branches when represented on the plane of the equivalent strain to fracture and the stress triaxiality. A transformation of above 2D fracture locus to the space of principal strains was performed which revealed the existence of two new branches not known before. The existence of those branches explains the formation of shear-induced fracture. As an illustration of this new approach, initiation and propagation of cracks in a series of deep drawing tests is predicted and compared with the experimental observations. It was shown that the location of fracture as well as the magnitude of punch travel corresponding to first fracture was correctly predicted by MMC fracture model for both square and circular punch cases.

  5. Compressive Response of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube Films Gleaned from in Situ Flat-Punch Indentations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-14

    shearing of the material directly underneath the indenter tip by as much as 30 lm, and (iii) a positively sloped plateau for displacements between 10...between each video frame and the corresponding position on the load–displacement curve (see video files S1 and S2, shown at 15 and 10 times their original...load drop at;4.3-lm displacement and a subsequent (iii) sloped plateau region with a small positive slope starting at the displacement of ;11 lm

  6. Efficacy of Punch Reduction Prior to Cryotherapy in Patients with Viral Warts: A Case-Control Study in a Single Tertiary Center

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ju Yeon; Oh, Seung Hwan; Lee, Jong Hee; Lee, Joo-Heung; Lee, Dong-Youn; Yang, Jun-Mo

    2017-01-01

    Background Cutaneous warts are a common complaint to visit dermatologic clinic and its course is variable, ranging from spontaneous resolution to a chronic condition refractory to treatment. Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of punch biopsy for cutaneous warts. Methods Thirty-nine patients who received punch biopsy for warts were reviewed through charts and photos. Among them, 15 were matched with cryotherapy-only controls in terms of size and location of the wart. We compared the number and cost of treatments between the two groups. Results Eleven of the total 39 patients were treated with cryotherapy in addition to punch biopsy and the average number of treatments was 4.1±3.3 (mean±standard deviation). In a case-control study, the ratio value of cost was 2.9±3.6 in the experimental group and was 5.9±4.1 in controls (p<0.05). Conclusion Punch biopsies can decrease the number and cost of treatment by reducing the size of warts and inducing local inflammation to accelerate resolution. Therefore, punch reduction should be considered as a viable measure to treat warts. PMID:28392648

  7. Shear Yielding and Shear Jamming of Dense Hard Sphere Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbani, Pierfrancesco; Zamponi, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the response of dense hard sphere glasses to a shear strain in a wide range of pressures ranging from the glass transition to the infinite-pressure jamming point. The phase diagram in the density-shear strain plane is calculated analytically using the mean-field infinite-dimensional solution. We find that just above the glass transition, the glass generically yields at a finite shear strain. The yielding transition in the mean-field picture is a spinodal point in presence of disorder. At higher densities, instead, we find that the glass generically jams at a finite shear strain: the jamming transition prevents yielding. The shear yielding and shear jamming lines merge in a critical point, close to which the system yields at extremely large shear stress. Around this point, highly nontrivial yielding dynamics, characterized by system-spanning disordered fractures, is expected.

  8. Gelation under shear

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, B.D.; Hanley, H.J.M.; Straty, G.C.; Muzny, C.D.

    1995-12-31

    An experimental small angle neutron scattering (SANS) study of dense silica gels, prepared from suspensions of 24 nm colloidal silica particles at several volume fractions {theta} is discussed. Provided that {theta}{approx_lt}0.18, the scattered intensity at small wave vectors q increases as the gelation proceeds, and the structure factor S(q, t {yields} {infinity}) of the gel exhibits apparent power law behavior. Power law behavior is also observed, even for samples with {theta}>0.18, when the gel is formed under an applied shear. Shear also enhances the diffraction maximum corresponding to the inter-particle contact distance of the gel. Difficulties encountered when trying to interpret SANS data from these dense systems are outlined. Results of computer simulations intended to mimic gel formation, including computations of S(q, t), are discussed. Comments on a method to extract a fractal dimension characterizing the gel are included.

  9. Shear-thinning Fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Whipped cream and the filling for pumpkin pie are two familiar materials that exhibit the shear-thinning effect seen in a range of industrial applications. It is thick enough to stand on its own atop a piece of pie, yet flows readily when pushed through a tube. This demonstrates the shear-thinning effect that was studied with the Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002. CVX observed the behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. The principal investigator was Dr. Robert Berg of the National Institutes of Standards and Technology in Gaithersburg, MD.

  10. Shear Roll Mill Reactivation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-13

    process equipment sprinkler protection systems , and the 5 psig steam supply serving the building heating and make-up air systems . It also included...control system can be run for maintenance and/or checkout while the fire alarm panel is bypassed. A sprinkler line and gate valve serving the Primac...the 440 v. electrical system providing power for process equipment motors, shear roll hydraulic pump motors, the air compressor motor, as well as

  11. The effect of shearing rate and slope angle on the simple shear response of marine clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biscontin, G.; Rutherford, C.

    2010-12-01

    The response of submarine slopes to seismic or storm loading has become an important element in the risk assessment for offshore structures and local tsunami hazard. Evaluation of submarine slope stability requires characterization of soil behavior and relies on the selection of appropriate parameter values. Although the traditional simple shear device has been used to investigate cyclic loading effects on marine clay, it does not allow for complex loading conditions which often contribute to the failure on submarine slopes. Understanding the interaction between the initial shear stress, the slope angle, and the multi-directional shaking due to earthquakes or storm loading is an important aspect to understanding the failure mechanisms of submarine slope failures. The initial static driving force on the slope is combined with the dynamic loading by storms and earthquakes to create complex loading paths. Therefore, the ability to apply complex stress or strain paths is important to fully study the shear response of marine clays on submarine slopes. A new multi-directional simple shear device developed at Texas A&M University allows loading along three independent axes, two perpendicular horizontal directions to allow any stress or strain paths in the horizontal plane, and a third in the vertical direction. This device is used to investigate the response of Gulf of Mexico marine deposits to different loading conditions. To study the effect of slope angle on the shear response of the soil, samples are subjected to a shear stress during consolidation, Kα consolidation. One-dimensional monotonic and cyclic shearing of Ko consolidated specimens is used to simulate level ground conditions, whereas sloping surfaces were simulated using Kα consolidation for both monotonic and cyclic tests. The effects of shearing rate on the soil response are investigated using strain controlled tests at varying frequencies.

  12. Micromechanics of shear banding

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, J.J.

    1992-08-01

    Shear-banding is one of many instabilities observed during the plastic flow of solids. It is a consequence of the dislocation mechanism which makes plastic flow fundamentally inhomogeneous, and is exacerbated by local adiabatic heating. Dislocation lines tend to be clustered on sets of neighboring glide planes because they are heterogeneously generated; especially through the Koehler multiple-cross-glide mechanism. Factors that influence their mobilities also play a role. Strain-hardening decreases the mobilities within shear bands thereby tending to spread (delocalize) them. Strain-softening has the inverse effect. This paper reviews the micro-mechanisms of these phenomena. It will be shown that heat production is also a consequence of the heterogeneous nature of the microscopic flow, and that dislocation dipoles play an important role. They are often not directly observable, but their presence may be inferred from changes in thermal conductivity. It is argued that after deformation at low temperatures dipoles are distributed a la Pareto so there are many more small than large ones. Instability at upper yield point, the shapes of shear-band fronts, and mechanism of heat generation are also considered. It is shown that strain-rate acceleration plays a more important role than strain-rate itself in adiabatic instability.

  13. Analysis of strong nocturnal shears for wind machine design. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mahrt, L.; Heald, R.C.

    1980-11-01

    Wind shear data at wind turbine heights from several sites is reviewed and new data is documented in terms of total and component shear. A variety of atmospheric scenarios may combine to give large persistent shear. Among these, strong boundary layer stability is foremost. It occurs with strong nocturnal surface cooling, in low level frontal and subsidence inversions, and in thunderstorm outflows. Strong shears resulting from surface radiation inversions are particularly evident over the High Plains where dry air and high altitude combine to result in strong radiational cooling. Terrain is also an important influence on shear but it is not well understood and is very site specific.

  14. Rheometry-PIV of shear-thickening wormlike micelles.

    PubMed

    Marín-Santibañez, Benjamín M; Pérez-Gonzalez, José; de Vargas, Lourdes; Rodríguez-Gonzalez, Francisco; Huelsz, Guadalupe

    2006-04-25

    The shear-thickening behavior of an equimolar semidilute aqueous solution of 40 mM/L cetylpyridinium chloride and sodium salicylate was studied in this work by using a combined method of rheometry and particle image velocimetry (PIV). Experiments were conducted at 27.5 degrees C with Couette, vane-bob, and capillary rheometers in order to explore a wide shear stress range as well as the effect of boundary conditions and time of flow on the creation and destruction of shear-induced structures (SIS). The use of the combined method of capillary rheometry with PIV allowed the detection of fast spatial and temporal variations in the flow kinematics, which are related to the shear-thickening behavior and the dynamics of the SIS but are not distinguished by pure rheometrical measurements. A rich-in-details flow curve was found for this solution, which includes five different regimes. Namely, at very low shear rates a Newtonian behavior was found, followed by a shear thinning one in the second regime. In the third, shear banding was observed, which served as a precursor of the SIS and shear-thickening. The fourth and fifth regimes in the flow curve were separated by a spurtlike behavior, and they clearly evidenced the existence of shear-thickening accompanied by stick-slip oscillations at the wall of the rheometer, which subsequently produced variations in the shear rate under shear stress controlled flow. Such a stick-slip phenomenon prevailed up to the highest shear stresses used in this work and was reflected in asymmetric velocity profiles with spatial and temporal variations linked to the dynamics of creation and breakage of the SIS. The presence of apparent slip at the wall of the rheometer provides an energy release mechanism which leads to breakage of the SIS, followed by their further reformation during the stick part of the cycles. In addition, PIV measurements allowed the detection of apparent slip at the wall, as well as mechanical failures in the bulk of the

  15. Instabilities in shear and simple shear deformations of gold crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, A. A.; Batra, R. C.

    We use the tight-binding potential and molecular mechanics simulations to study local and global instabilities in shear and simple shear deformations of three initially defect-free finite cubes of gold single crystal containing 3480, 7813, and 58,825 atoms. Displacements on all bounding surfaces are prescribed while studying simple shear deformations, but displacements on only two opposite surfaces are assigned during simulations of shear deformations with the remaining four surfaces kept free of external forces. The criteria used to delineate local instabilities in the system include the following: (i) a component of the second-order spatial gradients of the displacement field having large values relative to its average value in the body, (ii) the minimum eigenvalue of the Hessian of the energy of an atom becoming non-positive, and (iii) structural changes represented by a high value of the common neighborhood parameter. It is found that these criteria are met essentially simultaneously at the same atomic position. Effects of free surfaces are evidenced by different deformation patterns for the same specimen deformed in shear and simple shear. The shear strength of a specimen deformed in simple shear is more than three times that of the same specimen deformed in shear. It is found that for each cubic specimen deformed in simple shear the evolution with the shear strain of the average shear stress, prior to the onset of instabilities, is almost identical to that in an equivalent hyperelastic material with strain energy density derived from the tight-binding potential and the assumption that it obeys the Cauchy-Born rule. Even though the material response of the hyperelastic body predicted from the strain energy density is stable over the range of the shear strain simulated in this work, the molecular mechanics simulations predict local and global instabilities in the three specimens.

  16. Evaluation of the Punch-it™ NA-Sample kit for detecting microbial DNA in blood culture bottles using PCR-reverse blot hybridization assay.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungho; Wang, Hye-Young; Kim, Seoyong; Park, Soon Deok; Yu, Kwangmin; Kim, Hyo Youl; Uh, Young; Lee, Hyeyoung

    2016-09-01

    DNA extraction efficiency affects the success of PCR-based method applications. The Punch-it™ NA-Sample kit for extracting DNA by using paper chromatography is technically easy to use and requires just two reagents and only 10min to complete. The Punch-it™ NA-Sample kit could be offered as a rapid, accurate, and convenient method for extracting bacterial and fungal DNA from blood culture bottles. We compared the efficiencies of the commercial kit (Punch-it™ NA-Sample kit) and an in-house conventional boiling method with Chelex-100 resin for DNA extraction from blood culture bottles. The efficiency of the two DNA extraction methods was assessed by PCR-reverse blot hybridization assay (PCR-REBA, REBA Sepsis-ID) for detecting Gram positive (GP) bacteria, Gram negative (GN) bacteria, and Candida species with 196 positive and 200 negative blood culture bottles. The detection limits of the two DNA extraction methods were 10(3)CFU/mL for GP bacteria, 10(3)CFU/mL for GN bacteria, and 10(4)CFU/mL for Candida. The sensitivity and specificity of the Punch-it™ NA-Sample kit by REBA Sepsis-ID were 95.4% (187/196) and 100% (200/200), respectively. The overall agreement of the two DNA extraction methods was 98.9% (392/396). Three of four samples showing discrepant results between the two extraction methods were more accurately matched up with the Punch-it™ NA-Sample kit based on conventional culture methods. The results indicated that the Punch-it™ NA-Sample kit extracted bacterial and fungal DNA in blood culture bottles and allowed extracted DNA to be used in molecular assay.

  17. Influence of loading-rate and steel fibers on the shear strength of ultra high performance concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratislav, Lukic; Pascal, Forquin

    2015-09-01

    The paper describes quasi-static and dynamic experimental methods used to examine the confined shear strength of an Ultra High Performance Concrete, with and without the presence of steel fibers in the concrete composition. An experimental setup was created to investigate the concrete shear strength under quasi-static loading regime using a hydraulic press Schenk while dynamic shear strength was characterized by subjecting concrete samples to dynamic loading through a modified Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar. Both methods are based on a Punch Through Shear (PTS) test with a well-instrumented aluminum passive confinement ring that allows measuring the change of radial stress in the shear ligament throughout the test. Firstly, four equally distributed radial notches have been performed in order to deduce the radial stress by suppressing a self-confinement of the sample peripheral part. However, by analyzing the strain gauge data from the confinement ring, it has been noticed that these were apparently insufficient, especially for fiber-reinforced samples, resulting in subsequently practicing eight radial notches through the sample peripheral part. The results obtained from both procedures are reported and discussed.

  18. Shear mode grinding

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, N.J.; Fuchs, B.A.

    1989-04-24

    The thesis of this paper is that shear mode grinding of glass (1) occurs with abrasive particle sizes less than 1/mu/m, (2) that it is the mechanical limit of the the more common mechanical-chemical glass polishing, and (3) that the debris is insufficient in size to perform the function of eroding the binder in the grinding wheel and thus necessitates the addition of an abrasive and/or chemical additions to the coolant to effect wheel-dressing. 13 refs.

  19. Shear modulus imaging by direct visualization of propagating shear waves with phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Song, Shaozhen; Huang, Zhihong; Nguyen, Thu-Mai; Wong, Emily Y.; Arnal, Bastien; O’Donnell, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. We propose an integrated method combining low-frequency mechanics with optical imaging to map the shear modulus within the biological tissue. Induced shear wave propagating in tissue is tracked in space and time using phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PhS-OCT). Local estimates of the shear-wave speed obtained from tracking results can image the local shear modulus. A PhS-OCT system remotely records depth-resolved, dynamic mechanical waves at an equivalent frame rate of ∼47  kHz with the high spatial resolution. The proposed method was validated by examining tissue-mimicking phantoms made of agar and light scattering material. Results demonstrate that the shear wave imaging can accurately map the elastic moduli of these phantoms. PMID:24213539

  20. Comb-push ultrasound shear elastography (CUSE): a novel method for two-dimensional shear elasticity imaging of soft tissues.

    PubMed

    Song, Pengfei; Zhao, Heng; Manduca, Armando; Urban, Matthew W; Greenleaf, James F; Chen, Shigao

    2012-09-01

    Fast and accurate tissue elasticity imaging is essential in studying dynamic tissue mechanical properties. Various ultrasound shear elasticity imaging techniques have been developed in the last two decades. However, to reconstruct a full field-of-view 2-D shear elasticity map, multiple data acquisitions are typically required. In this paper, a novel shear elasticity imaging technique, comb-push ultrasound shear elastography (CUSE), is introduced in which only one rapid data acquisition (less than 35 ms) is needed to reconstruct a full field-of-view 2-D shear wave speed map (40 × 38 mm). Multiple unfocused ultrasound beams arranged in a comb pattern (comb-push) are used to generate shear waves. A directional filter is then applied upon the shear wave field to extract the left-to-right (LR) and right-to-left (RL) propagating shear waves. Local shear wave speed is recovered using a time-of-flight method based on both LR and RL waves. Finally, a 2-D shear wave speed map is reconstructed by combining the LR and RL speed maps. Smooth and accurate shear wave speed maps are reconstructed using the proposed CUSE method in two calibrated homogeneous phantoms with different moduli. Inclusion phantom experiments demonstrate that CUSE is capable of providing good contrast (contrast-to-noise ratio ≥ 25 dB) between the inclusion and background without artifacts and is insensitive to inclusion positions. Safety measurements demonstrate that all regulated parameters of the ultrasound output level used in CUSE sequence are well below the FDA limits for diagnostic ultrasound.

  1. Wind shear test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Techniques for forecasting and detecting a type of wind shear called microbursts are being tested this month in an operational program at Denver's Stapleton International Airport as part of an effort to reduce hazards to airplanes and passengers.Wind shear, which can be spawned by convective storms, can occur as a microburst. These downbursts of cool air are usually recognizable as a visible rain shaft beneath a thundercloud. Sometimes, however, the rain shaft evaporates before reaching the ground, leaving the downdraft invisible. Although thunderstorms are traditionally avoided by airplane pilots, these invisible downdrafts also harbor hazards in what usually appear to be safe skies. When the downdraft reaches the earth's surface, the downdraft spreads out horizontally, much like a stream of water gushing from a garden hose on a concrete surface, explained John McCarthy, director of the operational program. Airplanes can encounter trouble when the downdraft from the microburst causes sudden shifts in wind direction, which may reduce lift on the wing, an especially dangerous situation during takeoff.

  2. TUBE SHEARING VALVE

    DOEpatents

    Wilner, L.B.

    1960-05-24

    Explosive operated valves can be used to join two or more containers in fluid flow relationship, one such container being a sealed reservoir. The valve is most simply disposed by mounting it on the reservoir so thst a tube extends from the interior of the reservoir through the valve body, terminating at the bottom of the bore in a closed end; other containers may be similarly connected or may be open connected, as desired. The piston of the valve has a cutting edge at its lower end which shears off the closed tube ends and a recess above the cutting edge to provide a flow channel. Intermixing of the fluid being transferred with the explosion gases is prevented by a copper ring at the top of the piston which is force fitted into the bore at the beginning of the stroke. Although designed to avoid backing up of the piston at pressures up to 10,000 psi in the transferred fluid, proper operation is independent of piston position, once the tube ends were sheared.

  3. Excited waves in shear layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bechert, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    The generation of instability waves in free shear layers is investigated. The model assumes an infinitesimally thin shear layer shed from a semi-infinite plate which is exposed to sound excitation. The acoustical shear layer excitation by a source further away from the plate edge in the downstream direction is very weak while upstream from the plate edge the excitation is relatively efficient. A special solution is given for the source at the plate edge. The theory is then extended to two streams on both sides of the shear layer having different velocities and densities. Furthermore, the excitation of a shear layer in a channel is calculated. A reference quantity is found for the magnitude of the excited instability waves. For a comparison with measurements, numerical computations of the velocity field outside the shear layer were carried out.

  4. Shear strength of non-shear reinforced concrete elements. Part 3: Prestressed hollow-core slabs

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, L.C.

    1997-12-31

    This paper deals with the shear strength of prestressed hollow-core slabs determined by the theory of plasticity. Two failure mechanisms are considered in order to derive the solutions. In the case of sliding failure in a diagonal crack, the shear strength is determined by means of the crack sliding model developed by Jin-Ping Zhang. The model takes into account the resistance against the formation of cracks due to prestressing as well as the variation of the prestressing force in the transfer zone. Due to the fact that the anchorage of the reinforcement takes place by bond, a rotation failure, which is indeed by a crack formed at the support with subsequent slip of the reinforcement, is also considered. This failure mode is likely to occur in cases with a high prestressing force combined with a short shear span. The theoretical calculations are compared with test results form the literature. A good agreement has been found.

  5. Cake properties in ultrafiltration of TiO2 fine particles combined with HA: in situ measurement of cake thickness by fluid dynamic gauging and CFD calculation of imposed shear stress for cake controlling.

    PubMed

    Du, Xing; Qu, Fangshu; Liang, Heng; Li, Kai; Chang, Haiqing; Li, Guibai

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the cake buildup of TiO2 fine particles in the presence of humid acid (HA) and cake layer controlling during ultrafiltration (UF) were investigated. Specifically, we measured the cake thickness using fluid dynamic gauging (FDG) method under various solution conditions, including TiO2 concentration (0.1-0.5 g/L), HA concentration (0-5 mg/L, total organic carbon (TOC)), and pH values (e.g., 4, 6 and 10), and calculated the shear stress distribution induced by stirring using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to analyze the cake layer controlling conditions, including the operation flux (50-200 L m(-2) h(-1)) and TiO2 concentration (0.1-0.5 g/L). It was found that lower TiO2/HA concentration ratio could lead to exceedingly severe membrane fouling because of the formation of a relatively denser cake layer by filling the voids of cake layer with HA, and pH was essential for cake layer formation owing to the net repulsion between particles. Additionally, it was observed that shear stress was rewarding for mitigating cake growth under lower operation flux as a result of sufficient back-transport forces, and exhibited an excellent performance on cake layer controlling in lower TiO2 concentrations due to slight interaction forces on the vicinity of membrane.

  6. Displacement-based seismic design of flat slab-shear wall buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Subhajit; Singh, Yogendra

    2016-06-01

    Flat slab system is becoming widely popular for multistory buildings due to its several advantages. However, the performance of flat slab buildings under earthquake loading is unsatisfactory due to their vulnerability to punching shear failure. Several national design codes provide guidelines for designing flat slab system under gravity load only. Nevertheless, flat slab buildings are also being constructed in high seismicity regions. In this paper, performance of flat slab buildings of various heights, designed for gravity load alone according to code, is evaluated under earthquake loading as per ASCE/SEI 41 methodology. Continuity of slab bottom reinforcement through column cage improves the performance of flat slab buildings to some extent, but it is observed that these flat slab systems are not adequate in high seismicity areas and need additional primary lateral load resisting systems such as shear walls. A displacement-based method is proposed to proportion shear walls as primary lateral load resisting elements to ensure satisfactory performance. The methodology is validated using design examples of flat slab buildings with various heights.

  7. Inductive shearing of drilling pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Ludtka, Gerard M.; Wilgen, John; Kisner, Roger; Mcintyre, Timothy

    2016-04-19

    Induction shearing may be used to cut a drillpipe at an undersea well. Electromagnetic rings may be built into a blow-out preventer (BOP) at the seafloor. The electromagnetic rings create a magnetic field through the drillpipe and may transfer sufficient energy to change the state of the metal drillpipe to shear the drillpipe. After shearing the drillpipe, the drillpipe may be sealed to prevent further leakage of well contents.

  8. Coherent structures in compressible free-shear-layer flows

    SciTech Connect

    Aeschliman, D.P.; Baty, R.S.; Kennedy, C.A.; Chen, J.H.

    1997-08-01

    Large scale coherent structures are intrinsic fluid mechanical characteristics of all free-shear flows, from incompressible to compressible, and laminar to fully turbulent. These quasi-periodic fluid structures, eddies of size comparable to the thickness of the shear layer, dominate the mixing process at the free-shear interface. As a result, large scale coherent structures greatly influence the operation and efficiency of many important commercial and defense technologies. Large scale coherent structures have been studied here in a research program that combines a synergistic blend of experiment, direct numerical simulation, and analysis. This report summarizes the work completed for this Sandia Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project.

  9. Monitoring of thermal therapy based on shear modulus changes: II. Shear wave imaging of thermal lesions.

    PubMed

    Arnal, Bastien; Pernot, Mathieu; Tanter, Mickael

    2011-08-01

    The clinical applicability of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for noninvasive therapy is currently hampered by the lack of robust and real-time monitoring of tissue damage during treatment. The goal of this study is to show that the estimation of local tissue elasticity from shear wave imaging (SWI) can lead to a precise mapping of the lesion. HIFU treatment and monitoring were respectively performed using a confocal setup consisting of a 2.5-MHz single element transducer focused at 34 mm on ex vivo samples and an 8-MHz ultrasound diagnostic probe. Ultrasound-based strain imaging was combined with shear wave imaging on the same device. The SWI sequences consisted of 2 successive shear waves induced at different lateral positions. Each wave was created with pushing beams of 100 μs at 3 depths. The shear wave propagation was acquired at 17,000 frames/s, from which the elasticity map was recovered. HIFU sonications were interleaved with fast imaging acquisitions, allowing a duty cycle of more than 90%. Thus, elasticity and strain mapping was achieved every 3 s, leading to real-time monitoring of the treatment. When thermal damage occurs, tissue stiffness was found to increase up to 4-fold and strain imaging showed strong shrinkages that blur the temperature information. We show that strain imaging elastograms are not easy to interpret for accurate lesion characterization, but SWI provides a quantitative mapping of the thermal lesion. Moreover, the concept of shear wave thermometry (SWT) developed in the companion paper allows mapping temperature with the same method. Combined SWT and shear wave imaging can map the lesion stiffening and temperature outside the lesion, which could be used to predict the eventual lesion growth by thermal dose calculation. Finally, SWI is shown to be robust to motion and reliable in vivo on sheep muscle.

  10. True Shear Parallel Plate Viscometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethridge, Edwin; Kaukler, William

    2010-01-01

    This viscometer (which can also be used as a rheometer) is designed for use with liquids over a large temperature range. The device consists of horizontally disposed, similarly sized, parallel plates with a precisely known gap. The lower plate is driven laterally with a motor to apply shear to the liquid in the gap. The upper plate is freely suspended from a double-arm pendulum with a sufficiently long radius to reduce height variations during the swing to negligible levels. A sensitive load cell measures the shear force applied by the liquid to the upper plate. Viscosity is measured by taking the ratio of shear stress to shear rate.

  11. Failure During Sheared Edge Stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, B. S.; van Tyne, C. J.

    2008-12-01

    Failure during sheared edge stretching of sheet steels is a serious concern, especially in advanced high-strength steel (AHSS) grades. The shearing process produces a shear face and a zone of deformation behind the shear face, which is the shear-affected zone (SAZ). A failure during sheared edge stretching depends on prior deformation in the sheet, the shearing process, and the subsequent strain path in the SAZ during stretching. Data from laboratory hole expansion tests and hole extrusion tests for multiple lots of fourteen grades of steel were analyzed. The forming limit curve (FLC), regression equations, measurement uncertainty calculations, and difference calculations were used in the analyses. From these analyses, an assessment of the primary factors that contribute to the fracture during sheared edge stretching was made. It was found that the forming limit strain with consideration of strain path in the SAZ is a major factor that contributes to the failure of a sheared edge during stretching. Although metallurgical factors are important, they appear to play a somewhat lesser role.

  12. Shearing dynamics and jamming density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson, Peter; Vâgberg, Daniel; Teitel, Stephen

    2009-03-01

    We study the effect of a shearing dynamics on the properties of a granular system, by examining how the jamming density depends on the preparation of the starting configurations. Whereas the jamming density at point J was obtained by relaxing random configurations [O'Hern et al, Phys. Rev. E 68, 011306 (2003)], we apply this method to configurations obtained after shearing the system at a certain shear rate. We find that the jamming density increases somewhat and that this effect is more pronounced for configurations produced at smaller shear rates. Different measures of the order of the jammed configurations are also discussed.

  13. Tunable shear thickening in suspensions

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Neil Y.C.; Ness, Christopher; Cates, Michael E.; Sun, Jin; Cohen, Itai

    2016-01-01

    Shear thickening, an increase of viscosity with shear rate, is a ubiquitous phenomenon in suspended materials that has implications for broad technological applications. Controlling this thickening behavior remains a major challenge and has led to empirical strategies ranging from altering the particle surfaces and shape to modifying the solvent properties. However, none of these methods allows for tuning of flow properties during shear itself. Here, we demonstrate that by strategic imposition of a high-frequency and low-amplitude shear perturbation orthogonal to the primary shearing flow, we can largely eradicate shear thickening. The orthogonal shear effectively becomes a regulator for controlling thickening in the suspension, allowing the viscosity to be reduced by up to 2 decades on demand. In a separate setup, we show that such effects can be induced by simply agitating the sample transversely to the primary shear direction. Overall, the ability of in situ manipulation of shear thickening paves a route toward creating materials whose mechanical properties can be controlled. PMID:27621472

  14. The role of shear in the transition from continuous shear thickening to discontinuous shear thickening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Weifeng; Xuan, Shouhu; Gong, Xinglong

    2015-04-01

    Dense non-Brownian suspension has rich rheology and is hard to understand, especially for distinguishing continuous shear thickening (CST) from discontinuous shear thickening (DST). By studying the shear stress dependent rheology of a well-known DST suspension of cornstarch in water, we find that the transition from CST to DST could occur not only by increasing the volume fraction ϕ but also by increasing the shear stress σ. For the recovery process of jammed suspension, we observe that the shear activates the time-dependent nature of particle rearrangement. DST can then be interpreted as the consequence of shear-induced jamming. Based on the test data, we plot the schematic phase diagram in the ϕ-σ plane and find out that ϕ and σ perform almost the same effect on flow-state transition.

  15. Development of a Robust Static Punch Experiment for Screening Unprocessed Ultra-High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE) Unidirectional Cross-Ply Material

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    Development of a Robust Static Punch Experiment for Screening Unprocessed Ultra-High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE) Unidirectional...Screening Unprocessed Ultra-High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE) Unidirectional Cross-Ply Material David Gray, Robert Kaste, and Paul...Unprocessed Ultra-High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE) Unidirectional Cross-Ply Material 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM

  16. Predictability of Sheared Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, F.; Tao, D.

    2015-12-01

    Predictability of the formation, rapid intensification and eyewall replacement of sheared tropical cyclones (TCs) are explored through a series of convection-permitting ensemble simulations using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with different environmental vertical wind shear, sea-surface temperature (SST), and ambient moisture conditions. It is found that the intrinsic predictability of the RI onset time is more limited with increasing shear magnitude until the shear magnitude is large enough to prevent the TC formation. Based on ensemble sensitivity and correlation analysis, the RI onset timing within one set is largely related to the vortex tilt magnitude, the diabatic heating distribution and the strength of the primary vortex circulation. Systematic differences amongst the ensemble members begin to arise right after the initial burst of moist convection associated with the incipient vortex. This difference from the randomness inherent in moist convection in terms of both location and intensity first changes the TC vortex structure subtly and then leads to the deviations in system scales and eventually in the development (and precession) of the TC. On average, a higher SST has a positive effect on the TC formation and reduces the uncertainty of development under all shear conditions, while a drier environment has a negative impact on the TCs development and either broadens the ensemble spread of RI onset time or prevents the storm from forming when the shear-induced tilt is large. Nevertheless, the uncertainty in environmental shear magnitudes may dominate over the effect of randomness in moist convection in terms of TC formation and predictability. A byproduct of tropical cyclones under vertical wind shear is the secondary eyewall formation (SEF). It is found that the eyewall formation is more often observed in TCs with moderate to high shear, which was inherently more unpredictable. The inward contraction/axisymmeterization of shear

  17. Shear rotation numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doeff, E.; Misiurewicz, M.

    1997-11-01

    This paper presents results on rotation numbers for orientation-preserving torus homeomorphisms homotopic to a Dehn twist. Rotation numbers and the rotation set for such homeomorphisms have been defined and initially investigated by the first author in a previous paper. Here we prove that each rotation number 0951-7715/10/6/017/img5 in the interior of the rotation set is realized by some compact invariant set, and that there is an ergodic measure on that set with mean rotation number 0951-7715/10/6/017/img5. It is also proved that the function which assigns its rotation set to such a homeomorphism is continuous. Finally, a counterexample is presented that shows that rational extremal points of the shear rotation set do not necessarily correspond to any periodic orbits.

  18. APPARATUS FOR SHEARING TUBULAR JACKETS

    DOEpatents

    Simon, J.P.

    1962-09-01

    A machine is designed for removing the jacket from the core of a used rod-like fuel element by shearing the jacket into a spiral ribbon. Three skewed rolls move the fuel element axially and rotatively, and a tool cooperates with one of the rolls to carry out the shearing action. (AEC)

  19. Flocculation of model algae under shear.

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Flint; Lechman, Jeremy B.

    2010-11-01

    We present results of molecular dynamics simulations of the flocculation of model algae particles under shear. We study the evolution of the cluster size distribution as well as the steady-state distribution as a function of shear rates and algae interaction parameters. Algal interactions are modeled through a DLVO-type potential, a combination of a HS colloid potential (Everaers) and a yukawa/colloid electrostatic potential. The effect of hydrodynamic interactions on aggregation is explored. Cluster strucuture is determined from the algae-algae radial distribution function as well as the structure factor. DLVO parameters including size, salt concentration, surface potential, initial volume fraction, etc. are varied to model different species of algae under a variety of environmental conditions.

  20. Viscosity of Sheared Helical filament Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartucci, Matthew; Urbach, Jeff; Blair, Dan; Schwenger, Walter

    The viscosity of suspensions can be dramatically affected by high aspect ratio particles. Understanding these systems provides insight into key biological functions and can be manipulated for many technological applications. In this talk, the viscosity as a function of shear rate of suspensions of helical filaments is compared to that of suspensions of straight rod-like filaments. Our goal is to determine the impact of filament geometry on low volume fraction colloidal suspensions in order to identify strategies for altering viscosity with minimal volume fraction. In this research, the detached flagella of the bacteria Salmonella Typhimurium are used as a model system of helical filaments and compared to mutated straight flagella of the Salmonella. We compare rheological measurements of the suspension viscosity in response to shear flow and use a combination of the rheology and fluorescence microscopy to identify the microstructural changes responsible for the observed rheological response.

  1. A Piezoelectric Shear Stress Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Taeyang; Saini, Aditya; Kim, Jinwook; Gopalarathnam, Ashok; Zhu, Yong; Palmieri, Frank L.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a piezoelectric sensor with a floating element was developed for shear stress measurement. The piezoelectric sensor was designed to detect the pure shear stress suppressing effects of normal stress generated from the vortex lift-up by applying opposite poling vectors to the: piezoelectric elements. The sensor was first calibrated in the lab by applying shear forces and it showed high sensitivity to shear stress (=91.3 +/- 2.1 pC/Pa) due to the high piezoelectric coefficients of PMN-33%PT (d31=-1330 pC/N). The sensor also showed almost no sensitivity to normal stress (less than 1.2 pC/Pa) because of the electromechanical symmetry of the device. The usable frequency range of the sensor is 0-800 Hz. Keywords: Piezoelectric sensor, shear stress, floating element, electromechanical symmetry

  2. Electroosmotic shear flow in microchannels.

    PubMed

    Mampallil, Dileep; van den Ende, Dirk

    2013-01-15

    We generate and study electroosmotic shear flow in microchannels. By chemically or electrically modifying the surface potential of the channel walls a shear flow component with controllable velocity gradient can be added to the electroosmotic flow caused by double layer effects at the channel walls. Chemical modification is obtained by treating the channel wall with a cationic polymer. In case of electric modification, we used gate electrodes embedded in the channel wall. By applying a voltage to the gate electrode, the zeta potential can be varied and a controllable, uniform shear stress can be applied to the liquid in the channel. The strength of the shear stress depends on both the gate voltage and the applied field which drives the electroosmotic shear flow. Although the stress range is still limited, such a microchannel device can be used in principle as an in situ micro-rheometer for lab on a chip purposes.

  3. Testing modified gravity with cosmic shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harnois-Déraps, J.; Munshi, D.; Valageas, P.; van Waerbeke, L.; Brax, P.; Coles, P.; Rizzo, L.

    2015-12-01

    We use the cosmic shear data from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey to place constraints on f(R) and Generalized Dilaton models of modified gravity. This is highly complementary to other probes since the constraints mainly come from the non-linear scales: maximal deviations with respects to the General Relativity (GR) + Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) scenario occurs at k ˜ 1 h Mpc-1. At these scales, it becomes necessary to account for known degeneracies with baryon feedback and massive neutrinos, hence we place constraints jointly on these three physical effects. To achieve this, we formulate these modified gravity theories within a common tomographic parametrization, we compute their impact on the clustering properties relative to a GR universe, and propagate the observed modifications into the weak lensing ξ± quantity. Confronted against the cosmic shear data, we reject the f(R) \\lbrace |f_{R_0}| = 10^{-4}, n = 1\\rbrace model with more than 99.9 per cent confidence interval (CI) when assuming a ΛCDM dark matter only model. In the presence of baryonic feedback processes and massive neutrinos with total mass up to 0.2 eV, the model is disfavoured with at least 94 per cent CI in all different combinations studied. Constraints on the \\lbrace |f_{R_0}| = 10^{-4}, n = 2\\rbrace model are weaker, but nevertheless disfavoured with at least 89 per cent CI. We identify several specific combinations of neutrino mass, baryon feedback and f(R) or Dilaton gravity models that are excluded by the current cosmic shear data. Notably, universes with three massless neutrinos and no baryon feedback are strongly disfavoured in all modified gravity scenarios studied. These results indicate that competitive constraints may be achieved with future cosmic shear data.

  4. Shear jamming in highly strained granular system without shear banding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yiqiu; Barés, Jonathan; Zheng, Hu; Behringer, Robert

    2016-11-01

    Bi et al. have shown that, if sheared, a granular material can jam even if its packing fraction (ϕ) is lower than the critical isotropic jamming point ϕJ. They have introduced a new critical packing fraction value ϕS such that for ϕS< ϕ< ϕJ the system jams if sheared. Nevertheless, the value of ϕS as a function of the shear profile or the strain necessary to observe jamming remain poorly understood because of the experimental complexity to access high strain without shear band. We present a novel 2D periodic shear apparatus made of 21 independent, aligned and mirrored glass rings. Each ring can be moved independently which permits us to impose any desired shear profile. The circular geometry allows access to any strain value. The forces between grains are measured using reflective photoelasticity. By performing different shear profiles for different packing fractions we explored the details of jamming diagram including the location of the yield surface. This work is supported by NSF No.DMR1206351, NASA No.NNX15AD38G and W. M. Keck Foundation.

  5. Systematic error analysis and correction in quadriwave lateral shearing interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wenhua; Li, Jinpeng; Chen, Lei; Zheng, Donghui; Yang, Ying; Han, Zhigang

    2016-12-01

    To obtain high-precision and high-resolution measurement of dynamic wavefront, the systematic error of the quadriwave lateral shearing interferometer (QWLSI) is analyzed and corrected. The interferometer combines a chessboard grating with an order selection mask to select four replicas of the wavefront under test. A collimating lens is introduced to collimate the replicas, which not only eliminates the coma induced by the shear between each two replicas, but also avoids the astigmatism and defocus caused by CCD tilt. Besides, this configuration permits the shear amount to vary from zero, which benefits calibrating the systematic errors. A practical transmitted wavefront was measured by the QWLSI with different shear amounts. The systematic errors of reconstructed wavefronts are well suppressed. The standard deviation of root mean square is 0.8 nm, which verifies the stability and reliability of QWLSI for dynamic wavefront measurement.

  6. Spatially modulated interferometer and beam shearing device therefor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reininger, Francis M. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A spatially modulated interferometer incorporates a beam shearing system having a plurality of reflective surfaces defining separate light paths of equal optical path length for two separate output beams. The reflective surfaces are arranged such that when the two beams emerge from the beam shearing system they contain more than 50 percent of the photon flux within the selected spectral pass band. In one embodiment, the reflective surfaces are located on a number of prism elements combined to form a beam shearing prism structure. The interferometer utilizing the beam sharing system of the invention includes fore-optics for collecting light and focusing it into a beam to be sheared, and a detector located at an exit pupil of the device. In a preferred embodiment, the interferometer has no moving parts.

  7. On the gating of mechanosensitive channels by fluid shear stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhangli; Pak, On Shun; Feng, Zhe; Liu, Allen P.; Young, Yuan-Nan

    2016-12-01

    Mechanosensation is an important process in biological fluid-structure interaction. To understand the biophysics underlying mechanosensation, it is essential to quantify the correlation between membrane deformation, membrane tension, external fluid shear stress, and conformation of mechanosensitive (MS) channels. Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD) simulations of vesicle/cell in three types of flow configurations are conducted to calculate the tension in lipid membrane due to fluid shear stress from the surrounding viscous flow. In combination with a simple continuum model for an MS channel, SDPD simulation results suggest that shearing adhered vesicles/cells is more effective to induce membrane tension sufficient to stretch MS channels open than a free shear flow or a constrictive channel flow. In addition, we incorporate the bilayer-cytoskeletal interaction in a two-component model to probe the effects of a cytoskeletal network on the gating of MS channels.

  8. Drift Wave Test Particle Transport in Reversed Shear Profile

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, W.; Park, H.B.; Kwon, J.M.; Stronzzi, D.; Morrison, P.J.; Choi, D.I.

    1998-06-01

    Drift wave maps, area preserving maps that describe the motion of charged particles in drift waves, are derived. The maps allow the integration of particle orbits on the long time scale needed to describe transport. Calculations using the drift wave maps show that dramatic improvement in the particle confinement, in the presence of a given level and spectrum of E x B turbulence, can occur for q(r)-profiles with reversed shear. A similar reduction in the transport, i.e. one that is independent of the turbulence, is observed in the presence of an equilibrium radial electric field with shear. The transport reduction, caused by the combined effects of radial electric field shear and both monotonic and reversed shear magnetic q-profiles, is also investigated.

  9. Magnetized stratified rotating shear waves.

    PubMed

    Salhi, A; Lehner, T; Godeferd, F; Cambon, C

    2012-02-01

    We present a spectral linear analysis in terms of advected Fourier modes to describe the behavior of a fluid submitted to four constraints: shear (with rate S), rotation (with angular velocity Ω), stratification, and magnetic field within the linear spectral theory or the shearing box model in astrophysics. As a consequence of the fact that the base flow must be a solution of the Euler-Boussinesq equations, only radial and/or vertical density gradients can be taken into account. Ertel's theorem no longer is valid to show the conservation of potential vorticity, in the presence of the Lorentz force, but a similar theorem can be applied to a potential magnetic induction: The scalar product of the density gradient by the magnetic field is a Lagrangian invariant for an inviscid and nondiffusive fluid. The linear system with a minimal number of solenoidal components, two for both velocity and magnetic disturbance fields, is eventually expressed as a four-component inhomogeneous linear differential system in which the buoyancy scalar is a combination of solenoidal components (variables) and the (constant) potential magnetic induction. We study the stability of such a system for both an infinite streamwise wavelength (k(1) = 0, axisymmetric disturbances) and a finite one (k(1) ≠ 0, nonaxisymmetric disturbances). In the former case (k(1) = 0), we recover and extend previous results characterizing the magnetorotational instability (MRI) for combined effects of radial and vertical magnetic fields and combined effects of radial and vertical density gradients. We derive an expression for the MRI growth rate in terms of the stratification strength, which indicates that purely radial stratification can inhibit the MRI instability, while purely vertical stratification cannot completely suppress the MRI instability. In the case of nonaxisymmetric disturbances (k(1) ≠ 0), we only consider the effect of vertical stratification, and we use Levinson's theorem to demonstrate the

  10. Parametric Study of Rockbolt Shear Behaviour by Double Shear Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Hagan, P. C.; Saydam, S.; Hebblewhite, B.; Li, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Failure of rockbolts as a result of shear or bending loads can often be found in underground excavations. The response of rock anchorage systems has been studied in shear, both by laboratory tests as well as numerical modelling in this study. A double shear test was developed to examine the shear behaviour of a bolt installed across two joints at different angles. To investigate the influence of various parameters in the double shear test, a numerical model of a fully grouted rockbolt installed in concrete was constructed and analysed using FLAC3D code. A number of parameters were considered including concrete strength, inclination between rockbolt and joints and rockbolt diameter. The numerical model considered three material types (steel, grout and concrete) and three interfaces (concrete-concrete, grout-concrete and grout-rockbolt). The main conclusions drawn from the study were that the level of bolt resistance to shear was influenced by rock strength, inclination angle, and diameter of the rockbolt. The numerical simulation of the bolt/grout interaction and deformational behaviour was found to be in close agreement with earlier experimental test results.

  11. From supersonic shear wave imaging to full-field optical coherence shear wave elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahas, Amir; Tanter, Mickaël; Nguyen, Thu-Mai; Chassot, Jean-Marie; Fink, Mathias; Claude Boccara, A.

    2013-12-01

    Elasticity maps of tissue have proved to be particularly useful in providing complementary contrast to ultrasonic imaging, e.g., for cancer diagnosis at the millimeter scale. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) offers an endogenous contrast based on singly backscattered optical waves. Adding complementary contrast to OCT images by recording elasticity maps could also be valuable in improving OCT-based diagnosis at the microscopic scale. Static elastography has been successfully coupled with full-field OCT (FF-OCT) in order to realize both micrometer-scale sectioning and elasticity maps. Nevertheless, static elastography presents a number of drawbacks, mainly when stiffness quantification is required. Here, we describe the combination of two methods: transient elastography, based on speed measurements of shear waves induced by ultrasonic radiation forces, and FF-OCT, an en face OCT approach using an incoherent light source. The use of an ultrafast ultrasonic scanner and an ultrafast camera working at 10,000 to 30,000 images/s made it possible to follow shear wave propagation with both modalities. As expected, FF-OCT is found to be much more sensitive than ultrafast ultrasound to tiny shear vibrations (a few nanometers and micrometers, respectively). Stiffness assessed in gel phantoms and an ex vivo rat brain by FF-OCT is found to be in good agreement with ultrasound shear wave elastography.

  12. From supersonic shear wave imaging to full-field optical coherence shear wave elastography.

    PubMed

    Nahas, Amir; Tanter, Mickaël; Nguyen, Thu-Mai; Chassot, Jean-Marie; Fink, Mathias; Claude Boccara, A

    2013-12-01

    Elasticity maps of tissue have proved to be particularly useful in providing complementary contrast to ultrasonic imaging, e.g., for cancer diagnosis at the millimeter scale. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) offers an endogenous contrast based on singly backscattered optical waves. Adding complementary contrast to OCT images by recording elasticity maps could also be valuable in improving OCT-based diagnosis at the microscopic scale. Static elastography has been successfully coupled with full-field OCT (FF-OCT) in order to realize both micrometer-scale sectioning and elasticity maps. Nevertheless, static elastography presents a number of drawbacks, mainly when stiffness quantification is required. Here, we describe the combination of two methods: transient elastography, based on speed measurements of shear waves induced by ultrasonic radiation forces, and FF-OCT, an en face OCT approach using an incoherent light source. The use of an ultrafast ultrasonic scanner and an ultrafast camera working at 10,000 to 30,000 images/s made it possible to follow shear wave propagation with both modalities. As expected, FF-OCT is found to be much more sensitive than ultrafast ultrasound to tiny shear vibrations (a few nanometers and micrometers, respectively). Stiffness assessed in gel phantoms and an ex vivo rat brain by FF-OCT is found to be in good agreement with ultrasound shear wave elastography.

  13. Shear thinning of nanoparticle suspensions.

    SciTech Connect

    Grest, Gary Stephen; Petersen, Matthew K.; in't Veld, Pieter J.

    2008-08-01

    Results of large scale non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations are presented for nanoparticles in an explicit solvent. The nanoparticles are modeled as a uniform distribution of Lennard-Jones particles, while the solvent is represented by standard Lennard-Jones particles. Here we present results for the shear rheology of spherical nanoparticles of size 5 to 20 times that of the solvent for a range of nanoparticle volume fractions and interactions. Results from NEMD simulations suggest that for strongly interacting nanoparticle that form a colloidal gel, the shear rheology of the suspension depends only weakly on the size of the nanoparticle, even for nanoparticles as small as 5 times that of the solvent. However for hard sphere-like colloids the size of the nanoparticles strongly affects the shear rheology. The shear rheology for dumbbell nanoparticles made of two fused spheres is also compared to spherical nanoparticles and found to be similar except at very high volume fractions.

  14. Grafted polymer under shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanjiv; Foster, Damien P.; Giri, Debaprasad; Kumar, Sanjay

    2016-04-01

    A self-attracting-self-avoiding walk model of polymer chain on a square lattice has been used to gain an insight into the behaviour of a polymer chain under shear flow in a slit of width L. Using exact enumeration technique, we show that at high temperature, the polymer acquires the extended state continuously increasing with shear stress. However, at low temperature the polymer exhibits two transitions: a transition from the coiled to the globule state and a transition to a stem-flower like state. For a chain of finite length, we obtained the exact monomer density distributions across the layers at different temperatures. The change in density profile with shear stress suggests that the polymer under shear flow can be used as a molecular gate with potential application as a sensor.

  15. Shear shocks in fragile networks.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Stephan; Upadhyaya, Nitin; van Opheusden, Bas; Vitelli, Vincenzo

    2013-12-24

    A minimal model for studying the mechanical properties of amorphous solids is a disordered network of point masses connected by unbreakable springs. At a critical value of its mean connectivity, such a network becomes fragile: it undergoes a rigidity transition signaled by a vanishing shear modulus and transverse sound speed. We investigate analytically and numerically the linear and nonlinear visco-elastic response of these fragile solids by probing how shear fronts propagate through them. Our approach, which we tentatively label shear front rheology, provides an alternative route to standard oscillatory rheology. In the linear regime, we observe at late times a diffusive broadening of the fronts controlled by an effective shear viscosity that diverges at the critical point. No matter how small the microscopic coefficient of dissipation, strongly disordered networks behave as if they were overdamped because energy is irreversibly leaked into diverging nonaffine fluctuations. Close to the transition, the regime of linear response becomes vanishingly small: the tiniest shear strains generate strongly nonlinear shear shock waves qualitatively different from their compressional counterparts in granular media. The inherent nonlinearities trigger an energy cascade from low to high frequency components that keep the network away from attaining the quasi-static limit. This mechanism, reminiscent of acoustic turbulence, causes a superdiffusive broadening of the shock width.

  16. A novel in vitro bovine cartilage punch model for assessing the regeneration of focal cartilage defects with biocompatible bacterial nanocellulose

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Current therapies for articular cartilage defects fail to achieve qualitatively sufficient tissue regeneration, possibly because of a mismatch between the speed of cartilage rebuilding and the resorption of degradable implant polymers. The present study focused on the self-healing capacity of resident cartilage cells in conjunction with cell-free and biocompatible (but non-resorbable) bacterial nanocellulose (BNC). This was tested in a novel in vitro bovine cartilage punch model. Methods Standardized bovine cartilage discs with a central defect filled with BNC were cultured for up to eight weeks with/without stimulation with transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1. Cartilage formation and integrity were analyzed by histology, immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. Content, release and neosynthesis of the matrix molecules proteoglycan/aggrecan, collagen II and collagen I were also quantified. Finally, gene expression of these molecules was profiled in resident chondrocytes and chondrocytes migrated onto the cartilage surface or the implant material. Results Non-stimulated and especially TGF-β1-stimulated cartilage discs displayed a preserved structural and functional integrity of the chondrocytes and surrounding matrix, remained vital in long-term culture (eight weeks) without signs of degeneration and showed substantial synthesis of cartilage-specific molecules at the protein and mRNA level. Whereas mobilization of chondrocytes from the matrix onto the surface of cartilage and implant was pivotal for successful seeding of cell-free BNC, chondrocytes did not immigrate into the central BNC area, possibly due to the relatively small diameter of its pores (2 to 5 μm). Chondrocytes on the BNC surface showed signs of successful redifferentiation over time, including increase of aggrecan/collagen type II mRNA, decrease of collagen type I mRNA and initial deposition of proteoglycan and collagen type II in long-term high-density pellet cultures

  17. Origin of shear thickening in semidilute wormlike micellar solutions and evidence of elastic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Marín-Santibáñez, Benjamín M.; Pérez-González, José; Rodríguez-González, Francisco

    2014-11-01

    The origin of shear thickening in an equimolar semidilute wormlike micellar solution of cetylpyridinium chloride and sodium salicylate was investigated in this work by using Couette rheometry, flow visualization, and capillary Rheo-particle image velocimetry. The use of the combined methods allowed the discovery of gradient shear banding flow occurring from a critical shear stress and consisting of two main bands, one isotropic (transparent) of high viscosity and one structured (turbid) of low viscosity. Mechanical rheometry indicated macroscopic shear thinning behavior in the shear banding regime. However, local velocimetry showed that the turbid band increased its viscosity along with the shear stress, even though barely reached the value of the viscosity of the isotropic phase. This shear band is the precursor of shear induced structures that subsequently give rise to the average increase in viscosity or apparent shear thickening of the solution. Further increase in the shear stress promoted the growing of the turbid band across the flow region and led to destabilization of the shear banding flow independently of the type of rheometer used, as well as to vorticity banding in Couette flow. At last, vorticity banding disappeared and the flow developed elastic turbulence with chaotic dynamics.

  18. Verification of the standard model of shear stress transport and its modified version that takes into account the streamline curvature and estimation of the applicability of the Menter combined boundary conditions in calculating the ultralow profile drag for an optimally configured cylinder-coaxial disk arrangement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaev, S. A.; Baranov, P. A.; Sudakov, A. G.; Popov, I. A.

    2016-08-01

    A modification of the popular model of shear stress transport aimed at calculating the separation flow of an incompressible viscous liquid is justified. The modification eliminates the nonphysical pumping of the vortex viscosity in the cores of large-scale vortices. It has been verified with regard to the influence of the streamline curvature on the vortex viscosity by introducing a reciprocal linear function of the turbulent Richardson number with the Isaev-Kharchenko-Usachov constant equal to 0.02.Verification is based on solving the test problem an axisymmetric steady flow about a disk-cylinder tandem with an optimally configured nose, which has an ultralow profile drag for a Reynolds number of 5 × 105. It has been shown that the Menter combined boundary conditions are valid if y + y of the wall does not exceed two.

  19. Plane contact problem on indentation of a flat punch into a transversely-isotropic half-plane with functionally graded transversely-isotropic coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliev, A. S.; Volkov, S. S.; Aizikovich, S. M.; Mitrin, B. I.

    2017-02-01

    Plane contact problem of the theory of elasticity on indentation of a non-deformable punch with a flat base into an elastic transversely-isotropic half-plane with a transversely-isotropic functionally graded coating is considered. Elastic moduli of the coating vary with depth according to arbitrary functions. An approximated analytical solution effective for a whole range of geometrical parameter (relative layer thickness) of the problem is constructed. Some properties of the contact normal pressure under the punch are obtained analytically and illustrated by the numerical examples for a transversely-isotropic homogeneous and functionally graded coatings with different types of variation of elastic moduli with depth. The distinctions in distribution of contact normal pressure for homogeneous and functionally graded materials, coated and non-coated bodies are studied analytically and numerically.

  20. E. coli in a wall bounded shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molaei, Mehdi; Sheng, Jian

    2012-11-01

    Understanding bacteria motility over a wall in a shear flow is critical to determine those crucial biophysical processes involved in the biofilm formation and the shear erosion. Using digital holographic microscopy combined with microfluidics we capture three-dimensional swimming patterns of wild-type E. coli bacteria in a straight micro-channel subjecting to a carefully controlled flow shear. Three-dimensional locations and orientations of bacterial are extracted with a resolution of 0.185 μm in lateral directions and 0.5 μm in the wall normal direction. Robust statistics based on thousands of trajectories allow us to characterize bacteria swimming over a surface under flow shear. These characteristics, including swimming velocity, tumbling frequencies, cellular attachment, and suspension dispersion, will be used to elucidate the cell wall interactions in shear flows. Current analysis will focus on the hydrodynamic mechanisms other than near field interfacial forces on cell migration and orientation near a sheared surface. Preliminary data on bacteria over a chemically modified surface will also be presented. National Institution of Health.

  1. Generation of remote adaptive torsional shear waves with an octagonal phased array to enhance displacements and reduce variability of shear wave speeds: comparison with quasi-plane shear wavefronts.

    PubMed

    Ouared, Abderrahmane; Montagnon, Emmanuel; Cloutier, Guy

    2015-10-21

    A method based on adaptive torsional shear waves (ATSW) is proposed to overcome the strong attenuation of shear waves generated by a radiation force in dynamic elastography. During the inward propagation of ATSW, the magnitude of displacements is enhanced due to the convergence of shear waves and constructive interferences. The proposed method consists in generating ATSW fields from the combination of quasi-plane shear wavefronts by considering a linear superposition of displacement maps. Adaptive torsional shear waves were experimentally generated in homogeneous and heterogeneous tissue mimicking phantoms, and compared to quasi-plane shear wave propagations. Results demonstrated that displacement magnitudes by ATSW could be up to 3 times higher than those obtained with quasi-plane shear waves, that the variability of shear wave speeds was reduced, and that the signal-to-noise ratio of displacements was improved. It was also observed that ATSW could cause mechanical inclusions to resonate in heterogeneous phantoms, which further increased the displacement contrast between the inclusion and the surrounding medium. This method opens a way for the development of new noninvasive tissue characterization strategies based on ATSW in the framework of our previously reported shear wave induced resonance elastography (SWIRE) method proposed for breast cancer diagnosis.

  2. The tabletting machine as an analytical instrument: qualification of the measurement devices for punch forces and validation of the calibration procedures.

    PubMed

    Belda, P M; Mielck, J B

    1998-11-01

    The quality of force measurement in an eccentric tabletting machine equipped with piezo-electric load washers mounted under pre-stress at the upper and lower punches, and the reliability of their calibration in situ and under working conditions were carefully investigated, since this tabletting machine is used as an 'analytical instrument' for the evaluation of the compression behaviour of pharmaceutical materials. For a quasistatic calibration procedure the repeatability under standard conditions and the robustness against variations in machine settings, installation conditions, equipment and handling were evaluated. Two differently constructed reference load cells equipped with strain gauges were used for the calibration of the upper punch sensor. The lower punch sensor was calibrated against the upper one. Except for a mechanical hysteresis, owing to uneven stress distribution over the piezo-electric sensors, the results of the quasistatic measurements are assessed to be satisfactory. In addition, dynamic calibrations were performed. One of the strain-gauged load cells was used in addition to two piezo-electric load washers installed without pre-stress. The dynamic behaviour of all the transducers used is deficient. While for the piezo-electric sensors a significant change in the slope of the calibration function with respect to the quasistatic behaviour was observed, for the strain-gauged load cell a pronounced hysteresis must be noted. Comparing the dynamic behaviour at different profiles of rates of force development generated by variations in machine speed and by maximum force setting, the variability in the sensitivity of the upper and lower punch piezo-electric load washers is comparatively small.

  3. Quantitation of dopamine, serotonin and adenosine content in a tissue punch from a brain slice using capillary electrophoresis with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry detection.

    PubMed

    Fang, Huaifang; Pajski, Megan L; Ross, Ashley E; Venton, B Jill

    2013-01-01

    Methods to determine neurochemical concentrations in small samples of tissue are needed to map interactions among neurotransmitters. In particular, correlating physiological measurements of neurotransmitter release and the tissue content in a small region would be valuable. HPLC is the standard method for tissue content analysis but it requires microliter samples and the detector often varies by the class of compound being quantified; thus detecting molecules from different classes can be difficult. In this paper, we develop capillary electrophoresis with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry detection (CE-FSCV) for analysis of dopamine, serotonin, and adenosine content in tissue punches from rat brain slices. Using field-amplified sample stacking, the limit of detection was 5 nM for dopamine, 10 nM for serotonin, and 50 nM for adenosine. Neurotransmitters could be measured from a tissue punch as small as 7 µg (7 nL) of tissue, three orders of magnitude smaller than a typical HPLC sample. Tissue content analysis of punches in successive slices through the striatum revealed higher dopamine but lower adenosine content in the anterior striatum. Stimulated dopamine release was measured in a brain slice, then a tissue punch collected from the recording region. Dopamine content and release had a correlation coefficient of 0.71, which indicates much of the variance in stimulated release is due to variance in tissue content. CE-FSCV should facilitate measurements of tissue content in nanoliter samples, leading to a better understanding of how diseases or drugs affect dopamine, serotonin, and adenosine content.

  4. Optimized shear wave generation using hybrid beamforming methods.

    PubMed

    Nabavizadeh, Alireza; Greenleaf, James F; Fatemi, Mostafa; Urban, Matthew W

    2014-01-01

    Elasticity imaging is a medical imaging modality that measures tissue elasticity as an aid in the diagnosis of certain diseases. Shear wave-based methods have been developed to perform elasticity measurements in soft tissue. These methods often use the radiation force mechanism of focused ultrasound to induce shear waves in soft tissue such as liver, kidney, breast, thyroid and skeletal muscle. The efficiency of the ultrasound beam in producing broadband extended shear waves in soft tissue is very important to the widespread use of this modality. Hybrid beamforming combines two types of focusing, conventional spherical focusing and axicon focusing, to produce a beam for generating a shear wave that has increased depth-of-field (DOF) so that measurements can be made with a shear wave with a consistent wave front. Spherical focusing is used in many applications to achieve high lateral resolution, but has low DOF. Axicon focusing, with a cone-shaped transducer, can provide good lateral resolution with large DOF. We describe our linear aperture design and beam optimization performed using angular spectrum simulations. We performed a large parametric simulation study in which we varied the focal depth for the spherical focusing portion of the aperture, the numbers of elements devoted to the spherical and axicon focusing portions of the aperture and the opening angle used for axicon focusing. The hybrid beamforming method was experimentally tested in two phantoms, and shear wave speed measurement accuracy and DOF for each hybrid beam were evaluated. We compared our results with those for shear waves generated using only spherical focusing. The results of this study indicate that hybrid beamforming is capable of producing a beam with increased DOF over which accurate shear wave speed measurements can be made for different-size apertures and at different focal depths.

  5. Temperature effect on ideal shear strength of Al and Cu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iskandarov, Albert M.; Dmitriev, Sergey V.; Umeno, Yoshitaka

    2011-12-01

    According to Frenkel’s estimation, at critical shear stress τc=G/2π, where G is the shear modulus, plastic deformation or fracture is initiated even in defect-free materials. In the past few decades it was realized that, if material strength is probed at the nanometer scale, it can be close to the theoretical limit, τc. The weakening effect of the free surface and other factors has been discussed in the literature, but the effect of temperature on the ideal strength of metals has not been addressed thus far. In the present study, we perform molecular dynamics simulations to estimate the temperature effect on the ideal shear strength of two fcc metals, Al and Cu. Shear parallel to the close-packed (111) plane along the [112¯] direction is studied at temperatures up to 800 K using embedded atom method potentials. At room temperature, the ideal shear strength of Al (Cu) is reduced by 25% (22%) compared to its value at 0 K. For both metals, the shear modulus, G, and the critical shear stress at which the stacking fault is formed, τc, decrease almost linearly with increasing temperature. The ratio G/τc linearly increases with increasing temperature, meaning that τc decreases with temperature faster than G. Critical shear strain, γc, also decreases with temperature, but in a nonlinear fashion. The combination of parameters, Gγc/τc, introduced by Ogata as a generalization of Frenkel’s formula, was found to be almost independent of temperature. We also discuss the simulation cell size effect and compare our results with the results of abinitio calculations and experimental data.

  6. Pleuroscopic punch biopsy using insulated-tip diathermic knife-2 for the diagnosis of desmoplastic malignant mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Masai, Kyohei; Sasada, Shinji; Izumo, Takehiro; Taniyama, Tomoko; Nakamura, Yukiko; Chavez, Christine; Sakurai, Hiroyuki; Tsuta, Koji; Tsuchida, Takaaki

    2013-10-01

    Desmoplastic malignant mesothelioma (DMM) is a rare subtype of malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) and is often difficult to distinguish from pleural fibrosis and reactive mesothelial hyperplasia, especially if the biopsy samples are small. We performed full-thickness pleural biopsy on a lesion suspected to be DMM using an insulated-tip diathermic knife-2 (IT knife-2) during flex-rigid pleuroscopy. IT knife-2 is a novel electrosurgical device for endoscopic submucosal dissection in the early gastrointestinal cancer. It consists of a needle knife with 3 short blades at the distal end attached to an insulated ceramic tip. A 54-year-old man presenting with chest wall mass and thickened pleura, in whom a computed tomography-guided percutaneous needle aspiration had remained negative, underwent flex-rigid pleuroscopy for definitive diagnosis. While applying electric current, we used the IT knife-2 to incise the pleura in a circular shape just above the endothoracic fascia. The incised pleura was removed by forceps and examined pathologically. The microscopic examination was compatible with DMM. We discovered that pleuroscopic punch biopsy using IT knife-2 can diagnose DMM. Use of IT knife-2 during flex-rigid pleuroscopy can obtain sufficient samples from densely thickened pleura, which is difficult to diagnose with small biopsies.

  7. Operating manual for the U.S. Geological Survey minimonitor, 1988 revised edition; punched-paper-tape model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ficken, James H.; Scott, Carl T.

    1988-01-01

    This manual describes the U.S. Geological Survey Minimonitor Water Quality Data Measuring and Recording System. Instructions for calibrating, servicing, maintaining, and operating the system are provided. The Survey Minimonitor is a battery-powered , multiparameter water quality monitoring instrument designed for field use. A watertight can containing signal conditioners is connected with cable and waterproof connectors to various water quality sensors. Data are recorded on a punched paper-tape recorder. An external battery is required. The operation and maintenance of various sensors and signal conditioners are discussed, for temperature, specific conductance, dissolved oxygen, and pH. Calibration instructions are provided for each parameter, along with maintenance instructions. Sections of the report explain how to connect the Minimonitor to measure direct-current voltages, such as signal outputs from other instruments. Instructions for connecting a satellite data-collection platform or a solid-state data recorder to the Minimonitor are given also. Basic information is given for servicing the Minimonitor and trouble-shooting some of its electronic components. The use of test boxes to test sensors, isolate component problems, and verify calibration values is discussed. (USGS)

  8. Yield shear stress and disaggregating shear stress of human blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jinmu; Lee, Byoung-Kwon; Shin, Sehyun

    2014-05-01

    This review presents two distinct rheological parameters of blood that have the potential to indicate blood circulation adequacy: yield shear stress (YSS) and disaggregating shear stress (DSS). YSS and DSS reflect the strength of red blood cell (RBC) aggregation in suspension under static and dynamic conditions, respectively. YSS, defined as the critical stress to disperse RBC aggregates under static conditions, was found to be dependent upon hematocrit, fibrinogen, and red cell deformability, but not temperature. DSS, defined as the minimum shear stress to disperse RBC aggregates under dynamic conditions, is dependent upon fibrinogen, red cell deformability, and temperature but not hematocrit. Owing to recent advances in measurement technology, these two parameters can be easily measured, and thus, their clinical significance in blood circulation can be verified.

  9. Importance of Tensile Strength on the Shear Behavior of Discontinuities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazvinian, A. H.; Azinfar, M. J.; Geranmayeh Vaneghi, R.

    2012-05-01

    In this study, the shear behavior of discontinuities possessing two different rock wall types with distinct separate compressive strengths was investigated. The designed profiles consisted of regular artificial joints molded by five types of plaster mortars, each representing a distinct uniaxial compressive strength. The compressive strengths of plaster specimens ranged from 5.9 to 19.5 MPa. These specimens were molded considering a regular triangular asperity profile and were designed so as to achieve joint walls with different strength material combinations. The results showed that the shear behavior of discontinuities possessing different joint wall compressive strengths (DDJCS) tested under constant normal load (CNL) conditions is the same as those possessing identical joint wall strengths, but the shear strength of DDJCS is governed by minor joint wall compressive strength. In addition, it was measured that the predicted values obtained by Barton's empirical criterion are greater than the experimental results. The finding indicates that there is a correlation between the joint roughness coefficient (JRC), normal stress, and mechanical strength. It was observed that the mode of failure of asperities is either pure tensile, pure shear, or a combination of both. Therefore, Barton's strength criterion, which considers the compressive strength of joint walls, was modified by substituting the compressive strength with the tensile strength. The validity of the modified criterion was examined by the comparison of the predicted shear values with the laboratory shear test results reported by Grasselli (Ph.D. thesis n.2404, Civil Engineering Department, EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland, 2001). These comparisons infer that the modified criterion can predict the shear strength of joints more precisely.

  10. Transport suppression by shear reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinell, Julio; Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego

    2009-11-01

    The relationship between transport and shear is a problem of considerable interest to magnetically confined plasmas. It is well known that there are cases in which an increase of flow shear can lead to a reduction of turbulent transport. However, this is not a generic result, and there are transport problems in which the opposite is the case. In particular, as originally discussed in Ref. footnotetextdel-Castillo-Negrete and Morrison, Phys. Fluids A 5, 948 (1993), barriers to chaotic transport typically form in regions of vanishing shear. This property, which is generic to the so-called non-twist Hamiltonian systems footnotetextdel-Castillo-Negrete, Greene, and Morrison, Physica D 91, 1 (1996), explains the observed resilience of transport barriers in non-monotonic zonal flows in plasmas and fluids and the robustness of shearless magnetic surfaces in reverse shear configurations. Here we study the role of finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects on the suppression of chaotic transport by shear reduction in a simplified model. Following Ref. footnotetextdel-Castillo-Negrete, Phys. Plasmas, 7, 1702 (2000) we consider a model consisting of a superposition of drift waves and a non-monotonic zonal flow. The FLR effects are incorporated by gyroaveraging the E xB velocity, and transport is studied by following the evolution of ensembles of test particles.

  11. Shear banding in drying films of colloidal nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Sharp, James S; Smith, Michael I

    2015-04-28

    Drying suspensions of colloidal nanoparticles exhibit a variety of interesting strain release mechanisms during film formation. These result in the selection of characteristic length scales during failure processes such as cracking and subsequent delamination. A wide range of materials (e.g., bulk metallic glasses) release strain through plastic deformations which occur in a narrow band of material known as a shear band. Here we show that drying colloidal films also exhibit shear banding. Bands are observed to form a small distance behind the drying front and then to propagate rapidly at ∼45° to the direction of drying. It is shown that the spacing of the bands depends on salt concentration and the evaporation rate of the colloidal suspension. These combined observations suggest that there is a critical shear rate (related to the film yield stress) which controls the ratio of bandwidth to band spacing. Local deformations were measured in the early stages of drying using fluorescent tracer particles. The measurements were used to show that the existence of shear bands is linked to the compaction of particles perpendicular to the drying front. The spacing of shear bands was also found to be strongly correlated with the characteristic length scale of the compaction process. These combined studies elucidate the role of plastic deformation during pattern formation in drying films of colloidal nanoparticles.

  12. Diamond anvil cell for spectroscopic investigation of materials at high temperature, high pressure and shear

    DOEpatents

    Westerfield, C.L.; Morris, J.S.; Agnew, S.F.

    1997-01-14

    Diamond anvil cell is described for spectroscopic investigation of materials at high temperature, high pressure and shear. A cell is described which, in combination with Fourier transform IR spectroscopy, permits the spectroscopic investigation of boundary layers under conditions of high temperature, high pressure and shear. 4 figs.

  13. Diamond anvil cell for spectroscopic investigation of materials at high temperature, high pressure and shear

    DOEpatents

    Westerfield, Curtis L.; Morris, John S.; Agnew, Stephen F.

    1997-01-01

    Diamond anvil cell for spectroscopic investigation of materials at high temperature, high pressure and shear. A cell is described which, in combination with Fourier transform IR spectroscopy, permits the spectroscopic investigation of boundary layers under conditions of high temperature, high pressure and shear.

  14. Shear Brillouin light scattering microscope

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Moonseok; Besner, Sebastien; Ramier, Antoine; Kwok, Sheldon J. J.; An, Jeesoo; Scarcelli, Giuliano; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Brillouin spectroscopy has been used to characterize shear acoustic phonons in materials. However, conventional instruments had slow acquisition times over 10 min per 1 mW of input optical power, and they required two objective lenses to form a 90° scattering geometry necessary for polarization coupling by shear phonons. Here, we demonstrate a confocal Brillouin microscope capable of detecting both shear and longitudinal phonons with improved speeds and with a single objective lens. Brillouin scattering spectra were measured from polycarbonate, fused quartz, and borosilicate in 1-10 s at an optical power level of 10 mW. The elastic constants, phonon mean free path and the ratio of the Pockels coefficients were determined at microscopic resolution. PMID:26832263

  15. Squirming through shear thinning fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datt, Charu; Zhu, Lailai; Elfring, Gwynn J.; Pak, On Shun

    2015-11-01

    Many microorganisms find themselves surrounded by fluids which are non-Newtonian in nature; human spermatozoa in female reproductive tract and motile bacteria in mucosa of animals are common examples. These biological fluids can display shear-thinning rheology whose effects on the locomotion of microorganisms remain largely unexplored. Here we study the self-propulsion of a squirmer in shear-thinning fluids described by the Carreau-Yasuda model. The squirmer undergoes surface distortions and utilizes apparent slip-velocities around its surface to swim through a fluid medium. In this talk, we will discuss how the nonlinear rheological properties of a shear-thinning fluid affect the propulsion of a swimmer compared with swimming in Newtonian fluids.

  16. Shear Acceleration in Expanding Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieger, F. M.; Duffy, P.

    2016-12-01

    Shear flows are naturally expected to occur in astrophysical environments and potential sites of continuous non-thermal Fermi-type particle acceleration. Here we investigate the efficiency of expanding relativistic outflows to facilitate the acceleration of energetic charged particles to higher energies. To this end, the gradual shear acceleration coefficient is derived based on an analytical treatment. The results are applied to the context of the relativistic jets from active galactic nuclei. The inferred acceleration timescale is investigated for a variety of conical flow profiles (i.e., power law, Gaussian, Fermi-Dirac) and compared to the relevant radiative and non-radiative loss timescales. The results exemplify that relativistic shear flows are capable of boosting cosmic-rays to extreme energies. Efficient electron acceleration, on the other hand, requires weak magnetic fields and may thus be accompanied by a delayed onset of particle energization and affect the overall jet appearance (e.g., core, ridge line, and limb-brightening).

  17. Coinfection with HIV-1 and HCV--a one-two punch.

    PubMed

    Kim, Arthur Y; Chung, Raymond T

    2009-09-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of chronic liver disease, cirrhosis, and death; it is estimated that 180 million persons are infected with HCV worldwide. The consequences of HCV are worse in those who are coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1), which is unfortunately a common scenario because of shared risk factors of the viruses. More studies into effects of HCV/HIV-1 coinfection are needed, but efforts have been hampered by limitations in our understanding of the combined pathogenesis of the 2 viruses. Gaining insight into the mechanisms that underlie the immunopathogenesis of these persistent viral infections could lead to new therapeutic strategies for patients with HCV/HIV-1 coinfection.

  18. Influence of high deformation rate, brain region, transverse compression, and specimen size on rat brain shear stress morphology and magnitude.

    PubMed

    Haslach, Henry W; Gipple, Jenna M; Leahy, Lauren N

    2017-01-26

    An external mechanical insult to the brain, such as a blast, may create internal stress and deformation waves, which have shear and longitudinal components that can induce combined shear and compression of the brain tissue. To isolate the consequences of such interactions for the shear stress and to investigate the role of the extracellular fluid in the mechanical response, translational shear stretch at 10/s, 60/s, and 100/s translational shear rates under either 0% or 33% fixed transverse compression is applied without preconditioning to rat brain specimens. The specimens from the cerebrum, the cerebellum grey matter, and the brainstem white matter are nearly the full length of their respective regions. The translational shear stress response to translational shear deformation is characterized by the effect that each of four factors, high deformation rate, brain region, transverse compression, and specimen size, have on the shear stress magnitude averaged over ten specimens for each combination of factors. Increasing the deformation rate increases the magnitude of the shear stress at a given translational shear stretch, and as tested by ANOVAs so does applying transverse fixed compression of 33% of the thickness. The stress magnitude differs by the region that is the specimen source: cerebrum, cerebellum or brainstem. The magnitude of the shear stress response at a given deformation rate and stretch depends on the specimen length, called a specimen size effect. Surprisingly, under no compression a shorter length specimen requires more shear stress, but under 33% compression a shorter length specimen requires less shear stress, to meet a required shear deformation rate. The shear specimen size effect calls into question the applicability of the classical shear stress definition to hydrated soft biological tissue.

  19. A hybrid molecular dynamics study on the non-Newtonian rheological behaviors of shear thickening fluid.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kaihui; Wang, Yu; Xuan, Shouhu; Gong, Xinglong

    2017-07-01

    To investigate the microstructural evolution dependency on the apparent viscosity in shear-thickening fluids (STFs), a hybrid mesoscale model combined with stochastic rotation dynamics (SRD) and molecular dynamics (MD) is used. Muller-Plathe reverse perturbation method is adopted to analyze the viscosities of STFs in a two-dimensional model. The characteristic of microstructural evolution of the colloidal suspensions under different shear rate is studied. The effect of diameter of colloidal particles and the phase volume fraction on the shear thickening behavior is investigated. Under low shear rate, the two-atom structure is formed, because of the strong particle attractions in adjacent layers. At higher shear rate, the synergetic pair structure extends to layered structure along flow direction because of the increasing hydrodynamics action. As the shear rate rises continuously, the layered structure rotates and collides with other particles, then turned to be individual particles under extension or curve string structure under compression. Finally, at the highest shear rate, the strings curve more severely and get into two-dimensional cluster. The apparent viscosity of the system changes from shear-thinning behavior to the shear-thickening behavior. This work presents valuable information for further understanding the shear thickening mechanism.

  20. Shearing Effectiveness of Integral Stiffening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Robert F; Libove, Charles

    1955-01-01

    Values of coefficients for defining the effectiveness of integral stiffeners in resisting shear deformations of the plate of which they are an integral part are presented for a variety of proportions of rectangular stiffeners with circular fillets. Formulas are given in which these coefficients may be employed to calculate the elastic constants associated with the twisting and shearing of integrally stiffened plates. The size of fillet radius is shown to contribute appreciably to the degree of penetration of the stresses from the skin into the stiffener.

  1. On poro-hyperelastic shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suvorov, A. P.; Selvadurai, A. P. S.

    2016-11-01

    The paper examines the problem of the shear of a porous hyperelastic material, the pore space of which is saturated with an incompressible fluid. Poro-hyperelasticity provides a suitable approach for modelling the mechanical behaviour of highly deformable materials in engineering applications and particularly soft tissues encountered in biomechanical applications. Unlike with the infinitesimal theory of poroelasticity, the application of pure shear generates pore fluid pressures that dissipate with time as fluid migrates either from or into the pore space due to the generated fluid pressure gradients. The analytical results provide benchmark problems that can be used to examine the accuracy of computational approaches.

  2. Fiber bundle models for stress release and energy bursts during granular shearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michlmayr, Gernot; Or, Dani; Cohen, Denis

    2012-12-01

    Fiber bundle models (FBMs) offer a versatile framework for representing transitions from progressive to abrupt failure in disordered material. We report a FBM-based description of mechanical interactions and associated energy bursts during shear deformation of granular materials. For strain-controlled shearing, where elements fail in a sequential order, we present analytical expressions for strain energy release and failure statistics. Results suggest that frequency-magnitude characteristics of fiber failure vary considerably throughout progressive shearing. Predicted failure distributions were in good agreement with experimentally observed shear stress fluctuations and associated bursts of acoustic emissions. Experiments also confirm a delayed release of acoustic emission energy relative to shear stress buildup, as anticipated by the model. Combined with data-rich acoustic emission measurements, the modified FBM offers highly resolved contact-scale insights into granular media dynamics of shearing processes.

  3. Transition in high-speed free shear layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demetriades, A.

    1990-01-01

    The laminar free-shear layers considered in the study are formed by combinations of the velocities and momentum thicknesses of two adjacent parallel flows. Transition in wakes, pure free-shear layers of the Chapman type, and separate and partition flows are discussed. A stability-transition connection is emphasized, and it is suggested that a recurring deficiency in some stability calculations is the use of overly simplified laminar profiles. It is also noted that physical principles can be used for estimating the transition location or providing the factors affecting it. One such approach, a threshold theory, is discussed by way of example.

  4. Increasing volume of vestibular soft tissues in flapless implant surgery through a modified connective punch technique: a controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    BASSI, M. ANDREASI; ANDRISANI, C.; LICO, S.; SILVESTRE, F.; GARGARI, M.; ARCURI, C.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Purpose The aim of this article is to make a comparative assessment between the modification of the soft-tissue profile, around the healing cap screws (HCSs), following both the traditional flapless surgery (TFS) and a new modified flapless surgery, named Modified Connective Tissue Punch (MCTP) technique. Materials and methods 8 patients (3M and 5F) (mean age 54.25±11.247 years) were enrolled in this study. Sixteen two-piece implants were placed on upper jaws, 2 for each patient, 8 with TFS and 8 with MCTP technique. In each patient the implants were placed in edentulous areas, of 2 or 3 adjacent teeth long. MCTP technique was performed on the front implant site (FIS) while the TFS was performed on the rear implant site (RIS). All implants were inserted and covered with healing cap screws (HCSs). Alginate impressions were carried out at the moment of the surgery, at 1 month and 4 months post-operative. Plaster models were poured and subsequently digitally scanned, in order to measure the distance between the gingival outline and the free margin of the HCS. The recorded values were analyzed with the ANOVA test. Results The use of MTCP technique, in comparison to TFS, showed a significative better outcome, in terms of vertical increments, of gingiva, on the VS toward the HCSs, during the entire observation period (p = 0.000 for all). Conclusion The Authors recommend the use of MCTP technique for a better vestibular soft tissue outcome in flapless implant surgery. PMID:28042442

  5. mTOR Inhibition by Everolimus Does Not Impair Closure of Punch Biopsy Wounds in Renal Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dutt, Shelley B.; Gonzales, Josephine; Boyett, Megan; Costanzo, Anne; Han, Peggy P.; Steinberg, Steven; McKay, Dianne B.; Jameson, Julie M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors are approved to prevent allograft rejection and control malignancy. Unfortunately, they are associated with adverse effects, such as wound healing complications that detract from more extensive use. There is a lack of prospective wound healing studies to monitor patients treated with mTOR inhibitors, such as everolimus or sirolimus, especially in nondiabetics. Methods Patients receiving everolimus with standard immunosuppressant therapy or standard immunosuppressant therapy without everolimus were administered 3-mm skin biopsy punch wounds in the left scapular region. Homeostatic gene expression was examined in the skin obtained from the biopsy and wound surface area was examined on day 7. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were examined for cytokine production. Results There are no significant changes in autophagy related 13, epidermal growth factor, insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3, IL-2, kruppel-like factor 4, and TGFB1 gene expression in the skin suggesting that there is little impact of everolimus on these genes within nonwounded skin. Peripheral blood T cells are more sensitive to cell death in everolimus-treated patients, but they retain the ability to produce proinflammatory cytokines required for efficient wound repair. Importantly, there is no delay in the closure of biopsy wounds in patients receiving everolimus as compared to those not receiving mTOR inhibition. Conclusions Everolimus treatment is not associated with impaired closure of skin biopsy wounds in kidney transplant recipients. These data highlight the importance of exploring whether larger surgical wounds would show a similar result and how other factors, such as diabetes, impact wound healing complications associated with mTOR suppression.

  6. Numerical development of a new correlation between biaxial fracture strain and material fracture toughness for small punch test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pradeep; Dutta, B. K.; Chattopadhyay, J.

    2017-04-01

    The miniaturized specimens are used to determine mechanical properties of the materials, such as yield stress, ultimate stress, fracture toughness etc. Use of such specimens is essential whenever limited quantity of material is available for testing, such as aged/irradiated materials. The miniaturized small punch test (SPT) is a technique which is widely used to determine change in mechanical properties of the materials. Various empirical correlations are proposed in the literature to determine the value of fracture toughness (JIC) using this technique. bi-axial fracture strain is determined using SPT tests. This parameter is then used to determine JIC using available empirical correlations. The correlations between JIC and biaxial fracture strain quoted in the literature are based on experimental data acquired for large number of materials. There are number of such correlations available in the literature, which are generally not in agreement with each other. In the present work, an attempt has been made to determine the correlation between biaxial fracture strain (εqf) and crack initiation toughness (Ji) numerically. About one hundred materials are digitally generated by varying yield stress, ultimate stress, hardening coefficient and Gurson parameters. Such set of each material is then used to analyze a SPT specimen and a standard TPB specimen. Analysis of SPT specimen generated biaxial fracture strain (εqf) and analysis of TPB specimen generated value of Ji. A graph is then plotted between these two parameters for all the digitally generated materials. The best fit straight line determines the correlation. It has been also observed that it is possible to have variation in Ji for the same value of biaxial fracture strain (εqf) within a limit. Such variation in the value of Ji has been also ascertained using the graph. Experimental SPT data acquired earlier for three materials were then used to get Ji by using newly developed correlation. A reasonable

  7. Efficacy of bubaline fibrin glue on full-thickness pinch and punch skin grafting in a pig.

    PubMed

    Dejyong, Krittee; Kaewamatawong, Theerayuth; Brikshavana, Pasakorn; Durongphongtorn, Sumit

    2017-03-01

    Fibrin glue, which is formed from the action of thrombin (a serine protease) on fibrinogen, has been developed for use as an adhesive to increase the success of skin graft surgery. The objective of this study was to evaluate if bubaline fibrin glue would promote skin graft survival in pigs. The grafting was divided into two steps. First, granulation wound preparation was performed in a healthy swine by creating four full-skin depth wounds (3 × 12 cm(2)) at the dorsal part of the loin area on each side. Second, pinch and punch skin grafting, where eight skin discs (0.6 cm diameter) were regularly placed (0.6 cm distance apart) in the granulation tissue bed of each wound, was performed 5 days later. The bubaline fibrin glue was added prior to application of the 16 skin graft discs in two of the wounds, while no glue was added to the other 16 skin graft discs in the other two wounds. The number of surviving graft pieces and histological examination was evaluated after 3, 7, and 14 days post-operation and compared by pairing between the control and the bubaline fibrin glue groups. The number of grafts that remained at 3 and 7 days post-operation and the number of new microvessels at 3 days post-operation were significantly higher ( p < 0.05) in the bubaline fibrin glue group than in the control group. However, there was no significant difference in the number of fibroblasts, the intensity of scarring and the intensity of inflammation between the two groups, except for the significantly lower intensity of inflammation at 7 days post-operation in the bubaline fibrin glue group. In conclusion, bubaline fibrin glue has the advantage of decreasing the skin graft loss by approximately 31.3-37.5% compared with the control group and also promotes angiogenesis.

  8. Acute Inflammation Loci Are Involved in Wound Healing in the Mouse Ear Punch Model.

    PubMed

    Canhamero, Tatiane; Garcia, Ludmila Valino; De Franco, Marcelo

    2014-09-01

    involved in the initiation of wound repair processes. Future Directions: The pleiotropic effects of the QTL are important in the identification of the genes responsible for tissue repair processes, especially when combined with global gene expression research. Microarray analysis complements the biological information obtained in QTL mapping, making this tool essential for gene identification. This approach will allow the investigation of future targets for therapeutic wound healing treatments.

  9. Acute Inflammation Loci Are Involved in Wound Healing in the Mouse Ear Punch Model

    PubMed Central

    Canhamero, Tatiane; Garcia, Ludmila Valino; De Franco, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    involved in the initiation of wound repair processes. Future Directions: The pleiotropic effects of the QTL are important in the identification of the genes responsible for tissue repair processes, especially when combined with global gene expression research. Microarray analysis complements the biological information obtained in QTL mapping, making this tool essential for gene identification. This approach will allow the investigation of future targets for therapeutic wound healing treatments. PMID:25207201

  10. Structure formation of surfactant membranes under shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiba, Hayato; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Gompper, Gerhard

    2013-07-01

    Shear-flow-induced structure formation in surfactant-water mixtures is investigated numerically using a meshless-membrane model in combination with a particle-based hydrodynamics simulation approach for the solvent. At low shear rates, uni-lamellar vesicles and planar lamellae structures are formed at small and large membrane volume fractions, respectively. At high shear rates, lamellar states exhibit an undulation instability, leading to rolled or cylindrical membrane shapes oriented in the flow direction. The spatial symmetry and structure factor of this rolled state agree with those of intermediate states during lamellar-to-onion transition measured by time-resolved scatting experiments. Structural evolution in time exhibits a moderate dependence on the initial condition.

  11. Zipper and freeway shear zone junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passchier, Cees; Platt, John

    2016-04-01

    Ductile shear zones are usually presented as isolated planar high-strain domains in a less deformed wall rock, characterised by shear sense indicators such as characteristic deflected foliation traces. Many shear zones, however, form branched systems and if movement on such branches is contemporaneous, the resulting geometry can be complicated and lead to unusual fabric geometries in the wall rock. For Y-shaped shear zone junctions with three simultaneously operating branches, and with slip directions at a high angle to the branch line, eight basic types of shear zone triple junctions are possible, divided into three groups. The simplest type, called freeway junctions, have similar shear sense on all three branches. If shear sense is different on the three branches, this can lead to space problems. Some of these junctions have shear zone branches that join to form a single branch, named zipper junctions, or a single shear zone which splits to form two, known as wedge junctions. Closing zipper junctions are most unusual, since they form a non-active high-strain zone with opposite deflection of foliations. Shear zipper and shear wedge junctions have two shear zones with similar shear sense, and one with the opposite sense. All categories of shear zone junctions show characteristic flow patterns in the shear zone and its wall rock. Shear zone junctions with slip directions normal to the branch line can easily be studied, since ideal sections of shear sense indicators lie in the plane normal to the shear zone branches and the branch line. Expanding the model to allow slip oblique and parallel to the branch line in a full 3D setting gives rise to a large number of geometries in three main groups. Slip directions can be parallel on all branches but oblique to the branch line: two slip directions can be parallel and a third oblique, or all three branches can have slip in different directions. Such more complex shear zone junctions cannot be studied to advantage in a

  12. Dual-domain lateral shearing interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Naulleau, Patrick P.; Goldberg, Kenneth Alan

    2004-03-16

    The phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer (PS/PDI) was developed to address the problem of at-wavelength metrology of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) optical systems. Although extremely accurate, the fact that the PS/PDI is limited to use with coherent EUV sources, such as undulator radiation, is a drawback for its widespread use. An alternative to the PS/PDI, with relaxed coherence requirements, is lateral shearing interferometry (LSI). The use of a cross-grating, carrier-frequency configuration to characterize a large-field 4.times.-reduction EUV lithography optic is demonstrated. The results obtained are directly compared with PS/PDI measurements. A defocused implementation of the lateral shearing interferometer in which an image-plane filter allows both phase-shifting and Fourier wavefront recovery. The two wavefront recovery methods can be combined in a dual-domain technique providing suppression of noise added by self-interference of high-frequency components in the test-optic wavefront.

  13. Fluidization of wet granulates under shear.

    PubMed

    Rahbari, S H Ebrahimnazhad; Vollmer, J; Herminghaus, S; Brinkmann, M

    2010-12-01

    Small amounts of a wetting liquid render sand a stiff and moldable material. The cohesive forces between the sand grains are caused by capillary bridges at the points of contact. Due to the finite strength of these bridges wet sand undergoes a transition from an arrested (i.e., solidified) to a fluidized state under an externally applied shear force. The transition between these two dynamic states is studied in a MD-type simulation of a two-dimensional assembly of bidisperse frictionless disks under the action of a cosine force profile. In addition to soft core repulsion the disks interact through a hysteretic and short ranged attractive force modeling the effect of the capillary bridges. In this model the transition between the fluidized and the arrested state is discontinuous and hysteretic. The parameter dependence of the critical force for solidification is modeled by combining theoretical arguments with a detailed numerical exploration of the transition. We address a range of densities from slightly below close packing until slightly above densities where the system approaches a shear-banded state. Differences and similarities of the transition in wet granulates to the jamming transition are also addressed.

  14. HUBBLE PROVIDES 'ONE-TWO PUNCH' TO SEE BIRTH OF STARS IN GALACTIC WRECKAGE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    similar to the so-called Hickson compact groups -- clusters of at least four galaxies in a tight configuration that are isolated from other galaxies. The galaxies are so close together that they lose energy from the relentless pull of gravity. Eventually, they fall into each other and form one massive galaxy. This color-composite image was made by combining photographs taken in near-infrared light with NICMOS and ultraviolet and visible light with ACS. The pictures were taken with these filters: the H-band and J-band on NICMOS; the V-band on the ACS wide-field camera; and the U-band on the ACS high-resolution camera. The images were taken on May 13 and 14. Credits: NASA, the NICMOS Group (STScI, ESA), and the NICMOS Science Team (University of Arizona)

  15. Poroelastic fluid effects on shear for rocks with soft anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berryman, James G.

    2005-06-01

    A general analysis of poroelasticity for vertical transverse isotropy (VTI) shows that four eigenvectors are pure shear modes with no coupling to the pore-fluid mechanics. The remaining two eigenvectors are linear combinations of pure compression and uniaxial shear, both of which are coupled to the fluid mechanics. After reducing the problem to a 2 × 2 system, the analysis shows in a relatively elementary fashion how a poroelastic system with isotropic solid elastic frame, but with anisotropy introduced only through the poroelastic coefficients (and, therefore, termed soft anisotropy), interacts with the mechanics of the pore fluid and produces shear dependence on fluid properties in the overall poroelastic system. The analysis shows, for example, that this effect is always present (though sometimes small in magnitude) in the systems studied and can be comparatively large (on the order of 10 to 20 per cent) for wave propagation studies in some rocks, including Sierra White granite and Spirit River sandstone. Some of the results quoted here are obtained by using a new product formula relating local bulk and uniaxial shear energy to the product of the two eigenvalues that are coupled to the fluid mechanics. This product formula was first derived in prior work. The results obtained here are observed to be useful both for explaining difficult to reconcile laboratory wave propagation (especially ultrasonic) data showing that the shear modulus exhibits clear dependence on fluid content and also for benchmarking of poroelastic codes.

  16. A new method to evaluate the effects of shear on the skin.

    PubMed

    de Wert, Luuk A; Bader, Dan L; Oomens, Cees W J; Schoonhoven, Lisette; Poeze, Martijn; Bouvy, Nicole D

    2015-01-01

    Currently, pressure ulcer preventive strategies focus mainly on pressure redistribution. Little attention is paid to reduce the harmful effects of shear-force, because little is known about pathophysiological aspects of shear-force. Even today, no method to measure the effects of shear-force on the skin is available. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the response to shear-forces in terms of analyzing a noninvasive biomarker and reactive hyperemic parameter measured at the skin of healthy participants. A physical model was developed to produce a combination of pressure and shear or pressure alone on the skin. Ten healthy male participants were included and pressure (3.9 kPa) and a combined loading of pressure and shear (2.4 kPa + 14.5 N) was applied at the volar aspect of the forearms for 15 and 30 minutes. A Sebutape sample was used to collect IL-1α and total protein (TP) noninvasively. The reactive hyperemic parameter was derived from a laser Doppler flowmeter. The increase in IL-1α/TP-ratio after a combined loading of pressure and shear for 30 minutes of 6.2 ± 2.5 was significantly higher compared with all other test conditions (p < 0.05). The increase in cutaneous blood cell flux was already significantly higher when a combined loading of pressure and shear was applied for 15 minutes compared with pressure alone. These results shows that the IL-1α/TP-ratio and cutaneous blood cell flux can be used as robust measures of the effect of shear-force on skin in humans. Therefore, this model can be used to evaluate materials aimed at the reduction of shear.

  17. Transiently Jammed State in Shear Thickening Suspensions under Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Shomeek; Allen, Benjamin; Brown, Eric

    2014-03-01

    We examine the response of a suspension of cornstarch and water under normal impact at controlled velocities. This is a model system to understand why a person can run on the surface of a discontinuous shear thickening fluid. Using simultaneous high-speed imaging of the top and bottom surfaces along with normal force measurements allows us to investigate whether the force response is a result of system spanning structures. We observe a shear thickening transition where above a critical velocity the normal force increases by orders of magnitude. In the high force regime the force response is displacement dependent like a solid rather than velocity dependent like a liquid. The stresses are on the order of 106 Pa which is enough to hold up a person's weight. In this regime imaging shows the existence of a solid like structure that extends to the bottom interface.

  18. Dynamics of Sheared Granular Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondic, Lou; Utter, Brian; Behringer, Robert P.

    2002-01-01

    This work focuses on the properties of sheared granular materials near the jamming transition. The project currently involves two aspects. The first of these is an experiment that is a prototype for a planned ISS (International Space Station) flight. The second is discrete element simulations (DES) that can give insight into the behavior one might expect in a reduced-g environment. The experimental arrangement consists of an annular channel that contains the granular material. One surface, say the upper surface, rotates so as to shear the material contained in the annulus. The lower surface controls the mean density/mean stress on the sample through an actuator or other control system. A novel feature under development is the ability to 'thermalize' the layer, i.e. create a larger amount of random motion in the material, by using the actuating system to provide vibrations as well control the mean volume of the annulus. The stress states of the system are determined by transducers on the non-rotating wall. These measure both shear and normal components of the stress on different size scales. Here, the idea is to characterize the system as the density varies through values spanning dense almost solid to relatively mobile granular states. This transition regime encompasses the regime usually thought of as the glass transition, and/or the jamming transition. Motivation for this experiment springs from ideas of a granular glass transition, a related jamming transition, and from recent experiments. In particular, we note recent experiments carried out by our group to characterize this type of transition and also to demonstrate/ characterize fluctuations in slowly sheared systems. These experiments give key insights into what one might expect in near-zero g. In particular, they show that the compressibility of granular systems diverges at a transition or critical point. It is this divergence, coupled to gravity, that makes it extremely difficult if not impossible to

  19. Shear piezoelectricity in bone at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minary-Jolandan, Majid; Yu, Min-Feng

    2010-10-01

    Recent demonstration of shear piezoelectricity in an isolated collagen fibril, which is the origin of piezoelectricity in bone, necessitates investigation of shear piezoelectric behavior in bone at the nanoscale. Using high resolution lateral piezoresponse force microcopy (PFM), shear piezoelectricity in a cortical bone sample was studied at the nanoscale. Subfibrillar structure of individual collagen fibrils with a periodicity of 60-70 nm were revealed in PFM map, indicating the direct contribution of collagen fibrils to the shear piezoelectricity of bone.

  20. Simple phase-shifting lateral shearing interferometer.

    PubMed

    Mihaylova, Emilia; Whelan, Maurice; Toal, Vincent

    2004-06-01

    A phase-shifting electronic speckle pattern shearing interferometer with a very simple shearing device is proposed. Two partially reflective glass plates are used to introduce the shear in this new interferometer. The reflection coefficients of the coatings on the two plates are 0.3 and 0.7. The distance between the two glass plates controls the size of the shear. The proposed new interferometric system is simple, flexible, and low cost.

  1. Ensemble-averaged particle orientation and shear viscosity of single-wall-carbon-nanotube suspensions under shear and electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chen; Shan, Jerry W.

    2010-02-01

    The ensemble-averaged particle-orientation angles and apparent shear viscosities of dilute suspensions of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in a liquid solvent, α-terpineol, were experimentally studied under combined shear flow and electric fields. An optical polarization-modulation method was used to measure the orientation angles of individual and small bundles of SWNTs, while a modified concentric-cylinder viscometer was used to make simultaneous electrorheological measurements of the apparent viscosity. The particle-orientation response occurs on time scales one to two orders of magnitude faster than the macroscopic electrorheological response, and does not appear to directly affect the apparent viscosity at these low concentrations. Particle-orientation angles for various shear rates and electric fields are found to collapse when plotted against the parameter, f ˜E2/γ˙, as predicted by the theory developed by Mason and co-workers for the equilibrium orientation angle of ellipsoids under electric fields and shear flow. However, comparison between measured and predicted particle-orientation angles shows poor agreement at intermediate values of f. Electrostatic interactions between large-aspect-ratio particles are shown to be significant, and may account for the discrepancy between the measurements and classical theory for even dilute suspensions of nanotubes under both shear and electric fields.

  2. The Amount and Preferred Orientation of Simple-shear in a Deformation Tensor: Implications for Detecting Shear Zones and Faults with GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, A. M.; Griffiths, J. H.

    2007-05-01

    At the 2005 Fall Meeting of the American Geophysical Union, Griffiths and Johnson [2005] introduced a method of extracting from the deformation-gradient (and velocity-gradient) tensor the amount and preferred orientation of simple-shear associated with 2-D shear zones and faults. Noting the 2-D is important because the shear zones and faults in Griffiths and Johnson [2005] were assumed non-dilatant and infinitely long, ignoring the scissors- like action along strike associated with shear zones and faults of finite length. Because shear zones and faults can dilate (and contract) normal to their walls and can have a scissors-like action associated with twisting about an axis normal to their walls, the more general method of detecting simple-shear is introduced and called MODES "method of detecting simple-shear." MODES can thus extract from the deformation-gradient (and velocity- gradient) tensor the amount and preferred orientation of simple-shear associated with 3-D shear zones and faults near or far from the Earth's surface, providing improvements and extensions to existing analytical methods used in active tectonics studies, especially strain analysis and dislocation theory. The derivation of MODES is based on one definition and two assumptions: by definition, simple-shear deformation becomes localized in some way; by assumption, the twirl within the deformation-gradient (or the spin within the velocity-gradient) is due to a combination of simple-shear and twist, and coupled with the simple- shear and twist is a dilatation of the walls of shear zones and faults. The preferred orientation is thus the orientation of the plane containing the simple-shear and satisfying the mechanical and kinematical boundary conditions. Results from a MODES analysis are illustrated by means of a three-dimensional diagram, the cricket- ball, which is reminiscent of the seismologist's "beach ball." In this poster, we present the underlying theory of MODES and illustrate how it works by

  3. Structure of wind-shear turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trevino, G.; Laituri, T. R.

    1989-01-01

    The statistical characteristics of wind shear turbulence are modelled. Isotropic turbulence serves as the basis of comparison for the anisotropic turbulence which exists in wind shear. The question of turbulence scales in wind shear is addressed from the perspective of power spectral density.

  4. Ultra-High-Speed Observation of Cutting of Failure Phenomenon in Thin Metallic Lamina by Punch and Measurement of Displacements by Digital Image Correlation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishioka, Toshihisa; Iwawaki, Takashi; Fujimoto, Takehiro; Kashiwara, Yoshiyuki

    Machine components of industrial products are often produced by press cutting. However, the mechanism of cutting (ductile fracture of metals) is not perfectly understood. In order to clarify this mechanism, cutting processes were observed by an ultrahigh-speed camera. The ultrahigh-speed camera is capable of recording maximum record rate 1,000,000 frames per second (preserved images102 frames); each frame has 80,000 pixels. Therefore, this ultrahigh-speed camera is currently the world's most advanced camera in terms of spatial and time resolutions. A detailed movie of the cutting process was recorded. The details of the cutting process include the crack length versus time, crack tip opening angle, and fracture path. The crack tip opening angles were evaluated approximately 0.1 mm behind the tip of the propagating crack. The CTOA criterion was found to be almost valid during the cutting process. Furthermore, in order to use the image correlation method, random patterns were generated by spraying paint onto the metal sections. Images of a specimen section were taken after punching the sheet metal. The distributions of displacements were evaluated by the digital image correlation method. We found smoothly cut sections and rough surfaces. A smoothly cut section is very important for industrial products. In this study, the optimal speed of punching and punch-die clearances were examined. The ductile fracture criterion determined in this study is extremely useful for fabricating machine components by press cutting because it can be used for simulations without the need for a cutting system. The data of the image correlation method can be used for an intelligent hybrid method that can provide very accurate strain and stress distributions and fracture parameters such as the T* integral, which is the most promising fracture parameter for assessing the quality of metallic materials.

  5. A simple model to understand the role of membrane shear elasticity and stress-free shape on the motion of red blood cells in shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viallat, Annie; Abkarian, Manouk; Dupire, Jules

    2015-11-01

    The analytical model presented by Keller and Skalak on the dynamics of red blood cells in shear flow described the cell as a fluid ellipsoid of fixed shape. It was extended to introduce shear elasticity of the cell membrane. We further extend the model when the cell discoid physiological shape is not a stress-free shape. We show that spheroid stress-free shapes enables fitting experimental data with values of shear elasticity typical to that found with micropipettes and optical tweezers. For moderate shear rates (when RBCs keep their discoid shape) this model enables to quantitatively determine an effective cell viscosity, that combines membrane and hemoglobin viscosities and an effective shear modulus of the membrane that combines shear modulus and stress-free shape. This model allows determining RBC mechanical parameters both in the tanktreading regime for cells suspended in a high viscosity medium, and in the tumbling regime for cells suspended in a low viscosity medium. In this regime,a transition is predicted between a rigid-like tumbling motion and a fluid-like tumbling motion above a critical shear rate, which is directly related to the mechanical parameters of the cell. A*MIDEX (n ANR-11-IDEX-0001-02) funded by the ''Investissements d'Avenir'', Region Languedoc-Roussillon, Labex NUMEV (ANR-10-LABX-20), BPI France project DataDiag.

  6. Transformation-deformation bands in C60 after the treatment in a shear diamond anvil cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulnitskiy, B. A.; Blank, V. D.; Levitas, V. I.; Perezhogin, I. A.; Popov, M. Yu; Kirichenko, A. N.; Tyukalova, E. V.

    2016-04-01

    The C60 fullerene has been investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy in a shear diamond anvil cell after applying pressure and shear deformation treatment of fcc phase. Shear transformation-deformation bands are revealed consisting of shear-strain-induced nanocrystals of linearly polymerized fullerene and polytypes, the triclinic, monoclinic, and hcp C60, fragments of amorphous structures, and voids. Consequently, after pressure release, the plastic strain retains five high pressure phases, which is potentially important for their engineering applications. Localized shear deformation initially seems contradictory because high pressure phases of C60 are stronger than the initial low pressure phase. However, this was explained by transformation-induced plasticity during localized phase transformations. It occurs due to a combination of applied stresses and internal stresses from a volume reduction during phase transformations. Localized phase transformations and plastic shear deformation promote each other, which produce positive mechanochemical feedback and cascading transformation-deformation processes. Since the plastic shear in a band is much larger than is expected based on the torsion angle, five phase transformations occur in the same region with no transformation outside the band. The results demonstrate that transformation kinetics cannot be analyzed in terms of prescribed shear, and methods to measure local shear should be developed.

  7. The SDSS Coadd: Cosmic Shear Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Huan; Dodelson, Scott; Seo, Hee-Jong; Soares-Santos, Marcelle; Annis, James; Hao, Jiangang; Johnston, David; Kubo, Jeffrey M.; Reis, Ribamar R.R.; Simet, Melanie; /Chicago U., EFI /Chicago U., KICP

    2011-11-01

    Stripe 82 in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey was observed multiple times, allowing deeper images to be constructed by coadding the data. Here we analyze the ellipticities of background galaxies in this 275 square degree region, searching for evidence of distortions due to cosmic shear. The E-mode is detected in both real and Fourier space with > 5-{sigma} significance on degree scales, while the B-mode is consistent with zero as expected. The amplitude of the signal constrains the combination of the matter density {Omega}{sub m} and fluctuation amplitude {sigma}{sub 8} to be {Omega}{sub m}{sup 0.7} {sigma}{sub 8} = 0.276{sub -0.050}{sup +0.036}.

  8. Split-thickness flap with a semicircular punched-ridge pedicled periosteal flap for implant restoration in highly atrophic patients: a technical note.

    PubMed

    Seemann, Rudolf; Perisanidis, Christos; Traxler, Hannes; Ewers, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Attached gingiva is a crucial aspect of healthy peri-implant tissue. Severely atrophied jaws have minimal quantities of attached gingiva. Any surgical procedure bears the potential risk of further loss of attached gingiva. The split-thickness flap described here provides excellent access. Using a biopsy punch, the periosteum is easily cut in semicircular fashion on the labial surface of the bone so that it remains pedicled on the lingual or palatal ridge. The split-thickness flap permits fixation of the gingival flap to the periosteum. The periosteal flap is closed with sutures to achieve soft tissue closure over the implants even in case of simultaneous vestibuloplasty.

  9. Controlled shear/tension fixture

    DOEpatents

    Hsueh, Chun-Hway [Knoxville, TN; Liu, Chain-tsuan [Knoxville, TN; George, Easo P [Knoxville, TN

    2012-07-24

    A test fixture for simultaneously testing two material test samples is provided. The fixture provides substantially equal shear and tensile stresses in each test specimens. By gradually applying a load force to the fixture only one of the two specimens fractures. Upon fracture of the one specimen, the fixture and the load train lose contact and the second specimen is preserved in a state of upset just prior to fracture. Particular advantages of the fixture are (1) to control the tensile to shear load on the specimen for understanding the effect of these stresses on the deformation behavior of advanced materials, (2) to control the location of fracture for accessing localized material properties including the variation of the mechanical properties and residual stresses across the thickness of advanced materials, (3) to yield a fractured specimen for strength measurement and an unfractured specimen for examining the microstructure just prior to fracture.

  10. Turbulent Shear and Internal Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munroe, James; Sutherland, Bruce

    2008-11-01

    A series of experiments is presented that model the generation of non-hydrostatic internal gravity waves in upper ocean by the forcing of wind driven turbulent eddies in the surface mixed layer. A turbulent shear layer is forced by a conveyor belt with affixed flat plates near the surface of a stratified fluid and downward propagating internal waves are generated. The turbulence in the shear layer is characterized using particle image velocimetry to measure the kinetic energy as well as length and time scales. The internal waves are measured using synthetic schlieren to determine the amplitudes, frequencies, momentum fluxes, and the energy of the generated waves. The fraction of energy that leaks from the mixed layer to the internal wave field is presented. Consistent with other studies, it is found that the frequencies of internal waves generated by turbulence are an approximate constant fraction of the buoyancy frequency. Implications to internal waves propagating into the deep ocean will be discussed.

  11. Matrix cracking of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites in shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, Varun P.; Zok, Frank W.

    2014-12-01

    The mechanics of cracking in fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) under general loadings remains incomplete. The present paper addresses one outstanding aspect of this problem: the development of matrix cracks in unidirectional plies under shear loading. To this end, we develop a model based on potential energy differences upstream and downstream of a fully bridged steady-state matrix crack. Through a combination of analytical solutions and finite element simulations of the constituent stresses before and after cracking, we identify the dominant stress components that drive crack growth. We show that, when the axial slip lengths are much larger than the fiber diameter and when interfacial slip precedes cracking, the shear stresses in the constituents are largely unaffected by the presence of the crack; the changes that do occur are confined to a 'core' region within a distance of about one fiber diameter from the crack plane. Instead, the driving force for crack growth derives mainly from the axial stresses-tensile in the fibers and compressive in the matrix-that arise upon cracking. These stresses are well-approximated by solutions based on shear-lag analysis. Combining these solutions with the governing equation for crack growth yields an analytical estimate of the critical shear stress for matrix cracking. An analogous approach is used in deriving the critical stresses needed for matrix cracking under arbitrary in-plane loadings. The applicability of these results to cross-ply CMC laminates is briefly discussed.

  12. DYNAMIC SHEAR-INFLUENCED COLLAGEN SELF-ASSEMBLY

    PubMed Central

    Saeidi, Nima; Sander, Edward A.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to influence the direction of polymerization of a self-assembling biomolecular system has the potential to generate materials with extremely high anisotropy. In biological systems where highly-oriented cellular populations give rise to aligned and often load-bearing tissue such organized molecular scaffolds could aid in the contact guidance of cells for engineered tissue constructs (e.g cornea and tendon). In this investigation we examine the detailed dynamics of pepsin-extracted type I bovine collagen assembly on a glass surface under the influence of flow between two plates. Differential Interference Contrast (DIC) imaging (60x-1.4NA) with focal plane stabilization was used to resolve and track the growth of collagen aggregates on borosilicate glass for 4 different shear rates (500, 80, 20, and 9 s-1). The detailed morphology of the collagen fibrils/aggregates was examined using Quick Freeze Deep Etch electron microscopy. Nucleation of fibrils on the glass was observed to occur rapidly (~2 min) followed by continued growth of the fibrils. The growth rates were dependent on flow in a complex manner with the highest rate of axial growth (0.1 microns/sec) occurring at a shear rate of 9 s-1. The lowest growth rate occurred at the highest shear. Fibrils were observed to both branch and join during the experiments. The best alignment of fibrils was observed at intermediate shear rates of 20 and 80s-1. However, the investigation revealed that fibril directional growth was not stable. At high shear rates, fibrils would often turn downstream forming what we term “hooks” which are likely the combined result of monomer interaction with the initial collagen layer or “mat” and the high shear rate. Further, QFDE examination of fibril morphology demonstrated that the assembled fibrillar structure did not possess native D-periodicity. Instead, fibrils comprised a collection of generally aligned, monomers which were self-assembled to form a fibril

  13. Shear Strength of Aluminum Oxynitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandekar, Dattatraya P.; Vaughan, Brian A. M.; Proud, William G.

    2007-06-01

    Aluminum oxynitride (AlON) is a transparent, polycrystalline cubic spinel. The results of investigations^1-4 on shock response of AlON permit determination of the equation of state, and shear strength retained under shock compression. Whereas the values of the HEL of AlON holds no surprises, the inelastic response of AlON reported in Ref. 1-4 differ significantly and is stress dependent. The results of Ref. 1-2 show that AlON retains a shear strength of 3 to 4 GPa when shocked up to around 20 GPa, but the results of Ref, 3-4 seem to suggest a possible loss of shear strength when shocked to 16 GPa and beyond. Our analysis examines the observed differences in the inelastic response of AlON reported in these four studies . 1. J. U. Cazamias, et. al., in Fundamental Issues and Applications of Shock-Wave and High Strain Rate Phenomena, Eds. Staudhammer, Murr, and Meyers, Elsevier, NY, 173 (2001). 2. B. A. M. Vaughn, et.al., Shock Physics, Cavendish Laboratory, Report SP/1092 (2001) 3. T. Sekine, et.al., J. Appl. Phys. 94, 4803 (2003). 4. T. F. Thornhill, et.al., Shock Compression of Matter-2005, Eds. Furnish, Elert, Russell, White, AIP, NY, 143 (2006).

  14. Minimum cut and shear bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tordesillas, Antoinette; Cramer, Andrew; Walker, David M.

    2013-06-01

    We explore the efficacy of network optimisation theory for minimum cut to quantify the evolution of granular fabric and its functionality as a transmission medium in deforming dense granular media. Our focus here is on force transmission in a sheared assembly of polydisperse particles, in a biaxial compression test under constant confining pressure. The granular fabric is examined with respect to the material's force-bearing contact network over that regime when the material has reached its residual strength, and is deforming under a near constant volume in the presence of a fully developed shear band. The structural evolution of the fabric is quantitatively characterized using a representative weighted-directed network that is similarly evolving as the sample deforms. The edges or links, representing the interparticle contacts, are each weighted by the capacity of the contact to transmit force: a scalar that depends solely on the relative motion of the contacting grains. In the large strain failure regime, the minimum cut which represents the bottleneck in force transmission is found to lie in the persistent shear band. This study paves the way for the future analysis of flows and force transmission through an evolving contact network and, in turn, the characterisation of the relationship between the material's contact topology and its capacity to transmit forces through its contact network.

  15. Haptic Edge Detection Through Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platkiewicz, Jonathan; Lipson, Hod; Hayward, Vincent

    2016-03-01

    Most tactile sensors are based on the assumption that touch depends on measuring pressure. However, the pressure distribution at the surface of a tactile sensor cannot be acquired directly and must be inferred from the deformation field induced by the touched object in the sensor medium. Currently, there is no consensus as to which components of strain are most informative for tactile sensing. Here, we propose that shape-related tactile information is more suitably recovered from shear strain than normal strain. Based on a contact mechanics analysis, we demonstrate that the elastic behavior of a haptic probe provides a robust edge detection mechanism when shear strain is sensed. We used a jamming-based robot gripper as a tactile sensor to empirically validate that shear strain processing gives accurate edge information that is invariant to changes in pressure, as predicted by the contact mechanics study. This result has implications for the design of effective tactile sensors as well as for the understanding of the early somatosensory processing in mammals.

  16. Haptic Edge Detection Through Shear

    PubMed Central

    Platkiewicz, Jonathan; Lipson, Hod; Hayward, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Most tactile sensors are based on the assumption that touch depends on measuring pressure. However, the pressure distribution at the surface of a tactile sensor cannot be acquired directly and must be inferred from the deformation field induced by the touched object in the sensor medium. Currently, there is no consensus as to which components of strain are most informative for tactile sensing. Here, we propose that shape-related tactile information is more suitably recovered from shear strain than normal strain. Based on a contact mechanics analysis, we demonstrate that the elastic behavior of a haptic probe provides a robust edge detection mechanism when shear strain is sensed. We used a jamming-based robot gripper as a tactile sensor to empirically validate that shear strain processing gives accurate edge information that is invariant to changes in pressure, as predicted by the contact mechanics study. This result has implications for the design of effective tactile sensors as well as for the understanding of the early somatosensory processing in mammals. PMID:27009331

  17. Fracture structure near a longitudinal shear macrorupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, R. V.; Osipenko, N. M.

    2012-09-01

    Fracture evolution the near a main longitudinal shear in the presence of normal stresses is studied. Experiments with model materials (gypsum, cheese) showed that a multiscale echelon structure of cracks feathering the main rupture is formed under the shear domination conditions. A system of small cracks in the initial echelon is replaced by an echelon of larger and sparser cracks. Intensive transverse compression along the normal to the shear plane, which imitates the initial stress concentrator, takes the fracture region away from the shear plane. A model of evolution development of the observed echelon structure along the main rupture front under the shear domination conditions is proposed.

  18. Apparatus for shearing spent nuclear fuel assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Weil, Bradley S.; Metz, III, Curtis F.

    1980-01-01

    A method and apparatus are described for shearing spent nuclear fuel assemblies of the type comprising an array of fuel pins disposed within an outer metal shell or shroud. A spent fuel assembly is first compacted in a known manner and then incrementally sheared using fixed and movable shear blades having matched laterally projecting teeth which slidably intermesh to provide the desired shearing action. Incremental advancement of the fuel assembly after each shear cycle is limited to a distance corresponding to the lateral projection of the teeth to ensure fuel assembly breakup into small uniform segments which are amenable to remote chemical processing.

  19. Steady incompressible variable thickness shear layer aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chi, M. R.

    1976-01-01

    A shear flow aerodynamic theory for steady incompressible flows is presented for both the lifting and non lifting problems. The slow variation of the boundary layer thickness is considered. The slowly varying behavior is treated by using multitime scales. The analysis begins with the elementary wavy wall problem and, through Fourier superpositions over the wave number space, the shear flow equivalents to the aerodynamic transfer functions of classical potential flow are obtained. The aerodynamic transfer functions provide integral equations which relate the wall pressure and the upwash. Computational results are presented for the pressure distribution, the lift coefficient, and the center of pressure travel along a two dimensional flat plate in a shear flow. The aerodynamic load is decreased by the shear layer, compared to the potential flow. The variable thickness shear layer decreases it less than the uniform thickness shear layer based upon equal maximum shear layer thicknesses.

  20. A Two-Axis Direct Fluid Shear Stress Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adcock, Edward E.; Scott, Michael A.; Bajikar, Sateesh S.

    2010-01-01

    This innovation is a miniature or micro sized semiconductor sensor design that provides two axis direct non-intrusive measurement of skin friction or wall shear stress in fluid flow. The sensor is fabricated by micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) technology, enabling small size and low cost reproductions. The sensors have been fabricated by utilizing MEMS fabrication processes to bond a sensing element wafer to a fluid coupling wafer. This layering technique provides for an out of plane dimension that is on the same order of length as the inplane dimensions. The sensor design has the following characteristics: a shear force collecting plate with dimensions that can be tailored to various application specific requirements such as spatial resolution, temporal resolution and shear force range and resolution. This plate is located coplanar to both the sensor body and flow boundary, and is connected to a dual axis gimbal structure by a connecting column or lever arm. The dual axis gimbal structure has torsional hinges with embedded piezoresistive torsional strain gauges which provide a voltage output that is correlated to the applied shear stress (and excitation current) on force collection plate that is located on the flow boundary surface (hence the transduction method). This combination of design elements create a force concentration and resolution structure that enables the generation of a large stress on the strain gauge from the small shear stress on the flow boundary wall. This design as well as the use of back side electrical contacts establishes a non-intrusive method to quantitatively measure the shear force vector on aerodynamic bodies.

  1. Constitutive Behavior of Reinforced Concrete Membrane Elements under Tri-directional Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labib, Moheb

    The two-dimensional behavior of typical reinforced concrete (RC) structures has been extensively studied in the past several decades by investigating the constitutive behavior of full-scale reinforced concrete elements subjected to a bi-axial state of stress. In order to understand the true behavior of many large complex structures, the goal of this investigation is to develop new constitutive relationships for RC elements subjected to tri-directional shear stresses. Recently, additional out-of-plane jacks were installed on the panel tester at University of Houston so that concrete elements could be subjected to tri-directional shear stresses. This upgrade makes the panel tester the only one of its kind in the US that is capable of applying such combinations of stresses on full-scale reinforced concrete elements. This dissertation presents the details of the mounting and installation of the additional hydraulic jacks on the universal panel tester. The experimental program includes a series of seven reinforced concrete elements subjected to different combinations of in-plane and out-of-plane shear stresses. Increasing the applied out-of-plane shear stresses reduced the membrane shear strength of the elements. The effect of applying out-of-plane shear stresses on the in-plane shear strength was represented by modifying the softening coefficient in the compression stress strain curve of concrete struts. The modified model was able to capture the behavior and the ultimate capacity of the tested elements. The effect of the in-plane shear reinforcement ratio on the interaction between in-plane and out-of-plane shear stresses was evaluated. The model was implemented in the Finite Element package FEAP and was used to predict the ultimate capacity of many structures subjected to a combination of in-plane and out-of-plane shear stresses. The results of the analytical model were used to develop simplified design equations for members subjected to bi-directional shear loads

  2. Piezoelectric Response of Polyvinylidene Fluoride to Combined Compression and Shear.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-31

    Uproj" 0.27 km/s PVDF Element Figure 2. Configuration of inclined-impact experiments (a thin metalic film element is vapor deposited onto the impact...thick. Electrodes are vapor - deposited onto each side of the circular 0.5-cm- diameter sensitized area in the center of each 2.54-cm-diameter film . The...and coworkers 1, 2 at the National Bureau of Standards (NBS). The sensing element in the NBS stress gage is a double layer of the thin , polymer film

  3. Shear wave measurements in shock-induced, high-pressure phases

    SciTech Connect

    Aidun, J.B.

    1993-01-01

    Structural phase transformations under shock loading are of considerable interest for understanding the response of solids under nonhydrostatic stresses and at high strain-rates. Examining shock-induced transformations from continuum level measurements is fundamentally constrained by the inability to directly identify microscopic processes, and also by the limited number of material properties that can be directly measured. ne latter limitation can be reduced by measuring both shear and compression waves using Lagrangian gauges in combined, compression and shear loading. The shear wave serves as an important, real-time probe of the shocked state and unloading response. Using results from a recent study of CaCO[sub 3], the unique information obtained from the shear wave speed and the detailed structure of the shear wave are shown to be useful for distinguishing the effects of phase transformations from yielding, as well as in characterizing the high-pressure phases and the yielding process under shock loading.

  4. Shear wave measurements in shock-induced, high-pressure phases

    SciTech Connect

    Aidun, J.B.

    1993-07-01

    Structural phase transformations under shock loading are of considerable interest for understanding the response of solids under nonhydrostatic stresses and at high strain-rates. Examining shock-induced transformations from continuum level measurements is fundamentally constrained by the inability to directly identify microscopic processes, and also by the limited number of material properties that can be directly measured. ne latter limitation can be reduced by measuring both shear and compression waves using Lagrangian gauges in combined, compression and shear loading. The shear wave serves as an important, real-time probe of the shocked state and unloading response. Using results from a recent study of CaCO{sub 3}, the unique information obtained from the shear wave speed and the detailed structure of the shear wave are shown to be useful for distinguishing the effects of phase transformations from yielding, as well as in characterizing the high-pressure phases and the yielding process under shock loading.

  5. Drift-Alfven instabilities of a finite beta plasma shear flow along a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailenko, V. V.; Mikhailenko, V. S.; Lee, Hae June

    2016-02-01

    It was derived that the drift-Alfven instabilities with the shear flow parallel to the magnetic field have significant difference from the drift-Alfven instabilities of a shearless plasma when the ion temperature is comparable with electron temperature for a finite plasma beta. The velocity shear not only modifies the frequency and the growth rate of the known drift-Alfven instability, which develops due to the inverse electron Landau damping, but also triggers a combined effect of the velocity shear and the inverse ion Landau damping, which manifests the development of the ion kinetic shear-flow-driven drift-Alfven instability. The excited unstable waves have the phase velocities along the magnetic field comparable with the ion thermal velocity, and the growth rate is comparable with the frequency. The development of this instability may be the efficient mechanism of the ion energization in shear flows.

  6. Wind turbine blade shear web disbond detection using rotor blade operational sensing and data analysis.

    PubMed

    Myrent, Noah; Adams, Douglas E; Griffith, D Todd

    2015-02-28

    A wind turbine blade's structural dynamic response is simulated and analysed with the goal of characterizing the presence and severity of a shear web disbond. Computer models of a 5 MW offshore utility-scale wind turbine were created to develop effective algorithms for detecting such damage. Through data analysis and with the use of blade measurements, a shear web disbond was quantified according to its length. An aerodynamic sensitivity study was conducted to ensure robustness of the detection algorithms. In all analyses, the blade's flap-wise acceleration and root-pitching moment were the clearest indicators of the presence and severity of a shear web disbond. A combination of blade and non-blade measurements was formulated into a final algorithm for the detection and quantification of the disbond. The probability of detection was 100% for the optimized wind speed ranges in laminar, 30% horizontal shear and 60% horizontal shear conditions.

  7. Large-scale magnetic field generation by randomly forced shearing waves.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, T; McWilliams, J C; Schekochihin, A A

    2011-12-16

    A rigorous theory for the generation of a large-scale magnetic field by random nonhelically forced motions of a conducting fluid combined with a linear shear is presented in the analytically tractable limit of low magnetic Reynolds number (Rm) and weak shear. The dynamo is kinematic and due to fluctuations in the net (volume-averaged) electromotive force. This is a minimal proof-of-concept quasilinear calculation aiming to put the shear dynamo, a new effect recently found in numerical experiments, on a firm theoretical footing. Numerically observed scalings of the wave number and growth rate of the fastest-growing mode, previously not understood, are derived analytically. The simplicity of the model suggests that shear dynamo action may be a generic property of sheared magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

  8. Factors governing hole expansion ratio of steel sheets with smooth sheared edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jae Ik; Jung, Jaimyun; Lee, Hak Hyeon; Kim, Gyo-Sung; Kim, Hyoung Seop

    2016-11-01

    Stretch-flangeability measured using hole expansion test (HET) represents the ability of a material to form into a complex shaped component. Despite its importance in automotive applications of advanced high strength steels, stretch-flangeability is a less known sheet metal forming property. In this paper, we investigate the factors governing hole expansion ratio (HER) by means of tensile test and HET. We correlate a wide range of tensile properties with HERs of steel sheet specimens because the stress state in the hole edge region during the HET is almost the same as that of the uniaxial tensile test. In order to evaluate an intrinsic HER of steel sheet specimens, the initial hole of the HET specimen is produced using a milling process after punching, which can remove accumulated shearing damage and micro-void in the hole edge region that is present when using the standard HER evaluation method. It was found that the intrinsic HER of steel sheet specimens was proportional to the strain rate sensitivity exponent and post uniform elongation.

  9. Shear Fractures of Extreme Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Boris

    2016-10-01

    Natural and laboratory observations show that shear ruptures (faults) can propagate with extreme dynamics (up to intersonic rupture velocities) through intact materials and along pre-existing faults with frictional and coherent (bonded) interfaces. The rupture propagation is accompanied by significant fault strength weakening in the rupture head. Although essential for understanding earthquakes, rock mechanics, tribology and fractures, the question of what physical processes determine how that weakening occurs is still unresolved. The general approach today to explain the fault weakening is based upon the strong velocity-weakening friction law according to which the fault strength drops rapidly with slip velocity. Different mechanisms of strength weakening caused by slip velocity have been proposed including thermal effect, high-frequency compressional waves, expansion of pore fluid, macroscopic melting and gel formation. This paper proposes that shear ruptures of extreme dynamics propagating in intact materials and in pre-existing frictional and coherent interfaces are governed by the same recently identified mechanism which is associated with an intensive microcracking process in the rupture tip observed for all types of extreme ruptures. The microcracking process creates, in certain conditions, a special fan-like microstructure shear resistance of which is extremely low (up to an order of magnitude less than the frictional strength). The fan-structure representing the rupture head provides strong interface weakening and causes high slip and rupture velocities. In contrast with the velocity-weakening dependency, this mechanism provides the opposite weakening-velocity effect. The fan-mechanism differs remarkably from all reported earlier mechanisms, and it can provide such important features observed in extreme ruptures as: extreme slip and rupture velocities, high slip velocity without heating, off-fault tensile cracking, transition from crack-like to pulse

  10. Phoresis in a Shearing Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Söderholm, Lars H.; Borg, Karl I.

    2003-05-01

    An axially symmetric body small compared with the mean free path is free to move in a shearing gas. The body is treated as a test particle. The force and torque acting on the body are calculated. This force and torque will set the body in motion, which asymptotically will take place in one of the eigendirections of the rate of deformation tensor. The axis of the body then points in the same direction. For a velocity field vx(y) the final motion is parallel to one of the lines x = y and x = -y, and the speed of the motion is given by V = 9μβN/8p (2πkBT/m)1/2 ατb1/4 + 1/2πατ + [8 - (6 - πατ)]b3vx,y. Here μ is the viscosity of the gas, p is the pressure, βN is a number close to unity, T is the temperature, m is the mass of a gas molecule, and ατ is parameter in the boundary conditions close to unity. The non-dimensional numbers b1 and b3 depends on the shape of the body. This speed is of the order of the mean free path of the gas multiplied by the shearing. There will be no motion for a body, which is reflection symmetric in a plane orthogonal to the axis of symmetry. This means that there is a phenomenon of phoresis in a shearing gas, which is analogous to thermophoresis in a gas with a temperature gradient.

  11. Nucleation of shear bands in amorphous alloys

    PubMed Central

    Perepezko, John H.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Chen, Ming-Wei; Wang, Jun-Qiang; Gonzalez, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    The initiation and propagation of shear bands is an important mode of localized inhomogeneous deformation that occurs in a wide range of materials. In metallic glasses, shear band development is considered to center on a structural heterogeneity, a shear transformation zone that evolves into a rapidly propagating shear band under a shear stress above a threshold. Deformation by shear bands is a nucleation-controlled process, but the initiation process is unclear. Here we use nanoindentation to probe shear band nucleation during loading by measuring the first pop-in event in the load–depth curve which is demonstrated to be associated with shear band formation. We analyze a large number of independent measurements on four different bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) alloys and reveal the operation of a bimodal distribution of the first pop-in loads that are associated with different shear band nucleation sites that operate at different stress levels below the glass transition temperature, Tg. The nucleation kinetics, the nucleation barriers, and the density for each site type have been determined. The discovery of multiple shear band nucleation sites challenges the current view of nucleation at a single type of site and offers opportunities for controlling the ductility of BMG alloys. PMID:24594599

  12. Does Shear Thickening Occur in Semisolid Metals?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, Helen V.; Favier, Veronique

    2016-04-01

    In the various forms of semisolid processing such as thixoforming and thixoforging, the entry into the die occurs in a fraction of a second so it is the transient rheological behavior which governs the initial stages of flow. In experiments in the literature, this rheological behavior is probed through applying rapid transitions in shear rate under isothermal conditions. There is contradictory evidence as to whether the behavior during these transitions is shear thinning or shear thickening, although it is clear that once in the die the material is thinning. Here the data in the literature are reanalyzed to obtain a rationalization of the contradictions which has not previously been available. It is argued that if a suspension is initially in a disagglomerated state ( i.e., one which is initially sheared), the instantaneous behavior with a jump-up in shear rate is shear thickening (even if the long-term steady-state behavior is shear thinning) provided the fraction solid is greater than about 0.36 and the final shear rate at the end of the jump is greater than about 100 s-1. If the jump-up in shear rate is made from rest then yield masks the shear thickening.

  13. A new inclinable shear apparatus for large sample testing: design and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickli, Ch.; Burger, S.; Herranhof, H.; Michel, T.; Moser, A.; Tröger, A.

    2012-04-01

    Soil bioengineering methods are commonly applied to protect slopes from erosion and shallow landslides. However, the precise effectiveness of vegetation regarding slope stability is difficult to determine. Root reinforcement can be evaluated directly in terms of the additional shear strength provided by roots in root-reinforced soils. In this context we designed a shearing device for large scale planted soil samples with the aim to provide information about the contribution of plant roots to soil shear strength. The apparatus allows investigations on soil block samples with roots of different plant species commonly used for remediation and habitat restoration purposes under almost natural conditions. Shear stress results of rooted soils can be compared to those of un-vegetated soils with similar soil types. New and different to conventionally applied concepts, shear tests can be performed at variable inclinations up to 45° , considering plant growth at the corresponding angle of slope. Furthermore, experiments can be conducted at variable depth of the shearing zone, with low normal stresses and low shearing rates of≥ 0.01 mm/min. The measurements involve shearing force, shearing displacement (up to 200 mm), normal stress, normal displacement (dilatancy/consolidation) all recorded with high accuracy. Saturated and partially saturated soil samples containing roots can be tested with the soil humidity measured near the shearing zone. An automatic data logging system was designed for real-time visualisation of the different parameters and recording all required data in conjunction with the described direct shear apparatus. The device for soil samples of up to 500 x 500 x 400 mm offers a unique possibility to span the gap between investigations concerning vegetation effects on small planted soil specimens (e.g. triaxial tests) and the calculation of slope stability on entire slopes with vegetation. In addition, it combines the advantages of laboratory tests under

  14. Shear zone junctions: Of zippers and freeways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passchier, Cees W.; Platt, John P.

    2017-02-01

    Ductile shear zones are commonly treated as straight high-strain domains with uniform shear sense and characteristic curved foliation trails, bounded by non-deforming wall rock. Many shear zones, however, are branched, and if movement on such branches is contemporaneous, the resulting shape can be complicated and lead to unusual shear sense arrangement and foliation geometries in the wall rock. For Y-shaped shear zone triple junctions with three joining branches and transport direction at a high angle to the branchline, only eight basic types of junction are thought to be stable and to produce significant displacement. The simplest type, called freeway junctions, have similar shear sense in all three branches. The other types show joining or separating behaviour of shear zone branches similar to the action of a zipper. Such junctions may have shear zone branches that join to form a single branch (closing zipper junction), or a single shear zone that splits to form two branches, (opening zipper junction). All categories of shear zone junctions show characteristic foliation patterns and deflection of markers in the wall rock. Closing zipper junctions are unusual, since they form a non-active zone with opposite deflection of foliations in the wall rock known as an extraction fault or wake. Shear zipper junctions can form domains of overprinting shear sense along their flanks. A small and large field example are given from NE Spain and Eastern Anatolia. The geometry of more complex, 3D shear zone junctions with slip parallel and oblique to the branchline is briefly discussed.

  15. Conductor shears as iceberg encroaches

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-10-01

    Operators in the Arctic regions must protect wellheads from encroaching icebergs and icepack sheets. Diverting ice masses and excavating large holes below scour depth is expensive. Now an alternate approach allows the conductor to shear, shuts in the well, and provides a method of re-entering the well. The new system has been successfully used by Mobil on two exploratory wells in the Hibernia field off eastern Canada. The wells used 18 3/4-in. wellheads rated at 10,000 psi with 36-in. conductor pipe. The performance of the system is discussed.

  16. Compactness of lateral shearing interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrec, Yann; Taboury, Jean; Sauer, Hervé; Chavel, Pierre

    2011-08-01

    Imaging lateral shearing interferometers are good candidates for airborne or spaceborne Fourier-transform spectral imaging. For such applications, compactness is one key parameter. In this article, we compare the size of four mirror-based interferometers, the Michelson interferometer with roof-top (or corner-cube) mirrors, and the cyclic interferometers with two, three, and four mirrors, focusing more particularly on the last two designs. We give the expression of the translation they induce between the two exiting rays. We then show that the cyclic interferometer with three mirrors can be made quite compact. Nevertheless, the Michelson interferometer is the most compact solution, especially for highly diverging beams.

  17. Gravity waves on shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, John

    2001-09-01

    The eigenvalue problem for gravity waves on a shear flow of depth h and non-inflected velocity profile U(y) (typically parabolic) is revisited, following Burns (1953) and Yih (1972). Complementary variational formulations that provide upper and lower bounds to the Froude number F as a function of the wave speed c and wavenumber k are constructed. These formulations are used to improve Burns's long-wave approximation and to determine Yih's critical wavenumber k[low asterisk], for which the wave is stationary (c = 0) and to which k must be inferior for the existence of an upstream running wave.

  18. Invariant Quantities in Shear Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baule, A.; Evans, R. M. L.

    2008-12-01

    The dynamics of systems out of thermal equilibrium is usually treated on a case-by-case basis without knowledge of fundamental and universal principles. We address this problem for a class of driven steady states, namely, those mechanically driven at the boundaries such as complex fluids under shear. From a nonequilibrium counterpart to detailed balance (NCDB) we derive a remarkably simple set of invariant quantities which remain unchanged when the system is driven. These new nonequilibrium relations are both exact and valid arbitrarily far from equilibrium. Furthermore, they enable the systematic calculation of transition rates in driven systems with state spaces of arbitrary connectivity.

  19. Effect of orientation and targeted extracellular matrix degradation on the shear mechanical properties of the annulus fibrosus.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Nathan T; Smith, Lachlan J; Han, Woojin M; Morelli, Jeffrey; Yoder, Jonathon H; Elliott, Dawn M

    2011-11-01

    The intervertebral disc experiences combinations of compression, torsion, and bending that subject the disc substructures, particularly the annulus fibrosus (AF), to multidirectional loads and deformations. Combined tensile and shear loading is a particularly important loading paradigm, as compressive loads place the AF in circumferential hoop tension, and spine torsion or bending induces AF shear. Yet the anisotropy of AF mechanical properties in shear, as well as important structure-function mechanisms governing this response, are not well-understood. The objective of this study, therefore, was to investigate the effects of tissue orientation and enzymatic degradation of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and elastin on AF shear mechanical properties. Significant anisotropy was found: the circumferential shear modulus, Gθz, was an order of magnitude greater than the radial shear modulus, Grθ. In the circumferential direction, prestrain significantly increased the shear modulus, suggesting an important role for collagen fiber stretch in shear properties for this orientation. While not significant and highly variable, ChABC treatment to remove GAG increased the circumferential shear modulus compared to PBS control (p=0.15). Together with the established literature for tensile loading of fiber-reinforced GAG-rich tissues, the trends for changes in shear modulus with ChABC treatment reflect complex, structure-function relationships between GAG and collagen that potentially occur over several hierarchical scales. Elastase digestion did not significantly affect shear modulus with respect to PBS control; further contributing to the notion that circumferential shear modulus is dominated by collagen fiber stretch. The results of this study highlight the complexity of the structure-function relationships that govern the mechanical response of the AF in radial and circumferential shear, and provide new and more accurate data for the validation of material models and tissue

  20. Computer modelling of bone's adaptation: the role of normal strain, shear strain and fluid flow.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Abhishek Kumar; Prasad, Jitendra

    2017-04-01

    Bone loss is a serious health problem. In vivo studies have found that mechanical stimulation may inhibit bone loss as elevated strain in bone induces osteogenesis, i.e. new bone formation. However, the exact relationship between mechanical environment and osteogenesis is less clear. Normal strain is considered as a prime stimulus of osteogenic activity; however, there are some instances in the literature where osteogenesis is observed in the vicinity of minimal normal strain, specifically near the neutral axis of bending in long bones. It suggests that osteogenesis may also be induced by other or secondary components of mechanical environment such as shear strain or canalicular fluid flow. As it is evident from the literature, shear strain and fluid flow can be potent stimuli of osteogenesis. This study presents a computational model to investigate the roles of these stimuli in bone adaptation. The model assumes that bone formation rate is roughly proportional to the normal, shear and fluid shear strain energy density above their osteogenic thresholds. In vivo osteogenesis due to cyclic cantilever bending of a murine tibia has been simulated. The model predicts results close to experimental findings when normal strain, and shear strain or fluid shear were combined. This study also gives a new perspective on the relation between osteogenic potential of micro-level fluid shear and that of macro-level bending shear. Attempts to establish such relations among the components of mechanical environment and corresponding osteogenesis may ultimately aid in the development of effective approaches to mitigating bone loss.

  1. Analysis of the complex stress state during early loading in cylindrical compression-shear specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, S.; Frint, P.; F-X Wagner, M.

    2017-03-01

    In most engineering applications, materials are subjected to complex load cases rather than the simple uniaxial ones typically used for material characterization. To experimentally study the material behavior under a combination of compression and shear, an inclined compression specimen can be used. This specimen has been applied in various earlier experimental studies, typically to investigate shear localization under quasi-static or impact loading. In this contribution, we analyze the stress state in a compression-shear specimen in detail using an elastic-ideal plastic finite element simulation. The effects of specimen aspect ratio (height/diameter), inclination angle, and friction conditions between specimen and tool plates are investigated using the material parameters of different conventional steels as input. Shear stress distributions in characteristic shear directions on specific planes in the specimen that control the subsequent plastic deformation behavior are evaluated. Our results show that, even in the absence of friction, shear stresses are distributed heterogeneously in the inclined specimen, which differs from the stress distribution in a conventional compression specimen. Moreover, the highest shear and equivalent stresses always occur at the edges of the short diagonal plane of the specimen, independent of the investigated parameters. This study contributes to a more detailed understanding of the elasto-plastic mechanics in compression-shear specimens, and it specifically provides information for the analysis of the onset of early plastic deformation.

  2. Wall Shear Stress, Wall Pressure and Near Wall Velocity Field Relationships in a Whirling Annular Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Winslow, Robert B.; Thames, H. Davis, III

    1996-01-01

    The mean and phase averaged pressure and wall shear stress distributions were measured on the stator wall of a 50% eccentric annular seal which was whirling in a circular orbit at the same speed as the shaft rotation. The shear stresses were measured using flush mounted hot-film probes. Four different operating conditions were considered consisting of Reynolds numbers of 12,000 and 24,000 and Taylor numbers of 3,300 and 6,600. At each of the operating conditions the axial distribution (from Z/L = -0.2 to 1.2) of the mean pressure, shear stress magnitude, and shear stress direction on the stator wall were measured. Also measured were the phase averaged pressure and shear stress. These data were combined to calculate the force distributions along the seal length. Integration of the force distributions result in the net forces and moments generated by the pressure and shear stresses. The flow field inside the seal operating at a Reynolds number of 24,000 and a Taylor number of 6,600 has been measured using a 3-D laser Doppler anemometer system. Phase averaged wall pressure and wall shear stress are presented along with phase averaged mean velocity and turbulence kinetic energy distributions located 0.16c from the stator wall where c is the seal clearance. The relationships between the velocity, turbulence, wall pressure and wall shear stress are very complex and do not follow simple bulk flow predictions.

  3. An unload-induced direct-shear model for granular gouge friction in rock discontinuities.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Zou, Yang; Li, Xing; Zhao, Jian

    2014-09-01

    The experimental study introduces an unload-induced direct-shear model to investigate the frictional slip of a layer of simulated granular gouges induced by the combination of a decreasing normal stress and a constant shear stress. A frictional equilibrium state of the gouge layer is initially established under fixed normal and shear stresses. The normal stress is proposed to decrease at a constant unloading rate to induce the frictional slip of the gouge layer, and the shear stress is proposed to keep a constant value during the test. A displacement meter and load cells synchronously measure the slip displacement and the applied normal and shear stresses, respectively. The normal and shear stresses sharply decrease with the frictional slip, owing to damage of gouge contacts. The frictional slip is then gradually arrested with new formation of gouge contacts. A greater initial shear stress induces larger normal and shear stress reductions and a smaller slip displacement. The strain energy stored in the discontinuous system before the frictional slip is found to affect the slip displacement. The advantages and the limitations of this model are discussed at the end.

  4. Effects of Coalescence on Shear-Induced Gelation of Colloids.

    PubMed

    Jaquet, Baptiste; Lazzari, Stefano; Colonna, Luca; Colombo, Gabriele; Soos, Miroslav; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2017-02-07

    Shearing lyophobic colloidal suspensions can lead to aggregation, followed by gelation, if the formed clusters grow to sizes large enough to percolate. If the temperature is set over the glass transition temperature of the suspended material, the particles embedded in the same aggregate start to coalesce with one another. Coalescence occurs to the finite viscosity of the particles' material, which leads to material diffusion from particle to particle. The driving force of this process is the reduction of the particle-dispersant interface and, as a consequence, the decrease the center-to-center separation of the particles. This leads to decreased cluster size, and hence a delayed gelation. Simultaneously, coalescence reinforces the particle-particle bonds formed upon aggregation, leading to clusters that are able to resist higher hydrodynamic forces before breaking up, hence leading to faster gelation. These two competing effects, combined with the natural complexity of colloidal aggregation makes it rather difficult to understand and predict which trend becomes dominant. In the present work, the shear-induced gelation of model polymeric colloidal systems with different glass transition temperatures has been studied. Starting with their interaction potential we investigate the impact of temperature on the gel time in concentrated suspensions (φ = 5%) under steady shear, followed by the effect of temperature on the stress-resistance of fully destabilized clusters under agitation. The results of the present work allow for a systematic view and deepened understanding of the factors governing shear-induced gelation in the presence of coalescence.

  5. Sensor for Boundary Shear Stress in Fluid Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Lih, Shyh-Shiuh; Chang, Zensheu; Trease, Brian P.; Kerenyi, Kornel; Widholm, Scott E.; Ostlund, Patrick N.

    2012-01-01

    The formation of scour patterns at bridge piers is driven by the forces at the boundary of the water flow. In most experimental scour studies, indirect processes have been applied to estimate the shear stress using measured velocity profiles. The estimations are based on theoretical models and associated assumptions. However, the turbulence flow fields and boundary layer in the pier-scour region are very complex and lead to low-fidelity results. In addition, available turbulence models cannot account accurately for the bed roughness effect. Direct measurement of the boundary shear stress, normal stress, and their fluctuations are attractive alternatives. However, most direct-measurement shear sensors are bulky in size or not compatible to fluid flow. A sensor has been developed that consists of a floating plate with folded beam support and an optical grid on the back, combined with a high-resolution optical position probe. The folded beam support makes the floating plate more flexible in the sensing direction within a small footprint, while maintaining high stiffness in the other directions. The floating plate converts the shear force to displacement, and the optical probe detects the plate s position with nanometer resolution by sensing the pattern of the diffraction field of the grid through a glass window. This configuration makes the sensor compatible with liquid flow applications.

  6. A Multiresolution Approach to Shear Wave Image Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Hollender, Peter; Bottenus, Nick; Trahey, Gregg

    2015-01-01

    Shear wave imaging techniques build maps of local elasticity estimating the local group velocity of induced mechanical waves. Velocity estimates are formed using the time delay in the motion profile of the medium at two or more points offset from the shear wave source. Because the absolute time-of-flight between any pair of locations scales with the distance between them, there is an inherent trade-off between robustness to time-of-flight errors and lateral spatial resolution based on the number and spacing of the receive points used for each estimate. This work proposes a method of using the time delays measured between all combinations of locations to estimate a noise-robust, high-resolution image. The time-of-flight problem is presented as an overdetermined system of linear equations that can be directly solved with and without spatial regularization terms. Finite element method simulations of acoustic radiation force-induced shear waves are used to illustrate the method, demonstrating superior contrast-to-noise ratio and lateral edge resolution characteristics compared to linear regression of arrival times. This technique may improve shear wave imaging in situations where time-of-flight noise is a limiting factor. PMID:26276953

  7. THE SDSS CO-ADD: COSMIC SHEAR MEASUREMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Huan; Dodelson, Scott; Soares-Santos, Marcelle; Annis, James; Hao Jiangang; Johnston, David; Kubo, Jeffrey M.; Reis, Ribamar R. R.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Simet, Melanie

    2012-12-10

    Stripe 82 in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey was observed multiple times, allowing deeper images to be constructed by co-adding the data. Here, we analyze the ellipticities of background galaxies in this 275 deg{sup 2} region, searching for evidence of distortions due to cosmic shear. We do so using measurements of both the shear-shear correlation function and power spectrum, with the latter determined using both ''quadratic'' and ''pseudo'' estimation techniques. We show how we verified these methods using mock catalogs. We also describe our methods for modeling and correcting for the effects of the point-spread function (PSF) in our shape measurements, and we also describe our prescription for estimating photometric redshifts (photo-z's) for our galaxy sample. In particular, we assess the impact of potential systematic effects due to the PSF and to photo-z's, and show that these are under control in our analysis. We find consistent correlation function and power spectrum results, where the E-mode cosmic shear signal is detected in both real and Fourier space with >5{sigma} significance on degree scales, while the B-mode is consistent with zero as expected. The amplitude of the signal constrains the combination of the matter density {Omega}{sub m} and fluctuation amplitude {sigma}{sub 8} to be {Omega}{sup 0.7}{sub m}{sigma}{sub 8} = 0.252{sup +0.032}{sub -{sub 0.052}}.

  8. Shear Assisted Electrochemical Exfoliation of Graphite to Graphene.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Dhanraj B; Brenker, Jason; Easton, Christopher D; Tabor, Rico F; Neild, Adrian; Majumder, Mainak

    2016-04-12

    The exfoliation characteristics of graphite as a function of applied anodic potential (1-10 V) in combination with shear field (400-74 400 s(-1)) have been studied in a custom-designed microfluidic reactor. Systematic investigation by atomic force microscopy (AFM) indicates that at higher potentials thicker and more fragmented graphene sheets are obtained, while at potentials as low as 1 V, pronounced exfoliation is triggered by the influence of shear. The shear-assisted electrochemical exfoliation process yields large (∼10 μm) graphene flakes with a high proportion of single, bilayer, and trilayer graphene and small ID/IG ratio (0.21-0.32) with only a small contribution from carbon-oxygen species as demonstrated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. This method comprises intercalation of sulfate ions followed by exfoliation using shear induced by a flowing electrolyte. Our findings on the crucial role of hydrodynamics in accentuating the exfoliation efficiency suggest a safer, greener, and more automated method for production of high quality graphene from graphite.

  9. Density-shear instability in electron magneto-hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, T. S. Hollerbach, R.; Lyutikov, M.

    2014-05-15

    We discuss a novel instability in inertia-less electron magneto-hydrodynamics (EMHD), which arises from a combination of electron velocity shear and electron density gradients. The unstable modes have a lengthscale longer than the transverse density scale, and a growth-rate of the order of the inverse Hall timescale. We suggest that this density-shear instability may be of importance in magnetic reconnection regions on scales smaller than the ion skin depth, and in neutron star crusts. We demonstrate that the so-called Hall drift instability, previously argued to be relevant in neutron star crusts, is a resistive tearing instability rather than an instability of the Hall term itself. We argue that the density-shear instability is of greater significance in neutron stars than the tearing instability, because it generally has a faster growth-rate and is less sensitive to geometry and boundary conditions. We prove that, for uniform electron density, EMHD is “at least as stable” as regular, incompressible MHD, in the sense that any field configuration that is stable in MHD is also stable in EMHD. We present a connection between the density-shear instability in EMHD and the magneto-buoyancy instability in anelastic MHD.

  10. Poroelastic fluid effects on shear for rocks with soft anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J G

    2004-04-13

    A general analysis of poroelasticity for vertical transverse isotropy (VTI) shows that four eigenvectors are pure shear modes with no coupling to the pore-fluid mechanics. The remaining two eigenvectors are linear combinations of pure compression and uniaxial shear, both of which are coupled to the fluid mechanics. After reducing the problem to a 2 x 2 system, the analysis shows in a relatively elementary fashion how a poroelastic system with isotropic solid elastic frame, but with anisotropy introduced through the poroelastic coefficients, interacts with the mechanics of the pore fluid and produces shear dependence on fluid properties in the overall poroelastic system. The analysis shows for example that this effect is always present (though sometimes small in magnitude) in the systems studied, and can be quite large (on the order of 10 to 20%) for wave propagation studies in some real granites and sandstones, including Spirit River sandstone and Schuler-Cotton Valley sandstone. Some of the results quoted here are obtained by using a new product formula relating local bulk and uniaxial shear energy to the product of the two eigenvalues that are coupled to the fluid mechanics. This product formula was first derived in prior work, but is given a more intuitive derivation here. The results obtained here are observed to be useful both for explaining difficult to reconcile experimental data, and for benchmarking of poroelastic codes.

  11. Optical Beam-Shear Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Stefan; Szwaykowski, Piotr

    2007-01-01

    A technique for measuring optical beam shear is based on collecting light from the four quadrants of the beam and comparing the optical power collected from each quadrant with that from the other three quadrants. As used here, "shear" signifies lateral displacement of a beam of light from a nominal optical axis. A sensor for implementing this technique consists of a modified focusing lens and a quad-cell photodetector, both centered on the nominal optical axis. The modification of the lens consists in cutting the lens into four sectors (corresponding to the four quadrants) by sawing along two orthogonal diameters, then reassembling the lens following either of two approaches described next. In one approach, the lens is reassembled by gluing the sectors back together. In the simplest variant of this approach, the kerf of the saw matches the spacing of the photodetector cells, so that the focus of each sector crosses the axis of symmetry to fall on the opposite photodetector cell (see figure). In another variant of this approach, the lens sectors are spaced apart to make their individual foci to fall on separate photodetector cells, without crossing the optical axis. In the case of a sufficiently wide beam, the modified lens could be replaced with four independent lenses placed in a square array, each focusing onto an independent photodetector

  12. Shear wall ultimate drift limits

    SciTech Connect

    Duffey, T.A.; Goldman, A.; Farrar, C.R.

    1994-04-01

    Drift limits for reinforced-concrete shear walls are investigated by reviewing the open literature for appropriate experimental data. Drift values at ultimate are determined for walls with aspect ratios ranging up to a maximum of 3.53 and undergoing different types of lateral loading (cyclic static, monotonic static, and dynamic). Based on the geometry of actual nuclear power plant structures exclusive of containments and concerns regarding their response during seismic (i.e.,cyclic) loading, data are obtained from pertinent references for which the wall aspect ratio is less than or equal to approximately 1, and for which testing is cyclic in nature (typically displacement controlled). In particular, lateral deflections at ultimate load, and at points in the softening region beyond ultimate for which the load has dropped to 90, 80, 70, 60, and 50 percent of its ultimate value, are obtained and converted to drift information. The statistical nature of the data is also investigated. These data are shown to be lognormally distributed, and an analysis of variance is performed. The use of statistics to estimate Probability of Failure for a shear wall structure is illustrated.

  13. Shear-Induced Reactive Gelation.

    PubMed

    Brand, Bastian; Morbidelli, Massimo; Soos, Miroslav

    2015-11-24

    In this work, we describe a method for the production of porous polymer materials in the form of particles characterized by narrow pore size distribution using the principle of shear-induced reactive gelation. Poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene) primary particles with diameter ranging from 80 to 200 nm are used as building blocks, which are assembled into fractal-like clusters when exposed to high shear rates generated in a microchannel. It was found that independent of the primary particle size, it is possible to modulate the internal structure of formed fractal-like aggregates having fractal dimension ranging from 2.4 to 2.7 by varying the residence time in the microchannel. Thermally induced postpolymerization was used to increase the mechanical resilience of such formed clusters. Primary particle interpenetration was observed by SEM and confirmed by light scattering resulting in an increase of fractal dimension. Nitrogen sorption measurements and mercury porosimetry confirmed formation of a porous material with surface area ranging from 20 to 40 m(2)/g characterized by porosity of 70% and narrow pore size distribution with an average diameter around 700 nm without the presence of any micropores. The strong perfusive character of the synthesized material was confirmed by the existence of a plateau of the height equivalent to a theoretical plate measured at high reduced velocities using a chromatographic column packed with the synthesized microclusters.

  14. Shear dynamo problem: Quasilinear kinematic theory.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, S; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2009-04-01

    Large-scale dynamo action due to turbulence in the presence of a linear shear flow is studied. Our treatment is quasilinear and kinematic but is nonperturbative in the shear strength. We derive the integrodifferential equation for the evolution of the mean magnetic field by systematic use of the shearing coordinate transformation and the Galilean invariance of the linear shear flow. For nonhelical turbulence the time evolution of the cross-shear components of the mean field does not depend on any other components excepting themselves. This is valid for any Galilean-invariant velocity field, independent of its dynamics. Hence the shear-current assisted dynamo is essentially absent, although large-scale nonhelical dynamo action is not ruled out.

  15. Double-Diffusive Convection in Rotational Shear

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    CONVECTION IN ROTATIONAL SHEAR by James S. Ball March 2015 Thesis Advisor: Timour Radko Second Reader: John Colosi THIS PAGE...AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS DOUBLE-DIFFUSIVE CONVECTION IN ROTATIONAL SHEAR 6. AUTHOR(S) James S. Ball 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND...INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK ii Approved for public release;distribution is unlimited DOUBLE-DIFFUSIVE CONVECTION IN ROTATIONAL SHEAR James S. Ball

  16. Shear wall experiments and design in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y.J.; Hofmayer, C.

    1994-12-01

    This paper summarizes the results of recent survey studies on the available experimental data bases and design codes/standards for reinforced concrete (RC) shear wall structures in Japan. Information related to the seismic design of RC reactor buildings and containment structures was emphasized in the survey. The seismic requirements for concrete structures, particularly those related to shear strength design, are outlined. Detailed descriptions are presented on the development of Japanese shear wall equations, design requirements for containment structures, and ductility requirements.

  17. Continuous wave laser for wind shear detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Loren

    1991-01-01

    Details of the design and development of a continuous-wave heterodyne carbon dioxide laser which has wind shear detection capabilities are given in viewgraph form. The goal of the development was to investigate the lower cost CW (rather than pulsed) lidar option for look-ahead wind shear detection from aircraft. The device has potential utility for ground based wind shear detection at secondary airports where the high cost of a Terminal Doppler Weather Radar system is not justifiable.

  18. Effective temperature for sheared suspensions: a route towards closures for migration in bidisperse suspension.

    PubMed

    van der Sman, R G M; Vollebregt, H M

    2012-12-01

    By extending the concept of an effective temperature, earlier introduced for sheared monodisperse suspensions, we propose a continuum theory for sheared bidisperse suspensions. We show the theory for sheared suspensions can be constructed from the theory for Brownian suspensions by replacing the temperature with the effective temperature. Furthermore, we explore the validity of closure relations based on mean field/free volume theory, by comparison with experimental data obtained for Brownian bidisperse suspensions. In a recent paper, we have shown that the new theory, combined with the discussed closure relations, is indeed a predictive theory.

  19. Contactless remote induction of shear waves in soft tissues using a transcranial magnetic stimulation device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasland-Mongrain, Pol; Miller-Jolicoeur, Erika; Tang, An; Catheline, Stefan; Cloutier, Guy

    2016-03-01

    This study presents the first observation of shear waves induced remotely within soft tissues. It was performed through the combination of a transcranial magnetic stimulation device and a permanent magnet. A physical model based on Maxwell and Navier equations was developed. Experiments were performed on a cryogel phantom and a chicken breast sample. Using an ultrafast ultrasound scanner, shear waves of respective amplitudes of 5 and 0.5 μm were observed. Experimental and numerical results were in good agreement. This study constitutes the framework of an alternative shear wave elastography method.

  20. Laser-ultrasound spectroscopy apparatus and method with detection of shear resonances for measuring anisotropy, thickness, and other properties

    DOEpatents

    Levesque, Daniel; Moreau, Andre; Dubois, Marc; Monchalin, Jean-Pierre; Bussiere, Jean; Lord, Martin; Padioleau, Christian

    2000-01-01

    Apparatus and method for detecting shear resonances includes structure and steps for applying a radiation pulse from a pulsed source of radiation to an object to generate elastic waves therein, optically detecting the elastic waves generated in the object, and analyzing the elastic waves optically detected in the object. These shear resonances, alone or in combination with other information, may be used in the present invention to improve thickness measurement accuracy and to determine geometrical, microstructural, and physical properties of the object. At least one shear resonance in the object is detected with the elastic waves optically detected in the object. Preferably, laser-ultrasound spectroscopy is utilized to detect the shear resonances.

  1. Near-wall similarity in the three-dimensional turbulent boundary layers. III - Shear-driven flow results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, F. J.; Mcallister, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    Ten of eleven proposed three-dimensional similarity models identified in the literature are evaluated with direct wall shear, velocity field, and pressure gradient data from a three-dimensional shear-driven boundary layer flow. Results define an upper limit on velocity vector skewing for each model's predictive ability. When combined with earlier results for pressure-driven flows, each model's predictive ability with and without pressure gradients is summarized. The utility of some two-dimensional type indirect wall shear measurement methods and wall shear inference methods from near-wall velocity measurements for three-dimensional flows is also discussed.

  2. Origins of Shear Jamming for Frictional Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong; Zheng, Hu; Ren, Jie; Dijksman, Joshua; Bares, Jonathan; Behringer, Robert

    2016-11-01

    Granular systems have been shown to be able to behave like solids, under shear, even when their densities are below the critical packing fraction for frictionless isotropic jamming. To understand such a phenomena, called shear jamming, the question we address here is: how does shear bring a system from a unjammed state to a jammed state, where the coordination number, Z, is no less than 3, the isotropic jamming point for frictional grains? Since Z can be used to distinguish jammed states from unjammed ones, it is vital to understand how shear increases Z. We here propose a set of three particles in contact, denoted as a trimer, as the basic unit to characterize the deformation of the system. Trimers, stabilized by inter-grain friction, fail under a certain amount of shear and bend to make extra contacts to regain stability. By defining a projection operator of the opening angle of the trimer to the compression direction in the shear, O, we see a systematically linear decrease of this quantity with respect to shear strain, demonstrating the bending of trimers as expected. In addition, the average change of O from one shear step to the next shows a good collapse when plotted against Z, indicating a universal behavior in the process of shear jamming. We acknowledge support from NSF DMR1206351, NASA NNX15AD38G, the William M. Keck Foundation and a RT-MRSEC Fellowship.

  3. Periodically sheared 2D Yukawa systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kovács, Anikó Zsuzsa; Hartmann, Peter; Donkó, Zoltán

    2015-10-15

    We present non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation studies on the dynamic (complex) shear viscosity of a 2D Yukawa system. We have identified a non-monotonic frequency dependence of the viscosity at high frequencies and shear rates, an energy absorption maximum (local resonance) at the Einstein frequency of the system at medium shear rates, an enhanced collective wave activity, when the excitation is near the plateau frequency of the longitudinal wave dispersion, and the emergence of significant configurational anisotropy at small frequencies and high shear rates.

  4. Dynamic shear deformation in high purity Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Cerreta, Ellen K; Bingert, John F; Trujillo, Carl P; Lopez, Mike F; Gray, George T

    2009-01-01

    The forced shear test specimen, first developed by Meyer et al. [Meyer L. et al., Critical Adiabatic Shear Strength of Low Alloyed Steel Under Compressive Loading, Metallurgical Applications of Shock Wave and High Strain Rate Phenomena (Marcel Decker, 1986), 657; Hartmann K. et al., Metallurgical Effects on Impact Loaded Materials, Shock Waves and High Strain rate Phenomena in Metals (Plenum, 1981), 325-337.], has been utilized in a number of studies. While the geometry of this specimen does not allow for the microstructure to exactly define the location of shear band formation and the overall mechanical response of a specimen is highly sensitive to the geometry utilized, the forced shear specimen is useful for characterizing the influence of parameters such as strain rate, temperature, strain, and load on the microstructural evolution within a shear band. Additionally, many studies have utilized this geometry to advance the understanding of shear band development. In this study, by varying the geometry, specifically the ratio of the inner hole to the outer hat diameter, the dynamic shear localization response of high purity Fe was examined. Post mortem characterization was performed to quantify the width of the localizations and examine the microstructural and textural evolution of shear deformation in a bcc metal. Increased instability in mechanical response is strongly linked with development of enhanced intergranular misorientations, high angle boundaries, and classical shear textures characterized through orientation distribution functions.

  5. Shear wave splitting and shear wave splitting tomography of the southern Puna plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calixto, Frank J.; Robinson, Danielle; Sandvol, Eric; Kay, Suzanne; Abt, David; Fischer, Karen; Heit, Ben; Yuan, Xiaohui; Comte, Diana; Alvarado, Patricia

    2014-11-01

    We have investigated the seismic anisotropy beneath the Central Andean southern Puna plateau by applying shear wave splitting analysis and shear wave splitting tomography to local S waves and teleseismic SKS, SKKS and PKS phases. Overall, a very complex pattern of fast directions throughout the southern Puna plateau region and a circular pattern of fast directions around the region of the giant Cerro Galan ignimbrite complex are observed. In general, teleseismic lag times are much greater than those for local events which are interpreted to reflect a significant amount of sub and inner slab anisotropy. The complex pattern observed from shear wave splitting analysis alone is the result of a complex 3-D anisotropic structure under the southern Puna plateau. Our application of shear wave splitting tomography provides a 3-D model of anisotropy in the southern Puna plateau that shows different patterns depending on the driving mechanism of upper-mantle flow and seismic anisotropy. The trench parallel a-axes in the continental lithosphere above the slab east of 68W may be related to deformation of the overriding continental lithosphere since it is under compressive stresses which are orthogonal to the trench. The more complex pattern below the Cerro Galan ignimbrite complex and above the slab is interpreted to reflect delamination of continental lithosphere and upwelling of hot asthenosphere. The a-axes beneath the Cerro Galan, Cerro Blanco and Carachi Pampa volcanic centres at 100 km depth show some weak evidence for vertically orientated fast directions, which could be due to vertical asthenospheric flow around a delaminated block. Additionally, our splitting tomographic model shows that there is a significant amount of seismic anisotropy beneath the slab. The subslab mantle west of 68W shows roughly trench parallel horizontal a-axes that are probably driven by slab roll back and the relatively small coupling between the Nazca slab and the underlying mantle. In

  6. The Behaviour of Reinforced Concrete Subjected to Reversed Cyclic Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, David Michael Volpe

    Reversed cyclic loading, as may occur during seismic events, can cause sudden and brittle shear failures in reinforced concrete structural members. This thesis presents both experimental and analytical investigations into the behaviour of members subjected to reversed cyclic shear loading, and culminates in the development of a new, rational model to describe this behaviour. In the experimental phase of the research, ten reinforced concrete shell elements were tested under reversed cyclic in-plane shear loads. Data collected by means of several acquisition systems allowed extensive analysis of the experiments, and provided insight into the behaviour of the crack interfaces. In comparison with existing models, such as the Modified Compression Field Theory, it was found that the shear strengths of these reversed cyclically loaded specimens were as much as 25% lower than monotonic predictions. The results of the experimental program informed the development of a new analytical model, the General Crack Component Model (GCCM). The central concept of the GCCM is that the reversed cyclic behaviour of a shear panel depends on the behaviour of multiple crack systems, each with its own constitutive properties. A rigorous framework based on the principles of compatibility and equilibrium was formulated in order to allow for the appropriate combination of the stiffnesses of the three components of the model: concrete, steel, and cracks. The GCCM was validated for reversed cyclic and monotonic loading by comparison with the experimental results as well as data from other researchers. It was shown that the model provides good estimates of the behaviour of reinforced concrete subjected to reversed cyclic loads, and that it can be used as part of a larger structural analysis, ultimately helping engineers to design safer structures and more accurately assess the safety of existing construction.

  7. Behavior of granular materials under cyclic shear.

    PubMed

    Mueggenburg, Nathan W

    2005-03-01

    The design and development of a parallel plate shear cell for the study of large-scale shear flows in granular materials is presented. The parallel plate geometry allows for shear studies without the effects of curvature found in the more common Couette experiments. A system of independently movable slats creates a well with side walls that deform in response to the motions of grains within the pack. This allows for true parallel plate shear with minimal interference from the containing geometry. The motions of the side walls also allow for a direct measurement of the velocity profile across the granular pack. Results are presented for applying this system to the study of transients in granular shear and for shear-induced crystallization. Initial shear profiles are found to vary from packing to packing, ranging from a linear profile across the entire system to an exponential decay with a width of approximately six bead diameters. As the system is sheared, the velocity profile becomes much sharper, resembling an exponential decay with a width of roughly three bead diameters. Further shearing produces velocity profiles which can no longer be fit to an exponential decay, but are better represented as a Gaussian decay or error function profile. Cyclic shear is found to produce large-scale ordering of the granular pack, which has a profound impact on the shear profile. There exist periods of time in which there is slipping between layers as well as periods of time in which the layered particles lock together resulting in very little relative motion.

  8. Tuning graphene properties by shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Concha, Andres; Cheng, Shengfeng; Covaci, Lucian; Mahadevan, L.

    2014-03-01

    Graphene being the thinnest possible membrane made out of carbon atoms is prone to deformations under slight external forcing. Here, we take advantage of this proneness to deformations to manipulate transport properties of graphene ribbons. We analyze the effect on conductance and LDOS of the spontaneous pattern produced when a wide ribbon is subject to shear. The deformation of the ribbon produces pseudo-magnetic fields, scalar potentials, and Fermi velocity renormalization resulting in the modification of transmission properties without the need of an external gate potential. Our proposal paves the way for producing electronic waveguides by using an elastic instability that spans from the nano to macro-scales. AC was partially supported by Conicyt PAI 79112004 and Fondecyt iniciacion 11130075. LC acknowledges individual support from FWO-Vlaanderen.

  9. Quadruple Lap Shear Processing Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, Tony N.; McCool, A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Thiokol, Science and Engineering Huntsville Operations (SEHO) Laboratory has previously experienced significant levels of variation in testing Quadruple Lap Shear (QLS) specimens. The QLS test is used at Thiokol / Utah for the qualification of Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) nozzle flex bearing materials. A test was conducted to verify that process changes instituted by SEHO personnel effectively reduced variability, even with normal processing variables introduced. A test matrix was designed to progress in a series of steps; the first establishing a baseline, then introducing additional solvents or other variables. Variables included normal test plan delay times, pre-bond solvent hand-wipes and contaminants. Each condition tested utilized standard QLS hardware bonded with natural rubber, two separate technicians and three replicates. This paper will report the results and conclusions of this investigation.

  10. Magnetoconvection in sheared magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Bian, N. H.; Garcia, O. E.

    2008-10-15

    The development of magnetoconvection in a sheared magnetic field is investigated. The equilibrium magnetic field B{sub 0} is horizontal and its orientation varies linearly along the vertical axis. Preliminary consideration of the transition from the inertial to the viscous regime of the gravitational resistive interchange instability, reveals that the latter is characterized by the existence of viscoresistive boundary layers of vertical width which scales as Q{sup -1/6}, where Q is the Chandrasekhar number. The situation is analogous to the one encountered in magnetically confined laboratory plasmas, where convective flows are constrained by the magnetic shear to develop in boundary layers located around resonant magnetic surfaces in order to fulfill the 'interchange condition'k{center_dot}B{sub 0}=0, where k is the wave vector of the magnetic perturbation. It follows that when the effect of thermal diffusion is taken into account in the process, convection can only occur above a certain critical value of the Rayleigh number which scales as Q{sup 2/3} for large Q. At the onset, the convection pattern is a superposition of identically thin convective rolls everywhere aligned with the local magnetic field lines and which therefore adopt the magnetic field geometry, a situation also reminiscent of the penumbra of sunspots. Using this degeneracy, equations describing the weakly nonlinear state are obtained and discussed. A reduced magnetohydrodynamic description of magnetoconvection is introduced. Since it is valid for arbitrary magnetic field configurations, it allows a simple extension to the case where there exists an inclination between the direction of gravity and the plane spanned by the equilibrium magnetic field. These reduced magnetohydrodynamic equations are proposed as a powerful tool for further investigations of magnetoconvection in more complex field line geometries.

  11. LS-DYNA Simulation of Hemispherical-punch Stamping Process Using an Efficient Algorithm for Continuum Damage Based Elastoplastic Constitutive Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salajegheh, Nima; Abedrabbo, Nader; Pourboghrat, Farhang

    2005-08-01

    An efficient integration algorithm for continuum damage based elastoplastic constitutive equations is implemented in LS-DYNA. The isotropic damage parameter is defined as the ratio of the damaged surface area over the total cross section area of the representative volume element. This parameter is incorporated into the integration algorithm as an internal variable. The developed damage model is then implemented in the FEM code LS-DYNA as user material subroutine (UMAT). Pure stretch experiments of a hemispherical punch are carried out for copper sheets and the results are compared against the predictions of the implemented damage model. Evaluation of damage parameters is carried out and the optimized values that correctly predicted the failure in the sheet are reported. Prediction of failure in the numerical analysis is performed through element deletion using the critical damage value. The set of failure parameters which accurately predict the failure behavior in copper sheets compared to experimental data is reported as well.

  12. Evaluation of irradiation effects of 16 MeV proton-irradiated 12Cr-1MoV steel by small punch (SP) tests

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, S.H.; Hong, J.H. ); Kim, I.S. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1994-06-15

    Recently, interest in small-scale specimens for testing irradiated materials has arisen in conjunction with the need to develop materials for fusion reactor materials and to study irradiation effects using an ion irradiation facility. Several attempts have been made to evaluate material property changes due to irradiation using a small specimen technique. The SP (small punch) test is an example of small-scale specimen test techniques, originally developed by Baik et al. to estimate DBTT (ductile-to-brittle transition temperature) using broken standard CVN (Charpy 5-notch) specimens. The objective of the present study is to evaluate 16 MeV proton irradiation effects on a fusion reactor candidate material in terms of changes in energy up to failure and J[sub IC] fracture toughness (SP J[sub IC]) by using a SP test technique and a J[sub IC] - [bar [epsilon

  13. Small punch tests on martensitic/ferritic steels F82H, T91 and Optimax-A irradiated in SINQ Target-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, X.; Dai, Y.

    2003-12-01

    Small punch (SP) tests were conducted in a temperature range from -190 to 80 °C on martensitic/ferritic steels F82H, T91 and Optimax-A irradiated in SINQ Target-3 up to 9.4 dpa in a irradiation temperature range of 90-275 °C. Results demonstrate: (a) the irradiation hardening deduced from SP tests is reasonably consistent with the results obtained by tensile tests; (b) with increasing irradiation dose, the SP yield load increases at all test temperatures, while the displacement at the maximum load and the total displacement at failure decrease; (c) the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT SP) increases with increasing irradiation dose, and does so more quickly at irradiation doses above ˜6-7 dpa; in addition, the ΔDBTT SP increases linearly with helium content.

  14. Implementation of a non-lethal biopsy punch monitoring program for mercury in smallmouth bass, Micropterus dolomieu Lacepede, from the Eleven Point River, Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ackerson, R.J.; McKee, J.M.; Schmitt, C.J.; Brumbaugh, William G.

    2014-01-01

    A non-lethal biopsy method for monitoring mercury (Hg) concentrations in smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu; smallmouth) from the Eleven Point River in southern Missouri USA was evaluated. A biopsy punch was used to remove a muscle tissue plug from the area immediately below the anterior dorsal fin of 31 smallmouth. An additional 35 smallmouth (controls) were held identically except that no tissue plug was removed. After sampling, all fish were held in a concrete hatchery raceway for 6 weeks. Mean survival at the end of the holding period was 97 % for both groups. Smallmouth length, weight and Fulton’s condition factor at the end of the holding period were also similar between plugged and non-plugged controls, indicating that the biopsy procedure had minimal impact on growth under these conditions. Tissue plug Hg concentrations were similar to smallmouth Hg data obtained in previous years by removing the entire fillet for analysis.

  15. Implementation of a non-lethal biopsy punch monitoring program for mercury in smallmouth bass, Micropterus dolomieu Lacepède, from the Eleven Point River, Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ackerson, J.R.; Schmitt, C. J.; McKee, M.J.; Brumbaugh, W.G.

    2013-01-01

    A non-lethal biopsy method for monitoring mercury (Hg) concentrations in smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu; smallmouth) from the Eleven Point River in southern Missouri USA was evaluated. A biopsy punch was used to remove a muscle tissue plug from the area immediately below the anterior dorsal fin of 31 smallmouth. An additional 35 smallmouth (controls) were held identically except that no tissue plug was removed. After sampling, all fish were held in a concrete hatchery raceway for 6 weeks. Mean survival at the end of the holding period was 97 % for both groups. Smallmouth length, weight and Fulton’s condition factor at the end of the holding period were also similar between plugged and non-plugged controls, indicating that the biopsy procedure had minimal impact on growth under these conditions. Tissue plug Hg concentrations were similar to smallmouth Hg data obtained in previous years by removing the entire fillet for analysis.

  16. Comparison of irradiated 15Kh2MFA material mechanical properties using conventional testing methods and innovative approach of small punch testing (SPT) and automated ball indentation (ABIT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopriva, R.; Petelova, P.; Eliasova, I.; Kytka, M.; Culek, M.

    2017-02-01

    Article describes two innovative testing methods – Small Punch Testing (SPT) and Automated Ball Indentation Test (ABIT) – which are based on the determination and evaluation of material properties from miniaturized testing specimens. These methods are very promising due to minimum material needed for testing and also in case of testing highly irradiated materials of components that are not included in standard surveillance programs. The test results were obtained for reactor pressure vessel (RPV) base material 15Ch2MFA in both states - initial unirradiated and irradiated. Subsequently results were compared with standard tensile tests to prove applicability of these testing methods for the evaluation of degradation of irradiated structural materials of nuclear power plants.

  17. The Multi-Dimensional Nature of Wind Shear Investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, W. J.

    1977-01-01

    The impact of air carrier accidents has lead to investigations into the wind shear phenomenon. This report includes such topics as wind shear characterization, aircraft pilot performance in shear conditions, terminology and language development, wind shear forecasting, ground and flight wind shear displays, wind shear data collection and dissemination, and pilot factors associated with wind shear encounters. Some areas which show promise for short term solutions to the wind shear hazards includes: (1) improved gust front warning through ground based sensors; (2) greater pilot awareness of wind shear through improved training; and (3) airborne displays based on groundspeed/airspeed comparisons.

  18. Crosswind Shear Gradient Affect on Wake Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Fred H.; Ahmad, Nashat N.

    2011-01-01

    Parametric simulations with a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model are used to explore the influence of crosswind shear on aircraft wake vortices. Previous studies based on field measurements, laboratory experiments, as well as LES, have shown that the vertical gradient of crosswind shear, i.e. the second vertical derivative of the environmental crosswind, can influence wake vortex transport. The presence of nonlinear vertical shear of the crosswind velocity can reduce the descent rate, causing a wake vortex pair to tilt and change in its lateral separation. The LES parametric studies confirm that the vertical gradient of crosswind shear does influence vortex trajectories. The parametric results also show that vortex decay from the effects of shear are complex since the crosswind shear, along with the vertical gradient of crosswind shear, can affect whether the lateral separation between wake vortices is increased or decreased. If the separation is decreased, the vortex linking time is decreased, and a more rapid decay of wake vortex circulation occurs. If the separation is increased, the time to link is increased, and at least one of the vortices of the vortex pair may have a longer life time than in the case without shear. In some cases, the wake vortices may never link.

  19. Shear alters motility of Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molaei, Mehdi; Jalali, Maryam; Sheng, Jian

    2013-11-01

    Understanding of locomotion of microorganisms in shear flows drew a wide range of interests in microbial related topics such as biological process including pathogenic infection and biophysical interactions like biofilm formation on engineering surfaces. We employed microfluidics and digital holography microscopy to study motility of E. coli in shear flows. We controlled the shear flow in three different shear rates: 0.28 s-1, 2.8 s-1, and 28 s-1 in a straight channel with the depth of 200 μm. Magnified holograms, recorded at 15 fps with a CCD camera over more than 20 minutes, are analyzed to obtain 3D swimming trajectories and subsequently used to extract shear responses of E.coli. Thousands of 3-D bacterial trajectories are tracked. The change of bacteria swimming characteristics including swimming velocity, reorientation, and dispersion coefficient are computed directly for individual trajectory and ensemble averaged over thousands of realizations. The results show that shear suppresses the bacterial dispersions in bulk but promote dispersions near the surface contrary to those in quiescent flow condition. Ongoing analyses are focusing to quantify effect of shear rates on tumbling frequency and reorientation of cell body, and its implication in locating the hydrodynamic mechanisms for shear enhanced angular scattering. NIH, NSF, GoMRI.

  20. Finite element modelling of fabric shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hua; Clifford, Mike J.; Long, Andrew C.; Sherburn, Martin

    2009-01-01

    In this study, a finite element model to predict shear force versus shear angle for woven fabrics is developed. The model is based on the TexGen geometric modelling schema, developed at the University of Nottingham and orthotropic constitutive models for yarn behaviour, coupled with a unified displacement-difference periodic boundary condition. A major distinction from prior modelling of fabric shear is that the details of picture frame kinematics are included in the model, which allows the mechanisms of fabric shear to be represented more accurately. Meso- and micro-mechanisms of deformation are modelled to determine their contributions to energy dissipation during shear. The model is evaluated using results obtained for a glass fibre plain woven fabric, and the importance of boundary conditions in the analysis of deformation mechanisms is highlighted. The simulation results show that the simple rotation boundary condition is adequate for predicting shear force at large deformations, with most of the energy being dissipated at higher shear angles due to yarn compaction. For small deformations, a detailed kinematic analysis is needed, enabling the yarn shear and rotation deformation mechanisms to be modelled accurately.

  1. Study of shear-stiffened elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Tongfei; Li, Weihua; Ding, Jie; Alici, Gursel; Du, Haiping

    2013-06-01

    Shear thickening fluids, which are usually concentrated colloidal suspensions composed of non-aggregating solid particles suspended in fluids, exhibit a marked increase in viscosity beyond a critical shear rate. This increased viscosity is seen as being both 'field-activated', due to the dependence on shearing rate, as well as reversible. Shear thickening fluids have found good applications as protection materials, such as in liquid body armor, vibration absorber or dampers. This research aims to expand the protection material family by developing a novel solid status shear thickening material, called shear-stiffened elastomers. These new shear-stiffened elastomers were fabricated with the mixture of silicone rubber and silicone oil. A total of four SSE samples were fabricated in this study. Their mechanical and rheological properties under both steady-state and dynamic loading conditions were tested with a parallel-plate. The effects of silicone oil composition and angular frequency were summarized. When raising the angular frequency in dynamic shear test, the storage modulus of conventional silicone rubber shows a small increasing trend with the frequency. However, if silicone oil is selected to be mixed with silicone rubber, the storage modulus increases dramatically when the frequency and strain are both beyond the critical values.

  2. The formation of multiple adiabatic shear bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, F.; Wright, T. W.; Ramesh, K. T.

    2006-07-01

    In a previous paper, Zhou et al. [2006. A numerical methodology for investigating adiabatic shear band formation. J. Mech. Phys. Solids, 54, 904-926] developed a numerical method for analyzing one-dimensional deformation of thermoviscoplastic materials. The method uses a second order algorithm for integration along characteristic lines, and computes the plastic flow after complete localization with high resolution and efficiency. We apply this numerical scheme to analyze localization in a thermoviscoplastic material where multiple shear bands are allowed to form at random locations in a large specimen. As a shear band develops, it unloads neighboring regions and interacts with other bands. Beginning with a random distribution of imperfections, which might be imagined as arising qualitatively from the microstructure, we obtain the average spacing of shear bands through calculations and compare our results with previously existing theoretical estimates. It is found that the spacing between nucleating shear bands follows the perturbation theory due to Wright and Ockendon [1996. A scaling law for the effect of inertia on the formation of adiabatic shear bands. Int. J. Plasticity 12, 927-934], whereas the spacing between mature shear bands is closer to that predicted by the momentum diffusion theory of Grady and Kipp [1987. The growth of unstable thermoplastic shear with application to steady-wave shock compression in solids. J. Mech. Phys. Solids 35, 95-119]. Scaling laws for the dependence of band spacing on material parameters differ in many respects from either theory.

  3. Simple shear deformation of partially molten aplite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stipp, Michael; Tullis, Jan; Berger, Alfons

    2013-04-01

    The tectonic processes which are important for melt distribution and transport in the intermediate and lower crust and which can result in crustal weakening are not yet well understood. Natural migmatites are usually overprinted by annealing and retrogression during uplift and exhumation, largely obliterating the deformation structures and microstructures of their partially molten history. Deformation experiments on partially molten crustal rocks have so far been conducted in pure shear geometry and mostly under low confining pressures in the brittle deformation field, both of which are not representative of nature. We carried out deformation experiments in simple shear that predominates in the crust and especially crustal shear zones. Undrained experiments were carried out on Enfield aplite at ~1.5 GPa, 900° -1000° C, and ˜ 5*10-6 s-1, conditions which favor crystal plastic deformation of quartz and feldspar (Dell'Angelo and Tullis, 1988). Sample slices 1.0-1.5 mm thick were placed between the shear pistons with the shear plane at a 45° -angle to the compression direction. Maximum shear strain in the experiments is ? ?2.8. Despite difficulties in controlling the melt content by varying the amount of added water, we were able to achieve the full range of brittle to crystal plastic deformation mechanisms. With decreasing melt content Enfield aplite displays a transition from discrete fracturing at a high angle (~70-90° ) to the shear plane (>20 vol.% melt), to cataclastic shearing (10-20 vol.% melt) and to crystal plastic deformation (

  4. The cosmological information of shear peaks: beyond the abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marian, Laura; Smith, Robert E.; Hilbert, Stefan; Schneider, Peter

    2013-06-01

    We study the cosmological information of weak lensing (WL) peaks, focusing on two other statistics besides their abundance: the stacked tangential-shear profiles and the peak-peak correlation function. We use a large ensemble of simulated WL maps with survey specifications relevant to future missions like Euclid and LSST, to measure and examine the three peak probes. We find that the auto-correlation function of peaks with high signal-to-noise ratio ({S}/{N}) measured from fields of size 144 deg2 has a maximum of ˜0.3 at an angular scale ϑ ˜ 10 arcmin. For peaks with smaller {S}/{N}, the amplitude of the correlation function decreases, and its maximum occurs on smaller angular scales. The stacked tangential-shear profiles of the peaks also increase with their {S}/{N}. We compare the peak observables measured with and without shape noise and find that for {S}/{N}˜ 3 only ˜5 per cent of the peaks are due to large-scale structures, the rest being generated by shape noise. The correlation function of these small peaks is therefore very weak compared to that of small peaks measured from noise-free maps, and also their mean tangential-shear profile is a factor of a few smaller than the noise-free one. The covariance matrix of the probes is examined: the correlation function is only weakly covariant on scales ϑ < 30 arcmin, and slightly more on larger scales; the shear profiles are very correlated for ϑ > 2 arcmin. The cross-covariance of the three probes is relatively weak. Using the Fisher-matrix formalism, we compute the cosmological constraints for {Ωm, σ8, w, ns} considering each probe separately, as well as in combination. We find that the peak-peak correlation and shear profiles yield marginalized errors which are larger by a factor of 2-4 for {Ωm, σ8} than the errors yielded by the peak abundance alone, while the errors for {w, ns} are similar. By combining the three probes, the marginalized constraints are tightened by a factor of ˜2 compared to the

  5. Steel shear walls, behavior, modeling and design

    SciTech Connect

    Astaneh-Asl, Abolhassan

    2008-07-08

    In recent years steel shear walls have become one of the more efficient lateral load resisting systems in tall buildings. The basic steel shear wall system consists of a steel plate welded to boundary steel columns and boundary steel beams. In some cases the boundary columns have been concrete-filled steel tubes. Seismic behavior of steel shear wall systems during actual earthquakes and based on laboratory cyclic tests indicates that the systems are quite ductile and can be designed in an economical way to have sufficient stiffness, strength, ductility and energy dissipation capacity to resist seismic effects of strong earthquakes. This paper, after summarizing the past research, presents the results of two tests of an innovative steel shear wall system where the boundary elements are concrete-filled tubes. Then, a review of currently available analytical models of steel shear walls is provided with a discussion of capabilities and limitations of each model. We have observed that the tension only 'strip model', forming the basis of the current AISC seismic design provisions for steel shear walls, is not capable of predicting the behavior of steel shear walls with length-to-thickness ratio less than about 600 which is the range most common in buildings. The main reasons for such shortcomings of the AISC seismic design provisions for steel shear walls is that it ignores the compression field in the shear walls, which can be significant in typical shear walls. The AISC method also is not capable of incorporating stresses in the shear wall due to overturning moments. A more rational seismic design procedure for design of shear walls proposed in 2000 by the author is summarized in the paper. The design method, based on procedures used for design of steel plate girders, takes into account both tension and compression stress fields and is applicable to all values of length-to-thickness ratios of steel shear walls. The method is also capable of including the effect of

  6. Turbulence structure at high shear rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Moon Joo; Kim, John; Moin, Parviz

    1987-01-01

    The structure of homogeneous turbulence in the presence of a high shear rate is studied using results obtained from three-dimensional time-dependent numerical simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations on a grid of 512 x 128 x 128 node points. It is shown that high shear rate enhances the streamwise fluctuating motion to such an extent that a highly anisotropic turbulence state with a one-dimensional velocity field and two-dimensional small-scale turbulence develops asymptotically as total shear increases. Instantaneous velocity fields show that high shear rate in homogeneous turbulent shear flow produces structures which are similar to the streaks present in the viscous sublayer of turbulent boundary layers.

  7. Structure of turbulence at high shear rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Moon Joo; Kim, John; Moin, Parviz

    1990-01-01

    The structure of homogeneous turbulence subject to high shear rate has been investigated by using three-dimensional, time-dependent numerical simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations. This study indicates that high shear rate alone is sufficient for generation of the streaky structures, and that the presence of a solid boundary is not necessary. Evolution of the statistical correlations is examined to determine the effect of high shear rate on the development of anisotropy in turbulence. It is shown that the streamwise fluctuating motions are enhanced so profoundly that a highly anisotropic turbulence state with a 'one-component' velocity field and 'two-component' vorticity field develops asymptotically as total shear increases. Because of high-shear rate, rapid distortion theory predicts remarkably well the anisotropic behavior of the structural quantities.

  8. WEAK LENSING MASS RECONSTRUCTION: FLEXION VERSUS SHEAR

    SciTech Connect

    Pires, S.

    2010-11-10

    Weak gravitational lensing has proven to be a powerful tool to map directly the distribution of dark matter in the universe. The technique, currently used, relies on the accurate measurement of the gravitational shear that corresponds to the first-order distortion of the background galaxy images. More recently, a new technique has been introduced that relies on the accurate measurement of the gravitational flexion that corresponds to the second-order distortion of the background galaxy images. This technique should probe structures on smaller scales than that of shear analysis. The goal of this paper is to compare the ability of shear and flexion to reconstruct the dark matter distribution by taking into account the dispersion in shear and flexion measurements. Our results show that the flexion is less sensitive than shear for constructing the convergence maps on scales that are physically feasible for mapping, meaning that flexion alone should not be used to do convergence map reconstruction, even on small scales.

  9. Shear layer excitation, experiment versus theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bechert, D. W.; Stahl, B.

    1984-01-01

    The acoustical excitation of shear layers is investigated. Acoustical excitation causes the so-called orderly structures in shear layers and jets. Also, the deviations in the spreading rate between different shear layer experiments are due to the same excitation mechanism. Measurements in the linear interaction region close to the edge from which the shear layer is shed are examined. Two sets of experiments (Houston 1981 and Berlin 1983/84) are discussed. The measurements were carried out with shear layers in air using hot wire anemometers and microphones. The agreement between these measurements and the theory is good. Even details of the fluctuating flow field correspond to theoretical predictions, such as the local occurrence of negative phase speeds.

  10. Determining Shear Stress Distribution in a Laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Aboudi, Jacob; Yarrington, Phillip W.

    2010-01-01

    A "simplified shear solution" method approximates the through-thickness shear stress distribution within a composite laminate based on an extension of laminated beam theory. The method does not consider the solution of a particular boundary value problem; rather, it requires only knowledge of the global shear loading, geometry, and material properties of the laminate or panel. It is thus analogous to lamination theory in that ply-level stresses can be efficiently determined from global load resultants at a given location in a structure and used to evaluate the margin of safety on a ply-by-ply basis. The simplified shear solution stress distribution is zero at free surfaces, continuous at ply boundaries, and integrates to the applied shear load. The method has been incorporated within the HyperSizer commercial structural sizing software to improve its predictive capability for designing composite structures. The HyperSizer structural sizing software is used extensively by NASA to design composite structures. In the case of through-thickness shear loading on panels, HyperSizer previously included a basic, industry-standard, method for approximating the resulting shear stress distribution in sandwich panels. However, no such method was employed for solid laminate panels. The purpose of the innovation is to provide an approximation of the through-thickness shear stresses in a solid laminate given the through-thickness shear loads (Qx and Qy) on the panel. The method was needed for implementation within the HyperSizer structural sizing software so that the approximated ply-level shear stresses could be utilized in a failure theory to assess the adequacy of a panel design. The simplified shear solution method was developed based on extending and generalizing bi-material beam theory to plate-like structures. It is assumed that the through-thickness shear stresses arise due to local bending of the laminate induced by the through-thickness shear load, and by imposing

  11. Analysis of variations of the thickness-phase objects by lateral shearing interferometry and white light scanning interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altamar, Hernando R.; Plata, Arturo

    2004-10-01

    The interferometric techniques of lateral shearing and white light scanning interferometry are combined to determine the variations of thickness of phase objects and the thickness of such objects is approximated through B-splines functions.

  12. Micro-mechanics of electrostatically stabilized suspensions of cellulose nanofibrils under steady state shear flow.

    PubMed

    Martoïa, F; Dumont, P J J; Orgéas, L; Belgacem, M N; Putaux, J-L

    2016-02-14

    In this study, we characterized and modeled the rheology of TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofibril (NFC) aqueous suspensions with electrostatically stabilized and unflocculated nanofibrous structures. These colloidal suspensions of slender and wavy nanofibers exhibited a yield stress and a shear thinning behavior at low and high shear rates, respectively. Both the shear yield stress and the consistency of these suspensions were power-law functions of the NFC volume fraction. We developed an original multiscale model for the prediction of the rheology of these suspensions. At the nanoscale, the suspensions were described as concentrated systems where NFCs interacted with the Newtonian suspending fluid through Brownian motion and long range fluid-NFC hydrodynamic interactions, as well as with each other through short range hydrodynamic and repulsive colloidal interaction forces. These forces were estimated using both the experimental results and 3D networks of NFCs that were numerically generated to mimic the nanostructures of NFC suspensions under shear flow. They were in good agreement with theoretical and measured forces for model colloidal systems. The model showed the primary role played by short range hydrodynamic and colloidal interactions on the rheology of NFC suspensions. At low shear rates, the origin of the yield stress of NFC suspensions was attributed to the combined contribution of repulsive colloidal interactions and the topology of the entangled NFC networks in the suspensions. At high shear rates, both concurrent colloidal and short (in some cases long) range hydrodynamic interactions could be at the origin of the shear thinning behavior of NFC suspensions.

  13. Shear-Induced Unfolding and Enzymatic Cleavage of Full-Length VWF Multimers

    PubMed Central

    Lippok, Svenja; Radtke, Matthias; Obser, Tobias; Kleemeier, Lars; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Budde, Ulrich; Netz, Roland R.; Rädler, Joachim O.

    2016-01-01

    Proteolysis of the multimeric blood coagulation protein von Willebrand Factor (VWF) by ADAMTS13 is crucial for prevention of microvascular thrombosis. ADAMTS13 cleaves VWF within the mechanosensitive A2 domain, which is believed to open under shear flow. In this study, we combine fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and a microfluidic shear cell to monitor real-time kinetics of full-length VWF proteolysis as a function of shear stress. For comparison, we also measure the Michaelis-Menten kinetics of ADAMTS13 cleavage of wild-type VWF in the absence of shear but partially denaturing conditions. Under shear, ADAMTS13 activity on full-length VWF arises without denaturing agent as evidenced by FCS and gel-based multimer analysis. In agreement with Brownian hydrodynamics simulations, we find a sigmoidal increase of the enzymatic rate as a function of shear at a threshold shear rate γ˙1/2 = 5522/s. The same flow-rate dependence of ADAMTS13 activity we also observe in blood plasma, which is relevant to predict hemostatic dysfunction. PMID:26840720

  14. Periodic Viscous Shear Heating Instability in Fine-Grained Shear Zones: Mechanism for Intermediate Depth Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coon, E.; Kelemen, P.; Hirth, G.; Spiegelman, M.

    2005-12-01

    Kelemen and Hirth (Fall 2004 AGU) presented a model for periodic, viscous shear heating instabilities along pre-existing, fine grained shear zones. This provides an attractive alternative to dehydration embrittlement for explaining intermediate-depth earthquakes, especially those in a narrow thermal window within the mantle section of subducting oceanic plates (Hacker et al JGR03). Ductile shear zones with widths of cm to m are common in shallow mantle massifs and peridotite along oceanic fracture zones. Pseudotachylites in a mantle shear zone show that shear heating temperatures exceeded the mantle solidus (Obata & Karato Tectonophys95). Olivine grain growth in shear zones is pinned by closely spaced pyroxenes; thus, once formed, these features do not `heal' on geological time scales in the absence of melt or fluid (Warren & Hirth EPSL05). Grain-size sensitive creep will be localized within these shear zones, in preference to host rocks with olivine grain size from 1 to 10 mm. Inspired by the work of Whitehead & Gans (GJRAS74), we proposed that such pre-existing shear zones might undergo repeated shear heating instabilities. This is not a new concept; what is new is that viscous deformation is limited to a narrow shear zone, because grain boundary sliding, sensitive to both stress and grain size, may accommodate creep even at high stress and high temperature. These new ideas yield a new result: simple models for a periodic shear heating instability. Last year, we presented a 1D numerical model using olivine flow laws, assuming that viscous deformation remains localized in shear zones, surrounded by host rocks undergoing elastic deformation. Stress evolves due to elastic strain and drives viscous deformation in a shear zone of specified width. Shear heating and thermal diffusion control T. A maximum of 1400 C (substantial melting of peridotite ) was imposed. Grain size evolves due to recrystallization and diffusion. For strain rates of E-13 to E-14 per sec and

  15. Shear coaxial injector instability mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puissant, C.; Kaltz, T.; Glogowski, M.; Micci, M.

    1994-01-01

    There is no definitive knowledge of which of several concurrent processes ultimately results in unstable combustion within liquid rocket chambers employing shear coaxial injectors. Possible explanations are a detrimental change in the atomization characteristics due to a decrease in the gas-to-liquid velocity ratio, a change in the gas side injector pressure drop allowing acoustic coupling to the propellant feed system or the disappearance of a stabilizing recirculation region at the base of the LOX post. The aim of this research effort is to investigate these proposed mechanisms under conditions comparable to actual engine operation. Spray characterization was accomplished with flash photography and planar laser imaging to examine the overall spray morphology and liquid jet breakup processes and with a PDPA to quantify the spatial distribution of droplet size and mean axial velocity. A simplified stability model based on the Rayleigh criterion was constructed for the flow dynamics occurring within the chamber and injector to evaluate the potential coupling between the chamber and injector acoustic modes and was supported by high frequency measurements of chamber and injector pressure oscillations. To examine recirculation within the LOX post recess, velocity measurements were performed in the recess region by means of LDV. Present experiments were performed under noncombusting conditions using LOX/GH2 stimulants at pressures up to 4 MPa.

  16. Inverse magnetic/shear catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInnes, Brett

    2016-05-01

    It is well known that very large magnetic fields are generated when the Quark-Gluon Plasma is formed during peripheral heavy-ion collisions. Lattice, holographic, and other studies strongly suggest that these fields may, for observationally relevant field values, induce ;inverse magnetic catalysis;, signalled by a lowering of the critical temperature for the chiral/deconfinement transition. The theoretical basis of this effect has recently attracted much attention; yet so far these investigations have not included another, equally dramatic consequence of the peripheral collision geometry: the QGP acquires a large angular momentum vector, parallel to the magnetic field. Here we use holographic techniques to argue that the angular momentum can also, independently, have an effect on transition temperatures, and we obtain a rough estimate of the relative effects of the presence of both a magnetic field and an angular momentum density. We find that the shearing angular momentum reinforces the effect of the magnetic field at low values of the baryonic chemical potential, but that it can actually decrease that effect at high chemical potentials.

  17. Sheared magnetofluids and Bernoulli confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quevado, H. J.; Bengtson, Roger; Mahajan, S. M.; Valanju, P. M.

    2001-10-01

    New magnetofluid states that differ qualitatively from those accessible to either neutral fluids or to conventional MHD plasmas have been predited theoretically. They are predicted to appear if plasmas with strong velocity shear flows (with large initial values of both magnetic and magnetofluid helicity) are created and allowed to relax. The dynamic invariance of these two helicities will force the plasma to self-organize and relax to a long-lived quasi equilibrium state away from thermal equilibrium. The investigation of these states bears critically upon basic plasma confinement and heating issues in both natural and laboratory plasmas. We have built a magnetic mirror device designed to create and investigate these theoretically predicted pressure-confining magnetofluid states. The primary experimental challenge is to create an initial plasma (with significant flows and currents) which is relatively isolated from walls and embedded in a modest magnetic external field. Our machine has a central bias rod to create a radial electric field for generating fast plasma flow, a large mirror ratio for good centrifugal confinement, and magnetic, Langmuir, and Mach probes to measure the evolution of plasma rotation profiles and fluctuations. Initial results will be presented demonstrating plasma rotation.

  18. Wind shear and turbulence simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Roland L.

    1987-01-01

    The aviation community is increasing its reliance on flight simulators. This is true both in pilot training and in research and development. In moving research concepts through the development pipeline, there is a sequence of events which take place: analysis, ground based simulation, inflight simulation, and flight testing. Increasing fidelity as progress toward the flight testing arena is accompanied by increasing cost. The question that seems to be posed in relation to the meteorological aspects of flight simulation is, How much fidelity is enough and can it be quantified. As a part of the Langley Simulation Technology Program, there are three principal areas of focus, one being improved simulation of weather hazards. A close liaison with the JAWS project was established because of the Langley Simulation Technology interests regarding reliable simulation of severe convective weather phenomena and their impact on aviation systems. Simulation offers the only feasible approach for examining the utility of new technology and new procedures for coping with severe convective weather phenomena such as wind shear. These simulation concepts are discussed in detail.

  19. Impact response of shear thickening suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Eric; Ozgen, Oktar; Kallmann, Marcelo; Allen, Benjamin

    2013-11-01

    Dense suspensions of hard particles such as cornstarch in water exhibit shear thickening, in which the energy dissipation rate under shear dramatically increases with increasing shear rate. Recent work has established that in steady-state shear this phenomena is a result of a dynamic jamming of the particles in suspension. Several dynamic phenomena observed in such suspensions have long been assumed to be a consequence of this shear thickening; strong impact resistance, the ability of a person to run on the fluid surface, fingering and hole instabilities under vibration, and oscillations in the speed of sinking of an object in the fluid. However, I will present results of experiments consisting of an indenter impacting a dense suspension which demonstrate that the strong impact resistance cannot be explained by existing models for steady-state shear thickening. I will show these dynamic phenomena can be reproduced by graphical simulations based on a minimal phenomenological model in which the fluid has a stiffness with a dependence on velocity history. These and other recent results suggest a need for new models to understand the dynamic phenomena associated with shear thickening fluids.

  20. Surface shear inviscidity of soluble surfactants

    PubMed Central

    Zell, Zachary A.; Nowbahar, Arash; Mansard, Vincent; Leal, L. Gary; Deshmukh, Suraj S.; Mecca, Jodi M.; Tucker, Christopher J.; Squires, Todd M.

    2014-01-01

    Foam and emulsion stability has long been believed to correlate with the surface shear viscosity of the surfactant used to stabilize them. Many subtleties arise in interpreting surface shear viscosity measurements, however, and correlations do not necessarily indicate causation. Using a sensitive technique designed to excite purely surface shear deformations, we make the most sensitive and precise measurements to date of the surface shear viscosity of a variety of soluble surfactants, focusing on SDS in particular. Our measurements reveal the surface shear viscosity of SDS to be below the sensitivity limit of our technique, giving an upper bound of order 0.01 μN·s/m. This conflicts directly with almost all previous studies, which reported values up to 103–104 times higher. Multiple control and complementary measurements confirm this result, including direct visualization of monolayer deformation, for SDS and a wide variety of soluble polymeric, ionic, and nonionic surfactants of high- and low-foaming character. No soluble, small-molecule surfactant was found to have a measurable surface shear viscosity, which seriously undermines most support for any correlation between foam stability and surface shear rheology of soluble surfactants. PMID:24563383

  1. Hierarchical cosmic shear power spectrum inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsing, Justin; Heavens, Alan; Jaffe, Andrew H.; Kiessling, Alina; Wandelt, Benjamin; Hoffmann, Till

    2016-02-01

    We develop a Bayesian hierarchical modelling approach for cosmic shear power spectrum inference, jointly sampling from the posterior distribution of the cosmic shear field and its (tomographic) power spectra. Inference of the shear power spectrum is a powerful intermediate product for a cosmic shear analysis, since it requires very few model assumptions and can be used to perform inference on a wide range of cosmological models a posteriori without loss of information. We show that joint posterior for the shear map and power spectrum can be sampled effectively by Gibbs sampling, iteratively drawing samples from the map and power spectrum, each conditional on the other. This approach neatly circumvents difficulties associated with complicated survey geometry and masks that plague frequentist power spectrum estimators, since the power spectrum inference provides prior information about the field in masked regions at every sampling step. We demonstrate this approach for inference of tomographic shear E-mode, B-mode and EB-cross power spectra from a simulated galaxy shear catalogue with a number of important features; galaxies distributed on the sky and in redshift with photometric redshift uncertainties, realistic random ellipticity noise for every galaxy and a complicated survey mask. The obtained posterior distributions for the tomographic power spectrum coefficients recover the underlying simulated power spectra for both E- and B-modes.

  2. Revisiting Taylor Dispersion: Differential enhancement of rotational and translational diffusion under oscillatory shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy, Brian; Ong, Desmond; Cheng, Xiang; Cohen, Itai

    2013-03-01

    The idea of Taylor dispersion - enhancement of translational diffusion under shear - has found applications in fields from pharmacology to chemical engineering. Here, in a combination of experiment and simulations, we study the translational and rotational diffusion of colloidal dimers under triangle-wave oscillatory shear. We find that the rotational diffusion is enhanced, in addition to the enhanced translational diffusion. This ``rotational Taylor dispersion'' depends strongly on the strain rate (Peclet number), aspect ratio, and the shear strain, in contradistinction to translational Taylor dispersion in a shear flow, which depends only weakly on strain rate and aspect ratio. This separate tunability of translations and orientations promises important applications in mixing and self-assembly of solutions of anisometric colloids. We discuss the corresponding effect on the structure and rheology of denser suspensions of rod-like particles. B. L. acknowledges supported by the Department of Defense (DoD) through the National Defense Science & Engineering Graduate Fellowship (NDSEG) Program.

  3. Fluid shear stress threshold regulates angiogenic sprouting.

    PubMed

    Galie, Peter A; Nguyen, Duc-Huy T; Choi, Colin K; Cohen, Daniel M; Janmey, Paul A; Chen, Christopher S

    2014-06-03

    The density and architecture of capillary beds that form within a tissue depend on many factors, including local metabolic demand and blood flow. Here, using microfluidic control of local fluid mechanics, we show the existence of a previously unappreciated flow-induced shear stress threshold that triggers angiogenic sprouting. Both intraluminal shear stress over the endothelium and transmural flow through the endothelium above 10 dyn/cm(2) triggered endothelial cells to sprout and invade into the underlying matrix, and this threshold is not impacted by the maturation of cell-cell junctions or pressure gradient across the monolayer. Antagonizing VE-cadherin widened cell-cell junctions and reduced the applied shear stress for a given transmural flow rate, but did not affect the shear threshold for sprouting. Furthermore, both transmural and luminal flow induced expression of matrix metalloproteinase 1, and this up-regulation was required for the flow-induced sprouting. Once sprouting was initiated, continuous flow was needed to both sustain sprouting and prevent retraction. To explore the potential ramifications of a shear threshold on the spatial patterning of new sprouts, we used finite-element modeling to predict fluid shear in a variety of geometric settings and then experimentally demonstrated that transmural flow guided preferential sprouting toward paths of draining interstitial fluid flow as might occur to connect capillary beds to venules or lymphatics. In addition, we show that luminal shear increases in local narrowings of vessels to trigger sprouting, perhaps ultimately to normalize shear stress across the vasculature. Together, these studies highlight the role of shear stress in controlling angiogenic sprouting and offer a potential homeostatic mechanism for regulating vascular density.

  4. Endothelial dysfunction and monocyte recruitment in cells exposed to non-uniform shear stress.

    PubMed

    Cicha, Iwona; Goppelt-Struebe, Margarete; Yilmaz, Atilla; Daniel, Werner G; Garlichs, Christoph D

    2008-01-01

    Atherosclerosis results from a combination of local blood flow patterns and systemic risk factors. We investigated whether non-uniform shear stress at bifurcations induces pro-atherogenic endothelial dysfunction and monocyte recruitment. Bifurcating flow-through cell culture slides were used to expose HUVECs to laminar or non-uniform shear stress for 18 h at 10 dyne/cm(2). For the adhesion assay, HUVECs were subsequently perfused with medium containing THP-1 monocytes for 1 h. Protein expression was determined by immunofluorescence. In areas exposed to laminar shear stress, alignment of endothelial cells with the flow was observed, accompanied by upregulation of eNOS and downregulation of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF). In contrast, cells exposed to non-uniform shear stress near the outer walls of bifurcations were characterized by irregular, unaligned shape, induction of endothelin-1 and CTGF, as well as reduced eNOS expression. These atherogenic effects of non-uniform shear stress were prevented when cells were treated with statins (1 mumol/l) during flow. Under non-uniform shear stress, a slight induction of VCAM-1, ICAM-1, and E-/P-selectin was observed. In agreement with this, monocyte recruitment, which was nearly undetectable under laminar shear stress, was moderately induced by non-uniform shear stress (P<0.02). In conclusion, inhibition of antioxidative eNOS and upregulation of atherogenic proteins is the first step in non-uniform shear stress-mediated endothelial dysfunction, which in vivo in the presence of atherogenic risk factors may further enhance monocyte recruitment into the artery wall.

  5. Method for shearing spent nuclear fuel assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Weil, Bradley S.; Watson, Clyde D.

    1977-01-01

    A method is disclosed for shearing spent nuclear fuel assemblies of the type wherein a plurality of long metal tubes packed with ceramic fuel are supported in a spaced apart relationship within an outer metal shell or shroud which provides structural support to the assembly. Spent nuclear fuel assemblies are first compacted in a stepwise manner between specially designed gag-compactors and then sheared into short segments amenable to chemical processing by shear blades contoured to mate with the compacted surface of the fuel assembly.

  6. Modeling of shear localization in materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lesuer, D.; LeBlanc, M.; Riddle, B.; Jorgensen, B.

    1998-02-11

    The deformation response of a Ti alloy, Ti-6Al-4V, has been studied during shear localization. The study has involved well-controlled laboratory tests involving a double-notch shear sample. The results have been used to provide a comparison between experiment and the predicted response using DYNA2D and two material models (the Johnson-Cook model and an isotropic elastic-plastic-hydrodynamic model). The work will serve as the basis for the development of a new material model which represents the different deformation mechanisms active during shear localization.

  7. Time accurate simulations of compressible shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, Peyman; Steinberger, Craig J.; Vidoni, Thomas J.; Madnia, Cyrus K.

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of this research are to employ direct numerical simulation (DNS) to study the phenomenon of mixing (or lack thereof) in compressible free shear flows and to suggest new means of enhancing mixing in such flows. The shear flow configurations under investigation are those of parallel mixing layers and planar jets under both non-reacting and reacting nonpremixed conditions. During the three-years of this research program, several important issues regarding mixing and chemical reactions in compressible shear flows were investigated.

  8. Coherent motion in excited free shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wygnanski, Israel J.; Petersen, Robert A.

    1987-01-01

    The application of the inviscid instability approach to externally excited turbulent free shear flows at high Reynolds numbers is explored. Attention is given to the cases of a small-deficit plane turbulent wake, a plane turbulent jet, an axisymmetric jet, the nonlinear evolution of instabilities in free shear flows, the concept of the 'preferred mode', vortex pairing in turbulent mixing layers, and experimental results for the control of free turbulent shear layers. The special features often attributed to pairing or to the preferred mode are found to be difficult to comprehend; the concept of feedback requires further substantiation in the case of incompressible flow.

  9. Shear forces enhance Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoite motility on vascular endothelium.

    PubMed

    Harker, Katherine S; Jivan, Elizabeth; McWhorter, Frances Y; Liu, Wendy F; Lodoen, Melissa B

    2014-04-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a highly successful parasite that infects approximately one-third of the human population and can cause fatal disease in immunocompromised individuals. Systemic parasite dissemination to organs such as the brain and eye is critical to pathogenesis. T. gondii can disseminate via the circulation, and both intracellular and extracellular modes of transport have been proposed. However, the processes by which extracellular tachyzoites adhere to and migrate across vascular endothelium under the conditions of rapidly flowing blood remain unknown. We used microfluidics and time-lapse fluorescence microscopy to examine the interactions between extracellular T. gondii and primary human endothelial cells under conditions of physiologic shear stress. Remarkably, tachyzoites adhered to and glided on human vascular endothelium under shear stress conditions. Compared to static conditions, shear stress enhanced T. gondii helical gliding, resulting in a significantly greater displacement, and increased the percentage of tachyzoites that invaded or migrated across the endothelium. The intensity of the shear forces (from 0.5 to 10 dynes/cm(2)) influenced both initial and sustained adhesion to endothelium. By examining tachyzoites deficient in the T. gondii adhesion protein MIC2, we found that MIC2 contributed to initial adhesion but was not required for adhesion strengthening. These data suggest that under fluidic conditions, T. gondii adhesion to endothelium may be mediated by a multistep cascade of interactions that is governed by unique combinations of adhesion molecules. This work provides novel information about tachyzoite interactions with vascular endothelium and contributes to our understanding of T. gondii dissemination in the infected host. IMPORTANCE Toxoplasma gondii is a global parasite pathogen that can cause fatal disease in immunocompromised individuals. An unresolved question is how the parasites circulate in the body to tissues to cause disease

  10. Shear Driven Synthesis of Polymeric Micro- and Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Tian

    usually categorizes emulsion as oil in water (O/W) and water in oil (W/O) dispersions. Oil in oil emulsion can also be formulated from the immiscible organic liquid pairs. Using the phase separation in the PS-cyclohexane system, the emulsion are formed under continuous shearing while the continuous phase is solvent-rich and the disperse phase is polymer-rich. By shearing the emulsions, the fibers sizes are reduced around 10X due to the smaller initial polymer droplet size. The fiber sizes are further reduced to 100 nm which enhances the competitive advantages of liquid shear technique. Controlled drug release combines the advantages of increased therapeutic efficacy, reduced toxicity and lower administration frequency. By dispersing model drugs in the spinning polymer solution, these drugs are successfully encapsulated inside the biodegradable matrix and the encapsulation efficiency is modulated by polymer concentration and fiber size while the release profile of the drug is determined by the degradation rate of the polymer matrix.

  11. Performance of internal covariance estimators for cosmic shear correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, O.; Seitz, S.; Eifler, T. F.; Gruen, D.

    2016-03-01

    Data re-sampling methods such as delete-one jackknife, bootstrap or the sub-sample covariance are common tools for estimating the covariance of large-scale structure probes. We investigate different implementations of these methods in the context of cosmic shear two-point statistics. Using lognormal simulations of the convergence field and the corresponding shear field we generate mock catalogues of a known and realistic covariance. For a survey of {˜ } 5000 ° ^2 we find that jackknife, if implemented by deleting sub-volumes of galaxies, provides the most reliable covariance estimates. Bootstrap, in the common implementation of drawing sub-volumes of galaxies, strongly overestimates the statistical uncertainties. In a forecast for the complete 5-yr Dark Energy Survey, we show that internally estimated covariance matrices can provide a large fraction of the true uncertainties on cosmological parameters in a 2D cosmic shear analysis. The volume inside contours of constant likelihood in the Ωm-σ8 plane as measured with internally estimated covariance matrices is on average ≳85 per cent of the volume derived from the true covariance matrix. The uncertainty on the parameter combination Σ _8 ˜ σ _8 Ω _m^{0.5} derived from internally estimated covariances is ˜90 per cent of the true uncertainty.

  12. Heterogeneous flow kinematics of cellulose nanofibril suspensions under shear.

    PubMed

    Martoïa, F; Perge, C; Dumont, P J J; Orgéas, L; Fardin, M A; Manneville, S; Belgacem, M N

    2015-06-28

    The rheology of NFC suspensions that exhibited different microstructures and colloidal stability, namely TEMPO and enzymatic NFC suspensions, was investigated at the macro and mesoscales using a transparent Couette rheometer combined with optical observations and ultrasonic speckle velocimetry (USV). Both NFC suspensions showed a complex rheology, which was typical of yield stress, non-linear and thixotropic fluids. Hysteresis loops and erratic evolutions of the macroscale shear stress were also observed, thereby suggesting important mesostructural changes and/or inhomogeneous flow conditions. The in situ optical observations revealed drastic mesostructural changes for the enzymatic NFC suspensions, whereas the TEMPO NFC suspensions did not exhibit mesoscale heterogeneities. However, for both suspensions, USV measurements showed that the flow was heterogeneous and exhibited complex situations with the coexistence of multiple flow bands, wall slippage and possibly multidimensional effects. Using USV measurements, we also showed that the fluidization of these suspensions could presumably be attributed to a progressive and spatially heterogeneous transition from a solid-like to a liquid-like behavior. As the shear rate was increased, the multiple coexisting shear bands progressively enlarged and nearly completely spanned over the rheometer gap, whereas the plug-like flow bands were eroded.

  13. Modeling and analysis of electrorheological suspensions in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Seo, Youngwook P; Seo, Yongsok

    2012-02-14

    A model capable of describing the flow behavior of electrorheological (ER) suspensions under different electric field strengths and over the full range of shear rates is proposed. Structural reformation in the low shear rate region is investigated where parts of a material are in an undeformed state, while aligned structures reform under the shear force. The model's predictions were compared with the experimental data of some ER fluids as well as the CCJ (Cho-Choi-Jhon) model. This simple model's predictions of suspension flow behavior with subsequent aligned structure reformation agreed well with the experimental data, both quantitatively and qualitatively. The proposed model plausibly predicted the static yield stress, whereas the CCJ model and the Bingham model predicted only the dynamic yield stress. The master curve describing the apparent viscosity was obtained by appropriate scaling both axes, which showed that a combination of dimensional analysis and flow curve analysis using the proposed model yielded a quantitatively and qualitatively precise description of ER fluid rheological behavior based on relatively few experimental measurements.

  14. Adiabatic shear mechanisms for the hard cutting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Caixu; Wang, Bo; Liu, Xianli; Feng, Huize; Cai, Chunbin

    2015-05-01

    The most important consequence of adiabatic shear phenomenon is formation of sawtooth chip. Lots of scholars focused on the formation mechanism of sawtooth, and the research often depended on experimental approach. For the present, the mechanism of sawtooth chip formation still remains some ambiguous aspects. This study develops a combined numerical and experimental approach to get deeper understanding of sawtooth chip formation mechanism for Polycrystalline Cubic Boron Nitride (PCBN) tools orthogonal cutting hard steel GCr15. By adopting the Johnson-Cook material constitutive equations, the FEM simulation model established in this research effectively overcomes serious element distortions and cell singularity in high strain domain caused by large material deformation, and the adiabatic shear phenomenon is simulated successfully. Both the formation mechanism and process of sawtooth are simulated. Also, the change features regarding the cutting force as well as its effects on temperature are studied. More specifically, the contact of sawtooth formation frequency with cutting force fluctuation frequency is established. The cutting force and effect of cutting temperature on mechanism of adiabatic shear are investigated. Furthermore, the effects of the cutting condition on sawtooth chip formation are researched. The researching results show that cutting feed has the most important effect on sawtooth chip formation compared with cutting depth and speed. This research contributes a better understanding of mechanism, feature of chip formation in hard turning process, and supplies theoretical basis for the optimization of hard cutting process parameters.

  15. Performance of internal covariance estimators for cosmic shear correlation functions

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, O.; Seitz, S.; Eifler, T. F.; Gruen, D.

    2015-12-31

    Data re-sampling methods such as the delete-one jackknife are a common tool for estimating the covariance of large scale structure probes. In this paper we investigate the concepts of internal covariance estimation in the context of cosmic shear two-point statistics. We demonstrate how to use log-normal simulations of the convergence field and the corresponding shear field to carry out realistic tests of internal covariance estimators and find that most estimators such as jackknife or sub-sample covariance can reach a satisfactory compromise between bias and variance of the estimated covariance. In a forecast for the complete, 5-year DES survey we show that internally estimated covariance matrices can provide a large fraction of the true uncertainties on cosmological parameters in a 2D cosmic shear analysis. The volume inside contours of constant likelihood in the $\\Omega_m$-$\\sigma_8$ plane as measured with internally estimated covariance matrices is on average $\\gtrsim 85\\%$ of the volume derived from the true covariance matrix. The uncertainty on the parameter combination $\\Sigma_8 \\sim \\sigma_8 \\Omega_m^{0.5}$ derived from internally estimated covariances is $\\sim 90\\%$ of the true uncertainty.

  16. Performance of internal covariance estimators for cosmic shear correlation functions

    DOE PAGES

    Friedrich, O.; Seitz, S.; Eifler, T. F.; ...

    2015-12-31

    Data re-sampling methods such as the delete-one jackknife are a common tool for estimating the covariance of large scale structure probes. In this paper we investigate the concepts of internal covariance estimation in the context of cosmic shear two-point statistics. We demonstrate how to use log-normal simulations of the convergence field and the corresponding shear field to carry out realistic tests of internal covariance estimators and find that most estimators such as jackknife or sub-sample covariance can reach a satisfactory compromise between bias and variance of the estimated covariance. In a forecast for the complete, 5-year DES survey we show that internally estimated covariance matrices can provide a large fraction of the true uncertainties on cosmological parameters in a 2D cosmic shear analysis. The volume inside contours of constant likelihood in themore » $$\\Omega_m$$-$$\\sigma_8$$ plane as measured with internally estimated covariance matrices is on average $$\\gtrsim 85\\%$$ of the volume derived from the true covariance matrix. The uncertainty on the parameter combination $$\\Sigma_8 \\sim \\sigma_8 \\Omega_m^{0.5}$$ derived from internally estimated covariances is $$\\sim 90\\%$$ of the true uncertainty.« less

  17. Determination of the Shear Stress Distribution in a Laminate from the Applied Shear Resultant--A Simplified Shear Solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Aboudi, Jacob; Yarrington, Phillip W.

    2007-01-01

    The simplified shear solution method is presented for approximating the through-thickness shear stress distribution within a composite laminate based on laminated beam theory. The method does not consider the solution of a particular boundary value problem, rather it requires only knowledge of the global shear loading, geometry, and material properties of the laminate or panel. It is thus analogous to lamination theory in that ply level stresses can be efficiently determined from global load resultants (as determined, for instance, by finite element analysis) at a given location in a structure and used to evaluate the margin of safety on a ply by ply basis. The simplified shear solution stress distribution is zero at free surfaces, continuous at ply boundaries, and integrates to the applied shear load. Comparisons to existing theories are made for a variety of laminates, and design examples are provided illustrating the use of the method for determining through-thickness shear stress margins in several types of composite panels and in the context of a finite element structural analysis.

  18. Validation of Shear Wave Elastography in Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Eby, Sarah F.; Song, Pengfei; Chen, Shigao; Chen, Qingshan; Greenleaf, James F.; An, Kai-Nan

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is a very dynamic tissue, thus accurate quantification of skeletal muscle stiffness throughout its functional range is crucial to improve the physical functioning and independence following pathology. Shear wave elastography (SWE) is an ultrasound-based technique that characterizes tissue mechanical properties based on the propagation of remotely induced shear waves. The objective of this study is to validate SWE throughout the functional range of motion of skeletal muscle for three ultrasound transducer orientations. We hypothesized that combining traditional materials testing (MTS) techniques with SWE measurements will show increased stiffness measures with increasing tensile load, and will correlate well with each other for trials in which the transducer is parallel to underlying muscle fibers. To evaluate this hypothesis, we monitored the deformation throughout tensile loading of four porcine brachialis whole-muscle tissue specimens, while simultaneously making SWE measurements of the same specimen. We used regression to examine the correlation between Young's modulus from MTS and shear modulus from SWE for each of the transducer orientations. We applied a generalized linear model to account for repeated testing. Model parameters were estimated via generalized estimating equations. The regression coefficient was 0.1944, with a 95% confidence interval of (0.1463 – 0.2425) for parallel transducer trials. Shear waves did not propagate well for both the 45° and perpendicular transducer orientations. Both parallel SWE and MTS showed increased stiffness with increasing tensile load. This study provides the necessary first step for additional studies that can evaluate the distribution of stiffness throughout muscle. PMID:23953670

  19. Wind shear related research at Princeton University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengel, Robert

    1992-01-01

    The topics addressed are: (1) real-time decision aiding-aircraft guidance for wind shear avoidance; (2) reducing the thrust-manual recovery strategies; and (3) dynamic behaviour of and aircraft encountering a single axis vortex.

  20. Shear-Joint Capability Versus Bolt Clearance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, H. M.

    1994-01-01

    NASA Technical Memorandum presents theoretical study of relationships between load-bearing capabilities of shear joints that comprise plates clamped together by multiple bolts and clearances between bolts and boltholes in those joints.

  1. Turbulent shear stresses in compressible boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laderman, A. J.; Demetriades, A.

    1979-01-01

    Hot-wire anemometer measurements of turbulent shear stresses in a Mach 3 compressible boundary layer were performed in order to investigate the effects of heat transfer on turbulence. Measurements were obtained by an x-probe in a flat plate, zero pressure gradient, two dimensional boundary layer in a wind tunnel with wall to freestream temperature ratios of 0.94 and 0.71. The measured shear stress distributions are found to be in good agreement with previous results, supporting the contention that the shear stress distribution is essentially independent of Mach number and heat transfer for Mach numbers from incompressible to hypersonic and wall to freestream temperature ratios of 0.4 to 1.0. It is also found that corrections for frequency response limitations of the electronic equipment are necessary to determine the correct shear stress distribution, particularly at the walls.

  2. Remote Sensing Wind and Wind Shear System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Contents: Remote sensing of wind shear and the theory and development of acoustic doppler; Wind studies; A comparison of methods for the remote detection of winds in the airport environment; Acoustic doppler system development; System calibration; Airport operational tests.

  3. Shear joint capability versus bolt clearance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, H. M.

    1992-01-01

    The results of a conservative analysis approach into the determination of shear joint strength capability for typical space-flight hardware as a function of the bolt-hole clearance specified in the design are presented. These joints are comprised of high-strength steel fasteners and abutments constructed of aluminum alloys familiar to the aerospace industry. A general analytical expression was first arrived at which relates bolt-hole clearance to the bolt shear load required to place all joint fasteners into a shear transferring position. Extension of this work allowed the analytical development of joint load capability as a function of the number of fasteners, shear strength of the bolt, bolt-hole clearance, and the desired factor of safety. Analysis results clearly indicate that a typical space-flight hardware joint can withstand significant loading when less than ideal bolt hole clearances are used in the design.

  4. Dynamo quenching due to shear flow.

    PubMed

    Leprovost, Nicolas; Kim, Eun-jin

    2008-04-11

    We provide a theory of dynamo (alpha effect) and momentum transport in three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics. For the first time, we show that the alpha effect is reduced by the shear even in the absence of magnetic field. The alpha effect is further suppressed by magnetic fields well below equipartition (with the large-scale flow) with different scalings depending on the relative strength of shear and magnetic field. The turbulent viscosity is also found to be significantly reduced by shear and magnetic fields, with positive value. These results suggest a crucial effect of shear and magnetic field on dynamo quenching and momentum transport reduction, with important implications for laboratory and astrophysical plasmas, in particular, for the dynamics of the Sun.

  5. Shear wave velocity measurements in marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, J. E.

    1982-09-01

    Pulsed ultrasonic techniques for the measurement of sound speed are reliable and well documented. Extension of these techniques to the measurement of shear wave velocities in marine sediments, generally was unsuccessful. Recently developed shear wave transducers, based upon piezoelectric benders operated at sonic frequencies, provide significantly improved transducer-sample mechanical coupling. This improved coupling allows the application of pulsed techniques to the measurement of shear wave velocities in marine sediments, and the rapid determination of sediment dynamic elastic properties. Two types of bender-based shear wave transducer and preliminary data are described: 1) a probe configuration for box core samples, and 2) a modification to the Hamilton Frame Velocimeter for cut samples.

  6. Effect of shear on aircraft landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luers, J. K.; Reeves, J. B.

    1973-01-01

    A simulation study was conducted to determine the effect of wind shear on aircraft landings. The landing of various type of commercial and military aircraft was digitally simulated starting from an initial altitude of 300 feet. Assuming no pilot feedback during descent, the deviation in touchdown point due to vertical profiles of wind shear was determined. The vertical profiles of wind shear are defined in terms of surface roughness, Z sub 0, and stability, L, parameters. The effects on touchdown due to Z sub 0 and L have been calculated for the different type aircraft. Comparisons were made between the following types of aircraft: (1) C-130E, (2) C-135A, (3) C-141, (4) DC-8, (5) Boeing 747, and (6) an augmentor-wing STOL. In addition, the wind shear effect on touchdown resulting from different locations of the center of gravity and gross weights was also analyzed.

  7. Flight in low-level wind shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, W.

    1983-01-01

    Results of studies of wind shear hazard to aircraft operation are summarized. Existing wind shear profiles currently used in computer and flight simulator studies are reviewed. The governing equations of motion for an aircraft are derived incorporating the variable wind effects. Quantitative discussions of the effects of wind shear on aircraft performance are presented. These are followed by a review of mathematical solutions to both the linear and nonlinear forms of the governing equations. Solutions with and without control laws are presented. The application of detailed analysis to develop warning and detection systems based on Doppler radar measuring wind speed along the flight path is given. A number of flight path deterioration parameters are defined and evaluated. Comparison of computer-predicted flight paths with those measured in a manned flight simulator is made. Some proposed airborne and ground-based wind shear hazard warning and detection systems are reviewed. The advantages and disadvantages of both types of systems are discussed.

  8. Summary Proceedings of a Wind Shear Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enders, J. H.; Melvin, W. W.; Frost, W.; Camp, D. W.

    1983-01-01

    A number of recent program results and current issues were addressed: the data collection phase of the highly successful Joint Airport Weather Study (JAWS) Project and the NASA-B5f7B Gust Gradient Program, the use of these data for flight crew training through educational programs (e.g., films) and with manned flight training simulators, methods for post-accident determination of wind conditions from flight data recorders, the microburst wind shear phenomenon which was positively measured and described the ring vortex as a possible generating mechanism, the optimum flight procedure for use during an unexpected wind shear encounter, evaluation of the low-level wind shear alert system (LLWSAS), and assessment of the demonstrated and viable application of Doppler radar as an operational wind shear warning and detection system.

  9. Electrostatic ion cyclotron velocity shear instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemons, D. S.; Winske, D.; Gary, S. P.

    1992-01-01

    A local electrostatic dispersion equation is derived for a shear flow perpendicular to an ambient magnetic field, which includes all kinetic effects and involves only one important parameter. The dispersion equation is cast in the form of Gordeyev integrals and is solved numerically. Numerical solutions indicate that an ion cyclotron instability is excited. The instability occurs roughly at multiples of the ion cyclotron frequency (modified by the shear), with the growth rate or the individual harmonics overlapping in the wavenumber. At large values of the shear parameter, the instability is confined to long wavelengths, but at smaller shear, a second distinct branch at shorter wavelengths also appears. The properties of the instability obtained are compared with those obtained in the nonlocal limit by Ganguli et al. (1985, 1988).

  10. Effects of transverse shearing flexibility on the postbuckling of plates loaded by inplane shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, Manuel

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents buckling and postbuckling results for plates loaded by inplane shear. The buckling results have been plotted to show the effects of thickness on the stress coefficient for aluminum plates. Results are given for various length-to-width ratios. Postbuckling results for thin plates with transverse shearing flexibility are compared to results from classical theory. The problems considered are the postbuckling response of plates in shear made of aluminum and of a + or - 45 deg graphite-epoxy laminate. Thus the materials are isotropic and orthotropic, respectively. The plates are considered to be long with side edges simply supported, with various inplane edge conditions, and the plates are subject to a constant shearing displacement along the side edges. Characteristic curves presenting the average shear stress resultant as a function of the applied displacement are given. These curves indicate that change in inplane edge conditions influence plate postbuckling stiffness and that transverse shearing is important in some cases.

  11. Shear band foliation as an indicator of sense of shear: Field observations in central Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weijermars, Ruud; Rondeel, Harm E.

    1984-10-01

    The Macizo de Nevera, a Paleozoic basement inlier surrounded by essentially flat-lying Mesozoic cover rocks of central Spain, exhibits an extremely consistent system of steep, dextral strike-slip faults. Different faults have a variable amount of displacement, but their en echelon arrangement and similar sense of displacement imply a cogenetic origin. A maximum displacement of 1.0 km, corresponding to an averaged angular shear strain of 1.5 and peak values of 6.6, occurs along the central part of the 6-km-long Truchas ductile shear zone. An early axial-plane cleavage is locally deflected into the Truchas shear zone and superposed by coarse shear band foliation. The consistent angular relationship between the new foliation and the shear zone boundary confirms the megascopic sense of shear.

  12. Lateral shearing interferometer with variable shearing for measurement of a small beam.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Zeng, Aijun; Zhu, Linglin; Huang, Huijie

    2014-04-01

    A lateral shearing interferometer with variable shearing for measurement of a small beam is proposed. The interferometer is composed of a polarization beam splitter, a thick birefringent plate, a quarter-wave plate, a mirror, and an image sensor. The shearing amount can be tiny by using the thick birefringent plate as the shear generator. The shearing amount of the interferometer can be continuously adjusted by rotating the thick birefringent plate, and 2D interferograms can be obtained by rotating the thick birefringent plate along the mutually perpendicular directions. The optical path difference is compensated with a double lateral shearing by using a quarter-wave plate and a mirror. The interferometer is verified by simulation and experiment; the experiment result is well coincident with the simulation result. The usefulness of the interferometer is verified.

  13. Mathematical interpretation of radial shearing interferometers.

    PubMed

    Malacara, D

    1974-08-01

    The procedure for computing a radial shearing interferometric pattern is given. The interferometric pattern is analyzed to obtain the wavefront shape. Restricting the discussion to wavefronts having rotational symmetry, we give two different methods of finding the wavefront. One approach is to scan along a diameter of the interferometric pattern and the other is to examine the shape of the fringes. The relative sensitivity of a radial shearing interferometer with respect to that of a Twyman-Green interferometer is also analyzed.

  14. Large Amplitude Oscillatory Shear near Jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tighe, Brian; Dagois-Bohy, Simon; Somfai, Ellak; van Hecke, Martin

    2014-11-01

    Jammed solids such as foams and emulsions can be driven with oscillatory shear at finite strain amplitude and frequency. On a macro scale, this induces nonlinearities such as strain softening and shear thinning. On the micro scale one observes the onset of irreversibility, caging, and long-time diffusion. Using simulations of soft viscous spheres, we systematically vary the distance to the jamming transition. We correlate crossovers in the microscopic and macroscopic response, and construct scaling arguments to explain their relationships.

  15. Thermodynamics of dilute gases in shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jou, D.; Criado-Sancho, M.

    2001-03-01

    We consider the effect of shear and normal viscous pressures on the non-equilibrium entropy of ideal gases in Couette flow. These results extend the previous ones (Bidar et al., Physica A 233 (1996) 163), where normal pressure effects were ignored. Furthermore, we analyze the non-equilibrium contributions to the chemical potential, which may be useful in the analysis of shear-induced effects on colligative properties and chemical equilibrium.

  16. Modeling and implementation of wind shear data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Walter

    1987-01-01

    The problems of implementing the JAWS wind shear data are discussed. The data sets are described from the view of utilizing them in an aircraft performance computer program. Then, some of the problems of nonstandard procedures are described in terms of programming the equations of aircraft motion when the effects of temporal and spatially variable winds are included. Finally, some of the computed effects of the various wind shear terms are shown.

  17. Shear-stabilized emulsion flooding process

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, C.W.; Reed, R.L.

    1982-06-29

    Additional amounts of crude oil are recovered from a subterranean formation by flooding with a translucent emulsion comprising an upper- or middle-phase microemulsion as an external phase and a polymer-containing brine solution as an internal phase. The translucent emulsion tends to coalesce into its component phases under conditions of no shear, but is stabilized by low shears such as those imposed on fluids flowing through a subterranean formation.

  18. Shear Strength Behavior of Human Trabecular Bone

    PubMed Central

    Sanyal, Arnav; Gupta, Atul; Bayraktar, Harun H.; Kwon, Ronald Y.; Keaveny, Tony M.

    2012-01-01

    The shear strength of human trabecular bone may influence overall bone strength under fall loading conditions and failure at bone-implant interfaces. Here, we sought to compare shear and compressive yield strengths of human trabecular bone and elucidate the underlying failure mechanisms. We analyzed 54 specimens (5-mm cubes), all aligned with the main trabecular orientation and spanning four anatomic sites, 44 different cadavers, and a wide range of bone volume fraction (0.06–0.38). Micro-CT-based non-linear finite element analysis was used to assess the compressive and shear strengths and the spatial distribution of yielded tissue; the tissue-level constitutive model allowed for kinematic non-linearity and yielding with strength asymmetry. We found that the computed values of both the shear and compressive strengths depended on bone volume fraction via power law relations having an exponent of 1.7 (R2=0.95 shear; R2=0.97 compression). The ratio of shear to compressive strengths (mean ± SD, 0.44 ± 0.16) did not depend on bone volume fraction (p=0.24) but did depend on microarchitecture, most notably the intra-trabecular standard deviation in trabecular spacing (R2=0.23, p<0.005). For shear, the main tissue-level failure mode was tensile yield of the obliquely oriented trabeculae. By contrast, for compression, specimens having low bone volume fraction failed primarily by large-deformation-related tensile yield of horizontal trabeculae and those having high bone volume failed primarily by compressive yield of vertical trabeculae. We conclude that human trabecular bone is generally much weaker in shear than compression at the apparent level, reflecting different failure mechanisms at the tissue level. PMID:22884967

  19. Shear dispersion in dense granular flows

    DOE PAGES

    Christov, Ivan C.; Stone, Howard A.

    2014-04-18

    We formulate and solve a model problem of dispersion of dense granular materials in rapid shear flow down an incline. The effective dispersivity of the depth-averaged concentration of the dispersing powder is shown to vary as the Péclet number squared, as in classical Taylor–Aris dispersion of molecular solutes. An extension to generic shear profiles is presented, and possible applications to industrial and geological granular flows are noted.

  20. Local Transport Barrier Formation and Relaxation in Reversed Shear Plasmas on TFTR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Synakowski, E. J.

    1996-11-01

    Central to discussions of transport barrier formation and sustainment in the plasma core or edge is E× B shear stabilization of plasma turbulence. It has also been suggested that the low core current densities in TFTR reversed shear plasmas yield large gradients in the Shafranov shift that in themselves stabilize the dominant modes in the core of these plasmas without the benefit of E× B shear. (M. Beer, invited presentation, this meeting) Examined here are the possibilities that one, both, or neither mechanism is responsible for the improved core confinement of TFTR Enhanced Reversed Shear (ERS) plasmas. The difficulty in separating the influence of both effects centers in part on the fact that large Shafranov shifts are accompanied by large pressure gradients, implying that shift-induced stabilization will always be favorable when pressure-gradient-driven E× B shear is expected to be large. The roles of these two mechanisms are separated on TFTR by varying the local radial electric field through changes in the velocity shear induced by different combinations of co- and counter-injection of neutral beams at constant heating power. Co- and counter-injection provide the opportunity of generating V_φ-driven contributions to the E× B shear that add both destructively and constructively to the nabla p-driven term in the radial force balance equation. Significant variations in the E× B shear at and near the transport barrier region can thus be realized, permitting detailed examinations of the response of local transport to changes in the local radial electric field with small variations in the Shafranov shift. The relation between shearing rates, predicted growth rates, and the threshold behavior of local barrier formation and losses in confinement will be discussed. Changes in local fluctuation behavior across the transition into and out of ERS confinement will also be examined for these experiments. The characteristics and power thresholds of barrier formation

  1. Shear modulus of kaolin containing methane bubbles

    SciTech Connect

    Duffy, S.M. ); Wheeler, S.J. . Dept. of Engineering Science); Bennell, J.D. )

    1994-05-01

    Measurements of undrained shear moduli are reported from a program of laboratory tests on reconstituted kaolin samples containing relatively large bubbles of methane gas. The experimental program included low-frequency torsional stress-strain loops and torsional resonant column tests, providing values of shear moduli for shear-strain similitudes from 0.0004% to 0.1%. At all values of strain amplitude, the reduction of shear moduli caused by the presence of gas bubbles was greater than predicted by a theoretical elastic expression. This pattern of behavior was attributed to te formation of local yield zones around the gas-bubble cavities during consolidation prior to shear testing (a phenomenon that would also occur in-situ within offshore sediments). The results of the research program suggest that reductions in shear moduli of up to 50% could be caused by relatively small volumes of gas bubbles, occupying just a few percent of the total soil volume. This would have considerable significance for the displacements of offshore foundations constructed on sediments containing undissolved gas.

  2. Accurate shear measurement with faint sources

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun; Foucaud, Sebastien; Luo, Wentao E-mail: walt@shao.ac.cn

    2015-01-01

    For cosmic shear to become an accurate cosmological probe, systematic errors in the shear measurement method must be unambiguously identified and corrected for. Previous work of this series has demonstrated that cosmic shears can be measured accurately in Fourier space in the presence of background noise and finite pixel size, without assumptions on the morphologies of galaxy and PSF. The remaining major source of error is source Poisson noise, due to the finiteness of source photon number. This problem is particularly important for faint galaxies in space-based weak lensing measurements, and for ground-based images of short exposure times. In this work, we propose a simple and rigorous way of removing the shear bias from the source Poisson noise. Our noise treatment can be generalized for images made of multiple exposures through MultiDrizzle. This is demonstrated with the SDSS and COSMOS/ACS data. With a large ensemble of mock galaxy images of unrestricted morphologies, we show that our shear measurement method can achieve sub-percent level accuracy even for images of signal-to-noise ratio less than 5 in general, making it the most promising technique for cosmic shear measurement in the ongoing and upcoming large scale galaxy surveys.

  3. An expert system for wind shear avoidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengel, Robert F.; Stratton, D. Alexander

    1990-01-01

    A study of intelligent guidance and control concepts for protecting against the adverse effects of wind shear during aircraft takeoffs and landings is being conducted, with current emphasis on developing an expert system for wind shear avoidance. Principal objectives are to develop methods for assessing the likelihood of wind shear encounter (based on real-time information in the cockpit), for deciding what flight path to pursue (e.g., takeoff abort, landing go-around, or normal climbout or glide slope), and for using the aircraft's full potential for combating wind shear. This study requires the definition of both deterministic and statistical techniques for fusing internal and external information , for making go/no-go decisions, and for generating commands to the manually controlled flight. The program has begun with the development of the WindShear Safety Advisor, an expert system for pilot aiding that is based on the FAA Windshear Training Aid; a two-volume manual that presents an overview , pilot guide, training program, and substantiating data provides guidelines for this initial development. The WindShear Safety Advisor expert system currently contains over 200 rules and is coded in the LISP programming language.

  4. Shear induced structures in crystallizing cocoa butter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzanti, Gianfranco; Guthrie, Sarah E.; Sirota, Eric B.; Marangoni, Alejandro G.; Idziak, Stefan H. J.

    2004-03-01

    Cocoa butter is the main structural component of chocolate and many cosmetics. It crystallizes in several polymorphs, called phases I to VI. We used Synchrotron X-ray diffraction to study the effect of shear on its crystallization. A previously unreported phase (phase X) was found and a crystallization path through phase IV under shear was observed. Samples were crystallized under shear from the melt in temperature controlled Couette cells, at final crystallization temperatures of 17.5^oC, 20^oC and 22.5^oC in Beamline X10A of NSLS. The formation of phase X was observed at low shear rates (90 s-1) and low crystallization temperature (17.5^oC), but was absent at high shear (720 s-1) and high temperature (20^oC). The d-spacing and melting point suggest that this new phase is a mixture rich on two of the three major components of cocoa butter. We also found that, contrary to previous reports, the transition from phase II to phase V can happen through the intermediate phase IV, at high shear rates and temperature.

  5. On shearing fluids with homogeneous densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, D. C.; Srivastava, V. C.; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we study shearing spherically symmetric homogeneous density fluids in comoving coordinates. It is found that the expansion of the four-velocity of a perfect fluid is homogeneous, whereas its shear is generated by an arbitrary function of time M( t), related to the mass function of the distribution. This function is found to bear a functional relationship with density. The field equations are reduced to two coupled first order ordinary differential equations for the metric coefficients g_{11} and g_{22}. We have explored a class of solutions assuming that M is a linear function of the density. This class embodies, as a subcase, the complete class of shear-free solutions. We have discussed the off quoted work of Kustaanheimo (Comment Phys Math XIII:12, 1, 1947) and have noted that it deals with shear-free fluids having anisotropic pressure. It is shown that the anisotropy of the fluid is characterized by an arbitrary function of time. We have discussed some issues of historical priorities and credentials related to shear-free solutions. Recent controversial claims by Mitra (Astrophys Space Sci 333:351, 2011 and Gravit Cosmol 18:17, 2012) have also been addressed. We found that the singularity and the shearing motion of the fluid are closely related. Hence, there is a need for fresh look to the solutions obtained earlier in comoving coordinates.

  6. Effect of micellar topology on shear rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Simon; Calabrese, Michelle; Wagner, Norman

    2014-03-01

    Micellar topology affects the nonlinear shear rheology of self-assembled surfactant solutions. Segmental alignment of wormlike micelles (WLMs) exhibiting varying degrees of branching was investigated under shear in the flow-gradient and flow-vorticity planes using new small angle neutron scattering (SANS) sample environments. The degree of branching in mixed cationic/anionic surfactant (CTAT/SDBS) WLMs is controlled via the addition of the hydrotropic salt sodium tosylate. Shear-induced segmental alignment of the micelles is characterized by spatially-resolved flow-small angle neutron scattering (flow-SANS). Our ability to resolve structural projections in both planes provides insight to branch behavior and kinematics under shear flows. Local segmental orientation and alignment in the flow-gradient plane is a non-monotonic function of branching level and radial position. Alignment in the flow-gradient plane is significantly higher than that observed in the flow-vorticity plane, suggesting that branches may simultaneously migrate into the vorticity direction and inhibit spatially localized flows. Shear and normal stresses calculated from micellar alignment using the stress-SANS law are favorably compared with rheological measurements under identical conditions. The results provide evidence for the effects of micellar topology on the nonlinear shear rheology of WLM solutions.

  7. A new look on blood shear thinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abkarian, Manouk; Lanotte, Luca; Fromental, Jean-Marc; Mendez, Simon; Fedosov, Dmitry; Gompper, Gerhard; Mauer, Johannes; Claveria, Viviana

    2015-11-01

    Blood is a shear-thinning fluid. At shear rates γ˙ < 1 s-1 , its drop of viscosity has been related primarily to the breaking-up of networks of ``rouleaux'' formed by stacked red blood cells (RBCs). For higher γ˙ in the range 10 - 1000 s-1 , where RBCs flow as single elements, studies demonstrated that RBCs suspended in a viscous fluid mimicking the viscosity of whole blood, deformed into ellipsoids aligned steadily in the direction of the flow, while their membrane rotated about their center of mass like a tank-tread. Such drop-like behavior seemed to explain shear-thinning. Here, using rheometers, microfluidics and simulations, we show that the dynamics of single RBCs in plasma-like fluids display a different sequence of deformation for increasing shear rates going from discocytes to successively, stomatocytes, folded stomatocytes, trilobes and tetralobes, but never ellipsoids. This result is also identical for physiological hematocrits. We correlate this shape diagram to the different regimes in blood rheology for high shear rates and propose a new-look on the interpretation of blood shear-thinning behavior.

  8. Analysis of shear banding in twelve materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batra, R. C.; Kim, C. H.

    The problem of the initiation and growth of shear bands in 12 different materials, namely, OFHC copper, Cartridge brass, Nickel 200, Armco IF (interstitial free) iron, Carpenter electric iron, 1006 steel, 2024-T351 aluminum, 7039 aluminum, low alloy steel, S-7 tool steel, Tungsten alloy, and Depleted Uranium (DU -0.75 Ti) is studied with the objectives of finding out when a shear band initiates, and upon what parameters does the band width depend. The nonlinear coupled partial differential equations governing the overall simple shearing deformations of a thermally softening viscoplastic block are analyzed. It is assumed that the thermomechanical response of these materials can be adequately represented by the Johnson-Cook law, and the only inhomogeneity present in the block is the variation in its thickness. The effect of the defect size on the initiation and subsequent growth of the band is also studied. It is found that, for each one of these 12 materials, the deformation has become nonhomogeneous by the time the maximum shear stress occurs. Also the band width, computed when the shear stress has dropped to 85 percent of its peak value, does not correlate well with the thermal conductivity of the material. The band begins to grow rapidly when the shear stress has dropped to 90 percent of its maximum value.

  9. Cosmology with cosmic shear observations: a review.

    PubMed

    Kilbinger, Martin

    2015-07-01

    Cosmic shear is the distortion of images of distant galaxies due to weak gravitational lensing by the large-scale structure in the Universe. Such images are coherently deformed by the tidal field of matter inhomogeneities along the line of sight. By measuring galaxy shape correlations, we can study the properties and evolution of structure on large scales as well as the geometry of the Universe. Thus, cosmic shear has become a powerful probe into the nature of dark matter and the origin of the current accelerated expansion of the Universe. Over the last years, cosmic shear has evolved into a reliable and robust cosmological probe, providing measurements of the expansion history of the Universe and the growth of its structure. We review here the principles of weak gravitational lensing and show how cosmic shear is interpreted in a cosmological context. Then we give an overview of weak-lensing measurements, and present the main observational cosmic-shear results since it was discovered 15 years ago, as well as the implications for cosmology. We then conclude with an outlook on the various future surveys and missions, for which cosmic shear is one of the main science drivers, and discuss promising new weak cosmological lensing techniques for future observations.

  10. Dynamic shear jamming in dense suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Ivo; Majumdar, Sayantan; Jaeger, Heinrich

    Shear a dense suspension of cornstarch and water hard enough, and the system seems to solidify as a result. Indeed, previous studies have shown that a jamming front propagates through these systems until, after interaction with boundaries, a jammed solid spans across the system. Because these fully jammed states are only observed if the deformation is fast enough, a natural question to ask is how this phenomenon is related to the discontinuous shear thickening (DST) behavior of these suspensions. We present a single experimental setup in which we on the one hand can measure the rheological flow curves, but on the other hand also determine if the suspension is in a jammed state. This we do by using a large-gap cylindrical Couette cell, where we control the applied shear stress using a rheometer. Because our setup only applies shear, the jammed states we observe are shear-jammed, and cannot be a result of an overall increase in packing fraction. We probe for jammed states by dropping small steel spheres on the surface of the suspension, and identify elastic responses. Our experiments reveal a clear distinction between the onset of DST and Shear-Jammed states, which have qualitatively different trends with packing fraction close to the isotropic jamming point.

  11. A Controlled Shear Decorrelation Experiment (CSDX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tynan, George

    1999-11-01

    The controlled shear de-correlation experiment (CSDX) is being designed to study the effect of sheared flows on: (1) known linear pressure gradient-driven drift and/or effective gravity-driven flute eigenmodes; (2) the nonlinear three-wave coupling of a finite number of large amplitude coherent modes; and (3) on the rate of electrostatic turbulent fluctuation energy cascades. This research is motivated by magnetic confinement experiments and theory which suggest that sheared E x B shear flows lead to a nonlinear de-correlation of plasma turbulence. The plasma state (i.e. quiescent, single small-amplitude drift wave, nonlinearly coupled modes, or strongly turbulent) will be controlled by varying the magnetic field strength, collisionality, parallel current, and/or effective gravity due to solid-body plasma rotation driven by azimuthal ExB drifts. The radial electric field strength and shear rate will be controlled independently of the plasma state by the application of externally controlled voltages to concentric annular rings which will form the ends of the experimental region. Diagnostics include azimuthal, radial, and axial Langmuir probe arrays, laser induced flourescence (LIF) for ion temperature and equilibrium ExB flow velocities. Bi-spectral analysis techniques will be used to measure k-space resolved linear growth rates and nonlinear energy cascading due to three-wave coupling in the presence of flow shear. Designs and experimental plans will be presented and discussed.

  12. Behavior of Tilted Angle Shear Connectors

    PubMed Central

    Khorramian, Koosha; Maleki, Shervin; Shariati, Mahdi; Ramli Sulong, N. H.

    2015-01-01

    According to recent researches, angle shear connectors are appropriate to transfer longitudinal shear forces across the steel-concrete interface. Angle steel profile has been used in different positions as L-shaped or C-shaped shear connectors. The application of angle shear connectors in tilted positions is of interest in this study. This study investigates the behaviour of tilted-shaped angle shear connectors under monotonic loading using experimental push out tests. Eight push-out specimens are tested to investigate the effects of different angle parameters on the ultimate load capacity of connectors. Two different tilted angles of 112.5 and 135 degrees between the angle leg and steel beam are considered. In addition, angle sizes and lengths are varied. Two different failure modes were observed consisting of concrete crushing-splitting and connector fracture. By increasing the size of connector, the maximum load increased for most cases. In general, the 135 degrees tilted angle shear connectors have a higher strength and stiffness than the 112.5 degrees type. PMID:26642193

  13. Wall shear stress in collapsed tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naili, S.; Ribreau, C.

    1999-01-01

    A small flexural wall rigidity brings unique features to cross-sectional shapes and blood flow within veins, which are characterised by a non-uniform hemodynamical environment acting upon endothelial cells. Velocity fields and related wall shear stress were numerically determined for a large number of conditions, assuming a fully developed, steady, incompressible laminar flow through an uniform smooth pipe with a constant cross-section. It was shown that the flatness greatly influences the resulting distribution of the wall shear stresses along the lumen perimeter. For instance, under a steady longitudinal pressure gradient at about 500 Pascal per meter inside a constant oval-shaped tube, with a lumen perimeter of the order of 5 × 10^{-2} meter, the maximum wall shear stress is found at about 2 Pascal where the local curvature is minimal. On the other hand, the minimal wall shear stress of the order of 1 Pascal is found where the local curvature is maximal. Clear indications have been reported showing that the hemodynamical wall shear stress does alter endothelial cell morphology and orientation. These results are being used for developing an experimental set-up in order to locally map out the characteristic shear stresses looking for endothelial shape modifications whenever a viscous fluid flow is applied.

  14. Resolution of axial shear strain elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thitaikumar, Arun; Righetti, Raffaella; Krouskop, Thomas A.; Ophir, Jonathan

    2006-10-01

    The technique of mapping the local axial component of the shear strain due to quasi-static axial compression is defined as axial shear strain elastography. In this paper, the spatial resolution of axial shear strain elastography is investigated through simulations, using an elastically stiff cylindrical lesion embedded in a homogeneously softer background. Resolution was defined as the smallest size of the inclusion for which the strain value at the inclusion/background interface was greater than the average of the axial shear strain values at the interface and inside the inclusion. The resolution was measured from the axial shear strain profile oriented at 45° to the axis of beam propagation, due to the absence of axial shear strain along the normal directions. The effects of the ultrasound system parameters such as bandwidth, beamwidth and transducer element pitch along with signal processing parameters such as correlation window length (W) and axial shift (ΔW) on the estimated resolution were investigated. The results show that the resolution (at 45° orientation) is determined by the bandwidth and the beamwidth. However, the upper bound on the resolution is limited by the larger of the beamwidth and the window length, which is scaled inversely to the bandwidth. The results also show that the resolution is proportional to the pitch and not significantly affected by the axial window shift.

  15. The shear-stress intensity factor for a centrally cracked stiff-flanged shear web

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichter, W. B.

    1976-01-01

    By use of the principle of superposition the stiff-flanged shear web is modeled mathematically by an infinite elastic strip with fixed longitudinal edges. The shear-stress intensity factor for a central longitudinal crack is calculated for various values of the ratio of strip width to crack length, h/a, in the range 0.1-10. The interaction of the crack with the boundaries is illustrated by boundary shear-stress distributions for three values of h/a. Some implications of the results for the design of damage-tolerant shear webs are discussed briefly.

  16. Fluctuating hydrodynamics simulations of coarse-grained lipid membranes under steady-state conditions and in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Erik G

    2013-07-01

    The stochastic Eulerian-Lagrangian method (SELM) is used to simulate coarse-grained lipid membrane models under steady-state conditions and in shear flow. SELM is an immersed boundary method which combines the efficiency of particle-based simulations with the realistic solvent dynamics provided by fluctuating hydrodynamics. Membrane simulations in SELM are shown to give structural properties in accordance with equilibrium statistical mechanics and dynamic properties in agreement with previous simulations of highly detailed membrane models in explicit solvent. Simulations of sheared membranes are used to calculate surface shear viscosities and inter-monolayer friction coefficients. The membrane models are shown to be shear thinning under a wide range of applied shear rates.

  17. Strength distributions of adhesive bonded and adhesive/rivet combined joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imanaka, Makoto; Haraga, Kosuke; Nishikawa, Tetsuya

    1992-11-01

    The tensile and shear strengths of adhesive and adhesive/rivet combined joints are statistically evaluated, and the probability of failure is calculated for these two types of joints. Attention is given to the effects of the adhesive/rivet combination on mean tensile shear strength and coefficient of variation. The adhesive joint's strength distribution was well approximated by Weibull or doubly-exponential distribution function; tensile shear strength is significantly improved by the combination with rivets.

  18. Compressive and shear buckling analysis of metal matrix composite sandwich panels under different thermal environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Jackson, Raymond H.

    1993-01-01

    Combined inplane compressive and shear buckling analysis was conducted on flat rectangular sandwich panels using the Raleigh-Ritz minimum energy method with a consideration of transverse shear effect of the sandwich core. The sandwich panels were fabricated with titanium honeycomb core and laminated metal matrix composite face sheets. The results show that slightly slender (along unidirectional compressive loading axis) rectangular sandwich panels have the most desirable stiffness-to-weight ratios for aerospace structural applications; the degradation of buckling strength of sandwich panels with rising temperature is faster in shear than in compression; and the fiber orientation of the face sheets for optimum combined-load buckling strength of sandwich panels is a strong function of both loading condition and panel aspect ratio. Under the same specific weight and panel aspect ratio, a sandwich panel with metal matrix composite face sheets has much higher buckling strength than one having monolithic face sheets.

  19. Shear induced alignment of short nanofibers in 3D printed polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdem Yunus, Doruk; Shi, Wentao; Sohrabi, Salman; Liu, Yaling

    2016-12-01

    3D printing of composite materials offers an opportunity to combine the desired properties of composite materials with the flexibility of additive manufacturing in geometric shape and complexity. In this paper, the shear-induced alignment of aluminum oxide nanowires during stereolithography printing was utilized to fabricate a nanowire reinforced polymer composite. To align the fibers, a lateral oscillation mechanism was implemented and combined with wall pattern printing technique to generate shear flow in both vertical and horizontal directions. A series of specimens were fabricated for testing the composite material’s tensile strength. The results showed that mechanical properties of the composite were improved by reinforcement of nanofibers through shear induced alignment. The improvement of tensile strength was approximately ∼28% by aligning the nanowires at 5 wt% (∼1.5% volume fraction) loading of aluminum oxide nanowires.

  20. Shear induced alignment of short nanofibers in 3D printed polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Yunus, Doruk Erdem; Shi, Wentao; Sohrabi, Salman; Liu, Yaling

    2016-12-09

    3D printing of composite materials offers an opportunity to combine the desired properties of composite materials with the flexibility of additive manufacturing in geometric shape and complexity. In this paper, the shear-induced alignment of aluminum oxide nanowires during stereolithography printing was utilized to fabricate a nanowire reinforced polymer composite. To align the fibers, a lateral oscillation mechanism was implemented and combined with wall pattern printing technique to generate shear flow in both vertical and horizontal directions. A series of specimens were fabricated for testing the composite material's tensile strength. The results showed that mechanical properties of the composite were improved by reinforcement of nanofibers through shear induced alignment. The improvement of tensile strength was approximately ∼28% by aligning the nanowires at 5 wt% (∼1.5% volume fraction) loading of aluminum oxide nanowires.

  1. Doppler optical coherence tomography imaging of local fluid flow and shear stress within microporous scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yali; Bagnaninchi, Pierre O.; Yang, Ying; Haj, Alicia El; Hinds, Monica T.; Kirkpatrick, Sean J.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2009-05-01

    Establishing a relationship between perfusion rate and fluid shear stress in a 3D cell culture environment is an ongoing and challenging task faced by tissue engineers. We explore Doppler optical coherence tomography (DOCT) as a potential imaging tool for in situ monitoring of local fluid flow profiles inside porous chitosan scaffolds. From the measured fluid flow profiles, the fluid shear stresses are evaluated. We examine the localized fluid flow and shear stress within low- and high-porosity chitosan scaffolds, which are subjected to a constant input flow rate of 0.5 ml.min-1. The DOCT results show that the behavior of the fluid flow and shear stress in micropores is strongly dependent on the micropore interconnectivity, porosity, and size of pores within the scaffold. For low-porosity and high-porosity chitosan scaffolds examined, the measured local fluid flow and shear stress varied from micropore to micropore, with a mean shear stress of 0.49+/-0.3 dyn.cm-2 and 0.38+/-0.2 dyn.cm-2, respectively. In addition, we show that the scaffold's porosity and interconnectivity can be quantified by combining analyses of the 3D structural and flow images obtained from DOCT.

  2. Fourier band-power E/B-mode estimators for cosmic shear

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Matthew R.; Rozo, Eduardo

    2016-01-20

    We introduce new Fourier band-power estimators for cosmic shear data analysis and E/B-mode separation. We consider both the case where one performs E/B-mode separation and the case where one does not. The resulting estimators have several nice properties which make them ideal for cosmic shear data analysis. First, they can be written as linear combinations of the binned cosmic shear correlation functions. Secondly, they account for the survey window function in real-space. Thirdly, they are unbiased by shape noise since they do not use correlation function data at zero separation. Fourthly, the band-power window functions in Fourier space are compact and largely non-oscillatory. Fifthly, they can be used to construct band-power estimators with very efficient data compression properties. In particular, we find that all of the information on the parameters Ωm, σ8 and ns in the shear correlation functions in the range of ~10–400 arcmin for single tomographic bin can be compressed into only three band-power estimates. Finally, we can achieve these rates of data compression while excluding small-scale information where the modelling of the shear correlation functions and power spectra is very difficult. Given these desirable properties, these estimators will be very useful for cosmic shear data analysis.

  3. Morphology Evolution and Dynamic Viscoelastic Behavior of Ternary Elastomer Blends under Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xia; Liu, Xianggui; Han, Charles C.; Wang, Dujin

    The influence of nanoparticle geometry, such as size and shape, on the phase morphology of partially miscible binary polymer blends under and after shear has been examined by rheological and rheo-optical techniques. The phase morphologies of the solution-polymerized styrene-butadiene rubber and low vinyl content polyisoprene (SSBR/LPI) blend systems were affected by the dispersion status of fillers which were determined by filler shapes and shear strength. Under weak shear flow, the domain morphology of the OMMT filled blend was much thinner than that of the SiO2 filled blend. Under strong shear flow, the string-like phase interface of the OMMT filled blend was much blurred compared with that of the SiO2 filled blend. After shear cessation, the orientation status of OMMT sheets determined the orientation of newborn domains. Combined morphology observation and rheological analysis showed that the anisotropic structure and the unfavorable bending energy of OMMT sheets played important roles on phase morphology and its evolution process during or after shear. The authors thank the financial support from National Natural Science Foundation of China (No.51173195).

  4. Couplings between swelling and shear in saturated slit nanopores: a molecular simulation study.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Hai; Galliero, Guillaume

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the coupling between swelling and shear in liquid saturated slit nanopores is studied using molecular dynamics simulations on Lennard-Jones systems. First, the consistency of the simulations using thermodynamics and direct routes is validated when dealing separately with swelling and shear. Then, the coupling between swelling and shear is explored by displacing the solid walls in one direction while letting them move freely on the other. Results indicate that shear can induce swelling and vice versa because of the confined fluid phase structure. This phenomenon, which is neglected in poromechanics modeling, may be non-negligible in highly structured microporous systems, such as clays. It implies that the response to a variation in the external load can be a combination of volumetric and shear deformations, because of the fluid. Finally, we explore the behavior induced by solid walls moving at a constant velocity. Interestingly, when the wall velocity exceeds the swelling velocity, the instantaneous states of the system are no longer at equilibrium and the averaged pore width slightly increases with increasing shear rate.

  5. Shear rheology of molten crumb chocolate.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J E; Van Damme, I; Johns, M L; Routh, A F; Wilson, D I

    2009-03-01

    The shear rheology of fresh molten chocolate produced from crumb was studied over 5 decades of shear rate using controlled stress devices. The Carreau model was found to be a more accurate description than the traditional Casson model, especially at shear rates between 0.1 and 1 s(-1). At shear rates around 0.1 s(-1) (shear stress approximately 7 Pa) the material exhibited a transition to a solid regime, similar to the behavior reported by Coussot (2005) for other granular suspensions. The nature of the suspension was explored by investigating the effect of solids concentration (0.20 < phi < 0.75) and the nature of the particles. The rheology of the chocolate was then compared with the rheology of (1) a synthetic chocolate, which contained sunflower oil in place of cocoa butter, and (2) a suspension of sugar of a similar size distribution (volume mean 15 mum) in cocoa butter and emulsifier. The chocolate and synthetic chocolate showed very similar rheological profiles under both steady shear and oscillatory shear. The chocolate and the sugar suspension showed similar Krieger-Dougherty dependency on volume fraction, and a noticeable transition to a stiff state at solids volume fractions above approximately 0.5. Similar behavior has been reported by Citerne and others (2001) for a smooth peanut butter, which had a similar particle size distribution and solids loading to chocolate. The results indicate that the melt rheology of the chocolate is dominated by hydrodynamic interactions, although at high solids volume fractions the emulsifier may contribute to the departure of the apparent viscosity from the predicted trend.

  6. Boundary Shear Stress Along Vegetated Streambanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, L. A.; Wynn, T.

    2007-12-01

    Sediment, a leading cause of water quality impairment, damages aquatic ecosystems and interferes with recreational uses and water treatment processes. Streambank retreat can contribute as much as 85% of watershed sediment yield. Vegetation is an important component of stream restoration designs used to control streambank retreat, but vegetation effects on streambank boundary shear stress (SBSS) need to be quantified. The overall goal of this experiment is to predict boundary shear stress along vegetated streambanks. This goal will be met by determining a method for measuring boundary shear stress in the field along hydraulically rough streambanks, evaluating the effects of streambank vegetation on boundary shear stress in the field, and developing predictive methods based on measurable vegetative properties. First, three streambank vegetation types (herbaceous, shrubbery, and woody) will be modeled in a flume study to examine both boundary shear stress measurement theory and instruments for field use. An appropriate method (law of the wall, Reynold's stresses, TKE, or average wall shear stress) and field instrument (ADV, propeller, or Pitot tube) will be selected, resulting in a field technique to measure SBSS. Predictive methods for estimating SBSS, based on common vegetation measurements, will be developed in the flume study and validated with field data. This research is intended to improve our understanding of the role of riparian vegetation in stream morphology by evaluating the effects of vegetation on boundary shear stress, providing insight to the type and density of vegetation required for streambank stability. The results will also aide in quantifying sediment inputs from streambanks, providing quantitative information for stream restoration projects and watershed management planning.

  7. Experimental shear zones and magnetic fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borradaile, G. J.; Alford, C.

    Magnetic fabric analysis has been used as a non-destructive means of detecting petrofabric development during experimentally produced multi-stage, transpressive deformations in 'shear zones'. Artificial, magnetic-bearing silicate sands and calcite sands, bonded with Portland cement, were deformed at room temperature and at 100 and 150 MPa confining pressure. The slip-rate for the shear zone walls was 0.73 × 10 -4 mm s -1 and the maximum shear strains were about 0.38, across zones that were initially about 5 mm thick. The magnetic fabric ellipsoid rapidly spins so that the maximum and intermediate susceptibilities tend to become parallel to the shear zone walls throughout the sheared zone. The ellipsoid becomes increasingly oblate with progressive deformation. However, in all cases, the anisotropy is strongly influenced by the pre-deformation magnetic fabric. During deformation the cement gel collapses so that cataclasis of the mineral grains is suppressed. In the quartz-feldspar aggregates the magnetite's alignment is accommodated by particulate flow (intergranular displacements) of the grains. In the calcite aggregates stronger magnetic fabrics develop due to plastic deformation of calcite grains as well as particulate flow. However, the calcite grain fabrics are somewhat linear ( L ≥ S) whereas the magnetic fabrics are planar ( S > L). The preferred dimensional orientations of magnetite are weak and it is possible that the magnetic fabrics are due to intragranular rearrangements of magnetic domains. The transpressive shear zones are much more efficient than axial-symmetric shortening in the increase of anisotropy of the magnetic fabrics, especially in the case of the calcite aggregates. This suggests that flow laws derived for axial-symmetric shortening experiments may not be appropriate for non-coaxial strain histories such as those of shear zones.

  8. Assessment of the Effects of Cold Work on Crack Initiation in a Light Water Environment Using the Small-Punch Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isselin, Jerome; Kai, Akira; Sakaguchi, Kazuhiko; Shoji, Tetsuo

    2008-05-01

    Work hardening induced by manufacturing processes has important consequences for the resistance to the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of low-carbon stainless steel in high-temperature water conditions. It is of great importance to understand the mechanisms and the factors promoting environmentally assisted cracking in such environments. In this study, the effect of work hardening on 316L austenitic stainless steel was studied using a small-punch SCC test facility applied to miniaturized specimens. Tests were performed in a boiling water reactor (BWR) environment with trapezoidal loading. After the tests, the fracture faces and the surfaces of the samples were examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Focused ion beam (FIB) etching was used to prepare samples for the SEM observations. Identification of the oxide was done using a Raman spectroscope and comparison of the data to reference spectra. The results showed the unfavorable effect of cold rolling against crack initiation. The oxide composition is affected by work hardening. Hence, the ferrous oxide formation is promoted by Fe diffusion caused by the dislocation density increase associated with an active strain during the test.

  9. Cloning and Molecular Characterization of a Metabolic Gene with Developmental Functions in Drosophila. I. Analysis of the Head Function of Punch

    PubMed Central

    McLean, J. R.; Boswell, R.; O'Donnell, J.

    1990-01-01

    In an effort to understand the functions of pterins throughout development we have been studying Punch (Pu), the structural gene for the enzyme GTP cyclohydrolase in Drosophila melanogaster. This enzyme catalyzes the first step in the pterin biosynthetic pathway. The Pu gene product is required for vital functions at two distinct stages in embryogenesis, and a pigmentation function in the eye of the young adult. We have localized the Pu region to 29 kb of DNA through the analysis of lesions present in Pu mutants. Since all of the mutations that were mapped affect the eye pigmentation function of Pu, and since this function is the best defined biochemically, we have concentrated on identifying and characterizing Pu products required for eye pigmentation in our initial examination of the cloned region. Four different transcripts from this region are expressed in the adult head. We show that one of these transcripts, the 1.7-kb species, is responsible for the pigmentation function through the analysis of mutant transcripts and the use of an in vitro translation assay. A 2-kb region lying within the locus is specifically required for this eye pigmentation function. PMID:2127575

  10. Compact forced simple-shear sample for studying shear localization in materials

    DOE PAGES

    Gray, George Thompson; Vecchio, K. S.; Livescu, Veronica

    2015-11-06

    In this paper, a new specimen geometry, the compact forced-simple-shear specimen (CFSS), has been developed as a means to achieve simple shear testing of materials over a range of temperatures and strain rates. The stress and strain state in the gage section is designed to produce essentially “pure” simple shear, mode II in-plane shear, in a compact-sample geometry. The 2-D plane of shear can be directly aligned along specified directional aspects of a material's microstructure of interest; i.e., systematic shear loading parallel, at 45°, and orthogonal to anisotropic microstructural features in a material such as the pancake-shaped grains typical inmore » many rolled structural metals, or to specified directions in fiber-reinforced composites. Finally, the shear-stress shear-strain response and the damage evolution parallel and orthogonal to the pancake grain morphology in 7039-Al are shown to vary significantly as a function of orientation to the microstructure.« less

  11. Compact forced simple-shear sample for studying shear localization in materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, George Thompson; Vecchio, K. S.; Livescu, Veronica

    2015-11-06

    In this paper, a new specimen geometry, the compact forced-simple-shear specimen (CFSS), has been developed as a means to achieve simple shear testing of materials over a range of temperatures and strain rates. The stress and strain state in the gage section is designed to produce essentially “pure” simple shear, mode II in-plane shear, in a compact-sample geometry. The 2-D plane of shear can be directly aligned along specified directional aspects of a material's microstructure of interest; i.e., systematic shear loading parallel, at 45°, and orthogonal to anisotropic microstructural features in a material such as the pancake-shaped grains typical in many rolled structural metals, or to specified directions in fiber-reinforced composites. Finally, the shear-stress shear-strain response and the damage evolution parallel and orthogonal to the pancake grain morphology in 7039-Al are shown to vary significantly as a function of orientation to the microstructure.

  12. Humboldt slide - A large shear-dominated retrogressive slope failure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, J.V.; Prior, D.B.; Field, M.E.

    1999-01-01

    Humboldt Slide is a large, complex slide zone located on the northern California continental margin. Its three-dimensional architecture has been imaged by a combination of multibeam bathymetry, Huntec Deep-Tow seismic profiling, and sidescan sonar. The slide is interpreted to be Late Pleistocene to early Holocene in age and was caused by a combination of factors. The area of the slide is a local depocenter with high accumulation rates of organic-rich sediment; there has been local steepening of slopes by tectonic uplifts; and the entire area is one of high seismicity. Overall, the failure occurred by retrogressive, shear-dominated, minimum movement apparently as a sequence of events. Failure initially occurred by subsidence extension at the middle of the feature, followed by upslope retrogressive failure and downslope compression, and finally by translational sliding at the top of the slide. Degassing, as evidenced by abundant pockmarks, may have inhibited downslope translation. The slide may still be active, as suggested by offsets in Holocene hemipelagic sediment draped over some of the shear surfaces. Crown cracks occur above the present head of the failure and may represent the next generation of failure.

  13. Dynamics of Discontinuous Shear Thickening suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Eric

    2015-03-01

    Concentrated suspensions of hard particles such as cornstarch in water exhibit Discontinuous Shear Thickening, in which an increasing shear rate drives a transition from liquid- to solid-like mechanical behavior. In steady-state shear this phenomena is a result of a dynamic version of jamming in which forces are transmitted along particle contact networks that span to system boundaries and repeatedly form and break up. Several dynamic phenomena observed in such suspensions have long been assumed to be a consequence of this shear thickening, but cannot be explained as a direct result of shear thickening; for example a uniquely strong impact response which allows a person to run on the fluid surface. We perform experiments in which a concentrated suspension is subjected to transient impact. We find that the strong impact response is due a short-lived jammed contact network spanning to the boundaries and a delay time required for this dynamically jammed region to propagate to the boundary. The resulting ability of this system-spanning solid-like region to support loads can explain the ability of a person to run on the surface of these fluids. This delay before a solid-like response may also explain several other dynamic phenomena observed in these fluids.

  14. Internal hydraulic jumps with large upstream shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogden, Kelly; Helfrich, Karl

    2015-11-01

    Internal hydraulic jumps in approximately two-layered flows with large upstream shear are investigated using numerical simulations. The simulations allow continuous density and velocity profiles, and a jump is forced to develop by downstream topography, similar to the experiments conducted by Wilkinson and Wood (1971). High shear jumps are found to exhibit significantly more entrainment than low shear jumps. Furthermore, the downstream structure of the flow has an important effect on the jump properties. Jumps with a slow upper (inactive) layer exhibit a velocity minimum downstream of the jump, resulting in a sub-critical downstream state, while flows with the same upstream vertical shear and a larger barotropic velocity remain super-critical downstream of the jump. A two-layer theory is modified to account for the vertical structure of the downstream density and velocity profiles and entrainment is allowed through a modification of the approach of Holland et al. (2002). The resulting theory can be matched reasonably well with the numerical simulations. However, the results are very sensitive to how the downstream vertical profiles of velocity and density are incorporated into the layered model, highlighting the difficulty of the two layer approximation when the shear is large.

  15. Shear-Driven Reconnection in Kinetic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, C.; Antiochos, S. K.; Germaschewski, K.; Karpen, J. T.; DeVore, C. R.; Bessho, N.

    2015-12-01

    The explosive energy release in solar eruptive phenomena is believed to be due to magnetic reconnection. In the standard model for coronal mass ejections (CME) and/or solar flares, the free energy for the event resides in the strongly sheared magnetic field of a filament channel. The pre-eruption force balance consists of an upward force due to the magnetic pressure of the sheared field countered by a downward tension due to overlying unsheared field. Magnetic reconnection disrupts this force balance; therefore, it is critical for understanding CME/flare initiation, to model the onset of reconnection driven by the build-up of magnetic shear. In MHD simulations, the application of a magnetic-field shear is a trivial matter. However, kinetic effects are dominant in the diffusion region and thus, it is important to examine this process with PIC simulations as well. The implementation of such a driver in PIC methods is challenging, however, and indicates the necessity of a true multiscale model for such processes in the solar environment. The field must be sheared self-consistently and indirectly to prevent the generation of waves that destroy the desired system. Plasma instabilities can arise nonetheless. In the work presented here, we show that we can control this instability and generate a predicted out-of-plane magnetic flux. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Award No. AGS-1331356.

  16. Colloidal Aggregate Structure under Shear by USANS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Tirtha; van Dyk, Antony K.; Ginzburg, Valeriy V.; Nakatani, Alan I.

    2015-03-01

    Paints are complex formulations of polymeric binders, inorganic pigments, dispersants, surfactants, colorants, rheology modifiers, and other additives. A commercially successful paint exhibits a desired viscosity profile over a wide shear rate range from 10-5 s-1 for settling to >104 s-1 for rolling, and spray applications. Understanding paint formulation structure is critical as it governs the paint viscosity profile. However, probing paint formulation structure under shear is a challenging task due to the formulation complexity containing structures with different hierarchical length scales and their alterations under the influence of an external flow field. In this work mesoscale structures of paint formulations under shear are investigated using Ultra Small-Angle Neutron Scattering (rheo-USANS). Contrast match conditions were utilized to independently probe the structure of latex binder particle aggregates and the TiO2 pigment particle aggregates. Rheo-USANS data revealed that the aggregates are fractal in nature and their self-similarity dimensions and correlations lengths depend on the chemistry of the binder particles, the type of rheology modifier present and the shear stress imposed upon the formulation. These results can be explained in the framework of diffusion and reaction limited transient aggregates structure evolution under simple shear.

  17. Pressure-shear experiments on granular materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhart, William Dodd; Thornhill, Tom Finley, III; Vogler, Tracy John; Alexander, C. Scott

    2011-10-01

    Pressure-shear experiments were performed on granular tungsten carbide and sand using a newly-refurbished slotted barrel gun. The sample is a thin layer of the granular material sandwiched between driver and anvil plates that remain elastic. Because of the obliquity, impact generates both a longitudinal wave, which compresses the sample, and a shear wave that probes the strength of the sample. Laser velocity interferometry is employed to measure the velocity history of the free surface of the anvil. Since the driver and anvil remain elastic, analysis of the results is, in principal, straightforward. Experiments were performed at pressures up to nearly 2 GPa using titanium plates and at higher pressure using zirconium plates. Those done with the titanium plates produced values of shear stress of 0.1-0.2 GPa, with the value increasing with pressure. On the other hand, those experiments conducted with zirconia anvils display results that may be related to slipping at an interface and shear stresses mostly at 0.1 GPa or less. Recovered samples display much greater particle fracture than is observed in planar loading, suggesting that shearing is a very effective mechanism for comminution of the grains.

  18. The shear fracture toughness, KIIc, of graphite

    DOE PAGES

    Burchell, Timothy D.; Erdman, III, Donald L.

    2015-11-05

    In this study, the critical shear stress intensity factor, KIIc, here-in referred to as the shear fracture toughness, KIIc (MPa m), of two grades of graphite are reported. The range of specimen volumes was selected to elucidate any specimen size effect, but smaller volume specimen tests were largely unsuccessful, shear failure did not occur between the notches as expected. This was probably due to the specimen geometry causing the shear fracture stress to exceed the compressive failure stress. In subsequent testing the specimen geometry was altered to reduce the compressive footprint and the notches (slits) made deeper to reduce themore » specimen's ligament length. Additionally, we added the collection of Acoustic Emission (AE) during testing to assist with the identification of the shear fracture load. The means of KIIc from large specimens for PCEA and NBG-18 are 2.26 MPa m with an SD of 0.37 MPa m and 2.20 MPa m with an SD of 0.53 MPa m, respectively. The value of KIIc for both graphite grades was similar, although the scatter was large. In this work we found the ratio of KIIc/KIc ≈ 1.6. .« less

  19. Viscoelasticity and shear thinning of nanoconfined water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapoor, Karan; Amandeep, Patil, Shivprasad

    2014-01-01

    Understanding flow properties and phase behavior of water confined to nanometer-sized pores and slits is central to a wide range of problems in science, such as percolation in geology, lubrication of future nano-machines, self-assembly and interactions of biomolecules, and transport through porous media in filtration processes. Experiments with different techniques in the past have reported that viscosity of nanoconfined water increases, decreases, or remains close to bulk water. Here we show that water confined to less than 20-nm-thick films exhibits both viscoelasticity and shear thinning. Typically viscoelasticity and shear thinning appear due to shearing of complex non-Newtonian mixtures possessing a slowly relaxing microstructure. The shear response of nanoconfined water in a range of shear frequencies (5 to 25 KHz) reveals that relaxation time diverges with reducing film thickness. It suggests that slow relaxation under confinement possibly arises due to existence of a critical point with respect to slit width. This criticality is similar to the capillary condensation in porous media.

  20. Nonmonotonic flow curves of shear thickening suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mari, Romain; Seto, Ryohei; Morris, Jeffrey F.; Denn, Morton M.

    2015-05-01

    The discontinuous shear thickening (DST) of dense suspensions is a remarkable phenomenon in which the viscosity can increase by several orders of magnitude at a critical shear rate. It has the appearance of a first-order phase transition between two hypothetical "states" that we have recently identified as Stokes flows with lubricated or frictional contacts, respectively. Here we extend the analogy further by means of stress-controlled simulations and show the existence of a nonmonotonic steady-state flow curve analogous to a nonmonotonic equation of state. While we associate DST with an S -shaped flow curve, at volume fractions above the shear jamming transition the frictional state loses flowability and the flow curve reduces to an arch, permitting the system to flow only at small stresses. Whereas a thermodynamic transition leads to phase separation in the coexistence region, we observe a uniform shear flow all along the thickening transition. A stability analysis suggests that uniform shear may be mechanically stable for the small Reynolds numbers and system sizes in a rheometer.

  1. Nonmonotonic flow curves of shear thickening suspensions.

    PubMed

    Mari, Romain; Seto, Ryohei; Morris, Jeffrey F; Denn, Morton M

    2015-05-01

    The discontinuous shear thickening (DST) of dense suspensions is a remarkable phenomenon in which the viscosity can increase by several orders of magnitude at a critical shear rate. It has the appearance of a first-order phase transition between two hypothetical "states" that we have recently identified as Stokes flows with lubricated or frictional contacts, respectively. Here we extend the analogy further by means of stress-controlled simulations and show the existence of a nonmonotonic steady-state flow curve analogous to a nonmonotonic equation of state. While we associate DST with an S-shaped flow curve, at volume fractions above the shear jamming transition the frictional state loses flowability and the flow curve reduces to an arch, permitting the system to flow only at small stresses. Whereas a thermodynamic transition leads to phase separation in the coexistence region, we observe a uniform shear flow all along the thickening transition. A stability analysis suggests that uniform shear may be mechanically stable for the small Reynolds numbers and system sizes in a rheometer.

  2. Electrostatic ion cyclotron velocity shear instability

    SciTech Connect

    Lemons, D.S.; Winske, D.; Gary, S.P. )

    1992-12-01

    An electrostatic ion cyclotron instability driven by sheared velocity flow perpendicular to a uniform magnetic field is investigated in the local approximation. The dispersion equation, which includes all kinetic effects and involves only one important parameter, is cast in the form of Gordeyev integrals and solved numerically. The instability occurs roughly at multiples of the ion cyclotron frequency (but modified by the shear) with the growth rate of the individual harmonics overlapping in wavenumber. At small values of the shear parameter, the instability exists in two branches, one at long wavelength, [kappa][rho][sub i] [approximately] 0.5, and one at short wavelength, [kappa][rho][sub i] > 1.5 ([kappa][rho][sub i] is the wavenumber normalized to the ion gyroradius). At larger values of the shear parameter only the longer wavelength branch persists. The growth rate of the long wavelength mode, maximized over wavenumber and frequency, increases monotonically with the shear parameter. Properties of the instability are compared to those of Ganguli et al. obtained in the nonlocal limit.

  3. Effects of pressure on the shear modulus, mass and thickness of the perfused porcine kidney.

    PubMed

    Helfenstein, C; Gennisson, J-L; Tanter, M; Beillas, P

    2015-01-02

    Eleven fresh ex vivo porcine kidneys were perfused in the artery, vein and ureter with degassed Dulbecco׳s Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM). The effect of perfusion pressure was evaluated using ten different pressures combinations. The shear modulus of the tissues was estimated during perfusion using shear wave elastography. The organ weight change was measured by a digital scale and cameras were used to follow the changes of the dimensions after each pressure combination. The effect of perfusion on the weight and the thickness was non-reversible, whereas the effect on the shear modulus was reversible. Pressure was found to increase the average shear modulus in the cortex by as much as 73%. A pressure of 80 mmHg was needed to observe tissues shear modulus in the same range as in vivo tests (Gcortex=9.1 kPa, Gmedulla=8.5 kPa ex vivo versus Gcortex=9.1 kPa, Gmedulla=8.7 kPa in vivo in Gennisson et al., 2012).

  4. Buckling Behavior of Long Symmetrically Laminated Plates Subjected to Shear and Linearly Varying Axial Edge Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.

    1997-01-01

    A parametric study of the buckling behavior of infinitely long symmetrically laminated anisotropic plates that are subjected to linearly varying edge loads, uniform shear loads, or combinations of these loads is presented. The study focuses on the effects of the shape of linearly varying edge load distribution, plate orthotropy, and plate flexural anisotropy on plate buckling behavior. In addition, the study exmines the interaction of linearly varying edge loads and uniform shear loads with plate flexural anisotropy and orthotropy. Results obtained by using a special purpose nondimensional analysis that is well suited for parametric studies of clamped and simply supported plates are presented for [+/- theta](sub s), thin graphite-epoxy laminates that are representative of spacecraft structural components. Also, numerous generic buckling-design charts are presented for a wide range of nondimensional parameters that are applicable to a broad class of laminate constructions. These charts show explicitly the effects of flexural orthotropy and flexural anisotropy on plate buckling behavior for linearly varying edge loads, uniform shear loads, or combinations of these loads. The most important finding of the present study is that specially orthotropic and flexurally anisotropic plates that are subjected to an axial edge load distribution that is tension dominated can support shear loads that are larger in magnitude than the shear buckling load.

  5. Microstructure and tribological properties of 3D needle-punched C/C-SiC brake composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Peng; Li, Zhuan; Xiong, Xiang

    2010-04-01

    Carbon fibre reinforced carbon and silicon carbide dual matrix composites (C/C-SiC) show excellent tribological properties and are promising candidates for advanced friction materials. A pressure infiltration/carbonization combined with liquid silicon infiltration was developed for fabricating C/C-SiC composites. The carbon fabric preform was fabricated with the three-dimensional needling method. In the pressure infiltration process, the carbon fibre reinforced plastic was prepared by infiltration of the fabric preform with the furan resin. Then the carbon fibre reinforced plastic was carbonized which was pyrolysed to form a porous carbon/carbon composites. Finally, the porous carbon/carbon was infiltrated with molten silicon to obtain C/C-SiC composites. The composites exhibit excellent friction behavior, including a good stability of brake, and the average dynamic μ is 0.38 and static μ is 0.50, in combination with the linear wear rate of about 5.6 μm cycle -1. Moreover, the friction surface was covered with friction film which is about 10 μm in thickness. These results show that the C/C-SiC brake composites are promising candidates for advanced brake and clutch systems.

  6. Applicability of Channel flow as an extrusion mechanism of the Higher Himalayan Shear Zone from Sutlej, Zanskar, Dhauliganga and Goriganga Sections, Indian Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Soumyajit

    2010-05-01

    and extrusion mechanism by various combinations of simple shear, pure shear and channel flow in shifting modes. International Journal of Earth Sciences. 2. Mukherjee S, Koyi HA (in press) Higher Himalayan Shear Zone, Zanskar Indian Himalaya: microstructural studies and extrusion mechanism by a combination of simple shear and channel flow. International Journal of Earth Sciences.

  7. Effects of Shear, Defocus, and Wavefront Error on the Theoretical Performance of the Composite Infrared Spectrometer for Cassini

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martino, Antonio J.; Hagopian, John G.

    1998-01-01

    The combined effects on performance of shear between the two arms, defocus of die detector, and difference in wavefront between the two arms of a Fourier transform spectrometer using cube corner retroreflectors were investigated. Performance was characterized by the amplitude of the fringe signals coming from a detector as the path-length difference was scanned. A closed-form expression was found for the combined effects of shear and defocus, and it was found that defocus had no effect in the absence of shear. The effect of wavefront error was modeled numerically and assumed to be independent of shear and defocus. Results were compared with measurements made on the breadboard and engineering model of the Composite Infrared Spectrometer for the Cassini mission to Saturn, and good agreement was found.

  8. Bacterial motility and chemotaxis in shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusconi, Roberto; Guasto, Jeffrey S.; Son, Kwangmin; Stocker, Roman

    2011-11-01

    Bacteria often exhibit directed motility (``taxis'') in response to gradients of dissolved resources, like nutrients or oxygen. While we have a detailed understanding of chemotaxis in quiescent environments, it has been largely overlooked how this behavior is affected by fluid flow, despite the ubiquity of flow in bacterial habitats. Here we present experiments on aerotaxis (attraction to dissolved oxygen) of Bacillus subtilis in controlled shear flows. Using novel microfluidic devices we expose bacterial suspensions to steady oxygen gradients, with independent control over shear rates. From single-cell trajectories and the spatial distribution of bacteria, we show that the cell rotation induced by shear reduces the aerotactic performance, demonstrating that hydrodynamic conditions affect bacterial fitness.

  9. Scaling effects in direct shear tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orlando, A.D.; Hanes, D.M.; Shen, H.H.

    2009-01-01

    Laboratory experiments of the direct shear test were performed on spherical particles of different materials and diameters. Results of the bulk friction vs. non-dimensional shear displacement are presented as a function of the non-dimensional particle diameter. Simulations of the direct shear test were performed using the Discrete Element Method (DEM). The simulation results show Considerable differences with the physical experiments. Particle level material properties, such as the coefficients of static friction, restitution and rolling friction need to be known a priori in order to guarantee that the simulation results are an accurate representation of the physical phenomenon. Furthermore, laboratory results show a clear size dependency on the results, with smaller particles having a higher bulk friction than larger ones. ?? 2009 American Institute of Physics.

  10. Mitigating shear lag in tall buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaur, Himanshu; Goliya, Ravindra K.

    2015-09-01

    As the height of building increases, effect of shear lag also becomes considerable in the design of high-rise buildings. In this paper, shear lag effect in tall buildings of heights, i.e., 120, 96, 72, 48 and 36 stories of which aspect ratio ranges from 3 to 10 is studied. Tube-in-tube structural system with façade bracing is used for designing the building of height 120 story. It is found that bracing system considerably reduces the shear lag effect and hence increases the building stiffness to withstand lateral loads. Different geometric patterns of bracing system are considered. The best effective geometric configuration of bracing system is concluded in this study. Lateral force, as wind load is applied on the buildings as it is the most dominating lateral force for such heights. Wind load is set as per Indian standard code of practice IS 875 Part-3. For analysis purpose SAP 2000 software program is used.

  11. Active dynamics of tissue shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popović, Marko; Nandi, Amitabha; Merkel, Matthias; Etournay, Raphaël; Eaton, Suzanne; Jülicher, Frank; Salbreux, Guillaume

    2017-03-01

    We present a hydrodynamic theory to describe shear flows in developing epithelial tissues. We introduce hydrodynamic fields corresponding to state properties of constituent cells as well as a contribution to overall tissue shear flow due to rearrangements in cell network topology. We then construct a generic linear constitutive equation for the shear rate due to topological rearrangements and we investigate a novel rheological behaviour resulting from memory effects in the tissue. We identify two distinct active cellular processes: generation of active stress in the tissue, and actively driven topological rearrangements. We find that these two active processes can produce distinct cellular and tissue shape changes, depending on boundary conditions applied on the tissue. Our findings have consequences for the understanding of tissue morphogenesis during development.

  12. Streamline curvature in supersonic shear layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kibens, V.

    1992-01-01

    Results of an experimental investigation in which a curved shear layer was generated between supersonic flow from a rectangular converging/diverging nozzle and the freestream in a series of open channels with varying radii of curvature are reported. The shear layers exhibit unsteady large-scale activity at supersonic pressure ratios, indicating increased mixing efficiency. This effect contrasts with supersonic flow in a straight channel, for which no large-scale vortical structure development occurs. Curvature must exceed a minimum level before it begins to affect the dynamics of the supersonic shear layer appreciably. The curved channel flows are compared with reference flows consisting of a free jet, a straight channel, and wall jets without sidewalls on a flat and a curved plate.

  13. Tethered DNA dynamics in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Donev, Aleksandar; Weisgraber, Todd; Alder, Berni J; Graham, Michael D; de Pablo, Juan J

    2009-06-21

    We study the cyclic dynamics of a single polymer tethered to a hard wall in shear flow using Brownian dynamics, the lattice Boltzmann method, and a recent stochastic event-driven molecular dynamics algorithm. We focus on the dynamics of the free end (last bead) of the tethered chain and we examine the cross-correlation function and power spectral density of the chain extensions in the flow and gradient directions as a function of chain length N and dimensionless shear rate Wi. Extensive simulation results suggest a classical fluctuation-dissipation stochastic process and question the existence of periodicity of the cyclic dynamics, as previously claimed. We support our numerical findings with a simple analytical calculation for a harmonic dimer in shear flow.

  14. Shear and extensional properties of kefiran.

    PubMed

    Piermaría, Judith; Bengoechea, Carlos; Abraham, Analía Graciela; Guerrero, Antonio

    2016-11-05

    Kefiran is a neutral polysaccharide constituted by glucose and galactose produced by Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens. It is included into kefir grains and has several health promoting properties. In the present work, shear and extensional properties of different kefiran aqueous dispersions (0.5, 1 and 2% wt.) were assessed and compared to other neutral gums commonly used in food, cosmetic and pharmaceutics industries (methylcellulose, locust bean gum and guar gum). Kefiran showed shear flow characteristics similar to that displayed by other representative neutral gums, although it always yielded lower viscosities at a given concentration. For each gum system it was possible to find a correlation between dynamic and steady shear properties by a master curve including both the apparent and complex viscosities. When studying extensional properties of selected gums at 2% wt. by means of a capillary break-up rheometer, kefiran solutions did not show important extensional properties, displaying a behaviour close the Newtonian.

  15. Sheared DNA fragment sizing: comparison of techniques.

    PubMed Central

    Ordahl, C P; Johnson, T R; Caplan, A I

    1976-01-01

    DNA fragmented by conventional French press shearing procedures (30,000 lbs/in2) has a number-average fragment size of 230 base pairs. This is considerably smaller than the 450 base pairs typically reported for DNA sheared by this method. Comparison of 5 sizing techniques indicates that sheared DNA fragment size is overestimated by either measurement of velocity sedimentation or Kleinschmidt Electron Microscopic visualization. Both adsorption grid electron microscopic visualization and gel electrophoresis yield the most reliable estimates of the mean size of small DNA fragment populations. In addition, the assessment of fragment size distribution (not possible from sedimentation analysis) potentially allows more critical evaluation of DNA hybridization and reassociation kinetic and measurement parameters. Images PMID:1034292

  16. Measuring shear modulus of individual fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behlow, Herbert; Saini, Deepika; Oliviera, Luciana; Skove, Malcolm; Rao, Apparao

    2014-03-01

    Fiber technology has advanced to new heights enabling tailored mechanical properties. For reliable fiber applications their mechanical properties must be well characterized at the individual fiber level. Unlike the tensile modulus, which can be well studied in a single fiber, the present indirect and dynamic methods of measuring the shear properties of fibers suffer from various disadvantages such as the interaction between fibers and the influence of damping. In this talk, we introduce a quasi-static method to directly measure the shear modulus of a single micron-sized fiber. Our simple and inexpensive setup yields a shear modulus of 16 and 2 GPa for a single IM7 carbon fiber and a Kevlar fiber, respectively. Furthermore, our setup is also capable of measuring the creep, hysteresis and the torsion coefficient, and examples of these will be presented.

  17. Observations of velocity shear driven plasma turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kintner, P. M., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Electrostatic and magnetic turbulence observations from HAWKEYE-1 during the low altitude portion of its elliptical orbit over the Southern Hemisphere are presented. The magnetic turbulence is confined near the auroral zone and is similar to that seen at higher altitudes by HEOS-2 in the polar cusp. The electrostatic turbulence is composed of a background component with a power spectral index of 1.89 + or - .26 and an intense component with a power spectral index of 2.80 + or - .34. The intense electrostatic turbulence and the magnetic turbulence correlate with velocity shears in the convective plasma flow. Since velocity shear instabilities are most unstable to wave vectors perpendicular to the magnetic field, the shear correlated turbulence is anticipated to be two dimensional in character and to have a power spectral index of 3 which agrees with that observed in the intense electrostatic turbulence.

  18. Physical models of tissue in shear fields.

    PubMed

    Carstensen, Edwin L; Parker, Kevin J

    2014-04-01

    This review considers three general classes of physical as opposed to phenomenological models of the shear elasticity of tissues. The first is simple viscoelasticity. This model has a special role in elastography because it is the language in which experimental and clinical data are communicated. The second class of models involves acoustic relaxation, in which the medium contains inner time-dependent systems that are driven through the external bulk medium. Hysteresis, the phenomenon characterizing the third class of models, involves losses that are related to strain rather than time rate of change of strain. In contrast to the vast efforts given to tissue characterization through their bulk moduli over the last half-century, similar research using low-frequency shear data is in its infancy. Rather than a neat summary of existing facts, this essay is a framework for hypothesis generation-guessing what physical mechanisms give tissues their shear properties.

  19. Shear banding in soft glassy materials.

    PubMed

    Fielding, S M

    2014-10-01

    Many soft materials, including microgels, dense colloidal emulsions, star polymers, dense packings of multilamellar vesicles, and textured morphologies of liquid crystals, share the basic 'glassy' features of structural disorder and metastability. These in turn give rise to several notable features in the low frequency shear rheology (deformation and flow properties) of these materials: in particular, the existence of a yield stress below which the material behaves like a solid, and above which it flows like a liquid. In the last decade, intense experimental activity has also revealed that these materials often display a phenomenon known as shear banding, in which the flow profile across the shear cell exhibits macroscopic bands of different viscosity. Two distinct classes of yield stress fluid have been identified: those in which the shear bands apparently persist permanently (for as long as the flow remains applied), and those in which banding arises only transiently during a process in which a steady flowing state is established out of an initial rest state (for example, in a shear startup or step stress experiment). Despite being technically transient, such bands may in practice persist for a very long time and so be mistaken for the true steady state response of the material in experimental practice. After surveying the motivating experimental data, we describe recent progress in addressing it theoretically, using the soft glassy rheology model and a simple fluidity model. We also briefly place these theoretical approaches in the context of others in the literature, including elasto-plastic models, shear transformation zone theories, and molecular dynamics simulations. We discuss finally some challenges that remain open to theory and experiment alike.

  20. Shear banding in soft glassy materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fielding, S. M.

    2014-10-01

    Many soft materials, including microgels, dense colloidal emulsions, star polymers, dense packings of multilamellar vesicles, and textured morphologies of liquid crystals, share the basic ‘glassy’ features of structural disorder and metastability. These in turn give rise to several notable features in the low frequency shear rheology (deformation and flow properties) of these materials: in particular, the existence of a yield stress below which the material behaves like a solid, and above which it flows like a liquid. In the last decade, intense experimental activity has also revealed that these materials often display a phenomenon known as shear banding, in which the flow profile across the shear cell exhibits macroscopic bands of different viscosity. Two distinct classes of yield stress fluid have been identified: those in which the shear bands apparently persist permanently (for as long as the flow remains applied), and those in which banding arises only transiently during a process in which a steady flowing state is established out of an initial rest state (for example, in a shear startup or step stress experiment). Despite being technically transient, such bands may in practice persist for a very long time and so be mistaken for the true steady state response of the material in experimental practice. After surveying the motivating experimental data, we describe recent progress in addressing it theoretically, using the soft glassy rheology model and a simple fluidity model. We also briefly place these theoretical approaches in the context of others in the literature, including elasto-plastic models, shear transformation zone theories, and molecular dynamics simulations. We discuss finally some challenges that remain open to theory and experiment alike.